WorldWideScience

Sample records for light fragment emission

  1. Dissertation: Precompound Emission of Energetic Light Fragments in Spallation Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerby, Leslie Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-04

    Emission of light fragments (LF) from nuclear reactions is an open question. Different reaction mechanisms contribute to their production; the relative roles of each, and how they change with incident energy, mass number of the target, and the type and emission energy of the fragments is not completely understood. None of the available models are able to accurately predict emission of LF from arbitrary reactions. However, the ability to describe production of LF (especially at energies ≳ 30 MeV) from many reactions is important for different applications, such as cosmic-ray-induced Single Event Upsets (SEUs), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and heavy-ion beams, to name just a few. The Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) version 03.03 and the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) version 03.03 event generators in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code version 6 (MCNP6) describe quite well the spectra of fragments with sizes up to ⁴He across a broad range of target masses and incident energies (up to ~ 5 GeV for CEM and up to ~ 1 TeV/A for LAQGSM). However, they do not predict the high energy tails of LF spectra heavier than ⁴He well. Most LF with energies above several tens of MeV are emitted during the precompound stage of a reaction. The current versions of the CEM and LAQGSM event generators do not account for precompound emission of LF larger than ⁴He. The aim of our work is to extend the precompound model in them to include such processes, leading to an increase of predictive power of LF-production in MCNP6. This entails upgrading the Modified Exciton Model currently used at the preequilibrium stage in CEM and LAQGSM. It also includes expansion and examination of the coalescence and Fermi break-up models used in the precompound stages of spallation reactions within CEM and LAQGSM. Extending our models to include emission of fragments heavier than ⁴He at the precompound stage has indeed provided results that have much

  2. Fragments emission from light mass composite nuclei within collective clusterization mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, BirBikram

    2016-01-01

    Based on the quantum mechanical fragmentation theory (QMFT) the dynamical cluster decay model (DCM) has been developed by Gupta and Collaborators to study the decay of hot and rotating compound systems. Number of compound nuclei (CN) in different mass regions have been studied quite extensively while taking into consideration nuclear structure effects in the same. It is quite relevant to mention here that in the binary decay of CN nuclear structure effects comes into picture, within DCM, via preformation probability P_0 of the complimentary fragments before penetrating the potential barrier between them with certain probability P . It is interesting to note here that the statistical models treat various decay modes of the CN on different footing contrary to the DCM. In very light mass region the decay of number of composite systems "2"0","2"1","2"2Ne*, "2"6"-"2"9Al, "2"8Si, "3"1P, "3"2S, "3"9K and "4"0Ca*, formed in low energy heavy ion reactions, have been investigated for different reaction mechanisms particularly fusion-fission (FF) and deep inelastic orbiting (DIO) from equilibrated and non-equilibrated compound nucleus processes, respectively

  3. Study of the out-of-plane emission of protons and light fragments in symmetric heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brill, D.; Beckerle, P.; Bormann, C.; Schwab, E.; Shin, Y.; Stock, R.; Stroebele, H.; Baltes, P.; Muentz, C.; Oeschler, H.; Sturm, C.; Wagner, A.; Barth, R.; Cieslak, M.; Debowski, M.; Grosse, E.; Koczon, P.; Mang, M.; Miskowiec, D.; Schicker, R.; Senger, P.; Kohlmeyer, B.; Puehlhofer, F.; Speer, J.; Voelkel, K.; Walus, W.

    1996-01-01

    Midrapidity protons from 209 Bi+ 209 Bi collisions were measured with the Kaon Spectrometer at SIS at incident energies of E Lab /A=400, 700 and 1000 MeV. Additionally, light fragments were analysed at 400 MeV. We have investigated the azimuthal emission pattern of the particles relative to the reaction plane as function of transverse momentum, bombarding energy and impact parameter. We observe an enhanced emission of particles perpendicular to the reaction plane at all bombarding energies. The ratio of the number of particles emitted out-of-plane/in-plane increases strongly with the particles transverse momentum. The anisotropy decreases with increasing beam energy. Composite particles show a much stronger effect than protons. (orig.)

  4. Study of fragmentation reactions of light nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toneli, David Arruda; Carlson, Brett Vern

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The decay of the compound nucleus is traditionally calculated using a sequential emission model, such as the Weisskopf-Ewing or Hauser-Feshbach ones, in which the compound nucleus decays through a series of residual nuclei by emitting one particle at a time until there is no longer sufficient energy for further emission. In light compound nucleus, however, the excitation energy necessary to fully disintegrate the system is relatively easy to attain. In such cases, decay by simultaneous emission of two or more particles becomes important. A model which takes into account all these decay is the Fermi fragmentation model. Recently, the equivalence between the Fermi fragmentation model and statistical multifragmentation model used to describe the decay for highly excited fragments for reactions of heavy ions was demonstrated. Due the simplicity of the thermodynamic treatment used in the multifragmentation model, we have adapted it to the calculation of Fermi breakup of light nuclei. The ultimate goal of this study is to calculate the distribution of isotopes produced in proton-induced reactions on light nuclei of biological interest, such as C, O e Ca. Although most of these residual nuclei possess extremely short half-lives and thus represent little long-term danger, they tend to be deficient in neutrons and to decay by positron emission, which allows the monitoring of proton radiotherapy by PET (Positron Emission Tomography). (author)

  5. Emission of light charged particles from fragments produced on fission of uranium nuclei by 153 MeV protons and 1700 MeV negative pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belovitzky, G.E.; Shteingrad, O.M.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the emission of light charged particles (LCP) with Z = 1, 2 from fragments produced in fission of uranium nuclei by 153 MeV protons and 1700 MeV negative pions was studied. It was found that LCP accompanying the fission by pions are emitted from non-accelerated fragments immediately after the fission, whereas in the case of 153 MeV protons, the LCP are emitted from the accelerated heavy fragments. The number of LCP emitted in the course of pion-induced fission is 0.7 per fission event, which exceeds by a factor of 30 the corresponding number for 153 MeV protons [ru

  6. The extended sum-rule model view of light and intermediate mass fragment emission in nuclear reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brancus, I.M.; Rebel, H.; Wentz, J.; Corcalciuc, V.

    1989-11-01

    The original sum-rule model worked out by Wilczynski et al. and successfully used for a global description of complete and incomplete fusion reactions has been extended by a term accounting for dissipative processes of the dinuclear system on its way to fusion. When applying to light and heavy ion collisions with various targets at energies in the transitional region, the new term proves to be rather essential for reproducing the element distributions of the fragments emitted from rather asymmetric systems. (orig.) [de

  7. Light fragment formation at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boal, D.H.

    1982-03-01

    This paper concerns itself mainly with the production of energetic protons and light fragments at wide angles. The experiments point to nucleon emission in proton-induced reactions as involving a mechanism in which the observed nucleon is directly knocked out of the nucleus. A similar feature seems to be required to explain (p,F) and (e,F) reactions: an energetic nucleon is produced in one scattering of the projectile, and the struck nucleon subsequently loses some of its energy as it traverses the remaining part of the nucleus, gathering up other nucleons as it goes, to become a fragment. This is what one might call the extreme snowball model, and a more accurate description probably involves multiple scattering of the projectile in addition to the extreme snowball contribution. This will be particularly true for fragments in the mass 6 to 9 region. This scenario also appears to apply to deuteron-induced fragment production. However, for alpha-induced reactions it would appear that the nucleons forming a fragment can originate from collisions involving different incident nucleons in the projectile. For heavy ions, this effect is even stronger, and the snowball contribution is greatly reduced compared to that of the traditional coalescence model

  8. Fragment emission from modestly excited nuclear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Y. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Souza, R.T. de [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Chen, S.L. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Cornell, E.W. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Davin, B. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Fox, D. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Hamilton, T.M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Mcdonald, K. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Tsang, M.B. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Glasmacher, T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Dinius, J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Gelbke, C.K. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Handzy, D.O. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility]|[Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Hsi, W.C.

    1996-07-08

    Fragment emission patterns occurring in nuclear systems of modest excitation are studied. Exclusive measurement of fragment emission in {sup 14}N+{sup 197}Au reactions at E/A=100, 130 and 156 MeV allows selection of central collisions where a single source dominates the decay. Low threshold measurement of IMF emission for these events allows investigation of the influence of detector threshold effects. The time scale of fragment emission is deduced using fragment-fragment velocity correlations. Comparisons are made to the predictions of a statistical decay model. (orig.).

  9. Complex fragment emission from hot compound nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.

    1986-03-01

    The experimental evidence for compound nucleus emission of complex fragments at low energies is used to interpret the emission of the same fragments at higher energies. The resulting experimental picture is that of highly excited compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion processes which decay statistically. In particular, complex fragments appear to be produced mostly through compound nucleus decay. In the appendix a geometric-kinematic theory for incomplete fusion and the associated momentum transfer is outlined. 10 refs., 19 figs

  10. Various light particles emissions accompaning light heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billerey, R.

    1981-01-01

    In this work we have investigated light particles emission accompanying heavy-ion induced reactions. The experiments were performed at the isochronous cyclotron of the I.S.N. de Grenoble and we got in and out of plane correlations between solid state and gazeous detectors. In 14 N (100 MeV) + 27 Al we have chosen, light particles emitted in coincidence with deep inelastic fragments or evaporation residues have been measured. Likewise we observed the correlations between fragments and fragments. The particularities we found between protons and alpha emissions are to be assigned to differences in separation energies, but their relative energies and angular momenta have also a significant part [fr

  11. Studies of complex fragment emission in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobotka, L.G.

    1989-01-01

    The production of large fragments, fragments with mass between light particles and fission fragments, in intermediate and high energy nuclear reactions has fostered the proposal of a number of novel reaction mechanisms. These include liquid-vapor equilibrium and nuclear shattering. Temporarily left in the wake of these exciting proposed mechanisms was the old standard, statistical decay of compound nuclei. To be sure, the standard treatment of compound nucleus decay did not deal with large fragment production. However, this omission was not due to any fundamental deficiency of statistical models, but rather an uncertainty concerning exactly how to splice large fragment emission into statistical models. A large portion of our program deals with this problem. Specifically, by studying the yields of large fragments produced in sufficiently low energy reactions we are attempting to deduce the asymmetry and l-wave dependence of large fragment emission from compound nuclear intermediates. This, however, is only half of the problem. Since the novel mechanisms proposed for large fragment emission were spawned by intermediate and high energy reaction data, we must also realize the relevance of the compound nucleus mechanisms at high energies. It is not unreasonable to suspect that compound nucleus-like objects are formed with less than complete momentum transfer and perhaps less than complete mass transfer. Therefore the study of energy, mass, and angular momentum transfer in incomplete fusion and non-compound reactions. This thread joins the apparently divergent subjects covered in this report

  12. Detection of fission fragments by secondary emission; Detection des fragments de fission par emission secondaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audias, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    This fission fragment detecting apparatus is based on the principle that fragments traversing a thin foil will cause emission of secondary electrons. These electrons are then accelerated (10 kV) and directly detected by means of a plastic scintillator and associated photomultiplier. Some of the advantages of such a detector are, its rapidity, its discriminating power between alpha particles and fission fragments, its small energy loss in detecting the fragments and the relatively great amount of fissionable material which it can contain. This paper is subdivided as follows: a) theoretical considerations b) constructional details of apparatus and some experimental details and c) a study of the secondary emission effect itself. (author) [French] Le detecteur de fragments de fission que nous avons realise est base sur le principe de l'emission secondaire produite par les fragments de fission traversant une feuille mince: les electrons secondaires emis sont acceleres a des tensions telles (de l'ordre de 10 kV), qu'ils soient directement detectables par un scintillateur plastique associe a un photomultiplicateur. L'interet d'un tel detecteur reside: dans sa rapidite, sa tres bonne discrimination alpha, fission, la possibilite de detecter les fragments de fission avec une perte d'energie pouvant rester relativement faible, et la possibilite d'introduire des quantites de matiere fissile plus importantes que dans les autres types de detecteurs. Ce travail comporte: -) un apercu bibliographique de la theorie du phenomene, -) realisation et mise au point du detecteur avec etude experimentale de quelques parametres intervenant dans l'emission secondaire, -) etude de l'emission secondaire (sur la face d'emergence des fragments de fission) en fonction de l'energie du fragment et en fonction de l'epaisseur de matiere traversee avant emission secondaire, et -) une etude comparative de l'emission secondaire sur la face d'incidence et sur la face d'emergence des fragments de

  13. Production of Energetic Light Fragments in Spallation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashnik Stepan G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Different reaction mechanisms contribute to the production of light fragments (LF from nuclear reactions. Available models cannot accurately predict emission of LF from arbitrary reactions. However, the emission of LF is important formany applications, such as cosmic-ray-induced single event upsets, radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and heavy-ion beams, to name just a few. The cascade-exciton model (CEM and the Los Alamos version of the quark-gluon string model (LAQGSM, as implemented in the CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 event generators used in the Los Alamos Monte Carlo transport code MCNP6, describe quite well the spectra of fragments with sizes up to 4He across a broad range of target masses and incident energies. However, they do not predict high-energy tails for LF heavier than 4He. The standard versions of CEM and LAQGSM do not account for preequilibrium emission of LF larger than 4He. The aim of our work is to extend the preequilibrium model to include such processes. We do this by including the emission of fragments heavier than 4He at the preequilibrium stage, and using an improved version of the Fermi Break-up model, providing improved agreement with various experimental data.

  14. Light particles emitted with the fission fragments of thorium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San-Tsiang, T; Faraggi, H

    1947-01-01

    The traces produced by the fission of thorium with fast neutrons have been recorded photographically and studied. The formation of a light fragment of long range by either quadripartition or tripartition was not observed. The release of a short-range light fragment by bipartition was observed about one hundred times more frequently than was the release of such a fragment by tripartition. The ratio of the range of the two heavy fragments produced by tripartition was 1:2; this compares with a ratio of 1:3 for the heavy fragments produced by bipartition.

  15. Non-equilibrium versus equilibrium emission of complex fragments from hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viola, V.E.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Yennello, S.; Fields, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    The relative contributions of equilibrium and non-equilibrium mechanisms for intermediate-mass fragment emission have been deduced for Z=3-14 fragments formed in 3 He- and 14 N-induced reactions on Ag and Au targets. Complete inclusive excitation function measurements have been performed for 3 He projectiles from E/A=67 to 1,200 MeV and for 14 N from E/A=20 to 50 MeV. The data are consistent with a picture in which equilibrated emission is important at the lowest energies, but with increasing bombarding energy the cross sections are increasingly dominated by non-equilibrium processes. Non-equilibrium emission is also shown to be favored for light fragments relative to heavy fragments. These results are supported by coincidence studies of intermediate-mass fragments tagged by linear momentum transfer measurements

  16. Neutron emission during acceleration of 252Cf fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batenkov, O.I.; Blinov, M.V.; Blinov, A.B.; Smirnov, S.N.

    1991-01-01

    We investigate neutron emission during acceleration of fission fragments in the process of spontaneous fission of 252 Cf. Experimental angular and energy distributions of neutrons are compared with the results of calculations of neutron evaporation during fragment acceleration. (author). 8 refs, 3 figs

  17. Complex fragment emission at low and high excitation energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.

    1986-08-01

    Complex fragment emission has been certified as a compound nucleus process at low energies. An extension of the measurements to heavy ion reactions up to 50 MeV/u shows that most complex fragments are emitted by highly excited compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion reactions. 12 refs., 26 figs

  18. Tests of models for inclusive production of energetic light fragments at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boal, D.H.; Green, R.E.L.; Korteling, R.G.; Soroushian, M.

    1980-09-01

    Several models of light fragment emission are confronted with data from electron and proton induced reactions. The data appear to favor a mechanism, called the snowball model here, in which there is a single collison of the projectile and a few collisions of the secondary nucleons which then form the observed fragment. The parameter of the model is determined by fitting new isotopically separated inclusive differential cross section data taken at TRIUMF. (auth)

  19. The multi-step prompt particle emission from fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhivopistsev, A.; Oprea, C.; Oprea, I.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work is the study of non-equilibrium high-energy gamma emission from 252 Cf. In the framework of the formalism of statistical multi-step compound processes in nuclear reactions. A relation was found between the shape of the high-energy part of the gamma spectrum and different mechanisms of excitation of the fission fragments. Agreement with experimental data for different groups of fission fragments was obtained. The analysis of the experimental high-energy part of gamma spectra yields information about the mechanism of excitation of fission fragments. The influence of dissipation of the deformation excess on intrinsic excitation of fission fragments was studied. (authors)

  20. Light fragment production at forward angles in Ne and Ar induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alard, J.P.; Biagi, F.; Morel, P.; Bastid, N.; Augerat, J.; Charmensat, P.; Crouau, M.; Dupieux, P.; Fraysse, L.; Marroncle, J.; Brochard, F.; Gorodetzky, P.; Racca, C.

    1990-01-01

    The results of the experiments performed at Saturne, in order to investigate light fragment emission at small angles, are reported. The measurements were performed using a plastic wall associated with the Diogene pictorial drift chamber. Different selected multiplicities in the central chamber are applied. The exclusive measurements are reported both for Ne and Ar projectiles on several targets

  1. MCNP6 fragmentation of light nuclei at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashnik, Stepan G., E-mail: mashnik@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kerby, Leslie M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States)

    2014-11-11

    Fragmentation reactions induced on light target nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below are studied with the latest Los Alamos Monte Carlo transport code MCNP6 and with its cascade-exciton model (CEM) and Los Alamos version of the quark-gluon string model (LAQGSM) event generators, version 03.03, used as stand-alone codes. Such reactions are involved in different applications, like cosmic-ray-induced single event upsets (SEU's), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and ion beams, among others; therefore, it is important that MCNP6 simulates them as well as possible. CEM and LAQGSM assume that intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions on light nuclei occur generally in two stages. The first stage is the intranuclear cascade (INC), followed by the second, Fermi breakup disintegration of light excited residual nuclei produced after the INC. Both CEM and LAQGSM account also for coalescence of light fragments (complex particles) up to {sup 4}He from energetic nucleons emitted during INC. We investigate the validity and performance of MCNP6, CEM, and LAQGSM in simulating fragmentation reactions at intermediate energies and discuss possible ways of further improving these codes.

  2. The formation and deexcitation of hot nuclei in 40Ar + 197Au collisions at 44 and 77 MeV/A. Neutrons emission light charged particles and complex fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, A.

    1990-05-01

    This work is a contribution to the study of the formation and decay of hot nuclei produced in heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies. By studying the system Ar + Au and Ar + Th at 44 MeV/u and 77 MeV/u we first show how to classify events in two groups: peripheral and very dissipative collisions, measuring the number of evaporated neutrons, which depend directly on the violence of the collision. Associated with these neutrons, different deexcitation channels were observed (heavy residues, fission fragments, light charged particles, intermediate mass fragments). The ratio between peripheral and very dissipative collisions was found independent of the system and the same as the one observed at lower incident energy. The most probable neutron multiplicity for very dissipative collisions is not very different at 44 MeV/u and 77 MeV/u. A measurement of the angular distribution of fission fragments and heavy residues was performed. Detected products are essentially associated with large neutron multiplicity and have a cross section close to the one for the very dissipative collisions. The total mass of the fission fragments is close to the mass of the target, while the mass of the heavy residue is much smaller. The backward evaporated light charged particles are also produced in very dissipative collisions. The characteristics of their energy spectra as well as their multiplicities are very similar at 44 MeV/u 77 MeV/u. From the number of evaporated light charged particles, the estimation of the quasi-target excitation energy was done and found to be close to 600 MeV at 44 MeV/u and 77 MeV/u [fr

  3. Neutron emission and fragment yield in high-energy fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grudzevich, O. T.; Klinov, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    The KRIS special library of spectra and emission probabilities in the decays of 1500 nuclei excited up to energies between 150 and 250 MeV was developed for correctly taking into account the decay of highly excited nuclei appearing as fission fragments. The emission of neutrons, protons, and photons was taken into account. Neutron emission fromprimary fragments was found to have a substantial effect on the formation of yields of postneutron nuclei. The library was tested by comparing the calculated and measured yields of products originating from the fission of nuclei that was induced by high-energy protons. The method for calculating these yields was tested on the basis of experimental data on the thermal-neutroninduced fission of 235 U nuclei

  4. Topology of White Stars in Relativistic Fragmentation of Light Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Andreeva, N P; Vokal, S; Vokalova, A; Gaitinov, A Sh; Gerassimov, S G; Goncharova, L A; Dronov, V A; Zarubin, P I; Zarubina, I G; Kovalenko, A D; Kravchakova, A; Larionova, V G; Levitskaja, O V; Lepehin, F G; Malakhov, A I; Moiseenko, A A; Orlova, G I; Peresadko, N G; Polukhina, N G; Rukojatkin, P A; Rusakova, V V; Salmanova, N A; Sarkisian, V R; Simonov, B B; Stan, E; Stanoeva, R; Chernyavsky, M M; Haidue, M; Kharlamov, S P; Tsakov, I; Shchedrina, T V

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper, experimental observation of the multifragmentation processes of light relativistic nuclei carried out by means of emulsions are reviewed. Events of the type of "white stars" in which the dissociation of relativistic nuclei is not accompanied by the production of mesons and the target-nucleus fragments are considered. A distinctive feature of the charge topology in the dissociation of the Ne, Mg, Si and S nuclei is an almost total suppression of the binary splitting of nuclei to fragments with charges higher than 2. The growth of the nuclear fragmentation degree is revealed in an increase in the multiplicity of singly and doubly charged fragments with decreasing charge of the main non-excited part of the fragmenting nucleus. The processes of dissociation of stable Li, Be, B, C, N, and O isotopes to charged fragments were used to study special features of the formation of systems consisting of the lightest nuclei - alpha, d and t. Clustering of the 3He nucleus can be detected in "white sta...

  5. Realistic level densities in fragment emission at high excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, M.G.; Blann, M.; Ignatyuk, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Heavy fragment emission from a 44 100 Ru compound nucleus at 400 and 800 MeV of excitation is analyzed to study the influence of level density models on final yields. An approach is used in which only quasibound shell-model levels are included in calculating level densities. We also test the traditional Fermi gas model for which there is no upper energy limit to the single particle levels. We compare the influence of these two level density models in evaporation calculations of primary fragment excitations, kinetic energies and yields, and on final product yields

  6. The rise and fall of multi-fragment emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogilvie, C.A.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Hubele, J.; Kunde, G.J.; Lindenstruth, V.; Liu, Z.; Lynen, U.; Meijer, R.J.; Milkau, U.; Mueller, W.F.J.; Sann, H.; Trautmann, W.; Adloff, J.C.; Rudolf, G.; Stuttge, L.

    1991-03-01

    We have studied multifragment decays of Au projectiles after collissions with C, Al, and Cu targets at a bombarding energy of 600 MeV/nucleon. We find that with increasing violence of the collision, measured via the associated multiplicity of light particles, the mean multiplicity of intermediate mass fragments first increases to a maximum IMF >≅3 and then decreases again. Calculations using the BUU model suggest that the fragmentation is governed by the energy E dep deposited into the Au nucleus and that IMF > reaches its maximum around E dep ≅8 MeV/nucleon. PACS 25.70 Np. (orig.)

  7. The angular momentum dependence of complex fragment emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobtka, L.G.; Sarantites, D.G.; Li, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Large fragment (A > 4) production at high angular momentum is studied via the reaction, 200 MeV 45 Sc + 65 Cu. Comparisons of the fragment yields from this reaction (high angular momentum) to those from 93 Nb + Be (low angular momentum) are used to verify the strong angular momentum dependence of large fragment production predicted by equilibrium models. Details of the coincident γ-ray distributions not only confirm a rigidly rotating intermediate but also indicate that the widths of the primary L-wave distributions decrease with increasing symmetry in the decay channel. These data are used to test the asymmetry and L-wave dependence of emission barriers calculated from a rotating, finite range corrected, liquid drop model. 21 refs., 10 figs

  8. Asymmetries in heavy meson production from light quark fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias de Deus, J.; Duraes, F.

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of the asymmetry in D - /D + production from π - beams, being a direct consequence of the properties of the light quark fragmentation function into heavy mesons. The main features of the asymmetry, as a function of x F , are easily described. An integrated sum rule for the D - , D + multiplicity difference is presented. Predictions for the asymmetry in B meson production are given. (orig.)

  9. Fragment emission in relativistic heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csernai, L.P.; Subramanian, P.R.; Buchwald, G.; Graebner, G.; Rosenhauer, A.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.

    1982-05-01

    The authors present a theoretical description of nuclear collisions which consists of a three-dimensional fluid-dynamical model, a chemical equilibrium break-up calculation for local light fragment (i.e. p, n, d, t, 3 He, 4 He) production and a final thermal evaporation of these particles. The light fragment cross section and some properties of the heavy target residues are calculated for the asymmetric systems Ne+U at 400 MeV/N, Ne+Pb at 800 MeV/N and C+Sn at 86 MeV/N. The results of the model calculations are compared with recent experimental data. Several observable signs of the collective hydrodynamical processes are consistent with the present data. An event-by-event analysis of the flow patterns of the various clusters is proposed which can yield deeper insight into collision dynamics. (author)

  10. Research on Acoustic Emission and Electromagnetic Emission Characteristics of Rock Fragmentation at Different Loading Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujun Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationships among the generation of acoustic emission, electromagnetic emission, and the fracture stress of rock grain are investigated, which are based on the mechanism of acoustic emission and electromagnetic emission produced in the process of indenting rock. Based on the relationships, the influence of loading rate on the characteristics of acoustic emission and electromagnetic emission of rock fragmentation is further discussed. Experiment on rock braking was carried out with three loading rates of 0.001 mm/s, 0.01 mm/s, and 0.1 mm/s. The results show that the phenomenon of acoustic emission and electromagnetic emission is produced during the process of loading and breaking rock. The wave forms of the two signals and the curve of the cutter indenting load show jumping characteristics. Both curves have good agreement with each other. With the increase of loading rate, the acoustic emission and electromagnetic emission signals are enhanced. Through analysis, it is found that the peak count rate, the energy rate of acoustic emission, the peak intensity, the number of pulses of the electromagnetic emission, and the loading rate have a positive correlation with each other. The experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis. The proposed studies can lead to an in-depth understanding of the rock fragmentation mechanism and help to prevent rock dynamic disasters.

  11. Statistical emission of complex fragments from highly excited compound nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuse, T.

    1991-01-01

    A full statistical analysis has been given in terms of the Extended Hauser-Feshbach method. The charge and kinetic energy distributions of 35 Cl+ 12 C reaction at E lab = 180, 200 MeV and 23 Na+ 24 Mg reaction at E lab = 89 MeV which form the 47 V compound nucleus are investigated as a prototype of the light mass system. The measured kinetic energy distributions of the complex fragments are shown to be well reproduced by the Extended Hauser-Feshbach method, so the observed complex fragment production is understood as the statistical binary decay from the compound nucleus induced by heavy-ion reaction. Next, this method is applied to the study of the complex production from the 111 In compound nucleus which is formed by the 84 Kr+ 27 Al reaction at E lab = 890 MeV. (K.A.) 18 refs., 10 figs

  12. White light emission from engineered silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide indirect bandgap semiconductor. The light emission efficiency is low in nature. But this material has very unique physical properties like good thermal conductivity, high break down field etc in addition to its abundance. Therefore it is interesting to engineer its...... light emission property so that to take fully potential applications of this material. In this talk, two methods, i.e. doping SiC heavily by donor-acceptor pairs and making SiC porous are introduced to make light emission from SiC. By co-doping SiC with nitrogen and boron heavily, strong yellow emission...... is demonstrated. After optimizing the passivation conditions, strong blue-green emission from porous SiC is demonstrated as well. When combining the yellow emission from co-doped SiC and blue-green from porous SiC, a high color rendering index white light source is achieved....

  13. Studies of complex fragment emission in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G.

    1993-01-01

    The study of intermediate-energy heavy-ion nuclear reactions is reported. This work has two foci: the properties of nuclear matter under abnormal conditions, in this energy domain, predominately low densities and the study of the relevant reaction mechanisms. Nuclear matter properties, such as phase transitions, are reflected in the dynamics of the reactions. The process leads to an understanding of the reaction mechanism themselves and therefore to the response characteristics of finite, perhaps non-equilibrium, strongly interacting systems. The program has the following objectives: to study energy, mass, and angular momentum deposition by studying incomplete fusion reactions; to gain confidence in the understanding of how highly excited systems decompose by studying all emissions from the highly excited systems; to push these kinds of studies into the intermediate energy domain (where intermediate mass fragment emission is not improbable) with excitation function studies; and to learn about the dynamics of the decays using particle-particle correlations. The last effort focuses on simple systems, where definitive statements are possible. These avenues of research share a common theme, large complex fragment production. It is this feature, more than any other, which distinguishes the intermediate energy domain

  14. Fragment ion and electron emission from C sub 6 sub 0 by fast heavy ion impact

    CERN Document Server

    Mizuno, T; Itoh, A; Tsuchida, H; Nakai, Y

    2003-01-01

    Correlation between electron emission and fragmentation of C sub 6 sub 0 was studied using 847keV Si sup + ions. Mass distribution of fragment ions, number distribution of secondary electrons, and final charge distribution of outgoing projectiles were successfully measured by means of a triple coincidence time-of-flight method. Strong correlation was observed for electron emission and fragmentation.

  15. Light fragment production at CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Yu.B. [National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Soldatov, A.A. [National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-11-15

    Recent data on the deuteron and {sup 3}He production in central Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) energies measured by the NA49 Collaboration are analyzed within the model of the three-fluid dynamics (3FD) complemented by the coalescence model for the light-fragment production. The simulations are performed with different equations of state - with and without deconfinement transition. It is found that scenarios with the deconfinement transition are preferable for reproduction rapidity distributions of deuterons and {sup 3}He, the corresponding results well agree with the experimental data. At the same time the calculated transverse-mass spectra at midrapidity do not agree that nicely with the experimental data. The latter apparently indicate that coalescence coefficients should be temperature and/or momentum dependent. (orig.)

  16. Light fragment preformation in cold fission of {sup 282}Cn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Gherghescu, R.A. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    In a previous article, published in Phys. Rev. C 94, 014309 (2016), we have shown for the first time that the best dynamical trajectory during the deformation toward fission of the superheavy nucleus {sup 286}Fl is a linearly increasing radius of the light fragment, R{sub 2}. This macroscopic-microscopic result reminds us about the α or cluster preformation at the nuclear surface, assumed already in 1928, and proved microscopically many times. This time we give more detailed arguments for the nucleus {sup 282}Cn. Also similar figures are presented for heavy nuclei {sup 240}Pu and {sup 252} Cf. The deep minimum of the total deformation energy near the surface is shown for the first time as a strong argument for cluster preformation. (orig.)

  17. Measurement of light emission in scintillation vials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran Ramiro, M. Teresa; Garcia-Torano, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    The efficiency and energy resolution of liquid scintillation counting (LSC) systems are strongly dependent on the optical characteristics of scintillators, vials, and reflectors. This article presents the results of measurements of the light-emission profile of scintillation vials. Two measurement techniques, autoradiographs and direct measurements with a photomultiplier tube, have been used to obtain light-emission distribution for standard vials of glass, etched glass and polyethylene. Results obtained with both techniques are in good agreement. For the first time, the effect of the meniscus in terms of light contribution has been numerically estimated. These results can help design LSC systems that are more efficient in terms of light collection

  18. Studies of complex fragment emission in heavy ion reactions: Progress report, September 1, 1987--August 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobotka, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    The production of large fragments, fragments with mass between light particles and fission fragments, in intermediate and high energy nuclear reactions has fostered the proposal of a number of novel reaction mechanisms. These include liquid-vapor equilibrium and nuclear shattering. Temporarily left in the wake of these exciting proposed mechanisms was the old standard, statistical decay of compound nuclei. To be sure, the standard treatment of compound nucleus decay did not deal with large fragment production. However, this emission was not due to any fundamental deficiency of statistical models, but rather an uncertainty concerning exactly how to splice large fragment emission into statistical models. A large portion of our program deals with this problem. Specifically, by studying the yields of large fragments produced in sufficiently low energy reactions we are attempting to deduce the asymmetry and l-wave dependence of large fragment emission from compound nuclear intermediates. This, however, is only half of the problem. Since the novel mechanisms proposed for large fragment emission were spawned by intermediate and high energy reaction data, we must also realize the relevance of the compound nucleus mechanisms at high energies. It is not unreasonable to suspect that compound nucleus-like objects are formed with less than complete momentum transfer and perhaps less than complete mass transfer. Therefore the study of large fragment production in low energy reactions should go hand in hand with the study of energy, mass, and angular momentum transfer in incomplete fusion and non-compound reactions. This thread joins the apparently divergent subjects covered in this report

  19. Studies of complex fragment emission in heavy ion reactions: Progress report, September 1, 1986 through August 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobotka, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    The production of large fragments, fragments with mass between light particles and fission fragments, in intermediate and high energy nuclear reactions has fostered the proposal of a number of novel reaction mechanisms. These include liquid-vapor equilibrium and nuclear shattering. Temporarily left in the wake of these exciting proposed mechanisms was the old standard, statistical decay of compound nuclei. To be sure, the standard treatment of compound nucleus decay did not deal with large fragment production. However, this omission was not due to any fundamental deficiency of statistical models, but rather an uncertainty concerning exactly how to splice large fragment emission into statistical models. A large portion of our program deals with this problem. Specifically, by studying the yields of large fragments produced in sufficiently low energy reactions we are attempting to deduce the asymmetry and l-wave dependence of large fragment emission from compound nuclear intermediates. This, however, is only half of the problem. Since the novel mechanisms proposed for large fragment emission were spawned by intermediate and high energy reaction data, we must also realize the relevance of the compound nucleus mechanisms at high energies. It is not unreasonable to suspect that compound nucleus-like objects are formed with less than complete momentum transfer and perhaps less than complete mass transfer. Therefore the study of large fragment production in low energy reactions should go hand in hand with the study of energy, mass, and angular momentum transfer in non-compound reactions. This thread joins the apparently divergent subjects covered in this report. 39 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Production of light fragments in hA collisions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, M.A.; Vechernin, V.V.

    1988-12-01

    Production of fast relativistic light fragments in hA collisions at high energies is considered. Direct coalescence of produced nucleons into fragments is shown to be the main mechanism for fragment production. The influence of the nuclear field is small and is not described by the well-known Butler-Pearson formulas. The coalescence coefficient strongly depends on the angle and on the behaviour of the fragment wave function at small internucleon distances. (author). 14 refs, 7 figs

  1. Studies of complex fragment emission in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    Our work involves the study of intermediate energy heavy-ion nuclear reactions. This work has two foci. On the one hand, we desire to learn about the properties of nuclear matter under abnormal conditions, in this energy domain, predominately low densities. This purpose runs abreast of the second, which is the study of the relevant reaction mechanisms. The two objectives are inexorably linked because our experimental laboratory for studying nuclear matter properties is a dynamic one. We are forced to ask how nuclear matter properties, such as phase transitions, are reflected in the dynamics of the reactions. It may be that irrefutable information about nuclear matter will not be extracted from the reaction work. Nevertheless, we are compelled to undertake this effort not only because it is the only game in town and as yet we do not know that information cannot be extracted, but also because of our second objective. The process leads to an understanding of the reaction mechanism themselves and therefore to the response characteristics of finite, perhaps non-equilibrium, strongly interacting systems. Our program has been: To study energy, mass, and angular momentum deposition by studying incomplete fusion reactions. To gain confidence that we understand how highly excited systems decompose by studying all emissions from the highly excited systems. To push these kinds of studies into the intermediate energy domain, with excitation function studies. And attempt to learn about the dynamics of the decays using particle-particle correlations. In the last effort, we have decided to focus on simple systems, where we believe, definitive statements are possible. These avenues of research share a common theme, large complex fragment production

  2. Collectivity in composite fragment emission from relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, R.; Claesson, G.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Kolb, B.; Schmidt, H.R.; Doss, K.G.R.; Harris, J.W.; Kristiansson, P.; Lefebres, F.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Ritter, H.G.; Teitelbaum, L.; Tincknell, M.; Weiss, S.; Ferguson, R.L.; Gavron, I.; Jacak, B.V.; Wilhelmy, J.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Kampert, K.H.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Wieman, H.

    1987-05-01

    Composite fragments of 2< Z<10 have been measured in the Plastic Ball Spectrometer in 200 MeV/nucleon Au+Au and Au+Fe collisions. Strong azimuthal alignment of the fragments reveal the collective behaviour of the reaction. (orig.)

  3. Quantifying the linear and nonlinear relations between the urban form fragmentation and the carbon emission distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, S.; Dai, S.; Ren, Y.; Yu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Scientifically revealing the spatial heterogeneity and the relationship between the fragmentation of urban landscape and the direct carbon emissions are of great significance to land management and urban planning. In fact, the linear and nonlinear effects among the various factors resulted in the carbon emission spatial map. However, there is lack of the studies on the direct and indirect relations between the carbon emission and the city functional spatial form changes, which could not be reflected by the land use change. The linear strength and direction of the single factor could be calculated through the correlation and Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) analysis, the nonlinear power of one factor and the interaction power of each two factors could be quantified by the Geodetector analysis. Therefore, we compared the landscape fragmentation metrics of the urban land cover and functional district patches to characterize the landscape form and then revealed the relations between the landscape fragmentation level and the direct the carbon emissions based on the three methods. The results showed that fragmentation decreased and the fragmented patches clustered at the coarser resolution. The direct CO2 emission density and the population density increased when the fragmentation level aggregated. The correlation analysis indicated the weak linear relation between them. The spatial variation of GWR output indicated the fragmentation indicator (MESH) had the positive influence on the carbon emission located in the relatively high emission region, and the negative effects regions accounted for the small part of the area. The Geodetector which explores the nonlinear relation identified the DIVISION and MESH as the most powerful direct factor for the land cover patches, NP and PD for the functional district patches, and the interactions between fragmentation indicator (MESH) and urban sprawl metrics (PUA and DIS) had the greatly increased explanation powers on the

  4. MCNP6 Simulation of Light and Medium Nuclei Fragmentation at Intermediate Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kerby, Leslie Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    2015-08-24

    Fragmentation reactions induced on light and medium nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below are studied with the Los Alamos transport code MCNP6 and with its CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 event generators. CEM and LAQGSM assume that intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions on light nuclei occur generally in two stages. The first stage is the intranuclear cascade (INC), followed by the second, Fermi breakup disintegration of light excited residual nuclei produced after the INC. CEM and LAQGSM account also for coalescence of light fragments (complex particles) up to sup>4He from energetic nucleons emitted during INC. We investigate the validity and performance of MCNP6, CEM, and LAQGSM in simulating fragmentation reactions at intermediate energies and discuss possible ways of further improving these codes.

  5. Compaction of a Bed of Fragmentable Particles and Associated Acoustic Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegron, L.; Sornay, P.; Favretto-Cristini, N.

    2013-06-01

    The nuclear fuel of light water power reactors are manufactured by powder metallurgy. This is also the method that is used for the production of fuels containing minor actinides that have high activity and long life. Given their radiotoxicity, it is necessary to simplify the manufacturing process to the maximum, limiting dissemination and retention of matter. In addition, the fuel must have a mostly open porosity. Implementation of particles of a few hundred micrometers and controlled cohesion could meet this dual objective. However, it should be ensured that the mechanical strength of compacts before sintering is sufficient without adding binder. The phenomena that occur during the manufacture of compact are thus analyzed and quantified. It is shown that only a portion of the particles breaks upon application of a stress up to 600 MPa and it is possible to detect this fragmentation by acoustic emission (AE). (authors)

  6. Fragment formation in light-ion induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Yuichi

    2001-01-01

    The intermediate mass fragment (IMF) formation in the 12 GeV proton induced reaction on Au target is analyzed by the quantum molecular dynamics model combined with the JAM hadronic cascade model and the non-equilibrated percolation model. We show that the sideward peaked angular distribution of IMF occur in the multifragmentation at very short time scale around 20 fm/c where non-equilibrated features of the residual nucleus fluctuates the nucleon density and fragments in the repulsive Coulomb force are pushed for the sideward direction. (author)

  7. Fluorescence and amplified spontaneous emission of glass forming compounds containing styryl-4H-pyran-4-ylidene fragment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vembris, Aivars, E-mail: aivars.vembris@cfi.lu.lv [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, 8 Kengaraga Street, Riga LV-1063 (Latvia); Muzikante, Inta [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, 8 Kengaraga Street, Riga LV-1063 (Latvia); Karpicz, Renata; Sliauzys, Gytis [Institute of Physics, Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, A. Gostauto 11, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania); Miasojedovas, Arunas; Jursenas, Saulius [Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Gulbinas, Vidmantas [Institute of Physics, Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, A. Gostauto 11, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2012-09-15

    Potential of glassy films of newly synthesised low molecular weight organic molecules for light amplification and lasing applications has been investigated by analysing fluorescence, transient differential absorption and amplified spontaneous emission properties. These non-symmetric and symmetric molecules contain styryl-4H-pyran-4-ylidene fragment with three different electron acceptor groups: dicyanomethylene, barbituric acid, indene-1,3-dione. Fluorescence quantum yields of the investigated compounds in solutions are between 0.32 and 0.54, while they drop down by an order of magnitude in thin solid films. Incorporation of bulky side groups reduced excitonic interactions enabling manifestation of amplified spontaneous emission in the neat films of the investigated derivatives. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bulky substituents attached to DCM dye enable formation of neat glassy films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigated dyes show amplified spontaneous emission in neat films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two electron donor groups negatively influence light amplification.

  8. Direct fragmentation of quarkonia including Fermi motion using light-cone wave function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobary, M.A. Gomshi [Razi University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kermanshah (Iran); A.E.O.I., Center for Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, Tehran (Iran); Javadi, B. [Razi University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kermanshah (Iran)

    2005-07-01

    We investigate the effect of Fermi motion on the direct fragmentation of the J/{psi} and {upsilon} states employing a light-cone wave function. Consistent with such a wave function we set up the kinematics of a heavy quark fragmenting into quarkonia such that the Fermi motion of the constituents splits into a longitudinal as well as a transverse direction and thus calculate the fragmentation functions for these states. In the framework of our investigation, we estimate that the fragmentation probabilities of J/{psi} and {upsilon} may increase at least up to 14 percent when including this degree of freedom. (orig.)

  9. Engineering photonic and plasmonic light emission enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Nathaniel

    Semiconductor photonic devices are a rapidly maturing technology which currently occupy multi-billion dollar markets in the areas of LED lighting and optical data communication. LEDs currently demonstrate the highest luminous efficiency of any light source for general lighting. Long-haul optical data communication currently forms the backbone of the global communication network. Proper design of light management is required for photonic devices, which can increase the overall efficiency or add new device functionality. In this thesis, novel methods for the control of light propagation and confinement are developed for the use in integrated photonic devices. The first part of this work focuses on the engineering of field confinement within deep subwavelength plasmonic resonators for the enhancement of light-matter interaction. In this section, plasmonic ring nanocavities are shown to form gap plasmon modes confined to the dielectric region between two metal layers. The scattering properties, near-field enhancement and photonic density of states of nanocavity devices are studied using analytic theory and 3D finite difference time domain simulations. Plasmonic ring nanocavities are fabricated and characterized using photoluminescence intensity and decay rate measurements. A 25 times increase in the radiative decay rate of Er:Si02 is demonstrated in nanocavities where light is confined to volumes as small as 0.01( ln )3. The potential to achieve lasing, due to the enhancement of stimulated emission rate in ring nanocavities, is studied as a route to Si-compatible plasmon-enhanced nanolasers. The second part of this work focuses on the manipulation of light generated in planar semiconductor devices using arrays of dielectric nanopillars. In particular, aperiodic arrays of nanopillars are engineered for omnidirectional light extraction enhancement. Arrays of Er:SiNx, nanopillars are fabricated and a ten times increase in light extraction is experimentally demonstrated

  10. Spontaneous light emission from fibers in MINOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avvakumov, S.; Barrett, W.L.; Belias, T.; Bower, C.; Erwin, A.; Kordosky, M.; Lang, K.; Lee, R.; Liu, J.; Miller, W.; Mualem, L.; Nichol, R.; Nelson, J.; Pearce, G.; Proga, M.; Rebel, B.; Ruddick, K.; Smith, C.; Thomas, J.; Vahle, P.; Webb, R.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the observation and measurements of unexpected background rates in the MINOS Far Detector. The noise level at the Far Detector is significantly greater than that expected from natural radioactivity and intrinsic photomultiplier dark current. We have conducted a series of additional tests which demonstrate that the excess rate is caused by spontaneous light emission in the wavelength-shifting fibers, which are used to read out signals from scintillator strips. This noise due to fibers exhibits an exponential fall off with time with a decay time constant of the order of 100 days

  11. Stimulated light emission in a dielectrically disordered composite porous matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, E.; Künzner, N.; Diener, J.; Fujii, Minoru; Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Kovalev, D.

    2005-06-01

    We report on a medium exhibiting extremely efficient light scattering properties: a liquid network formed in a porous matrix. Liquid fragments confined in the solid matrix result in a random fluctuation of the dielectric function and act as scattering objects for photons. The optical scattering efficiency is defined by the filling factor of the liquid in the pores and its dielectric constant. The spectral dependence of the scattering length of photons indicates that the phenomenon is governed by a Mie-type scattering mechanism. The degree of the dielectric disorder of the medium, i.e. the level of opacity is tunable by the ambient vapor pressure of the dielectric substance. In the strongest scattering regime the scattering length of photons is found to be in the micrometer range. By incorporation of dye molecules in the voids of the porous layer a system exhibiting optical gain is realized. In the multiple scattering regime the optical path of diffusively propagating photons is enhanced and light amplification through stimulated emission occurs: a strong intensity enhancement of the dye emission accompanied by significant spectral narrowing is observed above the excitation threshold for a layer being in the opalescence state.

  12. Isotopic dependence of the fragments' internal temperatures determined from multifragment emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, S. R.; Donangelo, R.

    2018-05-01

    The internal temperatures of fragments produced by an excited nuclear source are investigated by using the microcanonical version of the statistical multifragmentation model, with discrete energy. We focus on the fragments' properties at the breakup stage, before they have time to deexcite by particle emission. Since the adopted model provides the excitation energy distribution of these primordial fragments, it allows one to calculate the temperatures of different isotope families and to make inferences about the sensitivity to their isospin composition. It is found that, due to the functional form of the nuclear density of states and the excitation energy distribution of the fragments, proton-rich isotopes are hotter than neutron-rich isotopes. This property has been taken to be an indication of earlier emission of the former from a source that cools down as it expands and emits fragments. Although this scenario is incompatible with the prompt breakup of a thermally equilibrated source, our results reveal that the latter framework also provides the same qualitative features just mentioned. Therefore they suggest that this property cannot be taken as evidence for nonequilibrium emission. We also found that this sensitivity to the isotopic composition of the fragments depends on the isospin composition of the source, and that it is weakened as the excitation energy of the source increases.

  13. Hadron fragment emission in cluster excitation processes at medium energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, Zs.

    1985-12-01

    An extended version of the cluster excitation model is proposed to describe the emission of various particle types in nuclear reactions in a consistent way. At first pion, proton deuteron and triton spectra from neutron-carbon interactions at 545 MeV in the angular region from deg 73 to deg 165 were tried to interpret by the model. The results are compared with model calculations. (author)

  14. Fragments of the constant region of immunoglobulin light chains are constituents of AL-amyloid proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, K E; Sletten, K; Westermark, Per

    1998-01-01

    Immunoglobulin light chains are the precursor proteins of AL-amyloidosis. In the fibril formation process properties of the variable part of the immunoglobulin light chains are believed to be of major importance. In this work it is shown that fragments of the constant part of the immunoglobulin l...... light chain are a constituent of the AL-amyloid proteins of kappa type. A specific antiserum has identified these fragments in gel filtration fractions where the absorbance approached the base line after the main retarded peak. The fragments are small and have been overlooked previously......Immunoglobulin light chains are the precursor proteins of AL-amyloidosis. In the fibril formation process properties of the variable part of the immunoglobulin light chains are believed to be of major importance. In this work it is shown that fragments of the constant part of the immunoglobulin...... in the purification process. The significance of the constant part in AL-proteins is unclear, but adds new aspects to the discussion of pre- or post-fibrillogenic cleavage of the immunoglobulin light chains....

  15. Carbon emissions from deforestation and forest fragmentation in the Brazilian Amazon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numata, Izaya; Cochrane, Mark A; Souza, Carlos M Jr; Sales, Marcio H

    2011-01-01

    Forest-fragmentation-related edge effects are one of the major causes of forest degradation in Amazonia and their spatio-temporal dynamics are highly influenced by annual deforestation patterns. Rapid biomass collapse due to edge effects in forest fragments has been reported in the Brazilian Amazon; however the collective impacts of this process on Amazonian carbon fluxes are poorly understood. We estimated biomass loss and carbon emissions from deforestation and forest fragmentation related to edge effects on the basis of the INPE (Brazilian National Space Research Institute) PRODES deforestation data and forest biomass volume data. The areas and ages of edge forests were calculated annually and the corresponding biomass loss and carbon emissions from these forest edges were estimated using published rates of biomass decay and decomposition corresponding to the areas and ages of edge forests. Our analysis estimated carbon fluxes from deforestation (4195 Tg C) and edge forest (126-221 Tg C) for 2001-10 in the Brazilian Amazon. The impacts of varying rates of deforestation on regional forest fragmentation and carbon fluxes were also investigated, with the focus on two periods: 2001-5 (high deforestation rates) and 2006-10 (low deforestation rates). Edge-released carbon accounted for 2.6-4.5% of deforestation-related carbon emissions. However, the relative importance of carbon emissions from forest fragmentation increased from 1.7-3.0% to 3.3-5.6% of the respective deforestation emissions between the two contrasting deforestation rates. Edge-related carbon fluxes are of increasing importance for basin-wide carbon accounting, especially as regards ongoing reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) efforts in Brazilian Amazonia.

  16. Carbon emissions from deforestation and forest fragmentation in the Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Izaya; Cochrane, Mark A.; Souza, Carlos M., Jr.; Sales, Marcio H.

    2011-10-01

    Forest-fragmentation-related edge effects are one of the major causes of forest degradation in Amazonia and their spatio-temporal dynamics are highly influenced by annual deforestation patterns. Rapid biomass collapse due to edge effects in forest fragments has been reported in the Brazilian Amazon; however the collective impacts of this process on Amazonian carbon fluxes are poorly understood. We estimated biomass loss and carbon emissions from deforestation and forest fragmentation related to edge effects on the basis of the INPE (Brazilian National Space Research Institute) PRODES deforestation data and forest biomass volume data. The areas and ages of edge forests were calculated annually and the corresponding biomass loss and carbon emissions from these forest edges were estimated using published rates of biomass decay and decomposition corresponding to the areas and ages of edge forests. Our analysis estimated carbon fluxes from deforestation (4195 Tg C) and edge forest (126-221 Tg C) for 2001-10 in the Brazilian Amazon. The impacts of varying rates of deforestation on regional forest fragmentation and carbon fluxes were also investigated, with the focus on two periods: 2001-5 (high deforestation rates) and 2006-10 (low deforestation rates). Edge-released carbon accounted for 2.6-4.5% of deforestation-related carbon emissions. However, the relative importance of carbon emissions from forest fragmentation increased from 1.7-3.0% to 3.3-5.6% of the respective deforestation emissions between the two contrasting deforestation rates. Edge-related carbon fluxes are of increasing importance for basin-wide carbon accounting, especially as regards ongoing reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) efforts in Brazilian Amazonia.

  17. Populations of excited states and reaction mechanisms in the emission of complex fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez del Campo, J.

    1990-01-01

    Cross sections for emission of complex fragments (Z>2) in their ground and excited states are presented for several heavy-ion reactions at bombarding energies above 10 MeV/nucleon. Data presented are mostly on the cross sections extracted by γ-ray techniques. It is shown that a simple statistical approach to associate the ratio, of cross sections for excited states and ground states, to the temperature of the emitter fails to give the expected temperatures. However, it is shown that this is mostly due to the fact that the fragments that γ decay are secondary fragments, produced by the particle decay of the primary emitted complex fragments. A Hauser-Feshbach analysis accounts well for the cross sections and extracted temperatures. 22 refs., 6 figs

  18. Fragment formation in GeV-energy proton and light heavy-ion induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, T.; Haga, M.; Haseno, M.

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated similarities and differences among the fragment formation processes in GeV-energy light-ion and light heavy-ion induced reactions. We have newly measured inclusive and exclusive energy spectra of intermediate mass fragments (3 ≤ Z ≤ 30; IMFs) for 8-GeV 16 O and 20 Ne and 12-GeV 20 Ne induced target multifragmentations (TMFs) in order to compare them with those previously measured for 8- and 12-GeV proton induced TMFs. We fond noticeable difference in their spectrum shapes and magnitudes but all of them clearly indicate the existence of sideward-peaked components, indicating fragment formations are mainly dictated not by a incident energy per nucleon but by a total energy of the projectile. (author)

  19. Light nuclides observed in the fission and fragmentation of 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricciardi, M.V.; Schmidt, K.H.; Benlliure, J.

    2001-05-01

    Light nuclides produced in collisions of 1 A.GeV 238 U with protons and titanium have been fully identified with a high-resolution forward magnetic spectrometer, the fragment separator (FRS), at GSI, and for each nuclide an extremely precise determination of the velocity has been performed. The so-obtained information on the velocity shows that the very asymmetric fission of uranium, in the 238 U + p reaction, produces neutron-rich isotopes of elements down to around charge 10. New important features of the fragmentation of 238 U, concerning the velocity and the N/Z-ratio of these light fragments, and a peculiar even-odd structure in N=Z nuclei, have also been observed. (orig.)

  20. Spontaneous light emission in complex nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, L. A.; García de Abajo, F. J.

    2004-05-01

    The spontaneous emission of an excited atom surrounded by different materials is studied in the framework of a semiclassical approach, where the transition dipole moment acts as the source of the emission field. The emission in the presence of semiinfinite media, metallic nanorings, spheres, gratings, and other complex geometries is investigated. Strong emission enhancement effects are obtained in some of these geometries associated to the excitation of plasmons (e.g., in nanorings or spheres). Furthermore, the emission is shown to take place only along narrow angular distributions when the atom is located inside a low-index dielectric and near its planar surface, or when metallic nanogratings are employed at certain resonant wave lengths. In particular, axially symmetric gratings made of real silver metal are considered, and both emission rate enhancement and focused far-field emission are achieved simultaneously when the grating is decorated with further nanostructures.

  1. Fragment emission in the interaction of xenon with 1-20 GeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porile, N.T.; Bujak, A.J.; Carmony, D.D.; Chung, Y.H.; Gutay, L.J.; Hirsch, A.S.; Mahi, M.; Paderewski, G.L.; Sangster, T.C.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Stringfellow, B.C.

    1989-01-01

    Differential cross sections for the emission of intermediate mass fragments in the interaction of xenon with 1-20 GeV protons have been measured. The cross sections increase sharply with energy up to 10 GeV and then level off. The energy spectra were fitted with an expression based on the phase transition droplet model and excellent fits were obtained above 9 GeV. Below 6 GeV, the fits show an increasing contribution from another mechanism, believed to be binary breakup. A droplet model fit to the cross sections ascribed to the multi-fragmentation component is able to reproduce their variation with both fragment mass and proton energy

  2. Stimulated Light Emission in Dense Fog Confined inside a Porous Glass Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, E.; Kovalev, D.; Künzner, N.; Diener, J.; Koch, F.; Fujii, M.

    2002-12-01

    We report on light amplification through stimulated emission in a dielectrically disordered medium. Liquid fragments confined in the solid matrix of porous quartz layers result in a random fluctuation of the dielectric function, and dye molecules embedded in the voids yield optical gain. The level of opacity is tunable by the ambient vapor pressure of the dielectric substance. In the multiple scattering regime, a strong intensity enhancement of the dye emission accompanied by significant spectral narrowing is observed above the threshold for a layer being in the opalescence state.

  3. Visible light emission from porous silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Lu, Weifang

    2017-01-01

    Light-emitting silicon carbide is emerging as an environment-friendly wavelength converter in the application of light-emitting diode based white light source for two main reasons. Firstly, SiC has very good thermal conductivity and therefore a good substrate for GaN growth in addition to the small...

  4. Multi-parameter spectroscopy of fission fragments and related emission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruben, A.; Jahnke, U.

    1993-01-01

    An exclusive measurement of the 252 C f(sf) fragment distribution in mass and energy in coincidence with the related emission products by combining a twin ionization chamber with a 4π-neutron tank, a n-γ-detector, and a solid-state detector telescope is presented. The experimental set-up, data handling and acquisition is described followed by a discussion of the raw data evaluation. (orig.)

  5. Light emission mechanism of mixed host organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wook; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-03-01

    Light emission mechanism of organic light-emitting diodes with a mixed host emitting layer was studied using an exciplex type mixed host and an exciplex free mixed host. Monitoring of the current density and luminance of the two type mixed host devices revealed that the light emission process of the exciplex type mixed host was dominated by energy transfer, while the light emission of the exciplex free mixed host was controlled by charge trapping. Mixed host composition was also critical to the light emission mechanism, and the contribution of the energy transfer process was maximized at 50:50 mixed host composition. Therefore, it was possible to manage the light emission process of the mixed host devices by managing the mixed host composition.

  6. Flow and spectra for light fragments from Au+Au collisions in the EOS TPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisa, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    We study the effects of the collective motion (flow) on distributions and yields of light fragments produced in heavy ion collisions at the Bevalac/SIS energy range. p, d, t, 3 He and α fragments emitted from Au+Au collisions at 0.25 - 1.15 AGeV bombarding energy were measured with the EOS TPC. The TPC has high and seamless acceptance in the forward hemisphere of the CM system, and excellent particle identification for light fragments. Analyses of the sidewards flow, squeeze-out, and radial flow signals are presented as a function of bombarding energy and centrality of the collision. The fragment mass systematics of the flow signals are seen to be consistent with a simple coalescence picture for the light particles studied. A unifying framework for describing many of the systematic features of the different types of flow (e.g. the p T dependence of squeeze-out) in terms of 3 parameters is discussed. Consistent with previous studies, the parameter describing squeeze-out is seen to be most sensitive to the Equation of State within a Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) model. The effect on extracted temperature of various radial flow profiles is discussed. Finally, a preliminary study of light particle yields in terms of the Quantum Statistical Model (QSM) is presented. It is found that the beam energy dependence of the 'chemical' temperature obtained from the yields tracks with the 'kinetic' temperature obtained from the spectral fits, if one accounts for a flow profile. However, discrepancies between different implementations (computer codes) of the QSM must be resolved before drawing final conclusions about agreement. (authors)

  7. Light emitting device having peripheral emissive region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-05-28

    Light emitting devices are provided that include one or more OLEDs disposed only on a peripheral region of the substrate. An OLED may be disposed only on a peripheral region of a substantially transparent substrate and configured to emit light into the substrate. Another surface of the substrate may be roughened or include other features to outcouple light from the substrate. The edges of the substrate may be beveled and/or reflective. The area of the OLED(s) may be relatively small compared to the substrate surface area through which light is emitted from the device. One or more OLEDs also or alternatively may be disposed on an edge of the substrate about perpendicular to the surface of the substrate through which light is emitted, such that they emit light into the substrate. A mode expanding region may be included between each such OLED and the substrate.

  8. Light dependency of VOC emissions from selected Mediterranean plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. M.; Harley, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.

    The light, temperature and stomatal conductance dependencies of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from ten plant species commonly found in the Mediterranean region were studied using a fully controlled leaf cuvette in the laboratory. At standard conditions of temperature and light (30°C and 1000 μmol m -2 s -1 PAR), low emitting species ( Arbutus unedo, Pinus halepensis, Cistus incanus, Cistus salvifolius, Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris) emitted between 0.1 and 5.0 μg (C) (total VOCs) g -1 dw h -1, a medium emitter ( Pinus pinea) emitted between 5 and 10 μg (C) g -1 dw h -1 and high emitters ( Cistus monspeliensis, Lavendula stoechas and Quercus sp.) emitted more than 10 μg (C) g -1 dw h -1. VOC emissions from all of the plant species investigated showed some degree of light dependency, which was distinguishable from temperature dependency. Emissions of all compounds from Quercus sp. were light dependent. Ocimene was one of several monoterpene compounds emitted by P. pinea and was strongly correlated to light. Only a fraction of monoterpene emissions from C. incanus exhibited apparent weak light dependency but emissions from this plant species were strongly correlated to temperature. Data presented here are consistent with past studies, which show that emissions are independent of stomatal conductance. These results may allow more accurate predictions of monoterpene emission fluxes from the Mediterranean region to be made.

  9. Description of light charged particle emission in ternary fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kuklin, S. N.; Scheid, W.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the motion of three fragments starting from the scission point of ternary system. In the alpha-accompanied ternary fission the initial conditions are not the free parameters and determined by minimization of potential energy at scission point. In the trajectory calculations the angular distribution and mean value of the kinetic energy of the alpha-particles are well described in the spontaneous ternary fission of 252 Cf. In the Be- and C-accompanied ternary fission we found that the emission of the third particle occurs from one of the heavy fragments after their separation. (authors)

  10. White-Light Emission from Layered Halide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew D; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2018-03-20

    With nearly 20% of global electricity consumed by lighting, more efficient illumination sources can enable massive energy savings. However, effectively creating the high-quality white light required for indoor illumination remains a challenge. To accurately represent color, the illumination source must provide photons with all the energies visible to our eye. Such a broad emission is difficult to achieve from a single material. In commercial white-light sources, one or more light-emitting diodes, coated by one or more phosphors, yield a combined emission that appears white. However, combining emitters leads to changes in the emission color over time due to the unequal degradation rates of the emitters and efficiency losses due to overlapping absorption and emission energies of the different components. A single material that emits broadband white light (a continuous emission spanning 400-700 nm) would obviate these problems. In 2014, we described broadband white-light emission upon near-UV excitation from three new layered perovskites. To date, nine white-light-emitting perovskites have been reported by us and others, making this a burgeoning field of study. This Account outlines our work on understanding how a bulk material, with no obvious emissive sites, can emit every color of the visible spectrum. Although the initial discoveries were fortuitous, our understanding of the emission mechanism and identification of structural parameters that correlate with the broad emission have now positioned us to design white-light emitters. Layered hybrid halide perovskites feature anionic layers of corner-sharing metal-halide octahedra partitioned by organic cations. The narrow, room-temperature photoluminescence of lead-halide perovskites has been studied for several decades, and attributed to the radiative recombination of free excitons (excited electron-hole pairs). We proposed that the broad white emission we observed primarily stems from exciton self-trapping. Here, the

  11. AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM THE EPA'S LIGHT DUTY TEST VEHICLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses measurements of ammonia (NH3) emissions from EPA's light duty test vehicle while operated on a dynamometer. The vehicle's (1993 Chevrolet equipped with a three-way catalyst) emissions were measured for three transient (urban driving, highway fuel economy, and ...

  12. Blue and white light emission from zinc oxide nanoforests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafisa Noor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Blue and white light emission is observed when high voltage stress is applied using micrometer-separated tungsten probes across a nanoforest formed of ZnO nanorods. The optical spectrum of the emitted light consistently shows three fine peaks with very high amplitude in the 465–485 nm (blue range, corresponding to atomic transitions of zinc. Additional peaks with smaller amplitudes in the 330–650 nm range and broad spectrum white light is observed depending on the excitation conditions. The spatial and spectral distribution of the emitted light, with pink–orange regions identifying percolation paths in some cases and high intensity blue and white light with center to edge variations in others, indicate that multiple mechanisms lead to light emission. Under certain conditions, the tungsten probe tips used to make electrical contact with the ZnO structures melt during the excitation, indicating that the local temperature can exceed 3422 °C, which is the melting temperature of tungsten. The distinct and narrow peaks in the optical spectra and the abrupt increase in current at high electric fields suggest that a plasma is formed by application of the electrical bias, giving rise to light emission via atomic transitions in gaseous zinc and oxygen. The broad spectrum, white light emission is possibly due to the free electron transitions in the plasma and blackbody radiation from molten silicon. The white light may also arise from the recombination through multiple defect levels in ZnO or due to the optical excitation from solid ZnO. The electrical measurements performed at different ambient pressures result in light emission with distinguishable differences in the emission properties and I–V curves, which also indicate that the dielectric breakdown of ZnO, sublimation, and plasma formation processes are the underlying mechanisms.

  13. Visible light emission from porous silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Lu, Weifang

    2017-01-01

    Light-emitting silicon carbide is emerging as an environment-friendly wavelength converter in the application of light-emitting diode based white light source for two main reasons. Firstly, SiC has very good thermal conductivity and therefore a good substrate for GaN growth in addition to the small...... lattice mismatch. Secondly, SiC material is abundant, containing no rear-earth element material as commercial phosphor. In this paper, fabrication of porous SiC is introduced, and their morphology and photoluminescence are characterized. Additionally, the carrier lifetime of the porous SiC is measured...... by time-resolved photoluminescence. The ultrashort lifetime in the order of ~70ps indicates porous SiC is very promising for the application in the ultrafast visible light communications....

  14. Emissions from light and medium goods vehicles in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj

    1996-01-01

    The article analyses atmospheric pollution of light goods vehicles (i.e. freight vehicles lighter than 6 tonnes) and medium goods vehicles (i.e. 6-24 t delivery trucks) in Denmark, and evaluated the scope for emission reductions. Light goods vehicles are very inefficient vehicles, and moreover have...

  15. Mechanism of f-decay - spontaneous emission of fragments by heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubchenya, V.A.; Ehjsmont, V.P.; Yavshits, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    A new type of model of radioactive decay - spontaneous emission of fragments by heavy nuclei, for which f-decay has been suggested, is formulated. The consideration is based on representation about a disintegrating configuration, for which the probability of f-cluster formation is close to 1. The moments method is used to determine the parameters of the disintegrating configuration. The probability of disintegrating configuration formation is determined by collective properties of a disintegrating nucleus. Effect of nucleon shells of the daughter nucleus and fragment leads to more compact disintegrating configuration and to decay energy increase, that's why at f-decay magic nuclei are formed. Probable spontaneous f-decay values calculated agree satisfactorily with experimental data. The calculational results testify to considerable decrease of f-decay probability at Z≥94

  16. Beta delayed particle emission in light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riisager, K.; Gabelmann, H.

    1991-01-01

    A short discussion of theoretical treatments of beta delayed particle emission is followed by a presentation of data on the newly found beta delayed deuteron decay of 6 He. This decay cannot be described properly with existing theories. (author) 8 refs.; 3 figs

  17. Solution of the Boltzmann equation for primary light ions and the transport of their fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kempe

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The Boltzmann equation for the transport of pencil beams of light ions in semi-infinite uniform media has been calculated. The equation is solved for the practically important generalized 3D case of Gaussian incident primary light ion beams of arbitrary mean square radius, mean square angular spread, and covariance. The transport of the associated fragments in three dimensions is derived based on the known transport of the primary particles, taking the mean square angular spread of their production processes, as well as their energy loss and multiple scattering, into account. The analytical pencil and broad beam depth fluence and absorbed dose distributions are accurately expressed using recently derived analytical energy and range formulas. The contributions from low and high linear energy transfer (LET dose components were separately identified using analytical expressions. The analytical results are compared with SHIELD-HIT Monte Carlo (MC calculations and found to be in very good agreement. The pencil beam fluence and absorbed dose distributions of the primary particles are mainly influenced by an exponential loss of the primary ions combined with an increasing lateral spread due to multiple scattering and energy loss with increasing penetration depth. The associated fluence of heavy fragments is concentrated at small radii and so is the LET and absorbed dose distribution. Their transport is also characterized by the buildup of a slowing down spectrum which is quite similar to that of the primaries but with a wider energy and angular spread at increasing penetration depths. The range of the fragments is shorter or longer depending on their nuclear mass to charge ratio relative to that of the primary ions. The absorbed dose of the heavier fragments is fairly similar to that of the primary ions and also influenced by a rapidly increasing energy loss towards the end of their ranges. The present analytical solution of the Boltzmann equation

  18. Controlling spontaneous emission of light by photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodahl, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Photonic bandgap crystals were proposed almost two decades ago as a unique tool for controlling propagation and emission of light. Since then the research field of photonic crystals has exploded and many beautiful demonstrations of the use of photonic crystals and fibers for molding light...... propagation have appeared that hold great promises for integrated optics. These major achievements solidly demonstrate the ability to control propagation of light. In contrast, an experimental demonstration of the use of photonic crystals for timing the emission of light has so far lacked. In a recent...... publication in Nature, we have demonstrated experimentally that both the direction and time of spontaneous emission can be controlled, thereby confirming the original proposal by Eli Yablonovich that founded the field of photonic crystals. We believe that this work opens new opportunities for solid...

  19. Entangled Light Emission From a Diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, R. M.; Shields, A. J.; Salter, C. L.; Farrer, I.; Nicoll, C. A.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Electrically-driven entangled photon generation is demonstrated for the first time using a single semiconductor quantum dot embedded in a light emitting diode structure. The entanglement fidelity is shown to be of sufficient quality for applications such as quantum key distribution.

  20. Emission of complex fragments in the reaction Ar+Au at 44 and 77 A.MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, A.; Guerreau, D.; Jiang, D.X.; Cramer, B.; Ingold, G.; Gatty, B.; Lott, B.; Piasecki, E.

    1992-01-01

    Complex fragment emission from the 44 and 77 A.MeV 40 Ar + 197 Au reaction was investigated, and complex fragments have been detected, together with the associated neutron multiplicity distributions, and are seen to be preferentially emitted in violent collisions. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium components were identified which are discussed in terms of statistical emission from the hot target-like fragment and of a possible persistence of a deep-inelastic process. (R.P.) 45 refs.; 16 figs.; 1 tab

  1. Macroscopic model description of heavy-ion induced complex-fragment emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carjan, N.

    1988-01-01

    The Yukawa-plus-exponential finite-range model and the standard liquid-drop model are shortly reviewed and compared. The dependence of the barrier heights and of the saddle-point shapes on mass-asymmetry and on angular momentum is studied for the compound nuclei 110 Sn, 149 Tb and 194 Hg. The predicted asymmetric-fission barriers, charge yields and total kinetic energies are compared with experimental data obtained from the deexcitation of compound nuclei by complex-fragment emission

  2. Energy damping and intermediate velocity fragment emission in peripheral Kr+Au collisions at 43 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuttge, L.; Adloff, J.C.; Bilwes, B.; Bilwes, R.; Cosmo, F.; Glaser, M.; Rudolf, G.; Scheibling, F.

    1991-01-01

    Triple and four-fold coincidences among fragments have been measured in the reaction 197 Au( 84 Kr,X) at 43 MeV/u. All events showing the projectile-like nucleus and fission fragments of the target-like nucleus, and all events with one additional intermediate velocity fragment, were analysed in the frame of a dissipative collision and a participant-spectator model. The mechanism is basically that of a dissipative collision but the emission of the intermediate velocity fragment by the target differs from an equilibrated evaporation. (author) 16 refs., 10 figs

  3. Emission of fragments in heavy ion-collisions at Fermi energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normand, J.

    2001-10-01

    The study of reaction mechanisms in Fermi energy domain has shown the dominant binary character of the process. The two heavy sources produced after the first stage of the interaction (the quasi-projectile QP and the quasi-target QT) can experience various decay modes from evaporation to multifragmentation. However, the presence of light fragments at mid rapidity cannot be explained by the standard decay of the QP and the QT. To understand the mechanisms producing such a contribution, the break-up of the QP has been studied on the following systems: Xe+Sn from 25 to 50 MeV/A, Ta+Au and Ta+U at 33, 39.6 MeV/A and U+U at 24 MeV/A. The experiment has been performed at GANIL with the INDRA multidetector. The particular behaviour of the heaviest fragment and the correlation between the charge and the velocity of the fragments suggest a shape deformation followed by the rupture of a neck formed in between the two partners of the collision. The heaviest fragment could be the reminiscence of the projectile. A method based on the angular distribution of the heaviest fragment has allowed to separate the statistical break-up of the QP and the non equilibrated break-up. The statistical break-up ranges from 30 % to 75 % of the break-ups. The comparison of the statistical component with a statistical model gives information about the charge, the angular momentum and the temperature of the QP. The comparison of the non equilibrated component with dynamical models could give information about the parameters of the nuclear interaction in medium. (author)

  4. Search for ternary fragmentation in the reaction 856 MeV 98Mo + 51V: Kinematic probing of intermediate-mass-fragment emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vardaci, Emanuele; Kaplan, Morton; Parker, Winifred E.; Moses, David J.; Boger, J.T.; Gilfoyle, G.T.; McMahan, M.A.; Montoya, M.

    2000-05-01

    A new technique has been applied to coincidence measurements between fission fragments (FF) and intermediate mass fragments (IMF) emitted from the composite system 149 65 Tb at an excitation energy of 224 MeV. The method permits simultaneous observation of IMF emissions along and normal to the FF separation axes. For the integrated total of 0.10 +-0.02 IMF emitted per fission, we find no significant correlation with FF direction, suggesting that IMFs associated with fission reactions are predominantly emitted from the system prior to fission

  5. [Investigation of emission characteristics for light duty vehicles with a portable emission measurement system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Kun; Fu, Li-Xin; Zhou, Yu; Lin, Xin; Chen, Ai-Zhong; Ge, Wei-hu; Du, Xuan

    2008-10-01

    Emission from 7 typical light-duty vehicles under actual driving conditions was monitored using a portable emission measurement system to gather data for characterization of the real world vehicle emission in Shenzhen, including the effects of driving modes on vehicle emission, comparison of fuel consumption based emission factors (g x L(-1) with mileage based emission factors (g x km(-1)), and the average emission factors of the monitored vehicles. The acceleration and deceleration modes accounted for 66.7% of total travel time, 80.3% of traveling distance and 74.6%-79.2% of vehicle emission; the acceleration mode contributed more than other driving modes. The fuel based emission factors were less dependent on the driving speed; they may be utilized in building macro-scale vehicle emission inventory with smaller sensitivity to the vehicle driving conditions. The effect of vehicle technology on vehicle emission was significant; the emission factors of CO, HC and NO(x) of carbureted vehicles were 19.9-20.5, 5.6-26.1 and 1.8-2.0 times the more advanced vehicles of Euro II, respectively. Using the ECE + EUDC driving cycle would not produce the desired real-world emission rates of light duty vehicles in a typical Chinese city.

  6. Enhanced emission of non-compound light particles in the reaction plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    In an experiment performed at the K500 cyclotron at Michigan State University, light particles in coincidence with two fission fragments for 14 N induced reactions on 197 Au at 420 MeV incident energy have been measured. The fission fragments were detected with two large area position sensitive parallel plate avalanche detectors. Light particle telescopes consisting of silicon-ΔE and Nal-E detectors were placed both in and out of the plane defined by the centers of the two fission detectors and the beam axis. The momentum transferred to the composite system was determined by measuring the folding angle between the two outgoing fission fragments. Unlike observations with more fissile targets, however, transfer and inelastic reactions characterized by small linear momentum transfers contribute negligibly to the fission cross section for reactions on the 197 Au target. For events which lead to fission, the most probable linear momentum transfer corresponded to about 85% of the beam momentum. This is similar to the most probable momentum transfer observed for fusion-like reactions on 238 U at the same beam energy. Much of the missing momentum is carried away by non-equilibrium light particle emission

  7. MCNP6 Simulation of Light and Medium Nuclei Fragmentation at Intermediate Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kerby, Leslie Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-22

    MCNP6, the latest and most advanced LANL Monte Carlo transport code, representing a merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX, is actually much more than the sum of those two computer codes; MCNP6 is available to the public via RSICC at Oak Ridge, TN, USA. In the present work, MCNP6 was validated and verified (V&V) against different experimental data on intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions, and results by several other codes, using mainly the latest modifications of the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) and of the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) event generators CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03. It was found that MCNP6 using CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 describes well fragmentation reactions induced on light and medium target nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below, and can serve as a reliable simulation tool for different applications, like cosmic-ray-induced single event upsets (SEU’s), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and ion beams, to name just a few. Future improvements of the predicting capabilities of MCNP6 for such reactions are possible, and are discussed in this work.

  8. Electrically driven light emission from an array of Si nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzitello, K I; Martin, H O; Aldao, C M; Roman, H E

    2004-01-01

    Charge transport and light emission properties of an array of silicon nanoclusters (NCs), sandwiched between a p-type and an n-type doped silicon crystal, are studied theoretically by assuming that electrons and holes enter from the opposite sides of the array in response to an applied electric field. The size of the NCs considered ranges from 16 nm down to 3.6 nm and their spatial distribution is optimized so that light emission, resulting from radiative recombinations, is peaked in the visible red around 1.8 eV. The light emission efficiency is limited by the carrier hopping times and is found to be in the range 2-0.5%, for fields ranging from 100 kV cm -1 to 500 kV cm -1 , respectively

  9. Fragmentation of the C60 molecule in collision with light ions studied by a multi-correlation technique. Cross-sections, electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rentenier, A.

    2004-04-01

    A quantitative study of the C60 fullerenes fragmentation in collision with light ions (H n + with n=1,2,3, He q+ with q=1,2) in the velocity range 0,1 - 2,3 u.a.) is presented. The multi-correlation technique, developed between fragment ions and electrons with well defined energy, has enlightened some of the dependences and properties of fragmentation mechanisms (cross sections, electron spectroscopy, size distributions, kinetic energy of fragment ions, Campi's scatter plot, activation energies). The deposited energy hence appeared as an important parameter. Cross sections have been measured, for the first time, for all the collisional processes. Ionisation and capture only depends on the collision velocity. On the other hand, scaling laws with the deposited energy have been observed for the cross sections of multifragmentation, which depends on the collision energy and the nature of the projectile. The deposited energy has also been found as an essential parameter to understand the evolution of the charged fragment size distributions. The electron spectroscopy, achieved at an emission angle of 35 degrees, showed spectra peaked at important energies (from 5 to 20 eV). The spectra shape depends on the collision velocity. A first theoretical analysis points out the link between the observed energy distribution and the presence of a centrifugal potential barrier. Finally, correlation experiments between produced ions and electron energy reveal that electron energy increases with internal energy. (author)

  10. A Simple yet Accurate Method for Students to Determine Asteroid Rotation Periods from Fragmented Light Curve Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beare, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Professional astronomers use specialized software not normally available to students to determine the rotation periods of asteroids from fragmented light curve data. This paper describes a simple yet accurate method based on Microsoft Excel[R] that enables students to find periods in asteroid light curve and other discontinuous time series data of…

  11. Light emission from compound eye with conformal fluorescent coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Miller, Amy E.; Pulsifer, Drew P.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2015-03-01

    Compound eyes of insects are attractive biological systems for engineered biomimicry as artificial sources of light, given their characteristic wide angular field of view. A blowfly eye was coated with a thin conformal fluorescent film, with the aim of achieving wide field-of-view emission. Experimental results showed that the coated eye emitted visible light and that the intensity showed a weaker angular dependence than a fluorescent thin film deposited on a flat surface.

  12. Light emission by an oscillator moving through a refracting plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshevskij, V.G.

    1982-01-01

    Optical-frequency light emitted by a fast electron passing through a crystalline plate of a finite thickness is treated. Formulas are presented for the spectral distribution and intensity of the emission at a given frequency and amplitude of the electron oscillations. The formulas correspond to both normal and abnormal Doppler effects. The calculations are carried out for the light observed in the vacuum, with the reflection and refraction at the edges of the plate taken into account

  13. Production study of light fragments emitted at low angle in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastid, N.

    1987-03-01

    The Diogene plastic wall was built in order to study fragment production in a 0 O -6 O angular range. After generalities on heavy ion collisions and a description of the Diogene detector, methods used for data analysis allowing identification of charged particles and measurement of their energy and emission angle are presented. From correlation studies between the Diogene events and the plastic wall events, we can have an information on the centrality of collisions. On the other hand, the study of differential cross sections shows two existing sources: one formed by the projectile remnant, at a velocity close to beam velocity and a source of intermediary rapidity formed by the participants. We have shown that even for very central collisions and heavy targets, the target nucleus remains partially transparent. In order to explain projectile fragmentation mechanism, we have used two models: a coalescence model and a thermal model. The first model gives the value of the coalescence radius. It seems that this model does not apply to angles nearing 0 O . With the thermal model, we have been able to sort out apparent temperature values which confirm the weak excitation energy of the projectile remnant [fr

  14. Effects of Neutron Emission on Fragment Mass and Kinetic Energy Distribution from Thermal Neutron-Induced Fission of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Saetone, E.

    2007-01-01

    The mass and kinetic energy distribution of nuclear fragments from thermal neutron-induced fission of 235 U(n th ,f) have been studied using a Monte-Carlo simulation. Besides reproducing the pronounced broadening in the standard deviation of the kinetic energy at the final fragment mass number around m = 109, our simulation also produces a second broadening around m = 125. These results are in good agreement with the experimental data obtained by Belhafaf et al. and other results on yield of mass. We conclude that the obtained results are a consequence of the characteristics of the neutron emission, the sharp variation in the primary fragment kinetic energy and mass yield curves. We show that because neutron emission is hazardous to make any conclusion on primary quantities distribution of fragments from experimental results on final quantities distributions

  15. Study of the emission of a light particle charged during the fission of 235U by thermal neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carles, Claude

    1969-01-01

    In a first part, this research thesis discusses the existing theories of the mechanism of emission of light particles charged of tri-partition (tri-partition is defined as an event involving two big fragments of masses comparable with those obtained in binary fission, and a charged light particle). Then, the author presents and reports an experiment performed by suing nuclear emulsions. Another type of experiment is then presented which allows the measurement of masses and energies of tri-partition fragments. The author then presents theoretical calculations which have been performed in order to find again some characteristics of tri-partition. These calculations are mainly based on Coulomb repulsion between various fragments

  16. UV emissions from low energy artificial light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Leona; Moseley, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Energy efficient light sources have been introduced across Europe and many other countries world wide. The most common of these is the Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL), which has been shown to emit ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are an alternative technology that has minimal UV emissions. This brief review summarises the different energy efficient light sources available on the market and compares the UV levels and the subsequent effects on the skin of normal individuals and those who suffer from photodermatoses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Azimuthal Anisotropies in Nuclear Fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowska, A.; Szarska, M.; Trzupek, A.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.

    2002-01-01

    The directed and elliptic flow of fragments emitted from the excited projectile nuclei has been observed for 158 AGeV Pb collisions with the lead and plastic targets. For comparison the flow analysis has been performed for 10.6 AGeV Au collisions with the emulsion target. The strong directed flow of heaviest fragments is found. Light fragments exhibit directed flow opposite to that of heavy fragments. The elliptic flow for all multiply charged fragments is positive and increases with the charge of the fragment. The observed flow patterns in the fragmentation of the projectile nucleus are practically independent of the mass of the target nucleus and the collision energy. Emission of fragments in nuclear multifragmentation shows similar, although weaker, flow effects. (author)

  18. Fragmentation of light initial quarks into charm mesons in e+e- annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yi; Li Shiyuan; Xie Qubing

    2003-01-01

    The authors study the process that the light initial quarks produced in e + e - annihilation combine with the (anti c) from gluon splitting to form (anti D's) [D - + D s - + (anti D 0 )] or (anti D * )'s [D *- + D s *- + (anti D *0 )]. The 'light + heavy' bound state is described by light-cone wavefunction. The contribution of this process to (anti D)(anti D * ) production at Z 0 pole is much larger compared with that in lower energies (e.g. 10.6 GeV). For this special process, the invariant mass of (anti D)(anti D * ) production at Z 0 pole is much larger compared with that in lower energies (e.g. 10.6 GeV). For this special process, the invariant mass of (anti D)(anti D * ) and the charm hadron fragmented from the c quark has a unique spectrum which peaks near 2M (antiD) if authors constrain the (anti D)(anti D * ) from all processes with energy larger than 20 GeV. It is also noticeable that the produced (anti D * ) in this process is dominantly longitudinally polarized, which is consistent with the OPAL data

  19. Surface magnetism studied by polarized light emission after He+ scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manske, J; Dirska, M; Lubinski, G; Schleberger, M; Narmann, A; Hoekstra, R

    Surface magnetism is studied by means of an ion beam of low energy (2-15 keV) scattered off the surface under grazing incidence conditions. During the scattering, a small fraction of the ions is neutralized into excited states which decay subsequently by light emission. The circular polarization of

  20. CO2 emissions from Super-light Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Bagger, Anne

    2011-01-01

    CO2 emission from the construction of buildings is seldom taken into account because focus is primarily on building operation. New technologies have therefore mainly been developed to reduce the energy consumption connected to operation. Super-light technology is a new structural principle giving...

  1. Weak light emission of soft tissues induced by heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello E.; Durando, Giovanni; Boschi, Federico

    2018-04-01

    The main goal of this work is to show that soft tissue interaction with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or direct heating leads to a weak light emission detectable using a small animal optical imaging system. Our results show that the luminescence signal is detectable after 30 min of heating, resembling the time scale of delayed luminescence. The imaging of a soft tissue after heating it using an HIFU field shows that the luminescence pattern closely matches the shape of the cone typical of the HIFU beam. We conclude that heating a soft tissue using two different sources leads to the emission of a weak luminescence signal from the heated region with a decay half-life of a few minutes (4 to 6 min). The origin of such light emission needs to be further investigated.

  2. Tunneling-Electron-Induced Light Emission from Single Gold Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Arthur; Li, Shaowei; Czap, Gregory; Ho, W

    2016-09-14

    The coupling of tunneling electrons with the tip-nanocluster-substrate junction plasmon was investigated by monitoring light emission in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Gold atoms were evaporated onto the ∼5 Å thick Al2O3 thin film grown on the NiAl (110) surface where they formed nanoclusters 3-7 nm wide. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) of these nanoclusters revealed quantum-confined electronic states. Spatially resolved photon imaging showed localized emission hot spots. Size dependent study and light emission from nanocluster dimers further support the viewpoint that coupling of tunneling electrons to the junction plasmon is the main radiative mechanism. These results showed the potential of the STM to reveal the electronic and optical properties of nanoscale metallic systems in the confined geometry of the tunnel junction.

  3. Identified Hadron Production and Light Quark Fragmentation in Z{sup 0} Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalelkar, Mohan S

    1998-10-16

    We have measured the differential cross sections for the production of {pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}, K{sup 0}, K*{sup 0}, {phi}, p, {Lambda} and their corresponding antiparticles in separate samples of flavor-tagged Z{sup 0} {yields} light-flavor (u{bar u}, d{bar d}, or s{bar s}), Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} events. Clear flavor dependences are observed, and the results are compared with the predictions of three fragmentation models. We have also performed a direct measurement of A{sub s}, the parity-violating coupling of the Z{sup 0} to strange quarks, by measuring the left-right-forward-backward production asymmetry in polar angle of the tagged s quark. Our preliminary result is A{sub s} = 0.82 {+-} 0.10(stat.) {+-} 0.07(syst.).

  4. Transport theory applied to hadron and light fragment production in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuermann, B.; Malfliet, R.; Mies, S.; Zwermann, W.

    1984-01-01

    Foundations of the transport theory for studying K + , K - , π - and light fragment production in nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energies are given. Inclusive production of protons, K + and π - in the Ne+NaF reaction at 400 MeV and 21 GeV/nucleon is consdered, their differential cross sections are caculated. Differential cross sections of K - and π - production in Si+Si → K + +X and Ne+NaF → π - +X reactions at the energy of 2.1 GeV/nucleon, their energy dependence are estimated. Comparison of the calculated and experimental data is graphically presented. The model of the transport theory is shown to successfully reproduce inclusive spectra of different particles (p, d, π, K + , K - ) in a wide energy range of incident particles (from 400 MeV to 2 GeV/nucleon). This approach can be generalized for lower energies by generating a mean nuclear potentiasl field

  5. Light emission from organic single crystals operated by electrolyte doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuki, Keiichiro; Sakanoue, Tomo; Yomogida, Yohei; Hotta, Shu; Takenobu, Taishi

    2018-03-01

    Light-emitting devices based on electrolytes, such as light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) and electric double-layer transistors (EDLTs), are solution-processable devices with a very simple structure. Therefore, it is necessary to apply this device structure into highly fluorescent organic materials for future printed applications. However, owing to compatibility problems between electrolytes and organic crystals, electrolyte-based single-crystal light-emitting devices have not yet been demonstrated. Here, we report on light-emitting devices based on organic single crystals and electrolytes. As the fluorescent materials, α,ω-bis(biphenylyl)terthiophene (BP3T) and 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnaphthacene (rubrene) single crystals were selected. Using ionic liquids as electrolytes, we observed clear light emission from BP3T LECs and rubrene EDLTs.

  6. Fission-fragment mass distribution and estimation of the cluster emission probability in the γ + 232Th and 181Ta reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamyan, S.A.; Adam, J.; Belov, A.G.; Chaloun, P.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Stegajlov, V.I.

    1997-01-01

    Fission-fragment mass distribution has been measured by the cumulative yields of radionuclides detected in the 232 Th(γ,f)-reaction at the Bremsstrahlung endpoint energies of 12 and 24 MeV. The yield upper limits have been estimated for the light nuclei 24 Na, 28 Mg, 38 S etc. at the Th and Ta targets exposure to the 24 MeV Bremsstrahlung. The results are discussed in terms of the multimodal fission phenomena and cluster emission >from a deformed fissioning system or from a compound nucleus

  7. Upgrading DRACULA setup to be used for light products - fission fragments coincidence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simion, V.; Petrovici, M.; Pop, A.; Berceanu, I.; Duma, M.; Moisa, D.; Pagano, A.; Geraci, E.

    1999-01-01

    At low bombarding energy (E/A 238 U give rise to a number of fission processes, all leading to very similar fission products. Therefore, in order to understand the fission processes in this energy domain it is of interest to determine the amount of fission occurring after a peripheral interaction relative to that originating from compound nucleus formation. Although the detection of a projectile residue (PLF) in coincidence with the fission fragments is a very promising probe for the macroscopic features of the mechanism of induced fission, at incident energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier (E/A 2 cross section area uses the phoswich technique by coupling a thin fast NE102A plastic scintillator to a 10 cm long BaF 2 crystal of hexagonal section. The BaF 2 crystal detectors have been successfully used in modular multielement detector ARGOS in the context of GANCT and HOTCT researches at LNS. The light response of the phoswich configuration as a function of the plastic thickness and of the energy and charge of the incident ion has been studied at Tandem energies. Both arrays will be placed in separate vacuum chambers attached to the remaining large angular opening windows of the reaction chamber. By rotating the whole device the fission fragment detection arrays will cover a range of 96 angle in the horizontal plane. The main advantage of this setup is that it allows to perform continuous measurements in energy and angle of the reaction products. The geometry of the whole device has been tested by Monte Carlo calculations using the code ELPHIC. The coincidence condition is completely fulfilled for the first two positions of the setup and partially for the third one. Measurements are intended to be performed at the SMP Tandem from LNS-Catania using light beams ( 16 O, 19 F, 20 Ne, 32 S) at ∼ 6 MeV/A on high fissility parameter targets. (authors)

  8. Highly efficient white top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes with forward directed light emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, Patricia; Reineke, Sebastian; Furno, Mauro; Luessem, Bjoern; Leo, Karl [Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, TU Dresden (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The demand for highly efficient and energy saving illumination has increased considerably during the last decades. Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are promising candidates for future lighting technologies. They offer high efficiency along with excellent color quality, allowing substantially lower power consumption than traditional illuminants. Recently, especially top-emitting devices have attracted high interest due to their compatibility with opaque substrates like metal sheets. In this contribution, we demonstrate top-emitting OLEDs with white emission spectra employing a multilayer hybrid cavity structure with two highly efficient phosphorescent emitter materials for orange-red (Ir(MDQ)2(acac)) and green (Ir(ppy)3) emission as well as the stable fluorescent blue emitter TBPe. To improve the OLED performance and modify the color quality, two different electron blocking layers and anode material combinations are tested. Compared to Lambertian emission, our devices show considerably enhanced forward emission, which is preferred for most lighting applications. Besides broadband emission and angle independent emission maxima, power efficiencies of 13.3 lm/W at 3 V and external quantum efficiencies of 5.3% are achieved. The emission shows excellent CIE coordinates of (0.420,0.407) at approx. 1000 cd/m{sup 2} and color rendering indices up to 77.

  9. Fragment emission in reactions of 18.5-GeV 12C ions with complex nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porile, N.T.; Cole, G.D.

    1982-01-01

    The emission of fragments ranging from 24 Na to 52 Mn in reactions of 18.5 GeV 12 C ions with Cu, Ag, Gd, Ta, Au, and U targets has been studied by means of activation techniques. The experiments involved determination of the fragment production cross sections and thick-target recoil properties. The latter were used to obtain mean fragment kinetic energies and values of β/sub parallel to/, the forward velocity component of the struck nucleus (in units of c). The results are compared with similar data for incident protons of the same total kinetic energy. The data may be used to assess the importance of central collisions in fragment production. Such collisions lead to the near total destruction of both interacting nuclei and the resulting fragments are emitted by a system of intermediate rapidity. In such a process, the factorization hypothesis, which has been shown to be valid for target and projectile fragmentation reactions, should not be obeyed. A test for factorization is performed by means of a relation which states that the ratio of the cross sections for producing fragment /sup A/Z in 12 C reactions to that for producing the same fragment in proton reactions with the same target is unity, provided both cross sections are reduced by the values of the corresponding total reaction cross sections sigma/sub R/, and evaluated for the same total kinetic energy of the projectile. The results of this comparison for the targets studied are presented and discussed

  10. Light Emission by Nonequilibrium Bodies: Local Kirchhoff Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Bouchon, Patrick; Brucoli, Giovanni; Marquier, François

    2018-04-01

    The goal of this paper is to introduce a local form of Kirchhoff law to model light emission by nonequilibrium bodies. While absorption by a finite-size body is usually described using the absorption cross section, we introduce a local absorption rate per unit volume and also a local thermal emission rate per unit volume. Their equality is a local form of Kirchhoff law. We revisit the derivation of this equality and extend it to situations with subsystems in local thermodynamic equilibrium but not in equilibrium between them, such as hot electrons in a metal or electrons with different Fermi levels in the conduction band and in the valence band of a semiconductor. This form of Kirchhoff law can be used to model (i) thermal emission by nonisothermal finite-size bodies, (ii) thermal emission by bodies with carriers at different temperatures, and (iii) spontaneous emission by semiconductors under optical (photoluminescence) or electrical pumping (electroluminescence). Finally, we show that the reciprocity relation connecting light-emitting diodes and photovoltaic cells derived by Rau is a particular case of the local Kirchhoff law.

  11. Light Emission by Nonequilibrium Bodies: Local Kirchhoff Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Jacques Greffet

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to introduce a local form of Kirchhoff law to model light emission by nonequilibrium bodies. While absorption by a finite-size body is usually described using the absorption cross section, we introduce a local absorption rate per unit volume and also a local thermal emission rate per unit volume. Their equality is a local form of Kirchhoff law. We revisit the derivation of this equality and extend it to situations with subsystems in local thermodynamic equilibrium but not in equilibrium between them, such as hot electrons in a metal or electrons with different Fermi levels in the conduction band and in the valence band of a semiconductor. This form of Kirchhoff law can be used to model (i thermal emission by nonisothermal finite-size bodies, (ii thermal emission by bodies with carriers at different temperatures, and (iii spontaneous emission by semiconductors under optical (photoluminescence or electrical pumping (electroluminescence. Finally, we show that the reciprocity relation connecting light-emitting diodes and photovoltaic cells derived by Rau is a particular case of the local Kirchhoff law.

  12. Capturing triplet emission in white organic light emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai [Faculty of EHSE, School of Engineering and IT, B-purple-12, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)

    2011-08-15

    The state-of-the art in the white organic light emitting devices (WOLEDs) is reviewed for further developments with a view to enhance the capture of triplet emission. In particular, applying the new exciton-spin-orbit-photon interaction operator as a perturbation, rates of spontaneous emission are calculated in a few phosphorescent materials and compared with experimental results. For iridium based phosphorescent materials the rates agree quite well with the experimental results. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Environmentally Benign Technology for Efficient Warm-White Light Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Pin-Chun; Lin, Ming-Shiun; Lin, Ching-Fuh

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays efficient down conversion for white light emission is mainly based on rare-earth doped phosphors or cadmium-containing quantum dots. Although they exhibit high luminescence efficiency, the rare-earth mining and cadmium pollution have so far led to extremely high environmental cost, which conflicts the original purpose of pursuing efficient lighting. Here, we explore a new strategy to achieve efficient luminescence conversion based on polymer-decorated nanoparticles. The ZnO and Mn2+ doped ZnS nanoparticles are encapsulated by poly(9,9-di-n- hexylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl). The resultant core-shell nanocomposites then encompass three UV-to-visible luminescence conversion routes for photon emissions at blue, green, and orange colors, respectively. As a result, the color temperature is widely tunable (2100 K ~ 6000 K), so candle light or pure white light can be generated. The quantum yield up to 91% could also be achieved. Such rare-earth-element free nanocomposites give the bright perspectives for energy-saving, healthy, and environmentally benign lighting.

  14. Heavy fragments emission in the 84Kr on 12C reaction at 35 MeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittig, W.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.; Wieleczko, J.P.; Auger, F.; Berthier, B.; Pascaud, J.M.; Quebert, J.; Plagnol, E.

    1984-01-01

    Heavy residues of collisions of 84 Kr + 12 C at 35 MeV/amu were measured using time of flight ΔE-E telescopes. An important part of the total cross-section leads to events that have all the characteristics of an equilibrated composite system decaying by heavy fragments emission. The experimental yields are well reproduced using a statistical model

  15. Intrinsic white-light emission from layered hybrid perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohner, Emma R; Jaffe, Adam; Bradshaw, Liam R; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2014-09-24

    We report on the second family of layered perovskite white-light emitters with improved photoluminescence quantum efficiencies (PLQEs). Upon near-ultraviolet excitation, two new Pb-Cl and Pb-Br perovskites emit broadband "cold" and "warm" white light, respectively, with high color rendition. Emission from large, single crystals indicates an origin from the bulk material and not surface defect sites. The Pb-Br perovskite has a PLQE of 9%, which is undiminished after 3 months of continuous irradiation. Our mechanistic studies indicate that the emission has contributions from strong electron-phonon coupling in a deformable lattice and from a distribution of intrinsic trap states. These hybrids provide a tunable platform for combining the facile processability of organic materials with the structural definition of crystalline, inorganic solids.

  16. Light emission from silicon with tin-containing nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Roesgaard

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Tin-containing nanocrystals, embedded in silicon, have been fabricated by growing an epitaxial layer of Si1−x−ySnxCy, where x = 1.6 % and y = 0.04 % on a silicon substrate, followed by annealing at various temperatures ranging from 650 ∘C to 900 ∘C. The nanocrystal density and average diameters are determined by scanning transmission-electron microscopy to ≈1017 cm−3 and ≈5 nm, respectively. Photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates that the light emission is very pronounced for samples annealed at 725 ∘C, and Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry shows that the nanocrystals are predominantly in the diamond-structured phase at this particular annealing temperature. The origin of the light emission is discussed.

  17. Influence of local field on spontaneous light emission by nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Ole; Lozovski, V.; Iezhokin, I.

    2009-01-01

    moment of transition that takes local-field effects into account. The effective dipole moment depends on the particle shape and size. Therefore, dipole radiation depends on those parameters too. The direction patterns of light emission by cubic particles have been calculated. The particles have been......A self-consistent approach based on the local-field concept has been proposed to calculate the direction patterns of light emission by nanoparticles with various shapes. The main idea of the method consists in constructing self-consistent equations for the electromagnetic field at any point...... of the system. The solution of the equations brings about relationships between the local field at an arbitrary point in the system and the external long-wave field via the local-field factor. The latter connects the initial moment of optical dipole transition per system volume unit and the effective dipole...

  18. Characterization of heat emission of light-curing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahbi, Mohammed A; Aalam, F A; Fatiny, F I; Radwan, S A; Eshan, I Y; Al-Samadani, K H

    2012-04-01

    This study was designed to analyze the heat emissions produced by light-curing units (LCUs) of different intensities during their operation. The null hypothesis was that the tested LCUs would show no differences in their temperature rises. FIVE COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE LCUS WERE TESTED: a "Flipo" plasma arc, "Cromalux 100" quartz-tungsten-halogen, "L.E. Demetron 1" second-generation light-emitting diode (LED), and "Blue Phase C5" and "UltraLume 5" third-generation LED LCUs. The intensity of each LCU was measured with two radiometers. The temperature rise due to illumination was registered with a type-K thermocouple, which was connected to a computer-based data acquisition system. Temperature changes were recorded in continues 10 and 20 s intervals up to 300 s. The Flipo (ARC) light source revealed the highest mean heat emission while the L.E. Demetron 1 LED showing the lowest mean value at 10 and 20 s exposure times. Moreover, Cromalux (QTH) recorded the second highest value for all intervals (12.71, 14.63, 14.60) of heat emission than Blue Phase C5 (LED) (12.25, 13.87, 13.69), interestingly at 20 s illumination for all intervals the highest results (18.15, 19.27, 20.31) were also recorded with Flipo (PAC) LCU, and the lowest (6.71, 5.97, 5.55) with L.E. Demetron 1 LED, while Blue Phase C5 (LED) recorded the second highest value at the 1st and 2nd 20 s intervals (14.12, 11.84, 10.18) of heat emission than Cromalux (QTH) (12.26, 11.43, 10.26). The speed of temperature or heat rise during the 10 and 20 s depends on light intensity of emitted light. However, the QTH LCU was investigated resulted in a higher temperature rise than LED curing units of the same power density. The PAC curing unit induced a significantly higher heat emission and temperature increase in all periods, and data were statistically different than the other tested groups (p < .05). LED (Blue Phase C5) was not statistically significant (p < .05) (at 10 s) than QTH units, also LED (Blue

  19. Impulse transfer and light particles emission during the reaction α + 232Th at 70 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, M.S.

    1988-02-01

    We have measured during the reaction 4 He + 232 Th at 70 MeV/u the angular correlation of heavy fragments of fission, the inclusive energy spectra of light particles (p, d, t, 3 He and α) and triple coincidence between two fission fragments and a light ejectile. Energy spectra show an evaporation component at low energy, a component of projectile fragmentation at energy equivalent to beam velocity and an intermediate component attributed to pre-equilibrium emission. The analysis of the correlation between linear momentum transfer to the fissioning nucleus and the characteristics of the ejectile in coincidence shows a phenomenon of incomplete massive transfer. We run an Intra-Nuclear Cascade (INC) computation to reproduce ejectile energy spectra, but the agreement with experiment was very bad. We conclude to the impossibility to apply INC computation at intermediate energy of 70 MeV/u. We also applied Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) for direct transfer reaction extended to continuum states: but the agreement with experiment was again deceiving. Finally, we used an analysis by moving sources for which we propose a model of generalized fragmentation giving a continuous representation of the emission source phenomenon from low energy up to high energy [fr

  20. Emission of fragments in heavy ion-collisions at Fermi energy; Modes de production des fragments dans les collisions d'ions lourds aux energies intermediaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normand, J

    2001-10-01

    The study of reaction mechanisms in Fermi energy domain has shown the dominant binary character of the process. The two heavy sources produced after the first stage of the interaction (the quasi-projectile QP and the quasi-target QT) can experience various decay modes from evaporation to multifragmentation. However, the presence of light fragments at mid rapidity cannot be explained by the standard decay of the QP and the QT. To understand the mechanisms producing such a contribution, the break-up of the QP has been studied on the following systems: Xe+Sn from 25 to 50 MeV/A, Ta+Au and Ta+U at 33, 39.6 MeV/A and U+U at 24 MeV/A. The experiment has been performed at GANIL with the INDRA multidetector. The particular behaviour of the heaviest fragment and the correlation between the charge and the velocity of the fragments suggest a shape deformation followed by the rupture of a neck formed in between the two partners of the collision. The heaviest fragment could be the reminiscence of the projectile. A method based on the angular distribution of the heaviest fragment has allowed to separate the statistical break-up of the QP and the non equilibrated break-up. The statistical break-up ranges from 30 % to 75 % of the break-ups. The comparison of the statistical component with a statistical model gives information about the charge, the angular momentum and the temperature of the QP. The comparison of the non equilibrated component with dynamical models could give information about the parameters of the nuclear interaction in medium. (author)

  1. Applications of Cherenkov Light Emission for Dosimetry in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Adam Kenneth

    Since its discovery in the 1930's, the Cherenkov effect has been paramount in the development of high-energy physics research. It results in light emission from charged particles traveling faster than the local speed of light in a dielectric medium. The ability of this emitted light to describe a charged particle's trajectory, energy, velocity, and mass has allowed scientists to study subatomic particles, detect neutrinos, and explore the properties of interstellar matter. However, only recently has the phenomenon been considered in the practical context of medical physics and radiation therapy dosimetry, where Cherenkov light is induced by clinical x-ray photon, electron, and proton beams. To investigate the relationship between this phenomenon and dose deposition, a Monte Carlo plug-in was developed within the Geant4 architecture for medically-oriented simulations (GAMOS) to simulate radiation-induced optical emission in biological media. Using this simulation framework, it was determined that Cherenkov light emission may be well suited for radiation dosimetry of clinically used x-ray photon beams. To advance this application, several novel techniques were implemented to realize the maximum potential of the signal, such as time-gating for maximizing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and Cherenkov-excited fluorescence for generating isotropic light release in water. Proof of concept experiments were conducted in water tanks to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method for two-dimensional (2D) projection imaging, three-dimensional (3D) parallel beam tomography, large field of view 3D cone beam tomography, and video-rate dynamic imaging of treatment plans for a number of common radiotherapy applications. The proposed dosimetry method was found to have a number of unique advantages, including but not limited to its non-invasive nature, water-equivalence, speed, high-resolution, ability to provide full 3D data, and potential to yield data in-vivo. Based on

  2. Emission of H- fragments from collisions of OH+ ions with atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhasz, Z.; Sulik, B.

    2010-01-01

    Compete text of publication follows. Detailed measurement of the kinematics of positive fragment ions from molecular collisions pro-vide useful information about the collision dynamics (see e.g. and references therein). In the present work, we turn our attention to negative fragments. Double differential emission spectra of negative charged particles have been measured in collisions of OH + ions with gas jets of Ar atoms and acetone (CH 3 -CO-CH 3 ) molecules at 7 keV impact energy. Among the emitted electrons, a relatively strong contribution of H - ions has been observed in both collision systems. According to a kinematic analysis, the observed H - ions were produced in close atom-atom collisions. For acetone, these ions originated from both the projectile and the target. The present ion impact energy range falls in the distal region of the Bragg peak. Therefore, a non negligible H - production in biological tissues could be relevant for ion therapy and for radiolysis in general. The present experiments were conducted at the 14.5 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source of the ARIBE facility, at the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL) in Caen, France. The molecular OH + ions were produced by introducing water vapor in the ECR plasma chamber. The extracted ions were collimated to a diameter of 2.5 mm before entering the collision chamber. In its center, the OH + projectiles crossed an effusive gas jet of either argon atoms or acetone molecules. In the collision area, the density of the gas target was typically of 10 13 cm -3 . The electrons and negative ions produced in the collision were detected by means of a single-stage spectrometer consisting of an electrostatic parallel-plate analyzer. Spectra taken at 30 deg observation angle are shown in Figure 1. Contributions from H - appear in clearly visible peaks. Kinematics shows that the peak at 410 eV in both panels is due emission of H - ions moving with nearly the projectile velocity. An H

  3. Optimization of emission color and efficiency of organic light emitting diodes for lighting applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Stefan; Krause, Ralf [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Kozlowski, Fryderyk; Schmid, Guenter; Hunze, Arvid [Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Winnacker, Albrecht [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In recent years the performance of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) has reached a level where OLED lighting presents an interesting application target. Research activities therefore focus amongst other things on the development of high efficient and stable white light emitting devices. We demonstrate how the color coordinates can be adjusted to achieve a warm white emission spectrum, whereas the OLED stack contains phosphorescent red and green dyes combined with a fluorescent blue one. Detailed results are presented with respect to a variation of layer thicknesses and dopant concentrations of the emission layers. Furthermore the influence of various dye molecules and hence different energy level alignments between host and dopants on color and efficiency will be discussed.

  4. White light emission of carbon dots by creating different emissive traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Julin; Anappara, Aji A.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a facile and rapid synthetic strategy for white light emitting carbon dots (CDs) by creating inhomogeneity in the surface-moieties by carbonizing ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) and ethylene glycol (EG) which are having different functional groups. The aqueous solution of the as-synthesised nanoparticles exhibits broad-band emission at several excitation wavelengths, with CIE parameters in the white gamut. Furthermore, white light emission is demonstrated through remote-phosphor technology, by capping 365 nm UV chip with PMMA, after dispersing the polymer with CDs. The resulting emission from the white-LED reported colour parameters such as CIE (0.34, 0.38), CRI of 84 and CCT of 5078 K.

  5. White light emission of carbon dots by creating different emissive traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Julin; Anappara, Aji A., E-mail: aji@nitc.ac.in

    2016-10-15

    Here we report a facile and rapid synthetic strategy for white light emitting carbon dots (CDs) by creating inhomogeneity in the surface-moieties by carbonizing ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) and ethylene glycol (EG) which are having different functional groups. The aqueous solution of the as-synthesised nanoparticles exhibits broad-band emission at several excitation wavelengths, with CIE parameters in the white gamut. Furthermore, white light emission is demonstrated through remote-phosphor technology, by capping 365 nm UV chip with PMMA, after dispersing the polymer with CDs. The resulting emission from the white-LED reported colour parameters such as CIE (0.34, 0.38), CRI of 84 and CCT of 5078 K.

  6. Carbon emissions avoided by electric conservation: the case of lighting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonduelle, A.

    2001-01-01

    Electricity conservation can limit the emissions of carbon dioxide and significantly contribute towards the Kyoto objectives. The detailed prospective modelling of the supply and demand system for electricity in France carried out by INESTENE estimates at 1.86 million tons of equivalent carbon content per year (MtC/y) the sole savings already efficient as regards lighting a value that can rise to 3 MtC/y for the implementation of the technical capacities, i.e. between 10 and 20% of the French effort to respect Kyoto. The use of the supply model ELFIN also highlights the major differences between the economic sectors that request the most electric peak and the other sectors. For example, energy conversation in lights in schools can lead to an emission decrease up to 70% higher than those carried out for a constant base use throughout the year. The study also shows that a method based on a calculation of the average emissions of power plants throughout the year clearly underestimates the gains attributed to energy control. The gains obtained per unit of energy are always higher than 100 gC/kWh, whereas the average carbon content of electricity in France is currently about 20 gC/kWh. Lastly, another significant result of the work concerns the nearly invariable emission gains related to conservation in lighting whether or not there has been a long-term replacement of nuclear energy. These results justify the efforts to control electricity in a 'low electric carbon' country like France. (author)

  7. Systematics of complex fragment emission from La induced reactions at E/A = 47 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehoe, W.L.; Mignerey, A.C.; Bradley, S.

    1989-03-01

    Complex fragment (Z > 2) emission was studied in the reverse kinematics reactions of 139 La on 27 Al and /sup nat./Cu at a bombarding energy of E/A = 47 MeV. Experimental results from inclusive and coincidence measurements for two- and three-fold complex fragments events are presented. Measured cross sections and Z 1 -Z 2 correlations show a predominately binary-decay process for the La + Al reaction, while the La + Cu reaction is dominated by multi-body decay. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  8. Exclusive measurements of light fragment production at forward angles in Ne-Pb and Ne-NaF collisions at E/A=400 MeV and 800 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastid, N.; Alard, J.P.; Arnold, J.; Augerat, J.; Biagi, F.; Crouau, M.; Charmensat, P.; Dupieux, P.; Fraysse, L.; Marroncle, J.; Montarou, G.; Parizet, M.J.; Qassoud, D.; Rahmani, A.; Schimmerling, W.

    1990-01-01

    Emission of light fragments at small angles is studied in relativistic heavy ion collisions using the Diogene plastic wall for both symmetrical and non-symmetrical target-projectile systems with 400 MeV per nucleon and 800 MeV per nucleon incident neon nuclei. Efficiency of multiplicity measurements in the small angle range for the selection of central or peripheral collisions is confirmed for asymmetric systems. Differential production cross sections of Z=1 fragments show evidence for the existence of two emitting sources. The apparent temperature of each source is obtained from comparison with a thermodynamical model. (orig.)

  9. Light particle emission as a probe of reaction mechanism and nuclear excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1989-01-01

    The central part of these lectures will be dealing with the problem of energy dissipation. A good understanding of the mechanisms for the dissipation requires to study both peripheral and central collisions or, in other words, to look at the impact paramenter dependence. This should also provide valuable information on the time scale. In order to probe the reaction mechanism and nuclear excitation, one of the most powerful tool is unquestionably the observation of light particle emission, including neutrons and charged particles. Several examples will be discussed related to peripheral collisions (the fate of transfer reactions, the excitation energy generation, the production of projectile-like fragments) as well as inner collisions for which extensive studies have demonstrated the strength of intermediate energy heavy ions for the production of very hot nuclei and detailed study of their decay properties

  10. Emission of medium-heavy fragments in asymetric heavy ion collisions at intermediate and relativistic incident energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milkau, T.U.E.

    1991-11-01

    For the study of the emission of medium-heavy fragments in asymmetric heavy ion collisions a series of experiments was performed and thereby following systems at intermediate and relativistic incident energies studied: 84 Kr+ 197 Au at E/A=35 MeV, 40 Ar+ 197 Au at E/A=30 MeV, respectively 220 MeV, and 12 C+ 197 Au at E/A=99 MeV, 301 MeV, 601 MeV, respectively 1105 MeV. In the experiments highly resolving detector telescopes with low thresholds were applied to the measurement of the energy and angular distributions of the medium-heavy fragments. The spectra were analyzed in the picture of longitudinally moving sources. Thereby beyond the production cross sections the angular distributions, the decreasement parameters in the high-energetic region of the energy spectra, and the position of the maxima were determined as characteristic parameters. The following picture resulted: The production cross sections for medium-heavy fragments showed a steep increasement and then a saturation, but with a strong projectile dependence. The charge distributions could be described by a power law, the parameter of which showed a universal dependence on the total incident energy. In the angular distributions the transition from an anisotropic emission at low energies to an isotropic emission from a nearly resting source at relativistic energies was distinctly to be recognized. The decreasement parameters of the energy distribution increased - for different projectiles differently strongly - logarithmically with growing incident energy. And the maxima of the energy distribution travelled with growing incident energy to smaller and smaller fragment energies. From this systematics a schematic model of the fragmentation can be obtained. (orig./HSI) [de

  11. Experimental Studies of Light Emission Phenomena in Superconducting RF Cavitites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, P.L.; /SLAC; Delayen, J.R.; /Jefferson Lab; Fryberger, D.; /SLAC; Goree, W.S.; Mammosser, J.; /Jefferson Lab /SNS Project, Oak Ridge; Szalata, Z.M.; II, J.G.Weisend /SLAC

    2009-08-04

    Experimental studies of light emission phenomena in superconducting RF cavities, which we categorize under the general heading of cavity lights, are described. The cavity lights data, which were obtained using a small CCD video camera, were collected in a series of nine experimental runs ranging from {approx} 1/2 to {approx} 2 h in duration. The video data were recorded on a standard VHS tape. As the runs progressed, additional instrumentation was added. For the last three runs a LabVIEW controlled data acquisition system was included. These runs furnish evidence for several, possibly related, light emission phenomena. The most intriguing of these is what appear to be small luminous objects {le} 1.5 mm in size, freely moving about in the vacuum space, generally without wall contact, as verified by reflections of the tracks in the cavity walls. In addition, on a number of occasions, these objects were observed to bounce off of the cavity walls. The wall-bounce aspect of most of these events was clearly confirmed by pre-bounce and post-bounce reflections concurrent with the tracks. In one of the later runs, a mode of behavior was observed that was qualitatively different from anything observed in the earlier runs. Perhaps the most perplexing aspect of this new mode was the observation of as many as seven luminous objects arrayed in what might be described as a macromolecular formation, coherently moving about in the interior of the cavity for extended periods of time, evidently without any wall contact. It is suggested that these mobile luminous objects are without explanation within the realm of established physics. Some remarks about more exotic theoretical possibilities are made, and future plans are discussed.

  12. Electronic emission produced by light projectiles at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    Two aspects of the electronic emission produced by light projectiles of intermediate energies have been studied experimentally. In the first place, measurements of angular distributions in the range from θ = 0 deg -50 deg induced by collisions of 50-200 keV H + incident on He have been realized. It was found that the double differential cross section of electron emission presents a structure focussed in the forward direction and which extends up to relatively large angles. Secondly, the dependence of the double differential cross section on the projectile charge was studied using H + and He 3 2+ projectiles of 50 and 100 keV/amu incident on He. Strong deviations from a constant scaling factor were found for increasing projectile charge. The double differential cross sections and the single differential cross sections as a function of the emission angle, and the ratios of the emissions induced by He 3 2+ and H + at equal incident projectile velocities are compared with the 'Continuum Distorted Wave-Eikonal Initial State' (CDW-EIS) approximation and the 'Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo' (CTMC) method. Both approximations, in which the potential of the projectile exercises a relevant role, reproduce the general aspects of the experimental results. An electron analyzer and the corresponding projectile beam line has been designed and installed; it is characterized by a series of properties which are particularly appropriate for the study of double differential electronic emission in gaseous as well as solid targets. The design permits to assure the conditions to obtain a well localized gaseous target and avoid instrumental distortions of the measured distributions. (Author) [es

  13. A semi-empirical formula on the pre-neutron-emission fragment mass distribution in nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fucheng; Hu Jimin

    1988-03-01

    A 5-Gauss semi-empirical formula on the pre-neutron-emission fragment mass distribution is given. The absolute standard deviation and maximum departure between calculated values and experimental data for (n,f) and (n,n'f) fission reactions from 232 Th to 245 Cm are approximately 0.4% and 0.8%, respectively. The error will get bigger if the formula is used at higher excitation energies

  14. Heavy fragment radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silisteanu, I.

    1991-06-01

    The effect of collective mode excitation in heavy fragment radioactivity (HFR) is explored and discussed in the light of current experimental data. It is found that the coupling and resonance effects in fragment interaction and also the proper angular momentum effects may lead to an important enhancing of the emission process. New useful procedures are proposed for the study of nuclear decay properties. The relations between different decay processes are investigated in detail. We are also trying to understand and explain in a unified way the reaction mechanisms in decay phenomena. (author). 17 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  15. Fragmentation in peripheral heavy-ion collisions: from neck emission to spectator decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukasik, J.; Auger, G.; Begemann-Blaich, M.L.; Bellaize, N.; Bittiger, R.; Bocage, F.; Borderie, B.; Bougault, R.; Bouriquet, B.; Charvet, J.L.; Chbihi, A.; Dayras, R.; Durand, D.; Frankland, J.D.; Galichet, E.; Gourio, D.; Guinet, D.; Hudan, S.; Hurst, B.; Lautesse, P.; Lavaud, F.; Le Fevre, A.; Legrain, R.; Lopez, O.; Lynen, U.; Mueller, W.F.J.; Nalpas, L.; Orth, H.; Plagnol, E.; Rosato, E.; Saija, A.; Schwarz, C.; Sfienti, C.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Trautmann, W.; Trzcinski, A.; Turzo, K.; Vient, E.; Vigilante, M.; Volant, C.; Zwieglinski, B.; Botvina, A.S

    2003-07-24

    Invariant cross sections of intermediate mass fragments in peripheral collisions of {sup 197}Au on {sup 197}Au at incident energies between 40 and 150 MeV per nucleon have been measured with the 4{pi} multi-detector INDRA. The maximum of the fragment production is located near mid-rapidity at the lower energies and moves gradually towards the projectile and target rapidities as the energy is increased. Schematic calculations within an extended Goldhaber model suggest that the observed cross section distributions and their evolution with energy are predominantly the result of the clustering requirement for the emerging fragments and of their Coulomb repulsion from the projectile and target residues. The quantitative comparison with transverse energy spectra and fragment charge distributions emphasizes the role of hard scattered nucleons in the fragmentation process.

  16. Light Fragment Production and Power Law Behavior in Au + Au Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.; Albergo, S.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F.P.; Caccia, Z.; Cebra, D.A.; Chacon, A.D.; Chance, J.L.; Choi, Y.; Costa, S.; Elliott, J.B.; Gilkes, M.L.; Hauger, J.A.; Hirsch, A.S.; Hjort, E.L.; Insolia, A.; Justice, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J.; Lisa, M.A.; Matis, H.S.; McMahan, M.; McParland, C.; Olson, D.L.; Partlan, M.D.; Porile, N.T.; Potenza, R.; Rai, G.; Rasmussen, J.; Ritter, H.G.; Romanski, J.; Romero, J.L.; Russo, G.V.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Srivastava, B.K.; Symons, T.J.M.; Tincknell, M.L.; Tuve, C.; Warren, P.G.; Weerasundara, D.; Wieman, H.H.; Wolf, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    Using charged-particle-exclusive measurements of Au+Au collisions in the LBL Bevalac's EOS time projection chamber, we investigate momentum-space densities of fragments up to 4 He as a function of fragment transverse momentum, azimuth relative to the reaction plane, rapidity, multiplicity, and beam energy. Most features of these densities above a transverse momentum threshold are consistent with momentum-space coalescence, and, in particular, the increase in sideward flow with fragment mass is generally well described by a momentum-space power law

  17. Light-induced protein nitration and degradation with HONO emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusel, Hannah; Elshorbany, Yasin; Kuhn, Uwe; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Reinmuth-Selzle, Kathrin; Kampf, Christopher J.; Li, Guo; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Lelieveld, Jos; Pöschl, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Su, Hang; Ammann, Markus; Cheng, Yafang

    2017-10-01

    Proteins can be nitrated by air pollutants (NO2), enhancing their allergenic potential. This work provides insight into protein nitration and subsequent decomposition in the presence of solar radiation. We also investigated light-induced formation of nitrous acid (HONO) from protein surfaces that were nitrated either online with instantaneous gas-phase exposure to NO2 or offline by an efficient nitration agent (tetranitromethane, TNM). Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ovalbumin (OVA) were used as model substances for proteins. Nitration degrees of about 1 % were derived applying NO2 concentrations of 100 ppb under VIS/UV illuminated conditions, while simultaneous decomposition of (nitrated) proteins was also found during long-term (20 h) irradiation exposure. Measurements of gas exchange on TNM-nitrated proteins revealed that HONO can be formed and released even without contribution of instantaneous heterogeneous NO2 conversion. NO2 exposure was found to increase HONO emissions substantially. In particular, a strong dependence of HONO emissions on light intensity, relative humidity, NO2 concentrations and the applied coating thickness was found. The 20 h long-term studies revealed sustained HONO formation, even when concentrations of the intact (nitrated) proteins were too low to be detected after the gas exchange measurements. A reaction mechanism for the NO2 conversion based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics is proposed.

  18. Effect of a microwave field on the cascade arc light emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerasimov, N.T.; Rosado, R.J.; Schram, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of a pulsed microwave field on the integral light emission from the argon plasma of a DC atmospheric-pressure cascade arc is investigated experimentally. An intensive light pulse and oscillations of light emission at frequencies of the order of 10 kHz are observed. The shape and amplitude

  19. Neutron emission from projectile-like and target-like fragments in the 18O+48Ti reaction at E(18O)=116 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambon, B.; Drain, D.; Pastor, C.; Dauchy, A.; Giorni, A.; Morand, C.

    1982-07-01

    Angular correlations between neutrons and projectile-like fragments detected near the grazing angle were analysed by assuming two incoherent neutrons sources. One source describes slower neutrons evaporated by target-like fragments in equilibrium. The faster, forward-peaked neutrons originate from a second source strongly correlated with the projectile-like fragments with regards to velocity and direction. In some cases neutron emission may even be attributed to known neutron emitter levels in excited ejectiles

  20. Penning plasma based simultaneous light emission source of visible and VUV lights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, G. L., E-mail: glvyas27@gmail.com [Manipal University Jaipur (India); Prakash, R.; Pal, U. N. [CSIR-Central Electronics and Engineering Research Institute, Microwave Tubes Division (India); Manchanda, R. [Institute for Plasma Research (India); Halder, N. [Manipal University Jaipur (India)

    2016-06-15

    In this paper, a laboratory-based penning plasma discharge source is reported which has been developed in two anode configurations and is able to produce visible and VUV lights simultaneously. The developed source has simultaneous diagnostics facility using Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. The two anode configurations, namely, double ring and rectangular configurations, have been studied and compared for optimum use of the geometry for efficient light emissions and recording. The plasma is produced using helium gas and admixture of three noble gases including helium, neon, and argon. The source is capable to produce eight spectral lines for pure helium in the VUV range from 20 to 60 nm and total 24 spectral lines covering the wavelength range 20–106 nm for the admixture of gases. The large range of VUV lines is generated from gaseous admixture rather from the sputtered materials. The recorded spectrum shows that the plasma light radiations in both visible and VUV range are larger in double ring configuration than that of the rectangular configurations at the same discharge operating conditions. To clearly understand the difference, the imaging of the discharge using ICCD camera and particle-in-cell simulation using VORPAL have also been carried out. The effect of ion diffusion, metastable collision with the anode wall and the nonlinear effects are correlated to explain the results.

  1. LEDs light spectrum effect on the success of fragmentation and growth of the leather coral Sarcophyton spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Chambel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for soft corals is reflected on the high attention of the scientific community during the last decades, with several studies focus on production techniques and optimization of coral husbandry (Schlacher et al., 2007;Sella and Benayahu, 2010. However, coral culture success is influenced by the interaction of different factors, such as water movement, temperature, nutrients, heterotrophic feeding and light conditions (Rocha et al., 2013a. Light plays a key role in the growth, reproduction and physiology of scleractinian corals that host phototrophic symbionts and it has been found that the photoresponse of corals is species-specific. Several studies have already focused on the effects of irradiance on coral and its algal symbionts (Osinga et al., 2011. Although, only a few works have investigated the role of the spectral quality of light on coral photobiology, physiology and growth (Rocha et al., 2013b. In the present study, we hypothesize that light spectrum can influence the growth performance of scleractinian corals when exposed at identical intensities of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR. To test our hypothesis we evaluated the effect of contrasting light spectra with an identical PAR of 70 ± 10 μmol quantam−2.s−1emitted by T8 fluorescent lamps (used as a control treatment and three different colours of Light Emitting Diode (LED, white, blue and red. It was evaluated survival and growth rates of Sarcophyton spp., an important scleractinian coral in the marine aquarium trade and for the bioprospecting of marine natural compounds. Replicated coral fragments were obtained from two mother colonies and were exposed to the four types of light spectrum for a period of 30 days. At the end of the experiment period, the results showed 100% of survival in coral fragments, and specific growth rate (SGR of 0,055 ± 0,09 %/day in control group and 0,091 ± 0,019 %/day, 0,210 ± 0,031 %/day and 0,380 ± 0,245 %/day in

  2. Non-classical light emission from single conjugated polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollars, Christopher; Lane, Stephen; Huser, Thomas

    2002-03-01

    Photon-antibunching from single, isolated molecules of collapsed-chain poly[2-methoxy,5-(2’-ethyl-hexyloxy)-p-phenylene-vinylene] (MEH-PPV) has been observed using confocal microscopy techniques. Efficient inter-segment energy transfer in collapsed-chain conjugated polymers leads to emission from an average of only 2-3 active sites on a polymer chain that is composed of hundreds of quasi-chromophores. These few centers consist of the segments with the lowest excitation energy and are supplied by the efficient light-harvesting and energy transfer of the surrounding higher-energy segments. This effect depends on the conformation of the polymer molecules, which is controlled by solvent polarity. These results provide new insight into the controversial photophysics of conjugated polymers and their application in optoelectronic devices.

  3. Scanning tunnelling microscope light emission: Finite temperature current noise and over cut-off emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathingal, Vijith; Dawson, Paul; Mitra, J

    2017-06-14

    The spectral distribution of light emitted from a scanning tunnelling microscope junction not only bears its intrinsic plasmonic signature but is also imprinted with the characteristics of optical frequency fluc- tuations of the tunnel current. Experimental spectra from gold-gold tunnel junctions are presented that show a strong bias (V b ) dependence, curiously with emission at energies higher than the quantum cut-off (eV b ); a component that decays monotonically with increasing bias. The spectral evolution is explained by developing a theoretical model for the power spectral density of tunnel current fluctuations, incorporating finite temperature contribution through consideration of the quantum transport in the system. Notably, the observed decay of the over cut-off emission is found to be critically associated with, and well explained in terms of the variation in junction conductance with V b . The investigation highlights the scope of plasmon-mediated light emission as a unique probe of high frequency fluctuations in electronic systems that are fundamental to the electrical generation and control of plasmons.

  4. Light emitting diode excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sean J; JiJi, Renée D

    2002-12-01

    An excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence instrument has been developed using a linear array of light emitting diodes (LED). The wavelengths covered extend from the upper UV through the visible spectrum: 370-640 nm. Using an LED array to excite fluorescence emission at multiple excitation wavelengths is a low-cost alternative to an expensive high power lamp and imaging spectrograph. The LED-EEM system is a departure from other EEM spectroscopy systems in that LEDs often have broad excitation ranges which may overlap with neighboring channels. The LED array can be considered a hybrid between a spectroscopic and sensor system, as the broad LED excitation range produces a partially selective optical measurement. The instrument has been tested and characterized using fluorescent dyes: limits of detection (LOD) for 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl)-anthracene and rhodamine B were in the mid parts-per-trillion range; detection limits for the other compounds were in the low parts-per-billion range (LED-EEMs were analyzed using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), which allowed the mathematical resolution of the individual contributions of the mono- and dianion fluorescein tautomers a priori. Correct identification and quantitation of six fluorescent dyes in two to six component mixtures (concentrations between 12.5 and 500 ppb) has been achieved with root mean squared errors of prediction (RMSEP) of less than 4.0 ppb for all components.

  5. Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends report is the authoritative reference for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions,...

  6. Efficient light emitting devices based on phosphorescent partially doped emissive layers

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui; Jabbour, Ghassan E.

    2013-01-01

    We report efficient organic light emitting devices employing an ultrathin phosphor emissive layer. The electroluminescent spectra of these devices can be tuned by introducing a low-energy emitting phosphor layer into the emission zone. Devices

  7. Efficient white organic light emission by single emitting layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Young Wook; Chung, Choong-Heui; Lee, Jin Ho; Kim, Yong-Hae; Sohn, Choong-Yong; Kim, Bong-Chul; Hwang, Chi-Sun; Song, Yoon-Ho; Lim, Jongtae; Ahn, Young-Joo; Kang, Gi-Wook; Lee, Namheon; Lee, Changhee

    2003-02-24

    Stable organic white light-emitting diodes are successfully fabricated by a single organic white emitting layer, which is Bis (2-methyl-8-quinolinato) (triphenylsiloxy) aluminum (III) (SAlq) doped red fluorescent dye of 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-tert-butyl-6(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)- 4H-pyran (DCJTB). The incomplete energy transfer from blue-emitting SAlq to red-emitting DCJTB enables to obtain a stable white balanced light-emission by the DCJTB doping concentration of 0.5%. A device with the structure of ITO/TPD (50 nm)/SAlq:DCJTB (30 nm, 0.5%)/Alq{sub 3} (20 nm)/LiF (0.5 nm)/Al (110 nm) shows maximum luminance of 20 400 cd/m{sup 2} at 810 mA/cm{sup 2}, external quantum efficiency of 2% at 200 cd/m{sup 2} ({approx}3 mA/cm{sup 2}), power efficiency of 2.3 lm/W at 67 cd/m{sup 2} ({approx}1 mA/cm{sup 2}), and a Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates of (0.34, 0.39) at 1.8 mA/cm{sup 2} to (0.31, 0.38) at 36 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  8. On-road emissions of light-duty vehicles in europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Martin; Bonnel, Pierre; Hummel, Rudolf; Provenza, Alessio; Manfredi, Urbano

    2011-10-01

    For obtaining type approval in the European Union, light-duty vehicles have to comply with emission limits during standardized laboratory emissions testing. Although emission limits have become more stringent in past decades, light-duty vehicles remain an important source of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide emissions in Europe. Furthermore, persisting air quality problems in many urban areas suggest that laboratory emissions testing may not accurately capture the on-road emissions of light-duty vehicles. To address this issue, we conduct the first comprehensive on-road emissions test of light-duty vehicles with state-of-the-art Portable Emission Measurement Systems. We find that nitrogen oxides emissions of gasoline vehicles as well as carbon monoxide and total hydrocarbon emissions of both diesel and gasoline vehicles generally remain below the respective emission limits. By contrast, nitrogen oxides emissions of diesel vehicles (0.93 ± 0.39 grams per kilometer [g/km]), including modern Euro 5 diesel vehicles (0.62 ± 0.19 g/km), exceed emission limits by 320 ± 90%. On-road carbon dioxide emissions surpass laboratory emission levels by 21 ± 9%, suggesting that the current laboratory emissions testing fails to accurately capture the on-road emissions of light-duty vehicles. Our findings provide the empirical foundation for the European Commission to establish a complementary emissions test procedure for light-duty vehicles. This procedure could be implemented together with more stringent Euro 6 emission limits in 2014. The envisaged measures should improve urban air quality and provide incentive for innovation in the automotive industry.

  9. Light particle emission in deeply inelastic collisions of 280 MeV 40Ar + 58Ni: Thermal equilibrium and angular momentum transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babinet, R.; Cauvin, B.; Girard, J.; Alexander, J.M.; Chiang, T.H.; Galin, J.; Gatty, B.; Guerreau, D.; Tarrago, X.

    1980-01-01

    Protons and α-particles emitted in coincidence with a deep inelastic fragment produced in the reaction 40 Ar(280 MeV) + 58 Ni have been measured. From a detailed study of their in-plane angular distribution, it is shown that the bulk of the light charged particle emission can be attributed to a secondary evaporation process by the two primary deep inelastic fragments. A lowest estimate of the fragment spin (assuming total alignment perpendicular to the reaction plane) is obtained from the anisotropy of the out-of-plane angular distribution of the α-particles. For very asymmetric splitting, the heavy fragment spin estimate as obtained from the α-anisotropy measurement is consistent with the observed proton to α-particle multiplicity ratio. The results are in agreement with the hypothesis of a sticking configuration between two deformed nuclei. (orig.) 891 WL/orig. 892 MB

  10. An organic white light-emitting dye: very small molecular architecture displays panchromatic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandhikonda, Premchendar; Heagy, Michael D

    2010-11-14

    The synthesis and photophysical characterization of a new white-light fluorophore is described. The optimization of excitation wavelengths allows the naphthalimide (NI) dyes to display blue, green or white light emission depending on the excitation wavelength.

  11. Influence of Magnetically Conjugate Fragments of Auroral Emission Images on the Accuracy of Determining E av of Precipitating Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banshchikova, M. A.; Chuvashov, I. N.; Kuzmin, A. K.; Kruchenitskii, G. M.

    2018-05-01

    Results of magnetic conjugation of image fragments of auroral emissions at different altitudes along the magnetic field lines and preliminary results of evaluation of their influence on the accuracy of remote mapping of energy characteristics of precipitating electrons are presented. The results are obtained using the code of tracing being an integral part of the software Vector M intended for calculation of accompanying, geophysical, and astronomical information for the center of mass of a space vehicle (SV) and remote observation of aurora by means of Aurovisor-VIS/MP imager onboard the SV Meteor-MP to be launched.

  12. Secondary emission from a CuBe target due to bombardment with parent and fragment ions of ammonia and phosphine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerk, T.D.

    1977-01-01

    The secondary electron emission of the first dynode of a CuBe alloy sixteen dynode electron multiplier has been studied in the course of electron impact ionization studies of ammonia and phosphine. Relative secondary electron emission coefficients have been obtained for the singly and doubly charged parent and fragment ions of ammonia, ammonia-d 3 , phosphine and phosphine-d 3 for kinetic energies of 5,25 and 10,5 keV. It has been found, that in general deuterated ions have smaller γ coefficients, that ammonia ions have larger γ coefficients than corresponding phosphine ions, and that the γ coefficients increase with the complexity of the ion under study. (Auth.)

  13. Quantitative analysis of directional spontaneous emission spectra from light sources in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; Vos, Willem L.

    2005-01-01

    We have performed angle-resolved measurements of spontaneous-emission spectra from laser dyes and quantum dots in opal and inverse opal photonic crystals. Pronounced directional dependencies of the emission spectra are observed: angular ranges of strongly reduced emission adjoin with angular ranges of enhanced emission. It appears that emission from embedded light sources is affected both by the periodicity and by the structural imperfections of the crystals: the photons are Bragg diffracted by lattice planes and scattered by unavoidable structural disorder. Using a model comprising diffuse light transport and photonic band structure, we quantitatively explain the directional emission spectra. This work provides detailed understanding of the transport of spontaneously emitted light in real photonic crystals, which is essential in the interpretation of quantum optics in photonic-band-gap crystals and for applications wherein directional emission and total emission power are controlled

  14. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis Reveals High Levels of Genetic Divergence Among the Light Organ Symbionts of Flashlight Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, C J; Haygood, M G

    1991-08-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphisms within the lux and 16S ribosomal RNA gene regions were used to compare unculturable bacterial light organ symbionts of several anomalopid fish species. The method of Nei and Li (1979) was used to calculate phylogenetic distance from the patterns of restriction fragment lengths of the luxA and 16S rRNA regions. Phylogenetic trees constructed from each distance matrix (luxA and 16S rDNA data) have similar branching orders. The levels of divergence among the symbionts, relative to other culturable luminous bacteria, suggests that the symbionts differ at the level of species among host fish genera. Symbiont relatedness and host geographic location do not seem to be correlated, and the symbionts do not appear to be strains of common, free-living, luminous bacteria. In addition, the small number of hybridizing fragments within the 16S rRNA region of the symbionts, compared with that of the free-living species, suggests a decrease in copy number of rRNA operons relative to free-living species. At this level of investigation, the symbiont phylogeny is consistent with the proposed phylogeny of the host fish family and suggests that each symbiont strain coevolved with its host fish species.

  15. AC-driven organic light emission devices with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, So-Yeon; Yu, SeGi

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated alternating current (AC)-driven organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs), with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) incorporated within the emission layer. With CNT incorporation, the brightness of the OLEDs was substantially improved, and the turn-on voltage was reduced by at least a factor of five. Furthermore, the current levels of the CNT-incorporated OLEDs were lower than that of the reference device. A roughly 70% decrease in the current level was obtained for a CNT concentration of 0.03 wt%. This was accomplished by keeping the concentration of CNTs low and the length of CNTs short, which helped to suppress the percolation networking of CNTs within the emitting layer. Strong local electric fields near the end-tips of CNTs and micro-capacitors formed by dispersed CNTs might have caused this high brightness and these low currents. CNT incorporation in the emitting layer can improve the characteristics of AC-driven OLEDs, which are considered to be one of the candidates for flat panel displays and lightning devices.

  16. A wireless acoustic emission sensor remotely powered by light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahedi, F; Huang, H

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, wireless sensing of acoustic emission (AE) signals using a battery-free sensor node remotely powered by light is presented. The wireless sensor consists of a piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) for AE signal acquisition and a wireless transponder that performs signal conditioning, frequency conversion, and wireless transmission. For signal conditioning, a voltage follower that consumes less than 2 mW was introduced to buffer the high impedance of the PWAS from the low impedance of the wireless transponder. A photocell-based energy harvester with a stable voltage output was developed to power the voltage follower so that the wireless AE sensor can operate without an external power source. The principle of operation of the battery-free wireless AE sensor node and the sensor interrogation system is described, followed by a detailed description of the hardware implementation. The voltage follower and the wireless channel were characterized by ultrasound pitch–catch and pencil lead break experiments. (paper)

  17. AC-driven Organic Light Emission Devices with Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, So-Yeon [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yu, SeGi [Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    We have investigated alternating current (AC)-driven organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs), with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) incorporated within the emission layer. With CNT incorporation, the brightness of the OLEDs was substantially improved, and the turn-on voltage was reduced by at least a factor of five. Furthermore, the current levels of the CNT-incorporated OLEDs were lower than that of the reference device. A roughly 70% decrease in the current level was obtained for a CNT concentration of 0.03 wt%. This was accomplished by keeping the concentration of CNTs low and the length of CNTs short, which helped to suppress the percolation networking of CNTs within the emitting layer. Strong local electric fields near the end-tips of CNTs and micro-capacitors formed by dispersed CNTs might have caused this high brightness and these low currents. CNT incorporation in the emitting layer can improve the characteristics of AC-driven OLEDs, which are considered to be one of the candidates for flat panel displays and lightning devices.

  18. Beamed neutron emission driven by laser accelerated light ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, S.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; McKenna, P.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-05-01

    Highly anisotropic, beam-like neutron emission with peak flux of the order of 109 n/sr was obtained from light nuclei reactions in a pitcher-catcher scenario, by employing MeV ions driven by a sub-petawatt laser. The spatial profile of the neutron beam, fully captured for the first time by employing a CR39 nuclear track detector, shows a FWHM divergence angle of ˜ 70^\\circ , with a peak flux nearly an order of magnitude higher than the isotropic component elsewhere. The observed beamed flux of neutrons is highly favourable for a wide range of applications, and indeed for further transport and moderation to thermal energies. A systematic study employing various combinations of pitcher-catcher materials indicates the dominant reactions being d(p, n+p)1H and d(d,n)3He. Albeit insufficient cross-section data are available for modelling, the observed anisotropy in the neutrons’ spatial and spectral profiles is most likely related to the directionality and high energy of the projectile ions.

  19. Determination of the shapes and sizes of the regions in which in hadron-nucleus collisions reactions leading to the nucleon emission, particle production, and fragment evaporation occur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Shapes and sizes of the regions in target-nuclei in which reactions leading to the nucleon emission, particle production and fragment evaporation occur are determined. The region of nucleon emission is of cylindrical shape, with the diameter as large as two nucleon diameters, centered on the incident hadron course. The reactions leading to the particle production happen predominantly along the incident hadron course in nuclear matter. The fragment evaporation goes from the surface layer of the part of the target-nucleus damaged in nucleon emission process

  20. Visible Light Emission from Atomic Scale Patterns Fabricated by the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.; Stokbro, Kurt

    1999-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) induced light emission from artificial atomic scale structures comprising silicon dangling bonds on hydrogen-terminated Si(001) surfaces has been mapped spatially and analyzed spectroscopically in the visible spectral range. The light emission is based on a novel...

  1. Microcontact printing of self-assembled monolayers to pattern the light-emission of polymeric light-emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brondijk, J. J.; Li, X.; Akkerman, H. B.; Blom, P. W. M.; de Boer, B.

    By patterning a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of thiolated molecules with opposing dipole moments on a gold anode of a polymer light-emitting diode (PLED), the charge injection and, therefore, the light-emission of the device can be controlled with a micrometer-scale resolution. Gold surfaces were

  2. 75 FR 7426 - Tier 2 Light-Duty Vehicle and Light-Duty Truck Emission Standards and Gasoline Sulfur Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... 2060-AI23; 2060-AQ12 Tier 2 Light-Duty Vehicle and Light-Duty Truck Emission Standards and Gasoline.... The rulemaking also required oil refiners to limit the sulfur content of the gasoline they produce. Sulfur in gasoline has a detrimental impact on catalyst performance and the sulfur requirements have...

  3. Study of photophysical processes in organic light-emitting diodes based on light-emission profile reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvelli, M.

    2012-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are emerging as a promising option for energy-efficient, flexible light sources. A key factor that needs to be measured and controlled is the shape of the emission profile, i.e. the spatial distribution of the emitting excitons across the active layer thickness.

  4. Fragmentation of the C60 molecule in collision with light ions studied by a multi-correlation technique. Cross-sections, electron spectroscopy; Fragmentation de la molecule C60 par impact d'ions legers etudiee en multicorrelation. Sections efficaces, spectroscopie d'electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rentenier, A

    2004-04-01

    A quantitative study of the C60 fullerenes fragmentation in collision with light ions (H{sub n}{sup +} with n=1,2,3, He{sup q+} with q=1,2) in the velocity range 0,1 - 2,3 u.a.) is presented. The multi-correlation technique, developed between fragment ions and electrons with well defined energy, has enlightened some of the dependences and properties of fragmentation mechanisms (cross sections, electron spectroscopy, size distributions, kinetic energy of fragment ions, Campi's scatter plot, activation energies). The deposited energy hence appeared as an important parameter. Cross sections have been measured, for the first time, for all the collisional processes. Ionisation and capture only depends on the collision velocity. On the other hand, scaling laws with the deposited energy have been observed for the cross sections of multifragmentation, which depends on the collision energy and the nature of the projectile. The deposited energy has also been found as an essential parameter to understand the evolution of the charged fragment size distributions. The electron spectroscopy, achieved at an emission angle of 35 degrees, showed spectra peaked at important energies (from 5 to 20 eV). The spectra shape depends on the collision velocity. A first theoretical analysis points out the link between the observed energy distribution and the presence of a centrifugal potential barrier. Finally, correlation experiments between produced ions and electron energy reveal that electron energy increases with internal energy. (author)

  5. Efficient light emitting devices based on phosphorescent partially doped emissive layers

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui

    2013-05-29

    We report efficient organic light emitting devices employing an ultrathin phosphor emissive layer. The electroluminescent spectra of these devices can be tuned by introducing a low-energy emitting phosphor layer into the emission zone. Devices with the emissive layer consisting of multiple platinum-complex/spacer layer cells show a peak external quantum efficiency of 18.1%, which is among the best EQE values for platinum-complex based light emitting devices. Devices with an ultrathin phosphor emissive layer show stronger luminance decay with the operating time compared to the counterpart devices having a host-guest emissive layer.

  6. Isoprenoid emission response to changing light conditions of English oak, European beech and Norway spruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. van Meeningen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Light is an important environmental factor controlling biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC emissions, but in natural conditions its impact is hard to separate from other influential factors such as temperature. We studied the light response of foliar BVOC emissions, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance on three common European tree species, namely English oak (Quercus robur, European beech (Fagus sylvatica and two provenances of Norway spruce (Picea abies in Taastrup, Denmark. Leaf scale measurements were performed on the lowest positioned branches of the tree in July 2015. Light intensity was increased in four steps (0, 500, 1000 and 1500 µmol m−2 s−1, whilst other chamber conditions such as temperature, humidity and CO2 levels were fixed. Whereas the emission rate differed between individuals of the same species, the relative contributions of compounds to the total isoprenoid emission remained similar. Whilst some compounds were species specific, the compounds α-pinene, camphene, 3-carene, limonene and eucalyptol were emitted by all of the measured tree species. Some compounds, like isoprene and sabinene, showed an increasing emission response with increasing light intensity, whereas other compounds, like camphene, had no significant emission response to light for most of the measured trees. English oak and European beech showed high light-dependent emission fractions from isoprene and sabinene, but other emitted compounds were light independent. For the two provenances of Norway spruce, the compounds α-pinene, 3-carene and eucalyptol showed high light-dependent fractions for many of the measured trees. This study highlights differences between compound emissions in their response to a change in light and a possible light independence for certain compounds, which might be valid for a wider range of tree species. This information could be of importance when improving emission models and to further emphasize the

  7. Isoprenoid emission response to changing light conditions of English oak, European beech and Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meeningen, Ylva; Schurgers, Guy; Rinnan, Riikka; Holst, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Light is an important environmental factor controlling biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions, but in natural conditions its impact is hard to separate from other influential factors such as temperature. We studied the light response of foliar BVOC emissions, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance on three common European tree species, namely English oak (Quercus robur), European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and two provenances of Norway spruce (Picea abies) in Taastrup, Denmark. Leaf scale measurements were performed on the lowest positioned branches of the tree in July 2015. Light intensity was increased in four steps (0, 500, 1000 and 1500 µmol m-2 s-1), whilst other chamber conditions such as temperature, humidity and CO2 levels were fixed. Whereas the emission rate differed between individuals of the same species, the relative contributions of compounds to the total isoprenoid emission remained similar. Whilst some compounds were species specific, the compounds α-pinene, camphene, 3-carene, limonene and eucalyptol were emitted by all of the measured tree species. Some compounds, like isoprene and sabinene, showed an increasing emission response with increasing light intensity, whereas other compounds, like camphene, had no significant emission response to light for most of the measured trees. English oak and European beech showed high light-dependent emission fractions from isoprene and sabinene, but other emitted compounds were light independent. For the two provenances of Norway spruce, the compounds α-pinene, 3-carene and eucalyptol showed high light-dependent fractions for many of the measured trees. This study highlights differences between compound emissions in their response to a change in light and a possible light independence for certain compounds, which might be valid for a wider range of tree species. This information could be of importance when improving emission models and to further emphasize the discussion regarding light or

  8. Study of proton and 2 protons emission from light neutron deficient nuclei around A=20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerguerras, T.

    2001-09-01

    Proton and two proton emission from light neutron deficient nuclei around A=20 have been studied. A radioactive beam of 18 Ne, 17 F and 20 Mg, produced at the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds by fragmentation of a 24 Mg primary beam at 95 MeV/A, bombarded a 9 Be target to form unbound states. Proton(s) and nuclei from the decay were detected respectively in the MUST array and the SPEG spectrometer. From energy and angle measurements, the invariant mass of the decaying nucleus could be reconstructed. Double coincidence events between a proton and 17 F, 16 O, 15 O, 14 O and 18 Ne were registered to obtain excitation energy spectra of 18 Ne, 17 F, 16 F, 15 F et 19 Na. Generally, the masses measures are in agreement with previous experiments. In the case of 18 Ne, excitation energy and angular distributions agree well with the predictions of a break up model calculation. From 17 Ne proton coincidences, a first experimental measurement of the ground state mass excess of 18 Na has been obtained and yields 24,19(0,15)MeV. Two proton emission from 17 Ne and 18 Ne excited states and the 19 Mg ground state was studied through triple coincidences between two proton and 15 O, 16 O and 17 Ne respectively. In the first case, the proton-proton relative angle distribution in the center of mass has been compared with model calculation. Sequential emission from excited states of 17 Ne, above the proton emission threshold, through 16 F is dominant but a 2 He decay channel could not be excluded. No 2 He emission from the 1.288 MeV 17 Ne state, or from the 6.15 MeV 18 Ne state has been observed. Only one coincidence event between 17 Ne and two proton was registered, the value of the one neutron stripping reaction cross section of 20 Mg being much lower than predicted. (author)

  9. Fragmentation and momentum correlations in heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The role of momentum correlations in the production of light and medium mass fragments is studied by imposing momentum cut in the clusterization of the phase space. Our detailed investigation shows that momentum cut has a major role to play in the emission of fragments. A comparison with the experimental data is also ...

  10. Monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions from Quercus coccifera exhibit interacting responses to light and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Staudt

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Light and temperature are known to be the most important environmental factors controlling biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC emissions from plants, but little is known about their interdependencies especially for BVOCs other than isoprene. We studied light responses at different temperatures and temperature responses at different light levels of foliar BVOC emissions, photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence on Quercus coccifera, an evergreen oak widespread in Mediterranean shrublands. More than 50 BVOCs were detected in the emissions from Q. coccifera leaves most of them being isoprenoids plus a few green leaf volatiles (GLVs. Under standard conditions non-oxygenated monoterpenes (MT-hc accounted for about 90% of the total BVOC release (mean ± SD: 738 ± 378 ng m−2 projected leaf area s−1 or 13.1 ± 6.9 μg g−1 leaf dry weight h−1 and oxygenated monoterpenes (MT-ox and sesquiterpenes (SQTs accounted for the rest in about equal proportions. Except GLVs, emissions of all BVOCs responded positively to light and temperature. The light responses of MT and SQT emissions resembled that of CO2-assimilation and were little influenced by the assay temperature: at high assay temperature, MT-hc emissions saturated at lower light levels than at standard assay temperature and tended even to decrease in the highest light range. The emission responses to temperature showed mostly Arrhenius-type response curves, whose shapes in the high temperature range were clearly affected by the assay light level and were markedly different between isoprenoid classes: at non-saturating light, all isoprenoids showed a similar temperature optimum (~43 °C, but, at higher temperatures, MT-hc emissions decreased faster than MT-ox and SQT emissions. At saturating light, MT-hc emissions peaked around 37 °C and rapidly dropped at higher temperatures, whereas MT-ox and SQT emissions strongly increased between 40 and 50 °C accompanied by a burst of GLVs. In all

  11. Light vehicle regulated and unregulated emissions from different biodiesels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karavalakis, George; Stournas, Stamoulis; Bakeas, Evangelos

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the regulated and unregulated emissions profile and fuel consumption of an automotive diesel and biodiesel blends, prepared from two different biodiesels, were investigated. The biodiesels were a rapeseed methyl ester (RME) and a palm-based methyl ester (PME). The tests were performed on a chassis dynamometer with constant volume sampling (CVS) over the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) and the non-legislated Athens Driving Cycle (ADC), using a Euro 2 compliant passenger vehicle. The objectives were to evaluate the impact of biodiesel chemical structure on the emissions, as well as the influence of the applied driving cycle on the formation of exhaust emissions and fuel consumption. The results showed that NOx emissions were influenced by certain biodiesel properties, such as those of cetane number and iodine number. NOx emissions followed a decreasing trend over both cycles, where the most beneficial reduction was obtained with the application of the more saturated biodiesel. PM emissions were decreased with the palm-based biodiesel blends over both cycles, with the exception of the 20% blend which was higher compared to diesel fuel. PME blends led to increases in PM emissions over the ADC. The majority of the biodiesel blends showed a tendency for lower CO and HC emissions. The differences in CO2 emissions were not statistically significant. Fuel consumption presented an increase with both biodiesels. Total PAH and nitro-PAH emission levels were decreased with the use of biodiesel independently of the source material. Lower molecular weight PAHs were predominant in both gaseous and particulate phases. Both biodiesels had a negative impact on certain carbonyl emissions. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were the dominant aldehydes emitted from both fuels.

  12. Beryllium isotopes in primary cosmic radiation and light nuclei fragmentation observed in plastic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Katsura.

    1975-01-01

    Plastic sheets consisting of 50 layers of Daicel and Kodak cellulose nitrate were flown from Fort Churchill, Canada in 1971 for the study of isotopic components of light nuclei, especially beryllium, in primary cosmic rays. In this plastic stack, 59 Be normals and 24 Be albedos as well as 109 Li normals and 53 Li albedos were identified. The center of mass and the standard deviation for Be 7 and Be 9+10 may be derived from the mass spectrum. (orig./WL) [de

  13. Effect of surface contaminants on the light emission spectrum of LiF TLDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abhold, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Recent results show the differences between the light emissions spectra from LiF Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLDs) for gamma vs. alpha irradiations to be due to contaminants on the surface of the TLD. The light emission spectrum for thermal neutron irradiations was observed to be identical to that for a Cs-137 gamma irradiation in Harshaw TLD-100. Further experiments with surface treatments on TLD-100 indicate trace contaminants introduced by the standard methanol cleansing rinse in reagent grade methanol to have a substantial effect on the light emission spectrum for Am-241 alpha irradiations

  14. Isoprenoid emission response to changing light conditions of English oak, European beech and Norway spruce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Meeningen, Ylva; Schurgers, Guy; Rinnan, Riikka

    2017-01-01

    and stomatal conductance on three common European tree species, namely English oak (Quercus robur), European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and two provenances of Norway spruce (Picea abies) in Taastrup, Denmark. Leaf scale measurements were performed on the lowest positioned branches of the tree in July 2015. Light......, whereas other compounds, like camphene, had no significant emission response to light for most of the measured trees. English oak and European beech showed high light-dependent emission fractions from isoprene and sabinene, but other emitted compounds were light independent. For the two provenances...... be valid for a wider range of tree species. This information could be of importance when improving emission models and to further emphasize the discussion regarding light or temperature dependencies for individual compounds across species. Light is an important environmental factor controlling biogenic...

  15. Spontaneous and light-induced photon emission from intact brains of chick embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锦珠; 于文斗; 孙彤

    1997-01-01

    Photon emission (PE) and light-induced photon emission(LPE) of intact brains isolated from chick embryos have been measured by using the single photon counting device. Experimental results showed that the intensi-ty level of photon emission was detected to be higher from intact brain than from the medium in which the brain was immerged during measuring, and the emission intensity was related to the developmental stages, the healthy situation of the measured embryos, and the freshness of isolated brains as well. After white light illumination, a short-life de-layed emission from intact brains was observed, and its relaxation behavior followed a hyperbolic rather than an expo-nential law. According to the hypothesis of biophoton emission originating from a delocalized coherent electromagnetic field and Frohlich’s idea of coherent long-range interactions in biological systems, discussions were made on the signifi-cance of photon emission in studying cell communication, biological regulation, living system’

  16. Stability of the Light Output, Oral Cavity Tip Accessibility in Posterior Region and Emission Spectrum of Light-Curing Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, C B; Nima, G; Sebold, M; Giannini, M; Price, R B

    2018-04-09

    This study evaluated the light output from six light-emitting diode dental curing lights after 25 consecutive light exposures without recharging the battery, tip accessibility in the posterior region, and light beam spread from light-curing units. Irradiance, spectral peak, and radiant exposure were measured with the battery fully charged (Bluephase Style, ESPE Cordless, Elipar S10, Demi Ultra, Valo Cordless, and Radii-Cal) and monitored for 25 light exposures (each lasting 10 seconds). The tip diameter was measured to identify the beam size and the ability of the six light-curing units to irradiate all areas of the lower second molar in the standard output setting. Four curing lights delivered a single peak wavelength from 454 to 462 nm, and two (Bluephase Style and Valo Cordless) delivered multiple emission peaks (at 410 and 458 nm and 400, 450, and 460 nm, respectively). The irradiance and radiant exposure always decreased after 25 exposures by 2% to 8%, depending on the light unit; however, only ESPE Cordless, Valo Cordless, and Radii-Cal presented a statistical difference between the first and the last exposure. The tip diameter ranged from 6.77 mm to 9.40 mm. The Radii-Cal delivered the lowest radiant exposure and irradiance. This light was also unable to access all the teeth with the tip parallel to the occlusal surface of the tooth. Not all of the blue-emitting lights deliver the same emission spectra, and some curing lights delivered a lower irradiance (as much as 8% lower) after the 25th exposure.

  17. Who controls the logistics emissions? Challenges in making fragmented supply chains environmentally sustainable from logistics service providers’ perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasi, Maisam; Sternberg, Henrik; Nilsson, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    that impact the cost and time requirements from customers of logistics services are not yet a reality. Research limitations/implications (if applicable) This paper implies that LSP sustainability cannot be investigated in isolation if a company does not manage proprietary resources. Practical implications (if......Purpose The purpose of this article is to explore the environmental impact of Logistics Service Provider (LSP) activities in the light of increased customer attention and fragmentation of the industry. It also explores to what extent the LSPs can actually monitor the environmental impact...... of logistics activities in the supply chain? Design/methodology/approach The methodology of this paper is a literature review, a qualitative interview survey, and three case studies. A framework on sustainability challenges in supply chains derived from the literature is used to structure and analyze...

  18. Tunable light emission and similarities with garnet structure of Ce-doped LSCAS glass for white-light devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, L.H.C., E-mail: luishca@uems.br [Grupo de Espectroscopia Optica e Fototermica, Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul - UEMS, C.P. 351, Dourados, MS (Brazil); Lima, S.M. [Grupo de Espectroscopia Optica e Fototermica, Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul - UEMS, C.P. 351, Dourados, MS (Brazil); Baesso, M.L.; Novatski, A.; Rohling, J.H. [Grupo de Estudos de Fenomenos Fototermicos, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900 Maringa, PR (Brazil); Guyot, Y.; Boulon, G. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, UMR 5620 CNRS, 69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2012-01-05

    Highlights: > Ce{sup 3+}-doped LSCAS glass exhibits broad, simultaneously blue and yellow emissions under UV excitation. > In this phosphor is possible to continuously tune the emission, covering the entire visible spectrum. > The ability to change the color temperature in accordance to the occasion is a feature of this glass system. - Abstract: In this paper, we report results concerning tunable light emission and color temperature in cerium-doped low-silica-calcium-alumino-silicate (LSCAS) glass for smart white-light devices. Spectroscopic results, analyzed using the CIE 1931 x-y chromatic diagram, show that this glass presents two broad emission bands centered at 475 and 540 nm, whose intensities can be tuned by the excitation wavelength. Moreover, the same emission can be achieved from a color temperature range from 3200 to 10,000 K, with a color-rendering index (CRI) of around 75% obtained by changing the optical path length of the sample. Our new phosphor LSCAS glass, which is a unique system that exhibits tunable yellow emission, combines all qualities for white-light devices.

  19. Multifragment emission in light-ion induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollacco, E.C.; Volant, C.; Dayras, R.; Legrain, R.; Cassagnou, Y.; Norbeck, E.

    1991-01-01

    Multifragment events for IMFs (3 ≤ Z ≤ 12) with multiplicity up to four have been observed in the reaction of 0.90 and 3.6 GeV 3 He ions with nat Ag nuclei. Events are detected in which IMFs account for up to 75% of the total charge of the system and extend up to total kinetic energies of 400 MeV. Fragment energy spectra and angular distributions are found to be dependent on event multiplicity

  20. Tonneau: a multidetector array for charged particle and light fragment 4π detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peghaire, A.; Zwieglinski, B.; Rosato, E.; Jin, G.M.; Kasagi, J.; Doubre, H.; Peter, J.; Guilbault, F.; Lebrun, C.; Cassagnou, Y.; Legrain, R.

    1989-01-01

    The central part of the light-particle detection unit for the GANIL multidetector is a spherical (80 cm radius) shell of 2 mm thick NE 102A plastic scintillator. It spans the range of polar angles from θ = 30 0 - 150 0 and the azimuthal range φ = 0 0 - 360 0 , and it is segmented into 72 individual Δθ = 60 0 and Δφ = 10 0 wide detection modules. Each module is viewed by a photomultiplier at each end which provide information on the particle impact position, atomic number Z and velocity. The performance of the modules was studied with an α-source and during several experiments with heavy ion beams from 25 up to 85 MeV/amu

  1. Determining the phonon energy of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite by scanning tunneling microscope light emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Yoichi; Michimata, Junichi; Watanabe, Shota; Katano, Satoshi; Inaoka, Takeshi

    2018-03-01

    We have investigated the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) light emission spectra of isolated single Ag nanoparticles lying on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The STM light emission spectra exhibited two types of spectral structures (step-like and periodic). Comparisons of the observed structures and theoretical predictions indicate that the phonon energy of the ZO mode of HOPG [M. Mohr et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 035439 (2007)] can be determined from the energy difference between the cutoff of STM light emission and the step in the former structure, and from the period of the latter structure. Since the role of the Ag nanoparticles does not depend on the substrate materials, this method will enable the phonon energies of various materials to be measured by STM light emission spectroscopy. The spatial resolution is comparable to the lateral size of the individual Ag nanoparticles (that is, a few nm).

  2. Light-duty vehicle greenhouse gas emission standards and corporate average fuel economy standards : final rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    Final Rule to establish a National Program consisting of new standards for light-duty vehicles that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve fuel economy. This joint : Final Rule is consistent with the National Fuel Efficiency Policy announce...

  3. White light emission from Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped oxyfluoride germanate glasses under UV light excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshminarayana, G.; Yang Hucheng; Qiu Jianrong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the absorption and photoluminescence properties of Tm 3+ /Dy 3+ ions co-doped oxyfluoride germanate glasses for white light emission. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) profiles of the host glass have been carried out to confirm its structure and thermal stability. From the measured absorption spectra, Judd-Ofelt (J-O) intensity parameters (Ω 2 , Ω 4 and Ω 6 ) have been evaluated for Tm 3+ and Dy 3+ ions. A combination of blue, yellow and red emissions has emerged in these glasses, which allows the observation of bright white light when the glasses are excited by the ultraviolet light. The white light luminescence colour could be changed by varying the excitation wavelength. Also, various colours of luminescence, including white light, can be easily tuned by adjusting the concentrations of Tm 3+ or Dy 3+ ions in the co-doped glasses. Concentration quenching effect was also investigated and possible energy transfer mechanism from Dy 3+ →Tm 3+ ions was explained which is also confirmed by the decay lifetime measurements. - Graphical Abstract: A combination of blue, yellow and red emissions has emerged from Tm 3+ /Dy 3+ co-doped glasses, which allows the observation of bright white light and makes them as excellent candidates applicable in the solid-state multi-colour three-dimensional display.

  4. A Versatile and Simple Approach to Generate Light Emission in Semiconductors Mediated by Electric Double Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Pu, Jiang

    2017-04-18

    The light-emitting device is the primary device for current light sources. In principle, conventional light-emitting devices need heterostructures and/or intentional carrier doping to form a p-n junction. This junction formation is, however, very difficult to achieve for most emerging semiconductors, and the fabrication of light-emitting devices is invariably a significant challenge. This study proposes a versatile and simple approach to realize light-emitting devices. This proposed device requires only a semiconducting film with two electrodes that are covered with an electrolyte. This unique structure achieves light emission at a voltage slightly larger than the bandgap energy of materials. This study applies this concept to emerging direct bandgap semiconductors, such as transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers and zinc oxide single crystals. These devices generate obvious light emission and provide sufficient evidence of the formation of a dynamic p-i-n junction or tunneling junction, presenting a versatile technique to develop optoelectronic devices.

  5. Plasmonics for solid-state lighting : enhanced excitation and directional emission of highly efficient light sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, G.; Louwers, Davy J.; Rodriguez, S.R.K.; Murai, S.; Jansen, O.T.A.; Verschuuren, M.A.; Gomez Rivas, J.

    2013-01-01

    Light sources based on reliable and energy-efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are instrumental in the development of solid-state lighting (SSL). Most research efforts in SSL have focused on improving both the intrinsic quantum efficiency (QE) and the stability of light emitters. For this reason,

  6. Pre-breakdown light emission phenomena in low-pressure argon between parabolic electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaars, E.; Perriëns, N.W.B.; Brok, W.J.M.; Bowden, M.D.; Veldhuizen, van E.M.; Kroesen, G.M.W.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental study on pre-breakdown light emission in low-pressure argon gas was performed. In a pulsed discharge, pre-breakdown phenomena were observed for repetition rates between 100 and 2000 Hz and pulse duration of 100 ¿s. These phenomena were studied with time-resolved emission imaging

  7. Prompt neutron emission from fragments in spontaneous fission of {sup 244,248}Cm and {sup 252}Cf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobyev, A. S.; Shcherbakov, O. A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Leningrad district, 188300 (Russian Federation); Dushin, V. N.; Jakovlev, V. A.; Kalinin, V. A.; Petrov, B. F. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Hambsch, F.J [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Laptev, A. B. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Leningrad district, 188300 (Russian Federation); Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Neutrons emitted in fission were measured separately for each complementary fragment in correlation with fission fragment energies. Two high efficiency Gd-loaded liquid scintillator tanks were used for neutron registration. Fission fragment energies were measured using a twin Frisch gridded ionization chamber with a pin-hole collimator. The neutron multiplicity distributions were obtained for each value of the fission fragment mass and energy and corrected for neutron registration efficiency, background and pile-up. The dependencies of these distributions on fragment mass and energy for different energy and mass bins, as well as the mass and energy distribution of the fission fragments are presented and discussed. (authors)

  8. Energy dependence of the asymmetry-violated space parity of fragment emission from the 239PU fission by slow polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Val'skij, G.V.; Zvezdkina, T.K.; Nikolaev, D.V.; Petrova, V.I.; Petrov, G.A.; Petukhov, A.K.; Pleva, Yu.S.; Tyukavin, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    Asymmetry violating parity in the fragment emission from fission of 239 Pu induced by polarized neutrons at six energy points in the interval 0.01 <= E <0.3 eV was measured. The results providing with an evidence in favour of the hypothesis that the asymmetry is independent on energy are discussed in view of the existing theoretical picture

  9. 'Beam-emission spectroscopy' diagnostics also measure edge fast-ion light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W W; Bortolon, A; McKee, G R; Smith, D R

    2011-01-01

    Beam-emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics normally detect fluctuations in the light emitted by an injected neutral beam. Under some circumstances, however, light from fast ions that charge exchange in the high neutral-density region at the edge of the plasma make appreciable contributions to the BES signals. This 'passive' fast-ion D α (FIDA) light appears in BES signals from both the DIII-D tokamak and the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). One type of passive FIDA light is associated with classical orbits that traverse the edge. Another type is caused by instabilities that expel fast ions from the core; this light can complicate measurement of the instability eigenfunction.

  10. Studies of complex fragment emission in heavy ion reactions. Progress report, January 1, 1993 - September 1, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G.

    1995-01-01

    This work involves the study of low and intermediate energy heavy-ion nuclear reactions. This work has two foci. First, the authors desired to learn about the properties of both nuclei and nuclear matter under abnormal conditions. Their efforts towards this end run abreast of those for their second focus which is the study of the relevant reaction mechanisms. The two objectives are inexorably linked because their experimental laboratory for studying nuclear properties is a dynamic one. Their task is to answer the questions of how nuclear and nuclear matter properties are reflected in the dynamics of the reactions. The second objective also has great intrinsic value in that they can anticipate improving upon their understanding of the reaction mechanism themselves and therefore to the response characteristics of finite, perhaps non-equilibrium, strongly interacting systems. The program has been: to study the dynamics of fusion reactions, specifically the dynamics of energy, mass, and angular momentum deposition. This work includes reactions near the Coulomb barrier, where fusion dominates the reaction cross section as well as higher energies where incomplete fusion reactions are the primary reactions. This includes the dynamics of fission, still the premier example of collective nuclear motion, as a function of excitation, spin, mass, and mass asymmetry. The authors push these kinds of studies into the intermediate energy domain, and where novel reaction scenarios are predicted. They have studied very central and peripheral collisions between very massive nuclei, and simplified projectile fragmentation reactions utilizing medium to light mass projectiles. The study of central collisions has shown us the importance of collective expansion. The study of peripheral collisions between very heavy nuclei has demonstrated the importance of dynamical production of fragments from the neck region

  11. White light emission from fluorescent SiC with porous surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta Maria

    2017-01-01

    We report for the frst time a NUV light to white light conversion in a N-B co-doped 6H-SiC (fuorescent SiC) layer containing a hybrid structure. The surface of fuorescent SiC sample contains porous structures fabricated by anodic oxidation method. After passivation by 20nm thick Al2O3, the photol......We report for the frst time a NUV light to white light conversion in a N-B co-doped 6H-SiC (fuorescent SiC) layer containing a hybrid structure. The surface of fuorescent SiC sample contains porous structures fabricated by anodic oxidation method. After passivation by 20nm thick Al2O3...... the bulk fuorescent SiC layer. A high color rendering index of 81.1 has been achieved. Photoluminescence spectra in porous layers fabricated in both commercial n-type and lab grown N-B co-doped 6H-SiC show two emission peaks centered approximately at 460nm and 530nm. Such bluegreen emission phenomenon can......, the photoluminescence intensity from the porous layer was signifcant enhanced by a factor of more than 12. Using a porous layer of moderate thickness (~10µm), high-quality white light emission was realized by combining the independent emissions of blue-green emission from the porous layer and yellow emission from...

  12. Organic light emission structures — XXI century technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokin V. M.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The given review allows to believe, that the decision of a complex technological, materialstechnological, technical problems at creation modern OLED- and PLED-devices in nearest 5—10 years will result in creation of devices with power efficiency more than 100 lm/W and service life till 100 000 hours. The realization of such parameters will allow to expand area of application of the considered systems and to create in the future unique flat powereffective organic lighting systems of new generation — light sources XXI of century.

  13. Blackbody emission from light interacting with an effective moving dispersive medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petev, M; Westerberg, N; Moss, D; Rubino, E; Rimoldi, C; Cacciatori, S L; Belgiorno, F; Faccio, D

    2013-07-26

    Intense laser pulses excite a nonlinear polarization response that may create an effective flowing medium and, under appropriate conditions, a blocking horizon for light. Here, we analyze in detail the interaction of light with such laser-induced flowing media, fully accounting for the medium dispersion properties. An analytical model based on a first Born approximation is found to be in excellent agreement with numerical simulations based on Maxwell's equations and shows that when a blocking horizon is formed, the stimulated medium scatters light with a blackbody emission spectrum. Based on these results, diamond is proposed as a promising candidate medium for future studies of Hawking emission from artificial, dispersive horizons.

  14. Light particle emission measurements in heavy ion reactions: Progress report, June 1, 1986-May 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitt, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    During the past year we have completed our work on neutron emission in coincidence with fission fragments from the 158 Er system. In addition to this we have completed preliminary analysis of our results on neutron emission from products of damped reactions between 58 Ni and 165 Ho at 930 MeV. Two experiments were planned for the present contract period as discussed in our proposal for 1986-87. One of these, to measure the mass and charge distributions from projectile-like fragments (PLF) in the reactions 58 Ni + 165 Ho and 58 Ni + 58 Ni using the time-of-flight facility at the HHIRF has been successfully completed. The other, to measure momentum correlations between neutrons and charged particles produced in central collisions between 32 S + 197 Au is scheduled to be run in mid-February. 14 refs., 4 figs

  15. Tailoring the chirality of light emission with spherical Si-based antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Bonod, Nicolas

    2016-05-21

    Chirality of light is of fundamental importance in several enabling technologies with growing applications in life sciences, chemistry and photodetection. Recently, some attention has been focused on chiral quantum emitters. Consequently, optical antennas which are able to tailor the chirality of light emission are needed. Spherical nanoresonators such as colloids are of particular interest to design optical antennas since they can be synthesized at a large scale and they exhibit good optical properties. Here, we show that these colloids can be used to tailor the chirality of a chiral emitter. To this purpose, we derive an analytic formalism to model the interaction between a chiral emitter and a spherical resonator. We then compare the performances of metallic and dielectric spherical antennas to tailor the chirality of light emission. It is seen that, due to their strong electric dipolar response, metallic spherical nanoparticles spoil the chirality of light emission by yielding achiral fields. In contrast, thanks to the combined excitation of electric and magnetic modes, dielectric Si-based particles feature the ability to inhibit or to boost the chirality of light emission. Finally, it is shown that dual modes in dielectric antennas preserve the chirality of light emission.

  16. The effects of emission control strategies on light-absorbing carbon emissions from a modern heavy-duty diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Michael A; Olson, Michael R; Liu, Z Gerald; Schauer, James J

    2015-06-01

    Control of atmospheric black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) has been proposed as an important pathway to climate change mitigation, but sources of BC and BrC are still not well understood. In order to better identify the role of modern heavy-duty diesel engines on the production of BC and BrC, emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine operating with different emission control strategies were examined using a source dilution sampling system. The effect of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particulate filter (DPF) on light-absorbing carbon (LAC) was evaluated at three steady-state engine operation modes: idle, 50% speed and load, and 100% speed and load. LAC was measured with four different engine configurations: engine out, DOC out, DPF out, and engine out with an altered combustion calibration. BC and BrC emission rates were measured with the Aethalometer (AE-31). EC and BC emission rates normalized to the mass of CO₂emitted increased with increasing engine speed and load. Emission rates normalized to brake-specific work did not exhibit similar trends with speed and load, but rather the highest emission rate was measured at idle. EC and OC emissions were reduced by 99% when the DOC and DPF architecture was applied. The application of a DPF was equally effective at removing 99% of the BC fraction of PM, proving to be an important control strategy for both LAC and PM. BC emissions were unexpectedly increased across the DOC, seemingly due to a change aerosol optical properties. Removal of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) flow due to simulated EGR cooler failure caused a large increase in OC and BrC emission rates at idle, but had limited influence during high load operation. LAC emissions proved to be sensitive to the same control strategies effective at controlling the total mass of diesel PM. In the context of black carbon emissions, very small emission rates of brown carbon were measured over a range of control technologies and engine operating

  17. Novel Strategy for Photopatterning Emissive Polymer Brushes for Organic Light Emitting Diode Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Zachariah A; Narupai, Benjaporn; Pester, Christian W; Bou Zerdan, Raghida; Sokolov, Anatoliy; Laitar, David S; Mukhopadhyay, Sukrit; Sprague, Scott; McGrath, Alaina J; Kramer, John W; Trefonas, Peter; Hawker, Craig J

    2017-06-28

    A light-mediated methodology to grow patterned, emissive polymer brushes with micron feature resolution is reported and applied to organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays. Light is used for both initiator functionalization of indium tin oxide and subsequent atom transfer radical polymerization of methacrylate-based fluorescent and phosphorescent iridium monomers. The iridium centers play key roles in photocatalyzing and mediating polymer growth while also emitting light in the final OLED structure. The scope of the presented procedure enables the synthesis of a library of polymers with emissive colors spanning the visible spectrum where the dopant incorporation, position of brush growth, and brush thickness are readily controlled. The chain-ends of the polymer brushes remain intact, affording subsequent chain extension and formation of well-defined diblock architectures. This high level of structure and function control allows for the facile preparation of random ternary copolymers and red-green-blue arrays to yield white emission.

  18. Comparison of real-world and certification emission rates for light duty gasoline vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tanzila; Frey, H Christopher

    2018-05-01

    U.S. light duty vehicles are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) emission standards. Emission compliance is determined by certification testing of selected emissions from representative vehicles on standard driving cycles using chassis dynamometers. Test results are also used in many emission inventories. The dynamometer based emission rates are adjusted to provide the certification levels (CL), which must be lower than the standards for compliance. Although standard driving cycles are based on specific observations of real-world driving, they are not necessarily real-world representative. A systematic comparison of the real-world emission rates of U.S. light duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) versus CL, and emission standards has not been previously reported. The purpose of this work is to compare regulatory limits (both CLs and emission standards) and the real-world emissions of LDGVs. The sensitivity of the comparisons to cold start emission was assessed. Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS) were used to measure hot stabilized exhaust emissions of 122 LDGVs on a specified 110 mile test route. Cold start emissions were measured with PEMS for a selected vehicle sample of 32 vehicles. Emissions were measured for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). For each vehicle, a Vehicle Specific Power (VSP) modal emission rate model was developed. The VSP modal rates were weighted by the standard driving cycles and real-world driving cycles to estimate the respective cycle average emission rates (CAERs). Measured vehicles were matched with certification test vehicles for comparison. For systematic trends in comparison, vehicles were classified into four groups based on the Tier 1 and Tier 2 emission regulation, and the vehicle type such as passenger car and passenger truck. Depending on the cycle-pollutant and the vehicle groups, hot stabilized CAERs are on average either statistically

  19. Hybrid Light-Emitting Diode Enhanced With Emissive Nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopylov, Oleksii

    This thesis investigates a new type of white light emitting hybrid diode, composed of a light emitting GaN/InGaN LED and a layer of semiconductor nanocrystals for color conversion. Unlike standard white LEDs, the device is configured to achieve high color conversion efficiency via non-radiative e......This thesis investigates a new type of white light emitting hybrid diode, composed of a light emitting GaN/InGaN LED and a layer of semiconductor nanocrystals for color conversion. Unlike standard white LEDs, the device is configured to achieve high color conversion efficiency via non...... of the hybrid diode fabrication including process techniques for GaN LED and incorporation of the nanocrystals are presented with the emphasis on the differences with standard LED processing. Results and analysis of optical and electrical characterization including photoluminescence (PL), micro-PL, time......-resolved PL and electroluminescence (EL) together with current-voltage characteristics are presented to evaluate the device performance. A clear evidence of non-radiative energy transfer was seen in the carrier dynamics of both the LED and the nanocrystals when the quantum well – nanocrystals separation...

  20. Light-emission from in-situ grown organic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Hansen, Roana Melina de; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2011-01-01

    Organic crystalline nanofibers made from phenylene-based molecules exhibit a wide range of extraordinary optical properties such as intense, anisotropic and polarized luminescence that can be stimulated either optically or electrically, waveguiding and random lasing. For lighting and display...... of morphological characterization and demonstrate how appropriate biasing with an AC gate voltage enables electroluminescence from these in-situ grown organic nanostructures....

  1. Particulate emission rates from light-duty vehicles in the South Coast Air Quality Management District

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durbin, T.D.; Norbeck, J.M.; Smith, M.R.; Truex, T.J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a particulate emission rate study conducted on 129 light-duty gasoline and 19 light-duty diesel vehicles for the Coordinating Research Council's (CRC's) Project E-24-2. Total particulate emission rates for newer gasoline vehicles were low with modest increases with vehicle age and older technology. Average FTP particulate emission rates as a function of model year for gasoline vehicles were found to be 2.5 mg/mi for 1991 and newer models, 14.4 mg/mi for 1986--1990 models, 49.0 mg/mi for 1981--1985 models, and 33.8 mg/mi for 1980 and older models. High gaseous emitters were found to have approximately 5--10 times the particulate emission rates of normal emitters. The diesel vehicles had an average particulate emission rate of 561 mg/mi. It should be noted that the light-duty diesel vehicles were predominantly older, pre-1985 vehicles; the 1985 and newer diesel vehicles had substantially lower particulate emissions, i.e., less than 100 mg/mi. Emission inventory estimates in the South Coast Air Basin based on the fleet emission rates were higher than those obtained using the default values in EMFAC7G, due primarily to the contribution of high emitters

  2. On the emission of fast and slow target fragments from 84Kr-AgBr interactions at 0.95 GeV/A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, B.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Singh, V.; Tuli, S.K.; Sengupta, S.

    2003-01-01

    Multiplicity distributions of secondary charged particles coming out of 84 Kr-AgBr interaction at 0.95 GeV/A have been reported. Angular distributions of fast and slow target fragments have also been studied. The sharp forward peak in the angular distribution of knocked out protons has further been analyzed in the light of intermittency and scaled factorial moment

  3. Microcontact printing of self-assembled monolayers to pattern the light-emission of polymeric light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brondijk, J.J.; Li, X.; Akkerman, H.B.; Blom, P.W.M.; Boer, B. de [University of Groningen, Molecular Electronics, Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2009-04-15

    By patterning a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of thiolated molecules with opposing dipole moments on a gold anode of a polymer light-emitting diode (PLED), the charge injection and, therefore, the light-emission of the device can be controlled with a micrometer-scale resolution. Gold surfaces were modified with SAMs based on alkanethiols and perfluorinated alkanethiols, applied by microcontact printing, and their work functions have been measured. The molecules form a chemisorbed monolayer of only {proportional_to}1.5 nm on the gold surface, thereby locally changing the work function of the metal. Kelvin probe measurements show that the local work function can be tuned from 4.3 to 5.5 eV, which implies that this anode can be used as a hole blocking electrode or as a hole injecting electrode, respectively, in PLEDs based on poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) derivatives. By microcontact printing of SAMs with opposing dipole moments, the work function was locally modified and the charge injection in the PLED could be controlled down to the micrometer length scale. Consequently, the local light-emission exhibits a high contrast. Microcontact printing of SAMs is a simple and inexpensive method to pattern, with micrometer resolution, the light-emission for low-end applications like static displays. (orig.)

  4. Microcontact printing of self-assembled monolayers to pattern the light-emission of polymeric light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondijk, J. J.; Li, X.; Akkerman, H. B.; Blom, P. W. M.; de Boer, B.

    2009-04-01

    By patterning a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of thiolated molecules with opposing dipole moments on a gold anode of a polymer light-emitting diode (PLED), the charge injection and, therefore, the light-emission of the device can be controlled with a micrometer-scale resolution. Gold surfaces were modified with SAMs based on alkanethiols and perfluorinated alkanethiols, applied by microcontact printing, and their work functions have been measured. The molecules form a chemisorbed monolayer of only ˜1.5 nm on the gold surface, thereby locally changing the work function of the metal. Kelvin probe measurements show that the local work function can be tuned from 4.3 to 5.5 eV, which implies that this anode can be used as a hole blocking electrode or as a hole injecting electrode, respectively, in PLEDs based on poly( p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) derivatives. By microcontact printing of SAMs with opposing dipole moments, the work function was locally modified and the charge injection in the PLED could be controlled down to the micrometer length scale. Consequently, the local light-emission exhibits a high contrast. Microcontact printing of SAMs is a simple and inexpensive method to pattern, with micrometer resolution, the light-emission for low-end applications like static displays.

  5. Studies of light emission by continuously sensitive avalanche chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.; Dominik, W.; Fabre, J.P.; Gaudaen, J.; Sauli, F.; Suzuki, M.

    1988-01-01

    The optimal conditions for the optical recording of images of electron avalanches between parallel meshes have been studied. The emission spectra of gas mixtures have been investigated, where triethylamine (TEA), tetrakis(dimethylamine)ethylene (TMAE), and nitrogen, are used as the photon-emitting agents. For a given charge gain, the photon intensity decreases with electric field. This favours amplification between parallel meshes instead of wires. The use of intensified CCD cameras permits the recording of the local energy loss along the tracks. (orig.)

  6. Revisiting Bremsstrahlung emission associated with Light Dark Matter annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Böhm, C

    2006-01-01

    We compute the single bremsstrahlung emission associated with the pair annihilation of spin-0 particles into electrons and positrons, via the t-channel exchange of a heavy fermion. We compare our result with the work of Beacom et al. . Unlike what is stated in the literature, we show that the Bremsstrahlung cross section is not necessarily given by the tree-level annihilation cross section (for a generalized kinematics) times a factor related to the emission of a soft photon. Such a factorization appears only in the soft photon limit or in the approximation where the masses of the particles in the initial and final states are negligible with respect to the mass of the internal particle. However, in the latter case, we do not recover the same factor as for e^+ e- --> mu^+ mu^- gamma. Numerically the difference, in the hard photon limit, is as large as a factor 3.6. However the effect on the upper limit of the dark matter mass is not significant. Using gamma ray observations, we obtain an upper limit on the dar...

  7. Study of light fragment production in Au + Au collisions at 150 and 400 A.MeV; Etude de la production de fragments legers dans les collisions Au + Au a 150 et 400 A.Me V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amouroux, V

    1996-12-17

    We study light fragment production in Au + Au collisions at energies between 150 and 400 A.MeV. Experimental data are extracted from Phase I experiments performed with the FOPI detector at GSI-Darmstadt. We first give centrality criteria and the method used in order to have an evaluation of the impact parameter; that permit comparison between experiment and IQMD or FREESCO models. A first study concerns charge distributions and the reduced variance {gamma}{sub 2}. We observe that the amplitude of the reduced variance decreases rapidly as the centrality of the collision increases; this last point shows that there is no liquid-gas phase transition in central collisions. Such a conclusion agrees with theoretical studies made by the Nantes group concerning fragment formation. A second part concerns a systematic study of differential cross sections of fragment production. We show that IQMD model gives a good qualitative agreement with experimental data; nevertheless, charge distributions are not correctly reproduced by theory. A study of the parameter which fix the width of the Gaussian associated with the nucleons of the interacting system can improve the shape of the charge distributions. Finally, we give at the end of the thesis a systematic presentation of experimental invariant cross sections of fragment production. (author) 80 refs.

  8. How light, temperature, and measurement and growth [CO2] interactively control isoprene emission in hybrid aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, Ülo; Sun, Zhihong

    2015-02-01

    Plant isoprene emissions have been modelled assuming independent controls by light, temperature and atmospheric [CO2]. However, the isoprene emission rate is ultimately controlled by the pool size of its immediate substrate, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), and isoprene synthase activity, implying that the environmental controls might interact. In addition, acclimation to growth [CO2] can shift the share of the control by DMADP pool size and isoprene synthase activity, and thereby alter the environmental sensitivity. Environmental controls of isoprene emission were studied in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides) saplings acclimated either to ambient [CO2] of 380 μmol mol(-1) or elevated [CO2] of 780 μmol mol(-1). The data demonstrated strong interactive effects of environmental drivers and growth [CO2] on isoprene emissions. Light enhancement of isoprene emission was the greatest at intermediate temperatures and was greater in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants, indicating greater enhancement of the DMADP supply. The optimum temperature for isoprene emission was higher at lower light, suggesting activation of alternative DMADP sinks at higher light. In addition, [CO2] inhibition of isoprene emission was lost at a higher temperature with particularly strong effects in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants. Nevertheless, DMADP pool size was still predicted to more strongly control isoprene emission at higher temperatures in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants. We argue that interactive environmental controls and acclimation to growth [CO2] should be incorporated in future isoprene emission models at the level of DMADP pool size. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  9. The emission function of ground-based light sources: State of the art and research challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Lamphar, Héctor Antonio

    2018-05-01

    To understand the night sky radiance generated by the light emissions of urbanised areas, different researchers are currently proposing various theoretical approaches. The distribution of the radiant intensity as a function of the zenith angle is one of the most unknown properties on modelling skyglow. This is due to the collective effects of the artificial radiation emitted from the ground-based light sources. The emission function is a key property in characterising the sky brightness under arbitrary conditions, therefore it is required by modellers, environmental engineers, urban planners, light pollution researchers, and experimentalists who study the diffuse light of the night sky. As a matter of course, the emission function considers the public lighting system, which is in fact the main generator of the skyglow. Still, another class of light-emitting devices are gaining importance since their overuse and the urban sprawl of recent years. This paper will address the importance of the emission function in modelling skyglow and the factors involved in its characterization. On this subject, the author's intention is to organise, integrate, and evaluate previously published research in order to state the progress of current research toward clarifying this topic.

  10. Improved emission spectrum from quantum dot superluminescent light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L.H.; Rossetti, M.; Fiore, A. [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Electronics, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Occhi, L.; Velez, C. [EXALOS AG, Technoparkstrasse 1, 8005 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2006-12-15

    The size dispersion of InAs quantum dots (QD) was optimized to broaden the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. A broad PL spectral width up to 96 nm is achieved from a single QD layer with InAs thickness smaller than 2.4 monolayers at a growth temperature of 510 C. QD Superluminescent light emitting diodes with an ultrawide (115 nm), smooth output spectrum are obtained by incorporating this QD layer into chirped stacked structures. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Magnetic Barkhausen emission in lightly deformed AISI 1070 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capo Sanchez, J., E-mail: jcapo@cnt.uo.edu.cu [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad de Oriente, Av. Patricio Lumumba s/n, 90500 Santiago de Cuba (Cuba); Campos, M.F. de [EEIMVR-Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. dos Trabalhadores 420, Vila Santa Cecilia, 27255-125 Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil); Padovese, L.R. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Escola Politecnica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2231, 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-01-15

    The Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) technique can evaluate both micro- and macro-residual stresses, and provides indication about the relevance of contribution of these different stress components. MBN measurements were performed in AISI 1070 steel sheet samples, where different strains were applied. The Barkhausen emission is also analyzed when two different sheets, deformed and non-deformed, are evaluated together. This study is useful to understand the effect of a deformed region near the surface on MBN. The low permeability of the deformed region affects MBN, and if the deformed region is below the surface the magnetic Barkhausen signal increases. - Highlights: > Evaluated residual stresses by the magnetic Barkhausen technique. > Indication about the relevance of micro-and macro-stress components. > Magnetic Barkhausen measurements were carried out in AISI 1070 steel sheet samples. > Two different sheets, deformed and non-deformed, are evaluated together. > Magnetic Barkhausen signal increases when deformed region is below the surface.

  12. Angle-dependent light emission from aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes under CO2 laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y; Gong, T; Liu, W J; Wei, J Q; Zhang, X F; Wang, K L; Zhong, M L; Wu, D H

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the light emission from aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) under continuous wave CO 2 laser (λ = 10.6 μm) irradiation. Results indicate that the light emission is dependent on the angle θ between the laser incident direction and the nanotube axis. The relative intensity of the light emission at certain wavelengths shows a Lorentzian feature when θ varies from 0 0 to 90 0 . The Lorentzian fitting curve displays a distinct tendency between shorter (λ 700 nm). A minimum intensity was observed at θ m close to 67 0 under shorter wavelength, whereas a maximum intensity was shown at θ m of about 60 0 at longer wavelength. These results show the anisotropic property of aligned MWNTs

  13. Light trapping for emission from a photovoltaic cell under normally incident monochromatic illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Yasuhiko, E-mail: takeda@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Iizuka, Hideo; Mizuno, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Ito, Hiroshi; Kajino, Tsutomu [Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories, Inc., 41-1, Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Ichiki, Akihisa; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi [Green Mobility Collaborative Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2014-09-28

    We have theoretically demonstrated a new light-trapping mechanism to reduce emission from a photovoltaic (PV) cell used for a monochromatic light source, which improves limiting conversion efficiency determined by the detailed balance. A multilayered bandpass filter formed on the surface of a PV cell has been found to prevent the light generated inside by radiative recombination from escaping the cell, resulting in a remarkable decrease of the effective solid angle for the emission. We have clarified a guide to design a suitable configuration of the bandpass filter and achieved significant reduction of the emission. The resultant gain in monochromatic conversion efficiency in the radiative limit due to the optimally designed 18-layerd bandpass filters is as high as 6% under normally incident 1064 nm illumination of 10 mW/cm²~ 1 kW/cm², compared with the efficiency for the perfect anti-reflection treatment to the surface of a conventional solar cell.

  14. Nanocrystalline silicon as the light emitting material of a field emission display device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaggi-Labiosa, A; Sola, F; Resto, O; Fonseca, L F; Gonzalez-BerrIos, A; Jesus, J De; Morell, G

    2008-01-01

    A nanocrystalline Si-based paste was successfully tested as the light emitting material in a field emission display test device that employed a film of carbon nanofibers as the electron source. Stable emission in the 550-850 nm range was obtained at 16 V μm -1 . This relatively low field required for intense cathodoluminescence (CL) from the PSi paste may lead to longer term reliability of both the electron emitting and the light emitting materials, and to lower power consumption. Here we describe the synthesis, characterization, and analyses of the light emitting nanostructured Si paste and the electron emitting C nanofibers used for building the device, including x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy. The corresponding spectra and field emission curves are also shown and discussed

  15. Comparisons of MOVES Light-duty Gasoline NOx Emission Rates with Real-world Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D.; Sonntag, D.; Warila, J.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies have shown differences between air quality model estimates and monitored values for nitrogen oxides. Several studies have suggested that the discrepancy between monitored and modeled values is due to an overestimation of NOx from mobile sources in EPA's emission inventory, particularly for light-duty gasoline vehicles. EPA's MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) is an emission modeling system that estimates emissions for cars, trucks and other mobile sources at the national, county, and project level for criteria pollutants, greenhouse gases, and air toxics. Studies that directly measure vehicle emissions provide useful data for evaluating MOVES when the measurement conditions are properly accounted for in modeling. In this presentation, we show comparisons of MOVES2014 to thousands of real-world NOx emissions measurements from individual light-duty gasoline vehicles. The comparison studies include in-use vehicle emissions tests conducted on chassis dynamometer tests in support of Denver, Colorado's Vehicle Inspection & Maintenance Program and remote sensing data collected using road-side instruments in multiple locations and calendar years in the United States. In addition, we conduct comparisons of MOVES predictions to fleet-wide emissions measured from tunnels. We also present details on the methodology used to conduct the MOVES model runs in comparing to the independent data.

  16. Chamber study of PCB emissions from caulking materials and light ballasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Guo, Zhishi; Krebs, Kenneth A; Stinson, Rayford A; Nardin, Joshua A; Pope, Robert H; Roache, Nancy F

    2015-10-01

    The emissions of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners from thirteen caulk samples were tested in a micro-chamber system. Twelve samples were from PCB-contaminated buildings and one was prepared in the laboratory. Nineteen light ballasts collected from buildings that represent 13 different models from five manufacturers were tested in 53-L environmental chambers. The rates of PCB congener emissions from caulking materials and light ballasts were determined. Several factors that may have affected the emission rates were evaluated. The experimentally determined emission factors showed that, for a given PCB congener, there is a linear correlation between the emission factor and the concentration of the PCB congener in the source. Furthermore, the test results showed that an excellent log-linear correlation exists between the normalized emission factor and the vapor pressure (coefficient of determination, r(2)⩾0.8846). The PCB congener emissions from ballasts at or near room temperature were relatively low with or without electrical load. However, the PCB congener emission rates increased significantly as the temperature increased. The results of this research provide new data and models for ranking the primary sources of PCBs and supports the development and refinement of exposure assessment models for PCBs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. [Real world instantaneous emission simulation for light-duty diesel vehicle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng; Chen, Chang-Hong; Dai, Pu; Li, Li; Huang, Hai-Ying; Cheng, Zhen; Jia, Ji-Hong

    2008-10-01

    Core architecture and input parameters of CMEM model were introduced to simulation the second by second vehicle emission rate on real world by taking a light-duty diesel car as a case. On-board test data by a portable emission measurement system were then used to validate the simulation results. Test emission factors of CO, THC, NO(x) and CO2 were respectively 0.81, 0.61, 2.09, and 193 g x km(-1), while calculated emission factors were 0.75, 0.47, 2.47, and 212 g x km(-1). The correlation coefficients reached 0.69, 0.69, 0.75, and 0.72. Simulated instantaneous emissions of the light duty diesel vehicle by CMEM model were strongly coherent with the transient driving cycle. By analysis, CO, THC, NO(x), and CO2 emissions would be reduced by 50%, 47%, 45%, and 44% after improving the traffic situation at the intersection. The result indicated that it is necessary and feasible to simulate the instantaneous emissions of mixed vehicle fleet in some typical traffic areas by the micro-scale vehicle emission model.

  18. Correlations between isospin dynamics and Intermediate Mass Fragments emission time scales: a probe for the symmetry energy in asymmetric nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Filippo, E; Cardella, G; Guidara, E La; Pagano, A; Papa, M; Amorini, F; Colonna, M; Gianì, S; Grassi, L; Han, J; Maiolino, C; Auditore, L; Minniti, T; Baran, V; Berceanu, I; Geraci, E; Grzeszczuk, A; Guazzoni, P; Lanzalone, G; Lombardo, I

    2013-01-01

    We show new data from the 64 Ni+ 124 Sn and 58 Ni+ 112 Sn reactions studied in direct kinematics with the CHIMERA detector at INFN-LNS and compared with the reverse kinematics reactions at the same incident beam energy (35 A MeV). Analyzing the data with the method of relative velocity correlations, fragments coming from statistical decay of an excited projectile-like (PLF) or target-like (TLF) fragments are discriminated from the ones coming from dynamical emission in the early stages of the reaction. By comparing data of the reverse kinematics experiment with a stochastic mean field (SMF) + GEMINI calculations our results show that observables from neck fragmentation mechanism add valuable constraints on the density dependence of symmetry energy. An indication is found for a moderately stiff symmetry energy potential term of EOS.

  19. Photodissociation of CH3CHO at 248 nm by time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy: Verification of roaming and triple fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kai-Chan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Li, Hou-Kuan; Lin, King-Chuen

    2014-02-01

    By using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy, the HCO fragment dissociated from acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) at 248 nm is found to partially decompose to H and CO. The fragment yields are enhanced by the Ar addition that facilitates the collision-induced internal conversion. The channels to CH2CO + H2 and CH3CO + H are not detected significantly. The rotational population distribution of CO, after removing the Ar collision effect, shows a bimodal feature comprising both low- and high-rotational (J) components, sharing a fraction of 19% and 81%, respectively, for the vibrational state v = 1. The low-J component is ascribed to both roaming pathway and triple fragmentation. They are determined to have a branching ratio of 0.06, respectively, relative to the whole v = 1 population. The CO roaming is accompanied by a highly vibrational population of CH4 that yields a vibrational bimodality.

  20. Silicon Mie resonators for highly directional light emission from monolayer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihan, Ahmet Fatih; Curto, Alberto G.; Raza, Søren; Kik, Pieter G.; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2018-05-01

    Controlling light emission from quantum emitters has important applications, ranging from solid-state lighting and displays to nanoscale single-photon sources. Optical antennas have emerged as promising tools to achieve such control right at the location of the emitter, without the need for bulky, external optics. Semiconductor nanoantennas are particularly practical for this purpose because simple geometries such as wires and spheres support multiple, degenerate optical resonances. Here, we start by modifying Mie scattering theory developed for plane wave illumination to describe scattering of dipole emission. We then use this theory and experiments to demonstrate several pathways to achieve control over the directionality, polarization state and spectral emission that rely on a coherent coupling of an emitting dipole to optical resonances of a silicon nanowire. A forward-to-backward ratio of 20 was demonstrated for the electric dipole emission at 680 nm from a monolayer MoS2 by optically coupling it to a silicon nanowire.

  1. Pre-breakdown light emission phenomena in low-pressure argon between parabolic electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagenaars, E [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Perriens, N W B [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Brok, W J M [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Bowden, M D [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Veldhuizen, E M van [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kroesen, G M W [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2006-09-07

    An experimental study on pre-breakdown light emission in low-pressure argon gas was performed. In a pulsed discharge, pre-breakdown phenomena were observed for repetition rates between 100 and 2000 Hz and pulse duration of 100 {mu}s. These phenomena were studied with time-resolved emission imaging using an intensified charge coupled device camera. The origin of the pre-breakdown emission was identified as diffusion of volume charges left over from previous discharges. These charges were accelerated towards the anode in small electron avalanches causing excitation of argon atoms. Different spatial distributions of the pre-breakdown light emission for different times between discharges were measured and the effects of the pre-breakdown phenomena on the main breakdown phase were studied using a double voltage pulse. The observed effects were attributed to the distribution of volume charges, left over from previous discharges, in the discharge gap during the pre-breakdown phase.

  2. Angular correlation between the heavy fragments and the light charged particles in tripartition of 236U and 252Cf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowinski, M.

    1975-05-01

    The energy distributions and relative intensities of protons, deuterons, tritons and alpha-particles emitted along the fission axis during thermal neutron fission of 236 U are measured simultaneously with the energies of the two fission fragments. The mass distributions of the fragments, the total kinetic energy (TKE), the dependence of the mean TKE on the fragment mass, as well as the mean kinetic energy dependence of polar particles on the fragment mass and energy are deduced from these data. Although some experimental results agree remarkably well with the hypothesis that polar particles are evaporated in-flight from fission fragments, the general conclusion is that these particles are emitted according to some other mechanism

  3. Light absorption by primary particle emissions from a lignite burning plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, T.C.; Bussemer, M.; Wehner, B.; Keller, S.; Charlson, R.J.; Heintzenberg, J.

    1999-01-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols from the burning of fossil fuels contribute to climate forcing by both scattering and absorbing solar radiation, and estimates of climate forcing by light-absorbing primary particles have recently been published. While the mass and optical properties of emissions are needed for these studies, the available measurements do not characterize the low-technology burning that is thought to contribute a large fraction of light-absorbing material to the global budget. The authors have measured characteristics of particulate matter (PM) emitted from a small, low-technology lignite-burning plant. The PM emission factor is comparable to those used to calculate emission inventories of light-absorbing particles. However, the fine fraction, the absorbing fraction, and the absorption efficiency of the emissions are substantially below assumptions that have been made in inventories of black carbon emissions and calculations of climate forcing. The measurements suggest that nonblack, light-absorbing particles are emitted from low-technology coal burning. As the burning rate increases, the emitted absorption cross-section decreases, and the wavelength dependence of absorption becomes closer to that of black particles

  4. Estimation of light duty vehicle emissions in Islamabad and climate co-benefits of improved emission standards implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Izhar Hussain; Zeeshan, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    Light Duty Vehicles (LDVs) hold a major share in Islamabad's vehicle fleet and their contribution towards air pollution has not been analyzed previously. Emissions for the base year (2014) and two optimistic 'what-if' scenarios were estimated by using the International Vehicle Emissions (IVE) model. Considering the recent implementation of Euro II as emission standard in Pakistan, scenario 1 assumed entire LDV fleet meeting at least Euro II standards while scenario 2 assumed all LDVs meeting Euro IV standards except motorcycles which would be meeting Euro III emission standards. Higher average age for all vehicles and lower share of Euro compliant vehicles was found in the base case. Low engine stress mode (lower speeds with frequent decelerations) was observed for all vehicles especially on arterials and residential roads. Highest overall emissions (59%) were observed on arterials, followed by residential roads (24%) and highways (17%) with higher emissions observed during morning (8-10 am) and evening (4-6 pm) rush hours. Composite emission factors were also calculated. Results reveal that 1094, 147, 11.1, 0.2 and 0.4 kt of CO2, CO, NOx, SO2 and PM10 respectively were emitted in 2014 by LDVs. Compared with the base year, scenario 1 showed a reduction of 9%, 69%, 73%, 13% and 31%, while scenario 2 exhibited a reduction of 5%, 92%, 90%, 92% and 81% for CO2, CO, NOx, SO2 and PM10 respectively. As compared to the base year, a 20 year CO2-equivalent Global Warming Potential (GWP) reduced by 55% and 64% under scenario 1 and 2 respectively, while a 100 year GWP reduced by 40% and 44% under scenario 1 and 2 respectively. Our results demonstrated significant co-benefits that could be achieved in emission reduction and air quality improvement in the city by vehicle technology implementation.

  5. Emission of high-energy, light particles from intermediate-energy heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.B.; Auble, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    One of the early surprises in examining reaction products from heavy ion reactions at 10 MeV/nucleon and above was the large yield of light particles emitted and the high energies to which the spectra of these particles extended. The interpretation of the origin of the high energy light ions has evolved from a picture of projectile excitation and subsequent evaporation to one of pre-equilibrium (or nonequilibrium) emission. The time scale for particle emission has thus moved from one that occurs following the initial collision to one that occurs at the very early stages of the collision. Research at ORNL on this phenomenon is reviewed

  6. Light emission and finite-frequency shot noise in molecular junctions: from tunneling to contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Brandbyge, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope induced light emission from an atomic or molecular junction has been probed from the tunneling to contact regime in recent experiments. There, the measured light emission yields suggest a strong correlation with the high-frequency current/charge fluctuations. We show...... that this is consistent with the established theory in the tunneling regime, by writing the finite-frequency shot noise as a sum of inelastic transitions between different electronic states. Based on this, we develop a practical scheme to perform calculations on realistic structures using nonequilibrium Green's functions...

  7. Electroplex emission at PVK/Bphen interface for application in white organic light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Liang; Li Fushan; Xie Jiangxing; Wu Chaoxing; Zheng Yong; Chen Dongling; Xu Sheng; Guo Tailiang; Qu Bo; Chen Zhijian; Gong Qihuang

    2011-01-01

    White organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with a structure of ITO/poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK)/4,7-diphenyl-1, 10-phenanthroline (Bphen)/tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq 3 )/LiF/Al has been fabricated via the thermal evaporation technique. The electroluminescence (EL) spectrum of the as-fabricated WOLED covers from 380 to 700 nm of the visible light region with a wide blue emission from PVK and an interesting new red emission. The red emission at 613 nm in EL spectra of the WOLED was attributed to electroplex emission at PVK/Bphen interface since it was not observed in photoluminescence spectra. The WOLED showed a Commission International De l'Eclairage coordinate of (0.31, 0.32), which is very close to the standard white coordinate (0.33, 0.33). - Highlights: → A white organic light-emitting diode was fabricated by vacuum deposition. → A new red emission at 613 nm was observed in the electroluminescence spectra. → Red emission comes from electroplex instead of exciplex at PVK/Bphen interface. → The device has a CIE coordinate of (0.31, 0.32).

  8. Real-time black carbon emission factor measurements from light duty vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestieri, Sara D; Collier, Sonya; Kuwayama, Toshihiro; Zhang, Qi; Kleeman, Michael J; Cappa, Christopher D

    2013-11-19

    Eight light-duty gasoline low emission vehicles (LEV I) were tested on a Chassis dynamometer using the California Unified Cycle (UC) at the Haagen-Smit vehicle test facility at the California Air Resources Board in El Monte, CA during September 2011. The UC includes a cold start phase followed by a hot stabilized running phase. In addition, a light-duty gasoline LEV vehicle and ultralow emission vehicle (ULEV), and a light-duty diesel passenger vehicle and gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicle were tested on a constant velocity driving cycle. A variety of instruments with response times ≥0.1 Hz were used to characterize how the emissions of the major particulate matter components varied for the LEVs during a typical driving cycle. This study focuses primarily on emissions of black carbon (BC). These measurements allowed for the determination of BC emission factors throughout the driving cycle, providing insights into the temporal variability of BC emission factors during different phases of a typical driving cycle.

  9. Emission of blue light from hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, W. A.; Yamagishi, H.; Yamaguchi, M.; Tawada, Y.

    1994-04-01

    THE development of new electroluminescent materials is of current technological interest for use in flat-screen full-colour displays1. For such applications, amorphous inorganic semiconductors appear particularly promising, in view of the ease with which uniform films with good mechanical and electronic properties can be deposited over large areas2. Luminescence has been reported1 in the red-green part of the spectrum from amorphous silicon carbide prepared from gas-phase mixtures of silane and a carbon-containing species (usually methane or ethylene). But it is not possible to achieve blue luminescence by this approach. Here we show that the use of an aromatic species-xylene-as the source of carbon during deposition results in a form of amorphous silicon carbide that exhibits strong blue luminescence. The underlying structure of this material seems to be an unusual combination of an inorganic silicon carbide lattice with a substantial 'organic' π-conjugated carbon system, the latter dominating the emission properties. Moreover, the material can be readily doped with an electron acceptor in a manner similar to organic semiconductors3, and might therefore find applications as a conductivity- or colour-based chemical sensor.

  10. Light-particle emission and heavy residues from nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caplar, R.; Hoelbling, S.; Gentner, R.; Lassen, L.; Oberstedt, A.

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the interrelation between light-particle multiplicities and mass resp. charge distributions of heavy residues from complete and incomplete fusion of heavy ions. We have shown that a simple statistical model provides the possibility of quantitatively correlating heavy-residue distributions and corresponding light-particle multiplicities both at the Coulomb barrier and at higher energies where preequilibrium emission occurs. (author). 8 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  11. Singularities of production of the light fragments with A=2 and 3 in 16Op-interactions at 3.25 A GeV/s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olimov, K.; Lutpullaev, S.L.; Olimov, Kh.K.; Petrov, V.I.; Yuldashev, A.A.; Usarov, A.A.; Yuldashev, B.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The process of formation of the secondary nuclei is influenced by the complex superposition of several mechanisms of interactions of the proton with 16 O nucleons and the production of the quasi-free few-nucleon associations, since its details are connected to the isotope singularities of fragments, the final state interactions, and finally, the non-direct, but the cascade character of the fragment origination. The investigation of formation of the light fragments (p, d, t, 3 He 2 , and 4 He 2 ) at nucleus fragmentation allows one to obtain the more detailed information on mechanisms of production of the final products of reaction, rather than the heavier fragments (A≥5), due to the following reasons. Firstly, the cross section of formation of light fragments is comparable to that of the total inelastic interactions of the considered reaction. Secondly, these particles can be produced both in the initial stage of hadron-nucleus collisions and in the final stage of interactions. Contrary to that, the heavier fragments may 'forget' their origination, being formed at peripheral or non-peripheral interactions of colliding nuclei, and do not contain the useful information on dynamics of the initial act of the interaction. The present work contains the intermediate results on investigations of processes of the oxygen fragmentation in interactions with protons at 3.25 A GeV/s and is devoted to the study of inclusive cross sections of formation of 3 H 1 , 3 He 2 , and 4 He 2 nuclei at different topological channels of the initial nucleus decay and identification of mechanisms of production of the few-nucleon nuclei based on the experimental material consisting of 13759 measured 16 Op-events. The momentum spectra of the formed deuterons were investigated, and their multiplicities and inclusive cross sections determined. It is shown, that in formation of the deuterons flying back, the main contribution comes from the 'evaporation' process and the Fermi

  12. Real-time emission factor measurements of isocyanic acid from light duty gasoline vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, James M; Crisp, Timia A; Collier, Sonya; Kuwayama, Toshihiro; Forestieri, Sara D; Perraud, Véronique; Zhang, Qi; Kleeman, Michael J; Cappa, Christopher D; Bertram, Timothy H

    2014-10-07

    Exposure to gas-phase isocyanic acid (HNCO) has been previously shown to be associated with the development of atherosclerosis, cataracts and rheumatoid arthritis. As such, accurate emission inventories for HNCO are critical for modeling the spatial and temporal distribution of HNCO on a regional and global scale. To date, HNCO emission rates from light duty gasoline vehicles, operated under driving conditions, have not been determined. Here, we present the first measurements of real-time emission factors of isocyanic acid from a fleet of eight light duty gasoline-powered vehicles (LDGVs) tested on a chassis dynamometer using the Unified Driving Cycle (UC) at the California Air Resources Board (CARB) Haagen-Smit test facility, all of which were equipped with three-way catalytic converters. HNCO emissions were observed from all vehicles, in contrast to the idealized laboratory measurements. We report the tested fleet averaged HNCO emission factors, which depend strongly on the phase of the drive cycle; ranging from 0.46 ± 0.13 mg kg fuel(-1) during engine start to 1.70 ± 1.77 mg kg fuel(-1) during hard acceleration after the engine and catalytic converter were warm. The tested eight-car fleet average fuel based HNCO emission factor was 0.91 ± 0.58 mg kg fuel(-1), within the range previously estimated for light duty diesel-powered vehicles (0.21-3.96 mg kg fuel(-1)). Our results suggest that HNCO emissions from LDGVs represent a significant emission source in urban areas that should be accounted for in global and regional models.

  13. Emission of projectile helium fragments in 14N interactions at 2.1 GeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhanja, R.; Devi, N.A.L.; Joseph, R.R.; Ojha, I.D.; Shyam, M.; Tuli, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of projectile helium fragments has been performed from the point of view of testing the factorization and limiting fragmentation hypothesis. An event-by-event examination of 923 interactions of 14 N in emulsion at 2.1 GeV per nucleon has been made for target identification. Events with projectile fragments have been divided into various reaction channels according to the multiplicity of He nuclei. The multiplicity distribution, angular structure and other properties of the projectile He fragments have been investigated to see the dependence on different targets and target excitation. The properties of He fragments emitted from the projectile have been found to remain independent of target in peripheral collision processes. The target and projectile breakup properties have been analysed in terms of the collision geometry. Gaussian distributions have been fitted to the projected angular distribution data for He fragments at various intervals of impact parameter and in different reaction channels. The properties of emitted He nuclei exhibit characteristic features of factorization and limiting fragmentation. (orig.)

  14. Neutron emission effects on fragment mass and kinetic energy distribution from fission of 239Pu induced by thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Lobato, I.

    2010-01-01

    The average of fragment kinetic energy (E-bar sign*) and the multiplicity of prompt neutrons (ν(bar sign)) as a function of fragment mass (m*), as well as the fragment mass yield (Y(m*)) from thermal neutron-induced fission of 239 Pu have been measured by Tsuchiya et al.. In that work the mass and kinetic energy are calculated from the measured kinetic energy of one fragment and the difference of time of flight of the two complementary fragments. However they do not present their results about the standard deviation σ E *(m*). In this work we have made a numerical simulation of that experiment which reproduces its results, assuming an initial distribution of the primary fragment kinetic energy (E(A)) with a constant value of the standard deviation as function of fragment mass (σ E (A)). As a result of the simulation we obtain the dependence σ E *(m*) which presents an enhancement between m* = 92 and m* = 110, and a peak at m* = 121.

  15. Study of the Light Emission Process from the Double Chooz Photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Crespo, J. I.; Gil-Botella, I.; Jimenez, S.; Lopez, M.; Novella, P.; Palomares, C.; Santorelli, R.; Verdugo, A.

    2012-09-13

    In this document we present a study of the light emitted by the base of a Hamamatsu R7081MOD-ASSY photomultiplier (PMT) of the same type used in the Double Chooz experiment. Several characteristic features of the light signal have been found in terms of amplitude, length and pulse shape. Additional investigations on the properties of the epoxy used to cover the photomultiplier base have been carried out. A possible explanation of the light emission process is discussed at the end of the study. (Author) 1 ref.

  16. Effects of cold temperature and ethanol content on VOC emissions from light-duty gasoline vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emissions of speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including mobile source air toxics (MSATs), were measured in vehicle exhaust from three light-duty spark ignition vehicles operating on summer and winter grade gasoline (E0) and ethanol blended (E10 and E85) fuels. Vehicle...

  17. Light emission probing quantum shot noise and charge fluctuations at a biased molecular junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, N.L.; Lu, Jing Tao; Brandbyge, M.

    2012-01-01

    The emission of plasmonic light from a single C60 molecule on Cu(111) is probed in a scanning tunneling microscope from the weak-coupling, tunneling range to strong coupling of the molecule to the electrodes at contact. At positive sample voltage the photon yield decreases owing to shot...

  18. Slow-light enhancement of spontaneous emission in active photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Sara; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta

    2012-01-01

    Photonic crystal defect waveguides with embedded active layers containing single or multiple quantum wells or quantum dots have been fabricated. Spontaneous emission spectra are enhanced close to the bandedge, consistently with the enhancement of gain by slow light effects. These are promising...... results for future compact devices for terabit/s communication, such as miniaturised semiconductor optical amplifiers and mode-locked lasers....

  19. Light charged particle emission in heavy-ion reactions – What have ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    coincidence with gamma rays, fission products, evaporation residues have yielded interesting results which bring out the influence of nuclear structure, nuclear mean field and dynamics on the emission of these particles. Keywords. Light charged particles; heavy-ion induced reactions; particle spectra and angular distri-.

  20. A stable Alq3@MOF composite for white-light emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; He, Wen-Wen; Du, Dong-Ying; Li, Shun-Li; Qin, Jun-Sheng; Su, Zhong-Min; Sun, Chun-Yi; Lan, Ya-Qian

    2016-02-25

    A stable mesoporous blue-emitting MOF NENU-521 was successfully constructed. NENU-521 can serve as a host for encapsulating Alq3 to obtain tunable and efficient white-light emission. The Alq3@NENU-521 composite possesses excellent stability and can be used as a promising white phosphor in WLEDs.

  1. Light particle and gamma ray emission measurements in heavy-ion reactions. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitt, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a position-sensitive neutron detector and a data acquisition system at HHIRF for studying light particle emission in heavy ion reactions is described. Results are presented and discussed for the reactions 12 C + 158 Gd, 13 C + 157 Gd, and 20 Ne + 150 Nd

  2. Cold Temperature Effects on Speciated VOC Emissions from Modern GDI Light-Duty Vehicles 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, speciated VOC emissions were characterized from three modern GDI light-duty vehicles. The vehicles were tested on a chassis dynamometer housed in a climate-controlled chamber at two temperatures (20 and 72 °F) using the EPA Federal Test Procedure (FTP) and a portio...

  3. Fabrication of White Light-emitting Electrochemical Cells with Stable Emission from Exciplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Soichi; Takizawa, Daisuke; Ikeda, Satoru; Takeuchi, Hironori; Nishimura, Suzushi; Nishide, Hiroyuki; Nishikitani, Yoshinori

    2016-11-15

    The authors present an approach for fabricating stable white light emission from polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells (PLECs) having an active layer which consists of blue-fluorescent poly(9,9-di-n-dodecylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFD) and π-conjugated triphenylamine molecules. This white light emission originates from exciplexes formed between PFD and amines in electronically excited states. A device containing PFD, 4,4',4''-tris[2-naphthyl(phenyl)amino]triphenylamine (2-TNATA), Poly(ethylene oxide) and K2CF3SO3 showed white light emission with Commission internationale de l'éclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.33, 0.43) and a Color Rendering Index (CRI) of Ra = 73 at an applied voltage of 3.5 V. Constant voltage measurements showed that the CIE coordinates of (0.27, 0.37), Ra of 67, and the emission color observed immediately after application of a voltage of 5 V were nearly unchanged and stable after 300 sec.

  4. Measuring the coherence properties of light emission from laser-plasma interactions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batha, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    Several detrimental instabilities can be excited when a high-intensity laser interacts with plasma. The temporal evolution and spectra of the scattered light emitted by many of these instabilities are used to characterize the instabilities and to benchmark theories. It has been difficult to image the emission region with sufficient resolution to make quantitative comparisons with theory. Direct measurement of the emission region would yield information on ponderomotive steepening phenomena, the true emission zone of convective instabilities, and on the saturation of absolute instabilities. The increase in laser intensity caused by the filamentation instability is conjectured to elevate the levels of parametric instabilities found in high-energy laser-plasma interactions. Because the diameter of the filaments is very small (on the order of 10 microm), it is impossible to image the emission sites directly and either to prove or to disprove this conjecture. The research reported here examines an alternate method of measuring the emission region of scattered light from parametric instabilities. This report provides a brief background of coherence theory by defining the relevant parameters in Section 2. A concrete example of the effect that multiple scattering sites would have on the proposed measurement is provided in Section 3. The following section briefly describes experiments that might be able to demonstrate the proposed technique. The conclusion raises the issue of coherence and its effect on the expected angular distribution of scattering light from parametric instabilities

  5. Light-absorbing organic carbon from prescribed and laboratory biomass burning and gasoline vehicle emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingjie; Hays, Michael D; Holder, Amara L

    2017-08-04

    Light-absorbing organic carbon (OC), also termed brown carbon (BrC), from laboratory-based biomass burning (BB) has been studied intensively to understand the contribution of BB to radiative forcing. However, relatively few measurements have been conducted on field-based BB and even fewer measurements have examined BrC from anthropogenic combustion sources like motor vehicle emissions. In this work, the light absorption of methanol-extractable OC from prescribed and laboratory BB and gasoline vehicle emissions was examined using spectrophotometry. The light absorption of methanol extracts showed a strong wavelength dependence for both BB and gasoline vehicle emissions. The mass absorption coefficients at 365 nm (MAC 365 , m 2 g -1 C) - used as a measurement proxy for BrC - were significantly correlated (p burn conditions and fuel types may impact BB BrC characteristics. The average MAC 365 of gasoline vehicle emission samples is 0.62 ± 0.76 m 2  g -1 C, which is similar in magnitude to the BB samples (1.27 ± 0.76 m 2  g -1 C). These results suggest that in addition to BB, gasoline vehicle emissions may also be an important BrC source in urban areas.

  6. Recent evidence concerning higher NO x emissions from passenger cars and light duty vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carslaw, David C.; Beevers, Sean D.; Tate, James E.; Westmoreland, Emily J.; Williams, Martin L.

    2011-12-01

    Ambient trends in nitrogen oxides (NO x) and nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) for many air pollution monitoring sites in European cities have stabilised in recent years. The lack of a decrease in the concentration of NO x and in particular NO 2 is of concern given European air quality standards are set in law. The lack of decrease in the concentration of NO x and NO 2 is also in clear disagreement with emission inventory estimates and projections. This work undertakes a comprehensive analysis of recent vehicle emissions remote sensing data from seven urban locations across the UK. The large sample size of 84,269 vehicles was carefully cross-referenced to a detailed and comprehensive database of vehicle information. We find that there are significant discrepancies between current UK/European estimates of NO x emissions and those derived from the remote sensing data for several important classes of vehicle. In the case of light duty diesel vehicles it is found that NO x emissions have changed little over 20 years or so over a period when the proportion of directly emitted NO 2 has increased substantially. For diesel cars it is found that absolute emissions of NO x are higher across all legislative classes than suggested by UK and other European emission inventories. Moreover, the analysis shows that more recent technology diesel cars (Euro 3-5) have clear increasing NO x emissions as a function of Vehicle Specific Power, which is absent for older technology vehicles. Under higher engine loads, these newer model diesel cars have a NO x/CO 2 ratio twice that of older model cars, which may be related to the increased use of turbo-charging. Current emissions of NO x from early technology catalyst-equipped petrol cars (Euro 1/2) were also found to be higher than emission inventory estimates - and comparable with NO x emissions from diesel cars. For heavy duty vehicles, it is found that NO x emissions were relatively stable until the introduction of Euro IV technology when

  7. Tuning the emission of aqueous Cu:ZnSe quantum dots to yellow light window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chunlei; Hu, Zhiyang; Xu, Shuhong; Wang, Yanbin; Zhao, Zengxia; Wang, Zhuyuan; Cui, Yiping

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of internally doped Cu:ZnSe QDs in an aqueous solution still suffers from narrow tunable emissions from the blue to green light window. In this work, we extended the emission window of aqueous Cu:ZnSe QDs to the yellow light window. Our results show that high solution pH, multiple injections of Zn precursors, and nucleation doping strategy are three key factors for preparing yellow emitted Cu:ZnSe QDs. All these factors can depress the reactivity of CuSe nuclei and Zn monomers, promoting ZnSe growth outside CuSe nuclei rather than form ZnSe nuclei separately. With increased ZnSe QD size, the conduction band and nearby trap state energy levels shift to higher energy sites, causing Cu:ZnSe QDs to have a much longer emission. (paper)

  8. Engineering light emission of two-dimensional materials in both the weak and strong coupling regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotons-Gisbert, Mauro; Martínez-Pastor, Juan P.; Ballesteros, Guillem C.; Gerardot, Brian D.; Sánchez-Royo, Juan F.

    2018-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have promising applications in optoelectronics, photonics, and quantum technologies. However, their intrinsically low light absorption limits their performance, and potential devices must be accurately engineered for optimal operation. Here, we apply a transfer matrix-based source-term method to optimize light absorption and emission in 2D materials and related devices in weak and strong coupling regimes. The implemented analytical model accurately accounts for experimental results reported for representative 2D materials such as graphene and MoS2. The model has been extended to propose structures to optimize light emission by exciton recombination in MoS2 single layers, light extraction from arbitrarily oriented dipole monolayers, and single-photon emission in 2D materials. Also, it has been successfully applied to retrieve exciton-cavity interaction parameters from MoS2 microcavity experiments. The present model appears as a powerful and versatile tool for the design of new optoelectronic devices based on 2D semiconductors such as quantum light sources and polariton lasers.

  9. Light Emission Requires Exposure to the Atmosphere in Ex Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Inoue

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The identification of organs bearing luciferase activity by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI is often difficult, and ex vivo imaging of excised organs plays a complementary role. This study investigated the importance of exposure to the atmosphere in ex vivo BLI. Mice were inoculated with murine pro-B cell line Ba/F3 transduced with firefly luciferase and p190 BCR-ABL. They were killed following in vivo BLI, and whole-body imaging was done after death and then after intraperitoneal air injection. In addition, the right knee was exposed and imaged before and after the adjacent bones were cut. Extensive light signals were seen on in vivo imaging. The luminescence disappeared after the animal was killed, and air injection restored the light emission from the abdomen only, suggesting a critical role of atmospheric oxygen in luminescence after death. Although no substantial light signal at the right knee was seen before bone cutting, light emission was evident after cutting. In conclusion, in ex vivo BLI, light emission requires exposure to the atmosphere. Bone destruction is required to demonstrate luciferase activity in the bone marrow after death.

  10. Strong white light emission from a processed porous silicon and its photoluminescence mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karacali, T.; Cicek, K.

    2011-01-01

    We have prepared various porous silicon (PS) structures with different surface conditions (any combination of oxidation, carbonization as well as thermal annealing) to increase the intensity of photoluminescence (PL) spectrum in the visible range. Strong white light (similar to day-light) emission was achieved by carrying out thermal annealing at 1100 deg. C after surface modification with 1-decene of anodic oxidized PS structures. Temperature-dependent PL measurements were first performed by gradually increasing the sample temperature from 10 to 300 K inside a cryostat. Then, we analyzed the measured spectrum of all prepared samples. After the analysis, we note that throughout entire measured spectrum, only two main peaks corresponding to blue and green-orange emission lines (which can be interpreted by quantum size effect and/or configuration coordinate model) were seem to be predominant for all temperature range. To further reveal and analysis these peaks, finally, measured data were inputted into the formula of activation energy of thermal excitation. We found that activation energies of blue and green-orange lines were approximately 49.3 and 44.6 meV, respectively. - Highlights: →Light emitting devices based on silicon technology are of great interest in illumination and display applications. → We have achieved strong white light (similar to day-light) emission from porous silicon. → The most important impact of carbonization on porous silicon and post annealing is the enhancement of room temperature luminescence.

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis and white light emission of cubic ZrO2:Eu3+ nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meetei, Sanoujam Dhiren; Singh, Shougaijam Dorendrajit

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • White light emitting cubic ZrO 2 :Eu 3+ nanocrystal is synthesized by hydrothermal technique. • Eu 3+ is used to stabilize crystalline phase and to get red counterpart of the white light. • Defect emission and Eu 3+ emission combined to give white light. • The white light emitted from this nanocrystal resembles vertical daylight of the Sun. • Lifetime corresponding to red counterpart of the sample is far longer than conventional white light emitters. -- Abstract: Production of white light has been a promising area of luminescence studies. In this work, white light emitting nanocrystals of cubic zirconia doped with Eu 3+ are synthesized by hydrothermal technique. The dopant Eu 3+ is used to stabilize crystalline phase to cubic and at the same time to get red counterpart of the white light. The synthesis procedure is simple and precursor required no further annealing for crystallization. X-ray diffraction patterns show the crystalline phase of ZrO 2 :Eu 3+ to be cubic and it is confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. From transmission electron microscopy images, size of the crystals is found to be ∼5 nm. Photoluminescence emission spectrum of the sample, on monitoring excitation at O 2− –Eu 3+ charge transfer state shows broad peak due to O 2− of the zirconia and that of Eu 3+ emission. Commission Internationale de l’éclairage co-ordinate of this nanocrystal (0.32, 0.34) is closed to that of the ideal white light (0.33, 0.33). Correlated color temperature of the white light (5894 K) is within the range of vertical daylight. Lifetime (1.32 ms) corresponding to 5 D 0 energy level of the Eu 3+ is found to be far longer than conventional red counterparts of white light emitters. It suggests that the ZrO 2 :Eu 3+ nanocrystals synthesized by hydrothermal technique may find applications in simulating the vertical daylight of the Sun

  12. Measuring the radial density distribution of light emission around the track of fast ions in nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibach, T.

    1983-01-01

    For analysing the emission and stopping of ionization electrons (σ-electrons) emitted by fast ions passing through a gas, the radial density distribution of the light emission of the (0,0) transition of two optical bands in nitrogen have been measured. The systems selected for the epxeriments are the 2nd positive system (2.PS) at 337.1 nm primarily excited by low-energy electrons of about 20 eV, and the first negative system (1.NS) at 391.4 nm excited by faster electrons and simultaneous ionization. The equipment developed for the experiments records the light emission with a telescope-type optical arrangement including interference filters, allowing high local resolution and dynamics of the measured range. The measurements have been carried out at pressures between 0.133 and 13.3 mbar, using photons of energies ranging from 270 keV to 2.8 MeV, helium 3 beams of 270 keV/u and 500 keV/u, and neon beams of 270 keV/u. Abel's inversion applied to the distance functions allows calculation of the spatial light emission density which is normalized for a gas density of 1 g/cm 3 . The profiles of the two bands indicate that the σ-electron spectrum gets harder in outward direction. Next to the beam the impact density decreases faster with increasing ion energy than the stopping power (increasing interaction range of the σ-electrons). With photon beams, about half of the whole light emission in the 1. NS, and of the ionization, is induced by primary interactions of the ion beam. This proportion decreases at constant energy per nucleon with increasing atomic number of the ions as compared with the σ-electrons. The primary σ-emission gets harder with higher atomic numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Neutron emission effects on final fragments mass and kinetic energy distribution from low energy fission of 234U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Lobato, I.

    2008-01-01

    The standard deviation of the final kinetic energy distribution (σ e ) as a function of mass of final fragments (m) from low energy fission of 234 U, measured with the Lohengrin spectrometer by Belhafaf et al., presents a peak around m = 109 and another around m = 122. The authors attribute the first peak to the evaporation of a large number of neutrons around the corresponding mass number, i.e. there is no peak on the standard deviation of the primary kinetic energy distribution (σ E ) as a function of primary fragment mass (A). The second peak is attributed to a real peak on σ E (A). However, theoretical calculations related to primary distributions made by H.R. Faust and Z. Bao do not suggest any peak on σ E (A). In order to clarify this apparent controversy, we have made a numerical experiment in which the masses and the kinetic energy of final fragments are calculated, assuming an initial distribution of the kinetic energy without structures on the standard deviation as function of fragment mass. As a result we obtain a pronounced peak on σ e (m) curve around m = 109, a depletion from m = 121 to m = 129, and an small peak around m = 122, which is not as great as that measured by Belhafaf et al. Our simulation also reproduces the experimental results on the yield of the final mass Y(m), the average number of emitted neutrons as a function of the provisional mass (calculated from the values of the final kinetic energy of the complementary fragments) and the average value of fragment kinetic energy as a function of the final mass. From our results we conclude that there are no peaks on the σ E (A) curve, and the observed peaks on σ e (m) are due to the emitted neutron multiplicity and the variation of the average fragment kinetic energy as a function of primary fragment mass. (Author)

  14. Zero- and two-dimensional hybrid carbon phosphors for high colorimetric purity white light-emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yamei; Chang, Qing; Xiu, Fei; Chen, Yingying; Liu, Zhengdong; Ban, Chaoyi; Cheng, Shuai; Liu, Juqing; Huang, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Carbon nanomaterials are promising phosphors for white light emission. A facile single-step synthesis method has been developed to prepare zero- and two-dimensional hybrid carbon phosphors for the first time. Zero-dimensional carbon dots (C-dots) emit bright blue luminescence under 365 nm UV light and two-dimensional nanoplates improve the dispersity and film forming ability of C-dots. As a proof-of-concept application, the as-prepared hybrid carbon phosphors emit bright white luminescence in the solid state, and the phosphor-coated blue LEDs exhibit high colorimetric purity white light-emission with a color coordinate of (0.3308, 0.3312), potentially enabling the successful application of white emitting phosphors in the LED field.

  15. The azimuthally anisotropic emission of unstable light nuclear in the heavy ion collisions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhiyong; Jin Genming; Li Zuyu; Duan Limin; Dai Guangxi; Zhang Baoguo; Wu Heyu; Wen Wanxin; Qi Yujin; Luo Qingzheng

    1996-01-01

    The unstable light nuclei emitted in the interaction of 40 Ar on 197 Au have been detected at energy of 25 MeV/u by using particle-particle correlation measurement at small relative angle. Their in-plane and out-of-plane emission were measured for three bins of experimentally estimated impact parameter. The enhanced in-plane emission for mid-rapidity unstable nuclei is observed. This enhanced in-plane emission becomes stronger with increasing of impact parameter, but changes small with the mass of unstable nuclei. The in-plane enhancement decreases slightly with the energy of excited state of unstable nuclei. For projectile-like unstable nuclei, the in-plane emission dominates as expected

  16. The determination of light elements in heavy matrix using proton induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levenets, V.V.; Omel'nik, A.P.; Shchur, A.A.; Chernov, A.E.; Usikov, N.P.; Zats, A.V.

    2007-01-01

    In this report the possibility of determination of light impurities in heavy matrixes is studied using proton induced X-Ray emission. The wide-band X-ray emission filter made from pyrolytic graphite was used in spectrometric scheme of experiment. The results of studying of filter features in energy range of X-ray emission from 4 to 12 keV were presented. The possibilities were examined of application of pyrolytic graphite filter to modify the X-rays spectrum for determination of iron, using characteristic emission of K-series, and hafnium, using L-series, in substances on base of zirconium (glasses, alloys etc.). It was shown, that the using of similar filter allows to reach the significant improving of metrological characteristics of analysis of mentioned impurities: the limits of detection of iron and hafnium were lowered single-order of magnitude. (authors)

  17. 40 CFR 86.1708-99 - Exhaust emission standards for 1999 and later light-duty vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for Light-Duty Vehicles and Light-Duty Trucks § 86.1708-99 Exhaust emission standards for 1999 and... are incorporated by reference (see § 86.1). (v) Hybrid electric vehicle requirements. Deterioration factors for hybrid electric vehicles shall be based on the emissions and mileage accumulation of the...

  18. An intranuclear cascade-percolation approach for protons and light fragments production in neon-niobium reactions at 400 and 800 MeV per nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montarou, G.; Marroncle, J.; Alard, J.P.; Augerat, J.; Bastid, N.; Charmensat, P.; Dupieux, P.; Fraysse, L.; Parizet, M.J.; Rahmani, A.; Brochard, F.; Gorodetzky, P.; Racca, C.; Cugnon, J.

    1992-01-01

    The results of intranuclear cascade calculations (ideal gas with two body collisions and no mean-field), complemented by a simple percolation procedure, are compared with experimental data on protons and light nuclear fragments (d, t, 3 He and 4 He) measured in 400 and 800 MeV/nucleon Ne+Nb collisions using the large solid angle detector DIOGENE. The model reproduces quite well global experimental observables like nuclear fragment multiplicity distributions or production cross-sections, and nuclear fragment to proton ratios. For rapidity distributions the best agreement occurs for peripheral reactions. Transverse momentum analysis confirms once again that the cascade, although being a microscopic approach, gives too small a collective flow. For heavier nuclear fragments conclusions are not so clear. Since the cross-sections are the main ingredients of the detailed treatment of the first stage of the reaction by the intranuclear cascade, such an approach can be very fruitful in order to infer informations on effective nucleon-nucleon cross-sections. (authors). 31 refs., 23 figs., 6 tabs

  19. PM₂.₅ emissions from light-duty gasoline vehicles in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xianbao; Yao, Zhiliang; Huo, Hong; He, Kebin; Zhang, Yingzhi; Liu, Huan; Ye, Yu

    2014-07-15

    As stricter standards for diesel vehicles are implemented in China, and the use of diesel trucks is forbidden in urban areas, determining the contribution of light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) to on-road PM2.5 emissions in cities is important. Additionally, in terms of particle number and size, particulates emitted from LDGVs have a greater health impact than particulates emitted from diesel vehicles. In this work, we measured PM2.5 emissions from 20 LDGVs in Beijing, using an improved combined on-board emission measurement system. We compared these measurements with those reported in previous studies, and estimated the contribution of LDGVs to on-road PM2.5 emissions in Beijing. The results show that the PM2.5 emission factors for LDGVs, complying with European Emission Standards Euro-0 through Euro-4 were: 117.4 ± 142, 24.1 ± 20.4, 4.85 ± 7.86, 0.99 ± 1.32, 0.17 ± 0.15 mg/km, respectively. Our results show a significant decline in emissions with improving vehicle technology. However, this trend is not reflected in recent emission inventory studies. The daytime contributions of LDGVs to PM2.5 emissions on highways, arterials, residential roads, and within urban areas of Beijing were 44%, 62%, 57%, and 57%, respectively. The contribution of LDGVs to PM2.5 emissions varied both for different road types and for different times. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Replacement policy of residential lighting optimized for cost, energy, and greenhouse gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lixi; Keoleian, Gregory A.; Saitou, Kazuhiro

    2017-11-01

    Accounting for 10% of the electricity consumption in the US, artificial lighting represents one of the easiest ways to cut household energy bills and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by upgrading to energy-efficient technologies such as compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) and light emitting diodes (LED). However, given the high initial cost and rapidly improving trajectory of solid-state lighting today, estimating the right time to switch over to LEDs from a cost, primary energy, and GHG emissions perspective is not a straightforward problem. This is an optimal replacement problem that depends on many determinants, including how often the lamp is used, the state of the initial lamp, and the trajectories of lighting technology and of electricity generation. In this paper, multiple replacement scenarios of a 60 watt-equivalent A19 lamp are analyzed and for each scenario, a few replacement policies are recommended. For example, at an average use of 3 hr day-1 (US average), it may be optimal both economically and energetically to delay the adoption of LEDs until 2020 with the use of CFLs, whereas purchasing LEDs today may be optimal in terms of GHG emissions. In contrast, incandescent and halogen lamps should be replaced immediately. Based on expected LED improvement, upgrading LED lamps before the end of their rated lifetime may provide cost and environmental savings over time by taking advantage of the higher energy efficiency of newer models.

  1. White light emission from Er2O3 nano-powder excited by infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanli, Sevcan; Eryurek, Gonul; Di Bartolo, Baldassare

    2017-07-01

    Phosphors of Er2O3 nano-crystalline powders were synthesized by the thermal decomposition method. The structural properties of the nano-powders were investigated with XRD and HRTEM measurements. The cubic phase with a = 10.540 Å was the only phase observed. The average crystalline sizes and the widths of the grain size distribution curves were determined to be 27.2, 18.7 and 9.7 nm, respectively. The spectroscopic properties of the Er2O3 nano-powder were studied by measuring the luminescence, decay and rise patterns under 808 and 975 nm diode laser excitations. A peculiar effect of the pressure was observed since an optically active ion (Er) is part of the complex and not a dopant. A broad band of the white light emission combined with blue, green and red up-conversion emission bands of Er3+ ions were observed at 0.03 mbar pressure under both excitation wavelengths. Only, an intense broad band white light emission was observed from these nanocrystals at atmospheric pressure. Rising patterns show that the white light intensity reaches its maximum value more rapidly under 975 nm excitation although it decays slower than that of 808 nm excitation. The color quality parameters such as the color coordinate (CRI), correlated color temperature and the color rendering index were found to vary with both the excitation wavelength and the ambient pressure indicating that these nanocrystals could be considered good white light emitting source under the infrared excitations.

  2. Adjusting White OLEDs with Yellow Light Emission Phosphor Dye and Ultrathin NPB Layer Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High efficiency white organic light emission devices were demonstrated with phosphor material dye bis[2-(4-tertbutylphenylbenzothiazolato-N,C2′]iridium (acetylacetonate and ultrathin layer structure. The ultra thin layer be composed of 4,4′-bis[N-1-naphthyl-N-phenyl-amino]biphenyl (NPB or 4,4′-N,N′-dicarbazole-biphenyl : NPB mixed layer with blue light emission. The emission spectra of devices could be adjusted by different phosphor doping concentrations and ultra thin layer structure. Warm white light emitting device could be obtained with 5 wt% doping concentration and power efficiency of 9.93 lm/W at 5 V. Pure white light with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE coordinates of (0.33, 0.30 and external quantum efficiency of 4.49% could be achieved with ultra thin layer device structure and 3 wt% phosphor doped device.

  3. Simulations of emission from microcavity tandem organic light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Rana; Xu, Chun; Zhao, Weijun; Liu, Rui; Shinar, Ruth; Shinar, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Microcavity tandem organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are simulated and compared to experimental results. The simulations are based on two complementary techniques: rigorous finite element solutions of Maxwell's equations and Fourier space scattering matrix solutions. A narrowing and blue shift of the emission spectrum relative to the noncavity single unit OLED is obtained both theoretically and experimentally. In the simulations, a distribution of emitting sources is placed near the interface of the electron transport layer tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) Al (Alq 3 ) and the hole transport layer (N,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)benzidine) (α-NPB). Far-field electric field intensities are simulated. The simulated widths of the emission peaks also agree with the experimental results. The simulations of the 2-unit tandem OLEDs shifted the emission to shorter wavelength, in agreement with experimental measurements. The emission spectra's dependence on individual layer thicknesses also agreed well with measurements. Approaches to simulate and improve the light emission intensity from these OLEDs, in particular for white OLEDs, are discussed.

  4. White-Light Emission and Structural Distortion in New Corrugated Two-Dimensional Lead Bromide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Lingling; Wu, Yilei; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Wasielewski, Michael R; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2017-03-29

    Hybrid inorganic-organic perovskites are developing rapidly as high performance semiconductors. Recently, two-dimensional (2D) perovskites were found to have white-light, broadband emission in the visible range that was attributed mainly to the role of self-trapped excitons (STEs). Here, we describe three new 2D lead bromide perovskites incorporating a series of bifunctional ammonium dications as templates which also emit white light: (1) α-(DMEN)PbBr 4 (DMEN = 2-(dimethylamino)ethylamine), which adopts a unique corrugated layered structure in space group Pbca with unit cell a = 18.901(4) Å, b = 11.782(2) Å, and c = 23.680(5) Å; (2) (DMAPA)PbBr 4 (DMAPA = 3-(dimethylamino)-1-propylamine), which crystallizes in P2 1 /c with a = 10.717(2) Å, b = 11.735(2) Å, c = 12.127(2) Å, and β = 111.53(3)°; and (3) (DMABA)PbBr 4 (DMABA = 4-dimethylaminobutylamine), which adopts Aba2 with a = 41.685(8) Å, b = 23.962(5) Å, and c = 12.000(2) Å. Photoluminescence (PL) studies show a correlation between the distortion of the "PbBr 6 " octahedron in the 2D layer and the broadening of PL emission, with the most distorted structure having the broadest emission (183 nm full width at half-maximum) and longest lifetime (τ avg = 1.39 ns). The most distorted member α-(DMEN)PbBr 4 exhibits white-light emission with a color rendering index (CRI) of 73 which is similar to a fluorescent light source and correlated color temperature (CCT) of 7863 K, producing "cold" white light.

  5. Enhancing light emission in flexible AC electroluminescent devices by tetrapod-like zinc oxide whiskers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Liu, Nishuang; Wang, Siliang; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Wanqiu; Yang, Zhichun; Wang, Yumei; Su, Jun; Li, Luying; Long, Fei; Zou, Zhengguang; Gao, Yihua

    2016-10-03

    Flexible alternating current electroluminescent devices (ACEL) are more and more popular and widely used in liquid-crystal display back-lighting, large-scale architectural and decorative lighting due to their uniform light emission, low power consumption and high resolution. However, presently how to acquire high brightness under a certain voltage are confronted with challenges. Here, we demonstrate an electroluminescence (EL) enhancing strategy that tetrapod-like ZnO whiskers (T-ZnOw) are added into the bottom electrode of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) instead of phosphor layer in flexible ACEL devices emitting blue, green and orange lights, and the brightness is greatly enhanced due to the coupling between the T-ZnOw and ZnS phosphor dispersed in the flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer. This strategy provides a new routine for the development of high performance, flexible and large-area ACEL devices.

  6. Angular distributions of light projectile fragments in deep inelastic Pb+Em interactions at 160 A GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adamovich, M I; Alexandrov, Yu A; Andreeva, N P; Badyal, S K; Basova, E E; Bhalla, K B; Bhasin, A; Bhatia, V S; Bradnova, V; Bubnov, V I; Cai, X; Chasnikov, I Yu; Chen, G M; Chernova, L P; Chernyavsky, M M; Dhamija, S; El-Chenawi, K F; Felea, D; Feng, S Q; Gaitinov, A S; Ganssauge, E R; Garpman, S I A; Gerassimov, S G; Gheata, A; Gheata, M; Grote, J; Gulamov, K G; Sen-Gupta, S K; Gupta, V K; Henjes, U; Jakobsson, B; Kanygina, E K; Karabova, M; Kharlamov, S P; Kovalenko, A D; Krasnov, S A; Kumar, V; Larionova, V G; Lepekhin, F G; Levitskaya, O V; Li, Y X; Liu, L S; Lokanathan, S; Lord, J J; Lukicheva, N S; Lu, Y; Luo, S B; Mangotra, L K; Manhas, I; Mittra, I S; Musaeva, A K; Nasyrov, S Z; Navotny, V S; Nystrand, J; Otterlund, I; Peresadko, N G; Qian, W Y; Qin, Y M; Raniwala, R; Rao, N K; Röper, M D; Rusakova, V V; Saidkhanov, N; Salmanova, N A; Seitimbetov, A M; Seliverstov, D M; Simonov, B B; Sethi, R; Singh, B; Skelding, D; Söderström, K; Stenlund, E; Svechnikova, L N; Svensson, T; Tawfik, A M; Tothova, M; Tretyakova, M I; Trofimova, T P; Tuleeva, U I; Vashisht, V; Vokal, S; Vrláková, J; Wang, H Q; Wang, X R; Weng, Z Q; Wilkes, R J; Yang, C B; Yin, Z B; Yu, L Z; Zhang, D H; Zheng, P Y; Zhokhova, S I; Zhou, D C

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear emulsion was exposed at CERN by the lead projectile at 160 A GeV. The angles between any pair of fragments with Z=2-4 have been measured in the emulsion plane for the events which did not contain heavy fragments. The constant characterizing the normal angle ( phi ) distribution of the fragment momentum projection onto the emulsion plane with respect to initial projectile momentum p/sub 0/ is found to be sigma /sub phi /=(0.37+or-0.02) mrad. Corresponding value sigma /sub 0/=(121+or-6) MeV/c of nucleon momentum distribution in the lead nucleus coincides with that expected from Fermi momentum distribution for this nucleus. The peak in the pair-angle distribution of double-charged fragments, /sup 8/Be to 2 alpha , is presented for the region of small angles (<0.1 mrad). The fraction of alpha -particles coming from the decay of the ground state /sup 8/Be is found to be (13+or-2)601130f their whole number. (14 refs).

  7. White-light emission from porous-silicon-aluminium Schottky junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masini, G.; La Monica, S.; Maiello, G.

    1996-01-01

    Porous-silicon-based white-light-emitting devices are presented. The fabrication process on different substrates is described. The peculiarities of technological steps for device fabrication (porous-silicon formation and aluminium treatment) are underlined. Doping profile of the porous layer, current-voltage characteristics, time response, lifetime tests and electroluminescence emission spectrum of the device are presented. A model for electrical behaviour of Al/porous silicon Schottky junction is presented. Electroluminescence spectrum of the presented devices showed strong similarities with white emission from crystalline silicon junctions in the breakdown region

  8. Emission lines in the hydrogen-deficient variable MV Sagittarii near maximum light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbig, G.H.

    1975-01-01

    The H-deficient R CrB type variable MV Sgr near maximum light shows a rich emission spectrum in the 5800--8600 A region. Most of these lines are due to Fe ii, but Si ii, N i, O i, and Hα also are present. Such a spectrum has not been observed in any other R CrB star, but there is some resemblance to v Sgr. The emission lines in MV Sgr probably originate in an extended region of low temperature, which may also be responsible for the infrared excess observed by Feast and Glass

  9. Total reaction cross sections and neutron-removal cross sections of neutron-rich light nuclei measured by the COMBAS fragment-separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, B. M.; Isataev, T.; Erdemchimeg, B.; Artukh, A. G.; Aznabaev, D.; Davaa, S.; Klygin, S. A.; Kononenko, G. A.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.; Kuterbekov, K.; Lukyanov, S. M.; Mikhailova, T. I.; Maslov, V. A.; Mendibaev, K.; Sereda, Yu M.; Penionzhkevich, Yu E.; Vorontsov, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    Preliminary results of measurements of the total reaction cross sections σR and neutron removal cross section σ-xn for weakly bound 6He, 8Li, 9Be and 10Be nuclei at energy range (20-35) A MeV with 28Si target is presented. The secondary beams of light nuclei were produced by bombardment of the 22Ne (35 A MeV) primary beam on Be target and separated by COMBAS fragment-separator. In dispersive focal plane a horizontal slit defined the momentum acceptance as 1% and a wedge degrader of 200 μm Al was installed. The Bρ of the second section of the fragment-separator was adjusted for measurements in energy range (20-35) A MeV. Two-neutron removal cross sections for 6He and 10Be and one -neutron removal cross sections 8Li and 9Be were measured.

  10. Emission enhancement, light extraction and carrier dynamics in InGaAs/GaAs nanowire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivisaari, Pyry; Chen, Yang; Anttu, Nicklas

    2018-03-01

    Nanowires (NWs) have the potential for a wide range of new optoelectronic applications. For example, light-emitting diodes that span over the whole visible spectrum are currently being developed from NWs to overcome the well known green gap problem. However, due to their small size, NW devices exhibit special properties that complicate their analysis, characterization, and further development. In this paper, we develop a full optoelectronic simulation tool for NW array light emitters accounting for carrier transport and wave-optical emission enhancement (EE), and we use the model to simulate InGaAs/GaAs NW array light emitters with different geometries and temperatures. Our results show that NW arrays emit light preferentially to certain angles depending on the NW diameter and temperature, encouraging temperature- and angle-resolved measurements of NW array light emission. On the other hand, based on our results both the EE and light extraction efficiency can easily change by at least a factor of two between room temperature and 77 K, complicating the characterization of NW light emitters if conventional methods are used. Finally, simulations accounting for surface recombination emphasize its major effect on the device performance. For example, a surface recombination velocity of 104 cm s-1 reported earlier for bare InGaAs surfaces results in internal quantum efficiencies less than 30% for small-diameter NWs even at the temperature of 30 K. This highlights that core-shell structures or high-quality passivation techniques are eventually needed to achieve efficient NW-based light emitters.

  11. Characteristics of black carbon emissions from in-use light-duty passenger vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuan; Zhang, Shaojun; Wu, Ye; Zhang, K Max; Wu, Xian; Li, Zhenhua; Hao, Jiming

    2017-12-01

    Mitigating black carbon (BC) emissions from various combustion sources has been considered an urgent policy issue to address the challenges of climate change, air pollution and health risks. Vehicles contribute considerably to total anthropogenic BC emissions and urban BC concentrations. Compared with heavy-duty diesel vehicles, there is much larger uncertainty in BC emission factors for light-duty passenger vehicles (LDPVs), in particular for gasoline LDPVs, which warrants further studies. In this study, we employed the dynamometer and the Aethalometer (AE-51) to measure second-by-second BC emissions from eight LDPVs by engine technology and driving cycle. The average BC emission factors under transient cycles (e.g., ECE-15, New European Driving Cycle, NEDC, Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicles Test Cycle, WLTC) are 3.6-91.5 mg/km, 7.6 mg/km and 0.13-0.58 mg/km, respectively, for diesel (N = 3), gasoline direct injection (GDI) (N = 1) and gasoline port-fuel injection (PFI) engine categories (N = 4). For gasoline PFI LDPVs, the instantaneous emission profiles show a strong association of peak BC emissions with cold-start and high-speed aggressive driving. Such impacts lead to considerable BC emission contributions in cold-start periods (e.g., the first 47 s-94 s) over the entire cycle (e.g., 18-76% of the NEDC and 13-36% of the WLTC) and increased BC emission factors by 80-440% under the WLTC compared to the NEDC. For diesel BC emissions, the size distribution exhibits a typical unimodal pattern with one single peak appearing approximately from 120 to 150 nm, which is largely consistent with previous studies. Nevertheless, the average mass ratios of BC to particle mass (PM) range from 0.38 to 0.54 for three diesel samples, representing substantial impacts from both driving and engine conditions. The significant discrepancy between gasoline BC emission factors obtained from tailpipe exhaust versus ambient conditions suggest that more comparative

  12. Neutron emission effects on final fragments mass and kinetic energy distribution from low energy fission of {sup 234}U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Lobato, I. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Apartado Postal 31-139, Lima (Peru)]. e-mail: mmontoya@ipen.gob.pe

    2008-07-01

    The standard deviation of the final kinetic energy distribution ({sigma}{sub e}) as a function of mass of final fragments (m) from low energy fission of {sup 234}U, measured with the Lohengrin spectrometer by Belhafaf et al., presents a peak around m = 109 and another around m = 122. The authors attribute the first peak to the evaporation of a large number of neutrons around the corresponding mass number, i.e. there is no peak on the standard deviation of the primary kinetic energy distribution ({sigma}{sub E}) as a function of primary fragment mass (A). The second peak is attributed to a real peak on {sigma}{sub E}(A). However, theoretical calculations related to primary distributions made by H.R. Faust and Z. Bao do not suggest any peak on {sigma}{sub E}(A). In order to clarify this apparent controversy, we have made a numerical experiment in which the masses and the kinetic energy of final fragments are calculated, assuming an initial distribution of the kinetic energy without structures on the standard deviation as function of fragment mass. As a result we obtain a pronounced peak on {sigma}{sub e} (m) curve around m = 109, a depletion from m = 121 to m = 129, and an small peak around m = 122, which is not as great as that measured by Belhafaf et al. Our simulation also reproduces the experimental results on the yield of the final mass Y(m), the average number of emitted neutrons as a function of the provisional mass (calculated from the values of the final kinetic energy of the complementary fragments) and the average value of fragment kinetic energy as a function of the final mass. From our results we conclude that there are no peaks on the {sigma}{sub E} (A) curve, and the observed peaks on {sigma}{sub e} (m) are due to the emitted neutron multiplicity and the variation of the average fragment kinetic energy as a function of primary fragment mass. (Author)

  13. First approach to exhaust emissions characterization of light vehicles in Montevideo, Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Mauro; González, Alice Elizabeth; Rezzano Tizze, Nicolás

    2018-03-15

    According to Act No. 17283 of November 28th, 2000, air quality protection is a general concern in Uruguay. Road transport is the main emitter of nitrogen oxides (NO x ), as the National Inventory of Air Emissions 2006 stated. Actually, it is responsible for the emissions of 59.8% of NO x and 28% of carbon monoxide (CO). The number of households owning a car in Uruguay increased from 29% in 2005 to 39% in 2013, enhancing the importance of characterizing the vehicular emissions of the national fleet. In this paper, a first approach for this characterization is presented. It was carried out on a sample of 11 light vehicles currently in use in Montevideo city, Uruguay. On-road emissions measurements of nitrogen monoxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) were carried out for calculating the emission factors. The fitness of the set of calculated emission factors values to different probability distributions was tested. When possible, the 95% confidence intervals were obtained for the mean emission factors (CO: 2.0g/km±0.3g/km; NO: 0.05g/km±0.01g/km). This procedure was useful to obtaining accurate confidence intervals from a relatively small sample size. Finally, the link between atmospheric emissions and some other parameters of the tested vehicles was studied using a multivariate statistical tool, highlighting the strong increase in carbon monoxide emissions observed for low vehicles speeds and fuel efficiencies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Complex fragment emission in the reaction 197Au → 197Au at an incident energy of 15 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmoll, R.

    1988-07-01

    For the study of the dominant decay processes in the reaction 15 MeV/u 197 Au → 197 Au in one-particle inclusive experiments the emission characteristics of all ejectiles in the mass range 24 ≤ A ≤ 197 were studied. The deflection function of the projectile-like fragments is for all energy losses at the grazing angle Θ cm gr =27.5 degrees peaked and in fact even for scattering events in which the whole available kinetic energy was dissipated in the collisions. The systematic analysis of the velocity spectra shows that the lightest fragments are formed in double-sequential fission of the highly excited gold-like fragments from the first deep inelastic reaction stage before reaching of a global equilibrium. On the other side symmetrical fission products, which are part of the narrow branch of the mass distribution, are emitted in simple-sequential non-equilibrium fission. This simple-sequential breakup is very closely limited to excitation energies of 75 ≤ E * ≤ 275 MeV of the primary, gold-like fragments, while the probability for double-sequential fission above E * ≅ 200 MeV increases very strongly. Contrarily to equilibrated compound-nucleus fission these processes are characterized by a in the source system strongly anisotropic angular distribution with distinct foreward/backward asymmetry and by an extremely asymmetric mass split. The study of the mass distribution shows that non-equilibrium fission at 15 MeV/u is both in view of the reaction cross section and regarding the creation of the complex fragments is the dominant decay process. The integral cross section of the broad four-body distribution corresponds to 60% of the total reaction cross section; the integral cross section of the narrow three-body distribution corresponds to 10%. (orig./HSI) [de

  15. An assessment of the real-world driving gaseous emissions from a Euro 6 light-duty diesel vehicle using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luján, José M.; Bermúdez, Vicente; Dolz, Vicente; Monsalve-Serrano, Javier

    2018-02-01

    Recent investigations demonstrated that real-world emissions usually exceed the levels achieved in the laboratory based type approval processes. By means of on-board emissions measurements, it has been shown that nitrogen oxides emitted by diesel engines substantially exceed the limit imposed by the Euro 6 regulation. Thus, with the aim of complementing the worldwide harmonized light vehicles test cycle, the real driving emissions cycle will be introduced after 1 September 2017 to regulate the vehicle emissions in real-world driving situations. This paper presents on-board gaseous emissions measurements from a Euro 6 light-duty diesel vehicle in a real-world driving route using a portable emissions measurement system. The test route characteristics follow the requirements imposed by the RDE regulation. The analysis of the raw emissions results suggests that the greatest amount of nitrogen oxides and nitrogen dioxide are emitted during the urban section of the test route, confirming that lower speeds with more accelerations and decelerations lead to higher nitrogen oxides emissions levels than constant high speeds. Moreover, the comparison of the two calculation methods proposed by the real driving emissions regulation has revealed emissions rates differences ranging from 10% to 45% depending on the pollutant emission and the trip section considered (urban or total). Thus, the nitrogen oxides emissions conformity factor slightly varies from one method to the other.

  16. How to prevent greenhouse gas emissions in electrical installations: lighting energy savings and solar energy approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavuz, C.; Aksoy, C. [Sakarya University, Faculty of Engineering, Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Serdivan (Turkey)

    2012-07-01

    Day by day greenhouse gas emissions increase dramatically. A passive adaptive method of lighting energy savings, daylight responsive systems are considered one of the best solutions for energy efficiency, saving and prevent CO{sub 2} emissions. Results of an annual experiment which was held in Sakarya University proves the necessity of daylight responsive systems with a 41% energy saving and 942.5 kg of prevented CO{sub 2} emissions Thinking this prevention is realized just only in a 36 m{sup 2} room with the use of 8 luminaries spreading such systems to nationwide, a major amount of greenhouse gas emissions would be prohibited. On the other hand energy saving is not the only way to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Again in Sakarya University a project has started to investigate the possibility of illumination of a complete building by using solar energy. This paper evaluates these mentioned systems both in energy efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions prevention and economic point of views. (author)

  17. The influence on intrinsic light emission of calcium tungstate and molybdate powders by multivalence Pr codoping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Fang; Xiao, Zhisong; Yan, Lu; Zhang, Feng; Huang, Anping

    2010-01-01

    For trivalent praseodymium (Pr 3+ ) and quadrivalent praseodymium (Pr 4+ ) codoped CaMO 4 (M = W, Mo) powders, the luminescence propriety of matrix is obviously influenced by carrier concentration. The light emission intensity of CaWO 4 matrix decreases exponentially with increasing of Pr concentration because oxygen-deficient (WO 3 .V O ) obtains an electron supplied by Pr 3+ (5d). However, the light emission intensity of CaMoO 4 is enhanced by Pr codoping because the quasi-free electrons increase the probability of radiative combination. The difference of photoluminescence properties in the two materials are attributed to the bonding character of M and O in the CaMO 4 structure. (orig.)

  18. Quantum mechanical modeling the emission pattern and polarization of nanoscale light emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rulin; Zhang, Yu; Bi, Fuzhen; Frauenheim, Thomas; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2016-07-21

    Understanding of the electroluminescence (EL) mechanism in optoelectronic devices is imperative for further optimization of their efficiency and effectiveness. Here, a quantum mechanical approach is formulated for modeling the EL processes in nanoscale light emitting diodes (LED). Based on non-equilibrium Green's function quantum transport equations, interactions with the electromagnetic vacuum environment are included to describe electrically driven light emission in the devices. The presented framework is illustrated by numerical simulations of a silicon nanowire LED device. EL spectra of the nanowire device under different bias voltages are obtained and, more importantly, the radiation pattern and polarization of optical emission can be determined using the current approach. This work is an important step forward towards atomistic quantum mechanical modeling of the electrically induced optical response in nanoscale systems.

  19. Room-temperature light-emission from Ge quantum dots in photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia Jinsong [Advanced Research Laboratories, Musashi Institute of Technolgy, 8-15-1 Todoroki, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-0082 (Japan)], E-mail: jxia@sc.musashi-tech.ac.jp; Nemoto, Koudai; Ikegami, Yuta [Advanced Research Laboratories, Musashi Institute of Technolgy, 8-15-1 Todoroki, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-0082 (Japan); Usami, Noritaka [Institute of Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-2-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai Japan (Japan)], E-mail: usa@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Nakata, Yasushi [Horiba, Ltd., 1-7-8 Higashi-Kanda, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0031 (Japan)], E-mail: yasushi.nakata@horiba.com; Shiraki, Yasuhiro [Advanced Research Laboratories, Musashi Institute of Technolgy, 8-15-1 Todoroki, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-0082 (Japan)

    2008-11-03

    Multiple layers of Ge self-assembled quantum dots were embedded into two-dimensional silicon photonic crystal microcavities fabricated on silicon-on-insulator substrates. Microphotoluminescence was used to study the light-emission characteristic of the Ge quantum dots in the microcavities. Strong resonant room-temperature light-emission was observed in the telecommunication wavelength region. Significant enhancement of the luminescence from Ge dots was obtained due to the resonance in the cavities. Multiple sharp resonant peaks dominated the spectrum, showing strong optical resonance inside the cavity. By changing the lattice constant of photonic crystal structure, the wavelengths of the resonant peaks are tuned in the wide wavelength range from 1.2 to 1.6 {mu}m.

  20. Ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from spotlights incorporating tungsten halogen lamps

    CERN Document Server

    MacKinlay, Alistair F; Whillock, M J

    1989-01-01

    This report summarises measurements of the ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from eleven 'desk-top' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamps and one 'floor-standing' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamp available in the UK. Values of occupational hazard weighted and erythemally weighted ultraviolet radiation irradiance and measurements and relevant calculations of blue-light hazards are presented. It is concluded that the safety design of some desk-top tungsten halogen lamps is inadequate to prevent unnecessary exposure of the skin to potentially harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is recommended that all tungsten halogen lamps should have sufficient filtration to reduce their ultraviolet emissions to an acceptably low level. As long as the comfort aversion responses of the eye are respected, direct viewing of the lamps examined should not constitute a retinal hazard.

  1. Ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from spotlights incorporating tungsten halogen lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinlay, A.F.; Whillock, M.J.; Meulemans, C.C.E.

    1989-07-01

    This report summarises measurements of the ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from eleven 'desk-top' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamps and one 'floor-standing' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamp available in the UK. Values of occupational hazard weighted and erythemally weighted ultraviolet radiation irradiance and measurements and relevant calculations of blue-light hazards are presented. It is concluded that the safety design of some desk-top tungsten halogen lamps is inadequate to prevent unnecessary exposure of the skin to potentially harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is recommended that all tungsten halogen lamps should have sufficient filtration to reduce their ultraviolet emissions to an acceptably low level. As long as the comfort aversion responses of the eye are respected, direct viewing of the lamps examined should not constitute a retinal hazard. (author)

  2. Fabrication, Light Emission, and Magnetism of Silica Nanoparticles Hybridized with AIE Luminogens and Inorganic Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Mahtab

    Much research efforts have been devoted in developing new synthetic approaches for fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) due to their potential high-technological applications. However, light emissions from most of the FSNPs prepared so far have been rather weak. This is due to the emission quenching caused by the aggregation of fluorophores in the solid state. We have observed a novel phenomenon of aggregation-induced emission (AIE): a series of propeller-shaped molecules such as tetraphenylethene (TPE) and silole are induced to emit efficiently by aggregate formation. Thus, they are ideal fluorophors for the construction of FSNPs and my thesis work focuses on the synthesis of silica nanoparticles containing these luminogens and magnetic nanostructures. Highly emissive FSNPs with core-shell structures are fabricated by surfactant-free sol-gel reactions of tetraphenylethene- (TPE) and silole-functionalized siloxanes followed by the reactions with tetraethoxysilane. The FSNPs are uniformly sized, surface-charged and colloidally stable. The diameters of the FSNPs are tunable in the range of 45--295 nm by changing the reaction conditions. Whereas their TPE and silole precursors are non-emissive, the FSNPs emit strong visible lights, thanks to the novel aggregation-induced emission characteristics of the TPE and silole aggregates in the hybrid nanoparticles. The FSNPs pose no toxicity to living cells and can be utilized to selectively image cytoplasm of HeLa cells. Applying the same tool in the presence of citrate-coated magnetite nanoparticles, uniform magnetic fluorescent silica nanoparticles (MFSNPs) with smooth surfaces are fabricated. These particles exhibit appreciable surface charges and hence good colloidal stability. They are superparamagnetic, exhibiting no hysteresis at room temperature. UV irradiation of a suspension of MFSNPs in ethanol gives strong blue and green emissions. The MFSNPs can selectively stain the cytoplasmic regions of the living cells

  3. Excitation light source dependence of emission in Sn2+-Ce3+ codoped ZnO-P2O5 glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Masai, Hirokazu; Hino, Yusuke; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Fukuda, Kentaro; Yoko, Toshinobu

    2013-01-01

    Correlation between excitation light source and the emission property of Sn^{2+}-Ce^{3+} co-doped zinc phosphate glasses is examined. Although photoluminescence (PL) peaks of both Sn^{2+}and Ce^{3+} shifted with increasing amount of Ce^{3+}, there was little energy resonance between Sn^{2+} and Ce^{3+} emission centers. On the other hand, radioluminescence (RL) spectra excited by X-ray was independent of the Ce concentration, indicating that emission was mainly observed from Sn^{2+} emission ...

  4. 40 CFR 86.1818-12 - Greenhouse gas emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Greenhouse gas emission standards for... Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1818-12 Greenhouse gas emission standards for light-duty... group of six greenhouse gases: Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons...

  5. Laboratory and field measurements of enantiomeric monoterpene emissions as a function of chemotype, light and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Staudt, M.; Bourgeois, I.; Williams, J.

    2014-03-01

    Plants emit significant amounts of monoterpenes into the earth's atmosphere, where they react rapidly to form a multitude of gas phase species and particles. Many monoterpenes exist in mirror-image forms or enantiomers. In this study the enantiomeric monoterpene profile for several representative plants (Quercus ilex L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., and Pinus halepensis Mill.) was investigated as a function of chemotype, light and temperature both in the laboratory and in the field. Analysis of enantiomeric monoterpenes from 19 Quercus ilex individuals from Southern France and Spain revealed four regiospecific chemotypes (genetically fixed emission patterns). In agreement with previous work, only Quercus ilex emissions increased strongly with light. However, for all three plant species no consistent enantiomeric variation was observed as a function of light, and the enantiomeric ratio of α-pinene was found to vary by less than 20% from 100 and 1000 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR (photosynthetically active radiation). The rate of monoterpene emission increased with temperature from all three plant species, but little variation in the enantiomeric distribution of α-pinene was observed with temperature. There was more enantiomeric variability between individuals of the same species than could be induced by either light or temperature. Field measurements of α-pinene enantiomer mixing ratios in the air, taken at a Quercus ilex forest in Southern France, and several other previously reported field enantiomeric ratio diel cycle profiles are compared. All show smoothly varying diel cycles (some positive and some negative) even over changing wind directions. This is surprising in comparison with variations of enantiomeric emission patterns shown by individuals of the same species.

  6. Broadly tunable metal halide perovskites for solid-state light-emission applications

    OpenAIRE

    Adjokatse, Sampson; Fang, Hong-Hua; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2017-01-01

    The past two years have witnessed heightened interest in metal-halide perovskites as promising optoelectronic materials for solid-state light emitting applications beyond photovoltaics. Metal-halide perovskites are low-cost solution-processable materials with excellent intrinsic properties such as broad tunability of bandgap, defect tolerance, high photoluminescence quantum efficiency and high emission color purity (narrow full-width at half maximum). In this review, the photophysical propert...

  7. Autocorrelation analysis of plasma plume light emissions in deep penetration laser welding of steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrňa, Libor; Šarbort, Martin; Řeřucha, Šimon; Jedlička, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-10, č. článku 012009. ISSN 1042-346X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : laser welding * plasma plume * light emissions * autocorrelation analysis * weld depth Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.492, year: 2016

  8. Silicon nanocrystal-based photonic crystal slabs with broadband and efficient directional light emission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondič, Lukáš; Varga, Marián; Pelant, Ivan; Valenta, J.; Kromka, Alexander; Elliman, R. G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-8, č. článku 5763. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ16-09692Y; GA MŠk(CZ) LD15003 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : photonic crystal slab * silicon nanocrystals * light emission Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  9. Fission fragment angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenne, D. De

    1991-01-01

    Most of the energy released in fission is converted into translational kinetic energy of the fragments. The remaining excitation energy will be distributed among neutrons and gammas. An important parameter characterizing the scission configuration is the primary angular momentum of the nascent fragments. Neutron emission is not expected to decrease the spin of the fragments by more than one unit of angular momentum and is as such of less importance in the determination of the initial fragment spins. Gamma emission is a suitable tool in studying initial fragment spins because the emission time, number, energy, and multipolarity of the gammas strongly depend on the value of the primary angular momentum. The main conclusions of experiments on gamma emission were that the initial angular momentum of the fragments is large compared to the ground state spin and oriented perpendicular to the fission axis. Most of the recent information concerning initial fragment spin distributions comes from the measurement of isomeric ratios for isomeric pairs produced in fission. Although in nearly every mass chain isomers are known, only a small number are suitable for initial fission fragment spin studies. Yield and half-life considerations strongly limit the number of candidates. This has the advantage that the behavior of a specific isomeric pair can be investigated for a number of fissioning systems at different excitation energies of the fragments and fissioning nuclei. Because most of the recent information on primary angular momenta comes from measurements of isomeric ratios, the global deexcitation process of the fragments and the calculation of the initial fragment spin distribution from measured isomeric ratios are discussed here. The most important results on primary angular momentum determinations are reviewed and some theoretical approaches are given. 45 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Full phosphorescent white-light organic light-emitting diodes with improved color stability and efficiency by fine tuning primary emission contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hua

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel type of white-light organic light emitting diode (OLED with high color stability was reported, in which the yellow-light emission layer of (4,4′-N,N′-dicarbazolebiphenyl (CBP : tris(2-phenylquinoline-C2,N′iridium(III (Ir(2-phq3 was sandwiched by double blue-light emission layers of 1,1-bis-[(di-4-tolylaminopheny1]cyclohexane (TAPC : bis[4,6-(di-fluorophenyl-pyridinato-N,C2′]picolinate (FIrpic and tris[3-(3-pyridylmesityl]borane (3TPYMB:FIrpic. And, it exhibited the maximum current efficiency of 33.1 cd/A, the turn-on voltage at about 3 V and the maximum luminance in excess of 20000 cd/m2. More important, it realized very stable white-light emission, and its CIE(x, y coordinates only shift from (0.34, 0.37 to (0.33, 0.37 as applied voltage increased from 5 V to 12 V. It is believed that the new scheme in emission layer of white-light OLED can fine tune the contribution of primary emission with applied voltage changed, resulting in high quality white-light OLED.

  11. Full phosphorescent white-light organic light-emitting diodes with improved color stability and efficiency by fine tuning primary emission contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Wang, E-mail: wmsu2008@sinano.ac.cn, E-mail: wanghua001@tyut.edu.cn; Du, Xiaogang [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center of Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Su, Wenming, E-mail: wmsu2008@sinano.ac.cn, E-mail: wanghua001@tyut.edu.cn; Zhang, Dongyu [Printable Electronics Research Centre, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, suzhou 215123 (China); Lin, Wenjing [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center of Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Printable Electronics Research Centre, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, suzhou 215123 (China)

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, a novel type of white-light organic light emitting diode (OLED) with high color stability was reported, in which the yellow-light emission layer of (4,4{sup ′}-N,N{sup ′}-dicarbazole)biphenyl (CBP) : tris(2-phenylquinoline-C2,N{sup ′})iridium(III) (Ir(2-phq){sub 3}) was sandwiched by double blue-light emission layers of 1,1-bis-[(di-4-tolylamino)pheny1]cyclohexane (TAPC) : bis[4,6-(di-fluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C2{sup ′}]picolinate (FIrpic) and tris[3-(3-pyridyl)mesityl]borane (3TPYMB):FIrpic. And, it exhibited the maximum current efficiency of 33.1 cd/A, the turn-on voltage at about 3 V and the maximum luminance in excess of 20000 cd/m{sup 2}. More important, it realized very stable white-light emission, and its CIE(x, y) coordinates only shift from (0.34, 0.37) to (0.33, 0.37) as applied voltage increased from 5 V to 12 V. It is believed that the new scheme in emission layer of white-light OLED can fine tune the contribution of primary emission with applied voltage changed, resulting in high quality white-light OLED.

  12. Full phosphorescent white-light organic light-emitting diodes with improved color stability and efficiency by fine tuning primary emission contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Wang; Du, Xiaogang; Su, Wenming; Lin, Wenjing; Zhang, Dongyu

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, a novel type of white-light organic light emitting diode (OLED) with high color stability was reported, in which the yellow-light emission layer of (4,4'-N,N'-dicarbazole)biphenyl (CBP) : tris(2-phenylquinoline-C2,N')iridium(III) (Ir(2-phq)3) was sandwiched by double blue-light emission layers of 1,1-bis-[(di-4-tolylamino)pheny1]cyclohexane (TAPC) : bis[4,6-(di-fluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C2']picolinate (FIrpic) and tris[3-(3-pyridyl)mesityl]borane (3TPYMB):FIrpic. And, it exhibited the maximum current efficiency of 33.1 cd/A, the turn-on voltage at about 3 V and the maximum luminance in excess of 20000 cd/m2. More important, it realized very stable white-light emission, and its CIE(x, y) coordinates only shift from (0.34, 0.37) to (0.33, 0.37) as applied voltage increased from 5 V to 12 V. It is believed that the new scheme in emission layer of white-light OLED can fine tune the contribution of primary emission with applied voltage changed, resulting in high quality white-light OLED.

  13. Projectile fragmentation of neutron-rich nuclei on light target (momentum distribution and nucleon-removal cross section)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Tanihata, I.; Suzuki, T.

    1992-01-01

    Transverse momentum distributions of the projectile fragments from β-unstable nuclei have been measured with various projectile and target combinations. The momentum correlation of two neutrons in the neutron halo is extracted from the P c t distribution of 9 Li and hat of the neutrons. It is found that the two neutrons are moving in the same direction on average and thus strongly suggests the formation of a di-neutron in 11 Li. (Author)

  14. Study of organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) with optimal emission efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai [School of Engineering and IT, B-purple 12, Faculty of EHS, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)

    2010-04-15

    The external emission efficiency of organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) is analysed by studying the rate of spontaneous emission of both singlet and triplet excitons and their corresponding radiative lifetimes. Rates of spontaneous emissions are calculated from the first order perturbation theory using the newly discovered time-dependent spin-orbit-exciton-photon interaction operator as the perturbation operator. It is clearly shown how the new interaction operator is responsible for attracting triplet excitons to a phosphor (heavy metal atom) and then it flips the spins to a singlet configuration. Thus, the spin forbidden transition becomes spin allowed. Calculated rates agree with the experimental results qualitatively. Results are of general interests for OLED studies. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. White organic light emitting devices with hybrid emissive layers combining phosphorescence and fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei Gangtie; Chen Xiaolan; Wang Lei; Zhu Meixiang; Zhu Weiguo [Key Lab of Environmental-friendly Chemistry and Application of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Wang Liduo; Qiu Yong [Key Lab of Organic-Optoelectronics and Molecular Sciences of Ministry of Education, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: lgt@xtu.edu.cn

    2008-05-21

    We fabricated a white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) by hybrid emissive layers which combined phosphorescence with fluorescence. In this device, the thin layer of 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-(t-butyl)-6-(1, 1, 7, 7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran played the role of undoped red emissive layer which was inserted between two blue phosphorescence emissive layers. The blue phosphorescent dye was bis[(4, 6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N, C{sup 2}] (picolinato) Ir(III), which was doped in the host material, N, N'-dicarbazolyl-1, 4-dimethene-benzene. The WOLED showed stable Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage coordinates and a high efficency of 9.6 cd A{sup -1} when the current density was 1.8 A m{sup -2}. The maximum luminance of the device achieved was 17 400 cd m{sup -2} when the current density was 3000 A m{sup -2}.

  16. Comprehensive Study of Solar Cell Structure Defects by Means of Noise and Light Emission Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Macku

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the issue of silicon solar cells localized defects from metrological and physical points of view. Structure imperfections represent the real problem because of solar cells long-term degradation and conversion efficiency decreasing. To this aim we pay our attention to research relating to the defect light emission and correlation with rectangular microplasma fluctuation. A sensitive CCD camera has been used for mapping of surface photon emission. The operation point of the samples has been set to reverse bias mode, and different electric field intensity was applied. We managed to get interesting information using a combination of optical investigation and electrical noise measurement in time and spectral domain. It will be revealed that a direct correlation between noise and photon emission exists and the results related to several defect spots are presented in detail in this paper.

  17. White light emission from an exciplex interface with a single emitting layer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Wilson; Perez-Gutierrez, Enrique; Agular, Andres; Barbosa G, J. Oracio C.; Maldonado, Jose L.; Meneses-Nava, Marco Antonio; Rodriguez Rivera, Mario A.; Rodriguez, Braulio

    2017-02-01

    Efficient solid state lighting devices based in inorganic emissive materials are now available in the market meanwhile for organic emissive materials still a lot of research work is in its way. [1,2] In this work a new organic emissive material based on carbazole, N-(4-Ethynylphenyl) carba-zole-d4 (6-d4), is used as electron-acceptor and commercial PEDOT:PSS as the electron-donor to obtain white emission. Besides the HOMO-LUMO levels of materials the white emission showed dependence on the films thicknesses and applied voltages. In here it is reported that by diminishing the thickness of the PEDOT:PSS layer, from 60 to 35 nm, and by keeping the derivative carbazole layer constant at 100 nm the electro-luminescence (EL) changed from emissive exciton states to the mixture of emissive exciton and exciplex states. [3] For the former thicknesses no white light was obtained meanwhile for the later the EL spectra broadened due to the emission of exciplex states. Under this condition, the best-achieved CIE coordinate was (0.31,0.33) with a driving voltage of 8 V. To lower the driving voltage of the devices a thin film of LiF was added between the derivative of carbazol and cathode but the CIE coordinates changed. The best CIE coordinates for this case were (0.29, 0.34) and (0.32, 0.37) with driving voltage of about 6.5 V. Acknowledgments: CeMie-Sol/27 (Mexico) 207450 References [1] Timothy L Dawson, Society of Dyers and Colourists, Color. Technol., 126, 1-10 (2010), doi: 10.1111/j.1478-4408.2010.00220.x [2] G. M. Farinola, R. Ragni, Journal of Solid State Lighting, 2:9 (2015), doi: 10.1186/s40539-015-0028-7. [3] E. Angioni, et al, J. Mater. Chem. C, 2016, 4, 3851, doi: 10.1039/c6tc00750c.

  18. Peripheral collisions of 2 GeV/nucleon Fe nuclei in nuclear emulsion. I. Light projectile fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedlander, E.M.; Crawford, H.J.; Gimpel, R.W.; Greiner, D.E.; Heckman, H.H.; Lindstrom, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    Observations on 374 collisions of 1.88-GeV/nucleon Fe nuclei in Ilford G-5 nuclear track emulsion, in which at least one projectle fragment of Z > = 3 was emitted within a 6 0 cone, revealed several features of projectile breakup. The onset of copious multiple fragmentation was observed. The relatively high α-particle multiplicities allowed for the first time a study of the α multiplicity distribution; a Poisson distribution gave an excellent fit. The data showed a significant enhancement of α-particle pairs with very small relative momenta. The transverse momentum distributions, which should reflect best the thermal motion in the projectile system, are in flagrant discrepancy with theoretical predictions; the distributions show a marked target dependence. The charges of all projectile fragments up to B were determined by measurement of gap-length distributions. Events with N/sub h/ = 0 are a class apart from the rest of the events; between N/sub h/ = 1 and N/sub h/ = 9 there is surprisingly little change in most parameters. 4 figures

  19. EMISSION HEIGHT AND TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION OF WHITE-LIGHT EMISSION OBSERVED BY HINODE/SOT FROM THE 2012 JANUARY 27 X-CLASS SOLAR FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kyoko; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Masuda, Satoshi; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Ohno, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    White-light emissions were observed from an X1.7 class solar flare on 2012 January 27, using three continuum bands (red, green, and blue) of the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite. This event occurred near the solar limb, and so differences in the locations of the various emissions are consistent with differences in heights above the photosphere of the various emission sources. Under this interpretation, our observations are consistent with the white-light emissions occurring at the lowest levels of where the Ca II H emission occurs. Moreover, the centers of the source regions of the red, green, and blue wavelengths of the white-light emissions are significantly displaced from each other, suggesting that those respective emissions are emanating from progressively lower heights in the solar atmosphere. The temperature distribution was also calculated from the white-light data, and we found the lower-layer emission to have a higher temperature. This indicates that high-energy particles penetrated down to near the photosphere, and deposited heat into the ambient lower layers of the atmosphere

  20. Suppression of Hydrogen Emission in an X-class White-light Solar Flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procházka, Ondrej; Milligan, Ryan O.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis [Astrophysics Research Centre, Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Allred, Joel C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kowalski, Adam F. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, 2000 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Kotrč, Pavel, E-mail: oprochazka01@qub.ac.uk [Astronomical Institute, The Czech Academy of Sciences, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic)

    2017-03-01

    We present unique NUV observations of a well-observed X-class flare from NOAA 12087 obtained at the Ondřejov Observatory. The flare shows a strong white-light continuum but no detectable emission in the higher Balmer and Lyman lines. Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and Fermi observations indicate an extremely hard X-ray spectrum and γ -ray emission. We use the RADYN radiative hydrodynamic code to perform two types of simulations: one where an energy of 3 × 10{sup 11} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} is deposited by an electron beam with a spectral index of ≈3, and a second where the same energy is applied directly to the photosphere. The combination of observations and simulations allows us to conclude that the white-light emission and the suppression or complete lack of hydrogen emission lines is best explained by a model where the dominant energy deposition layer is located in the lower layers of the solar atmosphere, rather than the chromosphere.

  1. White light emission from exciplex using tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum as chromaticity-tuning layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Jing; Li, Feng; Gao, Wenbao; Liu, Shiyong; Liu, Yu; Wang, Yue

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate efficient organic white light-emitting devices (LEDs), using N,N prime-diphenyl-N,N prime-bis(1-naphthyl) - (1,1 prime-biphenyl)-4,4 prime-diamine (NPB) as the hole-transporting layer, 1,6-bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)pyridine boron complex [(dppy)BF] as the emitting layer, tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq) as the electron-transporting and chromaticity-tuning layer. The white light comes from exciplex emission at the solid-state interface between (dppy)BF and NPB in addition to the exciton emission from NPB and (dppy)BF, respectively. The chromaticity of white emission can be tuned by adjusting the thickness of the Alq layer. The white LEDs with an Alq thickness of 15 nm exhibit a maximum luminescence of 2000 cd/m2 and efficiency of 0.58 lm/W, and the Commission Internationale De l'Eclairage coordinates of resulting emission vary from (0.29,0.33) to (0.31,0.35) with increasing forward bias from 10 to 25 V. The region is very close to the equienergy white point (0.33,0.33). [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  2. Two-dimensionally grown single-crystal silicon nanosheets with tunable visible-light emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Wook; Lee, Jaejun; Sung, Ji Ho; Seo, Dong-jae; Kim, Ilsoo; Jo, Moon-Ho; Kwon, Byoung Wook; Choi, Won Kook; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2014-07-22

    Since the discovery of graphene, growth of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials has greatly attracted attention. However, spontaneous growth of atomic two-dimensional (2D) materials is limitedly permitted for several layered-structure crystals, such as graphene, MoS2, and h-BN, and otherwise it is notoriously difficult. Here we report the gas-phase 2D growth of silicon (Si), that is cubic in symmetry, via dendritic growth and an interdendritic filling mechanism and to form Si nanosheets (SiNSs) of 1 to 13 nm in thickness. Thin SiNSs show strong thickness-dependent photoluminescence in visible range including red, green, and blue (RGB) emissions with the associated band gap energies ranging from 1.6 to 3.2 eV; these emission energies were greater than those from Si quantum dots (SiQDs) of the similar sizes. We also demonstrated that electrically driven white, as well as blue, emission in a conventional organic light-emitting diode (OLED) geometry with the SiNS assembly as the active emitting layers. Tunable light emissions in visible range in our observations suggest practical implications for novel 2D Si nanophotonics.

  3. On-board measurements of emissions from light-duty gasoline vehicles in three mega-cities of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Hong; Yao, Zhiliang; Zhang, Yingzhi; Shen, Xianbao; Zhang, Qiang; Ding, Yan; He, Kebin

    2012-03-01

    This paper is the second in a series of three papers aimed at understanding the emissions of vehicles in China by conducting on-board emission measurements. This paper focuses on light-duty gasoline vehicles. In this study, we measured 57 light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) in three Chinese mega-cites (Beijing, Guangzhou, and Shenzhen), covering Euro 0 through Euro IV technologies, and generated CO, HC, and NOx emission factors and deterioration rates for each vehicle technology. The results show that the vehicle emission standards have played a significant role in reducing vehicle emission levels in China. The vehicle emission factors are reduced by 47-81%, 53-64%, 46-71%, and 78-82% for each phase from Euro I to Euro IV. Euro 0 vehicles have a considerably high emission level, which is hundreds of times larger than that of Euro IV vehicles. Three old taxis and four other Euro I and Euro II LDGVs are also identified as super emitters with equivalent emission levels to Euro 0 vehicles. Of the measured fleet, 23% super emitters were estimated to contribute 50-80% to total emissions. Besides vehicle emission standards, measures for restricting super emitters are equally important to reduce vehicle emissions. This study is intended to improve the understanding of the vehicle emission levels in China, but some key issues such as emission deterioration rates are yet to be addressed with the presence of a sufficient amount of vehicle emission measurements.

  4. Emission of intermediate-mass fragments in the interaction of sup 1 sup 6 O with sup 5 sup 9 Co, sup 9 sup 3 Nb and sup 1 sup 9 sup 7 Au

    CERN Document Server

    Gadioli, E; Birattari, C; Cavinato, M; Fabrici, E; Gadioli-Erba, E; Pigni, M; Steyn, G F; Förtsch, S V; Lawrie, J J; Connell, S H; Sellschop, J P Friedel; Sideras-Haddad, E; Cowley, A A

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we study the emission of sup 8 Be sub g sub s , B and N fragments in the interaction of sup 1 sup 6 O ions with sup 5 sup 9 Co, sup 9 sup 3 Nb and sup 1 sup 9 sup 7 Au at incident energies varying from 6 to 25 MeV/nucleon. The spectra of these fragments, as well as those of C fragments studied in a previous paper, are dominated at forward angles by a component originating from break-up of sup 1 sup 6 O. At the higher incident energies break-up occurs after quite a sizeable projectile energy loss. Another mechanism which dominates at large emission angles, favours the emission of low-energy fragments and is attributed to the coalescence of nucleons during the cascade of nucleon-nucleon interactions by means of which the excited nuclei produced in the primary two-ion interaction thermalize. (orig.)

  5. Influence of Emission Spectrum and Irradiance on Light Curing of Resin-Based Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Cak; Sullivan, B; Turbino, M L; Soares, C J; Price, R B

    This study examined the influence of different emission spectra (single-peak and broad-spectrum) light-curing units (LCUs) delivering the same radiant exposures at irradiance values of 1200 or 3600 mW/cm 2 on the polymerization and light transmission of four resin-based composites (RBCs). Two prototype LCUs that used the same light tip, but were either a single-peak blue or a broad-spectrum LED, were used to deliver the same radiant exposures to the top surfaces of the RBCs using either standard (1200 mW/cm 2 ) or high irradiance (3600 mW/cm 2 ) settings. The emission spectrum and radiant power from the LCUs were measured with a laboratory-grade integrating sphere coupled to a spectrometer, and the light beam was assessed with a beam profiler camera. Four RBCs (Filtek Supreme Ultra A2, Tetric EvoCeram A2, Tetric EvoCeram T, and TPH Spectra High Viscosity A2) were photoactivated using four different light conditions: single-peak blue/standard irradiance, single-peak blue/high irradiance, broad-spectrum/standard irradiance, and broad-spectrum/high irradiance. The degree of conversion (N=5) and microhardness at the top and bottom of 2.3-mm-diameter by 2.5-mm-thick specimens (N=5) were analyzed with analysis of variance and Tukey tests. The real-time light transmission through the RBCs was also measured. For all light conditions, the 2.3-mm-diameter specimens received a homogeneous irradiance and spectral distribution. Although similar radiant exposures were delivered to the top surfaces of the RBCs, the amount of light energy emitted from the bottom surfaces was different among the four RBCs, and was also greater for the single-peak lights. Very little violet light (wavelengths below 420 nm) reached the bottom of the 2.5-mm-thick specimens. The degree of conversion and microhardness results varied according to the RBC (pspectrum lights, while at the bottom, where little violet light was observed, the results were equal or higher when they were photoactivated with

  6. Dynamics of the cavity radiation of a correlated emission laser initially seeded with a thermal light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesfa, Sintayehu, E-mail: sint_tesfa@yahoo.com [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer Street 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Physics Department, Dilla University, PO Box 419, Dilla (Ethiopia)

    2011-10-15

    A detailed analysis of the time evolution of the two-mode squeezing, entanglement and intensity of the cavity radiation of a two-photon correlated emission laser initially seeded with a thermal light is presented. The dependences of the degree of two-mode squeezing and entanglement on the intensity of the thermal light and time are found to have a more or less similar nature, although the actual values differ, especially in the early stages of the process and when the atoms are initially prepared with nearly 50:50 probability to be in the upper and lower energy levels. Seeding the cavity degrades the nonclassical features significantly, particularly in the vicinity of t=0. It is also shown that the mean photon number in a wider time span has a dip when mode b is seeded but a peak when mode a is seeded. Moreover, it turns out that the effect of the seed light on the nonclassical features and intensity of the cavity radiation decreases significantly with time, an outcome essentially attributed to the pertinent emission-absorption mechanism. This can be taken as an encouraging aspect in the practical utilization of this model as a source of a bright entangled light.

  7. Cumulation of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldin, A.M.; Bondarev, V.K.; Golovanov, L.B.

    1977-01-01

    Limit fragmentation of light nuclei (deuterium, helium) bombarded with 8,6 GeV/c protons was investigated. Fragments (pions, protons and deuterons) were detected within the emission angle 50-150 deg with regard to primary protons and within the pulse range 150-180 MeV/c. By the kinematics of collision of a primary proton with a target at rest the fragments observed correspond to a target mass upto 3 GeV. Thus, the data obtained correspond to teh cumulation upto the third order

  8. Complex fragment emission from the 3He+natAg system between 0.48 and 3.6 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yennello, S.J.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Fields, D.E.; Planeta, R.; Viola, V.E.; Indiana Univ., Bloomington; Pollacco, E.C.; Volant, C.; Dayras, R.; Legrain, R.; Casssagnou, Y.; Harar, S.; Hourani, E.

    1990-01-01

    The emission of complex fragments (3≤Z≤12) from reactions of 3 He with nat Ag has been studied at bombarding energies of E=480, 900, 1800, 2700 and 3600 MeV. Between 900 and 1800 MeV slopes of the fragment kinetic energy spectra at backward angles undergo a change in character, becoming much flatter; in addition, the Coulomb peak is found to broaden significantly and shift to lower energies. Power-law fits to the fragment charge distributions result in decreasing values of the exponent τ up to a bombarding energy of 1800 MeV; at this value and beyond, a constant value of τ=2.1±0.1 is observed. Elemental cross sections at the highest energy are found to increase by approximately two orders of magnitude relative to data near 100 MeV. The data suggest a change in reaction mechanism between incident energies of 900 and 1800 MeV. (orig.)

  9. CORRELATION OF HARD X-RAY AND WHITE LIGHT EMISSION IN SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Battaglia, Marina; Kleint, Lucia; Casadei, Diego [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Bahnhofstrasse 6, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martinez; Hudson, Hugh S. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A statistical study of the correlation between hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares is performed in order to search for a link between flare-accelerated electrons and white light formation. We analyze 43 flares spanning GOES classes M and X using observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. We calculate X-ray fluxes at 30 keV and white light fluxes at 6173 Å summed over the hard X-ray flare ribbons with an integration time of 45 s around the peak hard-X ray time. We find a good correlation between hard X-ray fluxes and excess white light fluxes, with a highest correlation coefficient of 0.68 for photons with energy of 30 keV. Assuming the thick target model, a similar correlation is found between the deposited power by flare-accelerated electrons and the white light fluxes. The correlation coefficient is found to be largest for energy deposition by electrons above ∼50 keV. At higher electron energies the correlation decreases gradually while a rapid decrease is seen if the energy provided by low-energy electrons is added. This suggests that flare-accelerated electrons of energy ∼50 keV are the main source for white light production.

  10. Solution processable 2-(trityloxy)ethyl and tert-butyl group containing amorphous molecular glasses of pyranylidene derivatives with light-emitting and amplified spontaneous emission properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarins, Elmars; Vembris, Aivars; Misina, Elina; Narels, Martins; Grzibovskis, Raitis; Kokars, Valdis

    2015-11-01

    Small organic molecules with incorporated 4H-pyran-4-ylidene (pyranylidene) fragment as the π-conjugation system which bonds the electron acceptor fragment (A) with electron donor part (D) in the molecule - also well known as derivatives of 4-(dicyano-methylene)-2-methyl-6-[p-(dimethylamino)styryl]-4H-pyran (DCM) laser dye-have attracted considerable attention of scientists as potential new generation materials for organic photonics and molecular electronics due to their low-cost fabrication possibility, flexibility and low-weight. Six glassy derivatives of 4H-pyran-4-ylidene (pyranylidene) with attached bulky 2-(trityloxy)ethyl and tert-butyl groups are described in this report. Almost all of the synthesized compounds form good optical quality transparent amorphous films from volatile organic solvents and could be obtained in good yields up to 75%. Their light emission in solution and thin solid films is in the range of 600-700 nm, they are thermally stable and show glass transition in the range of 108-158 °C. The amplified spontaneous emission threshold values of the neat films of the glassy pyranylidene derivatives vary from 155 to 450 μJ/cm2 and their HOMO and LUMO energy levels are between of those of tris(8-hydroxy quinolinato) aluminum (Alq3). The photoluminescence quantum yields of the glassy compounds are in the range from 1% to about 7.7% and their electroluminescence properties have been investigated. Therefore, glassy pyranylidene derivatives could be a very potential low-cost solution processable materials for Alq3 hosted light-amplification and light-emitting application studies.

  11. Enhanced light emission efficiency and current stability by morphology control and thermal annealing of organic light emitting diode devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caria, S [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), Via P Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Como, E Da [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), Via P Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Murgia, M [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), Via P Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Zamboni, R [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), Via P Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Melpignano, P [Centro Ricerche Plast-Optica (CRP), via Jacopo Linussio 1, 33020 Amaro (UD) (Italy); Biondo, V [Centro Ricerche Plast-Optica (CRP), via Jacopo Linussio 1, 33020 Amaro (UD) (Italy)

    2006-08-23

    The electro-optical behaviour of organic light emitting diode devices (OLEDs) is greatly influenced by the morphology of the films. A major parameter is due to the important role that the morphology of the active organic thin films plays in the phenomena that lead to light emission. For vacuum-grown OLEDs, the morphology of the specific thin films can be varied by modification of the deposition conditions. We have assessed the method (ultrahigh-vacuum organic molecular beam deposition) and conditions (variation of the deposition rate) for electro-emission (EL) optimization in a standard {alpha}-NPB (N,N'-bis-(1-naphthyl)-N,N' diphenyl-1,1' biphenyl-4-4' diamine)/Alq3 (tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium) vacuum-grown OLED device. The best EL performances have been obtained for OLEDs made in ultrahigh vacuum with the Alq3 layer deposited with a differential deposition rate ranging from 1.0 to 0.3Angsts{sup -1}. The results are consistent with a model of different Alq3 morphologies, allowing efficient charge injection at the metal/organic interface, and of the minimization of grain boundaries at the electron-hole recombination interface, allowing efficient radiative excitonic decay. At the same time, with the objective of controlling and stabilizing the morphology changes and stabilizing the charge transport over a long OLED operating time, we have studied the effect of thermal annealing processing in the standard current behaviour of OLEDs. The large current fluctuations typically observed for standard vacuum-grown OLEDs have been smeared out and kept constant over a long operating time by the given thermal annealing conditions. The results are interpreted in terms of the stabilization of intrinsic polymorphism of the organic film's structure induced by thermal energy and leading the morphology to a lowest-energetic configuration.

  12. Studies of light charged particle emission from fission and ER reactions in the system 344 MeV {sup 28}Si+{sup 121}Sb{yields}{sup 149}Tb (E{sup *}=240 MeV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Morton E-mail: kaplan@cmchem.chem.cmu.edu; Copi, Craig J.; DeYoung, Paul A.; Gilfoyle, G.J.; Karol, Paul J.; Moses, David J.; Parker, W.E.; Rehm, K. Ernst; Sarafa, John; Vardaci, Emanuele

    2001-04-09

    Light charged particles (LCP) have been measured for the reaction 344 MeV {sup 28}Si+{sup 121}Sb in singles and in coincidence with evaporation residues (ER), fusion-fission fragments (FF), and other LCP. A major feature of this experiment was the use of a gas-filled magnetic spectrometer in the forward direction to separate ER from the much more abundant yield of elastically scattered projectiles and projectile-like fragments. The dominant sources of evaporative {sup 1}H and {sup 4}He emission are the ER (approximately 75%), with the remainder being largely associated with fission reactions. For these latter reactions, most of the {sup 1}H and {sup 4}He can be well accounted for by evaporation from the composite system prior to fission and by evaporation from the postfission fragments. LCP emission cross sections were determined for each identified source, and a comparison has been made to previous studies. From this comparison, indications were found for significant entrance channel effects, with the more asymmetric channels exhibiting much larger LCP cross sections. Statistical model predictions for ER emissions are in good agreement with observed LCP energy spectra, angular distributions, and integrated inclusive and exclusive cross sections, with all calculations using the same unique set of model parameters. This result contrasts strongly with recent reports for light mass systems, where model calculations were unable to simultaneously reproduce all observables.

  13. Hot electron light emission in gallium arsenide/aluminium(x) gallium(1-x) arsenic heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teke, Ali

    In this thesis we have demonstrated the operation of a novel tunable wavelength surface light emitting device. The device is based on a p-GaAs, and n-Ga1- xAlxAs heterojunction containing an inversion layer on the p- side, and GaAs quantum wells on the n- side, and, is referred to as HELLISH-2 (Hot Electron Light Emitting and Lasing in Semiconductor Heterostructure-Type 2). The devices utilise hot electron longitudinal transport and, therefore, light emission is independent of the polarity of the applied voltage. The wavelength of the emitted light can be tuned with the applied bias from GaAs band-to-band transition in the inversion layer to e1-hh1 transition in the quantum wells. In this work tunable means that the device can be operated at either single or multiple wavelength emission. The operation of the device requires only two diffused in point contacts. In this project four HELLISH-2 samples coded as ES1, ES2, ES6 and QT919 have been studied. First three samples were grown by MBE and the last one was grown by MOVPE techniques. ES1 was designed for single and double wavelength operation. ES2 was a control sample used to compare our results with previous work on HELLISH-2 and ES6 was designed for single, double and triple wavelength operation. Theoretical modelling of the device operation was carried out and compared with the experimental results. HELLISH-2 structure was optimised for low threshold and high efficiency operation as based on our model calculations. The last sample QT919 has been designed as an optimised device for single and double wavelength operation like ES1. HELLISH-2 has a number of advantages over the conventional light emitters, resulting in some possible applications, such as light logic gates and wavelength division multiplexing in optoelectronic.

  14. On-board emission measurement of high-loaded light-duty vehicles in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughedaoui, Ménouèr; Kerbachi, Rabah; Joumard, Robert

    2008-01-01

    A sample of eight private gasoline and diesel conventional light-duty vehicles (LDVs) in use with various ages, carrying a load of 460 kg, were tested on a representative trip in the traffic flow of the city of Blida to obtain emission factors representing the actual use conditions of Algerian LDVs. The gas sampling system (mini-constant volume sampling) as well as the analyzers are carried on-board the vehicle. Around 55 tests were conducted during 3 months covering more than 480 km under various real driving conditions. The mean speed downtown is about 16.1 km/hr with a rather low acceleration, an average of 0.60 m/sec2. For each test, kinematics are recorded as well as the analysis of the four emitted pollutants carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and total hydrocarbons. Emission factors were evaluated according to speed for each category of gasoline and diesel engines. The influence of some parameters such as cold/hot start, age of vehicle and its state of maintenance are discussed. Results are compared with the European database ARTEMIS for comparable vehicles. These measurements contribute to the development of unit emission of the vehicles used in Algeria, which are necessary for the calculation of emission inventory of pollutants and greenhouse gases from the road transportation sector. The unit emissions constitute a tool of decisionmaking aid regarding the conception of new regulations of vehicle control and inspection in Algeria and even in similar developing countries.

  15. Evaluation of NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light Data for Mapping Global Fossil Fuel Combustion CO2 Emissions: A Comparison with DMSP-OLS Nighttime Light Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jinpei; Liu, Xiaoping; Li, Xia; Li, Meifang; Li, Wenkai

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the stable light products and radiance calibrated products from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) have been useful for mapping global fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at fine spatial resolution. However, few studies on this subject were conducted with the new-generation nighttime light data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Satellite, which has a higher spatial resolution and a wider radiometric detection range than the traditional DMSP-OLS nighttime light data. Therefore, this study performed the first evaluation of the potential of NPP-VIIRS data in estimating the spatial distributions of global CO2 emissions (excluding power plant emissions). Through a disaggregating model, three global emission maps were then derived from population counts and three different types of nighttime lights data (NPP-VIIRS, the stable light data and radiance calibrated data of DMSP-OLS) for a comparative analysis. The results compared with the reference data of land cover in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou show that the emission areas of map from NPP-VIIRS data have higher spatial consistency of the artificial surfaces and exhibit a more reasonable distribution of CO2 emission than those of other two maps from DMSP-OLS data. Besides, in contrast to two maps from DMSP-OLS data, the emission map from NPP-VIIRS data is closer to the Vulcan inventory and exhibits a better agreement with the actual statistical data of CO2 emissions at the level of sub-administrative units of the United States. This study demonstrates that the NPP-VIIRS data can be a powerful tool for studying the spatial distributions of CO2 emissions, as well as the socioeconomic indicators at multiple scales.

  16. Evaluation of NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light Data for Mapping Global Fossil Fuel Combustion CO2 Emissions: A Comparison with DMSP-OLS Nighttime Light Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinpei Ou

    Full Text Available Recently, the stable light products and radiance calibrated products from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's (DMSP Operational Linescan System (OLS have been useful for mapping global fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions at fine spatial resolution. However, few studies on this subject were conducted with the new-generation nighttime light data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP Satellite, which has a higher spatial resolution and a wider radiometric detection range than the traditional DMSP-OLS nighttime light data. Therefore, this study performed the first evaluation of the potential of NPP-VIIRS data in estimating the spatial distributions of global CO2 emissions (excluding power plant emissions. Through a disaggregating model, three global emission maps were then derived from population counts and three different types of nighttime lights data (NPP-VIIRS, the stable light data and radiance calibrated data of DMSP-OLS for a comparative analysis. The results compared with the reference data of land cover in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou show that the emission areas of map from NPP-VIIRS data have higher spatial consistency of the artificial surfaces and exhibit a more reasonable distribution of CO2 emission than those of other two maps from DMSP-OLS data. Besides, in contrast to two maps from DMSP-OLS data, the emission map from NPP-VIIRS data is closer to the Vulcan inventory and exhibits a better agreement with the actual statistical data of CO2 emissions at the level of sub-administrative units of the United States. This study demonstrates that the NPP-VIIRS data can be a powerful tool for studying the spatial distributions of CO2 emissions, as well as the socioeconomic indicators at multiple scales.

  17. Oxygenated palm biodiesel: Ignition, combustion and emissions quantification in a light-duty diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Cheng Tung; Ng, Jo-Han; Ahmad, Solehin; Rajoo, Srithar

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Diesel engine test using palm biodiesel and diesel at varying speed and load. • Palm biodiesel shows better performance at late stage of cycle evolution. • Oxygen in palm biodiesel fuel improves local combustion at late stage of combustion. • Emissions of NO are lower at low and medium operating speed for palm biodiesel. • Formulation of trend guide for performance and emissions characteristics for light-duty diesel engines. - Abstract: This paper presents an investigation of oxygenated neat palm biodiesel in a direct injection single cylinder diesel engine in terms of ignition, combustion and emissions characteristics. Conventional non-oxygenated diesel fuel is compared as baseline. The engine testing is performed between the operating speed of 2000–3000 rpm and load of up to 3 bar of brake mean effective pressure. From it, a total of 50 experiment cases are tested to form a comprehensive operational speed-load contour map for ignition and combustion; while various engine-out emissions such as NO, CO, UHCs and CO 2 are compared based on fuel type-speed combinations. The ignition and combustion evolution contour maps quantify the absolute ignition delay period and elucidate the difference between that of palm biodiesel and fossil diesel. Although diesel has shorter ignition delay period by up to 0.6 CAD at 3000 rpm and burns more rapidly at the start of combustion, combustion of palm biodiesel accelerates during the mid-combustion phase and overtakes diesel in the cumulative heat release rates (HRR) prior to the 90% cumulative HRR. This can be attributed to the oxygen contained in palm biodiesel assisting in localized regions of combustion. In terms of performance, the oxygenated nature of palm biodiesel provided mixed performances with improved thermal efficiency and increased brake specific fuel consumption, due to the improved combustion and lower calorific values, respectively. Emission measurements show that NO for palm biodiesel is

  18. Enhancing Light Emission of ZnO-Nanofilm/Si-Micropillar Heterostructure Arrays by Piezo-Phototronic Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Chen, Mengxiao; Yu, Ruomeng; Zhang, Taiping; Song, Dongsheng; Liang, Renrong; Zhang, Qinglin; Cheng, Shaobo; Dong, Lin; Pan, Anlian; Wang, Zhong Lin; Zhu, Jing; Pan, Caofeng

    2015-06-22

    n-ZnO nanofilm/p-Si micropillar heterostructure light-emitting diode (LED) arrays for white light emissions are achieved and the light emission intensity of LED array is enhanced by 120% under -0.05% compressive strains. These results indicate a promising approach to fabricate Si-based light-emitting components with high performances enhanced by piezo-phototronic effect, with potential applications in touchpad technology, personalized signatures, smart skin, and silicon-based photonic integrated circuits. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Light vehicle energy efficiency programs and their impact on Brazilian CO2 emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, William; La Rovere, Emilio Lebre

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses the impact of an energy efficiency program for light vehicles in Brazil on emissions of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), the main greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. Several energy efficiency programs for light vehicles around the world are reviewed. The cases of Japan and Europe were selected for presentation here given their status as current and future world leaders in the control of passenger vehicle fuel consumption. The launching of the National Climate Change Plan and the pressure on the Brazilian car industry due to the world financial crisis make it a good time for the Brazilian government to implement such a program, and its various benefits are highlighted in this study. Three scenarios are established for Brazil covering the 2000-2030 period: the first with no efficiency goals, the second with the Japanese goals applied with a 10 years delay, and the third, with the Japanese goals applied with no delay. The consequences of a vehicular efficiency program and its middle and long-term effects on the consumption of energy and the CO 2 emissions are quantified and discussed. The simulation results indicate that efficiency goals may make an important contribution to reducing vehicular emissions and fuel consumption in Brazil, compared to a baseline scenario.

  20. Light vehicle energy efficiency programs and their impact on Brazilian CO{sub 2} emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wills, William; La Rovere, Emilio Lebre [Centro de Estudos Integrados sobre Meio Ambiente e Mudancas Climaticas, Centro Clima/COPPE/UFRJ, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco I2000, sala 208, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, CEP: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-11-15

    This paper analyses the impact of an energy efficiency program for light vehicles in Brazil on emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), the main greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. Several energy efficiency programs for light vehicles around the world are reviewed. The cases of Japan and Europe were selected for presentation here given their status as current and future world leaders in the control of passenger vehicle fuel consumption. The launching of the National Climate Change Plan and the pressure on the Brazilian car industry due to the world financial crisis make it a good time for the Brazilian government to implement such a program, and its various benefits are highlighted in this study. Three scenarios are established for Brazil covering the 2000-2030 period: the first with no efficiency goals, the second with the Japanese goals applied with a 10 years delay, and the third, with the Japanese goals applied with no delay. The consequences of a vehicular efficiency program and its middle and long-term effects on the consumption of energy and the CO{sub 2} emissions are quantified and discussed. The simulation results indicate that efficiency goals may make an important contribution to reducing vehicular emissions and fuel consumption in Brazil, compared to a baseline scenario. (author)

  1. Origins of efficient green light emission in phase-separated InGaN quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Y-L; Liu, C-P; Lin, Y-H; Hsueh, T-H; Lin, R-M; Lyu, D-Y; Peng, Z-X; Lin, T-Y

    2006-01-01

    Green-light-emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with high luminescent efficiency were grown by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The microstructure of the sample was studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high-resolution x-ray diffraction, while its optical behaviour was analysed in great detail by a variety of photoluminescence methods. Two InGaN-related peaks that were clearly found in the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum are assigned to quasi-quantum dots (516 nm) and the InGaN matrix (450 nm), respectively, due to a strong phase separation observed by HRTEM. Except for the strong indium aggregation regions (511 meV of Stokes shift), slight composition fluctuations were also observed in the InGaN matrix, which were speculated from an 'S-shaped' transition and a Stokes shift of 341 meV. Stronger carrier localization and an internal quantum efficiency of the dot-related emission (21.5%), higher than the InGaN-matrix related emission (7.5%), was demonstrated. Additionally, a shorter lifetime and 'two-component' PL decay were found for the low-indium-content regions (matrix). Thus, the carrier transport process within quantum wells is suggested to drift from the low-In-content matrix to the high-In-content dots, resulting in the enhanced luminescence efficiency of the green light emission

  2. Efficient light emission from inorganic and organic semiconductor hybrid structures by energy-level tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, R.; Bianchi, F.; Blumstengel, S.; Christodoulou, C.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Kobin, B.; Moudgil, K.; Barlow, S.; Hecht, S.; Marder, S.R.; Henneberger, F.; Koch, N.

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental limits of inorganic semiconductors for light emitting applications, such as holographic displays, biomedical imaging and ultrafast data processing and communication, might be overcome by hybridization with their organic counterparts, which feature enhanced frequency response and colour range. Innovative hybrid inorganic/organic structures exploit efficient electrical injection and high excitation density of inorganic semiconductors and subsequent energy transfer to the organic semiconductor, provided that the radiative emission yield is high. An inherent obstacle to that end is the unfavourable energy level offset at hybrid inorganic/organic structures, which rather facilitates charge transfer that quenches light emission. Here, we introduce a technologically relevant method to optimize the hybrid structure's energy levels, here comprising ZnO and a tailored ladder-type oligophenylene. The ZnO work function is substantially lowered with an organometallic donor monolayer, aligning the frontier levels of the inorganic and organic semiconductors. This increases the hybrid structure's radiative emission yield sevenfold, validating the relevance of our approach. PMID:25872919

  3. Measurements of the Spectral Light Emission from Decaying High Pressure Helium Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevefelt, J; Johansson, J

    1971-04-15

    The rate of electron density decay has been determined in a helium pulsed discharge plasma at pressures ranging from 100 to 600 Torr, primarily during the early afterglow where the electron density is from 1019 to 2 x 1017/m3. Measurements of the electrical conductivity and the absolute intensity of the light emission were made. The effective recombination rate coefficient was found to increase faster than linearly with gas pressure. The total photon emission rate was significantly lower than the effective recombination rate. Below 400 Torr pressure the afterglow was dominated by He-bands, which were related to the recombination of He{sub 2+} and He{sub 3+} ions. At higher pressures the appearance of intense lines originating from the atomic n = 3 and 23 P states is proposed to result from the He{sub 4+} recombination. Absorption measurements of the atomic metastable concentration gave evidence for recombination directly into the 23 S state. The concentration of molecular metastables was surprisingly low. The light emission had a Techi dependence, with 0 < chi < 0.35 for the intense atomic lines and 0.78 < chi < 1.10 for the molecular bands

  4. Electroplex light emission based on BCP and a novel star-shaped hexafluorenylbenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tao; Yu, Junsheng; Lou, Shuangling; Jiang, Yadong; Zhang, Qing

    2009-05-01

    Organic light emitting diode (OLEDs) are fabricated using a novel star-shaped hexafluorenylbenzene with a simple structure of indium-tin-oxide (ITO)/1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakis(9,9-diethyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)benzene (HKEthFLYPh):N, N'-bis-(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (NPB)/2,9-dimenthyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP)/tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3)/Mg:Ag by spin coating method. The electroluminescent properties of the device are characterized. The results show that there is a new peak at 600 nm, which is no appearance in PL spectra. This new emission is proposed to be electroplex that occurred at the solid-state interface between HKEthFLYPh and BCP in addition to the exciton emission from NPB. The Commissions Internationale De L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of the device are (x=0.33, y=0.29) at 10 V, which obviously belongs to white light emission.

  5. Efficient light emission from inorganic and organic semiconductor hybrid structures by energy-level tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, R; Bianchi, F; Blumstengel, S; Christodoulou, C; Ovsyannikov, R; Kobin, B; Moudgil, K; Barlow, S; Hecht, S; Marder, S R; Henneberger, F; Koch, N

    2015-04-15

    The fundamental limits of inorganic semiconductors for light emitting applications, such as holographic displays, biomedical imaging and ultrafast data processing and communication, might be overcome by hybridization with their organic counterparts, which feature enhanced frequency response and colour range. Innovative hybrid inorganic/organic structures exploit efficient electrical injection and high excitation density of inorganic semiconductors and subsequent energy transfer to the organic semiconductor, provided that the radiative emission yield is high. An inherent obstacle to that end is the unfavourable energy level offset at hybrid inorganic/organic structures, which rather facilitates charge transfer that quenches light emission. Here, we introduce a technologically relevant method to optimize the hybrid structure's energy levels, here comprising ZnO and a tailored ladder-type oligophenylene. The ZnO work function is substantially lowered with an organometallic donor monolayer, aligning the frontier levels of the inorganic and organic semiconductors. This increases the hybrid structure's radiative emission yield sevenfold, validating the relevance of our approach.

  6. Measurements of the Spectral Light Emission from Decaying High Pressure Helium Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevefelt, J.; Johansson, J.

    1971-04-01

    The rate of electron density decay has been determined in a helium pulsed discharge plasma at pressures ranging from 100 to 600 Torr, primarily during the early afterglow where the electron density is from 10 19 to 2 x 10 17 /m 3 . Measurements of the electrical conductivity and the absolute intensity of the light emission were made. The effective recombination rate coefficient was found to increase faster than linearly with gas pressure. The total photon emission rate was significantly lower than the effective recombination rate. Below 400 Torr pressure the afterglow was dominated by He-bands, which were related to the recombination of He 2 + and He 3 + ions. At higher pressures the appearance of intense lines originating from the atomic n = 3 and 2 3 P states is proposed to result from the He 4 + recombination. Absorption measurements of the atomic metastable concentration gave evidence for recombination directly into the 2 3 S state. The concentration of molecular metastables was surprisingly low. The light emission had a T e χ dependence, with 0 < χ < 0.35 for the intense atomic lines and 0.78 < χ < 1.10 for the molecular bands

  7. [The spectrogram characteristics of organic blue-emissive light-emitting excitated YAG : Ce phosphor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jian-Fei; Zhang, Fang-Hui; Mu, Qiang; Zhang, Mai-Li

    2011-09-01

    It is demonstrated that the panchromatic luminescence devices with organic blue-emissive light-emitting was fabricated. This technique used down conversion, which was already popular in inorganic power LEDs to obtain white light emission. A blue OLED device with a configuration of ITO/2T-NATA (30 nm)/AND : TBPe (50 Wt%, 40 nm)/Alq3 (100 nm)/LiF(1 nm)/Al(100 nm) was prepared via vacuum deposition process, and then coated with YAG : Ce phosphor layers of different thicknesses to obtain a controllable and uniform shape while the CIE coordinates were fine tuned. This development not only decreased steps of technics and degree of difficulty, but also applied the mature technology of phosphor. The results showed that steady spectrogram was obtained in the devices with phosphor, with a best performance of a maximum luminance of 13 840 cd x m(-2) which was about 2 times of that of the devices without phosphor; a maximum current efficiency of 17.3 cd x A(-1) was increased more two times more than the devices without phosphor. The emission spectrum could be adjusted by varying the concentration and thickness of the phosphor layers. Absoulte spectrogram of devices was in direct proportion with different driving current corresponding.

  8. Efficient polymer white-light-emitting diodes with a single-emission layer of fluorescent polymer blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Qiaoli; Xu Yunhua; Jiang Jiaxing; Peng Junbiao; Cao Yong

    2007-01-01

    Efficient polymer white-light-emitting diodes (WPLEDs) have been fabricated with a single layer of fluorescent polymer blend. The device structure consists of ITO/PEDOT/PVK/emissive layer/Ba/Al. The emissive layer is a blend of poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO), phenyl-substituted PPV derivative (P-PPV) and a copolymer of 9,9-dioctylfluorene and 4,7-di(4-hexylthien-2-yl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (PFO-DHTBT), which, respectively, emits blue, green and red light. The emission of pure and efficient white light was implemented by tuning the blend weight ratio of PFO: P-PPV: PFO-DHTBT to 96:4:0.4. The maximum current efficiency and luminance are, respectively, 7.6 cd/A at 6.7 V and 11930 cd/m 2 at 11.2 V. The CIE coordinates of white-light emission were stable with the drive voltages

  9. [Multiplayer white organic light-emitting diodes with different order and thickness of emission layers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Lu, Fu-Han; Cao, Jin; Zhu, Wen-Qing; Jiang, Xue-Yin; Zhang, Zhi-Lin; Xu, Shao-Hong

    2008-02-01

    In multilayer OLED devices, the order and thickness of the emission layers have great effect on their spectrum. Based on the three basic colours of red, blue and green, a series of white organic light-emitting diodes(WOLEDS)with the structure of ITO/CuPc(12 nm)/NPB(50 nm)/EML/LiF(1 nm)/Al(100 nm) and a variety of emission layer's orders and thicknesses were fabricated. The blue emission material: 2-t-butyl-9,10-di-(2-naphthyl)anthracene (TBADN) doped with p-bis(p-N, N-diphenyl-amono-styryl)benzene(DSA-Ph), the green emission material: tris-[8-hydroxyquinoline]aluminum(Alq3) doped with C545, and the red emission material: tris-[8-hydroxyquinoline]aluminum( Alq3) doped with 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyl-6-(1, 1, 7, 7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB) were used. By adjusting the order and thickness of each emission layer in the RBG structure, we got a white OLED with current efficiency of 5.60 cd x A(-1) and Commission Internationale De L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0. 34, 0.34) at 200 mA x cm(-2). Its maximum luminance reached 20 700 cd x m(-2) at current density of 400 mA x cm(-2). The results were analyzed on the basis of the theory of excitons' generation and diffusion. According to the theory, an equation was set up which relates EL spectra to the luminance efficiency, the thickness of each layer and the exciton diffusion length. In addition, in RBG structure with different thickness of red layer, the ratio of th e spectral intensity of red to that of blue was calculated. It was found that the experimental results are in agreement with the theoretical values.

  10. Post-operaist readings of Marxian ‘Fragment on Machines” in the light of their critiques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystian Szadkowski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Text undertakes a much needed contextual and critical reading of Marxian„Fragment on Machines” from the Grundrisse. The crucial thesis states that despitethe seeming crisis of the post-operaist Marxism, theoretical intuitions formulatedby thinkers like Negri, Virno, Vercellone are still valid. Three various but interrelatedtypes of post-operaist reading are presented here in detail to support theargument: the political, the philosophical and the historico-economical. In thelast part of the paper they are confronted with three main lines of critique of thepost-operaist readings: the philological, the political-economic and the „political”.Through such a confrontation some of the arguments are refuted and reevaluated.

  11. The collision of a hypervelocity massive projectile with free-standing graphene: Investigation of secondary ion emission and projectile fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Sheng; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V.; Eller, Michael J.; Della-Negra, Serge; Schweikert, Emile A.

    2017-02-01

    We present here the study of the individual hypervelocity massive projectiles (440-540 keV, 33-36 km/s Au4004+ cluster) impact on 1-layer free-standing graphene. The secondary ions were detected and recorded separately from each individual impact in the transmission direction using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. We observed C1-10± ions emitted from graphene, the projectiles which penetrated the graphene, and the Au1-3± fragment ions in mass spectra. During the projectile-graphene interaction, the projectile loses ˜15% of its initial kinetic energy (˜0.18 keV/atom, 72 keV/projectile). The Au projectiles are neutralized when approaching the graphene and then partially ionized again via electron tunneling from the hot rims of the holes on graphene, obtaining positive and negative charges. The projectile reaches an internal energy of ˜450-500 eV (˜4400-4900 K) after the impact and then undergoes a ˜90-100 step fragmentation with the ejection of Au1 atoms in the experimental time range of ˜0.1 μs.

  12. Type approval and real-world CO_2 and NO_x emissions from EU light commercial vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharof, Nikiforos; Tietge, Uwe; Franco, Vicente; Mock, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In the European Union, light duty vehicles (LDVs) are subject to emission targets for carbon dioxide (CO_2) and limits for pollutants such as nitrogen oxides (NO_x). CO_2 emissions are regulated for both passenger vehicles (PV) and light commercial vehicles (LCV), as individual manufacturers are required to reach fleet averages of 130 g/km by 2015 and 175 g/km by 2017, respectively. In the case of PVs, it has been found that there is a significant divergence between real-world and type-approval CO_2 emissions, which has been increasing annually, reaching 40% in 2014. On-road exceedances of regulated NO_x emission limits for diesel passenger cars have also been documented. The current study investigated the LCV characteristics and CO_2 and NO_x emissions in the European Union. A vehicle market analysis found that LCVs comprise 17% of the diesel LDV market and while there were some data for CO_2 emissions, there were hardly any data publicly available for NO_x emissions. Monitoring the divergence in CO_2 emissions revealed that it increased from 14% in 2006 to 33% in 2014, posing an additional annual fuel cost from 120€ in 2006 to 305€ in 2014, while a significant percentage of Euro 5 vehicles exceeded NO_x emission standards. - Highlights: • Light commercial vehicles comprise 17% of diesel light duty vehicle market. • On-road CO_2 emissions were found to be on average 33% higher than compared to type approval measurements. • The annual additional fuel cost due to the on-road and type approval divergence is estimated at 400€. • Data indicates exceedances in on-road NO_x emissions. • Little attention has been given to light commercial vehicles compared to passenger vehicles.

  13. Support for the revision of regulation on CO2 emissions from light commercial vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smokers, R.; Fraga, F.; Verbeek, M.; Willems, F.; Massink, R.; Spreen, J. [TNO, Delft (Netherlands); Norris, J.; Martinez, C. [AEA Technology plc, London (United Kingdom); Kampman, B.; Brinke, L.; Van Essen, H. [CE Delft, Delft (Netherlands); Schilling, S.; Gruhlke, A.; Sander, K. [Institut fuer Oekologie und Politik Oekopol, Hamburg (Netherlands); Breemersch, T.; De Ceuster, G.; Vanherle, K.; Heyndrickx, C. [Transport and Mobility Leuven TML, Leuven (Belgium); Wrigley, S.; O' Brien, S.; Johnson, A. [Ricardo UK, Shoreham-by-Sea, West Sussex (United Kingdom); Buttigieg, D.; Sima, L.; Pagnac, J.; Dhaene, G. [IHS Global Insight, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-04-15

    Road vehicles make a major contribution to transport sector CO2 emissions and the European Union has several policies in place to reduce their emissions. One of these is the regulation to reduce the CO2 emissions of light commercial vehicles (LCVs or vans), Regulation (EU) 510/2011, often referred to as the vans regulation. This contains a number of review clauses, which require the European Commission to carry out an impact assessment on the 2020 target of 147 gCO2/km, and to assess a number of further issues. The ensuing study addresses a wide range of topics relating to this regulation, and includes the development of cost curves for different LCV segments, the evaluation of different utility parameters, a comparison with the effort needed to reduce the CO2 emissions of passenger cars, an assessment of the impact of electric vehicle penetration and calculation of the effects on the total cost of ownership and the societal abatement costs associated with the 2020 target. CE Delft contributed to this study by developing scenarios for the market uptake of electric vehicles in this vehicle segment, and by providing support to the Commission regarding the economic aspects of the Impact Analysis.

  14. Efficient red phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with double emission layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Khalifa, M; Mazzeo, M; Maiorano, V; Mariano, F; Carallo, S; Melcarne, A; Cingolani, R; Gigli, G

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate efficient red phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with a bipolar emission structure (D-EML) formed by two different layers doped with a red phosphorescent dye. Due to its self-balancing character, the recombination zone is shifted far from the emission/carrier-blocking-layer interfaces. This prevents the accumulation of carriers at the interfaces and reduces the triplet-triplet annihilation, resulting in an improved efficiency of the D-EML device compared with the standard single-EML architecture. However, a current efficiency of 8.4 cd A -1 at 10 mA cm -2 is achieved in the D-EML device compared with 3.7 cd A -1 in the single-EML device

  15. Laser based imaging of time depending microscopic scenes with strong light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius; Wilhelm, Eugen; Rothe, Hendrik

    2011-10-01

    Investigating volume scatterometry methods based on short range LIDAR devices for non-static objects we achieved interesting results aside the intended micro-LIDAR: the high speed camera recording of the illuminated scene of an exploding wire -intended for Doppler LIDAR tests - delivered a very effective method of observing details of objects with extremely strong light emission. As a side effect a schlieren movie is gathered without any special effort. The fact that microscopic features of short time processes with high emission and material flow might be imaged without endangering valuable equipment makes this technique at least as interesting as the intended one. So we decided to present our results - including latest video and photo material - instead of a more theoretical paper on our progress concerning the primary goal.

  16. Efficient red phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with double emission layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Khalifa, M; Mazzeo, M; Maiorano, V; Mariano, F; Carallo, S; Melcarne, A; Cingolani, R; Gigli, G [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of CNR-INFM, Distretto tecnologico ISUFI, Universita del Salento, Italy, Via per Arnesano, Km.5, 73100 Lecce (Italy)], E-mail: mohamed.benkhalifa@unile.it

    2008-08-07

    We demonstrate efficient red phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with a bipolar emission structure (D-EML) formed by two different layers doped with a red phosphorescent dye. Due to its self-balancing character, the recombination zone is shifted far from the emission/carrier-blocking-layer interfaces. This prevents the accumulation of carriers at the interfaces and reduces the triplet-triplet annihilation, resulting in an improved efficiency of the D-EML device compared with the standard single-EML architecture. However, a current efficiency of 8.4 cd A{sup -1} at 10 mA cm{sup -2} is achieved in the D-EML device compared with 3.7 cd A{sup -1} in the single-EML device.

  17. Phosphorescent Molecularly Doped Light-Emitting Diodes with Blended Polymer Host and Wide Emission Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stable green light emission and high efficiency organic devices with three polymer layers were fabricated using bis[2-(4′-tert-butylphenyl-1-phenyl-1H-benzoimidazole-N,C2′] iridium(III (acetylacetonate doped in blended host materials. The 1 wt% doping concentration showed maximum luminance of 7841 cd/cm2 at 25.6 V and maximum current efficiency of 9.95 cd/A at 17.2 V. The electroluminescence spectra of devices indicated two main peaks at 522 nm and 554 nm coming from phosphor dye and a full width at half maximum (FWHM of 116 nm. The characteristics of using blended host, doping iridium complex, emission spectrum, and power efficiency of organic devices were investigated.

  18. White emission from organic light-emitting diodes with a super-thin BCP layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao Jingang [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Deng Zhenbo [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)]. E-mail: zbdeng@center.njtu.edu.cn; Yang Shengyi [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2007-01-15

    We report a method to achieve white emission from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in which a super-thin (3 nm) hole blocking layer, 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP), was inserted between electron-transport layer 8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum (Alq{sub 3}) and 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyl-6(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl) -4H-pyran (DCJTB) doped poly-vinlycarbazole (PVK) layer. The BCP layer can not only confine exciton in the emitting layer but also control energy transfer proportion from PVK to Alq{sub 3} and then from Alq{sub 3} to DCJTB through BCP layer. In this way, pure white emission with CIE coordinate of (0.32, 0.32) was obtained and it was voltage independent. The brightness reached 270 cd/m{sup 2} at 18 V with an efficiency of 0.166 cd/A.

  19. White emission from organic light-emitting diodes with a super-thin BCP layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Jingang; Deng Zhenbo; Yang Shengyi

    2007-01-01

    We report a method to achieve white emission from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in which a super-thin (3 nm) hole blocking layer, 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP), was inserted between electron-transport layer 8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum (Alq 3 ) and 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyl-6(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl) -4H-pyran (DCJTB) doped poly-vinlycarbazole (PVK) layer. The BCP layer can not only confine exciton in the emitting layer but also control energy transfer proportion from PVK to Alq 3 and then from Alq 3 to DCJTB through BCP layer. In this way, pure white emission with CIE coordinate of (0.32, 0.32) was obtained and it was voltage independent. The brightness reached 270 cd/m 2 at 18 V with an efficiency of 0.166 cd/A

  20. Ultrathin nondoped emissive layers for efficient and simple monochrome and white organic light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongbiao; Chen, Jiangshan; Ma, Dongge

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, highly efficient and simple monochrome blue, green, orange, and red organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on ultrathin nondoped emissive layers (EMLs) have been reported. The ultrathin nondoped EML was constructed by introducing a 0.1 nm thin layer of pure phosphorescent dyes between a hole transporting layer and an electron transporting layer. The maximum external quantum efficiencies (EQEs) reached 17.1%, 20.9%, 17.3%, and 19.2% for blue, green, orange, and red monochrome OLEDs, respectively, indicating the universality of the ultrathin nondoped EML for most phosphorescent dyes. On the basis of this, simple white OLED structures are also demonstrated. The demonstrated complementary blue/orange, three primary blue/green/red, and four color blue/green/orange/red white OLEDs show high efficiency and good white emission, indicating the advantage of ultrathin nondoped EMLs on constructing simple and efficient white OLEDs.

  1. ELECTROMAGNETIC EMISSION FROM LONG-LIVED BINARY NEUTRON STAR MERGER REMNANTS. II. LIGHT CURVES AND SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Daniel M. [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute), Am Mühlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany); Ciolfi, Riccardo, E-mail: daniel.siegel@aei.mpg.de, E-mail: riccardo.ciolfi@unitn.it [Physics Department, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy)

    2016-03-01

    Recent observations indicate that in a large fraction of binary neutron star (BNS) mergers a long-lived neutron star (NS) may be formed rather than a black hole. Unambiguous electromagnetic (EM) signatures of such a scenario would strongly impact our knowledge on how short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) and their afterglow radiation are generated. Furthermore, such EM signals would have profound implications for multimessenger astronomy with joint EM and gravitational-wave (GW) observations of BNS mergers, which will soon become reality thanks to the ground-based advanced LIGO/Virgo GW detector network. Here we explore such EM signatures based on the model presented in a companion paper, which provides a self-consistent evolution of the post-merger system and its EM emission up to ∼10{sup 7} s. Light curves and spectra are computed for a wide range of post-merger physical properties. We present X-ray afterglow light curves corresponding to the “standard” and the “time-reversal” scenario for SGRBs (prompt emission associated with the merger or with the collapse of the long-lived NS). The light curve morphologies include single and two-plateau features with timescales and luminosities that are in good agreement with Swift observations. Furthermore, we compute the X-ray signal that should precede the SGRB in the time-reversal scenario, the detection of which would represent smoking-gun evidence for this scenario. Finally, we find a bright, highly isotropic EM transient peaking in the X-ray band at ∼10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} s after the BNS merger with luminosities of L{sub X} ∼ 10{sup 46}–10{sup 48} erg s{sup −1}. This signal represents a very promising EM counterpart to the GW emission from BNS mergers.

  2. Green leaf volatiles and oxygenated metabolite emission bursts from mesquite branches following light-dark transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, K; Barron-Gafford, G A; Norman, J P; Abrell, L; Monson, R K; Meyers, K T; Pavao-Zuckerman, M; Dontsova, K; Kleist, E; Werner, C; Huxman, T E

    2012-09-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are a diverse group of fatty acid-derived compounds emitted by all plants and are involved in a wide variety of developmental and stress-related biological functions. Recently, GLV emission bursts from leaves were reported following light-dark transitions and hypothesized to be related to the stress response while acetaldehyde bursts were hypothesized to be due to the 'pyruvate overflow' mechanism. In this study, branch emissions of GLVs and a group of oxygenated metabolites (acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetic acid, and acetone) derived from the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) bypass pathway were quantified from mesquite plants following light-dark transitions using a coupled GC-MS, PTR-MS, and photosynthesis system. Within the first minute after darkening following a light period, large emission bursts of both C(5) and C(6) GLVs dominated by (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate together with the PDH bypass metabolites are reported for the first time. We found that branches exposed to CO(2)-free air lacked significant GLV and PDH bypass bursts while O(2)-free atmospheres eliminated the GLV burst but stimulated the PDH bypass burst. A positive relationship was observed between photosynthetic activity prior to darkening and the magnitude of the GLV and PDH bursts. Photosynthesis under (13)CO(2) resulted in bursts with extensive labeling of acetaldehyde, ethanol, and the acetate but not the C(6)-alcohol moiety of (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate. Our observations are consistent with (1) the "pyruvate overflow" mechanism with a fast turnover time (3 h) responsible for the C(6) alcohol moiety of (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate via the 13-lipoxygenase pathway. We conclude that our non-invasive method may provide a new valuable in vivo tool for studies of acetyl-CoA and fatty acid metabolism in plants at a variety of spatial scales.

  3. BaZrO3 perovskite nanoparticles as emissive material for organic/inorganic hybrid light-emitting diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamulevičius, S.; Ivaniuk, K.; Cherpak, V.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work we have demonstrated double-channel emission from organic exciplexes coupled to inorganic nanoparticles. The process is demonstrated by yellow-green emission in light-emitting diodes based on organic exciplexes hybridized with perovskite-type dispersed BaZrO3 nanoparticles...

  4. A modal approach to light emission and propagation in coupled cavity waveguide systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Kristensen, P. T.; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate systems of optical cavities coupled to waveguides,which necessitates the introduction of non-trivial radiation conditions and normalization procedures. In return, the approach provides simple and accurate modeling of Green functions,Purcell factors and perturbation...... corrections, as well as an alternative approach to the so-calledcoupled mode theory. In combination, these results may form part of the foundations for highly efficient, yet physically transparent models of light emission and propagation in both classical and quantum integrated photonic circuits....

  5. Efficient organic light-emitting devices with platinum-complex emissive layer

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui

    2011-01-18

    We report efficient organic light-emitting devices having a platinum-complex emissive layer with the peak external quantum efficiency of 17.5% and power efficiency of 45 lm W−1. Variation in the device performance with platinum-complex layer thickness can be attributed to the interplay between carrier recombination and intermolecular interactions in the layer. Efficient white devices using double platinum-complex layers show the external quantum efficiency of 10%, the Commission Internationale d’Énclairage coordinates of (0.42, 0.41), and color rendering index of 84 at 1000 cd m−2.

  6. Efficient organic light-emitting devices with platinum-complex emissive layer

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui; Wu, Fang-Iy; Haverinen, Hanna; Li, Jian; Cheng, Chien-Hong; Jabbour, Ghassan E.

    2011-01-01

    We report efficient organic light-emitting devices having a platinum-complex emissive layer with the peak external quantum efficiency of 17.5% and power efficiency of 45 lm W−1. Variation in the device performance with platinum-complex layer thickness can be attributed to the interplay between carrier recombination and intermolecular interactions in the layer. Efficient white devices using double platinum-complex layers show the external quantum efficiency of 10%, the Commission Internationale d’Énclairage coordinates of (0.42, 0.41), and color rendering index of 84 at 1000 cd m−2.

  7. Organic light-emitting diodes with a spacer enhanced exciplex emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Chen, Rui; Sun, Handong; Wei Sun, Xiao

    2014-04-01

    By introducing a spacer molecule into the blended exciplex emissive layer, the performance of the bulk heterojunction exciplex organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) was improved dramatically; the maximum luminous efficiency was enhanced by about 22% from 7.9 cd/A to 9.7 cd/A, and the luminous efficiency drop was reduced by 28% at 400 mA/cm2. Besides the suppressed annihilation of exciton, the time-resolved photoluminescence measurements indicated that the spacer enhanced the delayed fluorescence through increasing the backward intersystem crossing rate from the triplet to singlet exciplex state. This method is useful for developing high performance exciplex OLEDs.

  8. Detection of Time Lags between Quasar Continuum Emission Bands Based On Pan-STARRS Light Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Green, Paul J.; Pancoast, Anna; MacLeod, Chelsea L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Greene, Jenny E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Morganson, Eric; Shen, Yue [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Brandt, W. N.; Grier, C. J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Rix, H.-W. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Protopapas, Pavlos [Institute for Applied Computational Science, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Scott, Caroline [Astrophysics, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Burgett, W. S.; Hodapp, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Magnier, E. A. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2017-02-20

    We study the time lags between the continuum emission of quasars at different wavelengths, based on more than four years of multi-band ( g , r , i , z ) light curves in the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Fields. As photons from different bands emerge from different radial ranges in the accretion disk, the lags constrain the sizes of the accretion disks. We select 240 quasars with redshifts of z ≈ 1 or z ≈ 0.3 that are relatively emission-line free. The light curves are sampled from day to month timescales, which makes it possible to detect lags on the scale of the light crossing time of the accretion disks. With the code JAVELIN , we detect typical lags of several days in the rest frame between the g band and the riz bands. The detected lags are ∼2–3 times larger than the light crossing time estimated from the standard thin disk model, consistent with the recently measured lag in NGC 5548 and microlensing measurements of quasars. The lags in our sample are found to increase with increasing luminosity. Furthermore, the increase in lags going from g − r to g − i and then to g − z is slower than predicted in the thin disk model, particularly for high-luminosity quasars. The radial temperature profile in the disk must be different from what is assumed. We also find evidence that the lags decrease with increasing line ratios between ultraviolet Fe ii lines and Mg ii, which may point to changes in the accretion disk structure at higher metallicity.

  9. Membrane potential and microsecond to millisecond delayed light emission after a single excitation flash in isolated chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jursinic, P.; Govindjee; Wraight, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of light-induced and salt-jump induced membrane potential on microsecond and millisecond delayed light emission from chloroplasts, following a single 10 ns flash, have been studied. Microsecond delayed light emission is shown to be independent of the membrane potential contrary to proposals that the activation energy for delayed light emission can be modulated by transmembrane electric fields. This result is discussed in terms of the possible origin of this short-lived emission. Millisecond delayed light after a single excitation flash is enhanced by membrane potential only if a proton gradient is present. By measuring changes in ms delayed light caused by simultaneous injection of KCl and Na-benzoate (which creates a proton gradient) in the presence of valinomycin, the light-induced potential generated across the thylakoid membrane by a single excitation flash was calibrated and found to be 128 +- 10 mV in agreement with the recent measurements of Zickler and Witt, (FEBS Lett. 66, 142-148 (1976)), based on voltage-dependent ionophores. It is concluded that the secondary charges that give rise to ms delayed light, after a single flash, do not fully span the membrane. (author)

  10. Design of Slow and Fast Light Photonic Crystal Waveguides for Single-photon Emission Using a Bloch Mode Expansion Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Rigal, B.; Kapon, E.

    We design slow and fast light photonic crystal waveguides for single-photon emission using a Bloch mode expansion and scattering matrix technique. We propose slow light designs that increase the group index-waveguide mode volume ratio for larger Purcell enhancement, and address efficient slow-to-...

  11. On the efficient warm white-light emission from nano-sized Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesaria, M., E-mail: maura.cesaria@le.infn.it [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Lecce (Italy); Collins, J. [Wheaton College, Norton, MA (United States); Di Bartolo, B. [Department of Physics, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We consider the reported emission of white light (WL) in the spectral range from 400 to beyond 900 nm induced by monochromatic infrared light (803.5 and 975 nm) continuous wave excitation of nominally un-doped yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nano-powders. Based on the experimental evidence, such an emission feature is a nano-scale phenomenon, resembles very closely the emission from an incandescent lamp (mimicking the sunlight, i.e., the most comfortable light to human eyes) and exhibits very high efficiency (864 lum/W) and nearly theoretical (i.e., 99) color rendering index. At the fundamental level, the origin of this phenomenon is still unexplained. In this paper we address the fundamental questions raised by the reported occurrence of WL emission from Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanopowders and attempt an interpretation at a more fundamental level. In particular we focus on the multiphoton-absorption and nonexponential decay patterns of the reported WL emission as starting points to formulate models and interpretations of the experimental occurrences still lacking in the literature. Our discussion invokes the electronic dispersion of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and nanoscale effects, which is supported by the experimental evidence according to which the observed warm WL emission is a nanoscale phenomenon with properties that only can be explained by nanoscale physics. - Highlights: • Emission of white light from 400 to beyond 900 nm induced by infrared light of un-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-powders. • The emission feature resembles very closely the emission from an incandescent lamp. • The observed emission properties only can be explained by nanoscale physics.

  12. Fragmentation of neutral van der Waals clusters with visible laser light: A new variant of the Raman effect?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamatovic, A.; Howorka, F.; Scheier, P.; Maerk, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    We have observed strong photodissociation (using visible laser light) of neutral van der Waals clusters (Ar, N 2 , O 2 , CO 2 , SO 2 , NH 3 ) produced by supersonic expansion and detected by electron ionization/mass spectrometer. Several tests were performed, all of them supporting this surprising discovery. We suggest that Raman induced photodissociation (RIP) is responsible for this phenomenon. This first observation of Raman induced photodissociation provides a new technique for the study of neutral van der Waals clusters. (orig.)

  13. Experimental study of the light charged particles emitted in coincidence with the main fragments from D.I.C. in the 40Ar (280 MeV) + 58Ni system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, S.; Babinet, R.; Cauvin, B.; Girard, J.; Auger, P.; Chiang, T.; Galin, J.; Gatty, B.; Guerreau, D.; Tarrago, X.

    1979-01-01

    The light charged particles emitted in coincidence with the main fragments from deep inelastic collisions in the 40 Ar (280 MeV) + 58 Ni have been studied. Both radial (in the reaction plane) and azimuthal angular distributions have been measured. For very asymmetric splitting, the radial angular distribution of the α particles shows two components one of which could be attributed to statistical evaporation by the heavy partner of the detected light fragment. The azimuthal distribution of that component clearly indicates a strong alignment of the spin of the emitting fragment with the orbital angular momentum and a preference for the 'sticking' limit. For symmetric splitting, some α particle energy spectra could not be explained in terms of statistical evaporation by either of the two main fragments. (orig.)

  14. Modification of Light Emission in Si-Rich Silicon Nitride Films Versus Stoichiometry and Excitation Light Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchynska, T.; Khomenkova, L.; Slaoui, A.

    2018-04-01

    Si-rich SiN x films with different stoichiometry were grown on Si substrate by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The Si content was varied by changing the NH3/SiH4 gas flow ratio from 0.45 up to 1.0. Conventional furnace annealing at 1100°C for 30 min was applied to produce the Si quantum dots (QDs) in the SiN x films. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to determine the refractive index of the SiN x films that allowed estimating the film's stoichiometry. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been also used to confirm the stoichiometry and microstructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of Si-rich SiN x films are complex. A non-monotonous variation of the different PL peaks versus Si excess contents testifies to the competition of different radiative channels. The analysis of PL spectra, measured at the different excitation light energies and variable temperatures, has revealed that the PL bands with the peaks within the range 2.1-3.0 eV are related to the carrier recombination via radiative native defects in the SiN x host. Simultaneously, the PL bands with the peaks at 1.5-2.0 eV are caused by the exciton recombination in the Si QDs of different sizes. The way to control the SiN x emission is discussed.

  15. Metal oxide core shell nanostructures as building blocks for efficient light emission (SISGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jane P [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Dorman, James [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Cheung, Cyrus [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    The objective of this research is to synthesize core-shell nano-structured metal oxide materials and investigate their structural, electronic and optical properties to understand the microscopic pathways governing the energy conversion process, thereby controlling and improving their efficiency. Specifically, the goal is to use a single metal oxide core-shell nanostructure and a single excitation source to generate photons with long emission lifetime over the entire visible spectrum and when controlled at the right ratio, generating white light. In order to achieve this goal, we need to control the energy transfer between light emitting elements, which dictates the control of their interatomic spacing and spatial distribution. We developed an economical wet chemical process to form the nanostructured core and to control the thickness and composition of the shell layers. With the help from using DOE funded synchrotron radiation facility, we delineated the growth mechanism of the nano-structured core and the shell layers, thereby enhancing our understanding of structure-property relation in these materials. Using the upconversion luminescence and the lifetime measurements as effective feedback to materials sysnthes is and integration, we demonstrated improved luminescence lifetimes of the core-shell nano-structures and quantified the optimal core-multi-shell structure with optimum shell thickness and composition. We developed a rare-earths co-doped LaPO4 core-multishell structure in order to produce a single white light source. It was decided that the mutli-shell method would produce the largest increase in luminescence efficiency while limiting any energy transfer that may occur between the dopant ions. All samples resulted in emission spectra within the accepted range of white light generation based on the converted CIE color coordinates. The white light obtained varied between warm and cool white depending on the layering architecture, allowing for the

  16. White light emission from organic-inorganic hererostructure devices by using CdSe quantum dots as emitting layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Aiwei; Teng Feng; Gao Yinhao; Li Dan; Zhao Suling; Liang Chunjun; Wang Yongsheng

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, white light emission was obtained from organic-inorganic heterostructure devices by using CdSe quantum dots as emitting layer, in which CdSe quantum dots were synthesized via a colloidal chemical approach by using CdO and Se powder as precursors. Photoluminescence of CdSe quantum dots demonstrated a white emission with a full wavelength at half maximum (FWHM) of about 200 nm under ambient conditions, and the white emission could be observed in both multilayer device ITO/PEDOT:PSS/CdSe/BCP/Alq 3 /Al and single-layer device: ITO/PEDOT:PSS/CdSe/Al. The broad emission was attributed to the inhomogeneous broadening. The CIE coordinates of the multilayer device were x=0.35 and y=0.40. The white-light-emitting diodes with CdSe quantum dots as the emitting layer are potentially useful in lighting applications

  17. Tuning Light Emission of a Pressure-Sensitive Silicon/ZnO Nanowires Heterostructure Matrix through Piezo-phototronic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mengxiao; Pan, Caofeng; Zhang, Taiping; Li, Xiaoyi; Liang, Renrong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-06-28

    Based on white light emission at silicon (Si)/ZnO hetrerojunction, a pressure-sensitive Si/ZnO nanowires heterostructure matrix light emitting diode (LED) array is developed. The light emission intensity of a single heterostructure LED is tuned by external strain: when the applied stress keeps increasing, the emission intensity first increases and then decreases with a maximum value at a compressive strain of 0.15-0.2%. This result is attributed to the piezo-phototronic effect, which can efficiently modulate the LED emission intensity by utilizing the strain-induced piezo-polarization charges. It could tune the energy band diagrams at the junction area and regulate the optoelectronic processes such as charge carriers generation, separation, recombination, and transport. This study achieves tuning silicon based devices through piezo-phototronic effect.

  18. Multi-year remote-sensing measurements of gasoline light-duty vehicle emissions on a freeway ramp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoedin, A.; Andreasson, K.

    2000-01-01

    On-road optical remote-sensing measurements of gasoline light-duty vehicle (LDV) emissions - CO, HC, NO - were conducted on a freeway ramp in Gothenburg, Sweden, in 1991, 1995 and 1998. Based on almost 30,000 emission measurements, the results show that both catalyst cars and non-catalyst cars emissions deteriorate over time, but also that the emission performance of new TWC-cars has improved significantly in recent years. Furthermore, it was found that fleet age rather than model year determines the rate of emission deterioration for TWC-cars for both CO and NO. The study demonstrates that remote sensing may constitute a powerful tool to evaluate real-world LDV emissions; however, daily field calibration procedures need to be developed in order to assure that the evolution in fleet average emissions can be accurately measured. (author)

  19. Deterministic control of the emission from light sources in 1D nanoporous photonic crystals (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galisteo-López, Juan F.

    2017-02-01

    Controlling the emission of a light source demands acting on its local photonic environment via the local density of states (LDOS). Approaches to exert such control on large scale samples, commonly relying on self-assembly methods, usually lack from a precise positioning of the emitter within the material. Alternatively expensive and time consuming techniques can be used to produce samples of small dimensions where a deterministic control on emitter position can be achieved. In this work we present a full solution process approach to fabricate photonic architectures containing nano-emitters which position can be controlled with nanometer precision over squared milimiter regions. By a combination of spin and dip coating we fabricate one-dimensional (1D) nanoporous photonic crystals, which potential in different fields such as photovoltaics or sensing has been previously reported, containing monolayers of luminescent polymeric nanospheres. We demonstrate how, by modifying the position of the emitters within the photonic crystal, their emission properties (photoluminescence intensity and angular distribution) can be deterministically modified. Further, the nano-emitters can be used as a probe to study the LDOS distribution within these systems with a spatial resolution of 25 nm (provided by the probe size) carrying out macroscopic measurements over squared milimiter regions. Routes to enhance light-matter interaction in this kind of systems by combining them with metallic surfaces are finally discussed.

  20. Light-Dependent Aerobic Methane Oxidation Reduces Methane Emissions from Seasonally Stratified Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Kirsten; Milucka, Jana; Brand, Andreas; Littmann, Sten; Wehrli, Bernhard; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are a natural source of methane to the atmosphere and contribute significantly to total emissions compared to the oceans. Controls on methane emissions from lake surfaces, particularly biotic processes within anoxic hypolimnia, are only partially understood. Here we investigated biological methane oxidation in the water column of the seasonally stratified Lake Rotsee. A zone of methane oxidation extending from the oxic/anoxic interface into anoxic waters was identified by chemical profiling of oxygen, methane and δ13C of methane. Incubation experiments with 13C-methane yielded highest oxidation rates within the oxycline, and comparable rates were measured in anoxic waters. Despite predominantly anoxic conditions within the zone of methane oxidation, known groups of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea were conspicuously absent. Instead, aerobic gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs were identified as the active methane oxidizers. In addition, continuous oxidation and maximum rates always occurred under light conditions. These findings, along with the detection of chlorophyll a, suggest that aerobic methane oxidation is tightly coupled to light-dependent photosynthetic oxygen production both at the oxycline and in the anoxic bottom layer. It is likely that this interaction between oxygenic phototrophs and aerobic methanotrophs represents a widespread mechanism by which methane is oxidized in lake water, thus diminishing its release into the atmosphere. PMID:26193458

  1. Time- and space-resolved light emission and spectroscopic research of the flashover plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleizer, J. Z.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Leopold, J. [Department of Applied Physics, Rafael Laboratories, Box 2250, Haifa 31021 (Israel)

    2015-02-21

    The results of an experimental study of the evolution of surface flashover across the surface of an insulator in vacuum subject to a high-voltage pulse and the parameters of the flashover plasma are reported. For the system studied, flashover is always initiated at the cathode triple junctions. Using time-resolved framing photography of the plasma light emission the velocity of the light emission propagation along the surface of the insulator was found to be ∼2.5·10{sup 8} cm/s. Spectroscopic measurements show that the flashover is characterized by a plasma density of 2–4 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3} and neutral and electron temperatures of 2–4 eV and 1–3 eV, respectively, corresponding to a plasma conductivity of ∼0.2 Ω{sup −1} cm{sup −1} and a discharge current density of up to ∼10 kA/cm{sup 2}.

  2. Electrical manipulation of the light emission of single CdSe/CdS nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.

    2005-01-01

    In the center of the present thesis lies the study and manipulation of the light emission of novel rod-shaped cadmium-selenide/cadmium-sulfide (CdSe/CdS) nanocrystals. These nanocrystals consist of a spherical CdSe nucleus, on which a CdS nanorod is grown monocrystallinely. By this grow spatially asymmetric semiconductor nanorods with an aspect ratio between 1.6 and 4.0. By the measurement of the radiation rate in this thesis it could be shown that the electron is delocalized over the whole nanorod, while the hole is localized in the CdSe nucleus. Therefore by the length of the cadmium-sulfide rod the wave-function overlap can be directly manipulated. The wave functions and by this the emission energies can be beside the geometry especially also controlled by external fields. Because the magnitude of the so-called ''Stark effect in quantum-bounded structures'' increases with the spatial extension of the nanostructure, in the nanorods an in comparison with spherical nanocrystals distinctly increased field effect could be observed. Experiments on single CdSe/CdS nanorods exhibit however not only a shift of the emission energy by the 50-fold of the line width, but simultaneously a field-induced decreasement of the emission intensity by one order of magnitude. The experimental results can be excellently compared with a theoretical model. For this the effective-mass model was supplemented by the Coulomb interaction and extended by a finite-element method for asymmetric geometries. By this it is possible to predict both the radiation rate, the Stark shift of the emission energy, and the intensity modulation by electric fields qualitatively and quantitatively and to describe the Stark effect in colloidal nanocrystal by a quantum-mechanical model. The emission characteristics is not only influenced by external fields, but also by fluctuations of local fields, which arise by diffunding surface charges. These local field changes induce also a Stark shift and lead to a time

  3. Influence of heterojunction interface on exciplex emission from organic light-emitting diodes under electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shengyi; Zhang, Xiulong; Lou, Zhidong; Hou, Yanbing [Beijing Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing (China)

    2008-03-15

    In this paper, electroluminescence from organic light-emitting diodes based on 2-(4'-biphenyl)-5-(4{sup ''}-tert-butylphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PBD) and N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (TPD) is reported. Based on the exciplex emission from the TPD/PBD interface under high electric fields, the influence of the TPD/PBD interface on exciplex emission was investigated by increasing the number of TPD/PBD interfaces while keeping both the total thickness of the TPD layer and the PBD layer constant in the multiple quantum-wells (MQW) device ITO/TPD/[PBD/TPD]{sub n}/PBD/Al (n is the well number that was varied from 0 to 3). Our experimental data shows that exciplex emission can be enhanced by suitably increasing the well number of this kind of MQW-like device. (orig.)

  4. SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE POWERED BY MAGNETARS: LATE-TIME LIGHT CURVES AND HARD EMISSION LEAKAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S. Q.; Wang, L. J.; Dai, Z. G.; Wu, X. F.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, research performed by two groups has revealed that the magnetar spin-down energy injection model with full energy trapping can explain the early-time light curves of SN 2010gx, SN 2013dg, LSQ12dlf, SSS120810, and CSS121015 but fails to fit the late-time light curves of these superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). These results imply that the original magnetar-powered model is challenged in explaining these SLSNe. Our paper aims to simultaneously explain both the early- and late-time data/upper limits by considering the leakage of hard emissions. We incorporate quantitatively the leakage effect into the original magnetar-powered model and derive a new semianalytical equation. Comparing the light curves reproduced by our revised magnetar-powered model with the observed data and/or upper limits of these five SLSNe, we found that the late-time light curves reproduced by our semianalytical equation are in good agreement with the late-time observed data and/or upper limits of SN 2010gx, CSS121015, SN 2013dg, and LSQ12dlf and the late-time excess of SSS120810, indicating that the magnetar-powered model might be responsible for these SLSNe and that the gamma-ray and X-ray leakages are unavoidable when the hard photons were down-Comptonized to softer photons. To determine the details of the leakage effect and unveil the nature of SLSNe, more high-quality bolometric light curves and spectra of SLSNe are required

  5. Light-particle emission as a probe of the rotational degrees of freedom in deep-inelastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobotka, L.G.

    1982-05-01

    The emission of alpha particles in coincidence with the most deeply inelastic heavy-ion reactions has been studied for 181 Ta + 165 Ho at 1354 MeV laboratory energy and /sup nat/Ag + 84 Kr at 664 MeV. Alpha particle energy spectra and angular distributions, in coincidence with a projectile-like fragment, were acquired both in the reaction plane and out of the reaction plane at a fixed in-plane angle. The in-plane data for both systems are employed to show that the bulk of the alpha particles in coincidence with the deep-inelastic exit channel can be explained by evaporation from the fully accelerated fragments. Average velocity diagrams, α-particle energy spectra as a function of angle in several rest frames, and α-particle angular distributions are presented. The out-of-plane alpha particle angular distributions and the gamma-ray multiplicities are used to study the transfer and partitioning of angular momentum between the two fragments. For the /sup nat/Ag + 84 Kr system, individual fragment spins are extracted form the alpha particle angular distributions as a function of mass asymmetry while the sum of the fragment spins is derived from the gamma-ray multiplicities. These data, together with the fragment kinetic energies, are consistent with rigid rotation of an intermediate complex consisting of two substantially deformed spheroids in near proximity. These data also indicate that some angular momentum fractionation exists at the largest asymmetries examined. Out-of-plane alpha particle distributions, gamma-ray multiplicities, fragment spins as well as the formalism for the spin evaluation at various levels of sophistication are presented

  6. Light-particle emission as a probe of the rotational degrees of freedom in deep-inelastic reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobotka, L.G.

    1982-05-01

    The emission of alpha particles in coincidence with the most deeply inelastic heavy-ion reactions has been studied for /sup 181/Ta/sup +/ /sup 165/Ho at 1354 MeV laboratory energy and /sup nat/Ag + /sup 84/Kr at 664 MeV. Alpha particle energy spectra and angular distributions, in coincidence with a projectile-like fragment, were acquired both in the reaction plane and out of the reaction plane at a fixed in-plane angle. The in-plane data for both systems are employed to show that the bulk of the alpha particles in coincidence with the deep-inelastic exit channel can be explained by evaporation from the fully accelerated fragments. Average velocity diagrams, ..cap alpha..-particle energy spectra as a function of angle in several rest frames, and ..cap alpha..-particle angular distributions are presented. The out-of-plane alpha particle angular distributions and the gamma-ray multiplicities are used to study the transfer and partitioning of angular momentum between the two fragments. For the /sup nat/Ag + /sup 84/Kr system, individual fragment spins are extracted form the alpha particle angular distributions as a function of mass asymmetry while the sum of the fragment spins is derived from the gamma-ray multiplicities. These data, together with the fragment kinetic energies, are consistent with rigid rotation of an intermediate complex consisting of two substantially deformed spheroids in near proximity. These data also indicate that some angular momentum fractionation exists at the largest asymmetries examined. Out-of-plane alpha particle distributions, gamma-ray multiplicities, fragment spins as well as the formalism for the spin evaluation at various levels of sophistication are presented.

  7. Probing Millisecond Pulsar Emission Geometry Using Light Curves From the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Christo; Harding, Alice; Guillemot, L.

    2009-01-01

    An interesting new high-energy pulsar sub-population is emerging following early discoveries of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We present results from 3D emission modeling, including the Special Relativistic effects of aberration and time-of-flight delays and also rotational sweepback of 13-field lines, in the geometric context of polar cap (PC), slot gap (SG), outer gap (OG), and two-pole caustic (TPC) pulsar models. In contrast to the general belief that these very old, rapidly-rotating neutron stars (NSs) should have largely pair-starved magnetospheres due to the absence of significant pair production, we find that most of the light curves are best fit by SG and OG models, which indicates the presence of narrow accelerating gaps limited by robust pair production -- even in these pulsars with very low spin-down luminosities. The gamma-ray pulse shapes and relative phase lags with respect to the radio pulses point to high-altitude emission being dominant for all geometries. We also find exclusive differentiation of the current gamma-ray MSP population into two MSP sub-classes: light curve shapes and lags across wavebands impose either pair-starved PC (PSPC) or SG / OG-type geometries. In the first case, the radio pulse has a small lag with respect to the single gamma-ray pulse, while the (first) gamma-ray peak usually trails the radio by a large phase offset in the latter case. Finally, we find that the flux correction factor as a function of magnetic inclination and observer angles is typically of order unity for all models. Our calculation of light curves and flux correction factor f(_, _, P) for the case of MSPs is therefore complementary to the "ATLAS paper" of Watters et al. for younger pulsars.

  8. Jet fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxon, D.H.

    1985-10-01

    The paper reviews studies on jet fragmentation. The subject is discussed under the topic headings: fragmentation models, charged particle multiplicity, bose-einstein correlations, identified hadrons in jets, heavy quark fragmentation, baryon production, gluon and quark jets compared, the string effect, and two successful models. (U.K.)

  9. Tailoring the Energy Landscape in Quasi-2D Halide Perovskites Enables Efficient Green-Light Emission

    KAUST Repository

    Quan, Li Na; Zhao, Yongbiao; Garcí a de Arquer, F. Pelayo; Sabatini, Randy; Walters, Grant; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Comin, Riccardo; Li, Yiying; Fan, James Z.; Tan, Hairen; Pan, Jun; Yuan, Mingjian; Bakr, Osman; Lu, Zhenghong; Kim, Dong Ha; Sargent, Edward H.

    2017-01-01

    Organo-metal halide perovskites are a promising platform for optoelectronic applications in view of their excellent charge-transport and bandgap tunability. However, their low photoluminescence quantum efficiencies, especially in low-excitation regimes, limit their efficiency for light emission. Consequently, perovskite light-emitting devices are operated under high injection, a regime under which the materials have so far been unstable. Here we show that, by concentrating photoexcited states into a small subpopulation of radiative domains, one can achieve a high quantum yield, even at low excitation intensities. We tailor the composition of quasi-2D perovskites to direct the energy transfer into the lowest-bandgap minority phase and to do so faster than it is lost to nonradiative centers. The new material exhibits 60% photoluminescence quantum yield at excitation intensities as low as 1.8 mW/cm2, yielding a ratio of quantum yield to excitation intensity of 0.3 cm2/mW; this represents a decrease of 2 orders of magnitude in the excitation power required to reach high efficiency compared with the best prior reports. Using this strategy, we report light-emitting diodes with external quantum efficiencies of 7.4% and a high luminescence of 8400 cd/m2.

  10. Non-doped white organic light-emitting diodes based on aggregation-induced emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Shuming; Kwok, Hoi Sing [Center for Display Research, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Zhao Zujin; Tang, Ben Zhong, E-mail: eekwok@ust.h [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-03-10

    Non-doped white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) based on newly synthesized bluish-green light-emitting material 1,3,6,8-tetrakis [4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenyl]pyrene (TTPEPy) and red light-emitting material 4-(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenyl)-7-(5-(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl) phenyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole (BTPETTD) have been demonstrated. A maximum efficiency of 7.4 cd A{sup -1}, 4 lm W{sup -1} and brightness of 18 000 cd m{sup -2} have been achieved by employing 3 nm thick 4, 4'-bis [N-(1-naphthyl-1-)-N-phenyl-amino]- biphenyl (NPB) as an electron-blocking layer. The WOLEDs exhibit a high colour rendering index of 90 and moderate colour stability with 1931 Commision International de L'Eclairage coordinates changing from (0.41, 0.41) to (0.38, 0.40) over a wide range of driving voltages. Moreover, the non-doped WOLEDs enjoy a reduced efficiency roll-off due to their nature of aggregation-induced emission.

  11. Improvement of Lighting Uniformity and Phosphor Life in Field Emission Lamps Using Carbon Nanocoils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Ju Chung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The lighting performances and phosphor degradation in field emission lamps (FELs with two different kinds of cathode materials—multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and carbon nanocoils (CNCs—were compared. The MWCNTs and CNCs were selectively synthesized on 304 stainless steel wire substrates dip-coated with nanosized Pd catalysts by controlling the growth temperature in thermal chemical vapor deposition, and the film uniformity can be optimized by adjusting the growth time. FELs were successfully fabricated by assembling these cathode filaments with a glass bulb-type anode. The FEL with the CNC cathode showed much higher lighting uniformity and light-spot density and a lower current at the same voltage than that with the MWCNT cathode filament, and its best luminous efficiency was as high as 75 lm/W at 8 kV. We also found that, for P22, the phosphor degradation can be effectively suppressed by replacing MWCNTs with CNCs in the cathode, due to the much larger total bright spot area and hence much lower current density loading on the anode.

  12. Non-doped white organic light-emitting diodes based on aggregation-induced emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shuming; Kwok, Hoi Sing; Zhao Zujin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Non-doped white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) based on newly synthesized bluish-green light-emitting material 1,3,6,8-tetrakis [4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenyl]pyrene (TTPEPy) and red light-emitting material 4-(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenyl)-7-(5-(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl) phenyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole (BTPETTD) have been demonstrated. A maximum efficiency of 7.4 cd A -1 , 4 lm W -1 and brightness of 18 000 cd m -2 have been achieved by employing 3 nm thick 4, 4'-bis [N-(1-naphthyl-1-)-N-phenyl-amino]- biphenyl (NPB) as an electron-blocking layer. The WOLEDs exhibit a high colour rendering index of 90 and moderate colour stability with 1931 Commision International de L'Eclairage coordinates changing from (0.41, 0.41) to (0.38, 0.40) over a wide range of driving voltages. Moreover, the non-doped WOLEDs enjoy a reduced efficiency roll-off due to their nature of aggregation-induced emission.

  13. On the theory of frequency-shifted secondary emission of light-harvesting molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    The expressions are obtained for the intensity of the frequency-shifted secondary emission of a chromophore playing the role of a reaction center in the simplest model three-chromophore molecular 'light-harvesting' antenna, which is constructed and oriented in space so that the incident photons coherently excite two of its chromophore pigments. The quantum-field formalism was used, which takes into account the generalized (quantum-electrodynamic) dipole-dipole, as well as radiative and nonradiative dissipative interactions between pigments and the reaction center of the antenna. The special features of the excitation spectrum of the Raman scattering line and the frequency-shifted fluorescence spectrum of the reaction center of the molecular antenna under study are discussed. A comparison of the expressions obtained for the excitation and fluorescence spectra and with the corresponding expressions obtained for a bichromophore molecular system, which differs from a three-chromophore antenna by the absence of one of the pigments, revealed the properties of the mechanism of action of light-harvesting molecular antennas that have not been found earlier. In particular, it is shown that 'the light-harvesting' caused by the collective dissipative interactions of pigments with the reaction center of the antenna can substantially exceed a sum of contributions from separate pigments

  14. Top-Emission Organic Light Emitting Diode Fabrication Using High Dissipation Graphite Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Sheng Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study uses a synthetic graphite fiber as the heat dissipation substrate for top-emission organic light emitting diode (TEOLED to reduce the impact from joule heat. UV glue (YCD91 was spin coated onto the substrate as the insulation layer. The TEOLED structure is (glass; copper; graphite substrate/YCD91 glue/Al/Au/EHI608/TAPC/Alq3/LiF/Al/Ag. The proposed graphite fiber substrate presents better luminous performance compared with glass and copper substrate devices with luminance of 3055 cd/m2 and current efficiency of 6.11 cd/A at 50 mA/cm2. When lighting period of different substrates TEOLED, the substrate case back temperature was observed using different lighting periods. A glass substrate element operating from 5 to 25 seconds at 3000 cd/m2 luminance produced a temperature rate of 1.207°C/sec. Under 4000 cd/m2 luminance the copper and graphite substrate temperature rates were 0.125°C/sec and 0.088°C/sec. Graphite component lifetime was determined to be 1.875 times higher than the glass components and 1.125 times higher than that of copper.

  15. Tailoring the Energy Landscape in Quasi-2D Halide Perovskites Enables Efficient Green-Light Emission

    KAUST Repository

    Quan, Li Na

    2017-05-10

    Organo-metal halide perovskites are a promising platform for optoelectronic applications in view of their excellent charge-transport and bandgap tunability. However, their low photoluminescence quantum efficiencies, especially in low-excitation regimes, limit their efficiency for light emission. Consequently, perovskite light-emitting devices are operated under high injection, a regime under which the materials have so far been unstable. Here we show that, by concentrating photoexcited states into a small subpopulation of radiative domains, one can achieve a high quantum yield, even at low excitation intensities. We tailor the composition of quasi-2D perovskites to direct the energy transfer into the lowest-bandgap minority phase and to do so faster than it is lost to nonradiative centers. The new material exhibits 60% photoluminescence quantum yield at excitation intensities as low as 1.8 mW/cm2, yielding a ratio of quantum yield to excitation intensity of 0.3 cm2/mW; this represents a decrease of 2 orders of magnitude in the excitation power required to reach high efficiency compared with the best prior reports. Using this strategy, we report light-emitting diodes with external quantum efficiencies of 7.4% and a high luminescence of 8400 cd/m2.

  16. Controlling the emission and propagation of light with nano-plasmonic metamaterials and metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xingjie

    Metamaterials---artificially structured materials with engineered electromagnetic properties---have enabled unprecedented flexibility in manipulating electromagnetic waves and producing new functionalities. Metasurfaces are subwavelength thin metamaterial layers to introduce unusual properties do not exist in nature. They can play a fundamental role in generating synthetic scattering diagrams of macroscopic objects. Optical metamaterials and metasurfaces have enabled unprecedented flexibility in manipulating light waves and producing new functionalities. We have studied various topics in this field, from designs to potential applications. We experimentally demonstrated the world's first optical metasurface which is capable of precisely manipulating light in arbitrary ways over a broad range of near-infrared light, which could make possible of many optical innovations such as more powerful microscopes, telecommunications and computers. We proposed the first hyperbolic metasurface, which consist of a highly anisotropic material layer and an isotropic material layer can support Dyakonov surface waves that have hyperbolic dispersion. This type of metasurfaces support a broadband singularity in the photonic density of states, which opens up another possibility to engineer the spontaneous emission efficiency. We also developed a set of parallel simulation tools which can handle a variety of problems in nanophotonics and plasmonics. Especially, we established an on-line research environment for the research community with six tools, which deliver a cloud computing service with no demand for either any powerful computational hardware or any additional software installations and cover a range of tasks including the design and simulation of complex transformation optics devices and optical metamaterials.

  17. Experimental study of the production of light fragments in the α+α interactions at medium energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avome-Nze, M.-M.

    1979-01-01

    The production of light nuclides 3 He, 4 He, 6 Li, 7 Li and 7 Be in the α+α interactions to 103 MeV and to 218 MeV of incident energy is studied. The technique of semiconductors telescope has permitted to proceed to identification of these nuclides, to measure their energy spectra and their angular range. The cross sections of different nuclides were measured by integration on energy E and on solid angle Ω. The different values show that the α + α reactions can take prominent part in the production of helium-3. They appear sufficient to expound 6 Li abundance in the interstellar environment. On the contrary, the spallation is not sufficient to explain 7 Li abundance in the interstellar environment [fr

  18. Light fragment emission within the model of transport theory for high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malfliet, R.; Martschew, E.; Schuermann, B.

    1983-01-01

    The model of transport theory is extended to include the formation of composite particles through thermodynamics. First results obtained are encouraging and show the significance of non-equilibrated components in the inclusive spectra. (author)

  19. New insights into the parametrization of temperature and light responses of mono - and sesquiterpene emissions from Aleppo pine and rosemary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudt, M.; Bourgeois, I.; Al Halabi, R.; Song, W.; Williams, J.

    2017-03-01

    Phytogenic emission of large volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as monoterpenes (MTs) and sesquiterpenes (SQTs) are key precursors to the formation and growth of atmospheric particles. However, controlled environment studies to elucidate emission responses to temperature and light are still sparse. In this study, the volatile contents and emission responses of Aleppo pine and Rosemary have been investigated. These two common Mediterranean species store semivolatiles inside (resin ducts) and outside (trichomes) their foliage tissues respectively. Both species emitted mainly MTs with basal emission rates of around 5 (Rosemary) and 10 (pine) μg g-1 h-1 and SQTs about one order of magnitude lower. In Aleppo pine, two volatile sources could be clearly distinguished: 1) de-novo synthesized emission of (E)-β-ocimene and linalool, which accounted for about 70% of the total VOC release, were not found in foliar VOC extracts and expressed light dependency (LD) and temperature responses typical for enzyme driven emissions; and 2) storage-derived emissions of various MTs and SQTs whose emissions increased exponentially with temperature, showed no light dependency and were all present in leaf extracts. In Rosemary, all emitted MTs and SQTs including many oxygenated compounds, showed responses typical for stored volatiles and were all found in leaf extracts. The emissions of individual volatiles or volatile classes could be well described with the commonly applied empirical algorithms developed for LD or non LD emissions. However, the shapes of the temperature responses, and hence the deduced coefficient values, were significantly different between oxygenated and non-oxygenated compounds. They also differed between the storage-derived emissions of the two plant species, for individual VOCs or VOC classes. We address the possible reasons for this variation in temperature responses and argue that they are mostly due to molecular interactions along the species specific leaf

  20. Comparison between fragmented QRS and Q waves in myocardial scar detection using myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbagh Kakhki, Vahid Reza; Ayati, Narjess; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Sadeghi, Ramin; Tayyebi, Mohammad; Shariati, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI) is of paramount importance in patient management, which necessitates the development of efficient and accurate diagnostic methods. Q wave is not present in all patients with MI, and its prevalence is declining. Recently, fragmented QRS (fQRS) complex has been introduced as a marker of prior MI. To investigate diagnostic value of fQRS compared to Q wave. We included 500 consecutive patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease who underwent two days of gated myocardial perfusion imaging using dipyridamole pharmacologic stress. Electrocardiogram (ECG) was evaluated to detect fQRS as well as Q-wave. Finally, subjects were compared in terms of ventricular perfusion and function indices. A total of 207 men and 269 women with mean age of 57.06 ± 12 years were studied. ECG analysis showed that 14.3% of the patients had both fQRS and Q waves, 30.7% had fQRS, and 3.8% had Q waves. Fixed myocardial perfusion defect was noted in 22.3% of patients according to MPIs. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for myocardial scar detection were 78%, 65%, 39%, and 91%, respectively, for fQRS and 61%, 94%, 76%, and 89%, respectively, for Q wave. Although fQRS had lower specificity compared to Q wave in the detection of myocardial scar, due to higher sensitivity and negative predictive value can be an invaluable diagnostic index. There is also an incremental value for fQRS in association with Q-wave in myocardial scar assessment.

  1. Suppressed speckle contrast of blue light emission out of white lamp with phosphors excited by blue laser diodes for high-brightness lighting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Junichi; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Takeda, Yuji; Ueno, Misaki; Kawasaki, Yoji; Matsuba, Yoshiaki; Heike, Atsushi

    2012-11-01

    The speckle contrast of blue light emission out of high-brightness white lamps using phosphors excited by InGaN/GaN blue laser diodes is evaluated as a measure of coherence. As a result, speckle contrast of as low as 1.7%, the same level as a blue light emitting diode, is obtained. This implies that the original blue laser light can be converted into incoherent light through lamp structures without any dynamic mechanisms. This unique speckle-free performance is considered to be realized by multiple scattering inside the lamp structure, the multi-longitudinal mode operation of the blue laser diodes, and the use of multiple laser diodes. Such almost-incoherent white lamps can be applied for general lighting without any nuisance of speckle noise and should be categorized as lamps rather than lasers in terms of laser safety regulation.

  2. Unregulated gaseous exhaust emission from modern ethanol fuelled light duty vehicles in cold ambient condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairotte, M.; Adam, T. W.; Zardini, A. A.; Astorga, C.

    2011-12-01

    the first minutes of the cycle, before the light-off of the Three-Way Catalyst (TWC). Less ammonia has been emitted with ethanol fuel, in particular in low ambient condition (E75 versus E5). Ammonia is a harmful compound for human health and vegetation, and is a precursor of secondary aerosol. Even if agricultural activities are the main source of anthropogenic ammonia, the contribution from the transport sector increases significantly during the cold season. Consequently, using high concentrated ethanol as fuel may have a positive impact on ammonia emission in urban area. However, ethanol fuel had a negative impact on formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. The latter together with methane was notably emitted in low ambient temperature, in comparison with gasoline fuel (E5). Moreover, the OFP at -7°C was influenced by the amount of ethanol in gasoline, mainly because of the increase of ozone precursors linked to ethanol (ethylene, acetylene, and acetaldehyde). Even if ozone concentration levels are generally lower during the cold seasons these results show that the issue should be considered globally before promoting the use of high concentrated ethanol fuel in a large scale.

  3. White emission from nano-structured top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes based on a blue emitting layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Woo Jin; Park, Jung Jin; Park, O Ok; Im, Sang Hyuk; Chin, Byung Doo

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated that white emission can be obtained from nano-structured top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (TEOLEDs) based on a blue emitting layer (EML). The nano-structured TEOLEDs were fabricated on nano-patterned substrates, in which both optical micro-cavity and scattering effects occur simultaneously. Due to the combination of these two effects, the electroluminescence spectra of the nano-structured device with a blue EML exhibited not only blue but also yellow colours, which corresponded to the intrinsic emission of the EML and the resonant emission of the micro-cavity effect. Consequently, it was possible to produce white emission from nano-structured TEOLEDs without employing a multimode micro-cavity. The intrinsic emission wavelength can be varied by altering the dopant used for the EML. Furthermore, the emissive characteristics turned out to be strongly dependent on the nano-pattern sizes of the nano-structured devices. (paper)

  4. Broadband white light emission from Ce:AlN ceramics: High thermal conductivity down-converters for LED and laser-driven solid state lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Wieg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride (AlN as a transparent ceramic host for Ce3+, a well-known active ion dopant. We show that the Ce:AlN ceramics have overlapping photoluminescent (PL emission peaks that cover almost the entire visible range resulting in a white appearance under 375 nm excitation without the need for color mixing. The PL is due to a combination of intrinsic AlN defect complexes and Ce3+ electronic transitions. Importantly, the peak intensities can be tuned by varying the Ce concentration and processing parameters, causing different shades of white light without the need for multiple phosphors or light sources. The Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage coordinates calculated from the measured spectra confirm white light emission. In addition, we demonstrate the viability of laser driven white light emission by coupling the Ce:AlN to a readily available frequency tripled Nd-YAG laser emitting at 355 nm. The high thermal conductivity of these ceramic down-converters holds significant promise for producing higher power white light sources than those available today.

  5. Energy transfer and colour tunability in UV light induced Tm3+/Tb3+/Eu3+: ZnB glasses generating white light emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh, V; Gupta, Kiran; Parthasaradhi Reddy, C; Ham, Byoung S

    2017-03-15

    A promising energy transfer (Tm 3+ →Tb 3+ →Eu 3+ ) approach is brought forward to generate white light emission under ultraviolet (UV) light excitation for solid state lightening. Tm 3+ /Tb 3+ /Eu 3+ ions are combinedly doped in zinc borate glass system in view of understanding energy transfer process resulting in white light emission. Zinc borate (host) glass displayed optical and luminescence properties due to formation of Zn(II) x -[O(-II)] y centres in the ZnB glass matrix. At 360nm (UV) excitation, triply doped Tm 3+ /Tb 3+ /Eu 3+ : ZnB glasses simultaneously shown their characteristic emission bands in blue (454nm: 1 D 2 → 3 F 4 ), green (547nm: 5 D 4 → 7 F 5 ) and red (616nm: 5 D 0 → 7 F 2 ) regions. In triple ions doped glasses, energy transfer dynamics is discussed in terms of Forster-Dexter theory, excitation & emission profiles, lifetime curves and from partial energy level diagram of three ions. The role of Tb 3+ in ET from Tm 3+ →Eu 3+ was discussed using branch model. From emission decay analysis, energy transfer probability (P) and efficiency (η) were evaluated. Colour tunability from blue to white on varying (Tb 3+ , Eu 3+ ) content is demonstrated from Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates. Based on chromaticity coordinates, other colour related parameters like correlated colour temperature (CCT) and colour purity are also computed for the studied glass samples. An appropriate blending of such combination of rare earth ions could show better suitability as potential candidates in achieving multi-colour and warm/cold white light emission for white LEDs application in the field of solid state lightening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Recent progress on perturbative QCD fragmentation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, K.

    1995-05-01

    The recent development of perturbative QCD (PQCD) fragmentation functions has strong impact on quarkonium production. I shall summarize B c meson production based on these PQCD fragmentation functions, as well as, the highlights of some recent activities on applying these PQCD fragmentation functions to explain anomalous J/ψ and ψ' production at the Tevatron. Finally, I discuss a fragmentation model based on the PQCD fragmentation functions for heavy quarks fragmenting into heavy-light mesons

  7. Selective scanning tunneling microscope light emission from rutile phase of VO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Joe; Kuwahara, Masashi; Hotsuki, Masaki; Katano, Satoshi; Uehara, Yoichi

    2016-09-28

    We observed scanning tunneling microscope light emission (STM-LE) induced by a tunneling current at the gap between an Ag tip and a VO2 thin film, in parallel to scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) profiles. The 34 nm thick VO2 film grown on a rutile TiO2 (0 0 1) substrate consisted of both rutile (R)- and monoclinic (M)-structure phases of a few 10 nm-sized domains at room temperature. We found that STM-LE with a certain photon energy of 2.0 eV occurs selectively from R-phase domains of VO2, while no STM-LE was observed from M-phase. The mechanism of STM-LE from R-phase VO2 was determined to be an interband transition process rather than inverse photoemission or inelastic tunneling processes.

  8. Applications of Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (Lasers) for Restorative Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Ajlal, Syed

    2016-01-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser) has been used widely in a range of biomedical and dental applications in recent years. In the field of restorative dentistry, various kinds of lasers have been developed for diagnostic (e.g. caries detection) and operative applications (e.g. tooth ablation, cavity preparation, restorations, bleaching). The main benefits for laser applications are patient comfort, pain relief and better results for specific applications. Major concerns for using dental lasers frequently are high cost, need for specialized training and sensitivity of the technique, thereby compromising its usefulness particularly in developing countries. The main aim of this paper is to evaluate and summarize the applications of lasers in restorative dentistry, including a comparison of the applications of lasers for major restorative dental procedures and conventional clinical approaches. A remarkable increase in the use of lasers for dental application is expected in the near future. PMID:26642047

  9. Impact of surface morphology on the properties of light emission in InGaN epilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristijonas Uždavinys, Tomas; Marcinkevičius, Saulius; Mensi, Mounir; Lahourcade, Lise; Carlin, Jean-François; Martin, Denis; Butté, Raphaël; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2018-05-01

    Scanning near-field optical microscopy was used to study the influence of the surface morphology on the properties of light emission and alloy composition in InGaN epitaxial layers grown on GaN substrates. A strong correlation between the maps of the photoluminescence (PL) peak energy and the gradient of the surface morphology was observed. This correlation demonstrates that the In incorporation strongly depends on the geometry of the monolayer step edges that form during growth in the step-flow mode. The spatial distribution of nonradiative recombination centers — evaluated from PL intensity maps — was found to strongly anticorrelate with the local content of In atoms in the InGaN alloy.

  10. Optimization of the implosion phase on TC-I by light emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aramaki, E.A.; Porto, P.; Berni, L.; Honda, R.Y.; Ueda, M.; Doi, I.; Machid, M.

    1988-01-01

    The best operation condition on the field-reversed theta-pinch TC-I at UNICAMP is studied by analysis of the helium-plasma light emission and electromagnetic signals observed during the preionization and implosion phase of FRC plasma. The TC-I device can be operated with a crowbar switch on the preionization and main capacitor banks, in order to fix the number of oscillations as well as the time interval between the end of the preionization and the main discharge phase. A detailed study of the plasma implosion has been carried out by changing the above parameters and also the working gas pressure by using photodiode, a visible spectrometer, magnetic probes, a Faraday cup and a streak camera [pt

  11. Optimization of the implosion phase of TC-I by light emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aramaki, E.A.; Porto, P.; Berni, L.; Honda, R.Y.; Ueda, M.; Doi, I.; Machida, M.

    1989-01-01

    The best operation condition on the field-reversed theta-pinch TC-I at UNICAMP is studied by analysis of the helium-plasma light emission and electromagnetic signals observed during the preionization and implosion phase of FRC plasma. The TC-I device can be operated with a crowbar switch on the preionization and main capacitor banks, in order to fix the number of oscillations as well as the time interval between the end of the preionization and the main discharge phase. A detailed study of the plasma implosion has been carried out by changing the above parameters and also the working gas pressure by using a photodiode, a visible spectrometer, magnetic probes, a Faraday cup and a streak camera. (orig.)

  12. Mechanism of giant enhancement of light emission from Au/CdSe nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Y-P; Liang, C-T; Chen, Y-F; Lai, C-W; Chou, P-T

    2007-01-01

    Based on the enhanced electron-hole recombination rate generated by surface plasmon (SP) waves of Au nanoparticles (NPs) and electrons transferred from CdSe quantum dots (QDs) to Au NPs, we propose a mechanism to elucidate the luminescent behavior in Au and CdSe nanocomposites. With our proposed model, the enhancement of the spectrally integrated PL intensity can be manipulated by up to a factor of ∼33, the largest value ever reported. Our study can be used to clarify the ambiguity in controlling the light emission enhancement and quenching of semiconductor nanocrystals coupled with the SP waves of metal NPs. It should be very useful for the creation of highly efficient solid-state emitters

  13. In-situ TEM study on structural change and light emission of a multiwall carbon nanotube during Joule heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, K.; Asaka, K.; Nakahara, H.; Saito, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Structure changes of a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) during Joule heating were studied with simultaneous measurement of light emission spectra. The outer shells of the MWNT peeled off one by one because of excessive heating. All the peeled outer shells finally disappeared and inner shells whose tips were closed emerged, i.e., a new MWNT was formed. Each diameter of the shells comprising the MWNT decreased compared with those before the fracture. Light emission spectra during Joule heating of an MWNT were composed of both the blackbody radiation and characteristic peaks. The peaks in the light emission spectra shifted to higher energies in accordance with shrinkage of the inner shells. The energies of the peaks in the spectra corresponded to energy gaps between van Hove singularities calculated from the diameters of the shells, indicating that the peaks in the spectra are attributed to the interband electron transition in the MWNT.

  14. Red, green, blue and white light upconversion emission in Yb3+/Tm3+/Ho3+ co-doped tellurite glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desirena, H; De la Rosa, E; Meza, O; Salas, P

    2011-01-01

    Several Yb 3+ /Tm 3+ /Ho 3+ co-doped transparent TeO 2 -ZnO-Na 2 O-Yb 2 O 3 -Ho 2 O 3 -Tm 2 O 3 glasses were prepared and luminescence properties were characterized. Simultaneous red, green and blue (RGB) emission were obtained after excitation at 970 nm. Colour emission was tuned from multicolour to white light with colour coordinate (0.32, 0.33) matching very well with the white reference (0.33, 0.33). Changes in colour emission were obtained by varying the intensity ratios between RGB bands that are strongly concentration dependent because of the interaction of co-dopants. The colour tunability, high quality of white light and high intensity of the emitted signal make these transparent glasses excellent candidates for applications in solid-state lighting.

  15. Emission Characteristics of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes and Organic Thin-Films with Planar and Corrugated Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Kuo Wei

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review the emission characteristics from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs and organic molecular thin films with planar and corrugated structures. In a planar thin film structure, light emission from OLEDs was strongly influenced by the interference effect. With suitable design of microcavity structure and layer thicknesses adjustment, optical characteristics can be engineered to achieve high optical intensity, suitable emission wavelength, and broad viewing angles. To increase the extraction efficiency from OLEDs and organic thin-films, corrugated structure with micro- and nano-scale were applied. Microstructures can effectively redirects the waveguiding light in the substrate outside the device. For nanostructures, it is also possible to couple out the organic and plasmonic modes, not only the substrate mode.

  16. Compact fluorescent lighting in Wisconsin: elevated atmospheric emission and landfill deposition post-EISA implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, John D; Katers, John F

    2013-07-01

    The majority of states in the USA, including Wisconsin, have been affected by elevated air, soil and waterborne mercury levels. Health risks associated with mercury increase from the consumption of larger fish species, such as Walleye or Pike, which bio-accumulate mercury in muscle tissue. Federal legislation with the 2011 Mercury and Air Toxics Standards and the Wisconsin legislation on mercury, 2009 Wisconsin Act 44, continue to aim at lowering allowable levels of mercury emissions. Meanwhile, mercury-containing compact fluorescent lights (CFL) sales continue to grow as businesses and consumers move away from energy intensive incandescent light bulbs. An exchange in pollution media is occurring as airborne mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants, the largest anthropogenic source of mercury, are being reduced by lower energy demand and standards, while more universal solid waste containing mercury is generated each time a CFL is disposed. The treatment of CFLs as a 'universal waste' by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) led to the banning of non-household fluorescent bulbs from most municipal solid waste. Although the EPA encourages recycling of bulbs, industry currently recycles fluorescent lamps and CFLs at a rate of only 29%. Monitoring programs at the federal and state level have had only marginal success with industrial and business CFL recycling. The consumer recycling rate is even lower at only 2%. A projected increase in residential CFL use in Wisconsin owing to the ramifications of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 will lead to elevated atmospheric mercury and landfill deposition in Wisconsin.

  17. Hydrogen-exchange kinetics of the indole NH proton of the buried tryptophan in the constant fragment of the immunoglobulin light chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, Y.; Goto, Y.; Hamaguchi, K.; Hayashi, F.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kyogoku, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The constant fragment of the immunoglobulin light chain (type λ) has two trytophyl residues at positions 150 and 187. Trp-150 is buried in the interior, and Trp-187 lies on the surface of the molecule. The hydrogen-deuterium exchange kinetics of the indole NH proton Trp-150 were studied at various pH values at 25 0 C by 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance. Exchange rates were approximately first order in hydroxyl ion dependence above pH 8, were relatively independent of pH between pH 7 and 8, and decreased below pH 7. On the assumption that the exchange above pH 8 proceeds through local fluctuations of the protein molecule, the exchange rates between pH 7 and 8 through global unfolding were estimated. The exchange rate constant within this pH range at 25 0 C thus estimated was consistent with that of the global unfolding of the constant fragment under the same conditions as those reported previously. The activation energy for the exchange process at pH 7.8 was the same as that for the unfolding process by 2 M guanidine hydrochloride. The exchange rates of backbone NH protons were almost the same as that of the indole NH proton of Trp-150 at pH 7.l. These observations also indicated that the exchange between pH 7 and 8 occurs through global unfolding of the protein molecule and is rate-limited by the unfolding. At around pH 9, on the other hand, the activation energy for the exchange process of the indole NH proton of Trp-150 was smaller than that for the unfolding process, and the exchange rates differed according to the different signals of backbone NH protons. These findings together with the pH dependence of the rate constant indicated that exchange due to local fluctuations is predominant above pH 8

  18. Proteins involved in biophoton emission and flooding-stress responses in soybean under light and dark conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Abu Hena Mostafa; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-02-01

    To know the molecular systems basically flooding conditions in soybean, biophoton emission measurements and proteomic analyses were carried out for flooding-stressed roots under light and dark conditions. Photon emission was analyzed using a photon counter. Gel-free quantitative proteomics were performed to identify significant changes proteins using the nano LC-MS along with SIEVE software. Biophoton emissions were significantly increased in both light and dark conditions after flooding stress, but gradually decreased with continued flooding exposure compared to the control plants. Among the 120 significantly identified proteins in the roots of soybean plants, 73 and 19 proteins were decreased and increased in the light condition, respectively, and 4 and 24 proteins were increased and decreased, respectively, in the dark condition. The proteins were mainly functionally grouped into cell organization, protein degradation/synthesis, and glycolysis. The highly abundant lactate/malate dehydrogenase proteins were decreased in flooding-stressed roots exposed to light, whereas the lysine ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme was increased in both light and dark conditions. Notably, however, specific enzyme assays revealed that the activities of these enzymes and biophoton emission were sharply increased after 3 days of flooding stress. This finding suggests that the source of biophoton emission in roots might involve the chemical excitation of electron or proton through enzymatic or non-enzymatic oxidation and reduction reactions. Moreover, the lysine ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme may play important roles in responses in flooding stress of soybean under the light condition and as a contributing factor to biophoton emission.

  19. Influence of emissive layer thickness on electrical characteristics of polyfluorene copolymer based polymer light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, D; Gopikrishna, P; Singh, A; Dey, A; Iyer, P K

    2016-01-01

    Polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) with a device configuration of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/PFONPN01 [Poly [2,7-(9,9’-dioctylfluorene)-co-N-phenyl-1,8-naphthalimide (99:01)]/LiF/Al have been fabricated by varying the emissive layer (EML) thickness (40/65/80/130 nm) and the influence of EML thickness on the electrical characteristics of PLED has been studied. PLED can be modelled as a simple combination of resistors and capacitors. The impedance spectroscopy analysis showed that the devices with different EML thickness had different values of parallel resistance (R P ) and the parallel capacitance (C P ). The impedance of the devices is found to increase with increasing EML thickness resulting in an increase in the driving voltage. The device with an emissive layer thickness of 80nm, spin coated from a solution of concentration 15 mg/mL is found to give the best device performance with a maximum brightness value of 5226 cd/m 2 . (paper)

  20. Tuning light emission of PbS nanocrystals from infrared to visible range by cation exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Binetti, Enrico

    2015-10-27

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, with intense and sharp-line emission between red and near-infrared spectral regions, are of great interest for optoelectronic and bio-imaging applications. The growth of an inorganic passivation layer on nanocrystal surfaces is a common strategy to improve their chemical and optical stability and their photoluminescence quantum yield. In particular, cation exchange is a suitable approach for shell growth at the expense of the nanocrystal core size. Here, the cation exchange process is used to promote the formation of a CdS passivation layer on the surface of very small PbS nanocrystals (2.3 nm in diameter), blue shifting their optical spectra and yielding luminescent and stable nanostructures emitting in the range of 700–850 nm. Structural, morphological and compositional investigation confirms the nanocrystal size contraction after the cation-exchange process, while the PbS rock-salt crystalline phase is retained. Absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrate the growth of a passivation layer with a decrease of the PbS core size, as inferred by the blue-shift of the excitonic peaks. The surface passivation strongly increases the photoluminescence intensity and the excited state lifetime. In addition, the nanocrystals reveal increased stability against oxidation over time. Thanks to their absorption and emission spectral range and the slow recombination dynamics, such highly luminescent nano-objects can find interesting applications in sensitized photovoltaic cells and light-emitting devices.

  1. Constraints on light WIMP candidates from the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arina, Chiara; Tytgat, Michel H.G.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the measurements reported by direct detection experiments, most notably DAMA, CDMS-II, CoGeNT and Xenon10/100, we study further the constraints that might be set on some light dark matter candidates, M DM ∼ few GeV, using the Fermi-LAT data on the isotropic gamma-ray diffuse emission. In particular, we consider a Dirac fermion singlet interacting through a new Z' gauge boson, and a scalar singlet S interacting through the Higgs portal. Both candidates are WIMP (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles), i.e. they have an annihilation cross-section in the pbarn range. Also they may both have a spin-independent elastic cross section on nucleons in the range required by direct detection experiments. Although being generic WIMP candidates, because they have different interactions with Standard Model particles, their phenomenology regarding the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray emission is quite distinct. In the case of the scalar singlet, the one-to-one correspondence between its annihilation cross-section and its spin-independent elastic scattering cross-section permits to express the constraints from the Fermi-LAT data in the direct detection exclusion plot, σ n 0 −M DM . Depending on the astrophysics, we argue that it is possible to exclude the singlet scalar dark matter candidate at 95% confidence level. The constraints on the Dirac singlet interacting through a Z' are comparatively weaker

  2. Tuning light emission of PbS nanocrystals from infrared to visible range by cation exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Binetti, Enrico; Striccoli, Marinella; Sibillano, Teresa; Giannini, Cinzia; Brescia, Rosaria; Falqui, Andrea; Comparelli, Roberto; Corricelli, Michela; Tommasi, Raffaele; Agostiano, Angela; Curri, M Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, with intense and sharp-line emission between red and near-infrared spectral regions, are of great interest for optoelectronic and bio-imaging applications. The growth of an inorganic passivation layer on nanocrystal surfaces is a common strategy to improve their chemical and optical stability and their photoluminescence quantum yield. In particular, cation exchange is a suitable approach for shell growth at the expense of the nanocrystal core size. Here, the cation exchange process is used to promote the formation of a CdS passivation layer on the surface of very small PbS nanocrystals (2.3 nm in diameter), blue shifting their optical spectra and yielding luminescent and stable nanostructures emitting in the range of 700–850 nm. Structural, morphological and compositional investigation confirms the nanocrystal size contraction after the cation-exchange process, while the PbS rock-salt crystalline phase is retained. Absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrate the growth of a passivation layer with a decrease of the PbS core size, as inferred by the blue-shift of the excitonic peaks. The surface passivation strongly increases the photoluminescence intensity and the excited state lifetime. In addition, the nanocrystals reveal increased stability against oxidation over time. Thanks to their absorption and emission spectral range and the slow recombination dynamics, such highly luminescent nano-objects can find interesting applications in sensitized photovoltaic cells and light-emitting devices.

  3. Characterisation of fragments emission by azimuthal correlations using 4{pi} AMPHORA detector: study of {sup 32}S + {sup 58}Ni and {sup nat}Ag at 38 MeV per nucleon; Caracterisation de l`emission de fragments par correlations azimutales avec le detecteur 4{pi} AMPHORA: etude des systemes {sup 32}S+{sup 58}Ni et {sup nat}Ag a 38 MeV par nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benchekroun, D

    1994-05-01

    The first part of this work reports on designing and testing a detector made of a gas proportional counter coupled to a CsI(TI) crystal. It is shown that a good identification of fragments of charge ranging from 3 to 20 is achieved. The energy threshold is lower than in the case of a conventional plastic - CsI(TI) phoswich detector. The second part is devoted to the study of complex fragment production in the {sup 32}S + {sup nat}Ag and {sup 32}S + {sup 58}Ni reactions using the multidetector array AMPHORA. The total multiplicity of charged particles has been used as a criterion of centrally of the collision. The evaluation of the characteristics of fragment emission has thus been studied from peripheral to central collisions. In the case of the most violet collisions the data infer that a rotating hot source has been formed (excitation energy of the order of 500 MeV). It is demonstrated that this sources de-excites through emission of a long chain of fragments and particles. The analysis of the azimuthal correlations of fragments with the evaporation code MODGAN confirmed the hypothesis of such a source. That hot source should rotate with an angular momentum up to 120 h and the emission times would be of the order of 10{sup -21} s. (author). 80 refs.

  4. Quantum Dots in Two-Dimensional Perovskite Matrices for Efficient Near-Infrared Light Emission

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Zhenyu

    2017-03-13

    Quantum-dot-in-perovskite solids are excellent candidates for infrared light-emitting applications. The first generation of dot-in-perovskite light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has shown bright infrared electroluminescence with tunable emission wavelength; however, their performance has been limited by degradation of the active layer at practical operating voltages. This arises from the instability of the three-dimensional (3D) organolead halide perovskite matrix. Herein we report the first dot-in-perovskite solids that employ two-dimensional (2D) perovskites as the matrix. 2D perovskite passivation is achieved via an in situ alkylammonium/alkylamine substitution carried out during the quantum dot (QD) ligand exchange process. This single-step film preparation process enables deposition of the QD/perovskite active layers with thicknesses of 40 nm, over seven times thinner than the first-generation dot-in-perovskite thin films that relied on a multistep synthesis. The dot-in-perovskite film roughness improved from 31 nm for the first-generation films to 3 nm for films as a result of this new approach. The best devices exhibit external quantum efficiency peaks exceeding 2% and radiances of ∼1 W sr–1 m–2, with an improved breakdown voltage up to 7.5 V. Compared to first-generation dot-in-perovskites, this new process reduces materials consumptions 10-fold and represents a promising step toward manufacturable devices.

  5. One-dimensional organic lead halide perovskites with efficient bluish white-light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhao; Zhou, Chenkun; Tian, Yu; Shu, Yu; Messier, Joshua; Wang, Jamie C.; van de Burgt, Lambertus J.; Kountouriotis, Konstantinos; Xin, Yan; Holt, Ethan; Schanze, Kirk; Clark, Ronald; Siegrist, Theo; Ma, Biwu

    2017-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid metal halide perovskites, an emerging class of solution processable photoactive materials, welcome a new member with a one-dimensional structure. Herein we report the synthesis, crystal structure and photophysical properties of one-dimensional organic lead bromide perovskites, C4N2H14PbBr4, in which the edge sharing octahedral lead bromide chains [PbBr4 2-]∞ are surrounded by the organic cations C4N2H14 2+ to form the bulk assembly of core-shell quantum wires. This unique one-dimensional structure enables strong quantum confinement with the formation of self-trapped excited states that give efficient bluish white-light emissions with photoluminescence quantum efficiencies of approximately 20% for the bulk single crystals and 12% for the microscale crystals. This work verifies once again that one-dimensional systems are favourable for exciton self-trapping to produce highly efficient below-gap broadband luminescence, and opens up a new route towards superior light emitters based on bulk quantum materials.

  6. Quantum Dots in Two-Dimensional Perovskite Matrices for Efficient Near-Infrared Light Emission

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Zhenyu; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Walters, Grant; Fan, James Z.; Liu, Min; Kinge, Sachin; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum-dot-in-perovskite solids are excellent candidates for infrared light-emitting applications. The first generation of dot-in-perovskite light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has shown bright infrared electroluminescence with tunable emission wavelength; however, their performance has been limited by degradation of the active layer at practical operating voltages. This arises from the instability of the three-dimensional (3D) organolead halide perovskite matrix. Herein we report the first dot-in-perovskite solids that employ two-dimensional (2D) perovskites as the matrix. 2D perovskite passivation is achieved via an in situ alkylammonium/alkylamine substitution carried out during the quantum dot (QD) ligand exchange process. This single-step film preparation process enables deposition of the QD/perovskite active layers with thicknesses of 40 nm, over seven times thinner than the first-generation dot-in-perovskite thin films that relied on a multistep synthesis. The dot-in-perovskite film roughness improved from 31 nm for the first-generation films to 3 nm for films as a result of this new approach. The best devices exhibit external quantum efficiency peaks exceeding 2% and radiances of ∼1 W sr–1 m–2, with an improved breakdown voltage up to 7.5 V. Compared to first-generation dot-in-perovskites, this new process reduces materials consumptions 10-fold and represents a promising step toward manufacturable devices.

  7. Substrate dependence of TM-polarized light emission characteristics of BAlGaN/AlN quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seoung-Hwan; Ahn, Doyeol

    2018-06-01

    To study the substrate dependence of light emission characteristics of transverse-magnetic (TM)-polarized light emitted from BAlGaN/AlN quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaN and AlN substrates were investigated theoretically. It is found that the topmost valence subband for QW structures grown on AlN substrate, is heavy hole state (HH1) while that for QW structures grown on GaN substrate is crystal-field split off light hole state (CL1), irrespective of the boron content. Since TM-polarized light emission is associated with the light hole state, the TM-polarized emission peak of BAlGaN/AlN QW structures grown on GaN substrate is expected to be much larger than that of the QW structure grown on AlN substrate. Also, both QW structures show that the spontaneous emission peak of BAlGaN/AlN QW structures would be improved with the inclusion of the boron. However, it rapidly begins to decrease when the boron content exceeds a critical value.

  8. Light absorption of biomass burning and vehicle emission-sourced carbonaceous aerosols of the Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhaofu; Kang, Shichang; Li, Chaoliu; Yan, Fangping; Chen, Pengfei; Gao, Shaopeng; Wang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yulan; Sillanpää, Mika

    2017-06-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols over the Tibetan Plateau originate primarily from biomass burning and vehicle emissions (BB and VEs, respectively). The light absorption characteristics of these carbonaceous aerosols are closely correlated with the burning conditions and represent key factors that influence climate forcing. In this study, the light absorption characteristics of elemental carbon (EC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in PM 2.5 (fine particulate matter smaller than 2.5 μm) generated from BB and VEs were investigated over the Tibetan Plateau (TP). The results showed that the organic carbon (OC)/EC ratios from BB- and VE-sourced PM 2.5 were 17.62 ± 10.19 and 1.19 ± 0.36, respectively. These values were higher than the ratios in other regions, which was primarily because of the diminished amount of oxygen over the TP. The mass absorption cross section of EC (MAC EC ) at 632 nm for the BB-sourced PM 2.5 (6.10 ± 1.21 m 2 .g -1 ) was lower than that of the VE-sourced PM 2.5 (8.10 ± 0.98 m 2 .g -1 ), indicating that the EC content of the BB-sourced PM 2.5 was overestimated because of the high OC/EC ratio. The respective absorption per mass (α/ρ) values at 365 nm for the VE- and BB-sourced PM 2.5 were 0.71 ± 0.17 m 2 .g -1 and 0.91 ± 0.18 m 2 .g -1 . The α/ρ value of the VEs was loaded between that of gasoline and diesel emissions, indicating that the VE-sourced PM 2.5 originated from both types of emissions. Because OC and WSOC accounts for most of the carbonaceous aerosols at remote area of the TP, the radiative forcing contributed by the WSOC should be high, and requires further investigation.

  9. 40 CFR 86.1709-99 - Exhaust emission standards for 1999 and later light light-duty trucks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... emissions measured on the federal Highway Fuel Economy Test in 40 CFR part 600, subpart B, shall be not.... Both the projected emissions and the Highway Fuel Economy Test standard shall be rounded to the nearest... effectiveness. A/C-on specific “open-loop” or “commanded enrichment” air-fuel enrichment strategies (as defined...

  10. Light propagation and emission in scattering media. Application to imaging of complex media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierrat, Romain

    2007-01-01

    In this manuscript, we raise different aspects of the propagation and emission of electromagnetic waves in a scattering medium. In the first part, we show that the Radiative Transfer Equation (rte) is a very good tool to study light propagation in a complex medium. Thanks to this formalism, we study the evolution of the spatial coherence of the beam inside the medium, which is seen as a signature of the different transport regimes of photons (single scattering, multiple scattering, diffusive regime). Next, we derive rigorously the diffusion approximation by using a modal approach of the rte. In particular, we obtain that the diffusion coefficient is independent of the level of absorption in the dynamic regime while it depends on absorption in the case of the steady-state regime. Finally, we study the temporal fluctuations of the scattered intensity and show that the use of the rte allows to go beyond the diffusive regime described by the diffusing-waves spectroscopy theory (dws). Comparisons between numerical computations and experiments are realized in reflexion to underline the fundamental role of the anisotropy of the scattering, which is not described by the standard theory. The second part is dedicated to the study of light emission in complex media. First, we study the amplification of scattered light in a gain system called random laser and show that it exists a laser threshold in the incoherent feedback regime. This threshold is quantified by using a modal approach of the rte. Thanks to this formalism, we highlight the limitations of the diffusion approximation in such a system. Next, we study the modification of the fluorescent decay rate of a single molecule embedded in a complex medium. We derive a model allowing the replacement of the scattering medium by an homogeneous equivalent medium taking into account the multiple scattering and the interactions between scatterers. This model is validated by comparison with the value of the decay rate of the

  11. Potential to reduce emissions of sulphur dioxide through reducing sulphur levels in heavy and light fuel oils - a discussion paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tushingham, M.; Bellamy, J.

    2001-01-01

    Background information on the sulphur levels in light fuel oil (used in residential heating) and heavy fuel oil (used as industrial fuel oil) is provided. In addition to the description of sulphur levels in light and heavy fuel oils, the report also provides a summary of regulatory limits in Canada and elsewhere, and a description of the emission benefits of decreasing sulphur in fuels. 4 refs., 10 tabs., 12 figs

  12. Lighting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  13. Carbon dioxide emission trends in cars and light trucks: A comparative analysis of emissions and methodologies for Florida's counties (2000 and 2008)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garren, S.J.; Pinjari, A.R.; Brinkmann, R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates methodologies to quantify CO 2 emissions from cars and light trucks in Florida. The most widely used methodology to calculate greenhouse gas emissions in the transportation sector at the local level uses a harmonic average (HA) methodology based on nationally averaged fuel economies that assume 55% city and 45% highway VMTs. This paper presents a local condition (LC) methodology that accounts for county-level variations in city and highway VMTs, as opposed to assumed uniform driving conditions. Both HA and LC methodologies were used to estimate and compare absolute and per capita CO 2 emissions both statewide and counties for 2000 and 2008. From 2000 to 2008, statewide absolute and per capita CO 2 emissions increased similarly using HA and LC methodologies; however, the percent change varied considerably among counties. Statewide CO 2 emissions calculated from HA and LC methodologies differed by only -0.2% (2000) and 1.7% (2008); however, the differences in the county-level emissions ranged from -8.0% to 14.9% (2000) and from -5.6% to 17.0% (2008). While either the HA or the LC methodology yields a similar result statewide, significant variation exists at the county level, warranting the need to consider local driving conditions when estimating county-level emissions. - Highlights: → The paper evaluates GHG emission methods for on-road passenger vehicles in Florida. → The paper compares methods that assume the harmonic average with actual VMTs driven. → The paper analyzes statewide GHG emissions aggregated by county for 2000 and 2008. → The paper improves on methods that balance bottom-up with top-down GHG emissions.

  14. Variability in operation-based NO(x) emission factors with different test routes, and its effects on the real-driving emissions of light diesel vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taewoo; Park, Junhong; Kwon, Sangil; Lee, Jongtae; Kim, Jeongsoo

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to quantify the differences in NO(x) emissions between standard and non-standard driving and vehicle operating conditions, and to estimate by how much NO(x) emissions exceed the legislative emission limits under typical Korean road traffic conditions. Twelve Euro 3-5 light-duty diesel vehicles (LDDVs) manufactured in Korea were driven on a chassis dynamometer over the standard New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) and a representative Korean on-road driving cycle (KDC). NO(x) emissions, average speeds and accelerations were calculated for each 1-km trip segment, so called averaging windows. The results suggest that the NO(x) emissions of the tested vehicles are more susceptible to variations in the driving cycles than to those in the operating conditions. Even under comparable operating conditions, the NO(x) control capabilities of vehicles differ from each other, i.e., NO(x) control is weaker for the KDC than for the NEDC. The NO(x) emissions over the KDC for given vehicle operating conditions exceed those over the NEDC by more than a factor of 8. Consequently, on-road NO(x) emission factors are estimated here to exceed the Euro 5 emission limit by up to a factor of 8, 4 and 3 for typical Korean urban, rural, and motorway road traffic conditions, respectively. Our findings support the development of technical regulations for supplementary real-world emission tests for emission certification and the corresponding research actions taken by automotive industries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fleet average NOx emission performance of 2004 model year light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-05-01

    The On-Road Vehicle and Engine Emission Regulations came into effect on January 1, 2004. The regulations introduced more stringent national emission standards for on-road vehicles and engines, and also required that companies submit reports containing information concerning the company's fleets. This report presented a summary of the regulatory requirements relating to nitric oxide (NO x ) fleet average emissions for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty passenger vehicles under the new regulations. The effectiveness of the Canadian fleet average NO x emission program at achieving environmental performance objectives was also evaluated. A summary of the fleet average NO x emission performance of individual companies was presented, as well as the overall Canadian fleet average of the 2004 model year based on data submitted by companies in their end of model year reports. A total of 21 companies submitted reports covering 2004 model year vehicles in 10 test groups, comprising 1,350,719 vehicles of the 2004 model year manufactured or imported for the purpose of sale in Canada. The average NO x value for the entire Canadian LDV/LDT fleet was 0.2016463 grams per mile. The average NO x values for the entire Canadian HLDT/MDPV fleet was 0.321976 grams per mile. It was concluded that the NO x values for both fleets were consistent with the environmental performance objectives of the regulations for the 2004 model year. 9 tabs

  16. Long-term implications of alternative light-duty vehicle technologies for global greenhouse gas emissions and primary energy demands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyle, Page; Kim, Son H.

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses global light-duty vehicle (LDV) transport in the upcoming century, and the implications of vehicle technology advancement and fuel-switching on greenhouse gas emissions and primary energy demands. Five different vehicle technology scenarios are analyzed with and without a CO 2 emissions mitigation policy using the GCAM integrated assessment model: a reference internal combustion engine vehicle scenario, an advanced internal combustion engine vehicle scenario, and three alternative fuel vehicle scenarios in which all LDVs are switched to natural gas, electricity, or hydrogen by 2050. The emissions mitigation policy is a global CO 2 emissions price pathway that achieves 450 ppmv CO 2 at the end of the century with reference vehicle technologies. The scenarios demonstrate considerable emissions mitigation potential from LDV technology; with and without emissions pricing, global CO 2 concentrations in 2095 are reduced about 10 ppmv by advanced ICEV technologies and natural gas vehicles, and 25 ppmv by electric or hydrogen vehicles. All technological advances in vehicles are important for reducing the oil demands of LDV transport and their corresponding CO 2 emissions. Among advanced and alternative vehicle technologies, electricity- and hydrogen-powered vehicles are especially valuable for reducing whole-system emissions and total primary energy. - Highlights: → Alternative-fuel LDVs reduce whole-system CO 2 emissions, even without carbon pricing. → Alternative-fuel LDVs enhance the CO 2 mitigation capacity of the transportation sector. → Electric and hydrogen vehicles reduce whole-system primary energy supporting LDV transport.

  17. Nuclear fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    An introduction to nuclear fragmentation, with emphasis in percolation ideas, is presented. The main theoretical models are discussed and as an application, the uniform expansion approximation is presented and the statistical multifragmentation model is used to calculate the fragment energy spectra. (L.C.)

  18. Comparison of interfacial properties of electrodeposited single carbon fiber/epoxy composites using tensile and compressive fragmentation tests and acoustic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joung-Man; Kim, Jin-Won; Yoon, Dong-Jin

    2002-03-01

    Interfacial and microfailure properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites were evaluated using both tensile fragmentation and compressive Broutman tests with an aid of acoustic emission (AE). A monomeric and two polymeric coupling agents were applied via the electrodeposition (ED) and the dipping applications. A monomeric and a polymeric coupling agent showed significant and comparable improvements in interfacial shear strength (IFSS) compared to the untreated case under both tensile and compressive tests. Typical microfailure modes including cone-shaped fiber break, matrix cracking, and partial interlayer failure were observed under tension, whereas the diagonal slipped failure at both ends of the fractured fiber exhibited under compression. Adsorption and shear displacement mechanisms at the interface were described in terms of electrical attraction and primary and secondary bonding forces. For both the untreated and the treated cases AE distributions were separated well in tension, whereas AE distributions were rather closely overlapped in compression. It might be because of the difference in molecular failure energies and failure mechanisms between tension and compression. The maximum AE voltage for the waveform of either carbon or large-diameter basalt fiber breakages in tension exhibited much larger than that in compression. AE could provide more likely the quantitative information on the interfacial adhesion and microfailure.

  19. Light particles emitted with very forward quasi-projectiles and the mechanism in the fragmentation of 44 MeV/a.m.u. 40Ar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, P.; Bacri, Ch.O.; Borrel, V.; Stephan, C.; Tassan-Got, L.; Beaumel, D.; Bernas, M.; Clapier, F.; Mirea, M.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of projectile fragmentation in the Fermi-energy region has been investigated for fragments emitted in the incident beam direction by detecting fast protons and neutrons evaporated by the projectile-like fragments. The proton coincidence rate is shown to increase with fragment velocity loss. This increase is also correlated to the decrease of the fragment yield, with the coincident rate doubling when the yield decreases by a factor of 10. The coincidence rate is found to be also proportional to the fragment mass loss for fragments with the beam velocity. A two-step mechanism is sketched out to interpret these results. For fragments with the beam velocity, the projectile nucleon removal is equally shared between a first fast step and the second evaporative step, while for fragments at the tenth of the maximum yield, the nucleons are removed by evaporation. Finally, the experimental observation that the most probable velocity for forward fragments is very close to that of the beam may be the result of a strong forward/backward momentum asymmetry in a Goldhaber-type analysis. (author)

  20. Wavelength-tuned light emission via modifying the band edge symmetry: Doped SnO2 as an example

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Hang; Deng, Rui; Li, Yongfeng; Yao, Bin; Ding, Zhanhui; Wang, Qingxiao; Han, Yu; Wu, Tao; Liu, Lei

    2014-01-01

    at 398 nm is observed in the indium-doped SnO2-based heterojunction. Our results demonstrate an unprecedented doping-based approach toward tailoring the symmetry of band edge states and recovering ultraviolet light emission in wide-bandgap oxides. © 2014

  1. Investigation of black and brown carbon multiple-wavelength-dependent light absorption from biomass and fossil fuel combustion source emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael R. Olson; Mercedes Victoria Garcia; Michael A. Robinson; Paul Van Rooy; Mark A. Dietenberger; Michael Bergin; James Jay Schauer

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of the black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) components of source emissions is critical to understanding the impact combustion aerosols have on atmospheric light absorption. Multiple-wavelength absorption was measured from fuels including wood, agricultural biomass, coals, plant matter, and petroleum distillates in controlled combustion settings....

  2. 75 FR 62739 - 2017 and Later Model Year Light Duty Vehicle GHG Emissions and CAFE Standards; Notice of Intent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... Model Year Light Duty Vehicle GHG Emissions and CAFE Standards; Notice of Intent AGENCIES: Environmental... fuel economy (CAFE) standards in accordance with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), as... FR 49454, 49460 (September 28, 2009). The NHTSA CAFE standards are only based on technologies that...

  3. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  4. Multi-fragmentation of C60 induced by 4He2+ impact (E<60 keV/amu) and investigated by a multi-correlation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rentenier, A.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.

    2003-01-01

    In this communication, the C 60 multi-fragmentation induced by 4 He 2+ ion impact in the 20-240 keV energy range, is investigated. Using a multi-stop time-of-flight technique, it becomes possible to measure partial spectra corresponding to the simultaneous emission of 2-5 light charged fragments; small charged fragments are found to be accompanied by the emission of at least another one. The fragment size distribution depends on the collisional energy and the multiplicity of emitted charged fragments. It is more peaked on small sizes when the collision velocity or the multiplicity increases. Corresponding relative cross sections are also measured; processes with emission of 2 and 3 charged fragments are always dominant but their relative weights decrease slowly when the collision energy increases

  5. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT 2011: SPECTROSCOPIC CAMPAIGN AND EMISSION-LINE LIGHT CURVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Aaron J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA, 92697-4575 (United States); Bennert, Vardha N. [Physics Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407 (United States); Canalizo, Gabriela [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Gates, Elinor L. [Lick Observatory, P.O. Box 85, Mount Hamilton, CA 95140 (United States); Greene, Jenny E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Malkan, Matthew A.; Treu, Tommaso [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Pancoast, Anna [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Sand, David J. [Texas Tech University, Physics Department, Box 41051, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Woo, Jong-Hak [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Assef, Roberto J. [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército Libertador 441, Santiago (Chile); Bae, Hyun-Jin [Department of Astronomy and Center for Galaxy Evolution Research, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Brewer, Brendon J. [Department of Statistics, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, MC 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); and others

    2015-04-15

    In the Spring of 2011 we carried out a 2.5 month reverberation mapping campaign using the 3 m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory, monitoring 15 low-redshift Seyfert 1 galaxies. This paper describes the observations, reductions and measurements, and data products from the spectroscopic campaign. The reduced spectra were fitted with a multicomponent model in order to isolate the contributions of various continuum and emission-line components. We present light curves of broad emission lines and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) continuum, and measurements of the broad Hβ line widths in mean and rms spectra. For the most highly variable AGNs we also measured broad Hβ line widths and velocity centroids from the nightly spectra. In four AGNs exhibiting the highest variability amplitudes, we detect anticorrelations between broad Hβ width and luminosity, demonstrating that the broad-line region “breathes” on short timescales of days to weeks in response to continuum variations. We also find that broad Hβ velocity centroids can undergo substantial changes in response to continuum variations; in NGC 4593, the broad Hβ velocity shifted by ∼250 km s{sup −1} over a 1 month period. This reverberation-induced velocity shift effect is likely to contribute a significant source of confusion noise to binary black hole searches that use multi-epoch quasar spectroscopy to detect binary orbital motion. We also present results from simulations that examine biases that can occur in measurement of broad-line widths from rms spectra due to the contributions of continuum variations and photon-counting noise.

  6. The multielectron character of the S 2p → 4e{sub g} shape resonance in the SF{sub 6} molecule studied via detection of soft X-ray emission and neutral high-Rydberg fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivimäki, A., E-mail: kivimaki@iom.cnr.it [CNR—Istituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM), Laboratorio TASC, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Coreno, M. [CNR—Istituto di Struttura della Materia (ISM), Basovizza Area Science Park, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Miotti, P.; Frassetto, F.; Poletto, L. [CNR—Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie (IFN), via Trasea 7, 35131 Padova (Italy); Stråhlman, C. [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Simone, M. de [CNR—Istituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM), Laboratorio TASC, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Richter, R. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The soft X-ray emission spectrum of SF{sub 6} changes at the S 2p → 4e{sub g} shape resonance. • The emission band around 172 eV indicates the population of the 6a{sub 1g} orbital. • Shake-up processes accompanying S 2p ionization can explain the new emissions. • Field ionization of neutral high Rydberg (HR) fragments reveals F and S atoms. • The yield of neutral HR fragments increases at the S 2p → 4e{sub g} shape resonance. - Abstract: We have studied the nature of the S 2p → 4e{sub g} shape resonance in the SF{sub 6} molecule by performing two different experiments. Soft X-ray emission spectra measured at the 4e{sub g} shape resonance reveal features that do not originate from the S 2p{sup −1} states. One of the features can be assigned to the 6a{sub 1g} → S 2p transition. The 6a{sub 1g} orbital, which is empty in the molecular ground state, can be populated either in core–valence double excitations or in S 2p shake-up transitions. Both these channels are considered. We have also studied the fragmentation of SF{sub 6} molecule after the decay of the S 2p core-hole states by observing neutral fragments in high-Rydberg states, where an electron occupies an orbital with n ≥ 20 (n is the principal quantum number). Such neutral fragments become, in relative terms, more abundant at the S 2p → 4e{sub g} shape resonance with respect to the S 2p → 2t{sub 2g} shape resonance, which is a pure one-electron phenomenon.

  7. Defect controlled tuning of the ratio of ultraviolet to visible light emission in TiO2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, S.; Basak, D.

    2016-01-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) of sol–gel TiO 2 thin film has been found to be largely dependent on the post-deposition processing such as annealing at 500 °C in air, vacuum and ultraviolet (UV) light curing at room temperature. A detailed analysis of room temperature PL spectra shows that the UV/VIS PL peak intensity ratio is maximum for the film which has been annealed at 500 °C in air. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the presence of Ti 3+ type of point defects. The visible emission is deconvoluted to green and orange emissions. Analyses of the present experimental results indicate that V O and/or Ti 3+ causes the green emission and OH and/or excess O 2 adsorption on TiO 2 surface probably causes the orange emission. The time correlated single photon counting spectroscopy data of the UV PL indicates higher number defects in vacuum annealed and UV cured films as compared to the air annealed film. Correlation of the results altogether allows us to conclude that the surface defects those causing the visible emission are smaller in number in the air annealed film. The present results may be useful for tuning the relative PL intensities of UV, green and orange emissions. - Highlights: • Sol–gel TiO 2 films were treated both in air, vacuum at 500 °C and under UV light (room temperature). • UV/VIS PL intensity ratio is maximum for air annealed and minimum for UV cured films. • Both green and orange emission predominantly controls the visible emission of TiO 2 . • The visible emission exhibit a clear correlation with Ti 3+  defects on the surface.

  8. Fragmentation of neck-like structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, C.; Bowman, D.R.; Peaslee, G.F.; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI

    1994-01-01

    Evidence for intermediate mass fragment emission from neck-like structures joining projectile- and target-like residues has been observed for peripheral 129 Xe+ nat Cu collisions at E/A=50 MeV. These framents are emitted primarily at velocities intermediate between those of the projectile and the target. Relative to the charge distribution for fragments evaporated from the projectile-like residue, the distribution for ''neck'' emission shows an enhanced emission for fragments with 4 f < 8. (orig.)

  9. Light absorbing organic aerosols (brown carbon) over the tropical Indian Ocean: impact of biomass burning emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, Bikkina; Sarin, M M

    2013-01-01

    The first field measurements of light absorbing water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), referred as brown carbon (BrC), have been made in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) during the continental outflow to the Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (ARS). The absorption signal measured at 365 nm in aqueous extracts of aerosols shows a systematic linear increase with WSOC concentration, suggesting a significant contribution from BrC to the absorption properties of organic aerosols. The mass absorption coefficient (b abs ) of BrC shows an inverse hyperbolic relation with wavelength (from ∼300 to 700 nm), providing an estimate of the Angstrom exponent (α P , range: 3–19; Av: 9 ± 3). The mass absorption efficiency of brown carbon (σ abs−BrC ) in the MABL varies from 0.17 to 0.72 m 2  g −1 (Av: 0.45 ± 0.14 m 2  g −1 ). The α P and σ abs−BrC over the BoB are quite similar to that studied from a sampling site in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), suggesting the dominant impact of organic aerosols associated with the continental outflow. A comparison of the mass absorption efficiency of BrC and elemental carbon (EC) brings to focus the significant role of light absorbing organic aerosols (from biomass burning emissions) in atmospheric radiative forcing over oceanic regions located downwind of the pollution sources. (letter)

  10. Evaluation of emission factors for light-duty gasoline vehicles based on chassis dynamometer and tunnel studies in Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng; Tao, Shikang; Lou, Shengrong; Hu, Qingyao; Wang, Hongli; Wang, Qian; Li, Li; Wang, Hongyu; Liu, Jian'gang; Quan, Yifeng; Zhou, Lanlan

    2017-11-01

    CO, THC, NOx, and PM emission factors of 51 light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) spanning the emission standards from Euro 2 to Euro 5 were measured by a chassis dynamometer. High frequencies of high-emitting vehicles were observed in Euro 2 and Euro 3 LDGV fleet. 56% and 33% of high-emitting vehicles contributed 81%-92% and 82%-85% of the emissions in Euro 2 and Euro 3 test fleet, respectively. Malfunctions of catalytic convertors after high strength use are the main cause of the high emissions. Continuous monitoring of a gasoline vehicle dominated tunnel in Shanghai, China was conducted to evaluate the average emission factors of vehicles in real-world. The results indicated that the emission factors of LDGVs were considerably underestimated in EI guidebook in China. The overlook of high-emitting vehicles in older vehicle fleet is the main reason for this underestimation. Enhancing the supervision of high emission vehicles and strengthening the compliance tests of in-use vehicles are essential measures to control the emissions of in-use gasoline vehicles at the present stage in China.

  11. Transparent organic light-emitting diodes with balanced white emission by minimizing waveguide and surface plasmonic loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Bo; Ou, Qing-Dong; Li, Yan-Qing; Chen, Jing-De; Zhao, Xin-Dong; Wei, Jian; Xie, Zhong-Zhi; Tang, Jian-Xin

    2017-07-10

    It is challenging in realizing high-performance transparent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with symmetrical light emission to both sides. Herein, an efficient transparent OLED with highly balanced white emission to both sides is demonstrated by integrating quasi-periodic nanostructures into the organic emitter and the metal-dielectric composite top electrode, which can simultaneously suppressing waveguide and surface plasmonic loss. The power efficiency and external quantum efficiency are raised to 83.5 lm W -1 and 38.8%, respectively, along with a bi-directional luminance ratio of 1.26. The proposed scheme provides a facile route for extending application scope of transparent OLEDs for future transparent displays and lightings.

  12. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  13. Light emission from sputtered or backscattered atoms on tungsten surfaces under ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Yasuhiro; Nogami, Keisuke; Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kenmotsu, Takahiko; Furuya, Kenji; Motohashi, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    We measured the intensity of light emission from sputtered atoms on tungsten surfaces under the irradiations of Kr"+ ion and Ar"+ ion, as a function of the perpendicular distance from the surface. Using the analysis of decay curve, we estimated the mean vertical velocity component in direction normal to the surface. We found that the estimated mean velocity had much differences according to the excited state. For example, although the estimated mean vertical velocity component normal to the surface from the 400.9 nm line((5d"5(6S)6p "7p_4→(5d"5(6S)6s "7S_3 transition) was 5.6±1.7 km/sec, that from the 386.8 nm line((5d"4(6S)6p "7D_4→(5d"5(6S)6s "7S_4 transition) was 2.8±1.0 km/sec. However, for different projectiles and energies, we found no remarkable changes in the velocity. (author)

  14. Selective self-assembly and light emission tuning of layered hybrid perovskites on patterned graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Valentino L P; Kovaříček, Petr; Valeš, Václav; Drogowska, Karolina; Verhagen, Tim; Vejpravova, Jana; Horák, Lukáš; Listorti, Andrea; Colella, Silvia; Kalbáč, Martin

    2018-02-15

    The emission of light in two-dimensional (2-D) layered hybrid organic lead halide perovskites, namely (R-NH 3 ) 2 PbX 4 , can be effectively tuned using specific building blocks for the perovskite formation. Herein this behaviour is combined with a non-covalent graphene functionalization allowing excellent selectivity and spatial resolution of the perovskite film growth, promoting the formation of hybrid 2-D perovskite : graphene heterostructures with uniform coverage of up to centimeter scale graphene sheets and arbitrary shapes down to 5 μm. Using cryo-Raman microspectroscopy, highly resolved spectra of the perovskite phases were obtained and the Raman mapping served as a convenient spatially resolved technique for monitoring the distribution of the perovskite and graphene constituents on the substrate. In addition, the stability of the perovskite phase with respect to the thermal variation was inspected in situ by X-ray diffraction. Finally, time-resolved photoluminescence characterization demonstrated that the optical properties of the perovskite films grown on graphene are not hampered. Our study thus opens the door to smart fabrication routes for (opto)-electronic devices based on 2-D perovskites in contact with graphene with complex architectures.

  15. Synthesis of silver nanoprisms: A photochemical approach using light emission diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saade, Jamil; Araújo, Cid B. de

    2014-01-01

    We report a simplified photochemical methodology for fabrication of silver nanoprisms (Ag-NPs). The particles, synthesized in aqueous solution, were produced by illumination with narrow band and low cost Light Emission Diodes (LEDs) and exhibit Localized Surface Plasmon Resonances (LSPR) from the blue to the near-infrared. The new methodology consists of one pot synthesis that uses only three chemical reagents and allows good control of the sizes and the aspect ratios of triangular Ag-NPs. Reduction of silver ions by trisodium citrate (TSC), catalyzed on silver seeds, is exploited to synthesize and to control the growth of the Ag-NPs. The growth kinetics of the particles was characterized by monitoring the LSPR absorption band during several hours under continuous illumination. Optical absorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction and zeta potential measurements were performed to characterize the shape and size of the Ag-NPs and the colloid stability during its synthesis and aging. The TEM images and extinction spectra revealed Ag-NPs with good size dispersion and narrow LSPR bands with great potential for applications in nanotechnology. - Highlights: • Efficient method to synthesize Ag nanoprisms using only three chemical reagents. • Practicality: it removes the needs for some steps used in photochemical synthesis. • Zeta Potential measurements revealed the best conditions for colloids stability. • Non-coherent-radiation-induced dipoles cause aggregation of similar nanoprisms. • Data confirmed step-like-structures on the nanoprisms surface due to their aging

  16. Coincidence measurements of intermediate mass fragments produced in /sup 32/S-induced reactions on Ag at E/A = 22.5 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, D.J.; Lynch, W.G.; Nayak, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    Single- and two-particle inclusive cross sections for the production of light nuclei and intermediate mass fragments, 3< or =Z< or =24, were measured at angles well beyond the grazing angle for /sup 32/S-induced reactions on Ag at 720 MeV. Information about fragment multiplicities and reaction dynamics was extracted from measurements of light particles, intermediate mass fragments, and targetlike residues in coincidence with intermediate mass fragments. Incomplete linear momentum transfer and non-compound-particle emission are important features of collisions producing intermediate mass fragments. About half of the incident kinetic energy in these collisions is converted into internal excitation. The mean multiplicity of intermediate mass fragments is of the order of 1. Particle correlations are strongly enhanced in the plane which contains the intermediate mass fragment and the beam axis

  17. Fragmentation functions approach in pQCD fragmentation phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolli, S.

    1996-07-01

    Next-to-leading order parton fragmentation functions into light mesons are presented. They have been extracted from real and simulated e + e - data and used to predict inclusive single particle distributions at different machines

  18. Reduction of particle emissions from light duty vehicles and from taxies; Reduktion af partikelelemissioner fra varebiler og taxier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Johan; Henriques, M.; Weibel, T.G. [TetraPlan A/S (Denmark)

    2006-11-03

    This project, 'Reduction of particle emissions from light duty vehicles and from taxies', analyses different strategies to reduce the particle emission, their effect for particle emissions, and the resulting cost for the society and for the companies. The project describes the EU regulation of emissions, the possibilities of reducing the emissions via special requirements in environmental zones and the Danish taxation of light duty vehicles. Further, the project includes interviews with owners of light duty vehicles and taxies and also with Danish producers of particle filters. The strategies analysed in the scenarios include: 1) Promotion of particle filters; 2) Shift from diesel to gasoline and; 3) Downsizing. The effects for particle emissions and for mortality are described. Further, the costs and benefits for the society and the cost for the companies are evaluated. The effects of the scenarios are analysed, both for initiatives implemented at a national level and for implementation in an environmental zone in the municipality of Copenhagen. The main results are that the socioeconomic benefits in the year 2012 are greater than the costs, if taxis and light duty vehicles have filters installed and if they are driving in the Copenhagen area. For light duty vehicles it is only profitable, if the prices of the filters fall to the price level that is expected in the future in the study. Further, the analysis shows that for light duty vehicles and taxies driving all over the country, the socioeconomic benefits achieved by installing particle filters are too small to cover the costs. The analysis shows that it is also profitable socio-economically to change from diesel to petrol for light duty vehicles and for taxies (except taxies driving nationally). The analysis is based on the producer prices including the general net tax level, while the specific taxes are not included. From the point of view of the companies it is not profitable to change to petrol

  19. Synthesis of Colloidal Nanocrystal Heterostructures for High-Efficiency Light Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yifei

    -LEDs. Secondly, CdS/CdSe/ZnS QDQWs were synthesized and their luminescence was tuned in an effort to realize efficient blue light emission from CdSe nanocrystals. CdSe QWs with a well width of 1.05 nm emitted at 467 nm with a spectral full-width-at-half-maximum of ~30 nm. With a 3-monolayer ZnS cladding layer which also acts as a passivating and strain-compensating layer, the QDQWs acquired a ~35% PL quantum yield (QY). Blue and green EL was obtained from QDQW-LEDs with 3-4.5 monolayers (MLs) QWs. It was found that as the well width and peak wavelength decreased, the overall EL was increasingly dominated by defect state emission, suggesting the device performance is mainly limited by poor charge injection into the QDQWs.

  20. Transparent organic light-emitting diodes with different bi-directional emission colors using color-conversion capping layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jonghee, E-mail: jonghee.lee@etri.re.kr [OLED Research Center, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Koh, Tae-Wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyunsu [OLED Research Center, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Schwab, Tobias [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Lee, Jae-Hyun [Department School of Global Convergence Studies, Hanbat National University, San 16-1, Duckmyoung-dong, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of); Hofmann, Simone [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Lee, Jeong-Ik [OLED Research Center, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Seunghyup [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-06-15

    We report a study on transparent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with different bi-directional emission colors, enabled by color-conversion organic capping layers. Starting from a transparent blue OLED with an uncapped Ag top electrode exhibiting an average transmittance of 33.9%, a 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM)-doped tris-(8-hydroxy-quinolinato)-aluminum (Alq3) capping layer is applied to achieve color-conversion from blue to orange-red on the top side while maintaining almost unchanged device transmittance. This color-conversion capping layer does not only change the color of the top side emission, but also enhances the overall device efficiency due to the optical interaction of the capping layer with the primary blue transparent OLED. Top white emission from the transparent bi-directional OLED exhibits a correlated color temperature around 6000–7000 K, with excellent color stability as evidenced by an extremely small variation in color coordinate of Δ(x,y)=(0.002, 0.002) in the forward luminance range of 100–1000 cd m{sup −2}. At the same time, the blue emission color of bottom side is not influenced by the color conversion capping layer, which finally results in different emission colors of the two opposite sides of our transparent OLEDs. - Highlights: • We report transparent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with different bi-directional emission colors. • Transparent blue OLED with color-conversion organic capping layers (CCL) shows orange top side emission. • Top white emission exhibits a CCT around 7000 K, with excellent color stability on a driving voltage.

  1. Formation of Long-Lived Color Centers for Broadband Visible Light Emission in Low-Dimensional Layered Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Edward P; Thomas, Tudor H; Quarti, Claudio; Stanton, Michael R; Dashwood, Cameron D; Gillett, Alexander J; Richter, Johannes M; Pearson, Andrew J; Davis, Nathaniel J L K; Sirringhaus, Henning; Price, Michael B; Greenham, Neil C; Beljonne, David; Dutton, Siân E; Deschler, Felix

    2017-12-27

    We investigate the origin of the broadband visible emission in layered hybrid lead-halide perovskites and its connection with structural and photophysical properties. We study ⟨001⟩ oriented thin films of hexylammonium (HA) lead iodide, (C 6 H 16 N) 2 PbI 4 , and dodecylammonium (DA) lead iodide, (C 12 H 28 N) 2 PbI 4 , by combining first-principles simulations with time-resolved photoluminescence, steady-state absorption and X-ray diffraction measurements on cooling from 300 to 4 K. Ultrafast transient absorption and photoluminescence measurements are used to track the formation and recombination of emissive states. In addition to the excitonic photoluminescence near the absorption edge, we find a red-shifted, broadband (full-width at half-maximum of about 0.4 eV), emission band below 200 K, similar to emission from ⟨110⟩ oriented bromide 2D perovskites at room temperature. The lifetime of this sub-band-gap emission exceeds that of the excitonic transition by orders of magnitude. We use X-ray diffraction measurements to study the changes in crystal lattice with temperature. We report changes in the octahedral tilt and lattice spacing in both materials, together with a phase change around 200 K in DA 2 PbI 4 . DFT simulations of the HA 2 PbI 4 crystal structure indicate that the low-energy emission is due to interstitial iodide and related Frenkel defects. Our results demonstrate that white-light emission is not limited to ⟨110⟩ oriented bromide 2D perovskites but a general property of this class of system, and highlight the importance of defect control for the formation of low-energy emissive sites, which can provide a pathway to design tailored white-light emitters.

  2. Transparent organic light-emitting diodes with different bi-directional emission colors using color-conversion capping layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jonghee; Koh, Tae-Wook; Cho, Hyunsu; Schwab, Tobias; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Hofmann, Simone; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Yoo, Seunghyup

    2015-01-01

    We report a study on transparent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with different bi-directional emission colors, enabled by color-conversion organic capping layers. Starting from a transparent blue OLED with an uncapped Ag top electrode exhibiting an average transmittance of 33.9%, a 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM)-doped tris-(8-hydroxy-quinolinato)-aluminum (Alq3) capping layer is applied to achieve color-conversion from blue to orange-red on the top side while maintaining almost unchanged device transmittance. This color-conversion capping layer does not only change the color of the top side emission, but also enhances the overall device efficiency due to the optical interaction of the capping layer with the primary blue transparent OLED. Top white emission from the transparent bi-directional OLED exhibits a correlated color temperature around 6000–7000 K, with excellent color stability as evidenced by an extremely small variation in color coordinate of Δ(x,y)=(0.002, 0.002) in the forward luminance range of 100–1000 cd m −2 . At the same time, the blue emission color of bottom side is not influenced by the color conversion capping layer, which finally results in different emission colors of the two opposite sides of our transparent OLEDs. - Highlights: • We report transparent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with different bi-directional emission colors. • Transparent blue OLED with color-conversion organic capping layers (CCL) shows orange top side emission. • Top white emission exhibits a CCT around 7000 K, with excellent color stability on a driving voltage

  3. Wavelength-tuned light emission via modifying the band edge symmetry: Doped SnO2 as an example

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Hang

    2014-03-27

    We report the observation of ultraviolet photoluminescence and electroluminescence in indium-doped SnO2 thin films with modified "forbidden" bandgap. With increasing indium concentration in SnO 2, dominant visible light emission evolves into the ultraviolet regime in photoluminescence. Hybrid functional first-principles calculations demonstrate that the complex of indium dopant and oxygen vacancy breaks "forbidden" band gap to form allowed transition states. Furthermore, undoped and 10% indium-doped SnO2 layers are synthesized on p-type GaN substrates to obtain SnO2-based heterojunction light-emitting diodes. A dominant visible emission band is observed in the undoped SnO 2-based heterojunction, whereas strong near-ultraviolet emission peak at 398 nm is observed in the indium-doped SnO2-based heterojunction. Our results demonstrate an unprecedented doping-based approach toward tailoring the symmetry of band edge states and recovering ultraviolet light emission in wide-bandgap oxides. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  4. Exhaust gas emissions from various automotive fuels for light-duty vehicles. Effects on health, environment and energy utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlvik, P.; Brandberg, Aa.

    1999-12-01

    The main aim of the investigation has been to assess the effects on health and environment from various alternative fuels for light-duty vehicles. Effects that can be identified and quantified, such as acidification, ozone formation, cancer risk and climate change, have been of primary interest but other effects, such as respiratory diseases, have also been investigated. Data have been collected through literature surveys for subsequent calculation of the mentioned effects in different time-frames. Corrections have been used to take into consideration the influence of climate, ageing and driving pattern. Emissions generated in fuel production have also been accounted for. The most significant and important differences between the fuels have been found for effects as ozone formation cancer risk and particulate emissions. Alternative fuels, such as methanol and methane (natural gas and biogas), significantly decrease the ozone formation in comparison to petrol, while ethanol, methanol and methane are advantageous concerning cancer risk. The particulate emissions are considerably higher for diesel engines fuelled by diesel oil and RME in comparison to the other fuels. In the future, the importance of acid emissions in the fuel production will increase since the NO x and SO x emissions will decrease from the vehicles. The emissions of climate gases could be significantly reduced by using non-fossil fuels but the efficiency of the drive train is also of importance. The technical development potential for further emission reductions is considerable for all fuels but the advantage for the best fuel options will remain in the future

  5. Study of proton and 2 protons emission from light neutron deficient nuclei around A=20; Etude de l'emission proton et de deux protons dans les noyaux legers deficients en neutrons de la region A=20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerguerras, T

    2001-09-01

    Proton and two proton emission from light neutron deficient nuclei around A=20 have been studied. A radioactive beam of {sup 18}Ne, {sup 17}F and {sup 20}Mg, produced at the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds by fragmentation of a {sup 24}Mg primary beam at 95 MeV/A, bombarded a {sup 9}Be target to form unbound states. Proton(s) and nuclei from the decay were detected respectively in the MUST array and the SPEG spectrometer. From energy and angle measurements, the invariant mass of the decaying nucleus could be reconstructed. Double coincidence events between a proton and {sup 17}F, {sup 16}O, {sup 15}O, {sup 14}O and {sup 18}Ne were registered to obtain excitation energy spectra of {sup 18}Ne, {sup 17}F, {sup 16}F, {sup 15}F et {sup 19}Na. Generally, the masses measures are in agreement with previous experiments. In the case of {sup 18}Ne, excitation energy and angular distributions agree well with the predictions of a break up model calculation. From {sup 17}Ne proton coincidences, a first experimental measurement of the ground state mass excess of {sup 18}Na has been obtained and yields 24,19(0,15)MeV. Two proton emission from {sup 17}Ne and {sup 18}Ne excited states and the {sup 19}Mg ground state was studied through triple coincidences between two proton and {sup 15}O, {sup 16}O and {sup 17}Ne respectively. In the first case, the proton-proton relative angle distribution in the center of mass has been compared with model calculation. Sequential emission from excited states of {sup 17}Ne, above the proton emission threshold, through {sup 16}F is dominant but a {sup 2}He decay channel could not be excluded. No {sup 2}He emission from the 1.288 MeV {sup 17}Ne state, or from the 6.15 MeV {sup 18}Ne state has been observed. Only one coincidence event between {sup 17}Ne and two proton was registered, the value of the one neutron stripping reaction cross section of {sup 20}Mg being much lower than predicted. (author)

  6. Study of proton and 2 protons emission from light neutron deficient nuclei around A=20; Etude de l'emission proton et de deux protons dans les noyaux legers deficients en neutrons de la region A=20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerguerras, T

    2001-09-01

    Proton and two proton emission from light neutron deficient nuclei around A=20 have been studied. A radioactive beam of {sup 18}Ne, {sup 17}F and {sup 20}Mg, produced at the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds by fragmentation of a {sup 24}Mg primary beam at 95 MeV/A, bombarded a {sup 9}Be target to form unbound states. Proton(s) and nuclei from the decay were detected respectively in the MUST array and the SPEG spectrometer. From energy and angle measurements, the invariant mass of the decaying nucleus could be reconstructed. Double coincidence events between a proton and {sup 17}F, {sup 16}O, {sup 15}O, {sup 14}O and {sup 18}Ne were registered to obtain excitation energy spectra of {sup 18}Ne, {sup 17}F, {sup 16}F, {sup 15}F et {sup 19}Na. Generally, the masses measures are in agreement with previous experiments. In the case of {sup 18}Ne, excitation energy and angular distributions agree well with the predictions of a break up model calculation. From {sup 17}Ne proton coincidences, a first experimental measurement of the ground state mass excess of {sup 18}Na has been obtained and yields 24,19(0,15)MeV. Two proton emission from {sup 17}Ne and {sup 18}Ne excited states and the {sup 19}Mg ground state was studied through triple coincidences between two proton and {sup 15}O, {sup 16}O and {sup 17}Ne respectively. In the first case, the proton-proton relative angle distribution in the center of mass has been compared with model calculation. Sequential emission from excited states of {sup 17}Ne, above the proton emission threshold, through {sup 16}F is dominant but a {sup 2}He decay channel could not be excluded. No {sup 2}He emission from the 1.288 MeV {sup 17}Ne state, or from the 6.15 MeV {sup 18}Ne state has been observed. Only one coincidence event between {sup 17}Ne and two proton was registered, the value of the one neutron stripping reaction cross section of {sup 20}Mg being much lower than predicted. (author)

  7. CO_2 emissions reduction of Chinese light manufacturing industries: A novel RAM-based global Malmquist–Luenberger productivity index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emrouznejad, Ali; Yang, Guo-liang

    2016-01-01

    Climate change has become one of the most challenging issues facing the world. Chinese government has realized the importance of energy conservation and prevention of the climate changes for sustainable development of China's economy and set targets for CO_2 emissions reduction in China. In China industry contributes 84.2% of the total CO_2 emissions, especially manufacturing industries. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) and Malmquist productivity (MP) index are the widely used mathematical techniques to address the relative efficiency and productivity of a group of homogenous decision making units, e.g. industries or countries. However, in many real applications, especially those related to energy efficiency, there are often undesirable outputs, e.g. the pollutions, waste and CO_2 emissions, which are produced inevitably with desirable outputs in the production. This paper introduces a novel Malmquist–Luenberger productivity (MLP) index based on directional distance function (DDF) to address the issue of productivity evolution of DMUs in the presence of undesirable outputs. The new RAM (Range-adjusted measure)-based global MLP index has been applied to evaluate CO_2 emissions reduction in Chinese light manufacturing industries. Recommendations for policy makers have been discussed. - Highlights: •CO_2 emissions reduction in Chinese light manufacturing industries are measured. •A novel RAM based Malmquist–Luenberger productivity index has been developed. •Recommendation to policy makers for reducing CO_2 reduction in China are given.

  8. ZnO nanopowder induced light scattering for improved visualization of emission sites in carbon nanotube films and arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meško, Marcel; Ou, Qiongrong; Matsuda, Takafumi; Ishikawa, Tomokazu; Veis, Martin; Antoš, Roman; Ogino, Akihisa; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2009-06-01

    We report on ZnO nanopowder induced light scattering for improved visualization of emission sites in carbon nanotube films and arrays. We observed a significant reduction of the internal multiple light scattering phenomena, which are characteristic for ZnO micropowders. The microsized grains of the commercially available ZnO:Zn (P 15) were reduced to the nanometre scale by pulsed laser ablation at an oxygen ambient pressure of 10 kPa. Our investigations show no crystalline change and no shift of the broad green emission peak at 500 nm for the ZnO nanopowder. For the application in field emission displays, we demonstrate the possibility of achieving cathodoluminescence with a fine pitch size of 100 µm of the patterned pixels without requiring additional electron beam focusing and without a black matrix. Moreover, the presented results show the feasibility of employing ZnO nanopowder as a detection material for the phosphorus screen method, which is able to localize emission sites of carbon nanotube films and arrays with an accuracy comparable to scanning anode field emission microscopy.

  9. ZnO nanopowder induced light scattering for improved visualization of emission sites in carbon nanotube films and arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesko, Marcel; Ou Qiongrong; Matsuda, Takafumi; Ishikawa, Tomokazu; Ogino, Akihisa; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Veis, Martin; Antos, Roman

    2009-01-01

    We report on ZnO nanopowder induced light scattering for improved visualization of emission sites in carbon nanotube films and arrays. We observed a significant reduction of the internal multiple light scattering phenomena, which are characteristic for ZnO micropowders. The microsized grains of the commercially available ZnO:Zn (P 15) were reduced to the nanometre scale by pulsed laser ablation at an oxygen ambient pressure of 10 kPa. Our investigations show no crystalline change and no shift of the broad green emission peak at 500 nm for the ZnO nanopowder. For the application in field emission displays, we demonstrate the possibility of achieving cathodoluminescence with a fine pitch size of 100 μm of the patterned pixels without requiring additional electron beam focusing and without a black matrix. Moreover, the presented results show the feasibility of employing ZnO nanopowder as a detection material for the phosphorus screen method, which is able to localize emission sites of carbon nanotube films and arrays with an accuracy comparable to scanning anode field emission microscopy.

  10. Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emissions from agricultural crop species: is guttation a possible source for methanol emissions following light/dark transition ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffar, Ahsan; Amelynck, Crist; Bachy, Aurélie; Digrado, Anthony; Delaplace, Pierre; du Jardin, Patrick; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Schoon, Niels; Aubinet, Marc; Heinesch, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the CROSTVOC (CROp STress VOC) project, the exchange of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) between two important agricultural crop species, maize and winter wheat, and the atmosphere has recently been measured during an entire growing season by using the eddy covariance technique. Because of the co-variation of BVOC emission drivers in field conditions, laboratory studies were initiated in an environmental chamber in order to disentangle the responses of the emissions to variations of the individual environmental parameters (such as PPFD and temperature) and to diverse abiotic stress factors. Young plants were enclosed in transparent all-Teflon dynamic enclosures (cuvettes) through which BVOC-free and RH-controlled air was sent. BVOC enriched air was subsequently sampled from the plant cuvettes and an empty cuvette (background) and analyzed for BVOCs in a high sensitivity Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (hs-PTR-MS) and for CO2 in a LI-7000 non-dispersive IR gas analyzer. Emissions were monitored at constant temperature (25 °C) and at a stepwise varying PPFD pattern (0-650 µmol m-2 s-1). For maize plants, sudden light/dark transitions at the end of the photoperiod were accompanied by prompt and considerable increases in methanol (m/z 33) and water vapor (m/z 39) emissions. Moreover, guttation droplets appeared on the sides and the tips of the leaves within a few minutes after light/dark transition. Therefore the assumption has been raised that methanol is also coming out with guttation fluid from the leaves. Consequently, guttation fluid was collected from young maize and wheat plants, injected in an empty enclosure and sampled by PTR-MS. Methanol and a large number of other compounds were observed from guttation fluid. Recent studies have shown that guttation from agricultural crops frequently occurs in field conditions. Further research is required to find out the source strength of methanol emissions by this guttation

  11. Pressure-enhanced light emission and its structural origin in Er:GdVO 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Fang; Yue, Binbin; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Shen, Hui; Yang, Ke; Hong, Xinguo; Chen, Bin; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2017-01-09

    Rare earth phosphors have been widely studied because of their sharp emission lines and excellent optical performance. However, photoluminescence (PL) tuning by crystal field in Er3+ embedded phosphors has always been a challenge. Here, we demonstrate that pressure can help to enhance the red and green light emission simultaneously in Er:GdVO4. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction investigations revealed that a structural phase transition was responsible for the enhancement. Our work brightens the future prospects for applications of Er3+-based PL materials in various fields, such as high power lasers and (bio) medical imaging.

  12. Manipulating the Local Light Emission in Organic Light-Emitting Diodes by using Patterned Self-Assembled Monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathijssen, S.G.J.; Hal, P.A. van; Biggelaar, T.J.M. van den; Smits, E.C.P.; Boer, B. de; Kemerink, M.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Leeuw, D.M. de

    2008-01-01

    In organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), interface dipoles play an important role in the process of charge injection from the metallic electrode into the active organic layer.[1,2] An oriented dipole layer changes the effective work function of the electrode because of its internal electric field.

  13. Impact of freeway weaving segment design on light-duty vehicle exhaust emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Qiao, Fengxiang; Yu, Lei; Chen, Shuyan; Li, Tiezhu

    2018-06-01

    In the United States, 26% of greenhouse gas emissions is emitted from the transportation sector; these emisssions meanwhile are accompanied by enormous toxic emissions to humans, such as carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO x ), and hydrocarbon (HC), approximately 2.5% and 2.44% of a total exhaust emissions for a petrol and a diesel engine, respectively. These exhaust emissions are typically subject to vehicles' intermittent operations, such as hard acceleration and hard braking. In practice, drivers are inclined to operate intermittently while driving through a weaving segment, due to complex vehicle maneuvering for weaving. As a result, the exhaust emissions within a weaving segment ought to vary from those on a basic segment. However, existing emission models usually rely on vehicle operation information, and compute a generalized emission result, regardless of road configuration. This research proposes to explore the impacts of weaving segment configuration on vehicle emissions, identify important predictors for emission estimations, and develop a nonlinear normalized emission factor (NEF) model for weaving segments. An on-board emission test was conducted on 12 subjects on State Highway 288 in Houston, Texas. Vehicles' activity information, road conditions, and real-time exhaust emissions were collected by on-board diagnosis (OBD), a smartphone-based roughness app, and a portable emission measurement system (PEMS), respectively. Five feature selection algorithms were used to identify the important predictors for the response of NEF and the modeling algorithm. The predictive power of four algorithm-based emission models was tested by 10-fold cross-validation. Results showed that emissions are also susceptible to the type and length of a weaving segment. Bagged decision tree algorithm was chosen to develop a 50-grown-tree NEF model, which provided a validation error of 0.0051. The estimated NEFs are highly correlated with the observed NEFs in the training

  14. Methanol emissions from maize: Ontogenetic dependence to varying light conditions and guttation as an additional factor constraining the flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffar, A.; Schoon, N.; Digrado, A.; Bachy, A.; Delaplace, P.; du Jardin, P.; Fauconnier, M.-L.; Aubinet, M.; Heinesch, B.; Amelynck, C.

    2017-03-01

    Because of its high abundance and long lifetime compared to other volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere, methanol (CH3OH) plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry. Even though agricultural crops are believed to be a large source of methanol, emission inventories from those crop ecosystems are still scarce and little information is available concerning the driving mechanisms for methanol production and emission at different developmental stages of the plants/leaves. This study focuses on methanol emissions from Zea mays L. (maize), which is vastly cultivated throughout the world. Flux measurements have been performed on young plants, almost fully grown leaves and fully grown leaves, enclosed in dynamic flow-through enclosures in a temperature and light-controlled environmental chamber. Strong differences in the response of methanol emissions to variations in PPFD (Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density) were noticed between the young plants, almost fully grown and fully grown leaves. Moreover, young maize plants showed strong emission peaks following light/dark transitions, for which guttation can be put forward as a hypothetical pathway. Young plants' average daily methanol fluxes exceeded by a factor of 17 those of almost fully grown and fully grown leaves when expressed per leaf area. Absolute flux values were found to be smaller than those reported in the literature, but in fair agreement with recent ecosystem scale flux measurements above a maize field of the same variety as used in this study. The flux measurements in the current study were used to evaluate the dynamic biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emission model of Niinemets and Reichstein. The modelled and measured fluxes from almost fully grown leaves were found to agree best when a temperature and light dependent methanol production function was applied. However, this production function turned out not to be suitable for modelling the observed emissions from the young plants

  15. A rapid excitation-emission matrix fluorometer utilizing supercontinuum white light and acousto-optic tunable filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenbo [Imaging Unit, Integrative Oncology Department, BC Cancer Agency Research Center, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3 (Canada); Department of Dermatology and Skin Science, University of British Columbia, 835 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E8 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of British Columbia, KAIS 5500, 2332 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Wu, Zhenguo; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan, E-mail: hzeng@bccrc.ca [Imaging Unit, Integrative Oncology Department, BC Cancer Agency Research Center, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3 (Canada); Department of Dermatology and Skin Science, University of British Columbia, 835 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E8 (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Scanning speed and coupling efficiency of excitation light to optic fibres are two major technical challenges that limit the potential of fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectrometer for on-line applications and in vivo studies. In this paper, a novel EEM system, utilizing a supercontinuum white light source and acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs), was introduced and evaluated. The supercontinuum white light, generated by pumping a nonlinear photonic crystal fiber with an 800 nm femtosecond laser, was efficiently coupled into a bifurcated optic fiber bundle. High speed EEM spectral scanning was achieved using AOTFs both for selecting excitation wavelength and scanning emission spectra. Using calibration lamps (neon and mercury argon), wavelength deviations were determined to vary from 0.18 nm to −0.70 nm within the spectral range of 500–850 nm. Spectral bandwidth for filtered excitation light broadened by twofold compared to that measured with monochromatic light between 650 nm and 750 nm. The EEM spectra for methanol solutions of laser dyes were successfully acquired with this rapid fluorometer using an integration time of 5 s.

  16. A rapid excitation-emission matrix fluorometer utilizing supercontinuum white light and acousto-optic tunable filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wenbo; Wu, Zhenguo; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-01-01

    Scanning speed and coupling efficiency of excitation light to optic fibres are two major technical challenges that limit the potential of fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectrometer for on-line applications and in vivo studies. In this paper, a novel EEM system, utilizing a supercontinuum white light source and acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs), was introduced and evaluated. The supercontinuum white light, generated by pumping a nonlinear photonic crystal fiber with an 800 nm femtosecond laser, was efficiently coupled into a bifurcated optic fiber bundle. High speed EEM spectral scanning was achieved using AOTFs both for selecting excitation wavelength and scanning emission spectra. Using calibration lamps (neon and mercury argon), wavelength deviations were determined to vary from 0.18 nm to −0.70 nm within the spectral range of 500–850 nm. Spectral bandwidth for filtered excitation light broadened by twofold compared to that measured with monochromatic light between 650 nm and 750 nm. The EEM spectra for methanol solutions of laser dyes were successfully acquired with this rapid fluorometer using an integration time of 5 s.

  17. White light emission and second harmonic generation from secondary group participation (SGP) in a coordination network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun; Zeller, Matthias; Hunter, Allen D; Xu, Zhengtao

    2012-01-25

    We describe a white emitting coordination network solid that can be conveniently applied as a thin film onto a commercial UV-LED lamp for practical white lighting applications. The solid state material was discovered in an exercise of exploring molecular building blocks equipped with secondary groups for fine-tuning the structures and properties of coordination nets. Specifically, CH(3)SCH(2)CH(2)S- and (S)-CH(3)(OH)CHCH(2)S- (2-hydroxylpropyl) were each attached as secondary groups to the 2,5- positions of 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid (bdc), and the resultant molecules (L1 and L2, respectively) were crystallized with Pb(II) into the topologically similar 3D nets of PbL1 and PbL2, both consisting of interlinked Pb-carboxyl chains. While the CH(3)S- groups in PbL1 are not bonded to the Pb(II) centers, the hydroxy groups in PbL2 participate in coordinating to Pb(II) and thus modify the bonding features around the Pb(II), but only to a slight and subtle degree (e.g., Pb-O distances 2.941-3.116 Å). Interestingly, the subtle change in structure significantly impacts the properties, i.e., while the photoluminescence of PbL1 is yellowish green, PbL2 features bright white emission. Also, the homochiral side group in PbL2 imparts significant second harmonic generation, in spite of its seemingly weak association with the main framework (the NLO-phore). In a broad perspective, this work showcases the idea of secondary group participation (SGP) in the construction of coordination networks, an idea that parallels that of hemilabile ligands in organometallics and points to an effective strategy in developing advanced functions in solid state framework materials. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  18. White light emission and color tunability of dysprosium doped barium silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Lokesh; Sharma, Anchal; Vishwakarma, Amit K.; Jha, Kaushal [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Delhi 110042 (India); Jayasimhadri, M., E-mail: jayaphysics@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Delhi 110042 (India); Ratnam, B.V.; Jang, Kiwan [Department of Physics, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-77 (Korea, Republic of); Rao, A.S.; Sinha, R.K. [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Delhi 110042 (India)

    2016-01-15

    The present work elucidates the synthesis of Dy{sup 3+} doped barium silicate glasses, along with the subsequent studies performed to evaluate its viability in solid state lighting applications. The synthesized photonic glasses were investigated via X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. The photoluminescence properties were examined under ultraviolet (UV)/near UV (NUV) excitation. Photoluminescence spectrum exhibited characteristic emission bands at λ{sub em}=483 nm (blue) and λ{sub em}=576 nm (yellow) which are ascribed to the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 13/2} transitions of Dy{sup 3+} ion, respectively. The chromaticity coordinates under excitation of λ{sub ex}=348 nm are (0.31, 0.34), which lies in the white region of CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram and are in excellent proximity with the standard equal energy white illuminant (0.333, 0.333). The calculated correlated color temperature and the yellow to blue (Y/B) ratio are found to be 6602 K and 1.12, respectively for the optimized sample. The synthesized photonic glass also offered the possibility of tuning the color as exemplified through the variation in CIE coordinates, correlated color temperature and the Y/B ratio. The results confirm the possibility of color tunability from the proposed glass and may be useful for various photonic device applications. - Highlights: • Successfully synthesized Dy{sup 3+} doped barium silicate glasses. • Structural properties thoroughly discussed by using XRD and FT-IR. • Photoluminescence and colorimetry properties have been investigated. • Y/B ratio and the reason for color tunability have been successfully explained. • CIE coordinates of Dy{sup 3+}:BBS glass confirm its suitability for w-LEDs.

  19. Light emission efficiency and imaging properties of YAP:Ce granular phosphor screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalivas, N.; Valais, I.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Konstantinidis, A.; Cavouras, D.; Kandarakis, I.; Gaitanis, A.; Nomicos, C.D.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2007-01-01

    Phosphor materials are used in medical imaging combined with radiographic film or other photodetectors. Cerium (Ce 3+ ) -doped scintillators are of particular interest for medical imaging, because of their very fast response. YAP:Ce scintillator-based image detectors have already been evaluated in single-crystal form and under conditions of positron emission tomography and synchrotron or γ-ray irradiation. Furthermore, YAP:Ce phosphor has been evaluated in conjunction with radiographic films. The present work reports experimental and theoretical data concerning the light output absolute luminescence efficiency (AE) of the YAP:Ce screens under irradiation conditions employed in medical X-ray projection imaging (i.e., in diagnostic radiology). projection imaging (i.e., in diagnostic radiology). YAP:Ce phosphor screens with surface densities ranging between 53 and 110 mg/cm 2 were prepared by sedimentation on fused silica substrates in our laboratory. The resulted surface density of the screens was determined by dividing the phosphor mass deposited on the screen surface with the area of the surface. Additionally this work addresses the imaging performance of YAP:Ce by estimation of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE), i.e., the square of the signal to noise ratio transfer. Absolute efficiency was found to decrease with X-ray tube voltage for for YAP:Ce phosphor. The highest experimental efficiency was obtained for the 53.7 mg/cm 2 and 88.0 mg/cm 2 YAP:Ce screens. The highest DQE value was found for the 88.0 mg/cm 2 screen irradiated at 60 kVp. (orig.)

  20. Controlled fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, Werner

    2002-01-01

    Contrary to natural fragmentation, controlled fragmentation offers the possibility to adapt fragment parameters like size and mass to the performance requirements in a very flexible way. Known mechanisms like grooves inside the casing, weaken the structure. This is, however, excluded for applications with high accelerations during launch or piercing requirements for example on a semi armor piercing penetrator. Another method to achieve controlled fragmentation with an additional grid layer is presented with which the required grooves are produced 'just in time' inside the casing during detonation of the high explosive. The process of generating the grooves aided by the grid layer was studied using the hydrocode HULL with respect to varying grid designs and material combinations. Subsequent to this, a large range of these theoretically investigated combinations was contemplated in substantial experimental tests. With an optimised grid design and a suitable material selection, the controlled fragment admits a very flexible adaptation to the set requirements. Additional advantages like the increase of perforation performance or incendiary amplification can be realized with the grid layer

  1. Effect of refraction index and light sharing on detector element identification for 2D detector modules in Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tornai, M.P.; Hoffman, E.J.; Cherry, S.R.

    1994-01-01

    Relationships among indices of refraction (n) of scintillation detectors, light sharing among discrete detector elements and accuracy of detector element identification in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) 2-D detector arrays were examined with theory and experiment. Mismatches between the index of refraction of scintillators and the glass of photomultipliers (PMT) were seen to lead to nonlinear relationships between crystal position and ratio (positioning) signals derived from PMTs. Insight is provided into the empirically derived use of light sharing among elements of the crystals in PET 2-D array detectors to compensate for this nonlinear response. ((orig.))

  2. Chameleon fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brax, Philippe [Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA, IPhT, CNRS, URA 2306, F-91191Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Upadhye, Amol, E-mail: philippe.brax@cea.fr, E-mail: aupadhye@anl.gov [Institute for the Early Universe, Ewha University, International Education, Building #601, 11-1, Daehyun-Dong Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    A scalar field dark energy candidate could couple to ordinary matter and photons, enabling its detection in laboratory experiments. Here we study the quantum properties of the chameleon field, one such dark energy candidate, in an ''afterglow'' experiment designed to produce, trap, and detect chameleon particles. In particular, we investigate the possible fragmentation of a beam of chameleon particles into multiple particle states due to the highly non-linear interaction terms in the chameleon Lagrangian. Fragmentation could weaken the constraints of an afterglow experiment by reducing the energy of the regenerated photons, but this energy reduction also provides a unique signature which could be detected by a properly-designed experiment. We show that constraints from the CHASE experiment are essentially unaffected by fragmentation for φ{sup 4} and 1/φ potentials, but are weakened for steeper potentials, and we discuss possible future afterglow experiments.

  3. Chameleon fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Philippe; Upadhye, Amol

    2014-01-01

    A scalar field dark energy candidate could couple to ordinary matter and photons, enabling its detection in laboratory experiments. Here we study the quantum properties of the chameleon field, one such dark energy candidate, in an ''afterglow'' experiment designed to produce, trap, and detect chameleon particles. In particular, we investigate the possible fragmentation of a beam of chameleon particles into multiple particle states due to the highly non-linear interaction terms in the chameleon Lagrangian. Fragmentation could weaken the constraints of an afterglow experiment by reducing the energy of the regenerated photons, but this energy reduction also provides a unique signature which could be detected by a properly-designed experiment. We show that constraints from the CHASE experiment are essentially unaffected by fragmentation for φ 4 and 1/φ potentials, but are weakened for steeper potentials, and we discuss possible future afterglow experiments

  4. The effects of biodiesels on semivolatile and nonvolatile particulate matter emissions from a light-duty diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan; Li, Shao-Meng; Liggio, John; Hayden, Katherine; Han, Yuemei; Stroud, Craig; Chan, Tak; Poitras, Marie-Josée

    2017-11-01

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) represent a dominant category of secondary organic aerosol precursors that are increasingly included in air quality models. In the present study, an experimental system was developed and applied to a light-duty diesel engine to determine the emission factors of particulate SVOCs (pSVOCs) and nonvolatile particulate matter (PM) components at dilution ratios representative of ambient conditions. The engine was tested under three steady-state operation modes, using ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD), three types of pure biodiesels and their blends with ULSD. For ULSD, the contribution of pSVOCs to total particulate organic matter (POM) mass in the engine exhaust ranged between 21 and 85%. Evaporation of pSVOCs from the diesel particles during dilution led to decreases in the hydrogen to carbon ratio of POM and the PM number emission factor of the particles. Substituting biodiesels for ULSD could increase pSVOCs emissions but brought on large reductions in black carbon (BC) emissions. Among the biodiesels tested, tallow/used cooking oil (UCO) biodiesel showed advantages over soybean and canola biodiesels in terms of both pSVOCs and nonvolatile PM emissions. It is noteworthy that PM properties, such as particle size and BC mass fraction, differed substantially between emissions from conventional diesel and biodiesels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Super RLuc8: A novel engineered Renilla luciferase with a red-shifted spectrum and stable light emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnama, Somaieh; Saffar, Behnaz; Kahrani, Zahra Fanaei; Nazari, Mahboobeh; Emamzadeh, Rahman

    2017-01-01

    Renilla luciferase is a bioluminescent enzyme which is broadly used as a reporter protein in molecular biosensors. In this study, a novel luciferase with desired light emission wavelength and thermostability is reported. The results indicated that the new luciferase, namely super RLuc8, had a red-shifted spectrum and showed stable light emission. Super RLuc8 showed a 10-fold (p-value=0.0084) increase in the thermostability at 37°C after 20min incubation, in comparison to the native enzyme. The optimum temperature of the mutant increased from 30 to 37°C. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis indicated that the increased thermostability was most probably caused by a better structural compactness and more local rigidity in the regions out of the emitter site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Time-of-flight Measurement Of Hole-tunneling Properties And Emission Color Control In Organic Light-emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, K.; Kashiwabara, K.; Nakajima, K.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Ohtani, N.

    2011-12-01

    Hole transport properties of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with a thin hole-blocking layer (HBL) were evaluated by time-of-flight measurement. Electroluminescence (EL) spectra of OLEDs with various HBL thicknesses were also evaluated. The results clearly show that the time-resolved photocurrent response and the emission color strongly depend on HBL thickness. This can be attributed to hole-tunneling through the thin HBL. We successfully fabricated a white OLED by controlling the thickness of HBL.

  7. A Versatile and Simple Approach to Generate Light Emission in Semiconductors Mediated by Electric Double Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Pu, Jiang; Fujimoto, Taiyo; Ohasi, Yuki; Kimura, Shota; Chen, Chang-Hsiao; Li, Lain-Jong; Sakanoue, Tomo; Takenobu, Taishi

    2017-01-01

    The light-emitting device is the primary device for current light sources. In principle, conventional light-emitting devices need heterostructures and/or intentional carrier doping to form a p-n junction. This junction formation is, however, very

  8. Rear surface light emission measurements from laser-produced shock waves in clear and Al-coated polystyrene targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, E. A.; Deniz, A. V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Stamper, J. A.; Obenschain, S. P.; Lehecka, T.; Mostovych, A. N.; Seely, J.

    1999-08-01

    The Nike KrF laser, with its very uniform focal distributions, has been used at intensities near 10 14 W/cm 2 to launch shock waves in polystyrene targets. The rear surface visible light emission differed between clear polystyrene (CH) targets and targets with a thin (125 nm) Al coating on the rear side. The uncoated CH targets showed a relatively slowly rising emission followed by a sudden fall when the shock emerges, while the Al-coated targets showed a rapid rise in emission when the shock emerges followed by a slower fall, allowing an unambiguous determination of the time the shock arrived at the rear surface. A half-aluminized target allowed us to observe this difference in a single shot. The brightness temperature of both the aluminized targets and the non-aluminized targets was slightly below but close to rear surface temperature predictions of a hydrodynamic code. A discussion of preheat effects is given.

  9. A novel orange emissive phosphor SrWO4:Sm3+ for white light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Zhenghua; Wei Ruiping; Ma Jingxin; Pang Chaoran; Liu Weisheng

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → A novel orange emissive phosphor SrWO 4 :Sm 3+ was firstly reported. → The optics properties of Sm 3+ -doped SrWO 4 phosphor were successfully discussed. → The temperature-dependent luminescence indicates the phosphor exhibits a small thermal-quenching property. → The phosphor is a potential candidate as orange-emitting component for white LED. - Abstract: A novel orange emissive phosphor, Sm 3+ -doped SrWO 4 , was synthesized by high temperature solid-state reaction in air atmosphere. The excitation spectra show that the phosphors can be efficiently excited by ultraviolet and near-ultraviolet light, the optimized concentration is 4 mol%. Three emission peaks locate at 562, 596 and 642 nm, corresponding to CIE chromaticity coordinates of (x = 0.54, y = 0.46), which indicates the orange light emitting. The decay curves are well fitted with triple-exponential decay models. The quantum yield of the Sr 0.96 Sm 0.04 WO 4 phosphor is about 70.65% under excitation of 377 nm. Furthermore, the temperature-dependent luminescence indicates the phosphor exhibits a small thermal-quenching property. So the phosphor is able to be applied to UV-LED chip-based white light-emitting diodes.

  10. White top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes using one-emissive layer of the DCJTB doped DPVBi layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M.S.; Jeong, C.H.; Lim, J.T. [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyonggi-Do, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, G.Y. [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyonggi-Do, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); The National Program for Tera-level Devices, Hawolgok-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: gyyeom@skku.edu

    2008-04-01

    White top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (TEOLEDs) composed of one doped emissive layer which emits two-wavelength light though the radiative recombination were fabricated. As the emissive layer, 4,4-bis(2,2-diphenylethen-1-yl)biphenyl (DPVBi) was used as the host material and 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-tert-butyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl) -4H-pyran (DCJTB) was added as the dopant material. By optimizing the DCJTB concentration (1.2%) and the thickness of the DPVBi layer (30 nm), the intensity ratio of the two wavelengths could be adjusted for balanced white light emission. By using the device composed of glass/Ag (100 nm)/ITO (90 nm)/2-TNATA (60 nm)/NPB (15 nm)/DPVBi:DCJTB (1.2%, 30 nm)/Alq{sub 3} (20 nm)/Li (1.0 nm)/Al (2.0 nm)/Ag (20 nm)/ITO (63 nm)/SiO{sub 2} (42 nm), the Commission Internationale d'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinate of (0.32, 0.34) close to the ideal white color CIE coordinate could be obtained at 100 cd/m{sup 2}.

  11. On-road assessment of light duty vehicles in Delhi city: Emission factors of CO, CO2 and NOX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiprakash; Habib, Gazala

    2018-02-01

    This study presents the technology based emission factors of gaseous pollutants (CO, CO2, and NOX) measured during on-road operation of nine passenger cars of diesel, gasoline, and compressed natural gas (CNG). The emissions from two 3-wheelers, and three 2-wheelers were measured by putting the vehicles on jacks and operating them according to Modified Indian Driving Cycle (MIDC) at no load condition. The emission factors observed in the present work were significantly higher than values reported from dynamometer study by Automotive Research Association of India (ARAI). Low CO (0.34 ± 0.08 g km-1) and high NOX (1.0 ± 0.4 g km-1) emission factors were observed for diesel passenger cars, oppositely high CO (2.2 ± 2.6 g km-1) and low NOX (1.0 ± 1.6 g km-1) emission factors were seen for gasoline powered cars. The after-treatment technology in diesel vehicles was effective in CO reduction. While the use of turbocharger in diesel vehicles to generate high combustion temperature and pressure produces more NOx, probably which may not be effectively controlled by after-treatment device. The after-treatment devices in gasoline powered Post-2010, Post-2005 vehicles can be acclaimed for reduced CO emissions compared to Post-2000 vehicles. This work presents a limited data set of emission factors from on-road operations of light duty vehicles, this limitation can be improved by further measurements of emissions from similar vehicles.

  12. Fractal statistics of brittle fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Davydova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of fragmentation statistics of brittle materials that includes four types of experiments is presented. Data processing of the fragmentation of glass plates under quasi-static loading and the fragmentation of quartz cylindrical rods under dynamic loading shows that the size distribution of fragments (spatial quantity is fractal and can be described by a power law. The original experimental technique allows us to measure, apart from the spatial quantity, the temporal quantity - the size of time interval between the impulses of the light reflected from the newly created surfaces. The analysis of distributions of spatial (fragment size and temporal (time interval quantities provides evidence of obeying scaling laws, which suggests the possibility of self-organized criticality in fragmentation.

  13. Contribution to very inelastic collisions. Emission mechanism of light charged particles and angular momentum transfer in 40Ar (280 MeV) + 58Ni nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babinet, R.

    1981-07-01

    This work ends a particularly detailed study on very inelastic collisions in 40 A (280 MeV) + 58 Ni reaction. The two experiments in coincidence (fragment-fragment and particle-fragment) which are this work basis, essentially experimental, are the following of the very precise inclusive measurements already done on this system. They allowed to precise many important aspects of the reaction mechanism. Conclusions from a precise analysis of the fragment kinematics near the mass symmetry is the new aspect of this study. Information implicitely contained in the two complementary fragment angular correlation width are particularly detailed. Concerning the particle-fragment coincidence experiment, a quantitative analysis method of the invariant cross sections (in the reaction plane) has been developed; it shows clearly what is the origin of the emitted particles. The result of a two-stage mechanism allows to interpret simply the anisotropy out-of-plane of the alpha particle emission. The individual spin has been obtained for the first time for each of the two fragments of very inelastic collisions in nearly all the mass asymmetry domain [fr

  14. Bespoke Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The PhD project Bespoke Fragments is investigating the space emerging in the exploration of the relationship between digital drawing and fabrication, and the field of materials and their properties and capacities. Through a series of different experiments, the project situates itself in a shuttli...

  15. Rock fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.S.; Green, S.J.; Hakala, W.W.; Hustrulid, W.A.; Maurer, W.C. (eds.)

    1976-01-01

    Experts in rock mechanics, mining, excavation, drilling, tunneling and use of underground space met to discuss the relative merits of a wide variety of rock fragmentation schemes. Information is presented on novel rock fracturing techniques; tunneling using electron beams, thermocorer, electric spark drills, water jets, and diamond drills; and rock fracturing research needs for mining and underground construction. (LCL)

  16. Isoprenoids emission in Stipa tenacissima L.: Photosynthetic control and the effect of UV light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidolotti, Gabriele; Rey, Ana; Medori, Mauro; Calfapietra, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Fluxes of CO_2 and isoprenoids were measured for the first time in Stipa tenacissima L (alfa grass), a perennial tussock grass dominant in the driest areas of Europe. In addition, we studied how those fluxes were influenced by environmental conditions, leaf ontogeny and UV radiation and compared emission rates in two contrasting seasons: summer when plants are mostly inactive and autumn, the growing season in this region. Leaf ontogeny significantly affected both photosynthesis and isoprenoids emission. Isoprene emission was positively correlated with photosynthesis, although a low isoprene emission was detected in brown leaves with a net carbon loss. Moreover, leaves with a significant lower photosynthesis emitted only monoterpenes, while at higher photosynthetic rates also isoprene was produced. Ambient UV radiation uncoupled photosynthesis and isoprene emission. It is speculated that alfa grass represent an exception from the general rules governing plant isoprenoid emitters. - Highlights: • Stipa tenacissima L. is a grass emitting either monoterpenes and isoprene. • The emission has reasonable rates even in senescent leaves. • Isoprene emission is positively correlated with CO_2 assimilation. • Ambient UV radiation uncouples photosynthesis and isoprene emission. • Leaves with lower photosynthetic rates emit only monoterpenes. - We proved for the first time that alfa grass emit both isoprene and monoterpene, and we provide some innovative aspects about the UV effect and the behavior of Stipa tenacissima.

  17. Enhanced Emission by Accumulated Charges at Organic/Metal Interfaces Generated during the Reverse Bias of Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichiro Nozoe

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A high frequency rectangular alternating voltage was applied to organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs with the structure ITO/TPD/Alq3/Al and ITO/CoPc/Alq3/Al, where ITO is indium-tin-oxide, TPD is 4,4′-bis[N-phenyl-N-(m-tolylamino]biphenyl, CoPc is cobalt phthalocyanine, and Alq3 is Tris(8-quinolinolatoaluminum, and the effect on emission of the reverse bias was examined. The results reveal that the emission intensity under an alternating reverse-forward bias is greater than that under an alternating zero-forward bias. The difference in the emission intensity (∆I increased both for decreasing frequency and increasing voltage level of the reverse bias. In particular, the change in emission intensity was proportional to the voltage level of the reverse bias given the same frequency. To understand ΔI, this paper proposes a model in which an OLED works as a capacitor under reverse bias, where positive and negative charges accumulate on the metal/organic interfaces. In this model, the emission enhancement that occurs during the alternating reverse-forward bias is rationalized as a result of the charge accumulation at the organic/metal interfaces during the reverse bias, which possibly modulates the vacuum level shifts at the organic/metal interfaces to reduce both the hole injection barrier at the organic/ITO interface and the electron injection barrier at the organic/Al interface under forward bias.

  18. Red Emission of SrAl2O4:Mn4+ Phosphor for Warm White Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, N. T. K.; Tuan, N. T.; Lien, N. T. K.; Nguyen, D. H.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, SrAl2O4:Mn4+ phosphor is prepared by co-precipitation. The phase structure, morphology, composition and luminescent performance of the phosphor are investigated in detail with x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, steady-state photoluminescence (PL) spectra, and temperature-dependent PL measurements. The phosphor shows a strong red emission peak at ˜ 690 nm, which is due to the transition between electronic levels and the electric dipole transition 2Eg to 4A2g of Mn4+ ions located at the sites with D3d local symmetry. The sample doped with 0.04 mol.% Mn4+ exhibits intense red emission with high thermal stability and appropriate International Commission on Illumination (CIE) coordinates (x = 0.6959, y = 0.2737). It is also found that the phosphor absorption in an extended band from 250 nm to 500 nm has three peaks at 320 nm, 405 nm, and 470 nm, which match well with the emission band of ultraviolet (UV) lighting emission diode (LED) or blue LED chips. These results demonstrate that SrAl2O4:Mn4+ phosphor can play the role of activator in narrow red-emitting phosphor, which is potentially useful in UV (˜ 320 nm) or blue (˜ 460 nm) LED.

  19. Development of Hot Exhaust Emission Factors for Iranian-Made Euro-2 Certified Light-Duty Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banitalebi, Ehsan; Hosseini, Vahid

    2016-01-05

    Emission factors (EFs) are fundamental, necessary data for air pollution research and scenario implementation. With the vision of generating national EFs of the Iranian transportation system, a portable emission measurement system (PEMS) was used to develop the basic EFs for a statistically significant sample of Iranian gasoline-fueled privately owned light duty vehicles (LDVs) operated in Tehran. A smaller sample size of the same fleet was examined by chassis dynamometer (CD) bag emission measurement tests to quantify the systematic differences between the PEMS and CD methods. The selected fleet was tested over four different routes of uphill highways, flat highways, uphill urban streets, and flat urban streets. Real driving emissions (RDEs) and fuel consumption (FC) rates were calculated by weighted averaging of the results from each route. The activity of the fleet over each route type was assumed as a weighting factor. The activity data were obtained from a Tehran traffic model. The RDEs of the selected fleet were considerably higher than the certified emission levels of all vehicles. Differences between Tehran real driving cycles and the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) was attributed to the lower loading of NEDC. A table of EFs based on RDEs was developed for the sample fleet.

  20. Time-resolved light emission of a, c, and r-cut sapphires shock-compressed to 65 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q. C.; Zhou, X. M.

    2018-04-01

    To investigate light emission and dynamic deformation behaviors, sapphire (single crystal Al2O3) samples with three crystallographic orientations (a, c, and r-cut) were shock-compressed by the planar impact method, with final stress ranges from 47 to 65 GPa. Emission radiance and velocity versus time profiles were simultaneously measured with a fast pyrometer and a Doppler pin system in each experiment. Wave profile results show anisotropic elastic-plastic transitions, which confirm the literature observations. Under final shock stress of about 52 GPa, lower emission intensity is observed in the r-cut sample, in agreement with the previous report in the literature. When final shock stress increases to 57 GPa and 65 GPa, spectral radiance histories of the r-cut show two stages of distinct features. In the first stage, the emission intensity of r-cut is lower than those of the other two, which agrees with the previous report in the literature. In the second stage, spectral radiance of r-cut increases with time at much higher rate and it finally peaks over those of the a and c-cut. These observations (conversion of intensified emission in the r-cut) may indicate activation of a second slip system and formation of shear bands which are discussed with the resolved shear stress calculations for the slip systems in each of the three cuts under shock compression.

  1. The effect of electric field strength on electroplex emission at the interface of NPB/PBD organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, De-Wei; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Fu-Jun; Song, Shu-Fang; Zhao, Su-Ling; Wang, Yong; Yuan, Guang-Cai; Zhang, Yan-Fei; Xu, Hong-Hua

    2007-02-01

    Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) based on two kinds of blue emission materials N, N'-bis(1-naphthyl)- N, N'-diphenyl-l,l'-diphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPB) and 2-(4-biphenylyl)-5(4- tert-butyl-phenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PBD) was fabricated. There is only one emission peak in photoluminescence (PL) spectrum which originates from NPB exciton emission. And the electroluminescence (EL) emission peaks have an apparent red-shift with the increase of driving voltage. The red-shift emission from exciplex emission could be ruled out. Thus, by the method of Gaussian fitting it should be ascribed to the overlap of exciton emission and electroplex emission which occurs at the interface between NPB and PBD. The formation of the electroplex emission under high electric field is analyzed.

  2. Characterization of in-use light-duty gasoline vehicle emissions by remote sensing in Beijing: impact of recent control measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Fu, Lixin; Cheng, Linglin

    2007-09-01

    China's national government and Beijing city authorities have adopted additional control measures to reduce the negative impact of vehicle emissions on Beijing's air quality. An evaluation of the effectiveness of these measures may provide guidance for future vehicle emission control strategy development. In-use emissions from light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) were investigated at five sites in Beijing with remote sensing instrumentation. Distance-based mass emission factors were derived with fuel consumption modeled on real world data. The results show that the recently implemented aggressive control strategies are significantly reducing the emissions of on-road vehicles. Older vehicles are contributing substantially to the total fleet emissions. An earlier program to retrofit pre-Euro cars with three-way catalysts produced little emission reduction. The impact of model year and driving conditions on the average mass emission factors indicates that the durability of vehicles emission controls may be inadequate in Beijing.

  3. Quark fragmentation in e+e- collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oddone, P.

    1984-12-01

    This brief review of new results in quark and gluon fragmentation observed in e + e - collisions concentrates mostly on PEP results and, within PEP, mostly on TPC results. The new PETRA results have been reported at this conference by M. Davier. It is restricted to results on light quark fragmentation since the results on heavy quark fragmentation have been reported by J. Chapman

  4. Strong blue and white photoluminescence emission of BaZrO{sub 3} undoped and lanthanide doped phosphor for light emitting diodes application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, V.H. [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, A. P. 1-948, Leon Gto., 37160 (Mexico); De la Rosa, E., E-mail: elder@cio.mx [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, A. P. 1-948, Leon Gto., 37160 (Mexico); Salas, P. [Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 1-1010, Queretaro, Qro. 76000 (Mexico); Velazquez-Salazar, J.J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Texas at San Antonio One UTSA Circle, San Antonio TX 78249 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, we report the obtained strong broadband blue photoluminescence (PL) emission centered at 427 nm for undoped BaZrO{sub 3} observed after 266 nm excitation of submicron crystals prepared by hydrothermal/calcinations method. This emission is enhanced with the introduction of Tm{sup 3+} ions and is stronger than the characteristic PL blue emission of such lanthanide. The proposed mechanism of relaxation for host lattice emission is based on the presence of oxygen vacancies produced during the synthesis process and the charge compensation due to the difference in the electron valence between dopant and substituted ion in the host. Brilliant white light emission with a color coordinate of (x=0.29, y=0.32) was observed by combining the blue PL emission from the host with the green and red PL emission from Tb{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} ions, respectively. The color coordinate can be tuned by changing the ratio between blue, green and red band by changing the concentration of lanthanides. - Graphical abstract: Strong blue emission from undoped BaZrO{sub 3} phosphor and white light emission by doping with Tb{sup 3+} (green) and Eu{sup 3+} (red) after 266 nm excitation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blue emission from BaZrO{sub 3} phosphor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blue emission enhanced with Tm{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer White light from BaZrO{sup 3+} phosphor.

  5. Broadband sensitized white light emission of g-C_3N_4/Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+ composite phosphor under near ultraviolet excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Bing; Xue, Yongfei; Li, Pengju; Zhang, Jingtao; Zhang, Jie; Shi, Hengzhen

    2015-01-01

    The g-C_3N_4/Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+ composite phosphors were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet visible diffuse reflection spectra, photoluminescence spectra and luminescence decay curves. Under the excitation of 360 nm near ultraviolet light, these composite phosphors show tunable emission from blue to red region, in which white light emission can be obtained in term of appropriate quality proportion of Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+ relative to g-C_3N_4/Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+. In addition, the emission color can be also dependent on the excitation wavelength in g-C_3N_4/Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+ composite phosphor. - Graphical abstract: Under the excitation of 360 nm near ultraviolet light, the g-C_3N_4/Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+ composite phosphors show tunable emission from blue to red region, in which white light emission can be obtained. - Highlights: • The g-C3N4/Y2MoO6:Eu"3"+ composite phosphors were synthesized and characterized. • White light emission was realized in the g-C3N4/Y2MoO6:Eu"3"+ composites under UV excitation. • A novel idea to realize the broadband sensitized white light emission in phosphors was provided.

  6. Semiconductive 3-D haloplumbate framework hybrids with high color rendering index white-light emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan-E; Xu, Gang; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Cai, Li-Zhen; Li, Wen-Hua; Guo, Guo-Cong

    2015-12-01

    Single-component white light materials may create great opportunities for novel conventional lighting applications and display systems; however, their reported color rendering index (CRI) values, one of the key parameters for lighting, are less than 90, which does not satisfy the demand of color-critical upmarket applications, such as photography, cinematography, and art galleries. In this work, two semiconductive chloroplumbate (chloride anion of lead(ii)) hybrids, obtained using a new inorganic-organic hybrid strategy, show unprecedented 3-D inorganic framework structures and white-light-emitting properties with high CRI values around 90, one of which shows the highest value to date.

  7. Multi-fragmentation of C{sub 60} induced by {sup 4}He{sup 2+} impact (E<60 keV/amu) and investigated by a multi-correlation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rentenier, A.; Moretto-Capelle, P. E-mail: pmc@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A

    2003-05-01

    In this communication, the C{sub 60} multi-fragmentation induced by {sup 4}He{sup 2+} ion impact in the 20-240 keV energy range, is investigated. Using a multi-stop time-of-flight technique, it becomes possible to measure partial spectra corresponding to the simultaneous emission of 2-5 light charged fragments; small charged fragments are found to be accompanied by the emission of at least another one. The fragment size distribution depends on the collisional energy and the multiplicity of emitted charged fragments. It is more peaked on small sizes when the collision velocity or the multiplicity increases. Corresponding relative cross sections are also measured; processes with emission of 2 and 3 charged fragments are always dominant but their relative weights decrease slowly when the collision energy increases.

  8. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  9. Origin of complex fragments from 32S + natAg reaction at 37.5 A.MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benchekroun, D.; Cheynis, B.; Demeyer, A.; Gerlic, E.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, P.; Lebreton, L.; Magda, M.T.; Stern, M.; Chabane, A.; Desesquelles, P.; Giorni, A.; Heuer, D.; Lleres, A.; Viano, J.B.

    1996-08-01

    Fragment emission from collisions of 32 S with nat Ag at 37.5 A.MeV has been studied with the 4π multidetector AMPHORA. Production of intermediate mass and heavy fragments as well as of light charged particles has been measured. The total charged particle multiplicity and polar angular distributions have been used to select various classes of collisions. Analysis of angular and energy distributions of fragments and light particles in central collisions indicates the formation of a hot source (excitation energy of ∼ 4.4 A.MeV) with an additional contribution from a preequilibrium process at more forward angles. Azimuthal angle correlations of He - Li, Li - Li, B - B, and C - C pairs have been used as a tool to study the origin of complex fragments. Data at backward angles are well described by considering a thermalized emitter with an angular momentum around 70 h and a fragment emission time of the order of 200 fm/c. A microscopic approach of BNV type confirms these emission times and angular momenta indicating the persistence of an incomplete fusion process responsible for the emission of complex fragments at backward angles

  10. Architectural fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Jacob Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    I have created a large collection of plaster models: a collection of Obstructions, errors and opportunities that may develop into architecture. The models are fragments of different complex shapes as well as more simple circular models with different profiling and diameters. In this contect I have....... I try to invent the ways of drawing the models - that decode and unfold them into architectural fragments- into future buildings or constructions in the landscape. [1] Luigi Moretti: Italian architect, 1907 - 1973 [2] Man Ray: American artist, 1890 - 1976. in 2015, I saw the wonderful exhibition...... "Man Ray - Human Equations" at the Glyptotek in Copenhagen, organized by the Philips Collection in Washington D.C. and the Israel Museum in Jerusalem (in 2013). See also: "Man Ray - Human Equations" catalogue published by Hatje Cantz Verlag, Germany, 2014....

  11. N2O emission from plant surfaces – light stimulated and a global phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Ambus, Per

    2017-01-01

    for the first time N2O emission fromterrestrial vegetation in response to natural solar ultra violet radiation. We conducted field site measurementsto investigate N2O atmosphere exchange from grass vegetation exposed to solar irradiance with and withoutUV-screening. Further laboratory tests were conducted...... with a range of species to study the controls and possibleloci of UV-induced N2O emission from plants. Plants released N2O in response to natural sunlight at rates of c.20-50 nmol m-2 h-1, mostly due to the UV component. The emission rate is temperature dependent with a ratherhigh activation energy indicative...

  12. The Zero-Degree Detector system for fragmentation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.H.; Christl, M.J.; Howell, L.W.; Kuznetsov, E.

    2007-01-01

    The measurement of nuclear fragmentation cross-sections requires the detection and identification of individual projectile fragments. If light and heavy fragments are recorded in the same detector, it may be impossible to distinguish the signal from the light fragment. To overcome this problem, we have developed the Zero-degree Detector System (ZDDS). The ZDDS enables the measurement of cross-sections for light fragment production by using pixelated detectors to separately measure the signals of each fragment. The system has been used to measure the fragmentation of beams as heavy as Fe at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan

  13. Light absorbing organic carbon from prescribed and laboratory biomass burning and gasoline vehicle emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The light absorption of carbonaceous aerosols plays an important role in the atmospheric radiation balance. Light-absorbing organic carbon (OC), also called brown carbon (BrC), from laboratory-based biomass burning (BB) has been studied intensively to understand the contribution ...

  14. 78 FR 34375 - Proposed Information Collection Request; Comment Request; Exhaust Emissions of Light-Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... respond, including through the use of appropriate automated electronic, mechanical, or other technological... be voluntary. The target population for the project will include light-duty cars and trucks certified... Numbers: 2363.02. Respondents/affected entities: private owners of light-duty cars and trucks. Respondent...

  15. Readout of scintillator light with avalanche photodiodes for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ruru; Fremout, A.; Tavernier, S.; Bruyndonckx, P.; Clement, D.; Loude, J.-F.; Morel, C.

    1999-01-01

    The noise properties and other relevant characteristics of avalanche photodiodes have been investigated with the perspective of replacing photomultiplier tubes in positron emission tomography. It is clearly demonstrated that they are a valid alternative to photomultiplier tubes in this application

  16. Final report for measurement of primary particulate matter emissions from light-duty motor vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norbeck, J. M.; Durbin, T. D.; Truex, T. J.

    1998-12-31

    This report describes the results of a particulate emissions study conducted at the University of California, Riverside, College of Engineering-Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) from September of 1996 to August of 1997. The goal of this program was to expand the database of particulate emissions measurements from motor vehicles to include larger numbers of representative in-use vehicles. This work was co-sponsored by the Coordinating Research Council (CRC), the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and was part of a larger study of particulate emissions being conducted in several states under sponsorship by CRC. For this work, FTP particulate mass emission rates were determined for gasoline and diesel vehicles, along with the fractions of particulates below 2.5 and 10 microns aerodynamic diameter. A total of 129 gasoline-fueled vehicles and 19 diesel-fueled vehicles were tested as part of the program.

  17. Effects of Cold Temperature and Ethanol Content on VOC Emissions from Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicles

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Supporting information Table S6 provides emission rates in g/km of volatile organic compounds measured from gasoline vehicle exhaust during chassis dynamometer...

  18. Light particle emission measurements in heavy ion reactions. Final report, June 1, 1981-May 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitt, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    Progress in instrumentation development reported includes improvements in the design of position sensitive neutron detectors, design of a thin-walled, spherical, aluminum target chamber, and use of thin silicon detectors to detect and identify evaporation residues from fusion reactions. The problem of the short lifetime of evaporation residue detectors is addressed by using a pair of large area, multi-wire proportional counters followed by a thin sheet of plastic scintillator. Neutron emission associated with fission has been studied, as well as nonequilibrium emission associated with inelastic products and evaporation residue. An experiment was performed to study neutron emission associated with fission and fission-like events in the case of the Er composite system. Other work in progress includes neutron emissions from the C + Gd and Ne + Nd reactions. 9 refs

  19. Visible light emission from silicon implanted and annealed SiO2layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghislotti, G.; Nielsen, B.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Lynn, K.G.; Di Mauro, L.F.; Bottani, C.E.; Corni, F.; Tonini, R.; Ottaviani, G.P.

    1997-01-01

    Silicon implanted and annealed SiO 2 layers are studied using photoluminescence (PL) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). Two PL emission bands are observed. A band centered at 560 nm is present in as-implanted samples and it is still observed after 1,000 C annealing. The emission time is fast. A second band centered at 780 nm is detected after 1,000 C annealing. The intensity of the 780 nm band further increased when hydrogen annealing was performed. The emission time is long (1 micros to 0.2 ms). PAS results show that defects produced by implantation anneal at 600 C. Based on the annealing behavior and on the emission times, the origin of the two bands is discussed

  20. Evaluation of solid particle number and black carbon for very low particulate matter emissions standards in light-duty vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M-C Oliver; Shields, J Erin

    2017-06-01

    To reliably measure at the low particulate matter (PM) levels needed to meet California's Low Emission Vehicle (LEV III) 3- and 1-mg/mile particulate matter (PM) standards, various approaches other than gravimetric measurement have been suggested for testing purposes. In this work, a feasibility study of solid particle number (SPN, d50 = 23 nm) and black carbon (BC) as alternatives to gravimetric PM mass was conducted, based on the relationship of these two metrics to gravimetric PM mass, as well as the variability of each of these metrics. More than 150 Federal Test Procedure (FTP-75) or Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (US06) tests were conducted on 46 light-duty vehicles, including port-fuel-injected and direct-injected gasoline vehicles, as well as several light-duty diesel vehicles equipped with diesel particle filters (LDD/DPF). For FTP tests, emission variability of gravimetric PM mass was found to be slightly less than that of either SPN or BC, whereas the opposite was observed for US06 tests. Emission variability of PM mass for LDD/DPF was higher than that of both SPN and BC, primarily because of higher PM mass measurement uncertainties (background and precision) near or below 0.1 mg/mile. While strong correlations were observed from both SPN and BC to PM mass, the slopes are dependent on engine technologies and driving cycles, and the proportionality between the metrics can vary over the course of the test. Replacement of the LEV III PM mass emission standard with one other measurement metric may imperil the effectiveness of emission reduction, as a correlation-based relationship may evolve over future technologies for meeting stringent greenhouse standards. Solid particle number and black carbon were suggested in place of PM mass for the California LEV III 1-mg/mile FTP standard. Their equivalence, proportionality, and emission variability in comparison to PM mass, based on a large light-duty vehicle fleet examined, are dependent on engine