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Sample records for ligand rebinding kinetics

  1. Quantitative modeling assesses the contribution of bond strengthening, rebinding and force sharing to the avidity of biomolecule interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Lo Schiavo

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion is mediated by numerous membrane receptors. It is desirable to derive the outcome of a cell-surface encounter from the molecular properties of interacting receptors and ligands. However, conventional parameters such as affinity or kinetic constants are often insufficient to account for receptor efficiency. Avidity is a qualitative concept frequently used to describe biomolecule interactions: this includes incompletely defined properties such as the capacity to form multivalent attachments. The aim of this study is to produce a working description of monovalent attachments formed by a model system, then to measure and interpret the behavior of divalent attachments under force. We investigated attachments between antibody-coated microspheres and surfaces coated with sparse monomeric or dimeric ligands. When bonds were subjected to a pulling force, they exhibited both a force-dependent dissociation consistent with Bell's empirical formula and a force- and time-dependent strengthening well described by a single parameter. Divalent attachments were stronger and less dependent on forces than monovalent ones. The proportion of divalent attachments resisting a force of 30 piconewtons for at least 5 s was 3.7 fold higher than that of monovalent attachments. Quantitative modeling showed that this required rebinding, i.e. additional bond formation between surfaces linked by divalent receptors forming only one bond. Further, experimental data were compatible with but did not require stress sharing between bonds within divalent attachments. Thus many ligand-receptor interactions do not behave as single-step reactions in the millisecond to second timescale. Rather, they exhibit progressive stabilization. This explains the high efficiency of multimerized or clustered receptors even when bonds are only subjected to moderate forces. Our approach provides a quantitative way of relating binding avidity to measurable parameters including bond

  2. Quantitative Modeling Assesses the Contribution of Bond Strengthening, Rebinding and Force Sharing to the Avidity of Biomolecule Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Schiavo, Valentina; Robert, Philippe; Limozin, Laurent; Bongrand, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion is mediated by numerous membrane receptors. It is desirable to derive the outcome of a cell-surface encounter from the molecular properties of interacting receptors and ligands. However, conventional parameters such as affinity or kinetic constants are often insufficient to account for receptor efficiency. Avidity is a qualitative concept frequently used to describe biomolecule interactions: this includes incompletely defined properties such as the capacity to form multivalent attachments. The aim of this study is to produce a working description of monovalent attachments formed by a model system, then to measure and interpret the behavior of divalent attachments under force. We investigated attachments between antibody-coated microspheres and surfaces coated with sparse monomeric or dimeric ligands. When bonds were subjected to a pulling force, they exhibited both a force-dependent dissociation consistent with Bell’s empirical formula and a force- and time-dependent strengthening well described by a single parameter. Divalent attachments were stronger and less dependent on forces than monovalent ones. The proportion of divalent attachments resisting a force of 30 piconewtons for at least 5 s was 3.7 fold higher than that of monovalent attachments. Quantitative modeling showed that this required rebinding, i.e. additional bond formation between surfaces linked by divalent receptors forming only one bond. Further, experimental data were compatible with but did not require stress sharing between bonds within divalent attachments. Thus many ligand-receptor interactions do not behave as single-step reactions in the millisecond to second timescale. Rather, they exhibit progressive stabilization. This explains the high efficiency of multimerized or clustered receptors even when bonds are only subjected to moderate forces. Our approach provides a quantitative way of relating binding avidity to measurable parameters including bond maturation, rebinding and

  3. Ligand Exchange Kinetics of Environmentally Relevant Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panasci, Adele Frances [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The interactions of ground water with minerals and contaminants are of broad interest for geochemists but are not well understood. Experiments on the molecular scale can determine reaction parameters (i.e. rates of ligand exchange, activation entropy, activation entropy, and activation volume) that can be used in computations to gain insight into reactions that occur in natural groundwaters. Experiments to determine the rate of isotopic ligand exchange for three environmentally relevant metals, rhodium (Rh), iron (Fe), and neptunium (Np), are described. Many environmental transformations of metals (e.g. reduction) in soil occur at trivalent centers, Fe(III) in particular. Contaminant ions absorb to mineral surfaces via ligand exchange, and the reversal of this reaction can be dangerous, releasing contaminants into the environment. Ferric iron is difficult to study spectroscopically because most of its complexes are paramagnetic and are generally reactive toward ligand exchange; therefore, Rh(III), which is diamagnetic and less reactive, was used to study substitution reactions that are analogous to those that occur on mineral oxide surfaces. Studies on both Np(V) and Np(VI) are important in their own right, as 237Np is a radioactive transuranic element with a half-life of 2 million years.

  4. Ligand-promoted protein folding by biased kinetic partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingorani, Karan S; Metcalf, Matthew C; Deming, Derrick T; Garman, Scott C; Powers, Evan T; Gierasch, Lila M

    2017-04-01

    Protein folding in cells occurs in the presence of high concentrations of endogenous binding partners, and exogenous binding partners have been exploited as pharmacological chaperones. A combined mathematical modeling and experimental approach shows that a ligand improves the folding of a destabilized protein by biasing the kinetic partitioning between folding and alternative fates (aggregation or degradation). Computationally predicted inhibition of test protein aggregation and degradation as a function of ligand concentration are validated by experiments in two disparate cellular systems.

  5. Effects of electrostatic interactions on ligand dissociation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbaş, Aykut; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera; Marko, John F.

    2018-02-01

    We study unbinding of multivalent cationic ligands from oppositely charged polymeric binding sites sparsely grafted on a flat neutral substrate. Our molecular dynamics simulations are suggested by single-molecule studies of protein-DNA interactions. We consider univalent salt concentrations spanning roughly a 1000-fold range, together with various concentrations of excess ligands in solution. To reveal the ionic effects on unbinding kinetics of spontaneous and facilitated dissociation mechanisms, we treat electrostatic interactions both at a Debye-Hückel (DH) (or implicit ions, i.e., use of an electrostatic potential with a prescribed decay length) level and by the more precise approach of considering all ionic species explicitly in the simulations. We find that the DH approach systematically overestimates unbinding rates, relative to the calculations where all ion pairs are present explicitly in solution, although many aspects of the two types of calculation are qualitatively similar. For facilitated dissociation (FD) (acceleration of unbinding by free ligands in solution) explicit-ion simulations lead to unbinding at lower free-ligand concentrations. Our simulations predict a variety of FD regimes as a function of free-ligand and ion concentrations; a particularly interesting regime is at intermediate concentrations of ligands where nonelectrostatic binding strength controls FD. We conclude that explicit-ion electrostatic modeling is an essential component to quantitatively tackle problems in molecular ligand dissociation, including nucleic-acid-binding proteins.

  6. Nickel speciation and complexation kinetics in freshwater by ligand exchange and DPCSV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han Bin Xue,; Jansen, S.; Prasch, A.; Sigg, L.

    2001-01-01

    A technique of ligand exchange with DMG (dimethylglyoxime) and DPCSV was applied to determine Ni speciation in lake, river, and groundwater samples. The working conditions related to ligand-exchange equilibrium were optimized, and the ligand-exchange kinetics were examined. The observed

  7. Estimation of kinetic and thermodynamic ligand-binding parameters using computational strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deganutti, Giuseppe; Moro, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Kinetic and thermodynamic ligand-protein binding parameters are gaining growing importance as key information to consider in drug discovery. The determination of the molecular structures, using particularly x-ray and NMR techniques, is crucial for understanding how a ligand recognizes its target in the final binding complex. However, for a better understanding of the recognition processes, experimental studies of ligand-protein interactions are needed. Even though several techniques can be used to investigate both thermodynamic and kinetic profiles for a ligand-protein complex, these procedures are very often laborious, time consuming and expensive. In the last 10 years, computational approaches have enormous potential in providing insights into each of the above effects and in parsing their contributions to the changes in both kinetic and thermodynamic binding parameters. The main purpose of this review is to summarize the state of the art of computational strategies for estimating the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of a ligand-protein binding.

  8. Thermo-Kinetic Investigation of Comparative Ligand Effect on Cysteine Iron Redox Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Ahmad Rizvi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ions in their free state bring unwanted biological oxidations generating oxidative stress. The ligand modulated redox potential can be indispensable in prevention of such oxidative stress by blocking the redundant bio-redox reactions. In this study we investigated the comparative ligand effect on the thermo-kinetic aspects of biologically important cysteine iron (III redox reaction using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The results were corroborated with the complexation effect on redox potential of iron(III-iron(II redox couple. The selected ligands were found to increase the rate of cysteine iron (III redox reaction in proportion to their stability of iron (II complex (EDTA < terpy < bipy < phen. A kinetic profile and the catalytic role of copper (II ions by means of redox shuttle mechanism for the cysteine iron (III redox reaction in presence of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen ligand is also reported.

  9. Organic ligand-induced dissolution kinetics of antimony trioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingyun Hu; Mengchang He

    2017-01-01

    The influence of low-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (LMWDOM) on the dissolution rate of Sb2O3 was investigated.Some representative LMWDOMs with carboxyl,hydroxyl,hydrosulfuryl and amidogen groups occurring naturally in the solution were chosen,namely oxalic acid,citric acid,tartaric acid,EDTA,salicylic acid,phthalandione,glycine,thiolactic acid,xylitol,glucose and catechol.These LMWDOMs were dissolved in inert buffers at pH =3.7,6.6 and 8.6 and added to powdered Sb2O3 in a stirred,thermostatted reactor (25℃).The addition of EDTA,tartaric acid,thiolactic acid,citric acid and oxalic acid solutions at pH 3.7 and catechol at pH 8.6 increased the rate of release of antimony.In the 10 mmol/L thiolactic acid solution,up to 97% by mass of the antimony was released after 120 min reaction.There was no effect on the dissolution of Sb2O3 for the other ligands.A weak correlation between dissolution rate with the dissociation constant of ligands and the stability of the dissolved complex was also found.All the results showed that the extent of the promoting effect of ligands on the dissolution of Sb2O3 was not determined by the stability of the dissolved complex,but by the dissociation constant of ligands and detachment rate of surface chelates from the mineral surface.This study can not only help in further understanding the effect of individual low-molecular-weight organic ligands,but also provides a reference to deduce the effect of natural organic matters with oxygen-bearing functional groups on the dissolution of antimony oxide minerals.

  10. Organic ligand-induced dissolution kinetics of antimony trioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xingyun; He, Mengchang

    2017-06-01

    The influence of low-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (LMWDOM) on the dissolution rate of Sb 2 O 3 was investigated. Some representative LMWDOMs with carboxyl, hydroxyl, hydrosulfuryl and amidogen groups occurring naturally in the solution were chosen, namely oxalic acid, citric acid, tartaric acid, EDTA, salicylic acid, phthalandione, glycine, thiolactic acid, xylitol, glucose and catechol. These LMWDOMs were dissolved in inert buffers at pH=3.7, 6.6 and 8.6 and added to powdered Sb 2 O 3 in a stirred, thermostatted reactor (25°C). The addition of EDTA, tartaric acid, thiolactic acid, citric acid and oxalic acid solutions at pH3.7 and catechol at pH8.6 increased the rate of release of antimony. In the 10mmol/L thiolactic acid solution, up to 97% by mass of the antimony was released after 120min reaction. There was no effect on the dissolution of Sb 2 O 3 for the other ligands. A weak correlation between dissolution rate with the dissociation constant of ligands and the stability of the dissolved complex was also found. All the results showed that the extent of the promoting effect of ligands on the dissolution of Sb 2 O 3 was not determined by the stability of the dissolved complex, but by the dissociation constant of ligands and detachment rate of surface chelates from the mineral surface. This study can not only help in further understanding the effect of individual low-molecular-weight organic ligands, but also provides a reference to deduce the effect of natural organic matters with oxygen-bearing functional groups on the dissolution of antimony oxide minerals. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Thermo-Kinetic Investigation of Comparative Ligand Effect on Cysteine Iron Redox Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Teshima, Norio; Maqsood, Syed Raashid; Akhoon, Showket Ahmad; Peerzada, Ghulam Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal ions in their free state bring unwanted biological oxidations generating oxidative stress. The ligand modulated redox potential can be indispensable in prevention of such oxidative stress by blocking the redundant bio-redox reactions. In this study we investigated the comparative ligand effect on the thermo-kinetic aspects of biologically important cysteine iron (III) redox reaction using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The results were corroborated...

  12. Characterization of ligand binding to melanocortin 4 receptors using fluorescent peptides with improved kinetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Reet; Veiksina, Santa; Rinken, Ago; Kopanchuk, Sergei

    2017-03-15

    Melanocortin 4 (MC 4 ) receptors are important drug targets as they regulate energy homeostasis, eating behaviour and sexual functions. The ligand binding process to these G protein-coupled receptors is subject to considerable complexity. Different steps in the complex dynamic regulation can be characterized by ligand binding kinetics. Optimization of these kinetic parameters in terms of on-rate and residence time can increase the rapid onset of drug action and reduce off-target effects. Fluorescence anisotropy (FA) is one of the homogeneous fluorescence-based assays that enable continuous online monitoring of ligand binding kinetics. FA has been implemented for the kinetic study of melanocortin MC 4 receptors expressed on budded baculoviruses. However, the slow dissociation of the fluorescently labelled peptide NDP-α-MSH does not enable reaching equilibrium nor enable more in-depth study of the binding mechanisms. To overcome this problem, two novel red-shifted fluorescent ligands were designed. These cyclized heptapeptide derivatives (UTBC101 and UTBC102) exhibited nanomolar affinity toward melanocortin MC 4 receptors but had relatively different kinetic properties. The dissociation half-lives of UTBC101 (τ 1/2 =160min) and UTBC102 (τ 1/2 =7min) were shorter compared to that what was previously reported for Cy3B-NDP-α-MSH (τ 1/2 =224min). The significantly shorter dissociation half-life of UTBC102 enables equilibrium in screening assays, whereas the higher affinity of UTBC101 helps to resolve a wider range of competitor potencies. These two ligands are suitable for further kinetic screening of novel melanocortin MC 4 receptor specific ligands and could complement each other in these studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A hierarchy of functionally important relaxations within myoglobin based on solvent effects, mutations and kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantsker, David; Samuni, Uri; Friedman, Joel M; Agmon, Noam

    2005-06-01

    Geminate CO rebinding in myoglobin is studied for two viscous solvents, trehalose and sol-gel (bathed in 100% glycerol) at several temperatures. Mutations in key distal hemepocket residues are used to eliminate or enhance specific relaxation modes. The time-resolved data are analyzed with a modified Agmon-Hopfield model which is capable of providing excellent fits in cases where a single relaxation mode is dominant. Using this approach, we determine the relaxation rate constants of specific functionally important modes, obtaining also their Arrhenius activation energies. We find a hierarchy of distal pocket modes controlling the rebinding kinetics. The "heme access mode" (HAM) is responsible for the major slow-down in rebinding. It is a solvent-coupled cooperative mode which restricts ligand return from the xenon cavities. Bulky side-chains, like those His64 and Trp29 (in the L29W mutant), operate like overdamped pendulums which move over and block the binding site. They may be either unslaved (His64) or moderately slaved (Trp29) to the solvent. Small side-chain relaxations, most notably of leucines, are revealed in some mutants (V68L, V68A). They are conjectured to facilitate inter-cavity ligand motion. When all relaxations are arrested (H64L in trehalose), we observe pure inhomogeneous kinetics with no temperature dependence, suggesting that proximal relaxation is not a factor on the investigated timescale.

  14. Comparison of the kinetics of different Markov models for ligand binding under varying conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini, Johannes W. R.; Habeck, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We recently derived a Markov model for macromolecular ligand binding dynamics from few physical assumptions and showed that its stationary distribution is the grand canonical ensemble [J. W. R. Martini, M. Habeck, and M. Schlather, J. Math. Chem. 52, 665 (2014)]. The transition probabilities of the proposed Markov process define a particular Glauber dynamics and have some similarity to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Here, we illustrate that this model is the stochastic analog of (pseudo) rate equations and the corresponding system of differential equations. Moreover, it can be viewed as a limiting case of general stochastic simulations of chemical kinetics. Thus, the model links stochastic and deterministic approaches as well as kinetics and equilibrium described by the grand canonical ensemble. We demonstrate that the family of transition matrices of our model, parameterized by temperature and ligand activity, generates ligand binding kinetics that respond to changes in these parameters in a qualitatively similar way as experimentally observed kinetics. In contrast, neither the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm nor the Glauber heat bath reflects changes in the external conditions correctly. Both converge rapidly to the stationary distribution, which is advantageous when the major interest is in the equilibrium state, but fail to describe the kinetics of ligand binding realistically. To simulate cellular processes that involve the reversible stochastic binding of multiple factors, our pseudo rate equation model should therefore be preferred to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and the Glauber heat bath, if the stationary distribution is not of only interest

  15. Comparison of the kinetics of different Markov models for ligand binding under varying conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martini, Johannes W. R., E-mail: jmartin2@gwdg.de [Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen (Germany); Felix Bernstein Institute for Mathematical Statistics in the Biosciences, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Habeck, Michael, E-mail: mhabeck@gwdg.de [Felix Bernstein Institute for Mathematical Statistics in the Biosciences, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-03-07

    We recently derived a Markov model for macromolecular ligand binding dynamics from few physical assumptions and showed that its stationary distribution is the grand canonical ensemble [J. W. R. Martini, M. Habeck, and M. Schlather, J. Math. Chem. 52, 665 (2014)]. The transition probabilities of the proposed Markov process define a particular Glauber dynamics and have some similarity to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Here, we illustrate that this model is the stochastic analog of (pseudo) rate equations and the corresponding system of differential equations. Moreover, it can be viewed as a limiting case of general stochastic simulations of chemical kinetics. Thus, the model links stochastic and deterministic approaches as well as kinetics and equilibrium described by the grand canonical ensemble. We demonstrate that the family of transition matrices of our model, parameterized by temperature and ligand activity, generates ligand binding kinetics that respond to changes in these parameters in a qualitatively similar way as experimentally observed kinetics. In contrast, neither the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm nor the Glauber heat bath reflects changes in the external conditions correctly. Both converge rapidly to the stationary distribution, which is advantageous when the major interest is in the equilibrium state, but fail to describe the kinetics of ligand binding realistically. To simulate cellular processes that involve the reversible stochastic binding of multiple factors, our pseudo rate equation model should therefore be preferred to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and the Glauber heat bath, if the stationary distribution is not of only interest.

  16. Synthesis and thermal decomposition kinetics of Th(IV) complex with unsymmetrical Schiff base ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Yuhua; Bi Caifeng; Liu Siquan; Yang Lirong; Liu Feng; Ai Xiaokang

    2006-01-01

    A new unsymmetrical Schiff base ligand (H 2 LLi) was synthesized using L-lysine, o-vanillin and salicylaladyde. Thorium(IV) complex of this ligand [Th(H 2 L)(NO 3 )](NO 3 ) 2 x 3H 2 O have been prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, UV and molar conductance. The thermal decomposition kinetics of the complex for the second stage was studied under non-isothermal condition by TG and DTG methods. The kinetic equation may be expressed as: dα/dt = A x e -E/RT x 1/2 (1-α) x [-ln(1-α)] -1 . The kinetic parameters (E, A), activation entropy ΔS ≠ and activation free-energy ΔG ≠ were also calculated. (author)

  17. Accuracy and precision of protein-ligand interaction kinetics determined from chemical shift titrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markin, Craig J.; Spyracopoulos, Leo, E-mail: leo.spyracopoulos@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry (Canada)

    2012-12-15

    NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations for the study of weak protein-ligand interactions represent a rich source of information regarding thermodynamic parameters such as dissociation constants (K{sub D}) in the micro- to millimolar range, populations for the free and ligand-bound states, and the kinetics of interconversion between states, which are typically within the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. We recently developed two chemical shift titration methods wherein co-variation of the total protein and ligand concentrations gives increased precision for the K{sub D} value of a 1:1 protein-ligand interaction (Markin and Spyracopoulos in J Biomol NMR 53: 125-138, 2012). In this study, we demonstrate that classical line shape analysis applied to a single set of {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N 2D HSQC NMR spectra acquired using precise protein-ligand chemical shift titration methods we developed, produces accurate and precise kinetic parameters such as the off-rate (k{sub off}). For experimentally determined kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale, k{sub off} {approx} 3,000 s{sup -1} in this work, the accuracy of classical line shape analysis was determined to be better than 5 % by conducting quantum mechanical NMR simulations of the chemical shift titration methods with the magnetic resonance toolkit GAMMA. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental precision for k{sub off} from line shape analysis of NMR spectra was determined to be 13 %, in agreement with the theoretical precision of 12 % from line shape analysis of the GAMMA simulations in the presence of noise and protein concentration errors. In addition, GAMMA simulations were employed to demonstrate that line shape analysis has the potential to provide reasonably accurate and precise k{sub off} values over a wide range, from 100 to 15,000 s{sup -1}. The validity of line shape analysis for k{sub off} values approaching intermediate exchange ({approx}100 s{sup -1}), may be facilitated by

  18. Accuracy and precision of protein–ligand interaction kinetics determined from chemical shift titrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, Craig J.; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-01-01

    NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations for the study of weak protein–ligand interactions represent a rich source of information regarding thermodynamic parameters such as dissociation constants (K D ) in the micro- to millimolar range, populations for the free and ligand-bound states, and the kinetics of interconversion between states, which are typically within the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. We recently developed two chemical shift titration methods wherein co-variation of the total protein and ligand concentrations gives increased precision for the K D value of a 1:1 protein–ligand interaction (Markin and Spyracopoulos in J Biomol NMR 53: 125–138, 2012). In this study, we demonstrate that classical line shape analysis applied to a single set of 1 H– 15 N 2D HSQC NMR spectra acquired using precise protein–ligand chemical shift titration methods we developed, produces accurate and precise kinetic parameters such as the off-rate (k off ). For experimentally determined kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale, k off ∼ 3,000 s −1 in this work, the accuracy of classical line shape analysis was determined to be better than 5 % by conducting quantum mechanical NMR simulations of the chemical shift titration methods with the magnetic resonance toolkit GAMMA. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental precision for k off from line shape analysis of NMR spectra was determined to be 13 %, in agreement with the theoretical precision of 12 % from line shape analysis of the GAMMA simulations in the presence of noise and protein concentration errors. In addition, GAMMA simulations were employed to demonstrate that line shape analysis has the potential to provide reasonably accurate and precise k off values over a wide range, from 100 to 15,000 s −1 . The validity of line shape analysis for k off values approaching intermediate exchange (∼100 s −1 ), may be facilitated by more accurate K D measurements from NMR

  19. Accuracy and precision of protein-ligand interaction kinetics determined from chemical shift titrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markin, Craig J; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-12-01

    NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations for the study of weak protein-ligand interactions represent a rich source of information regarding thermodynamic parameters such as dissociation constants (K ( D )) in the micro- to millimolar range, populations for the free and ligand-bound states, and the kinetics of interconversion between states, which are typically within the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. We recently developed two chemical shift titration methods wherein co-variation of the total protein and ligand concentrations gives increased precision for the K ( D ) value of a 1:1 protein-ligand interaction (Markin and Spyracopoulos in J Biomol NMR 53: 125-138, 2012). In this study, we demonstrate that classical line shape analysis applied to a single set of (1)H-(15)N 2D HSQC NMR spectra acquired using precise protein-ligand chemical shift titration methods we developed, produces accurate and precise kinetic parameters such as the off-rate (k ( off )). For experimentally determined kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale, k ( off ) ~ 3,000 s(-1) in this work, the accuracy of classical line shape analysis was determined to be better than 5 % by conducting quantum mechanical NMR simulations of the chemical shift titration methods with the magnetic resonance toolkit GAMMA. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental precision for k ( off ) from line shape analysis of NMR spectra was determined to be 13 %, in agreement with the theoretical precision of 12 % from line shape analysis of the GAMMA simulations in the presence of noise and protein concentration errors. In addition, GAMMA simulations were employed to demonstrate that line shape analysis has the potential to provide reasonably accurate and precise k ( off ) values over a wide range, from 100 to 15,000 s(-1). The validity of line shape analysis for k ( off ) values approaching intermediate exchange (~100 s(-1)), may be facilitated by more accurate K ( D ) measurements

  20. Kinetic and mechanism formation reaction of complex compound Cu with di-n-buthildithiocarbamate (dbdtc) ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryani, S.; Kurniawan, C.; Kasmui

    2018-04-01

    Synthesis of complex compound is one field of research which intensively studied. Metal-dithiocarbamate complexes find wide-ranging applications in nanomaterial and metal separation science, and have potential use as chemotherapeutic, pesticides, and as additives to lubricants. However, the information about is reaction kinetic and mechanism are very much lacking. The research and analyzes results show that reaction synthesis ligand DBDTC and complex compounds Cu-DBDTC. Optimum reaction condition of formation of complex compounds Cu with DBDTC at pH=3, [DBDTC] = 4.10-3 M, and the time of reaction 5 minutes. Based the analysis varian reaction of complex compounds at pH 3 and 4, diffrence significance at the other pH: 5; 5,5; 6; 6,5 ; 7; and 8. The various of mole with reactants comosition difference sigbificance, those the time reaction for 5 and 6 minutes diffrence by significance with the other time, it is 3,4,8, and 10 minutes. The great product to at condition pH 6, the time optimum at 5 minutes and molar ratio of logam: ligand = 1:2. The reaction kinetic equation of complex compound Cu with chelathing ligand DBDTC is V=0.917106 [Cu2+]0.87921 [DBDTC]2.03021. Based on the kinetic data, and formed complex compounds estimation, the mechanism explaining by 2 stages. In the first stage formation of [Cu(DBDTC)], and then [Cu(DBDTC)2] with the last structure geomethry planar rectangle. The result of this research will be more useful if an effort is being done in reaction mechanism by chemical computation method for obtain intermediate, and for constant “k” in same stage, k1.k2. and compound complex constanta (β).

  1. Colloidal nanoparticle size control: experimental and kinetic modeling investigation of the ligand-metal binding role in controlling the nucleation and growth kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffari, Saeed; Li, Wenhui; Thompson, Coogan; Ivanov, Sergei; Seifert, Soenke; Lee, Byeongdu; Kovarik, Libor; Karim, Ayman M

    2017-09-21

    Despite the major advancements in colloidal metal nanoparticles synthesis, a quantitative mechanistic treatment of the ligand's role in controlling their size remains elusive. We report a methodology that combines in situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and kinetic modeling to quantitatively capture the role of ligand-metal binding (with the metal precursor and the nanoparticle surface) in controlling the synthesis kinetics. We demonstrate that accurate extraction of the kinetic rate constants requires using both, the size and number of particles obtained from in situ SAXS to decouple the contributions of particle nucleation and growth to the total metal reduction. Using Pd acetate and trioctylphosphine in different solvents, our results reveal that the binding of ligands with both the metal precursor and nanoparticle surface play a key role in controlling the rates of nucleation and growth and consequently the final size. We show that the solvent can affect the metal-ligand binding and consequently ligand coverage on the nanoparticles surface which has a strong effect on the growth rate and final size (1.4 nm in toluene and 4.3 nm in pyridine). The proposed kinetic model quantitatively predicts the effects of varying the metal concentration and ligand/metal ratio on nanoparticle size for our work and literature reports. More importantly, we demonstrate that the final size is exclusively determined by the nucleation and growth kinetics at early times and not how they change with time. Specifically, the nanoparticle size in this work and many literature reports can be predicted using a single, model independent kinetic descriptor, (growth-to-nucleation rate ratio) 1/3 , despite the different metals and synthetic conditions. The proposed model and kinetic descriptor could serve as powerful tools for the design of colloidal nanoparticles with specific sizes.

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of ligand-exchange reactions of Cd(II) chelates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nivorozhkin, L.E.; Kalabin, G.A.; Nivorozhkin, A.L.; Valeev, R.B.; Minkin, V.I.

    1987-03-01

    Tetrahedral Cd(II) bis(5-thio(or seleno)pyrazole-4-carboxaldiminates) of types II and III have been synthesized for the first time. The kinetics of the degenerate ligand exchange and enantiomerization of the complexes obtained have been studied by dynamic /sup 111/Cd, /sup 77/Se, and /sup 1/H (s = 1/2) NMR. The rate of intramolecular enantiomerization (k = 1/tau) is more than an order of magnitude greater than the corresponding values for processes of degenerate ligand exchange (a second-order reaction) determined from the dynamics of the averaging of the /sup 111/Cd-/sup 77/Se and /sup 111/Cd-N=CH spin-spin coupling constants. The cleavage and formation processes of the Cd-Se and Cd-N bonds are isoenergetic (..delta.. G/sub 298//sup not equal to/ = 14.4 kcal/mole for chelate II with X = Se and R = CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/). The free energies of activation of degenerate ligand exchange determined form the dynamics of the averaging of the /sup 111/Cd N=CH spin-spin coupling constant increase from 12.7 to 17.9 kcal/mole along the following series for R: C/sub 2/H/sub 5/ < Ar < CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/ < t-C/sub 4/H/sub 9/ < cyclo-C/sub 6/H/sub 11/. Replacement of the sulfur atom in the chelate ring by selenium results in increases in the rates of ligand exchange. A mechanism of degenerate ligand exchange has been proposed.

  3. Kinetic modeling of receptor-ligand binding applied to positron emission tomographic studies with neuroleptic tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, J; Wolf, A P; Shiue, C Y; Fowler, J S

    1987-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with labeled neuroleptics has made possible the study of neurotransmitter-receptor systems in vivo. In this study we investigate the kinetics of the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylamine (dopamine) receptor-ligand binding using PET data from a series of experiments in the baboon with the /sup 18/F-labeled drugs spiperone, haloperidol, and benperidol. Models used to describe these systems are based on first-order kinetics which applies at high specific activity (low receptor occupancy). The parameters governing the uptake and loss of drug from the brain were found by fitting PET data from regions with little or no receptor concentration (cerebellum) and from experiments in which specific binding was blocked by pretreatment with the drug (+)-butaclamol. Receptor constants were determined by fitting data from receptor-containing structures. Correcting the arterial plasma activities (the model driving function) for the presence of drug metabolites was found to be important in the modeling of these systems.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Kinetic Measurements to Estimate and Predict Protein-Ligand Residence Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Luca; Theret, Isabelle; Antoine, Mathias; Perron-Sierra, Françoise; Charton, Yves; Fourquez, Jean-Marie; Wierzbicki, Michel; Boutin, Jean A; Ferry, Gilles; Decherchi, Sergio; Bottegoni, Giovanni; Ducrot, Pierre; Cavalli, Andrea

    2016-08-11

    Ligand-target residence time is emerging as a key drug discovery parameter because it can reliably predict drug efficacy in vivo. Experimental approaches to binding and unbinding kinetics are nowadays available, but we still lack reliable computational tools for predicting kinetics and residence time. Most attempts have been based on brute-force molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which are CPU-demanding and not yet particularly accurate. We recently reported a new scaled-MD-based protocol, which showed potential for residence time prediction in drug discovery. Here, we further challenged our procedure's predictive ability by applying our methodology to a series of glucokinase activators that could be useful for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined scaled MD with experimental kinetics measurements and X-ray crystallography, promptly checking the protocol's reliability by directly comparing computational predictions and experimental measures. The good agreement highlights the potential of our scaled-MD-based approach as an innovative method for computationally estimating and predicting drug residence times.

  5. Electro-kinetic separation of rare earth elements using a redox-active ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Huayi; Cole, Bren E.; Qiao, Yusen; Bogart, Justin A.; Cheisson, Thibault; Manor, Brian C.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Purification of rare earth elements is challenging due to their chemical similarities. All of the deployed separation methods rely on thermodynamic properties, such as distribution equilibria in solvent extraction. Rare-earth-metal separations based on kinetic differences have not been examined. Herein, we demonstrate a new approach for rare-earth-element separations by exploiting differences in the oxidation rates within a series of rare earth compounds containing the redox-active ligand [{2-(tBuN(O))C_6H_4CH_2}{sub 3}N]{sup 3-}. Using this method, a single-step separation factor up to 261 was obtained for the separation of a 50:50 yttrium-lutetium mixture. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Time-dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy as a tool to measure the ligand exchange kinetics on a quantum dot surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koole, R.; Schapotschnikow, P.Z.; de Mello Donega, C.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Meijerink, A.

    2008-01-01

    The exchange kinetics of native ligands that passivate CdSe quantum dots (hexadecylamine (HDA), trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO), and trioctylphosphine (TOP)) by thiols is followed in situ. This is realized by measuring, in real-time, the decrease in emission intensity of the QDs upon addition of

  7. Design, Testing and Kinetic Analysis of Bulky Monodentate Phosphorus Ligands in the Mizoroki-Heck Reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dodds, Deborah L.; Boele, Maarten D. K.; van Strijdonck, Gino P. F.; de Vries, Johannes G.; van Leeuwen, Piet W. N. M.; Kamer, Paul C. J.

    A series of new monodentate phosphane ligands 2 have been evaluated in the MizorokiHeck arylation reaction of iodobenzene and styrene and compared with our previously reported ligands, 1, 3 and 4. The concept of rational ligand design is discussed, and we describe how the performance of this new

  8. Precipitation kinetics of Mg-carbonates, influence of organic ligands and consequences for CO2 mineral sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Forming magnesium carbonate minerals through carbonation of magnesium silicates has been proposed as a safe and durable way to store carbon dioxide, with a possibly high potential to offset anthropogenic CO 2 emissions. To date however, chemical reactions involved in this process are facing strong kinetic limitations, which originate in the low reactivity of both Mg-silicates and Mg-carbonates. Numerous studies have focused on the dissolution of Mg-silicates, under the questionable hypothesis that this step limits the whole process. This thesis work focuses instead on the mechanisms and rates of formation of magnesium carbonates, which are the final products of carbonation reactions. The first part of the work is dedicated to studying the influence on magnesite precipitation kinetics of three organic ligands known to accelerate Mg-silicates dissolution rates: oxalate, citrate and EDTA. With help of mixed-flow reactor experiments performed between 100 and 150 C, we show that these ligands significantly reduce magnesite growth rates, through two combined mechanisms: (1) complexation of Mg 2+ cations in aqueous solution, which was rigorously estimated from a thermodynamic database established through a critical review of the literature, and (2) adsorption of ligands to a limited number of surface sites, leading to a decrease of the precipitation rate constant. The observed growth inhibition is maximal with citrate. We then used hydrothermal atomic force microscopy to probe the origin of the documented growth inhibition. Our observations show that citrate and oxalate interact with the crystal growth process on magnesite surface, modifying the shape of growth hillocks as well as the step generation frequency through spiral growth. We also show that the ligands adsorb preferentially on different kink-sites, which is probably related to their different structures and chemical properties. We propose that the stronger magnesite growth inhibition caused by citrate is related

  9. Kinetics of protein–ligand unbinding: Predicting pathways, rates, and rate-limiting steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Limongelli, Vittorio; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The ability to predict the mechanisms and the associated rate constants of protein–ligand unbinding is of great practical importance in drug design. In this work we demonstrate how a recently introduced metadynamics-based approach allows exploration of the unbinding pathways, estimation of the rates, and determination of the rate-limiting steps in the paradigmatic case of the trypsin–benzamidine system. Protein, ligand, and solvent are described with full atomic resolution. Using metadynamics, multiple unbinding trajectories that start with the ligand in the crystallographic binding pose and end with the ligand in the fully solvated state are generated. The unbinding rate koff is computed from the mean residence time of the ligand. Using our previously computed binding affinity we also obtain the binding rate kon. Both rates are in agreement with reported experimental values. We uncover the complex pathways of unbinding trajectories and describe the critical rate-limiting steps with unprecedented detail. Our findings illuminate the role played by the coupling between subtle protein backbone fluctuations and the solvation by water molecules that enter the binding pocket and assist in the breaking of the shielded hydrogen bonds. We expect our approach to be useful in calculating rates for general protein–ligand systems and a valid support for drug design. PMID:25605901

  10. Investigation into kinetics of redox interaction in the system Ce(4) β-diketonate-additional ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anufrieva, S.I.; Snezhko, N.I.; Pechurova, N.I.; Martynenko, L.N.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1981-01-01

    The rate of reduction of β-diketonate complexes of Ce(4) to Ce(3) β-diketonates in benzene solution in the presence and in the absence of additional ligands is studied using spectrophotometry. The rate of reduction of Ce(4) β-diketonates increases in the series Ce(TTFA) 4 4 4 4 4 (TTFA - thenoyltrifluoroacetone, DPM- --dipivaloylmethane, DBM - dibenzoylemethane, BA benzoylacetone, AA - acetylaceton). The studied phosphorus-containing additional ligands as to their effect on the rate of Ce (4) reduction can be arranged in the following order: trioctylphosphine oxide>triphenylphosphine oxide>tributyl phosphate [ru

  11. Kinetics of a redox reaction in the system Ce(IV) β-diketonate - additional ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anufrieva, S.I.; Snezhko, N.I.; Pechurova, N.I.; Martynenko, L.N.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    Preparation of solutions containing stable compounds of Ce(IV) with organic ligands is difficult, because even strong Ce(IV) complexes undergo intramolecular reduction and have a tendency to hydrolysis. It is known that Ce(IV) β-diketonates have different resistances to reduction inorganic solvents, depending on the structure. Using spectrophotometric analysis we have investigated the oxidation-reduction characteristics of solutions of certain Ce(IV) β-diketonates in benzene in the absence and presence of neutral ligands containing donor O or N atoms

  12. Kinetic study on ligand exchange reaction between EC and 99mTc-GH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Chunying; Luo Shineng; Fang Ping; Huang Heyun; Xie Minhao; Meng Hong

    1995-01-01

    The ligand exchange reaction between EC and 99m Tc-GH and its influence factors such as concentrations of EC and pH were described. The concentration of EC has no influence on the exchange reaction rate constant, while pH is the most important influence factor. The rate constants of ligand exchange reaction at different pH values were determined. The results showed that in order to make the labelling yield of 99m Tc-EC higher than 90%, pH of the reaction must be higher than 8

  13. Preparation, characterization, and kinetics of thermolysis of nickel and copper nitrate complexes with 2,2 Prime -bipyridine ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Kapoor, I.P.S. [Department of Chemistry, DDU Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur 273 009 (India); Singh, Gurdip, E-mail: gsingh4us@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, DDU Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur 273 009 (India); Froehlich, Roland [Institut fuer Organische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2012-10-10

    Graphical abstract: Nickel and copper nitrate complexes with 2,2 Prime -bipyridine, nitrate and water ligands have been prepared and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, FT-IR and CHN analyses. Thermolysis was performed by using TG, DTA and ignition delay measurements. The kinetics of thermolysis were also evaluated. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preparation and characterization of Ni and Cu nitrate complexes have been reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermolysis has been carried out using TG-DTA and ignition delay measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their thermal decomposition pathways have been proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxides residues as end product of thermolysis were revealed by XRD patterns. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinetics of their isothermal decomposition was evaluated. - Abstract: Nickel and copper nitrate complexes with 2,2 Prime -bipyridine (bipy) as a N donor and nitrate and water as oxygen donor ligands of the general formula [M(NO{sub 3})(C{sub 10}H{sub 8}N{sub 2})(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}](NO{sub 3}), where M = Ni and Cu, have been obtained from the corresponding metal nitrate salts. These complexes were characterized by X-ray crystallography, FT-IR, and CHN analysis. Both the complexes have been found to be six coordinated. Their thermal decomposition behaviour was investigated by TG, DTA, and ignition delay measurements. TG-DTA examinations of these complexes revealed multistep thermal decomposition. The corresponding metal oxide residues obtained after thermolysis were identified from their X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD). Kinetics of isothermal decomposition of the complexes was established from both the model-fitting as well as isoconversional methods.

  14. Investigation into kinetics of redox interaction in the system Ce(4). beta. -diketonate-additional ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anufrieva, S.I.; Snezhko, N.I.; Pechurova, N.I.; Martynenko, L.N.; Spitsyn, V.I. (Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    1981-07-01

    The rate of reduction of ..beta..-diketonate complexes of Ce(4) to Ce(3) ..beta..-diketonates in benzene solution in the presence and in the absence of additional ligands is studied using spectrophotometry. The rate of reduction of Ce(4) ..beta..-diketonates increases in the series Ce(TTFA)/sub 4/ligands as to their effect on the rate of Ce (4) reduction can be arranged in the following order: trioctylphosphine oxide>triphenylphosphine oxide>tributyl phosphate.

  15. Inhibition of ligand exchange kinetics via active-site trapping with an antibody fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyen, David; Steyaert, Jan; Barlow, John N

    2014-04-01

    We describe the first example of an inhibitory antibody fragment (nanobody ca1697) that binds simultaneously to an enzyme (the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli) and its bound substrate (folate). Binding of the antibody to the substrate causes a 20-fold reduction in the rate of folate exchange kinetics. This work opens up the prospect of designing new types of antibody-based inhibitors of enzymes and receptors through suitable design of immunogens.

  16. Cerebral kinetics of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor ligand [{sup 123}I]IBZM in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Philipp T. [Department of Neurology, University Hospital Aachen, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Aachen, 52074 Aachen (Germany)], E-mail: pmeyer@ukaachen.de; Salber, Dagmar [C. and O. Vogt Institute of Brain Research, University Hospital Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Schiefer, Johannes [Department of Neurology, University Hospital Aachen, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Cremer, Markus [Institute of Neurosciences and Biophysics, Research Center Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Schaefer, Wolfgang M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Aachen, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Kosinski, Christoph M. [Department of Neurology, University Hospital Aachen, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef [Institute of Neurosciences and Biophysics, Research Center Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    Introduction: In vivo small animal imaging of the dopaminergic system is of great interest for basic and applied neurosciences, especially in transgenic mice. Small animal SPECT is particularly attractive because of its superior spatial resolution and tracer availability. We investigated the kinetics of the commercial dopamine D{sub 2} receptor (DZR) ligand [{sup 123}I]IBZM in mice as a prerequisite for an appropriate design of translational SPECT imaging between mice and humans. Methods: Cerebral kinetics of [{sup 123}I]IBZM under isoflurane anaesthesia were assessed by autoradiography in mice sacrificed at 30, 60, 120 and 200 min after iv injection. To explore the possible effects of isoflurane anaesthesia, an additional mice group was only anaesthetized for 20 min before being sacrificed at 140 min (putative time of single-scan SPECT analysis). Results: Maximum [{sup 123}I]IBZM uptake in the striatum (D{sub 2}R-rich; 10.5{+-}2.7 %ID/g) and cerebellum (D{sub 2}R-devoid; 2.4{+-}0.7 %ID/g) was observed at 30 min after injection. Thereafter, [{sup 123}I]IBZM uptake decreased slowly in striatum and rapidly in the cerebellum (200 min: 5.3{+-}1.9 and 0.4{+-}0.2 %ID/g, respectively). The striatum-to-cerebellum (S/C) [{sup 123}I]IBZM uptake ratio increased from 4.6{+-}1.2 at 30 min to 11.6{+-}2.6 at 120 min. The S/C ratio at 200 min was highly variable (17.8{+-}10.1), possibly indicating pseudo-equilibration in some animals. In mice, which were only anaesthetized between 120 and 140 min, a higher S/C ratio of 17.0{+-}5.1 was observed. Conclusions: The present study suggests that [{sup 123}I]IBZM is a suitable ligand for D{sub 2}R-SPECT in mice. Although a single-scan analysis may be a pragmatic semi-quantitative approach, tracer kinetic analyses on dynamic SPECT data should be pursued. The interfering effects of isoflurane anaesthesia need to be considered.

  17. Uranium (VI) complexing by macrocyclic or chelating ligands in aqueous solutions stability, formation kinetics, polarographic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brighli, M.

    1984-07-01

    Stability of chelates (with EDTA,N,N ethylenediamine diacetic acid EDDA nitrilotriacetic acid NTA and iminodiacetic acid) of UO 2 2+ and UO 4 species of uranium VI is studied in aqueous solution (NaClO 4 3M at 25 deg celcius). Structure in solution are proposed and discussed for mononuclear species. Only complexing kinetics (formation and acid hydrolysis) of UO 4 with EDDA and NTA are studied by spectrophotometry (other reactions are too fast). Besides UO 2 2+ complexes are formed with crown ethers I5C5 and I8C6 in aqueous solution (TEA ClO 4 M/10 at 25 deg celcius. Complexes are probably stabilized by solvation. Results are confirmed by voltametry and reduction mechanisms of UO 2 2+ and its complexes on mercury drop are proposed. 143 refs [fr

  18. Mechanism and degradation kinetics of zinc complex containing isophthalato and 2,2‧-dipyridylamine ligands under different atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdravković, J. D.; Radovanović, L.; Poleti, D.; Rogan, J. R.; Vulić, P. J.; Radovanović, Ž.; Minić, D. M.

    2018-06-01

    The design of mixed-ligand complexes are of increasing interest from fundamental as well as technological and curative aspects. Having that in mind, we studied zinc complex containing 2,2‧-dipyridylamine (dipya) and dianion of isophthalic acid (ipht), [Zn(dipya)(ipht)]n, as promising precursor for synthesis of nanostructured metal oxide. In that sense, the mechanism and degradation kinetics of [Zn(dipya)(ipht)]n was analyzed under non-isothermal conditions in nitrogen and in air atmospheres. Peak deconvolution of the [Zn(dipya)(ipht)]n decomposition profile, in the form of a derivative thermogram (DTG), in nitrogen atmosphere, revealed the presence of three decomposition steps, while in air five single steps were isolated. In both cases ZnO is formed as residue at 530 °C: pure (in air) or in amorphous matrix (nitrogen). In air we obtained well crystalized ZnO nanospheres (∼25 nm), by thermal treatment in temperature range 370-530 °C showing that this complex could be considered as good precursor for production of nanosized ZnO.

  19. Kinetic study on ligand exchange reaction between ethylenedicysteine and 99mTc- glucoheptonate (99mTc-GH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.Y.; Ji, S.R.; Lu, C.X.; Ding, S.Y.; Chen, Z.P.; Lin, X.T.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: 99m Tc-L,L-ethylenedicysteine( 99m Tc-EC)is a new type of renal imaging agent. It can be labeled very easily and efficiently at room temperature through direct labeling at pH 12. The need for direct labeling at pH 12 does not compromise the simplicity and ease of preparation of 99m Tc-EC and its practical usefulness in daily routine. On the basis of the labeling experiments, we developed a ligand exchange labeling method, in which the labeling EC with 99m Tc can be performed at pH 8. In order to provide a theoretic basis, a detailed kinetic study of ligand exchange reaction between 99m Tc- glucoheptonate( 99m Tc-GH) and EC was carried out. Materials and Methods: 99m Tc-EC is prepared as follows: 99m Tc-GH + EC → 99m Tc-EC + GH, labeling can be easily performed by adding 99m TcO 4 - (2∼6ml generator elute) to glucoheptonate solution containing SnCl 2 .2H 2 O solution to form 99m Tc-GH, then freshly prepared 99m Tc-GH is transferred to the aqueous solution of different concentrations of EC at different pH value, after being shaken, 99m Tc-EC was formed. Radiolabeling yield(RLY) and radiochemical purity(RCP) of 99m Tc-GH and 99m Tc-EC were measured by Xinhua No.1 paper with developing system of Me 2 CO/H 2 O/con.NH 3 .H 2 O=9/3/1(V/V). 99m Tc-GH(RCP must be over 98%, 80ul, 3.6∼7.4MBq) was added to 1ml of 0.5mol/L phosphate buffer(pH 12) containing different amount of EC(150, 75, 50 and 15ug), the sample was taken out at different time intervals and RCP was determined. The solution of EC(30ul, 5g/L) was added to 1ml of 0.5mol/L phosphate buffer at different pH value(pH11, 10, 9, 8, 7), after completely vortexed, 99m Tc-GH(RCP must be over 98%, 80ul, 3.6∼7.4MBq) was then added, the sample was taken out and RCP was determined as above. The rate constant(k) of ligand exchange reaction at different concentrations of EC and different reaction pH values were calculated out by integrating. Plot ln[1/(1-RLY)] vs t(time) showed a liner relationship, and the rate

  20. Binding equilibrium and kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands in cell adhesion: Insights from computational model systems and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikl, Thomas R.; Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adhesion of cell membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. In this article, we review recent results from simulations and theory that lead to novel insights on how the binding equilibrium and kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring and molecular properties of the proteins. Simulations and theory both indicate that the binding equilibrium constant K2D and the on- and off-rate constants of anchored receptors and ligands in their 2-dimensional (2D) membrane environment strongly depend on the membrane roughness from thermally excited shape fluctuations on nanoscales. Recent theory corroborated by simulations provides a general relation between K2D and the binding constant K3D of soluble variants of the receptors and ligands that lack the membrane anchors and are free to diffuse in 3 dimensions (3D). PMID:27294442

  1. Protein flexibility and ligand rigidity : a thermodynamic and kinetic study of ITAM-based ligand binding to Syk tandem SH2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mol, Nico J; Catalina, M Isabel; Dekker, Frank J; Fischer, Marcel J E; Heck, Albert J R; Liskamp, Rob M J; Dekker, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The Syk tandem Src homology 2 domain (Syk tSH2) constitutes a flexible protein module involved in the regulation of Syk kinase activity. The Syk tSH2 domain is assumed to function by adapting the distance between its two SH2 domains upon bivalent binding to diphosphotyrosine ligands. A thermodynamic

  2. Dependence of cancer cell adhesion kinetics on integrin ligand surface density measured by a high-throughput label-free resonant waveguide grating biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgovan, Norbert; Peter, Beatrix; Bősze, Szilvia; Ramsden, Jeremy J; Szabó, Bálint; Horvath, Robert

    2014-02-07

    A novel high-throughput label-free resonant waveguide grating (RWG) imager biosensor, the Epic® BenchTop (BT), was utilized to determine the dependence of cell spreading kinetics on the average surface density (v(RGD)) of integrin ligand RGD-motifs. v(RGD) was tuned over four orders of magnitude by co-adsorbing the biologically inactive PLL-g-PEG and the RGD-functionalized PLL-g-PEG-RGD synthetic copolymers from their mixed solutions onto the sensor surface. Using highly adherent human cervical tumor (HeLa) cells as a model system, cell adhesion kinetic data of unprecedented quality were obtained. Spreading kinetics were fitted with the logistic equation to obtain the spreading rate constant (r) and the maximum biosensor response (Δλmax), which is assumed to be directly proportional to the maximum spread contact area (Amax). r was found to be independent of the surface density of integrin ligands. In contrast, Δλmax increased with increasing RGD surface density until saturation at high densities. Interpreting the latter behavior with a simple kinetic mass action model, a 2D dissociation constant of 1753 ± 243 μm(-2) (corresponding to a 3D dissociation constant of ~30 μM) was obtained for the binding between RGD-specific integrins embedded in the cell membrane and PLL-g-PEG-RGD. All of these results were obtained completely noninvasively without using any labels.

  3. Chemical modification of protein A chromatography ligands with polyethylene glycol. I: Effects on IgG adsorption equilibrium, kinetics, and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Justin; Zhang, Shaojie; Crews, Gillian; Carta, Giorgio; Przybycien, Todd

    2018-04-20

    Chemical modification of Protein A (ProA) chromatography ligands with polyethylene glycol (PEGylation) has been proposed as a strategy to increase the process selectivity and resin robustness by providing the ligand with a steric repulsion barrier against non-specific binding. This article comprises a comprehensive study of IgG adsorption and transport in Repligen CaptivA PriMAB resin with PEGylated ProA ligands that are modified using 5.2 and 21.5 kDa PEG chains. We studied the impact of the molecular weight of the PEG as well as the extent of PEGylation for the 5.2 kDa PEG modification. In all cases, PEGylation of ProA ligands decreases the resin average pore size, particle porosity, and static binding capacity for IgG proportional to the volume of conjugated PEG in the resin. Resin batch uptake experiments conducted in bulk via a stirred-tank system and with individual resin particles under confocal laser scanning microscopy suggests that PEGylation introduces heterogeneity into IgG binding kinetics: a fraction of the IgG binding sites are transformed from typical fast association kinetic behavior to slow kinetic behavior. pH gradient elution experiments of an IgG molecule on the modified resins show an increase in IgG elution pH for all modified resins, implying a decrease in IgG-ProA binding affinity on modification. Despite losses in static binding capacity for all resins with PEGylated ligands, the loss of dynamic binding capacity at 10% breakthrough (DBC 10% ) ranged more broadly from almost 0-47% depending on the PEG molecular weight and the extent of PEGylation. Minimal losses in DBC 10% were observed with a low extent of PEGylation with a smaller molecular weight PEG, while higher losses were observed at higher extents of PEGylation and with higher molecular weight PEG due to decreased static binding capacity and increased mass transfer resistance. This work provides insight into the practical implications for resin performance if PEGylation is

  4. Metal, bond energy, and ancillary ligand effects on actinide-carbon σ-bond hydrogenolysis. A kinetic and mechanistic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z.; Marks, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    A kineticmechanistic study of actinide hydrocarbyl ligand hydrogenolysis (An-R + H 2 → An-H + RH) is reported. For the complex Cp' 2 TH(CH 2 -t-Bu)(O-t-Bu)(Cp' = eta 5 -Me 5 C 5 ), the rate law is first-order in organoactinide and first-order in H 2 , with k/sub H2/k/sub D2/ = 2.5 (4) and k/sub THF/k/sub toluene/ = 2.9 (4). For a series of complexes, hydrogenolysis rates span a range of ca. 10 5 with Cp' 2 ThCH 2 C(CH 3 ) 2 CH 2 ≅ Cp' 2 U(CH 2 -t-Bu) (too rapid to measure accurately) > Cp' 2 Th(CH 2 -t-Bu)[OCH(t-Bu) 2 ] = Cp' 2 Th(CH 2 -t-Bu)(O-t-Bu) > Cp' 2 Th(CH 2 -t-Bu)(Cl) > Me 2 Si(Me 4 C 5 ) 2 Th(n-Bu) 2 > Cp' 2 Th(n-Bu) 2 ≅ Cp' 2 ThMe 2 > Cp' 2 Th(Me)(O 3 SCF 3 ) > Cp' 2 Th(n-Bu)[OCG(t-Bu) 2 ] ≅ Cp' 2 Th(Me)[OSiMe 2 (t-Bu)] > Cp' 2 ZrMe 2 = Cp' 2 Th(rho-C 6 H 4 NMe 2 )(O-tu-Bu) > Cp' 2 Th(Ph)(O-t-Bu) > Cp' 2 U(Me)[OCH(t-Bu) 2 ] > Cp' 2 Th(Me)[OCH(t-Bu) 2 ]. In the majority of cases, the rate law is cleanly first-order in organoactinide over 3 or more half-lives. However, for Cp' 2 ThMe 2 → (Cp' 2 ThH 2 ) 2 , an intermediate is observe by NMR that is probably [Cp' 2 Th(Me)(μ-H)] 2 . For Cp' 2 Th(Me)(O 3 SCF 3 ), a follow-up reaction, which consumes Cp' 2 TH(H)(O 3 SCF 3 ) is detected. Variable-temperature kinetic studies yield ΔH** = 3.7 (2) kcalmol and ΔS double dagger = -50.8 (7) eu for Cp' 2 Th(CH 2 -t-Bu)(O-t-Bu) and ΔH double dagger = 9 (2) kcalmol and ΔS double dagger = -45 (5) eu for Cp' 2 U(Me)[OCH(O-t-Bu) 2

  5. Kinetic analysis of the translocator protein positron emission tomography ligand [{sup 18}F]GE-180 in the human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feeney, Claire [Imperial College London, Division of Brain Sciences, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, Computational, Cognitive and Clinical Neuroimaging Laboratory, London (United Kingdom); Scott, Gregory; Raffel, Joel; Roberts, S.; Coello, Christopher; Jolly, Amy; Searle, Graham; Goldstone, A.P.; Nicholas, Richard S.; Gunn, Roger N.; Sharp, David J. [Imperial College London, Division of Brain Sciences, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London (United Kingdom); Brooks, David J. [Imperial College London, Division of Brain Sciences, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London (United Kingdom); Aarhus University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus (Denmark); Trigg, William [GE Healthcare Ltd, Amersham (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    PET can image neuroinflammation by targeting the translocator protein (TSPO), which is upregulated in activated microglia. The high nonspecific binding of the first-generation TSPO radioligand [{sup 11}C]PK-11195 limits accurate quantification. [{sup 18}F]GE-180, a novel TSPO ligand, displays superior binding to [{sup 11}C]PK-11195 in vitro. Our objectives were to: (1) evaluate tracer characteristics of [{sup 18}F]GE-180 in the brains of healthy human subjects; and (2) investigate whether the TSPO Ala147Thr polymorphism influences outcome measures. Ten volunteers (five high-affinity binders, HABs, and five mixed-affinity binders, MABs) underwent a dynamic PET scan with arterial sampling after injection of [{sup 18}F]GE-180. Kinetic modelling of time-activity curves with one-tissue and two-tissue compartment models and Logan graphical analysis was applied to the data. The primary outcome measure was the total volume of distribution (V{sub T}) across various regions of interest (ROIs). Secondary outcome measures were the standardized uptake values (SUV), the distribution volume and SUV ratios estimated using a pseudoreference region. The two-tissue compartment model was the best model. The average regional delivery rate constant (K{sub 1}) was 0.01 mL cm{sup -3} min{sup -1} indicating low extraction across the blood-brain barrier (1 %). The estimated median V{sub T} across all ROIs was also low, ranging from 0.16 mL cm{sup -3} in the striatum to 0.38 mL cm{sup -3} in the thalamus. There were no significant differences in V{sub T} between HABs and MABs across all ROIs. A reversible two-tissue compartment model fitted the data well and determined that the tracer has a low first-pass extraction (approximately 1 %) and low V{sub T} estimates in healthy individuals. There was no observable dependency on the rs6971 polymorphism as compared to other second-generation TSPO PET tracers. Investigation of [{sup 18}F]GE-180 in populations with neuroinflammatory disease is needed

  6. Consequences of Morphology on Molecularly Imprinted Polymer-Ligand Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika M. Rosengren

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP morphology and template-rebinding over a series of warfarin-imprinted methacrylic acid co(ethylene dimethacrylate polymers has been explored. Detailed investigations of the nature of template recognition revealed that an optimal template binding was obtained with polymers possessing a narrow population of pores (~3–4 nm in the mesopore size range. Importantly, the warfarin-polymer rebinding analyses suggest strategies for regulating ligand binding capacity and specificity through variation of the degree of cross-linking, where polymers prepared with a lower degree of cross-linking afford higher capacity though non-specific in character. In contrast, the co-existence of specific and non-specific binding was found in conjunction with higher degrees of cross-linking and resultant meso- and macropore size distributions.

  7. Effect of the competition of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on the kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities of Cr(III)-organic ligand complexes using competitive ligand exchange (EDTA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Graziele da Costa; Goveia, Danielle; Romão, Luciane Pimenta Cruz; de Oliveira, Luciana Camargo

    2015-05-01

    The effect of competition of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on the kinetic stability of Cr(III) complexed with natural organic matter (NOM) was characterized using EDTA exchange with single-stage tangential-flow ultrafiltration. For a water sample from Serra de Itabaiana, 3% of spiked Cr(III) was exchanged, while for a sample from the Itapanhaú River, 7, 10, 10, and 21% was exchanged in experiments using Cr(III) alone and in combination with Cu(II), Ni(II), or Cu(II) + Ni(II), respectively. Times required to reach exchange equilibrium with EDTA were less than 360 min. The influence of competition from Ni(II) and Cu(II) on the availability of complexed Cr(III) was low, demonstrating preference of the ligand sites for Cr(III). This was correlated with sample humification, as confirmed by EPR and (13)C NMR analyses. Exchange efficiency was in the order Cu > Ni > Cr, and the process could be readily described by first order kinetics, with average rate constants of 0.35-0.37 h(-1). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Computation of restoration of ligand response in the random kinetics of a prostate cancer cell signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, Saswati; Nakakuki, Takashi; Hatakeyama, Mariko; Kimura, Shuhei; Raha, Soumyendu

    2011-01-01

    Mutation and/or dysfunction of signaling proteins in the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathway are frequently observed in various kinds of human cancer. Consistent with this fact, in the present study, we experimentally observe that the epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced activation profile of MAP kinase signaling is not straightforward dose-dependent in the PC3 prostate cancer cells. To find out what parameters and reactions in the pathway are involved in this departure from the normal dose-dependency, a model-based pathway analysis is performed. The pathway is mathematically modeled with 28 rate equations yielding those many ordinary differential equations (ODE) with kinetic rate constants that have been reported to take random values in the existing literature. This has led to us treating the ODE model of the pathways kinetics as a random differential equations (RDE) system in which the parameters are random variables. We show that our RDE model captures the uncertainty in the kinetic rate constants as seen in the behavior of the experimental data and more importantly, upon simulation, exhibits the abnormal EGF dose-dependency of the activation profile of MAP kinase signaling in PC3 prostate cancer cells. The most likely set of values of the kinetic rate constants obtained from fitting the RDE model into the experimental data is then used in a direct transcription based dynamic optimization method for computing the changes needed in these kinetic rate constant values for the restoration of the normal EGF dose response. The last computation identifies the parameters, i.e., the kinetic rate constants in the RDE model, that are the most sensitive to the change in the EGF dose response behavior in the PC3 prostate cancer cells. The reactions in which these most sensitive parameters participate emerge as candidate drug targets on the signaling pathway. 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bifunctional cyclam-based ligands with phosphorus acid pendant moieties for radiocopper separation: thermodynamic and kinetic studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paúrová, M.; Havlíčková, J.; Pospíšilová, Aneta; Vetrík, Miroslav; Císařová, I.; Stephan, H.; Pietzsch, H.-J.; Hrubý, Martin; Hermann, P.; Kotek, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 12 (2015), s. 4671-4687 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/12/0950 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : copper * ion-selective resins * kinetics Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 5.771, year: 2015

  10. Dissociation kinetics of open-chain and macrocyclic gadolinium(III)-aminopolycarboxylate complexes related to magnetic resonance imaging: catalytic effect of endogenous ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Pálinkás, Zoltán; Uggeri, Fulvio; Maiocchi, Alessandro; Aime, Silvio; Brücher, Ernő

    2012-12-14

    The kinetics of the metal exchange reactions between open-chain Gd(DTPA)(2-) and Gd(DTPA-BMA), macrocyclic Gd(DOTA)(-) and Gd(HP-DO3A) complexes, and Cu(2+)  ions were investigated in the presence of endogenous citrate, phosphate, carbonate and histidinate ligands in the pH range 6-8 in NaCl (0.15 M) at 25 °C. The rates of the exchange reactions of Gd(DTPA)(2-) and Gd(DTPA-BMA) are independent of the Cu(2+) concentration in the presence of citrate and the reactions occur via the dissociation of Gd(3+)  complexes catalyzed by the citrate ions. The HCO(3)(-)/CO(3)(2-) and H(2)PO(4)(-) ions also catalyze the dissociation of complexes. The rates of the dissociation of Gd(DTPA-BMA), catalyzed by the endogenous ligands, are about two orders of magnitude higher than those of the Gd(DTPA)(2-). In fact near to physiological conditions the bicarbonate and carbonate ions show the largest catalytic effect, that significantly increase the dissociation rate of Gd(DTPA-BMA) and make the higher pH values (when the carbonate ion concentration is higher) a risk-factor for the dissociation of complexes in body fluids. The exchange reactions of Gd(DOTA)(-) and Gd(HP-DO3A) with Cu(2+) occur through the proton assisted dissociation of complexes in the pH range 3.5-5 and the endogenous ligands do not affect the dissociation rates of complexes. More insights into the interaction scheme between Gd(DTPA-BMA) and Gd(DTPA)(2-) and endogenous ligands have been obtained by acquiring the (13)C NMR spectra of the corresponding diamagnetic Y(III)-complexes, indicating the increase of the rates of the intramolecular rearrangements in the presence of carbonate and citrate ions. The herein reported results may have implications in the understanding of the etiology of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, a rare disease that has been associated to the administration of Gd-containing agents to patients with impaired renal function. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Kinetic Isotope Effect Determination Probes the Spin of the Transition State, Its Stereochemistry, and Its Ligand Sphere in Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Oxoiron(IV) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Debasish; Mallick, Dibyendu; Shaik, Sason

    2018-01-16

    This Account outlines interplay of theory and experiment in the quest to identify the reactive-spin-state in chemical reactions that possess a few spin-dependent routes. Metalloenzymes and synthetic models have forged in recent decades an area of increasing appeal, in which oxometal species bring about functionalization of hydrocarbons under mild conditions and via intriguing mechanisms that provide a glimpse of Nature's designs to harness these reactions. Prominent among these are oxoiron(IV) complexes, which are potent H-abstractors. One of the key properties of oxoirons is the presence of close-lying spin-states, which can mediate H-abstractions. As such, these complexes form a fascinating chapter of spin-state chemistry, in which chemical reactivity involves spin-state interchange, so-called two-state reactivity (TSR) and multistate reactivity (MSR). TSR and MSR pose mechanistic challenges. How can one determine the structure of the reactive transition state (TS) and its spin state for these mechanisms? Calculations can do it for us, but the challenge is to find experimental probes. There are, however, no clear kinetic signatures for the reactive-spin-state in such reactions. This is the paucity that our group has been trying to fill for sometime. Hence, it is timely to demonstrate how theory joins experiment in realizing this quest. This Account uses a set of the H-abstraction reactions of 24 synthetic oxoiron(IV) complexes and 11 hydrocarbons, together undergoing H-abstraction reactions with TSR/MSR options, which provide experimentally determined kinetic isotope effect (KIE exp ) data. For this set, we demonstrate that comparing KIE exp results with calculated tunneling-augmented KIE (KIE TC ) data leads to a clear identification of the reactive spin-state during H-abstraction reactions. In addition, generating KIE exp data for a reaction of interest, and comparing these to KIE TC values, provides the mechanistic chemist with a powerful capability to

  12. Ligand binding affinity at the insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A and subsequent IR-A tyrosine phosphorylation kinetics are important determinants of mitogenic biological outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinda eRajapaksha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The insulin receptor (IR is a tyrosine kinase receptor that can mediate both metabolic and mitogenic biological actions. The IR isoform-A (IR-A arises from alternative splicing of exon 11 and has different ligand binding and signalling properties compared to the IR isoform-B. The IR-A not only binds insulin but also insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II with high affinity. IGF-II acting through the IR-A promotes cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration by activating some unique signalling molecules compared to those activated by insulin. This observation led us to investigate whether the different IR-A signalling outcomes in response to IGF-II and insulin could be attributed to phosphorylation of a different subset of IR-A tyrosine residues or to the phosphorylation kinetics. We correlated IR-A phosphorylation to activation of molecules involved in mitogenic and metabolic signalling (MAPK and Akt and receptor internalisation rates (related to mitogenic signalling. We also extended this study to incorporate two ligands that are known to promote predominantly mitogenic ([His4, Tyr15, Thr49, Ile51] IGF-I, qIGF-I or metabolic (S597 peptide biological actions, to see if common mechanisms can be used to define mitogenic or metabolic signalling through the IR-A. The 3-fold lower mitogenic action of IGF-II compared to insulin was associated with a decreased potency in activation of Y960, Y1146, Y1150, Y1151, Y1316 and Y1322, in MAPK phosphorylation and in IR-A internalization. With the poorly mitogenic S597 peptide it was a decreased rate of tyrosine phosphorylation rather than potency that was associated with a low mitogenic potential. We conclude that both decreased affinity of IR-A binding and the kinetics of IR-A phosphorylation can independently lead to a lower mitogenic activity. None of the studied parameters could account for the lower metabolic activity of qIGF-I.

  13. Equilibrium and NMR studies on GdIII, YIII, CuII and ZnII complexes of various DTPA-N,N''-bis(amide) ligands. Kinetic stabilities of the gadolinium(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jászberényi, Zoltán; Bányai, István; Brücher, Ernö; Király, Róbert; Hideg, Kálmán; Kálai, Tamás

    2006-02-28

    Three DTPA-derivative ligands, the non-substituted DTPA-bis(amide) (L(0)), the mono-substituted DTPA-bis(n-butylamide) (L(1)) and the di-substituted DTPA-bis[bis(n-butylamide)] (L(2)) were synthesized. The stability constants of their Gd3+ complexes (GdL) have been determined by pH-potentiometry with the use of EDTA or DTPA as competing ligands. The endogenous Cu2+ and Zn2+ ions form ML, MHL and M(2)L species. For the complexes CuL(0) and CuL(1) the dissociation of the amide hydrogens (CuLH(-1)) has also been detected. The stability constants of complexes formed with Gd3+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ increase with an increase in the number of butyl substituents in the order ML(0) DTPA)2-, while the complex GdL2 possesses a much higher kinetic stability.

  14. Drug-Target Kinetics in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Peter J

    2018-01-17

    The development of therapies for the treatment of neurological cancer faces a number of major challenges including the synthesis of small molecule agents that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Given the likelihood that in many cases drug exposure will be lower in the CNS than in systemic circulation, it follows that strategies should be employed that can sustain target engagement at low drug concentration. Time dependent target occupancy is a function of both the drug and target concentration as well as the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters that describe the binding reaction coordinate, and sustained target occupancy can be achieved through structural modifications that increase target (re)binding and/or that decrease the rate of drug dissociation. The discovery and deployment of compounds with optimized kinetic effects requires information on the structure-kinetic relationships that modulate the kinetics of binding, and the molecular factors that control the translation of drug-target kinetics to time-dependent drug activity in the disease state. This Review first introduces the potential benefits of drug-target kinetics, such as the ability to delineate both thermodynamic and kinetic selectivity, and then describes factors, such as target vulnerability, that impact the utility of kinetic selectivity. The Review concludes with a description of a mechanistic PK/PD model that integrates drug-target kinetics into predictions of drug activity.

  15. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Rationale for SAHA Being a Preferential Human HDAC8 Inhibitor as Compared to the Structurally Similar Ligand, TSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raushan K.; Lall, Naveena; Leedahl, Travis S.; McGillivray, Abigail; Mandal, Tanmay; Haldar, Manas; Mallik, Sanku; Cook, Gregory; Srivastava, D.K.

    2013-01-01

    Of the different hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) has been approved by the FDA for treatment of T-cell lymphoma. Interestingly, a structurally similar inhibitor, Trichostatin A (TSA), which has a higher in vitro inhibitory-potency against HDAC8, reportedly shows a poor efficacy in clinical settings. In order to gain the molecular insight into the above discriminatory feature, we performed transient kinetic and isothermal titration calorimetric studies for the interaction of SAHA and TSA to the recombinant form of human HDAC8. The transient kinetic data revealed that the binding of both the inhibitors to the enzyme showed the biphasic profiles, which represented an initial encounter of enzyme with the inhibitor followed by the isomerization of the transient enzyme-inhibitor complexes. The temperature-dependent transient kinetic studies with the above inhibitors revealed that the bimolecular process is primarily dominated by favorable enthalpic changes, as opposed to the isomerization step; which is solely contributed by entropic changes. The standard binding-enthalpy (ΔH0) of SAHA, deduced from the transient kinetic as well as the isothermal titration calorimetric experiments, was 2–3 kcal/mol higher as compared to TSA. The experimental data presented herein suggests that SAHA serves as a preferential (target-specific/selective) HDAC8 inhibitor as compared to TSA. Arguments are presented that the detailed kinetic and thermodynamic studies may guide in the rational design of HDAC inhibitors as therapeutic agents. PMID:24079912

  16. Periodicity in tumor vasculature targeting kinetics of ligand-functionalized nanoparticles studied by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and intravital microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hak, Sjoerd; Cebulla, Jana; Huuse, Else Marie

    2014-01-01

    In the past two decades advances in the development of targeted nanoparticles have facilitated their application as molecular imaging agents and targeted drug delivery vehicles. Nanoparticle-enhanced molecular imaging of the angiogenic tumor vasculature has been of particular interest. Not only...... because angiogenesis plays an important role in various pathologies, but also since endothelial cell surface receptors are directly accessible for relatively large circulating nanoparticles. Typically, nanoparticle targeting towards these receptors is studied by analyzing the contrast distribution...... kinetics. These kinetics will not only depend on nanoparticle characteristics, but also on receptor binding and recycling. In this study, we monitored the in vivo targeting kinetics of αvβ3-integrin specific nanoparticles with intravital microscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging...

  17. Kinetic Analysis of the Multivalent Ligand Binding Interaction between Protein A/G and IgG: A Standard System Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, Peter P; Shaw, Andrew M

    2017-09-28

    Recombinant protein A/G (PAG) has a sequence coding for eight IgG binding sites and has enhanced interspecies affinity. High-frequency sampling of a PAG titration with IgG produces concentration profiles that are sensitive to the kinetic availability of the binding sites. The full kinetic model developed here for IgG binding sequentially to PAG shows only two distinct kinetic processes, describing an initial rapid association of two antibodies to PAG with a rate constant k-fast = (1.86 ± 0.08) × 10 6 M -1 s -1 and a slower antibody binding process to all remaining sites, k-slow = (1.24 ± 0.05) × 10 4 M -1 s -1 . At equilibrium (after 1 h), the maximum IgG occupancy of PAG is 2.8 ± 0.5, conflicting with the genetic evidence of eight binding sites and suggesting significant steric hindrance of the neighboring IgG binding sites. The phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution defines a standard system setting, and this may be compared with other settings. The mean association rate of PAG-IgG n in the standard setting is 282 ± 20% higher than when PAG is tethered to a surface. A systems biology approach requires that a model parameter set that defines a system in a standard setting should be transferable to another system. The transfer of parameters between settings may be performed using activity coefficients characterizing an effective concentration of species in a system, a i = γ i c i . The activity correction, γ, for the eight-site occupancy is γ = 0.35 ± 0.06, and mapping from the standard setting to the solution setting suggests γ PAG-IgG = 0.4 ± 0.03. The role of activity coefficients and transferability of kinetic parameters between system settings is discussed.

  18. Neutral bidentate N-heterocyclic ligands - phase transfer reagents improving the kinetics of solvent extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) ions with tetradentate 6,6'-bis-(diethyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)-2,2'-bipyridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narbutt, J.; Krejzler, J.

    2008-01-01

    Poor kinetics of solvent extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) ions from 1 M HNO 3 with 6,6'-bis-(diethyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)-2,2'-bipyridine (etBTBP) has been improved by adding an auxiliary bidentate N-heterocyclic ligand to the extraction system. Two such ligands were studied, derivatives of bis-triazine and pyridine-triazine, which alone poorly extract the metal ions, but together with etBTBP they act as phase transfer reagents, improving the extraction kinetics to a different degree. The ability to transfer the metal ions from aqueous to organic phase depends on lipophilicity and acid/base properties of these auxiliary ligands, as well as on the mode of shaking the two liquid phases - gentle or vigorous. (orig.)

  19. The Adsorption of Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, and Cd by Modified Ligand in a Single Component Aqueous Solution: Equilibrium, Kinetic, Thermodynamic, and Desorption Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Igberase

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, an amino functionalized adsorbent was developed by grafting 4-aminobenzoic acid onto the backbone of cross-linked chitosan beads. The 3 sets of beads including chitosan (CX, glutaraldehyde cross-linked chitosan (CCX, and 4-aminobenzoic acid grafted cross-linked chitosan (FGCX were characterized by FTIR, XRD, SEM, and TGA. The water content and amine concentration of FGCX were determined. The effect of adsorption parameters was studied and the optimum was used for further studies. Equilibrium data was obtained from the adsorption experiment carried out at different initial concentration; the data were applied in isotherm, thermodynamics, and kinetic studies. The Langmuir and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich (DKR models were successful in describing the isotherm data for the considered metal ions while the Freundlich and Temkin model fit some of the considered metal ions. Pseudo-second-order and intraparticle model described the kinetic data quite well. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibb’s free energy change (ΔGo, enthalpy change (ΔHo, and entropy change (ΔSo were calculated and the results showed that the adsorption of Pb, Cu, Ni, Zn, and Cd ions onto FGCX is spontaneous and endothermic in nature. Regeneration of the spent adsorbent was efficient for the considered metal ions.

  20. Flash kinetics in liquefied noble gases: Studies of alkane activation and ligand dynamics at rhodium carbonyl centers, and a search for xenon-carbene adducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeston, Jake Simon [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    A general introduction is given to place the subsequent chapters in context for the nonspecialist. Results are presented from a low temperature infrared (IR) flash kinetic study of C-H bond activation via photoinduced reaction of Cp*Rh(CO)2 (1) with linear and cyclic alkanes in liquid krypton and liquid xenon solution. No reaction was observed with methane; for all other hydrocarbons studied, the rate law supports fragmentation of the overall reaction into an alkane binding step followed by an oxidative addition step. For the binding step, larger alkanes within each series (linear and cyclic) interact more strongly than smaller alkanes with the Rh center. The second step, oxidative addition of the C-H bond across Rh, exhibits very little variance in the series of linear alkanes, while in the cyclic series the rate decreases with increasing alkane size. Results are presented from an IR flash kinetic study of the photoinduced chemistry of Tp*Rh(CO)2 (5; Tp* = hydridotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borato) in liquid xenon solution at –50 °C. IR spectra of the solution taken 2 μs after 308 nm photolysis exhibit two transient bands at 1972-1980 cm-1 and 1992-2000 cm-1, respectively. These bands were assigned to (η3-Tp*)Rh(CO)•Xe and (η2-Tp*)Rh(CO)•Xe solvates on the basis of companion studies using Bp*Rh(CO)2 (9; Bp* = dihydridobis(3,5-dimethyl pyrazolyl)borato). Preliminary kinetic data for reaction of 5 with cyclohexane in xenon solution indicate that both transient bands still appear and that their rates of decay correlate with formation of the product Tp*Rh(CO)(C6H11)(H). The preparation and reactivity of the new complex Bp*Rh(CO)(pyridine) (11) are described. The complex reacts with CH3I to yield the novel Rh carbene hydride complex HB(Me2pz)2Rh(H)(I)(C5H5N)(C(O)Me) (12), resulting from formal addition of CH

  1. A PET imaging agent with fast kinetics: synthesis and in vivo evaluation of the serotonin transporter ligand [{sup 11}C]2-[2-dimethylaminomethylphenylthio]-5-fluorophenylamine ([{sup 11}C]AFA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yiyun E-mail: hh285@columbia.edu; Narendran, Raj; Bae, Sung-A; Erritzoe, David; Guo Ningning; Zhu Zhihong; Hwang, D.-R.; Laruelle, Marc

    2004-08-01

    A new serotonin transporter (SERT) ligand, [{sup 11}C]2-[2-(dimethylaminomethylphenylthio)]-5-fluorophenylamine (10, [{sup 11}C]AFA), was synthesized and evaluated as a candidate PET radioligand in pharmacological and pharmacokinetic studies. As a PET radioligand, AFA (8) can be labeled with either C-11 or F-18. In vitro, AFA displayed high affinity for SERT (K{sub i} 1.46{+-}0.15 nM) and lower affinity for norepinephrine transporter (NET, K{sub i} 141.7{+-}47.4 nM) or dopamine transporter (DAT, K{sub i} >10,000 nM). [{sup 11}C]AFA (10) was prepared from its monomethylamino precursor 9 by reaction with high specific activity [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide. Radiochemical yield was 43{+-}20% based on [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide at end of bombardment (EOB, n = 10) and specific activity was 2,129 {+-} 1,369 Ci/mmol at end of synthesis (EOS, n = 10). Biodistribution studies in rats indicated that [{sup 11}C]AFA accumulated in brain regions known to contain high concentrations of SERT. Binding in SERT-rich brain regions was reduced significantly by pretreatment with either the cold compound 8 or with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram, but not by the selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor nisoxetine, thus underlining its in vivo binding selectivity and specificity for SERT. Imaging experiments in baboons demonstrated that the uptake pattern of [{sup 11}C]AFA in the baboon brain is consistent with the known distribution of SERT, with highest activity levels in the midbrain and thalamus, followed by striatum, hippocampus, and cortical regions. Activity levels in the baboon brain peaked at 15-40 min after radioligand injection, indicating a fast uptake kinetics for [{sup 11}C]AFA. Pretreatment of the baboon with citalopram (4 mg/kg) significantly reduced the specific binding of [{sup 11}C]AFA in all SERT-containing brain regions. Kinetic analysis revealed that the regional equilibrium specific to non-specific partition coefficients (V{sub 3}&apos

  2. Influence of ligand polarizability on the reversible binding of O2 by trans-[Rh(X)(XNC)(PPh3)2] (X = Cl, Br, SC6F5, C2Ph; XNC = xylyl isocyanide). Structures and a kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Laurence; Mokoena, Lebohang V; Fernandes, Manuel A

    2008-10-06

    The complexes trans-[Rh(X)(XNC)(PPh 3) 2] (X = Cl, 1; Br, 2; SC 6F 5, 3; C 2Ph, 4; XNC = xylyl isocyanide) combine reversibly with molecular oxygen to give [Rh(X)(O 2)(XNC)(PPh 3) 2] of which [Rh(SC 6F 5)(O 2)(XNC)(PPh 3) 2] ( 7) and [Rh(C 2Ph)(O 2)(XNC)(PPh 3) 2] ( 8) are sufficiently stable to be isolated in crystalline form. Complexes 2, 3, 4, and 7 have been structurally characterized. Kinetic data for the dissociation of O 2 from the dioxygen adducts of 1- 4 were obtained using (31)P NMR to monitor changes in the concentration of [Rh(X)(O 2)(XNC)(PPh 3) 2] (X = Cl, Br, SC 6F 5, C 2Ph) resulting from the bubbling of argon through the respective warmed solutions (solvent chlorobenzene). From data recorded at temperatures in the range 30-70 degrees C, activation parameters were obtained as follows: Delta H (++) (kJ mol (-1)): 31.7 +/- 1.6 (X = Cl), 52.1 +/- 4.3 (X = Br), 66.0 +/- 5.8 (X = SC 6F 5), 101.3 +/- 1.8 (X = C 2Ph); Delta S (++) (J K (-1) mol (-1)): -170.3 +/- 5.0 (X = Cl), -120 +/- 13.6 (X = Br), -89 +/- 18.2 (X = SC 6F 5), -6.4 +/- 5.4 (X = C 2Ph). The values of Delta H (++) and Delta S (++) are closely correlated (R (2) = 0.9997), consistent with a common dissociation pathway along which the rate-determining step occurs at a different position for each X. Relative magnitudes of Delta H (++) are interpreted in terms of differing polarizabilities of ligands X.

  3. Mesoscopic dynamics of diffusion-influenced enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Kapral, Raymond

    2011-01-28

    A particle-based mesoscopic model for enzyme kinetics is constructed and used to investigate the influence of diffusion on the reactive dynamics. Enzymes and enzyme-substrate complexes are modeled as finite-size soft spherical particles, while substrate, product, and solvent molecules are point particles. The system is evolved using a hybrid molecular dynamics-multiparticle collision dynamics scheme. Both the nonreactive and reactive dynamics are constructed to satisfy mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws, and reversible reaction steps satisfy detailed balance. Hydrodynamic interactions among the enzymes and complexes are automatically accounted for in the dynamics. Diffusion manifests itself in various ways, notably in power-law behavior in the evolution of the species concentrations. In accord with earlier investigations, regimes where the product production rate exhibits either monotonic or nonmonotonic behavior as a function of time are found. In addition, the species concentrations display both t(-1/2) and t(-3/2) power-law behavior, depending on the dynamical regime under investigation. For high enzyme volume fractions, cooperative effects influence the enzyme kinetics. The time dependent rate coefficient determined from the mass action rate law is computed and shown to depend on the enzyme concentration. Lifetime distributions of substrate molecules newly released in complex dissociation events are determined and shown to have either a power-law form for rebinding to the same enzyme from which they were released or an exponential form for rebinding to different enzymes. The model can be used and extended to explore a variety of issues related concentration effects and diffusion on enzyme kinetics.

  4. Mesoscopic dynamics of diffusion-influenced enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Kapral, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    A particle-based mesoscopic model for enzyme kinetics is constructed and used to investigate the influence of diffusion on the reactive dynamics. Enzymes and enzyme-substrate complexes are modeled as finite-size soft spherical particles, while substrate, product, and solvent molecules are point particles. The system is evolved using a hybrid molecular dynamics-multiparticle collision dynamics scheme. Both the nonreactive and reactive dynamics are constructed to satisfy mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws, and reversible reaction steps satisfy detailed balance. Hydrodynamic interactions among the enzymes and complexes are automatically accounted for in the dynamics. Diffusion manifests itself in various ways, notably in power-law behavior in the evolution of the species concentrations. In accord with earlier investigations, regimes where the product production rate exhibits either monotonic or nonmonotonic behavior as a function of time are found. In addition, the species concentrations display both t^{-1/2} and t^{-3/2} power-law behavior, depending on the dynamical regime under investigation. For high enzyme volume fractions, cooperative effects influence the enzyme kinetics. The time dependent rate coefficient determined from the mass action rate law is computed and shown to depend on the enzyme concentration. Lifetime distributions of substrate molecules newly released in complex dissociation events are determined and shown to have either a power-law form for rebinding to the same enzyme from which they were released or an exponential form for rebinding to different enzymes. The model can be used and extended to explore a variety of issues related concentration effects and diffusion on enzyme kinetics.

  5. Reduction of dinitrogen ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Processes of dinitrogen ligand reduction in complexes of transition metals are considered. The basic character of the dinitrogen ligand is underlined. Data on X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy and intensities of bands ν (N 2 ) in IR-spectra of nitrogen complexes are given. The mechanism of protonation of an edge dinitrogen ligand is discussed. Model systems and mechanism of nitrogenogenase are compared

  6. Radiation induced ligand loss from cobalt complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funston, A. M.; McFadyen, W.D.; Tregloan, P.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Due to the rapid nature of ligand dissociation from cobalt(II) complexes the study of the rate of ligand dissociation necessitates the use of a technique such as pulse radiolysis. This allows the rapid reduction of the corresponding cobalt(III) complex by a reducing radical, such as the aquated electron, to form the cobalt(II) complex. However, to date, no systematic study of either the mechanism of reduction or the influence of the electronic structure on the rate of ligand dissociation has been carried out. In order to understand these processes more fully the mechanism of reduction of a range of related cobalt(III) complexes by the aquated electron and the subsequent rate of ligand dissociation from the resulting cobalt(II) complexes is being investigated. It has been found that a number of processes are observed following the initial rapid reaction of the cobalt(III) complex with the aquated electron. Ultimately ligand loss is observed. Depending upon the complex, the initial processes observed may include the formation of coordinated radicals and electron transfer within the complex. For complexes containing aromatic ligands such as 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine the formation of a coordinated radical is observed as the initial reduction step. The kinetics of ligand dissociation of these complexes has been determined. The loss of monodentate ligands is fast and has been indistinguishable from the reduction processes when aromatic ligands are also present in the complex. However, for diamine chelates and diimine chelates spectra of the transient species can be resolved

  7. Ligands in PSI structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Abhinav; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Morse, Andrew; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Deacon, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    A survey of the types and frequency of ligands that are bound to PSI structures is analyzed as well as their utility in functional annotation of previously uncharacterized proteins. Approximately 65% of PSI structures report some type of ligand(s) that is bound in the crystal structure. Here, a description is given of how such ligands are handled and analyzed at the JCSG and a survey of the types, variety and frequency of ligands that are observed in the PSI structures is also compiled and analyzed, including illustrations of how these bound ligands have provided functional clues for annotation of proteins with little or no previous experimental characterization. Furthermore, a web server was developed as a tool to mine and analyze the PSI structures for bound ligands and other identifying features

  8. Ammonia formation by metal-ligand cooperative hydrogenolysis of a nitrido ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askevold, Bjorn; Nieto, Jorge Torres; Tussupbayev, Samat; Diefenbach, Martin; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Holthausen, Max C.; Schneider, Sven

    2011-07-01

    Bioinspired hydrogenation of N2 to ammonia at ambient conditions by stepwise nitrogen protonation/reduction with metal complexes in solution has experienced remarkable progress. In contrast, the highly desirable direct hydrogenation with H2 remains difficult. In analogy to the heterogeneously catalysed Haber-Bosch process, such a reaction is conceivable via metal-centred N2 splitting and unprecedented hydrogenolysis of the nitrido ligands to ammonia. We report the synthesis of a ruthenium(IV) nitrido complex. The high nucleophilicity of the nitrido ligand is demonstrated by unusual N-C coupling with π-acidic CO. Furthermore, the terminal nitrido ligand undergoes facile hydrogenolysis with H2 at ambient conditions to produce ammonia in high yield. Kinetic and quantum chemical examinations of this reaction suggest cooperative behaviour of a phosphorus-nitrogen-phosphorus pincer ligand in rate-determining heterolytic hydrogen splitting.

  9. Ligand sphere conversions in terminal carbide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul; Reinholdt, Anders; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Metathesis is introduced as a preparative route to terminal carbide complexes. The chloride ligands of the terminal carbide complex [RuC(Cl)2(PCy3)2] (RuC) can be exchanged, paving the way for a systematic variation of the ligand sphere. A series of substituted complexes, including the first...... example of a cationic terminal carbide complex, [RuC(Cl)(CH3CN)(PCy3)2]+, is described and characterized by NMR, MS, X-ray crystallography, and computational studies. The experimentally observed irregular variation of the carbide 13C chemical shift is shown to be accurately reproduced by DFT, which also...... demonstrates that details of the coordination geometry affect the carbide chemical shift equally as much as variations in the nature of the auxiliary ligands. Furthermore, the kinetics of formation of the sqaure pyramidal dicyano complex, trans-[RuC(CN)2(PCy3)2], from RuC has been examined and the reaction...

  10. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the equilibration reaction between the sulfur and carbon bonded forms of a cobalt(III) complex with the ligands 2-aminoethyl-3-aminopropylsulfide and 1,1,1-tris(aminomethyl)ethane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, J.; Kjellerup, S.; Kofod, Pauli

    1996-01-01

    -thia-hexan-4-ide anion). Kinetic and thermodn. data were obtained using UV-visible spectroscopy, IE-HPLC and 13C NMR ([OH-] = 4 * 10-5-1.0 M, T = 25.0-100 Deg, I = 1.0 M). The kinetic data were interpreted in terms of different reactivity of ion pairs with perchlorate and hydroxide, resp. Rate consts....... and activation parameters for the formation of the Co-alkyl complex from ion pairs with perchlorate and hydroxide, resp. (composite terms), and for the reformation of the Co-S complex from ion pairs with perchlorate are given, together with thermodn. data. The data were interpreted in terms of the intermediate...

  11. Receptor binding kinetics equations: Derivation using the Laplace transform method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, Sam R J

    Measuring unlabeled ligand receptor binding kinetics is valuable in optimizing and understanding drug action. Unfortunately, deriving equations for estimating kinetic parameters is challenging because it involves calculus; integration can be a frustrating barrier to the pharmacologist seeking to measure simple rate parameters. Here, a well-known tool for simplifying the derivation, the Laplace transform, is applied to models of receptor-ligand interaction. The method transforms differential equations to a form in which simple algebra can be applied to solve for the variable of interest, for example the concentration of ligand-bound receptor. The goal is to provide instruction using familiar examples, to enable investigators familiar with handling equilibrium binding equations to derive kinetic equations for receptor-ligand interaction. First, the Laplace transform is used to derive the equations for association and dissociation of labeled ligand binding. Next, its use for unlabeled ligand kinetic equations is exemplified by a full derivation of the kinetics of competitive binding equation. Finally, new unlabeled ligand equations are derived using the Laplace transform. These equations incorporate a pre-incubation step with unlabeled or labeled ligand. Four equations for measuring unlabeled ligand kinetics were compared and the two new equations verified by comparison with numerical solution. Importantly, the equations have not been verified with experimental data because no such experiments are evident in the literature. Equations were formatted for use in the curve-fitting program GraphPad Prism 6.0 and fitted to simulated data. This description of the Laplace transform method will enable pharmacologists to derive kinetic equations for their model or experimental paradigm under study. Application of the transform will expand the set of equations available for the pharmacologist to measure unlabeled ligand binding kinetics, and for other time

  12. Schiff base ligand

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Low-temperature stoichiometric Schiff base reaction in air in 3 : 1 mole ratio between benz- aldehyde and triethylenetetramine (trien) in methanol yields a novel tetraaza µ-bis(bidentate) acyclic ligand L. It was .... electrochemical work was performed as reported in ..... change in ligand shape through change in oxidation.

  13. Kinetic Typography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Djonov, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images.......After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images....

  14. Ligand modeling and design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, B.P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used in the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams. Organic ligands with metal ion specificity are critical components in the development of solvent extraction and ion exchange processes that are highly selective for targeted radionuclides. The traditional approach to the development of such ligands involves lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing, which in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, results in wasted research effort. The author`s approach breaks down and simplifies this costly process with the aid of computer-based molecular modeling techniques. Commercial software for organic molecular modeling is being configured to examine the interactions between organic ligands and metal ions, yielding an inexpensive, commercially or readily available computational tool that can be used to predict the structures and energies of ligand-metal complexes. Users will be able to correlate the large body of existing experimental data on structure, solution binding affinity, and metal ion selectivity to develop structural design criteria. These criteria will provide a basis for selecting ligands that can be implemented in separations technologies through collaboration with other DOE national laboratories and private industry. The initial focus will be to select ether-based ligands that can be applied to the recovery and concentration of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions including cesium, strontium, and radium.

  15. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the equilibration reaction between the sulfur and carbon bonded forms of a cobalt(III) complex with the ligands 1,4,7-triazycyclononane and 1,4-diaza-7-thiacyclodecane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Y.S.; Becker, J.; Kofod, Pauli

    1996-01-01

    The new cyclic thioether 1,4-diaza-7-thiacyclodecane, dathicd, has been synthesized and used for the prepn. of the sulfur- and carbon-bonded cobalt(III) complexes: [Co(tacn)(S-dathicd)]Cl3.5H2O and [Co(tacn)(C-dathicd)](ClO4)2 (tacn, 1,4,7-triazacyclononane; C-dathicd, 1,4-diamino-7-thiacyclodecan......-sulfur complex to form the alkyl complex gave 100% loss of deuterium. It is concluded that the labile methylene proton is bound to the carbon atom which in the alkyl complex is bound to cobalt(III). From the kinetic data it is estd. that the carbanion reacts with water 270 times faster than it is captured...

  16. Quantitative analysis of protein-ligand interactions by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Ayako; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Yanaka, Saeko; Sugase, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Protein-ligand interactions have been commonly studied through static structures of the protein-ligand complex. Recently, however, there has been increasing interest in investigating the dynamics of protein-ligand interactions both for fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms and for drug development. NMR is a versatile and powerful tool, especially because it provides site-specific quantitative information. NMR has widely been used to determine the dissociation constant (KD), in particular, for relatively weak interactions. The simplest NMR method is a chemical-shift titration experiment, in which the chemical-shift changes of a protein in response to ligand titration are measured. There are other quantitative NMR methods, but they mostly apply only to interactions in the fast-exchange regime. These methods derive the dissociation constant from population-averaged NMR quantities of the free and bound states of a protein or ligand. In contrast, the recent advent of new relaxation-based experiments, including R2 relaxation dispersion and ZZ-exchange, has enabled us to obtain kinetic information on protein-ligand interactions in the intermediate- and slow-exchange regimes. Based on R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange, methods that can determine the association rate, kon, dissociation rate, koff, and KD have been developed. In these approaches, R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange curves are measured for multiple samples with different protein and/or ligand concentration ratios, and the relaxation data are fitted to theoretical kinetic models. It is critical to choose an appropriate kinetic model, such as the two- or three-state exchange model, to derive the correct kinetic information. The R2 dispersion and ZZ-exchange methods are suitable for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions with a micromolar or sub-micromolar dissociation constant but not for very weak interactions, which are typical in very fast exchange. This contrasts with the NMR methods that are used

  17. THERMODYNAMICS OF PROTEIN-LIGAND INTERACTIONS AND THEIR ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rummi Devi Saini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Physiological processes are controlled mainly by intermolecular recognition mechanisms which involve protein–protein and protein–ligand interactions with a high specificity and affinity to form a specific complex. Proteins being an important class of macromolecules in biological systems, it is important to understand their actions through binding to other molecules of proteins or ligands. In fact, the binding of low molecular weight ligands to proteins plays a significant role in regulating biological processes such as cellular metabolism and signal transmission. Therefore knowledge of the protein–ligand interactions and the knowledge of the mechanisms involved in the protein-ligand recognition and binding are key in understanding biology at molecular level which will facilitate the discovery, design, and development of drugs. In this review, the mechanisms involved in protein–ligand binding, the binding kinetics, thermodynamic concepts and binding driving forces are discussed. Thermodynamic mechanisms involved in a few important protein-ligand binding are described. Various spectroscopic, non-spectroscopic and computational method for analysis of protein–ligand binding are also discussed.

  18. Development and Application of Ligand-Exchange Reaction Method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: This paper presents an improved kinetic-spectrophotometric procedure for determining clonazepam (CZP) in pharmaceutical formulations and human serum. Methods: The method is based on ligand-exchange reaction. The reaction was followed spectrophotometrically by measuring the rate of change of ...

  19. Essential role of conformational selection in ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Austin D; Pozzi, Nicola; Chen, Zhiwei; Di Cera, Enrico

    2014-02-01

    Two competing and mutually exclusive mechanisms of ligand recognition - conformational selection and induced fit - have dominated our interpretation of ligand binding in biological macromolecules for almost six decades. Conformational selection posits the pre-existence of multiple conformations of the macromolecule from which the ligand selects the optimal one. Induced fit, on the other hand, postulates the existence of conformational rearrangements of the original conformation into an optimal one that are induced by binding of the ligand. In the former case, conformational transitions precede the binding event; in the latter, conformational changes follow the binding step. Kineticists have used a facile criterion to distinguish between the two mechanisms based on the dependence of the rate of relaxation to equilibrium, kobs, on the ligand concentration, [L]. A value of kobs decreasing hyperbolically with [L] has been seen as diagnostic of conformational selection, while a value of kobs increasing hyperbolically with [L] has been considered diagnostic of induced fit. However, this simple conclusion is only valid under the rather unrealistic assumption of conformational transitions being much slower than binding and dissociation events. In general, induced fit only produces values of kobs that increase with [L] but conformational selection is more versatile and is associated with values of kobs that increase with, decrease with or are independent of [L]. The richer repertoire of kinetic properties of conformational selection applies to kinetic mechanisms with single or multiple saturable relaxations and explains the behavior of nearly all experimental systems reported in the literature thus far. Conformational selection is always sufficient and often necessary to account for the relaxation kinetics of ligand binding to a biological macromolecule and is therefore an essential component of any binding mechanism. On the other hand, induced fit is never necessary and

  20. Physical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifschitz, E.M.; Pitajewski, L.P.

    1983-01-01

    The textbook covers the subject under the following headings: kinetic gas theory, diffusion approximation, collisionless plasma, collisions within the plasma, plasma in the magnetic field, theory of instabilities, dielectrics, quantum fluids, metals, diagram technique for nonequilibrium systems, superconductors, and kinetics of phase transformations

  1. Heparin kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swart, C.A.M. de.

    1983-01-01

    The author has studied the kinetics of heparin and heparin fractions after intravenous administration in humans and in this thesis the results of this study are reported. Basic knowledge about the physico-chemical properties of heparin and its interactions with proteins resulting in anticoagulant and lipolytic effects are discussed in a review (chapter II), which also comprises some clinical aspects of heparin therapy. In chapter III the kinetics of the anticoagulant effect are described after intravenous administration of five commercial heparin preparations. A mathematical model is presented that fits best to these kinetics. The kinetics of the anticoagulant and lipolytic effects after intravenous injection of various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions and their relationship with the disappearance of the radiolabel are described in chapter IV. Chapter V gives a description of the kinetics of two radiolabels after injection of in vitro formed complexes consisting of purified, 125 I-radiolabelled antithrombin III and various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions. (Auth.)

  2. Glutamate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandt, Mette; Johansen, Tommy N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Homologation and substitution on the carbon backbone of (S)-glutamic acid [(S)-Glu, 1], as well as absolute stereochemistry, are structural parameters of key importance for the pharmacological profile of (S)-Glu receptor ligands. We describe a series of methyl-substituted 2-aminoadipic acid (AA...

  3. Labeled receptor ligands for spect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, H.F.

    1989-01-01

    Receptor specific imaging agents for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can potentially be useful in the understanding of basic biochemistry and pharmacology of receptors. SPECT images may also provide tools for evaluation of density and binding kinetics of a specific receptor, information important for diagnosis and patient management. Basic requirements for receptor imaging agents are: (a) they are labeled with short-lived isotopes, (b) they show high selectivity and specific uptake, (c) they exhibit high target/background ratio, and (d) they can be modeled to obtain quantitative information. Several good examples of CNS receptor specific ligands labeled with I-123 have been developed, including iodoQNB, iodoestrogen iodobenzadiazepine, iodobenazepine, iodobenzamides for muscarinic, estrogen benzadiazepine, D-1 and D-2 dopamine receptors. With the advent of newer and faster SPECT imaging devices, it may be feasible to quantitate the receptor density by in vivo imaging techniques. These new brain imaging agents can provide unique diagnostic information, which may not be available through other imaging modalities, such as CT and MRI

  4. The opposing effects of isotropic and anisotropic attraction on association kinetics of proteins and colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Arthur C.; Kools, Ramses; Swenson, David W. H.; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2017-10-01

    The association and dissociation of particles via specific anisotropic interactions is a fundamental process, both in biology (proteins) and in soft matter (colloidal patchy particles). The presence of alternative binding sites can lead to multiple productive states and also to non-productive "decoy" or intermediate states. Besides anisotropic interactions, particles can experience non-specific isotropic interactions. We employ single replica transition interface sampling to investigate how adding a non-productive binding site or a nonspecific isotropic interaction alters the dimerization kinetics of a generic patchy particle model. The addition of a decoy binding site reduces the association rate constant, independent of the site's position, while adding an isotropic interaction increases it due to an increased rebinding probability. Surprisingly, the association kinetics becomes non-monotonic for a tetramer complex formed by multivalent patchy particles. While seemingly identical to two-particle binding with a decoy state, the cooperativity of binding multiple particles leads to a kinetic optimum. Our results are relevant for the understanding and modeling of biochemical networks and self-assembly processes.

  5. Kinetic Titration Series with Biolayer Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Daniel; Willbold, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Biolayer interferometry is a method to analyze protein interactions in real-time. In this study, we illustrate the usefulness to quantitatively analyze high affinity protein ligand interactions employing a kinetic titration series for characterizing the interactions between two pairs of interaction patterns, in particular immunoglobulin G and protein G B1 as well as scFv IC16 and amyloid beta (1–42). Kinetic titration series are commonly used in surface plasmon resonance and involve sequential injections of analyte over a desired concentration range on a single ligand coated sensor chip without waiting for complete dissociation between the injections. We show that applying this method to biolayer interferometry is straightforward and i) circumvents problems in data evaluation caused by unavoidable sensor differences, ii) saves resources and iii) increases throughput if screening a multitude of different analyte/ligand combinations. PMID:25229647

  6. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  7. AMPA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player in the f......Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player...... in the formation of memory. Hence, ligands affecting AMPARs are highly important for the study of the structure and function of this receptor, and in this regard polyamine-based ligands, particularly polyamine toxins, are unique as they selectively block Ca2+ -permeable AMPARs. Indeed, endogenous intracellular...

  8. Radiobiology with DNA ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinreich, R.; Argentini, M.; Guenther, I.; Koziorowski, J.; Larsson, B.; Nievergelt-Egido, M.C.; Salt, C.; Wyer, L.; Dos Santos, D.F.; Hansen, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with the following topics: labelling of DNA ligands and other tumour-affinic compounds with 4.15-d 124 I, radiotoxicity of Hoechst 33258 and 33342 and of iodinated Hoechst 33258 in cell cultures, preparation of 76 Br-, 123 I-, and 221 At-labelled 5-halo-2'-deoxyuridine, chemical syntheses of boron derivatives of Hoechst 33258.III., Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

  9. Kinetical Analysis of the Mechanism of the Ligand Substitution Reaction between the Ethylenediamine-N,N{sup `}-bis[2-(2-hydroxyphenyl) acetato] cadmate (2) Ion and the Ethylenediaminetetraacetatoferrate (3) Ion; Echienjiami-N,N`-bisu[2-(2-hidorokishifueniru)asetato] kadomiume (2) san eion to echirenjiamintetoraasetato tetsu (3) san ion tono aida no haiishi okikae hanno no hanno sokudoron ni yoru kiko kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsuyama, Tetsuo.; Orihara, Katsuo.; Takahata, Yasuyuki.; Yokota, Toshiyuki. [Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan). Department of Materials Science and Enginering

    1998-12-10

    The kinetics of the ligand substitution reaction between the ethylenediamine-N,N`- bis[2-(2-hydroxyphenyl) acetato] cadmate (2) ion and the ethylenediaminetetraacetatoferrate (3) ion were carried out at 25 degreeC and ionic strength=0.1 mol dm{sup -3}. The substitution reaction was shown to proceed by a chain reaction mechanism where the chain propageting steps are the reactions of metal complexes with metal ions. The properties of the metal chain reaction mechanism are discussed. The metal-substitution of [Fe (edta)]{sup -} with cadmium ion was studied by the use of the chain reactins. The observed rae constants of the reaction were separated into two rate constants. The mechamism of the reactions is discussed. (author)

  10. Kinetical Analysis of the Mechanism of the Ligand Substitution Reaction between the Ethylenediamine-N,N[sup ']-bis[2-(2-hydroxyphenyl) acetato] cadmate (2) Ion and the Ethylenediaminetetraacetatoferrate (3) Ion. Echienjiami-N,N'-bisu[2-(2-hidorokishifueniru)asetato] kadomiume (2) san eion to echirenjiamintetoraasetato tetsu (3) san ion tono aida no haiishi okikae hanno no hanno sokudoron ni yoru kiko kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsuyama, Tetsuo.; Orihara, Katsuo.; Takahata, Yasuyuki.; Yokota, Toshiyuki. (Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan). Department of Materials Science and Enginering)

    1998-12-10

    The kinetics of the ligand substitution reaction between the ethylenediamine-N,N'- bis[2-(2-hydroxyphenyl) acetato] cadmate (2) ion and the ethylenediaminetetraacetatoferrate (3) ion were carried out at 25 degreeC and ionic strength=0.1 mol dm[sup -3]. The substitution reaction was shown to proceed by a chain reaction mechanism where the chain propageting steps are the reactions of metal complexes with metal ions. The properties of the metal chain reaction mechanism are discussed. The metal-substitution of [Fe (edta)][sup -] with cadmium ion was studied by the use of the chain reactins. The observed rae constants of the reaction were separated into two rate constants. The mechamism of the reactions is discussed. (author)

  11. Kinetics and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ahmadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous degradation of Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84 by potassium peroxydisulfate (K2S2O8 has been studied in laboratory scale experiments. The effect of the initial concentrations of potassium peroxydisulfate and RY84, pH and temperature on RY84 degradation were also examined. Experimental data were analyzed using first and second-order kinetics. The degradation kinetics of RY84 of the potassium peroxydisulfate process followed the second-order reaction kinetics. These rate constants have an extreme values similar to of 9.493 mM−1min−1 at a peroxydisulfate dose of 4 mmol/L. Thermodynamic parameters such as activation (Ea and Gibbs free energy (ΔG° were also evaluated. The negative value of ΔGo and Ea shows the spontaneous reaction natural conditions and exothermic nature.

  12. Granulocyte kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, A.M.; Lavender, J.P.; Saverymuttu, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    By using density gradient materials enriched with autologous plasma, the authors have been able to isolate granulocutes from other cellular elements and label them with In-111 without separation from a plasma environment. The kinetic behavior of these cells suggests that phenomena attributed to granulocyte activation are greatly reduced by this labeling. Here, they review their study of granulocyte kinetics in health and disease in hope of quantifying sites of margination and identifying principal sites of destruction. The three principle headings of the paper are distribution, life-span, and destruction

  13. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Ligand Exchange Reaction Between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    11 Y. Fan, W. You, W. Huang, J.L. Liu and Y.N. Wang, Salen-type nickel(II) ... 16 R. Vafazadeh, B. Khaledi and A.C. Willis, Synthesis and crystal struc- ture of a new ... 24 M.K. Taylor, J. Reglinski and D. Wallace, Coordination geometry.

  14. INFLUENCE OF NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC ORGANIC LIGANDS ON THE STABILITY AND MOBILITY OF REDUCED TC(IV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathalie A. Wall; Baohua Gu

    2012-12-20

    The primary objectives were (1) to quantify the interactions of organic ligands with Tc(IV) through the generation of thermodynamic (complexation) and kinetic parameters needed to assess and predict the mobility of reduced Tc(IV) at DOE contaminated sites; and (2) to determine the impact of organic ligands on the mobility and fate of reduced Tc(IV) under field geochemical conditions.

  15. Bexarotene ligand pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, R E

    2000-12-01

    Bexarotene (LGD-1069), from Ligand, was the first retinoid X receptor (RXR)-selective, antitumor retinoid to enter clinical trials. The company launched the drug for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), as Targretin capsules, in the US in January 2000 [359023]. The company filed an NDA for Targretin capsules in June 1999, and for topical gel in December 1999 [329011], [349982] specifically for once-daily oral administration for the treatment of patients with early-stage CTCL who have not tolerated other therapies, patients with refractory or persistent early stage CTCL and patients with refractory advanced stage CTCL. The FDA approved Targretin capsules at the end of December 1999 for once-daily oral treatment of all stages of CTCL in patients refractory to at least one prior systemic therapy, at an initial dose of 300 mg/m2/day. After an NDA was submitted in December 1999 for Targretin gel, the drug received Priority Review status for use as a treatment of cutaneous lesions in patients with stage IA, IB or IIA CTCL [354836]. The FDA issued an approvable letter in June 2000, and granted marketing clearance for CTCL in the same month [370687], [372768], [372769], [373279]. Ligand had received Orphan Drug designation for this indication [329011]. At the request of the FDA, Ligand agreed to carry out certain post-approval phase IV and pharmacokinetic studies [351604]. The company filed an MAA with the EMEA for Targretin Capsules to treat lymphoma in November 1999 [348944]. The NDA for Targretin gel is based on a multicenter phase III trial that was conducted in the US, Canada, Europe and Australia involving 50 patients and a multicenter phase I/II clinical program involving 67 patients. Targretin gel was evaluated for the treatment of patients with early stage CTCL (IA-IIA) who were refractory to, intolerant to, or reached a response plateau for at least 6 months on at least two prior therapies. Efficacy results exceeded the protocol-defined response

  16. Multiscale simulations of ligand adsorption and exchange on gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui-Min; Liu, Hong; Qian, Hu-Jun; Jiao, Gui-Sheng; Lu, Zhong-Yuan

    2018-01-17

    We have developed a multiscale model that combines first-principles methods with atomistic and mesoscopic simulations to explore the molecular structures and packing density of the ligands present on the gold nanoparticle (AuNP) surface, as well as the adsorption/exchange reaction kinetics of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)/PEG-SH ligands on different facets of gold, namely, Au(111), Au(100), and Au(110). Our model predicts that on clean gold surfaces, CTAB adsorption is diffusion limited. Specifically, CTAB has the preferentially higher adsorption rate and coverage density on Au(100) and Au(110) surfaces, forming a more compact layer with respect to that on the Au(111) surface, which could result in greater growth of gold nanoparticles along the (111) direction. As opposed to CTAB adsorption, the exchange reaction between PEG-SH with CTAB shows no selectivity to different crystal faces, and the reaction process follows Langmuir diffusion kinetics. Kinetic analysis reveals that, in water, the exchange reaction is zeroth order with respect to the concentration of an incoming PEG-SH, indicative of a dissociative exchange mechanism. The observed rate constant decreases exponentially with the PEG-SH chain length, consistent with a diffusion process for the free PEG-SH in water. In particular, we show that the exchange efficiency increases as the chain rigidness and size of the incoming ligand and/or steric bulk of the initial protecting ligand shell are decreased. Our objectives are to provide a model to assess the kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption/exchange reaction process, and we expect that these findings will have important implications for routine surface characterization of AuNPs.

  17. Ligand-mediated adhesive mechanics of two static, deformed spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Sarthok; Nguyen, Giang; Kotousov, Andrei; Roberts, Anthony J

    2016-10-01

    A self-consistent model is developed to investigate attachment/detachment kinetics of two static, deformable microspheres with irregular surface and coated with flexible binding ligands. The model highlights how the microscale binding kinetics of these ligands as well as the attractive/repulsive potential of the charged surface affects the macroscale static deformed configuration of the spheres. It is shown that in the limit of smooth, neutrally charged surface (i.e., the dimensionless inverse Debye length, [Formula: see text]), interacting via elastic binders (i.e., the dimensionless stiffness coefficient, [Formula: see text]) the adhesion mechanics approaches the regime of application of the JKR theory, and in this particular limit, the contact radius, R c , scales with the particle radius, R, according to the scaling law, [Formula: see text]. We show that static, deformed, highly charged, ligand-coated surface of micro-spheres exhibit strong adhesion. Normal stress distribution within the contact area adjusts with the binder stiffness coefficient, from a maximum at the center to a maximum at the periphery of the region. Although reported in some in vitro experiments involving particle adhesion, until now a physical interpretation for this variation of the stress distribution for deformable, charged, ligand-coated microspheres is missing. Surface roughness results in a diminished adhesion with a distinct reduction in the pull-off force, larger separation gap, weaker normal stress and limited area of adhesion. These results are in agreement with the published experimental findings.

  18. Physisorption kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    1986-01-01

    This monograph deals with the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of molecules physisorbed on solid surfaces. Although frequent and detailed reference is made to experiment, it is mainly concerned with the theory of the subject. In this, we have attempted to present a unified picture based on the master equation approach. Physisorption kinetics is by no means a closed and mature subject; rather, in writing this monograph we intended to survey a field very much in flux, to assess its achievements so far, and to give a reasonable basis from which further developments can take off. For this reason we have included many papers in the bibliography that are not referred to in the text but are of relevance to physisorption. To keep this monograph to a reasonable size, and also to allow for some unity in the presentation of the material, we had to omit a number of topics related to physisorption kinetics. We have not covered to any extent the equilibrium properties of physisorbed layers such as structures, phase tr...

  19. Ligand Depot: a data warehouse for ligands bound to macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zukang; Chen, Li; Maddula, Himabindu; Akcan, Ozgur; Oughtred, Rose; Berman, Helen M; Westbrook, John

    2004-09-01

    Ligand Depot is an integrated data resource for finding information about small molecules bound to proteins and nucleic acids. The initial release (version 1.0, November, 2003) focuses on providing chemical and structural information for small molecules found as part of the structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. Ligand Depot accepts keyword-based queries and also provides a graphical interface for performing chemical substructure searches. A wide variety of web resources that contain information on small molecules may also be accessed through Ligand Depot. Ligand Depot is available at http://ligand-depot.rutgers.edu/. Version 1.0 supports multiple operating systems including Windows, Unix, Linux and the Macintosh operating system. The current drawing tool works in Internet Explorer, Netscape and Mozilla on Windows, Unix and Linux.

  20. Metal-ligand interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervin, Kent M.

    Experimental studies of the interactions of small transition-metal cluster anions with carbonyl ligands are reviewed and compared with neutral and cationic clusters. Under thermal conditions, the reaction rates of transition-metal clusters with carbon monoxide are measured as a function of cluster size. Saturation limits for carbon monoxide addition can be related to the geometric structures of the clusters. Both energy-resolved threshold collision-induced dissociation experiments and time-resolved photodissociation experiments are used to measure metal-carbonyl binding energies. For platinum and palladium trimer anions, the carbonyl binding energies are assigned to different geometric binding sites. Platinum and palladium cluster anions catalyse the oxidation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide in a full catalytic cycle at thermal energies.

  1. Melatonin: functions and ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahaveer; Jadhav, Hemant R

    2014-09-01

    Melatonin is a chronobiotic substance that acts as synchronizer by stabilizing bodily rhythms. Its synthesis occurs in various locations throughout the body, including the pineal gland, skin, lymphocytes and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Its synthesis and secretion is controlled by light and dark conditions, whereby light decreases and darkness increases its production. Thus, melatonin is also known as the 'hormone of darkness'. Melatonin and analogs that bind to the melatonin receptors are important because of their role in the management of depression, insomnia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease (AD), diabetes, obesity, alopecia, migraine, cancer, and immune and cardiac disorders. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of melatonin in these disorders, which could aid in the design of novel melatonin receptor ligands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Kinetic investigation of uranyl-uranophile complexation. 1. Macrocyclic kinetic effect and macrocyclic protection effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabushi, I.; Yoshizawa, A.

    1986-01-01

    Equilibria and rates of ligand-exchange reactions between uranyl tricarbonate and dithiocarbamates and between uranyl tris-(dithiocarbamates) and carbonate were studied under a variety of conditions. The dithiocarbamates used were acyclic diethyl-dithiocarbamate and macrocyclic tris(dithiocarbamate). The acyclic ligand showed a triphasic (successive three-step) equilibrium with three different equilibrium constants while the macrocyclic ligand showed a clear monophasic (one-step) equilibrium with a much larger stability constant for the dithiocarbamate-uranyl complex. The macrocyclic ligand showed the S/sub N/2-type ligand-exchange rate in the forward as well as reverse process, while the first step of the acyclic ligand-exchange reaction proceeded via the S/sub N/1-type mechanism. This kinetic macrocyclic effect on molecularity is interpreted as the result of a unique topological requirement of uranyl complexation. The macrocyclic ligand also exhibited a clear protection effect, leading to the large stability constant. 19 references, 10 figures, 2 tables

  3. Macrocyclic G-quadruplex ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M C; Ulven, Trond

    2010-01-01

    are macrocyclic structures which have been modeled after the natural product telomestatin or from porphyrin-based ligands discovered in the late 1990s. These two structural classes of G-quadruplex ligands are reviewed here with special attention to selectivity and structure-activity relationships, and with focus...

  4. The chemistry of separations ligand degradation by organic radical cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezyk, S.P.; Horne, G.P.; Mincher, B.J.; Zalupski, P.R.; Cook, A.R.; Wishart, J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Solvent based extractions of used nuclear fuel use designer ligands in an organic phase extracting ligand complexed metal ions from an acidic aqueous phase. These extractions will be performed in highly radioactive environments, and the radiation chemistry of all these complexing agents and their diluents will play a major role in determining extraction efficiency, separation factors, and solvent-recycle longevity. Although there has been considerable effort in investigating ligand damage occurring in acidic water radiolysis conditions, only minimal fundamental kinetic and mechanistic data has been reported for the degradation of extraction ligands in the organic phase. Extraction solvent phases typically use normal alkanes such as dodecane, TPH, and kerosene as diluents. The radiolysis of such diluents produce a mixture of radical cations (R"."+), carbon-centered radicals (R".), solvated electrons, and molecular products such as hydrogen. Typically, the radical species will preferentially react with the dissolved oxygen present to produce relatively inert peroxyl radicals. This isolates the alkane radical cation species, R"."+ as the major radiolytically-induced organic species that can react with, and degrade, extraction agents in this phase. Here we report on our recent studies of organic radical cation reactions with 2 ligands: CMPO and TODGA. Elucidating these parameters, and combining them with the known acidic aqueous phase chemistry, will allow a full, fundamental, understanding of the impact of radiation on solvent extraction based separation processes to be achieved. (authors)

  5. The chemistry of separations ligand degradation by organic radical cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezyk, S.P.; Horne, G.P. [California State University at Long Beach, Long Beach, CA 90840 (United States); Mincher, B.J.; Zalupski, P.R. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Cook, A.R.; Wishart, J.F. [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York, 11973 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Solvent based extractions of used nuclear fuel use designer ligands in an organic phase extracting ligand complexed metal ions from an acidic aqueous phase. These extractions will be performed in highly radioactive environments, and the radiation chemistry of all these complexing agents and their diluents will play a major role in determining extraction efficiency, separation factors, and solvent-recycle longevity. Although there has been considerable effort in investigating ligand damage occurring in acidic water radiolysis conditions, only minimal fundamental kinetic and mechanistic data has been reported for the degradation of extraction ligands in the organic phase. Extraction solvent phases typically use normal alkanes such as dodecane, TPH, and kerosene as diluents. The radiolysis of such diluents produce a mixture of radical cations (R{sup .+}), carbon-centered radicals (R{sup .}), solvated electrons, and molecular products such as hydrogen. Typically, the radical species will preferentially react with the dissolved oxygen present to produce relatively inert peroxyl radicals. This isolates the alkane radical cation species, R{sup .+} as the major radiolytically-induced organic species that can react with, and degrade, extraction agents in this phase. Here we report on our recent studies of organic radical cation reactions with 2 ligands: CMPO and TODGA. Elucidating these parameters, and combining them with the known acidic aqueous phase chemistry, will allow a full, fundamental, understanding of the impact of radiation on solvent extraction based separation processes to be achieved. (authors)

  6. Stochastic kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombino, A.; Mosiello, R.; Norelli, F.; Jorio, V.M.; Pacilio, N.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear system kinetics is formulated according to a stochastic approach. The detailed probability balance equations are written for the probability of finding the mixed population of neutrons and detected neutrons, i.e. detectrons, at a given level for a given instant of time. Equations are integrated in search of a probability profile: a series of cases is analyzed through a progressive criterium. It tends to take into account an increasing number of physical processes within the chosen model. The most important contribution is that solutions interpret analytically experimental conditions of equilibrium (moise analysis) and non equilibrium (pulsed neutron measurements, source drop technique, start up procedures)

  7. Cloud computing approaches for prediction of ligand binding poses and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrenz, Morgan; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S

    2015-01-22

    We describe an innovative protocol for ab initio prediction of ligand crystallographic binding poses and highly effective analysis of large datasets generated for protein-ligand dynamics. We include a procedure for setup and performance of distributed molecular dynamics simulations on cloud computing architectures, a model for efficient analysis of simulation data, and a metric for evaluation of model convergence. We give accurate binding pose predictions for five ligands ranging in affinity from 7 nM to > 200 μM for the immunophilin protein FKBP12, for expedited results in cases where experimental structures are difficult to produce. Our approach goes beyond single, low energy ligand poses to give quantitative kinetic information that can inform protein engineering and ligand design.

  8. Surface-Bound Ligands Modulate Chemoselectivity and Activity of a Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Vu, Khanh B.

    2015-04-03

    "Naked" metal nanoparticles (NPs) are thermodynamically and kinetically unstable in solution. Ligands, surfactants, or polymers, which adsorb at a particle\\'s surface, can be used to stabilize NPs; however, such a mode of stabilization is undesirable for catalytic applications because the adsorbates block the surface active sites. The catalytic activity and the stability of NPs are usually inversely correlated. Here, we describe an example of a bimetallic (PtFe) NP catalyst stabilized by carboxylate surface ligands that bind preferentially to one of the metals (Fe). NPs stabilized by fluorous ligands were found to be remarkably competent in catalyzing the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde; NPs stabilized by hydrocarbon ligands were significantly less active. The chain length of the fluorous ligands played a key role in determining the chemoselectivity of the FePt NP catalysts. (Chemical Presented). © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  9. Tolrestat kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.R.; Kraml, M.; Cayen, M.N.; Dubuc, J.; Ryder, S.; Dvornik, D.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of tolrestat, a potent inhibitor of aldose reductase, were examined. Serum concentrations of tolrestat and of total 14 C were measured after dosing normal subjects and subjects with diabetes with 14 C-labeled tolrestat. In normal subjects, tolrestat was rapidly absorbed and disappearance from serum was biphasic. Distribution and elimination t 1/2s were approximately 2 and 10 to 12 hr, respectively, after single and multiple doses. Unchanged tolrestat accounted for the major portion of 14 C in serum. Radioactivity was rapidly and completely excreted in urine and feces in an approximate ratio of 2:1. Findings were much the same in subjects with diabetes. In normal subjects, the kinetics of oral tolrestat were independent of dose in the 10 to 800 mg range. Repetitive dosing did not result in unexpected cumulation. Tolrestat was more than 99% bound to serum protein; it did not compete with warfarin for binding sites but was displaced to some extent by high concentrations of tolbutamide or salicylate

  10. Two novel mixed-ligand complexes containing organosulfonate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingtian; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Xuan; Fang, Hua; Ding, Liyun

    2008-07-01

    The structures reported herein, viz. bis(4-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonato-kappaO)bis(4,5-diazafluoren-9-one-kappa(2)N,N')copper(II), [Cu(C(10)H(8)NO(3)S)(2)(C(11)H(6)N(2)O)(2)], (I), and poly[[[diaquacadmium(II)]-bis(mu-4-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonato)-kappa(2)O:N;kappa(2)N:O] dihydrate], {[Cd(C(10)H(8)NO(3)S)(2)(H(2)O)(2)].2H(2)O}(n), (II), are rare examples of sulfonate-containing complexes where the anion does not fulfill a passive charge-balancing role, but takes an active part in coordination as a monodentate and/or bridging ligand. Monomeric complex (I) possesses a crystallographic inversion center at the Cu(II) atom, and the asymmetric unit contains one-half of a Cu atom, one complete 4-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonate (ans) ligand and one 4,5-diazafluoren-9-one (DAFO) ligand. The Cu(II) atom has an elongated distorted octahedral coordination geometry formed by two O atoms from two monodentate ans ligands and by four N atoms from two DAFO molecules. Complex (II) is polymeric and its crystal structure is built up by one-dimensional chains and solvent water molecules. Here also the cation (a Cd(II) atom) lies on a crystallographic inversion center and adopts a slightly distorted octahedral geometry. Each ans anion serves as a bridging ligand linking two Cd(II) atoms into one-dimensional infinite chains along the [010] direction, with each Cd(II) center coordinated by four ans ligands via O and N atoms and by two aqua ligands. In both structures, there are significant pi-pi stacking interactions between adjacent ligands and hydrogen bonds contribute to the formation of two- and three-dimensional networks.

  11. Correcting ligands, metabolites, and pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ott, M.A.; Vriend, G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A wide range of research areas in bioinformatics, molecular biology and medicinal chemistry require precise chemical structure information about molecules and reactions, e.g. drug design, ligand docking, metabolic network reconstruction, and systems biology. Most available databases,

  12. Water oxidation catalyzed by mononuclear ruthenium complexes with a 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylate (bda) ligand: how ligand environment influences the catalytic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staehle, Robert; Tong, Lianpeng; Wang, Lei; Duan, Lele; Fischer, Andreas; Ahlquist, Mårten S G; Sun, Licheng; Rau, Sven

    2014-02-03

    A new water oxidation catalyst [Ru(III)(bda)(mmi)(OH2)](CF3SO3) (2, H2bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid; mmi = 1,3-dimethylimidazolium-2-ylidene) containing an axial N-heterocyclic carbene ligand and one aqua ligand was synthesized and fully characterized. The kinetics of catalytic water oxidation by 2 were measured using stopped-flow technique, and key intermediates in the catalytic cycle were probed by density functional theory calculations. While analogous Ru-bda water oxidation catalysts [Ru(bda)L2] (L = pyridyl ligands) are supposed to catalyze water oxidation through a bimolecular coupling pathway, our study points out that 2, surprisingly, undergoes a single-site water nucleophilic attack (acid-base) pathway. The diversion of catalytic mechanisms is mainly ascribed to the different ligand environments, from nonaqua ligands to an aqua ligand. Findings in this work provide some critical proof for our previous hypothesis about how alternation of ancillary ligands of water oxidation catalysts influences their catalytic efficiency.

  13. Ligand-Receptor Interaction-Mediated Transmembrane Transport of Dendrimer-like Soft Nanoparticles: Mechanisms and Complicated Diffusive Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Junshi; Chen, Pengyu; Dong, Bojun; Huang, Zihan; Zhao, Kongyin; Yan, Li-Tang

    2016-05-09

    Nearly all nanomedical applications of dendrimer-like soft nanoparticles rely on the functionality of attached ligands. Understanding how the ligands interact with the receptors in cell membrane and its further effect on the cellular uptake of dendrimer-like soft nanoparticles is thereby a key issue for their better application in nanomedicine. However, the essential mechanism and detailed kinetics for the ligand-receptor interaction-mediated transmembrane transport of such unconventional nanoparticles remain poorly elucidated. Here, using coarse-grained simulations, we present the very first study of molecular mechanism and kinetics behaviors for the transmembrane transport of dendrimer-like soft nanoparticles conjugated with ligands. A phase diagram of interaction states is constructed through examining ligand densities and membrane tensions that allows us to identify novel endocytosis mechanisms featured by the direct wrapping and the penetration-extraction vesiculation. The results provide an in-depth insight into the diffusivity of receptors and dendrimer in the membrane plane and demonstrate how the ligand density influences receptor diffusion and uptake kinetics. It is interesting to find that the ligand-conjugated dendrimers present superdiffusive behaviors on a membrane, which is revealed to be driven by the random fluctuation dynamics of the membrane. The findings facilitate our understanding of some recent experimental observations and could establish fundamental principles for the future development of such important nanomaterials for widespread nanomedical applications.

  14. LigandRFs: random forest ensemble to identify ligand-binding residues from sequence information alone

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng; Huang, Jianhua Z; Gao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding is important for some proteins to perform their functions. Protein-ligand binding sites are the residues of proteins that physically bind to ligands. Despite of the recent advances in computational prediction

  15. Toehold-Mediated Displacement of an Adenosine-Binding Aptamer from a DNA Duplex by its Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserud, Jon H; Macri, Katherine M; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2016-10-24

    DNA is increasingly used to engineer dynamic nanoscale circuits, structures, and motors, many of which rely on DNA strand-displacement reactions. The use of functional DNA sequences (e.g., aptamers, which bind to a wide range of ligands) in these reactions would potentially confer responsiveness on such devices, and integrate DNA computation with highly varied molecular stimuli. By using high-throughput single-molecule FRET methods, we compared the kinetics of a putative aptamer-ligand and aptamer-complement strand-displacement reaction. We found that the ligands actively disrupted the DNA duplex in the presence of a DNA toehold in a similar manner to complementary DNA, with kinetic details specific to the aptamer structure, thus suggesting that the DNA strand-displacement concept can be extended to functional DNA-ligand systems. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic ligands: biochemical and genetic aspects in Torpedo californica and Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluates the biochemical and genetic aspects of the acetylcholine receptor proteins and cholinergic ligands in Drosophila melanogaster and Torpedo californica. Included are (1) a comparative study of nicotinic ligand-induced cation release from acetylcholine receptors isolated from Torpedo californica and from Drosophila melanogaster, (2) solution studies of the cholinergic ligands, nikethamide and ethamivan, aimed at measuring internal molecular rotational barriers in solvents of different polarity; and (3) the isolation and characterization of the gene(s) for the acetylcholine receptor in Drosophila melasogaster. Acetylcholine receptor proteins isolated from Drosphila melanogaster heads were found to behave kinetically similar (with regards to cholinergic ligand-induced 155 Eu: 3+ displacement from prelabeled proteins) to receptor proteins isolated from Torpedo californica electric tissue, providing additional biochemical evidence for the existence of a Drosophila acetylcholine receptor

  17. Study of substitution reactions of ligands in VO2+ complexes in toluene solutions by ESR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundkvist, R.; Panfilov, A.T.; Kalinichenko, N.B.; Marov, I.N.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Geokhimii i Analiticheskoj Khimii)

    1976-01-01

    Kinetics and equilibrium of stepwise substitution of ligands have been investigated at different temperatures for the complexes of oxovanadium (4) with salicylaldoxime, 8-oxyquinoline, acetylacetone, benzoylacetone, and tenoyltrifluoroacetone. The relative complexability of these ligands in toluene has been studied. The parameters of spin-Hamiltonian of EPR spectra of the VO 2+ complexes have been determined. The equilibrium constants, the rate constants, and activation energy have been found for the substitution reactions of ligands in the complexes VOA 2 : VOA 2 +HB=VOAB+HA; VOAB+HB=VOB 2 +HA, where HA and HB are the ligands with different donor atoms. The mixed complexes have been detected of the general formula VOAB, where HA is salicylaldoxime or 8-oxyquinoline and HB is β-diketone

  18. Combined modeling of cell aggregation and adhesion mediated by receptor–ligand interactions under shear flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Du

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Blood cell aggregation and adhesion to endothelial cells under shear flow are crucial to many biological processes such as thrombi formation, inflammatory cascade, and tumor metastasis, in which these cellular interactions are mainly mediated by the underlying receptor–ligand bindings. While theoretical modeling of aggregation dynamics and adhesion kinetics of interacting cells have been well studied separately, how to couple these two processes remains unclear. Here we develop a combined model that couples cellular aggregation dynamics and adhesion kinetics under shear flow. The impacts of shear rate (or shear stress and molecular binding affinity were elucidated. This study provides a unified model where the action of a fluid flow drives cell aggregation and adhesion under the modulations of the mechanical shear flow and receptor–ligand interaction kinetics. It offers an insight into understanding the relevant biological processes and functions.

  19. Heterobifunctional crosslinkers for tethering single ligand molecules to scanning probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riener, Christian K.; Kienberger, Ferry; Hahn, Christoph D.; Buchinger, Gerhard M.; Egwim, Innocent O.C.; Haselgruebler, Thomas; Ebner, Andreas; Romanin, Christoph; Klampfl, Christian; Lackner, Bernd; Prinz, Heino; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Gruber, Hermann J.

    2003-01-01

    Single molecule recognition force microscopy (SMRFM) is a versatile atomic force microscopy (AFM) method to probe specific interactions of cognitive molecules on the single molecule level. It allows insights to be gained into interaction potentials and kinetic barriers and is capable of mapping interaction sites with nm positional accuracy. These applications require a ligand to be attached to the AFM tip, preferably by a distensible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain between the measuring tip and the ligand molecule. The PEG chain greatly facilitates specific binding of the ligand to immobile receptor sites on the sample surface. The present study contributes to tip-PEG-ligand tethering in three ways: (i) a convenient synthetic route was found to prepare NH 2 -PEG-COOH which is the key intermediate for long heterobifunctional crosslinkers; (ii) a variety of heterobifunctional PEG derivatives for tip-PEG-ligand linking were prepared from NH 2 -PEG-COOH; (iii) in particular, a new PEG crosslinker with one thiol-reactive end and one terminal nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) group was synthesized and successfully used to tether His 6 -tagged protein molecules to AFM tips via noncovalent NTA-Ni 2+ -His 6 bridges. The new crosslinker was applied to link a recombinant His 6 -tagged fragment of the very-low density lipoprotein receptor to the AFM tip whereupon specific docking to the capsid of human rhinovirus particles was observed by force microscopy. In a parallel study, the specific interaction of the small GTPase Ran with the nuclear import receptor importin β1 was studied in detail by SMRFM, using the new crosslinker to link His 6 -tagged Ran to the measuring tip [Nat. Struct. Biol. (2003), 10, 553-557

  20. Rosetta Ligand docking with flexible XML protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, Gordon; Meiler, Jens

    2012-01-01

    RosettaLigand is premiere software for predicting how a protein and a small molecule interact. Benchmark studies demonstrate that 70% of the top scoring RosettaLigand predicted interfaces are within 2Å RMSD from the crystal structure [1]. The latest release of Rosetta ligand software includes many new features, such as (1) docking of multiple ligands simultaneously, (2) representing ligands as fragments for greater flexibility, (3) redesign of the interface during docking, and (4) an XML script based interface that gives the user full control of the ligand docking protocol.

  1. Multiple pathways of sigma(1) receptor ligand uptakes into primary cultured neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H; Karasawa, J; Sagi, N; Takahashi, S; Horikomi, K; Okuyama, S; Nukada, T; Sora, I; Yamamoto, T

    2001-08-03

    Although many antipsychotics have affinities for sigma receptors, the transportation pathway of exogenous sigma(1) receptor ligands to intracellular type-1 sigma receptors are not fully understood. In this study, sigma(1) receptor ligand uptakes were studied using primary cultured neuronal cells. [(3)H](+)-pentazocine and [(3)H](R)-(+)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolidinone L-tartrate (MS-377), used as a selective sigma(1) receptor ligands, were taken up in a time-, energy- and temperature-dependent manner, suggesting that active transport mechanisms were involved in their uptakes. sigma(1) receptor ligands taken up into primary cultured neuronal cells were not restricted to agonists, but also concerned antagonists. The uptakes of these ligands were mainly Na(+)-independent. Kinetic analysis of [(3)H](+)-pentazocine and [(3)H]MS-377 uptake showed K(m) values (microM) of 0.27 and 0.32, and V(max) values (pmol/mg protein/min) of 17.4 and 9.4, respectively. Although both ligands were incorporated, the pharmacological properties of these two ligands were different. Uptake of [(3)H](+)-pentazocine was inhibited in the range 0.4-7.1 microM by all the sigma(1) receptor ligands used, including N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]ethylamine monohydrochloride (NE-100), a selective sigma(1) receptor ligand. In contrast, the inhibition of [(3)H]MS-377 uptake was potently inhibited by haloperidol, characterized by supersensitivity (IC(50), approximately 2 nM) and was inhibited by NE-100 with low sensitivity (IC(50), 4.5 microM). Moreover, kinetic analysis revealed that NE-100 inhibited [(3)H]MS-377 uptake in a noncompetitive manner, suggesting that NE-100 acted at a site different from the uptake sites of [(3)H]MS-377. These findings suggest that there are at least two uptake pathways for sigma(1) receptor ligands in primary cultured neuronal cells (i.e. a haloperidol-sensitive pathway and another, unclear, pathway). In

  2. Ligand and proton exchange dynamics in recombinant human myoglobin mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambright, D G; Balasubramanian, S; Boxer, S G

    1989-05-05

    Site-specific mutants of human myoglobin have been prepared in which lysine 45 is replaced by arginine (K45R) and aspartate 60 by glutamate (D60E), in order to examine the influence of these residues and their interaction on the dynamics of the protein. These proteins were studied by a variety of methods, including one and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, exchange kinetics for the distal and proximal histidine NH protons as a function of pH in the met cyano forms, flash photolysis of the CO forms, and ligand replacement kinetics. The electronic absorption and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the CO forms of these proteins are virtually identical, indicating that the structure of the heme pocket is unaltered by these mutations. There are, however, substantial changes in the dynamics of both CO binding and proton exchange for the mutant K45R, whereas the mutant D60E exhibits behavior indistinguishable from the reference human myoglobin. K45R has a faster CO bimolecular recombination rate and slower CO off-rate relative to the reference. The kinetics for CO binding are independent of pH (6.5 to 10) as well as ionic strength (0 to 1 M-NaCl). The exchange rate for the distal histidine NH is substantially lower for K45R than the reference, whereas the proximal histidine NH exchange rate is unaltered. The exchange behavior of the human proteins is similar to that reported for a comparison of the exchange rates for myoglobins having lysine at position 45 with sperm whale myoglobin, which has arginine at this position. This indicates that the differences in exchange rates reflects largely the Lys----Arg substitution. The lack of a simple correlation for the CO kinetics with this substitution means that these are sensitive to other factors as well. Specific kinetic models, whereby substitution of arginine for lysine at position 45 can affect ligand binding dynamics, are outlined. These experiments demonstrate that a relatively

  3. Kinetics in Signal Transduction Pathways Involving Promiscuous Oligomerizing Receptors Can Be Determined by Receptor Specificity : Apoptosis Induction by TRAIL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szegezdi, Eva; van der Sloot, Almer M.; Mahalingam, Devalingam; O'Leary, Lynda; Cool, Robbert H.; Munoz, Ines G.; Montoya, Guillermo; Quax, Wim J.; de Jong, Steven; Samali, Afshin; Serrano, Luis

    Here we show by computer modeling that kinetics and outcome of signal transduction in case of hetero-oligomerizing receptors of a promiscuous ligand largely depend on the relative amounts of its receptors. Promiscuous ligands can trigger the formation of nonproductive receptor complexes, which slows

  4. Crystallization of protein–ligand complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassell, Anne M.; An, Gang; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Bynum, Jane M.; Carter, H. Luke III; Deng, Su-Jun J.; Gampe, Robert T.; Grisard, Tamara E.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Nolte, Robert T.; Rocque, Warren J.; Wang, Liping; Weaver, Kurt L.; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce; Xu, Robert; Shewchuk, Lisa M.

    2007-01-01

    Methods presented for growing protein–ligand complexes fall into the categories of co-expression of the protein with the ligands of interest, use of the ligands during protein purification, cocrystallization and soaking the ligands into existing crystals. Obtaining diffraction-quality crystals has long been a bottleneck in solving the three-dimensional structures of proteins. Often proteins may be stabilized when they are complexed with a substrate, nucleic acid, cofactor or small molecule. These ligands, on the other hand, have the potential to induce significant conformational changes to the protein and ab initio screening may be required to find a new crystal form. This paper presents an overview of strategies in the following areas for obtaining crystals of protein–ligand complexes: (i) co-expression of the protein with the ligands of interest, (ii) use of the ligands during protein purification, (iii) cocrystallization and (iv) soaks

  5. Ligand-Controlled Synthesis of Azoles via Ir-Catalyzed Reactions of Sulfoxonium Ylides with 2-Amino Heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Alicia M; Chan, Vincent S; Napolitano, José G; Krabbe, Scott W; Schomaker, Jennifer M; Shekhar, Shashank

    2016-05-20

    An iridium-catalyzed method was developed for the synthesis of imidazo-fused pyrrolopyrazines. The presence or absence of a nitrogenated ligand controlled the outcome of the reaction, leading to simple β-keto amine products in the absence of added ligand and the cyclized 7- and 8-substituted-imidazo[1,2-a]pyrrolo[2,3-e]pyrazine products in the presence of ligand. This catalyst control was conserved across a variety of ylide and amine coupling partners. The substrate was shown to act as a ligand for the iridium catalyst in the absence of other ligands via NMR spectroscopy. Kinetic studies indicated that formation of the Ir-carbene was reversible and the slow step of the reaction. These mechanistic investigations suggest that the β-keto amine products form via an intramolecular carbene N-H insertion, and the imidazopyrrolopyrazines form via an intermolecular carbene N-H insertion.

  6. -Pincer Ligand Family through Ligand Post-Modification

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Mei-Hui; Hu, Jinsong; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2017-01-01

    A series of air-stable nickel complexes containing triazine-based PN3P-pincer ligands were synthesized and fully characterized. Complex 3 contains a de-aromatized central triazine ring from the deprotonation of one of the N–H arms. With a post-modification strategy, the Me-PN3P*NiCl complex (3) could be converted into a new class of diimine–traizine PN3P-pincer nickel complexes.

  7. -Pincer Ligand Family through Ligand Post-Modification

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Mei-Hui

    2017-10-02

    A series of air-stable nickel complexes containing triazine-based PN3P-pincer ligands were synthesized and fully characterized. Complex 3 contains a de-aromatized central triazine ring from the deprotonation of one of the N–H arms. With a post-modification strategy, the Me-PN3P*NiCl complex (3) could be converted into a new class of diimine–traizine PN3P-pincer nickel complexes.

  8. Mechanistic pathways of recognition of a solvent-inaccessible cavity of protein by a ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Jagannath; Pandit, Subhendu; Dandekar, Bhupendra; Vallurupalli, Pramodh

    One of the puzzling questions in the realm of protein-ligand recognition is how a solvent-inaccessible hydrophobic cavity of a protein gets recognized by a ligand. We address the topic by simulating, for the first time, the complete binding process of benzene from aqueous media to the well-known buried cavity of L99A T4 Lysozyme at an atomistic resolution. Our multiple unbiased microsecond-long trajectories, which were completely blind to the location of target binding site, are able to unequivocally identify the kinetic pathways along which benzene molecule meanders across the solvent and protein and ultimately spontaneously recognizes the deeply buried cavity of L99A T4 Lysozyme at an accurate precision. Our simulation, combined with analysis based on markov state model and free energy calculation, reveals that there are more than one distinct ligand binding pathways. Intriguingly, each of the identified pathways involves the transient opening of a channel of the protein prior to ligand binding. The work will also decipher rich mechanistic details on unbinding kinetics of the ligand as obtained from enhanced sampling techniques.

  9. Reactivity of halide and pseudohalide ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukushkin, Yu.N.

    1987-01-01

    Reactivity of halide and pseudohalide (cyanide, azide, thiocyanate, cyanate) ligands tending to form bridge bonds in transition metal (Re, Mo, W) complexes is considered. Complexes where transition metal salts are ligands of other, complex-forming ion, are described. Transformation of innerspheric pseudohalide ligands is an important way of directed synthesis of these metal coordination compounds

  10. Cesium removal and kinetics equilibrium: Precipitation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    This task consisted of both non-radioactive and radioactive (tracer) tests examining the influence of potentially significant variables on cesium tetraphenylborate precipitation kinetics. The work investigated the time required to reach cesium decontamination and the conditions that affect the cesium precipitation kinetics

  11. Increased precision for analysis of protein-ligand dissociation constants determined from chemical shift titrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markin, Craig J.; Spyracopoulos, Leo, E-mail: leo.spyracopoulos@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    NMR is ideally suited for the analysis of protein-protein and protein ligand interactions with dissociation constants ranging from {approx}2 {mu}M to {approx}1 mM, and with kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. For the determination of dissociation constants (K{sub D}) of 1:1 protein-protein or protein-ligand interactions using NMR, the protein and ligand concentrations must necessarily be similar in magnitude to the K{sub D}, and nonlinear least squares analysis of chemical shift changes as a function of ligand concentration is employed to determine estimates for the parameters K{sub D} and the maximum chemical shift change ({Delta}{delta}{sub max}). During a typical NMR titration, the initial protein concentration, [P{sub 0}], is held nearly constant. For this condition, to determine the most accurate parameters for K{sub D} and {Delta}{delta}{sub max} from nonlinear least squares analyses requires initial protein concentrations that are {approx}0.5 Multiplication-Sign K{sub D}, and a maximum concentration for the ligand, or titrant, of {approx}10 Multiplication-Sign [P{sub 0}]. From a practical standpoint, these requirements are often difficult to achieve. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that co-variation of the ligand and protein concentrations during a titration leads to an increase in the precision of the fitted K{sub D} and {Delta}{delta}{sub max} values when [P{sub 0}] > K{sub D}. Importantly, judicious choice of protein and ligand concentrations for a given NMR titration, combined with nonlinear least squares analyses using two independent variables (ligand and protein concentrations) and two parameters (K{sub D} and {Delta}{delta}{sub max}) is a straightforward approach to increasing the accuracy of measured dissociation constants for 1:1 protein-ligand interactions.

  12. Ligand-regulated peptide aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Russell A

    2009-01-01

    The peptide aptamer approach employs high-throughput selection to identify members of a randomized peptide library displayed from a scaffold protein by virtue of their interaction with a target molecule. Extending this approach, we have developed a peptide aptamer scaffold protein that can impart small-molecule control over the aptamer-target interaction. This ligand-regulated peptide (LiRP) scaffold, consisting of the protein domains FKBP12, FRB, and GST, binds to the cell-permeable small-molecule rapamycin and the binding of this molecule can prevent the interaction of the randomizable linker region connecting FKBP12 with FRB. Here we present a detailed protocol for the creation of a peptide aptamer plasmid library, selection of peptide aptamers using the LiRP scaffold in a yeast two-hybrid system, and the screening of those peptide aptamers for a ligand-regulated interaction.

  13. Plasma kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma kinetic theory is discussed and a comparison made with the kinetic theory of gases. The plasma is described by a modified set of fluid equations and it is shown how these fluid equations can be derived. (UK)

  14. Ligand binding by PDZ domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine N.; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    , for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well...... as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context....

  15. Kinetic mechanism of human DNA ligase I reveals magnesium-dependent changes in the rate-limiting step that compromise ligation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark R; Conrad, John A; Wahl, Daniel; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2011-07-01

    DNA ligase I (LIG1) catalyzes the ligation of single-strand breaks to complete DNA replication and repair. The energy of ATP is used to form a new phosphodiester bond in DNA via a reaction mechanism that involves three distinct chemical steps: enzyme adenylylation, adenylyl transfer to DNA, and nick sealing. We used steady state and pre-steady state kinetics to characterize the minimal mechanism for DNA ligation catalyzed by human LIG1. The ATP dependence of the reaction indicates that LIG1 requires multiple Mg(2+) ions for catalysis and that an essential Mg(2+) ion binds more tightly to ATP than to the enzyme. Further dissection of the magnesium ion dependence of individual reaction steps revealed that the affinity for Mg(2+) changes along the reaction coordinate. At saturating concentrations of ATP and Mg(2+) ions, the three chemical steps occur at similar rates, and the efficiency of ligation is high. However, under conditions of limiting Mg(2+), the nick-sealing step becomes rate-limiting, and the adenylylated DNA intermediate is prematurely released into solution. Subsequent adenylylation of enzyme prevents rebinding to the adenylylated DNA intermediate comprising an Achilles' heel of LIG1. These ligase-generated 5'-adenylylated nicks constitute persistent breaks that are a threat to genomic stability if they are not repaired. The kinetic and thermodynamic framework that we have determined for LIG1 provides a starting point for understanding the mechanism and specificity of mammalian DNA ligases.

  16. Bitopic Ligands and Metastable Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronik, Philipp; Gaiser, Birgit I; Sejer Pedersen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    of orthosteric binding sites. Bitopic ligands have been employed to address the selectivity problem by combining (linking) an orthosteric ligand with an allosteric modulator, theoretically leading to high-affinity subtype selective ligands. However, it remains a challenge to identify suitable allosteric binding...... that have been reported to date, this type of bitopic ligands would be composed of two identical pharmacophores. Herein, we outline the concept of bitopic ligands, review metastable binding sites, and discuss their potential as a new source of allosteric binding sites....

  17. Radioiodinated ligands for dopamine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, H.F.

    1994-01-01

    The dopamine receptor system is important for normal brain function; it is also the apparent action site for various neuroleptic drugs for the treatment of schizophrenia and other metal disorders. In the past few years radioiodinated ligands for single photon emission tomography (SPECT) have been successfully developed and tested in humans: [ 123 I]TISCH for D1 dopamine receptors; [ 123 I]IBZM, epidepride, IBF and FIDA2, four iodobenzamide derivatives, for D2/D3 dopamine receptors. In addition, [ 123 I]β-CIT (RTI-55) and IPT, cocaine derivatives, for the dopamine reuptake site are potentially useful for diagnosis of loss of dopamine neurons. The first iodinated ligand, (R)trans-7-OH-PIPAT, for D3 dopamine receptors, was synthesized and characterized with cloned cell lines (Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9) expressing the D2 and D3 dopamine receptors and with rat basal forebrain membrane preparations. Most of the known iodobenzamides displayed similar potency in binding to both D2 and D3 dopamine receptors expressed in the cell lines. Initial studies appear to suggest that by fine tuning the structures it may be possible to develop agents specific for D2 and D3 dopamine receptors. It is important to investigate D2/D3 selectivity for this series of potent ligands

  18. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase from Bordetella/Alcaligenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyners, Christian; Baud, Matthias G J; Fuchter, Matthew J; Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2014-03-01

    Thermodynamic studies on ligand-protein binding have become increasingly important in the process of drug design. In combination with structural data and molecular dynamics simulations, thermodynamic studies provide relevant information about the mode of interaction between compounds and their target proteins and therefore build a sound basis for further drug optimization. Using the example of histone deacetylases (HDACs), particularly the histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase (HDAH) from Bordetella/Alcaligenes, a novel sensitive competitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based binding assay was developed and the thermodynamics of interaction of both fluorescent ligands and inhibitors to histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase were investigated. The assay consumes only small amounts of valuable target proteins and is suitable for fast kinetic and mechanistic studies as well as high throughput screening applications. Binding affinity increased with increasing length of aliphatic spacers (n = 4-7) between the hydroxamate moiety and the dansyl head group of ligand probes. Van't Hoff plots revealed an optimum in enthalpy contribution to the free energy of binding for the dansyl-ligand with hexyl spacer. The selectivity in the series of dansyl-ligands against human class I HDAC1 but not class II HDACs 4 and 6 increased with the ratio of ΔH(0)/ΔG(0). The data clearly emphasize the importance of thermodynamic signatures as useful general guidance for the optimization of ligands or rational drug design. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Are superhalogens without halogen ligand capable of transcending traditional halogen-based superhalogens? Ab initio case study of binuclear anions based on pseudohalogen ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jin-Feng; Sun, Yin-Yin; Li, Miao-Miao; Li, Jian-Li; Yin, Bing; Bai, Hongcun

    2015-01-01

    The superhalogen properties of polynuclear structures without halogen ligand are theoretically explored here for several [M 2 (CN) 5 ] −1 (M =  Ca, Be) clusters. At CCSD(T) level, these clusters have been confirmed to be superhalogens due to their high vertical electron detachment energies (VDE). The largest one is 9.70 eV for [Ca 2 (CN) 5 ] −1 which is even higher than those of corresponding traditional structures based on fluorine or chlorine ligands. Therefore the superhalogens stronger than the traditional halogen-based structures could be realized by ligands other than halogen atoms. Compared with CCSD(T), outer valence Green’s function (OVGF) method either overestimates or underestimates the VDEs for different structures while MP2 results are generally consistent in the aspect of relative values. The extra electrons of the highest VDE anions here aggregate on the bridging CN units with non-negligible distribution occurring on other CN units too. These two features lower both the potential and kinetic energies of the extra electron respectively and thus lead to high VDE. Besides superhalogen properties, the structures, relative stabilities and thermodynamic stabilities with respect to the detachment of cyanide ligand were also investigated. The sum of these results identifies the potential of polynuclear structures with pseudohalogen ligand as suitable candidates with enhanced superhalogens properties

  20. Are superhalogens without halogen ligand capable of transcending traditional halogen-based superhalogens? Ab initio case study of binuclear anions based on pseudohalogen ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Feng; Sun, Yin-Yin; Bai, Hongcun; Li, Miao-Miao; Li, Jian-Li; Yin, Bing

    2015-06-01

    The superhalogen properties of polynuclear structures without halogen ligand are theoretically explored here for several [M2(CN)5]-1 (M = Ca, Be) clusters. At CCSD(T) level, these clusters have been confirmed to be superhalogens due to their high vertical electron detachment energies (VDE). The largest one is 9.70 eV for [Ca2(CN)5]-1 which is even higher than those of corresponding traditional structures based on fluorine or chlorine ligands. Therefore the superhalogens stronger than the traditional halogen-based structures could be realized by ligands other than halogen atoms. Compared with CCSD(T), outer valence Green's function (OVGF) method either overestimates or underestimates the VDEs for different structures while MP2 results are generally consistent in the aspect of relative values. The extra electrons of the highest VDE anions here aggregate on the bridging CN units with non-negligible distribution occurring on other CN units too. These two features lower both the potential and kinetic energies of the extra electron respectively and thus lead to high VDE. Besides superhalogen properties, the structures, relative stabilities and thermodynamic stabilities with respect to the detachment of cyanide ligand were also investigated. The sum of these results identifies the potential of polynuclear structures with pseudohalogen ligand as suitable candidates with enhanced superhalogens properties.

  1. Are superhalogens without halogen ligand capable of transcending traditional halogen-based superhalogens? Ab initio case study of binuclear anions based on pseudohalogen ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jin-Feng; Sun, Yin-Yin; Li, Miao-Miao; Li, Jian-Li; Yin, Bing, E-mail: rayinyin@nwu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Physico-Inorganic Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Bai, Hongcun [Key Laboratory of Energy Source and Chemical Engineering, Ningxia University, Yinchuan, Ningxia 750021 (China)

    2015-06-15

    The superhalogen properties of polynuclear structures without halogen ligand are theoretically explored here for several [M{sub 2}(CN){sub 5}]{sup −1} (M =  Ca, Be) clusters. At CCSD(T) level, these clusters have been confirmed to be superhalogens due to their high vertical electron detachment energies (VDE). The largest one is 9.70 eV for [Ca{sub 2}(CN){sub 5}]{sup −1} which is even higher than those of corresponding traditional structures based on fluorine or chlorine ligands. Therefore the superhalogens stronger than the traditional halogen-based structures could be realized by ligands other than halogen atoms. Compared with CCSD(T), outer valence Green’s function (OVGF) method either overestimates or underestimates the VDEs for different structures while MP2 results are generally consistent in the aspect of relative values. The extra electrons of the highest VDE anions here aggregate on the bridging CN units with non-negligible distribution occurring on other CN units too. These two features lower both the potential and kinetic energies of the extra electron respectively and thus lead to high VDE. Besides superhalogen properties, the structures, relative stabilities and thermodynamic stabilities with respect to the detachment of cyanide ligand were also investigated. The sum of these results identifies the potential of polynuclear structures with pseudohalogen ligand as suitable candidates with enhanced superhalogens properties.

  2. Mechanism of redox reactions induced by light and electron pulse in solutions of mixed ligand iron(II) complex cyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, A.; Szoeke, J.; Wojnarovits, L.

    1991-01-01

    Redox reactions induced by light and electron pulse have been studied in aqueous solutions of mixed ligand iron(II) complex cyanides. The short lived intermediates have been identified by time resolved specroscopy, the results of detailed kinetic analysis have been discussed. (author) 6 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  3. Electrochemistry of oxo-technetium(V) complexes containing Schiff base and 8-quinolinol ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refosco, F.; Mazzi, U.; Deutsch, E.; Kirchhoff, J.R.; Heineman, W.R.; Seeber, R.

    1988-01-01

    The electrochemistry of six-coordinate, monooxo technetium(V) complexes containing Schiff base ligands has been studied in acetonitrile and N,N'-dimethylformamide solutions. The complexes have the general formula TcOCl(L B ) 2 or TcO(L T )(L B ), where L B represents a bidentate-N,O Schiff base ligand or a bidentate-N,O 8-quinolinol ligand and L T represents a tridentate-O,N,O Schiff base ligand. Cyclic voltammetry at a platinum-disk electrode, controlled-potential coulometry, and thin-layer spectroelectrochemistry were used to probe both the oxidation and the reduction of these complexes. The results of these studies, and previously reported results on the analogous Re(V) complexes, can be understood within a single general reaction scheme. The salient features of this scheme are (i) one-electron reduction of Tc(V) to Tc(IV), (ii) subsequent loss of a ligand situated cis to the Tc≡O linkage, and (iii) subsequent isomerization of this unstable Tc(IV) product to more stable complex in which the site trans to the Tc≡O linkage is vacant. The Tc(IV) complexes can also be reduced to analogous Tc(III) species, which appear to undergo the same ligand loss and isomerization reactions. The technetium complexes are 400-500 mV easier to reduce than are their rhenium analogues. The 8-quinolinol ligands, and especially the 5-nitro derivative, both thermodynamically and kinetically stabilize the Tc(IV) and Tc(III) oxidation states. These electrogenerated species are unusual in that they constitute the bulk of the known examples of monomeric Tc(IV) and Tc(III) complexes containing only N- and O-donating ligands. 34 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  4. Insights into an original pocket-ligand pair classification: a promising tool for ligand profile prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Pérot

    Full Text Available Pockets are today at the cornerstones of modern drug discovery projects and at the crossroad of several research fields, from structural biology to mathematical modeling. Being able to predict if a small molecule could bind to one or more protein targets or if a protein could bind to some given ligands is very useful for drug discovery endeavors, anticipation of binding to off- and anti-targets. To date, several studies explore such questions from chemogenomic approach to reverse docking methods. Most of these studies have been performed either from the viewpoint of ligands or targets. However it seems valuable to use information from both ligands and target binding pockets. Hence, we present a multivariate approach relating ligand properties with protein pocket properties from the analysis of known ligand-protein interactions. We explored and optimized the pocket-ligand pair space by combining pocket and ligand descriptors using Principal Component Analysis and developed a classification engine on this paired space, revealing five main clusters of pocket-ligand pairs sharing specific and similar structural or physico-chemical properties. These pocket-ligand pair clusters highlight correspondences between pocket and ligand topological and physico-chemical properties and capture relevant information with respect to protein-ligand interactions. Based on these pocket-ligand correspondences, a protocol of prediction of clusters sharing similarity in terms of recognition characteristics is developed for a given pocket-ligand complex and gives high performances. It is then extended to cluster prediction for a given pocket in order to acquire knowledge about its expected ligand profile or to cluster prediction for a given ligand in order to acquire knowledge about its expected pocket profile. This prediction approach shows promising results and could contribute to predict some ligand properties critical for binding to a given pocket, and conversely

  5. Insights into an original pocket-ligand pair classification: a promising tool for ligand profile prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérot, Stéphanie; Regad, Leslie; Reynès, Christelle; Spérandio, Olivier; Miteva, Maria A; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Pockets are today at the cornerstones of modern drug discovery projects and at the crossroad of several research fields, from structural biology to mathematical modeling. Being able to predict if a small molecule could bind to one or more protein targets or if a protein could bind to some given ligands is very useful for drug discovery endeavors, anticipation of binding to off- and anti-targets. To date, several studies explore such questions from chemogenomic approach to reverse docking methods. Most of these studies have been performed either from the viewpoint of ligands or targets. However it seems valuable to use information from both ligands and target binding pockets. Hence, we present a multivariate approach relating ligand properties with protein pocket properties from the analysis of known ligand-protein interactions. We explored and optimized the pocket-ligand pair space by combining pocket and ligand descriptors using Principal Component Analysis and developed a classification engine on this paired space, revealing five main clusters of pocket-ligand pairs sharing specific and similar structural or physico-chemical properties. These pocket-ligand pair clusters highlight correspondences between pocket and ligand topological and physico-chemical properties and capture relevant information with respect to protein-ligand interactions. Based on these pocket-ligand correspondences, a protocol of prediction of clusters sharing similarity in terms of recognition characteristics is developed for a given pocket-ligand complex and gives high performances. It is then extended to cluster prediction for a given pocket in order to acquire knowledge about its expected ligand profile or to cluster prediction for a given ligand in order to acquire knowledge about its expected pocket profile. This prediction approach shows promising results and could contribute to predict some ligand properties critical for binding to a given pocket, and conversely, some key pocket

  6. Ligand photo-isomerization triggers conformational changes in iGluR2 ligand binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tino Wolter

    Full Text Available Neurological glutamate receptors bind a variety of artificial ligands, both agonistic and antagonistic, in addition to glutamate. Studying their small molecule binding properties increases our understanding of the central nervous system and a variety of associated pathologies. The large, oligomeric multidomain membrane protein contains a large and flexible ligand binding domains which undergoes large conformational changes upon binding different ligands. A recent application of glutamate receptors is their activation or inhibition via photo-switchable ligands, making them key systems in the emerging field of optochemical genetics. In this work, we present a theoretical study on the binding mode and complex stability of a novel photo-switchable ligand, ATA-3, which reversibly binds to glutamate receptors ligand binding domains (LBDs. We propose two possible binding modes for this ligand based on flexible ligand docking calculations and show one of them to be analogues to the binding mode of a similar ligand, 2-BnTetAMPA. In long MD simulations, it was observed that transitions between both binding poses involve breaking and reforming the T686-E402 protein hydrogen bond. Simulating the ligand photo-isomerization process shows that the two possible configurations of the ligand azo-group have markedly different complex stabilities and equilibrium binding modes. A strong but slow protein response is observed after ligand configuration changes. This provides a microscopic foundation for the observed difference in ligand activity upon light-switching.

  7. Development of immobilized ligands for actinide separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paine, R.T.

    1994-01-01

    Primary goals during this grant period were to (1) synthesize new bifunctional chelating ligands, (2) characterize the structural features of the Ln and An coordination complexes formed by these ligands, (3) use structural data to iteratively design new classes of multifunctional ligands, and (4) explore additional routes for attachment of key ligands to solid supports that could be useful for chromatographic separations. Some highlights of recently published work as well as a summary of submitted, unpublished and/or still in progress research are outlined

  8. Principles of chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    House, James E

    2007-01-01

    James House's revised Principles of Chemical Kinetics provides a clear and logical description of chemical kinetics in a manner unlike any other book of its kind. Clearly written with detailed derivations, the text allows students to move rapidly from theoretical concepts of rates of reaction to concrete applications. Unlike other texts, House presents a balanced treatment of kinetic reactions in gas, solution, and solid states. The entire text has been revised and includes many new sections and an additional chapter on applications of kinetics. The topics covered include quantitative rela

  9. Introduction to chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Soustelle, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This book is a progressive presentation of kinetics of the chemical reactions. It provides complete coverage of the domain of chemical kinetics, which is necessary for the various future users in the fields of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Materials Science, Chemical Engineering, Macromolecular Chemistry and Combustion. It will help them to understand the most sophisticated knowledge of their future job area. Over 15 chapters, this book present the fundamentals of chemical kinetics, its relations with reaction mechanisms and kinetic properties. Two chapters are then devoted to experimental re

  10. Kinetic equation solution by inverse kinetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, G.

    1983-01-01

    We propose a computer program (CAMU) which permits to solve the inverse kinetic equation. The CAMU code is written in HPL language for a HP 982 A microcomputer with a peripheral interface HP 9876 A ''thermal graphic printer''. The CAMU code solves the inverse kinetic equation by taking as data entry the output of the ionization chambers and integrating the equation with the help of the Simpson method. With this program we calculate the evolution of the reactivity in time for a given disturbance

  11. Macrocyclic ligands for uranium complexation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potts, K.T.

    1991-04-01

    A highly preorganized 24-macrocycle containing biuret, thiobiuret and pyridine subunits has been prepared by high dilution ring-closure procedures. Intermediate products to this macrocycle have been utilized to extend this synthetic route to include further representatives where solubility and stability will be influenced by substituent variation. A 1:1 complex has been formed from uranyl acetate and a quinquepyridine derivative, this representing a new type of ligand for the uranyl ion. A very convenient synthetic procedure that will allow the incorporation of these macrocycles into polymeric systems has been developed for the introduction of a vinyl substituent into the 4-position of the pyridine ring. Using triflate, vinyltributyltin and Pd 0 chemistry, this procedure should make a variety of substituted 4-vinylpyridines available for the first time. 3 refs

  12. CXCR4 Ligands : The Next Big Hit?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walenkamp, Annemiek M. E.; Lapa, Constantin; Herrmann, Ken; Wester, Hans-Juergen

    2017-01-01

    The G protein-coupled protein receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is an attractive target for cancer diagnosis and treatment, as it is overexpressed in many solid and hematologic cancers. Binding of its ligand, C-X-C chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12), results in receptor internalization and

  13. Ligand-receptor Interactions by NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novak. P.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Today NMR spectroscopy is a method of choice for elucidation of interactions between biomolecules and the potential ligands. Knowledge on these interactions is an essential prerequisite for the rational drug design. The most important contribution of NMR to drug design a few years ago was the 3D structure determination of proteins. Besides delivering the 3D structures of the free proteins as a raw material for the modeling studies on ligand binding, NMR can directly yield valuable experimental data on the biologically important protein-ligand complexes. In addition to X-ray diffraction, NMR spectroscopy can provide information on the internal protein dynamics ordynamics of intermolecular interactions. Changes in NMR parameters allow us to detect ("SAR by NMR" and quantitatively determine binding affinities (titration, diffusion NMR experiments, etc. of potential ligands. Also, it is possible to determine the binding site and conformations of ligands, receptors and receptor-ligand complexes with the help of NMR methods such as tr-NOESY. Epitopes or functional groups responsible for binding of ligands to the receptor can be identified by employing STD or WaterLOGSY experiments. In this review are described some of the most frequent NMR methods for the characterization of the interactions between biomolecules and ligands, together with their advantages and disadvantages.

  14. Autocrine signal transmission with extracellular ligand degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratov, C B; Posta, F; Shvartsman, S Y

    2009-03-01

    Traveling waves of cell signaling in epithelial layers orchestrate a number of important processes in developing and adult tissues. These waves can be mediated by positive feedback autocrine loops, a mode of cell signaling where binding of a diffusible extracellular ligand to a cell surface receptor can lead to further ligand release. We formulate and analyze a biophysical model that accounts for ligand-induced ligand release, extracellular ligand diffusion and ligand-receptor interaction. We focus on the case when the main mode for ligand degradation is extracellular and analyze the problem with the sharp threshold positive feedback nonlinearity. We derive expressions that link the speed of propagation and other characteristics of traveling waves to the parameters of the biophysical processes, such as diffusion rates, receptor expression level, etc. Analyzing the derived expressions we found that traveling waves in such systems can exhibit a number of unusual properties, e.g. non-monotonic dependence of the speed of propagation on ligand diffusivity. Our results for the fully developed traveling fronts can be used to analyze wave initiation from localized perturbations, a scenario that frequently arises in the in vitro models of epithelial wound healing, and guide future modeling studies of cell communication in epithelial layers.

  15. Organotellurium ligands – designing and complexation reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    membered rings it is negative and ~30 ppm only. Keywords. Organotellurium ligands; hybrid telluroether; platinum metal complexes; tellurium-125 NMR. 1. Introduction. Tellurium is the noblest metalloid which may act as a Lewis acid as well as Lewis base. The ligand chemistry of tellurium, which acts as a 'soft' donor, was ...

  16. Can ligand addition to soil enhance Cd phytoextraction? A mechanistic model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhongbing; Schneider, André; Nguyen, Christophe; Sterckeman, Thibault

    2014-11-01

    Phytoextraction is a potential method for cleaning Cd-polluted soils. Ligand addition to soil is expected to enhance Cd phytoextraction. However, experimental results show that this addition has contradictory effects on plant Cd uptake. A mechanistic model simulating the reaction kinetics (adsorption on solid phase, complexation in solution), transport (convection, diffusion) and root absorption (symplastic, apoplastic) of Cd and its complexes in soil was developed. This was used to calculate plant Cd uptake with and without ligand addition in a great number of combinations of soil, ligand and plant characteristics, varying the parameters within defined domains. Ligand addition generally strongly reduced hydrated Cd (Cd(2+)) concentration in soil solution through Cd complexation. Dissociation of Cd complex ([Formula: see text]) could not compensate for this reduction, which greatly lowered Cd(2+) symplastic uptake by roots. The apoplastic uptake of [Formula: see text] was not sufficient to compensate for the decrease in symplastic uptake. This explained why in the majority of the cases, ligand addition resulted in the reduction of the simulated Cd phytoextraction. A few results showed an enhanced phytoextraction in very particular conditions (strong plant transpiration with high apoplastic Cd uptake capacity), but this enhancement was very limited, making chelant-enhanced phytoextraction poorly efficient for Cd.

  17. Influence of CCR7 ligand DNA preexposure on the magnitude and duration of immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yunsang; Seong, Kug Eo; Rouse, Richard J.D.; Rouse, Barry T.

    2003-01-01

    The CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 7 ligands CCL21 and CCL19 were recently described as essential elements for establishing the microenvironment needed to initiate optimal immune responses in secondary lymphoid tissues. In the present study we have kinetically investigated the primary responses of naive DO11.10 TCR-transgenic CD4+ T cells (OVA323-339 peptide specific) adoptively transferred into normal BALB/c mice given plasmid DNA encoding CCR7 ligands. The primary responses of CD4+ Tg-T cells in CCR7 ligand DNA recipients occurred more promptly, reaching levels higher than those observed in vector controls. In line with enhanced specific immunity, the T-cell population in CCR7 ligand recipients underwent more in vivo cell division following Ag stimulation, and a higher percentage of Ag-specific T cells expressed an activation phenotype. Moreover, the enhanced primary responses of naive CD4+ T cells appeared to act via affects on migration and maturation of CD11c+ dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes. In addition following mucosal challenge of herpes simplex virus-immune mice with virus, those that had received CCL21 or CCL19 during priming contained a higher frequency of responding CD4 T cells in lymph nodes and the site of infection. Moreover, CCL21- and CCL19-treated mice showed less severe disease and better survival following challenge. Our results are discussed in terms of the relevance of CCR7 ligand preimmunization to improve vaccine

  18. Kinetics in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, A.

    1987-01-01

    In this chapter the authors first briefly review the kinetics of first- and second-order processes for continuous and pulsed irradiation, without taking the effects of nonhomogeneous formation of the species into consideration. They also discuss diffusion controlled reactions under conditions where interactions of more than two particles can be neglected, first the kinetics of the diffusion-controlled reaction of randomly generated species (homogeneous reaction) and then that of isolated pairs of reactants. The latter is often called geminate kinetics when dealing with pairs of oppositely charged species; they shall use this term for the kinetics of isolated pairs in general. In the last section they discuss briefly the kinetics of groups of more than two reactants

  19. Non-kinetic capabilities: complementing the kinetic prevalence to targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Ducheine, P.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting is used in military doctrine to describe a military operational way, using (military) means to influence a target (or addressee) in order to achieve designated political and/or military goals. The four factors italicized are used to analyse non-kinetic targeting, complementing our knowledge and understanding of the kinetic prevalence. Paradoxically, non-kinetic targeting is not recognized as a separate concept: kinetic and non-kinetic are intertwined facets of targeting. Kinetic tar...

  20. Uptake kinetics of the somatostatin receptor ligand [86Y]DOTA-dPhe1-Tyr3-octreotide ([86Y]SMT487) using positron emission tomography in non-human primates and calculation of radiation doses of the 90Y-labelled analogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesch, F.; Brockmann, J.; Koehle, M.

    1999-01-01

    [ 90 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide ([ 90 Y]-SMT487) has been suggested as a promising radiotherapeutic agent for somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours. In order to quantify the in vivo parameters of this compound and the radiation doses delivered to healthy organs, the analogue [ 86 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide was synthesised and its uptake measured in baboons using positron emission tomography (PET). [ 86 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide was administered at two different peptide concentrations, namely 2 and 100 μg peptide per m 2 body surface. The latter concentration corresponded to a radiotherapeutic dose. In a third protocol [ 86 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide was injected in conjunction with a simultaneous infusion of an amino acid solution that was high in l-lysine in order to lower the renal uptake of radioyttrium. Quantitative whole-body PET scans were recorded to measure the uptake kinetics for kidneys, liver, lung and bone. The individual absolute uptake kinetics were used to calculate the radiation doses for [ 90 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide according to the MIRD recommendations extrapolated to a 70-kg human. The highest radiation dose was received by the kidneys, with 2.1-3.3 mGy per MBq [ 90 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide injected. For the 100 μg/m 2 SMT487 protocol with amino acid co-infusion this dose was about 20%-40% lower than for the other two treatment protocols. The liver and the red bone marrow received doses ranging from 0.32 to 0.53 mGy and 0.03 to 0.07 mGy per MBq [ 90 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide, respectively. The average effective dose equivalent amounted to 0.23-0.32 mSv/MBq. The comparatively low estimated radiation doses to normal organs support the initiation of clinical phase I trials with [ 90 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide in patients with somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours. (orig.)

  1. Uptake kinetics of the somatostatin receptor ligand [{sup 86}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide ([{sup 86}Y]SMT487) using positron emission tomography in non-human primates and calculation of radiation doses of the {sup 90}Y-labelled analogue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesch, F.; Brockmann, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Nuklearchemie; Herzog, H.; Muehlensiepen, H.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizin; Stolz, B.; Marbach, P. [Novartis Pharma AG, Basel (Switzerland); Koehle, M. [Klinikum der Freien Universitaet Berlin (Germany)

    1999-04-29

    [{sup 90}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide ([{sup 90}Y]-SMT487) has been suggested as a promising radiotherapeutic agent for somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours. In order to quantify the in vivo parameters of this compound and the radiation doses delivered to healthy organs, the analogue [{sup 86}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide was synthesised and its uptake measured in baboons using positron emission tomography (PET). [{sup 86}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide was administered at two different peptide concentrations, namely 2 and 100 {mu}g peptide per m{sup 2} body surface. The latter concentration corresponded to a radiotherapeutic dose. In a third protocol [{sup 86}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide was injected in conjunction with a simultaneous infusion of an amino acid solution that was high in l-lysine in order to lower the renal uptake of radioyttrium. Quantitative whole-body PET scans were recorded to measure the uptake kinetics for kidneys, liver, lung and bone. The individual absolute uptake kinetics were used to calculate the radiation doses for [{sup 90}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide according to the MIRD recommendations extrapolated to a 70-kg human. The highest radiation dose was received by the kidneys, with 2.1-3.3 mGy per MBq [{sup 90}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide injected. For the 100 {mu}g/m{sup 2} SMT487 protocol with amino acid co-infusion this dose was about 20%-40% lower than for the other two treatment protocols. The liver and the red bone marrow received doses ranging from 0.32 to 0.53 mGy and 0.03 to 0.07 mGy per MBq [{sup 90}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide, respectively. The average effective dose equivalent amounted to 0.23-0.32 mSv/MBq. The comparatively low estimated radiation doses to normal organs support the initiation of clinical phase I trials with [{sup 90}Y]DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide in patients with somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours. (orig

  2. Kinetics of phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, M.O.; Aziz, M.J.; Stephenson, G.B.

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the Materials Research Society symposium on Kinetics of Phase Transformations held in Boston, Massachusetts from November 26-29, 1990. The symposium provided a forum for research results in an exceptionally broad and interdisciplinary field. Presentations covered nearly every major class of transformations including solid-solid, liquid-solid, transport phenomena and kinetics modeling. Papers involving amorphous Si, a dominant topic at the symposium, are collected in the first section followed by sections on four major areas of transformation kinetics. The symposium opened with joint sessions on ion and electron beam induced transformations in conjunction with the Surface Chemistry and Beam-Solid Interactions: symposium. Subsequent sessions focused on the areas of ordering and nonlinear diffusion kinetics, solid state reactions and amorphization, kinetics and defects of amorphous silicon, and kinetics of melting and solidification. Seven internationally recognized invited speakers reviewed many of the important problems and recent results in these areas, including defects in amorphous Si, crystal to glass transformations, ordering kinetics, solid-state amorphization, computer modeling, and liquid/solid transformations

  3. Correcting ligands, metabolites, and pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vriend Gert

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wide range of research areas in bioinformatics, molecular biology and medicinal chemistry require precise chemical structure information about molecules and reactions, e.g. drug design, ligand docking, metabolic network reconstruction, and systems biology. Most available databases, however, treat chemical structures more as illustrations than as a datafield in its own right. Lack of chemical accuracy impedes progress in the areas mentioned above. We present a database of metabolites called BioMeta that augments the existing pathway databases by explicitly assessing the validity, correctness, and completeness of chemical structure and reaction information. Description The main bulk of the data in BioMeta were obtained from the KEGG Ligand database. We developed a tool for chemical structure validation which assesses the chemical validity and stereochemical completeness of a molecule description. The validation tool was used to examine the compounds in BioMeta, showing that a relatively small number of compounds had an incorrect constitution (connectivity only, not considering stereochemistry and that a considerable number (about one third had incomplete or even incorrect stereochemistry. We made a large effort to correct the errors and to complete the structural descriptions. A total of 1468 structures were corrected and/or completed. We also established the reaction balance of the reactions in BioMeta and corrected 55% of the unbalanced (stoichiometrically incorrect reactions in an automatic procedure. The BioMeta database was implemented in PostgreSQL and provided with a web-based interface. Conclusion We demonstrate that the validation of metabolite structures and reactions is a feasible and worthwhile undertaking, and that the validation results can be used to trigger corrections and improvements to BioMeta, our metabolite database. BioMeta provides some tools for rational drug design, reaction searches, and

  4. Autocrine signal transmission with extracellular ligand degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muratov, C B; Posta, F; Shvartsman, S Y

    2009-01-01

    Traveling waves of cell signaling in epithelial layers orchestrate a number of important processes in developing and adult tissues. These waves can be mediated by positive feedback autocrine loops, a mode of cell signaling where binding of a diffusible extracellular ligand to a cell surface receptor can lead to further ligand release. We formulate and analyze a biophysical model that accounts for ligand-induced ligand release, extracellular ligand diffusion and ligand–receptor interaction. We focus on the case when the main mode for ligand degradation is extracellular and analyze the problem with the sharp threshold positive feedback nonlinearity. We derive expressions that link the speed of propagation and other characteristics of traveling waves to the parameters of the biophysical processes, such as diffusion rates, receptor expression level, etc. Analyzing the derived expressions we found that traveling waves in such systems can exhibit a number of unusual properties, e.g. non-monotonic dependence of the speed of propagation on ligand diffusivity. Our results for the fully developed traveling fronts can be used to analyze wave initiation from localized perturbations, a scenario that frequently arises in the in vitro models of epithelial wound healing, and guide future modeling studies of cell communication in epithelial layers

  5. Irreversible processes kinetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Brush, Stephen G

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic Theory, Volume 2: Irreversible Processes deals with the kinetic theory of gases and the irreversible processes they undergo. It includes the two papers by James Clerk Maxwell and Ludwig Boltzmann in which the basic equations for transport processes in gases are formulated, together with the first derivation of Boltzmann's ""H-theorem"" and a discussion of this theorem, along with the problem of irreversibility.Comprised of 10 chapters, this volume begins with an introduction to the fundamental nature of heat and of gases, along with Boltzmann's work on the kinetic theory of gases and s

  6. Isotopic studies on ligand exchange between complex and simple cyanides in water medium and in liquid hydrogen cyanide. Part 2. Radiocyanide ligand exchange study between hydrogen cyanide and octacyanotungstate(4) in water solutions of mineral acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.

    1979-01-01

    Radiocyanide ligand exchange between potassium octacyanotungstate(4) and hydrogen cyanide in aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid and between octacyanotungstic(4) acid and hydrogen cyanide in aqueous solutions have been investigated experimentally. The observed enhancement of the rate of ligand exchange in acidic medium has been rationalized in terms of the proposed new general reaction scheme taking into account the reversible decomposition of complex cyanide at low pH, and irreversible one at high pH. The discussion on the results obtained has been carried out within the framework of derived formal kinetic equations. (author)

  7. An Analogy Using Pennies and Dimes to Explain Chemical Kinetics Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Figueroa, Jose E.; Perez, Wanda I.; Lopez, Jose R.; Moore-Russo, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors present an analogy that uses coins and graphical analysis to teach kinetics concepts and resolve pseudo-first-order rate constants related to transition-metal complexes ligand-solvent exchange reactions. They describe an activity that is directed to upper-division undergraduate and graduate students. The activity…

  8. A Versatile Dinucleating Ligand Containing Sulfonamide Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundberg, Jonas; Witt, Hannes; Cameron, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    ligand can be prepared in aqueous solutions using only divalent metal ions. Two of the copper(II) complexes, [Cu2(psmp)(OH)] and [Cu2(psmp)(OAc)2]-, demonstrate the anticipated 1:2 ligand/metal stoichiometry and show that the dimetallic binding site created for exogenous ligands possesses high inherent...... of antiferromagnetic coupling. This is corroborated computationally by broken-symmetry density functional theory, which for isotropic modeling of the coupling predicts an antiferromagnetic coupling strength of J = 70.5 cm-1....

  9. SHORT COMMUNICATION CATALYTIC KINETIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of ...

  10. γ-Sultam-cored N,N-ligands in the ruthenium(ii)-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of aryl ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, Slavko; Modec, Barbara; Stephan, Michel; Mohar, Barbara

    2016-02-14

    The synthesis of new enantiopure syn- and anti-3-(α-aminobenzyl)-benzo-γ-sultam ligands 6 and their application in the ruthenium(ii)-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) of ketones using formic acid/triethylamine is described. In particular, benzo-fused cyclic ketones afforded excellent enantioselectivities in reasonable time employing a low loading of the syn ligand-containing catalyst. A never-before-seen dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) during reduction of a γ-keto carboxylic ester (S7) derivative of 1-indanone is realized leading as well to excellent induction.

  11. Ligand based pharmacophore modelling of anticancer histone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-21

    Jun 21, 2010 ... The study was carried out using the software Ligand Scout (version .... Computer Science, for his great help and support. We are also grateful to Faculty of Engineering and applied. Sciences, Mohammad .... Aided Mol. Design ...

  12. Synthesis and characterization β-ketoamine ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaid, Nurzati Amani Mohamed; Hassan, Nur Hasyareeda; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd

    2018-04-01

    β-ketoamine ligands are important members of heterodonor ligand because of their ease of preparation and modification of both steric and/or electronic effects. Complexes with β-ketoamine has received much less attention and there has been no study about this complex with β-ketoamine in ionic liquid reported. Two type of β-ketoamine ligands which are 4-amino-3-pentene-2-onato (A) and 3-amino-2-butenoic acid methyl ester (B) have been synthesized in this work. The resulting compound formed was characterized using standard spectroscopic and structural techniques which includes 1H and 13C, NMR spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy. The 1H and 13C NMR spectrum displayed all the expected signals with correct integration and multiplicity. And it is proved that there are some differences between two ligands as observed in NMR and FTIR spectrum.

  13. EGFR Activation by Spatially Restricted Ligands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clouse, Katherine N; Goodrich, Jennifer S

    2006-01-01

    ...) activity has been associated with an increased prognosis of breast cancer. During cogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster local Egfr activation by the spatially-restricted TGFalpha-like ligand Gurken (Grk...

  14. EGFR Activation by Spatially Restricted Ligands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goodrich, Jennifer S

    2005-01-01

    ...) activity has been associated with an increased prognosis of breast cancer. During oogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster, local EGFR activation by the spatially restricted TGF alpha-like ligand, Gurken (Grk...

  15. Cell-specific targeting by heterobivalent ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josan, Jatinder S; Handl, Heather L; Sankaranarayanan, Rajesh; Xu, Liping; Lynch, Ronald M; Vagner, Josef; Mash, Eugene A; Hruby, Victor J; Gillies, Robert J

    2011-07-20

    Current cancer therapies exploit either differential metabolism or targeting to specific individual gene products that are overexpressed in aberrant cells. The work described herein proposes an alternative approach--to specifically target combinations of cell-surface receptors using heteromultivalent ligands ("receptor combination approach"). As a proof-of-concept that functionally unrelated receptors can be noncovalently cross-linked with high avidity and specificity, a series of heterobivalent ligands (htBVLs) were constructed from analogues of the melanocortin peptide ligand ([Nle(4), dPhe(7)]-α-MSH) and the cholecystokinin peptide ligand (CCK-8). Binding of these ligands to cells expressing the human Melanocortin-4 receptor and the Cholecystokinin-2 receptor was analyzed. The MSH(7) and CCK(6) were tethered with linkers of varying rigidity and length, constructed from natural and/or synthetic building blocks. Modeling data suggest that a linker length of 20-50 Å is needed to simultaneously bind these two different G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). These ligands exhibited up to 24-fold enhancement in binding affinity to cells that expressed both (bivalent binding), compared to cells with only one (monovalent binding) of the cognate receptors. The htBVLs had up to 50-fold higher affinity than that of a monomeric CCK ligand, i.e., Ac-CCK(6)-NH(2). Cell-surface targeting of these two cell types with labeled heteromultivalent ligand demonstrated high avidity and specificity, thereby validating the receptor combination approach. This ability to noncovalently cross-link heterologous receptors and target individual cells using a receptor combination approach opens up new possibilities for specific cell targeting in vivo for therapy or imaging.

  16. NMRKIN: Simulating line shapes from two-dimensional spectra of proteins upon ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, Ulrich L.; Schaffhausen, Brian

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of the shape of signals in NMR spectra is a powerful tool to study exchange and reaction kinetics. Line shapes in two-dimensional spectra of proteins recorded for titrations with ligands provide information about binding rates observed at individual residues. Here we describe a fast method to simulate a series of line shapes derived from two-dimensional spectra of a protein during a ligand titration. This procedure, which takes the mutual effects of two dimensions into account, has been implemented in MATLAB as an add-on to NMRLab (Guenther et al., 2000). In addition, more complex kinetic models, including sequential and parallel reactions, were simulated to demonstrate common features of more complex line shapes which could be encountered in protein-ligand interactions. As an example of this method, we describe its application to line shapes obtained for a titration of the p85 N-SH2 domain of PI3-kinase with a peptide derived from polyomavirus middle T antigen (MT)

  17. Semiconductor Quantum Dots with Photoresponsive Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansalone, Lorenzo; Tang, Sicheng; Zhang, Yang; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; Raymo, Françisco M; Garcia-Amorós, Jaume

    2016-10-01

    Photochromic or photocaged ligands can be anchored to the outer shell of semiconductor quantum dots in order to control the photophysical properties of these inorganic nanocrystals with optical stimulations. One of the two interconvertible states of the photoresponsive ligands can be designed to accept either an electron or energy from the excited quantum dots and quench their luminescence. Under these conditions, the reversible transformations of photochromic ligands or the irreversible cleavage of photocaged counterparts translates into the possibility to switch luminescence with external control. As an alternative to regulating the photophysics of a quantum dot via the photochemistry of its ligands, the photochemistry of the latter can be controlled by relying on the photophysics of the former. The transfer of excitation energy from a quantum dot to a photocaged ligand populates the excited state of the species adsorbed on the nanocrystal to induce a photochemical reaction. This mechanism, in conjunction with the large two-photon absorption cross section of quantum dots, can be exploited to release nitric oxide or to generate singlet oxygen under near-infrared irradiation. Thus, the combination of semiconductor quantum dots and photoresponsive ligands offers the opportunity to assemble nanostructured constructs with specific functions on the basis of electron or energy transfer processes. The photoswitchable luminescence and ability to photoinduce the release of reactive chemicals, associated with the resulting systems, can be particularly valuable in biomedical research and can, ultimately, lead to the realization of imaging probes for diagnostic applications as well as to therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer.

  18. Designer TGFβ superfamily ligands with diversified functionality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P Allendorph

    Full Text Available Transforming Growth Factor--beta (TGFβ superfamily ligands, including Activins, Growth and Differentiation Factors (GDFs, and Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs, are excellent targets for protein-based therapeutics because of their pervasiveness in numerous developmental and cellular processes. We developed a strategy termed RASCH (Random Assembly of Segmental Chimera and Heteromer, to engineer chemically-refoldable TGFβ superfamily ligands with unique signaling properties. One of these engineered ligands, AB208, created from Activin-βA and BMP-2 sequences, exhibits the refolding characteristics of BMP-2 while possessing Activin-like signaling attributes. Further, we find several additional ligands, AB204, AB211, and AB215, which initiate the intracellular Smad1-mediated signaling pathways more strongly than BMP-2 but show no sensitivity to the natural BMP antagonist Noggin unlike natural BMP-2. In another design, incorporation of a short N-terminal segment from BMP-2 was sufficient to enable chemical refolding of BMP-9, without which was never produced nor refolded. Our studies show that the RASCH strategy enables us to expand the functional repertoire of TGFβ superfamily ligands through development of novel chimeric TGFβ ligands with diverse biological and clinical values.

  19. Enzyme-catalyzed and binding reaction kinetics determined by titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lee D; Transtrum, Mark K; Quinn, Colette; Demarse, Neil

    2016-05-01

    Isothermal calorimetry allows monitoring of reaction rates via direct measurement of the rate of heat produced by the reaction. Calorimetry is one of very few techniques that can be used to measure rates without taking a derivative of the primary data. Because heat is a universal indicator of chemical reactions, calorimetry can be used to measure kinetics in opaque solutions, suspensions, and multiple phase systems and does not require chemical labeling. The only significant limitation of calorimetry for kinetic measurements is that the time constant of the reaction must be greater than the time constant of the calorimeter which can range from a few seconds to a few minutes. Calorimetry has the unique ability to provide both kinetic and thermodynamic data. This article describes the calorimetric methodology for determining reaction kinetics and reviews examples from recent literature that demonstrate applications of titration calorimetry to determine kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed and ligand binding reactions. A complete model for the temperature dependence of enzyme activity is presented. A previous method commonly used for blank corrections in determinations of equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for binding reactions is shown to be subject to significant systematic error. Methods for determination of the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions and for simultaneous determination of thermodynamics and kinetics of ligand binding reactions are reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. LigandRFs: random forest ensemble to identify ligand-binding residues from sequence information alone

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2014-12-03

    Background Protein-ligand binding is important for some proteins to perform their functions. Protein-ligand binding sites are the residues of proteins that physically bind to ligands. Despite of the recent advances in computational prediction for protein-ligand binding sites, the state-of-the-art methods search for similar, known structures of the query and predict the binding sites based on the solved structures. However, such structural information is not commonly available. Results In this paper, we propose a sequence-based approach to identify protein-ligand binding residues. We propose a combination technique to reduce the effects of different sliding residue windows in the process of encoding input feature vectors. Moreover, due to the highly imbalanced samples between the ligand-binding sites and non ligand-binding sites, we construct several balanced data sets, for each of which a random forest (RF)-based classifier is trained. The ensemble of these RF classifiers forms a sequence-based protein-ligand binding site predictor. Conclusions Experimental results on CASP9 and CASP8 data sets demonstrate that our method compares favorably with the state-of-the-art protein-ligand binding site prediction methods.

  1. Cell surface receptors for signal transduction and ligand transport: a design principles study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Shankaran

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Receptors constitute the interface of cells to their external environment. These molecules bind specific ligands involved in multiple processes, such as signal transduction and nutrient transport. Although a variety of cell surface receptors undergo endocytosis, the systems-level design principles that govern the evolution of receptor trafficking dynamics are far from fully understood. We have constructed a generalized mathematical model of receptor-ligand binding and internalization to understand how receptor internalization dynamics encodes receptor function and regulation. A given signaling or transport receptor system represents a particular implementation of this module with a specific set of kinetic parameters. Parametric analysis of the response of receptor systems to ligand inputs reveals that receptor systems can be characterized as being: i avidity-controlled where the response control depends primarily on the extracellular ligand capture efficiency, ii consumption-controlled where the ability to internalize surface-bound ligand is the primary control parameter, and iii dual-sensitivity where both the avidity and consumption parameters are important. We show that the transferrin and low-density lipoprotein receptors are avidity-controlled, the vitellogenin receptor is consumption-controlled, and the epidermal growth factor receptor is a dual-sensitivity receptor. Significantly, we show that ligand-induced endocytosis is a mechanism to enhance the accuracy of signaling receptors rather than merely serving to attenuate signaling. Our analysis reveals that the location of a receptor system in the avidity-consumption parameter space can be used to understand both its function and its regulation.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of mixed ligand chiral nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Guven, Zekiye P.

    2016-06-22

    Chiral mixed ligand silver nanoclusters were synthesized in the presence of a chiral and an achiral ligand. While the chiral ligand led mostly to the formation of nanoparticles, the presence of the achiral ligand drastically increased the yield of nanoclusters with enhanced chiral properties. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of mixed ligand chiral nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Guven, Zekiye P.; Ustbas, Burcin; Harkness, Kellen M.; Coskun, Hikmet; Joshi, Chakra Prasad; Besong, Tabot M.D.; Stellacci, Francesco; Bakr, Osman; Akbulut, Ozge

    2016-01-01

    Chiral mixed ligand silver nanoclusters were synthesized in the presence of a chiral and an achiral ligand. While the chiral ligand led mostly to the formation of nanoparticles, the presence of the achiral ligand drastically increased the yield of nanoclusters with enhanced chiral properties. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. A Novel Selective Inverse Agonist of the CB2 Receptor as a Radiolabeled Tool Compound for Kinetic Binding Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martella, Andrea; Sijben, Huub; Rufer, Arne C; Grether, Uwe; Fingerle, Juergen; Ullmer, Christoph; Hartung, Thomas; IJzerman, Adriaan P; van der Stelt, Mario; Heitman, Laura H

    2017-10-01

    The endocannabinoid system, and in particular the cannabinoid type 2 receptor (CB2R), raised the interest of many medicinal chemistry programs for its therapeutic relevance in several (patho)physiologic processes. However, the physico-chemical properties of tool compounds for CB2R (e.g., the radioligand [ 3 H]CP55,940) are not optimal, despite the research efforts in developing effective drugs to target this system. At the same time, the importance of drug-target binding kinetics is growing since the kinetic binding profile of a ligand may provide important insights for the resulting in vivo efficacy. In this context we synthesized and characterized [ 3 H]RO6957022, a highly selective CB2R inverse agonist, as a radiolabeled tool compound. In equilibrium and kinetic binding experiments [ 3 H]RO6957022 showed high affinity for human CB2R with fast association ( k on ) and moderate dissociation ( k off ) kinetics. To demonstrate the robustness of [ 3 H]RO6957022 binding, affinity studies were carried out for a wide range of CB2R reference ligands, spanning the range of full, partial, and inverse agonists. Finally, we used [ 3 H]RO6957022 to study the kinetic binding profiles (i.e., k on and k off values) of selected synthetic and endogenous (i.e., 2-arachidonoylglycerol, anandamide, and noladin ether) CB2R ligands by competition association experiments. All tested ligands, and in particular the endocannabinoids, displayed distinct kinetic profiles, shedding more light on their mechanism of action and the importance of association rates in the determination of CB2R affinity. Altogether, this study shows that the use of a novel tool compound, i.e., [ 3 H]RO6957022, can support the development of novel ligands with a repertoire of kinetic binding profiles for CB2R. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  5. Impact of protein and ligand impurities on ITC-derived protein-ligand thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüner, Stefan; Neeb, Manuel; Barandun, Luzi Jakob; Sielaff, Frank; Hohn, Christoph; Kojima, Shun; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Diederich, François; Klebe, Gerhard

    2014-09-01

    The thermodynamic characterization of protein-ligand interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful tool in drug design, giving valuable insight into the interaction driving forces. ITC is thought to require protein and ligand solutions of high quality, meaning both the absence of contaminants as well as accurately determined concentrations. Ligands synthesized to deviating purity and protein of different pureness were titrated by ITC. Data curation was attempted also considering information from analytical techniques to correct stoichiometry. We used trypsin and tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (TGT), together with high affinity ligands to investigate the effect of errors in protein concentration as well as the impact of ligand impurities on the apparent thermodynamics. We found that errors in protein concentration did not change the thermodynamic properties obtained significantly. However, most ligand impurities led to pronounced changes in binding enthalpy. If protein binding of the respective impurity is not expected, the actual ligand concentration was corrected for and the thus revised data compared to thermodynamic properties obtained with the respective pure ligand. Even in these cases, we observed differences in binding enthalpy of about 4kJ⋅mol(-1), which is considered significant. Our results indicate that ligand purity is the critical parameter to monitor if accurate thermodynamic data of a protein-ligand complex are to be recorded. Furthermore, artificially changing fitting parameters to obtain a sound interaction stoichiometry in the presence of uncharacterized ligand impurities may lead to thermodynamic parameters significantly deviating from the accurate thermodynamic signature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural characterization of natural nickel and copper binding ligands along the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal transect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene M Boiteau

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Organic ligands form strong complexes with many trace elements in seawater. Various metals can compete for the same ligand chelation sites, and the final speciation of bound metals is determined by relative binding affinities, concentrations of binding sites, uncomplexed metal concentrations, and association/dissociation kinetics. Different ligands have a wide range of metal affinities and specificities. However, the chemical composition of these ligands in the marine environment remains poorly constrained, which has hindered progress in modeling marine metal speciation. In this study, we detected and characterized natural ligands that bind copper (Cu and nickel (Ni in the eastern South Pacific Ocean with liquid chromatography tandem inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC-ICPMS, and high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS. Dissolved Cu, Ni, and ligand concentrations were highest near the coast. Chromatographically unresolved polar compounds dominated ligands isolated near the coast by solid phase extraction. Offshore, metal and ligand concentrations decreased, but several new ligands appeared. One major ligand was detected that bound both Cu2+ and Ni2+. Based on accurate mass and fragmentation measurements, this compound has a molecular formula of C20H21N4O8S2 + M+ (M = metal isotope and contains several azole-like metal binding groups. Additional lipophilic Ni complexes were also present only in oligotrophic waters, with masses of 649, 698, and 712 m/z (corresponding to the 58Ni metal complex. Molecular formulae of C32H54N3O6S2Ni+ and C33H56N3O6S2Ni+ were determined for two of these compounds. Addition of Cu and Ni to the samples also revealed the presence of additional compounds that can bind both Ni and Cu. Although these specific compounds represent a small fraction of the total dissolved Cu and Ni pool, they highlight the compositional diversity and spatial heterogeneity of marine Ni and Cu ligands, as

  7. Dual-Ligand Modified Polymer-Lipid Hybrid Nanoparticles for Docetaxel Targeting Delivery to Her2/neu Overexpressed Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhe; Tang, Wenxin; Luo, Xingen; Zhang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Chao; Li, Hao; Gao, Di; Luo, Huiyan; Jiang, Qing; Liu, Jie

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a dual-ligand polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticle drug delivery vehicle comprised of an anti-HER2/neu peptide (AHNP) mimic with a modified HIV-1 Tat (mTAT) was established for the targeted treatment of Her2/neu-overexpressing cells. The resultant dual-ligand hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) consisted of a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) core, a near 90% surface coverage of the lipid monolayer, and a 5.7 nm hydrated polyethylene glycol shell. Ligand density optimization study revealed that cellular uptake efficiency of the hybrid NPs could be manipulated by controlling the surface-ligand densities. Furthermore, the cell uptake kinetics and mechanism studies showed that the dual-ligand modifications of hybrid NPs altered the cellular uptake pathway from caveolae-mediated endocytosis (CvME) to the multiple endocytic pathways, which would significantly enhance the NP internalization. Upon the systemic investigation of the cellular uptake behavior of dual-ligand hybrid NPs, docetaxel (DTX), a hydrophobic anticancer drug, was successfully encapsulated into dual-ligand hybrid NPs with high drug loading for Her2/neu-overexpressing SK-BR-3 breast cancer cell treatment. The DTX-loaded dual-ligand hybrid NPs showed a decreased burst release and a more gradual sustained drug release property. Because of the synergistic effect of dual-ligand modification, DTX-loaded dual-ligand hybrid NPs exerted substantially better therapeutic potency against SK-BR-3 cancer cells than other NP formulations and free DTX drugs. These results demonstrate that the dual-ligand hybrid NPs could be a promising vehicle for targeted drug delivery to treat breast cancer.

  8. Expression of nociceptive ligands in canine osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, S; Fadl-Alla, B A; Pondenis, H C; Zhang, X; Wycislo, K L; Lezmi, S; Fan, T M

    2015-01-01

    Canine osteosarcoma (OS) is associated with localized pain as a result of tissue injury from tumor infiltration and peritumoral inflammation. Malignant bone pain is caused by stimulation of peripheral pain receptors, termed nociceptors, which reside in the localized tumor microenvironment, including the periosteal and intramedullary bone cavities. Several nociceptive ligands have been determined to participate directly or indirectly in generating bone pain associated with diverse skeletal abnormalities. Canine OS cells actively produce nociceptive ligands with the capacity to directly or indirectly activate peripheral pain receptors residing in the bone tumor microenvironment. Ten dogs with appendicular OS. Expression of nerve growth factor, endothelin-1, and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 was characterized in OS cell lines and naturally occurring OS samples. In 10 dogs with OS, circulating concentrations of nociceptive ligands were quantified and correlated with subjective pain scores and tumor volume in patients treated with standardized palliative therapies. Canine OS cells express and secrete nerve growth factor, endothelin-1, and prostaglandin E2. Naturally occurring OS samples uniformly express nociceptive ligands. In a subset of OS-bearing dogs, circulating nociceptive ligand concentrations were detectable but failed to correlate with pain status. Localized foci of nerve terminal proliferation were identified in a minority of primary bone tumor samples. Canine OS cells express nociceptive ligands, potentially permitting active participation of OS cells in the generation of malignant bone pain. Specific inhibitors of nociceptive ligand signaling pathways might improve pain control in dogs with OS. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  9. Relativistic Chiral Kinetic Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephanov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    This very brief review of the recent progress in chiral kinetic theory is based on the results of Refs. [J.-Y. Chen, D. T. Son, M. A. Stephanov, H.-U. Yee, Y. Yin, Lorentz Invariance in Chiral Kinetic Theory, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 (18) (2014) 182302. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.182302); J.-Y. Chen, D. T. Son, M. A. Stephanov, Collisions in Chiral Kinetic Theory, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115 (2) (2015) 021601. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.021601); M. A. Stephanov, H.-U. Yee, The no-drag frame for anomalous chiral fluid, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 (12) (2016) 122302. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.122302)].

  10. Relativistic Chiral Kinetic Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephanov, Mikhail

    2016-12-15

    This very brief review of the recent progress in chiral kinetic theory is based on the results of Refs. [J.-Y. Chen, D. T. Son, M. A. Stephanov, H.-U. Yee, Y. Yin, Lorentz Invariance in Chiral Kinetic Theory, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 (18) (2014) 182302. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.182302); J.-Y. Chen, D. T. Son, M. A. Stephanov, Collisions in Chiral Kinetic Theory, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115 (2) (2015) 021601. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.021601); M. A. Stephanov, H.-U. Yee, The no-drag frame for anomalous chiral fluid, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 (12) (2016) 122302. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.122302)].

  11. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  12. Immobilisation of ligands by radio-derivatized polymers; Immobilisering av ligander med radioderiverte polymerer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, J.M.; Fritsch, P.

    1995-01-30

    The invention relates to radio-derivatized polymers and a method of producing them by contacting non-polymerizable conjugands with radiolysable polymers in the presence of irradiation. The resulting radio-derivatized polymers can be further linked with ligand of organic or inorganic nature to immobilize such ligands. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Long-lived charge-separated states in ligand-stabilized silver clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Pelton, Matthew; Tang, Yun; Bakr, Osman; Stellacci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Recently developed synthesis methods allow for the production of atomically monodisperse clusters of silver atoms stabilized in solution by aromatic thiol ligands, which exhibit intense absorption peaks throughout the visible and near-IR spectral regions. Here we investigated the time-dependent optical properties of these clusters. We observed two kinetic processes following ultrafast laser excitation of any of the absorption peaks: a rapid decay, with a time constant of 1 ps or less, and a slow decay, with a time constant that can be longer than 300 ns. Both time constants decrease as the polarity of the solvent increases, indicating that the two processes correspond to the formation and recombination, respectively, of a charge-separated state. The long lifetime of this state and the broad optical absorption spectrum mean that the ligand-stabilized silver clusters are promising materials for solar energy harvesting. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  14. Long-lived charge-separated states in ligand-stabilized silver clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Pelton, Matthew

    2012-07-25

    Recently developed synthesis methods allow for the production of atomically monodisperse clusters of silver atoms stabilized in solution by aromatic thiol ligands, which exhibit intense absorption peaks throughout the visible and near-IR spectral regions. Here we investigated the time-dependent optical properties of these clusters. We observed two kinetic processes following ultrafast laser excitation of any of the absorption peaks: a rapid decay, with a time constant of 1 ps or less, and a slow decay, with a time constant that can be longer than 300 ns. Both time constants decrease as the polarity of the solvent increases, indicating that the two processes correspond to the formation and recombination, respectively, of a charge-separated state. The long lifetime of this state and the broad optical absorption spectrum mean that the ligand-stabilized silver clusters are promising materials for solar energy harvesting. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  15. Relativistic Kinetic Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereshchagin, Gregory V.; Aksenov, Alexey G.

    2017-02-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Acronyms and definitions; Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Foundations: 1. Basic concepts; 2. Kinetic equation; 3. Averaging; 4. Conservation laws and equilibrium; 5. Relativistic BBGKY hierarchy; 6. Basic parameters in gases and plasmas; Part II. Numerical Methods: 7. The basics of computational physics; 8. Direct integration of Boltzmann equations; 9. Multidimensional hydrodynamics; Part III. Applications: 10. Wave dispersion in relativistic plasma; 11. Thermalization in relativistic plasma; 12. Kinetics of particles in strong fields; 13. Compton scattering in astrophysics and cosmology; 14. Self-gravitating systems; 15. Neutrinos, gravitational collapse and supernovae; Appendices; Bibliography; Index.

  16. Quantum kinetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bonitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book presents quantum kinetic theory in a comprehensive way. The focus is on density operator methods and on non-equilibrium Green functions. The theory allows to rigorously treat nonequilibrium dynamics in quantum many-body systems. Of particular interest are ultrafast processes in plasmas, condensed matter and trapped atoms that are stimulated by rapidly developing experiments with short pulse lasers and free electron lasers. To describe these experiments theoretically, the most powerful approach is given by non-Markovian quantum kinetic equations that are discussed in detail, including computational aspects.

  17. A General Ligand Design for Gold Catalysis allowing Ligand-Directed Anti Nucleophilic Attack of Alkynes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanzhao; Wang, Zhixun; Li, Yuxue; Wu, Gongde; Cao, Zheng; Zhang, Liming

    2014-01-01

    Most homogenous gold catalyses demand ≥0.5 mol % catalyst loading. Due to the high cost of gold, these reactions are unlikely to be applicable in medium or large scale applications. Here we disclose a novel ligand design based on the privileged biphenyl-2-phosphine framework that offers a potentially general approach to dramatically lowering catalyst loading. In this design, an amide group at the 3’ position of the ligand framework directs and promotes nucleophilic attack at the ligand gold complex-activated alkyne, which is unprecedented in homogeneous gold catalysis considering the spatial challenge of using ligand to reach antiapproaching nucleophile in a linear P-Au-alkyne centroid structure. With such a ligand, the gold(I) complex becomes highly efficient in catalyzing acid addition to alkynes, with a turnover number up to 99,000. Density functional theory calculations support the role of the amide moiety in directing the attack of carboxylic acid via hydrogen bonding. PMID:24704803

  18. A new class of PN3-pincer ligands for metal–ligand cooperative catalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huaifeng

    2014-12-01

    Work on a new class of PN3-pincer ligands for metal-ligand cooperative catalysis is reviewed. While the field of the pyridine-based PN3-transition metal pincer complexes is still relatively young, many important applications of these complexes have already emerged. In several cases, the PN3-pincer complexes for metal-ligand cooperative catalysis result in significantly improved or unprecedented activities. The synthesis and coordination chemistry of PN3-pincer ligands are briefly summarized first to cover the synthetic routes for their preparation, followed by a focus review on their applications in catalysis. A specific emphasis is placed on the later section about the role of PN3-pincer ligands\\' dearomatization-rearomatization steps during the catalytic cycles. The mechanistic insights from density functional theory (DFT) calculations are also discussed.

  19. A new class of PN3-pincer ligands for metal–ligand cooperative catalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huaifeng; Zheng, Bin; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Work on a new class of PN3-pincer ligands for metal-ligand cooperative catalysis is reviewed. While the field of the pyridine-based PN3-transition metal pincer complexes is still relatively young, many important applications of these complexes have already emerged. In several cases, the PN3-pincer complexes for metal-ligand cooperative catalysis result in significantly improved or unprecedented activities. The synthesis and coordination chemistry of PN3-pincer ligands are briefly summarized first to cover the synthetic routes for their preparation, followed by a focus review on their applications in catalysis. A specific emphasis is placed on the later section about the role of PN3-pincer ligands' dearomatization-rearomatization steps during the catalytic cycles. The mechanistic insights from density functional theory (DFT) calculations are also discussed.

  20. Effects of PPARγ ligands on vascular tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomone, Salvatore; Drago, Filippo

    2012-06-01

    Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ (PPARγ), originally described as a transcription factor for genes of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, has been more recently studied in the context of cardiovascular pathophysiology. Here, we review the available data on PPARγ ligands as modulator of vascular tone. PPARγ ligands include: thiazolidinediones (used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus), glitazars (bind and activate both PPARγ and PPARα), and other experimental drugs (still in development) that exploit the chemistry of thiazolidinediones as a scaffold for PPARγ-independent pharmacological properties. In this review, we examine both short (mostly from in vitro data)- and long (mostly from in vivo data)-term effects of PPARγ ligands that extend from PPARγ-independent vascular effects to PPARγ-dependent gene expression. Because endothelium is a master regulator of vascular tone, we have attempted to differentiate between endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent effects of PPARγ ligands. Based on available data, we conclude that PPARγ ligands appear to influence vascular tone in different experimental paradigms, most often in terms of vasodilatation (potentially increasing blood flow to some tissues). These effects on vascular tone, although potentially beneficial, must be weighed against specific cardiovascular warnings that may apply to some drugs, such as rosiglitazone.

  1. LIBRA: LIgand Binding site Recognition Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Le Viet; Caprari, Silvia; Bizai, Massimiliano; Toti, Daniele; Polticelli, Fabio

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, structural genomics and ab initio molecular modeling activities are leading to the availability of a large number of structural models of proteins whose biochemical function is not known. The aim of this study was the development of a novel software tool that, given a protein's structural model, predicts the presence and identity of active sites and/or ligand binding sites. The algorithm implemented by ligand binding site recognition application (LIBRA) is based on a graph theory approach to find the largest subset of similar residues between an input protein and a collection of known functional sites. The algorithm makes use of two predefined databases for active sites and ligand binding sites, respectively, derived from the Catalytic Site Atlas and the Protein Data Bank. Tests indicate that LIBRA is able to identify the correct binding/active site in 90% of the cases analyzed, 90% of which feature the identified site as ranking first. As far as ligand binding site recognition is concerned, LIBRA outperforms other structure-based ligand binding sites detection tools with which it has been compared. The application, developed in Java SE 7 with a Swing GUI embedding a JMol applet, can be run on any OS equipped with a suitable Java Virtual Machine (JVM), and is available at the following URL: http://www.computationalbiology.it/software/LIBRAv1.zip. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Dockomatic - automated ligand creation and docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Casey W; Jacob, Reed B; McDougal, Owen M; Hampikian, Greg; Andersen, Tim

    2010-11-08

    The application of computational modeling to rationally design drugs and characterize macro biomolecular receptors has proven increasingly useful due to the accessibility of computing clusters and clouds. AutoDock is a well-known and powerful software program used to model ligand to receptor binding interactions. In its current version, AutoDock requires significant amounts of user time to setup and run jobs, and collect results. This paper presents DockoMatic, a user friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI) application that eases and automates the creation and management of AutoDock jobs for high throughput screening of ligand to receptor interactions. DockoMatic allows the user to invoke and manage AutoDock jobs on a single computer or cluster, including jobs for evaluating secondary ligand interactions. It also automates the process of collecting, summarizing, and viewing results. In addition, DockoMatic automates creation of peptide ligand .pdb files from strings of single-letter amino acid abbreviations. DockoMatic significantly reduces the complexity of managing multiple AutoDock jobs by facilitating ligand and AutoDock job creation and management.

  3. Dockomatic - automated ligand creation and docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hampikian Greg

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of computational modeling to rationally design drugs and characterize macro biomolecular receptors has proven increasingly useful due to the accessibility of computing clusters and clouds. AutoDock is a well-known and powerful software program used to model ligand to receptor binding interactions. In its current version, AutoDock requires significant amounts of user time to setup and run jobs, and collect results. This paper presents DockoMatic, a user friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI application that eases and automates the creation and management of AutoDock jobs for high throughput screening of ligand to receptor interactions. Results DockoMatic allows the user to invoke and manage AutoDock jobs on a single computer or cluster, including jobs for evaluating secondary ligand interactions. It also automates the process of collecting, summarizing, and viewing results. In addition, DockoMatic automates creation of peptide ligand .pdb files from strings of single-letter amino acid abbreviations. Conclusions DockoMatic significantly reduces the complexity of managing multiple AutoDock jobs by facilitating ligand and AutoDock job creation and management.

  4. Design, synthesis and evaluation of 4,7-diamino-1,10-phenanthroline G-quadruplex ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Corvinius; Borch, Jonas; Ulven, Trond

    2009-01-01

    the central ionic column. Introduction of positively charged side chains results in compounds with appreciable G-quadruplex stabilizing properties and high aqueous solubility, with the longer side chains giving more potent compounds. Ligands carrying guanidine side chains in general show higher quadruplex...... stabilizing activity and distinctly slower kinetic properties than their amino and dimethylamino analogues, possibly due to specific hydrogen bond interactions with the G-quadruplex loops....

  5. Ligand identification using electron-density map correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Cohn, Judith D.

    2007-01-01

    An automated ligand-fitting procedure is applied to (F o − F c )exp(iϕ c ) difference density for 200 commonly found ligands from macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank to identify ligands from density maps. A procedure for the identification of ligands bound in crystal structures of macromolecules is described. Two characteristics of the density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identification procedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of a set of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to the density. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the density with the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. The fingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the test ligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using a Z-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean and standard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatched ligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probability of observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. The procedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligands in the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57% of all ligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these two characteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identifications were made for representative (F o − F c )exp(iϕ c ) difference density from entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48% of the 200 cases, the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. This approach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in new macromolecular structures as well as in the identification of which ligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule

  6. Identification of individual protein-ligand NOEs in the limit of intermediate exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reibarkh, Mikhail; Malia, Thomas J.; Hopkins, Brian T.; Wagner, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    Interactions of proteins with small molecules or other macromolecules play key roles in many biological processes and in drug action, and NMR is an excellent tool for their structural characterization. Frequently, however, line broadening due to intermediate exchange completely eliminates the signals needed for measuring specific intermolecular NOEs. This limits the use of NMR for detailed structural studies in such kinetic situations. Here we show that an optimally chosen excess of ligand over protein can reduce the extent of line broadening for both the ligand and the protein. This makes observation of ligand resonances possible but reduces the size of the measurable NOEs due to the residual line broadening and the non-stoichiometric concentrations. Because the solubility of small molecule drug leads are often limited to high micromolar concentrations, protein concentrations are restricted to even lower values in the low micromolar range. At these non-stoichiometric concentrations and in the presence of significant residual line broadening, conventional NOESY experiments very often are not sensitive enough to observe intermolecular NOEs since the signals inverted by the NOESY preparation pulse sequence relax prior to significant NOE build up. Thus, we employ methods related to driven NOE spectroscopy to investigate protein-ligand interactions in the intermediate exchange regime. In this approach, individual protein resonances are selectively irradiated for up to five seconds to build up measurable NOEs at the ligand resonances. To enable saturation of individual protein resonances we prepare deuterated protein samples selectively protonated at a few sites so that the 1D 1 H spectrum of the protein is resolved well enough to permit irradiation of individual protein signals, which do not overlap with the ligand spectrum. This approach is suitable for measuring a sufficiently large number of protein-ligand NOEs that allow calculation of initial complex structures

  7. Oxidative desulfurization: kinetic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, S; Uppaluri, R; Purkait, M K

    2009-01-30

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H(2)O(2) over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel.

  8. Oxidative desulfurization: Kinetic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhir, S.; Uppaluri, R.; Purkait, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H 2 O 2 over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel

  9. Modeling chemical kinetics graphically

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heck, A.

    2012-01-01

    In literature on chemistry education it has often been suggested that students, at high school level and beyond, can benefit in their studies of chemical kinetics from computer supported activities. Use of system dynamics modeling software is one of the suggested quantitative approaches that could

  10. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    acetylchlorophosphonazo(CPApA) by hydrogen peroxide in 0.10 M phosphoric acid. A novel catalytic kinetic-spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of copper based on this principle. Copper(II) can be determined spectrophotometrically ...

  11. Kinetic energy budget details

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper presents the detailed turbulent kinetic energy budget and higher order statistics of flow behind a surface-mounted rib with and without superimposed acoustic excitation. Pattern recognition technique is used to determine the large-scale structure magnitude. It is observed that most of the turbulence ...

  12. Point kinetics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimpland, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    A normalized form of the point kinetics equations, a prompt jump approximation, and the Nordheim-Fuchs model are used to model nuclear systems. Reactivity feedback mechanisms considered include volumetric expansion, thermal neutron temperature effect, Doppler effect and void formation. A sample problem of an excursion occurring in a plutonium solution accidentally formed in a glovebox is presented

  13. Characteristic molecular vibrations of adenosine receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Hyun Keun; Yang, Jin-San; Joung, Je-Gun; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Oh, S June

    2015-02-13

    Although the regulation of membrane receptor activation is known to be crucial for molecular signal transduction, the molecular mechanism underlying receptor activation is not fully elucidated. Here we study the physicochemical nature of membrane receptor behavior by investigating the characteristic molecular vibrations of receptor ligands using computational chemistry and informatics methods. By using information gain, t-tests, and support vector machines, we have identified highly informative features of adenosine receptor (AdoR) ligand and corresponding functional amino acid residues such as Asn (6.55) of AdoR that has informative significance and is indispensable for ligand recognition of AdoRs. These findings may provide new perspectives and insights into the fundamental mechanism of class A G protein-coupled receptor activation. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Unbinding Kinetics of a p38 MAP Kinase Type II Inhibitor from Metadynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasnovas, Rodrigo; Limongelli, Vittorio; Tiwary, Pratyush; Carloni, Paolo; Parrinello, Michele

    2017-04-05

    Understanding the structural and energetic requisites of ligand binding toward its molecular target is of paramount relevance in drug design. In recent years, atomistic free energy calculations have proven to be a valid tool to complement experiments in characterizing the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of protein/ligand interaction. Here, we investigate, through a recently developed metadynamics-based protocol, the unbinding mechanism of an inhibitor of the pharmacologically relevant target p38 MAP kinase. We provide a thorough description of the ligand unbinding pathway identifying the most stable binding mode and other thermodynamically relevant poses. From our simulations, we estimated the unbinding rate as k off = 0.020 ± 0.011 s -1 . This is in good agreement with the experimental value (k off = 0.14 s -1 ). Next, we developed a Markov state model that allowed identifying the rate-limiting step of the ligand unbinding process. Our calculations further show that the solvation of the ligand and that of the active site play crucial roles in the unbinding process. This study paves the way to investigations on the unbinding dynamics of more complex p38 inhibitors and other pharmacologically relevant inhibitors in general, demonstrating that metadynamics can be a powerful tool in designing new drugs with engineered binding/unbinding kinetics.

  15. Supramolecular architectures constructed using angular bipyridyl ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, Sarah Ann

    2003-01-01

    This work details the synthesis and characterization of a series of coordination frameworks that are formed using bidentate angular N-donor ligands. Pyrimidine was reacted with metal(ll) nitrate salts. Reactions using Cd(NO 3 ) 2 receive particular focus and the analogous reactions using the linear ligand, pyrazine, were studied for comparison. In all cases, two-dimensional coordination networks were prepared. Structural diversity is observed for the Cd(ll) centres including metal-nitrate bridging. In contrast, first row transition metal nitrates form isostructural one-dimensional chains with only the bridging N-donor ligands generating polymeric propagation. The angular ligand, 2,4-bis(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (dpt), was reacted with Cd(NO 3 ) 2 and Zn(NO 3 ) 2 . Whereas Zn(NO 3 ) 2 compounds exhibit solvent mediated polymorphism, a range of structures were obtained for the reactions with Cd(NO 3 ) 2 , including the first example of a doubly parallel interpenetrated 4.8 2 net. 4,7-phenanthroline, was reacted with various metal(ll) nitrates as well as cobalt(ll) and copper(ll) halides. The ability of 4,7-phenanthroline to act as both a N-donor ligand and a hydrogen bond acceptor has been discussed. Reactions of CuSCN with pyrimidine yield an unusual three-dimensional structure in which polymeric propagation is not a result of ligand bridging. The reaction of CuSCN with dpt yielded structural supramolecular isomers. (author)

  16. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where "nonspecific" interactions contribute to biological function.

  17. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  18. Evaluation of several novel diamide based ligands for selective extraction of tetravalent plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaramakrishna, Mallampalli; Nayak, Shashikant K. [Heavy Water Board, V.S. Bhavan, Mumbai (India); Raut, Dhaval R.; Mohapatra, Prasanta K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai (India). Radiochemistry Division; Nayak, Sandip K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai (India). Bioorganic Division

    2017-06-01

    The present paper describes the selective extraction of tetravalent plutonium employing several diamide ligands containing aromatic spacer groups. The ligands containing two amide functional groups attached to a 2,4,6-tri-phenyl pyridine moiety with different substituents viz.; L{sub I} (iso-butyl), L{sub II}(n-butyl), L{sub III}(n-octyl), L{sub IV} (2-ethylhexyl) at the amidic nitrogen atom were evaluated for the extraction of Pu(IV) using their nitrobenzene solutions. The distribution ratio values of Pu(IV) with the diamide ligands followed the order: L{sub II}>L{sub I}>L{sub III}>L{sub IV} and were significantly higher than those of metal ions such as Cs(I), Sr(II), Am(III) and Eu(III). The distribution ratio values of U(VI) were about 2-3 orders magnitude lower than those of Pu(IV). The extraction and stripping kinetics were found to be moderately fast and it took less than 30 min (less than 5 min for L{sub I} and L{sub IV}) to obtain equilibrium D values. The extraction was found to be increasing with the aqueous phase nitric acid concentration conforming to a solvation mechanism of extraction. The extracted species contained two ligand molecules for L{sub I} and L{sub II} while monosolvates were observed for the other two extractants. The ligands showed good radiation stability up to an absorbed dose of 630 kGy.

  19. Synthesis, spectral, thermal, potentiometric and antimicrobial studies of transition metal complexes of tridentate ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika M. Jadhav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of metal complexes of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, Fe(III and Mn(II have been synthesized with newly synthesized biologically active tridentate ligand. The ligand was synthesized by condensation of dehydroacetic acid (3-acetyl-6-methyl-(2H pyran-2,4(3H-dione or DHA, o-phenylene diamine and fluoro benzaldehyde and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, magnetic susceptibility, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, IR, 1H-NMR, UV–Vis spectroscopy and mass spectra. From the analytical data, the stoichiometry of the complexes was found to be 1:2 (metal:ligand with octahedral geometry. The molar conductance values suggest the non-electrolyte nature of metal complexes. The IR spectral data suggest that the ligand behaves as a dibasic tridentate ligand with ONN donor atoms sequence towards central metal ion. Thermal behaviour (TG/DTA and kinetic parameters calculated by the Coats–Redfern and Horowitz–Metzger method suggest more ordered activated state in complex formation. To investigate the relationship between stability constants of metal complexes and antimicrobial activity, the dissociation constants of Schiff bases and stability constants of their binary metal complexes have been determined potentiometrically in THF–water (60:40% solution at 25 ± 1 °C and at 0.1 M NaClO4 ionic strength. The potentiometric study suggests 1:1 and 1:2 complexation. Antibacterial and antifungal activities in vitro were performed against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma, respectively. The stability constants of the metal complexes were calculated by the Irving–Rosotti method. A relation between the stability constant and antimicrobial activity of complexes has been discussed. It is observed that the activity enhances upon complexation and the order of antifungal activity is in accordance with stability order of metal ions.

  20. Efficient computation of co-transcriptional RNA-ligand interaction dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfinger, Michael T; Flamm, Christoph; Hofacker, Ivo L

    2018-05-04

    Riboswitches form an abundant class of cis-regulatory RNA elements that mediate gene expression by binding a small metabolite. For synthetic biology applications, they are becoming cheap and accessible systems for selectively triggering transcription or translation of downstream genes. Many riboswitches are kinetically controlled, hence knowledge of their co-transcriptional mechanisms is essential. We present here an efficient implementation for analyzing co-transcriptional RNA-ligand interaction dynamics. This approach allows for the first time to model concentration-dependent metabolite binding/unbinding kinetics. We exemplify this novel approach by means of the recently studied I-A 2 ' -deoxyguanosine (2 ' dG)-sensing riboswitch from Mesoplasma florum. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Interaction of calreticulin with CD40 ligand, TRAIL and Fas ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, K; Pagh, R T; Holmskov, U

    2007-01-01

    is utilized by many other functionally diverse molecules and in this work the interaction of calreticulin with C1q and structurally similar molecules was investigated. In addition to C1q and MBL, CD40 ligand (CD40L), tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Fas ligand (FasL) were...... found to bind calreticulin strongly. A low level or no binding was observed for adiponectin, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), CD30L, surfactant protein-A and -D and collagen VIII. The interaction with calreticulin required a conformational change in CD40L, TRAIL and FasL and showed the same...

  2. Synthesis, characterization and thermal study of some transition metal complexes of an asymmetrical tetradentate Schiff base ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ACHUT S. MUNDE

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Complexes of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, Mn(II and Fe(III with an asymmetric tetradentate Schiff base ligand derived from dehydroacetic acid, 4-methyl-o-phenylenediamine and salicylic aldehyde were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, conductometry, magnetic susceptibility, UV–Vis, IR, 1H-NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis of powdered samples and thermal analysis, and screened for antimicrobial activity. The IR spectral data suggested that the ligand behaves as a dibasic tetadentate ligand towards the central metal ion with an ONNO donor atoms sequence. From the microanalytical data, the stoichiometry of the complexes 1:1 (metal:ligand was found. The physico-chemical data suggested square planar geometry for the Cu(II and Ni(II complexes and octahedral geometry for the Co(II, Mn(II and Fe(III complexes. The thermal behaviour (TGA/DTA of the complexes was studied and kinetic parameters were determined by Horowitz–Metzger and Coats–Redfern methods. The powder X-ray diffraction data suggested a monoclinic crystal system for the Co(II, Mn(II and Fe(III complexes. The ligand and their metal complexes were screened for antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and fungicidal activity against Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma viride.

  3. Detection of site-specific binding and co-binding of ligands to macromolecules using 19F NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, B.G.

    1991-01-01

    Study of ligand-macromolecular interactions by 19 F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy affords many opportunities for obtaining molecular biochemical and pharmaceutical information. This is due to the absence of a background fluorine signal, as well as the relatively high sensitivity of 19 F NMR. Use of fluorine-labeled ligands enables one to probe not only binding and co-binding phenomena to macromolecules, but also can provide data on binding constants, stoichiometries, kinetics, and conformational properties of these complexes. Under conditions of slow exchange and macromolecule-induced chemical shifts, multiple 19 F NMR resonances can be observed for free and bound ligands. These shifted resonances are a direct correlate of the concentration of ligand bound in a specific state rather than the global concentrations of bound or free ligand which are usually determined using other techniques such as absorption spectroscopy or equilibrium dialysis. Examples of these interactions are demonstrated both from the literature and from interactions of 5-fluorotryptophan, 5-fluorosalicylic acid, flurbiprofen, and sulindac sulfide with human serum albumin. Other applications of 19 F NMR to study of these interactions in vivo, as well for receptor binding and metabolic tracing of fluorinated drugs and proteins are discussed

  4. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  5. Programmed Death-Ligand 1 Immunohistochemistry Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Büttner, Reinhard; Gosney, John R; Skov, Birgit Guldhammer

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Three programmed death-1/programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitors are currently approved for treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Treatment with pembrolizumab in NSCLC requires PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing. Nivolumab and atezolizumab are approved without PD-L1...

  6. Versatile phosphite ligands based on silsesquioxane backbones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vlugt, JI; Ackerstaff, J; Dijkstra, TW; Mills, AM; Kooijman, H; Spek, AL; Meetsma, A; Abbenhuis, HCL; Vogt, D

    Silsesquioxanes are employed as ligand backbones for the synthesis of novel phosphite compounds with 3,3'-5,5'-tetrakis(tert-butyl)-2,2'-di-oxa-1,1'-biphenyl substituents. Both mono- and bidentate phosphites are prepared in good yields. Two types of silsesquioxanes are employed as starting

  7. Kinetic energy absorbing pad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bricmont, R.J.; Hamilton, P.A.; Ming Long Ting, R.

    1981-01-01

    Reactors, fuel processing plants etc incorporate pipes and conduits for fluids under high pressure. Fractures, particularly adjacent to conduit elbows, produce a jet of liquid which whips the broken conduit at an extremely high velocity. An enormous impact load would be applied to any stationary object in the conduit's path. The design of cellular, corrugated metal impact pads to absorb the kinetic energy of the high velocity conduits is given. (U.K.)

  8. Monitoring ligand-receptor interactions by photonic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeney, Sylvia [M E Mueller Institute for Structural Biology, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 70, Basel, 4056 (Switzerland); Mor, Flavio; Forro, Laszlo [Laboratory of Complex Matter Physics (LPMC), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Koszali, Roland [Institute for Information and Communication Technologies (IICT), University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland (HEIG-VD), Rue Galilee 15, CH 1401 Yverdon-les-bains (Switzerland); Moy, Vincent T, E-mail: sylvia.jeney@unibas.ch, E-mail: vmoy@miami.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1600 NW 10th Avenue, Miami, FL 33136 (United States)

    2010-06-25

    We introduce a method for the acquisition of single molecule force measurements of ligand-receptor interactions using the photonic force microscope (PFM). Biotin-functionalized beads, manipulated with an optical trap, and a streptavidin-functionalized coverslip were used to measure the effect of different pulling forces on the lifetime of individual streptavidin-biotin complexes. By optimizing the design of the optical trap and selection of the appropriate bead size, pulling forces in excess of 50 pN were achieved. Based on the amplitude of three-dimensional (3D) thermal position fluctuations of the attached bead, we were able to select for a bead-coverslip interaction that was mediated by a single streptavidin-biotin complex. Moreover, the developed experimental system was greatly accelerated by automation of data acquisition and analysis. In force-dependent kinetic measurements carried out between streptavidin and biotin, we observed that the streptavidin-biotin complex exhibited properties of a catch bond, with the lifetime increasing tenfold when the pulling force increased from 10 to 20 pN. We also show that silica beads were more appropriate than polystyrene beads for the force measurements, as tethers, longer than 200 nm, could be extracted from polystyrene beads.

  9. Monitoring ligand-receptor interactions by photonic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeney, Sylvia; Mor, Flavio; Forro, Laszlo; Koszali, Roland; Moy, Vincent T

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a method for the acquisition of single molecule force measurements of ligand-receptor interactions using the photonic force microscope (PFM). Biotin-functionalized beads, manipulated with an optical trap, and a streptavidin-functionalized coverslip were used to measure the effect of different pulling forces on the lifetime of individual streptavidin-biotin complexes. By optimizing the design of the optical trap and selection of the appropriate bead size, pulling forces in excess of 50 pN were achieved. Based on the amplitude of three-dimensional (3D) thermal position fluctuations of the attached bead, we were able to select for a bead-coverslip interaction that was mediated by a single streptavidin-biotin complex. Moreover, the developed experimental system was greatly accelerated by automation of data acquisition and analysis. In force-dependent kinetic measurements carried out between streptavidin and biotin, we observed that the streptavidin-biotin complex exhibited properties of a catch bond, with the lifetime increasing tenfold when the pulling force increased from 10 to 20 pN. We also show that silica beads were more appropriate than polystyrene beads for the force measurements, as tethers, longer than 200 nm, could be extracted from polystyrene beads.

  10. Dynamic ligand-based pharmacophore modeling and virtual ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Five ligand-based pharmacophore models were generated from 40 different .... the Phase module of the Schrodinger program.35 Each model consisted of six types of ... ligand preparation included the OPLS_2005 force field and to retain the ...

  11. Substrate coated with receptor and labelled ligand for assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Improvements in the procedures for assaying ligands are described. The assay consists of a polystyrene tube on which receptors are present for both the ligand to be assayed and a radioactively labelled form of the ligand. The receptors on the bottom portion of the tube are also coated with labelled ligands, thus eliminating the necessity for separate addition of the labelled ligand and sample during an assay. Examples of ligands to which this method is applicable include polypeptides, nucleotides, nucleosides and proteins. Specific examples are given in which the ligand to be assayed is digoxin, the labelled form of the ligand is 3-0-succinyl digoxyigenin tyrosine ( 125 I) and the receptor is digoxin antibody. (U.K.)

  12. Calcite Dissolution Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berelson, W.; Subhas, A.; Dong, S.; Naviaux, J.; Adkins, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    A geological buffer for high atmospheric CO2 concentrations is neutralization via reaction with CaCO3. We have been studying the dissolution kinetics of carbonate minerals using labeled 13C calcite and Picarro-based measurements of 13C enrichments in solution DIC. This methodology has greatly facilitated our investigation of dissolution kinetics as a function of water carbonate chemistry, temperature and pressure. One can adjust the saturation state Omega by changing the ion activity product (e.g. adjusting carbonate ion concentration), or by changing the solubility product (e.g. adjusting temperature or pressure). The canonical formulation of dissolution rate vs. omega has been refined (Subhas et al. 2015) and shows distinct non-linear behavior near equilibrium and rates in sea water of 1-3 e-6 g/cm2day at omega = 0.8. Carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that catalyzes the hydration of dissolved CO2 to carbonic acid, was shown (in concentrations 500x. This result points to the importance of carbonic acid in enhancing dissolution at low degrees of undersaturation. CA activity and abundance in nature must be considered regarding the role it plays in catalyzing dissolution. We also have been investigating the role of temperature on dissolution kinetics. An increase of 16C yields an order of magnitude increase in dissolution rate. Temperature (and P) also change Omega critical, the saturation state where dissolution rates change substantially. Increasing pressure (achieved in a pressure reaction chamber we built) also shifts Omega critical closer to equilibrium and small pressure increases have large impact on dissolution kinetics. Dissolution rates are enhanced by an order of magnitude for a change in pressure of 1500 psi relative to the dissolution rate achieved by water chemistry effects alone for an omega of 0.8. We've shown that the thermodynamic determination of saturation state does not adequately describe the kinetics of dissolution. The interplay of mineral

  13. Kinetic speciation of mercury–humate complexes in aqueous solutions by using competing ligand exchange method

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vudamala, K.; Chakraborty, P.

    with ultrapure water (of resistivity 18.2 MΩ cm-1) acidified to contain 1 % (v/v) ultrapure HNO3 (Merck, Germany). Stock solutions of humic acid (HA) was prepared using HA from Fluka (commercialized by Sigma-Aldrich, cat. No. 53680, Sigma-Aldrich, Inc... river emptying into Cochin backwaters, Indian J. Mar. Sci. 15 (1986) 253–259. http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=8219806 (accessed September 4, 2015). [25] P.K. Krishnakumar, V.K. Pillai, Mercury Near a Caustic Soda plant at karwar,India, Mar...

  14. Role of ligand-ligand vs. core-core interactions in gold nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milowska, Karolina Z; Stolarczyk, Jacek K

    2016-05-14

    The controlled assembly of ligand-coated gold nanoclusters (NCs) into larger structures paves the way for new applications ranging from electronics to nanomedicine. Here, we demonstrate through rigorous density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing novel functionals accounting for van der Waals forces that the ligand-ligand interactions determine whether stable assemblies can be formed. The study of NCs with different core sizes, symmetry forms, ligand lengths, mutual crystal orientations, and in the presence of a solvent suggests that core-to-core van der Waals interactions play a lesser role in the assembly. The dominant interactions originate from combination of steric effects, augmented by ligand bundling on NC facets, and related to them changes in electronic properties induced by neighbouring NCs. We also show that, in contrast to standard colloidal theory approach, DFT correctly reproduces the surprising experimental trends in the strength of the inter-particle interaction observed when varying the length of the ligands. The results underpin the importance of understanding NC interactions in designing gold NCs for a specific function.

  15. Structure–kinetic relationship study of CDK8/CycC specific compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Elisabeth V.; Böttcher, Jark; Huber, Robert; Maskos, Klaus; Neumann, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In contrast with the very well explored concept of structure–activity relationship, similar studies are missing for the dependency between binding kinetics and compound structure of a protein ligand complex, the structure–kinetic relationship. Here, we present a structure–kinetic relationship study of the cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8)/cyclin C (CycC) complex. The scaffold moiety of the compounds is anchored in the kinase deep pocket and extended with diverse functional groups toward the hinge region and the front pocket. These variations can cause the compounds to change from fast to slow binding kinetics, resulting in an improved residence time. The flip of the DFG motif (“DMG” in CDK8) to the inactive DFG-out conformation appears to have relatively little influence on the velocity of binding. Hydrogen bonding with the kinase hinge region contributes to the residence time but has less impact than hydrophobic complementarities within the kinase front pocket. PMID:23630251

  16. AutoSite: an automated approach for pseudo-ligands prediction—from ligand-binding sites identification to predicting key ligand atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, Pradeep Anand; Sanner, Michel F.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The identification of ligand-binding sites from a protein structure facilitates computational drug design and optimization, and protein function assignment. We introduce AutoSite: an efficient software tool for identifying ligand-binding sites and predicting pseudo ligand corresponding to each binding site identified. Binding sites are reported as clusters of 3D points called fills in which every point is labelled as hydrophobic or as hydrogen bond donor or acceptor. From these fills AutoSite derives feature points: a set of putative positions of hydrophobic-, and hydrogen-bond forming ligand atoms. Results: We show that AutoSite identifies ligand-binding sites with higher accuracy than other leading methods, and produces fills that better matches the ligand shape and properties, than the fills obtained with a software program with similar capabilities, AutoLigand. In addition, we demonstrate that for the Astex Diverse Set, the feature points identify 79% of hydrophobic ligand atoms, and 81% and 62% of the hydrogen acceptor and donor hydrogen ligand atoms interacting with the receptor, and predict 81.2% of water molecules mediating interactions between ligand and receptor. Finally, we illustrate potential uses of the predicted feature points in the context of lead optimization in drug discovery projects. Availability and Implementation: http://adfr.scripps.edu/AutoDockFR/autosite.html Contact: sanner@scripps.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27354702

  17. Oxygen Atom Exchange between H2O and Non-Heme Oxoiron(IV) Complexes: Ligand Dependence and Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Mayank; Company, Anna; Sabenya, Gerard; Costas, Miquel; Que, Lawrence

    2016-06-20

    Detailed studies of oxygen atom exchange (OAE) between H2(18)O and synthetic non-heme oxoiron(IV) complexes supported by tetradentate and pentadentate ligands provide evidence that they proceed by a common mechanism but within two different kinetic regimes, with OAE rates that span 2 orders of magnitude. The first kinetic regime involves initial reversible water association to the Fe(IV) complex, which is evidenced by OAE rates that are linearly dependent on [H2(18)O] and H2O/D2O KIEs of 1.6, while the second kinetic regime involves a subsequent rate determining proton-transfer step between the bound aqua and oxo ligands that is associated with saturation behavior with [H2(18)O] and much larger H2O/D2O KIEs of 5-6. [Fe(IV)(O)(TMC)(MeCN)](2+) (1) and [Fe(IV)(O)(MePy2TACN)](2+) (9) are examples of complexes that exhibit kinetic behavior in the first regime, while [Fe(IV)(O)(N4Py)](2+) (3), [Fe(IV)(O)(BnTPEN)](2+) (4), [Fe(IV)(O)(1Py-BnTPEN)](2+) (5), [Fe(IV)(O)(3Py-BnTPEN)](2+) (6), and [Fe(IV)(O)(Me2Py2TACN)](2+) (8) represent complexes that fall in the second kinetic regime. Interestingly, [Fe(IV)(O)(PyTACN)(MeCN)](2+) (7) exhibits a linear [H2(18)O] dependence below 0.6 M and saturation above 0.6 M. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the OAE rates shows that most of these complexes exhibit large and negative activation entropies, consistent with the proposed mechanism. One exception is complex 9, which has a near-zero activation entropy and is proposed to undergo ligand-arm dissociation during the RDS to accommodate H2(18)O binding. These results show that the observed OAE kinetic behavior is highly dependent on the nature of the supporting ligand and are of relevance to studies of non-heme oxoiron(IV) complexes in water or acetonitrile/water mixtures for applications in photocatalysis and water oxidation chemistry.

  18. A response calculus for immobilized T cell receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Menné, C; Mariuzza, R A

    2001-01-01

    determine the level of T cell activation. When fitted to T cell responses against purified ligands immobilized on plastic surfaces, the 2D-affinity model adequately simulated changes in cellular activation as a result of varying ligand affinity and ligand density. These observations further demonstrated...

  19. Fullerenes as a new type of ligands for transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, V.I.

    2007-01-01

    Fullerenes are considered as ligands in transition metal π-complexes. The following aspects are discussed: metals able to form π-complexes with fullerenes (Zr, V, Ta, Mo, W, Re, Ru, etc.); haptic numbers; homo- and hetero ligand complexes; ligand compatibility with fullerenes for different metals, including fullerenes with a disturbed structure of conjugation [ru

  20. New pinene-derived pyridines as bidentate chiral ligands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malkov, A. V.; Stewart-Liddon, A.; Teplý, Filip; Kobr, L.; Muir, K. W.; Haigh, D.; Kočovský, P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 18 (2008), s. 4011-4025 ISSN 0040-4020 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : chiral ligands * transition metal catalysis * asymmetric catalysis * pyridine ligands * oxazoline ligands Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.897, year: 2008

  1. Biophysical and physicochemical methods differentiate highly ligand-efficient human D-amino acid oxidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jos H M; Venhorst, Jennifer; van Dongen, Maria J P; Frankena, Jurjen; Bassissi, Firas; de Bruin, Natasja M W J; den Besten, Cathaline; de Beer, Stephanie B A; Oostenbrink, Chris; Markova, Natalia; Kruse, Chris G

    2011-10-01

    Many early drug research efforts are too reductionist thereby not delivering key parameters such as kinetics and thermodynamics of target-ligand binding. A set of human D-Amino Acid Oxidase (DAAO) inhibitors 1-6 was applied to demonstrate the impact of key biophysical techniques and physicochemical methods in the differentiation of chemical entities that cannot be adequately distinguished on the basis of their normalized potency (ligand efficiency) values. The resulting biophysical and physicochemical data were related to relevant pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties. Surface Plasmon Resonance data indicated prolonged target-ligand residence times for 5 and 6 as compared to 1-4, based on the observed k(off) values. The Isothermal Titration Calorimetry-derived thermodynamic binding profiles of 1-6 to the DAAO enzyme revealed favorable contributions of both ΔH and ΔS to their ΔG values. Surprisingly, the thermodynamic binding profile of 3 elicited a substantially higher favorable contribution of ΔH to ΔG in comparison with the structurally closely related fused bicyclic acid 4. Molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations of 1, 3, and 4 led to novel insights into the thermodynamic properties of the binding process at an atomic level and in the different thermodynamic signatures of 3 and 4. The presented holistic approach is anticipated to facilitate the identification of compounds with best-in-class properties at an early research stage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Kinetic modeling and fitting software for interconnected reaction schemes: VisKin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Andrews, Jared N; Pedersen, Steen E

    2007-02-15

    Reaction kinetics for complex, highly interconnected kinetic schemes are modeled using analytical solutions to a system of ordinary differential equations. The algorithm employs standard linear algebra methods that are implemented using MatLab functions in a Visual Basic interface. A graphical user interface for simple entry of reaction schemes facilitates comparison of a variety of reaction schemes. To ensure microscopic balance, graph theory algorithms are used to determine violations of thermodynamic cycle constraints. Analytical solutions based on linear differential equations result in fast comparisons of first order kinetic rates and amplitudes as a function of changing ligand concentrations. For analysis of higher order kinetics, we also implemented a solution using numerical integration. To determine rate constants from experimental data, fitting algorithms that adjust rate constants to fit the model to imported data were implemented using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm or using Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno methods. We have included the ability to carry out global fitting of data sets obtained at varying ligand concentrations. These tools are combined in a single package, which we have dubbed VisKin, to guide and analyze kinetic experiments. The software is available online for use on PCs.

  3. Kinetics of evaporation of barium THD precursors used for organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtman, V.; Schieber, M.; Yitzchaik, S.; Yaroslavsky, Y.

    1997-04-01

    Various methods have been used to synthesize Ba(THD) 2 and its molecular structure has been studied using nuclear magnetic resonance. Compared with Raman and infrared spectroscopy it was found that NMR is very useful to determine quantitatively the decomposition through aging of Ba(THD) 2. The transport kinetics of Ba(THD) 2 has been studied under experimental conditions of a OMCVD reactor. It has been found that the freshly prepared Ba(THD) 2 by the reaction of Ba metal with THD ligand in anhydrous conditions with subsequent crystallization from methanol transported quantitatively without decomposition. A simple model shows that the transport kinetics corresponds to a diffusion controlled process.

  4. Kinetics of tetrataenite disordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Santos, E.; Gattacceca, J.; Rochette, P.; Fillion, G.; Scorzelli, R.B.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrataenite is a chemically ordered L1 0 -type Fe 50 Ni 50 alloy detected for the first time in 1977 by 57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy studies in iron meteorites. The thermal history of meteorites, in particular short thermal events like those associated to hypervelocity impacts, can be constrained by tracing the presence of tetrataenite or its disordering into taenite. The knowledge of the disordering kinetics of tetrataenite, that is associated with changes in its magnetic properties, is still very fragmentary so that the time–temperature history of these meteorites cannot be constrained in details. Furthermore, knowledge of disordering kinetics is important due to potential technological application of tetrataenite as a rare-earth free strong magnet. Thus, this work provides the first time–temperature data for disordering reaction of tetrataenite. We have shown that disordering is not an instantaneous process but is a kinetic limited reaction. It was shown that disordering may take place at any temperature above the order–disorder transition for L 10 superstructure phase (∼320 °C) when the appropriate time-scale is considered. This result means that the apparent Curie point for tetrataenite is not an absolute property in the sense that any estimate of this parameter should be referred to a given time-scale. - Highlights: • The first time–temperature data for tetrataenite disordering reaction is provided. • Previous works does not give a complete picture of tetrataenite disordering. • Apparent Curie temperature of tetrataenite should be referred to a time-scale. • Tetrataenite can be used as a probe to detect thermal/shock events recorded in meteorites

  5. Kinetics of FeII-polyaminocarboxylate oxidation by molecular oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jessica M.; Farley, Kevin J.; Carbonaro, Richard F.

    2018-03-01

    Complexation of iron by naturally-occurring and synthetic organic ligands has a large effect on iron oxidation and reduction rates which in turn affect the aqueous geochemistry of many other chemical constituents. In this study, the kinetics of FeII oxidation in the presence of the polyaminocarboxylate synthetic chelating agents ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and trimethylenediamine-N,N,N‧,N‧-tetraacetic acid (TMDTA) was investigated over the pH range 5.50-8.53. Batch oxidation experiments in the presence of molecular oxygen were conducted using a 2:1 M concentration ratio of polyaminocarboxylate (ligand, L) to FeII. The experimental data resembled first order kinetics for the oxidation of FeII-L to FeIII-L and observed rate constants at pH 6.0 were comparable to rate constants for the oxidation of inorganic FeII. Similar to other structurally-similar FeII-polyaminocarboxylate complexes, oxidation rates of FeII-EGTA and FeII-TMDTA decrease with increasing pH, which is the opposite trend for the oxidation of FeII complexed with inorganic ligands. However, the oxidation rates of FeII complexed with EGTA and TMDTA were considerably lower (4-5 orders of magnitude) than FeII complexed to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The distinguishing feature of the slower-reacting complexes is that they have a longer backbone between diamine functional groups. An analytical equilibrium model was developed to determine the contributions of the species FeIIL2- and FeII(H)L- to the overall oxidation rate of FeII-L. Application of this model indicated that the protonated FeII(H)L species are more than three orders of magnitude more reactive than FeIIL2-. These rate constants were used in a coupled kinetic equilibrium numerical model where the ligand to iron ratio (TOTL:TOTFe) and pH were varied to evaluate the effect on the FeII oxidation rate. Overall, increasing TOTL:TOTFe for EGTA and TMDTA enhances FeII oxidation rates at lower pH and inhibits FeII oxidation

  6. Quantum kinetic Ising models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augusiak, R; Cucchietti, F M; Lewenstein, M; Haake, F

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a quantum generalization of classical kinetic Ising models (KIM), described by a certain class of quantum many-body master equations. Similarly to KIMs with detailed balance that are equivalent to certain Hamiltonian systems, our models reduce to a set of Hamiltonian systems determining the dynamics of the elements of the many-body density matrix. The ground states of these Hamiltonians are well described by the matrix product, or pair entangled projected states. We discuss critical properties of such Hamiltonians, as well as entanglement properties of their low-energy states.

  7. Sigma-2 receptor ligands QSAR model dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rescifina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data have been obtained from the Sigma-2 Receptor Selective Ligands Database (S2RSLDB and refined according to the QSAR requirements. These data provide information about a set of 548 Sigma-2 (σ2 receptor ligands selective over Sigma-1 (σ1 receptor. The development of the QSAR model has been undertaken with the use of CORAL software using SMILES, molecular graphs and hybrid descriptors (SMILES and graph together. Data here reported include the regression for σ2 receptor pKi QSAR models. The QSAR model was also employed to predict the σ2 receptor pKi values of the FDA approved drugs that are herewith included.

  8. Metal-ligand cooperative activation of nitriles by a ruthenium complex with a de-aromatized PNN pincer ligand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsink, Linda E; Perdriau, Sébastien C P; de Vries, Johannes G; Otten, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    The pincer complex (PNN)RuH(CO), with a de-aromatized pyridine in the ligand backbone, is shown to react with nitriles in a metal-ligand cooperative manner. This leads to the formation of a series of complexes with new Ru-N(nitrile) and C(ligand)-C(nitrile) bonds. The initial nitrile cycloaddition

  9. EGFR Activation by Spatially Restricted Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    the level of ligand production, that result in human breast cancer. We have integrated genetic and biochemical methods to study (1) the effects of a...and spindle-B encode components of the RAD52 DNA repair pathway and affect meiosis and patterning in Drosophila oogenesis. Genes Dev 12, 2711-2723...findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision

  10. Selective oxoanion separation using a tripodal ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Custelcean, Radu; Moyer, Bruce A.; Rajbanshi, Arbin

    2016-02-16

    The present invention relates to urea-functionalized crystalline capsules self-assembled by sodium or potassium cation coordination and by hydrogen-bonding water bridges to selectively encapsulate tetrahedral divalent oxoanions from highly competitive aqueous alkaline solutions and methods using this system for selective anion separations from industrial solutions. The method involves competitive crystallizations using a tripodal tris(urea) functionalized ligand and, in particular, provides a viable approach to sulfate separation from nuclear wastes.

  11. Targeting Selectins and Their Ligands in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eNatoni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant glycosylation is a hallmark of cancer cells with increased evidence pointing to a role in tumor progression. In particular, aberrant sialylation of glycoproteins and glycolipids have been linked to increased immune cell evasion, drug evasion, drug resistance, tumor invasiveness, and vascular dissemination leading to metastases. Hypersialylation of cancer cells is largely the result of overexpression of sialyltransferases. Humans differentially express twenty different sialyltransferases in a tissue-specific manner, each of which catalyze the attachment of sialic acids via different glycosidic linkages (2-3; 2-6 or 2-8 to the underlying glycan chain. One important mechanism whereby overexpression of sialyltransferases contributes to an enhanced metastatic phenotype is via the generation of selectin ligands. Selectin ligand function requires the expression of sialyl-Lewis X and its structural-isomer sialyl-Lewis A, which are synthesized by the combined action of alpha 1-3-fucosyltransferases, 2-3-sialyltransferases, 1-4-galactosyltranferases, and N-acetyl--glucosaminyltransferases. The α2-3-sialyltransferases ST3Gal4 and ST3Gal6 are critical to the generation of functional E- and P-selectin ligands and overexpression of these sialyltransferases have been linked to increased risk of metastatic disease in solid tumors and poor outcome in multiple myeloma. Thus, targeting selectins and their ligands as well as the enzymes involved in their generation, in particular sialyltransferases, could be beneficial to many cancer patients. Potential strategies include sialyltransferase inhibition and the use of selectin antagonists, such as glycomimetic drugs and antibodies. Here, we review ongoing efforts to optimize the potency and selectivity of sialyltransferase inhibitors, including the potential for targeted delivery approaches, as well as evaluate the potential utility of selectin inhibitors, which are now in early clinical

  12. Photoexcitation dynamics of nitric oxide bound ferric myoglobin probed by femtosecond IR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jaehun

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved vibrational spectra show that photolysis quantum yield of NO bound ferric myoglobin is smaller than 0.86, the deligated NO geminately rebinds with subnanosecond time scale, and the rebinding kinetics depends on protein conformation.

  13. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seery, D.J.; Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M. (United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (USA)); Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.; Hsu, J.; Hajaligol, M.; Sarofim, A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Jenkins, R.; Mallin, J.; Espindola-Merin, B. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA)); Essenhigh, R.; Misra, M.K. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (USA))

    1989-07-01

    This report contains results of a coordinated, multi-laboratory investigation of coal devolatilization. Data is reported pertaining to the devolatilization for bituminous coals over three orders of magnitude in apparent heating rate (100 to 100,000 + {degree}C/sec), over two orders of magnitude in particle size (20 to 700 microns), final particle temperatures from 400 to 1600{degree}C, heat transfer modes ranging from convection to radiative, ambient pressure ranging from near vacuum to one atmosphere pressure. The heat transfer characteristics of the reactors are reported in detail. It is assumed the experimental results are to form the basis of a devolatilization data base. Empirical rate expressions are developed for each phase of devolatilization which, when coupled to an awareness of the heat transfer rate potential of a particular devolatilization reactor, indicate the kinetics emphasized by a particular system reactor plus coal sample. The analysis indicates the particular phase of devolatilization that will be emphasized by a particular reactor type and, thereby, the kinetic expressions appropriate to that devolatilization system. Engineering rate expressions are developed from the empirical rate expressions in the context of a fundamental understanding of coal devolatilization developed in the course of the investigation. 164 refs., 223 figs., 44 tabs.

  14. Repair kinetics in tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thames, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    Monoexponential repair kinetics is based on the assumption of a single, dose-independent rate of repair of sublethal injury in the target cells for tissue injury after exposure to ionizing radiation. Descriptions of the available data based on this assumption have proved fairly successful for both acutely responding (skin, lip mucosa, gut) and late-responding (lung, spinal cord) normal tissues. There are indications of biphasic exponential repair in both categories, however. Unfortunately, the data usually lack sufficient resolution to permit unambiguous determination of the repair rates. There are also indications that repair kinetics may depend on the size of the dose. The data are conflicting on this account, however, with suggestions of both faster and slower repair after larger doses. Indeed, experiments that have been explicitly designed to test this hypothesis show either no effect (gut, spinal cord), faster repair after higher doses (lung, kidney), or slower repair after higher doses (skin). Monoexponential repair appears to be a fairly accurate description that provides an approximation to a more complicated picture, the elucidation of whose details will, however, require very careful and extensive experimental study. (author). 30 refs.; 1 fig

  15. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  16. Stability and kinetics of uranyl ion complexation by macrocycles in propylene carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fux, P.

    1984-06-01

    A thermodynamic study of uranyl ion complexes formation with different macrocyclic ligands was realized in propylene carbonate as solvent using spectrophotometric and potentiometric techniques. Formation kinetics of two UO 2 complexes: a crown ether (18C6) and a coronand (22) was studied by spectrophotometry in propylene carbonate with addition of tetraethylammonium chlorate 0.1M at 25 0 C. Possible structures of complexes in solution are discussed [fr

  17. Simplification of lipase design in the enzymatic kinetic resolution of amines by saturation transfer difference NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marcio S.; Pietrobom, Daniel, E-mail: s.marcio@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (CCNH/UFABC), Santo André, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for racemic amide and lipase interaction as a first-pass design method in the enzymatic kinetic resolution of amines. As a novel adaptation of commonly used protein-ligand screening NMR methodologies, this approach relies upon a lipase-amide interaction wherein the time-consuming is reduced drastically and new insights are produced during the development of biocatalysis reactions. (author)

  18. Chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ou Sik; Park, Youn Yeol

    1996-12-01

    This book is about chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism. It consists of eleven chapters, which deal with reaction and reaction speed on reaction mechanism, simple reaction by rate expression, reversible reaction and simultaneous reaction, successive reaction, complicated reaction mechanism, assumption for reaction mechanism, transition state theory, successive reaction and oscillating reaction, reaction by solution, research method high except kinetics on reaction mechanism, high reaction of kinetics like pulsed radiolysis.

  19. Chemical kinetics of gas reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kondrat'Ev, V N

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Kinetics of Gas Reactions explores the advances in gas kinetics and thermal, photochemical, electrical discharge, and radiation chemical reactions. This book is composed of 10 chapters, and begins with the presentation of general kinetic rules for simple and complex chemical reactions. The next chapters deal with the experimental methods for evaluating chemical reaction mechanisms and some theories of elementary chemical processes. These topics are followed by discussions on certain class of chemical reactions, including unimolecular, bimolecular, and termolecular reactions. The rema

  20. Determination of ligand binding modes in weak protein–ligand complexes using sparse NMR data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Williams, Martin L.; Doak, Bradley C.; Vazirani, Mansha; Ilyichova, Olga [Monash University, Medicinal Chemistry, Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Australia); Wang, Geqing [La Trobe University, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Bioscience (Australia); Bermel, Wolfgang [Bruker Biospin GmbH (Germany); Simpson, Jamie S.; Chalmers, David K. [Monash University, Medicinal Chemistry, Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Australia); King, Glenn F. [The University of Queensland, Institute for Molecular Bioscience (Australia); Mobli, Mehdi, E-mail: m.mobli@uq.edu.au [The University of Queensland, Centre for Advanced Imaging (Australia); Scanlon, Martin J., E-mail: martin.scanlon@monash.edu [Monash University, Medicinal Chemistry, Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Australia)

    2016-11-15

    We describe a general approach to determine the binding pose of small molecules in weakly bound protein–ligand complexes by deriving distance constraints between the ligand and methyl groups from all methyl-containing residues of the protein. We demonstrate that using a single sample, which can be prepared without the use of expensive precursors, it is possible to generate high-resolution data rapidly and obtain the resonance assignments of Ile, Leu, Val, Ala and Thr methyl groups using triple resonance scalar correlation data. The same sample may be used to obtain Met {sup ε}CH{sub 3} assignments using NOESY-based methods, although the superior sensitivity of NOESY using [U-{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N]-labeled protein makes the use of this second sample more efficient. We describe a structural model for a weakly binding ligand bound to its target protein, DsbA, derived from intermolecular methyl-to-ligand nuclear Overhauser enhancements, and demonstrate that the ability to assign all methyl resonances in the spectrum is essential to derive an accurate model of the structure. Once the methyl assignments have been obtained, this approach provides a rapid means to generate structural models for weakly bound protein–ligand complexes. Such weak complexes are often found at the beginning of programs of fragment based drug design and can be challenging to characterize using X-ray crystallography.

  1. Kinetic Dissection of the Pre-existing Conformational Equilibrium in the Trypsin Fold*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Austin D.; Chakraborty, Pradipta; Di Cera, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Structural biology has recently documented the conformational plasticity of the trypsin fold for both the protease and zymogen in terms of a pre-existing equilibrium between closed (E*) and open (E) forms of the active site region. How such plasticity is manifested in solution and affects ligand recognition by the protease and zymogen is poorly understood in quantitative terms. Here we dissect the E*-E equilibrium with stopped-flow kinetics in the presence of excess ligand or macromolecule. Using the clotting protease thrombin and its zymogen precursor prethrombin-2 as relevant models we resolve the relative distribution of the E* and E forms and the underlying kinetic rates for their interconversion. In the case of thrombin, the E* and E forms are distributed in a 1:4 ratio and interconvert on a time scale of 45 ms. In the case of prethrombin-2, the equilibrium is shifted strongly (10:1 ratio) in favor of the closed E* form and unfolds over a faster time scale of 4.5 ms. The distribution of E* and E forms observed for thrombin and prethrombin-2 indicates that zymogen activation is linked to a significant shift in the pre-existing equilibrium between closed and open conformations that facilitates ligand binding to the active site. These findings broaden our mechanistic understanding of how conformational transitions control ligand recognition by thrombin and its zymogen precursor prethrombin-2 and have direct relevance to other members of the trypsin fold. PMID:26216877

  2. Adsorption analysis equilibria and kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Do, Duong D

    1998-01-01

    This book covers topics of equilibria and kinetics of adsorption in porous media. Fundamental equilibria and kinetics are dealt with for homogeneous as well as heterogeneous particles. Five chapters of the book deal with equilibria and eight chapters deal with kinetics. Single component as well as multicomponent systems are discussed. In kinetics analysis, we deal with the various mass transport processes and their interactions inside a porous particle. Conventional approaches as well as the new approach using Maxwell-Stefan equations are presented. Various methods to measure diffusivity, such

  3. Complete relaxation and conformational exchange matrix (CORCEMA) analysis of intermolecular saturation transfer effects in reversibly forming ligand-receptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayalakshmi, V; Krishna, N Rama

    2002-03-01

    A couple of recent applications of intermolecular NOE (INOE) experiments as applied to biomolecular systems involve the (i) saturation transfer difference NMR (STD-NMR) method and (ii) the intermolecular cross-saturation NMR (ICS-NMR) experiment. STD-NMR is a promising tool for rapid screening of a large library of compounds to identify bioactive ligands binding to a target protein. Additionally, it is also useful in mapping the binding epitopes presented by a bioactive ligand to its target protein. In this latter application, the STD-NMR technique is essentially similar to the ICS-NMR experiment, which is used to map protein-protein or protein-nucleic acid contact surfaces in complexes. In this work, we present a complete relaxation and conformational exchange matrix (CORCEMA) theory (H. N. B. Moseley et al., J. Magn. Reson. B 108, 243-261 (1995)) applicable for these two closely related experiments. As in our previous work, we show that when exchange is fast on the relaxation rate scale, a simplified CORCEMA theory can be formulated using a generalized average relaxation rate matrix. Its range of validity is established by comparing its predictions with those of the exact CORCEMA theory which is valid for all exchange rates. Using some ideal model systems we have analyzed the factors that influence the ligand proton intensity changes when the resonances from some protons on the receptor protein are saturated. The results show that the intensity changes in the ligand signals in an intermolecular NOE experiment are very much dependent upon: (1) the saturation time, (2) the location of the saturated receptor protons with respect to the ligand protons, (3) the conformation of the ligand-receptor interface, (4) the rotational correlation times for the molecular species, (5) the kinetics of the reversibly forming complex, and (6) the ligand/receptor ratio. As an example of a typical application of the STD-NMR experiment we have also simulated the STD effects for a

  4. ProBiS-ligands: a web server for prediction of ligands by examination of protein binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konc, Janez; Janežič, Dušanka

    2014-07-01

    The ProBiS-ligands web server predicts binding of ligands to a protein structure. Starting with a protein structure or binding site, ProBiS-ligands first identifies template proteins in the Protein Data Bank that share similar binding sites. Based on the superimpositions of the query protein and the similar binding sites found, the server then transposes the ligand structures from those sites to the query protein. Such ligand prediction supports many activities, e.g. drug repurposing. The ProBiS-ligands web server, an extension of the ProBiS web server, is open and free to all users at http://probis.cmm.ki.si/ligands. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Spectrophotometric method for determination of bifunctional macrocyclic ligands in macrocyclic ligand-protein conjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadachova, E.; Chappell, L.L.; Brechbiel, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    A simple spectrophotometric assay for determination of bifunctional polyazacarboxylate-macrocyclic ligands of different sizes that are conjugated to proteins has been developed for: 12-membered macrocycle DOTA (2-[4-nitrobenzyl]-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid) and analogs, the 15-membered PEPA macrocycle (2-[4-nitrobenzyl]-1,4,7,10,13-pentaazacyclopentadecane-N,N',N'',N''',N'''' -pentaacetic acid), and the large 18-membered macrocycle HEHA (1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaazacyclooctadecane-N,N',N'',N''',N''''-hexaacetic acid). The method is based on titration of the blue-colored 1:1 Pb(II)-Arsenazo III (AAIII) complex with the polyazacarboxylate macrocyclic ligand in the concentration range of 0-2.5 μM, wherein color change occurring upon transchelation of the Pb(II) from the AAIII to the polyazamacrocyclic ligand is monitored at 656 nm. The assay is performed at ambient temperature within 20 min without any interfering interaction between the protein and Pb(II)-AA(III) complex. Thus, this method also provides a ligand-to-protein ratio (L/P ratio) that reflects the effective number of ligands per protein molecule available to radiolabeling. The method is not suitable for 14-membered TETA macrocycle (2-[4-nitrobenzyl]-1, 4, 8, 11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid) because of low stability constant of Pb(II)-TETA complex. The method is rapid, simple and may be customized for other polyazacarboxylate macrocyclic ligands

  6. Kinetics of Social Contagion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zhongyuan; Iñiguez, Gerardo; Karsai, Márton; Kertész, János

    2015-11-01

    Diffusion of information, behavioral patterns or innovations follows diverse pathways depending on a number of conditions, including the structure of the underlying social network, the sensitivity to peer pressure and the influence of media. Here we study analytically and by simulations a general model that incorporates threshold mechanism capturing sensitivity to peer pressure, the effect of "immune" nodes who never adopt, and a perpetual flow of external information. While any constant, nonzero rate of dynamically introduced spontaneous adopters leads to global spreading, the kinetics by which the asymptotic state is approached shows rich behavior. In particular, we find that, as a function of the immune node density, there is a transition from fast to slow spreading governed by entirely different mechanisms. This transition happens below the percolation threshold of network fragmentation, and has its origin in the competition between cascading behavior induced by adopters and blocking due to immune nodes. This change is accompanied by a percolation transition of the induced clusters.

  7. The temperature hydration kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Oroian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the hydration kinetics of lentil seeds (Lens culinaris in water at different temperatures (25, 32.5, 40, 55, 70 and 80 °C for assessing the adequacy of models for describing the absorption phenomena during soaking. The diffusion coefficient values were calculated using Fick’s model for spherical and hemispherical geometries and the values were in the range of 10−6 m2/s. The experimental data were fitted to Peleg, Sigmoidal, Weibull and Exponential models. The models adequacy was determined using regression coefficients (R2, root mean square error (RMSE and reduced chi-square (χ2. The Peleg model is the suitable one for predicting the experimental data. Temperature had a positive and significant effect on the water absorption capacities and absorption was an endothermic process.

  8. Displacement of aqua ligands from the hydroxopentaaquarhodium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The kinetics of the reaction of HOBt with [Rh(H2O)5(OH)]2+ has been studied spectrophotomet- ... antitumor properties, were found to be effective as anti- ... Experimental ..... in rate may be explained based on the acid dissociation.

  9. Ligand cluster-based protein network and ePlatton, a multi-target ligand finder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yu; Shi, Tieliu

    2016-01-01

    Small molecules are information carriers that make cells aware of external changes and couple internal metabolic and signalling pathway systems with each other. In some specific physiological status, natural or artificial molecules are used to interact with selective biological targets to activate or inhibit their functions to achieve expected biological and physiological output. Millions of years of evolution have optimized biological processes and pathways and now the endocrine and immune system cannot work properly without some key small molecules. In the past thousands of years, the human race has managed to find many medicines against diseases by trail-and-error experience. In the recent decades, with the deepening understanding of life and the progress of molecular biology, researchers spare no effort to design molecules targeting one or two key enzymes and receptors related to corresponding diseases. But recent studies in pharmacogenomics have shown that polypharmacology may be necessary for the effects of drugs, which challenge the paradigm, 'one drug, one target, one disease'. Nowadays, cheminformatics and structural biology can help us reasonably take advantage of the polypharmacology to design next-generation promiscuous drugs and drug combination therapies. 234,591 protein-ligand interactions were extracted from ChEMBL. By the 2D structure similarity, 13,769 ligand emerged from 156,151 distinct ligands which were recognized by 1477 proteins. Ligand cluster- and sequence-based protein networks (LCBN, SBN) were constructed, compared and analysed. For assisting compound designing, exploring polypharmacology and finding possible drug combination, we integrated the pathway, disease, drug adverse reaction and the relationship of targets and ligand clusters into the web platform, ePlatton, which is available at http://www.megabionet.org/eplatton. Although there were some disagreements between the LCBN and SBN, communities in both networks were largely the same

  10. Towards ligand docking including explicit interface water molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Lemmon

    Full Text Available Small molecule docking predicts the interaction of a small molecule ligand with a protein at atomic-detail accuracy including position and conformation the ligand but also conformational changes of the protein upon ligand binding. While successful in the majority of cases, docking algorithms including RosettaLigand fail in some cases to predict the correct protein/ligand complex structure. In this study we show that simultaneous docking of explicit interface water molecules greatly improves Rosetta's ability to distinguish correct from incorrect ligand poses. This result holds true for both protein-centric water docking wherein waters are located relative to the protein binding site and ligand-centric water docking wherein waters move with the ligand during docking. Protein-centric docking is used to model 99 HIV-1 protease/protease inhibitor structures. We find protease inhibitor placement improving at a ratio of 9:1 when one critical interface water molecule is included in the docking simulation. Ligand-centric docking is applied to 341 structures from the CSAR benchmark of diverse protein/ligand complexes [1]. Across this diverse dataset we see up to 56% recovery of failed docking studies, when waters are included in the docking simulation.

  11. Kinetic theory of Jeans instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trigger, S.A.; Ershkovic, A.I.; Heijst, van G.J.F.; Schram, P.P.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Kinetic treatment of the Jeans gravitational instability, with collisions taken into account, is presented. The initial-value problem for the distribution function which obeys the kinetic equation, with the collision integral conserving the number of particles, is solved. Dispersion relation is

  12. Rebinding the Ties that Bind: Government Efforts to Preserve and Promote Marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherson, Sean E.; Duncan, William C.

    2004-01-01

    Governmental efforts to strengthen marriage through a variety of approaches have become increasingly common in the last decade. Societal trends related to family formation, marriage, and divorce have shaped interest in marriage and its stability as a social institution. The public sector has targeted efforts at key stages in the life history of…

  13. Comparative tissue distribution of conformationally restricted radioiodinated vesamicol receptor ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efange, S M.N.; Khare, A B; Langason, R B

    1995-05-01

    Three conformationally restricted analogs of vesamicol, 1'-[1-(3-iodobenzyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-3-yl]-spirol[1H-indene-1,4'- piperidine] (5), 1'-[1-(3-iodobenzyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-3-yl]-3,4-dihydrospiro[indene-1,4'- piperidine] (6) and 1'-[1-(3-iodobenzyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-3-yl)]-3,4-dihydrospiro[naphthalene- 1(2H),4'-piperidine] (7), were labelled with iodine-125 and evaluated as potential radioligands for mapping vesamicol receptor (VR) density and cholinergic function in vivo. All compounds showed similar kinetics in most tissues. However, differences were observed in the brain. Although comparable levels of each corresponding enantiomeric pair were obtained initially in the brain, the levels of the dextrorotatory enantiomers (+)-5, (+)-6 and (+)-7 were found to decrease by 72-82% over a period of 3 h. In contrast, the brain levels of the corresponding levorotatory isomers were maintained throughout the duration of the experiment. Among the dextrorotatory isomers, (+)-6 showed the highest brain extraction, while (+)-7 showed the lowest. In tissue dissection experiments, the levels of (+)-5, (+)-6 and (+)-7 were highest in the striatum and moderate to low in the cortex and cerebellum. Co-administration of haloperidol with (+)-6 decreased the levels of the latter in the striatum by 27%, while the levels in the cortex and cerebellum were each reduced by 60%. In addition, haloperidol failed to affect the regional distribution of (+)-7 in the brain. However, both haloperidol and spiperone increased the striatal levels of (+)-5 by 67 and 76%, respectively, suggesting that the binding of this radioligand is related to cholinergic function. Furthermore, haloperidol reduced the concentration of (+)-5 in the cortex and cerebellum by 25 and 33%, respectively, thereby implicating the sigma site as a secondary target for this ligand in the cortex.

  14. Comparative tissue distribution of conformationally restricted radioiodinated vesamicol receptor ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efange, S.M.N.; Khare, A.B.; Langason, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    Three conformationally restricted analogs of vesamicol, 1'-[1-(3-iodobenzyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-3-yl]-spirol[1H-indene-1,4'- piperidine] (5), 1'-[1-(3-iodobenzyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-3-yl]-3,4-dihydrospiro[indene-1,4'- piperidine] (6) and 1'-[1-(3-iodobenzyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-3-yl)-3,4-dihydrospiro[naphthalene- 1(2H),4'-piperidine] (7), were labelled with iodine-125 and evaluated as potential radioligands for mapping vesamicol receptor (VR) density and cholinergic function in vivo. All compounds showed similar kinetics in most tissues. However, differences were observed in the brain. Although comparable levels of each corresponding enantiomeric pair were obtained initially in the brain, the levels of the dextrorotatory enantiomers (+)-5, (+)-6 and (+)-7 were found to decrease by 72-82% over a period of 3 h. In contrast, the brain levels of the corresponding levorotatory isomers were maintained throughout the duration of the experiment. Among the dextrorotatory isomers, (+)-6 showed the highest brain extraction, while (+)-7 showed the lowest. In tissue dissection experiments, the levels of (+)-5, (+)-6 and (+)-7 were highest in the striatum and moderate to low in the cortex and cerebellum. Co-administration of haloperidol with (+)-6 decreased the levels of the latter in the striatum by 27%, while the levels in the cortex and cerebellum were each reduced by 60%. In addition, haloperidol failed to affect the regional distribution of (+)-7 in the brain. However, both haloperidol and spiperone increased the striatal levels of (+)-5 by 67 and 76%, respectively, suggesting that the binding of this radioligand is related to cholinergic function. Furthermore, haloperidol reduced the concentration of (+)-5 in the cortex and cerebellum by 25 and 33%, respectively, thereby implicating the sigma site as a secondary target for this ligand in the cortex

  15. Serotoninergic receptors in brain tissue: properties and identification of various 3H-ligand binding sites in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leysen, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    In vitro binding studies to serotoninergic receptors were performed using 3 H-LSD, 3 H-5-HT and 3 H-spiperone. An overwiew is given on findings using these three ligands with respect to the following: localization of specific binding sites, in various animal species, the regional distribution in the brain and periphery, the subcellular and cellular distribution. Properties of the binding sites, influence of the composition of the assay medium, binding kinetic properties, receptor regulation in vivo. Identity of the binding sites, differences between site for various 3 H-ligands, pharmacological specificity of the membranous binding sites, chemical composition of the macromolecular complex constituting the binding site. Function of the receptor. Binding affinities of 44 compounds were measured in binding assays using 3 H-spiperone and 3 H-LSD with rat frontal cortex membrane preparations and using 3 H-5-HT and 3 H-LSD with rat hippocampal membrane preparations

  16. Catalytic behaviors of Co{sup II} and Mn{sup II} compounds bearing α-Diimine ligands for oxidative polymerization or drying oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Gilvan E.S.; Nunes, Everton V.; Dantas, Roberta C.; Meneghetti, Mario R.; Meneghetti, Simoni M.P., E-mail: simoni.plentz@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Maceió, AL (Brazil). Grupo de Catálise e Reatividade Química; Simone, Carlos A. de [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), São Carlos, USP, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Física

    2018-05-01

    The oxidative polymerization of linseed oil was investigated comparing the classical catalysts cobalt(II) 2-ethylhexanoate and manganese(II) 2-ethylhexanoate and their derivatives modified by the presence of chelating nitrogen ligands, i.e., 2,2’-bipyridyl, 2-(acetyl-2,6-diisopropylphenylimine)- pyridine and [N-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imine]acenaphthoquinone. The suitable stoichiometries between the two precursor complexes with the three ligands were determined by UV-visible spectroscopy. All complexes were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, and one complex was characterized also by X-ray diffraction. The apparent kinetic constants of oxidative polymerization of linseed oil was determined, for each catalytic system, via the periodic measurements of the oil viscosity during the oxidation reaction. The results indicated that the modifications of the classical two complexes with the chelating nitrogen ligands improved the catalytic efficiency at least to the manganese complex. (author)

  17. Predicting Nanocrystal Shape through Consideration of Surface-Ligand Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Bealing, Clive R.

    2012-03-27

    Density functional calculations for the binding energy of oleic acid-based ligands on Pb-rich {100} and {111} facets of PbSe nanocrystals determine the surface energies as a function of ligand coverage. Oleic acid is expected to bind to the nanocrystal surface in the form of lead oleate. The Wulff construction predicts the thermodynamic equilibrium shape of the PbSe nanocrystals. The equilibrium shape is a function of the ligand surface coverage, which can be controlled by changing the concentration of oleic acid during synthesis. The different binding energy of the ligand on the {100} and {111} facets results in different equilibrium ligand coverages on the facets, and a transition in the equilibrium shape from octahedral to cubic is predicted when increasing the ligand concentration during synthesis. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  18. Prediction of GPCR-Ligand Binding Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangmin Seo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel method that predicts binding of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs and ligands. The proposed method uses hub and cycle structures of ligands and amino acid motif sequences of GPCRs, rather than the 3D structure of a receptor or similarity of receptors or ligands. The experimental results show that these new features can be effective in predicting GPCR-ligand binding (average area under the curve [AUC] of 0.944, because they are thought to include hidden properties of good ligand-receptor binding. Using the proposed method, we were able to identify novel ligand-GPCR bindings, some of which are supported by several studies.

  19. Mixed ligand chelates of rare earths in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakhani, S.U.; Thakur, G.S.; Sangal, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    Mixed ligand chelates of the 1:1 trivalent lanthanoids-EDTA, HEDTA and NTA chelates-1, 2-Dihydroxybenzene (Pyrocatechol) have been investigated at 35degC and 0.2 M ionic strength maintained by NaC10 4 . The formation of mixed ligand chelates has been found in all cases. The formation of mixed ligand chelates with EDTA shows the coordination number of lanthanoids to be eight, while the mixed ligand chelates with HEDTA and NTA shows the coordination number to be seven and six respectively. The stability constants of mixed ligand chelates are smaller than the binary complexes. The order of stability constants with respect to primary ligands follows the order NTA>HEDTA>EDTA. With respect to metal ions the stability constants increases with the decrease in ionic radii such as Gd< Er< Yb. (author)

  20. New ' Bucky- ligands'. Potentially Monoanionic Terdentate Diamino Aryl Pincer Ligands Anchored to C60

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Meijer, M.D.; Gossage, R.A.; Jastrzebski, J.T.B.H.

    1998-01-01

    Two new methanofullerenes have been prepared by the reaction of C{6}{0} with diazo substituted, potentially monoanionic, terdentate diamino aryl ligands, yielding a mixture of the open valence [5, 6]- and closed valence [6,6]-isomers. Single isomers of the pure [6,6]-methanofullerenes were obtained

  1. LASSO-ligand activity by surface similarity order: a new tool for ligand based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Darryl; Sadjad, Bashir S; Zsoldos, Zsolt; Simon, Aniko

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Ligand Screening (VLS) has become an integral part of the drug discovery process for many pharmaceutical companies. Ligand similarity searches provide a very powerful method of screening large databases of ligands to identify possible hits. If these hits belong to new chemotypes the method is deemed even more successful. eHiTS LASSO uses a new interacting surface point types (ISPT) molecular descriptor that is generated from the 3D structure of the ligand, but unlike most 3D descriptors it is conformation independent. Combined with a neural network machine learning technique, LASSO screens molecular databases at an ultra fast speed of 1 million structures in under 1 min on a standard PC. The results obtained from eHiTS LASSO trained on relatively small training sets of just 2, 4 or 8 actives are presented using the diverse directory of useful decoys (DUD) dataset. It is shown that over a wide range of receptor families, eHiTS LASSO is consistently able to enrich screened databases and provides scaffold hopping ability.

  2. LASSO—ligand activity by surface similarity order: a new tool for ligand based virtual screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Darryl; Sadjad, Bashir S.; Zsoldos, Zsolt; Simon, Aniko

    2008-06-01

    Virtual Ligand Screening (VLS) has become an integral part of the drug discovery process for many pharmaceutical companies. Ligand similarity searches provide a very powerful method of screening large databases of ligands to identify possible hits. If these hits belong to new chemotypes the method is deemed even more successful. eHiTS LASSO uses a new interacting surface point types (ISPT) molecular descriptor that is generated from the 3D structure of the ligand, but unlike most 3D descriptors it is conformation independent. Combined with a neural network machine learning technique, LASSO screens molecular databases at an ultra fast speed of 1 million structures in under 1 min on a standard PC. The results obtained from eHiTS LASSO trained on relatively small training sets of just 2, 4 or 8 actives are presented using the diverse directory of useful decoys (DUD) dataset. It is shown that over a wide range of receptor families, eHiTS LASSO is consistently able to enrich screened databases and provides scaffold hopping ability.

  3. New synthetic routes toward enantiopure nitrogen donor ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Sala, Xavier; Rodríguez, Anna M.; Rodríguez, Montserrat; Romero, Isabel; Parella, Teodor; Zelewsky, Alexander von; Llobet, Antoni; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi

    2008-01-01

    New polypyridylic chiral ligands, having either C₃ or lower symmetry, have been prepared via a de novo construction of the pyridine nucleus by means of Kröhnke methodology in the key step. The chiral moieties of these ligands originate from the monoterpen chiral pool, namely (-)-α-pinene ((-)-14, (-)-15) and (-)-myrtenal ((-)-9, (-)-10). Extension of the above-mentioned asymmetric synthesis procedure to the preparation of enantiopure derivatives of some commonly used polypyridylic ligands has...

  4. Selectivity in ligand recognition of G-quadruplex loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Nancy H; Patel, Manisha; Tofa, Amina B; Ghosh, Ragina; Parkinson, Gary N; Neidle, Stephen

    2009-03-03

    A series of disubstituted acridine ligands have been cocrystallized with a bimolecular DNA G-quadruplex. The ligands have a range of cyclic amino end groups of varying size. The crystal structures show that the diagonal loop in this quadruplex results in a large cavity for these groups, in contrast to the steric constraints imposed by propeller loops in human telomeric quadruplexes. We conclude that the nature of the loop has a significant influence on ligand selectivity for particular quadruplex folds.

  5. Singular Value Decomposition and Ligand Binding Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Galo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Singular values decomposition (SVD is one of the most important computations in linear algebra because of its vast application for data analysis. It is particularly useful for resolving problems involving least-squares minimization, the determination of matrix rank, and the solution of certain problems involving Euclidean norms. Such problems arise in the spectral analysis of ligand binding to macromolecule. Here, we present a spectral data analysis method using SVD (SVD analysis and nonlinear fitting to determine the binding characteristics of intercalating drugs to DNA. This methodology reduces noise and identifies distinct spectral species similar to traditional principal component analysis as well as fitting nonlinear binding parameters. We applied SVD analysis to investigate the interaction of actinomycin D and daunomycin with native DNA. This methodology does not require prior knowledge of ligand molar extinction coefficients (free and bound, which potentially limits binding analysis. Data are acquired simply by reconstructing the experimental data and by adjusting the product of deconvoluted matrices and the matrix of model coefficients determined by the Scatchard and McGee and von Hippel equation.

  6. Spectrochemical study on different ligand neodymium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomenko, V.S.; Lozinskij, M.O.; Fialkov, Yu.A.; Krasovskaya, L.I.; Rasshinina, T.A.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Organicheskoj Khimii)

    1986-01-01

    A series of new adducts of neodymium complexes with 1, 1, 1, 5, 5, 5-hexafluoropentadione - 2, 4 and 2-heptafluoropropoxy-1, 1, 1, 2-tetrafluoro-5-phenylpentadione-3, 5: Nd(HFPTFPhPD) 3 x2H 2 O, Nd(HFPTFPhPD) 3 xDipy, Nd(HFPTFPhPD) 3 xPhen, Nd(HFPTFPhPD) 3 xDphen, Nd(HFA) 3 x2H 2 O, Nd(HFA) 3 xDipy, Nd(HFA) 3 xPhen, Nd(HFA) 3 xDphen, have been synthesized. Ways of their fragmentation under electron impact are established. Bond strength of additional ligands with central atom in the complexes studied is evaluated. Data on decomposition mechanisms of bicharged ions have been obtained for the first time. Addition of bis-heterocycles to neodymium three-ligand complexes changes the properties of the complexes - their thermal stability and photochemical stability increase, in certain cases their volatility increases

  7. Novel Somatostatin Receptor Ligands Therapies for Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Paragliola

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is considered the treatment of choice in acromegaly, but patients with persistent disease after surgery or in whom surgery cannot be considered require medical therapy. Somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs octreotide (OCT, lanreotide, and the more recently approved pasireotide, characterized by a broader receptor ligand binding profile, are considered the mainstay in the medical management of acromegaly. However, in the attempt to offer a more efficacious and better tolerated medical approach, recent research has been aimed to override some limitations related to the use of currently approved drugs and novel SRLs therapies, with potential attractive features, have been proposed. These include both new formulation of older molecules and new molecules. Novel OCT formulations are aimed in particular to improve patients’ compliance and to reduce injection discomfort. They include an investigational ready-to-use subcutaneous depot OCT formulation (CAM2029, delivered via prefilled syringes and oral OCT that uses a “transient permeability enhancer” technology, which allows for OCT oral absorption. Another new delivery system is a long-lasting OCT implant (VP-003, which provide stable doses of OCT throughout a period of several months. Finally, a new SRL DG3173 (somatoprim seems to be more selective for GH secretion, suggesting possible advantages in the presence of hyperglycemia or diabetes. How much these innovations will actually be beneficial to acromegaly patients in real clinical practice remains to be seen.

  8. Kinetics of thyroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, Mitsuo; Nishikawa, Mitsushige; Naito, Kimikazu; Ishii, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Kiyoshi

    1980-01-01

    Kinetics of thyroid hormones were outlined, and recent progress in metabolism of these hormones was also described. Recently, not only T 4 and T 3 but also rT 3 , 3,3'-T 2 , 3',5'-T 2 , and 3,5-T 2 can be measured by RIA. To clarify metabolic pathways of these hormones, metabolic clearance rate and production rate of these hormones were calculated. As single-compartment analysis was insufficient to clarify disappearance curves of thyroid hormones in blood such as T 3 and T 2 of which metabolic speed was so fast, multi-compartment analysis or non-compartment analysis were also performed. Thyroid hormones seemed to be measured more precisely by constant infusion method. At the first step of T 4 metabolism, T 3 was formed by 5'-monodeiodination of T 4 , and rT 3 was formed by 5-monodeiodination of T 4 . As metabolic pathways of T 3 and rT 3 , conversion of them to 3,3'-T 2 or to 3',5'-T 2 and 3,5-T 2 was supposed. This subject will be an interesting research theme in future. (Tsunoda, M.)

  9. Molecular Characterization of the Interactions between Vascular Selectins and Glycoprotein Ligands on Human Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Abusamra, Dina

    2016-12-01

    The human bone marrow vasculature constitutively expresses both E-selectin and P-selectin where they interact with the cell-surface glycan moiety, sialyl Lewis x, on circulating hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to mediate the essential tethering/rolling step. Although several E-selectin glycoprotein ligands (E-selLs) have been identified, the importance of each E-selL on human HSPCs is debatable and requires additional methodologies to advance their specific involvement. The first objective was to fill the knowledge gap in the in vitro characterization of the mechanisms used by selectins to mediate the initial step in the HSPCs homing by developing a real time immunoprecipitation-based assay on a surface plasmon resonance chip. This novel assay bypass the difficulties of purifying ligands, enables the use of natively glycosylated forms of selectin ligands from any model cell of interest and study its binding affinities under flow. We provide the first comprehensive quantitative binding kinetics of two well-documented ligands, CD44 and PSGL-1, with E-selectin. Both ligands bind monomeric E-selectin transiently with fast on- and off-rates while they bind dimeric E-selectin with remarkably slow on- and off-rates with the on-rate, but not the off-rate, is dependent on salt concentration. Thus, suggest a mechanism through which monomeric selectins mediate initial fast-on and -off binding to capture the circulating cells out of shear-flow; subsequently, tight binding by dimeric/oligomeric selectins is enabled to slow rolling significantly. The second objective is to fully identify and characterize E/P-selectin ligand candidates expressed on CD34+ HSPCs which cause enhanced migration after intravenous transplantation compared to their CD34- counterparts. CD34 is widely recognized marker of human HSPCs but its natural ligand and function on these cells remain elusive. Proteomics identified CD34 as an E-selL candidate on human HSPCs, whose binding to E

  10. Crystallization of bi-functional ligand protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Claudia; Vera, Laura; Devel, Laurent; Catalani, Maria Pia; Czarny, Bertrand; Cassar-Lajeunesse, Evelyn; Nuti, Elisa; Rossello, Armando; Dive, Vincent; Stura, Enrico Adriano

    2013-06-01

    Homodimerization is important in signal transduction and can play a crucial role in many other biological systems. To obtaining structural information for the design of molecules able to control the signalization pathways, the proteins involved will have to be crystallized in complex with ligands that induce dimerization. Bi-functional drugs have been generated by linking two ligands together chemically and the relative crystallizability of complexes with mono-functional and bi-functional ligands has been evaluated. There are problems associated with crystallization with such ligands, but overall, the advantages appear to be greater than the drawbacks. The study involves two matrix metalloproteinases, MMP-12 and MMP-9. Using flexible and rigid linkers we show that it is possible to control the crystal packing and that by changing the ligand-enzyme stoichiometric ratio, one can toggle between having one bi-functional ligand binding to two enzymes and having the same ligand bound to each enzyme. The nature of linker and its point of attachment on the ligand can be varied to aid crystallization, and such variations can also provide valuable structural information about the interactions made by the linker with the protein. We report here the crystallization and structure determination of seven ligand-dimerized complexes. These results suggest that the use of bi-functional drugs can be extended beyond the realm of protein dimerization to include all drug design projects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Superior serum half life of albumin tagged TNF ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Nicole; Schneider, Britta; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Wajant, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Due to their immune stimulating and apoptosis inducing properties, ligands of the TNF family attract increasing interest as therapeutic proteins. A general limitation of in vivo applications of recombinant soluble TNF ligands is their notoriously rapid clearance from circulation. To improve the serum half life of the TNF family members TNF, TWEAK and TRAIL, we genetically fused soluble variants of these molecules to human serum albumin (HSA). The serum albumin-TNF ligand fusion proteins were found to be of similar bioactivity as the corresponding HSA-less counterparts. Upon intravenous injection (i.v.), serum half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins, as determined by ELISA, was around 15 h as compared to approximately 1 h for all of the recombinant control TNF ligands without HSA domain. Moreover, serum samples collected 6 or 24 h after i.v. injection still contained high TNF ligand bioactivity, demonstrating that there is only limited degradation/inactivation of circulating HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins in vivo. In a xenotransplantation model, significantly less of the HSA-TRAIL fusion protein compared to the respective control TRAIL protein was required to achieve inhibition of tumor growth indicating that the increased half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins translates into better therapeutic action in vivo. In conclusion, our data suggest that genetic fusion to serum albumin is a powerful and generally applicable mean to improve bioavailability and in vivo activity of TNF ligands.

  12. Spectra of fluorinated rare earth. beta. -diketonates with added ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khomenko, V.S.; Lozinskij, M.O.; Fialkov, Yu.A.; Rasshinina, T.A.; Krasovskaya, L.I. (AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk. Inst. Fiziki; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Organicheskoj Khimii)

    1984-01-01

    Different-ligand rare earth complexes are synthesized. Fluorated ..beta..-diketones, triethylphosphine oxide and trifluoracetic acid are used as active ligands. Mass-spectra of low and high resolution are taken at the energy of ionizing electrons of 70 eV, as well as luminescence spectra of complexes. Fragmentation ways of complexes decomposition under electron shock are studied. A series of changing the bound strength of additional ligands with europium in mixed complexes is determined. It is shown that the introduction of additional ligands can purposefully change physical and chemical properties of complexes.

  13. Implicit ligand theory for relative binding free energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Hai; Minh, David D. L.

    2018-03-01

    Implicit ligand theory enables noncovalent binding free energies to be calculated based on an exponential average of the binding potential of mean force (BPMF)—the binding free energy between a flexible ligand and rigid receptor—over a precomputed ensemble of receptor configurations. In the original formalism, receptor configurations were drawn from or reweighted to the apo ensemble. Here we show that BPMFs averaged over a holo ensemble yield binding free energies relative to the reference ligand that specifies the ensemble. When using receptor snapshots from an alchemical simulation with a single ligand, the new statistical estimator outperforms the original.

  14. Hyperpolarized 89Y NMR spectroscopic detection of yttrium ion and DOTA macrocyclic ligand complexation: pH dependence and Y-DOTA intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Sarah; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a rapidly emerging physics technique used to enhance the signal strength in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and imaging (MRI) experiments for nuclear spins such as yttrium-89 by >10,000-fold. One of the most common and stable MRI contrast agents used in the clinic is Gd-DOTA. In this work, we have investigated the binding of the yttrium and DOTA ligand as a model for complexation of Gd ion and DOTA ligand. The macrocyclic ligand DOTA is special because its complexation with lanthanide ions such as Gd3+ or Y3+ is highly pH dependent. Using this physics technology, we have tracked the complexation kinetics of hyperpolarized Y-triflate and DOTA ligand in real-time and detected the Y-DOTA intermediates. Different kinds of buffers were used (lactate, acetate, citrate, oxalate) and the pseudo-first order complexation kinetic calculations will be discussed. The authors would like to acknowledge the support by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  15. Kinetic effects on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Taro

    2001-01-01

    Resistive and ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theories are insufficient to adequately explain MHD phenomena in the high-temperature plasma. Recent progress in numerical simulations concerning kinetic effects on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena is summarized. The following three topics are studied using various models treating extended-MHD phenomena. (1) Kinetic modifications of internal kink modes in tokamaks with normal and reversed magnetic shear configurations. (2) Temporal evolution of the toroidal Alfven eigenmode and fishbone mode in tokamaks with energetic ions. (3) Kinetic stabilization of a title mode in field-reversed configurations by means of anchoring ions and beam ions. (author)

  16. Direct and quantitative characterization of dynamic ligand exchange between coordination-driven self-assembled supramolecular polygons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yao-Rong; Stang, Peter J

    2009-03-18

    The direct observation of dynamic ligand exchange between Pt-N coordination-driven self-assembled supramolecular polygons (triangles and rectangles) has been achieved using stable (1)H/(2)D isotope labeling of the pyridyl donors and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry combined with NMR spectroscopy. Both the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of such exchange processes have been established on the basis of quantitative mass spectral results. Further investigation has shown that the exchange is highly dependent on experimental conditions such as temperature, solvent, and the counteranions.

  17. Probing Ligand Exchange in the P450 Enzyme CYP121 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Dynamic Equilibrium of the Distal Heme Ligand as a Function of pH and Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Andrew J; Dornevil, Kednerlin; Ma, Li; Davis, Ian; Liu, Aimin

    2017-12-06

    CYP121 is a cytochrome P450 enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis that catalyzes the formation of a C-C bond between the aromatic groups of its cyclodityrosine substrate (cYY). The crystal structure of CYP121 in complex with cYY reveals that the solvent-derived ligand remains bound to the ferric ion in the enzyme-substrate complex. Whereas in the generally accepted P450 mechanism, binding of the primary substrate in the active-site triggers the release of the solvent-derived ligand, priming the metal center for reduction and subsequent O 2 binding. Here we employed sodium cyanide to probe the metal-ligand exchange of the enzyme and the enzyme-substrate complex. The cyano adducts were characterized by UV-vis, EPR, and ENDOR spectroscopies and X-ray crystallography. A 100-fold increase in the affinity of cyanide binding to the enzyme-substrate complex over the ligand-free enzyme was observed. The crystal structure of the [CYP121(cYY)CN] ternary complex showed a rearrangement of the substrate in the active-site, when compared to the structure of the binary [CYP121(cYY)] complex. Transient kinetic studies showed that cYY binding resulted in a lower second-order rate constant (k on (CN) ) but a much more stable cyanide adduct with 3 orders of magnitude slower k off (CN) rate. A dynamic equilibrium between multiple high- and low-spin species for both the enzyme and enzyme-substrate complex was also observed, which is sensitive to changes in both pH and temperature. Our data reveal the chemical and physical properties of the solvent-derived ligand of the enzyme, which will help to understand the initial steps of the catalytic mechanism.

  18. Steric and electronic effects of 1,3-disubstituted cyclopentadienyl ligands on metallocene derivatives of Cerium, Titanium, Manganese, and Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofield, Chadwick Dean [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Sterically demanding 1,3-disubstituted cyclopentadienyl ligands were used to modify the physical properties of the corresponding metallocenes. Sterically demanding ligands provided kinetic stabilization for trivalent cerium compounds. Tris(di-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)cerium was prepared and anion competition between halides and cyclopentadienyl groups which had complicated synthesis of the tris(cyclopentadienyl)compound was qualitatively examined. Bis(di-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)cerium methyl was prepared and its rate of decomposition, by ligand redistribution, to tris(di-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)cerium was shown to be slower than the corresponding rate for less sterically demanding ligands. Asymmetrically substituted ligands provided a symmetry label for examination of chemical exchange processes. Tris[trimethylsilyl(t-butyl)cyclopentadienyl]cerium was prepared and the rate of interconversion between the C1 and C3 isomers was examined. The enthalpy difference between the two distereomers is 7.0 kJ/mol. The sterically demanding cyclopentadienyl ligands ansa-di-t-butylcyclopentadiene (Me2Si[(Me3C)2C5H3]2), ansa-bis(trimethylsilyl)cyclopentadiene (Me2Si[(Me3Si)2C5H3]2) and tetra-t-butylfulvalene and metallocene derivatives of the ligands were prepared and their structures were examined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The effect that substituents on the cyclopentadienyl ring have on the pi-electron system of the ligand was examined through interaction between ligand and metal orbitals. A series of 1,3-disubstituted manganocenes was prepared and their electronic states were determined by solid-state magnetic susceptibility, electron paramagnetic resonance, X-ray crystallography, and variable temperature UV-vis spectroscopy. Spin-equilibria in [(Me3C)2C5H3]2Mn and [(Me3

  19. Calculating the mean time to capture for tethered ligands and its effect on the chemical equilibrium of bound ligand pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lu; Decker, Caitlin G; Maynard, Heather D; Levine, Alex J

    2016-09-01

    We present here the calculation of the mean time to capture of a tethered ligand to the receptor. This calculation is then used to determine the shift in the partitioning between (1) free, (2) singly bound, and (3) doubly bound ligands in chemical equilibrium as a function of the length of the tether. These calculations are used in the research article Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 Dimer with Superagonist in vitro Activity Improves Granulation Tissue Formation During Wound Healing (Decker et al., in press [1]) to explain quantitatively how changes in polymeric linker length in the ligand dimers modifies the efficacy of these molecules relative to that of free ligands.

  20. Role of ligands in permanganate oxidation of organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin; Pang, Su-Yan; Ma, Jun

    2010-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that several ligands such as phosphate, pyrophosphate, EDTA, and humic acid could significantly enhance permanganate oxidation of triclosan (one phenolic biocide), which was explained by the contribution of ligand-stabilized reactive manganese intermediates in situ formed upon permanganate reduction. To further understand the underlying mechanism, we comparatively investigated the influence of ligands on permanganate oxidation of bisphenol A (BPA, one phenolic endocrine-disrupting chemical), carbamazepine (CBZ, a pharmaceutical containing the olefinic group), and methyl p-tolyl sulfoxide (TMSO, a typical oxygen-atom acceptor). Selected ligands exerted oxidation enhancement for BPA but had negligible influence for CBZ and TMSO. This was mainly attributed to the effects of identified Mn(III) complexes, which would otherwise disproportionate spontaneously in the absence of ligands. The one-electron oxidant Mn(III) species exhibited no reactivity toward CBZ and TMSO for which the two-electron oxygen donation may be the primary oxidation mechanism but readily oxidized BPA. The latter case was a function of pH, the complexing ligand, and the molar [Mn(III)]:[ligand] ratio, generally consistent with the patterns of ligand-affected permanganate oxidation. Moreover, the combination of the one-electron reduction of Mn(III) (Mn(III) + e(-) -->Mn(II)) and the Mn(VII)/Mn(II) reaction in excess ligands (Mn(VII) + 4Mn(II) ----> (ligands) 5Mn(III)) suggested a catalytic role of the Mn(III)/Mn(II) pair in permanganate oxidation of some phenolics in the presence of ligands.

  1. Bicarbonate kinetics in Indian males

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    ized kinetics of bicarbonate using a three-compartment model, to assess which compartmental fluxes changed dur- .... total VCO2 was < 3 % and the average respiratory quotient ..... a part of the nonrespiratory losses of 13CO2 occur to this.

  2. Kinetic equations in dirty superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraehenbuehl, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Kinetic equations for superconductors in the dirty limit are derived using a method developed for superfluid systems, which allows a systematic expansion in small parameters; exact charge conservation is obeyed. (orig.)

  3. Cell kinetics and therapeutic efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeff, M.; Abenhardt, W.; Gruner, B.; Stoffner, D.; Mainz Univ.

    1976-01-01

    The study shows that cell kinetics effects correlate with the effects of cytostatic drugs in the tumour model investigated here. It should, however, be noted that even genetically related tumour cell types may react differently to the same cytostatic drug, and that the cell kinetics effects, due to the changes in the cell cycle, cannot be predicted but should be followed with a very fast method, e.g. sequential flan fluorescence cytophotometry, for optimal therapeutic results. (orig./GSE) [de

  4. Synthesis and complexation of acyclic dithiolate ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashford, L.

    1999-11-01

    Four approaches to ring substituted and unsubstituted N,N'-bis(o-mercaptobenzyliden)propylenediaminate ligands are described using N,N-dimethylcarbamate as a thiolate protecting group. Of the four basic methods, substitution, reduction, rearrangement and oxidation, the latter two successfully synthesise the aldehyde precursor. Rearrangement of the thiocarbamoyl group to the protected thiophenol is shown to be facilitated by a para-nitro substiuent. Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes of N,N'-bis(p-nitro-o-mercaptobenzyliden)-propylenediaminate are synthesised by reaction of 2-formyl-4-nitro-N,N-dimethylcarbamoyI thiophenol, [Ni(OAc) 2 ].4(H 2 O) and 1,3-diaminopropane. The para-unsubstituted Ni(II) complex, Nickel-[N,N'-bis(o-mercaptobenzyliden) propylenediaminate] is prepared via reaction of the aldehyde, 2-formyl-N,N-dimethylcarbamoyl thiophenol with [Ni(OAc) 2 ].4(H 2 O) and 1,3-diaminopropane. The analogous carbamoyl-protected amine ligands, N,N'-dimethyl-N.N'-di[2-(N'',N''-dimethylcarbamyl)mercapto] benzyl-1,3-propane-diamine and N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-di[2-(N'',N''-dimethylcarbamyl)mercapto] benzyl-1,2-ethane-diamine are also studied. The tertiary-butyl-protected diimine ligand, N,N'-bis-(o-mercaptobenzylidene)-propylenediaminate is prepared from 2-(tert-butylsulfanyl)benzaldehyde and 1,3-diaminopropane. Reaction with [Ni(H 2 O) 6 ]Cl 2 gives Nickel-[N,N'-bis(o-mercaptobenzyliden)-propylenediaminate], the crystal structure showing a distorted square-planar Ni(II) centre. Reaction with ZnCl 2 gives Zinc-[N,N'-bis(o-mercaptobenzyliden)propylenediaminate]dichloride. The crystal structure shows the thiolate donors remain protected and uncoordinated. The Zn(II) ion is coordinated by two imine donors and two chloride ions in a tetrahedral environment. In reactions with Ag(I) and Hg(II), N,N'-bis-(o-mercaptobenzylidene)-propylenediaminate acts as a reductant giving the free metals. Structural data and NMR and IR spectroscopic data for Nickel

  5. Kinetic characterisation of arylamine N-acetyltransferase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sim Edith

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs are important drug- and carcinogen-metabolising enzymes that catalyse the transfer of an acetyl group from a donor, such as acetyl coenzyme A, to an aromatic or heterocyclic amine, hydrazine, hydrazide or N-hydroxylamine acceptor substrate. NATs are found in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, and they may also have an endogenous function in addition to drug metabolism. For example, NAT from Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been proposed to have a role in cell wall lipid biosynthesis, and is therefore of interest as a potential drug target. To date there have been no studies investigating the kinetic mechanism of a bacterial NAT enzyme. Results We have determined that NAT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which has been described as a model for NAT from M. tuberculosis, follows a Ping Pong Bi Bi kinetic mechanism. We also describe substrate inhibition by 5-aminosalicylic acid, in which the substrate binds both to the free form of the enzyme and the acetyl coenzyme A-enzyme complex in non-productive reaction pathways. The true kinetic parameters for the NAT-catalysed acetylation of 5-aminosalicylic acid with acetyl coenzyme A as the co-factor have been established, validating earlier approximations. Conclusion This is the first reported study investigating the kinetic mechanism of a bacterial NAT enzyme. Additionally, the methods used herein can be applied to investigations of the interactions of NAT enzymes with new chemical entities which are NAT ligands. This is likely to be useful in the design of novel potential anti-tubercular agents.

  6. Tracer kinetic modelling of receptor data with mathematical metabolite correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, C.; Buck, A.

    1996-01-01

    Quantitation of metabolic processes with dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) and tracer kinetic modelling relies on the time course of authentic ligand in plasma, i.e. the input curve. The determination of the latter often requires the measurement of labelled metabilites, a laborious procedure. In this study we examined the possibility of mathematical metabolite correction, which might obviate the need for actual metabolite measurements. Mathematical metabilite correction was implemented by estimating the input curve together with kinetic tissue parameters. The general feasibility of the approach was evaluated in a Monte Carlo simulation using a two tissue compartment model. The method was then applied to a series of five human carbon-11 iomazenil PET studies. The measured cerebral tissue time-activity curves were fitted with a single tissue compartment model. For mathematical metabolite correction the input curve following the peak was approximated by a sum of three decaying exponentials, the amplitudes and characteristic half-times of which were then estimated by the fitting routine. In the simulation study the parameters used to generate synthetic tissue time-activity curves (K 1 -k 4 ) were refitted with reasonable identifiability when using mathematical metabolite correciton. Absolute quantitation of distribution volumes was found to be possible provided that the metabolite and the kinetic models are adequate. If the kinetic model is oversimplified, the linearity of the correlation between true and estimated distribution volumes is still maintained, although the linear regression becomes dependent on the input curve. These simulation results were confirmed when applying mathematical metabolite correction to the 11 C iomazenil study. Estimates of the distribution volume calculated with a measured input curve were linearly related to the estimates calculated using mathematical metabolite correction with correlation coefficients >0.990. (orig./MG)

  7. Kinetic parameters from thermogravimetric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    High performance polymeric materials are finding increased use in aerospace applications. Proposed high speed aircraft will require materials to withstand high temperatures in an oxidative atmosphere for long periods of time. It is essential that accurate estimates be made of the performance of these materials at the given conditions of temperature and time. Temperatures of 350 F (177 C) and times of 60,000 to 100,000 hours are anticipated. In order to survey a large number of high performance polymeric materials on a reasonable time scale, some form of accelerated testing must be performed. A knowledge of the rate of a process can be used to predict the lifetime of that process. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) has frequently been used to determine kinetic information for degradation reactions in polymeric materials. Flynn and Wall studied a number of methods for using TGA experiments to determine kinetic information in polymer reactions. Kinetic parameters, such as the apparent activation energy and the frequency factor, can be determined in such experiments. Recently, researchers at the McDonnell Douglas Research Laboratory suggested that a graph of the logarithm of the frequency factor against the apparent activation energy can be used to predict long-term thermo-oxidative stability for polymeric materials. Such a graph has been called a kinetic map. In this study, thermogravimetric analyses were performed in air to study the thermo-oxidative degradation of several high performance polymers and to plot their kinetic parameters on a kinetic map.

  8. The universal statistical distributions of the affinity, equilibrium constants, kinetics and specificity in biomolecular recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiliang Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We uncovered the universal statistical laws for the biomolecular recognition/binding process. We quantified the statistical energy landscapes for binding, from which we can characterize the distributions of the binding free energy (affinity, the equilibrium constants, the kinetics and the specificity by exploring the different ligands binding with a particular receptor. The results of the analytical studies are confirmed by the microscopic flexible docking simulations. The distribution of binding affinity is Gaussian around the mean and becomes exponential near the tail. The equilibrium constants of the binding follow a log-normal distribution around the mean and a power law distribution in the tail. The intrinsic specificity for biomolecular recognition measures the degree of discrimination of native versus non-native binding and the optimization of which becomes the maximization of the ratio of the free energy gap between the native state and the average of non-native states versus the roughness measured by the variance of the free energy landscape around its mean. The intrinsic specificity obeys a Gaussian distribution near the mean and an exponential distribution near the tail. Furthermore, the kinetics of binding follows a log-normal distribution near the mean and a power law distribution at the tail. Our study provides new insights into the statistical nature of thermodynamics, kinetics and function from different ligands binding with a specific receptor or equivalently specific ligand binding with different receptors. The elucidation of distributions of the kinetics and free energy has guiding roles in studying biomolecular recognition and function through small-molecule evolution and chemical genetics.

  9. Synthesis and properties of dioxo Tc(V) cationic complexes with nitrogen containing ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambino, D.; Kremer, C.; Savio, E.; Leon, A.; Kremer, E.

    1990-01-01

    A series of Tc(V) cationic complexes was synthesized by electrochemical reduction of TcO 4 - . The electrolysis was performed in aqueous media containing amines as ligands: ethylenediamine (en), diethylenetriamine (dien), triethylenetetramine (trien) and 1,3-diaminopropane (1,3-dap). The combination of different techniques allows to propose the general formula [TcO 2 (amine) 2 ] + for these compounds. Electrodeposition of TcO 2 was a competitive reaction. The UV spectra were compared with those for other Tc(V) amine complexes. The presence of two peaks could be verified. Preliminary studies showed that kinetic stability decreased in the sequence en, 1,3-dap, trien, dien. The decomposition rate increased when the pH was lowered. (author) 16 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  10. Empirical potentials for recombination reactions of photo-dissociated ligands. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elber, R.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this research was to design an appropriate potential and simulation methodology to describe the effect of radiation on ligands bound to metal-proteins. As model systems the authors investigated myoglobin, hemoglobin and their mutants. The great advantage of the globins as a target for theoretical studies is the wealth of experimental data available for them. They focused on studies that combine fast spectroscopy with mutation experiments. The mutations make it possible to examine detailed changes in the kinetic curves with atomically detailed information. The first spectroscopy, which is in the same time scale as of ordinary molecular dynamics (sub nanoseconds), makes it possible to compare the results of the computations to raw experimental data

  11. Protein-ligand interactions investigated by thermal shift assays (TSA) and dual polarization interferometry (DPI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøftehauge, Morten K; Hajizadeh, Nelly R; Swann, Marcus J; Pohl, Ehmke

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, a wide range of biophysical techniques investigating protein-ligand interactions have become indispensable tools to complement high-resolution crystal structure determinations. Current approaches in solution range from high-throughput-capable methods such as thermal shift assays (TSA) to highly accurate techniques including microscale thermophoresis (MST) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) that can provide a full thermodynamic description of binding events. Surface-based methods such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and dual polarization interferometry (DPI) allow real-time measurements and can provide kinetic parameters as well as binding constants. DPI provides additional spatial information about the binding event. Here, an account is presented of new developments and recent applications of TSA and DPI connected to crystallography.

  12. A Springloaded Metal-Ligand Mesocate Allows Access to Trapped Intermediates of Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogie, Paul M; Holloway, Lauren R; Lyon, Yana; Onishi, Nicole C; Beran, Gregory J O; Julian, Ryan R; Hooley, Richard J

    2018-04-02

    A strained, "springloaded" Fe 2 L 3 iminopyridine mesocate shows highly variable reactivity upon postassembly reaction with competitive diamines. The strained assembly is reactive toward transimination in minutes at ambient temperature and allows observation of kinetically trapped intermediates in the self-assembly pathway. When diamines are used that can only form less favored cage products upon full equilibration, trapped ML 3 fragments with pendant, "hanging" NH 2 groups are selectively formed instead. Slight variations in diamine structure have large effects on the product outcome: less rigid diamines convert the mesocate to more favored self-assembled cage complexes under mild conditions and allow observation of heterocomplex intermediates in the displacement pathway. The mesocate allows control of equilibrium processes and direction of product outcomes via small, iterative changes in added subcomponent structure and provides a method of accessing metal-ligand cage structures not normally observed in multicomponent Fe-iminopyridine self-assembly.

  13. Radiation sensitization by an iodine-labelled DNA ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R F; Murray, V; D' Cunha, G; Pardee, M; Haigh, A; Hodgson, G S [Peter MacCallum Cancer Inst., Melbourne (Australia); Kampouris, E; Kelly, D P [Melbourne Univ., Parkville (Australia)

    1990-05-01

    An iodinated DNA ligand, iodoHoechst 33258, which binds in the minor groove of DNA, enhances DNA strand breakage and cell killing by UV-A irradiation. The sites of UV-induced strand breaks reflect the known sequence specificity of the ligand. (author).

  14. Identifying Marine Copper-Binding Ligands in Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, H.; Hollibaugh, J. T.; Maldonado, M. T.; Ouchi, S.; van den Berg, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    Complexation reactions are important because they affect the bioavailability of trace metals such as copper and iron. For example, organic complexation can determine whether copper is a limiting or a toxic micronutrient at natural levels. Copper competes with iron for complexing ligands, and when iron is limiting, copper can also substitute for iron in some metabolic pathways. The speciation of copper can be measured using complexing capacity titrations, which provide the concentration of individual ligand classes (L1, L2 etc.) and the complex stabilities (log K). Using methods recently developed in our laboratory, we show that the ligands within these classes can be measured independently of titrations, thus confirming the titration method and simultaneously identifying the ligands within each class. Thiols were identified as the L1 ligand class and humic compounds as the weaker L2 class in samples from coastal Georgia, USA, collected monthly from April to December. Log K values of the ligand complexes were consistent with values expected for thiols and humic substances. Recent results from culture studies and from samples collected along Line P, a coastal - oceanic transect in the HNLC region of the NE subarctic Pacific, will be presented in comparison to the estuarine results. This comparison will help to broaden our perspective on copper complexation and the ligands responsible, furthering our understanding of ligand sources and life cycles.

  15. Some new IIB group complexes of an imidazolidine ligand ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The spectral data indicate that the ligand is coordinated to zinc(II) as a bidentate ligand in imidazolidine form but it binds to ..... confirmed by determination of the minimum inhibitory ...... Yue F, Gang L, Xiu-Mei T, Ji-De W and Wei W 2008. Chin.

  16. Mixed-Ligand Complexes Of Nickel (II) With 2-Acetylpyridine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The preparation and spectral properties of five nickel (II) mixed-ligands complexes (Ni [2-Actsc.Y]CI2), derived from 2-acetylpyridinethiosermicarbazones and some nitrogen/sulphur monodentate ligands such as thiophene, ammonia, picoline, pyridine and aniline are described. The complexes have been characterized on ...

  17. Synthesis of meta-substituted monodentate phosphinite ligands and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SATEJ S DESHMUKH

    from organic synthesis, phosphinite ligands find appli- cations in a variety of ... thesis of meta-substituted phosphinite ligands is rarely reported.18 This is most ... 1.9 μm; mobile phase used, 90% methanol + 10% water +. 0.1% formic acid) ...

  18. The Evaluation of Novel Camphor-derived Pyridyl Ligands as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    2009-03-03

    Mar 3, 2009 ... The structures of the copper (II) complexes of the ligands were calculated using ONIOM density functional theory and the results suggest that chiral induction to the alkene functional group is indeed lacking. This explains the moderate experimental selectivities obtained. KEYWORDS. Camphor ligands ...

  19. The Evaluation of Novel Camphor-derived Pyridyl Ligands as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The structures of the copper (II) complexes of the ligands were calculated using ONIOM density functional theory and the results suggest that chiral induction to the alkene functional group is indeed lacking. This explains the moderate experimental selectivities obtained. Keywords: Camphor ligands, asymmetric catalysis, ...

  20. Polymerization catalysts containing electron-withdrawing amide ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkin, John G.; Click, Damon R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention describes methods of making a series of amine-containing organic compounds which are used as ligands for group 3-10 and lanthanide metal compounds. The ligands have electron-withdrawing groups bonded to them. The metal compounds, when combined with a cocatalyst, are catalysts for the polymerization of olefins.

  1. Mixed ligand chelate therapy for plutonium and cadmium poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, J; Derr, S K [Hope Coll., Holland, MI (USA)

    1978-09-28

    Some experiments with mice are described in which complete removal of tissue deposits of /sup 239/Pu and prevention of mortality in animals given lethal doses of Cd were achieved using a mixed ligand chelate treatment (MLC). The mixed ligand consisted of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and salicylic acid.

  2. Immobilisation of ligands by radio-derivatized polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, J.M.; Fritsch, P.

    1995-01-01

    The invention relates to radio-derivatized polymers and a method of producing them by contacting non-polymerizable conjugands with radiolysable polymers in the presence of irradiation. The resulting radio-derivatized polymers can be further linked with ligand of organic or inorganic nature to immobilize such ligands. 2 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Correcting binding parameters for interacting ligand-lattice systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervy, Jordan; Bicout, Dominique J.

    2017-07-01

    Binding of ligands to macromolecules is central to many functional and regulatory biological processes. Key parameters characterizing ligand-macromolecule interactions are the stoichiometry, inducing the number of ligands per macromolecule binding site, and the dissociation constant, quantifying the ligand-binding site affinity. Both these parameters can be obtained from analyses of classical saturation experiments using the standard binding equation that offers the great advantage of mathematical simplicity but becomes an approximation for situations of interest when a ligand binds and covers more than one single binding site on the macromolecule. Using the framework of car-parking problem with latticelike macromolecules where each ligand can cover simultaneously several consecutive binding sites, we showed that employing the standard analysis leads to underestimation of binding parameters, i.e., ligands appear larger than they actually are and their affinity is also greater than it is. Therefore, we have derived expressions allowing to determine the ligand size and true binding parameters (stoichiometry and dissociation constant) as a function of apparent binding parameters retrieved from standard saturation experiments.

  4. Predicting Nanocrystal Shape through Consideration of Surface-Ligand Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Bealing, Clive R.; Baumgardner, William J.; Choi, Joshua J.; Hanrath, Tobias; Hennig, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Density functional calculations for the binding energy of oleic acid-based ligands on Pb-rich {100} and {111} facets of PbSe nanocrystals determine the surface energies as a function of ligand coverage. Oleic acid is expected to bind

  5. Lanthanide(III) complexes with tridentate Schiff base ligand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The X-ray study reveals isotopic Nd/Sm binuclear structures were each metal ion is nine-coordinated in the same fashion. Both metal centers have distorted tricapped trigonal prism geometry, with the Schiff base acting as tridentate ligand. The DPPH· radical scavenging effects of the Schiff base ligand and its Ln(III) ...

  6. Models of protein-ligand crystal structures: trust, but verify.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deller, Marc C; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    X-ray crystallography provides the most accurate models of protein-ligand structures. These models serve as the foundation of many computational methods including structure prediction, molecular modelling, and structure-based drug design. The success of these computational methods ultimately depends on the quality of the underlying protein-ligand models. X-ray crystallography offers the unparalleled advantage of a clear mathematical formalism relating the experimental data to the protein-ligand model. In the case of X-ray crystallography, the primary experimental evidence is the electron density of the molecules forming the crystal. The first step in the generation of an accurate and precise crystallographic model is the interpretation of the electron density of the crystal, typically carried out by construction of an atomic model. The atomic model must then be validated for fit to the experimental electron density and also for agreement with prior expectations of stereochemistry. Stringent validation of protein-ligand models has become possible as a result of the mandatory deposition of primary diffraction data, and many computational tools are now available to aid in the validation process. Validation of protein-ligand complexes has revealed some instances of overenthusiastic interpretation of ligand density. Fundamental concepts and metrics of protein-ligand quality validation are discussed and we highlight software tools to assist in this process. It is essential that end users select high quality protein-ligand models for their computational and biological studies, and we provide an overview of how this can be achieved.

  7. Ligand Binding Domain Protein in Tetracycline-Inducible Expression

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate tetracycline-inducible expression system for producing clinically usable, highquality liver X receptor ligand-binding domain recombinant protein. Methods: In this study, we have expressed and purified the recombinant liver X receptor β-ligand binding domain proteins in E. coli using a tetracycline ...

  8. Pyrazolyl conjugates of bombesin: a new tridentate ligand framework for the stabilization of fac-[M(CO){sub 3}]{sup +} moiety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Susana; Correia, Joao D.G.; Santos, Isabel [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Veerendra, Bhadrasetty [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Sieckman, Gary L. [Research Division, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Hoffman, Timothy J. [Research Division, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States)]|[Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)]|[Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Institute, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Rold, Tammy L. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Figueroa, Said Daibes [Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Institute, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Retzloff, Lauren [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); McCrate, Joseph [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Prasanphanich, Adam [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Smith, Charles J. [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)]|[University of Missouri Research Reactor Center, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)]|[Research Division, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States)]|[Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)]. E-mail: smithcj@health.missouri.edu

    2006-07-15

    We have described the synthesis of tridentate pyrazolyl ligand frameworks for coordination to the fac-[*M(CO){sub 3}]{sup +} metal fragment (*M={sup 186/188}Re or {sup 99m}Tc). These ligands impart a degree of kinetic inertness on the metal center, warranting their study in biological systems. We herein report in vitro/in vivo radiolabeling investigations of a new series of pyrazolyl bombesin (BBN) conjugates radiolabeled via the Isolink kit. These new conjugates are based on the general structure [{sup 99m}Tc-pyrazolyl-X-BBN[7-14]NH{sub 2}], where X={beta}-alanine, serylserylserine or glycylglycylglycine. The pyrazolyl ligand is a tridentate ligand framework that coordinates the metal center through nitrogen donor atoms. The results of these investigations demonstrate the ability of these new conjugates to specifically target the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor subtype 2, which is overexpressed on human prostate PC-3 cancerous tissues. Therefore, these studies suggest the tridentate pyrazolyl ligand framework to be an ideal candidate for the design and development of low-valent {sup 99m}Tc-based diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals based on BBN or other targeting vectors.

  9. Ligand receptor dynamics at streptavidin-coated particle surfaces: A flow cytometric and spectrofluorimetric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buranda, T. [Univ. of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, G.M. [Univ. of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nolan, J.P.; Keij, J. [Los Alamos National Labs., NM (United States); Lopez, G.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sklar, L.A. [Univ. of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1999-04-29

    The authors have studied the binding of 5-((N-(5-(N-(6-(biotinoyl)amino)hexanoyl)amino)pentyl)thioureidyl)fluorescein (fluorescein biotin) to 6.2 {micro}m diameter, streptavidin-coated polystyrene beads using a combination of fluorimetric and flow cytometric methods. They have determined the average number of binding sites per bead, the extent of fluorescein quenching upon binding to the bead, and the association and dissociation kinetics. The authors estimate the site number to be {approx}1 million per bead. The binding of the fluorescein biotin ligand occurs in steps where the insertion of the biotin moiety into one receptor pocket is followed immediately by the capture of the fluorescein moiety by a neighboring binding pocket; fluorescence quenching is a consequence of this secondary binding. At high surface coverage, the dominant mechanism of quenching appears to be via the formation of nonfluorescent nearest-neighbor aggregates. At early times, the binding process is characterized by biphasic association and dissociation kinetics which are remarkably dependent on the initial concentration of the ligand. The rate constant for binding to the first receptor pocket of a streptavidin molecule is {approx}(1.3 {+-} 0.3) {times} 10{sup 7} 1{sup {minus}1} S{sup {minus}1}. The rate of binding of a second biotin may be reduced due to steric interference. The early time dissociative behavior is in sharp contrast to the typical stability associated with this system. The early time dissociative behavior is in sharp contrast to the typical stability associated with this system. The dissociation rate constant is as high as 0.05 s{sup {minus}1} shortly after binding, but decreases by 3 orders of magnitude after 3 h of binding. Potential sources for the time dependence of the dissociation rate constant are discussed.

  10. Novel peptide ligand with high binding capacity for antibody purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, L. N.; Gustavsson, P. E.; Michael, R.

    2012-01-01

    Small synthetic ligands for protein purification have become increasingly interesting with the growing need for cheap chromatographic materials for protein purification and especially for the purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Today, Protein A-based chromatographic resins are the most...... commonly used capture step in mAb down stream processing; however, the use of Protein A chromatography is less attractive due to toxic ligand leakage as well as high cost. Whether used as an alternative to the Protein A chromatographic media or as a subsequent polishing step, small synthetic peptide...... ligands have an advantage over biological ligands; they are cheaper to produce, ligand leakage by enzymatic degradation is either eliminated or significantly reduced, and they can in general better withstand cleaning in place (CIP) conditions such as 0.1 M NaOH. Here, we present a novel synthetic peptide...

  11. Identification and characterization of PPARα ligands in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Avik; Kundu, Madhuchhanda; Jana, Malabendu; Mishra, Rama K; Yung, Yeni; Luan, Chi-Hao; Gonzalez, Frank J; Pahan, Kalipada

    2016-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) regulates hepatic fatty acid catabolism and mediates the metabolic response to starvation. Recently we found that PPARα is constitutively activated in nuclei of hippocampal neurons and controls plasticity via direct transcriptional activation of CREB. Here we report the discovery of three endogenous PPARα ligands-3-hydroxy-(2,2)-dimethyl butyrate, hexadecanamide, and 9-octadecenamide-in mouse brain hippocampus. Mass spectrometric detection of these compounds in mouse hippocampal nuclear extracts, in silico interaction studies, time-resolved FRET analyses, and thermal shift assay results clearly indicated that these three compounds served as ligands of PPARα. Site-directed mutagenesis studies further revealed that PPARα Y464 and Y314 are involved in binding these hippocampal ligands. Moreover, these ligands activated PPARα and upregulated the synaptic function of hippocampal neurons. These results highlight the discovery of hippocampal ligands of PPARα capable of modulating synaptic functions.

  12. Ligand Electron Density Shape Recognition Using 3D Zernike Descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekaran, Prasad; Grandison, Scott; Cowtan, Kevin; Mak, Lora; Lawson, David M.; Morris, Richard J.

    We present a novel approach to crystallographic ligand density interpretation based on Zernike shape descriptors. Electron density for a bound ligand is expanded in an orthogonal polynomial series (3D Zernike polynomials) and the coefficients from this expansion are employed to construct rotation-invariant descriptors. These descriptors can be compared highly efficiently against large databases of descriptors computed from other molecules. In this manuscript we describe this process and show initial results from an electron density interpretation study on a dataset containing over a hundred OMIT maps. We could identify the correct ligand as the first hit in about 30 % of the cases, within the top five in a further 30 % of the cases, and giving rise to an 80 % probability of getting the correct ligand within the top ten matches. In all but a few examples, the top hit was highly similar to the correct ligand in both shape and chemistry. Further extensions and intrinsic limitations of the method are discussed.

  13. Automated identification of crystallographic ligands using sparse-density representations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carolan, C. G.; Lamzin, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    A novel procedure for identifying ligands in macromolecular crystallographic electron-density maps is introduced. Density clusters in such maps can be rapidly attributed to one of 82 different ligands in an automated manner. A novel procedure for the automatic identification of ligands in macromolecular crystallographic electron-density maps is introduced. It is based on the sparse parameterization of density clusters and the matching of the pseudo-atomic grids thus created to conformationally variant ligands using mathematical descriptors of molecular shape, size and topology. In large-scale tests on experimental data derived from the Protein Data Bank, the procedure could quickly identify the deposited ligand within the top-ranked compounds from a database of candidates. This indicates the suitability of the method for the identification of binding entities in fragment-based drug screening and in model completion in macromolecular structure determination

  14. The affinity of the uranyl ion for nitrogen donor ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, N.V.; De Sousa, A.S.; Hancock, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Established ligand design principles are used to predict the solution chemistry of UO 2 2+ with nitrogen donor ligands which do not contain carboxylate donors. pK a 's of the nitrogen donors are lowered by addition of hydroxylalkyl groups causing UO 2 2+ to have a greater affinity for these ligands than for hydroxide. Potentiometric studies using the ligands N,N,N',N',N''-pentakis(2-hydroxypropyl)-1,4,7-triazaheptane; N,N,N',N',N''-pentakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-1,4,7-triazaheptane; N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxypropyl)1,2-diaminoethane, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane; 1,4,8,11-tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane and N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)glycine with UO 2 2+ showed that UO 2 2+ has a considerable aqueous solution chemistry with these ligands. (orig.)

  15. Gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, H.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    2000-01-01

    Gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory is developed as an extension of the existing gyrokinetic theories. In essence, the formalism introduced here is a kinetic description of magnetized plasmas in the gyrocenter coordinates which is fully equivalent to the Vlasov-Maxwell system in the particle coordinates. In particular, provided the gyroradius is smaller than the scale-length of the magnetic field, it can treat high frequency range as well as the usual low frequency range normally associated with gyrokinetic approaches. A significant advantage of this formalism is that it enables the direct particle-in-cell simulations of compressional Alfven waves for MHD applications and of RF waves relevant to plasma heating in space and laboratory plasmas. The gyrocenter-gauge kinetic susceptibility for arbitrary wavelength and arbitrary frequency electromagnetic perturbations in a homogeneous magnetized plasma is shown to recover exactly the classical result obtained by integrating the Vlasov-Maxwell system in the particle coordinates. This demonstrates that all the waves supported by the Vlasov-Maxwell system can be studied using the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic model in the gyrocenter coordinates. This theoretical approach is so named to distinguish it from the existing gyrokinetic theory, which has been successfully developed and applied to many important low-frequency and long parallel wavelength problems, where the conventional meaning of gyrokinetic has been standardized. Besides the usual gyrokinetic distribution function, the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory emphasizes as well the gyrocenter-gauge distribution function, which sometimes contains all the physics of the problems being studied, and whose importance has not been realized previously. The gyrocenter-gauge distribution function enters Maxwell's equations through the pull-back transformation of the gyrocenter transformation, which depends on the perturbed fields. The efficacy of the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic approach is

  16. Crystallization Kinetics within a Generic Modelling Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meisler, Kresten Troelstrup; von Solms, Nicolas; Gernaey, Krist

    2013-01-01

    An existing generic modelling framework has been expanded with tools for kinetic model analysis. The analysis of kinetics is carried out within the framework where kinetic constitutive models are collected, analysed and utilized for the simulation of crystallization operations. A modelling...... procedure is proposed to gain the information of crystallization operation kinetic model analysis and utilize this for faster evaluation of crystallization operations....

  17. Synthesis and study of lipophilic crown ethers and thia-ligands. Application to nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyon, Vincent

    1992-01-01

    In the field of metal extraction from the solutions of nuclear fuel reprocessing, new specific complexing agents that are more efficient than tributyl phosphate must possess a high lipophilic character. The use of lipophilic crown ethers and thia-ligands has eliminated the problem related to their loss in the aqueous media. Moreover, it has made their complexes more soluble in organic solvents. The increase of lipophilic character of monocyclic polyethers has been realized with the addition of an alkyl chain and the development of a new process has made possible the separation of cis-syn-cis and cis-anti-cis isomers of dicyclohexano 18 crown 6 on an industrial scale. The creation of a rapid NMR method of analysis has permitted to study the extracting capacity of those crown ethers in relation to monovalent and divalent cations in nitric acid media and also to demonstrate the influence brought by different substituents. Some new lipophilic thia-ligands (macrocycles and podands) have also been prepared and the study of palladium extraction in nitric acid media by these compounds has led to a better understanding of the relation between the structure and the extracting capacity. Of easy access, some podands have an extracting selectivity and an extracting kinetic for this metal which are highly superior than those of dialkyl sulphides actually employed in the industry. This makes their use possible in the nuclear area. (author) [fr

  18. Magnetically modified bacterial cellulose: A promising carrier for immobilization of affinity ligands, enzymes, and cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldikova, Eva [Global Change Research Institute, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Pospiskova, Kristyna [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 27, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Ladakis, Dimitrios; Kookos, Ioannis K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patras, Rio (Greece); Koutinas, Apostolis A. [Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, Iera Odos 75, Athens 11855 (Greece); Safarikova, Mirka [Global Change Research Institute, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Department of Nanobiotechnology, Biology Centre, ISB, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Safarik, Ivo, E-mail: safarik@nh.cas.cz [Global Change Research Institute, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 27, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Department of Nanobiotechnology, Biology Centre, ISB, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2017-02-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) produced by Komagataeibacter sucrofermentans was magnetically modified using perchloric acid stabilized magnetic fluid. Magnetic bacterial cellulose (MBC) was used as a carrier for the immobilization of affinity ligands, enzymes and cells. MBC with immobilized reactive copper phthalocyanine dye was an efficient adsorbent for crystal violet removal; the maximum adsorption capacity was 388 mg/g. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were also determined. Model biocatalysts, namely bovine pancreas trypsin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were immobilized on MBC using several strategies including adsorption with subsequent cross-linking with glutaraldehyde and covalent binding on previously activated MBC using sodium periodate or 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether. Immobilized yeast cells retained approximately 90% of their initial activity after 6 repeated cycles of sucrose solution hydrolysis. Trypsin covalently bound after MBC periodate activation was very stable during operational stability testing; it could be repeatedly used for ten cycles of low molecular weight substrate hydrolysis without loss of its initial activity. - Highlights: • Bacterial cellulose was magnetically modified with magnetic fluid. • Magnetic cellulose is an efficient carrier for affinity ligands. • Enzymes and cells can be efficiently immobilized to magnetic cellulose.

  19. The thermodynamic signature of ligand binding to histone deacetylase-like amidohydrolases is most sensitive to the flexibility in the L2-loop lining the active site pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyners, Christian; Krämer, Andreas; Yildiz, Özkan; Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-07-01

    The analysis of the thermodynamic driving forces of ligand-protein binding has been suggested to be a key component for the selection and optimization of active compounds into drug candidates. The binding enthalpy as deduced from isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is usually interpreted assuming single-step binding of a ligand to one conformation of the target protein. Although successful in many cases, these assumptions are oversimplified approximations of the reality with flexible proteins and complicated binding mechanism in many if not most cases. The relationship between protein flexibility and thermodynamic signature of ligand binding is largely understudied. Directed mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, enzyme kinetics and ITC methods were combined to dissect the influence of loop flexibility on the thermodynamics and mechanism of ligand binding to histone deacetylase (HDAC)-like amidohydrolases. The general ligand-protein binding mechanism comprises an energetically demanding gate opening step followed by physical binding. Increased flexibility of the L2-loop in HDAC-like amidohydrolases facilitates access of ligands to the binding pocket resulting in predominantly enthalpy-driven complex formation. The study provides evidence for the great importance of flexibility adjacent to the active site channel for the mechanism and observed thermodynamic driving forces of molecular recognition in HDAC like enzymes. The flexibility or malleability in regions adjacent to binding pockets should be given more attention when designing better drug candidates. The presented case study also suggests that the observed binding enthalpy of protein-ligand systems should be interpreted with caution, since more complicated binding mechanisms may obscure the significance regarding potential drug likeness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Rates and equilibrium constants of the ligand-induced conformational transition of an HCN ion channel protein domain determined by DEER spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collauto, Alberto; DeBerg, Hannah A; Kaufmann, Royi; Zagotta, William N; Stoll, Stefan; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2017-06-14

    Ligand binding can induce significant conformational changes in proteins. The mechanism of this process couples equilibria associated with the ligand binding event and the conformational change. Here we show that by combining the application of W-band double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy with microfluidic rapid freeze quench (μRFQ) it is possible to resolve these processes and obtain both equilibrium constants and reaction rates. We studied the conformational transition of the nitroxide labeled, isolated carboxy-terminal cyclic-nucleotide binding domain (CNBD) of the HCN2 ion channel upon binding of the ligand 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Using model-based global analysis, the time-resolved data of the μRFQ DEER experiments directly provide fractional populations of the open and closed conformations as a function of time. We modeled the ligand-induced conformational change in the protein using a four-state model: apo/open (AO), apo/closed (AC), bound/open (BO), bound/closed (BC). These species interconvert according to AC + L ⇌ AO + L ⇌ BO ⇌ BC. By analyzing the concentration dependence of the relative contributions of the closed and open conformations at equilibrium, we estimated the equilibrium constants for the two conformational equilibria and the open-state ligand dissociation constant. Analysis of the time-resolved μRFQ DEER data gave estimates for the intrinsic rates of ligand binding and unbinding as well as the rates of the conformational change. This demonstrates that DEER can quantitatively resolve both the thermodynamics and the kinetics of ligand binding and the associated conformational change.

  1. Regulation mechanisms of the FLT3-ligand after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prat-Lepesant, M.

    2005-06-01

    The hematopoietic compartment is one of the most severely damaged after chemotherapy, radiotherapy or accidental irradiations. Whatever its origin, the resulting damage to the bone marrow remains difficult to evaluate. Thus, it would be of great interest to get a biological indicator of residual hematopoiesis in order to adapt the treatment to each clinical situation. Recent results indicated that the plasma Flt3 ligand concentration was increased in patients suffering from either acquired or induced aplasia, suggesting that Flt3 ligand might be useful as a biological indicator of bone marrow status. We thus followed in a mouse model as well as in several clinical situations the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand concentration, after either homogeneous or heterogeneous irradiations. These variations were correlated to the number of hematopoietic progenitors and to other parameters such as duration and depth of pancytopenia. The results indicated that the concentration of Flt3 ligand in the blood reflects the bone marrow status, and that the follow-up of plasma Flt3 ligand concentration could give predictive information about the bone marrow function and the duration and severity of pancytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Nevertheless, the clinical use of Flt3 ligand as a biological indicator of bone marrow damage require the knowledge of the mechanisms regulating the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand concentration. We thus developed a study in the mouse model. The results indicated that the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand variations were not solely due to a balance between its production by lymphoid cells and its consumption by hematopoietic cells. Moreover, we showed that T lymphocytes are not the main regulator of plasma Flt3 ligand concentration as previously suggested, and that other cell types, possibly including bone marrow stromal cells, might be strongly implicated. These results also suggest that the Flt3 ligand is a main systemic regulator of hematopoiesis

  2. Cellular trafficking of quantum dot-ligand bioconjugates and their induction of changes in normal routing of unconjugated ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tekle, Christina; van Deurs, Bo; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    Can quantum dots (Qdots) act as relevant intracellular probes to investigate routing of ligands in live cells? The intracellular trafficking of Qdots that were coupled to the plant toxin ricin, Shiga toxin, or the ligand transferrin (Tf) was studied by confocal fluorescence microscopy. The Tf...

  3. Molecular Characterization of the Interactions between Vascular Selectins and Glycoprotein Ligands on Human Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Abu Samra, Dina Bashir Kamil

    2016-01-01

    The first objective was to fill the knowledge gap in the in vitro characterization of the mechanisms used by selectins to mediate the initial step in the HSPCs homing by developing a real time immunoprecipitation-based assay on a surface plasmon resonance chip. This novel assay bypass the difficulties of purifying ligands, enables the use of natively glycosylated forms of selectin ligands from any model cell of interest and study its binding affinities under flow. We provide the first comprehensive quantitative binding kinetics of two well-documented ligands, CD44 and PSGL-1, with E-selectin. Both ligands bind monomeric E-selectin transiently with fast on- and off-rates while they bind dimeric E-selectin with remarkably slow on- and off-rates with the on-rate, but not the off-rate, is dependent on salt concentration. Thus, suggest a mechanism through which monomeric selectins mediate initial fast-on and -off binding to capture the circulating cells out of shear-flow; subsequently, tight binding by dimeric/oligomeric selectins is enabled to slow rolling significantly. The second objective is to fully identify and characterize E/P-selectin ligand candidates expressed on CD34+ HSPCs which cause enhanced migration after intravenous transplantation compared to their CD34- counterparts. CD34 is widely recognized marker of human HSPCs but its natural ligand and function on these cells remain elusive. Proteomics identified CD34 as an E-selL candidate on human HSPCs, whose binding to E-selectin was confirmed using some static and flow-based assays. E-selectin binds to CD34 with an affinity comparable to the well-described E-selLs CD44/HCELL and PSGL-1. CD34 knockdown resulted in faster-rolling velocities compared to control cells especially at and above three dyne/cm2. CD34 is the first selectin ligand since PSGL-1 reported to bind E-/P-/L-selectins and likely plays a key role in directing the migration of human HSPCs to the bone marrow.

  4. Gas adsorption and gas mixture separations using mixed-ligand MOF material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupp, Joseph T [Northfield, IL; Mulfort, Karen L [Chicago, IL; Snurr, Randall Q [Evanston, IL; Bae, Youn-Sang [Evanston, IL

    2011-01-04

    A method of separating a mixture of carbon dioxiode and hydrocarbon gas using a mixed-ligand, metal-organic framework (MOF) material having metal ions coordinated to carboxylate ligands and pyridyl ligands.

  5. Regulation mechanisms of the FLT3-ligand after irradiation; Mecanismes de regulation du FLT3-ligand apres irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prat-Lepesant, M

    2005-06-15

    The hematopoietic compartment is one of the most severely damaged after chemotherapy, radiotherapy or accidental irradiations. Whatever its origin, the resulting damage to the bone marrow remains difficult to evaluate. Thus, it would be of great interest to get a biological indicator of residual hematopoiesis in order to adapt the treatment to each clinical situation. Recent results indicated that the plasma Flt3 ligand concentration was increased in patients suffering from either acquired or induced aplasia, suggesting that Flt3 ligand might be useful as a biological indicator of bone marrow status. We thus followed in a mouse model as well as in several clinical situations the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand concentration, after either homogeneous or heterogeneous irradiations. These variations were correlated to the number of hematopoietic progenitors and to other parameters such as duration and depth of pancytopenia. The results indicated that the concentration of Flt3 ligand in the blood reflects the bone marrow status, and that the follow-up of plasma Flt3 ligand concentration could give predictive information about the bone marrow function and the duration and severity of pancytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Nevertheless, the clinical use of Flt3 ligand as a biological indicator of bone marrow damage require the knowledge of the mechanisms regulating the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand concentration. We thus developed a study in the mouse model. The results indicated that the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand variations were not solely due to a balance between its production by lymphoid cells and its consumption by hematopoietic cells. Moreover, we showed that T lymphocytes are not the main regulator of plasma Flt3 ligand concentration as previously suggested, and that other cell types, possibly including bone marrow stromal cells, might be strongly implicated. These results also suggest that the Flt3 ligand is a main systemic regulator of hematopoiesis

  6. Structural basis and kinetics of force-induced conformational changes of an αA domain-containing integrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Xiang

    Full Text Available Integrin α(Lβ₂ (lymphocyte function-associated antigen, LFA-1 bears force upon binding to its ligand intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 when a leukocyte adheres to vascular endothelium or an antigen presenting cell (APC during immune responses. The ligand binding propensity of LFA-1 is related to its conformations, which can be regulated by force. Three conformations of the LFA-1 αA domain, determined by the position of its α₇-helix, have been suggested to correspond to three different affinity states for ligand binding.The kinetics of the force-driven transitions between these conformations has not been defined and dynamically coupled to the force-dependent dissociation from ligand. Here we show, by steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulations, that the αA domain was successively transitioned through three distinct conformations upon pulling the C-terminus of its α₇-helix. Based on these sequential transitions, we have constructed a mathematical model to describe the coupling between the αA domain conformational changes of LFA-1 and its dissociation from ICAM-1 under force. Using this model to analyze the published data on the force-induced dissociation of single LFA-1/ICAM-1 bonds, we estimated the force-dependent kinetic rates of interstate transition from the short-lived to intermediate-lived and from intermediate-lived to long-lived states. Interestingly, force increased these transition rates; hence activation of LFA-1 was accelerated by pulling it via an engaged ICAM-1.Our study defines the structural basis for mechanical regulation of the kinetics of LFA-1 αA domain conformational changes and relates these simulation results to experimental data of force-induced dissociation of single LFA-1/ICAM-1 bonds by a new mathematical model, thus provided detailed structural and kinetic characterizations for force-stabilization of LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction.

  7. Transformation kinetics for nucleus clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, Elena; Rios, Paulo R.

    2009-01-01

    A rigorous mathematical approach based on stochastic geometry concepts is presented to extend previous Johnson-Mehl, Avrami, Kolmogorov treatment of transformation kinetics to situations in which nuclei are not homogeneously located in space but are located in clusters. An exact analytical solution is presented here for the first time assuming that nucleation sites follow a Matern cluster process. The influence of Matern cluster process parameters on subsequent growth kinetics and the microstructural path are illustrated by means of numerical examples. Moreover, using the superposition principle, exact analytical solutions are also obtained when nucleation takes place by a combination of a Matern cluster process and an inhomogeneous Poisson point process. The new solutions presented here significantly increase the number of exactly solvable cases available to formal kinetics.

  8. Chapter 22. Cell population kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1975-01-01

    The main contribution of radioisotopes to the development of a new discipline, cell population kinetics, was shown. The aim of this science is to establish, for each tissue of the organism, the life span of its component cells and the mechanisms governing its growth, its differentiation and its homeostasis with respect to outside attacks. Labelling techniques have been used to follow the cells during these various processes. The case of non-dividing cells was considered first, taking as example, the red blood cells of which the lifetime was studied, after which the case of proliferating cells was examined using 14 C- or tritium-labelled thymidine. The methods used to measure the cell cycle parameters were described: labelled-mitosis curve method, double-labelling and continuous labelling methods, proliferation coefficient measurement. Cell kinetics were shown to allow an interpretation of radiobiological data. Finally the practical value of cell kinetics research was shown [fr

  9. Kinetic theory and transport phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Soto, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    This textbook presents kinetic theory, which is a systematic approach to describing nonequilibrium systems. The text is balanced between the fundamental concepts of kinetic theory (irreversibility, transport processes, separation of time scales, conservations, coarse graining, distribution functions, etc.) and the results and predictions of the theory, where the relevant properties of different systems are computed. The book is organised in thematic chapters where different paradigmatic systems are studied. The specific features of these systems are described, building and analysing the appropriate kinetic equations. Specifically, the book considers the classical transport of charges, the dynamics of classical gases, Brownian motion, plasmas, and self-gravitating systems, quantum gases, the electronic transport in solids and, finally, semiconductors. Besides these systems that are studied in detail, concepts are applied to some modern examples including the quark–gluon plasma, the motion of bacterial suspen...

  10. Database of ligand-induced domain movements in enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayward Steven

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conformational change induced by the binding of a substrate or coenzyme is a poorly understood stage in the process of enzyme catalysed reactions. For enzymes that exhibit a domain movement, the conformational change can be clearly characterized and therefore the opportunity exists to gain an understanding of the mechanisms involved. The development of the non-redundant database of protein domain movements contains examples of ligand-induced domain movements in enzymes, but this valuable data has remained unexploited. Description The domain movements in the non-redundant database of protein domain movements are those found by applying the DynDom program to pairs of crystallographic structures contained in Protein Data Bank files. For each pair of structures cross-checking ligands in their Protein Data Bank files with the KEGG-LIGAND database and using methods that search for ligands that contact the enzyme in one conformation but not the other, the non-redundant database of protein domain movements was refined down to a set of 203 enzymes where a domain movement is apparently triggered by the binding of a functional ligand. For these cases, ligand binding information, including hydrogen bonds and salt-bridges between the ligand and specific residues on the enzyme is presented in the context of dynamical information such as the regions that form the dynamic domains, the hinge bending residues, and the hinge axes. Conclusion The presentation at a single website of data on interactions between a ligand and specific residues on the enzyme alongside data on the movement that these interactions induce, should lead to new insights into the mechanisms of these enzymes in particular, and help in trying to understand the general process of ligand-induced domain closure in enzymes. The website can be found at: http://www.cmp.uea.ac.uk/dyndom/enzymeList.do

  11. Calculation of protein-ligand binding affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Michael K; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Accurate methods of computing the affinity of a small molecule with a protein are needed to speed the discovery of new medications and biological probes. This paper reviews physics-based models of binding, beginning with a summary of the changes in potential energy, solvation energy, and configurational entropy that influence affinity, and a theoretical overview to frame the discussion of specific computational approaches. Important advances are reported in modeling protein-ligand energetics, such as the incorporation of electronic polarization and the use of quantum mechanical methods. Recent calculations suggest that changes in configurational entropy strongly oppose binding and must be included if accurate affinities are to be obtained. The linear interaction energy (LIE) and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) methods are analyzed, as are free energy pathway methods, which show promise and may be ready for more extensive testing. Ultimately, major improvements in modeling accuracy will likely require advances on multiple fronts, as well as continued validation against experiment.

  12. Constitutive and ligand-induced TCR degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Siersma, Volkert

    2004-01-01

    Modulation of TCR expression levels is a central event during T cell development and activation, and it probably plays an important role in adjusting T cell responsiveness. Conflicting data have been published on down-regulation and degradation rates of the individual TCR subunits, and several di...... to the lysosomes. Similar results were obtained in studies of primary human Vbeta8+ T cells stimulated with superantigen. Based on these results, the simplest model for TCR internalization, sorting, and degradation is proposed.......Modulation of TCR expression levels is a central event during T cell development and activation, and it probably plays an important role in adjusting T cell responsiveness. Conflicting data have been published on down-regulation and degradation rates of the individual TCR subunits, and several...... divergent models for TCR down-regulation and degradation have been suggested. The aims of this study were to determine the rate constants for constitutive and ligand-induced TCR degradation and to determine whether the TCR subunits segregate or are processed as an intact unit during TCR down...

  13. The coordination chemistry of macrocyclic ligands II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimes, J.; Knoechel, A.; Rudolph, G.

    1977-01-01

    Compounds of UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 0 or Th(NO 3 ) 4 .5H 2 0 with five selected crown ethers were prepared according to the method described in Knoeckel et al., Inorg.Nucl.Chem.Lett.; 11:787 (1975). The products were characterized by chemical analysis, NMR, IR and Raman spectroscopy. The results are analyzed and discussed. It is shown that the NO 3 groups remain free after combination, and the H 2 0 groups form the bonds to the polyether. It is concluded that the polyether molecule is attached to two units of UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 .2H 2 0 (or Th(NO 3 ) 4 .3H 2 0), one each side of the polyether. This would be contrary to the assumption in previous publications, that the U0 2 2+ and Th 4+ ions were coordinated inside the macrocyclic ligand structure. The present hypothesis, however, agrees with a recently published x-ray structure for the uranium compound. In view of the new proposed structure it is suggested that the compounds should be regarded as adducts rather than complexes. (U.K.)

  14. Complexes of technetium with polyhydric ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, L.L.Y.; Ronca, N.; Solomon, N.A.; Steigman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Polyhydric complexes of Tc(V) show absorption bands near 500 nm, with molar absorptivity coefficients of about 100. The shorter-chain compounds like ethylene glycol produce complexes which quickly disproportionate to Tc(IV) (as TcO 2 ) and Tc(VII) (as TcO 4 - ) on acidification. The longer-chain ligands like mannitol and gluconate do not. However, while the mannitol complex shows no change in spectrum from pH 12 to pH 3, the gluconate and glucoheptonate compounds show a definite spectral change on acidification, starting at pH 5. Electrophoresis similarity showed a change in mobility with pH for Tc-glucoheptonate, but none for Tc-mannitol. It was concluded that the carboxylic acid group of glucoheptonate was not binding the technetium. In 25 molal choline chloride the glucoheptonate-Tc mole ratio was 1:1 or less. A similar result emerged from a similar experiment in methylcellosolve as solvent. (author)

  15. Reactivity of Zinc Halide Complexes Containing Camphor-Derived Guanidine Ligands with Technical rac-Lactide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Metz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Three new zinc complexes with monoamine–guanidine hybridligands have been prepared, characterized by X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy, and tested in the solvent-free ring-opening polymerization of rac-lactide. Initially the ligands were synthesized from camphoric acid to obtain TMGca and DMEGca and then reacted with zinc(II halides to form zinc complexes. All complexes have a distorted tetrahedral coordination. They were utilized as catalysts in the solvent-free polymerization of technical rac-lactide at 150 °C. Colorless polylactide (PLA can be produced and after 2 h conversion up to 60% was reached. Furthermore, one zinc chlorido complex was tested with different qualities of lactide (technical and recrystallized and with/without the addition of benzyl alcohol as a co-initiator. The kinetics were monitored by in situ FT-IR or 1H NMR spectroscopy. All kinetic measurements show first-order behavior with respect to lactide. The influence of the chiral complexes on the stereocontrol of PLA was examined. Moreover, with MALDI-ToF measurements the end-group of the obtained polymer was determined. DFT and NBO calculations give further insight into the coordination properties. All in all, these systems are robust against impurities and water in the lactide monomer and show great catalytic activity in the ROP of lactide.

  16. Tunability of photoswitchable ruthenium sulfoxide compounds on the basis of ligand substitution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eicke, Sebastian; Dieckmann, Volker; Springfeld, Kristin; Imlau, Mirco [Deparment of Physics, University of Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Photoswitchable ruthenium sulfoxide compounds provide a light-induced linkage isomerization in combination with pronounced changes in characteristic optical properties. As representative of the ruthenium sulfoxide group the molecular compound [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(R-OSO)]{sup +} (OSO: 2-methylsulfinylbenzoate) can be tuned in its optical properties by the substitution of the photoswitchable ligands (R=Bn, BnCl, BnMe). These modified sulfoxides were studied in respect to their photochromic properties and kinetics of the generation and relaxation of the light-induced isomers. The kinetics were determined by pump-probe technique and show in each case two reversible thermal decay processes following Arrhenius law. The two photo-excited states offer lifetimes in the magnitude of {tau}{sub 1}{approx}10{sup 3} s and {tau}{sub 2}{approx}10{sup 4} s at room temperature with activation energies about E{sub A,I}=0.72 eV to 0.92 eV and E{sub A,II}=0.8 eV to 1.00 eV. Another respresentative of the photoswitchable sulfoxides is the [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(pySO)]{sup 2+} compound. This molecule is the first sulfoxide which allows for reversible switching between the ground and metastable states by light exposure. With this compound the sulfoxides are highly qualified for optical data storage on a molecular scale.

  17. Angiotensin converting enzyme immobilized on magnetic beads as a tool for ligand fishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Fernando G; Vanzolini, Kenia L; Cass, Quezia B

    2017-01-05

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) presents an important role in blood pressure regulation, since that converts angiotensin I to the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II. Some commercially available ACE inhibitors are captopril, lisinopril and enalapril; due to their side effects, naturally occurring inhibitors have been prospected. In order to endorse this research field we have developed a new tool for ACE ligand screening. To this end, ACE was extracted from bovine lung, purified and chemically immobilized in modified ferrite magnetic beads (ACE-MBs). The ACE-MBs have shown a Michaelian kinetic behavior towards hippuryl-histidyl-leucine. Moreover, as proof of concept, the ACE-MBs was inhibited by lisinopril with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) of 10nM. At the fishing assay, ACE-MBs were able not only to fish out the reference inhibitor, but also one peptide from a pool of tryptic digested BSA. In conclusion, ACE-MBs emerge as new straightforward tool for ACE kinetics determination, inhibition and binder screening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ligand exchange reactions of the heme group in hemoglobin and myoglobin as studied by pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raap, I.A.

    1978-01-01

    In this thesis, the kinetic aspects of the ligand exchange reactions of hemoglobin are studied using the pulse radiolysis technique, in particular, the reactions of hydrated electrons with methemoglobin. A hitherto unobserved transient state of the heme group is observed which appears immediately after the rapid reduction process. The absorption spectrum of this new species has the characteristics of a ferrous low-spin state and can therefore be ascribed to the formation of a hemochrome non-equilibrium state. The subsequent relaxation of this intermediate structure into a deoxy-conformation is dependent on the amount of proton activity in the solution and on the presence of organic and inorganic phosphate anions. The final absorption spectrum of the heme group is shown to correspond to a ferrous high-spin state in the relaxed quaternary conformation. This is in agreement with the kinetics observen the binding of carbon monoxide and oxygen to partially reduced methemoglobin. At reduction degrees of methemoglobin as well as of valncy 8ybrids where there is an important contribution from species with two reduced subunits, the binding of carbon monoxide to hemoglobin occurs with on-rate constants characteristic for the tensed quaternary conformation. It is argued that this conformational change of hemoglobin (the R-to-T transition) takes place very rapidly, which suggests the participation of an activated relaxed conformation. In addition, it is found that there is a distinct heterogeneity in the binding of oxygen to partially reduced methemoglobin even at low degrees of reduction

  19. Electrolytic formation of technetium complexes with π-acceptor ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerda, F.; Kremer, C.; Gambino, D.; Kremer, E.

    1994-01-01

    Electrolytic reduction of pertechnetate was performed in aqueous solution containing π-acceptor ligands. Cyanide and 1,10-phenanthroline were the selected ligands. In both cases, electrolyses produced a cathodic TcO 2 deposit and soluble Tc complexes. When cyanide was the ligand, the complexes formed were [Tc(CN) 6 ] 5- and [TcO 2 (CN) 4 ] 3- . When working with the amine, [Tc(phen) 3 ] 2+ and another positively charged species were found after reaction. Results are compared with previous studies with amines, and the usefulness of the electrolytic route to obtain Tc complexes is evaluated. (author) 11 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  20. Synthesis and study of new oxazoline-based ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Tilliet, Mélanie

    2008-01-01

    This thesis deals with the study of oxazoline-based ligands in metal-catalyzed asymmetric reactions. The first part describes the synthesis of six new bifunctinal pyridine-bis(oxazoline) ligands and their applications in asymmetric metal-catalysis. These ligands, in addition to a Lewis acid coordination site, are equipped with a Lewis basic part in the 4-position of the oxazoline rings. Dual activation by means of this system was probed in cyanide addition to aldehydes. The second part is con...

  1. NKG2D and its ligands in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Payal; Wu, Jennifer D

    2018-04-01

    NKG2D is an activating immune receptor expressed by NK and effector T cells. Induced expression of NKG2D ligand on tumor cell surface during oncogenic insults renders cancer cells susceptible to immune destruction. In advanced human cancers, tumor cells shed NKG2D ligand to produce an immune soluble form as a means of immune evasion. Soluble NKG2D ligands have been associated with poor clinical prognosis in cancer patients. Harnessing NKG2D pathway is considered a viable avenue in cancer immunotherapy over recent years. In this review, we will discuss the progress and perspectives. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Selected readings in chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Back, Margaret H

    2013-01-01

    Selected Readings in Chemical Kinetics covers excerpts from 12 papers in the field of general and gas-phase kinetics. The book discusses papers on the laws of connexion between the conditions of a chemical change and its amount; on the reaction velocity of the inversion of the cane sugar by acids; and the calculation in absolute measure of velocity constants and equilibrium constants in gaseous systems. The text then tackles papers on simple gas reactions; on the absolute rate of reactions in condensed phases; on the radiation theory of chemical action; and on the theory of unimolecular reacti

  3. Chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Houston, Paul L

    2006-01-01

    This text teaches the principles underlying modern chemical kinetics in a clear, direct fashion, using several examples to enhance basic understanding. It features solutions to selected problems, with separate sections and appendices that cover more technical applications.Each chapter is self-contained and features an introduction that identifies its basic goals, their significance, and a general plan for their achievement. This text's important aims are to demonstrate that the basic kinetic principles are essential to the solution of modern chemical problems, and to show how the underlying qu

  4. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  5. Deuteration kinetics of the graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefedov, Alexei; Woell, Christof [KIT, Leopoldshafen (Germany); Paris, Alessio; Calliari, Lucia [FBK-CMM, Trento (Italy); Verbitskiy, Nikolay [MSU, Moscow (Russian Federation); University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Wang, Ying; Irle, Stephan [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Fedorov, Alexander [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany); St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Haberer, Danny; Knupfer, Martin; Buechner, Bernd [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Oetzelt, Martin [BESSY II, Berlin (Germany); Petaccia, Luca [Elettra, Trieste (Italy); Usachov, Dmitry [St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vyalikh, Denis [St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Sagdev, Hermann [MPI fuer Polymerforschung, Mainz (Germany); Yashina, Lada [MSU, Moscow (Russian Federation); Grueneis, Alexander [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany); University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    The kinetics of the hydrogenation/deuteration reaction of graphene was studied by time-dependent x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). The graphene layer was then exposed to hydrogen or deuterium atomic gas beams, obtained by thermal cracking in a tungsten capillary at T=3000 K. After each step XPS of the C1s line was performed in order to measure H/C and D/C ratios. We have observed a strong kinetic isotope effect for the hydrogenation/deuteration reaction leading to substantially faster adsorption and higher maximum D/C ratios as compared to H/C (D/C 35% vs. H/C 25%).

  6. Vlasov simulations of Kinetic Alfven Waves at proton kinetic scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Vasconez; F. Valentini (Francesco); E. Camporeale (Enrico); P. Veltri

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractKinetic Alfv ́en waves represent an important subject in space plasma physics, since they are thought to play a crucial role in the development of the turbulent energy cascade in the solar wind plasma at short wavelengths (of the order of the proton inertial length d p and beyond). A

  7. Dissociation kinetics of acyclic and macrocyclic polyaminopolycarboxylate complexes of yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, P.N.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2000-01-01

    Dissociation kinetics of Y III complexes of a linear as well as two macrocyclic polyaminopolycarboxylates, ethylenediamine diacetic acid (EDDA), 1,7-diaza-4,10,13-trioxacyclopentadecane-N,N'-diacetic acid (K21DA) and 1,10-diaza-4,7,13,16-tetraoxacyclooctadecane-N,N'-diacetic acid (K22DA) have been studied at a constant ionic strength (0.1 M) under varying (H + ) and temperatures. Cu II ion acts as the scavenger of the free ligand. Dissociation rate of Y III -K21DA is insensitive to Cu II and acetate (used as buffer anion) concentrations. Kinetic stability of the three complexes follow the order : Y III -K22DA>Y III -K21DA>Y III -EDDA. Enthalpies of activation for K21DA and K22DA complexes of Y III are also evaluated. Thermodynamic stability constant (log K) for Y III -K22DA complex is 10.81 ± 0.04. (author)

  8. Sensitivity analysis of intracellular signaling pathway kinetics predicts targets for stem cell fate control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alborz Mahdavi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Directing stem cell fate requires knowledge of how signaling networks integrate temporally and spatially segregated stimuli. We developed and validated a computational model of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (Stat3 pathway kinetics, a signaling network involved in embryonic stem cell (ESC self-renewal. Our analysis identified novel pathway responses; for example, overexpression of the receptor glycoprotein-130 results in reduced pathway activation and increased ESC differentiation. We used a systematic in silico screen to identify novel targets and protein interactions involved in Stat3 activation. Our analysis demonstrates that signaling activation and desensitization (the inability to respond to ligand restimulation is regulated by balancing the activation state of a distributed set of parameters including nuclear export of Stat3, nuclear phosphatase activity, inhibition by suppressor of cytokine signaling, and receptor trafficking. This knowledge was used to devise a temporally modulated ligand delivery strategy that maximizes signaling activation and leads to enhanced ESC self-renewal.

  9. Entangled zinc-ditetrazolate frameworks involving in situ ligand synthesis and topological modulation by various secondary N-donor ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yunwu; Chen Weilin; Wang Yonghui; Li Yangguang; Wang Enbo

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of various secondary N-donor ligands into an in situ ditetrazolate-ligand synthesis system of terephthalonitrile, NaN 3 and ZnCl 2 led to the formation of three new entangled frameworks Zn(pdtz)(4,4'-bipy).3H 2 O (1), [Zn(pdtz)(bpp)] 2 .3H 2 O (2) and Zn(pdtz) 0.5 (N 3 )(2,2'-bipy) (3) (4,4'-bipy=4,4'-bipyridine; bpp=1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane; 2,2'-bipy=2,2'-bipyridine; H 2 pdtz=5,5'-1,4-phenylene-ditetrazole). The formation of pdtz 2- ligand involves the Sharpless [2+3] cycloaddition reaction between terephthalonitrile and NaN 3 in the presence of Zn 2+ ion as a Lewis-acid catalyst under hydrothermal conditions. Compound 1 exhibits a fivefold interpenetrating 3D framework based on the diamondoid topology. Compound 2 displays a twofold parallel interpenetrating framework based on the wavelike individual network. Compound 3 possesses a 2D puckered network. These new Zn-ditetrazolate frameworks are highly dependent on the modulation of different secondary N-donor ligands. Their luminescent properties were investigated. - Graphical abstract: Three new entangled frameworks were prepared by an in situ ditetrazolate-ligand synthesis system assisted with various auxiliary N-donor ligands. The entangled structures can be modulated by different secondary ligands.

  10. Formation of mixed ligand complexes of UO22+ involving some nitrogen and oxygen donor ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Mamta; Ram Nayan

    1996-01-01

    The complexation reactions of UO 2 2+ ion with nitrogen and oxygen donor ligands, 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulphonic acid, o-aminophenol (ap), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (sa), 3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulphonic acid (ss) and 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (ca) have been investigated in aqueous solution employing the pH-titration technique. Analysis of the experimental data recorded at 25 degC and at an ionic strength of 0.10 M KNO 3 indicates formation of binary, hydroxo and ternary complexes of uranium. Formation constant values of the existing species have been evaluated and the results have been discussed. (author). 21 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Elements of plasma kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.

    1976-01-01

    The physical foundations of plasma kinetic equations are exposed inside a series of seminars on plasma and fusion physics. The Vlasov and collisional equations with its application range have been discussed. The momenta equations for the macroscopic magnitudes and the more usual approximations have been obtained: two fluid equations for cold and warm plasmas, magnetohydrodynamic equations and the double-adiabatic theory. (author)

  12. Kinetic studies on leucite precursors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrázová, M.; Kloužková, A.; Kohoutková, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2009), s. 205-210 ISSN 1895-1066 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : leucite * crystallization kinetics * hydrothermal Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.065, year: 2009

  13. Some parameters of radionuclide kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokof'ev, O.N.; Smirnov, V.A.; Belen'kij, E.I.

    1978-01-01

    Numerical values of the rates of radionuclide absorption into, and elimination from, bovine organs were determined. Kinetic rate constants of radionuclides such as 89 Sr, 99 Mo, 131 I, 132 Tl, and 140 Be were calculated. The calculations were done for muscle, liver, and kidney

  14. Solving Simple Kinetics without Integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Pen~a, Lisandro Herna´ndez

    2016-01-01

    The solution of simple kinetic equations is analyzed without referencing any topic from differential equations or integral calculus. Guided by the physical meaning of the rate equation, a systematic procedure is used to generate an approximate solution that converges uniformly to the exact solution in the case of zero, first, and second order…

  15. Robustness Analysis of Kinetic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2009-01-01

    Kinetic structures in architecture follows a new trend which is emerging in responsive architecture coined by Nicholas Negroponte when he proposed that architecture may benefit from the integration of computing power into built spaces and structures, and that better performing, more rational...

  16. Kinetics of Bio-Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    his chapter predicts the specific rates of reaction by means of a mathematical expression, the kinetics of the reaction. This expression can be derived through a mechanistic interpretation of an enzymatically catalyzed reaction, but it is essentially of empirical nature for cell reactions. The mo...

  17. Resonance transport and kinetic entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Yu.B.; Knoll, J.; Voskresensky, D.N.

    2000-01-01

    We continue the description of the dynamics of unstable particles within the real-time formulation of nonequilibrium field theory initiated in a previous paper . There we suggest to use Baym's PHI-functional method in order to achieve approximation schemes with 'built in' consistency with respect to conservation laws and thermodynamics even in the case of particles with finite damping width. Starting from Kadanoff-Baym equations we discuss a consistent first order gradient approach to transport which preserves the PHI-derivable properties. The validity conditions for the resulting quantum four-phase-space kinetic theory are discussed under the perspective to treat particles with broad damping widths. This non-equilibrium dynamics naturally includes all those quantum features already inherent in the corresponding equilibrium limit (e.g. Matsubara formalism) at the same level of PHI-derivable approximation. Various collision-term diagrams are discussed including those of higher order which lead to memory effects. As an important novel part we derive a generalized nonequilibrium expression for the kinetic entropy flow, which includes contributions from fluctuations and mass-width effects. In special cases an H-theorem is derived implying that the entropy can only increase with time. Memory effects in the kinetic terms provide contributions to the kinetic entropy flow that in the equilibrium limit recover the famous bosonic type T 3 lnT correction to the specific heat in the case of Fermi liquids like Helium-3

  18. Cytotoxicity of an 125I-labelled DNA ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karagiannis, T.C.; Lobachevsky, P.N.; Martin, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    The subcellular distribution and cytotoxicity of a DNA-binding ligand [ 125 I]-Hoechst 33258 following incubation of K562 cells with the drug was investigated. The ability of a radical scavenger, dimethyl sulphoxide, to protect cells from the 125 I-decay induced cell death was also studied. Three different concentrations and specific activities of the drug were used to provide different ligand : DNA binding ratios. The results demonstrated a trend toward improved delivery of the ligand to the nucleus and to chromatin at higher ligand concentrations, with concomitant increased sensitivity to 125 I-decay induced cytotoxicity and decreased protection by dimethyl sulphoxide. This correlation of radiobiological parameters with subcellular drug distribution is consistent with the classical dogma that attributes cytotoxicity to DNA double-stranded breakage in the vicinity of the site of decay, where the high LET nature of the damage confers minimal sensitivity to radical scavenging

  19. Epibatidine-derivatives: ligands for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westera, G.; Patt, J.T.; Jankowski, K.; Bertrand, D.; Spang, J.; Schubiger, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    Epibatidine, isolated from the Ecuadorian frog Epipedobates tricolar, has been synthesized. 11 C-N-methyl derivate is investigated as useful nicotinergic receptor ligand by electrophysiological methods and in vivo mice experiments. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs

  20. PET and Hormone Receptor Ligands in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gemignani, Mary

    2006-01-01

    .... To investigate this further, this project's objectives are: To evaluate the use of estrogen-like ligands labeled with positron emitters in preoperatively determining the ER status of breast cancer using PET...

  1. Unique advantages of organometallic supporting ligands for uranium complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaconescu, Paula L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Garcia, Evan [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-05-31

    The objective of our research project was to study the reactivity of uranium complexes supported by ferrocene-based ligands. In addition, this research provides training of graduate students as the next generation of actinide scientists.

  2. Unique advantages of organometallic supporting ligands for uranium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaconescu, Paula L.; Garcia, Evan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of our research project was to study the reactivity of uranium complexes supported by ferrocene-based ligands. In addition, this research provides training of graduate students as the next generation of actinide scientists.

  3. Ligand Binding Domain Protein in Tetracycline-Inducible Expression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    binding domain proteins in E. coli using a tetracycline inducible system. To allow for ... development of molecular ligands with improved therapeutic windows. Keywords: Nuclear receptor ..... functional recombinant cannabinoid receptor CB2 in ...

  4. related apoptosis-inducing ligand in transplastomic tobacco

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -inducing ligand (sTRAIL) can, as the whole length TRAIL protein, bind with its receptors and specifically induce the apoptosis of cancer cells; therefore, it has been developed as a potential therapeutic agent for various cancer treatments.

  5. Dysprosium complexes with the tetraphenylporphyrin macrocyclic ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez M, V.; Padilla, J.; Ramirez, F.M.

    1992-04-01

    In this report, the results obtained on the synthesis, characterization and study of the chemical behavior of dysprosium complex with the acetylacetone chelating agent (Hacac) and the tetraphenylporphyrin macrocyclic ligand (H 2 TFP) are given. Based on the literature but according to our necessities and interest, the appropriate methodology settled down from the synthesis of prime matters until the obtaining and characterization of the products. The acetyl acetonate complex was obtained of mono hydrated dysprosium [Dy(acac) 3 . H 2 0] and trihydrated [Dy(acac) 3 .3 H 2 0], the mono tetra phenyl porphyrinate [Dy(TFP)(acac). 2 ac] the double sandwich of the dysprosium porphyrinate [Dy(TFP) 2 ] and the triple sandwich of the dysprosium porphyrinate [Dy(TFP) 3 . 2 TCB] (TCB = trichlorobenzene). Its were characterized by their melting points, solubility, IR, UV, TGA and DTA both first and besides the techniques already mentioned for NMR'H, RPE and Magnetic susceptibility the three last complexes. From the spectroscopic point of view, IR and RPE its suggested the existence of a complex of inverse mixed valence [Dy(TFP) 2- (TFP) 1- ] for the Dy(TFP) 2 as a result of the existence of the free radical (TFP' 1- and that it was not in none of the other porphyrin compounds. In the NMR'H spectra of the compounds were not observed signals in the region from 0 to 10 ppm that which shows that the dysprosium complexes in special those of the porphyrin type are highly paramagnetic and its could be used as displacement reagents, creators of images and contrast agents of great utility in these days in studies of NMR, technique today by today used in medical diagnoses. (Author)

  6. Tetrapyrroles as Endogenous TSPO Ligands in Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes: Comparisons with Synthetic Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Veenman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO is highly 0conserved in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Since its discovery in 1977, numerous studies established the TSPO’s importance for life essential functions. For these studies, synthetic TSPO ligands typically are applied. Tetrapyrroles present endogenous ligands for the TSPO. Tetrapyrroles are also evolutionarily conserved and regulate multiple functions. TSPO and tetrapyrroles regulate each other. In animals TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions range from effects on embryonic development to metabolism, programmed cell death, response to stress, injury and disease, and even to life span extension. In animals TSPOs are primarily located in mitochondria. In plants TSPOs are also present in plastids, the nuclear fraction, the endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi stacks. This may contribute to translocation of tetrapyrrole intermediates across organelles’ membranes. As in animals, plant TSPO binds heme and protoporphyrin IX. TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions in plants appear to relate to development as well as stress conditions, including salt tolerance, abscisic acid-induced stress, reactive oxygen species homeostasis, and finally cell death regulation. In bacteria, TSPO is important for switching from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, including the regulation of photosynthesis. As in mitochondria, in bacteria TSPO is located in the outer membrane. TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions may be part of the establishment of the bacterial-eukaryote relationships, i.e., mitochondrial-eukaryote and plastid-plant endosymbiotic relationships.

  7. A new class of modular chiral ligands with fluxional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Zhang, Ruzhou; Manyem, Shankar

    2003-08-06

    In ligand design for asymmetric catalysis, the usual norm is to derive the face shielding elements from a chiral source. New ligands in which the face shielding is determined by fluxional groups are introduced. Their design, modular synthesis, and experiments to demonstrate the significance of the fluxional groups are discussed. The advantage is that the fluxional groups, introduced at a later stage, allow for simple tuning of the face shielding group.

  8. Reversible Size Control of Silver Nanoclusters via Ligand-exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa

    2015-05-21

    The properties of atomically monodisperse noble metal nanoclusters (NCs) are intricately intertwined with their precise molecular formula. The vast majority of size-specific NC syntheses start from the reduction of the metal salt and thiol ligand mixture. Only in gold was it recently shown that ligand-exchange could induce the growth of NCs from one atomically precise species to another; a process of yet unknown reversibility. Here, we present a process for the ligand-exchange-induced growth of atomically precise silver NCs, in a biphasic liquid-liquid system, which is particularly of interest because of its complete reversibility and ability to occur at room temperature. We explore this phenomenon in-depth using Ag35(SG)18 [SG= glutathionate] and Ag44(4-FTP)30 [4-FTP= 4-fluorothiophenol] as model systems. We show that the ligand-exchange conversion of Ag35(SG)18 into Ag44(4-FTP)30 is rapid (< 5 min) and direct, while the reverse process proceeds slowly through intermediate cluster sizes. We adapt a recently developed theory of reverse Ostwald ripening to model the NCs’ interconvertibility. The model’s predictions are in good agreement with the experimental observations, and they highlight the importance of small changes in the ligand-metal binding energy in determining the final equilibrium NC size. Based on the insight provided by this model, we demonstrated experimentally that by varying the choice of ligands, ligand-exchange can be used to obtain different sized NCs. The findings in this work establish ligand-exchange as a versatile tool for tuning cluster sizes.

  9. Ligand assisted cleavage of uranium oxo-clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocton, Gregory; Pecaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella [Laboratoire de Reconnaissance Ionique et Chimie de Coordination, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, UMR-E 3 CEA-UJF, CEA/DSM/INAC, CEA-Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 09 (France); Filinchuk, Yaroslav [Swiss Norwegian Beam Lines (SNBL) at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2010-07-01

    Dibenzoylmethanate replaces the bridging triflate ligands in uranium triflate poly-oxo-clusters and cleaves the U{sub 12}O{sub 20} core yielding the new [U{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}({eta}-dbm){sub 12}] dibenzoylmethanate (dbm{sup -}) cluster which slowly dissociates into a monomeric complex. This reactivity demonstrates the importance of bridging ligands in stabilizing uranium poly-oxo-clusters. (authors)

  10. Reversible Size Control of Silver Nanoclusters via Ligand-exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa; Burlakov, Victor M.; Besong, Tabot M.D.; Joshi, Chakra Prasad; AbdulHalim, L; Black, David; Whetten, Robert; Goriely, Alain; Bakr, Osman

    2015-01-01

    The properties of atomically monodisperse noble metal nanoclusters (NCs) are intricately intertwined with their precise molecular formula. The vast majority of size-specific NC syntheses start from the reduction of the metal salt and thiol ligand mixture. Only in gold was it recently shown that ligand-exchange could induce the growth of NCs from one atomically precise species to another; a process of yet unknown reversibility. Here, we present a process for the ligand-exchange-induced growth of atomically precise silver NCs, in a biphasic liquid-liquid system, which is particularly of interest because of its complete reversibility and ability to occur at room temperature. We explore this phenomenon in-depth using Ag35(SG)18 [SG= glutathionate] and Ag44(4-FTP)30 [4-FTP= 4-fluorothiophenol] as model systems. We show that the ligand-exchange conversion of Ag35(SG)18 into Ag44(4-FTP)30 is rapid (< 5 min) and direct, while the reverse process proceeds slowly through intermediate cluster sizes. We adapt a recently developed theory of reverse Ostwald ripening to model the NCs’ interconvertibility. The model’s predictions are in good agreement with the experimental observations, and they highlight the importance of small changes in the ligand-metal binding energy in determining the final equilibrium NC size. Based on the insight provided by this model, we demonstrated experimentally that by varying the choice of ligands, ligand-exchange can be used to obtain different sized NCs. The findings in this work establish ligand-exchange as a versatile tool for tuning cluster sizes.

  11. Models of protein–ligand crystal structures: trust, but verify

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deller, Marc C.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray crystallography provides the most accurate models of protein–ligand structures. These models serve as the foundation of many computational methods including structure prediction, molecular modelling, and structure-based drug design. The success of these computational methods ultimately depends on the quality of the underlying protein–ligand models. X-ray crystallography offers the unparalleled advantage of a clear mathematical formalism relating the experimental data to the protein–ligand model. In the case of X-ray crystallography, the primary experimental evidence is the electron density of the molecules forming the crystal. The first step in the generation of an accurate and precise crystallographic model is the interpretation of the electron density of the crystal, typically carried out by construction of an atomic model. The atomic model must then be validated for fit to the experimental electron density and also for agreement with prior expectations of stereochemistry. Stringent validation of protein–ligand models has become possible as a result of the mandatory deposition of primary diffraction data, and many computational tools are now available to aid in the validation process. Validation of protein–ligand complexes has revealed some instances of overenthusiastic interpretation of ligand density. Fundamental concepts and metrics of protein–ligand quality validation are discussed and we highlight software tools to assist in this process. It is essential that end users select high quality protein–ligand models for their computational and biological studies, and we provide an overview of how this can be achieved. PMID:25665575

  12. Metallogel formation in aqueous DMSO by perfluoroalkyl decorated terpyridine ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatikonda, Rajendhraprasad; Bhowmik, Sandip; Rissanen, Kari; Haukka, Matti; Cametti, Massimo

    2016-08-09

    Terpyridine based ligands 1 and 2, decorated with a C8F17 perfluorinated tag, are able to form stable thermoreversible gels in the presence of several d-block metal chloride salts. The gel systems obtained have been characterized by NMR, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopies and Tgel experiments in order to gain insights into the observed different behaviour of the two similar ligands, also in terms of the effect of additional common anionic species.

  13. Prediction of ligand effects in platinum-amyloid-β coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Matthew; Deeth, Robert J; Platts, James A

    2017-08-01

    Ligand field molecular mechanics (LFMM) and semi-empirical Parametric Model 7 (PM7) methods are applied to a series of six Pt II -Ligand systems binding to the N-terminal domain of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide. Molecular dynamics using a combined LFMM/Assisted Model Building with Energy Refinement (AMBER) approach is used to explore the conformational freedom of the peptide fragment, and identifies favourable platinum binding modes and peptide conformations for each ligand investigated. Platinum coordination is found to depend on the nature of the ligand, providing evidence that binding mode may be controlled by suitable ligand design. Boltzmann populations at 310K indicate that each Pt-Aβ complex has a small number of thermodynamically accessible states. Ramachandran maps are constructed for the sampled Pt-Aβ conformations and secondary structural analysis of the obtained complex structures is performed and contrasted with the free peptide; coordination of these platinum complexes disrupts existing secondary structure in the Aβ peptide and promotes formation of ligand-specific turn-type secondary structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ligand recognition by RAR and RXR receptors: binding and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Fredy; de Lera, Angel R

    2005-10-06

    Fundamental biological functions, most notably embriogenesis, cell growth, cell differentiation, and cell apoptosis, are in part regulated by a complex genomic network that starts with the binding (and activation) of retinoids to their cognate receptors, members of the superfamily of nuclear receptors. We have studied ligand recognition of retinoic receptors (RXRalpha and RARgamma) using a molecular-mechanics-based docking method. The protocol used in this work is able to rank the affinity of pairs of ligands for a single retinoid receptor, the highest values corresponding to those that adapt better to the shape of the binding site and generate the optimal set of electrostatic and apolar interactions with the receptor. Moreover, our studies shed light onto some of the energetic contributions to retinoid receptor ligand selectivity. In this regard we show that there is a difference in polarity between the binding site regions that anchor the carboxylate in RAR and RXR, which translates itself into large differences in the energy of interaction of both receptors with the same ligand. We observe that the latter energy change is canceled off by the solvation energy penalty upon binding. This energy compensation is borne out as well by experiments that address the effect of site-directed mutagenesis on ligand binding to RARgamma. The hypothesis that the difference in binding site polarity might be exploited to build RXR-selective ligands is tested with some compounds having a thiazolidinedione anchoring group.

  15. Predicting Efficient Antenna Ligands for Tb(III) Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel, Amanda P.S.; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-06

    A series of highly luminescent Tb(III) complexes of para-substituted 2-hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (5LI-IAM-X) has been prepared (X = H, CH{sub 3}, (C=O)NHCH{sub 3}, SO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}, OCH{sub 3}, F, Cl, Br) to probe the effect of substituting the isophthalamide ring on ligand and Tb(III) emission in order to establish a method for predicting the effects of chromophore modification on Tb(III) luminescence. The energies of the ligand singlet and triplet excited states are found to increase linearly with the {pi}-withdrawing ability of the substituent. The experimental results are supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations performed on model systems, which predict ligand singlet and triplet energies within {approx}5% of the experimental values. The quantum yield ({Phi}) values of the Tb(III) complex increases with the triplet energy of the ligand, which is in part due to the decreased non-radiative deactivation caused by thermal repopulation of the triplet. Together, the experimental and theoretical results serve as a predictive tool that can be used to guide the synthesis of ligands used to sensitize lanthanide luminescence.

  16. The affinity plutonium(IV) for nitrogen donor ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, N.V.; Hancock, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    Established ligand design principles are used to predict the solution chemistry of Pu(IV) with nitrogen donor ligands which do not contain carboxylate donors. pK a 's of the nitrogen donors are lowered by addition of hydroxyalkyl groups causing Pu(IV) to have a greater affinity for these ligands than for hydroxide. Potentiometric studies using the ligands N,N,N'N',N''-pentakis(2-hydroxypropyl)-1,4,7-triazaheptane; N,N,N',N',N''-pentakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-1,4,7-triazaheptane; N,N,N',N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-1,2-diaminoethane; N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane; 1,4,8,11-tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane and N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)glycine with Pu(IV) showed that Pu(IV) has a considerable aqueous solution chemistry with these ligands. Data were processed by the ESTA library of programs and stability constants for all the systems are reported. Implications for selective ligand design for Pu(IV) are discussed. (orig.)

  17. TCDD and a putative endogenous AhR ligand, ITE, elicit the same immediate changes in gene expression in mouse lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Ellen C; Welle, Stephen L; Gasiewicz, Thomas A

    2010-03-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates toxicity of several classes of xenobiotics and also has important physiological roles in differentiation, reproduction, and immunity, although the endogenous ligand(s) mediating these functions is/are as yet unidentified. One candidate endogenous ligand, 2-(1'H-indolo-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), is a potent AhR agonist in vitro, activates the murine AhR in vivo, but does not induce toxicity. We hypothesized that ITE and the toxic ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), may modify transcription of different sets of genes to account for their different toxicity. To test this hypothesis, primary mouse lung fibroblasts were exposed to 0.5muM ITE, 0.2nM TCDD, or vehicle for 4 h, and total gene expression was evaluated using microarrays. After this short-term and low-dose treatment, several hundred genes were changed significantly, and the response to ITE and TCDD was remarkably similar, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Induced gene sets included the expected battery of AhR-dependent xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, as well as several sets that reflect the inflammatory role of lung fibroblasts. Real time quantitative RT-qPCR assay of several selected genes confirmed these microarray data and further suggested that there may be kinetic differences in expression between ligands. These data suggest that ITE and TCDD elicit an analogous change in AhR conformation such that the initial transcription response is the same. Furthermore, if the difference in toxicity between TCDD and ITE is mediated by differences in gene expression, then it is likely that secondary changes enabled by the persistent TCDD, but not by the shorter lived ITE, are responsible.

  18. Impact on the Fe redox cycling of organic ligands released by Synechococcus PCC 7002, under different iron fertilization scenarios. Modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samperio-Ramos, Guillermo; González-Dávila, Melchor; Santana-Casiano, J. Magdalena

    2018-06-01

    The kinetics of Fe redox transformations are of crucial importance in determining the bioavailability of iron, due to inorganic Fe(II) and Fe weakly organic complexes being the most easily assimilated species by phytoplankton. The role played by the natural organic ligands excreted by the cyanobacteria Synecococcus PCC 7002 on the iron redox chemistry was studied at different stages of growth, considering changes in the organic exudation of the cyanobacteria, associated with growth under two different scenarios of iron availability. The oxidation/reduction processes of iron were studied at nanomolar levels and under different physicochemical conditions of pH (7.2- 8.2), temperature (5- 35 °C) and salinity (10- 37). The presence of natural organic exudates of Synechococcus affected the redox behavior of iron. A pH-dependent and photo-induced Fe(III) reduction process was detected in the presence of exudates produced under Fe-Low conditions. Photolytic reactions also modified the reactivity of those exudates with respect to Fe(II), increasing its lifetime in seawater. Without light mediated processes, organic ligands excreted under iron deficient conditions intensified the Fe(II) oxidation at pH redox constants between iron and the major ligands present in solution. Two organic type ligands for the exudates of Synechococcus PCC 7002, with different iron-chelation properties were included in the model. The Fe(II) speciation was radically affected when organic ligands were considered. The individual contributions to the overall Fe(II) oxidation rate demonstrated that these organic ligands played a key role in the oxidation process, although their contributions were dependent on the prescribed iron conditions. The study, therefore, suggests that the variability in the composition and nature of organic exudates released, due to iron availability conditions, might determine the redox behaviour of iron in seawater.

  19. Kinetic modelling of [123I]CNS 1261--a potential SPET tracer for the NMDA receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlandsson, Kjell; Bressan, Rodrigo A.; Mulligan, Rachel S.; Gunn, Roger N; Cunningham, Vincent J.; Owens, Jonathan; Wyper, David; Ell, Peter J.; Pilowsky, Lyn S.

    2003-01-01

    N-(1-napthyl)-N'-(3-[ 123 I]-iodophenyl)-N-methylguanidine ([ 123 I]CNS 1261) is a novel SPET ligand developed for imaging the NMDA receptor intra-channel MK 801/PCP/ketamine site. Data was acquired in 7 healthy volunteers after bolus injection of [ 123 I]CNS 1261. Kinetic modeling showed reversible tracer binding. Arterial and venous time-activity curves overlapped after 90 min. The rank order of binding was: Thalamus > striatum > cortical regions > white matter. This distribution concurs with [ 11 C]-ketamine and [ 18 F]-memantine PET studies . These data provide a methodological basis for further direct in vivo challenge studies

  20. A Ferrocene-Based Catecholamide Ligand: the Consequences of Ligand Swivel for Directed Supramolecular Self-Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugridge, Jeffrey; Fiedler, Dorothea; Raymond, Kenneth

    2010-02-04

    A ferrocene-based biscatecholamide ligand was prepared and investigated for the formation of metal-ligand supramolecular assemblies with different metals. Reaction with Ge(IV) resulted in the formation of a variety of Ge{sub n}L{sub m} coordination complexes, including [Ge{sub 2}L{sub 3}]{sup 4-} and [Ge{sub 2}L{sub 2}({mu}-OMe){sub 2}]{sup 2-}. The ligand's ability to swivel about the ferrocenyl linker and adopt different conformations accounts for formation of many different Ge{sub n}L{sub m} species. This study demonstrates why conformational ligand rigidity is essential in the rational design and directed self-assembly of supramolecular complexes.

  1. Some Aspects of Extended Kinetic Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the pathway model of Mathai introduced in 2005 [Linear Algebra and Its Applications, 396, 317–328] we extend the standard kinetic equations. Connection of the extended kinetic equation with fractional calculus operator is established. The solution of the general form of the fractional kinetic equation is obtained through Laplace transform. The results for the standard kinetic equation are obtained as the limiting case.

  2. Holographic kinetic k-essence model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Norman [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: ncruz@lauca.usach.cl; Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F.; Rozas-Fernandez, Alberto [Colina de los Chopos, Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: a.rozas@cfmac.csic.es; Sanchez, Guillermo [Departamento de Matematica y Ciencia de la Computacion, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: gsanchez@usach.cl

    2009-08-31

    We consider a connection between the holographic dark energy density and the kinetic k-essence energy density in a flat FRW universe. With the choice c{>=}1, the holographic dark energy can be described by a kinetic k-essence scalar field in a certain way. In this Letter we show this kinetic k-essential description of the holographic dark energy with c{>=}1 and reconstruct the kinetic k-essence function F(X)

  3. The impact of whole human blood on the kinetic inertness of platinum(iv) prodrugs - an HPLC-ICP-MS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiner, Sarah; Grabarics, Márkó; Galvez, Luis; Varbanov, Hristo P; Sommerfeld, Nadine S; Galanski, Markus; Keppler, Bernhard K; Koellensperger, Gunda

    2018-04-17

    The potential advantage of platinum(iv) complexes as alternatives to classical platinum(ii)-based drugs relies on their kinetic stability in the body before reaching the tumor site and on their activation by reduction inside cancer cells. In this study, an analytical workflow has been developed to investigate the reductive biotransformation and kinetic inertness of platinum(iv) prodrugs comprising different ligand coordination spheres (respectively, lipophilicity and redox behavior) in whole human blood. The distribution of platinum(iv) complexes in blood pellets and plasma was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after microwave digestion. An analytical approach based on reversed-phase (RP)-ICP-MS was used to monitor the parent compound and the formation of metabolites using two different extraction procedures. The ligand coordination sphere of the platinum(iv) complexes had a significant impact on their accumulation in red blood cells and on their degree of kinetic inertness in whole human blood. The most lipophilic platinum(iv) compound featuring equatorial chlorido ligands showed a pronounced penetration into blood cells and a rapid reductive biotransformation. In contrast, the more hydrophilic platinum(iv) complexes with a carboplatin- and oxaliplatin-core exerted kinetic inertness on a pharmacologically relevant time scale with notable amounts of the compound accumulated in the plasma fraction.

  4. Secondary ligand-directed assembly of Co(II) coordination polymers based on a pyridine carboxylate ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Ke-Li; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Cai, Yi-Ni; Xu, Xiao-Wei; Feng, Yun-Long

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the influence of hydrogen bonds and secondary ligands on the structures and properties of the resulting frameworks, five new Co(II) compounds have been synthesized by the reactions of Co(II) salts and 3,5-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethoxy)benzoic acid (HL) with four rationally selected dicarboxylic acid ligands. Without secondary ligand, we got one compound [CoL 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] n ·2nH 2 O (1), which possesses a 1D chain structure. In the presence of ancillary ligands, namely, 1,3-adamantanedicarboxylic acid (H 2 adbc), terephthalic acid (H 2 tpa), thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H 2 tdc) and 1,4-benzenedithioacetic acid (H 2 bdtc), four 3D structures [Co 2 L 2 (adbc)] n ·nH 2 O (2), [Co 2 L 2 (tpa)] n (3), [Co 2 L 2 (tdc)] n (4), [Co 2 L 2 (bdtc)(H 2 O)] n (5) were obtained, respectively. It can be observed from the architectures of 1–5 that hydrogen bonds and secondary ligands both have great effects on the spatial connective fashions, resulting in the formation of various dimensional compounds. The XRPD, TGA data of title polymers and the magnetic properties for 2 and 5 have also been investigated. - Graphical abstract: The structural differences show that the ancillary ligands have great effects on the spatial connective fashions, resulting in the formation of various dimensional compounds. - Highlights: • Five new Co(II) coordination polymers have been synthesized by solvothermal reactions based on 3,5-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethoxy)benzoic acid (HL). • The long-flexible ligand (HL) is a good candidate to produce interpenetrating architectures. • The secondary dicarboxylic acid ligands play important roles in the spatial connective fashions and the formation of various dimensional compounds. • The magnetism studies show that both 2 and 5 exhibit antiferromagnetic interactions

  5. Kinetic modelling of enzymatic starch hydrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bednarska, K.A.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic modelling of enzymatic starch hydrolysis – a summary

    K.A. Bednarska

    The dissertation entitled ‘Kinetic modelling of enzymatic starch hydrolysis’ describes the enzymatic hydrolysis and kinetic modelling of liquefaction and saccharification of wheat starch.

  6. Biotechnological Fluorescent Ligands of the Bradykinin B1 Receptor: Protein Ligands for a Peptide Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Charest-Morin

    Full Text Available The bradykinin (BK B1 receptor (B1R is a peculiar G protein coupled receptor that is strongly regulated to the point of being inducible in immunopathology. Limited clinical evidence suggests that its expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is a biomarker of active inflammatory states. In an effort to develop a novel imaging/diagnostic tool, we report the rational design and testing of a fusion protein that is a ligand of the human B1R but not likely to label peptidases. This ligand is composed of a fluorescent protein (FP (enhanced green FP [EGFP] or mCherry prolonged at its N-terminus by a spacer peptide and a classical peptide agonist or antagonist (des-Arg9-BK, [Leu8]des-Arg9-BK, respectively. The design of the spacer-ligand joint peptide was validated by a competition assay for [3H]Lys-des-Arg9-BK binding to the human B1R applied to 4 synthetic peptides of 18 or 19 residues. The labeling of B1R-expressing cells with EGFP or mCherry fused with 7 of such peptides was performed in parallel (microscopy. Both assays indicated that the best design was FP-(Asn-Glyn-Lys-des-Arg9-BK; n = 15 was superior to n = 5, suggesting benefits from minimizing steric hindrance between the FP and the receptor. Cell labeling concerned mostly plasma membranes and was inhibited by a B1R antagonist. EGFP-(Asn-Gly15-Lys-des-Arg9-BK competed for the binding of [3H]Lys-des-Arg9-BK to human recombinant B1R, being only 10-fold less potent than the unlabeled form of Lys-des-Arg9-BK to do so. The fusion protein did not label HEK 293a cells expressing recombinant human BK B2 receptors or angiotensin converting enzyme. This study identifies a modular C-terminal sequence that can be adapted to protein cargoes, conferring high affinity for the BK B1R, with possible applications in diagnostic cytofluorometry, histology and drug delivery (e.g., in oncology.

  7. Kinetics of electrophilic substitution of erbium (3) for ytterbium (3) in aqueous solution of ethylenediaminetetraacetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitenko, S.I.; Martynenko, L.I.; Pechurova, N.I.; Spitsyn, V.I. (Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    1983-08-01

    The results obtained while studing the exchange kinetics in the ErA/sup -/ - Yb/sup 3 +/ system are compared with the kinetic regularities found for the NdA/sup -/ - Yb/sup 3 +/ system. Electrophilic substitution in ethylenediamine tetraacetates of rare earths (3) independently of the nature of a departing cation is realized through two competitive mechanisms: acid dissociation and associative mechanisms. Exchange through the acid dissociation mechanisms is catalized by protons while, depending on the medium acidity, mono- and biprotonated intermediate complexes are formed. The associative mechanism predominates in less acid media and is realized through the formation of intermediate binuclear complexes. The limiting exchange stage is a break in the metal-nitrogen bond formed by the departing cation and ligand in the intermediate binuclear complex.

  8. Kinetics of electrophilic substitution of erbium (3) for ytterbium (3) in aqueous solution of ethylenediaminetetraacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitenko, S.I.; Martynenko, L.I.; Pechurova, N.I.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    The results obtained while stUdying the exchange kinetics in the ErA - - Yb 3+ system are compared with the kinetic regularities found for the NdA - - Yb 3+ system. Electrophilic substitution in ethylenediamine tetraacetates of rare earths (3) independently of the nature of a departing cation is realized through two competitive mechanisms: acid dissociation and associatiVe mechanisms. Exchange through the acid dissociation mechanisms is catalized by protons while, depending on the medium acidity, mono- and biprotonated intermediate complexes are formed. The associative mechanism predominates in less acid media and is realized through the formation of intermediate binOclear compleXes. The limiting exchange stage is a break in the metal-nitrogen bond formed by the departing cation and ligand in the intermediate binUclear complex

  9. Kinetics of some rare earth ions substitution for neodymium(3) ion in aqueous solutions of ethylenediaminetetraacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitenko, S.I.; Martynenko, L.I.; Afonin, E.G.; Pechurova, N.I.

    1984-01-01

    Kinetics of electrophilic interaction in the systems NdA - -Ln 3+ (where Ln 3+ - Tu 3+ , Er 3+ , Gd 3+ , Eu 3+ , Pr 3+ ) has been studied. It is found that the following kinetic equation: W=W 1 +W 2 = (Ksub(1)csub(Hsup(+))+Ksub(2)csub(Lnsup(3+) 3+))csub(NdAsup(-)), where csub(Lnsup(3+)) and csub(NdA - ) - initial concentrations of Ln 3+ and NdA - , corresponds to the exchange rate. It is shown that W 1 - component of exchange rate according to the mechanism of acid dissociation, and W 2 - according to associative mechanism. The values of K 1 and K 2 at t=20 deg C, μ=0.1 are calculated. The dependence of K 2 on the nature of the ligand included is studied. It is shown that K 2 depends linearly on stability constant of Ln 3+ iminodiacetate

  10. Recognition of damaged DNA by Escherichia coli Fpg protein: insights from structural and kinetic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Douglas, Kenneth T.; Nevinsky, Georgy A.

    2003-01-01

    Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg) excises oxidized purines from damaged DNA. The recent determination of the three-dimensional structure of the covalent complex of DNA with Escherichia coli Fpg, obtained by reducing the Schiff base intermediate formed during the reaction [Gilboa et al., J. Biol. Chem. 277 (2002) 19811] has revealed a number of potential specific and non-specific interactions between Fpg and DNA. We analyze the structural data for Fpg in the light of the kinetic and thermodynamic data obtained by the method of stepwise increase in ligand complexity to estimate relative contributions of individual nucleotide units of lesion-containing DNA to its total affinity for this enzyme [Ishchenko et al., Biochemistry 41 (2002) 7540]. Stopped-flow kinetic analysis that has allowed the dissection of Fpg catalysis in time [Fedorova et al., Biochemistry 41 (2002) 1520] is also correlated with the structural data

  11. Kinetics of Vinyl Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate Initiated by Ce(IV-Vanillin Redox System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Palanivelu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of polymerization of methyl methacrylate initiated by Ce(IV-Vanillin redox system was studied in aqueous solution of sulfuric acid at 40°C. The rate of polymerization (Rp and the reaction orders with respect to monomer, initiator and ligand have been determined and found to be 1.5, 0.5 and 0.5 respectively. The effect of concentration of sulfuric acid on the polymerization was also studied. The rate of polymerization was found to increase with increasing temperature 30–60°C and decreases at higher temperature (>60°C. The overall activation energy (Ea was found to be 36.7 kJ/mol. A suitable kinetic scheme has been proposed.

  12. A Spectroscopic Study of the effect of Ligand Complexation on the Reduction of Uranium(VI) by Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AH2DS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zheming; Wagnon, Ken B.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Liu, Chongxuan; Rosso, Kevin M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-01-01

    In this project, the reduction rate of uranyl complexes with hydroxide, carbonate, EDTA, and Desferriferrioxamine B (DFB) by anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AH2DS), a potential electron shuttle for microbial reduction of metal ions (Newman and Kolter 2000), is studied by stopped-flow kinetics techniques under anoxic atmosphere. The apparent reaction rates varied with ligand type, solution pH, and U(VI) concentration. For each ligand, a single largest kobs within the studied pH range was observed, suggesting the influence of pH-dependent speciation on the U(VI) reduction rate. The maximum reaction rate found in each case followed the order of OH- > CO32- > EDTA > DFB, consistent with the same trend of the thermodynamic stability of the uranyl complexes and ionic sizes of the ligands. Increasing the stability of uranyl complexes and ligand size decreased the maximum reduction rate. The pH-dependent rates were modeled using a second-order rate expression that was assumed to be dependent on a single U(VI) complex and AH2DS species. By quantitatively comparing the calculated and measured apparent rate constants as a function of pH, species AHDS3- was suggested as the primary reductant in all cases examined. Species UO2CO3(aq) , UO2HEDTA-, and (UO2)2(OH)22+ were suggested as the principal electron acceptors among the U(VI) species mixture in carbonate, EDTA, and hydroxyl systems, respectively

  13. Ligand uptake in Mycobacterium tuberculosis truncated hemoglobins is controlled by both internal tunnels and active site water molecules [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Boron

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis, has two proteins belonging to the truncated hemoglobin (trHb family. Mt-trHbN presents well-defined internal hydrophobic tunnels that allow O2 and •ŸNO to migrate easily from the solvent to the active site, whereas Mt-trHbO possesses tunnels interrupted by a few bulky residues, particularly a tryptophan at position G8. Differential ligand migration rates allow Mt-trHbN to detoxify Ÿ•NO, a crucial step for pathogen survival once under attack by the immune system, much more efficiently than Mt-trHbO. In order to investigate the differences between these proteins, we performed experimental kinetic measurements, Ÿ•NO decomposition, as well as molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type Mt-trHbN and two mutants, VG8F and VG8W. These mutations affect both the tunnels accessibility as well as the affinity of distal site water molecules, thus modifying the ligand access to the iron. We found that a single mutation allows Mt-trHbN to acquire ligand migration rates comparable to those observed for Mt-trHbO, confirming that ligand migration is regulated by the internal tunnel architecture as well as by water molecules stabilized in the active site.

  14. Morphogenesis of Kinetic Reciprocal Frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Sassone, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic structures in civil engineering and architecture gained considerable more attention in the very recent years as a practical solution to face time dependant performances. Realized projects are mostly bridges, retractable roofs, while in architecture the trend follows the category of intera......Kinetic structures in civil engineering and architecture gained considerable more attention in the very recent years as a practical solution to face time dependant performances. Realized projects are mostly bridges, retractable roofs, while in architecture the trend follows the category...... (RF) were studied in the past as a practical solution to span distances with shorter elements. Leonardo da Vinci discovered interesting RF patterns and studied three dimensional arch structures for bridges. RF are generally defined as structures that forms closed circuits of forces, and where elements...

  15. Kinetic approach to relativistic dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbana, A.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Tripiccione, R.

    2017-08-01

    Despite a long record of intense effort, the basic mechanisms by which dissipation emerges from the microscopic dynamics of a relativistic fluid still elude complete understanding. In particular, several details must still be finalized in the pathway from kinetic theory to hydrodynamics mainly in the derivation of the values of the transport coefficients. In this paper, we approach the problem by matching data from lattice-kinetic simulations with analytical predictions. Our numerical results provide neat evidence in favor of the Chapman-Enskog [The Mathematical Theory of Non-Uniform Gases, 3rd ed. (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K., 1970)] procedure as suggested by recent theoretical analyses along with qualitative hints at the basic reasons why the Chapman-Enskog expansion might be better suited than Grad's method [Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 2, 331 (1949), 10.1002/cpa.3160020403] to capture the emergence of dissipative effects in relativistic fluids.

  16. Kinetic theory of tearing instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.; Dobrott, D.; Wang, T.S.

    1975-01-01

    The guiding-center kinetic equation with Fokker-Planck collision term is used to study, in cylindrical geometry, a class of dissipative instabilities of which the classical tearing mode is an archetype. Variational solution of the kinetic equation obviates the use of an approximate Ohm's law or adiabatic assumption, as used in previous studies, and it provides a dispersive relation which is uniformly valid for any ratio of wave frequency to collision frequency. One result of using the rigorous collision operator is the prediction of a new instability. This instability, driven by the electron temperature gradient, is predicted to occur under the long mean-free path conditions of present tokamak experiments, and has significant features in common with the kink-like oscillations observed in such experiments

  17. Kinetics of cadmium hydroxide precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.W.; Marani, D.; Luo, B.; Swenson, P.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents some preliminary results on the kinetics of Cd(OH)/sub 2/ precipitation, both in the absence and the presence of citric acid as an inhibiting agent. Batch and continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) precipitation studies are performed by mixing equal volumes of NaOH and Cd(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ solutions, in order to avoid localized supersaturation conditions. The rate of metal removal from the soluble phase is calculated from the mass balance for the CSTR precipitation tests. In addition, precipitation kinetics are studied in terms of nucleation and crystal growth rates, by means of a particle counter that allows a population balance analysis for the precipitation reactor at steady state conditions

  18. Art Engineering and Kinetic Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barış Yılmaz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Performing an art, either by painting or by sculpturing, requires to be interdisciplinary. When an artist creates his/her work of art, the process he/she realizes is supported by different engineering disciplines. Therefore, especially modern artists need to understand engineering science and this results in transforming artists into engineers. Opportunities provided by technology and science enable artists to expand his/her vision and to improve his/her works. Especially kinetic art has become an approach that combines art with engineering. Kinetic art, which is nourished with varied disciplines, is an excellent example to prove that art is interdisciplinary and to show the relationship between artist/art and engineering.

  19. Modeling the isochronal crystallization kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahay, S.S.; Krishnan, Karthik

    2004-01-01

    The classical Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model, originally formulated for the isothermal condition, is often used in conjunction with additivity principle for modeling the non-isothermal crystallization kinetics. This approach at times results in significant differences between the model prediction and experimental data. In this article, a modification to this approach has been imposed via an additional functional relationship between the activation energy and heating rate. The methodology has been validated with experimental isochronal crystallization kinetic data in Se 71 Te 20 Sb 9 glass and Ge 20 Te 80 systems. It has been shown that the functional relationship between heating rate and activation energy, ascribed to the reduction in apparent activation energy due to increasing non-isothermality, provides better phenomenological description and therefore improves the prediction capability of the JMAK model under isochronal condition

  20. Ligand-specific conformational changes in the alpha1 glycine receptor ligand-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Lynch, Joseph W

    2009-01-01

    , and by the antagonist, strychnine. Voltage-clamp fluorometry involves labeling introduced cysteines with environmentally sensitive fluorophores and inferring structural rearrangements from ligand-induced fluorescence changes. In the inner beta-sheet, we labeled residues in loop 2 and in binding domain loops D and E....... At each position, strychnine and glycine induced distinct maximal fluorescence responses. The pre-M1 domain responded similarly; at each of four labeled positions glycine produced a strong fluorescence signal, whereas strychnine did not. This suggests that glycine induces conformational changes...... in the inner beta-sheet and pre-M1 domain that may be important for activation, desensitization, or both. In contrast, most labeled residues in loops C and F yielded fluorescence changes identical in magnitude for glycine and strychnine. A notable exception was H201C in loop C. This labeled residue responded...

  1. Muscular Oxygen Uptake Kinetics in Aged Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschate, J; Drescher, U; Baum, K; Eichberg, S; Schiffer, T; Latsch, J; Brixius, K; Hoffmann, U

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary oxygen uptake (V˙O2) kinetics and heart rate kinetics are influenced by age and fitness. Muscular V˙O2 kinetics can be estimated from heart rate and pulmonary V˙O2. In this study the applicability of a test using pseudo-random binary sequences in combination with a model to estimate muscular V˙O2 kinetics was tested. Muscular V˙O2 kinetics were expected to be faster than pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics, slowed in aged subjects and correlated with maximum V˙O2 and heart rate kinetics. 27 elderly subjects (73±3 years; 81.1±8.2 kg; 175±4.7 cm) participated. Cardiorespiratory kinetics were assessed using the maximum of cross-correlation functions, higher maxima implying faster kinetics. Muscular V˙O2 kinetics were faster than pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics (0.31±0.1 vs. 0.29±0.1 s; p=0.004). Heart rate kinetics were not correlated with muscular or pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics or maximum V˙O2. Muscular V˙O2 kinetics correlated with maximum V˙O2 (r=0.35; p=0.033). This suggests, that muscular V˙O2 kinetics are faster than estimates from pulmonary V˙O2 and related to maximum V˙O2 in aged subjects. In the future this experimental approach may help to characterize alterations in muscular V˙O2 under various conditions independent of motivation and maximal effort. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Bumetanide kinetics in renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentikaeinen, P.J.P.; Pasternack, A.; Lampainen, E.; Neuvonen, P.J.; Penttilae, A.

    1985-01-01

    To study the effects of renal failure on bumetanide kinetics, the authors administered single intravenous doses of 1.0 mg/3.08 microCi 14 C-bumetanide to six healthy subjects and 22 patients with variable degrees of renal failure. The kinetics of 14 C-bumetanide and total 14 C were adequately described by a two-compartment open model in the control subjects and in the patients. The volume of the central compartment and the distribution t1/2 were of the same order in both groups, whereas the mean (+/- SE) volume at steady state was larger (22.1 +/- 1.6 and 16.9 +/- 1.0 L) and the elimination t1/2 was longer (1.9 +/- 0.2 and 1.4 +/- 0.1 hours) in patients with renal failure than in healthy controls. Bumetanide renal clearance was lower (10 +/- 3 and 90 +/- 13 ml/min) in patients than in subjects and correlated with creatinine clearance (r = 0.784) and log serum creatinine level (r = -0.843), whereas nonrenal clearance was significantly higher in the patients (153 +/- 14 and 99 +/- 6 ml/min). Bumetanide total plasma clearance did not significantly change. The non-protein-bound, free fraction of bumetanide was higher in patients and correlated with plasma albumin levels (r = -0.777). The kinetics of total 14 C showed similar but greater changes than those of 14C-bumetanide. Thus the most important changes in bumetanide kinetics in patients with renal failure are low renal clearance and a high free fraction, with a consequent increase in nonrenal clearance, volume of distribution, and elimination t1/2

  3. Production kinetics of zirconium tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudjoko, D.; Masduki, B.; Sunardjo; Sulistyo, B.

    1996-01-01

    This research was intended to study the kinetics of zirconium tetrachloride production. The process was carried out in semi continuous reactor, equipped with heater, temperature controller, sublimator and scrubber. The variables investigated were time, temperature and the pellet forming pressure. Within the range of variables studied, the expression of the process in the chemical reaction controller region and diffusion controller region were both presented. (author)

  4. On the kinetic energy density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, R.J.; Mas, D.; Moszkowski, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    We discuss two expressions for the density of kinetic energy which differ by an integration by parts. Using the Wigner transform we shown that the arithmetic mean of these two terms is closely analogous to the classical value. Harmonic oscillator wavefunctions are used to illustrate the radial dependence of these expressions. We study the differences they induce through effective mass terms when performing self-consistent calculations. (author)

  5. Kinetics of UO2 sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristic, M.M.

    1962-01-01

    Detailed conclusions related to the UO 2 sintering can be drawn from investigating the kinetics of the sintering process. This report gives an thorough analysis of the the data concerned with sintering available in the literature taking into account the Jander and Arrhenius laws. This analysis completes the study of influence of the O/U ratio and the atmosphere on the sintering. Results presented are fundamentals of future theoretical and experimental work related to characterisation of the UO 2 sintering process

  6. Microassay for measurement of binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woof, J.M.; Burton, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    An improved technique for measuring the binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules has been developed by modification of a procedure using centrifugation through a water-immiscible oil to separate free and cell-bound ligand. It maximises the percentage of ligand bound since cell-bound and free ligand can be separated easily and reproducibly even when very small reaction volumes are used. This permits low levels of ligand radiolabelling and relatively low numbers of cells to be used

  7. KINETIC ALGORITHMS FOR HARBOUR MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Gold

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern harbour management for a busy port needs to resolve a variety of simultaneous problems. Harbour traffic may be busy and the waterways congested, both by the major shipping and by the attendant harbour tugs. The harbour channel may be narrow and tortuous, and rapidly changing tides may require frequent course adjustments. Navigation aids must be clearly specified and immediately identifiable, in order to permit safe passage for the vessels. This requires a GIS with attributes not easily available with traditional products. The GeoVS system is a kinetic GIS with full three-dimensional visualisation, so that ships, bathymetry and landscape may be viewed in a form that is immediately understandable to both harbour pilots and the harbour authority. The system is kinetic because the data structures used to preserve the topological relationships between ships, seafloor and coastline are able to be maintained on a real-time basis, taking account of ship movement recorded on the compulsory AIS (Automatic Information System beacons. Maintenance of this real-time topology allows for easy detection of potential collisions, as well as real-time bathymetric estimations, necessary to prevent ship grounding in highly tidal environments. The system, based on previous research into kinetic Voronoi diagrams, as well as development of a completely new graphical engine, is now in commercial production, where its advantages over simpler twodimensional models without automatic collision and grounding detection are becoming evident. Other applications are readily envisaged, and will be addressed in the near future.

  8. Oxidation kinetics of corium pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulatsky, A.A., E-mail: andrei314@mail.ru [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Smirnov, S.A. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Kotova, S.Yu. [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Fischer, M.; Hellmann, S. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Tromm, W.; Miassoedov, A. [Forschungzentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), Karlsruhe (Germany); Bottomley, D. [EUROPÄISCHE KOMMISSION, Joint Research Centre Institut für Transurane (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Piluso, P. [CEA Cadarache-DEN/DTN/STRI, St.Paul-lez-Durance (France); Barrachin, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et Sûreté Nucléaire, St.Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • The analysis of experimental data on molten corium oxidation was been carried out. • The analysis has revealed the main factors influencing the oxidation kinetics. • The analysis was used for developing a qualitative analytical model. • The numerical modeling has confirmed the results of experimental data analysis. -- Abstract: Experimental, theoretical and numerical studies of oxidation kinetics of an open surface corium pool have been reported. The experiments have been carried out within OECD MASCA program and ISTC METCOR, METCOR-P and EVAN projects. It has been shown that the melt oxidation is controlled by an oxidant supply to the melt free surface from the atmosphere, not by the reducer supply from the melt. The project experiments have not detected any input of the zirconium oxidation kinetics into the process chemistry. The completed analysis puts forward a simple analytical model, which gives an explanation of the main features of melt oxidation process. The numerical modeling results are in good agreement with experimental data and theoretical considerations.

  9. Oxidation kinetics of corium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulatsky, A.A.; Smirnov, S.A.; Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Kotova, S.Yu.; Fischer, M.; Hellmann, S.; Tromm, W.; Miassoedov, A.; Bottomley, D.; Piluso, P.; Barrachin, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The analysis of experimental data on molten corium oxidation was been carried out. • The analysis has revealed the main factors influencing the oxidation kinetics. • The analysis was used for developing a qualitative analytical model. • The numerical modeling has confirmed the results of experimental data analysis. -- Abstract: Experimental, theoretical and numerical studies of oxidation kinetics of an open surface corium pool have been reported. The experiments have been carried out within OECD MASCA program and ISTC METCOR, METCOR-P and EVAN projects. It has been shown that the melt oxidation is controlled by an oxidant supply to the melt free surface from the atmosphere, not by the reducer supply from the melt. The project experiments have not detected any input of the zirconium oxidation kinetics into the process chemistry. The completed analysis puts forward a simple analytical model, which gives an explanation of the main features of melt oxidation process. The numerical modeling results are in good agreement with experimental data and theoretical considerations

  10. Aluminum corrosion product release kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Matt, E-mail: Matthew.Edwards@cnl.ca; Semmler, Jaleh; Guzonas, Dave; Chen, Hui Qun; Toor, Arshad; Hoendermis, Seanna

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Release of Al corrosion product was measured in simulated post-LOCA sump solutions. • Increased boron was found to enhance Al release kinetics at similar pH. • Models of Al release as functions of time, temperature, and pH were developed. - Abstract: The kinetics of aluminum corrosion product release was examined in solutions representative of post-LOCA sump water for both pressurized water and pressurized heavy-water reactors. Coupons of AA 6061 T6 were exposed to solutions in the pH 7–11 range at 40, 60, 90 and 130 °C. Solution samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and coupon samples were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The results show a distinct “boron effect” on the release kinetics, expected to be caused by an increase in the solubility of the aluminum corrosion products. New models were developed to describe both sets of data as functions of temperature, time, and pH (where applicable)

  11. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus is an enzyme with unusual kinetic properties and a crystal structure that suggests it evolved from a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen

    2015-01-01

    The adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRTase) encoded by the open reading frame SSO2342 of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2, was subjected to crystallographic, kinetic and ligand binding analyses. The enzyme forms dimers in solution and in the crystals, and binds one molecule of the reactants 5...

  12. Influence of Proton Acceptors on the Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reaction Kinetics of a Ruthenium-Tyrosine Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, J Christian; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2017-11-22

    A polypyridyl ruthenium complex with fluorinated bipyridine ligands and a covalently bound tyrosine moiety was synthesized, and its photo-induced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactivity in acetonitrile was investigated with transient absorption spectroscopy. Using flash-quench methodology with methyl viologen as an oxidative quencher, a Ru 3+ species is generated that is capable of initiating the intramolecular PCET oxidation of the tyrosine moiety. Using a series of substituted pyridine bases, the reaction kinetics were found to vary as a function of proton acceptor concentration and identity, with no significant H/D kinetic isotope effect. Through analysis of the kinetics traces and comparison to a control complex without the tyrosine moiety, PCET reactivity was found to proceed through an equilibrium electron transfer followed by proton transfer (ET-PT) pathway in which irreversible deprotonation of the tyrosine radical cation shifts the ET equilibrium, conferring a base dependence on the reaction. Comprehensive kinetics modeling allowed for deconvolution of complex kinetics and determination of rate constants for each elementary step. Across the five pyridine bases explored, spanning a range of 4.2 pK a units, a linear free-energy relationship was found for the proton transfer rate constant with a slope of 0.32. These findings highlight the influence that proton transfer driving force exerts on PCET reaction kinetics.

  13. Self-assembling hydrogels crosslinked solely by receptor-ligand interactions: tunability, rationalization of physical properties, and 3D cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael S; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Chwalek, Karolina; Bornhauser, Martin; Schlierf, Michael; Werner, Carsten; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-02-16

    We report a novel, noncovalent hydrogel system crosslinked solely by receptor-ligand interactions between biotin and avidin. The simple hydrogel synthesis and functionalization together with the widespread use of biotinylated ligands in biosciences make this versatile system suitable for many applications. The gels possess a range of tunable physical properties, including stiffness, lifetime, and swelling. The erosion rates, unexpectedly fast compared to the kinetic parameters for biotin-avidin, are explored in terms of stretching tensions on the polymers, a concept well-known on the single-molecule level, but largely unexplored in supramolecular systems. As proof of utility, the gels were functionalized with different peptide sequences to control human mesenchymal stromal cell morphology in 3D culture. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Using chemical shift perturbation to characterise ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Mike P

    2013-08-01

    Chemical shift perturbation (CSP, chemical shift mapping or complexation-induced changes in chemical shift, CIS) follows changes in the chemical shifts of a protein when a ligand is added, and uses these to determine the location of the binding site, the affinity of the ligand, and/or possibly the structure of the complex. A key factor in determining the appearance of spectra during a titration is the exchange rate between free and bound, or more specifically the off-rate koff. When koff is greater than the chemical shift difference between free and bound, which typically equates to an affinity Kd weaker than about 3μM, then exchange is fast on the chemical shift timescale. Under these circumstances, the observed shift is the population-weighted average of free and bound, which allows Kd to be determined from measurement of peak positions, provided the measurements are made appropriately. (1)H shifts are influenced to a large extent by through-space interactions, whereas (13)Cα and (13)Cβ shifts are influenced more by through-bond effects. (15)N and (13)C' shifts are influenced both by through-bond and by through-space (hydrogen bonding) interactions. For determining the location of a bound ligand on the basis of shift change, the most appropriate method is therefore usually to measure (15)N HSQC spectra, calculate the geometrical distance moved by the peak, weighting (15)N shifts by a factor of about 0.14 compared to (1)H shifts, and select those residues for which the weighted shift change is larger than the standard deviation of the shift for all residues. Other methods are discussed, in particular the measurement of (13)CH3 signals. Slow to intermediate exchange rates lead to line broadening, and make Kd values very difficult to obtain. There is no good way to distinguish changes in chemical shift due to direct binding of the ligand from changes in chemical shift due to allosteric change. Ligand binding at multiple sites can often be characterised, by

  15. Towards accurate free energy calculations in ligand protein-binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecher, Thomas; Labahn, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Cells contain a multitude of different chemical reaction paths running simultaneously and quite independently next to each other. This amazing feat is enabled by molecular recognition, the ability of biomolecules to form stable and specific complexes with each other and with their substrates. A better understanding of this process, i.e. of the kinetics, structures and thermodynamic properties of biomolecule binding, would be invaluable in the study of biological systems. In addition, as the mode of action of many pharmaceuticals is based upon their inhibition or activation of biomolecule targets, predictive models of small molecule receptor binding are very helpful tools in rational drug design. Since the goal here is normally to design a new compound with a high inhibition strength, one of the most important thermodynamic properties is the binding free energy DeltaG(0). The prediction of binding constants has always been one of the major goals in the field of computational chemistry, because the ability to reliably assess a hypothetical compound's binding properties without having to synthesize it first would save a tremendous amount of work. The different approaches to this question range from fast and simple empirical descriptor methods to elaborate simulation protocols aimed at putting the computation of free energies onto a solid foundation of statistical thermodynamics. While the later methods are still not suited for the screenings of thousands of compounds that are routinely performed in computational drug design studies, they are increasingly put to use for the detailed study of protein ligand interactions. This review will focus on molecular mechanics force field based free energy calculations and their application to the study of protein ligand interactions. After a brief overview of other popular methods for the calculation of free energies, we will describe recent advances in methodology and a variety of exemplary studies of molecular dynamics

  16. Photophysical investigation of energy transfer luminescence of lanthanide chelates with aromatic polyaminocarboxylate ligands in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Takashi; Yotsuyanagi, Takao

    1995-01-01

    Some photophysical data including emission lifetimes (τ), total emission quantum yields (Φ), and ligand phosphorescence data are reported for the energy-transfer luminescence of the Eu(III) chelate of Quin 2 and the Tb(III) chelate of BAPTA: Quin 2 means 2-[(2-amino-5-methylphenoxy)methyl]-6-methoxy-8-aminoquinoline-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid; BAPTA means 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid. The energy diagrams for the ligand T 1 and the metal-center f-f levels are proposed. The τ values of Tb(III)-BAPTA chelates are 1.73 ms in H 2 O and 3.44 ms in D 2 O. The Eu(III)-Quin 2 chelate system shows a bi-exponential decay of emission; τ=0.048 and 0.20 ms in H 2 O and 0.066 and 1.44 ms in D 2 O. The Quin 2 chelate is kinetically inert, so that the interchange of these two conformer structures are very slow at room temperature. The number of water molecules in the primary coordination sphere is calculated from the lifetime data to be 1.9-2.4 for Eu-Quin 2 and 0.5 for Tb-BAPTA. The Φ values in aqueous solutions are rather small in these systems; 0.009 for Tb-BAPTA and 0.0023 for Eu-Quin 2, but these are enough counterbalanced by the large molar absorptivities giving the great sensitization factors for the ions; the sensitization factors against each aqua ion are 1380 for Eu-Quin 2 and 1600 for Tb-BAPTA. (author)

  17. Selectivity in Ligand Binding to Uranyl Compounds: A Synthetic, Structural, Thermodynamic and Computational Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-12-06

    The uranyl cation (UO22+) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. We believe that the goal of developing a practical system for uranium separation from seawater will not be attained without new insights into our existing fundamental knowledge of actinide chemistry. We posit that detailed studies of the kinetic and thermodynamic factors that influence interactions between f-elements and ligands with a range of donor atoms is essential to any major advance in this important area. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. We anticipate that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials.

  18. Safety, tolerability, and biomarkers of the treatment of mice with aerosolized toll-like receptor ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria eAlfaro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We have previously discovered a synergistically therapeutic combination of two Toll-like receptor (TLR ligands, an oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN and Pam2CSK4. Aerosolization of these ligands stimulates innate immunity within the lungs to prevent pneumonia from bacterial and viral pathogens. Here we examined the safety and tolerability of this treatment in mice, and characterized the expression of biomarkers of innate immune activation. We found that neutrophils appeared in lung lavage fluid 4 hours after treatment, reached a peak at 48 hours, and resolved by 7 days. The peak of neutrophil influx was accompanied by a small increase in lung permeability. Despite the abundance of neutrophils in lung lavage fluid, only rare neutrophils were visible histopathologically in the interstitium surrounding bronchi and veins and none were visible in alveolar airspaces. The cytokines IL-6, TNF and CXCL2 rose several hundred-fold in lung lavage fluid 4 hours after treatment in a dose-dependent and synergistic manner, providing useful biomarkers of lung activation. IL-6 rose five-fold in serum with delayed kinetics compared to its rise in lavage fluid, and might serve as a systemic biomarker of immune activation of the lungs. The dose-response relationship of lavage fluid cytokines was preserved in mice that underwent myeloablative treatment with cytosine arabinoside to model the treatment of hematologic malignancy. There were no overt signs of distress in mice treated with ODN/Pam2CSK4 in doses up to 8-fold the therapeutic dose, and no changes in temperature, respiratory rate, or behavioral signs of sickness including sugar water preference, food disappearance, cage exploration or social interaction, though there was a small degree of transient weight loss. We conclude that treatment with aerosolized ODN/Pam2CSK4 is well tolerated in mice, and that innate immune activation of the lungs can be monitored by the measurement of inflammatory cytokines in lung lavage

  19. New synthetic routes toward enantiopure nitrogen donor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Xavier; Rodríguez, Anna M; Rodríguez, Montserrat; Romero, Isabel; Parella, Teodor; von Zelewsky, Alexander; Llobet, Antoni; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi

    2006-12-08

    New polypyridylic chiral ligands, having either C3 or lower symmetry, have been prepared via a de novo construction of the pyridine nucleus by means of Kröhnke methodology in the key step. The chiral moieties of these ligands originate from the monoterpen chiral pool, namely (-)-alpha-pinene ((-)-14, (-)-15) and (-)-myrtenal ((-)-9, (-)-10). Extension of the above-mentioned asymmetric synthesis procedure to the preparation of enantiopure derivatives of some commonly used polypyridylic ligands has been achieved through a new aldehyde building block ((-)-16). As an example, the synthesis of a chiral derivative of N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylamine (bpea) ligand, (-)-19, has been performed to illustrate the viability of the method. The coordinative ability of the ligands has been tested through the synthesis and characterization of complexes [Mn((-)-19)Br2], (-)-20, and [RuCl((-)-10)(bpy)](BF4), (-)-21. Some preliminary results related to the enantioselective catalytic epoxidation of styrene with the ruthenium complex are also presented.

  20. A grand unified model for liganded gold clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen Wu; Zhu, Beien; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Gao, Yi

    2016-12-01

    A grand unified model (GUM) is developed to achieve fundamental understanding of rich structures of all 71 liganded gold clusters reported to date. Inspired by the quark model by which composite particles (for example, protons and neutrons) are formed by combining three quarks (or flavours), here gold atoms are assigned three `flavours' (namely, bottom, middle and top) to represent three possible valence states. The `composite particles' in GUM are categorized into two groups: variants of triangular elementary block Au3(2e) and tetrahedral elementary block Au4(2e), all satisfying the duet rule (2e) of the valence shell, akin to the octet rule in general chemistry. The elementary blocks, when packed together, form the cores of liganded gold clusters. With the GUM, structures of 71 liganded gold clusters and their growth mechanism can be deciphered altogether. Although GUM is a predictive heuristic and may not be necessarily reflective of the actual electronic structure, several highly stable liganded gold clusters are predicted, thereby offering GUM-guided synthesis of liganded gold clusters by design.

  1. Receptor-ligand binding sites and virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattotuwagama, Channa K; Davies, Matthew N; Flower, Darren R

    2006-01-01

    Within the pharmaceutical industry, the ultimate source of continuing profitability is the unremitting process of drug discovery. To be profitable, drugs must be marketable: legally novel, safe and relatively free of side effects, efficacious, and ideally inexpensive to produce. While drug discovery was once typified by a haphazard and empirical process, it is now increasingly driven by both knowledge of the receptor-mediated basis of disease and how drug molecules interact with receptors and the wider physiome. Medicinal chemistry postulates that to understand a congeneric ligand series, or set thereof, is to understand the nature and requirements of a ligand binding site. Likewise, structural molecular biology posits that to understand a binding site is to understand the nature of ligands bound therein. Reality sits somewhere between these extremes, yet subsumes them both. Complementary to rules of ligand design, arising through decades of medicinal chemistry, structural biology and computational chemistry are able to elucidate the nature of binding site-ligand interactions, facilitating, at both pragmatic and conceptual levels, the drug discovery process.

  2. Tuning Confinement in Colloidal Silicon Nanocrystals with Saturated Surface Ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neale, Nathan R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Carroll, Gerard [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Limpens, Rens [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-04-16

    The optical properties of silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) are a subject of intense study and continued debate. In particular, Si NC photoluminescence (PL) properties are known to depend strongly on the surface chemistry, resulting in electron-hole recombination pathways derived from the Si NC band-edge, surface-state defects, or combined NC-conjugated ligand hybrid states. In this Letter, we perform a comparison of three different saturated surface functional groups - alkyls, amides, and alkoxides - on nonthermal plasma-synthesized Si NCs. We find a systematic and size-dependent high-energy (blue) shift in the PL spectrum of Si NCs with amide and alkoxy functionalization relative to alkyl. Time-resolved photoluminescence and transient absorption spectroscopies reveal no change in the excited-state dynamics between Si NCs functionalized with alkyl, amide, or alkoxide ligands, showing for the first time that saturated ligands - not only surface-derived charge-transfer states or hybridization between NC and low-lying ligand orbitals - are responsible for tuning the Si NC optical properties. To explain these PL shifts we propose that the atom bound to the Si NC surface strongly interacts with the Si NC electronic wave function and modulates the Si NC quantum confinement. These results reveal a potentially broadly applicable correlation between the optoelectronic properties of Si NCs and related quantum-confined structures based on the interaction between NC surfaces and the ligand binding group.

  3. Tuning Confinement in Colloidal Silicon Nanocrystals with Saturated Surface Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Gerard M; Limpens, Rens; Neale, Nathan R

    2018-05-09

    The optical properties of silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) are a subject of intense study and continued debate. In particular, Si NC photoluminescence (PL) properties are known to depend strongly on the surface chemistry, resulting in electron-hole recombination pathways derived from the Si NC band-edge, surface-state defects, or combined NC-conjugated ligand hybrid states. In this Letter, we perform a comparison of three different saturated surface functional groups-alkyls, amides, and alkoxides-on nonthermal plasma-synthesized Si NCs. We find a systematic and size-dependent high-energy (blue) shift in the PL spectrum of Si NCs with amide and alkoxy functionalization relative to alkyl. Time-resolved photoluminescence and transient absorption spectroscopies reveal no change in the excited-state dynamics between Si NCs functionalized with alkyl, amide, or alkoxide ligands, showing for the first time that saturated ligands-not only surface-derived charge-transfer states or hybridization between NC and low-lying ligand orbitals-are responsible for tuning the Si NC optical properties. To explain these PL shifts we propose that the atom bound to the Si NC surface strongly interacts with the Si NC electronic wave function and modulates the Si NC quantum confinement. These results reveal a potentially broadly applicable correlation between the optoelectronic properties of Si NCs and related quantum-confined structures based on the interaction between NC surfaces and the ligand binding group.

  4. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  5. The affinity of the uranyl ion for nitrogen donor ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, N.V. (Atomic Energy Corp. of South Africa Ltd., Pretoria (South Africa). Dept. of Process Technology); De Sousa, A.S.; Hancock, R.D. (Univ. of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Centre for Molecular Design)

    1992-01-01

    Established ligand design principles are used to predict the solution chemistry of UO[sub 2][sup 2+] with nitrogen donor ligands which do not contain carboxylate donors. pK[sub a]'s of the nitrogen donors are lowered by addition of hydroxylalkyl groups causing UO[sub 2][sup 2+] to have a greater affinity for these ligands than for hydroxide. Potentiometric studies using the ligands N,N,N',N',N''-pentakis(2-hydroxypropyl)-1,4,7-triazaheptane; N,N,N',N',N''-pentakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-1,4,7-triazaheptane; N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxypropyl)1,2-diaminoethane, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane; 1,4,8,11-tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane and N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)glycine with UO[sub 2][sup 2+] showed that UO[sub 2][sup 2+] has a considerable aqueous solution chemistry with these ligands. (orig.).

  6. Selective extraction of trivalent actinides with hard-soft mixed donor ligands: role of intra-ligand synergism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanty, Tapan K.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been given to understand the coordination chemistry of trivalent lanthanide (Ln) and actinide (An) with various ligands because of its close link with the nuclear waste management processes. It is well known that lanthanide-actinide separation is a challenging and difficult task because of very similar chemical properties of these two series of ions, which are associated with similar ionic radii and coordination numbers. Recently, we have introduced a new concept, 'intra-ligand synergism', where hard donor atom, such as, oxygen preferentially binds to trivalent actinides (An(III)) as compared to the valence iso-electronic trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)) in presence of another soft donor centre. In the present work, the conventional concept of selective complexation of actinides with soft donor ligands (either S or N donor) has been modified through exploiting this concept, and thereby the higher selectivity of 1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylamide (PDAM) based ligands, namely PDAM and its isobutyl and decyl derivatives towards Am(III) ion has been predicted theoretically through density functional calculations. Subsequently, several such amide derivatives have been synthesized to optimize the solubility of the ligands in organic phase. Finally, solvent extraction experiments have been carried out to validate the theoretical prediction on the selectivity of oxygen donor ligands towards Am(III) as compared to Eu(III), and a maximum separation factor of about 51 has been achieved experimentally using 2,9-bis(N-decylaminocarbonyl)-1,10-phenanthroline ligand. The separation factor is increased with the decrease in pH, which is very interesting since extraction of the Am 3+ ion is considered to be important under highly acidic conditions from the nuclear waste management point of view. (author)

  7. Conformational diversity of flexible ligand in metal-organic frameworks controlled by size-matching mixed ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, Xiu-Ni; Qin, Lan; Yan, Xiao-Zhi; Yu, Lei; Xie, Yi-Xin; Han, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal reactions of N-auxiliary flexible exo-bidentate ligand 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane (bpp) and carboxylates ligands naphthalene-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (2,6-H_2ndc) or 4,4′-(hydroxymethylene)dibenzoic acid (H_2hmdb), in the presence of cadmium(II) salts have given rise to two novel metal-organic frameworks based on flexible ligands (FL-MOFs), namely, [Cd_2(2,6-ndc)_2(bpp)(DMF)]·2DMF (1) and [Cd_3(hmdb)_3(bpp)]·2DMF·2EtOH (2) (DMF=N,N-Dimethylformamide). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that compound 1 exhibits a three-dimensional self-penetrating 6-connected framework based on dinuclear cluster second building unit. Compound 2 displays an infinite three-dimensional ‘Lucky Clover’ shape (2,10)-connected network based on the trinuclear cluster and V-shaped organic linkers. The flexible bpp ligand displays different conformations in 1 and 2, which are successfully controlled by size-matching mixed ligands during the self-assembly process. - Graphical abstract: Compound 1 exhibits a 3D self-penetrating 6-connected framework based on dinuclear cluster, and 2 displays an infinite 3D ‘Lucky Clover’ shape (2,10)-connected network based on the trinuclear cluster. The flexible 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane ligand displays different conformations in 1 and 2, which successfully controlled by size-matching mixed ligands during the self-assembly process.

  8. Conformational diversity of flexible ligand in metal-organic frameworks controlled by size-matching mixed ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Xiu-Ni; Qin, Lan; Yan, Xiao-Zhi; Yu, Lei; Xie, Yi-Xin; Han, Lei, E-mail: hanlei@nbu.edu.cn

    2015-12-15

    Hydrothermal reactions of N-auxiliary flexible exo-bidentate ligand 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane (bpp) and carboxylates ligands naphthalene-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (2,6-H{sub 2}ndc) or 4,4′-(hydroxymethylene)dibenzoic acid (H{sub 2}hmdb), in the presence of cadmium(II) salts have given rise to two novel metal-organic frameworks based on flexible ligands (FL-MOFs), namely, [Cd{sub 2}(2,6-ndc){sub 2}(bpp)(DMF)]·2DMF (1) and [Cd{sub 3}(hmdb){sub 3}(bpp)]·2DMF·2EtOH (2) (DMF=N,N-Dimethylformamide). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that compound 1 exhibits a three-dimensional self-penetrating 6-connected framework based on dinuclear cluster second building unit. Compound 2 displays an infinite three-dimensional ‘Lucky Clover’ shape (2,10)-connected network based on the trinuclear cluster and V-shaped organic linkers. The flexible bpp ligand displays different conformations in 1 and 2, which are successfully controlled by size-matching mixed ligands during the self-assembly process. - Graphical abstract: Compound 1 exhibits a 3D self-penetrating 6-connected framework based on dinuclear cluster, and 2 displays an infinite 3D ‘Lucky Clover’ shape (2,10)-connected network based on the trinuclear cluster. The flexible 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane ligand displays different conformations in 1 and 2, which successfully controlled by size-matching mixed ligands during the self-assembly process.

  9. Designing multiple ligands - medicinal chemistry strategies and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphy, Richard; Rankovic, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    It has been widely recognised over the recent years that parallel modulation of multiple biological targets can be beneficial for treatment of diseases with complex etiologies such as cancer asthma, and psychiatric disease. In this article, current strategies for the generation of ligands with a specific multi-target profile (designed multiple ligands or DMLs) are described and a number of illustrative example are given. Designing multiple ligands is frequently a challenging endeavour for medicinal chemists, with the need to appropriately balance affinity for 2 or more targets whilst obtaining physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties that are consistent with the administration of an oral drug. Given that the properties of DMLs are influenced to a large extent by the proteomic superfamily to which the targets belong and the lead generation strategy that is pursued, an early assessment of the feasibility of any given DML project is essential.

  10. Evaluation of macrocyclic hydroxyisophthalamide ligands as chelators for zirconium-89.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Nikunj B; Pandya, Darpan N; Xu, Jide; Tatum, David; Magda, Darren; Wadas, Thaddeus J

    2017-01-01

    The development of bifunctional chelators (BFCs) for zirconium-89 immuno-PET applications is an area of active research. Herein we report the synthesis and evaluation of octadentate hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (1 and 2) as zirconium-89 chelators. While both radiometal complexes could be prepared quantitatively and with excellent specific activity, preparation of 89Zr-1 required elevated temperature and an increased reaction time. 89Zr-1 was more stable than 89Zr-2 when challenged in vitro by excess DTPA or serum proteins and in vivo during acute biodistribution studies. Differences in radiometal complex stability arise from structural changes between the two ligand systems, and suggest further ligand optimization is necessary to enhance 89Zr chelation.

  11. Evaluation of macrocyclic hydroxyisophthalamide ligands as chelators for zirconium-89.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikunj B Bhatt

    Full Text Available The development of bifunctional chelators (BFCs for zirconium-89 immuno-PET applications is an area of active research. Herein we report the synthesis and evaluation of octadentate hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (1 and 2 as zirconium-89 chelators. While both radiometal complexes could be prepared quantitatively and with excellent specific activity, preparation of 89Zr-1 required elevated temperature and an increased reaction time. 89Zr-1 was more stable than 89Zr-2 when challenged in vitro by excess DTPA or serum proteins and in vivo during acute biodistribution studies. Differences in radiometal complex stability arise from structural changes between the two ligand systems, and suggest further ligand optimization is necessary to enhance 89Zr chelation.

  12. Ligand screening by saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, V V

    2005-04-26

    NMR based methods to screen for high-affinity ligands have become an indispensable tool for designing rationalized drugs, as these offer a combination of good experimental design of the screening process and data interpretation methods, which together provide unprecedented information on the complex nature of protein-ligand interactions. These methods rely on measuring direct changes in the spectral parameters, that are often simpler than the complex experimental procedures used to study structure and dynamics of proteins. The goal of this review article is to provide the basic details of NMR based ligand-screening methods, with particular focus on the saturation transfer difference (STD) experiment. In addition, we provide an overview of other NMR experimental methods and a practical guide on how to go about designing and implementing them.

  13. Lanthanide and actinide complexation studies with tetradentate 'N' donor ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, A.; Mohapatra, M.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Rawat, N.; Tomar, B.S.; Gadly, T.; Ghosh, S.K.; Manna, D.; Ghanty, T.K.

    2014-01-01

    Because of their similar charge and chemical behaviour separation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides is an important and challenging task in nuclear fuel cycle. Soft (S,N) donor ligands show selectivity towards the trivalent actinides over the lanthanides. Out of various 'N' donor ligands studied, bis(1,2,4)triazinyl bipyridine (BTBP) and bis(1,2,4)triazinyl phenanthroline (BTPhen) were found to be most promising. In order to understand the separation behaviour of these ligands, their complexation studies with these 'f' block elements are essential. In the present work, complexation studies of various lanthanide ions (La 3+ , Eu 3+ and Er 3+ ) was studied with ethyl derivatives of BTBP (C 2 BTBP) and BTBPhen (C 2 BTPhen) and pentyl derivative of BTBP (C 5 BTBP) in acetonitrile medium using UV-Vis spectrophotometry, fluorescence spectroscopy and solution calorimetry. Computational studies were also carried out to understand the experimental results

  14. Analytical developments for screening of lanthanides/ligands interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varenne, F.

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the potential of hyphenated capillary electrophoresis and inductively coupled mass spectrometry to classify different ligands according to their europium binding affinity in a hydro-organic medium. On the one hand, this method enables to evaluate the affinity of phosphorus-containing ligands in less than two hours and using less than 15 ng of ligand. On the other hand, complexation constants could be determined. The results are in excellent agreement with the values obtained by spectrophotometric titrations.Moreover, a library of copolymers for solid/liquid extraction of europium is investigated. The extraction protocol enables to classify copolymers according to their europium affinity in a hydro-organic medium. This screening requires 60 mg of copolymers. For the most promising recognition properties and selectivity La 3+ /Eu 3+ /Lu 3+ are evaluated. (author)

  15. Xanthene and Xanthone Derivatives as G-Quadruplex Stabilizing Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Altieri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Following previous studies on anthraquinone and acridine-based G-quadruplex ligands, here we present a study of similar aromatic cores, with the specific aim of increasing G-quadruplex binding and selectivity with respect to duplex DNA. Synthesized compounds include two and three-side chain xanthone and xanthene derivatives, as well as a dimeric “bridged” form. ESI and FRET measurements suggest that all the studied molecules are good G-quadruplex ligands, both at telomeres and on G-quadruplex forming sequences of oncogene promoters. The dimeric compound and the three-side chain xanthone derivative have been shown to represent the best compounds emerging from the different series of ligands presented here, having also high selectivity for G-quadruplex structures with respect to duplex DNA. Molecular modeling simulations are in broad agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Ligands Exchange Process on Gold Nanoparticles in Acetone Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, C. L.; Mu, Y. Y.; Bian, Z. C.; Luo, Z. H.; Luo, K.; Huang, A. Z.

    2018-05-01

    The ligands exchange process on gold nanoparticles (GNPs) was proceeded by using hydrophobic group (PPh3) and hydrophilic group (THPO) in acetone solution. The FTIR and XPS results demonstrated that part of THPO was replaced by PPh3 which was dissolved in polar solution (acetone); the results were in accordance with the electrochemical analysis where the differential capacity decreased with increasing exchange time. After 12 h, the exchange process terminated and the final ratio of PPh3 and THPO was about 1.4: 1. This ratio remained unchanged although the PPh3 and THPO modified GNPs re-dispersed in the PPh3 acetone solution demonstrating the stable adsorption of both ligands after exchanging for 12 h. The TEM images showed that the gold nanoparticles were self-assembled from scattered to arranged morphology due to the existence of hydrophilic and hydrophobic ligands and led to Janus gold nanoparticles.

  17. A tandem regression-outlier analysis of a ligand cellular system for key structural modifications around ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Ting

    2013-04-30

    A tandem technique of hard equipment is often used for the chemical analysis of a single cell to first isolate and then detect the wanted identities. The first part is the separation of wanted chemicals from the bulk of a cell; the second part is the actual detection of the important identities. To identify the key structural modifications around ligand binding, the present study aims to develop a counterpart of tandem technique for cheminformatics. A statistical regression and its outliers act as a computational technique for separation. A PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma) agonist cellular system was subjected to such an investigation. Results show that this tandem regression-outlier analysis, or the prioritization of the context equations tagged with features of the outliers, is an effective regression technique of cheminformatics to detect key structural modifications, as well as their tendency of impact to ligand binding. The key structural modifications around ligand binding are effectively extracted or characterized out of cellular reactions. This is because molecular binding is the paramount factor in such ligand cellular system and key structural modifications around ligand binding are expected to create outliers. Therefore, such outliers can be captured by this tandem regression-outlier analysis.

  18. Systematic study of ligand structures of metal oxide EUV nanoparticle photoresists

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Jing

    2015-03-19

    Ligand stabilized metal oxide nanoparticle resists are promising candidates for EUV lithography due to their high sensitivity for high-resolution patterning and high etching resistance. As ligand exchange is responsible for the patterning mechanism, we systematically studied the influence of ligand structures of metal oxide EUV nanoparticles on their sensitivity and dissolution behavior. ZrO2 nanoparticles were protected with various aromatic ligands with electron withdrawing and electron donating groups. These nanoparticles have lower sensitivity compared to those with aliphatic ligands suggesting the structures of these ligands is more important than their pka on resist sensitivity. The influence of ligand structure was further studied by comparing the nanoparticles’ solubility for a single type ligand to mixtures of ligands. The mixture of nanoparticles showed improved pattern quality. © (2015) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  19. Nonlinear Kinetics on Lattices Based on the Kinetic Interaction Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Kaniadakis

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Master equations define the dynamics that govern the time evolution of various physical processes on lattices. In the continuum limit, master equations lead to Fokker–Planck partial differential equations that represent the dynamics of physical systems in continuous spaces. Over the last few decades, nonlinear Fokker–Planck equations have become very popular in condensed matter physics and in statistical physics. Numerical solutions of these equations require the use of discretization schemes. However, the discrete evolution equation obtained by the discretization of a Fokker–Planck partial differential equation depends on the specific discretization scheme. In general, the discretized form is different from the master equation that has generated the respective Fokker–Planck equation in the continuum limit. Therefore, the knowledge of the master equation associated with a given Fokker–Planck equation is extremely important for the correct numerical integration of the latter, since it provides a unique, physically motivated discretization scheme. This paper shows that the Kinetic Interaction Principle (KIP that governs the particle kinetics of many body systems, introduced in G. Kaniadakis, Physica A 296, 405 (2001, univocally defines a very simple master equation that in the continuum limit yields the nonlinear Fokker–Planck equation in its most general form.

  20. A kinetics database and scripts for PHREEQC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, B.; Zhang, Y.; Teng, Y.; Zhu, C.

    2017-12-01

    Kinetics of geochemical reactions has been increasingly used in numerical models to simulate coupled flow, mass transport, and chemical reactions. However, the kinetic data are scattered in the literature. To assemble a kinetic dataset for a modeling project is an intimidating task for most. In order to facilitate the application of kinetics in geochemical modeling, we assembled kinetics parameters into a database for the geochemical simulation program, PHREEQC (version 3.0). Kinetics data were collected from the literature. Our database includes kinetic data for over 70 minerals. The rate equations are also programmed into scripts with the Basic language. Using the new kinetic database, we simulated reaction path during the albite dissolution process using various rate equations in the literature. The simulation results with three different rate equations gave difference reaction paths at different time scale. Another application involves a coupled reactive transport model simulating the advancement of an acid plume in an acid mine drainage site associated with Bear Creek Uranium tailings pond. Geochemical reactions including calcite, gypsum, and illite were simulated with PHREEQC using the new kinetic database. The simulation results successfully demonstrated the utility of new kinetic database.

  1. Spectroscopic study of cadmium (II) complexes with heterocyclic dithiocarbamate ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Fontan, S.; Rodriguez-Seoane, P.; Casas, J.S.; Sordo, J.; Jones, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    Cadmium(II) dithiocarbamates [Cd(dtc) 2 ] (dtc=4-carboxamidopiperidine-1-carbodithioate, morpholine-1-carbodithioate or 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-carbodithioate) and [Cd(dtc) 2 ].H 2 O (dtc=4-hydroxypiperidine-1-carbodithioate} have been prepared and characterized by thermal analysis and IR and NMR ( 13 C, 113 Cd) spectrometry. Two of these ligands have previously been shown capable of removing cadmium from its aged in vivo storage sites. The use of solid state 13 C NMR measurements to establish the coordination mode of the dithiocarbomate ligands is also examined and the difficulties which arise are discussed. (orig.)

  2. Contrasting roles for TLR ligands in HIV-1 pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beda Brichacek

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The first line of a host's response to various pathogens is triggered by their engagement of cellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. Binding of microbial ligands to these receptors leads to the induction of a variety of cellular factors that alter intracellular and extracellular environment and interfere directly or indirectly with the life cycle of the triggering pathogen. Such changes may also affect any coinfecting microbe. Using ligands to Toll-like receptors (TLRs 5 and 9, we examined their effect on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 replication in lymphoid tissue ex vivo. We found marked differences in the outcomes of such treatment. While flagellin (TLR5 agonist treatment enhanced replication of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR 5-tropic and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4-tropic HIV-1, treatment with oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN M362 (TLR9 agonist suppressed both viral variants. The differential effects of these TLR ligands on HIV-1 replication correlated with changes in production of CC chemokines CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, and of CXC chemokines CXCL10, and CXCL12 in the ligand-treated HIV-1-infected tissues. The nature and/or magnitude of these changes were dependent on the ligand as well as on the HIV-1 viral strain. Moreover, the tested ligands differed in their ability to induce cellular activation as evaluated by the expression of the cluster of differentiation markers (CD 25, CD38, CD39, CD69, CD154, and human leukocyte antigen D related (HLA-DR as well as of a cell proliferation marker, Ki67, and of CCR5. No significant effect of the ligand treatment was observed on apoptosis and cell death/loss in the treated lymphoid tissue ex vivo. Our results suggest that binding of microbial ligands to TLRs is one of the mechanisms that mediate interactions between coinfected microbes and HIV-1 in human tissues. Thus, the engagement of appropriate TLRs by microbial molecules or their mimetic might become a new strategy for HIV therapy or prevention.

  3. Designer ligands: The search for metal ion selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry T. Kaye

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews research conducted at Rhodes University towards the development of metal-selective ligands. The research has focused on the rational design, synthesis and evaluation of novel ligands for use in the formation of copper complexes as biomimetic models of the metalloenzyme, tyrosinase, and for the selective extraction of silver, nickel and platinum group metal ions in the presence of contaminating metal ions. Attention has also been given to the development of efficient, metal-selective molecular imprinted polymers.

  4. Introducing various ligands into superhalogen anions reduces their electronic stabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smuczyńska, Sylwia; Skurski, Piotr

    2008-02-01

    The vertical electron detachment energies (VDE) of six NaX2- anions (where X = F, Cl, Br) were calculated at the OVGF level with the 6-311++G(3df) basis sets. In all the cases studied the VDE exceeds the electron affinity of chlorine atom and thus those species were classified as superhalogen anions. The largest vertical binding energy was found for the NaF2- system (6.644 eV). The strong VDE dependence on the ligand type, ligand-central atom distance, and the character of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) was observed and discussed.

  5. Long ligands reinforce biological adhesion under shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Aleksey V.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, computer modeling has been used to show that longer ligands allow biological cells (e.g., blood platelets) to withstand stronger flows after their adhesion to solid walls. A mechanistic model of polymer-mediated ligand-receptor adhesion between a microparticle (cell) and a flat wall has been developed. The theoretical threshold between adherent and non-adherent regimes has been derived analytically and confirmed by simulations. These results lead to a deeper understanding of numerous biophysical processes, e.g., arterial thrombosis, and to the design of new biomimetic colloid-polymer systems.

  6. Force loading explains spatial sensing of ligands by cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oria, Roger; Wiegand, Tina; Escribano, Jorge; Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Uriarte, Juan Jose; Moreno-Pulido, Cristian; Platzman, Ilia; Delcanale, Pietro; Albertazzi, Lorenzo; Navajas, Daniel; Trepat, Xavier; García-Aznar, José Manuel; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta Ada; Roca-Cusachs, Pere

    2017-12-01

    Cells can sense the density and distribution of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules by means of individual integrin proteins and larger, integrin-containing adhesion complexes within the cell membrane. This spatial sensing drives cellular activity in a variety of normal and pathological contexts. Previous studies of cells on rigid glass surfaces have shown that spatial sensing of ECM ligands takes place at the nanometre scale, with integrin clustering and subsequent formation of focal adhesions impaired when single integrin-ligand bonds are separated by more than a few tens of nanometres. It has thus been suggested that a crosslinking ‘adaptor’ protein of this size might connect integrins to the actin cytoskeleton, acting as a molecular ruler that senses ligand spacing directly. Here, we develop gels whose rigidity and nanometre-scale distribution of ECM ligands can be controlled and altered. We find that increasing the spacing between ligands promotes the growth of focal adhesions on low-rigidity substrates, but leads to adhesion collapse on more-rigid substrates. Furthermore, disordering the ligand distribution drastically increases adhesion growth, but reduces the rigidity threshold for adhesion collapse. The growth and collapse of focal adhesions are mirrored by, respectively, the nuclear or cytosolic localization of the transcriptional regulator protein YAP. We explain these findings not through direct sensing of ligand spacing, but by using an expanded computational molecular-clutch model, in which individual integrin-ECM bonds—the molecular clutches—respond to force loading by recruiting extra integrins, up to a maximum value. This generates more clutches, redistributing the overall force among them, and reducing the force loading per clutch. At high rigidity and high ligand spacing, maximum recruitment is reached, preventing further force redistribution and leading to adhesion collapse. Measurements of cellular traction forces and actin flow speeds

  7. Thermodynamic basis for cluster kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Lina; Bian, Xiufang; Qin, Xubo

    2006-01-01

    Due to the inaccessibility of the supercooled region of marginal metallic glasses (MMGs) within the experimental time window, we study the cluster kinetics above the liquidus temperature, Tl, to acquire information on the fragility of the MMG systems. Thermodynamic basis for the stability...... of locally ordered structure in the MMG liquids is discussed in terms of the two-order-parameter model. It is found that the Arrhenius activation energy of clusters, h, is proportional to the chemical mixing enthalpy of alloys, Hchem. Fragility of the MMG forming liquids can be described by the ratio...

  8. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  9. Kinetic equations with pairing correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauser, R.

    1995-12-01

    The Gorkov equations are derived for a general non-equilibrium system. The Gorkov factorization is generalized by the cumulant expansion of the 2-particle correlation and by a generalized Wick theorem in the case of a perturbation expansion. A stationary solution for the Green functions in the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism is presented taking into account pairing correlations. Especially the effects of collisional broadening on the spectral functions and Green functions is discussed. Kinetic equations are derived in the quasi-particle approximation and in the case of particles with width. Explicit expressions for the self-energies are given. (orig.)

  10. Kinetic theory of radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, L.K.

    1987-01-01

    To help achieve the quantitative and mechanistic understanding of these processes, the kinetic theory of radiation effects has been developed in the DOE basic energy sciences radiation effects and fusion reactor materials programs, as well as in corresponding efforts in other countries. This discipline grapples with a very wide range of phenomena and draws on numerous sub-fields of theory such as defect physics, diffusion, elasticity, chemical reaction rates, phase transformations and thermodynamics. The theory is cast in a mathematical framework of continuum dynamics. Issues particularly relevant to the present inquiry can be viewed from the standpoints of applications of the theory and areas requiring further progress

  11. Kinetic study of the substitution of [Tc(tu)6]3+ by polyaminocarboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, J.; Gonalez, R.; Kremer, C.; Kremer, E.; Leon, A.

    1997-01-01

    Substitution route has been traditionally proposed for the synthesis of new Tc complexes. In particular, Tc(III) coordination compounds can be successfully prepared by substitution on [Tc(tu) 6 ] 3+ (tu = thiourea). In this substitution reaction, TcO 2 is a side product that should be minimized. The success of these synthetic procedures is based on controlling the reaction conditions in order that pure substitution could be faster enough compared to decomposition. In this work, the substitution of [Tc(tu) 6 ] 3+ by polycarboxylic acids (ethylenediaminetetraacetate (edta), diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (dtpa), N-tris(2-amino-ethyl)amin N', N', N '' , N '' , N ''' , N ''' -hexaacetate (ttaha) and 3-bromo-2,4,6-trimethylacetanilideiminodiacetate (mebrofenin)) is kinetically studied in order to obtain the best conditions for preparing Tc(III) complexes. As a general conclusion, substitution constants are strongly dependent on the pH. k obs values fall in the range 0.1-13 x 10 -2 M -1 s -1 , depending on the pH value and the temperature. No strong differences are found with different incoming ligands. For the four ligands (L), a straight line is obtained when plotting log k obs /([L m- ]) vs. pH. This is consistent with a rate constant k obs = {k 0 + Σk n [H + ] n /K n }[L m- ], where n represents the charge of the incoming ligand and m is the maximum value of n. (orig.)

  12. Coupled metal partitioning dynamics and toxicodynamics at biointerfaces: a theory beyond the biotic ligand model framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Jérôme F L

    2016-04-14

    A mechanistic understanding of the processes governing metal toxicity to microorganisms (bacteria, algae) calls for an adequate formulation of metal partitioning at biointerfaces during cell exposure. This includes the account of metal transport dynamics from bulk solution to biomembrane and the kinetics of metal internalisation, both potentially controlling the intracellular and surface metal fractions that originate cell growth inhibition. A theoretical rationale is developed here for such coupled toxicodynamics and interfacial metal partitioning dynamics under non-complexing medium conditions with integration of the defining cell electrostatic properties. The formalism explicitly considers intertwined metal adsorption at the biointerface, intracellular metal excretion, cell growth and metal depletion from bulk solution. The theory is derived under relevant steady-state metal transport conditions on the basis of coupled Nernst-Planck equation and continuous logistic equation modified to include metal-induced cell growth inhibition and cell size changes. Computational examples are discussed to identify limitations of the classical Biotic Ligand Model (BLM) in evaluating metal toxicity over time. In particular, BLM is shown to severely underestimate metal toxicity depending on cell exposure time, metal internalisation kinetics, cell surface electrostatics and initial cell density. Analytical expressions are provided for the interfacial metal concentration profiles in the limit where cell-growth is completely inhibited. A rigorous relationship between time-dependent cell density and metal concentrations at the biosurface and in bulk solution is further provided, which unifies previous equations formulated by Best and Duval under constant cell density and cell size conditions. The theory is sufficiently flexible to adapt to toxicity scenarios with involved cell survival-death processes.

  13. Preclinical pharmacological study on I-ADAM as a serotonin transporter ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Chunying; Lu Chunxiong; Jiang Quanfu; Zou Meifen; Chen Zhengping; Wang Songpei; Li Xiaomin; Zhang Tongxing; Zhu Junqing; Lin Xiangtong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the new ligand: I-2-( (22( (dimethylamino) methyl) phenyl) thio)-5- iodophenylamine (ADAM) as a serotonin imaging agent. Methods: Biological evaluations were performed in rats and mice. Results: Biodistribution studies in rats showed that the initial uptake of 131 I-ADAM in the brain was high (1.087%ID/organ at 2 min postinjection), and consistently displayed the highest binding (between 60-240 min postinjection) in hypothalamus, a region with the highest density of serotonin transporter (SERT). The specific binding [(TPCB)-1] of 131 I-ADAM in hypothalamus was 2.94, 3.03 and 3.09 at 60, 120 and 240 min postinjection, respectively. The (TPCB)-1 was significantly blocked by pretreatment with Paroxetine, which is known as a serotonin site reuptake inhibitor, while another nonselective competing drug, Ketanserin, showed no blocking effect. The rat brain autoradiography and analysis showed that there was high 131 I-ADAM uptake in hypothalamus, the ratio of hypothalamus/cerebellum was significantly reduced from 7.94 ± 0.39 to 1.30 ± 0.56 by pretreatment with Paroxetine at 60 min postinjection. Blood clearance kinetics was studied in rats, and the initial half-life of 13.79 min and late half-life of 357.14 min were obtained. The kinetic equation was: C=3.6147·e -0.0725t + 1.0413 e -0.0028t . The thyroid uptake was 0.009 and 1.421% ID/organ at 2 min and 120 min postinjection, respectively, suggesting that in vivo deiodination maybe the major route of metabolism. Toxicity trial showed that the dose per kilogram administered to mice was 1000 times greater than that to human beings, assuming a body-weight of 50 kg. Conclusion: These data suggest that 131 I-ADAM may be useful for SPECT imaging of SERT binding sits in the brain. (authors)

  14. Pulse radiolysis of porphyrin and ferriporphyrin solutions in 2-propanol-carbon tetrachloride systems. Protonation and ligand exchange kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brault, D.; Neta, P.

    1983-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis of aqueous and nonaqueous 2-propanol-acetone-carbon tetrachloride mixtures has been investigated by means of conductivity measurements and spectrophotometry. In these solvent mixtures, a pulse of hydrochloric acid originating from either primary events of solvent radiolysis or from further reactions of carbon tetrachloride with radicals derived from 2-propanol and acetone, is produced within ca 100 nanoseconds. Further production of hydrochloric acid occurs as a result of chain reactions involving hydrogen abstraction by CCl 3 or CCl 3 O 2 radicals. These latter radicals appear to be much more reactive and are likely to be involved in the reaction unless the solutions have been thoroughly deoxygenated. Protonation Reactions of porphyrins and ferriporphyrins, which do not react rapidly with the above radicals, were followed by means of spectrophotometric measurements. In turn, these reactions may be used to monitor hydrochloric acid formation. Spectrophotometric measurements on porphyrins corroborate conductivity results, although a quantitative comparison is not feasible because of differences in solvent properties. 6 figures

  15. Dopamine transporter SPECT using fast kinetic ligands: 123I-FP-β-CIT versus 99mTc-TRODAT-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laere, K. van; Ceuninck, L. de; Eynden, J. van den; Dupont, P.; Mortelmans, L.; Dom, R.; Vanbilloen, H.; Cleynhens, J.; Bormans, G.; Verbruggen, A.

    2004-01-01

    A comparative study was carried out on two promising presynaptic dopamine transporter single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) radioligands with a fast pharmacokinetic profile, 123 I-FP-β-CIT (FP) and 99m Tc-TRODAT-1 (TR), in order to assess their differential diagnostic power in early parkinsonism and their sensitivity for detection of disease progression. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 96 patients with early-stage parkinsonism referred in a tertiary clinical setting. Mean disease duration was 2.0±1.3 years, and patients had a modified Hoehn and Yahr (H and Y) stage of 1-2 (average 1.2). Forty-seven patients received TR, and 49 received FP. In both groups, ten patients with normal presynaptic function were included as a control population; all other patients were clinically diagnosed as having idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Groups were matched for gender, age, disease duration and modified H and Y stage. Triple-head gamma camera SPECT was analysed using a semiquantitative index of transporter binding (BI). Discriminant analysis with cross-validation resulted in a maximal classification accuracy for FP of 93% (sensitivity 95% and specificity 86%) for the contralateral putamen BI. For TR, the corresponding values were 87% accuracy, 92% sensitivity and 70% specificity. For FP, disease duration was correlated with both the putamen BI (-8.8%/year, ρ=-0.41, P=0.025) and the putamen/caudate ratio (-7.4%/year, ρ=-0.51, P=0.004), but for TR no significant correlation was found (all P values >0.5). In conclusion, both FP and TR show high sensitivity in a clinically relevant setting, but FP has superior accuracy for early differential diagnosis of idiopathic parkinsonism and non-degenerative extrapyramidal disorders, as well as better sensitivity for disease follow-up. (orig.)

  16. Poly-N-Acetyllactosamine Neo-Glycoproteins as Nanomolar Ligands of Human Galectin-3: Binding Kinetics and Modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bumba, Ladislav; Laaf, D.; Spiwok, V.; Elling, L.; Křen, Vladimír; Bojarová, Pavla

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2018), č. článku 372. E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LTC17005; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015047; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064; GA ČR GC15-02578J Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : carbohydrate * galectin-3 * galectins in diagnosis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.226, year: 2016

  17. Kinetic study reveals weak Fe-binding ligand, which affects the solubility of Fe in the Scheldt estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerringa, L. J. A.; Rijkenberg, M. J. A.; Wolterbeek, H. Th.; Verburg, T. G.; Boye, M.; de Baar, H. J. W.

    2007-01-01

    The chemistry of dissolved Fe(III) was studied in the Scheldt estuary (The Netherlands). Two discrete size fractions of the dissolved bulk (<0.2 mu m and <1 kDa) were considered at three salinities (S = 26, 10 and 0.3). Within the upper estuary, where fresh river water meets seawater, the dissolved

  18. The extraordinary specificity of xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase from Bacillus subtilis elucidated by reaction kinetics, ligand binding, and crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arent, Susan; Kadziola, Anders; Larsen, Sine

    2006-01-01

    Xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (XPRTase) from Bacillus subtilis is a representative of the highly xanthine specific XPRTases found in Gram-positive bacteria. These XPRTases constitute a distinct subclass of 6-oxopurine PRTases, which deviate strongly from the major class of H(X)GPRTases with ...

  19. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor ligand interactions: structural cross talk between ligands and the extracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham M West

    Full Text Available Activation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R in pancreatic β-cells potentiates insulin production and is a current therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Like other class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, the GLP-1R contains an N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. N-terminal truncations on the peptide agonist generate antagonists capable of binding to the extracellular domain, but not capable of activating full length receptor. The main objective of this study was to use Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX to identify how the amide hydrogen bonding network of peptide ligands and the extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R were altered by binding interactions and to then use this platform to validate direct binding events for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands. The HDX studies presented here for two glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R peptide ligands indicates that the antagonist exendin-4[9-39] is significantly destabilized in the presence of nonionic detergents as compared to the agonist exendin-4. Furthermore, HDX can detect stabilization of exendin-4 and exendin-4[9-39] hydrogen bonding networks at the N-terminal helix [Val19 to Lys27] upon binding to the N-terminal extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R. In addition we show hydrogen bonding network stabilization on nGLP-1R in response to ligand binding, and validate direct binding events with the extracellular domain of the receptor for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands.

  20. Gaseous ligand selectivity of the H-NOX sensor protein from Shewanella oneidensis and comparison to those of other bacterial H-NOXs and soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Liu, Wen; Berka, Vladimir; Tsai, Ah-Lim

    2017-09-01

    To delineate the commonalities and differences in gaseous ligand discrimination among the heme-based sensors with Heme Nitric oxide/OXygen binding protein (H-NOX) scaffold, the binding kinetic parameters for gaseous ligands NO, CO, and O 2 , including K D , k on , and k off , of Shewanella oneidensis H-NOX (So H-NOX) were characterized in detail in this study and compared to those of previously characterized H-NOXs from Clostridium botulinum (Cb H-NOX), Nostoc sp. (Ns H-NOX), Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (Tt H-NOX), Vibrio cholera (Vc H-NOX), and human soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), an H-NOX analogue. The K D (NO) and K D (CO) of each bacterial H-NOX or sGC follow the "sliding scale rule"; the affinities of the bacterial H-NOXs for NO and CO vary in a small range but stronger than those of sGC by at least two orders of magnitude. On the other hand, each bacterial H-NOX exhibits different characters in the stability of its 6c NO complex, reactivity with secondary NO, stability of oxyferrous heme and autoxidation to ferric heme. A facile access channel for gaseous ligands is also identified, implying that ligand access has only minimal effect on gaseous ligand selectivity of H-NOXs or sGC. This comparative study of the binding parameters of the bacterial H-NOXs and sGC provides a basis to guide future new structural and functional studies of each specific heme sensor with the H-NOX protein fold. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  1. Piezoresistive microcantilever aptasensor for ricin detection and kinetic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Wei Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Up to now, there has been no report on target molecules detection by a piezoresistive microcantilever aptasensor. In order to evaluate the test performance and investigate the response dynamic characteristics of a piezoresistive microcantilever aptasensor, a novel method for ricin detection and kinetic analysis based on a piezoresistive microcantilever aptasensor was proposed, where ricin aptamer was immobilised on the microcantilever surface by biotin-avidin binding system. Results showed that the detection limit of ricin was 0.04μg L−1 (S/N ≥ 3. A linear relationship between the response voltage and the concentration of ricin in the range of 0.2μg L−1-40μg L−1 was obtained, with the linear regression equation of ΔUe = 0.904C + 5.852 (n = 5, R = 0.991, p < 0.001. The sensor showed no response for abrin, BSA, and could overcome the influence of complex environmental disruptors, indicating high specificity and good selectivity. Recovery and reproducibility in the result of simulated samples (simulated water, soil, and flour sample determination met the analysis requirements, which was 90.5∼95.5% and 7.85%∼9.39%, respectively. On this basis, a reaction kinetic model based on ligand-receptor binding and the relationship with response voltage was established. The model could well reflect the dynamic response of the sensor. The correlation coefficient (R was greater than or equal to 0.9456 (p < 0.001. Response voltage (ΔUe and response time (t0 obtained from the fitting equation on different concentrations of ricin fitted well with the measured values.

  2. Screening small-molecule compound microarrays for protein ligands without fluorescence labeling with a high-throughput scanning microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Yiyan; Landry, James P; Sun, Yungshin; Zhu, Xiangdong; Wang, Xiaobing; Luo, Juntao; Wu, Chun-Yi; Lam, Kit S

    2010-01-01

    We describe a high-throughput scanning optical microscope for detecting small-molecule compound microarrays on functionalized glass slides. It is based on measurements of oblique-incidence reflectivity difference and employs a combination of a y-scan galvometer mirror and an x-scan translation stage with an effective field of view of 2 cm x 4 cm. Such a field of view can accommodate a printed small-molecule compound microarray with as many as 10,000 to 20,000 targets. The scanning microscope is capable of measuring kinetics as well as endpoints of protein-ligand reactions simultaneously. We present the experimental results on solution-phase protein reactions with small-molecule compound microarrays synthesized from one-bead, one-compound combinatorial chemistry and immobilized on a streptavidin-functionalized glass slide.

  3. Synthesis of a [sup 11]C-labeled novel, quinuclidine based ligand for the 5-HT[sub 3] receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopal, S; Diksic, M [Montreal Neurological Inst., PQ (Canada); Francis, B; Burns, H D [Merck Research Labs., West Point, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiopharmacology; Swain, C J [Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Labs., Harlow (United Kingdom). Neuroscience Research Centre

    1992-11-01

    L-683,877, a high affinity, 5-HT[sub 3] selective receptor ligand has been labeled with [sup 11]C for use in PET studies to measure regional brain kinetics of L-683,877 and to determine if [[sup 11]C]L-683,877 can be used for serotonin 5-HT[sub 3] receptor imaging. [[sup 11]C]L-683,877 was prepared by reacting [[sup 11]C]methyl iodide with the desmethyl, borane-protected precursor, L-686,472, in DMF in the presence of tetrabutyl ammonium hydroxide. The average specific activity of [[sup 11]C]L-683,877 was 2700 Ci/mmol and the average radiochemical yield (decay corrected)was 20% at the end of synthesis. (Author).

  4. Effects of subtle differences in ligand constitution and conformation in metallo-supramolecular self-assembled polygons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusilowskij, Boris; Dzyuba, Egor V; Troff, Ralf W; Schalley, Christoph A

    2011-12-07

    3,3'-Bis(pyridin-[n]-ylethynyl)biphenyl (n = 3, 4) and the corresponding 2,2'-bipyridines assemble with (dppp)Pt(II) triflate into metallo-supramolecular polygons. Depending on the position of the terminal pyridine N atoms, the assembly reaction leads to different equilibrium products. With the slow ligand exchange on Pt(II) complexes, the equilibrium is reached on a many-hour time-scale. During the assembly process, larger polygons form under kinetic control. This was confirmed by time-dependent (1)H and (31)P NMR spectroscopy in line with complementary ESI mass spectrometric experiments. The constitutional difference in the pyridine N-atom position is reflected in the tandem mass spectra of the complex ions. In addition, a highly specific fragmentation process of mass-selected M(3)L(3) ions was observed, which proceeds through a ring contraction yielding smaller M(2)L(2) ions.

  5. A kinetic model for hydrodesulfurisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sau, M.; Narasimhan, C.S.L.; Verma, R.P. [Indian Oil Corporation Limited, Research and Development Centre, Faridabad (India)

    1997-07-01

    Due to stringent environmental considerations and related insistence on low sulfur fuels, hydrodesulfurisation has emerged as an important component of any refining scheme globally. The process is used ranging from Naphta/Kerosine hydrotreating to heavy oil hydrotreating. Processes such as Deep gas oil desulfurisation aiming at reduction of sulfur levels to less than 500 ppm have emerged as major players in the scenario. Hydrodesulfurisation (HDS) involves parallel desulfurisation of different organo-sulfur compounds present in the complex petroleum mixtures. In order to design, monitor, optimise and control the HDS reactor, it is necessary to have a detailed, yet simple model which follows the reaction chemistry accurately. In the present paper, a kinetic model is presented for HDS using continuum theory of lumping. The sulfur distribution in the reaction mixture is treated as continuum and parallel reaction networks are devised for kinetic modelling using continuum theory of lumping approach. The model based on the above approach follows the HDS chemistry reasonably well and hence the model parameters are almost feed invariant. Methods are also devised to incorporate heat and pressure effects into the model. The model has been validated based on commercial kero-HDS data. It is found that the model predictions agree with the experimental/commercial data. 17 refs.

  6. Kinetic Profiles in NSTX Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R.E.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Bourdelle, C.; Ernst, D.R.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Gates, D.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Kaye, S.M.; Maingi, R.; Medley, S.; Menard, J.E.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Peng, M.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D.W.; Synakowski, E.J.; Wilson, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a low aspect ratio (R/a approximately 1.3) device with auxiliary heating from neutral-beam injection (NBI) and high-harmonic fast-wave heating (HHFW). Typical NSTX parameters are R(subscript ''0'') = 85 cm, a = 67 cm, I(subscript ''p'') = 0.7-1.4 MA, B(subscript ''phi'') = 0.25-0.45 T. Three co-directed deuterium neutral-beam sources have injected P(subscript ''NB'') less than or equal to 4.7 MW. HHFW plasmas typically have delivered P(subscript ''RF'') less than or equal to 3 MW. Important to the understanding of NSTX confinement are the new kinetic profile diagnostics: a multi-pulse Thomson scattering system (MPTS) and a charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) system. The MPTS diagnostic currently measures electron density and temperature profiles at 30 Hz at ten spatial locations. The CHERS system has recently become available to measure carbon ion temperature and toroidal flow at 17 radial positions spanning the outer half of the minor radius with 20 msec time resolution during NBI. Experiments conducted during the last year have produced a wide range of kinetic profiles in NSTX. Some interesting examples are presented below

  7. Conformational kinetics of aliphatic tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrarini, Alberta; Moro, Giorgio; Nordio, Pier Luigi

    The master equation describing the random walk between sites identified with the stable conformers of a chain molecule, represents the extension to the time domain of the Rotational Isomeric State model. The asymptotic analysis of the multidimensional diffusion equation in the continuous torsional variables subjected to the configurational potential, provides a rigorous justification for the discrete models, and it supplies, without resorting to phenomenological parameters, molecular definitions of the kinetic rates for the conformational transitions occurring at each segment of the chain. The coupling between the torsional variables is fully taken into account, giving rise to cooperative effects. A complete calculation of the specific correlation functions which describe the time evolution of the angular functions probed by N.M.R. and dielectric relaxation measurements, has been performed for alkyl chains attached to a massive core. The resulting behaviour has been compared with the decay of trans and gauche populations of specific bonds, expressed in terms of suitable correlation functions whose time integrals lead quite naturally to the definition of effective kinetic constants for the conformational transitions.

  8. Blood-organ transfer kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrable, K.W.; Chabot, G.E.; French, C.S.; Wrenn, M.E.; Lipsztein, J.; Sasso, T.L.; Durbin, P.W.

    1980-01-01

    Exact and approximate kinetics equations relating to the transfer and elimination of radionuclides from the blood and various organs in the body are presented. These expressions may be used to estimate the instantaneous activity or the total number of disintegrations of a radionuclide in the blood or various organs of reference in the body, hence, also the respective dose rates and doses. The exact kinetics equations may be used to relate measurements of radionuclides in excreta to burdens in the body. They do give better results for exposure intervals long compared to the effective mean lives of the radionuclide in the various organs of reference, and they yield the exact steady state expressions. Fortunately, this condition is often satisfied for the relatively long standard exposure interval of 50 years that is applied to occupational exposure. In addition, the steady state expressions may be used along with metabolic data of the distribution of elements in the body, diet and excreta to estimate values of the rate constants used in both the exact and approximate expressions. A comparison of the exact and approximate expressions is given for the uranium metabolic model of Wrenn et al. and a comparison is made with current ICRP models. (author)

  9. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  10. Numerical Simulation of the Kinetic Critical Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Sanada, Masaaki; Nishioka, Kazumi; Okada, Masahumi; Maksimov, Igor, L.

    1997-01-01

    Our main interest is to see whether the number density indicates a peak at the kinetically stable critical nucleus due to its kinetical stability. We have numerically calculated the time evolution of the number densities of clusters in the case of water vapor nucleation. We employ the condition in which the difference between the size of the thermodynamic crtitical nucleus and that of the kinetic one is appreciable. The results show that the peak does not appear in the number densities of clu...

  11. The effect of the physical properties of the substrate on the kinetics of cell adhesion and crawling studied by an axisymmetric diffusion-energy balance coupled model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi-Dooki, Aref; Shodja, Hossein M; Malekmotiei, Leila

    2015-05-14

    In this paper an analytical approach to study the effect of the substrate physical properties on the kinetics of adhesion and motility behavior of cells is presented. Cell adhesion is mediated by the binding of cell wall receptors and substrate's complementary ligands, and tight adhesion is accomplished by the recruitment of the cell wall binders to the adhesion zone. The binders' movement is modeled as their axisymmetric diffusion in the fluid-like cell membrane. In order to preserve the thermodynamic consistency, the energy balance for the cell-substrate interaction is imposed on the diffusion equation. Solving the axisymmetric diffusion-energy balance coupled equations, it turns out that the physical properties of the substrate (substrate's ligand spacing and stiffness) have considerable effects on the cell adhesion and motility kinetics. For a rigid substrate with uniform distribution of immobile ligands, the maximum ligand spacing which does not interrupt adhesion growth is found to be about 57 nm. It is also found that as a consequence of the reduction in the energy dissipation in the isolated adhesion system, cell adhesion is facilitated by increasing substrate's stiffness. Moreover, the directional movement of cells on a substrate with gradients in mechanical compliance is explored with an extension of the adhesion formulation. It is shown that cells tend to move from soft to stiff regions of the substrate, but their movement is decelerated as the stiffness of the substrate increases. These findings based on the proposed theoretical model are in excellent agreement with the previous experimental observations.

  12. Quantitative Characterization of E-selectin Interaction with Native CD44 and P-selectin Glycoprotein Ligand-1 (PSGL-1) Using a Real Time Immunoprecipitation-based Binding Assay

    KAUST Repository

    Abu Samra, Dina Bashir Kamil; Al Kilani, Alia; Hamdan, Samir; Sakashita, Kosuke; Gadhoum, Samah Z.; Merzaban, Jasmeen

    2015-01-01

    Selectins (E-, P-, and L-selectins) interact with glycoprotein ligands to mediate the essential tethering/rolling step in cell transport and delivery that captures migrating cells from the circulating flow. In this work, we developed a real time immunoprecipitation assay on a surface plasmon resonance chip that captures native glycoforms of two well known E-selectin ligands (CD44/hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1) from hematopoietic cell extracts. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of their binding to E-selectin. We show that both ligands bind recombinant monomeric E-selectin transiently with fast on- and fast off-rates, whereas they bind dimeric E-selectin with remarkably slow onand off-rates. This binding requires the sialyl Lewis x sugar moiety to be placed on both O- and N-glycans, and its association, but not dissociation, is sensitive to the salt concentration. Our results suggest a mechanism through which monomeric selectins mediate initial fast on and fast off kinetics to help capture cells out of the circulating shear flow; subsequently, tight binding by dimeric/oligomeric selectins is enabled to significantly slow rolling. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Quantitative Characterization of E-selectin Interaction with Native CD44 and P-selectin Glycoprotein Ligand-1 (PSGL-1) Using a Real Time Immunoprecipitation-based Binding Assay

    KAUST Repository

    Abu Samra, Dina Bashir Kamil

    2015-06-29

    Selectins (E-, P-, and L-selectins) interact with glycoprotein ligands to mediate the essential tethering/rolling step in cell transport and delivery that captures migrating cells from the circulating flow. In this work, we developed a real time immunoprecipitation assay on a surface plasmon resonance chip that captures native glycoforms of two well known E-selectin ligands (CD44/hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1) from hematopoietic cell extracts. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of their binding to E-selectin. We show that both ligands bind recombinant monomeric E-selectin transiently with fast on- and fast off-rates, whereas they bind dimeric E-selectin with remarkably slow onand off-rates. This binding requires the sialyl Lewis x sugar moiety to be placed on both O- and N-glycans, and its association, but not dissociation, is sensitive to the salt concentration. Our results suggest a mechanism through which monomeric selectins mediate initial fast on and fast off kinetics to help capture cells out of the circulating shear flow; subsequently, tight binding by dimeric/oligomeric selectins is enabled to significantly slow rolling. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Tantalum high-temperature oxidation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigor'ev, Yu.M.; Sarkisyan, A.A.; Merzhanov, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Kinetics of heat release and scale growth during tantalum oxidation within 650-1300 deg C temperature range in oxygen-containing media is investigated. Kinetic equations and temperature and pressure dependences of constants are ound Applicability of the kinetic Lorie mechanism for the description of the tantalum oxidation kinetics applicably to rapid-passing processes is shown. It is stated that the process rate (reaction ability) is determined by adsorption desorption factors on the external surface of the ''protective'' oxide for the ''linear'' oxidation stage [ru

  15. A Guided Inquiry Activity for Teaching Ligand Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brian J.; Graham, Kate J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe a guided inquiry activity for teaching ligand field theory. Previous research suggests the guided inquiry approach is highly effective for student learning. This activity familiarizes students with the key concepts of molecular orbital theory applied to coordination complexes. Students will learn to identify factors that…

  16. Oxahelicene NHC ligands in the asymmetric synthesis of nonracemic helicenes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gay Sánchez, Isabel; Šámal, Michal; Nejedlý, Jindřich; Karras, Manfred; Klívar, Jiří; Rybáček, Jiří; Buděšínský, Miloš; Bednárová, Lucie; Seidlerová, Beata; Stará, Irena G.; Starý, Ivo

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 31 (2017), s. 4370-4373 ISSN 1359-7345 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-29667S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : helicene-based NHC ligands * enantioselective [2+2+2] cycloisomerisation Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 6.319, year: 2016

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest ligand's binding to nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Long; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Li, Zheng-Qiang; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2012-01-01

    The research on the binding process of ligand to pyrazinamidase (PncA) is crucial for elucidating the inherent relationship between resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and PncA's activity. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods were performed to investigate the unbinding process of nicotinamide (NAM) from two PncA enzymes, which is the reverse of the corresponding binding process. The calculated potential of mean force (PMF) based on the steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations sheds light on an optimal binding/unbinding pathway of the ligand. The comparative analyses between two PncAs clearly exhibit the consistency of the binding/unbinding pathway in the two enzymes, implying the universality of the pathway in all kinds of PncAs. Several important residues dominating the pathway were also determined by the calculation of interaction energies. The structural change of the proteins induced by NAM's unbinding or binding shows the great extent interior motion in some homologous region adjacent to the active sites of the two PncAs. The structure comparison substantiates that this region should be very important for the ligand's binding in all PncAs. Additionally, MD simulations also show that the coordination position of the ligand is displaced by one water molecule in the unliganded enzymes. These results could provide the more penetrating understanding of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and be helpful for the development of new antituberculosis drugs.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest ligand's binding to nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Long Zhang

    Full Text Available The research on the binding process of ligand to pyrazinamidase (PncA is crucial for elucidating the inherent relationship between resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and PncA's activity. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD simulation methods were performed to investigate the unbinding process of nicotinamide (NAM from two PncA enzymes, which is the reverse of the corresponding binding process. The calculated potential of mean force (PMF based on the steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulations sheds light on an optimal binding/unbinding pathway of the ligand. The comparative analyses between two PncAs clearly exhibit the consistency of the binding/unbinding pathway in the two enzymes, implying the universality of the pathway in all kinds of PncAs. Several important residues dominating the pathway were also determined by the calculation of interaction energies. The structural change of the proteins induced by NAM's unbinding or binding shows the great extent interior motion in some homologous region adjacent to the active sites of the two PncAs. The structure comparison substantiates that this region should be very important for the ligand's binding in all PncAs. Additionally, MD simulations also show that the coordination position of the ligand is displaced by one water molecule in the unliganded enzymes. These results could provide the more penetrating understanding of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and be helpful for the development of new antituberculosis drugs.

  19. Chelating ligands: enhancers of quality and purity of biogas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality of biogas depends largely on the percentage of methane and hydrogen sulphide gas present. High concentration of hydrogen sulphide results in low quality biogas. This work employed the use of chelating ligands in scrubbing hydrogen sulphide gas while improving the yield of methane gas. Experimental ...

  20. GluR2 ligand-binding core complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasper, C; Lunn, M-L; Liljefors, T

    2002-01-01

    X-ray structures of the GluR2 ligand-binding core in complex with (S)-Des-Me-AMPA and in the presence and absence of zinc ions have been determined. (S)-Des-Me-AMPA, which is devoid of a substituent in the 5-position of the isoxazolol ring, only has limited interactions with the partly hydrophobic...