WorldWideScience

Sample records for lhc including exotic

  1. Pair of Heavy-Exotic-Quarks at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cieza-Montalvo, J E

    2002-01-01

    We study the production and signatures of heavy exotic quarks pairs at LHC in the framework of the vector singlet model (VSM), vector doublet model (VDM) and fermion-mirror-fermion (FMF) model. The pair production cross sections for the electroweak and strong sector are computed.

  2. LHC searches for exotic new particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golling, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    A coherent description of the ATLAS and CMS program of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics (except supersymmetry) is subject of this review. The theoretical motivation for new phenomena and the associated phenomenology are discussed. The search approach and philosophy by the experiments are presented in detail with illustrative examples both from Run-1 and early Run-2 of the LHC. The searches are largely driven by a diverse set of experimental signatures predicted by the various hypotheses of new physics.

  3. Exotic Seesaw-Motivated Heavy Leptons at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kumericki, Kresimir; Radovcic, Branimir

    2011-01-01

    We study the LHC potential for discovering TeV-scale SU(2)_L 5-plet fermions introduced recently to explain small neutrino masses. We show that the Drell-Yan production and the decays of new exotic Sigma leptons are testable at the LHC. Their production is abundant due to nontrivial electroweak gauge charges. For 1 fb^-1 of integrated luminosity at the present LHC sqrt{s}=7 TeV, there can be 270 Sigma-Sigmabar pairs produced for M_Sigma = 400 GeV. Besides producing same-sign dilepton events, they could lead, due to a chosen small mixing between heavy and light leptons, to ~10 golden decays Sigma^{+++}(Sigma^{+++}-bar) --> W^\\pm W^\\pm l^\\pm with a specific decay signature.

  4. Exotic colored scalars at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, Kfir; Frugiuele, Claudia; Nir, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    We study the phenomenology of exotic color-triplet scalar particles $X$ with charge $|Q|=2/3, 4/3,5/3,7/3,8/3$ and $10/3$. If $X$ is a non-singlet of $SU(2)_W$ representation, mass splitting within the multiplet allows for cascade decays of the members into the lightest state. We study examples where the lightest state, in turn, decays into a three-body $W^\\pm jj$ final state, and show that in such case the entire multiplet is compatible with existing direct collider searches and indirect precision tests down to $m_X\\sim250$~GeV. However, bound states $S$, made of $XX^\\dag$ pairs at $m_S\\approx2m_X$, form under rather generic conditions and their decay to diphoton can be the first discovery channel of the model. Furthermore, for $SU(2)_W$-non-singlets, the mode $S\\to W^+W^-$ may be observable and the width of $S\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ and $S\\to jj$ may appear large as a consequence of mass splittings within the $X$-multiplet. As an example we study in detail the case of an $SU(2)_W$ quartet, finding that $m_X\\simeq4...

  5. Exotic μτjj events from heavy ISS neutrinos at the LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Arganda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this letter we study new relevant phenomenological consequences of the right-handed heavy neutrinos with masses at the O(1TeV energy scale, working within the context of the Inverse Seesaw Model that includes three pairs of quasi-degenerate pseudo-Dirac heavy neutrinos. We propose a new exotic signal of these heavy neutrinos at the CERN Large Hadron Collider containing a muon, a tau lepton, and two jets in the final state, which is based on the interesting fact that this model can incorporate large Lepton Flavor Violation for specific choices of the relevant parameters, particularly, the neutrino Yukawa couplings. We will show here that an observable number of μτjj exotic events, without missing energy, can be produced at this ongoing run of the LHC.

  6. 3-3-1 exotic quark search at CERN LEPII-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Coutinho, Y A; Tonasse, M D

    1999-01-01

    The 3-3-1 electroweak model is the simplest chiral extension of the standard model which predicts single and double charged bileptons and exotic quarks carrying -4/3 and 5/3 units of the positron charge. In this paper we study the possibilities of the production and decay of one of these exotic quarks at CERN LEPII-LHC collider. For typical vector bilepton, exotic quark masses and mixing angles we obtained between 20 and 750 events per year. Angular distributions are also presented.

  7. Exotic Physics at the LHC with CASTOR in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Norbeck, Edwin; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Katsas, Panagiotis

    2007-01-01

    If CASTOR does not find events that can be identified with the anomalous cosmic-ray events, this assumption may need to be reconsidered. Pb-Pb collisions with the LHC will have an energy 28 times that of Au-Au collisions studied at RHIC. With this huge increase in energy a wealth of new phenomena is almost assured. Be...

  8. Searches for new exotic phenomena at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Pachal, Katherine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS and CMS detectors have collected about 3 fb^{-1} of proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV centre of mass energy during the 2015 LHC run. Results on searches for resonances decaying into vector bosons or fermions, for vector like quarks, for dark matter, for leptoquarks and for other new phenomena using these data will be presented.

  9. New LUX result compensates LHC searches for exotic quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chuan-Ren

    2016-01-01

    The scenario of the compressed mass spectrum between heavy quark and dark matter is a challenge for LHC searches. However, the elastic scattering cross section between dark matter and nuclei in dark matter direct detection experiments can be enhanced with nearly degenerate masses between heavy quarks and dark matter. In this paper, we illustrate such scenario with a vector dark matter, using the latest result from LUX 2016. The mass constraints on heavy quarks can be more stringent than current limits from LHC, unless the coupling strength is very small. However, the compress mass spectrum with allowed tiny coupling strength makes the decay lifetime of heavy quarks longer than the time scale of QCD hadronization.

  10. Exotic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sigamani, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A selection of results for searches for exotic physics at the LHC are presented. These include a search for massive resonances, dark matter with a high energy jet in association with large missing transverse momentum, long-lived neutral particles, and narrow dijet resonances. The results are based on 20/fb of LHC proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV taken with the CMS detector.

  11. String consistency, heavy exotics, and the 750 GeV diphoton excess at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvetic, Mirjam [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Center for Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Maribor (Slovenia); Halverson, James [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA (United States); Langacker, Paul [School of Natural Science, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States); Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-10-15

    String consistency conditions are stronger than anomaly cancellation and can require the addition of exotics in the visible sector. We study such exotics and demonstrate that they may account for the modest excess at 750 GeV in recent diphoton resonance searches performed by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. In a previous analysis of type II MSSM D-brane quivers we systematically added up to five exotics for the sake of satisfying string consistency conditions. Using this dataset, we demonstrate that 89780 of the 89964 quivers have exotics, 78155 of which include singlets that may couple to MSSM or exotic multiplets with coupling structures governed by U(1) symmetries that are often anomalous. We demonstrate that certain sets of exotics are far preferred over others and study the structure of singlet couplings to heavy exotics carrying standard model charges. Typical possibilities include singlets that may decay to vector-like quarks and/or vector-like leptons and subsequently to two photons. We show that a narrow width diphoton excess can be accounted for while evading existing bounds if multiple exotics are added, with vector-like leptons of mass M{sub L}

  12. How to include fermions into General relativity by exotic smoothness

    CERN Document Server

    Asselmeyer-Maluga, T

    2015-01-01

    This paper is two-fold. At first we will discuss the generation of source terms in the Einstein-Hilbert action by using (topologically complicated) compact 3-manifolds. There is a large class of compact 3-manifolds with boundary: a torus given as the complement of a (thickened) knot admitting a hyperbolic geometry, denoted as hyperbolic knot complements in the following. We will discuss the fermionic properties of this class of 3-manifolds, i.e. we are able to identify a fermion with a hyperbolic knot complement. Secondly we will construct a large class of space-times, the exotic $\\mathbb{R}^{4}$, containing this class of 3-manifolds naturally. We begin with a topological trivial space, the $\\mathbb{R}^{4}$, and change only the differential structure to obtain many nontrivial 3-manifolds. It is known for a long time that exotic $\\mathbb{R}^{4}$'s generate extra sources of gravity (Brans conjecture) but here we will analyze the structure of these source terms more carefully. Finally we will state that adding a...

  13. Exotic heavy leptons predicted by extended models at the CERN LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cieza-Montalvo, J E; 10.1103/PhysRevD.66.055003

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the production, signatures, and backgrounds of a pair of heavy-exotic charged leptons and a heavy-exotic neutrino in association with the exotic charged lepton in the framework of the vector singlet model, vector doublet model, and fermion-mirror- fermion model, at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We show that the cross sections for the production of a pair of heavy exotic leptons are competitive with the ones for the single production of exotic leptons.

  14. Combination of Run-1 exotic searches in diboson final states at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, F. [University of Edinburgh,Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Gadatsch, S. [CERN,Geneva (Switzerland); Gouzevich, M. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS-IN2P3,Villeurbanne (France); Leonidopoulos, C. [University of Edinburgh,Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Novaes, S.F. [Universidade Estadual Paulista,Sao Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, A. [Università di Padova e INFN - Sezione di Padova,Padova (Italy); Pierini, M. [CERN,Geneva (Switzerland); Tomei, T. [Universidade Estadual Paulista,Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-04-26

    We perform a statistical combination of the ATLAS and CMS results for the search of a heavy resonance decaying to a pair of vector bosons with the √s=8 TeV datasets collected at the LHC. We take into account six searches in hadronic and semileptonic final states carried out by the two collaborations. We consider only public information provided by ATLAS and CMS in the HEPDATA database and in papers published in refereed journals. We interpret the combined results within the context of a few benchmark new physics models, such as models predicting the existence of a W{sup ′} or a bulk Randall-Sundrum spin-2 resonance, for which we present exclusion limits, significances, p-values and best-fit cross sections. A heavy diboson resonance with a production cross section of ∼4–5 fb and mass between 1.9 and 2.0 TeV is the exotic scenario most consistent with the experimental results. Models in which a heavy resonance decays preferentially to a WW final state are disfavoured.

  15. Combination of Run-1 Exotic Searches in Diboson Final States at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, Flavia; Gouzevich, Maxime; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Novaes, Sergio; Oliveira, Alexandra; Pierini, Maurizio; Tomei, Thiago

    2016-01-01

    We perform a statistical combination of the ATLAS and CMS results for the search of a heavy resonance decaying to a pair of vector bosons with the $\\sqrt{s}=8$~TeV datasets collected at the LHC. We take into account six searches in hadronic and semileptonic final states carried out by the two collaborations. We consider only public information provided by ATLAS and CMS in the HEPDATA database and in papers published in refereed journals. The results are interpreted within the context of a few benchmark new physics models, such as models predicting the existence of a \\PWp or a bulk Randall-Sundum spin--2 resonance. We present exclusion limits, $z$-values, $p$-values and best-fit cross sections in different model interpretations for the combined results. Out of several benchmark exotic models considered in this study, a heavy resonance with a production cross section of $\\sim$5~fb and mass between 1.9 and 2.0 TeV is the scenario most consistent with the experimental results. Models in which a heavy resonance de...

  16. Combination of Run-1 exotic searches in diboson final states at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, F.; Gadatsch, S.; Gouzevich, M.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Novaes, S. F.; Oliveira, A.; Pierini, M.; Tomei, T.

    2016-04-01

    We perform a statistical combination of the ATLAS and CMS results for the search of a heavy resonance decaying to a pair of vector bosons with the √{s}=8 TeV datasets collected at the LHC. We take into account six searches in hadronic and semileptonic final states carried out by the two collaborations. We consider only public information provided by ATLAS and CMS in the HEPDATA database and in papers published in refereed journals. We interpret the combined results within the context of a few benchmark new physics models, such as models predicting the existence of a W' or a bulk Randall-Sundrum spin-2 resonance, for which we present exclusion limits, significances, p-values and best-fit cross sections. A heavy diboson resonance with a production cross section of ˜4-5 fb and mass between 1.9 and 2.0 TeV is the exotic scenario most consistent with the experimental results. Models in which a heavy resonance decays preferentially to a WW final state are disfavoured.

  17. Combination of Run-1 Exotic Searches in Diboson Final States at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, Flavia; Gouzevich, Maxime; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Novaes, Sergio; Oliveira, Alexandra; Pierini, Maurizio; Tomei, Thiago

    2016-01-01

    We perform a statistical combination of the ATLAS and CMS results for the search of a heavy resonance decaying to a pair of vector bosons with the $\\sqrt{s}=8$~TeV datasets collected at the LHC. We take into account six searches in hadronic and semileptonic final states carried out by the two collaborations. We consider only public information provided by ATLAS and CMS in the HEPDATA database and in papers published in refereed journals. The results are interpreted within the context of a few benchmark new physics models, such as models predicting the existence of a \\PWp or a bulk Randall-Sundum spin--2 resonance. We present exclusion limits, $z$-values, $p$-values and best-fit cross sections in different model interpretations for the combined results. Out of several benchmark exotic models considered in this study, a heavy resonance with a production cross section of $\\sim$5~fb and mass between 1.9 and 2.0 TeV is the scenario most consistent with the experimental results. Models in which a heavy resonance de...

  18. Including the introduction of exotic species in life cycle impact assessment: the case of inland shipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafiah, Marlia M; Leuven, Rob S E W; Sommerwerk, Nike; Tockner, Klement; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2013-12-17

    While the ecological impact of anthropogenically introduced exotic species is considered a major threat for biodiversity and ecosystems functioning, it is generally not accounted for in the environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) of products. In this article, we propose a framework that includes exotic species introduction in an LCA context. We derived characterization factors for exotic fish species introduction related to the transport of goods across the Rhine-Main-Danube canal. These characterization factors are expressed as the potentially disappeared fraction (PDF) of native freshwater fish species in the rivers Rhine and Danube integrated over space and time per amount of goods transported (PDF·m(3)·yr·kg(-1)). Furthermore, we quantified the relative importance of exotic fish species introduction compared to other anthropogenic stressors in the freshwater environment (i.e., eutrophication, ecotoxicity, greenhouse gases, and water consumption) for transport of goods through the Rhine-Main-Danube waterway. We found that the introduction of exotic fish species contributed to 70-85% of the total freshwater ecosystem impact, depending on the distance that goods were transported. Our analysis showed that it is relevant and feasible to include the introduction of exotic species in an LCA framework. The proposed framework can be further extended by including the impacts of other exotic species groups, types of water bodies and pathways for introduction.

  19. Enhanced scope of a Phase 2 CMS detector for the study of exotic physics signatures at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) run, which is due to start in 2025, is expected to collect an integrated luminosity of approximately $3000~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=14~\\mathrm{TeV}$. The discovery and study of physics beyond the standard model will remain one of the major goals of the CMS collaboration during this period. Such physics can yield exotic signatures, whose observation places unusual demands on the performance and capabilities of the detector. For a few selected exotic physics models, we present studies of what can be achieved using CMS data during the HL-LHC run. We look at how this potential is influenced by the design of the upgraded CMS detector, as documented in the $\\mathrm{phase~2}$ technical proposal. This document provides supplementary material for a deeper level of understanding of these studies. In the case of a high mass resonance decaying to leptons, we explore the hypothesis that this is discovered prior to 2025, and examine what would be learned about the resonance's properti...

  20. LHC as an Axion Factory: Probing an Axion Explanation for (g -2 )μ with Exotic Higgs Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Martin; Neubert, Matthias; Thamm, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    We argue that a large region of so-far unconstrained parameter space for axionlike particles (ALPs), where their couplings to the standard model are of order (0.01 - 1 ) TeV-1 , can be explored by searches for the exotic Higgs decays h →Z a and h →a a in run 2 of the LHC. Almost the complete region in which ALPs can explain the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon can be probed by searches for these decays with subsequent decay a →γ γ , even if the relevant couplings are loop suppressed and the a →γ γ branching ratio is less than 1.

  1. Production of the exotic 1(--) hadrons ϕ(2170), X(4260), and Y(b)(10890) at the LHC and Tevatron via the Drell-Yan mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed; Wang, Wei

    2011-05-13

    We calculate the Drell-Yan production cross sections and differential distributions in the transverse momentum and rapidity of the J(PC) = 1(--) exotic hadrons ϕ(2170), X(4260), and Y(b)(10890) at the LHC and the Tevatron. These hadrons are tetraquark (four-quark) candidates, with a hidden ss, cc, and bb quark pair, respectively. In deriving the distributions, we include the order α(s) QCD corrections, resum the large logarithms in the small transverse momentum region in the impact-parameter formalism, and use the state of the art parton distribution functions. Production rates for the processes pp(p) → ϕ(2170)× (→ ϕ(1020)π+ π- → K+ K- π+ π-) +…, pp(p) → X(4260)(→J/ψπ+ π- → μ+ μ- π+ π-)+…, and pp(p) → Y(b)(10890)(→ Υ(1S,2S,3S)π+ π- → μ+ μ- π+ π-) +… are presented. Their measurements will help in understanding the dynamics of these exotic hadrons.

  2. Exotic particles at the LHC. Production via the Higgs portal and WIMP dark matter searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hessler, Andre Georg

    2016-09-05

    This thesis addresses two different aspects of the search for Physics Beyond the Standard Model at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). First, and motivated by the recent discovery of a new interaction mediated by the Higgs boson, we systematically analyze the impact of the Higgs interaction on the production of new particles at the LHC. Second, we investigate the collider signatures of long-lived particles decaying into leptons and invisible energy, and which are predicted to exist in a class of neutrino mass models with a weakly interacting dark matter particle.

  3. Search for new exotic phenomena with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Igonkina, Olga; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The LHC is running since 2015 at a centre of mass energy of 13 TeV and the ATLAS detector has collected data efficiently during this time. This new energy opens a large window for searches beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. Results on searches for resonances decaying into vector boson or fermions, for vector like quarks, for dark matter, for leptoquarks and for other new phenomena using these data will be presented.

  4. Application of Grid technologies and search for exotics physics with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    March, Luis; Ros, Eduardo

    The work presented in this thesis has been performed within the ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) collaboration. Two subjects have been investigated. One subject is the Computing System Commissioning (CSC) production using an instance of the Production System (ProdSys), called Lexor, and the test of the ATLAS Distributed Analysis (ADA) using ProdSys. The other subject is the sim- ulation and subsequent analysis of processes involving new particles predicted by the Little Higgs model within the ATLAS detector. An introduction to the Standard Model (SM), the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the ATLAS experiment, software and computing is given in chapter 1. The problems of the SM are discussed and some proposed solutions are reviewed. The SM introduction is followed by an overview of LHC and ATLAS. The main AT- LAS subsystems are described and the ATLAS software and computing model is discussed. Many physics processes within and beyond the Standard Model involve b-quark decays. New heavy particles, expected in mo...

  5. Investigation of baryons with strangeness and search for weakly decaying exotics with ALICE at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dönigus, Benjamin; Braun-Munzinger, P

    Within this work data are analysed which have been taken with the ALICE apparatus (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The unique properties and the excellent performance of the LHC made it possible to take data for proton-proton collisions (pp) in the last three years at several center-of-mass energies (0.9 TeV, 2.36 TeV, 2.76 TeV, 7 TeV and 8 TeV). It was further possible to aquire data in two of the three years of lead–lead collisions (Pb–Pb) at sqrt(s_NN) = 2.76TeV and recently a short pilot run of proton–lead collisions (pPb) at sqrt(s_NN) = 5.01TeV was recorded. It will be continued as a full run in January/February this year. The high energies and at the same time low baryo-chemical potential (mu_B around 0) in Pb–Pb collisions at the LHC allow the production of strangeness, charm and bottom quarks in up to now unseen quantities. The particles created, either in the initial hard collision (charm and bottom) or in the quark-gluon plasma, end up in hadrons or ligh...

  6. Strategy and issues for the LHC upgrades and fair, including longer-term prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    This report discusses the time line, goals and key ingredients for the next ten years of LHC operation, including injector upgrade, for the following High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), and for the FAIR project. Results from pertinent EuCARD-WP4 workshops on optics, space charge, crab cavities, crystal collimation, and electron cloud are summarized in this context. A Large Hadron electron Collider, LHeC, would be an additional upgrade, further expanding the physics scope of the LHC, to eventually include both ep and γγ Higgs factories (LHeC-HF and SAPPHiRE). Results from relevant topical WP4 workshops are highlighted. The development of magnet and cable technology based on Nb3Sn, and HTS, for the HL-LHC prepares the ground for a future higher-energy hadron collider, either in the LHC tunnel, “HELHC” (33 TeV c.m.), or in a new 80- or 100-km tunnel, “VHE-LHC” (100 TeV c.m.). A large new tunnel could also host an ultimate highest-precision e+e- Higgs factory collider, “TLEP,” exhibiting many synergies an...

  7. Production of the exotic 1{sup --} hadrons {phi}(2170), X(4260) and Y{sub b}(10890) at the LHC and Tevatron via the Drell-Yan mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed; Wang, Wei

    2011-03-15

    We calculate the Drell-Yan production cross sections and differential distributions in the transverse momentum and rapidity of the J{sup PC}=1{sup --} exotic hadrons {phi}(2170), X(4260) and Y{sub b}(10890) at the hadron colliders LHC and the Tevatron. These hadrons are tetraquark (four-quark) candidates, with a hidden s anti s, c anti c and b anti b quark pair, respectively. In deriving the distributions and cross sections, we include the order {alpha}{sub s} QCD corrections, resum the large logarithms in the small transverse momentum region in the impact-parameter formalism, and use the state of the art parton distribution functions. Taking into account the data on the production and decays of these vector hadrons from the e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments, we present the production rates for the processes pp(anti p){yields} {phi}(2170)({yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})+.., pp(anti p){yields} X(4260)({yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})+.., and pp(anti p){yields} Y{sub b}(10890)({yields} ({upsilon}(1S), {upsilon}(2S), {upsilon}(3S)){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})+.. Their measurements at the hadron colliders will provide new experimental avenues to explore the underlying dynamics of these hadrons. (orig.)

  8. Theory Motivation For Exotic Signatures: Prospects and Wishlist for Run II

    OpenAIRE

    Stolarski, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Here I give some motivations for exotic signatures to search for at Run II of the LHC, focusing on displaced phenomena. I will discuss signatures arising from various different kinds of models including theories of dark matter and those with exotic decays of the Higgs.

  9. Other Exotic States in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Yanjun; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Many theories beyond the Standard Model (BSM) predict new phenomena accessible by the LHC. Searches for new physics models are performed using the ATLAS experiment at the LHC focusing on exotic signatures that can cover serval BSM theories. The results reported here use the pp collision data sample collected in 2015 and 2016 by the ATLAS detector at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  10. QCD Exotics

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, Stephen Lars

    2014-01-01

    QCD-motivated models for hadrons predict an assortment of "exotic" hadrons that have structures that are more complex then the quark-antiquark mesons and three-quark baryons of the original quark-parton model. These include pentaquark baryons, the six-quark H-dibaryon, and tetra-quark, hybrid, and glueball mesons. Despite extensive experimental searches, no unambiguous candidates for any of these exotic configurations have yet to be identified. On the other hand, a number of meson states, one that seems to be a proton-antiproton bound state, and others that contain either charmed-anticharmed quark pairs or bottom-antibottom quark pairs, have been recently discovered that neither fit into the quark-antiquark meson picture nor match the expected properties of the QCD-inspired exotics. Here I briefly review results from a recent search for the H-dibaryon, and discuss some properties of the newly discovered states --the so-called XYZ mesons-- and compare them with expectations for conventional quark-antiquark mes...

  11. Exotic hadrons from heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sungtae; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Maeda, Saori; Miyahara, Kenta; Morita, Kenji; Nielsen, Marina; Ohnishi, Akira; Sekihara, Takayasu; Song, Taesoo; Yasui, Shigehiro; Yazaki, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    High energy heavy ion collisions are excellent ways for producing heavy hadrons and composite particles, including the light (anti)nuclei. With upgraded detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it has become possible to measure hadrons beyond their ground states. Therefore, heavy ion collisions provide a new method for studying exotic hadrons that are either molecular states made of various hadrons or compact system consisting of multiquarks. Because their structures are related to the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), studying exotic hadrons is currently one of the most active areas of research in hadron physics. Experiments carried out at various accelerator facilities have indicated that some exotic hadrons may have already been produced. The present review is a summary of the current understanding of a selected set of exotic particle candidates that can be potentially measured in heavy ion collisions. It also includes discussions on the production of resonances, exotics and hadronic molecular states in these collisions based on the coalescence model and the statistical model. A more detailed discussion is given on the results from these models, leading to the conclusion that the yield of a hadron that is a compact multiquark state is typically an order of magnitude smaller than if it is an excited hadronic state with normal quark numbers or a loosely bound hadronic molecule. Attention is also given to some of the proposed heavy exotic hadrons that could be produced with sufficient abundance in heavy ion collisions because of the significant numbers of charm and bottom quarks that are produced at RHIC and even larger numbers at LHC, making it possible to study them in these experiments. Further included in the discussion are the general formalism for the coalescence model that involves resonance particles and its implication on the present estimated yield for resonance production. Finally

  12. Search for exotic Higgs boson decays at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, Nabarun

    2017-01-01

    A summary of recent results of direct searches for exotic decays of the 125 GeV Higgs boson is presented. The searches presented include lepton flavor violating (LFV) Higgs decay searches followed by searches for invisible Higgs decays. These searches were done with data collected by the CMS detector at the LHC in 2015 and 2016 at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  13. Search for exotic phenomena at the CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazana Małgorzata

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Signs of physics beyond the Standard Model are widely searched for in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC. We review results of exotic physics searches based on 20 fb−1 of data collected in 2012 by the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS detector at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. Selected benchmark analyses are presented, including searches in topologies with leptons, photons and jets, as well as a description of techniques to identify the production of exotic objects such as massive long-lived charged particles. No statistically-significant excess of events is observed in the data, therefore results are presented in terms of exclusion limits on the mass and the production cross section of hypothetical particles.

  14. Operational beams for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Papaphilippou, Y; Rumolo, G; Manglunki, D

    2014-01-01

    The variety of beams, needed to set-up in the injectors as requested in the LHC, are reviewed, in terms of priority but also performance expectations and reach during 2015. This includes the single bunch beams for machine commissioning and measurements (probe, Indiv) but also the standard physics beams with 50 ns and 25 ns bunch spacing and their high brightness variants using the Bunch Compression Merging and Splitting (BCMS) scheme. The required parameters and target performance of special beams like the doublet for electron cloud enhancement and the more exotic 8b$\\oplus$4e beam, compatible with some post-scrubbing scenarios are also described. The progress and plans for the LHC ion production beams during 2014-2015 are detailed. Highlights on the current progress of the setting up of the various beams are finally presented with special emphasis on potential performance issues across the proton and ion injector chain.

  15. ATLAS Exotic Searches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bousson Nicolas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the outstanding performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC that delivered more than 2 fb−1 of proton-proton collision data at center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, the ATLAS experiment has been able to explore a wide range of exotic models trying to address the questions unanswered by the Standard Model of particle physics. Searches for leptoquarks, new heavy quarks, vector-like quarks, black holes, hidden valley and contact interactions are reviewed in these proceedings.

  16. Exotic Mammal Laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladakovic, Izidora; Divers, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopy is an evolving field in veterinary medicine, and there is an increased interest in using laparoscopic techniques in nondomestic mammals, including zoo animals, wildlife, and exotic pets. The aim of this article is to summarize the approach to laparoscopic procedures, including instrumentation, patient selection and preparation, and surgical approaches, and to review the current literature on laparoscopy in exotic mammals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. From the LHC to Future Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J.; /CERN; Grojean, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Jakobs, K.; /Freiburg U.; Weiglein, G.; /Durham U., IPPP; Azuelos, G.; /TRIUMF; Dawson, S.; /Brookhaven; Gripaios, B.; /CERN; Han, T.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Hewett, J.; /SLAC; Lancaster, M.; /University Coll. London; Mariotti, C.; /INFN, Turin; Moortgat, F.; /Zurich, ETH; Moortgat-Pick, G.; /Durham U., IPPP; Polesello, G.; /INFN, Pavia; Riemann, S.; /DESY; Assamagan, K.; /Brookhaven; Bechtle, P.; /DESY; Carena, M.; /Fermilab; Chachamis, G.; /PSI, Villigen /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /INFN, Florence /Bonn U. /CERN /Bonn U. /Freiburg U. /Oxford U. /Louvain U., CP3 /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /INFN, Milan Bicocca /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Frascati /Fermilab /Warsaw U. /Florida U. /Orsay, LAL /LPSC, Grenoble /Warsaw U. /Yale U. /Stockholm U., Math. Dept. /Durham U., IPPP /DESY /Rome U. /University Coll. London /UC, San Diego /Heidelberg U. /Florida State U. /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins /McGill U. /Durham U., IPPP; /more authors..

    2010-06-11

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, theWorking Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions.

  18. From the LHC to future colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Roeck, A.; Assamagan, K.; Ellis, J.; Grojean, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; Jakobs, K.; Weiglien, G.; Well, J.; Azuelos, G.; Dawson, S.; Gripaios, B.; Han, T.; Hewett, J.; Lancaster, M.; Mariotti, C.; Moortgat, F.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Polesello, G.; Riemann, S.; Schumacher, M.; Bechtle, P.; Carena, M.; Chachamis, G.; Chen, K.F.; De Curtis, S.; Desch, K.; Dittmar, M.; Dreiner, H.; Duhrssen, M.; Foster, B.; Frandsen, M.T.; Giammanco, A.; Godbole, R.; Gopalakrishna, S.; Govoni, P.; Gunion, J.; Hollik, W.; Hou, W.S.; Isidori, G.; Juste, A.; Kalinowski, J.; Korytov, A.; Kou, E.; Kraml, S.; Krawczyk, M.; Martin, A.; Milstead, D.; Morton-Thurtle, V.; Moenig, K.; Mele, B.; Ozcan, E.; Pieri, M.; Plehn, T.; Reina, L.; Richter-Was, E.; Rizzo, T.; Rolbiecki, K.; Sannino, F.; Schram, M.; Smillie, J.; Sultansoy, S.; Tattersall, J.; Uwer, P., Webber, B.; and Wienemann, P.

    2010-03-02

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, the Working Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions.

  19. The LHC is safe

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Concerns have been expressed from time to time about the safety of new high-energy colliders, and the LHC has been no exception. The LHC Safety Assessment Group (LSAG)(*) was asked last year by the CERN management to review previous LHC safety analyses in light of additional experimental results and theoretical understanding. LSAG confirms, updates and extends previous conclusions that there is no basis for any conceivable threat from the LHC. Indeed, recent theoretical and experimental developments reinforce this conclusion. In this Colloquium, the basic arguments presented by LSAG will be reviewed. Cosmic rays of much higher effective centre-of-mass energies have been bombarding the Earth and other astronomical objects for billions of years, and their continued existence shows that the Earth faces no dangers from exotic objects such as hypothetical microscopic black holes that might be produced by the LHC - as discussed in a detailed paper by Giddings and Mangano(**). Measurements of strange particle produc...

  20. How to Find a Hidden World at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Wells, James D

    2008-01-01

    I discuss how the Large Hadron Collider era should broaden our view of particle physics research, and apply this thinking to the case of Hidden Worlds. I focus on one of the simplest representative cases of a Hidden World, and detail the rich implications it has for LHC physics, including universal suppression of Higgs boson production, trans-TeV heavy Higgs boson signatures, heavy-to-light Higgs boson decays, weakly coupled exotic gauge bosons, and Higgs boson decays to four fermions via light exotic gauge bosons. Some signatures may be accessible in the very early stages of collider operation, whereas others motivate a later high-lumonosity upgrade.

  1. A malacological survey in the Manso Power Plant, State of Mato Grosso, Brazil: new records of freshwater snails, including transmitters of schistosomiasis and exotic species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Ammon Fernandez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease of public health concern in Brazil, and the construction of hydroelectric dams, in addition to increasing permanent human settlement and tourism, has created conditions suitable for the establishment of mollusks that can transmit schistosomiasis. Such areas require a number of actions to prevent the establishment of schistosomiasis. This paper reports on a freshwater malacological survey carried out in the geographical area of the Manso Power Plant. Methods Mollusks were collected in 18 municipalities in the State of Mato Grosso between February 2002 and February 2004 (qualitative study and from April 2009 to February 2011 (quantitative study. Results Thirty-one species of mollusks were collected, including newly recorded species (Antillorbis nordestensis and Burnupia ingae. In addition, the geographic distributions of known species, including Biomphalaria straminea, a snail vector of Schistosoma mansoni, were expanded. A total of 4,507 specimens were collected in the APM Manso reservoir (Usina Hidrelétrica de Aproveitamento Múltiplo de Manso during the quantitative study, and Biomphalaria amazonica was found in six of the 10 localities analyzed. The Afroasiatic species Melanoides tuberculata, introduced after February 2009, was the dominant species (relative abundance 94.96%. Conclusions The study area is epidemiologically important due to the occurrence of B. straminea and B. amazonica, which are vectors of schistosomiasis, and M. tuberculata, a snail host of Centrocestus formosanus, which is responsible for centrocestiasis transmission. Observations of M. tuberculata and the exotic freshwater clams Corbicula fluminea and Corbicula largillierti raise concerns about biodiversity.

  2. Exotic Meson Searches at CMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgut, Suleyman; CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Exotic meson spectroscopy searches at the LHC yielded interesting results. Using an integrated luminosity of 25 . 6fb-1 recorded in proton-proton collisions at √{ 7} TeV and √{ 8} TeV, CMS searched for enhancements in multi-lepton final states in the mass range below the ϒ(1 S) ϒ(1 S) mass. Results will be presented and discussed.

  3. Exotic spectroscopy and decays: prospects for colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Domenech-Garret, J. L. (Juan Luis)

    2011-01-01

    In addition to well-motivated scenarios like supersymmetric particles, the so-called exotic matter (quirky matter, hidden valley models, etc.) can show up at the LHC and ILC, by exploring the spectroscopy of high mass levels and decay rates. In this paper we use QCD-inspired potential models, though without resorting to any particular one, to calculate level spacings of bound states and decay rates of the aforementioned exotic matter in order to design discovery strategies. We mainly focus on...

  4. Are Centauros exotic signals of the QGP?

    CERN Document Server

    Gladysz-Dziadus, E

    2001-01-01

    The exotic cosmic ray events are reviewed. Theoretical attempts to explain the Centauro-like phenomena are summarized. Results of accelerator experiments looking for Centauro-related objects are discussed. The discussion is completed with an overview of the current and future collider experiments at RHIC and LHC. In particular the CASTOR detector, dedicated to Centauro and strange objects research in heavy ion collisions at the LHC energies is presented.

  5. Searches for rare and exotic Higgs decays with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Prokoshin, Fedor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The HL-LHC will provide the opportunity to search for many rare and exotic decays of the 125 GeV Higgs boson. Data-driven techniques and multivariate analyses methods are needed to reach maximum discovery potential. In this talk an overview of the status of exotic searches at 13 TeV collisions is given and prospects for the ultimate reach at the HL-LHC will be made.

  6. Hadron Spectroscopy, exotics and $B_c^+$ physics at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Biplab

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study properties and decays of heavy flavored hadrons produced from $pp$ collisions at the LHC. During Run~1, it has recorded the world's largest data sample of beauty and charm hadrons, enabling precision spectroscopy studies of such particles. Several important results obtained by LHCb, such as the discovery of the first pentaquark states and the first unambiguous determination of the $Z_c(4430)^-$ as an exotic state, have dramatically increased the interest on spectroscopy of heavy hadrons. An overview of the latest LHCb results on the subject, including the discovery of four strange exotic states decaying as $X \\to J/\\psi \\phi$, is presented. LHCb has also made significant contributions to the field of $B_c^+$ physics, the lowest bound state of the heavy flavor $\\bar{b}$ and $c$ quarks. A synopsis of the the latest results is given.

  7. Hadron Spectroscopy, exotics and BC + physics at LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Biplab

    2016-11-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study properties and decays of heavy flavored hadrons produced from pp collisions at the LHC. During Run 1, it has recorded the world's largest data sample of beauty and charm hadrons, enabling precision spectroscopy studies of such particles. Several important results obtained by LHCb, such as the discovery of the first pentaquark states and the first unambiguous determination of the Zc (4430) - as an exotic state, have dramatically increased the interest in spectroscopy of heavy hadrons. An overview of the latest LHCb results on the subject, including the discovery of four strange exotic states decaying as X → J/ψϕ, is presented. LHCb has also made significant contributions to the field of BC + physics, the lowest bound state of the heavy flavor ̅b and c quarks. A synopsis of the latest results is given.

  8. Exotic charmonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakhlova, Galina V; Pakhlov, Pavel N [Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Russian Federation State Scientific Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Eidel' man, Semen I [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-07

    The most significant results on the spectroscopy, production, and decay of charmonium and charmonium-like states are reviewed. The surprise-filled physics of charmonium is currently attracting great experimental and theoretical attention. Unexpected properties exhibited by numerous discovered states fail to be explained by the theory, which instead suggests the existence in the spectra of charmonium-like particles of exotic systems different from usual bound states. (reviews of topical problems)

  9. Status of the LHC and HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bordry, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    After two years of intense work of consolidation and upgrading of the LHC and injector performance, in 2015 the LHC went back into operation. The work program of the last two years is reviewed and the performance of the upgraded accelerator, including first collisions, is presented. A projection for the expected LHC performance in 2015 is given. Finally, an outlook of the future LHC upgrade programme at CERN, including the high-luminosity LHC, is given

  10. Uncovering light scalars with exotic Higgs decays to bbmumu

    CERN Document Server

    Curtin, David; Zhong, Yi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The search for exotic Higgs decays are an essential probe of new physics. In particular, the small width of the Higgs boson makes its decay uniquely sensitive to the existence of light hidden sectors. Here we assess the potential of an exotic Higgs decay search for h -> 2X -> bbmumu to constrain theories with light CP-even (X = s) and CP-odd (X = a) singlet scalars in the mass range of 15 to 60 GeV. This decay channel arises naturally in many scenarios, such as the Standard Model augmented with a singlet, the two-Higgs-doublet model with a singlet (2HDM+S) -- which includes the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) -- and in hidden valley models. The 2b2mu channel may represent the best discovery avenue for many models. It has competitive reach, and is less reliant on low-pT b- and tau-reconstruction compared to other channels like 4b, 4tau, and 2tau2mu. We analyze the sensitivity of a 2b2mu search for the 8 and 14 TeV LHC, including the HL-LHC. We consider three types of analyses, employing c...

  11. ATLAS Run II Exotics Results

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    While Standard Model is in a good shape especially after Higgs boson discovery, there are a lot of questions beyond SM. The ATLAS detector is performing about 50 Exotics searches addressed these questions. This talk is discussing some of them with datasets collected during the 2015-2016 LHC run from 3 fb^-1 to 18 fb^-1 of proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV centre of mass energy . Results on searches for resonances decaying into vector boson or fermions, for vector like quarks, for dark matter, and for other new phenomena using these data will be presented.

  12. HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno Straessner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Large Hadron Collider (LHC and the two multi-purpose detectors, ATLAS and CMS, have been operated successfully at record centre-of-mass energies of 7 ÷ 8TeV. This paper presents the main physics results from proton–proton collisions based on a total luminosity of 2 × 5 fb−1. The most recent results from Standard Model measurements, Standard Model and MSSM Higgs searches, as well as searches for supersymmetric and exotic particles are reported. Prospects for ongoing and future data taking are presented.

  13. LHC signatures of WIMP-triggered baryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanou; Okui, Takemichi; Yunesi, Arash

    2016-12-01

    A robust mechanism was recently proposed in which thermal freeze-out of WIMPs can provide a unified origin of dark matter and baryon abundances in our universe. We point out that this WIMP-triggered baryogenesis mechanism can exhibit a rich collider phenomenology and be tested at the current and near-future experiments at LHC, even in the case where the WIMPs are completely devoid of SM gauge and Higgs portal interactions, as may be motivated by the persistent null results of WIMP dark matter searches. We catalog a rich array of LHC signatures robustly present in such a scenario. In particular, the simplest such implementation can already offer a very clean signal of a TeV-scale resonance that decays to diphotons with a cross section that can easily be within the reach of the current and near-future LHC runs in the region of parameter space that leads to a successful baryogenesis. Other characteristic signatures include the production of multiple bottom and/or multiple top quarks, promptly or displaced. An even more exotic possibility is the production of two separate sets of isolated emerging jets connected by a charged track, which may require new dedicated studies. Finally, dinucleon decay can also provide a powerful probe of the mechanism.

  14. Exotic Physics at ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meehan Samuel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A number of proposed explanations to observed phenomena predict new physics that will be directly observable at the LHC. Each new theory is manifested in the experiments as an experimental signature that sets it apart from the many well understood Standard Model processes. Presented here is a summary of a selection of such searches performed using 8 TeV center of mass energy data produced by the LHC and collected with the ATLAS detector. As no significant deviations from the standard model are observed in any search channel presented here, the results are interpreted in terms of constraints on new physics in a number of scenarios including dark matter, sequential standard model extensions, and model independent interpretations depending on the given search channel.

  15. Non-SM Exotic Higgs: Beyond SM and MSSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacaprara Stefano

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A review of the searches for exotic Higgs boson beyond standard model and minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM, from experiments at the Tevatron and LHC, is presented. Several different models have been considered, including extensions to standard model with fourth generation of fermions, fermiophobic Higgs, next-to-MSSM models, seesaw type-II, and rare decay of Higgs boson to hidden sector. For next-to- MSSM models several final states have been considered, including light pseudo-scalar Higgs decay into taus, muons, and photons, as well as charged Higgs boson. The searches has been performed with re-interpretation of results from standard model Higgs search as well as on new signatures.

  16. Exotic Decays of the 125 GeV Higgs Boson at Future $e^+e^-$ Lepton Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhen [Fermilab; Wang, Lian-Tao [Chicago U., EFI; Zhang, Hao [Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

    2016-12-29

    Discovery of unexpected properties of the Higgs boson offers an intriguing opportunity of shedding light on some of the most profound puzzles in particle physics. The Beyond Standard Model (BSM) decays of the Higgs boson could reveal new physics in a direct manner. Future electron-positron lepton colliders operating as Higgs factories, including CEPC, FCC-ee and ILC, with the advantages of a clean collider environment and large statistics, could greatly enhance the sensitivity in searching for these BSM decays. In this work, we perform a general study of Higgs exotic decays at future $e^+e^-$ lepton colliders, focusing on the Higgs decays with hadronic final states and/or missing energy, which are very challenging for the High-Luminosity program of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). We show that with simple selection cuts, $O(10^{-3}\\sim10^{-5})$ limits on the Higgs exotic decay branching fractions can be achieved using the leptonic decaying spectator $Z$ boson in the associated production mode $e^+e^-\\rightarrow Z H$. We further discuss the interplay between the detector performance and Higgs exotic decay, and other possibilities of exotic decays. Our work is a first step in a comprehensive study of Higgs exotic decays at future lepton colliders, which is a key ingredient of Higgs physics that deserves further investigation.

  17. CERN confirms LHC schedule

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The CERN Council held its 125th session on 20 June. Highlights of the meeting included confirmation that the LHC is on schedule for a 2007 start-up, and the announcement of a new organizational structure in 2004.

  18. From the LHC to future colliders. CERN Theory Institute summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeck, A. de [CERN, Dept. of Physics, Geneva (Switzerland); Univ. of Antwerp, Wilrijk (Belgium); Ellis, J.; Wells, J.; Gripaios, B.; Dittmar, M. [CERN, Dept. of Physics, Geneva (Switzerland); Grojean, C. [CERN, Dept. of Physics, Geneva (Switzerland); CEA, Saclay (France); Heinemeyer, S. [Inst. de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-UC, Santander (Spain); Jakobs, K.; Schumacher, M.; Duehrssen, M. [Albert-Ludwigs-Univ., Physikalisches Inst., Freiburg (Germany); Weiglein, G.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Morton-Thurtle, V.; Rolbiecki, K.; Smillie, J.; Tattersall, J. [Univ. of Durham, IPPP, Durham (United Kingdom); Azuelos, G. [Univ. de Montreal, Montreal (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada); Dawson, S.; Assamagan, K.; Gopalakrishna, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Han, T. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Dept. of Physics, Madison (United States); Hewett, J.; Rizzo, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park (United States); Lancaster, M.; Ozcan, E. [UCL, London (United Kingdom); Mariotti, C. [Sezione di Torino, INFN, Torino (Italy); Moortgat, F. [ETH Honggerberg, Dept. of Physics, Zurich (Switzerland); Polesello, G. [Sezione di Pavia, INFN, Pavia (Italy); Riemann, S.; Bechtle, P. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Carena, M.; Juste, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia (United States); Chachamis, G. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Chen, K.F.; Hou, W.S. [National Taiwan Univ., Dept. of Physics, Taipei (China); Curtis, S. de [Univ. of Florence (Italy); INFN, Dept. of Physics, Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Desch, K.; Wienemann, P. [Univ. Bonn, Physikalisches Inst., Bonn (Germany); Dreiner, H. [Bonn Univ., Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics and Physikalisches Inst., Bonn (Germany); Foster, B. [Univ. of Oxford, Particle Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Frandsen, M.T. [Univ. of Southern Denmark, CP3 - Origins, Odense (Denmark); Univ. of Oxford, Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2010-04-15

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, the Working Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions. (orig.)

  19. Heavy Exotic Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yizhuang

    2016-01-01

    We briefly review the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom, under the general strictures of chiral and heavy quark symmetries. The charm isosinglet exotic molecules with $J^{PC}=1^{++}$ binds, which we identify as the reported neutral $X(3872)$. The bottom isotriplet exotic with $J^{PC}=1^{+-}$ binds, and is identified as a mixed state of the reported charged exotics $Z^+_b(10610)$ and $Z^+_b(10650)$. The bound bottom isosinglet molecule with $J^{PC}=1^{++}$ is a possible neutral $X_b(10532)$ to be observed.

  20. Heavy exotic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    We briefly review the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom, under the general structures of chiral and heavy quark symmetries. The charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC = 1++ binds, which we identify as the reported neutral X(3872). The bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC = 1+1 binds, and is identified as a mixed state of the reported charged exotics Zb+(10610) and Zb-(10650). The bound bottom isosinglet molecule with JPC = 1++ is a possible neutral Xb(10532) to be observed.

  1. LHC Phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Logan, Heather E

    2011-01-01

    The analyses of the first 1-2/fb of Large Hadron Collider (LHC) data are already having significant impacts on a wide range of models. In this talk I give my perspective on why we expect to find new physics at the LHC, and how such a discovery might unfold.

  2. Discovering Uncolored Naturalness in Exotic Higgs Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Curtin, David

    2015-01-01

    Solutions to the hierarchy problem usually require top partners. In standard SUSY or composite Higgs theories, the partners carry SM color and are becoming increasingly constrained by LHC searches. However, theories like Folded SUSY (FS), Twin Higgs (TH) and Quirky Little Higgs (QLH) introduce uncolored top partners, which can be SM singlets or carry electroweak charge. Their small production cross section left doubt as to whether the LHC can effectively probe such scenarios. Typically, these partners are charged under their own mirror color gauge group. In FS and QLH, the absence of light mirror matter allows glueballs to form at the bottom of the mirror spectrum, this is also the case in some TH realizations. The Higgs can decay to these mirror glueballs, with the glueballs decaying into SM particles with potentially observable lifetimes. We undertake the first detailed study of this glueball signature and quantitatively demonstrate the discovery potential of uncolored naturalness via exotic Higgs decays at...

  3. Litter feedbacks, evolutionary change and exotic plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eppinga, M.B.; Kaproth, M.A.; Collins, A.R.; Molofsky, J.

    2011-01-01

    1. Understanding the mechanisms driving exotic plant invasions is important for designing successful invader control strategies. Previous studies have highlighted different invasion mechanisms, including alteration of nutrient cycles through plant–soil feedback and evolutionary change toward more co

  4. Exotic decays of the 125 GeV Higgs boson at future e+e- colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Lian-Tao; Zhang, Hao

    2017-06-01

    The discovery of unexpected properties of the Higgs boson would offer an intriguing opportunity to shed light on some of the most profound puzzles in particle physics. Beyond Standard Model (BSM) decays of the Higgs boson could reveal new physics in a direct manner. Future electron-positron lepton colliders operating as Higgs factories, including CEPC, FCC-ee and ILC, with the advantages of a clean collider environment and large statistics, could greatly enhance sensitivity in searching for these BSM decays. In this work, we perform a general study of Higgs exotic decays at future e+e- lepton colliders, focusing on the Higgs decays with hadronic final states and/or missing energy, which are very challenging for the High-Luminosity program of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). We show that with simple selection cuts, (10-3-10-5) limits on the Higgs exotic decay branching fractions can be achieved using the leptonic decaying spectator Z boson in the associated production mode e+e-→ ZH. We further discuss the interplay between detector performance and Higgs exotic decays, and other possibilities of exotic decays. Our work is a first step in a comprehensive study of Higgs exotic decays at future lepton colliders, which is a key area of Higgs physics that deserves further investigation. Supported by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC (DE-AC02-07CH11359) with the U.S. Department of Energy, DOE (DE-SC0013642), IHEP(Y6515580U1), and IHEP Innovation (Y4545171Y2)

  5. The LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The LHC will use the latest technologies on an enormous scale. 8000 superconducting magnets will keep the beams on track. The entire 27 km ring will be cooled by 700 000 litres of liquid helium to a temperature of -271 degrees Celsius , making the LHC the world's largest superconducting installation. Conventional superconducting wire will form the magnet coils, while high-temperature superconductors will carry a total of 2 300 000 amperes from the power supplies into the magnet cryostat

  6. Current therapies in exotic animal oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jennifer E; Kent, Michael S; Théon, Alain

    2004-09-01

    The majority of information on oncology therapies has been reported in humans, canine, and feline patients, and laboratory animals with experimentally induced tumors. A variety of treatments,including radiation therapy, chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, and others have been used with exotic animals. There are many species of exotic pets, and anatomic differences, as well as husbandry and nutritional requirements, must be taken into account to provide optimal care. By providing a broad overview of therapies and considerations for treatment, this article is intended to provide the practitioner with an overview of approach and options when addressing oncology cases in exotic animals.

  7. Anatomy of Exotic Higgs Decays in 2HDM

    CERN Document Server

    Kling, Felix; Su, Shufang

    2016-01-01

    Large mass splittings between new scalars in two-Higgs-doublet models (2HDM) open a key avenue to search for these new states via exotic heavy Higgs decays. We discuss in detail the different search channels for these new scalars at the LHC in the presence of a sizable mass splitting, i.e. a hierarchical 2HDM scenario, taking into account the theoretical and experimental constraints. We provide benchmark planes to exploit the complementarity among these searches, analyzing their potential to probe the hierarchical 2HDM parameter space during LHC Run 2.

  8. Anatomy of exotic Higgs decays in 2HDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Felix; No, Jose Miguel; Su, Shufang

    2016-09-01

    Large mass splittings between new scalars in two-Higgs-doublet models (2HDM) open a key avenue to search for these new states via exotic heavy Higgs decays. We discuss in detail the different search channels for these new scalars at the LHC in the presence of a sizable mass splitting, i.e. a hierarchical 2HDM scenario, taking into account the theoretical and experimental constraints. We provide benchmark planes to exploit the complementarity among these searches, analyzing their potential to probe the hierarchical 2HDM parameter space during LHC Run 2.

  9. Why own an exotic pet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P P

    2010-08-01

    Even though people have owned a wide variety of companion animals since times of old, the modern craze for increasingly exotic and little-known species raises a number of questions, including some of an ethical nature. While trade in exotic animals is certainly profitable for these who practise it, it poses great risks of varying types: ecological risks, threats to biodiversity conservation and health risks. Several introduced animal populations have gone on to establish a line in their new host country. We are just starting to measure the adverse impact this has had, in some cases on a very large scale. The veterinary profession doubtless has a major role to play in endeavouring to reform this trade in living creatures that unfortunately results in many losses.

  10. New Heavy Exotic Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, C P

    2012-01-01

    We review recent studies on exotic states at the Belle experiment. The results include: (1) The measurement of the cross sections of $\\gamma \\gamma \\to \\omega \\phi$, $\\phi\\phi$, and $\\omega \\omega$ for masses that range from threshold to 4.0 GeV. In addition to signals from well established spin-zero and spin-two charmonium states, there are clear resonant structures below charmonium threshold, which have not been previously observed. We report a spin-parity analysis for the new structures; (2) No X(3872) signal is observed in $\\eta J/\\psi$ or $\\gamma \\chi_{c1}$ mode in B decays. A narrow peak at 3823.5 MeV/$c^2$ (named as $\\psi_2$) to $\\gamma \\chi_{c1}$ with a significance of 4.2 standard deviations including systematic uncertainty is observed in $B^{\\pm} \\to K^{\\pm} \\gamma \\chi_{c1}$; (3) The bottomonium states $h_b(1P)$, $h_b(2P)$ and $\\Upsilon(1D)$ are observed in the reaction $e^+e^- \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- + X$; (4) The observation of two narrow charged structures (named as $Z_b(10610)$ and $Z_b(10650)$) in the...

  11. Higgs physics at LHC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Dasu

    2004-02-01

    The large hadron collider (LHC) and its detectors, ATLAS and CMS, are being built to study TeV scale physics, and to fully understand the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. The Monte-Carlo simulation results for the standard model and minimal super symmetric standard model Higgs boson searches and parameter measurements are discussed. Emphasis is placed on recent investigations of Higgs produced in association with top quarks and in vector boson fusion channels. These results indicate that Higgs sector can be explored in many channels within a couple of years of LHC operation i.e., $\\mathcal{L}=30$ fb-1. Complete coverage including measurements of Higgs parameters can be carried out with full LHC program.

  12. LHC Create

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    LHC Create is an upcoming 2-day workshop held at IdeaSquare in November. Participants from CERN and IPAC school of design will compete to design an exhibit that explains why CERN does what it does. The winner will have their exhibit fully realised and made available to experiments, institutes, and tourism agencies around the world.

  13. Pathways to exotic metastable silicon allotropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberl, Bianca; Strobel, Timothy A.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2016-12-01

    The Group 14 element silicon possesses a complex free-energy landscape with many (local) minima, allowing for the formation of a variety of unusual structures, some of which may be stabilized at ambient conditions. Such exotic silicon allotropes represent a significant opportunity to address the ever-increasing demand for novel materials with tailored functionality since these exotic forms are expected to exhibit superlative properties including optimized band gaps for solar power conversion. The application of pressure is a well-recognized and uniquely powerful method to access exotic states of silicon since it promotes large changes to atomic bonding. Conventional high-pressure syntheses, however, lack the capability to access many of these local minima and only four forms of exotic silicon allotropes have been recovered over the last 50 years. However, more recently, significant advances in high pressure methodologies and the use of novel precursor materials have yielded at least three more recoverable exotic Si structures. This review aims to give an overview of these innovative methods of high-pressure application and precursor selection and the recent discoveries of new Si allotropes. The background context of the conventional pressure methods and multitude of predicted new phases are also provided. This review also offers a perspective for possible access to many further exotic functional allotropes not only of silicon but also of other materials, in a technologically feasible manner.

  14. Exclusive glueball production at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Machado, M V T

    2011-01-01

    In this contribution we summarize recent results on the computation of cross sections for glueball candidates production in quasi-real photon-photon collisions and on central diffraction processes, i.e. double Pomeron exchange, in heavy ion interactions at the LHC are computed. In particular, we provide predictions for the production of exotic mesons f0(1500), f0(1710) and X(1835). The rates for these distinct production channels are compared.

  15. Exotic Signals of Vectorlike Quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A. [Fermilab; Yu, Felix [U. Mainz, PRISMA

    2016-12-06

    Vectorlike fermions are an important target for hadron collider searches. We show that the vectorlike quarks may predominantly decay via higher-dimensional operators into a quark plus a couple of other Standard Model fermions. Pair production of vectorlike quarks of charge 2/3 at the LHC would then lead to a variety of possible final states, including $t\\bar t + 4\\tau$, $t\\bar b\

  16. Electroweak Physics at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Erler, J

    2006-01-01

    The prospects for electroweak physics at the LHC are reviewed focusing mainly on precision studies. This includes projections for measurements of the effective Z pole weak mixing angle, of top quark, W boson, and Higgs scalar properties, and new physics searches.

  17. Exotic snakes are not always found in exotic places: how poison centres can assist emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubich, Carol; Krenzelok, Edward P

    2007-11-01

    Emergency departments throughout the USA may have some familiarity with the management of envenomation from indigenous snake species such as Crotalinae (rattlesnakes) and Micrurus (coral snakes). However, venomous species may include exotic reptiles whose bites pose substantial treatment challenges due to both a lack of experience and the difficulty in obtaining antivenoms. Two pet cobra envenomation incidents illustrate the challenges that face emergency departments, especially in urban settings, that are confronted with these exposures. It is important for emergency departments to be aware of the large underground presence of exotic venomous reptile pets and to utilise the expertise of regional poison centres that will also assist in the procurement of exotic antivenoms.

  18. Supplements for exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Fava, Johanna; Colitz, Carmen M H

    2014-09-01

    The use of supplements has become commonplace in an effort to complement traditional therapy and as part of long-term preventive health plans. This article discusses historical and present uses of antioxidants, vitamins, and herbs. By complementing traditional medicine with holistic and alternative nutrition and supplements, the overall health and wellness of exotic pets can be enhanced and balanced. Further research is needed for understanding the strengths and uses of supplements in exotic species. Going back to the animals' origin and roots bring clinicians closer to nature and its healing powers.

  19. Exotic nuclear matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenske H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments of nuclear structure theory for exotic nuclei are addressed. The inclusion of hyperons and nucleon resonances is discussed. Nuclear multipole response functions, hyperon interactions in infinite matter and in neutron stars and theoretical aspects of excitations of nucleon resonances in nuclei are discussed.

  20. From the LHC to Future Colliders CERN Theory Institute Summary Report

    CERN Document Server

    de Roeck, A; Grojean, C; Heinemeyer, S; Jakobs, K; Weiglein, G; Wells, J; Azuelos, Georges; Dawson, S; Gripaios, B; Han, T; Hewett, J; Lancaster, M; Mariotti, C; Moortgat, F; Moortgat-Pick, G; Polesello, G; Riemann, S; Schumacher, M; Assamagan, K; Bechtle, P; Carena, M S; Chachamis, G; Chen, K F; De Curtis, S; Desch, K; Dittmar, M; Dreiner, H; Dührssen, M; Frandsen, M T; Giammanco, A; Godbole, R; Govoni, P; Gunion, J F; Hollik, W; Hou, W S; Isidori, G; Juste, A; Kalinowski, J; Korytov, A; Kou, E; Kraml, S; Krawczyk, M; Martin, A; Milstead, D; Morton-Thurtle, V; Mönig, K; Melé, B; Pieri, M; Plehn, T; Reina, L; Richter-Was, E; Rizzo, T; Rolbiecki, K; Sannino, F; Schram, M; Smillie, J; Sultansoy, S; Uwer, P

    2010-01-01

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300/fb of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10/fb of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, the Working Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discover...

  1. Exotic Small Mammals and Bartonella

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-09

    In this podcast, Dr. Nina Marano discusses Bartonella, a bacterial agent that’s prevalent in many species, including cats, dogs, and cattle. Wild animals are normally thought to carry Bartonella, so when animals are caught in the wild for pet trade, the risk that humans can become infected with Bartonella increases. Bartonella is an identified risk associated with ownership of exotic animals and has serious health consequences.  Created: 4/9/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 4/9/2009.

  2. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Clifford; Steedman, Catrina

    2012-07-01

    A variety of exotic vertebrate and invertebrate species are kept as 'pets' including fishes, amphibians (for example, frogs and toads), reptiles (turtles, crocodiles, lizards and snakes), birds, mammals (for example, primates, civets, and lions), and invertebrates (for example spiders, scorpions, and centipedes), and ownership of some of these animals is rising. Data for 2009-2011 suggest that the number of homes with reptiles rose by approximately 12.5%. Recent surveys, including only some of these animals, indicated that they might be present in around 18.6% of homes (equal to approximately 42 million animals of which around 40 million are indoor or outdoor fish). Many exotic 'pets' are capable of causing injury or poisoning to their keepers and some contacts prove fatal. We examined NHS Health Episode Statistics for England using selected formal categories for hospital admissions and bed days for 2004-2010 using the following categories of injury, envenomation or sting; bitten or struck by crocodile or alligator; bitten or crushed by other reptiles: contact with venomous snakes and lizards; contact with scorpions. Between 2004 and 2010 these data conservatively show a total of 760 full consultation episodes, 709 admissions and 2,121 hospital bed days were associated with injuries probably from exotic pets. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets constitute a small but important component of emerging medical problems. Greater awareness of relevant injuries and medical sequelae from exotic pet keeping may help medics formulate their clinical assessment and advice to patients.

  3. LHC injection and dump protection

    CERN Document Server

    Bartmann, W; Bracco, C; Goddard, B; Kain, V; Rossi, A; Wollmann, D

    2010-01-01

    The machine protection against fast failures including injection or dump kickers relies on fixed and movable devices. Results will be shown from the low-intensity beam commissioning of the moveable injection protection devices in the SPS to LHC transfer lines and downstream of the LHC injection kickers, and of the LHC dump protection elements in IR6. This paper is almost exclusively focussing on the issues arising during the 2009 commissioning. The implications of these results and a commissioning status report with the planning for 2010 will be addressed.

  4. Exotic branes and nongeometric backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Jan; Shigemori, Masaki

    2010-06-25

    When string or M theory is compactified to lower dimensions, the U-duality symmetry predicts so-called exotic branes whose higher-dimensional origin cannot be explained by the standard string or M-theory branes. We argue that exotic branes can be understood in higher dimensions as nongeometric backgrounds or U folds, and that they are important for the physics of systems which originally contain no exotic charges, since the supertube effect generically produces such exotic charges. We discuss the implications of exotic backgrounds for black hole microstate (non-)geometries.

  5. LHC status report

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Following the great success of the first 3.5 TeV collisions in all four LHC experiments on 30 March, the focus of the LHC commissioning teams has turned to consolidating the beam injection and acceleration procedures.   During the last two weeks, the operators have adopted a cycle of beam commissioning studies by day and the preparation and delivery of collisions during the night shifts. The injection and acceleration processes for the beams are by now well established and almost all feedback systems, which are an essential ingredient for establishing reliable and safe machine operation, have been commissioned. Thanks to special current settings for the quadrupoles that are situated near the collision points, the LHC luminosity at high energy has been increased by a factor of 5 in three of the four experiments. Similar improvements are under way for the fourth experiment. The next steps include adjustments of the LHC machine protection and collimation devices, which will ensure 'stable beam' co...

  6. LHC Report: Ion Age

    CERN Multimedia

    John Jowett for the LHC team

    2013-01-01

    The LHC starts the New Year facing a new challenge: proton-lead collisions in the last month before the shutdown in mid-February.    Commissioning this new and almost unprecedented mode of collider operation is a major challenge both for the LHC and its injector chain. Moreover, it has to be done very quickly to achieve a whole series of physics goals, requiring modifications of the LHC configuration, in a very short time. These include a switch of the beam directions halfway through the run, polarity reversals of the ALICE spectrometer magnet and Van der Meer scans.    The Linac3 team kept the lead source running throughout the end-of-year technical stop, and recovery of the accelerator complex was very quick. New proton and lead beams were soon ready, with a bunch filling pattern that ensures they will eventually match up in the LHC. The LEIR machine has even attained a new ion beam intensity record.  On Friday 11 January the first single bunches o...

  7. Exotic searches at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Turra, Ruggero; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS detector has collected 3.2 fb^-1 of proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV centre of mass energy during the 2015 LHC run. A selected review of the recent result are presented in the context of the direct search for BSM, not SUSY, not BSM Higgs.

  8. Search for (exotic) strange matter in the Star and Alice experiments with the ultra-relativistic heavy ion colliders RHIC and LHC; Recherche de matiere etrange (exotique) dans les experiences STAR et ALICE aupres des collisionneurs d'ions lourds ultra-relativistes RHIC et LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernet, R

    2006-02-15

    Ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions offer the possibility to create conditions of temperature and density that could lead nuclear matter to a state of deconfined partons, the quark-gluon plasma. Strange baryon production is one of the essential observables to understand the mechanisms involved in the medium. Furthermore, theories predict a possible production of strange dibaryons, still hypothetical particles, from which one could draw important inferences in nuclear physics and astrophysics. The experiments STAR at RHIC, and, soon, ALICE at LHC, allow one to search for strange baryons and dibaryons. The STAR sensitivity to the metastable dibaryon H{sup 0} in the {lambda}p{pi}{sup -} decay mode was calculated thanks to a dedicated simulation. The search for the H{sup 0}, and for the {xi}{sup -}p resonance as well, was performed in the STAR Au+Au data at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 62.4 and 200 GeV energies. Within the framework of the preparation of ALICE to the first Pb+Pb data, the detector ability to identify strange baryons {lambda}, {xi} and {omega}, was estimated via several simulations. So as to favour the reconstruction efficiency in a large range of transverse momentum while keeping a reasonable S/B ratio, the influence of the geometrical selections and the size of the reconstruction zone was emphasized. The ALICE sensitivities to the metastable strange dibaryons H{sup 0} and ({xi}{sup 0}p){sub b} and to the {lambda}{lambda} resonance were calculated as well. (author)

  9. Strange exotic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    1998-08-01

    Exotic atoms of K- and Σ- are analyzed using density-dependent optical potentials constrained by a low-density limit. Emphasis is placed on radial sensitivities of the real potential. A potential depth of 180MeV inside nuclei is confirmed for K-. For Σ- a shallow attractive potential outside the nuclear surface becomes repulsive in the interior. The information content of limited data sets is demonstrated.

  10. Wildlife, exotic pets, and emerging zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomel, Bruno B; Belotto, Albino; Meslin, François-Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Most emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic; wildlife constitutes a large and often unknown reservoir. Wildlife can also be a source for reemergence of previously controlled zoonoses. Although the discovery of such zoonoses is often related to better diagnostic tools, the leading causes of their emergence are human behavior and modifications to natural habitats (expansion of human populations and their encroachment on wildlife habitat), changes in agricultural practices, and globalization of trade. However, other factors include wildlife trade and translocation, live animal and bushmeat markets, consumption of exotic foods, development of ecotourism, access to petting zoos, and ownership of exotic pets. To reduce risk for emerging zoonoses, the public should be educated about the risks associated with wildlife, bushmeat, and exotic pet trades; and proper surveillance systems should be implemented.

  11. PDF4LHC recommendations for LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Butterworth, Jon; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; De Roeck, Albert; Feltesse, Joel; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Glazov, Sasha; Huston, Joey; Kassabov, Zahari; McNulty, Ronan; Morsch, Andreas; Nadolsky, Pavel; Radescu, Voica; Rojo, Juan; Thorne, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We provide an updated recommendation for the usage of sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the assessment of PDF and PDF+$\\alpha_s$ uncertainties suitable for applications at the LHC Run II. We review developments since the previous PDF4LHC recommendation, and discuss and compare the new generation of PDFs, which include substantial information from experimental data from the Run I of the LHC. We then propose a new prescription for the combination of a suitable subset of the available PDF sets, which is presented in terms of a single combined PDF set. We finally discuss tools which allow for the delivery of this combined set in terms of optimized sets of Hessian eigenvectors or Monte Carlo replicas, and their usage, and provide some examples of their application to LHC phenomenology.

  12. Recommendations for PDF usage in LHC predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Placakyte, Ringaile

    2016-01-01

    A short review of the currently available modern parton distribution functions (PDFs)and the theory predictions obtained using those PDFs for several benchmark processes at LHC, including Higgs boson production, is presented in this write-up. It includes the discussion on theory assumptions made in the determination procedure of PDFs and an impact on the differences in the obtained predictions, followed by the alternative to PDF4LHC recommendations for the usage of PDF sets for theory predictions at the LHC.

  13. ISOLTRAP pins down masses of exotic nuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Blaum, Klaus; Beck, D; Bollen, G; Brodeur, M; Delahaye, P; George, S; Guenaut, C; Herfurth, F; Herlert, Alexander; Kellerbauer, A G; Kluge, H J; Lunney, M D; Mukherjee, M; Rodríguez, D; Schwarz, S; Schweikhard, L; Yazidjian, C

    2005-01-01

    The mass of radionuclides contribute to a variety of fundamental studies including tests of the weak interaction and the standard model. The limits of mass measurements on exotic nuclides have been extended considerably by the Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. Recent ISOLTRAP measurements are summarized and current technical improvements are outlined.

  14. Diphoton and Diboson Probes of Fermiophobic Higgs Bosons at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado, Antonio; Quiros, Mariano; Santiago, Jose; Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Extensions of the Standard Model Higgs sector with electroweak charged scalars can possess exotic `Higgs' bosons with vanishing or suppressed couplings to Standard Model fermions. These `fermiophobic' scalars, which cannot be produced via gluon fusion, are constrained by LHC measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs boson to have a small vacuum expectation value. This implies that vector boson fusion and associated vector boson production are in general suppressed rendering conventional Higgs searches insensitive. However, Drell-Yan Higgs pair production, which is not present in the SM, can be sizeable even in the limit of vanishing exotic Higgs vacuum expectation value. We utilize this to show that diphoton searches at 8 TeV LHC already rule out a large class of neutral fermiophobic Higgs bosons below around 110 GeV. This includes fermiophobic scalars found in two Higgs doublet as well as Higgs triplet and Georgi-Machacek type models. Our results extend the only relevant limit on fermiophobic Higgs bosons obtained b...

  15. Dynamical effects in fusion with exotic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo-Phuoc, K.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Reactions with stable beams have demonstrated strong interplay between nuclear structure and fusion. Exotic beam facilities open new perspectives to understand the impact of neutron skin, large isospin, and weak binding energies on fusion. Microscopic theories of fusion are required to guide future experiments. Purpose: To investigate new effects of exotic structures and dynamics in near-barrier fusion with exotic nuclei. Method: Microscopic approaches based on the Hartree-Fock (HF) mean-field theory are used for studying fusion barriers in -54Ca40+116Sn reactions for even isotopes. Bare potential barriers are obtained assuming frozen HF ground-state densities. Dynamical effects on the barrier are accounted for in time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations of the collisions. Vibrational couplings are studied in the coupled-channel framework and near-barrier nucleon transfer is investigated with TDHF calculations. Results: The development of a neutron skin in exotic calcium isotopes strongly lowers the bare potential barrier. However, this static effect is not apparent when dynamical effects are included. On the contrary, a fusion hindrance is observed in TDHF calculations with the most neutron-rich calcium isotopes which cannot be explained by vibrational couplings. Transfer reactions are also important in these systems due to charge equilibration processes. Conclusions: Despite its impact on the bare potential, the neutron skin is not seen as playing an important role in the fusion dynamics. However, the charge transfer with exotic projectiles could lead to an increase of the Coulomb repulsion between the fragments, suppressing fusion. The effects of transfer and dissipative mechanisms on fusion with exotic nuclei deserve further studies.

  16. QCD corrections to vector boson pair production in gluon fusion including interference effects with off-shell Higgs at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Caola, Fabrizio; Melnikov, Kirill; Röntsch, Raoul; Tancredi, Lorenzo

    2016-07-18

    We compute next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to the production of two massive electroweak bosons in gluon fusion. We consider both the prompt production process $gg \\to VV$ and the production mediated by an exchange of an s-channel Higgs boson, $gg \\to H^* \\to V V$. We include final states with both on- and off-shell vector bosons with leptonic decays. The gluonic production of vector bosons is a loop-induced process, including both massless and massive quarks in the loop. For $gg \\to ZZ$ production, we obtain the NLO QCD corrections to the massive loops through an expansion around the heavy top limit. This approximation is valid below the top production threshold, giving a broad range of invariant masses between the Higgs production and the top production thresholds in which our results are valid. We explore the NLO QCD effects in $gg \\to ZZ$ focusing, in particular, on the interference between prompt and Higgs-mediated processes. We find that the QCD corrections to the interference are large and s...

  17. LHC Report

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    During last week the commissioning effort has been devoted to beam development work, required to accelerate beams with nominal bunch intensity to 3.5 TeV. Significant progress has been done with the commissioning of the systems required to control the beam size and bunch length during the ramp and accelerate the beam with reproducible characteristics. The setting-up of the collimation system for the operation with higher intensity is presently ongoing with the aim of delivering physics with nominal bunch intensity towards the end of next week. For more information about the LHC and a video of the presentation recently done by LHC operators, please visit: http://lpcc.web.cern.ch/LPCC/ http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=2687

  18. LHC Status

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, L

    2007-01-01

    The installation of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is now approaching completion. Almost 1100 of the 1232 main bending magnets are installed and the whole ring will be installed by the end of March 2007. Emphasis is now moving from installation to commissioning, with the cool down of the first of the 8 sectors to liquid helium temperature well underway. In the other sectors, interconnect work is proceeding at a satisfactory pace and will be finished by the end of August. It is foreseen to inject the first beam into the LHC in November with the objective of having first collisions at the injection energy (450 GeV/c) in order to debug the machine and detectors before stopping for the annual winter shutdown. During this time, the detector installation will be finished and the machine will be pushed to full current ready for the first physics run at 7 TeV per beam in 2008.

  19. QCD corrections to vector boson pair production in gluon fusion including interference effects with off-shell Higgs at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caola, Fabrizio [CERN Theory Division,Geneva 23, CH-1211 (Switzerland); Dowling, Matthew; Melnikov, Kirill; Röntsch, Raoul; Tancredi, Lorenzo [Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics, KIT,Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-07-18

    We compute next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to the production of two massive electroweak bosons in gluon fusion. We consider both the prompt production process gg→VV and the production mediated by an exchange of an s-channel Higgs boson, gg→H{sup ∗}→VV. We include final states with both on- and off-shell vector bosons with leptonic decays. The gluonic production of vector bosons is a loop-induced process, including both massless and massive quarks in the loop. For gg→ZZ production, we obtain the NLO QCD corrections to the massive loops through an expansion around the heavy top limit. This approximation is valid below the top production threshold, giving a broad range of invariant masses between the Higgs production and the top production thresholds in which our results are valid. We explore the NLO QCD effects in gg→ZZ focusing, in particular, on the interference between prompt and Higgs-mediated processes. We find that the QCD corrections to the interference are large and similar in size to the corrections to both the signal and the background processes. At the same time, we observe that corrections to the interference change rapidly with the four-lepton invariant mass in the region around the ZZ production threshold. We also study the interference effects in gg→W{sup +}W{sup −} production where, due to technical limitations, we only consider contributions of massless loops. We find that the QCD corrections to the interference in this case are somewhat larger than those for either the signal or the background.

  20. Exotic smoothness and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sladkowski, J

    1996-01-01

    Short introduction to exotic differential structures on manifolds is given. The possible physical context of this mathematical curiosity is discussed. The topic is very interesting although speculative.

  1. Cryogenics for LHC experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Cryogenic systems will be used by LHC experiments to maximize their performance. Institutes around the world are collaborating with CERN in the construction of these very low temperature systems. The cryogenic test facility in hall 180 for ATLAS magnets. High Energy Physics experiments have frequently adopted cryogenic versions of their apparatus to achieve optimal performance, and those for the LHC will be no exception. The two largest experiments for CERN's new flagship accelerator, ATLAS and CMS, will both use large superconducting magnets operated at 4.5 Kelvin - almost 270 degrees below the freezing point of water. ATLAS also includes calorimeters filled with liquid argon at 87 Kelvin. For the magnets, the choice of a cryogenic version was dictated by a combination economy and transparency to emerging particles. For the calorimeters, liquid argon was selected as the fluid best suited to the experiment's physics requirements. High Energy Physics experiments are the result of worldwide collaborations and...

  2. Electroweak physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mozer, Matthias U

    2016-01-01

    The book discusses the recent experimental results obtained at the LHC that involve electroweak bosons. The results are placed into an appropriate theoretical and historical context. The work pays special attention to the rising subject of hadronically decaying bosons with high boosts, documenting the state-of-the-art identification techniques and highlighting example results their application. The document is not limited to electroweak physics in the strict sense, but also discusses the use of electroweak vector-bosons as tool in the study of other subjects in particle physics, such as determinations of the proton structure or the search for new exotic particles. The book is particularly well suited for graduate students, starting their thesis work on topics that involve electroweak bosons, as the book provides a comprehensive description of phenomena observable at current accelerators as well as a summary of the most relevant experimental techniques.

  3. Exotic hadron states

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wei; Steele, T G; Kleiv, R T; Bulthuis, B; Harnett, D; Richards, T; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Many charmonium-like and bottomonium-like $XYZ$ resonances have been observed by the Belle, Babar, CLEO and BESIII collaborations in the past decade. They are difficult to fit in the conventional quark model and thus are considered as candidates of exotic hadrons, such as multi-quark states, meson molecules, and hybrids. In this talk, we first briefly introduce the method of QCD sum rules and then provide a short review of the mass spectra of the quarkonium-like tetraquark states and the heavy quarkonium hybrids in the QCD sum rules approach. Possible interpretations of the $XYZ$ resonances are briefly discussed.

  4. Review of Exotic Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2011-01-01

    I review here the most recent results about the observation and the study of hadronic bound states that do not fit well in the standard quarkonium picture. Several new states have been observed in the last few years, at B-, tau-Factories and hadron colliders. For most of them, quantum number determinations are available and allow to develop the basis of a new spectroscopy based on exotic compounds like tetraquarks or meson molecules. Nonetheless, there is still a lot of work to do to complete the picture.

  5. MSSM interpretations of the LHC discovery. Light or heavy Higgs?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtle, P.; Stefaniak, T. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Heinemeyer, S. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain); Staal, O. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). The Oskar Klein Centre; Weiglein, G.; Zeune, L. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    A Higgs-like particle with a mass of about 126 GeV has been discovered at the LHC. Within the experimental uncertainties, the measured properties of this new state are compatible with those of the Higgs boson in the Standard Model (SM). While not statistically significant at present, the results show some interesting patterns of deviations from the SM predictions, in particular a higher rate in the {gamma}{gamma} decay mode observed by ATLAS and CMS, and a somewhat smaller rate in the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} mode. The LHC discovery is also compatible with the predictions of the Higgs sector of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), interpreting the new state as either the light or the heavy CP-even MSSM Higgs boson. Within the framework of the MSSM with seven free parameters (pMSSM-7), we fit the various rates of cross section times branching ratio as measured by the LHC and Tevatron experiments under the hypotheses of either the light or the heavy CP-even Higgs boson being the new state around 126 GeV, with and without the inclusion of further lowenergy observables. We find an overall good quality of the fits, with the best fit points exhibiting an enhancement of the {gamma}{gamma} rate, as well as a small suppression of the b anti b and {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} channels with respect to their SM expectations, depending on the details of the fit. For the fits including the whole data set the light CP-even Higgs interpretation in the MSSM results in a higher relative fit probability than the SM fit. On the other hand, we find that the present data also permit the more exotic interpretation in terms of the heavy CP-even MSSM Higgs, which could give rise to experimental signatures of additional Higgs states in the near future.

  6. LHC Report: Beam on

    CERN Multimedia

    Rossano Giachino for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The powering tests described in the last edition of the Bulletin were successfully finished at the end of the first week of March opening the way for 4 TeV operations this year. The beam was back in the machine on Wednesday 14 March. The first collisions at 4 TeV are scheduled for the first week of April.   The first beam of 2012 is dumped after making a few rounds in the LHC. The magnet powering tests were followed by the machine checkout phase. Here the operations team in collaboration with the equipment groups performs a sequence of tests to ensure the readiness of the LHC for beam. The tests include driving all the LHC systems – beam dump, injection, collimation, RF, power converters, magnet circuits, vacuum, interlocks, controls, timing and synchronization – through the operational cycle. The “checkout phase” is really a massive de-bugging exercise, which is performed with the objective of ensuring the proper functioning of the whole machine and t...

  7. Abort Gap Cleaning for LHC Run 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uythoven, Jan [CERN; Boccardi, Andrea [CERN; Bravin, Enrico [CERN; Goddard, Brennan [CERN; Hemelsoet, Georges-Henry [CERN; Höfle, Wolfgang [CERN; Jacquet, Delphine [CERN; Kain, Verena [CERN; Mazzoni, Stefano [CERN; Meddahi, Malika [CERN; Valuch, Daniel [CERN; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana [Fermilab

    2014-07-01

    To minimize the beam losses at the moment of an LHC beam dump the 3 μs long abort gap should contain as few particles as possible. Its population can be minimised by abort gap cleaning using the LHC transverse damper system. The LHC Run 1 experience is briefly recalled; changes foreseen for the LHC Run 2 are presented. They include improvements in the observation of the abort gap population and the mechanism to decide if cleaning is required, changes to the hardware of the transverse dampers to reduce the detrimental effect on the luminosity lifetime and proposed changes to the applied cleaning algorithms.

  8. Abort Gap Cleaning for LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Uythoven, J; Bravin, E; Goddard, B; Hemelsoet, GH; Höfle, W; Jacquet, D; Kain, V; Mazzoni, S; Meddahi, M; Valuch, D

    2015-01-01

    To minimise the beam losses at the moment of an LHC beam dump the 3 μs long abort gap should contain as few particles as possible. Its population can be minimised by abort gap cleaning using the LHC transverse damper system. The LHC Run 1 experience is briefly recalled; changes foreseen for the LHC Run 2 are presented. They include improvements in the observation of the abort gap population and the mechanism to decide if cleaning is required, changes to the hardware of the transverse dampers to reduce the detrimental effect on the luminosity lifetime and proposed changes to the applied cleaning algorithms.

  9. Dynamical R-parity violations from exotic instantons

    CERN Document Server

    Addazi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We show how R-parity can be dynamically broken by non-perturbative quantum gravity effects. In particular, in D-brane models, Exotic instantons provide a simple and calculable mechanism for the generation of R-parity violating bilinear, trilinear and higher order superpotential terms. We show examples of MSSM-like D-brane models, in which one Exotic Instanton induces only one term among the possible R-parity violating superpotentials. Naturally, the idea can be generalized for other gauge groups. As a consequence, a dynamical violation of R-parity does not necessarily destabilize the proton, {\\it i.e} a strong fine tuning is naturally avoided, in our case. For example, a Lepton violating superpotential term can be generated without generating Baryon violating ones, and {\\it viceversa}. This has strong implications in phenomenology: neutrino, neutron-antineutron, electric dipole moments, dark matter and LHC physics.

  10. Mammal Research: Exotic Ungulates in Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A review, of the exotic ungulate industry in Florida was made by mailing questionnaires to exotic ungulate permittees, phone interviews, interviews with exotic...

  11. Exotic tracers for atmospheric studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelock, J.E. (Brazzos Ltd., Launceston (UK)); Ferber, G.J. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Silver Spring, MD (USA). Air Resources Lab.)

    1982-01-01

    Tracer materials can be injected into the atmosphere to study transport and dispersion processes and to validate air pollution model calculations. Tracers should be inert, non-toxic and harmless to the environment. Tracers for long-range experiments, where dilution is very great, must be measurable at extremely low concentrations, well below the parts per trillion level. Compounds suitable for long-range tracer work are rare and efforts should be made to reserve them for meteorological studies, barring them from commercial uses which would increase atmospheric background concentrations. The use of these exotic tracers, including certain perfluorocarbons and isotopically labelled methanes, should be coordinated within the meteorological community to minimize interferences and maximise research benefits.

  12. Exotic tracers for atmospheric studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, James E.; Ferber, Gilbert J.

    Tracer materials can be injected into the atmosphere to study transport and dispersion processes and to validate air pollution model calculations. Tracers should be inert, non-toxic and harmless to the environment. Tracers for long-range experiments, where dilution is very great, must be measurable at extremely low concentrations, well below the parts per trillion level. Compounds suitable for long-range tracer work are rare and efforts should be made to reserve them for meteorological studies, barring them from commercial uses which would increase atmospheric background concentrations. The use of these exotic tracers, including certain perfluorocarbons and isotopically labelled methanes, should be coordinated within the meteorological community to minimize interferences and maximize research benefits.

  13. Parton distributions with LHC data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ball, R.D.; Deans, C.S.; Del Debbio, L.;

    2013-01-01

    We present the first determination of parton distributions of the nucleon at NLO and NNLO based on a global data set which includes LHC data: NNPDF2.3. Our data set includes, besides the deep inelastic, Drell-Yan, gauge boson production and jet data already used in previous global PDF determinati......We present the first determination of parton distributions of the nucleon at NLO and NNLO based on a global data set which includes LHC data: NNPDF2.3. Our data set includes, besides the deep inelastic, Drell-Yan, gauge boson production and jet data already used in previous global PDF...... determinations, all the relevant LHC data for which experimental systematic uncertainties are currently available: ATLAS and LHCb W and Z rapidity distributions from the 2010 run, CMS W electron asymmetry data from the 2011 run, and ATLAS inclusive jet cross-sections from the 2010 run. We introduce an improved...... implementation of the FastKernel method which allows us to fit to this extended data set, and also to adopt a more effective minimization methodology. We present the NNPDF2.3 PDF sets, and compare them to the NNPDF2.1 sets to assess the impact of the LHC data. We find that all the LHC data are broadly consistent...

  14. Exotic branes and nongeometric backgrounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, J.; Shigemori, M.

    2010-01-01

    When string or M theory is compactified to lower dimensions, the U-duality symmetry predicts so-called exotic branes whose higher-dimensional origin cannot be explained by the standard string or M-theory branes. We argue that exotic branes can be understood in higher dimensions as nongeometric backg

  15. Exotic branes and nongeometric backgrounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, J.; Shigemori, M.

    2010-01-01

    When string or M theory is compactified to lower dimensions, the U-duality symmetry predicts so-called exotic branes whose higher-dimensional origin cannot be explained by the standard string or M-theory branes. We argue that exotic branes can be understood in higher dimensions as nongeometric backg

  16. LHCB : Exotic hadrons at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Salazar De Paula, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations by Belle and CDF. Using the data collected at pp collisions at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment we present the unambiguous new observation of exotic charmonia hadrons produced in B decays.

  17. Diphoton and diboson probes of fermiophobic Higgs bosons at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Antonio; Garcia-Pepin, Mateo; Quirós, Mariano; Santiago, José; Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Extensions of the Standard Model Higgs sector with electroweak charged scalars can possess exotic `Higgs' bosons with vanishing or suppressed couplings to Standard Model fermions. These `fermiophobic' scalars, which cannot be produced via gluon fusion, are constrained by LHC measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs boson to have a small vacuum expectation value. This implies that vector boson fusion and associated vector boson production are in general suppressed rendering conventional Higgs searches insensitive. However, Drell-Yan Higgs pair production, which is not present in the SM, can be sizeable even in the limit of vanishing exotic Higgs vacuum expectation value. We utilize this to show that diphoton searches at 8 TeV LHC already rule out a large class of neutral fermiophobic Higgs bosons below ˜ 110 GeV. This includes fermiophobic scalars found in two Higgs doublet as well as Higgs triplet and Georgi-Machacek type models. Our results extend the only relevant limit on fermiophobic Higgs bosons obtained by a recent CDF analysis of 4 γ + X Tevatron data. Furthermore, diphoton limits are independent of the decay of the second Higgs boson and thus apply even for degenerate masses in contrast to the CDF search. We also find that if the fermiophobic Higgs has very enhanced couplings to photons, masses as large as ˜ 150 GeV can be ruled out while if these couplings are somehow highly suppressed, masses below ˜ 90 GeV can still be ruled out. Finally, we show that WW and ZZ diboson searches may serve as complementary probes for masses above the diphoton limit up to ˜ 250 GeV and discuss prospects at 13 TeV LHC.

  18. Models of 750 GeV quarkonium and the LHC excesses

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate models involving a vector-like quark X, which forms a 750 GeV bound state and reproduces the observed diphoton signals at the LHC, in connection with other excesses in the LHC data. An exotic hypercharge of -4/3 is required to fit the signal cross section, which indicates that there is additional particle(s) that mediates the decay of X in the full theory. We find that, introducing an SU(2) doublet vector-like quark of mass around 600 GeV in our UV-complete framework can accommodate not only the diphoton but also the on-Z excess (and potentially a slight excess in the monojet events). Our models also include a dark matter candidate. The most useful way to probe the models at the LHC is via monojet searches. The relic dark matter density is largely determined by coannihilation effects, and indirect detection of dark matter annihilation signals is the alternative and complementary probe of our models.

  19. Black Holes and Exotic Spinors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Hoff da Silva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Exotic spin structures are non-trivial liftings, of the orthogonal bundle to the spin bundle, on orientable manifolds that admit spin structures according to the celebrated Geroch theorem. Exotic spin structures play a role of paramount importance in different areas of physics, from quantum field theory, in particular at Planck length scales, to gravity, and in cosmological scales. Here, we introduce an in-depth panorama in this field, providing black hole physics as the fount of spacetime exoticness. Black holes are then studied as the generators of a non-trivial topology that also can correspond to some inequivalent spin structure. Moreover, we investigate exotic spinor fields in this context and the way exotic spinor fields branch new physics. We also calculate the tunneling probability of exotic fermions across a Kerr-Sen black hole, showing that the exotic term does affect the tunneling probability, altering the black hole evaporation rate. Finally we show that it complies with the Hawking temperature universal law.

  20. Statistics on the distribution of contracts and purchase orders by country for the LHC Project based on payments and outstanding commitments for the period 1 January 1995 to 31 March 2000 (including adjudications by the Finance Committee up to March 2000).

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    Statistics on the distribution of contracts and purchase orders by country for the LHC Project based on payments and outstanding commitments for the period 1 January 1995 to 31 March 2000 (including adjudications by the Finance Committee up to March 2000).

  1. LHC sector 6-7 magnet training 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    On 31 october 2014, the LHC operations team carried out the first magnet traing for the LHC after LS1. A current of 9779 ampères (corresponding to a magnet energy of 5.8 Tev) was reached for sector 6-7 before the magnet quench. The footage includes comments by LHC Engineer In Charge Kajetan Furschberger and and LHC Operations team leader Mirko Pojer.

  2. The LHC and its successors

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    Not too long before the first long technical stop of the LHC, engineers and physicists are already working on the next generation of accelerators: HL-LHC and LHeC. The first would push proton-proton collisions to an unprecedented luminosity rate; the second would give a second wind to electron-proton collisions.   The ring-ring configuration of the LHeC would need this type of magnets, currently being studied for possible future use. In one year, the LHC will begin to change. During the first long shutdown, from December 2012 to late 2014, the machine will go through a first phase of major upgrades, with the objective of running at 7 TeV per beam at the beginning of 2015. With this long technical stop and the two others that will follow (in 2018 and 2022), a new project will see the light of day. Current plans include the study of something that looks more like a new machine rather than a simple upgrade: the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). Much more powerful than the current machine, the HL-...

  3. Production of exotic and conventional quarkonia and open beauty/open charm at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    C. Bini; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at LHC is carrying on a wide programme to study the production properties of conventional and exotic quarkonium, beauty, and charm bound states. The latest results on J/$\\psi$, $\\psi$(2s) and X(3872) production at 7, 8, and 13 TeV, together with D meson production with Run-1 are presented. Studies of associated production of charmonium with vector bosons, searches for exotic states in the bottomonium sector and a new measurement of the ratio of b-quark fragmentation functions are also briefly presented.

  4. Production of exotic and conventional quarkonia and open beauty/open charm at ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bini, C.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    The ATLAS experiment at LHC is carrying on a wide programme to study the production properties of conventional and exotic quarkonium, beauty, and charm bound states. The latest results on J/ψ, ψ(2s) and X(3872) production at 7, 8, and 13 TeV, together with D meson production with Run-1 are presented. Studies of associated production of charmonium with vector bosons, searches for exotic states in the bottomonium sector and a new measurement of the ratio of b-quark fragmentation functions are also briefly presented.

  5. Supersymmetry Projection Rules on Exotic Branes

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    We study the supersymmetry projection rules on exotic branes in type II string theories and M-theory. They justify the validity of the exotic duality between standard branes and exotic branes of codimension two. By virtue of the supersymmetry projection rules on various branes, we can apply the exotic duality to a system which involves multiple non-parallel branes.

  6. New quarks: exotic versus strong

    OpenAIRE

    Holdom, B.

    2011-01-01

    The new quarks of a fourth family are being pushed into the strongly interacting regime due to the lower limits on their masses. The theoretical basis and experimental implications of such quarks are compared with exotic quarks.

  7. The LHC inauguration in pictures

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    The LHC inauguration ceremony was a memorable experience for everyone who attended. On Tuesday 21 October the ceremony hall, SMA18, was filled with over 1500 invited guests, VIPs included Swiss President Pascal Couchepin, French Prime Minister François Fillon and several ministers from CERN’s Member States and around the world. You can watch a video of the highlights of the ceremony at http://cds.cern.ch/record/1136012 The Heads of Delegations from all the Member and Observer States pose with the Director-General. "The LHC is a marvel of modern technology, which would not have been possible without the continuous support of our Member States," said the Director-General in his opening speech. "This is an opportunity for me to thank them on behalf of the world’s particle physics community." The LHC inauguration ceremony officially marked the end of 24 years of conception, development, constru...

  8. HL-LHC Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    The tentative schedule, key ingredients, as well as progress of pertinent R&D and component prototypes for the LHC luminosity upgrade, "HL-LHC," are reviewed. Also alternative scenarios based on performance-improving consolidations (PICs) instead of a full upgrade are discussed. Tentative time schedules and expected luminosity evolutions for the different scenarios are sketched. The important role of HL-LHC development as a step towards a future HE-LHC or VHE-LHC is finally highlighted. Presented at "Higgs & Beyond" Conference Tohoku University, Sendai 7 June 2013.

  9. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Toshimi Suda

    2014-11-01

    A brand-new electron scattering facility, the SCRIT Electron Scattering Facility, will soon start its operation at RIKEN RI Beam Factory, Japan. This is the world’s first electron scattering facility dedicated to the structure studies of short-lived nuclei. The goal of this facility is to determine the charge density distributions of short-lived exotic nuclei by elastic electron scattering. The first collision between electrons and exotic nuclei will be observed in the year 2014.

  10. Recommendations for PDF usage in LHC predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accardi, A. [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Alekhin, S. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation); Bluemlein, J. [DESY Zeuthen (Germany); and others

    2016-03-15

    We review the present status of the determination of parton distribution functions (PDFs) in the light of the precision requirements for the LHC in Run 2 and other future hadron colliders. We provide brief reviews of all currently available PDF sets and use them to compute cross sections for a number of benchmark processes, including Higgs boson production in gluon-gluon fusion at the LHC.We show that the differences in the predictions obtained with the various PDFs are due to particular theory assumptions made in the fits of those PDFs. We discuss PDF uncertainties in the kinematic region covered by the LHC and on averaging procedures for PDFs, such as advocated by the PDF4LHC15 sets, and provide recommendations for the usage of PDF sets for theory predictions at the LHC.

  11. Soft QCD Measurements at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tasevsky, Marek; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Results of recent soft QCD measurements by LHC experiments ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, LHCb, LHCf and TOTEM are reported. The measurements include total, elastic and inelastic cross sections, inclusive and identified particle spectra, underlying event and particle correlations in all three collision systems: pp, pPb and PbPb.

  12. Commissioned article: management of exotic snakebites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrell, D A

    2009-09-01

    Exotic (foreign or non-native) snakes, including venomous species, are becoming increasingly popular pets in Western countries. Some of them are kept illegally (as defined by the UK Dangerous Wild Animals Act of 1976). There is a large international market for such animals, with contraventions of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). In the UK, several other European countries and the USA the reported numbers of bites by venomous exotic snakes, although small, are increasing but still underestimate the occurrence of these occasionally fatal events because of the victims' reluctance to seek medical care. Victims are predominantly young men who have been drinking alcohol. Bites may be intentionally provoked. In Europe, the species most often involved are cobras, green mambas, American pit vipers particularly rattlesnakes, African adders, vipers and Asian green pit vipers. To illustrate the special problems involved, case histories are presented of bites by exotic species in the UK and of bites abroad, where patients were repatriated for treatment. In view of the relative rarity and diversity of these cases, expert advice must usually be sought. These requests should include information about the species thought to have been responsible and the history and timing of the evolution of envenoming. Sources of advice and antivenom are discussed together with recommendations for appropriate first aid and emergency treatment while this is being awaited. Respiratory and cardiovascular resuscitation may be required and when systemic or severe local envenoming develops, specific (equine or ovine) antivenom is indicated.

  13. Effects of exotic species on Yellowstone's grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, D.P.; Haroldson, Mark A.; Mattson, D.J.; Gunther, Kerry A.

    2001-01-01

    Humans have affected grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) by direct mortality, competition for space and resources, and introduction of exotic species. Exotic organisms that have affected grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Area include common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), nonnative clovers (Trifolium spp.), domesticated livestock, bovine brucellosis (Brucella abortus), lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola). Some bears consume substantial amounts of dandelion and clover. However, these exotic foods provide little digested energy compared to higher-quality bear foods. Domestic livestock are of greater energetic value, but use of this food by bears often leads to conflicts with humans and subsequent increases in bear mortality. Lake trout, blister rust, and brucellosis diminish grizzly bears foods. Lake trout prey on native cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) in Yellowstone Lake; white pine blister rust has the potential to destroy native whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) stands; and management response to bovine brucellosis, a disease found in the Yellowstone bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus), could reduce populations of these 2 species. Exotic species will likely cause more harm than good for Yellowstone grizzly bears. Managers have few options to mitigate or contain the impacts of exotics on Yellowstones grizzly bears. Moreover, their potential negative impacts have only begun to unfold. Exotic species may lead to the loss of substantial highquality grizzly bear foods, including much of the bison, trout, and pine seeds that Yellowstone grizzly bears currently depend upon.

  14. Searches for Exotic physics beyond the Standard Model with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Haley, Joseph; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    An overview of Exotic physics searches with the ATLAS detector is given in this presentation, highlighting selected LHC Run 1 results as well as first Run 2 results (if available). The Standard Model of particle physics is thought to be “completed” with the discovery of the Higgs boson, though many yet to be answered questions remain, such as dark matter, baryon asymmetry of the Universe, neutrino masses, quark/lepton generations, etc. New physics scenarios addressing these questions predict new particles/phenomena in a wide range of topologies/final states, motivating us to develop signature-based search strategy. This talk will summarize ATLAS results on Exotic physics searches and future prospects at the LHC.

  15. LHC Report: Rocky Recovery

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2011-01-01

    The last technical stop finished on Friday 8 July, but the machine returned to its pre-stop performance level over a week later.   Efficiency of LHC fills between 16 July and 20 July, 2011. The cryogenics team had the entire ring cold by Saturday morning and the usual post-technical stop tests with circulating beams started soon after. Unfortunately, they were interrupted by a major perturbation to CERN’s electrical network caused by an impressive thunderstorm that swept over the Pays de Gex. There were major knock-on effects, including the loss of cooling to the cryogenics and an inevitable recovery period once normal service had been re-established. The beams were circulating again by Tuesday afternoon and the post-technical stop checks continued, beefed up with further tests to address a number of issues related to the power cut.  Before the stop, the LHC had managed to get 1380 bunches per beam into collisions and the plan was to ramp back up relatively quickly to this leve...

  16. MoEDAL: Seeking magnetic monopoles and more at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2074312

    2015-01-01

    The MoEDAL experiment (Monopole and Exotics Detector at the LHC) is designed to directly search for magnetic monopoles and other highly ionising stable or metastable particles arising in various theoretical scenarios beyond the Standard Model. Its physics goals --largely complementary to the multi-purpose LHC detectors ATLAS and CMS-- are accomplished by the deployment of plastic nuclear track detectors combined with trapping volumes for capturing charged highly ionising particles and TimePix pixel devices for monitoring. This paper focuses on the status of the detectors and the prospects for LHC Run II.

  17. Searches for new physics with bosons at the ATLAS detector in LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Marsden, Stephen Philip; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model at LHC Run II with the ATLAS detector are presented in this talk. The 13 TeV center of mass energy at LHC Run II will significantly increase sensitivity to new physics at high-energy/high-mass regime compared to Run I. This talk will highlight results on Exotics physics searches in LHC Run II as well as selected results from Run I.

  18. Exotic quarkonium states at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Cristella, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Using large data samples of di-muon events, CMS has performed detailed measurements and searches for new states in the field of exotic quarkonia. We report on measurements of the charmonium X(3872), and search for its counterpart in the bottomonium sector. The investigation of the B+ to J/psi phi K+ decay reveals two structures in the J/psi phi mass spectrum. For the one closest to the kinematical threshold, and compatible with the Y(4140) state by CDF, a few explanations have been suggested such as a tetraquark partner of the X(3872), a molecular partner of the Y(3940) or a charmonium hybrid. Charged Z charmonium-like states are particularly interesting as candidates for tetra-quark states. Results from CMS are foreseen to be provided by applying a full amplitude analysis method to the neutral B meson 3-body decays into J/psi(or psi(2S)) Kaon Pion. Searches for tetraquarks are also performed in CMS in the multi-lepton final states including J/psi and Y.

  19. P fluxes and exotic branes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Davide M.; Riccioni, Fabio; Risoli, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    We consider the N = 1 superpotential generated in type-II orientifold models by non-geometric fluxes. In particular, we focus on the family of P fluxes, that are related by T-duality transformations to the S-dual of the Q flux. We determine the general rule that transforms a given flux in this family under a single T-duality transformation. This rule allows to derive a complete expression for the superpotential for both the IIA and the IIB theory for the particular case of a {T}^6/[{Z}_2× {Z}_2] orientifold. We then consider how these fluxes modify the generalised Bianchi identities. In particular, we derive a fully consistent set of quadratic constraints coming from the NS-NS Bianchi identities. On the other hand, the P flux Bianchi identities induce tadpoles, and we determine a set of exotic branes that can be consistently included in order to cancel them. This is achieved by determining a universal transformation rule under T-duality satisfied by all the branes in string theory.

  20. $P$ fluxes and exotic branes

    CERN Document Server

    Lombardo, Davide M; Risoli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We consider the ${\\cal N}=1$ superpotential generated in type-II orientifold models by non-geometric fluxes. In particular, we focus on the family of $P$ fluxes, that are related by T-duality transformations to the S-dual of the $Q$ flux. We determine the general rule that transforms a given flux in this family under a single T-duality transformation. This rule allows to derive a complete expression for the superpotential for both the IIA and the IIB theory for the particular case of a $T^6/[\\mathbb{Z}_2 \\times \\mathbb{Z}_2 ]$ orientifold. We then consider how these fluxes modify the generalised Bianchi identities. In particular, we derive a fully consistent set of quadratic constraints coming from the NS-NS Bianchi identities. On the other hand, the $P$ flux Bianchi identities induce tadpoles, and we determine a set of exotic branes that can be consistently included in order to cancel them. This is achieved by determining a universal transformation rule under T-duality satisfied by all the branes in string t...

  1. Postoperative management of the exotic animal patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Christal

    2002-01-01

    Careful postoperative management is crucial for the success of any orthopedic surgical repair. The special needs of the exotic animal must be met during the immediate postoperative period and during hospitalization. Many exotic animals require a quiet, stress-free environment and careful attention to housing parameters, such as perching, temperature, and visual security. To provide adequate pain relief in these patients, analgesia should be given before, during, and after surgery. The drugs most often used for pain relief are NSAIDs and opioid analgesics. After surgery, monitor the healing process carefully with regular examinations and radiographs while remaining vigilant for potential problems such as osteomyelitis or nonunion. Physical therapy prevents the development of fracture disease, which includes joint or ligament contracture and bone or muscle mass loss. Because physical therapy affords the patient full use of the affected limb, it is considered a helpful practice in all patients. Physical therapy, however, is critical for free-ranging exotic animals that will be released back into the wild, such as birds of prey.

  2. Searches for long-lived, Exotic particles with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, CP; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Three recent searches for massive, exotic, long-lived particles are presented for 2011 LHC data using the ATLAS detector. No new physics has been found but limits have been set, and tools for future searches have been developed. Improvements are under way using timing, ionization, and displac ed vertices in several ATLAS sub-detectors for searches with full 2011 data and 2012 data.

  3. Production of exotic charmonium in $\\gamma \\gamma$ interactions at hadronic colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Moreira, B D; Goncalves, V P; Navarra, F S

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the Exotic Charmonium (EC) production in $\\gamma \\gamma$ interactions present in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies as well as for the proposed energies of the Future Circular Collider (FCC). Our results demonstrate that the experimental study of these processes is feasible and can be used to constrain the theoretical decay widths and shed some light on the configuration of the considered multiquark states.

  4. Searching For Exotic Physics Beyond the Standard Model: Extrapolation Until the End of Run-3

    CERN Document Server

    Genest, Marie-Hel\\`ene; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The prospects of looking for exotic beyond-the-Standard-Model physics with the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the LHC in the rest of Run-2 and in Run-3 will be reviewed. A few selected analyses will be discussed, showing the gain in sensitivity that can be achieved by accumulating more data and comparing the current limits with the predicted reach. Some limiting factors will be identified, along with ideas on how to improve on the searches.

  5. LHC synchronization test successful

    CERN Multimedia

    The synchronization of the LHC's clockwise beam transfer system and the rest of CERN's accelerator chain was successfully achieved last weekend. Tests began on Friday 8 August when a single bunch of a few particles was taken down the transfer line from the SPS accelerator to the LHC. After a period of optimization, one bunch was kicked up from the transfer line into the LHC beam pipe and steered about 3 kilometres around the LHC itself on the first attempt. On Saturday, the test was repeated several times to optimize the transfer before the operations group handed the machine back for hardware commissioning to resume on Sunday. The anti-clockwise synchronization systems will be tested over the weekend of 22 August.Picture:http://lhc-injection-test.web.cern.ch/lhc-injection-test/

  6. Some LHC milestones...

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    October 1995 The LHC technical design report is published. This document details the operation and the architecture of the future accelerator. November 2000 The first of the 1232 main dipole magnets for the LHC are delivered. May 2005 The first interconnection between two magnets of the accelerator is made. To carry out the 1700 interconnections of the LHC, 123 000 operations are necessary. February 2006 The new CERN Control Centre, which combines all the control rooms for the accelerators, the cryogenics and the technical infrastructure, starts operation. The LHC will be controlled from here. October 2006 Construction of the largest refrigerator in the world is complete. The 27 km cryogenic distribution line inside the LHC tunnel will circulate helium in liquid and gas phases to provide cryogenic conditions for the superconducting magnets of the accelerator. November 2006 Magnet production for the LHC is complete. The last of t...

  7. Frontiers in Particle Physics: From Dark Matter to the LHC and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    With the recent discovery of the Higgs particle, this conference will be devoted to the status of our understanding of the Electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism and related topics. Particular emphasis will be given to the many relevant theories that may be realized in nature, and how these can be tested at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The conference will provide a broad overview of the latest results in particle physics, bringing together experimental and theoretical physicists. Additional topics will include: indirect and direct dark matter searches, SUSY searches, top quark physics, exotic phenomena, flavor physics and improved understanding of standard model processes. An important aspect of the conference is to provide a glimpse into the future from the experimental viewpoint, as well as the theoretical one. Registration is from Aspen Center for Physics website (link here).

  8. LHC Report: The beam is back at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes Alemany

    2015-01-01

    A series of sector beam tests paved the way for the start-up of the LHC in 2008 and 2009. These tests and the follow-up of the issues that arose were part of the process that led to a smooth start-up with beam.   Given this experience, sector tests were scheduled to take place several weeks before the 2015 start-up. On the weekend of 6-9 March, beam from the SPS was injected into both LHC injection regions, followed by a first pass through the downstream LHC sectors. For the clockwise LHC beam (called “beam 1”) this meant passing through ALICE and into Sector 2-3, while the anticlockwise beam (called “beam 2”) was threaded through LHCb and all the way from Point 8 to Point 6, where it was extracted by the beam dump kickers onto the beam dump block. The dry runs in the previous weeks were mainly targeted at preparation for the sector tests. The systems tested included: injection, timing, synchronisation and beam instrumentation. The beam interlock ...

  9. Searches for exotic stable massive particles with the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ohm, Christian; Moa, Torbjörn

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents two signature-based searches for exotic long-lived particles using experimental data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. At the LHC, proton-proton collisions take place at the world-record center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and luminosities of up to $3\\times 10^{33}cm^{-2}s^{-1}$. New physics has long been anticipated at the LHC and in this thesis two searches for hitherto unobserved particles are presented. Long-lived heavy hadrons have been predicted by models of supersymmetry, and these were the target of the first physics analysis. Using measurements of timing and energy loss, a search for so-called $R$-hadrons was performed. No excess was observed in the data, and new lower limits were established on the masses of meta-stable supersymmetric particles with color charge: $m_{\\tilde{g}} > 562-586$ GeV (depending on choice of scattering model), $m_{\\tilde{t}} > 309$ GeV and $m_{\\tilde{b}} > 294$ GeV. These constraints are the most stringent limits pu...

  10. The 750 GeV LHC diphoton excess from a baryon number conserving string model

    CERN Document Server

    Kokorelis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    We propose an explanation of the LHC data excess resonance of 750 GeV in the diphoton distribution using D-brane models, with gauged baryon number, which accommodate the Standard Model together with vector like exotics. We identify the 750 GeV scalar as either the sneutrino (${\\tilde \

  11. Scintillating Fibre Calorimetry at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Good electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry will play a central role in an LHC detector. The lead/scintillating fibre calorimeter technique provides a fast signal response well matched to the LHC rate requirements. It can be made to give equal response for electrons and hadrons (compensation) with good electromagnetic and hadronic energy resolutions.\\\\ \\\\ The aim of this R&D proposal is to study in detail the aspects that are relevant for application of this type of calorimeter in an LHC environment, including its integration in a larger system of detectors, e.g.~projective geometry, radiation hardness, light detection, calibration and stability monitoring, electron/hadron separation.....

  12. LHC Report: Back in operation

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    With the machine back in their hands since Friday, 4 March, the LHC operators are now performing the powering tests on the magnets. This is a crucial step before receiving the first beams and restarting Run 2 for physics.   A Distribution Feed-Box (DFB) brings power to the LHC magnets and maintains the stability of the current in the superconducting circuits. The LHC was the last machine to be handed back to operators after the completion of maintenance work carried out during the Year-End Technical Stop (YETS) that had started on 14 December 2015. During the eleven weeks of scheduled maintenance activities, several operations took place in all the accelerators and beam lines. They included the maintenance in several points of the cryogenic system, the replacement of 18 magnets in the Super Proton Synchrotron; an extensive campaign to identify and remove thousands of obsolete cables; the replacement of the LHC beam absorbers for injection (TDIs) that are used to absorb the SPS b...

  13. Keeping the LHC in power

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    The critical safety equipment around the LHC, including the machine protection systems, is connected to Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS).  In case of mains failure, the UPS systems continue to power, for a limited time, these critical systems and ensure a safe shutdown of the accelerator. This week, work began to upgrade and replace over 100 UPS systems in the LHC.   The new UPS installations. For the LHC, even a perturbation on the mains is more than just an inconvenience: it often results in beam dumps and, in some cases, requires an energy extraction from superconducting circuits. When this occurs, machine protection systems, and in particular the Quench Protection System, must remain active to correctly carry out the shutdown procedure. With the UPS systems, 10 minutes of crucial power can be provided to the protection systems during this critical phase. There are currently two UPS systems in place in each one of the 32 LHC UPS zones. Originally one was used as a backup if ...

  14. Revision of exotic $0^{--}$ glueball

    CERN Document Server

    Pimikov, Alexandr; Kochelev, Nikolai; Zhang, Pengming

    2016-01-01

    We present the new results for the exotic glueball state $0^{--}$ in the framework of the QCD sum rules. It is shown that previously used three-gluon current does not couple to any glueball bound state. We suggest considering a new current which couples to this exotic state. The resulting values for mass and decay constant of the $0^{--}$ glueball state are $M_G=6.3^{+0.8}_{-1.1}$ GeV and $F_G=67 \\pm 6 $ keV, respectively.

  15. The whole world behind the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The LHC Board, which includes representatives of the non-Member State organisations directly involved in the construction of the LHC accelerator and representatives of CERN, held its fourth meeting on Monday 21 May 2001. From left to right: 1st row, A. Yamamoto (KEK, Japan), P. Pfund (FNAL, United States), L. Maiani (CERN Director-General), L. Evans (LHC Project Leader), F. Dupont (IN2P3, France), D.D. Bhawalkar (CAT, India) ; 2nd row, P. Brossier (CEA, France), N. Tyurin (IHEP, Russia), A. Skrinsky (BINP, Russia), A. Astbury (TRIUMF, Canada), P. Lebrun (LHC Division Leader, CERN); 3rd row, T. Taylor (Deputy Division Leader LHC Division, CERN), A. Shotter (TRIUMF, Canada), P. Bryant (LHC, CERN), K. Hübner (Director for Accelerators, CERN), J. van der Boon (Director of Administration, CERN). Although Canada, the United States, India, Japan and the Russian Federation are not members of CERN, they are all playing an active part in the construction of the LHC through important technical and financial co...

  16. HL-LHC updates in Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    At a recent meeting in Japan, updates on the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project were presented, including the progress made so far and the deadlines still to be met for the upgraded machine to be operational from 2020.   New magnets made with advanced superconductor Nb3Sn in the framework of the HL-LHC project. These magnets are currently under construction at CERN by the TE-MSC group. The LHC is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, and in 2015 it will reach yet another new record for the energy of its colliding beams. One key factor of its discovery potential is its ability to produce collisions described in mathematical terms by the parameter known as “luminosity”. In 2025, the HL-LHC project will allow the total number of collisions in the LHC to increase by a factor of 10. The first step in this rich upgrade programme is the delivery of the Preliminary Design Report (PDR), which is also a key milestone of the HiLumi LHC Design Study partly fund...

  17. BSM searches (SUSY and Exotic) from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Schioppa, Marco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) at the LHC are mainly driven by two approaches: a signature-based search where one looks for a deviation from the SM prediction in event yield or kinematic properties, and a more theory-oriented approach where the search is designed to look for specific signatures/topologies predicted by certain beyond standard model (BSM ) scenarios. Typical examples for the latter are searches for Supersymmetry and other BSM theories with extended symmetries. Supersymmetry predicts a new partner for every SM particle. An extension to the SM by introducing new gauge or global symmetries (including in Hidden Sector) usually leads to the presence of new heavy gauge bosons. Extensive searches for such particles have been performed in ATLAS at LHC in the context of Supersymmetry, Extended Gauge models, Technicolor, Little Higgs, Extra Dimensions, Left-Right symmetric models, and many other BSM scenarios. Highlights from these searches are presented.

  18. LHC smashes luminosity record

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN particle-physics lab has surpassed its luminosity goals for 2016, delivering 40 inverse femtobarns against a target of 25. For 2016 the LHC was expected to reach a peak luminosity of 1034 cm‑2s‑1, but by the end of the run it was regularly operating 30% above that figure.

  19. LHC superconducting strand

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    This cross-section through a strand of superconducting matieral as used in the LHC shows the 8000 Niobium-Titanium filaments embedded like a honeycomb in copper. When cooled to 1.9 degrees above absolute zero in the LHC accelerator, these filaments will have zero resistance and so will carry a high electric current with no energy loss.

  20. "Exotic" black holes with torsion

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In the context of three-dimensional gravity with torsion, the concepts of standard and "exotic" Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes are generalized by going over to black holes with torsion. This approach provides a unified insight into thermodynamics of black holes, with or without torsion.

  1. Exotic meson studies at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreps Michal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations of several states. Using the pp collisions data collected at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment, we performed studies of the X(3872 decay rate to ψ (2Sγ final state, as well as confirmation the Z(4430+ state.

  2. Exotic meson studies at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Kreps, Michal

    2014-01-01

    The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations of several states. Using the $pp$ collisions data collected at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment, we performed studies of the $X(3872)$ decay rate to $\\psi (2S ) \\gamma$ final state, as well as confirmation the $Z(4430)^+$ state.

  3. Exotic Non-relativistic String

    CERN Document Server

    Casalbuoni, Roberto; Longhi, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    We construct a classical non-relativistic string model in 3+1 dimensions. The model contains a spurion tensor field that is responsible for the non-commutative structure of the model. Under double dimensional reduction the model reduces to the exotic non-relativistic particle in 2+1 dimensions.

  4. Searched for exotics at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Turra, Ruggero; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This note presents a selected subset of the analyses made by ATLAS using data from Run2 at 13 TeV searching for exotic New Physics. The choice of the analyses has been motivated by the connection with the $\\gamma\\gamma$ search where a modest excess has been found.

  5. Exotic smoothness and quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asselmeyer-Maluga, T, E-mail: torsten.asselmeyer-maluga@dlr.d [German Aerospace Center, Berlin, Germany and Loyola University, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2010-08-21

    Since the first work on exotic smoothness in physics, it was folklore to assume a direct influence of exotic smoothness to quantum gravity. Thus, the negative result of Duston (2009 arXiv:0911.4068) was a surprise. A closer look into the semi-classical approach uncovered the implicit assumption of a close connection between geometry and smoothness structure. But both structures, geometry and smoothness, are independent of each other. In this paper we calculate the 'smoothness structure' part of the path integral in quantum gravity assuming that the 'sum over geometries' is already given. For that purpose we use the knot surgery of Fintushel and Stern applied to the class E(n) of elliptic surfaces. We mainly focus our attention to the K3 surfaces E(2). Then we assume that every exotic smoothness structure of the K3 surface can be generated by knot or link surgery in the manner of Fintushel and Stern. The results are applied to the calculation of expectation values. Here we discuss the two observables, volume and Wilson loop, for the construction of an exotic 4-manifold using the knot 5{sub 2} and the Whitehead link Wh. By using Mostow rigidity, we obtain a topological contribution to the expectation value of the volume. Furthermore, we obtain a justification of area quantization.

  6. Bacterial and parasitic zoonoses of exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Marcy J

    2009-09-01

    Zoonoses are estimated to make up to 75% of today's emerging infectious diseases. Many of these diseases are carried and transmitted by exotic pets and wildlife. Exotic animal practitioners must be aware of these risks not only to protect their health but also to safeguard the health of staff and clients. This article reviews selected bacterial and parasitic zoonoses associated with exotic animals.

  7. LHC restart 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual production

    2016-01-01

    Footage of first injection of proton beam in the LHC machine, that took place on Friday March 25, 2016, at the injection energy of 450 GeV. Interview to Mike Lamont, head of LHC operations and of Fabiola Gianotti, CERN Director General. General footage of the Cern Control Centre on first beam 2016 day, the LHC machine operators and Engineers in Charge at work, relevant screens summarizing the machine parametres. Views of the LHC tunnel and the 4 main experimental caverns with views of the ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHCb detectors. 3 D animations of the CERN accelerator complex, from the Linac, to the PS, SPS and the LHC. VOICE OVER : Alex Brown

  8. Fourteenth Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-07-11

    The Fourteenth Annual Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015 was held August 2nd - August 7th, 2015, and belongs to the series of summer programs aimed at educating future workforce in nuclear physics-related areas, mostly about the challenges of radioactive ion beam physics. Through these schools the research community will be able to exploit fully the opportunities created by the exotic beam facilities. These facilities in the US include CARIBU at ANL, the NSCL and the future FRIB laboratory as well as smaller-scale university laboratories. The skill set needed by the future workforce is very diverse and a fundamental understanding of theoretical, technical, computational and applied fields are all important. Therefore, the Exotic Beam Summer Schools follow a unique approach, in which the students not only receive lectures but also participate in hands-on activities. The lectures covered broad topics in both the experimental and theoretical physics of nuclei far from stability as well as radioactive ions production and applications. The afternoons provided opportunities for "hands-on" projects with experimental equipment and techniques useful in FRIB research. Five activities were performed in groups of eight students, rotating through the activities over the five afternoons of the school. The center of the activities was an experiment at the FSU tandem accelerator, measuring the angular distribution and cross section of the 12C(d,p)13C transfer reaction, measured with a silicon telescope in a scattering chamber. The experimental data were analyzed by performing a DWBA calculation with the program DWUCK, and the resulting spectroscopic factors were compared to a shell model calculation. The other activities included target preparation, digital gamma-spectroscopy and modern neutron detection methods.

  9. Literature in Focus Perspectives on LHC Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Library invites you to a book presentation, a Literature in Focus event. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be the world’s largest, highest energy and highest intensity particle accelerator. This is a timely book with several perspectives on the hoped-for discoveries from the LHC. This book provides an overview of the techniques that will be crucial for finding new physics at the LHC, as well as perspectives on the importance and implications of the discoveries. Among the accomplished contributors to this book are leaders and visionaries in the field of particle physics beyond the Standard Model, including two Nobel Laureates (Steven Weinberg and Frank Wilczek). With its blend of popular and technical contents, the book will have wide appeal, not only to physical scientists but also to those in related fields. Perspectives on LHC Physics (World Scientific Publishing) Gordon Kane and Aaron Pierce (eds.) Tuesday 12 August, 4.30pm Council Chamber Refresh...

  10. LHC Report: LHC hit the target!

    CERN Document Server

    Enrico Bravin for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    Last week, the accumulated integrated luminosity reached the target value for 2016 of 25 fb-1 in both ATLAS and CMS.   The integrated luminosity delivered to ATLAS and CMS reached (and already passed!) 25 fb-1– the target for the whole year! Tuesday, 30 August was just a regular day for the 2016 LHC run. However,  on that day, the integrated luminosity delivered to ATLAS and CMS reached 25 fb-1 – the target for the whole year! How did we get here? A large group of committed scientists and technical experts work behind the scenes at the LHC, ready to adapt to the quirks of this truly impressive machine. After the push to produce as many proton-proton collisions as possible before the summer conferences, several new ideas and production techniques (such as Bunch Compression Multiple Splitting, BCMS) have been incorporated in the operation of LHC in order to boost its performance even further. Thanks to these improvements, the LHC was routinely operated with peak luminos...

  11. LHC News : Half way round the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2009-01-01

    Particles are smoothly making their way around the 27 km circumference of the LHC. Last weekend (7-8 November), the first bunches of injection energy protons completed their journey (anti-clockwise) through three octants of the LHC’s circumference and were dumped in a collimator just before entering the CMS cavern.

  12. The LHC babies

    CERN Document Server

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2011-01-01

    With the machine restart and first collisions at 3.5 TeV, 2009 and 2010 were two action-packed years at the LHC. The events were a real media success, but one important result that remained well hidden was the ten births in the LHC team over the same period. The mothers – engineers, cryogenics experts and administrative assistants working for the LHC – confirm that it is possible to maintain a reasonable work-life balance. Two of them tell us more…   Verena Kain (left) and Reyes Alemany (right) in the CERN Control Centre. With the LHC running around the clock, LHC operations engineers have high-pressure jobs with unsociable working hours. These past two years, which will undoubtedly go down in the annals of CERN history, the LHC team had their work cut out, but despite their high-octane professional lives, several female members of the team took up no less of a challenge in their private lives, creating a mini-baby-boom by which the LHC start-up will also be remembe...

  13. HL-LHC alternatives

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; White, S

    2014-01-01

    The HL-LHC parameters assume unexplored regimes for hadron colliders in various aspects of accelerator beam dynamics and technology. This paper reviews three alternatives that could potentially improve the LHC performance: (i) the alternative filling scheme 8b+4e, (ii) the use of a 200 MHz RF system in the LHC and (iii) the use of proton cooling methods to reduce the beam emittance (at top energy and at injection). The alternatives are assessed in terms of feasibility, pros and cons, risks versus benefits and the impact on beam availability.

  14. Conference: STANDARD MODEL @ LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    HCØ institute Universitetsparken 5 DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø Denmark Room: Auditorium 2 STANDARD MODEL @ LHC Niels Bohr International Academy and Discovery Center 10-13 April 2012 This four day meeting will bring together both experimental and theoretical aspects of Standard Model phenomenology at the LHC. The very latest results from the LHC experiments will be under discussion. Topics covered will be split into the following categories:     * QCD (Hard,Soft & PDFs)     * Vector Boson production     * Higgs searches     * Top Quark Physics     * Flavour physics

  15. Proton structure at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Hartland, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    A determination of Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) from a global fit to a dataset including measurements from the LHC has been performed. The determinations have been carried out according to the NNPDF methodology, leading to a fit minimising parametrisation bias and with an accurate account of PDF uncertainty. In this thesis the importance of QCD measurements at the LHC to PDF extraction are discussed, and we summarise some of the technical difficulties in their inclusion into PDF fits. A number of methods are presented that permit the efficient inclusion of these observables into PDF determinations. Firstly a Bayesian reweighting procedure taking advantage of the Monte Carlo representation of PDF uncertainties in NNPDF sets is discussed, which is demonstrated by a study of the impact of early W production asymmetry measurements from ATLAS, CMS and LHCb upon an earlier PDF set. A package for the fast computation of observables in an automated NLO framework is presented, providing an interface between Mo...

  16. Simplified SIMPs and the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daci, N.; Bruyn, I. De; Lowette, S. [Inter-University Institute for High Energies, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Tytgat, M.H.G.; Zaldivar, B. [Service de Physique Théorique, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Boulevard du Triomphe, CP225, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-11-17

    The existence of Dark Matter (DM) in the form of Strongly Interacting Massive Particles (SIMPs) may be motivated by astrophysical observations that challenge the classical Cold DM scenario. Other observations greatly constrain, but do not completely exclude, the SIMP alternative. The signature of SIMPs at the LHC may consist of neutral, hadron-like, trackless jets produced in pairs. We show that the absence of charged content can provide a very efficient tool to suppress dijet backgrounds at the LHC, thus enhancing the sensitivity to a potential SIMP signal. We illustrate this using a simplified SIMP model and present a detailed feasibility study based on simulations, including a dedicated detector response parametrization. We evaluate the expected sensitivity to various signal scenarios and tentatively consider the exclusion limits on the SIMP elastic cross section with nucleons.

  17. Logarithmic exotic conformal Galilean algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henkel, Malte, E-mail: Malte.henkel@univ-lorraine.fr [Groupe de Physique Statistique, Institut Jean Lamour (CNRS UMR 7198), Université de Lorraine Nancy, B.P. 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Hosseiny, Ali, E-mail: al_hosseiny@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C. Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Particles and Accelerators, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rouhani, Shahin, E-mail: rouhani@ipm.ir [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11165-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Particles and Accelerators, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Logarithmic representations of the conformal Galilean algebra (CGA) and the Exotic Conformal Galilean algebra (ECGA) are constructed. This can be achieved by non-decomposable representations of the scaling dimensions or the rapidity indices, specific to conformal Galilean algebras. Logarithmic representations of the non-exotic CGA lead to the expected constraints on scaling dimensions and rapidities and also on the logarithmic contributions in the co-variant two-point functions. On the other hand, the ECGA admits several distinct situations which are distinguished by different sets of constraints and distinct scaling forms of the two-point functions. Two distinct realisations for the spatial rotations are identified as well. This is the first concrete example of a reducible, but non-decomposable representation, without logarithmic terms. Such cases had been anticipated before.

  18. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC): The Energy Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brianti, Giorgio; Jenni, Peter

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Superconducting Magnets: Powerful, Precise, Plentiful * LHC Cryogenics: Quantum Fluids at Work * Current Leads: High Temperature Superconductors to the Fore * A Pumping Vacuum Chamber: Ultimate Simplicity * Vertex Detectors at LHC: In Search of Beauty * Large Silicon Trackers: Fast, Precise, Efficient * Two Approaches to High Resolution Electromagnetic Calorimetry * Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber: Chronometry of Particles * The LHCb RICH: The Lord of the Cherenkov Rings * Signal Processing: Taming the LHC Data Avalanche * Giant Magnets for Giant Detectors

  19. Grand Unification and Exotic Fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Feger, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    We exploit the recently developed software package LieART to show that SU(N) grand unified theories with chiral fermions in mixed tensor irreducible representations can lead to standard model chiral fermions without additional light exotic chiral fermions, i.e., only standard model fermions are light in these models. Results are tabulated which may be of use to model builders in the future. An SU(6) toy model is given and model searches are discussed.

  20. Exotic Smoothness and Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Asselmeyer-Maluga, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    Since the first work on exotic smoothness in physics, it was folklore to assume a direct influence of exotic smoothness to quantum gravity. Thus, the negative result of Duston (arXiv:0911.4068) was a surprise. A closer look into the semi-classical approach uncovered the implicit assumption of a close connection between geometry and smoothness structure. But both structures, geometry and smoothness, are independent of each other. In this paper we calculate the "smoothness structure" part of the path integral in quantum gravity assuming that the "sum over geometries" is already given. For that purpose we use the knot surgery of Fintushel and Stern applied to the class E(n) of elliptic surfaces. We mainly focus our attention to the K3 surfaces E(2). Then we assume that every exotic smoothness structure of the K3 surface can be generated by knot or link surgery a la Fintushel and Stern. The results are applied to the calculation of expectation values. Here we discuss the two observables, volume and Wilson loop, f...

  1. Exotic decay in cerium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Santhosh; Antony Joseph

    2002-04-01

    Half life for the emission of exotic clusters like 8Be, 12C, 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg and 28Si are computed taking Coulomb and proximity potentials as interacting barrier and many of these are found well within the present upper limit of measurement. These results lie very close to those values reported by Shanmugam et al using their cubic plus Yukawa plus exponential model (CYEM). It is found that 12C and 16O emissions from 116Ce and 16O from 118Ce are most favorable for measurement (1/2 < 1010 s). Lowest half life time for 16O emission from 116Ce stress the role of doubly magic 100Sn daughter in exotic decay. Geiger–Nuttall plots were studied for different clusters and are found to be linear. Inclusion of proximity potential will not produce much deviation to linear nature of Geiger–Nuttall plots. It is observed that neutron excess in the parent nuclei slow down the exotic decay process. These findings support the earlier observations of Gupta and collaborators using their preformed cluster model (PCM).

  2. Considerations on Energy Frontier Colliders after LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir [Fermilab

    2016-11-15

    Since 1960’s, particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics, 29 total have been built and operated, 7 are in operation now. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). The future of the world-wide HEP community critically depends on the feasibility of possible post-LHC colliders. The concept of the feasibility is complex and includes at least three factors: feasibility of energy, feasibility of luminosity and feasibility of cost. Here we overview all current options for post-LHC colliders from such perspective (ILC, CLIC, Muon Collider, plasma colliders, CEPC, FCC, HE-LHC) and discuss major challenges and accelerator R&D required to demonstrate feasibility of an energy frontier accelerator facility following the LHC. We conclude by taking a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and discussion on the perspectives for the far future of the accelerator-based particle physics. This paper largely follows previous study [1] and the presenta ion given at the ICHEP’2016 conference in Chicago [2].

  3. LHC cooling gains ground

    CERN Multimedia

    Huillet-Miraton Catherine

    The nominal cryogenic conditions of 1.9 K have been achieved in sectors 5-6 and 7-8. This means that a quarter of the machine has reached the nominal conditions for LHC operation, having attained a temperature of below 2 K (-271°C), which is colder than interstellar space! Elsewhere, the cryogenic system in Sector 8-1 has been filled with liquid helium and cooled to 2K and will soon be available for magnet testing. Sectors 6-7 and 2-3 are being cooled down and cool-down operations have started in Sector 3-4. Finally, preparations are in hand for the cool-down of Sector 1-2 in May and of Sector 4-5, which is currently being consolidated. The LHC should be completely cold for the summer. For more information: http://lhc.web.cern.ch/lhc/Cooldown_status.htm.

  4. LHC prototype magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    1.5 metre superconducting magnet. This prototype magnet for the LHC was cooled to a few degrees above absolute zero, which allowed it to obtain the world record for the highest magnetic field for an accelerator magnet in 1991.

  5. LHC brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  6. LHC brochure (Italian version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  7. LHC brochure (German version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will start-up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  8. LHC brochure (Danish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  9. LHC brochure (French version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  10. LHC brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2009-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  11. LHC brochure (German version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  12. LHC brochure (French version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  13. LHC brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070305

    2014-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  14. LHC brochure (Spanish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will start-up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  15. LHC brochure (Polish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will start-up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  16. LHC brochure (Greek version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefèvre, C

    2006-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will start-up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  17. LHC Brochure (norwegian version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2006-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will start-up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  18. LHC brochure (Norwegian version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2009-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will start up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  19. CERN recognises LHC suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    CERN has just presented the first awards recognising LHC suppliers. The Russian institute BINP, the Belgian firm Cockerill-Sambre and the US company Wah-Chang are the recipients of the first 'Golden Hadrons'.

  20. LHC Brochure (catalan version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2006-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will start-up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  1. LHC brochure (Catalan version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will start-up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  2. LHC: seven golden suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The fourth CERN Golden Hadron awards saw seven of the LHC's best suppliers receive recognition for the high quality of their work, compliance with delivery deadlines, flexibility and adaptability to the demanding working conditions of the project. The representatives of the seven companies which received awards during the Golden Hadron ceremony, standing with Lyn Evans, LHC Project Leader. 'The Golden Hadron awards are a symbol of our appreciation of not only the quality and timely delivery of components but also the collaborative and flexible way the firms have contributed to this very difficult project,' said Lyn Evans, head of the LHC project. The awards went to Kemppi-Kempower (Finland), Metso Powdermet (Finland), Transtechnik (Germany), Babcock Noell Nuclear (Germany), Iniziative Industriali (Italy), ZTS VVU Kosice (Slovakia), and Jehier (France). Babock Noell Nuclear (BNN) successfully produced one-third (416 cold dipole masses) of the LHC's superconducting dipole magnets, one of the most critical an...

  3. One health: zoonoses in the exotic animal practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Marcy J

    2011-09-01

    Zoonoses make up approximately ¾ of today’s emerging infectious diseases; many of these zoonoses come from exotic pets and wildlife. Recent outbreaks in humans associated with nondomestic animals include Sudden Acute Respiratory Syndrome, Ebola virus, salmonellosis, and monkeypox. Expanding human populations, increased exotic pet ownership and changes in climate may contribute to increased incidence of zoonoses. Education and preventive medicine practices can be applied by veterinarians and other health professionals to reduce the risk of contracting a zoonotic disease. The health of humans, animals, and the environment must be treated as a whole to prevent the transmission of zoonoses.

  4. Dark-photon searches via Higgs-boson production at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sanjoy; Gabrielli, Emidio; Heikinheimo, Matti; Mele, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    Dark photons γ ¯ mediating long-range forces in a dark sector are predicted by various new physics scenarios, and are being intensively searched for in experiments. We extend a previous study of a new discovery process for dark photons proceeding via Higgs-boson production at the LHC. Thanks to the nondecoupling properties of the Higgs boson, BR (H →γ γ ¯ ) values up to a few percent are possible for a massless dark photon, even for heavy dark-sector scenarios. The corresponding signature consists (for a Higgs boson at rest) of a striking monochromatic photon with energy Eγ=mH/2 , and a similar amount of missing energy. We perform a model-independent analysis at the LHC of both the gluon-fusion and vector-boson fusion (VBF) Higgs production mechanisms at 14 TeV, including parton-shower effects, and updating our previous parton-level analysis at 8 TeV in the gluon-fusion channel by a more realistic background modeling. We find that a 5 σ sensitivity can be reached in the gluon-fusion channel for BR (H →γ γ ¯)≃0.1 % with an integrated luminosity of L ≃300 fb-1. The corresponding VBF reach is instead restricted to 1%. Such decay rates can be naturally obtained in dark-photon scenarios arising from unbroken U (1 )F models explaining the origin and hierarchy of the Yukawa couplings, strongly motivating the search for this exotic Higgs decay at the LHC.

  5. LHC Report: astounding availability

    CERN Multimedia

    Andrea Apollonio for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    The LHC is off to an excellent start in 2016, having already produced triple the luminosity of 2015. An important factor in the impressive performance so far this year is the unprecedented machine availability.   LHC integrated luminosity in 2011, 2012, 2015 and 2016 and the prediction of the 2016 performance foreseen at the start of the year. Following the 2015-2016 end of year shutdown, the LHC restarted beam operation in March 2016. Between the restart and the first technical stop (TS1) in June, the LHC's beam intensity was successively increased, achieving operation with 2040 bunches per beam. The technical stop on 7-8 June was shortened to maximise the time available for luminosity production for the LHC experiments before the summer conferences. Following the technical stop, operation resumed and quickly returned to the performance levels previously achieved. Since then, the LHC has been running steadily with up to 2076 bunches per beam. Since the technical stop, a...

  6. Exotic nuclei and astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penionzhkevich Yu.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, nuclear physics investigations of the laws of the microscopic world contributed significantly to extension of our knowledge of phenomena occurring in the macroscopic world (Universe and made a formidable contribution to the development of astrophysical and cosmological theories. First of all, this concerns the expanding universe model, the evolution of stars, and the abundances of elements, as well as the properties of various stars and cosmic objects, including “cold” and neutron stars, black holes, and pulsars. Without claiming to give a full account of all cosmological problems, we will dwell upon those of them that, in my opinion, have much in common with nuclear-matter properties manifesting themselves in nuclear interactions.

  7. LHC INAUGURATION, LHC Fest highlights: exhibition time!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    David Gross, one of the twenty-one Nobel Laureates who have participated in the project.Tuesday 21 October 2008 Accelerating Nobels Colliding Charm, Atomic Cuisine, The Good Anomaly, A Quark Somewhere on the White Paper, Wire Proliferation, A Tale of Two Liquids … these are just some of the titles given to artworks by Physics Nobel Laureates who agreed to make drawings of their prize-winning discoveries (more or less reluctantly) during a special photo session. Science photographer Volker Steger made portraits of Physics Nobel Laureates and before the photo sessions he asked them to make a drawing of their most important discovery. The result is "Accelerating Nobels", an exhibition that combines unusual portraits of and original drawings by twenty-one Nobel laureates in physics whose work is closely related to CERN and the LHC. This exhibition will be one of the highlights of the LHC celebrations on 21 October in the SM18 hall b...

  8. Cryogenics for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tavian, L; Claudet, S; Ferlin, G; Wagner, U; van Weelderen, R

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This chapter will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system a...

  9. The latest from the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Work on closing up sectors in the LHC tunnel. The foreseen shutdown work on the LHC is proceeding well, including the powering tests with the new quench protection system. However, during the past week vacuum leaks have been found in two "cold" sectors of the LHC. The leaks were found in Sectors 8-1 and 2-3 while they were being prepared for the electrical tests on the copper stabilizers at around 80 K. In both cases the leak is at one end of the sector, where the electrical feedbox, DFBA, joins Q7, the final magnet in the sector. Unfortunately, the repair necessitates a partial warm-up of both sectors. This involves the end sub-sector being warmed to room temperature, while the adjacent sub-sector "floats" in temperature and the remainder of the sector is kept at 80 K. As the leak is from the helium circuit to the insulating vacuum, the repair work will have no impact on the vacuum in the beam pipe. However the intervention wil...

  10. Latest news from the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Last week the LHC passed the threshold of 3 pb-1 total integrated luminosity delivered to the experiments, of which about half was delivered in just one week. These excellent results were achieved by operating the machine with up to 50 nominal bunches per beam.   After a very successful week that saw intense beams circulating for long periods (a total of 76.5 hours of stable beams, corresponding to about 40% of the time), there has been a technical stop this week. Over the coming days, experts will work on bunch trains with 150 ns spacing between bunches (the current minimum spacing is 1000 ns). This will involve making the necessary changes throughout the injector chain, as well as in the LHC itself. In the LHC, bunch trains imply working with a crossing angle throughout the machine cycle, in order to avoid unwanted parasitic collisions, which means that the whole process of injection, ramp and squeeze will have to be re-commissioned. The task also includes re-commissioning all the protection syste...

  11. LHC Report: a brief deceleration

    CERN Multimedia

    Rossano Giachino & Markus Albert

    2015-01-01

    The LHC has now transitioned from powering tests to the machine checkout phase. This phase involves the full-scale tests of all systems in preparation for beam. Early last Saturday morning, during the ramp-down, an earth fault developed in the main dipole circuit. Full evaluation of the situation is ongoing.   The various systems are put through their operational paces from the CCC. This includes important tests of the beam dump system and full-scale tests of the beam interlock system (BIS) and its many inputs from other systems around the ring. All magnetic circuits are driven through the ramp, squeeze, ramp-down, and pre-cycle along with the collimators and RF. Instrumentation, feedbacks, and the control system are also stress tested. Inevitably there is some final frantic debugging but, up to now, things seem to be in reasonable shape. The machine checkout is an important coming together of all LHC systems. During this final phase before beam, the operations team tests all of the LHC subsystem...

  12. LHC Abort Gap Cleaning with the Transverse Damper

    CERN Document Server

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E; Höfle, Wolfgang; Kain, V; Meddahi, M; Shaposhnikova, E; Koschik, A

    2010-01-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider, LHC, particles not captured by the RF system at injection or leaking out of the RF bucket may quench the superconducting magnets during beam abort. The problem, common to other superconducting machines, is particularly serious for the LHC due to the very large stored energy in the beam. For the LHC a way of removing the unbunched beam has been studied and it uses the existing damper kickers to excite resonantly the particles travelling along the abort gap. In this paper we describe the results of simulations performed with MAD X for various LHC optics configurations, including the estimated multipolar errors.

  13. Single top quark production cross-section measurements using the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Finelli, Kevin Daniel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of single top quark production in proton--proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV using the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the LHC are presented. In the leading order process, a $W$ boson is exchanged in the $t$-channel. The single top quark and anti-top total production cross-sections ratio, as well as a measurement of the inclusive and fiducial production cross-sections are presented. In addition, a measurement of the production cross-section of a single top quark in association with a $W$ boson is presented. All measurements are compared to state-of-the-art theoretical calculations and the CKM matrix element $|V_{tb}|$ is determined. The $s$-channel production is also explored and limits on exotic production in single top quark processes are discussed. This includes the search for additional $W’$ bosons and a search for monotops.

  14. LHC Report: LHC smashes collision records

    CERN Multimedia

    Sarah Charley

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is now producing more than a billion proton-proton collisions per second.   The LHC is colliding protons at a faster rate than ever before: approximately 1 billion times per second. Since April 2016, the LHC has delivered more than 30 inverse femtobarns (fb-1) to both ATLAS and CMS. This means that around 2.4 quadrillion (2.4 million billion) collisions have been seen by each of the experiments this year. The inverse femtobarn is the unit of measurement for integrated luminosity, indicating the cumulative number of potential collisions. This compares with the total of 33.2 fb-1 produced between 2010 and 2015. The unprecedented performance this year is the result of both the incremental increases in collision rate and the sheer amount of time the LHC has been up and running. This comes after a slow start-up in 2015, when scientists and engineers still needed to learn how to operate the machine at a much higher energy. “With more energy, the machine is much more sen...

  15. Common origin of fermion mixing and geometrical CP violation, and its test through Higgs physics at the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Varzielas, Ivo de Medeiros; Leser, Philipp

    2012-12-14

    We construct for the first time a flavor model, based on the smallest discrete symmetry Δ(27) that implements spontaneous CP violation with a complex phase of geometric origin, which can actually reproduce all quark masses and mixing data. We show that its scalar sector has exotic properties that can be tested at the LHC.

  16. Azimuthal angular distributions in EDDE as a spin-parity analyser and glueball filter for the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Vladimir Alexeevich [Institute for High Energy Physics, 142 281, Protvino (Russian Federation); Ryutin, Roman Anatolievich [Institute for High Energy Physics, 142 281, Protvino (Russian Federation); Sobol, Andrei E. [Institute for High Energy Physics, 142 281, Protvino (Russian Federation); Guillaud, Jean-Paul [LAPP, Annecy (France)

    2005-06-01

    Exclusive Double Diffractive Events (EDDE) are analysed as the source of the information about the central system. The experimental possibilities for the exotic particles searches are considered. From the reggeized tensor current picture some azimuthal angle dependences were obtained to fit the data from the WA102 experiment and to make predictions for the LHC collider.

  17. Anatomizing Exotic Production of the Higgs Boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Felix [Fermilab

    2014-07-10

    We discuss exotic production modes of the Higgs boson and how their phenomenology can be probed in current Higgs analyses. We highlight the importance of differential distributions in disentangling standard production mechanisms from exotic modes. We present two model benchmarks for exotic Higgs production arising from chargino-neutralino production and study their impact on the current Higgs dataset. As a corollary, we emphasize that current Higgs coupling fits do not fully explore the space of new physics deviations possible in Higgs data.

  18. Cosmological anomalies and exotic smoothness structures

    OpenAIRE

    Asselmeyer-Maluga, Torsten; Brans, Carl H.

    2001-01-01

    It seems to be generally accepted that apparently anomalous cosmological observations, such as accelerating expansion, etc., necessarily are inconsistent with standard general relativity and standard matter sources. Following the suggestions of S{\\l}adkowski, we point out that in addition to exotic theories and exotic matter there is another possibility. We refer to exotic differential structures on ${\\mathbb R}^4$ which could be the source of the observed anomalies without changing the Einst...

  19. LHC Report: Take Five

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2011-01-01

    The LHC is continuing to perform well and an integrated luminosity of over 5fb-1 has now been delivered to ATLAS and CMS. While keeping a close eye on beam induced heating and vacuum quality, the bunch current has been gently raised to over 1.4x1011 protons per bunch. This has given a peak luminosity of 3.6x1033 cm-2s-1. Some long fills have helped production and recent high points include 120pb-1 delivered in one fill and 580pb-1 delivered in one week.   Time has also been devoted to some special physics runs for TOTEM and ALFA. In these runs, the beam is de-squeezed to a ß* of 90 m in ATLAS and CMS. This is instead of the usual 1m ß*, and gives a larger beam size at interaction points. The increased beam size results in a reduced beam divergence at the interaction points. This permits TOTEM and ALFA to probe low-angle scattering and allows them to measure the total cross section of proton-proton interactions and the absolute luminosity cal...

  20. Zoonotic parasites from exotic meat in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazly, Z A; Nurulaini, R; Shafarin, M S; Fariza, N J; Zawida, Z; Muhamad, H Y; Adnan, M; Premaalatha, B; Erwanas, A I; Zaini, C M; Ong, C C; Chandrawathani, P

    2013-09-01

    Four zoonotic parasites, Sarcocystis spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Trichinella spp. and Taenia spp were screened in exotic meats. A total of forty-six (n=46) meat samples from various species of exotic animals were received from all the 14 states in Malaysia from January 2012 to April 2012. All exotic meat samples were examined macroscopically and histologically for the four zoonotic parasites. Results by histological examination of exotic meats showed the presence of Sarcocystis and Toxoplasma cysts at 8.7% (n=4) and 4.3% (n=2) respectively. No Trichinella spp. and Taenia spp. were found.

  1. International Symposium on Exotic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Sobolev, Yu G; EXON-2014

    2015-01-01

    The production and the properties of nuclei in extreme conditions, such as high isospin, temperature, angular momenta, large deformations etc., have become the subject of detailed investigations in all scientific centers. The main topics discussed at the Symposium were: Synthesis and Properties of Exotic Nuclei; Superheavy Elements; Rare Processes, Nuclear Reactions, Fission and Decays; Experimental Facilities and Scientific Projects. This book provides a comprehensive overview of the newest results of the investigations in the main scientific centers such as GSI (Darmstadt, Germany), GANIL (Caen, France), RIKEN (Wako-shi, Japan), MSU (Michigan, USA), and JINR (Dubna, Russia).

  2. Decay spectroscopy of exotic fission products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykaczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-09-01

    The beta decay studies of exotic fission products have been performed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The scientific program was focused on the beta-strength function measurements and resulting new half-lives and beta-delayed neutron properties. These observables are important for nuclear structure analysis and modeling of the nucleosynthesis within rapid neutron capture process. The highlights include ten new beta half-lives and several Pn branching ratios including an observation of beta-delayed two-neutron emitter 86Ga. In addition, the measurements of the beta-strength within beta-gamma emission window were performed using a Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer for 22 fission products. These MTAS results are also important for the analysis of reactor anti-neutrino anomaly. The beta decay studies of exotic fission products have been performed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The scientific program was focused on the beta-strength function measurements and resulting new half-lives and beta-delayed neutron properties. These observables are important for nuclear structure analysis and modeling of the nucleosynthesis within rapid neutron capture process. The highlights include ten new beta half-lives and several Pn branching ratios including an observation of beta-delayed two-neutron emitter 86Ga. In addition, the measurements of the beta-strength within beta-gamma emission window were performed using a Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer for 22 fission products. These MTAS results are also important for the analysis of reactor anti-neutrino anomaly. Supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Nuclear Physics under Contracts DE-AC05-00R22725 (ORNL), DE-FG02-96ER40983 (UTK).

  3. Lectures on LHC physics

    CERN Document Server

    Plehn, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    With the discovery of the Higgs boson, the LHC experiments have closed the most important gap in our understanding of fundamental interactions, confirming that such interactions between elementary particles can be described by quantum field theory, more specifically by a renormalizable gauge theory. This theory is a priori valid for arbitrarily high energy scales and does not require an ultraviolet completion. Yet, when trying to apply the concrete knowledge of quantum field theory to actual LHC physics - in particular to the Higgs sector and certain regimes of QCD - one inevitably encounters an intricate maze of phenomenological know-how, common lore and other, often historically developed intuitions about what works and what doesn’t. These lectures cover three aspects to help understand LHC results in the Higgs sector and in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model: they discuss the many facets of Higgs physics, which is at the core of this significantly expanded second edition; then QCD, to the deg...

  4. Supermodels for early LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Christian W. [Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ligeti, Zoltan, E-mail: zligeti@lbl.go [Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schmaltz, Martin [Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Physics Department, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Thaler, Jesse [Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Walker, Devin G.E. [Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Center for the Fundamental Laws of Nature, Jefferson Physical Laboratory, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2010-06-21

    We investigate which new physics signatures could be discovered in the first year of the LHC, beyond the expected sensitivity of the Tevatron data by the end of 2010. We construct 'supermodels', for which the LHC sensitivity even with only 10 pb{sup -1} useful luminosity is greater than that of the Tevatron with 10 fb{sup -1}. The simplest supermodels involve s-channel resonances in the quark-antiquark and especially in the quark-quark channels. We concentrate on easily visible final states with small standard model backgrounds, and find that there are simple searches, besides those for Z{sup '} states, which could discover new physics in early LHC data. Many of these are well-suited to test searches for 'more conventional' models, often discussed for multi-fb{sup -1} data sets.

  5. The LHC in numbers

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    What makes the LHC the biggest particle accelerator in the world? Here are some of the numbers that characterise the LHC, and their equivalents in terms that are easier for us to imagine.   Feature Number Equivalent Circumference ~ 27 km   Distance covered by beam in 10 hours ~ 10 billion km a round trip to Neptune Number of times a single proton travels around the ring each second 11 245   Speed of protons first entering the LHC 299 732 500 m/s 99.9998 % of the speed of light Speed of protons when they collide 299 789 760 m/s 99.9999991 % of the speed of light Collision temperature ~ 1016 °C ove...

  6. The physics case for the MoEDAL experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsou, Vasiliki A

    2015-01-01

    The MoEDAL experiment (Monopole and Exotics Detector at the LHC) is designed to directly search for magnetic monopoles and other highly-ionising stable or metastable particles arising in theoretical scenarios beyond the Standard Model. Its physics goals are accomplished by the deployment of plastic nuclear track detectors combined with trapping volumes for capturing charged highly-ionising particles and TimePix pixel devices for monitoring. This paper is an overview of the MoEDAL physics reach, which is largely complementary to the programs of the large multi-purpose LHC detectors ATLAS and CMS.

  7. The physics case for the MoEDAL experiment at LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsou Vasiliki A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The MoEDAL experiment (Monopole and Exotics Detector at the LHC is designed to directly search for magnetic monopoles and other highly-ionising stable or metastable particles arising in theoretical scenarios beyond the Standard Model. Its physics goals are accomplished by the deployment of plastic nuclear track detectors combined with trapping volumes for capturing charged highly-ionising particles and TimePix pixel devices for monitoring. This paper is an overview of the MoEDAL physics reach, which is largely complementary to the programs of the large multi-purpose LHC detectors ATLAS and CMS.

  8. Commissioning of the nonlinear chromaticity at injection for LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080608; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; Carlier, Felix Simon; Langner, Andy Sven; Malina, Lukas; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Coello De Portugal - Martinez Vazquez, Jaime Maria; Skowronski, Piotr Krzysztof; Garcia-Tabares Valdivieso, Ana; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, correction of nonlinear chromaticity and amplitude detuning was included in the LHC commissioning for Run II. The corrections found during the nonlinear optics commissioning have been deployed operationally at injection in the LHC. This note summarizes the relevant measurements and corrections performed during the first commissioning of the LHC in Run II

  9. Exotic resonances due to η exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, Marek; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2016-10-01

    The meson X (3872) and several related states appear to be in large part hadronic molecules in which a heavy flavored meson (e.g., D0) is bound to another heavy meson (e.g., D bar * 0). Although not the only contribution to the binding, pion exchange seems to play a crucial role in generating the longest-range force between constituents. Mesons without u and d light quarks (such as Ds) cannot exchange pions, but under suitable conditions can bind as a result of η exchange. Channels in which this mechanism is possible are identified, and suggestions are made for searches for the corresponding molecular states, including a manifestly exotic baryonic Λc Dbar s* resonance decaying into J / ψ Λ.

  10. Exotic hadron spectroscopy at the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cowan, G A

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study the decays and properties of heavy flavoured hadrons produced in the forward region from proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. During Run 1, it has recorded the world's largest data sample of beauty and charm hadrons, enabling precise studies into the spectroscopy of such particles, including discoveries of new states and measurements of their masses, widths and quantum numbers. An overview of recent LHCb results in the area of exotic hadron spectroscopy is presented, focussing on the discovery of the first pentaquark states in the $\\Lambda_b^0 \\to J/\\psi p K^-$ channel and a search for them in the related $\\Lambda_b^0 \\to J/\\psi p\\pi^-$ mode. The LHCb non-confirmation of the D0 tetraquark candidate in the $B_s^0\\pi^+$ invariant mass spectrum is presented.

  11. LHC Status and Upgrade Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey

    2009-11-01

    The Large Hadron Collider has had a trying start-up and a challenging operational future lays ahead. Critical to the machine's performance is controlling a beam of particles whose stored energy is equivalent to 80 kg of TNT. Unavoidable beam losses result in energy deposition throughout the machine and without adequate protection this power would result in quenching of the superconducting magnets. A brief overview of the machine layout and principles of operation will be reviewed including a summary of the September 2008 accident. The current status of the LHC, startup schedule and upgrade options to achieve the target luminosity will be presented.

  12. Heavy Exotic Molecules with Charm and Bottom

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yizhuang

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom and their chiral partners under the general strictures of both heavy-quark and chiral symmetry. The chiral exotic partners with good parity formed using the $(0^+, 1^+)$ multiplet are about twice more bound than their primary exotic partners formed using the $(0^-,1^-)$ multiplet. The chiral couplings across the multiplets $(0^\\pm, 1^\\pm)$ cause the chiral exotic partners to unbind, and the primary exotic molecules to be about twice more bound, for $J\\leq 1$. Our multi-channel coupling results show that only the charm isosinglet exotic molecules with $J^{PC}=1^{++}$ binds, which we identify as the reported neutral $X(3872)$. Also, the bottom isotriplet exotic with $J^{PC}=1^{+-}$ binds, which we identify as a mixture of the reported charged exotics $Z^+_b(10610)$ and $Z^+_b(10650)$. The bound isosinglet with $J^{PC}=1^{++}$ is suggested as a possible neutral $X_b(10532)$ not yet reported.

  13. Experimental evidence for hadroproduction of exotic mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. S. Adams; T. Adams; Z. Bar-Yam; J. M. Bishop; V. A. Bodyagin; B. B. Brabson; D. S. Brown; N. M. Cason; S. U. Chung; R. R. Crittenden; J. P. Cummings; K. Danyo; S. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; J. P. Dowd; A. R. Dzierba; P. Eugenio; J. Gunter; R. W. Hackenburg; M. Hayek; E. I. Ivanov; I. Kachaev; W. Kern; E. King; O. L. Kodolova; V. L. Korotkikh; M. A. Kostin; J. Kuhn; R. Lindenbusch; V. Lipaev; J. M. LoSecco; J. J. Manak; J. Napolitano; M. Nozar; C. Olchanski; A. I. Ostrovidov; T. K. Pedlar; A. Popov; D. R. Rust; D. Ryabchikov; A. H. Sanjari; L. I. Sarycheva; E. Scott; K. K. Seth; N. Shenhav; W. D. Shephard; N. B. Sinev; J. A. Smith; P. T. Smith; D. L. Stienike; T. Sulanke; S. A. Taegar; S. Teige; D. R. Thompson; I. N. Vardanyan; D. P. Weygand; D. White; H. J. Willutzki; J. Wise; M. Witkowski; A. A. Yershov; D. Zhao

    2001-01-01

    New measurements of peripheral meson production are presented. The data confirm the existence of exotic mesons at 1.4 and 1.6 GeV/c2. The latter state dominates the eta'pi- decay spectrum. The data on eta pi+pi-pi- decay show large strength in several exotic (Jpc = 1- +) waves as well.

  14. Heavy exotic molecules with charm and bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    2016-11-01

    We revisit the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom and their chiral partners under the general strictures of both heavy-quark and chiral symmetry. The chiral exotic partners with good parity formed using the (0+ ,1+) multiplet are about twice more bound than their primary exotic partners formed using the (0- ,1-) multiplet. The chiral couplings across the multiplets (0± ,1±) cause the chiral exotic partners to unbind, and the primary exotic molecules to be about twice more bound, for J ≤ 1. Our multi-channel coupling results show that only the charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC =1++ bind, which we identify as the reported neutral X (3872). Also, the bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC =1+- binds, which we identify as a mixture of the reported charged exotics Zb+ (10610) and Zb+ (10650). The bound isosinglet with JPC =1++ is suggested as a possible neutral Xb (10532) not yet reported.

  15. Academic Training - LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES 13, 14, 15, March, from 11:00 to 12:00 - 16 March from 10:00 to 12:00 Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 14, 15 March, Council Room on 13, 16 March LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges A. De Roeck / CERN-PH, D. Bortoletto / Purdue Univ. USA, R. Wigmans / Texas, Tech Univ. USA, W. Riegler / CERN-PH, W. Smith / Wisconsin Univ. USA The upgrade of the LHC machine towards higher luminosity (1035 cm-2s-1) has been studied over the last few years. These studies have investigated scenarios to achieve the increase in peak luminosity by an order of magnitude, as well as the physics potential of such an upgrade and the impact of a machine upgrade on the LHC DETECTORS. This series of lectures will cover the following topics: Physics motivation and machine scenarios for an order of magnitude increase in the LHC peak luminosity (lecture 1) Detector challenges including overview of ideas for R&D programs by the LHC experiments: tracking and calorimetry, other new detector ...

  16. Academic Training - LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES 13, 14, 15, March, from 11:00 to 12:00 - 16 March from 10:00 to 12:00 Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 14, 15 March, Council Room on 13, 16 March LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges A. De Roeck / CERN-PH, D. Bortoletto / Purdue Univ. USA, R. Wigmans / Texas, Tech Univ. USA, W. Riegler / CERN-PH, W. Smith / Wisconsin Univ. USA The upgrade of the LHC machine towards higher luminosity (1035 cm-2s-1) has been studied over the last few years. These studies have investigated scenarios to achieve the increase in peak luminosity by an order of magnitude, as well as the physics potential of such an upgrade and the impact of a machine upgrade on the LHC DETECTORS. This series of lectures will cover the following topics: Physics motivation and machine scenarios for an order of magnitude increase in the LHC peak luminosity (lecture 1) Detector challenges including overview of ideas for R&D programs by the LHC experiments: tracking and calorimetry, other new detector ...

  17. Academic Training: The LHC machine /experiment interface

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 18, 19, 20, 21 & 22 April from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 The LHC machine /experiment interface S. TAPPROGGE, Univ. of Mainz, D, R. ASSMANN, CERN-AB E. TSESMELIS and D. MACINA, CERN-TS This series of lectures will cover some of the major issues at the boundary between the LHC machine and the experiments: 1) The physics motivation and expectations of the experiments regarding the machine operation. This will include an overview of the LHC physics programme (in pp and PbPb collisions), of the experimental signatures (from high pT objects to leading nucleons) and of the expected trigger rates as well as the data sets needed for specific measurements. Furthermore, issues related to various modes of operation of the machine (e.g. bunch spacings of 25 ns. vs. 75 ns.) and special requirements of the detectors for their commissioning will be described. 2) The LHC machine aspects: introduction of the main LHC parameters and discu...

  18. Academic Training: The LHC machine /experiment interface

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 18, 19, 20, 21 & 22 April from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 The LHC machine /experiment interface S. TAPPROGGE, Univ. of Mainz, D, R. ASSMANN, CERN-AB E. TSESMELIS and D. MACINA, CERN-TS This series of lectures will cover some of the major issues at the boundary between the LHC machine and the experiments: 1) The physics motivation and expectations of the experiments regarding the machine operation. This will include an overview of the LHC physics programme (in pp and PbPb collisions), of the experimental signatures (from high pT objects to leading nucleons) and of the expected trigger rates as well as the data sets needed for specific measurements. Furthermore, issues related to various modes of operation of the machine (e.g. bunch spacings of 25 ns. vs. 75 ns.) and special requirements of the detectors for their commissioning will be described. 2) The LHC machine aspects: introduction of the main LHC parameters and disc...

  19. High Luminosity LHC: challenges and plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, G.; Barranco, J.; Bertarelli, A.; Biancacci, N.; Bruce, R.; Brüning, O.; Buffat, X.; Cai, Y.; Carver, L. R.; Fartoukh, S.; Giovannozzi, M.; Iadarola, G.; Li, K.; Lechner, A.; Medina Medrano, L.; Métral, E.; Nosochkov, Y.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pellegrini, D.; Pieloni, T.; Qiang, J.; Redaelli, S.; Romano, A.; Rossi, L.; Rumolo, G.; Salvant, B.; Schenk, M.; Tambasco, C.; Tomás, R.; Valishev, S.; Van der Veken, F. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will undergo a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its rate of collisions by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor ten. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 T superconducting magnets, including Nb3Sn-based magnets never used in accelerators before, compact superconducting cavities for longitudinal beam rotation, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation. The dynamics of the HL-LHC beams will be also particularly challenging and this aspect is the main focus of this paper.

  20. LHC Report: Summer temperatures in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The LHC experiments have finished their data-taking period before the summer conferences. The machine has already delivered substantially more collisions to the experiments this year than in the whole of 2011. The LHC has now started a six-day Machine Development period, which will be followed by the second Technical Stop of the year.   The number of collisions delivered to the experiments is expressed in integrated luminosity. In 2011, the integrated luminosity delivered to both ATLAS and CMS was around 5.6 fb-1. On Monday 18 June, experiments finished taking data before the summer conferences and the integrated luminosity for 2012 so far is about 6.6 fb-1, well above the unofficial target of 5 fb-1. The LHC’s performance over the last week of running was so efficient that the injection kicker magnets – which heat up due to the circulating beam – did not have time to cool down between the subsequent fills. As the time constants for warming up and cooli...

  1. New EU project supports LHC theorists

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    LHCPhenonet, a new EU-funded research network aimed at improving the theoretical predictions that guide the LHC experiments, has begun its 4-year run as a Marie Curie Initial Training Network. CERN joins the network as an associate partner, along with almost 30 multinational institutions and computing companies.   Theorists from around the world gathered in Valencia to attend LHCPhenonet's kick-off meeting. LHCPhenonet will create research opportunities for young, talented European theorists, providing funding for both doctoral and post-doctoral positions across the various participating institutions – including the University of Durham, DESY, and the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). LHCPhenoNet aims to improve the Quantum Field Theory calculations that set the parameters of the LHC experiments, focusing on the LHC phenomenology that gave it its name. The 4.5 million euro project is funded by the EU's 7th Research Framework Programme and will be coordinated through the Span...

  2. Production of hhjj at the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Matthew J; Englert, Christoph; Greiner, Nicolas; Spannowsky, Michael

    2014-03-14

    Until now, a phenomenologically complete analysis of the hh+2j channel at the LHC has been missing. This is mostly due to the high complexity of the involved one-loop gluon fusion contribution and the fact that a reliable estimate thereof cannot be obtained through simplified calculations in the mt→∞ limit. In this Letter, we report on the LHC's potential to access di-Higgs production in association with two jets in a fully showered hadron-level analysis. Our study includes the finite top and bottom mass dependencies for the gluon fusion contribution.

  3. Electronics for LHC Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of most presentations made at this workshop on electronics for the large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. The presentations were arranged into 6 sessions: 1) electronics for tracker, 2) trigger electronics, 3) detector control systems, 4) data acquisition, 5) electronics for calorimeters and electronics for muons, and 6) links, power systems, grounding and shielding, testing and quality assurance.

  4. LHC: forwards and onwards

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Following the recent incident in Sector 3-4, which has brought the start-up of the LHC to a halt, the various teams are working hard to establish the cause, evaluate the situation and plan the necessary repairs. The LHC will be started up again in spring 2009 following the winter shutdown for the maintenance of all the CERN installations. The LHC teams are at work on warming up Sector 3-4 and establishing the cause of the serious incident that occurred on Friday, 19 September. Preliminary investigations suggest that the likely cause of the problem was a faulty electrical connection between two magnets. The connections probably melted, leading to a mechanical failure and a large leak of helium into the tunnel. However, the teams will not be able to carry out a full evaluation and assess the repairs needed until the sector has been warmed up again and inspected. "We are not worried about repairing the magnets as spare parts are available", said Lyn Evans, the LHC Project Leade...

  5. Mobilizing for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    A follow-up report on the incident that occurred in LHC Sector 3-4 was published on 5 December. It confirms that the accelerator will be restarted in the summer of 2009. From now until then, the teams will be pulling out all the stops to repair the sector and enhance the operational safety of the machine.

  6. LHC Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Jean Leyder

    2000-01-01

    The LHC is the next step in CERN's quest to unravel the mysteries of the Universe. It will accelerate protons to energies never before achieved in laboratories, and to hold them on course it will use powerful superconducting magnets on an unprecedented scale.

  7. Fully transparent LHC

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    Thanks to the first real signals received from the LHC while in operation before the incident, the experiments are now set to make the best use of the data they have collected. Report from the LHCC open session.The September open session of the LHCC (LHC Experiments Committee) came just a few days after the incident that occurred at the LHC. The packed auditorium was a testament to the huge interest raised by Lyn Evans’ talk about the status of the machine and the plans for the future. After being told that the actual consequences of the incident will be clear only once Sector 3-4 has been warmed up, the audience focussed on the reports from the experiments. For the first time, the reports showed performance results of the various detectors with particles coming from the machine and not just from cosmic rays or tests and simulations. "The first days of LHC beam exceeded all expectations and the experiments made extensive and rapid use of the data they collected", says ...

  8. MSSM Higgs at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Vivarelli, I; Gennai, S; Primo workshop italiano sulla fisica di ATLAS e CMS

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS and CMS discovery potential for the MSSM Higgs bosons is reviewed in this paper. The attention is focused on the direct Higgs production and on the Standard Model decay channels. After a short introduction, the most promising final states are discussed, showing that, if supersymmetry exists, its Higgs sector can be explored at LHC with an integrated luminosity of 10 fb$^{-1}$.

  9. Exotic RG Flows from Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Kiritsis, Elias; Pimenta, Leandro Silva

    2016-01-01

    Holographic RG flows are studied in an Einstein-dilaton theory with a general potential. The superpotential formalism is utilized in order to characterize and classify all solutions that are associated to asymptotically AdS space-times. Such solutions correspond to holographic RG flows and are characterized by their holographic $\\beta$-functions. Novel solutions are found that have exotic properties from a RG point-of view. Some have $\\beta$-functions that are defined patch-wise and lead to flows where the $\\beta$-function changes sign without the flow stopping. Others describe flows that end in non-neighboring extrema in field space. Finally others describe regular flows between two minima of the potential and correspond holographically to flows driven by the VEV of an irrelevant operator in the UV CFT.

  10. Exotic RG flows from holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiritsis, Elias [APC, Universite Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite (France); Crete Center for Theoretical Physics, Institute for Theoretical and Computational Physics, Department of Physics, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Crete Center for Quantum Complexity and Nanotechnology, Department of Physics, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Nitti, Francesco; Silva Pimenta, Leandro [APC, Universite Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite (France)

    2017-02-15

    Holographic RG flows are studied in an Einstein-dilaton theory with a general potential. The superpotential formalism is utilized in order to characterize and classify all solutions that are associated with asymptotically AdS space-times. Such solutions correspond to holographic RG flows and are characterized by their holographic β-functions. Novel solutions are found that have exotic properties from a RG point-of view. Some have β-functions that are defined patch-wise and lead to flows where the β-function changes sign without the flow stopping. Others describe flows that end in non-neighboring extrema in field space. Finally others describe regular flows between two minima of the potential and correspond holographically to flows driven by the VEV of an irrelevant operator in the UV CFT. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Exotic Hadrons from B Factories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulsom, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    The first generation of B-Factories, BaBar and Belle, operated over the previous decade and produced many world-leading measurements related to flavor physics. One of the most important discoveries was that of an apparent four-quark particle, named X(3872). It was the first of a growing X, Y, Z alphabet of exotic hadrons, now numbering more than a dozen, found by the e + e - collider experiments. These multi-quark states represent an unusual departure from the standard description that hadronic matter consists of only two or three quarks. These discoveries have led to the emergence of a new category of physics within heavy meson spectroscopy. This talk will review some of these key experimental results, and highlight the potential of the next generation B-Factory, Belle II, as it begins operation in the coming year.

  12. Hybrid Exotic Meson Decay Width

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, M S

    2005-01-01

    We present results of a decay width calculation for a hybrid exotic meson(h, JPC=1-+) in the decay channel h to pi+a1. This calculation uses quenched lattice QCD and Luescher's finite box method. Operators for the h and pi+a1 states are used in a correlation matrix which was expanded by varying the smearing and fuzzing levels at source and sink points. Scattering phase shifts for a discrete set of relative pi+a1 momenta are determined using eigenvalues of the correlation matrix and formulae derived by Luescher. The phase shift data is very sparse, but fits to a Breit-Wigner model are made, resulting in a decay width of about 80 MeV.

  13. Single top quark production cross-section and properties using the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00358737; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS measurements of single top-quark processes are summarized. Measurements using data at 7 and 8 TeV collisions from the LHC are presented. The measurements are performed using the semi-leptonic decay mode of the top-quark. Production cross-sections and the $\\left|V_{tb}\\right|$ CKM matrix element extraction are shown. All measurements are compared to theoretical calculations. In addition, the $s$-channel production mode is explored along with limits on exotic production modes.

  14. Le quark top comme sonde pour la recherche de nouvelle physique au LHC, avec le détecteur ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00388150; Meyer, Jean-Pierre

    The work of this thesis focuses on the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model in the compositeness framework, which postulates strongly coupled sectors at the TeV-scale consisting of exotic particles. Their existence can be tested at the CERN proton-proton collider, the LHC, using the ATLAS detector. The production of an heavy quark, such as the $T_{5/3}$ predicted in those models, can be inferred from an enhancement of the cross-section of a given signature. Some final states, such as the one studied in this thesis involving 2 same-sign leptons, are very rare and have an excellent sensitivity. Searches for $T_{5/3}$ production at the LHC using 8 and 13 TeV ATLAS data are presented. A small excess is seen at 8 TeV. Preliminary results of the 13 TeV analysis are presented and do not show any excess. The inferior limit put on the $T_{5/3}$ mass is 745 GeV at 8 TeV and 990~GeV at 13 TeV. Composite models include also heavy bosons such as top-philic $Z'$ coupled only to the top quark whose production in...

  15. Upgrades of the CMS Outer Tracker for HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sguazzoni, Giacomo

    2017-02-01

    The LHC machine is planning an upgrade program which will smoothly bring the luminosity to about 5 ×1034cm-2s-1 around 2028, to possibly reach an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1 in the following decade. This High Luminosity LHC scenario, HL-LHC, will require a preparation program of the LHC detectors known as Phase-2 upgrade. The current CMS Outer Tracker, already running close to its design limits, will not be able to survive HL-LHC radiation conditions and CMS will need a completely new device, in order to fully exploit the highly demanding operating conditions and the delivered luminosity. The new Tracker should have also L1 trigger capabilities. To achieve such goals, R&D activities are ongoing to explore options and develop solutions that would allow including tracking information at Level-1. The design choices for the CMS Outer Tracker upgrades are discussed along with some highlights of the R&D activities.

  16. The Beautiful Physics of LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108556

    2015-01-01

    Run 2 of the LHC offers some beautiful prospects for new physics, including flavour physics as well as more detailed studies of the Higgs boson and searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM). One of the possibilities for BSM physics is supersymmetry, and flavour physics plays various important r\\^oles in constraining supersymmetric models.

  17. US-LHC Magnet Database and conventions

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, J; Jain, A; Peggs, S; Pilat, F; Bottura, L; Sabbi, G L; MacKay, W W

    1999-01-01

    The US-LHC Magnet Database is designed for production-magnet quality assurance, field and alignment error impact analysis, cryostat assembly assistance, and ring installation assistance. The database consists of tables designed to store magnet field and alignment measurements data and quench data. This information will also be essential for future machine operations including local IR corrections. (7 refs).

  18. Effective SUSY and NPQMSSM after LHC run

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jihn E

    2012-01-01

    Some supersymmetric models after the recent LHC reports are reviewed. This includes the strong CP solution with axions, an extra Z' from GUTs, and the scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs bosons in supersymmetric extension of the standard model. We also comment on the maximal weak CP violation.

  19. Workshop on Likelihoods for the LHC Searches

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of this 3‐day workshop is to educate the LHC community about the scientific utility of likelihoods. We shall do so by describing and discussing several real‐world examples of the use of likelihoods, including a one‐day in‐depth examination of likelihoods in the Higgs boson studies by ATLAS and CMS.

  20. Behind the scenes at the LHC inauguration

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On 21 October the LHC inauguration ceremony will take place and people from all over CERN have been busy preparing. With delegations from 38 countries attending, including ministers and heads of state, the Bulletin has gone behind the scenes to see what it takes to put together an event of this scale.

  1. The LHC Low Level RF

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrenghien, Philippe; Molendijk, John Cornelis; Olsen, Ragnar; Rohlev, Anton; Rossi, Vittorio; Stellfeld, Donat; Valuch, Daniel; Wehrle, Urs

    2006-01-01

    The LHC RF consists of eight 400 MHz superconducting cavities per ring, with each cavity independently powered by a 300 kW klystron, via a circulator. The challenge for the Low Level is to cope with very high beam current (more than 1 A RF component) and achieve excellent beam lifetime (emittance growth time in excess of 25 hours). Each cavity has an associated Cavity Controller rack consisting of two VME crates which implement high gain RF Feedback, a Tuner Loop with a new algorithm, a Klystron Ripple Loop and a Conditioning system. In addition each ring has a Beam Control system (four VME crates) which includes a Frequency Program, Phase Loop, Radial Loop and Synchronization Loop. A Longitudinal Damper (dipole and quadrupole mode) acting via the 400 MHz cavities is included to reduce emittance blow-up due to filamentation from phase and energy errors at injection. Finally an RF Synchronization system implements the bunch into bucket transfer from the SPS into each LHC ring. When fully installed in 2007, the...

  2. Young and Exotic Stellar Zoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Universe. Westerlund 1 will certainly provide new opportunities in the long-standing quest for more and finer details about how stars, and especially massive ones, do form. ... and the Most Dense The large number of stars in Westerlund 1 was not the only surprise awaiting Clark and his colleagues. From their observations, the team members also found that all these stars are packed into an amazingly small volume of space, indeed less than 6 light-years across. In fact, this is more or less comparable to the 4 light-year distance to the star nearest to the Sun, Proxima Centauri! It is incredible: the concentration in Westerlund 1 is so high that the mean separation between stars is quite similar to the extent of the Solar System. "With so many stars in such a small volume, some of them may collide", envisages Simon Clark. "This could lead to the formation of an intermediate-mass black hole more massive than 100 solar masses. It may well be that such a monster has already formed at the core of Westerlund 1." The huge population of massive stars in Westerlund 1 suggests that it will have a very significant impact on its surroundings. The cluster contains so many massive stars that in a time span of less than 40 million years, it will be the site of more than 1,500 supernovae. A gigantic firework that may drive a fountain of galactic material! Because Westerlund 1 is at a distance of only about 10,000 light-years, high-resolution cameras such as NAOS/CONICA on ESO's Very Large Telescope can resolve its individual stars. Such observations are now starting to reveal smaller stars in Westerlund 1, including some that are less massive than the Sun. Astronomers will thus soon be able to study this exotic galactic zoo in great depth. More information The research presented in this ESO Press Release will soon appear in the leading research journal Astronomy and Astrophysics ("On the massive stellar population of the Super Star Cluster Westerlund 1" by J.S. Clark and colleagues). The

  3. Exotic mammals disperse exotic fungi that promote invasion by exotic trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, Martin A; Hayward, Jeremy; Horton, Thomas R; Amico, Guillermo C; Dimarco, Romina D; Barrios-Garcia, M Noelia; Simberloff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are often complex phenomena because many factors influence their outcome. One key aspect is how non-natives interact with the local biota. Interaction with local species may be especially important for exotic species that require an obligatory mutualist, such as Pinaceae species that need ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi. EM fungi and seeds of Pinaceae disperse independently, so they may use different vectors. We studied the role of exotic mammals as dispersal agents of EM fungi on Isla Victoria, Argentina, where many Pinaceae species have been introduced. Only a few of these tree species have become invasive, and they are found in high densities only near plantations, partly because these Pinaceae trees lack proper EM fungi when their seeds land far from plantations. Native mammals (a dwarf deer and rodents) are rare around plantations and do not appear to play a role in these invasions. With greenhouse experiments using animal feces as inoculum, plus observational and molecular studies, we found that wild boar and deer, both non-native, are dispersing EM fungi. Approximately 30% of the Pinaceae seedlings growing with feces of wild boar and 15% of the seedlings growing with deer feces were colonized by non-native EM fungi. Seedlings growing in control pots were not colonized by EM fungi. We found a low diversity of fungi colonizing the seedlings, with the hypogeous Rhizopogon as the most abundant genus. Wild boar, a recent introduction to the island, appear to be the main animal dispersing the fungi and may be playing a key role in facilitating the invasion of pine trees and even triggering their spread. These results show that interactions among non-natives help explain pine invasions in our study area.

  4. Exotic smoothness, noncommutative geometry and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sladkowski, J

    1994-01-01

    We investigate how exotic differential structures may reveal themselves in particle physics. The analysis is based on the A. Connes' construction of the standard model. It is shown that, if one of the copies of the spacetime manifold is equipped with an exotic differential structure, compact object of geometric origin may exist even if the spacetime is topologically trivial. Possible implications are discussed. An SU(3)\\otimes SU(2)\\otimes U(1) gauge model is constructed. This model may not be realistic but it shows what kind of physical phenomena might be expected due to the existence of exotic differential structures on the spacetime manifold.

  5. Quasi-exotic open-flavor mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Hilger, T

    2016-01-01

    Meson states with exotic quantum numbers arise naturally in a covariant bound-state framework in QCD. We investigate the consequences of shifting quark masses such that the states are no longer restricted to certain C-parities, but only by J^P. Then, a priori, one can no longer distinguish exotic or conventional states. In order to identify signatures of the different states to look for experimentally, we provide the behavior of masses, leptonic decay constants, and orbital-angular-momentum decomposition of such mesons, as well as the constellations in which they could be found. Most prominently, we consider the case of charged quasi-exotic excitations of the pion.

  6. Issues and Opportunities in Exotic Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Briceno, R A; Coito, S; Dudek, J J; Eichten, E; Fischer, C S; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Jackura, A; Kornicer, M; Krein, G; Lebed, R F; Machado, F A; Mitchell, R E; Morningstar, C J; Peardon, M; Pennington, M R; Peters, K; Richard, J -M; Shen, C -P; Shepherd, M R; Skwarnicki, T; Swanson, E S; Szczepaniak, A P; Yuan, C -Z

    2015-01-01

    The last few years have been witness to a proliferation of new results concerning heavy exotic hadrons. Experimentally, many new signals have been discovered that could be pointing towards the existence of tetraquarks, pentaquarks, and other exotic configurations of quarks and gluons. Theoretically, advances in lattice field theory techniques place us at the cusp of understanding complex coupled-channel phenomena, modelling grows more sophisticated, and effective field theories are being applied to an ever greater range of situations. It is thus an opportune time to evaluate the status of the field. In the following, a series of high priority experimental and theoretical issues concerning heavy exotic hadrons is presented.

  7. Exotic atoms and their electron shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simons, L.M.; Abbot, D.; Bach, B.; Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Bluem, P.; DeCecco, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.; Elsener, K.; Gotta, D.; Hauser, P.; Heitlinger, K.; Horvath, D.; Kottmann, F.; Morenzoni, E.; Missimer, J.; Reidy, J.J.; Siegel, R.; Taqqu, D.; Viel, D. (Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland) Coll. of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States) Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany) Inst. fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany) CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Inst. fuer Kernphysik (Germany) KFKI Research Inst. for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest (Hungary) Univ. Pisa (Italy) INFN - Pisa (Italy) ETH Zuerich, Villigen (Switzerland) Physics Dept., Univ. of Mississippi, University, MS (United States))

    1994-04-01

    Progress in the field of exotic atoms seems to increase proportionally with the number of exotic atoms produced and the increase in energy resolution with which the transition energies are determined. Modern experiments use high resolution crystal spectrometers or even aim at laser spectroscopy. The accuracy of these methods is limited by the interaction of the exotic atoms with their surroundings. The most important source of errors is the energy shift caused by the not well known status of the atomic electron shell. A novel method to eliminate these sources of error is presented and the possibilities for further high precision experiments is outlined. (orig.)

  8. Exotic atoms and their electron shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, L. M.; Abbot, D.; Bach, B.; Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Blüm, P.; DeCecco, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.; Elsener, K.; Gotta, D.; Hauser, P.; Heitlinger, K.; Horváth, D.; Kottmann, F.; Morenzoni, E.; Missimer, J.; Reidy, J. J.; Siegel, R.; Taqqu, D.; Viel, D.

    1994-04-01

    Progress in the field of exotic atoms seems to increase proportionally with the number of exotic atoms produced and the increase in energy resolution with which the transition energies are determined. Modern experiments use high resolution crystal spectrometers or even aim at laser spectroscopy. The accuracy of these methods is limited by the interaction of the exotic atoms with their surroundings. The most important source of errors is the energy shift caused by the not well known status of the atomic electron shell. A novel method to eliminate these sources of error is presented and the possibilities for further high precision experiments is outlined.

  9. 2008 LHC Open Days LHC magnets on display

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few years you’ve probably seen many of the 15 m long blue LHC dipole magnets being ferried around the site. Most of them are underground now, but on the LHC Open Days on 5 and 6 April the magnets will also play a central role on the surface. Installation of one of the LHC dipole magnets on the Saint-Genis roundabout on 7 March. The LHC dipole testing facility with several magnets at various stages of testing. The 27 km ring of the LHC consists of 1232 double-aperture superconducting dipole magnets, 360 short straight sections (SSS) and 114 special SSS for the insertion regions. On the Open Day, you will be able to "Follow the LHC magnets" through different stages around the site, culminating in their descent into the tunnel. Discover all the many components that have to be precisely integrated in the magnet casings, and talk to the engine...

  10. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  11. The Latest from the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    In SM18 six magnets have been cold tested with good results. It has also been a good week for cyostating with five more magnets completed. In sector 3-4 interconnection work and welding has started in the area damaged on 19 September last year. Interconnection work is also ongoing on the replacement magnet for the faulty dipole removed from sector 1-2. Three separate teams are now working in the three sectors to install the new DN200 pressure release nozzles. In total 27 magnets have been completed so far, with 34 nozzles welded. A new study is also underway to include a similar pressure release system for both the stand-alone magnets (SAMs) and the triplet magnets. All about Chamonix At the public session of the LHCC (the LHC experiments committee) held Wednesday, 18 February Steve Myers, Director for Accelerators and Technology, reviewed the discussions on the LHC at the Chamonix workshop. He explained the scenarios being studied to implement the machine consolidation measures and resume operation. The ...

  12. The LHC Computing Grid Project

    CERN Multimedia

    Åkesson, T

    In the last ATLAS eNews I reported on the preparations for the LHC Computing Grid Project (LCGP). Significant LCGP resources were mobilized during the summer, and there have been numerous iterations on the formal paper to put forward to the CERN Council to establish the LCGP. ATLAS, and also the other LHC-experiments, has been very active in this process to maximally influence the outcome. Our main priorities were to ensure that the global aspects are properly taken into account, that the CERN non-member states are also included in the structure, that the experiments are properly involved in the LCGP execution and that the LCGP takes operative responsibility during the data challenges. A Project Launch Board (PLB) was active from the end of July until the 10th of September. It was chaired by Hans Hoffmann and had the IT division leader as secretary. Each experiment had a representative (me for ATLAS), and the large CERN member states were each represented while the smaller were represented as clusters ac...

  13. Ecological engineering by a native leaf-cutting ant increases the performance of exotic plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farji-Brener, Alejandro G; Lescano, Natalia; Ghermandi, Luciana

    2010-05-01

    Numerous mechanisms are proposed to explain why exotic plants successfully invade natural communities. However, the positive effects of native engineers on exotic plant species have received less consideration. We tested whether the nutrient-rich soil patches created by a native ecological engineer (refuse dumps from the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex lobicornis) increase the performance of exotic more than native plants. In a greenhouse experiment, individuals from several native and exotic species were planted in pots with refuse dumps (RDs) and non-nest soils (NNSs). Total plant biomass and foliar nutrient content were measured at the end of the experiment. We also estimated the cover of exotic and native plant species in external RDs from 54 field ant nests and adjacent areas. Greenhouse plants showed more biomass and foliar nutrient content in RDs than in NNS pots. Nevertheless, differences in the final mean biomass among RD and NNS plants were especially great in exotics. Accordingly, the cover of exotic plants was higher in field RDs than in adjacent, non-nest soils. Our results demonstrated that plants can benefit from the enhanced nutrient content of ant RDs, and that A. lobicornis acts as an ecosystem engineer, creating a substrate that especially increases the performance of exotics. This supports the fluctuating resource hypothesis as a mechanism to promote biological invasions, and illustrates how this hypothesis may operate in nature. Since ant nests and exotic plants are more common in disturbed than in pristine environments, the role of ant nests in promoting biological invasions might be of particular interest. Proposals including the use of engineer species to restore disturbed habitats should be planned with caution because of their potential role in promoting invasions.

  14. LHC Forward Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Akiba, K.

    2016-10-17

    The goal of this report is to give a comprehensive overview of the rich field of forward physics, with a special attention to the topics that can be studied at the LHC. The report starts presenting a selection of the Monte Carlo simulation tools currently available, chapter 2, then enters the rich phenomenology of QCD at low, chapter 3, and high, chapter 4, momentum transfer, while the unique scattering conditions of central exclusive production are analyzed in chapter 5. The last two experimental topics, Cosmic Ray and Heavy Ion physics are presented in the chapter 6 and 7 respectively. Chapter 8 is dedicated to the BFKL dynamics, multiparton interactions, and saturation. The report ends with an overview of the forward detectors at LHC. Each chapter is correlated with a comprehensive bibliography, attempting to provide to the interested reader with a wide opportunity for further studies.

  15. LHC Report: machine development

    CERN Multimedia

    Rogelio Tomás García for the LHC team

    2015-01-01

    Machine development weeks are carefully planned in the LHC operation schedule to optimise and further study the performance of the machine. The first machine development session of Run 2 ended on Saturday, 25 July. Despite various hiccoughs, it allowed the operators to make great strides towards improving the long-term performance of the LHC.   The main goals of this first machine development (MD) week were to determine the minimum beam-spot size at the interaction points given existing optics and collimation constraints; to test new beam instrumentation; to evaluate the effectiveness of performing part of the beam-squeezing process during the energy ramp; and to explore the limits on the number of protons per bunch arising from the electromagnetic interactions with the accelerator environment and the other beam. Unfortunately, a series of events reduced the machine availability for studies to about 50%. The most critical issue was the recurrent trip of a sextupolar corrector circuit –...

  16. LHC forward physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartiglia, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States); Royon, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States). et al.

    2015-10-02

    The goal of this report is to give a comprehensive overview of the rich field of forward physics, with a special attention to the topics that can be studied at the LHC. The report starts presenting a selection of the Monte Carlo simulation tools currently available, chapter 2, then enters the rich phenomenology of QCD at low, chapter 3, and high, chapter 4, momentum transfer, while the unique scattering conditions of central exclusive production are analyzed in chapter 5. The last two experimental topics, Cosmic Ray and Heavy Ion physics are presented in the chapter 6 and 7 respectively. Chapter 8 is dedicated to the BFKL dynamics, multiparton interactions, and saturation. The report ends with an overview of the forward detectors at LHC. Each chapter is correlated with a comprehensive bibliography, attempting to provide to the interested reader with a wide opportunity for further studies.

  17. Ewsb at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Djouadi, A

    2009-01-01

    One of the major goals of the Large Hadron Collider is to probe the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism and the generation of the masses of the elementary particles. We review the physics of the Higgs sector in the Standard Model and some of its extensions such as supersymmetric theories and models of extra dimensions. The prospects for discovering the Higgs particles at the LHC and the study of their fundamental properties are summarised.

  18. The LHC on Google

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Where in the world could the LHC outdo Barack Obama in the popularity stakes? On Google, of course! The famous search engine has just published its Top Ten "most popular" and "fastest rising" searches for 2008 in each of 34 countries. Surprise, surprise, the term "Large Hadron Collider" was the 6th fastest rising topic in the United Kingdom and the 10th fastest in New Zealand. In the UK, "Large Hadron Collider" even beat "Obama" into 7th place!

  19. The LHC project

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    At the halfway point in the construction of the LHC, the project is now moving from the design and procurement phase to the installation phase, which officially started on 1st March. An overview of the progress of the project is given and the final schedule for installation and commissioning is discussed. The talk will be given in English but questions can be taken in French.

  20. LHC Magnet test failure

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "On Tueday, March 22, a Fermilab-built quadrupole magnet, one of an "inner triplet" of three focusing magnets, failed a high-pressure test at Point 5 in the tunnel of the LHC accelerator at CERN. Since Tuesday, teams at CERN and Fermilab have worked closely together to address the problem and have identified the cause of the failure. Now they are at work on a solution.:" (1 page)

  1. An LHC Lecture

    CERN Document Server

    Plehn, Tilman

    2009-01-01

    When we try to advance from a solid knowledge of field theory to LHC physics we usually encounter a frustrating problem: in particular Higgs physics and QCD techniques appear as a impenetrable granite block of phenomenological know-how, common lores, and historically grown intuition what works and what does not. I hope this lecture can drill a few holes into the rock and put you into a position to digest advanced writeups as well as some first research papers on the topic.

  2. Highly excited and exotic meson spectrum from dynamical lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, David Richards, Christopher Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Using a new quark-field construction algorithm and a large variational basis of operators, we extract a highly excited isovector meson spectrum on dynamical anisotropic lattices. We show how carefully constructed operators can be used to identify the continuum spin of extracted states. This method allows us to extract, with confidence, excited states, states of high spin and states with exotic quantum numbers, including, for the first time, spin-four states.

  3. Southwest Exotic Mapping Program (SWEMP) Database, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Southwest Exotic Plant Mapping Program (SWEMP) is a collaborative effort between the United States Geological Survey and federal, tribal, state, county and...

  4. Exotic geometric structures on Kodaira surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    McKay, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    On all compact complex surfaces (modulo finite unramified coverings), we classify all of the locally homogeneous geometric structures which are locally isomorphic to the exotic homogeneous surfaces of Lie.

  5. Exotic Matter and Space-Time

    CERN Document Server

    Terazawa, Hidezumi

    2013-01-01

    Exotic forms of matter such as carbon nanofoams, hexalambdas and strange stars, pentaquarks, color-balls, etc. and their relations to current problems in cosmo-particle physics such as dark matter and energy are discussed in some details.

  6. Exotic Brane Junctions from F-theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    Applying string dualities to F-theory, we obtain various $[p,q]$-branes whose constituents are standard branes of codimension two and exotic branes. We construct junctions of the exotic five-branes and their Hanany-Witten transitions associated with those in F-theory. In this procedure, we understand the monodromy of the single $5^2_2$-brane. We also find the objects which are sensitive to the branch cut of the $5^2_2$-brane. Considering the web of branes in the presence of multiple exotic five-branes analogous to the web of five-branes with multiple seven-branes, we obtain novel brane constructions for $SU(2)$ gauge theories with $n$ flavors and their superconformal limit with enhanced $E_{n+1}$ symmetry in five, four, and three dimensions. Hence, adapting the techniques of the seven-branes to the exotic branes, we will be able to construct F-theories in diverse dimensions.

  7. Dynamical effects in fusion with exotic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Phuoc, K; Simpson, E C

    2016-01-01

    [Background] Reactions with stable beams have demonstrated a strong interplay between nuclear structure and fusion. Exotic beam facilities open new perspectives to understand the impact of neutron skin, large isospin, and weak binding energies on fusion. Microscopic theories of fusion are required to guide future experiments. [Purpose] To investigate new effects of exotic structures and dynamics in near-barrier fusion with exotic nuclei. [Method] Microscopic approaches based on the Hartree-Fock (HF) mean-field theory are used for studying fusion barriers in $^{40-54}$Ca+$^{116}$Sn reactions for even isotopes. Bare potential barriers are obtained assuming frozen HF ground-state densities. Dynamical effects on the barrier are accounted for in time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations of the collisions. Vibrational couplings are studied in the coupled-channel framework and near-barrier nucleon transfer is investigated with TDHF calculations. [Results] The development of a neutron skin in exotic calcium iso...

  8. Processing LHC data

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN IT department

    2013-01-01

    The LHC produces 600 million collisions every second in each detector, which generates approximately one petabyte of data per second. None of today’s computing systems are capable of recording such rates. Hence sophisticated selection systems are used for a first fast electronic pre-selection, only passing one out of 10 000 events. Tens of thousands of processor cores then select 1% of the remaining events. Even after such a drastic data reduction, the four big experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb, together need to store over 25 petabytes per year. The LHC data are aggregated in the CERN Data Centre, where initial data reconstruction is performed, and a copy is archived to long-term tape storage. Another copy is sent to several large scale data centres around the world. Subsequently hundreds of thousands of computers from around the world come into action: harnessed in a distributed computing service, they form the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG), which provides the resources to store, distribute, an...

  9. LHC Dipoles Accelerate

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Andrezej Siemko (left), Peter Sievers (centre), and Lucio Rossi (right), have the exciting challenge of preparing and testing 2000 magnets for the LHC. The LHC is going to require a lot of powerful magnets by the time it begins operation in 2006. More specifically, it is going to need 130 special magnets, 400 quadrupoles, and a whopping 1250 dipoles! Preparing and testing these magnets for the conditions they will encounter in the LHC is not an easy task. But evaluation of the most recently received magnet, from the German company Noell, is showing that while the monumental task of receiving and testing nearly 2000 magnets is going to be exhausting, the goals are definitely attainable. At the moment and over the next year, pre-series magnets (the magnets that CERN uses to fine tune performance) are arriving slowly (90 in total will arrive), but by 2003 the rate of series magnet arrival will accelerate to 9 per week, that's over 450 in a single year! And working with these magnets when they arrive is tough. ...

  10. LHC Report: imaginative injectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Pierre Freyermuth for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    A new bunch injection scheme from the PS to the SPS allowed the LHC to achieve a new peak luminosity record.   Figure 1: PSB multi-turn injection principle: to vary the parameters during injection with the aim of putting the newly injected beam in a different region of the transverse phase-space plan. The LHC relies on the injector complex to deliver beam with well-defined bunch populations and the necessary transverse and longitudinal characteristics – all of which fold directly into luminosity performance. There are several processes taking place in the PS Booster (PSB) and the Proton Synchrotron (PS) acting on the beam structure in order to obtain the LHC beam characteristics. Two processes are mainly responsible for the beam brightness: the PSB multi-turn injection and the PS radio-frequency (RF) gymnastics. The total number of protons in a bunch and the transverse emittances are mostly determined by the multi-turn Booster injection, while the number of bunches and their time spacin...

  11. LHC support post

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    LHC support post prototype, which dates in 1995, in a long development period which started in the early ’90s and continued until the end of the decade. The wires next to the support post are probably wires from strain gauges, which are employed to measure the stress level in the material when the support is mechanically loaded. These supports are mechanically optimized to withstand a weight of up to 100Kn (10 tons) while being as thin as possible to minimize conduction heat to magnets. This is the reason why the stress measurement was extensively done in the prototyping phase. About support posts: The high magnetic fields needed for the LHC can only be reached using superconductors. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC will be the largest superconducting installation ever built and, at 1.9 degrees above absolute zero (300 degrees below room temperature), one of the the coldest objects in the universe! The magnet supports have to brid...

  12. LHC Report: Rocky XIV

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The LHC has been in luminosity production mode for the last couple of weeks. Peak luminosities have ranged between 6 and a record 7.74 x 1033 cm -2 s-1. Integrated luminosities per fill have been healthy, with 170 inverse picobarn per fill reached on five occasions in the last two weeks.  The total integrated luminosity for the year has passed 14 inverse femtobarns.   Injected bunch currents have peaked at an average of  1.69 x 1011 protons per bunch on average - a remarkable achievement for both the injectors and the LHC: the injectors to be able to produce good quality beam at these intensities; the LHC for being able to cope with these intensities without excessive losses. Peak performance from day to day depends strongly on the beam sizes and bunch intensities delivered by the injectors. It is a continual challenge to keep the Booster, PS and SPS optimally tuned while they deliver beams to their other wide range of users. Despite the excel...

  13. Tevatron operational status and possible lessons for the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Tevatron Run II luminosity progress and plans, including SC magnet measurements and modeling of field errors in view of the LHC operation. It also discusses antiproton production, stacking and cooling.

  14. Handbook of LHC Higgs Cross Sections: 4. Deciphering the Nature of the Higgs Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Florian, D. [National Univ. of San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); et al.

    2016-10-25

    This Report summarizes the results of the activities of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group in the period 2014-2016. The main goal of the working group was to present the state-of-the-art of Higgs physics at the LHC, integrating all new results that have appeared in the last few years. The first part compiles the most up-to-date predictions of Higgs boson production cross sections and decay branching ratios, parton distribution functions, and off-shell Higgs boson production and interference effects. The second part discusses the recent progress in Higgs effective field theory predictions, followed by the third part on pseudo-observables, simplified template cross section and fiducial cross section measurements, which give the baseline framework for Higgs boson property measurements. The fourth part deals with the beyond the Standard Model predictions of various benchmark scenarios of Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, extended scalar sector, Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model and exotic Higgs boson decays. This report follows three previous working-group reports: Handbook of LHC Higgs Cross Sections: 1. Inclusive Observables (CERN-2011-002), Handbook of LHC Higgs Cross Sections: 2. Differential Distributions (CERN-2012-002), and Handbook of LHC Higgs Cross Sections: 3. Higgs properties (CERN-2013-004). The current report serves as the baseline reference for Higgs physics in LHC Run 2 and beyond.

  15. etapi and eta'pi spectra and interpretation of possible exotic JPC=1-+ mesons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepaniak, Adam P; Swat, Maciej; Dzierba, Alex R; Teige, Scott

    2003-08-29

    We discuss a coupled channel analysis of the etapi and eta'pi systems produced in pi(-)p interactions at 18 GeV/c. We show that known Q(-)Q resonances, together with residual soft meson-meson rescattering, saturate the spectra including the exotic J(PC)=1(-+) channel. The possibility of a narrow exotic resonance at a mass near 1.6 GeV/c(2) cannot, however, be ruled out.

  16. Meteors, space aliens, and other exotic encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom. Hofacker

    1998-01-01

    Exotics have had a big impact on our environment. If you do not think so, just look at how many people believe that humans would not exist on this planet were it not for exotics. This belief centers on two main theories: (1) that humans could not have evolved were it not for a huge meteor from outer space striking the earth resulting in extinction of the dinasours, the...

  17. The ATLAS Tau Trigger Performance during LHC Run 1 and Prospects for Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Mitani, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS tau trigger is designed to select hadronic decays of the tau leptons. Tau lepton plays an important role in Standard Model (SM) physics, such as in Higgs boson decays. Tau lepton is also important in beyond the SM (BSM) scenarios, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles, as they are often produced preferentially in these models. During the 2010-2012 LHC run (Run1), the tau trigger was accomplished successfully, which leads several rewarding results such as evidence for $H\\rightarrow \\tau\\tau$. From the 2015 LHC run (Run2), LHC will be upgraded and overlapping interactions per bunch crossing (pile-up) are expected to increase by a factor two. It will be challenging to control trigger rates while keeping interesting physics events. This paper summarized the tau trigger performance in Run1 and its prospects for Run2.

  18. Data-driven Model-independent Searches for Long-lived Particles at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Coccaro, Andrea; Lubatti, H J; Russell, Heather; Shelton, Jessie

    2016-01-01

    Neutral long-lived particles (LLPs) are highly motivated by many BSM scenarios, such as theories of supersymmetry, baryogenesis, and neutral naturalness, and present both tremendous discovery opportunities and experimental challenges for the LHC. A major bottleneck for current LLP searches is the prediction of SM backgrounds, which are often impossible to simulate accurately. In this paper, we propose a general strategy for obtaining differential, data-driven background estimates in LLP searches, thereby notably extending the range of LLP masses and lifetimes that can be discovered at the LHC. We focus on LLPs decaying in the ATLAS Muon System, where triggers providing both signal and control samples are available at the LHC Run-2. While many existing searches require two displaced decays, a detailed knowledge of backgrounds will allow for very inclusive searches that require just one detected LLP decay. As we demonstrate for the $h \\to X X$ signal model of LLP pair production in exotic Higgs decays, this res...

  19. Electron scattering and reactions from exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karataglidis, S. [University of Johannesburg, Department of Physics, Auckland Park (South Africa); University of Melbourne, School of Physics, Victoria (Australia)

    2017-04-15

    The SCRIT and FAIR/ELISe experiments are the first to attempt to measure directly electron scattering form factors from nuclei far from stability. This will give direct information for the (one-body) charge densities of those systems, about which there is little information available. The SCRIT experiment will be taking data for medium-mass exotic nuclei, while the electron-ion collider at ELISe, when constructed, will be able to measure form factors for a wide range of exotic nuclei, as available from the radioactive ion beams produced by the FAIR experiment. Other facilities are now being proposed, which will also consider electron scattering from exotic nuclei at higher energies, to study short-range correlations in exclusive reactions. This review will consider all available information concerning the current status (largely theoretical) of electron scattering from exotic nuclei and, where possible, complement such information with equivalent information concerning the neutron densities of those exotic systems, as obtained from intermediate energy proton scattering. The issue of long- and short-range correlations will be discussed, and whether extending such studies to the exotic sector will elicit new information. (orig.)

  20. Search for exotic short-range interactions using paramagnetic insulators

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, P -H; Liu, C -Y; Long, J C

    2015-01-01

    We describe a proposed experimental search for exotic spin-coupled interactions using a solid state paramagnetic insulator. The experiment is sensitive to the net magnetization induced by the exotic interaction between the unpaired insulator electrons with a dense, non-magnetic mass in close proximity. An existing experiment has been used to set limits on the electric dipole moment of the electron by probing the magnetization induced in a cryogenic gadolinium gallium garnet sample on application of a strong electric field. With suitable additions, including a movable source mass, this experiment can be used to explore "monopole-dipole" forces on polarized electrons with unique or unprecedented sensitivity. The solid-state, non-magnetic construction, combined with the low-noise conditions and extremely sensitive magnetometry available at cryogenic temperatures leads to a sensitivity over ten orders of magnitude greater than exiting limits in the range below 1 mm.

  1. Allergic contact dermatitis from exotic woods: importance of patch-testing with patient-provided samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podjasek, Joshua O; Cook-Norris, Robert H; Richardson, Donna M; Drage, Lisa A; Davis, Mark D P

    2011-01-01

    Exotic woods from tropical and subtropical regions (eg, from South America, south Asia, and Africa) frequently are used occupationally and recreationally by woodworkers and hobbyists. These exotic woods more commonly provoke irritant contact dermatitis reactions, but they also can provoke allergic contact dermatitis reactions. We report three patients seen at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) with allergic contact dermatitis reactions to exotic woods. Patch testing was performed and included patient-provided wood samples. Avoidance of identified allergens was recommended. For all patients, the dermatitis cleared or improved after avoidance of the identified allergens. Clinicians must be aware of the potential for allergic contact dermatitis reactions to compounds in exotic woods. Patch testing should be performed with suspected woods for diagnostic confirmation and allowance of subsequent avoidance of the allergens.

  2. Exotic Hybrid Meson Spectroscopy with the GlueX detector at Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, David W. [JLAB

    2014-03-01

    The GlueX experiment is scheduled to begin taking data in 2015. The goal is to discover evidence for the existence of exotic hybrid mesons and to map out their spectrum in the light quark sector. Recent theoretical developments using Lattice QCD predict exotic hybrid states in a mass range accessible using the newly upgraded 12GeV electron accelerator at Jefferson Lab. Hybrid mesons, and in particular exotic hybrid mesons, provide the ideal laboratory for testing QCD in the confinement regime since these mesons explicitly manifest the gluonic degrees of freedom. The experiment will use 9 GeV linearly polarized photons produced via coherent bremsstrahlung to produce the exotic hybrids. The decay products will be detected in the solenoid-based GlueX detector currently under construction at Jefferson Lab. The status of the GlueX experiment including detector parameters will be presented along with theoretical motivation for the experiment.

  3. LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) Project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Shaposhnikova, Elena; Damerau, Heiko; Funken, Anne; Gilardoni, Simone; Goddard, Brennan; Hanke, Klaus; Kobzeva, Lelyzaveta; Lombardi, Alessandra; Manglunki, Django; Mataguez, Simon; Meddahi, Malika; Mikulec, Bettina; Rumolo, Giovanni; Scrivens, Richard; Vretenar, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    A massive improvement program of the LHC injector chain is presently being conducted under the LIU project. For the proton chain, this includes the replacement of Linac2 with Linac4 as well as all necessary upgrades to the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB), the Proton Synchrotron (PS) and Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), aimed at producing beams with the challenging High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) parameters. Regarding the heavy ions, plans to improve the performance of Linac3 and the Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) are also pursued under the general LIU program. The full LHC injection chain returned to operation after Long Shutdown 1, with extended beam studies taking place in Run 2. A general project Cost and Schedule Review also took place in March 2015, and several dedicated LIU project reviews were held to address issues awaiting pending decisions. In view of these developments, 2014 and 2015 have been key years to define a number of important aspects of the final LIU path. This paper will describe the reviewed LI...

  4. Growth performance of exotic Oreochromis niloticus, exotic Oreochromis niloticus fed with pelleted feeds in flow-through system

    OpenAIRE

    Eyo, A.A.; Okoye, F.C.; Sebiola, D.

    1999-01-01

    Local, exotic and hybrid tilapia fingerlings were fed 45% crude protein diet containing 18% fish meal in a flow through system in triplicate and their growth and food utilization observed for 14 weeks. At the end of the study, the hybrid (Exotic Oreochromis niloticus male x Exotic Oreochromis aureus female) fingerlings had higher growth rate and food conversion ratio (FCR) than the other treatments. This was followed by Exotic Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings. The exotic Oreochromis niloticu...

  5. Search for signatures with top, bottom, tau and exotics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrea Favareto; Luigi Longo

    2016-01-01

    The Standard Model (SM) of particle physics is a sensational success, especially since the discov- ery of the 125 GeV Higgs boson. However, there are still several open questions that the Standard Model doesnâ??t address, like the nature of dark matter and dark energy, the matter-antimatter asym- metry, the neutrino oscillations, the inconsistency with the general relativity and the hierarchy problem. Theories Beyond the Standard Model (BSM), such as Supersymmetry, Little and Com- posite Higgs, Extra-Dimensions, Extended Gauge models, Technicolor, Left-Right symmetric models, and many other BSM scenarios are trying to answer these questions. In these proceed- ings we present the most recent results for searches Beyond the Standard Model at the LHC by the ATLAS and CMS experiments, focusing on signatures with top, bottom, tau and exotics. The data are found to be consistent with the Standard Model. The non-observation of a signal permits to set limits at the 95pct confidence level on the production cross sect...

  6. Summary of results on exotic searches from ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tam Jason

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the success of the Standard Model (SM of particle physics in the recent decades describing nature within its capabilities, there remain open questions such as the naturalness of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking (EWSB as well as potential deeper underlying symmetries of the SM that may contribute to the possibility of unifying the fundamental interactions. Supersymmetry (SUSY is a very popular concept that is proposed to provide explanations to these issues, but there are also many other Beyond the Standard Model (BSM concepts proposed that attempt to solve these remaining conundrums. The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC is designed to search for those non-SUSY BSM theories, referred to as Exotics. Presented here is a summary of selected results from different searches performed using proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV during 2012. As no significant excess were observed over SM background processes, the obtained results are interpreted as constraints on the possibility of the existence of these new physics.

  7. A Global Computing Grid for LHC; Una red global de computacion para LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Calama, J. M.; Colino Arriero, N.

    2013-06-01

    An innovative computing infrastructure has played an instrumental role in the recent discovery of the Higgs boson in the LHC and has enabled scientists all over the world to store, process and analyze enormous amounts of data in record time. The Grid computing technology has made it possible to integrate computing center resources spread around the planet, including the CIEMAT, into a distributed system where these resources can be shared and accessed via Internet on a transparent, uniform basis. A global supercomputer for the LHC experiments. (Author)

  8. Status of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Gourber, J P

    1999-01-01

    Since the approval of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) by the CERN Council in December 1994, considerable progress has been made in the assessment of the beam parameters and the refining of the design of the machine components and experimental areas. Thanks to the strong support from a number of countries outside the Member States, the machine will be constructed in one single stage with first physics in 2005. The first large calls for tenders are being launched. The status of the project and the future plans are presented.

  9. Theory - LHC Phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider marks the culmination of a decades-long hunt for the last ingredient of the Standard Model. At the same time, there are still many puzzles in particle physics, foremost the existence of a relatively light Higgs boson, seemingly without any extra weak scale particles that would stabilize the Higgs mass against quantum corrections, and the existence of Dark Matter. This talk will give an overview of the most interesting theories that address these problems and how to test these theories at the LHC.

  10. First LHC Results

    CERN Document Server

    Horn, Claus; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Since four month the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is producing proton-proton collisions with a center of mass energy of 7 TeV offering the potential of directly producing dark matter particles in an energy range never reached before in accelerator-based particle physics. First the performance and first Standard Model measurements of the general purpose experiments CMS and ATLAS is presented. This talk then focuses on their potential to detect dark matter candidates. Results from ongoing physics analyzes are presented and expectations for possible future discoveries are discussed.

  11. Prototyping LHC Orbit Control

    CERN Document Server

    Wijnands, Thijs; Srinivasan, B

    2002-01-01

    Orbit correction consists in adjusting the strengths of the corrector magnets to make the measured beam position match a predefined reference. In the LHC, this involves around 2000 sensors and more than 1000 actuators that are distributed along both rings. The orbit correction scheme should be able to compensate for very slow orbit drifts in the range of a 10-2 Hz but also for fast motions (vibrations) up to 1 Hz. In this paper we investigate correction schemes that could be used in either case. The choice of design formalisms is based on the experience we gained with the SPS and the LEP.

  12. Awareness of Ebola: An Exotic Zoonotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NLPI Dharmayanti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Filovirus including Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fever is a zoonotic disease that characterised by immune suppression and systemic inflammatory response causing impairment of the vascular and immune systems. It is leading to multiorgan failures with mortality varies from 50-90% in human and primate. The Ebola virus is currently divided into five species, namely Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV, Sudan ebolavirus (SEBOV, Tai Forest ebolavirus, Reston ebolavirus (REBOV and Bundibugyo ebolavirus. Geographical distribution of Ebola virus in the Afrotropics region is mainly in the rainforests of Central and West Africa, while REBOV was detected in the Philippines. Bats are suspected as reservoir host of the virus. Recently, Ebola cases had been reported in endemic areas in Africa and then distributed to other countries which was not endemic through human travellers. Ebola virus is also potentially used as a biological weapon, so Ebola virus becomes public health concern. This paper describes the characters of Ebola virus, its clinical signs, transmission and threat as an exotic disease in Indonesia. By understanding the disease, the emergence of Ebola virus in Indonesia can be anticipated quickly.

  13. LHC Cost Review To Completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    At the CERN Finance Committee and the Committee of Council on 19-20 September, CERN management presented a review of costs to completion in 2006 of the LHC project. A document on the web reviews the background, evolution, and facts behind these costs. To view it please go to: http://user.web.cern.ch/CERN/LHC.html

  14. The High Luminosity LHC Project

    CERN Document Server

    Bruning, O

    2015-01-01

    This presentation reviews the status of the high luminosity LHC project, and highlights the main challenges from the technology and beam physics point of view. It will mention the outcome of the 2015 Cost and Schedule review for the HL-LHC project and summarizes the status of the high field quadrupole and crab cavity development.

  15. LHC Cryogenics on the mend

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 29 September, repairs began on the LHC cryogenic distribution line, or QRL, to replace a faulty part that occurs in the hundreds of elements of the line that are already on-site. The Accelerator Technology Department is designing a work programme to finish the repairs as soon as possible and minimize delays to the rest of the LHC project.

  16. First LHC beam in 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Impressions from the ATLAS control room while waiting for the very first 2017 LHC beams, from the traditional croissants in the morning to the "beam splashes" in the evening. The shift crew, online experts, run coordinators and management are looking forward the next steps of the LHC restart.

  17. The four main LHC experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    AC Team

    1999-01-01

    This diagram shows the locations of the four main experiments (ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb) that will take place at the LHC. Located between 50 m and 150 m underground, huge caverns have been excavated to house the giant detectors. The SPS, the final link in the pre-acceleration chain, and its connection tunnels to the LHC are also shown.

  18. Exotics and PWA for piN Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Azimov, Yakov

    2014-01-01

    Our talk is intended for the session in memory of Mitya Diakonov. The problem is considered of existence of flavor multiplets consisting of multi-quark baryons. We have argued that the S-matrix should have poles, at least Regge ones, with any quantum numbers, including exotic. This is a novel argument for possible a proof, yet there are no theoretical arguments to forbid exotics. Then we apply the partial-wave analysis (PWA) with addressing mainly to the non-strange exotic members of the anti-decuplet or even of higher multiplets. It suggested new N(1680) as a possible partner of Theta+. Later independent measurements of several collaborations seem to support our finding for N(1680), though its quantum numbers still wait for investigation. Similar approach to pi+ - proton scattering, in combination with K+ - proton scattering, suggests a number of candidates for 27-plets. Their interesting feature is possible existence of both very wide and very narrow baryon states. This phenomenon may be analogous to recent...

  19. Support for the LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Butin, François; Gastal, M; Lacarrère, D; Macina, D; Perrot, A L; Tsesmelis, E; Wilhelmsson, M; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2008-01-01

    Experimental Area Teams have been put in place and charged with the general co-ordination and management of the LHC experimental areas and of the zones in the LHC tunnel hosting near-beam detectors of the experiments. This organization is responsible for the in situ co-ordination of work with the aim of providing a structure that enables the experiment collaborations and accelerator groups to carry out their work effectively and safely. This presentation will review some key elements in the support given to the LHC experimental areas and, given the track record and successful implementation during the LHC installation and commissioning phase, will argue that such an organization structure will be required also for the period of LHC exploitation for physics.

  20. Hunting, Exotic Carnivores, and Habitat Loss: Anthropogenic Effects on a Native Carnivore Community, Madagascar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach J Farris

    Full Text Available The wide-ranging, cumulative, negative effects of anthropogenic disturbance, including habitat degradation, exotic species, and hunting, on native wildlife has been well documented across a range of habitats worldwide with carnivores potentially being the most vulnerable due to their more extinction prone characteristics. Investigating the effects of anthropogenic pressures on sympatric carnivores is needed to improve our ability to develop targeted, effective management plans for carnivore conservation worldwide. Utilizing photographic, line-transect, and habitat sampling, as well as landscape analyses and village-based bushmeat hunting surveys, we provide the first investigation of how multiple forms of habitat degradation (fragmentation, exotic carnivores, human encroachment, and hunting affect carnivore occupancy across Madagascar's largest protected area: the Masoala-Makira landscape. We found that as degradation increased, native carnivore occupancy and encounter rates decreased while exotic carnivore occupancy and encounter rates increased. Feral cats (Felis species and domestic dogs (Canis familiaris had higher occupancy than half of the native carnivore species across Madagascar's largest protected landscape. Bird and small mammal encounter rates were negatively associated with exotic carnivore occupancy, but positively associated with the occupancy of four native carnivore species. Spotted fanaloka (Fossa fossana occupancy was constrained by the presence of exotic feral cats and exotic small Indian civet (Viverricula indica. Hunting was intense across the four study sites where hunting was studied, with the highest rates for the small Indian civet (mean=90 individuals consumed/year, the ring-tailed vontsira (Galidia elegans (mean=58 consumed/year, and the fosa (Cryptoprocta ferox (mean=31 consumed/year. Our modeling results suggest hunters target intact forest where carnivore occupancy, abundance, and species richness, are highest

  1. Space-Charge Compensation Options for the LHC Injector Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Aiba, M; Dorda, U; Franchetti, G; Garoby, R; Koutchouk, Jean-Pierre; Martini, M; Métral, E; Papaphilippou, Y; Scandale, Walter; Shiltsev, V; Zimmermann, F

    2007-01-01

    Space-charge effects have been identified as the most serious intensity limitation in the CERN PS and PS Booster, on the way towards ultimate LHC performance and beyond. We here explore the application of several previously proposed space-charge compensation methods to the two LHC pre-injector rings, and the challenges which need to be overcome. The methods considered include the reduction of tune shift and resonance strengths via octupoles, pole-face windings, electron lenses, or neutralisation.

  2. Thermal and prompt photons at RHIC and the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquet, Jean-François [Department of Physics & Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada); Shen, Chun [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada); Denicol, Gabriel [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada); Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Luzum, Matthew [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia-Spain (Spain); Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão Travessa R, no. 187, 05508-090, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo (Brazil); Schenke, Björn [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada)

    2016-12-15

    Thermal and prompt photon production in heavy ion collisions is evaluated and compared with measurements from both RHIC and the LHC. An event-by-event hydrodynamical model of heavy ion collisions that includes shear and bulk viscosities is used, along with up-to-date photon emission rates. Larger tension with measurements is observed at RHIC than at the LHC. The center-of-mass energy and centrality dependence of thermal and prompt photons is investigated.

  3. CP Violation in SUSY Cascade Decay Chains at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Moortgat-Pick, G; Tattersall, J; Wienemann, P

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the potential to observe effects of CP violation in squark decay chains at the LHC. As the CP-violating observable we use the asymmetry composed by triple products of final state momenta. Extending methods for momentum reconstruction we show that there are good prospects for observation of these effects at the LHC. Finally, we include the main experimental factors and discuss the expected sensitivity.

  4. Lepton Number Violation and Scalar Searches at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    del Aguila, Francisco; Santamaria, Arcadi; Wudka, Jose

    2013-01-01

    We review the SM extensions with scalar multiplets including doubly-charged components eventually observable as di-leptonic resonances at the LHC. Special emphasis is payed to the limits on LNV implied by doubly-charged scalar searches at the LHC, and to the characterization of the multiplet doubly-charged scalars belong to if they are observed to decay into same-sign charged lepton pairs.

  5. LHC progress report

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Last weekend saw a record physics fill with a tenfold increase in instantaneous luminosity (event rate from collisions), marking an important milestone for the LHC. This physics fill did not only establish luminosities above 1.1 x 1028 cm-2 s-1 in all four experiments but was also kept in "stable beam" mode for a new record length of 30 hours. The particle physics experiments were able to more than double the total number of events so far recorded at 3.5 TeV.   The LHC screen indicating that squeezed stable beams have been achieved for the first time. The very successful weekend had been preceded by hard work on the accelerator side. A factor 5 improvement in luminosity was achieved by "squeezing" (reducing) the beam sizes at all four interaction points. This process, one of the most complex stages in the operation of the accelerator, was finalised the week before. Once the machine is "squeezed", the experimental insertions become aperture bot...

  6. LHC Capabilities for Quarkonia

    CERN Document Server

    Petrushanko, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of the charmonium and bottomonium resonances in nucleus-nucleus collisions provides crucial information on high-density QCD matter. First, the suppression of quarkonia production is generally agreed to be one of the most direct probes of quark-gluon plasma formation. The observation of anomalous J/$\\psi$ suppression at the CERN-SPS and at RHIC is well established but the clarification of some important remaining questions requires equivalent studies of the $\\Upsilon$ family, only possible at the LHC energies. Second, the production of heavy-quarks proceeds mainly via gluon-gluon fusion processes and, as such, is sensitive to saturation of the gluon density at low-x in the nucleus. Measured departures from the expected vacuum quarkonia cross-sections in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC will thus provide valuable information not only on the thermodynamical state of the produced partonic medium, but also on the initial-state modifications of the nuclear parton distribution functions. The capabilities ...

  7. Diffraction at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoze, V.A.; Ryskin, M.G. [University of Durham, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); NRC Kurchatov Institute, Gatchina, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Martin, A.D. [University of Durham, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    We show that the diffractive pp (and p anti p) data (on {sigma}{sub tot}, d{sigma}{sub el}/dt, proton dissociation into low-mass systems, {sigma}{sup D}{sub low} {sub M}, and high-mass dissociation, d{sigma}/d({Delta}{eta})) in a wide energy range from CERN-ISR to LHC energies, may be described in a two-channel eikonal model with only one 'effective' pomeron. By allowing the pomeron coupling to the diffractive eigenstates to depend on the collider energy (as is expected theoretically) we are able to explain the low value of {sigma}{sup D}{sub low} {sub M} measured at the LHC. We calculate the survival probability, S{sup 2}, of a rapidity gap to survive 'soft rescattering'. We emphasise that the values found for S{sup 2} are particularly sensitive to the detailed structure of the diffractive eigenstates. (orig.)

  8. LHC Upgrade Scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, F

    2007-01-01

    The EU CARE-HHH and US-LARP studies for an LHC luminosity upgrade aim at increasing the peak luminosity by a factor of 10, to 1035 cm-2s-1. The luminosity can be raised by rebuilding the interaction regions (IRs) in combination with a consistent change of beam parameters. In addition to advanced low-beta quadrupoles, the upgraded IRs may accommodate other new elements such as slim s.c. dipoles or quadrupoles embedded deep inside the detectors, global low-angle crab cavities, and wire compensators of long-range beam-beam effects. Important constraints on the upgrade path are the maximum acceptable number of detector pile-up events, favoring many closely spaced bunches, and the heat load on the cold-magnet beam screens, pointing towards fewer and more intense bunches. In order to translate the increased peak luminosity into a correspondingly higher integrated luminosity, the upgrade of the LHC ring should be complemented by an upgrade of the injector complex. I will present preferred upgrade scenarios for the L...

  9. Exotic Higgs Decay $h\\rightarrow\\phi\\phi\\rightarrow 4b$ at the LHeC

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Shang; Zhang, Chen; Zhu, Shou-hua

    2016-01-01

    We study the exotic decay of the 125 GeV Higgs boson ($h$) into a pair of light spin-0 particles ($\\phi$) which subsequently decays and results in a $4b$ final state. This decay mode is well motivated in the Next to Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) and extended Higgs sector models. Instead of searching at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) which are beset by large Standard Model (SM) backgrounds, we investigate this decay channel at the much cleaner Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC). With some simple selection cuts this channel becomes nearly free of background at this $ep$ machine, in stark contrast with the situation at the (HL-)LHC. With a parton level analysis we show that for the $\\phi$ mass range $[20,60]GeV$, with $100\\,fb^{-1}$ luminosity the LHeC is generally capable of constraining $C_{4b}^2\\equiv\\kappa_{V}^2\\times\\text{Br}(h\\rightarrow\\phi\\phi)\\times\\text{Br}^2(\\phi\\rightarrow b\\bar{b})$ ($\\kappa_{V}$ denotes the $hVV(V=W,Z)$ coup...

  10. LHC Injection Beam Quality During LHC Run I

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079186; Stapnes, Steinar

    The LHC at CERN was designed to accelerate proton beams from 450 GeV to 7 TeV and collide them in four large experiments. The 450 GeV beam is extracted from the last pre-accelerator, the SPS, and injected into the LHC via two 3 km long transfer lines, TI 2 and TI 8. The injection process is critical in terms of preservation of beam quality and machine protection. During LHC Run I (2009-2013) the LHC was filled with twelve high intensity injections per ring, in batches of up to 144 bunches of 1.7*10^11 protons per bunch. The stored beam energy of such a batch is already an order of magnitude above the damage level of accelerator equipment. Strict quality and machine protection requirements at injection have a significant impact on operational efficiency. During the first years of LHC operation, the injection phase was identified as one of the limiting factors for fast LHC turnaround time. The LHC Injection Quality Check (IQC) software framework was developed as a part of this thesis to monitor the beam quality...

  11. Lecture 7: Worldwide LHC Computing Grid Overview

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will introduce in an informal, but technically correct way the challenges that are linked to the needs of massively distributed computing architectures in the context of the LHC offline computing. The topics include technological and organizational aspects touching many aspects of LHC computing, from data access, to maintenance of large databases and huge collections of files, to the organization of computing farms and monitoring. Fabrizio Furano holds a Ph.D in Computer Science and has worked in the field of Computing for High Energy Physics for many years. Some of his preferred topics include application architectures, system design and project management, with focus on performance and scalability of data access. Fabrizio has experience in a wide variety of environments, from private companies to academic research in particular in object oriented methodologies, mainly using C++. He has also teaching experience at university level in Software Engineering and C++ Programming.

  12. Exotic baryon resonances in the Skyrme model

    CERN Document Server

    Diakonov, Dmitri

    2008-01-01

    We outline how one can understand the Skyrme model from the modern perspective. We review the quantization of the SU(3) rotations of the Skyrmion, leading to the exotic baryons that cannot be made of three quarks. It is shown that in the limit of large number of colours the lowest-mass exotic baryons can be studied from the kaon-Skyrmion scattering amplitudes, an approach known after Callan and Klebanov. We follow this approach and find, both analytically and numerically, a strong Theta+ resonance in the scattering amplitude that is traced to the rotational mode. The Skyrme model does predict an exotic resonance Theta+ but grossly overestimates the width. To understand better the factors affecting the width, it is computed by several methods giving, however, identical results. In particular, we show that insofar as the width is small, it can be found from the transition axial constant. The physics leading to a narrow Theta+ resonance is briefly reviewed and affirmed.

  13. Exotic Rotational Correlations in Emergent Quantum Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Estimates are presented of exotic, purely rotational correlations that arise in large systems if directions in space-time emerge from Planck scale quantum elements with no fixed classical background space. In the time domain, directions to world lines at finite separation $R$ from any world line coherently fluctuate in the classical (that is, $R\\rightarrow \\infty$) inertial frame, on a timescale $R/c$, by an angle of order $R^{-1/2}$ in Planck units. The exact exotic correlation function is computed for the signal in a Sagnac type interferometer of arbitrary shape. The signal variance is equal to twice the enclosed area divided by the perimeter, in Planck units. It is conjectured that exotic Planck scale rotational correlations, entangled with the strong interactions, determine the value of the cosmological constant. Cosmic acceleration may be viewed heuristically as centrifugal acceleration by rotational fluctuations of the matter vacuum. An experiment concept is sketched, based on a reconfiguration of the F...

  14. Timing, Trigger and Control Systems for LHC Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    \\\\ \\\\At the LHC, precise bunch-crossing clock and machine orbit signals must be broadcast over distances of several km from the Prevessin Control Room to the four experiment areas and other destinations. At the LHC experiments themselves, quite extensive distribution systems are also required for the transmission of timing, trigger and control (TTC) signals to large numbers of front-end electronics controllers from a single location in the vicinity of the central trigger processor. The systems must control the detector synchronization and deliver the necessary fast signals and messages that are phased with the LHC clock, orbit or bunch structure. These include the bunch-crossing clock, level-1 trigger decisions, bunch and event numbers, as well as test signals and broadcast commands. A common solution to this TTC system requirement is expected to result in important economies of scale and permit a rationalization of the development, operational and support efforts required. LHC Common Project RD12 is developi...

  15. Large Hadron Collider (LHC) phenomenology, operational challenges and theoretical predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Gilles, Abelin R

    2013-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the highest-energy particle collider ever constructed and is considered "one of the great engineering milestones of mankind." It was built by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) from 1998 to 2008, with the aim of allowing physicists to test the predictions of different theories of particle physics and high-energy physics, and particularly prove or disprove the existence of the theorized Higgs boson and of the large family of new particles predicted by supersymmetric theories. In this book, the authors study the phenomenology, operational challenges and theoretical predictions of LHC. Topics discussed include neutral and charged black hole remnants at the LHC; the modified statistics approach for the thermodynamical model of multiparticle production; and astroparticle physics and cosmology in the LHC era.

  16. LHC Databases on the Grid: Achievements and Open Issues

    CERN Document Server

    Vaniachine, A V

    2010-01-01

    To extract physics results from the recorded data, the LHC experiments are using Grid computing infrastructure. The event data processing on the Grid requires scalable access to non-event data (detector conditions, calibrations, etc.) stored in relational databases. The database-resident data are critical for the event data reconstruction processing steps and often required for physics analysis. This paper reviews LHC experience with database technologies for the Grid computing. List of topics includes: database integration with Grid computing models of the LHC experiments; choice of database technologies; examples of database interfaces; distributed database applications (data complexity, update frequency, data volumes and access patterns); scalability of database access in the Grid computing environment of the LHC experiments. The review describes areas in which substantial progress was made and remaining open issues.

  17. Exotic Smoothness and Quantum Gravity II: exotic R^4, singularities and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Asselmeyer-Maluga, T

    2011-01-01

    Since the first work on exotic smoothness in physics, it was folklore to assume a direct influence of exotic smoothness to quantum gravity. In the second paper, we calculate the "smoothness structure" part of the path integral in quantum gravity for the exotic R^4 as non-compact manifold. We discuss the influence of the "sum over geometries" to the "sum over smoothness structure". There are two types of exotic R^4: large (no smooth embedded 3-sphere) and small (smooth embedded 3-sphere). A large exotic R^4 can be produced by using topologically slice but smoothly non-slice knots whereas a small exotic R^4 is constructed by a 5-dimensional h-cobordism between compact 4-manifolds. The results are applied to the calculation of expectation values, i.e. we discuss the two observables, volume and Wilson loop. Then the appearance of naked singularities is analyzed. By using Mostow rigidity, we obtain a justification of area and volume quantization again. Finally exotic smoothness of the R^4 produces in all cases (sm...

  18. Dedication of Fermilab's LHC Remote Operations Center

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2007-01-01

    Fermilab's Remote Operations Center will be dedicated simultaneously at Fermilab in the U.S. and from CMS (Point 5) in Cessy, France. Speakers will include: from the U.S. DOE Undersecretary for Science Raymond Orbach and Fermilab Director Pier Oddone (U.S.); and from CERN Director General Robert Aymar, CMS Spokesperson Jim Virdee, LHC Project Leader Lyn Evans and US CMS Project Manager Joel Butler.

  19. The CMS crystal calorimeter for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Seez, Christopher J

    1999-01-01

    The CMS crystal calorimeter, comprising about 80,000 scintillating lead tungstate crystals read out by avalanche photodiodes ( in the barrel) and vacuum phototriodes ( in the endcap) is designed to give excellent energy resolution in the demanding LHC environment. It is now entering the construction phase. A status report on the project is presented, including recent results from test beam verification, crystal production and photodetector development.

  20. Multi-Parton Interactions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bartalini, P; Blok, B; Calucci, G; Corke, R; Diehl, M; Dokshitzer, Yu; Fano, L; Frankfurt, L; Gaunt, J R; Gieseke, S; Gustafson, G; Kar, D; Kom, C -H; Kulesza, A; Maina, E; Nagy, Z; Roehr, Ch; Siodmok, A; Schmelling, M; Stirling, W J; Strikman, M; Treleani, D

    2011-01-01

    We review the recent progress in the theoretical description and experimental observation of multiple parton interactions. Subjects covered include experimental measurements of minimum bias interactions and of the underlying event, models of soft physics implemented in Monte Carlo generators, developments in the theoretical description of multiple parton interactions and phenomenological studies of double parton scattering. This article stems from contributions presented at the Helmholtz Alliance workshop on "Multi-Parton Interactions at the LHC", DESY Hamburg, 13-15 September 2010.

  1. Electron Lenses for particle collimation in LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, V

    2008-01-01

    Electron Lenses built and installed in Tevatron have proven themselves as safe and very reliable instruments which can be effectively used in hadron collider operation for a number of applications, including compensation of beam-beam effects , DC beam removal from abort gaps , as a diagnostic tool. In this presentation we – following original proposal – consider in more detail a possibility of using electron lenses with hollow electron beam for ion and proton collimation in LHC.

  2. Production LHC HTS power lead test results

    CERN Document Server

    Tartaglia, M; Fehér, S; Huang, Y; Orris, D F; Pischalnikov, Y; Rabehl, Roger Jon; Sylvester, C D; Zbasnik, J

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab Magnet test facility has built and operated a test stand to characterize the performance of HTS power leads. We report here the results of production tests of 20 pairs of 7.5 kA HTS power leads manufactured by industry for installation in feed boxes for the LHC Interaction Region quadrupole strings. Included are discussions of the thermal, electrical, and quench characteristics under "standard" and "extreme" operating conditions, and the stability of performance across thermal cycles.

  3. Cooling of Magnetars with Exotic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Noda, Tsuneo; Fujisawa, Kotaro; Kotake, Kei; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    Thermal evolutions of magnetars are studied concerned with effects of exotic matter. All results are shown in two spatial dimensions for comparison with observational results by NuSTAR, NICER etc. in near future. Thermal conduction of envelope/crust in magnetars is affected by the strong magnetic field, and it could be an origin of hot/cold spots, which are expressed well with the two black body fitting. This study also stresses effects of the equation of state, on which the cooling processes, the thermal conductivity, and the heat capacity strongly depend. Exotic matter changes thermal evolutions of magnetars drastically, hence the effects could be detected in observations.

  4. Singularity links with exotic Stein fillings

    OpenAIRE

    Özbağcı, Burak; Akhmedov, Anar

    2012-01-01

    arXiv:1206.2468v3 [math.GT] 14 May 2014 SINGULARITY LINKS WITH EXOTIC STEIN FILLINGS ANAR AKHMEDOV AND BURAK OZBAGCI ABSTRACT. In [4], it was shown that there exist infinitely many contact Seifert fibered 3-manifolds each of which admits infinitely many exotic (homeomorphic but pairwise non-diffeomorphic) simply-connected Stein fillings. Here we extend this result to a larger set of contact Seifert fibered 3-manifolds with many singular fibers and observe that these 3- ma...

  5. Exotic populations in Galactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, F R

    2006-01-01

    Recent high-resolution observations of the central region of Galactic globular clusters have shown the presence of a large variety of exotic stellar objects whose formation and evolution may be strongly affected by dynamical interactions. In this paper I review the main properties of two classes of exotic objects: the so-called Blue Stragglers stars and the recently identified optical companions to Millisecond pulsar. Both these class of objects are invaluable tools to investigate the binary evolution in very dense environments and are powerful tracers of the dynamical history of the parent cluster.

  6. The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ALICE Collaboration; Aamodt, K.; Abrahantes Quintana, A.; Achenbach, R.; Acounis, S.; Adamová, D.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.; Agnese, F.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad, S.; Akindinov, A.; Akishin, P.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro, R.; Alfarone, G.; Alici, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Amend, W.; Andrei, C.; Andres, Y.; Andronic, A.; Anelli, G.; Anfreville, M.; Angelov, V.; Anzo, A.; Anson, C.; Anticić, T.; Antonenko, V.; Antonczyk, D.; Antinori, F.; Antinori, S.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Aprodu, V.; Arba, M.; Arcelli, S.; Argentieri, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Arefiev, A.; Arsene, I.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Awes, T. C.; Äysto, J.; Danish Azmi, M.; Bablock, S.; Badalà, A.; Badyal, S. K.; Baechler, J.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Bán, J.; Barbera, R.; Barberis, P.-L.; Barbet, J. M.; Barnäfoldi, G.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Bartos, D.; Basile, M.; Basmanov, V.; Bastid, N.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baudot, J.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I.; Becker, B.; Belikov, J.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belogianni, A.; Belyaev, S.; Benato, A.; Beney, J. L.; Benhabib, L.; Benotto, F.; Beolé, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdermann, E.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bernard, C.; Berny, R.; Berst, J. D.; Bertelsen, H.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Baskar, P.; Bhati, A.; Bianchi, N.; Bielčik, J.; Bielčiková, J.; Bimbot, L.; Blanchard, G.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Blyth, S.; Boccioli, M.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bombonati, C.; Bondila, M.; Bonnet, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Borel, H.; Borotto, F.; Borshchov, V.; Bortoli, Y.; Borysov, O.; Bose, S.; Bosisio, L.; Botje, M.; Böttger, S.; Bourdaud, G.; Bourrion, O.; Bouvier, S.; Braem, A.; Braun, M.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bravina, L.; Bregant, M.; Bruckner, G.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Brunasso, O.; Bruno, G. E.; Bucher, D.; Budilov, V.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Buncic, P.; Burns, M.; Burachas, S.; Busch, O.; Bushop, J.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calaon, F.; Caldogno, M.; Cali, I.; Camerini, P.; Campagnolo, R.; Campbell, M.; Cao, X.; Capitani, G. P.; Romeo, G. Cara; Cardenas-Montes, M.; Carduner, H.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Cariola, P.; Carminati, F.; Casado, J.; Casanova Diaz, A.; Caselle, M.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castor, J.; Catanescu, V.; Cattaruzza, E.; Cavazza, D.; Cerello, P.; Ceresa, S.; Černý, V.; Chambert, V.; Chapeland, S.; Charpy, A.; Charrier, D.; Chartoire, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chepurnov, V.; Chernenko, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chochula, P.; Chiavassa, E.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Choi, J.; Christakoglou, P.; Christiansen, P.; Christensen, C.; Chykalov, O. A.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli-Strolin, L.; Ciobanu, M.; Cindolo, F.; Cirstoiu, C.; Clausse, O.; Cleymans, J.; Cobanoglu, O.; Coffin, J.-P.; Coli, S.; Colla, A.; Colledani, C.; Combaret, C.; Combet, M.; Comets, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J.; Cormier, T.; Corsi, F.; Cortese, P.; Costa, F.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cuautle, E.; Cussonneau, J.; Dahlinger, M.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Daniel, L.; Das, I.; Das, T.; Dash, A.; Da Silva, R.; Davenport, M.; Daues, H.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; De Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; de Gaspari, M.; de Girolamo, P.; de Groot, J.; De Gruttola, D.; De Haas, A.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Remigis, P.; de Vaux, D.; Decock, G.; Delagrange, H.; Del Franco, M.; Dellacasa, G.; Dell'Olio, C.; Dell'Olio, D.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; Derkach, D.; Devaux, A.; Di Bari, D.; Di Bartolomeo, A.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dialinas, M.; Diaz, L.; Díaz Valdes, R.; Dietel, T.; Dima, R.; Ding, H.; Dinca, C.; Divià, R.; Dobretsov, V.; Dobrin, A.; Doenigus, B.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domínguez, I.; Dorn, M.; Drouet, S.; Dubey, A. E.; Ducroux, L.; Dumitrache, F.; Dumonteil, E.; Dupieux, P.; Duta, V.; Dutta Majumdar, A.; Dutta Majumdar, M.; Dyhre, Th; Efimov, L.; Efremov, A.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engster, C.; Enokizono, A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Evangelista, A.; Evans, D.; Evrard, S.; Fabjan, C. W.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Farano, R.; Fearick, R.; Fedorov, O.; Fekete, V.; Felea, D.; Feofilov, G.; Férnandez Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Fichera, F.; Filchagin, S.; Filoni, E.; Finck, C.; Fini, R.; Fiore, E. M.; Flierl, D.; Floris, M.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, Y.; Fokin, S.; Force, P.; Formenti, F.; Fragiacomo, E.; Fragkiadakis, M.; Fraissard, D.; Franco, A.; Franco, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fratino, U.; Fresneau, S.; Frolov, A.; Fuchs, U.; Fujita, J.; Furget, C.; Furini, M.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J.-J.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadrat, S.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gaido, L.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Gallio, M.; Gandolfi, E.; Ganoti, P.; Ganti, M.; Garabatos, J.; Garcia Lopez, A.; Garizzo, L.; Gaudichet, L.; Gemme, R.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Giolu, G.; Giraudo, G.; Giubellino, P.; Glasow, R.; Glässel, P.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Gonzalez Gutierrez, C.; Gonzales-Trueba, L. H.; Gorbunov, S.; Gorbunov, Y.; Gos, H.; Gosset, J.; Gotovac, S.; Gottschlag, H.; Gottschalk, D.; Grabski, V.; Grassi, T.; Gray, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grebieszkow, K.; Gregory, C.; Grigoras, C.; Grion, N.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, C.; Grigoryan, S.; Grishuk, Y.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Grynyov, B.; Guarnaccia, C.; Guber, F.; Guerin, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, M.; Guichard, A.; Guida, M.; Guilloux, G.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, V.; Gustafsson, H.-A.; Gutbrod, H.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamar, G.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hansen, J. C.; Hardy, P.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Harutyunyan, A.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Hasch, D.; Hasegan, D.; Hehner, J.; Heine, N.; Heinz, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herlant, S.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hetland, K.; Hille, P.; Hinke, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hoch, M.; Hoebbel, H.; Hoedlmoser, H.; Horaguchi, T.; Horner, M.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Hu, S.; Guo, C. Hu; Humanic, T.; Hurtado, A.; Hwang, D. S.; Ianigro, J. C.; Idzik, M.; Igolkin, S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Imhoff, M.; Innocenti, P. G.; Ionescu, E.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Insa, C.; Inuzuka, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jacobs, P.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jančurová, L.; Janik, R.; Jasper, M.; Jena, C.; Jirden, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jones, G. T.; Jorgensen, C.; Jouve, F.; Jovanović, P.; Junique, A.; Jusko, A.; Jung, H.; Jung, W.; Kadija, K.; Kamal, A.; Kamermans, R.; Kapusta, S.; Kaidalov, A.; Kakoyan, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kang, E.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplin, V.; Karadzhev, K.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Karpio, K.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Mohsin Khan, M.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kikola, D.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D.; Kim, D. S.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, H. N.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, S.; Kinson, J. B.; Kiprich, S. K.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, T.; Kiworra, V.; Klay, J.; Klein Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Klimov, A.; Klovning, A.; Kluge, A.; Kluit, R.; Kniege, S.; Kolevatov, R.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kornas, E.; Koshurnikov, E.; Kotov, I.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Kozlov, K.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krawutschke, T.; Krivda, M.; Kryshen, E.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugler, A.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, N.; Kumpumaeki, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. N.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kutovsky, M.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M.; Labbé, J.-C.; Lackner, F.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lafage, V.; La Rocca, P.; Lamont, M.; Lara, C.; Larsen, D. T.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Bornec, Y.; Le Bris, N.; Le Gailliard, C.; Lebedev, V.; Lecoq, J.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. C.; Lefévre, F.; Legrand, I.; Lehmann, T.; Leistam, L.; Lenoir, P.; Lenti, V.; Leon, H.; Monzon, I. Leon; Lévai, P.; Li, Q.; Li, X.; Librizzi, F.; Lietava, R.; Lindegaard, N.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M.; Listratenko, O. M.; Littel, F.; Liu, Y.; Lo, J.; Lobanov, V.; Loginov, V.; López Noriega, M.; López-Ramírez, R.; López Torres, E.; Lorenzo, P. M.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, S.; Ludolphs, W.; Lunardon, M.; Luquin, L.; Lusso, S.; Lutz, J.-R.; Luvisetto, M.; Lyapin, V.; Maevskaya, A.; Magureanu, C.; Mahajan, A.; Majahan, S.; Mahmoud, T.; Mairani, A.; Mahapatra, D.; Makarov, A.; Makhlyueva, I.; Malek, M.; Malkiewicz, T.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manea, C.; Mangotra, L. K.; Maniero, D.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marcel, A.; Marchini, S.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marin, A.; Marin, J.-C.; Marras, D.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Martínez Garcia, G.; Martini, S.; Marzari Chiesa, A.; Marzocca, C.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masetti, M.; Maslov, N. I.; Masoni, A.; Massera, F.; Mast, M.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Mayer, B.; Mazza, G.; Mazzaro, M. D.; Mazzoni, A.; Meddi, F.; Meleshko, E.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meneghini, S.; Meoni, M.; Mercado Perez, J.; Mereu, P.; Meunier, O.; Miake, Y.; Michalon, A.; Michinelli, R.; Miftakhov, N.; Mignone, M.; Mikhailov, K.; Milosevic, J.; Minaev, Y.; Minafra, F.; Mischke, A.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitsyn, V.; Mitu, C.; Mohanty, B.; Moisa, D.; Molnar, L.; Mondal, M.; Mondal, N.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Morando, M.; Morel, M.; Moretto, S.; Morhardt, Th; Morsch, A.; Moukhanova, T.; Mucchi, M.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Müller, H.; Müller, W.; Munoz, J.; Mura, D.; Musa, L.; Muraz, J. F.; Musso, A.; Nania, R.; Nandi, B.; Nappi, E.; Navach, F.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nellen, L.; Nendaz, F.; Nianine, A.; Nicassio, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B.; Nitti, M.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noto, F.; Nouais, D.; Nyiri, A.; Nystrand, J.; Odyniec, G.; Oeschler, H.; Oinonen, M.; Oldenburg, M.; Oleks, I.; Olsen, E. K.; Onuchin, V.; Oppedisano, C.; Orsini, F.; Ortiz-Velázquez, A.; Oskamp, C.; Oskarsson, A.; Osmic, F.; Österman, L.; Otterlund, I.; Ovrebekk, G.; Oyama, K.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S.; Pal, S.; Pálla, G.; Palmeri, A.; Pancaldi, G.; Panse, R.; Pantaleo, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pastirčák, B.; Pastore, C.; Patarakin, O.; Paticchio, V.; Patimo, G.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pénichot, Y.; Pepato, A.; Pereira, H.; Peresunko, D.; Perez, C.; Perez Griffo, J.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Peters, A. J.; Petráček, V.; Petridis, A.; Petris, M.; Petrov, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Peyré, J.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pichot, P.; Piemonte, C.; Pikna, M.; Pilastrini, R.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pini, B.; Pinsky, L.; Pinto Morais, V.; Pismennaya, V.; Piuz, F.; Platt, R.; Ploskon, M.; Plumeri, S.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Podesta, P.; Poggio, F.; Poghosyan, M.; Poghosyan, T.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Polozov, P.; Polyakov, V.; Pommeresch, B.; Pompei, F.; Pop, A.; Popescu, S.; Posa, F.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Pouthas, J.; Prasad, S.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Prodan, L.; Prono, G.; Protsenko, M. A.; Pruneau, C. A.; Przybyla, A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, A.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Quartieri, J.; Quercigh, E.; Rachevskaya, I.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Radomski, S.; Radu, A.; Rak, J.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Rasmussen, O. B.; Rasson, J.; Razin, V.; Read, K.; Real, J.; Redlich, K.; Reichling, C.; Renard, C.; Renault, G.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Ricaud, H.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Rigalleau, L. M.; Riggi, F.; Riegler, W.; Rindel, E.; Riso, J.; Rivetti, A.; Rizzi, M.; Rizzi, V.; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M.; Røed, K.; Röhrich, D.; Román-López, S.; Romanato, M.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosinsky, P.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Rostchin, V.; Rotondo, F.; Roukoutakis, F.; Rousseau, S.; Roy, C.; Roy, D.; Roy, P.; Royer, L.; Rubin, G.; Rubio, A.; Rui, R.; Rusanov, I.; Russo, G.; Ruuskanen, V.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Saini, J.; Saiz, P.; Salur, S.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sann, H.; Santiard, J.-C.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sargsyan, G.; Saturnini, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schackert, B.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schioler, T.; Schippers, J. D.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H.; Schneider, R.; Schossmaier, K.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Schyns, E.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Snow, H.; Sedykh, S.; Segato, G.; Sellitto, S.; Semeria, F.; Senyukov, S.; Seppänen, H.; Serci, S.; Serkin, L.; Serra, S.; Sesselmann, T.; Sevcenco, A.; Sgura, I.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharkov, E.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shileev, K.; Shukla, P.; Shurygin, A.; Shurygina, M.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddi, E.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Sigward, M. H.; Silenzi, A.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestri, R.; Simili, E.; Simion, V.; Simon, R.; Simonetti, L.; Singaraju, R.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B.; Sinha, T.; Siska, M.; Sitár, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, B.; Skowronski, P.; Slodkowski, M.; Smirnov, N.; Smykov, L.; Snellings, R.; Snoeys, W.; Soegaard, C.; Soerensen, J.; Sokolov, O.; Soldatov, A.; Soloviev, A.; Soltveit, H.; Soltz, R.; Sommer, W.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Soyk, D.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Staley, F.; Stan, I.; Stavinskiy, A.; Steckert, J.; Stefanini, G.; Stefanek, G.; Steinbeck, T.; Stelzer, H.; Stenlund, E.; Stocco, D.; Stockmeier, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolpovsky, P.; Strmeň, P.; Stutzmann, J. S.; Su, G.; Sugitate, T.; Šumbera, M.; Suire, C.; Susa, T.; Sushil Kumar, K.; Swoboda, D.; Symons, J.; Szarka, I.; Szostak, A.; Szuba, M.; Szymanski, P.; Tadel, M.; Tagridis, C.; Tan, L.; Tapia Takaki, D.; Taureg, H.; Tauro, A.; Tavlet, M.; Tejeda Munoz, G.; Thäder, J.; Tieulent, R.; Timmer, P.; Tolyhy, T.; Topilskaya, N.; Torcato de Matos, C.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Tosello, F.; Tournaire, A.; Traczyk, T.; Tröger, G.; Tromeur, W.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W.; Tsiledakis, G.; Tsilis, E.; Tsvetkov, A.; Turcato, M.; Turrisi, R.; Tuveri, M.; Tveter, T.; Tydesjo, H.; Tykarski, L.; Tywoniuk, K.; Ugolini, E.; Ullaland, K.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Usseglio, M.; Vacchi, A.; Vala, M.; Valiev, F.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Den Brink, A.; Van Eijndhoven, N.; Van Der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vanzetto, S.; Vanuxem, J.-P.; Vargas, M. A.; Varma, R.; Vascotto, A.; Vasiliev, A.; Vassiliou, M.; Vasta, P.; Vechernin, V.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Verhoeven, W.; Veronese, F.; Vetlitskiy, I.; Vernet, R.; Victorov, V.; Vidak, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y.; Vodopianov, A.; Volpe, G.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wabnitz, C.; Wagner, V.; Wallet, L.; Wan, R.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wheadon, R.; Weis, R.; Wen, Q.; Wessels, J.; Westergaard, J.; Wiechula, J.; Wiesenaecker, A.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, C.; Willis, N.; Windelband, B.; Witt, R.; Woehri, H.; Wyllie, K.; Xu, C.; Yang, C.; Yang, H.; Yermia, F.; Yin, Z.; Yin, Z.; Ky, B. Yun; Yushmanov, I.; Yuting, B.; Zabrodin, E.; Zagato, S.; Zagreev, B.; Zaharia, P.; Zalite, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampolli, C.; Zanevskiy, Y.; Zarochentsev, A.; Zaudtke, O.; Závada, P.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zepeda, A.; Zeter, V.; Zgura, I.; Zhalov, M.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, S.; Zhu, G.; Zichichi, A.; Zinchenko, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zubarev, A.; Zucchini, A.; Zuffa, M.

    2008-08-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a general-purpose, heavy-ion detector at the CERN LHC which focuses on QCD, the strong-interaction sector of the Standard Model. It is designed to address the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at extreme values of energy density and temperature in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Besides running with Pb ions, the physics programme includes collisions with lighter ions, lower energy running and dedicated proton-nucleus runs. ALICE will also take data with proton beams at the top LHC energy to collect reference data for the heavy-ion programme and to address several QCD topics for which ALICE is complementary to the other LHC detectors. The ALICE detector has been built by a collaboration including currently over 1000 physicists and engineers from 105 Institutes in 30 countries. Its overall dimensions are 16 × 16 × 26 m3 with a total weight of approximately 10 000 t. The experiment consists of 18 different detector systems each with its own specific technology choice and design constraints, driven both by the physics requirements and the experimental conditions expected at LHC. The most stringent design constraint is to cope with the extreme particle multiplicity anticipated in central Pb-Pb collisions. The different subsystems were optimized to provide high-momentum resolution as well as excellent Particle Identification (PID) over a broad range in momentum, up to the highest multiplicities predicted for LHC. This will allow for comprehensive studies of hadrons, electrons, muons, and photons produced in the collision of heavy nuclei. Most detector systems are scheduled to be installed and ready for data taking by mid-2008 when the LHC is scheduled to start operation, with the exception of parts of the Photon Spectrometer (PHOS), Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) and Electro Magnetic Calorimeter (EMCal). These detectors will be completed for the high-luminosity ion run expected in 2010. This

  7. Keeping HL-LHC accountable

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    This week saw the cost and schedule of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) and LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) projects come under close scrutiny from the external review committee set up for the purpose.    HL-LHC, whose implementation requires an upgrade to the CERN injector complex, responds directly to one of the key recommendations of the updated European Strategy for Particle Physics, which urges CERN to prepare for a ‘major luminosity upgrade’, a recommendation that is also perfectly in line with the P5 report on the US strategy for the field. Responding to this recommendation, CERN set up the HL-LHC project in 2013, partially supported by FP7 funding through the HiLumi LHC Design Study (2011-2015), and coordinated with the American LARP project, which oversees the US contribution to the upgrade. A key element of HL-LHC planning is a mechanism for receiving independent expert advice on all aspects of the project.  To this end, several technical reviews h...

  8. Impedance simulations and measurements on the LHC collimators with embedded beam position monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Biancacci, N; Kuczerowski, J; Métral,; Mounet, N; Salvant, B; Mostacci, A; Frasciello, O; Zobov, M

    2017-01-01

    The LHC collimation system is a critical element for the safe operation of the LHC machine. The necessity of fast accurate positioning of the collimator’s jaws, recently introduced the need to have button beam position monitors directly embedded in the jaws extremities of the LHC tertiary collimators and some secondary collimators. This addition led to a new design of these collimators including ferrites to damp higher order modes instead of rf fingers. In this work we will present the impedance bench measurements and simulations on a TCT (Transverse Tertiary Collimator) prototype including estimations for beam stability for the LHC.

  9. Impedance simulations and measurements on the LHC collimators with embedded beam position monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Biancacci

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The LHC collimation system is a critical element for the safe operation of the LHC machine. The necessity of fast accurate positioning of the collimator’s jaws, recently introduced the need to have button beam position monitors directly embedded in the jaws extremities of the LHC tertiary collimators and some secondary collimators. This addition led to a new design of these collimators including ferrites to damp higher order modes instead of rf fingers. In this work we will present the impedance bench measurements and simulations on a TCT (Transverse Tertiary Collimator prototype including estimations for beam stability for the LHC.

  10. Exotic Plant Invasion Risk in the Western United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This model was constructed to model the risk of invasion by exotic plant species. Roads may directly influence exotic plant dispersal via disturbance during road...

  11. LHC Luminosity Modeling for RUNII

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniou, Fanouria; Hostettler, Michael; Lamont, Mike; Papadopoulou, Stefania; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Papotti, Giulia; Pojer, Mirko; Salvachua, Belen; Wyszynski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    After a long shut-down (LS1), LHC restarted its operation on April 2015 at a record energy of 6.5TeV, achieving soon a good luminosity performance. In this paper, a luminosity model based on the three main components of the LHC luminosity degradation (intrabeam scattering, synchrotron radiation and luminosity burn-off), is compared with data from runII. Based on the observations, other sources of luminosity degradation are discussed and the model is refined. Finally, based on the experience from runI and runII, the model is used for integrated luminosity projections for the HL-LHC beam parameters.

  12. Understanding the LHC Controls Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Van den Eynden, M

    2000-01-01

    The analysis, design and construction of the LHC control system is a complex problem which will challenge CERN's capability to provide a modern controls infrastructure fulfilling the stringent operational requirements of this machine. The first part of this talk will review the present LHC project context in which several controls initiatives have already been taken. The second part will try to highlight the important technical aspects and engineering steps involved in the process of defining a control system architecture. The importance of understanding the major LHC operational challenges will be stressed along with some practical proposals and examples on how to conduct such activity with all stakeholders.

  13. Dissecting an LHC dipole

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The cold mass of a 15-metre main dipole magnet has some fifteen different components. All the main components are manufactured under CERN's direct responsibility. Four of them transit through CERN before being shipped to the dipole assembly contractors, namely the cable, which constitutes the magnet's superconducting core (see Bulletin 14/2004), the beam screens, the heat exchanger tubes and the cold bore beam tubes. The two latter components transit via Building 927 where they undergo part of the production process. The 58-mm diameter heat exchanger tubes will remove heat from the magnets using superfluid helium. The 53-mm diameter cold bore tubes will be placed under vacuum to allow the twin beams to circulate around the LHC.

  14. Scenarios for sLHC and vLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2008-01-01

    The projected lifetime of the LHC low-beta quadrupoles and evolution of the statistical error halving time call for an LHC luminosity upgrade by the middle of the coming decade. In the framework of the EU CARE-HHH network, two scenarios have been developed for increasing the LHC peak luminosity by a factor 10, to 1035 cm−2s−1 (“sLHC”). Both scenarios imply a rebuilding of the high-luminosity interaction regions (IRs) in combination with a consistent change of beam parameters. However, their respective features, bunch structures, IR layouts, merits and challenges differ substantially. In either scenario luminosity leveling during a store would be advantageous for the physics experiments. Longer-term R&D efforts are devoted to a higher-energy hadron collider (“vLHC”), which could be realized on a green field or as a later and more radical LHC upgrade.

  15. Open charm meson production at LHC*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luszczak Marta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We discuss charm production at the LHC. The production of single cc¯$car c$ pairs is calculated in the kt-factorization approach. We use Kimber-Martin-Ryskin unintegrated gluon distributions in the proton. The hadronization is included with the help of Peterson fragmentation functions. Transverse momentum and pseudorapidity distributions of charmed mesons are presented and compared to recent results of the ALICE, LHCb and ATLAS collaborations. Furthermore we discuss production of two pairs of cc¯ $car c$ within a simple formalism of double-parton scattering (DPS. Surprisingly large cross sections, comparable to single-parton scattering (SPS, are predicted for LHC energies. We discuss perspectives how to identify the double scattering contribution. We predict much larger cross section for large rapidity distance between charm quarks from different hard parton scatterings compared to single scattering.

  16. Scientific Opportunity: the Tevatron and the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    The press makes much of the competition between CERN’s LHC and Fermilab’s Tevatron in the search for the Higgs boson. This competitive aspect is real, and probably adds spice to the scientific exploration, but for us such reporting often feels like spilling the entire pepper shaker over a fine meal. The media’s emphasis on competition obscures the more important substance of our long-standing collaboration in scientific discovery.   Our laboratories and our communities have worked together for decades. Europeans have contributed greatly to the Tevatron’s many successes, including the discovery of the top quark, the discovery of fast oscillations in the decay of strange B mesons and the many searches for new phenomena. Americans have contributed to many programs at CERN, notably the extraordinary precision measurements of LEP, and more recently construction of the LHC accelerator and detectors. Fermilab scientists played a vital role throughout 2009 in...

  17. LHC Report: No beams but still busy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2011-01-01

    The LHC finished with beams for 2011 on Wednesday 7 December after a pretty good year of operation. The cryogenics team has emptied the magnets of helium for the winter technical stop and a full maintenance programme has started. The LHC is running long operational years at present with only a few short technical stops during operation with beam. This leaves very little time for much-needed maintenance and upgrades. Thus, the hardware teams involved have to take full advantage of the time available during the winter stop.   The Engineering Department is planning and coordinating the maintenance and repair activities for the whole accelerator complex. The list of planned interventions is truly impressive! There is a lot of work that involves the essential technical infrastructure systems (electricity, cooling, ventilation). Cryogenics have established a full programme aimed at maintaining and improving their already good level of availability. Other systems undergoing maintenance include: vacu...

  18. LHC Report: No beams but still busy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The LHC finished with beams for 2011 on Wednesday 7 December after a pretty good year of operation. The cryogenics team has emptied the magnets of helium for the winter technical stop and a full maintenance programme has started. The LHC is running long operational years at present with only a few short technical stops during operation with beam. This leaves very little time for much-needed maintenance and upgrades. Thus, the hardware teams involved have to take full advantage of the time available during the winter stop.   The Engineering Department is planning and coordinating the maintenance and repair activities for the whole accelerator complex. The list of planned interventions is truly impressive! There is a lot of work that involves the essential technical infrastructure systems (electricity, cooling, ventilation). Cryogenics have established a full programme aimed at maintaining and improving their already good level of availability. Other systems undergoing maintenance include: vacu...

  19. High Jet Multiplicity Physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia

    2016-01-01

    This book describes research in two different areas of state-of-the-art hadron collider physics, both of which are of central importance in the field of particle physics. The first part of the book focuses on the search for supersymmetric particles called gluinos. The book subsequently presents a set of precision measurements of “multi-jet” collision events, which involve large numbers of newly created particles, and are among the dominant processes at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Now that a Higgs boson has been discovered at the LHC, the existence (or non-existence) of supersymmetric particles is of the utmost interest and significance, both theoretically and experimentally. In addition, multi-jet collision events are an important background process for a wide range of analyses, including searches for supersymmetry.

  20. Cornering diphoton resonance models at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Backović, Mihailo; Mariotti, Alberto; Sessolo, Enrico Maria; Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We explore the ability of the high luminosity LHC to test models which can explain the 750 GeV diphoton excess. We focus on a wide class of models where a 750 GeV singlet scalar couples to Standard Model gauge bosons and quarks, as well as dark matter. Including both gluon and photon fusion production mechanisms, we show that LHC searches in channels correlated with the diphoton signal will be able to probe wide classes of diphoton models with $\\mathcal{L} \\sim 3000\\, \\text{fb}^{-1}$ of data. Furthermore, models in which the scalar is a portal to the dark sector can be cornered with as little as $\\mathcal{L} \\sim 30\\, \\text{fb}^{-1}$.

  1. Cornering diphoton resonance models at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backović, Mihailo [Center for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3),Universite Catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Kulkarni, Suchita [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences,Nikolsdorfergasse 18, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Mariotti, Alberto [Theoretische Natuurkunde and IIHE/ELEM, Vrije Universiteit Brussel,and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Sessolo, Enrico Maria [National Centre for Nuclear Research,Hoża 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Spannowsky, Michael [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Department of Physics,Durham University, Durham, DH13LE (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-02

    We explore the ability of the high luminosity LHC to test models which can explain the 750 GeV diphoton excess. We focus on a wide class of models where a 750 GeV singlet scalar couples to Standard Model gauge bosons and quarks, as well as dark matter. Including both gluon and photon fusion production mechanisms, we show that LHC searches in channels correlated with the diphoton signal will be able to probe wide classes of diphoton models with L∼3000 fb{sup −1} of data. Furthermore, models in which the scalar is a portal to the dark sector can be cornered with as little as L∼30 fb{sup −1}.

  2. Automation of electroweak corrections for LHC processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Mauro; Greiner, Nicolas; Tramontano, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Next-to-leading order (NLO) electroweak corrections will play an important role in Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Even though they are typically moderate at the level of total cross sections, they can lead to substantial deviations in the shapes of distributions. In particular, for the search for new physics, but also for a precise determination of Standard Model observables, their inclusion in theoretical predictions is mandatory for a reliable estimation of the Standard Model contribution. In this article we review the status and recent developments in electroweak calculations and their automation for LHC processes. We discuss general issues and properties of NLO electroweak corrections and present some examples, including the full calculation of the NLO corrections to the production of a W-boson in association with two jets computed using GoSam interfaced to MadDipole.

  3. Scalar Dark Matter Explanation of Diphoton Excess at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Huayong; Zheng, Sibo

    2015-01-01

    We consider a 750 GeV scalar dark matter as an explanation of diphoton signal excess observed at the LHC run 2 through direct Yukawa interaction with a SM top- or bottom-like fermion partner. In this setup the scalar dark matter is mainly produced by gluon fusion, and decays at the one-loop level to SM diboson channels $\\gamma\\gamma$, $ZZ$, $WW$ and $gg$. we show that fermion partner with mass $m_{\\psi}$ in the range between $(375,410)$ GeV or $(745, 750)$ GeV for exotic electric charge $Q=\\pm 2$ can account for scalar dark matter as the origin of diphoton excess.

  4. Preparation of the SPS as LHC injector

    CERN Document Server

    Collier, Paul

    1998-01-01

    A major project (SLI) for the preparation the SPS in its role as the final link in the injector chain to the LHC was launched one year ago [1,2]. The major areas of work include the upgrade of the RF and the injection systems, together with the provision of a new extraction channel to serve ring 2 of the LHC. In addition, studies have been made on the ability of the SPS to meet the stringent trans verse and longitudinal beam requirements of the LHC. This has lead to several other programmes of work including upgrades to the beam instrumentation, the transverse damper and the shielding of over 8 00 inter-magnet pumping ports to reduce the impedance of the machine. The planning of the project is influenced by the continued operation of LEP and the proposed new long base-line neutrino facility (NGS). In addition, during the machine upgrades, the SPS must continue to deliver high quality proton beams to the fixed-target experimental community and for an extensive range of experimental detect or test beams. The ma...

  5. LHC Report: Tests of new LHC running modes

    CERN Multimedia

    Verena Kain for the LHC team

    2012-01-01

    On 13 September, the LHC collided lead ions with protons for the first time. This outstanding achievement was key preparation for the planned 2013 operation in this mode. Outside of two special physics runs, the LHC has continued productive proton-proton luminosity operation.   Celebrating proton-ion collisions. The first week of September added another 1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity to ATLAS’s and CMS’s proton-proton data set. It was a week of good and steady production mixed with the usual collection of minor equipment faults. The peak performance was slightly degraded at the start of the week but thanks to the work of the teams in the LHC injectors the beam brightness – and thus the LHC peak performance – were restored to previous levels by the weekend. The LHC then switched to new running modes and spectacularly proved its potential as a multi-purpose machine. This is due in large part to the LHC equipment and controls, which have been designed wi...

  6. Overview of Exotic Physics at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Proceeding for the conference plenary talk at HEPMAD16, Madagascar on the topic of "Overview of Exotic Physics at ATLAS" (ATL-PHYS-SLIDE-2016-807 https://cds.cern.ch/record/2225222) Deadline: 16/12/2016 (could be postponed for some days later upon request as recently suggested by the conference organizer)

  7. Results from searches for exotic phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Martyniuk, Alex; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This talk will review the current state of experimental searches for "exotic" physics beyond the standard model of particle physics. The talk will cover a wide range of searches from ATLAS and CMS, in a (hopefully) jargon free pedagogical fashion, showing the big picture of the field at this time.

  8. Phenology of cheatgrass and associated exotic weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), is an exotic, highly invasive annual grass that has dramatically changed the aspect and ecological functions of vast areas of formerly big sagebrush/bunchgrass and salt desert rangelands in the Intermountain west. Cheatgrass increases the chance of ignition, rate of spr...

  9. Efficient pricing algorithms for exotic derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Lord (Roger)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractSince the Nobel-prize winning papers of Black and Scholes and Merton in 1973, the derivatives market has evolved into a multi-trillion dollar market. Structures which were once considered as exotic are now commonplace, appearing in retail products such as mortgages and investment notes.

  10. Mean-field models and exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.; Buervenich, T.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Rutz, K. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany)]|[Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Reinhard, P.G. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Erlangen (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    We discuss two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field model and the (nonrelativistic) Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model, and their capability to describe exotic nuclei. Test cases are superheavy nuclei and neutron-rich Sn isotopes. New information in this regime helps to fix hitherto loosely determined aspects of the models. (orig.)

  11. Ticks imported to Europe with exotic reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalca, Andrei Daniel

    2015-09-30

    It is known that traded exotic animals carry with them an immense number of associated symbionts, including parasites. Reptiles are no exception. Most of the imported reptiles originate from tropical countries and their possibility to carry potentially dangerous pathogens is high. According to CITES, Europe is currently the main reptile importer in the world. Despite this, there is no review or analysis available for the risk related to the importation of tick-borne diseases with traded reptile to the EU. The main aim of the manuscript is to provide a review on the available literature on ticks introduced to and exchanged between European countries via the live reptile trade. So far, the published reports of ticks imported on reptiles are limited to few European countries: Italy, Poland, Spain, Netherlands, Belgium, Slovenia and UK. The following species have been reported: Hyalomma aegyptium, Amblyomma dissimile, Amblyomma exornatum, Amblyomma flavomaculatum, Amblyomma fuscolineatum, Amblyomma latum, Amblyomma quadricavum, Amblyomma marmoreum, Amblyomma nuttalli, Amblyomma sparsum, Amblyomma sphenodonti, Amblyomma transversale and Amblyomma varanense. The majority of species are of African origin, followed by American and Asian species. All groups of reptiles (chelonians, snakes, lizards, crocodiles, tuataras) were involved. However, it seems that certain groups (i.e. tortoises of genus Testudo, monitor lizards of genus Varanus, snakes of genus Python) are more important as host for imported ticks, but this may be related to higher levels of international trade. Even fewer are the reports of tick-borne pathogens associated with imported reptile ticks. Despite the diversity of tick species reported on imported reptiles, the situations of truly invasive species are atypical and are limited in natural environments to maximum two cases where H. aegyptium was involved. Otherwise, the risk associated with reptile trade for introduction of invasive tick to Europe is low

  12. Will there be energy frontier colliders after LHC?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir [Fermilab

    2016-09-15

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). The future of the world-wide HEP community critically depends on the feasibility of possible post-LHC colliders. The concept of the feasibility is complex and includes at least three factors: feasibility of energy, feasibility of luminosity and feasibility of cost. Here we overview all current options for post-LHC colliders from such perspective (ILC, CLIC, Muon Collider, plasma colliders, CEPC, FCC, HE-LHC) and discuss major challenges and accelerator R&D required to demonstrate feasibility of an energy frontier accelerator facility following the LHC. We conclude by taking a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and discussion on the perspectives for the far future of the accelerator-based particle physics.

  13. New U.S. LHC Web site launched

    CERN Multimedia

    Katie Yurkewicz

    2007-01-01

    On September 12, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science launched a new Web site, www.uslhc.us, to tell the story of the U.S. role in the LHC. The site provides general information for the public about the LHC and its six experiments, as well as detailed information about the participation of physicists, engineers and students from the United States. The U.S. site joins the UK's LHC site in providing information for a national audience, with sites from several more countries expected to launch within the next year. The US LHC site features news and information about the LHC, along with high-resolution images and resources for students and educators. The site also features blogs by four particle physicists, including ATLAS collaborators Monica Dunford from the University of Chicago and Peter Steinberg from Brookhaven National Laboratory. More than 1,300 scientists from over 90 U.S. institutions participate in the LHC and its experiments, representing universities and national laboratories from...

  14. Post LHC7 SUSY benchmark points for ILC physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Howard [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States); List, Jenny [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    We re-evaluate prospects for supersymmetry at the proposed International Linear e{sup +}e{sup -} Collider (ILC) in light of the first year of serious data taking at LHC with {radical}(s)=7 TeV and {proportional_to}5 fb{sup -1} of pp collisions (LHC7). Strong new limits from LHC SUSY searches, along with a hint of a Higgs boson signal around m{sub h}{proportional_to}125 GeV, suggest a paradigm shift from previously popular models to ones with new and compelling signatures. We present a variety of new ILC benchmark models, including: natural SUSY, hidden SUSY, NUHM2 with low m{sub A}, non-universal gaugino mass (NUGM) model, pMSSM, Kallosh-Linde model, Bruemmer-Buchmueller model, normal scalar mass hierarchy (NMH) plus one surviving case from mSUGRA/CMSSM in the far focus point region. While all these models at present elude the latest LHC limits, they do offer intriguing case study possibilities for ILC operating at {radical}(s){proportional_to}0.25-1 TeV, and present a view of some of the diverse SUSY phenomena which might be expected at both LHC and ILC in the post LHC7 era.

  15. Coming Soon: LHC's Big Chill

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Installation of the LHC cryogenic distribution line has begun. The line is crucial to the project, as it is to be used to distribute the liquid helium for cooling the superconducting magnets down to 1.8 K.

  16. High Luminosity LHC Project Description

    CERN Document Server

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Rossi, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is a novel configuration of the Large Hadron Collider, aiming at increasing the luminosity by a factor five or more above the nominal LHC design, to allow increasing the integrated luminosity, in the high luminosity experiments ATLAS and CMS, from the 300 fb-1 of the LHC original design up to 3000 fb-1 or more. This paper contains a short description of the main machine parameters and of the main equipment that need to be developed and installed. The preliminary cost evaluation and the time plan are presented, too. Finally, the international collaboration that is supporting the project, the governance and the project structure are discussed, too.

  17. To the LHC and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Rodgers, Peter

    2004-01-01

    CERN was conceived in 1949 as a new European laboratory to halt the exodus of physics talent from Europe to North America. In 1954, the new lab formally came into existence upon ratification of the resolution by the first 12 European member states. To further strengthen its position as the top particle-physics laboratory in the world, the CERN council agreed a new seven-point strategy. Completing the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) on schedule in 2007 is the top priority, followed by consolidating the lab's infrastructure to guarantee reliable operation of the LHC; examining the lab's experimental program apart from the LHC; coordinating research in Europe; building a new injector for the LHC in 2006; increasing R&D on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC); and working on a long-term strategy for the lab. CERN expects to complete half of these at the end of 2008. (Edited abstract).

  18. The Workflow of LHC Papers

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Finally, the talk will focus on how the institutional repository (CDS) is being linked to the HEP disciplinary archive (INSPIRE) in order to provide users with a central access point to reach LHC results.

  19. LHC magnet string in 1994

    CERN Multimedia

    1994-01-01

    On 6-7 December 1994, a string of powerful superconducting magnets for CERN's next particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), ran successfully at 8.36 tesla for 24 hours. This magnetic field is 100 000 times that of the Earth and is required to keep beams of protons travelling on the correct circular path over 27 km at 7 TeV in the new LHC accelerator.

  20. LHC: from hot to cold

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The first cryogenic feedbox designed to supply electricity to the superconducting magnets of one arc has just been installed at Point 8 of the LHC. This latest milestone is the reward for the joint efforts of the AT and TS Departments at CERN, the IHEP Institute in Moscow and CERN’s industrial partners who collaborated in its manufacture, and is a precursor to the forthcoming cool down of the first 3.3 km sector of the LHC.

  1. LHC Results Highlights (CLASHEP 2013)

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, O

    2015-01-01

    The good performance of the LHC provided enough data at 7 TeV and 8 TeV to allow the experiments to perform very competitive measurements and to expand the knowledge about the fundamental interaction far beyond that from previous colliders. This report summarizes the highlights of the results obtained with these data samples by the four large experiments, covering all the topics of the physics program and focusing on those exploiting the possibilities of the LHC.

  2. NNLO corrections for LHC processes

    CERN Document Server

    Caola, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    To fully profit from the remarkable achievements of the experimental program at the LHC, very precise theoretical predictions for signal and background processes are required. In this contribution, I will review some of the recent progress in fully exclusive next-to-next-toleading-order (NNLO) QCD computations. As an example of the phenomenological relevance of these results, I will present LHC predictions for t-channel single-top production and Higgs boson production in association with one hard jet.

  3. Overview of the status/results in the exotics sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Chengping

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many exotic hadronic states beyond the conventional quark model (called char-moniumlike/bottomoniumlike states or XYZ particles were found in the B-factories or energy scans of the cross sections of e+e− annhilation into conventional quarkonia and light hadrons. Their nature properties were proposed including glueballs, hybrids, multi-quark states, hadron molecules, etc. Dramatic progress was made in the study of the them after the running of the B-factories. In this report, I present the most recent results on the XYZ results from Belle experiment.

  4. Exotic states (X, Y, Z, Pentaquark et al.)

    CERN Document Server

    Pappagallo, Marco; Palestini, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    The latest results from the ATLAS, CMS and LHCb collaborations in the area of exotic quarkonium decays will be presented. They include: the search for a bottomonium states in the$\\Upsilon (1S)\\pi^+ \\pi^-$ mass spectrum, the observation of a peaking structure in the $J/\\psi \\phi$ mass spectrum from $B^+\\to j/\\psi \\phi K^+$ decays, a search for the X(5568) state recently claimed by the D0 collaboration and the observation of J/$\\psi p$ resonances consistent with pentaquark states in $\\Lambda_b\\to J/\\psi K^-$ decays.

  5. Overview of the status/results in the exotics sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chengping; Li, Changsheng

    2016-11-01

    Many exotic hadronic states beyond the conventional quark model (called char-moniumlike/bottomoniumlike states or XYZ particles) were found in the B-factories or energy scans of the cross sections of e+e- annhilation into conventional quarkonia and light hadrons. Their nature properties were proposed including glueballs, hybrids, multi-quark states, hadron molecules, etc. Dramatic progress was made in the study of the them after the running of the B-factories. In this report, I present the most recent results on the XYZ results from Belle experiment.

  6. The LHC on the table

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    How many dipoles have been manufactured so far? How many have been delivered? To find out, you can now consult the LHC Progress Dashboard on the web. The dashboard tracks progress with regard to manufacture and delivery of thirty different types of LHC components. Do you want to know everything about progress on LHC construction? The LHC's engineers have recently acquired a very useful tracking tool precisely for that purpose. This is the LHC Progress Dashboard which makes it possible to track work progress in graph form. In the interests of transparency, the LHC Project Management has decided to make it accessible to the public on the web. You can now consult normalized graphs for each of the thirty different types of components that form part of machine construction, such as the cold masses of the dipole magnets, the vacuum chambers and the octupoles, etc. The graphs show: in blue: the contractual delivery curves, i.e. the delivery schedules to which the suppliers have committed themselves in their contra...

  7. The LHC at level best

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    On 10 March, a team of CERN surveyors descended into the LHC tunnel. Their aim: to take measurements of the height of the LHC magnets to see how geological shifts might be affecting the machine and to take reference positions of the machine before the interconnects are opened.    CERN surveyors take levelling measurements of the LHC magnets during LS1. The LHC tunnel is renowned for its geological stability: set between layers of sandstone and molasse, it has allowed the alignment of the world’s largest accelerators to be within sub-millimetre precision. But even the most stable of tunnels can be affected by geological events. To ensure the precise alignment of the LHC, the CERN survey team performs regular measurements of the vertical position of the magnets (a process known as “levelling”). Over the past month, the team has been taking measurements of the LHC before the temperature of the magnets reaches 100 K, beyond which there may be some mechanic...

  8. LHC Olympics flex physicists' brains

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Physicists from around the world met at CERN to strengthen their data-deciphering skills at the second LHC Olympics workshop. Physicists gather for the second LHC Olympics workshop. Coinciding with the kick-off of the winter Olympics in Turin, more than 70 physicists gathered at CERN from across the globe for the second LHC Olympics workshop on 9-10 February. Their challenge, however, involved brains rather than brawn. As the switch-on date for the LHC draws near, scientists excited by the project want to test and improve their ability to decipher the unprecedented amount of data that the world's biggest and most powerful particle accelerator is expected to generate. The LHC Olympics is a coordinated effort to do just that, minus the gold, silver and bronze of the athletics competition. 'In some ways, the LHC is not a precision instrument. It gives you the information that something is there but it's hard to untangle and interpret what it is,' said University of Michigan physicist Gordy Kane, who organiz...

  9. Last cast for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The first major contract signed for the LHC is drawing to a close. Belgian firm Cockerill Sambre (a member of the Arcelor Group) has just completed production of 50,000 tonnes of steel sheets for the accelerator's superconducting magnet yokes, in what has proved to be an exemplary partnership with CERN. Philippe Lebrun, Head of the AT Department, Lyn Evans, LHC Project Leader, and Lucio Rossi, Head of the AT-MAS Group, in front of the last batch of steel for the LHC at Cockerill Sambre. It was a bright red-letter day at the end of May, when Belgian firm Cockerill Sambre of the Arcelor Group marked the completion of one of the largest contracts for the LHC machine by casting the last batch of steel sheets for the LHC superconducting magnet yokes in the presence of LHC Project Leader Lyn Evans, AT Department Head Philippe Lebrun, Magnets and Superconductors (AT-MAS) Group Leader Lucio Rossi and Head of the AT-MAS Group's components centre Francesco Bertinelli. The yokes constitute approximately 80% of the acc...

  10. An exotic species is the favorite prey of a native enemy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Li

    Full Text Available Although native enemies in an exotic species' new range are considered to affect its ability to invade, few studies have evaluated predation pressures from native enemies on exotic species in their new range. The exotic prey naiveté hypothesis (EPNH states that exotic species may be at a disadvantage because of its naïveté towards native enemies and, therefore, may suffer higher predation pressures from the enemy than native prey species. Corollaries of this hypothesis include the native enemy preferring exotic species over native species and the diet of the enemy being influenced by the abundance of the exotic species. We comprehensively tested this hypothesis using introduced North American bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus, referred to as bullfrog, a native red-banded snake (Dinodon rufozonatum, the enemy and four native anuran species in permanent still water bodies as a model system in Daishan, China. We investigated reciprocal recognition between snakes and anuran species (bullfrogs and three common native species and the diet preference of the snakes for bullfrogs and the three species in laboratory experiments, and the diet preference and bullfrog density in the wild. Bullfrogs are naive to the snakes, but the native anurans are not. However, the snakes can identify bullfrogs as prey, and in fact, prefer bullfrogs over the native anurans in manipulative experiments with and without a control for body size and in the wild, indicating that bullfrogs are subjected to higher predation pressures from the snakes than the native species. The proportion of bullfrogs in the snakes' diet is positively correlated with the abundance of bullfrogs in the wild. Our results provide strong evidence for the EPNH. The results highlight the biological resistance of native enemies to naïve exotic species.

  11. The charge breeder beam line for the selective production of exotic species project at INFN-Legnaro National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatà, A.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Manzolaro, M.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.

    2014-02-01

    SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is an INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) project with the aim at producing and post-accelerating exotic beams to perform forefront research in nuclear physics. To allow post-acceleration of the radioactive ions, an ECR-based Charge Breeder (CB) developed on the basis of the Phoenix booster was chosen. The design of the complete beam line for the SPES-CB will be described: a system for stable 1+ beams production was included; special attention was paid to the medium resolution mass spectrometer after the CB to limit possible superposition of the exotic beams with the impurities present in the ECR plasma.

  12. The latest from the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    On 26 August, the first two fully tested crates for the new quench protection system (QPS) were installed in Sector 1-2. These are the first of 436 crates that will be installed around the ring. The two crates include detectors for both the enhanced busbar protection and the symmetric quench protection (more details). To test the crates before installation, a dedicated test bed has been created, capable of simulating all the conditions in the LHC, from a symmetric quench to an increase in busbar resistance. The teams are working two shifts a day, including weekends, to test the new crates. Two more test benches are also being built to increase the production rate. The whole task is on target for completion in mid October. Another important new task for the QPS team is to try and speed up the energy extraction from the magnets. The quicker the energy can be extracted the lower the risk of dangerously high temperatures should a quench occur. The time constant for the dipoles...

  13. Searches for Physics Beyond Standard Model at LHC with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Soni, N; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    This contribution summarises some of the recent results on the searches for physics beyond the Standard Model using the pp-collision data collected at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with ATLAS detector at centre-of-mass energy of sqrt{s} = 8 TeV. The search for supersymmetry (SUSY) is carried out in a large variety of production modes such as strong production of squarks and gluinos, weak production of sleptons and gauginos os production of massive long-lived particles through R-parity violation. No excess above the Standard Model background expectation is observed and exclusion limits are derived on the production of new physics. The results are interpreted as lower limits on sparticle masses in SUSY breaking scenarios. Searches for new exotic phenomena such as dark matter, large extra dimensions and black holes are also performed at ATLAS. As in the case of SUSY searches, no new exotic phenomena is observed and results are presented as upper limits on event yields from non-Standard-Model processes in a model i...

  14. The LHC's suppliers come up trumps

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Four of the LHC Project's most exceptional suppliers have just been honoured in the fifth Golden Hadron awards ceremony. For the first time, a CERN team was among the prize-winners. The CERN main workshop (Mechanical and Materials Engineering group, TS/MME) received the Golden Hadron Award at the prize-giving ceremony held at the Globe. From left to right, Saïd Atieh (TS/MME), Vincent Vuillemin (TS/MME group leader), Michel Caccioppoli (TS/MME), Lyn Evans (LHC Project Leader), Marc Polini (TS/MME-MS section leader), Jean-Luc Gayraud (Cegelec), Jean-Paul Bacher (TS/MME-AS section leader) and Paolo Ciriani (head of the TS Department). Flexible, responsive, committed... all fitting adjectives to describe the recipients of the fifth Golden Hadron awards. The prizes, designed to honour the LHC Project's best suppliers, were awarded to a total of four suppliers, including two that are involved in the final accelerator assembly work: proof, if it were needed, that the project has now entered its final phase. Drak...

  15. The BRAN luminosity detectors for the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matis, H. S.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, A.; Turner, W. C.; Bravin, E.; Miyamoto, R.

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes the several phases which led, from the conceptual design, prototyping, construction and tests with beam, to the installation and operation of the BRAN (Beam RAte of Neutrals) relative luminosity monitors for the LHC. The detectors have been operating since 2009 to contribute, optimize and maintain the accelerator performance in the two high luminosity interaction regions (IR), the IR1 (ATLAS) and the IR5 (CMS). The devices are gas ionization chambers installed inside a neutral particle absorber 140 m away from the Interaction Points in IR1 and IR5 and monitor the energy deposited by electromagnetic showers produced by high-energy neutral particles from the collisions. The detectors have the capability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity at the 40 MHz bunch rate, as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation during the nominal LHC operation. The devices have operated since the early commissioning phase of the accelerator over a broad range of luminosities reaching 1.4×1034 cm-2 s-1 with a peak pileup of 45 events per bunch crossing. Even though the nominal design luminosity of the LHC has been exceeded, the BRAN is operating well. After describing how the BRAN can be used to monitor the luminosity of the collider, we discuss the technical choices that led to its construction and the different tests performed prior to the installation in two IRs of the LHC. Performance simulations are presented together with operational results obtained during p-p operations, including runs at 40 MHz bunch rate, Pb-Pb operations and p-Pb operations.

  16. LHC Report: Ticking over

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The past two weeks have seen luminosity production rates vary somewhat but the overall upwards slope has remained steady. Over 17 fb-1 have been delivered to both ATLAS and CMS; LHCb is also doing well, with around 1.6 fb-1 delivered so far in 2012. The proton physics production also slotted in a five-day machine development period (Monday 8 to Saturday 13 October).   When producing the LHC beam in the PS, some parasitic low-intensity satellite bunches are formed 25 ns from the main bunches, which are spaced by 50 ns. ALICE, whose detector is designed to work with relatively low collision rates, has been taking data from satellite-main collisions. The population of these satellites has recently been increased thanks to gentle tweaks by the PS radio frequency experts. This has increased the peak luminosity in ALICE and will help them to reach their proton-proton integrated luminosity goal for the year. The October machine development programme was a mixed bag. While some studies were aimed at sho...

  17. Four tops for LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Ezequiel; Faroughy, Darius A.; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Morales, Roberto; Szynkman, Alejandro

    2017-02-01

    We design a search strategy for the Standard Model t t bar t t bar production at the LHC in the same-sign dilepton and trilepton channels. We study different signal features and, given the small expected number of signal events, we scrutinize in detail all reducible and irreducible backgrounds. Our analysis shows that by imposing a basic set of jet and lepton selection criteria, the SM pp → t t bar t t bar process could be evidenced in the near future, within Run-II, when combining both multi-lepton search channels. We argue that this search strategy should also be used as a guideline to test New Physics coupling predominantly to top-quarks. In particular, we show that a non-resonant New Physics enhancement in the four-top final state would be detectable through this search strategy. We study two top-philic simplified models of this kind, a neutral scalar boson and a Z‧, and present current and future exclusion limits on their mass and couplings.

  18. Illuminating the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    For the first time ever, on 29 September the LHC ring will be visible above ground. Spotlights aimed at the sky will light up the 27 km path of the ring to celebrate CERN's 50th anniversary. Also, everyone born in 1954 is invited to come to blow out birthday candles on a cake. To see the display, you can come to departure station for the gondola at Crozet*, France, starting at 18:30. There will be music, official speeches and food stands. At 20:00 the ring will light up, and to wrap it up at 21:15 there will be the cake and videoconferences with Robert Aymar, the Director-General of CERN, and the inventor of the Web, Tim Berners-Lee. The event is organized by the Department of Justice, Police and Security of the Canton of Geneva, Switzerland, in collaboration with communes of the Canton of Geneva, the Communauté des communes du Pays de Gex and the Préfecture de l'Ain. More information on the schedule for the night. * The event initially planned at Divonne has been moved to Crozet.

  19. LHC on the bus

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    On 15 December, an airport bus will be transformed in the image of CERN. The bus will be seen by the thousands of travellers arriving in Geneva, informing them of the possibility to visit CERN.   Sketch of the bus. The good relationship between Geneva International Airport and CERN started several years ago. In 2004 the airport put advertising space in the arrivals area at CERN's disposal free of charge. Now, starting on 15 December, a 40-foot long bus will display a giant sticker advertisement depicting CERN as it takes passengers over the airport tarmac to their planes. This is no ordinary sticker, and it was no mean task to attach it to the bus. The task of producing and attaching it was entrusted to Geneva-based specialists Mathys SA. With the ski season opening on 15 December, there will be many travellers arriving at the airport, and the bus will be ready to receive them. When one thinks of CERN, the subjects that naturally come to mind are the LHC, the mysteries of the Universe...

  20. Four Tops for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, Ezequiel; Kamenik, Jernej F; Morales, Roberto; Szynkman, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    We design a search strategy for the Standard Model $t\\bar t t \\bar t$ production at the LHC in the same-sign dilepton and trilepton channels. We study different signal features and, given the small expected number of signal events, we scrutinize in detail all reducible and irreducible backgrounds. Our analysis shows that by imposing a set of basic jet and lepton selection criteria, the SM $pp \\to t\\bar t t \\bar t$ process could be evidenced in the near future, within Run-II, when combining both multi-lepton search channels. We argue that this search strategy should also be used as a guideline to test New Physics coupling predominantly to top-quarks. In particular, we show that a non-resonant New Physics enhancement of the four-top final state would be detectable through this search strategy. We study two {\\it top-philic} simplified models of this kind, a neutral scalar boson and a $Z^\\prime$, and present current and future exclusion limits on their mass and couplings.

  1. Power to the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    It’s March already, and time for the LHC to wake up from its short winter break. The first of 7000 powering tests began on 4 March: the first step on the way to the first beams of 2016. It’s a tight schedule, with the powering tests scheduled for just 12 days before moving on to machine checkout and then commissioning with beam around Easter.   Last year marked a great start to Run 2. The objective for the year was to establish proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV with 25 ns bunch spacing, and in that we were successful, delivering four inverse femtobarns (4 fb-1) of data to the experiments. This was a great result but, to put it into context, the goal for the whole of Run 2 is to deliver 100 fb-1 by the end of 2018, so we still have a long way to go. 2015 was a learning year, and by the time we switched off for the end-of-year break, we had learned a great deal about how to operate this superb machine at the new higher energy, with shorter bunch spacing allowing us to get many ...

  2. LHC vacuum system

    CERN Document Server

    Gröbner, Oswald

    1999-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project, now in the advanced construction phase at CERN, comprises two proton storage rings with colliding beams of 7-TeV energy. The machine is housed in the existing LEP tunnel with a circumference of 26.7 km and requires a bending magnetic field of 8.4 T with 14-m long superconducting magnets. The beam vacuum chambers comprise the inner 'cold bore' walls of the magnets. These magnets operate at 1.9 K, and thus serve as very good cryo-pumps. In order to reduce the cryogenic power consumption, both the heat load from synchrotron radiation emitted by the proton beams and the resistive power dissipation by the beam image currents have to be absorbed on a 'beam screen', which operates between 5 and 20 K and is inserted inside the vacuum chamber. The design of this beam screen represents a technological challenge in view of the numerous and often conflicting requirements and the very tight mechanical tolerances imposed. The synchrotron radiation produces strong outgassing from the...

  3. Tracking the LHC halo

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    In the LHC, beams of 25-ns-spaced proton bunches travel at almost the speed of light and pass through many different devices installed along the ring that monitor their properties. During their whirling motion, beam particles might interact with the collimation instrumentation or with residual gas in the vacuum chambers and this creates the beam halo – an annoying source of background for the physics data. Newly installed CMS sub-detectors are now able to monitor it.   The Beam Halo Monitors (BHM) are installed around the CMS rotating shielding. The BHM are designed and built by University of Minnesota, CERN, Princeton University, INFN Bologna and the National Technical University of Athens. (Image: Andrea Manna). The Beam Halo Monitor (BHM) is a set of 20 Cherenkov radiators – 10-cm-long quartz crystals – installed at each end of the huge CMS detector. Their design goal is to measure the particles that can cause the so-called “machine-induced...

  4. Crystals in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Bent crystals can be used to deflect charged particle beams. Their use in high-energy accelerators has been investigated for almost 40 years. Recently, a bent crystal was irradiated for the first time in the HiRadMat facility with an extreme particle flux, which crystals would have to withstand in the LHC. The results were very encouraging and confirmed that this technology could play a major role in increasing the beam collimation performance in future upgrades of the machine.   UA9 bent crystal tested with a laser. Charged particles interacting with a bent crystal can be trapped in channelling states and deflected by the atomic planes of the crystal lattice (see box). The use of bent crystals for beam manipulation in particle accelerators is a concept that has been well-assessed. Over the last three decades, a large number of experimental findings have contributed to furthering our knowledge and improving our ability to control crystal-particle interactions. In modern hadron colliders, su...

  5. LHC Report: Level best

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC team

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is special: there is a limit to the number of the events the detector can handle per bunch crossing. Consequently the maximum luminosity provided in 2012 has been around 4 x1032 cm-2s-1 (compared to the maximum of 7.7 x1033 cm-2s-1 seen by ATLAS and CMS). Nonetheless LHCb still wants to integrate as much luminosity as possible.    To meet LHCb's requirements a luminosity leveling technique is used. A machine setup is chosen that would give a peak luminosity well above the required maximum if the beams are collided head-on at LHCb's interaction point. This peak luminosity is then reduced to the required maximum by moving the two beams transversely apart at the interaction point. As the beam current goes down during a fill, the beams can be moved together in small increments to keep the collision rate constant throughout the fill. In practice, when the LHC goes into collisions in LHCb, the initial luminosity is safely below LHCb's demanded le...

  6. Search for Exotic mono-jet and mono-photon signatures with the ATLAS detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezvani Reyhaneh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mono-jet and mono-photon signatures are final states in a variety of scenarios beyond the Standard Model, such as the Large Extra Dimension models, gauge-mediated SUSY breaking scenarios, and models with pair production of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles considered as dark matter candidates. The produced exotic particles do not interact with the detector, resulting in missing transverse energy. The results of searches, performed in the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, for new physics in final states with an energetic jet or photon and large missing transverse energy are presented. The mono-jet search is performed using both 4.6 fb−1 of 7 TeV and 10.5 fb−1 of 8 TeV data, while the mono-photon results correspond to 4.6 fb−1 of 7 TeV data.

  7. LHC Report: a record start for LHC ion operation

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven for the LHC Team

    2011-01-01

    After the technical stop, the LHC switched over to ion operation, colliding lead-ions on lead-ions. The recovery from the technical stop was very smooth, and records for ion luminosity were set during the first days of ion operation.   The LHC technical stop ended on the evening of Friday, 11 November. The recovery from the technical stop was extremely smooth, and already that same evening ion beams were circulating in the LHC. ‘Stable beams’ were declared the same night, with 2 x 2 bunches of ions circulating in the LHC, allowing the experiments to have their first look at ion collisions this year. However, the next step-up in intensity – colliding 170 x 170 bunches – was postponed due to a vacuum problem in the PS accelerator, so the collisions on Sunday, 13 November were confined to 9 x 9 bunches. The vacuum problem was solved, and on the night of Monday, 14 November, trains of 24 lead bunches were injected into the LHC and 170 x 170 bunches were brough...

  8. PREFACE: Structure of Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Michio; Otsuka, Takaharu; Aoi, Nori

    2006-11-01

    The International Symposium on `Structure of Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Forces' was held at The Koshiba Hall, University of Tokyo, on 9 - 12 March 2006. This symposium was organized as an activity of the Grant-in-Aid for the specially promoted area `Monte Carlo Shell Model' from the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture (MEXT) of Japan. The symposium was sponsored by the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) and by RIKEN. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss theoretical and experimental developments in the study of the structure of exotic nuclei and its relationship with nuclear forces. There has been much progress recently in our understanding of what the structure of exotic nuclei is and how it can be linked to nuclear forces, with emerging intriguing perspectives. The following subjects were covered in this symposium Present status and future of the shell model Effective interaction theories Experimental results and perspectives Few-body methods including ab initio calculations Advancements of mean-fieeld models Transition between shell and cluster structure Nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure Particle physics and the shell model Emphasis was placed on the interplay between many-body structures and nuclear forces, and on the experimental clarification of these topics. Around 80 participants attended the symposium and we enjoyed 34 excellent and lively invited talks and 26 oral presentations. The organizing committee consisted of B A Brown (MSU), S Fujii (CNS), M Honma (Aizu), T Kajino (NAO), T Mizusaki (Senshu), T Motobayashi (RIKEN), K Muto (TIT), T Otsuka (Chair, Tokyo/CNS/RIKEN), P Ring (TMU), N Shimizu (Scientific Secretary, Tokyo), S Shimoura (CNS), Y Utsuno (Scientific Secretary, JAEA). Finally, we would like to thank all the speakers and the participants as well as the other organizers for their contributions which made the symposium so successful.

  9. Different responses to the 2011 drought between native- and exotic-dominated experimental communities in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsey, B. J.; Polley, W.; Daneshgar, P. P.

    2014-12-01

    Global change includes invasion by non-native species, and invasion may affect ecosystem recovery from drought, especially when they cause species diversity declines. Here we test predictions in central Texas in a six-year experiment that compares mixtures of all exotic or all native species under two summer irrigation treatments (128 or 0 mm) that varies the amount of summer drought stress. A major drought (precipitation of 41% of normal) occurred in year 4 (2011), allowing a "natural experiment" test of how treatments affect drought resistance and recovery. Peak biomass was only 8% of pre-drought values in the drought year of 2011. Biomass resistance (drought/pre-drought biomass) and resilience (post-drought/pre-drought biomass) were similar among treatments. Native communities lost fewer species during the drought, and recovered more species after the drought than exotic communities. Over time, the responses in peak biomass to summer irrigation changed between native and exotic communities, with initially large responses in exotic communities in year 1 diminishing to non-significant responses by years 5 and 6. Native communities on the other hand, showed a small response to summer irrigation in year 1, but this response grew to become a large increase with irrigation by years 4-6. Reduced response to summer irrigation in exotic communities were associated with reduced species diversity and shifts in species composition towards C4 grasses. The differential effects of the drought indicate that non-native species will alter grassland community responses to drought events.

  10. MSSM Forecast for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera, Maria Eugenia; de Austri, Roberto Ruiz

    2009-01-01

    We perform a forecast of the MSSM with universal soft terms (CMSSM) for the LHC, based on an improved Bayesian analysis. We do not incorporate ad hoc measures of the fine-tuning to penalize unnatural possibilities: such penalization arises from the Bayesian analysis itself when the experimental value of $M_Z$ is considered. This allows to scan the whole parameter space, allowing arbitrarily large soft terms. Still the low-energy region is statistically favoured (even before including dark matter or g-2 constraints). Contrary to other studies, the results are almost unaffected by changing the upper limits taken for the soft terms. The results are also remarkable stable when using flat or logarithmic priors, a fact that arises from the larger statistical weight of the low-energy region in both cases. Then we incorporate all the important experimental constrains to the analysis, obtaining a map of the probability density of the MSSM parameter space, i.e. the forecast of the MSSM. Since not all the experimental i...

  11. LHC Report: Omnium-gatherum

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC team

    2012-01-01

    The last couple of weeks have seen a mixed bag of special runs, luminosity production, machine development and down-time.   Van der Meer scans were performed for ATLAS, CMS and ALICE. These scans step the beams transversely across each other and aim at a measurement of the absolute luminosity. A precise determination of the luminosity uncertainty is beneficial for many physics analyses and, indeed, measurements of important physics processes (such as top quark pair production) can be limited by luminosity errors. The scans were ultimately successful but the set-up and execution were affected by a number of technical problems. One of the main down-times was due to the replacement of an SPS dipole magnet which had developed a vacuum leak. A SPS magnet exchange is a well-practiced intervention. In this case, the whole exercise, including the pump down of the vacuum, took around 24 hours. There were also re-occuring problems with the fast switches of the SPS beam dump system. The LHC, as always, dep...

  12. The latest from the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The consolidation campaign, managed by the Quench Protection team, is advancing well. Phase 1 of the campaign is focused on the new protection system designed to monitor the superconducting busbars. This system will be able to detect tiny electrical resistances on these busbars, similar to the one that caused the incident in Sector 3-4. Following completion of the design of the two principal electronics boards, the first order for 2500 and 500 such boards will be placed this week. The manufacture of the cable segments for the first three LHC sectors is going ahead, and the installation programme has already begun in Sector 4-5. In total, more than 230 km of various types of cables will have to be laid. The complete system will consist of a network of 2132 detectors housed in 436 crates around the machine. These will monitor the interconnections of the main dipoles and quadrupoles in the three major circuits. The detectors will precisely measure the electrical resistance of each busbar segment, including the ...

  13. LHC rap: a global phenomenon

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Do you think the LHC is super duper fly? Does it make you want to compose some slick rhymes and bust out some killer beats? It did for one CERN rapper, and the results have become a YouTube smash hit! Katie McAlpine will sing for the CMS party on 24 September, and for the ATLAS Fest on 4 October.The Large Hadron Rap, to give it its full name, is the brainchild of AlpineKat, AKA Katie McAlpine, who is currently working for ATLAS e-News and outreach. To date, the YouTube video rap has been viewed more than 2.5 million times, to say nothing of the media coverage. Featured in newspapers around the world, including the New York Times in the US, The Telegraph in the UK and Geneva’s very own Matin Bleu, the rap is officially a sensation! Katie wrote the inspired (and pretty accurate) physics lyrics during her commute on the number 56 bus between Geneva and CERN. After obtaining permission to film in the experiment caverns and tunnel,...

  14. LHC Report: a Roman potpourri

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The last couple of weeks of operation have been a mixed bag, with time dedicated to TOTEM and ALFA, a floating machine development period and luminosity calibration runs. These special running periods were interleaved with some standard proton running where we’ve struggled a little to recover previous highs. The LHC has now returned to more routine operation.   The TOTEM and ALFA run required the development of special optics to produce large beam sizes and smaller angular spread at the interaction points in ATLAS and CMS. These special optics produce shallower angled proton-proton collisions than normal and thus allow experiments to probe the very small angle scattering regime. (For more information visit the TOTEM and ALFA websites.) The qualification of the new set-up at 4 TeV went well, paving the way for a 13-hour physics run for both TOTEM and ALFA with their Roman pots in position. Highlights from the 48-hour machine development period included the injection of high intensity bun...

  15. Jet charge at the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, David; Schwartz, Matthew D; Lin, Tongyan; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2013-05-24

    Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a light-quark jet could be extremely useful both for testing aspects of the standard model and for characterizing potential beyond-the-standard-model signals. We show that despite the complications of hadronization and out-of-jet radiation such as pileup, a weighted sum of the charges of a jet's constituents can be used at the LHC to distinguish among jets with different charges. Potential applications include measuring electroweak quantum numbers of hadronically decaying resonances or supersymmetric particles, as well as standard model tests, such as jet charge in dijet events or in hadronically decaying W bosons in tt[over ¯] events. We develop a systematically improvable method to calculate moments of these charge distributions by combining multihadron fragmentation functions with perturbative jet functions and pertubative evolution equations. We show that the dependence on energy and jet size for the average and width of the jet charge can be calculated despite the large experimental uncertainty on fragmentation functions. These calculations can provide a validation tool for data independent of Monte Carlo fragmentation models.

  16. LHC Report: playing with angles

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    Ready (after a machine development period), steady (running), go (for a special run)!   The crossing angles are an essential feature of the machine set-up. They have to be big enough to reduce the long-range beam-beam effect. The LHC has recently enjoyed a period of steady running and managed to set a new record for “Maximum Stable Luminosity Delivered in 7 days” of 3.29 fb-1 between 29 August and 4 September. The number of bunches per beam remains pegged at 2220 because of the limitations imposed by the SPS beam dump. The bunch population is also somewhat reduced due to outgassing near one of the injection kickers at point 8. Both limitations will be addressed during the year-end technical stop, opening the way for increased performance in 2017. On 10 and 11 September, a two day machine development (MD) period took place. The MD programme included a look at the possibility of reducing the crossing angle at the high-luminosity interaction points. The crossing angles are an ess...

  17. LHC Report: First collisions soon

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven for the LHC team

    2012-01-01

    On the evening of Friday 16 March beams were accelerated in the LHC at 4 TeV for the first time: a new world record! According to the schedule for the machine restart it will take another three weeks before the stable beams mode – the requirement for the detectors to start taking data – is achieved.   During the beam commissioning period the equipment teams make sure that their systems – beam instrumentation, radio frequency, beam interlock, feedback on orbit and tune, etc. – are working flawlessly with beam. Confidence in the correct functioning of all the magnets, their settings and their alignment is obtained by detailed measurements of the optics and the physical aperture. The optics measurements include the beta* of the squeezed beam at the centre of the experiments where the collisions will soon take place. This year the aim is to have a smaller beta* of 60 cm for the ATLAS and CMS experiments. As a reminder, smaller values of beta* mean thinner and m...

  18. Kulit ikan kakap tersamak: Exotic dan prospektif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliana Kasmudjiastuti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kakap fish skins are waste products of fillet industry. Up to now they have been wasted, of course accumulatively will cause environmental pollution. They are classified as the type of non conventional leather and exotic ones for the reasons of having special, beautiful, unique, typical, and attractive grain. Kakap fish skin have relatively small dimentions, there fore the tanning process can be done by home industry because simple equipments are possible to be used to process the fish skins into leather. In addition, Kakap fish leather have physical property of good tensile strength that may be used as material for leather goods. Although small however the exotic leather of kakap fish skins are prospective to be developed as material to manufacture exclusive leather goods, especially for niche markets. They also can be used as an alternative to substitute conventional leather.

  19. Molecular States and 1^-+ Exotic Mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, R; Li Xue Qian; Page, P R; Zhang, Rui; Ding, Yi-Bing; Li, Xue-Qian; Page, Philip R.

    2002-01-01

    This work investigates whether the observed 1^-+ exotic mesons are molecular states. We first use a potential model to calculate the spectra and lifetimes of the f_0(980) and a_0(980), taken to be loosely bound molecular states of K Kbar, then apply the same scenario to the 1^-+ exotic states pi_1(1400) and pi_1(1600), assuming them to be pi eta(1295) and pi eta(1440) molecules respectively. We derive the effective potential in the framework of field theory at the hadronic level. Our results indicate that the present data on pi_1(1400) and pi_1(1600) rule out the specific molecular ansatz. We show that the lifetime of a loosely bound heavy-light molecule with enough angular momentum is fully determined by the lifetimes of its constituent mesons.

  20. Exotic nuclei: production, properties and specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Duppen, Piet [Inst. voor Kern- en Stralingsfysika, Leuven Univ., Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    In this paper we will put the production of energetic radioactive ion beams of exotic nuclei in perspective and describe the two complementary production processes that are used nowadays: Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) followed by post-acceleration, and In-Flight Separation (IFS). After a general description of the process we will focus on recent technical developments in the field. In the subsequent section we give some `typical` examples of physics cases that are addressed with exotic beams. The examples are chosen not only because their physics importance but also to demonstrate the complementary aspects in the production process and the detection systems. This overview will not be complete and the reader is referred to literature for further information, nor is the lecture intended to give an overview of all the efforts that are taking place in the field by mentioning every project separately. (author) 50 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Clustering in stable and exotic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, C

    2016-01-01

    Since the pioneering discovery of molecular resonances in the 12C+12C reaction more than half a century ago a great deal of research work has been undertaken in alpha clustering. Our knowledge on physics of nuclear molecules has increased considerably and nuclear clustering remains one of the most fruitful domains of nuclear physics, facing some of the greatest challenges and opportunities in the years ahead. The occurrence of "exotic" shapes and Bose-Einstein alpha condensates in light N=Z alpha-conjugate nuclei is investigated. Various approaches of the superdeformed and hyperdeformed bands associated with quasimolecular resonant structures are presented. Evolution of clustering from stability to the drip-lines is examined: clustering aspects are, in particular, discussed for light exotic nuclei with large neutron excess such as neutron-rich Oxygen isotopes with their complete spectroscopy.

  2. Exotic Material as Interactions Between Scalar Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson G. A.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Many theoretical papers refer to the need to create exotic materials with average negative energies for the formation of space propulsion anomalies such as "wormholes" and "warp drives". However, little hope is given for the existence of such material to resolve its creation for such use. From the standpoint that non-minimally coupled scalar fields to gravity appear to be the current direction mathematically. It is proposed that exotic material is really scalar field interactions. Within this paper the Ginzburg-Landau (GL scalar fields associated with superconductor junctions isinvestigated as a source for negative vacuum energy fluctuations, which could be used to study the interactions among energyfluctuations, cosmological scalar (i.e., Higgs fields, and gravity.

  3. A macroscopic approach to creating exotic matter

    OpenAIRE

    Ridgely, C. T.

    2000-01-01

    Herein the Casimir effect is used to present a simple macroscopic view on creating exotic matter. The energy arising between two nearly perfectly conducting parallel plates is shown to become increasingly negative as the plate separation is reduced. It is proposed that the Casimir energy appears increasingly negative simply because the vacuum electromagnetic zero-point field performs positive work in pushing the plates together, transforming field energy into kinetic energy of the plates. Nex...

  4. Volume Integral Theorem for Exotic Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Nandi, Kamal Kanti; Zhang, Yuan-Zhong; Kumar, K. B. Vijaya

    2004-01-01

    We answer an important question in general relativity about the volume integral theorem for exotic matter by suggesting an exact integral quantifier for matter violating Averaged Null Energy Condition (ANEC). It is checked against some well known static, spherically symmetric traversable wormhole solutions of general relativity with a sign reversed kinetic term minimally coupled scalar field. The improved quantifier is consistent with the principle that traversable wormholes can be supported ...

  5. Implications of a ${J}^{PC}$ exotic

    CERN Document Server

    Page, P R

    1997-01-01

    Recent experimental data from BNL on the isovector J^PC =1^-+ exotic at 1.6 GeV indicate the existence of a non-quarkonium state consistent with lattice gauge theory predictions. We discuss how further experiments can strengthen this conclusion. We show that the \\rho\\pi, \\eta'\\pi and \\eta\\pi couplings of this state qualitatively support the hypothesis that it is a hybrid meson, although other interpretations cannot be eliminated.

  6. Kulit ikan kakap tersamak: Exotic dan prospektif

    OpenAIRE

    Emiliana Kasmudjiastuti

    2005-01-01

    Kakap fish skins are waste products of fillet industry. Up to now they have been wasted, of course accumulatively will cause environmental pollution. They are classified as the type of non conventional leather and exotic ones for the reasons of having special, beautiful, unique, typical, and attractive grain. Kakap fish skin have relatively small dimentions, there fore the tanning process can be done by home industry because simple equipments are possible to be used to process the fish skins ...

  7. Exotic woody plant invaders of the Transvaal

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, L.; K. J. Musil

    1984-01-01

    The frequency and abundance o ;f exotic, woody plant invaders were recorded in 60% of the quarter degree squares in the study area. Sixty-one invaders were encountered o f which the most important and aggressive were Acacia dealbaia, Populus spp.,  Melia azedarach, Opuntia ficus-indica, Salix babylonica and  Acacia mearnsii. Invasion patterns are discussed and an attempt is made to correlate distribution with environmental factors. Attention is drawn to the areas of greatest invasion and the ...

  8. From heavy ions to exotic atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Indelicato, Paul; Trassinelli, Martino

    2005-01-01

    We review a number of experiments and theoretical calculations on heavy ions and exotic atoms, which aim at providing informations on fundamental interactions. Among those are propositions of experiments for parity violation measurements in heavy ions and high-precision mesurements of He-like transition energies in highly charged ions. We also describe recent experiments on pionic atoms, that make use of highly-charged ion transitions to obtain accurate measurements of strong interaction shif...

  9. From heavy ions to exotic atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Indelicato, Paul; Trassinelli, Martino

    2005-01-01

    We review a number of experiments and theoretical calculations on heavy ions and exotic atoms, which aim at providing informations on fundamental interactions. Among those are propositions of experiments for parity violation measurements in heavy ions and high-precision mesurements of He-like transition energies in highly charged ions. We also describe recent experiments on pionic atoms, that make use of highly-charged ion transitions to obtain accurate measurements of strong interaction shif...

  10. Exotic rotational correlations in quantum geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Craig

    2017-05-01

    It is argued by extrapolation of general relativity and quantum mechanics that a classical inertial frame corresponds to a statistically defined observable that rotationally fluctuates due to Planck scale indeterminacy. Physical effects of exotic nonlocal rotational correlations on large scale field states are estimated. Their entanglement with the strong interaction vacuum is estimated to produce a universal, statistical centrifugal acceleration that resembles the observed cosmological constant.

  11. Handbook of LHC Higgs Cross Sections: 4. Deciphering the Nature of the Higgs Sector

    CERN Document Server

    de Florian, D.

    2017-01-01

    This Report summarizes the results of the activities of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group in the period 2014-2016. The main goal of the working group was to present the state-of-the-art of Higgs physics at the LHC, integrating all new results that have appeared in the last few years. The first part compiles the most up-to-date predictions of Higgs boson production cross sections and decay branching ratios, parton distribution functions, and off-shell Higgs boson production and interference effects. The second part discusses the recent progress in Higgs effective field theory predictions, followed by the third part on pseudo-observables, simplified template cross section and fiducial cross section measurements, which give the baseline framework for Higgs boson property measurements. The fourth part deals with the beyond the Standard Model predictions of various benchmark scenarios of Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, extended scalar sector, Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model and exotic ...

  12. J. J. Sakurai Prize for Theoretical Particle Physics Lecture: Particle physics after the first LHC results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarelli, Guido

    2012-03-01

    The LHC results released so far have very much restricted the possible range for the Standard Model Higgs boson mass. Moreover some indications for a signal at a mass around 125 GeV have been found. At the same time, no clear evidence for new physics has emerged from the LHC data. We discuss the impact of these results on our understanding of particle physics. The presently allowed window for the Higgs mass and the negative results for exotic particles are compatible with both the Standard model and its Supersymmetric extensions but imply considerable restrictions and need a substantial amount of fine tuning in all cases. We discuss the options that remain open and the perspectives for the near future.

  13. CASTOR Centauro and Strange Object Research in nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bartke, Jerzy; Chileev, K; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Golubeva, M B; Guber, F F; Karavitcheva, T L; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Tiflov, V V; Wlodarczyk, Z

    2002-01-01

    We describe the CASTOR detector designed to probe the very forward, baryon-rich rapidity region in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC. We present a phenomenological model describing the formation of a QGP fireball in a high baryochemical potential environment, and its subsequent decay into baryons and strangelets. The model explains Centauros and the long-penetrating component and makes predictions for the LHC. Simulations of Centauro-type events were done. To study the response of the apparatus to new effects different exotic species (DCC, Centauros, strangelets etc.) were passed through the deep calorimeter. The energy deposition pattern in the calorimeter appears to be a new clear signature of the QGP.

  14. Exotic leptoquarks from superstring derived models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elwood, J.K.; Faraggi, A.E.

    1997-03-01

    The H1 and ZEUS collaborations have recently reported a significant excess of e{sup +}p {r_arrow} e{sup +} jet events at high Q{sup 2}. While there exists insufficient data to conclusively determine the origin of this excess, one possibility is that it is due to a new leptoquark at mass scale around 200 GeV. We examine the type of leptoquark states that exist in superstring derived standard-like models, and show that, while these models may contain the standard leptoquark states which exist in Grand Unified Theories, they also generically contain new and exotic leptoquark states with fractional lepton number, {+-}1/2. In contrast to the traditional GUT-type leptoquark states, the couplings of the exotic leptoquarks to the Standard Model states are generated after the breaking of U(1){sub B-L}. This important feature of the exotic leptoquark states may result in local discrete symmetries which forbid some of the undesired leptoquark couplings. We examine these couplings in several models and study the phenomenological implications. The flavor symmetries of the superstring models are found to naturally suppress leptoquark flavor changing processes.

  15. Heavy feet for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The first 800 jacks (adjustable supports) for one sector of the LHC have arrived from India in recent weeks. After the final acceptance of the preseries jacks at the end of October, they can now be used to support the LHC cryo-magnets. How do you move the weight of eight adult Indian elephants by the breadth of a human hair? If you are a surveyor at CERN who has to adjust the 32 ton LHC dipoles with a resolution of 1/20 of a millimetre, you use the 80 kg jacks which were designed and are being procured by the Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT) in India. The jacks are undergoing final pre-shipment inspection by CAT engineers in India. More than 800 jacks have arrived in recent weeks from India, enough to equip the first sector of the LHC (one octant of the ring). For all the cryo-magnets (dipoles and quadrupoles) of the LHC 7000 jacks are needed in total. They are now being continuously delivered to CERN up to mid-2005. The close collaboration between the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) in India and CE...

  16. Hybrid beams in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The first proton-ion beams were successfully circulated in the LHC a couple of weeks ago. Everything went so smoothly that the LHC teams had planned the first p-Pb collisions for Wednesday, 16 November. Unfortunately, a last-minute problem with a component of the PS required for proton acceleration prevented the LHC teams from making these new collisions. However, the way is open for a possible physics run with proton-lead collisions in 2012.   Members of the LHC team photographed when the first hybrid beams got to full energy. The proton and lead beams are visible on the leftmost screen up on the wall (click to enlarge the photo). The technical challenge of making different beams circulate in the LHC is by no means trivial. Even if the machine is the same, there are a number of differences when it is operated with beams of protons, beams of lead or beams of proton and lead. Provided that the beams are equal, irrespective of whether they consist of protons or lead nuclei, they revolve at the...

  17. Scenarios for the LHC Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2008-01-01

    The projected lifetime of the LHC low-beta quadrupoles, the evolution of the statistical error halving time, and the physics potential all call for an LHC luminosity upgrade by the middle of the coming decade. In the framework of the CARE-HHH network three principal scenarios have been developed for increasing the LHC peak luminosity by more than a factor of 10, to values above 1035 cm−2s−1. All scenarios imply a rebuilding of the high-luminosity interaction regions (IRs) in combination with a consistent change of beam parameters. However, their respective features, bunch structures, IR layouts, merits and challenges, and luminosity variation with β∗ differ substantially. In all scenarios luminosity leveling during a store would be advantageous for the physics experiments. An injector upgrade must complement the upgrade measures in the LHC proper in order to provide the beam intensity and brightness needed as well as to reduce the LHC turnaround time for higher integrated luminosity.

  18. Physics at LHC and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The topics addressed during this Conference are as follows. ---An overview of the legacy results of the LHC experiments with 7 and 8 TeV data on Standard Model physics, Scalar sector and searches for New Physics. ---A discussion of the readiness of the CMS, ATLAS, and LHCb experiments for the forthcoming high-energy run and status of the detector upgrades ---A review of the most up-to-date theory outcome on cross-sections and uncertainties, phenomenology of the scalar sector, constraints and portals for new physics. ---The presentation of the improvements and of the expected sensibilities for the Run 2 of the LHC at 13 TeV and beyond. ---A comparison of the relative scientific merits of the future projects for hadron and e+e- colliders (HL-LHC, HE-LHC, ILC, CLIC, TLEP, VHE-LHC) towards precision measurements of the Scalar boson properties and of the Electroweak-Symmetry-Breaking parameters, and towards direct searches for New Physics.

  19. Le LHC, un tunnel cosmique

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    Et si la lumière au bout du tunnel du LHC était cosmique ? En d’autres termes, qu’est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter dans la connaissance de l’Univers ? Car la montée en énergie des accélérateurs de particules nous permet de mieux appréhender l’univers primordial, chaud et dense. Mais dans quel sens dit-on que le LHC reproduit des conditions proches du Big bang ? Quelles informations nous apporte-t-il sur le contenu de l’Univers ? La matière noire est-elle détectable au LHC ? L’énergie noire ? Pourquoi l’antimatière accumulée au CERN est-elle si rare dans l’Univers ? Et si le CERN a bâti sa réputation sur l’exploration des forces faibles et fortes qui opèrent au sein des atomes et de leurs noyaux, est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter des informations sur la force gravitationnelle qui gouverne l’évolution cosmique ? Depuis une trentaine d’années, notre compréhension de l’univers dans ses plus grandes dimensions et l’appréhension de son comportement aux plus peti...

  20. Use of exotic species in afforestation and facilitation for the establishment of biological invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Ricardo Fabricante

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to inventory the species used in landscaping the Campus of Agricultural Sciences of the Federal University of Paraíba, Areia, PB, Brazil and to rank them according to their origin and their invasive potential. Through walks throughout the study area (active search, we cataloged all the species used in local afforestation and classified them as native or exotic. Exotic plants were also classified as to their invasive potential. Altogether, we identified 76 species belonging to 67 genera and 25 families. Of these, only 26 species were native. The results of this study are worrisome because of the large number of exotic species used for planting at the study site (50 species, including known aggressive species: Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam., Azadirachta indica A. Juss. and Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit.

  1. Charmonia and exotics from BESIII

    CERN Document Server

    Kornicer, Mihajlo

    2015-01-01

    Several states that couple to one light-meson and a heavy-charmonium are recently reported, including the $Z_c(3900)$ and $Z_c(4020)$. These states cannot be interpreted within the constituent quark-model of mesons, and are good candidates for a new form of quark matter, four-quark matter. A review of recent results on new charmonium-like states studied at BESIII is presented.

  2. More about neutron Majorana mass from exotic instantons: An alternative mechanism in low-scale string theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addazi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    We discuss an alternative for baryon-violating six quarks transition in the context of low scale string theory. In particular, with MS = 10-103 TeV, such a transition can be mediated by two color-triplets through a quartic coupling with down-quarks, generated by exotic instantons, in a calculable and controllable way. We show how flavor-changing neutral currents (FCNCs) limits on color-triplet mass are well compatible with n -n¯ oscillation ones. If an n -n¯ transition was found, this would be an indirect hint for our model. This would strongly motivate searches for direct channels in proton-proton colliders. In fact, our model can be directly tested in an experimentally challenging 100-1000 TeV proton-proton collider, searching for our desired color-triplet states and an evidence for exotic instantons resonances, in addition to stringy Regge resonances, anomalous Z‧-bosons and gauged megaxion. In particular, our scenario can be related to the 750 GeV diphoton hint identifying it with the gauged megaxion dual to the B-field. On the other hand, this scenario is compatible with TeV-ish color triplets visible at large hadron collider (LHC) and with 1-10 TeV string scale, i.e. stringy resonances at LHC.

  3. Upgrade of the CMS Tracker for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinger, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The LHC machine is planning an upgrade program which will smoothly bring the luminosity to about $ 5 \\times 10^{34}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ in 2028, possibly reaching an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb$^{-1}$ by the end of 2037. This High Luminosity LHC scenario, HL-LHC, will require a preparation program of the LHC detectors known as Phase-2 Upgrade. The current CMS Tracker, including both inner pixel and outer strip systems, is already running beyond design specifications and will not be able to survive HL-LHC radiation conditions. CMS will need a completely new device in order to fully exploit the demanding operating conditions and the delivered luminosity. The upgrade plan includes extending the Pixel Detector in the forward region from the current coverage of $ \\lvert \\eta \\rvert < 2.4 $ to $ \\lvert \\eta \\rvert < 4$, where up to seven forward- and four extension disks will compose the new detector. Additionally, the new outer system should also have trigger capabilities. To achieve such goals, R\\&...

  4. 5th report from the LHC performance workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Bulletin's correspondent from Chamonix

    2012-01-01

    The morning session on Friday 10 February - the final day of the workshop - saw further examination of the challenges of the High Luminosity LHC and included a look at the state of R&D for the new magnets required for the high luminosity interaction regions. There was then an entertaining look at even more distant future. Possible future projects under consideration include the Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) which foresees colliding 60 GeV electrons with 7 TeV protons, and the High Energy LHC (HE-LHC) in which the beam energy of the LHC is increased from 7 to 16.5 TeV. Serious technological challenges exist for both these options. In the afternoon Steve Myers, CERN's Director for Accelerators and Technology, presented a summary of the workshop recommendations. In brief, the LHC should operate at 4 TeV in 2012 with the key priorities being: delivering enough luminosity to ATLAS and CMS to allow them to independently discover or exclude the Higgs; the proton-Lead ion run; and machine deve...

  5. CARBONIFEROUS CORALS AND CHAETETIDS FROM EXOTIC LIMESTONE BLOCK OF THE CRIMEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VICTOR OGAR

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A chaetetid sponge and coral fauna from a Carboniferous exotic limestone block in the Lower Jurassic Esciorda olistostrome on the Bodrak River (Crimean Mountains are described for the first time. The Bodrak exotic block is composed of massive limestone. It contains the chaetetid Chaetetes (Boswellia sp., the tabulate coral Multithecopora sp., and poorly preserved rugose corals, including Dibunophyllum? sp., Cordibia? sp. and gen. et sp. indet. Only the fasciculate colonies of the rugose coral Lytvophyllum askynensis (Kossovaya, 2009 are confidently identified. The studied association of fossils is similar to that of the Donets Basin and the Urals and confirms the Lower Bashkirian age of the Bodrak limestone block. 

  6. Post LHC8 SUSY benchmark points for ILC physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Howard [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States); List, Jenny [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    We re-evaluate prospects for supersymmetry at the proposed International Linear e{sup +}e{sup -} Collider (ILC) in light of the first two years of serious data taking at LHC: LHC7 with {proportional_to}5 fb{sup -1} of pp collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV and LHC8 with {proportional_to}20 fb{sup -1} at {radical}(s)=8 TeV. Strong new limits from LHC8 SUSY searches, along with the discovery of a Higgs boson with m{sub h}{approx_equal}125 GeV, suggest a paradigm shift from previously popular models to ones with new and compelling signatures. After a review of the current status of supersymmetry, we present a variety of new ILC benchmark models, including: natural SUSY, radiatively-driven natural SUSY (RNS), NUHM2 with low m{sub A}, a focus point case from mSUGRA/CMSSM, non-universal gaugino mass (NUGM) model, {tau}-coannihilation, Kallosh-Linde/spread SUSY model, mixed gauge-gravity mediation, normal scalar mass hierarchy (NMH), and one example with the recently discovered Higgs boson being the heavy CP-even state H. While all these models at present elude the latest LHC8 limits, they do offer intriguing case study possibilities for ILC operating at {radical}(s){approx_equal} 0.25-1 TeV. The benchmark points also present a view of the widely diverse SUSY phenomena which might still be expected in the post LHC8 era at both LHC and ILC.

  7. Recent Results on SUSY and Exotica Searches at the LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grout Zara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A review is presented of searches for Beyond the Standard Model (BSM physics at the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC with emphasis on most recent results. This includes a summary of Supersymmetry searches covering strong, electroweak, and R-parity violating scenarios, and a range of exotica searches including heavy boson searches, extra dimensions, and long-lived particles. The status of BSM physics after the first data-taking period (Run 1 of the LHC and the prospects for the second data-taking period (Run 2, beginning in 2015, are discussed.

  8. The Gauge-Higgs Legacy of the LHC Run I

    CERN Document Server

    Butter, Anja; Gonzalez-Fraile, J; Gonzalez-Garcia, M C; Plehn, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    The effective Lagrangian expansion provides a framework to study effects of new physics at the electroweak scale. To make full use of LHC data in constraining higher-dimensional operators we need to include both the Higgs and the electroweak gauge sector in our study. We first present an analysis of the relevant di-boson production LHC results to update constraints on triple gauge boson couplings. Our bounds are several times stronger than those obtained from LEP data. Next, we show how in combination with Higgs measurements the triple gauge vertices lead to a significant improvement in the entire set of operators, including operators describing Higgs couplings.

  9. Light, Luminosity and the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Short interview to Lucio Rossi, project leader of the High Luminosity LHC, about the concept of light in physics, light and luminosity in particle accelerators and the High Luminosity LHC project. On the occasion of International Year of Light 2015.

  10. Computer graphic of LHC in the tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    1996-01-01

    A computer-generated image of the LHC particle accelerator at CERN in the tunnel originally built for the LEP accelerator that was closed in 2000. The cross-section of an LHC superconducting dipole magnet is also seen.

  11. The HL-LHC accelerator physics challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Fartoukh, S

    2014-01-01

    We review the conceptual baseline of the HL-LHC project, putting into perspective the main beam physics challenges of this new collider in comparison with the existing LHC, and the series of solutions and possible mitigation measures presently envisaged.

  12. Searching for exotic physics with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Many theories beyond the Standard Model predict new phenomena accessible by the LHC. Searches for new physics models are performed using the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The results reported here use the pp collision data sample collected in 2015 and 2016 by the ATLAS detector at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  13. Dashboard for the LHC experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, J.; Belov, S.; Berejnoj, A.; Cirstoiu, C.; Chen, Y.; Chen, T.; Chiu, S.; Miguel, M. D. F. D.; Ivanchenko, A.; Gaidioz, B.; Herrala, J.; Janulis, M.; Kodolova, O.; Maier, G.; Maguire, E. J.; Munro, C.; Rivera, R. P.; Rocha, R.; Saiz, P.; Sidorova, I.; Tsai, F.; Tikhonenko, E.; Urbah, E.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present the Experiment Dashboard monitoring system, which is currently in use by four Large Hadron Collider (LHC)[1] experiments. The goal of the Experiment Dashboard is to monitor the activities of the LHC experiments on the distributed infrastructure, providing monitoring data from the virtual organization (VO) and user perspectives. The LHC experiments are using various Grid infrastructures (LCG[2]/EGEE[3], OSG[4], NDGF[5]) with correspondingly various middleware flavors and job submission methods. Providing a uniform and complete view of various activities like job processing, data movement and publishing, access to distributed databases regardless of the underlying Grid flavor is the challenging task. In this paper we will describe the Experiment Dashboard concept, its framework and main monitoring applications.

  14. Collision Rate Monitors for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bravin, E; Burger, S; Byrd, J M; Chow, K; Dutriat, C; Jolliot, M; Lefèvre, T; Matis, H S; Monroy, M; Talanov, V; Turner, W C; Ratti, A; Renet, S

    2007-01-01

    Collision rate monitors are essential in bringing particle beams into collision and optimizing the performances of a collider. In the case of LHC the relative luminosity will be monitored by measuring the flux of small angle neutral particles produced in the collisions. Due to the very different luminosity levels at the four interaction regions (IR) of LHC two different types of monitors have been developed. At the high luminosity IR (ATLAS and CMS) fast ionization chambers will be installed while at the other two (ALICE and LHC-b) solid state polycrystalline Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors will be used. The ionization chambers are being developed by LBNL while the CdTe monitors are being developed by CERN and CEA-LETI.

  15. The LHC goes 3G

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    A new telecommunications network has been installed in the LHC tunnel to facilitate operations during the long shutdown. Anyone using a smartphone, tablet or laptop computer will now be able to access the Internet from the tunnel.   Results of a download (green) and upload (yellow) test carried out in the LHC tunnel using the new Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS). The first long shutdown has officially begun, and the teams are about to enter the various tunnels around the Laboratory. It’s a good opportunity to talk telecommunications. As you can well imagine, even the highest of high-tech smartphones remains stubbornly silent and unresponsive 100 metres below the ground. Except at CERN… The IT-CS Group has implemented an impressive state-of-the-art solution to tackle this problem - a new Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS), better known as “3G”, covering the entire 27-km circumference of the LHC tunnel. Established on th...

  16. Transverse Impedance of LHC Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Métral, E; Assmann, Ralph Wolfgang; Boccardi, A; Bracco, C; Bohl, T; Caspers, Friedhelm; Gasior, M; Jones, O R; Kasinski, K; Kroyer, T; Redaelli, S; Robert-Demolaize, R; Roncarolo, F; Rumolo, G; Salvant, B; Steinhagen, R; Weiler, T; Zimmermann, F

    2007-01-01

    The transverse impedance in the LHC is expected to be dominated by the numerous collimators, most of which are made of Fibre-Reinforced-Carbon to withstand the impacts of high intensity proton beams in case of failures, and which will be moved very close to the beam, with full gaps of few millimetres, in order to protect surrounding super-conducting equipments. We present an estimate of the transverse resistive-wall impedance of the LHC collimators, the total impedance in the LHC at injection and top energy, the induced coupled-bunch growth rates and tune shifts, and finally the result of the comparison of the theoretical predictions with measurements performed in 2004 and 2006 on a prototype collimator installed in the SPS.

  17. The first LHC insertion quadrupole

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    An important milestone was reached in December 2003 at the CERN Magnet Assembly Facility. The team from the Accelerator Technology - Magnet and Electrical Systems group, AT-MEL, completed the first special superconducting quadrupole for the LHC insertions which house the experiments and major collider systems. The magnet is 8 metres long and contains two matching quadrupole magnets and an orbit corrector, a dipole magnet, used to correct errors in quadrupole alignment. All were tested in liquid helium and reached the ultimate performance criteria required for the LHC. After insertion in the cryostat, the superconducting magnet will be installed as the Q9 quadrupole in sector 7-8, the first sector of the LHC to be put in place in 2004. Members of the quadrupole team, from the AT-MEL group, gathered around the Q9 quadrupole at its inauguration on 12 December 2003 in building 181.

  18. Pauline Gagnon's Blog: Did we build the LHC just to find the Higgs?

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    2011-01-01

    There are bosos and bosons, and if the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) were built only to find the Higgs boson, you would be absolutely right to think all physicists belong to the first category. But the fact is, the LHC does much more than search for Higgs bosons.   A selection of recent results obtained by the ATLAS experiment in search for new discoveries. In blue, searches for various supersymmetric models, in turquoise, models involving extra dimensions, and the other colors showing even more exotic models. Despite the media focusing mainly on the Higgs boson, this search only represents one of the many aspects we hope to cover with the LHC. Granted, the Higgs boson brings such an elegant solution to the problem of the origin of mass that its high popularity among physicists has reached even the general public. But the LHC could be opening the door to parallel worlds, extra dimensions or the discovery of as many new particles as the ones we already know. These are but some of the exciting...

  19. Charmonium and exotics from Belle

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    The recent results on charmonium and charmoniumlike states from Belle experiment are reviewed. We summarise searches in $B$ decays for possible $X$-like states in final states containing $\\eta_c$. The new measurement of $e^+e^-\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\psi(2S)$ improves the determination of the properties of $Y(4360)$ and $Y(4660)$. The fits including $Y(4260)$ are performed. Evidence for a charged charmoniumlike structure at $4.05~{\\rm GeV}/c^2$ is observed in the $\\pi^{\\pm}\\psi(2S)$ intermediate state in the $Y(4360)$ decays. Belle also updates the measurement on $e^+e^-\\to KKJ/\\psi$ via initial state radiation using the full data sample. Finally, Belle observed $X(3872)$ in $B\\to K\\pi + X(\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-J/\\psi)$.

  20. The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei (anasen)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, M.; Blackmon, J. C.; Gardiner, H. E.; Linhardt, L. E.; Macon, K. T.; Mondello, L. L.; Baby, L.; Johnson, E.; Koshchiy, E.; Rogachev, G.; Wiedenhöver, I.; Bardayan, D. W.

    2013-03-01

    Experimental information about most reactions involving short-lived nuclei is limited. New facilities aim to provide wider access to unstable isotopes, but the limited intensities require more efficient and selective techniques and devices. The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN) is a charged-particle detector array designed primarily for studies of reactions important in the αp- and rp- processes with proton-rich exotic nuclei. The array consists of 40 silicon-strip detectors backed with CsI scintillators. The detectors cover an area of about 1300 cm2 providing essentially complete solid angle coverage for the reactions of interest with good energy and position resolution. ANASEN also includes a position-sensitive annular gas proportional counter that allows it to be used as an active gas target/detector. ANASEN is designed for direct measurement of (α,p) re-actions in inverse kinematics as well as for studies of proton elastic and inelastic scattering, (p, γ) reactions and transfer reactions. The array is being developed by Louisiana State University and Florida State University. Presently it is located at the RESOLUT radioacitve ion beam facility at FSU, where the first experiments are being performed. In the future, the array will be used at the ReA3 facility at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory.

  1. Electroweak physics at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryhill, J.; Oh, A.

    2017-02-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has completed in 2012 its first running phase and the experiments have collected data sets of proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV with an integrated luminosity of about 5 and 20 {{fb}}-1, respectively. Analyses of these data sets have produced a rich set of results in the electroweak sector of the standard model. This article reviews the status of electroweak measurements of the ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments at the LHC.

  2. Searches for Exotic Transient Signals with a Global Network of Optical Magnetometers for Exotic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pustelny, S

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we describe a novel scheme for searching for physics beyond the Standard Model. The idea is based on correlation of time-synchronized readouts of distant ($\\gtrsim$100~km) optical magnetometers. Such an approach limits hard-to-identify local transient noise, providing the system with unique capabilities of identification of global transient events. Careful analysis of the signal can reveal the nature of the events (e.g., its nonmagnetic origin), which opens avenues for new class of exotic-physics searches (searches for global transient exotic spin couplings) and tests of yet unverified theoretical models.

  3. Multi-parton interactions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulesza, A. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie; Nagy, Z. (eds.) [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    We review the recent progress in the theoretical description and experimental observation of multiple parton interactions. Subjects covered include experimental measurements of minimum bias interactions and of the underlying event, models of soft physics implemented in Monte Carlo generators, developments in the theoretical description of multiple parton interactions and phenomenological studies of double parton scattering. This article stems from contributions presented at the Helmholtz Alliance workshop on ''Multi-Parton Interactions at the LHC'', DESY Hamburg, 13-15 September 2010. (orig.)

  4. The CMS tracker for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Abbaneo, D

    2013-01-01

    The planned upgrades of the LHC and its injector chain are expected to allow operation at luminosities around or above 5 · 1034 cm−2 · s−1 sometimes after 2020, to eventually reach an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb−1 at the end of that decade. In order to fully exploit such operating conditions and the delivered luminosity, CMS needs to upgrade its tracking detectors and substantially improve its trigger capabilities. To achieve such goals, R&D activities are ongoing to develop solutions that would allow including tracking information at Level-1. Some of the options considered are reviewed, discussing their potential advantages and disadvantages.

  5. Nonlinear predictive control in the LHC accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco, E; Cristea, S; Casas, J

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a nonlinear model-based control strategy in a real challenging process. A predictive controller based on a nonlinear model derived from physical relationships, mainly heat and mass balances, has been developed and commissioned in the inner triplet heat exchanger unit (IT-HXTU) of the large hadron collider (LHC) particle accelerator at European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). The advanced regulation\\ maintains the magnets temperature at about 1.9 K. The development includes a constrained nonlinear state estimator with a receding horizon estimation procedure to improve the regulator predictions.

  6. QCD-instantons at LHC. Theoretical aspects; QCD-Instantonen am LHC. Theoretische Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petermann, M.

    2007-06-15

    Instantons are nonperturbative, topologically nontrivial field configurations, which occur in every nonabelian gauge theory. They can be understood as tunneling processes between topologically distinct vacua. Although being a basic theoretical aspect of the Standard Model, a direct experimental verification of instanton processes is still lacking. In this thesis the general discovery potential for QCD-instantons at the LHC is studied in detail by means of instanton perturbation theory. In this context the close correspondence between the leading instanton induced processes at HERA and at LHC becomes important. Essential aspects and differences to deep inelastic scattering can already be revealed by studying the simplest process. Based on these results inclusive cross sections are calculated including the emission of final state gluons. Compared to deep inelastic scattering, a large enhancement of the cross section is found. (orig.)

  7. High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) general infographics

    CERN Multimedia

    Landua, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC, which is expected to be operational after 2025, will increase the LHC’s luminosity by a factor of 10. To achieve this major upgrade, several technologies, some of which are completely innovative, are being developed.

  8. LHC news November 30, 2009 - LHC beats world energy record!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2009-01-01

    On Sunday Nov 29th 2009, the LHC operators managed to reach for the first time the record energy of 1.08 TeV with one beam. A few hours later, on Mon Nov. 30 at 00:44 they managed to circulate both beams at the record energy of 1.18 TeV for 45 minutes.

  9. Static super-replicating strategies for a class of exotic options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Deelstra, G.; Dhaene, J.; Vanmaele, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate static super-replicating strategies for European-type call options written on a weighted sum of asset prices. This class of exotic options includes Asian options and basket options among others. We assume that there exists a market where the plain vanilla options on the

  10. Summary Talk First Workshop on Forward Physics and Luminosity Determination at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A D

    2001-01-01

    An attempt is made to summarize the discussion at the Workshop, except for the panel discussion on the ability of the LHC detectors to accommodate forward reactions. The Workshop focused on two main topics. The first topic was forward physics at the LHC. Predictions were made for forward reactions, including elastic scattering and soft diffractive processes, intopic was forward physics at the LHC. Predictions were made for forward reactions, including elastic scattering and soft diffractive processes, in terms of (multi) Pomeron exchange, using knowledge gained at lower energies. The survival probability of rapidity gaps accompanying hard subprocesses was studied. The nature of the Pomeron, before and after QCD, was exposed, and some aspects of small x physics at the LHC were considered. The second topic of the Workshop concerned the accuracy of the luminosity measuring processes at the LHC. Attention concentrated on three methods. The classic approach based on the optical theorem, secondly, the observation o...

  11. An improved scattering routine for collimation tracking studies at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tambasco, Claudia; Salvachua Ferrando, Maria Belen; Cavoto, Gianluca

    The present Master thesis work has been carried out at CERN in the framework of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) Collimation project. The LHC accelerates proton beams up to 7 TeV colliding in the experiment detectors installed in four points of the accelerator ring. The LHC is built to store a energy of 360MJ for each beam. The energy deposition induced by local beam losses could quench the superconducting magnets located around the accelerator beam pipes. To prevent and keep under control dangerous beam losses, an efficient collimation system is required. In addition, the achievable LHC beam intensity is related to the beam loss rate and, consequently, to the cleaning efficiency of the collimation system. Collimation studies at LHC are carried out also by means of simulations by using SixTrack, a dedicated simulation tool that tracks a large numbers of particles for many turns around the ring. The SixTrack code includes a scattering routine to model proton interactions with the material of the collimators j...

  12. Searches for exotic resonances with top tagging

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, Junpei; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Several models of physics beyond the Standard Model contain preferential couplings to top quarks. We present an overview of searches for new physics containing boosted top quarks in the final state, using proton-proton collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. These results cover heavy gauge bosons, excited third generation quarks, or decay channels to vector-like top partner quarks.

  13. Magnetic shielding and exotic spin-dependent interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kimball, D F Jackson; Li, Y; Thulasi, S; Pustelny, S; Budker, D; Zolotorev, M

    2016-01-01

    Experiments searching for exotic spin-dependent interactions typically employ magnetic shielding between the source of the exotic field and the interrogated spins. We explore the question of what effect magnetic shielding has on detectable signals induced by exotic fields. Our general conclusion is that for common experimental geometries and conditions, magnetic shields should not significantly reduce sensitivity to exotic spin-dependent interactions, especially when the technique of comagnetometry is used. However, exotic fields that couple to electron spin can induce magnetic fields in the interior of shields made of a soft ferro- or ferrimagnetic material. This induced magnetic field must be taken into account in the interpretation of experiments searching for new spin-dependent interactions and raises the possibility of using a flux concentrator inside magnetic shields to amplify exotic spin-dependent signals.

  14. Exotic Newton-Hooke group, noncommutative plane and superconformal symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, Pedro D

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis we have studied some systems with exotic symmetries, which are a peculiarity in 2+1 space-time dimensions. Coded in the exotic structure appears noncommutative coordinates and a phases structure. This kind of systems has attracted attention from different areas of physics independently. Among them we can mention: theory of ray representations of Lie groups, anyons physics, some condensed matter systems, for instance the quantum Hall effect, planar gauge and gravitation theories, noncommutative field theory, noncommutative geometry and noncommutative quantum mechanics. We will focus our study in some topics on exotic nonrelativistic symmetries, such as the exotic Newton-Hooke group, the relation between the systems of exotic Newton-Hooke and the noncommutative Landau problem and the symmetries of noncommutative Landau problem, its conformal and supersymmetric extensions. The exotic Newton-Hooke group correspond to the nonrelativistic limit of the de Sitter groups, and has as a particular case (f...

  15. Supersymmetric exotic decays of the 125 GeV Higgs boson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinrui; Liu, Tao; Wang, Lian-Tao; Yu, Felix

    2014-06-06

    We reveal a set of novel decay topologies for the 125 GeV Higgs boson in supersymmetry which are initiated by its decay into a pair of neutralinos, and discuss their collider search strategies. This category of exotic Higgs decays is characterized by the collider signature: visible objects+E_{T}, with E_{T} dominantly arising from escaping dark matter particles. Their benchmark arises naturally in the Peccei-Quinn symmetry limit of the minimal supersymmetric standard model singlet extensions, which is typified by the coexistence of three light particles: singletlike scalar h_{1} and pseudoscalar a_{1}, and singlinolike neutralino χ_{1}, all with masses of ≲10  GeV, and the generic suppression of the exotic decays of the 125 GeV Higgs boson h_{2}→h_{1}h_{1}, a_{1}a_{1} and χ_{1}χ_{1}, however. As an illustration, we study the decay topology: h_{2}→χ_{1}χ_{2}, where the binolike χ_{2} decays to h_{1}χ_{1} or a_{1}χ_{1}, and h_{1}/a_{1}→ff[over ¯], with ff[over ¯]=μ^{+}μ^{-}, bb[over ¯]. In the dimuon case (m_{h_{1}/a_{1}}∼1  GeV), a statistical sensitivity of S/sqrt[B]>6σ can be achieved easily at the 8 TeV LHC, assuming σ(pp→Wh_{2})/σ(pp→Wh_{SM})Br(h_{2}→μ^{+}μ^{-}χ_{1}χ_{1})=0.1. In the bb[over ¯] case (m_{h_{1}/a_{1}}∼45  GeV), 600  fb^{-1} data at the 14 TeV LHC can lead to a statistical sensitivity of S/sqrt[B]>5σ, assuming σ(pp→Zh_{2})/σ(pp→Zh_{SM})Br(h_{2}→bb[over ¯]χ_{1}χ_{1})=0.5. These exotic decays open a new avenue for exploring new physics couplings with the 125 GeV Higgs boson at colliders.

  16. Astrophysical constraints on singlet scalars at LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, Mark P.; Masoumi, Ali

    2017-04-01

    We consider the viability of new heavy gauge singlet scalar particles at colliders such as the LHC . Our original motivation for this study came from the possibility of a new heavy particle of mass ~ TeV decaying significantly into two photons at colliders, such as LHC, but our analysis applies more broadly. We show that there are significant constraints from astrophysics and cosmology on the simplest UV complete models that incorporate such new particles and its associated collider signal. The simplest and most obvious UV complete model that incorporates such signals is that it arises from a new singlet scalar (or pseudo-scalar) coupled to a new electrically charged and colored heavy fermion. Here we show that these new fermions (and anti-fermions) would be produced in the early universe, then form new color singlet heavy mesons with light quarks, obtain a non-negligible freeze-out abundance, and remain in kinetic equilibrium until decoupling. These heavy mesons possess interesting phenomenology, dependent on their charge, including forming new bound states with electrons and protons. We show that a significant number of these heavy states would survive for the age of the universe and an appreciable number would eventually be contained within the earth and solar system. We show that this leads to detectable consequences, including the production of highly energetic events from annihilations on earth, new spectral lines, and, spectacularly, the destabilization of stars. The lack of detection of these consequences rules out such simple UV completions, putting pressure on the viability of such new particles at LHC . To incorporate such a scalar would require either much more complicated UV completions or even further new physics that provides a decay channel for the associated fermion.

  17. Taxonomic distribution and origins of the extended LHC (light-harvesting complex antenna protein superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinkmann Henner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extended light-harvesting complex (LHC protein superfamily is a centerpiece of eukaryotic photosynthesis, comprising the LHC family and several families involved in photoprotection, like the LHC-like and the photosystem II subunit S (PSBS. The evolution of this complex superfamily has long remained elusive, partially due to previously missing families. Results In this study we present a meticulous search for LHC-like sequences in public genome and expressed sequence tag databases covering twelve representative photosynthetic eukaryotes from the three primary lineages of plants (Plantae: glaucophytes, red algae and green plants (Viridiplantae. By introducing a coherent classification of the different protein families based on both, hidden Markov model analyses and structural predictions, numerous new LHC-like sequences were identified and several new families were described, including the red lineage chlorophyll a/b-binding-like protein (RedCAP family from red algae and diatoms. The test of alternative topologies of sequences of the highly conserved chlorophyll-binding core structure of LHC and PSBS proteins significantly supports the independent origins of LHC and PSBS families via two unrelated internal gene duplication events. This result was confirmed by the application of cluster likelihood mapping. Conclusions The independent evolution of LHC and PSBS families is supported by strong phylogenetic evidence. In addition, a possible origin of LHC and PSBS families from different homologous members of the stress-enhanced protein subfamily, a diverse and anciently paralogous group of two-helix proteins, seems likely. The new hypothesis for the evolution of the extended LHC protein superfamily proposed here is in agreement with the character evolution analysis that incorporates the distribution of families and subfamilies across taxonomic lineages. Intriguingly, stress-enhanced proteins, which are universally found in the

  18. Upgrades of the CMS outer tracker for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sguazzoni, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    The LHC machine is planning an upgrade program which will smoothly bring the luminosity up to or above $5\\times 10^{34}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ sometimes after 2020, to possibly reach an integrated luminosity of 3000fb$^{-1}$ at the end of that decade. In this ultimate scenario, called Phase-2, when LHC will reach the High Luminosity (HL-LHC) phase, CMS will need a completely new Tracker detector, in order to fully exploit the high-demanding operating conditions and the delivered luminosity. The new Tracker should have also trigger capabilities. To achieve such goals, R and D activities are ongoing to explore options and develop solutions that would allow including tracking information at Level-1. The design choices for the CMS Outer Tracker upgrades are discussed along with some highlights of the R and D activities.

  19. LHC Machine Protection Against Very Fast Crab Cavity Failures

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, T; Tomas, R; Tuckmantel, J; Wenninger, J; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    For the high-luminosity LHC upgrade program (HLLHC), the installation of crab cavities (CCs) is essential to compensate the geometric luminosity loss due to the crossing angle [1]. The baseline is a local scheme with CCs around the ATLAS and CMS experiments. In a failure case (e.g. a CC quench), the voltage and/or phase of a CC can change significantly with a fast time constant of the order of a LHC turn [2]. This can lead to large, global betatron oscillations of the beam. Against the background of machine protection, the influence of a CC failure on the beam dynamics is discussed. The results from dedicated tracking studies, including the LHC upgrade optics, are presented. Necessary countermeasures to limit the impact of CC failures to an acceptable level are proposed.

  20. Study of a Tracking/Preshower Detector for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD-2 Study of a Tracking/Preshower Detector for the LHC \\\\ \\\\An important goal in the design of a detector to operate with high machine luminosity at the LHC is the detection of electrons at either the trigger or analysis level as a signature of rare physics processes. The purpose of this R~\\&~D activity is the study of track-stub/preshower techniques in electron identification. Activities include the study of radiation tolerance for silicon pad counters of the preshower detector, with the associated development of fast, low-noise, radiation hard and low-power electronics readout for the counters. The final aim is the construction of a prototype detector capable of operating at LHC.

  1. The LHC's future, part 2: The High-Luminosity superconductor

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the HL-LHC project is to increase the total number of collisions of the LHC by a factor of 10 . Among the components to be upgraded are the interaction region quadrupole magnets in IP1 and IP5, which will implement a new superconducting technology based on Nb3Sn superconductor. This superconductor will allow reaching magnetic field of about 12 T, but it requires a complex fabrication process which includes heat treatment of the coils to about 650 C and vacuum impregnation with epoxy. In the Superconducting Model Magnets Laboratory (building 927), the Magnet, Superconductors and Cryostats (MSC) group is currently fabricating short models of the final Nb3Sn LHL-LHC quadrupole magnet to verify the magnet design and define fabrication and assembly procedures

  2. News from CERN, LHC Status and Strategy for Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the latest development at CERN, concentrating on the status of the LHC and the strategy for future linear colliders. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy as well as upgrades to the LHC (luminosity and energy) and to its injectors. This may be complemented by a linear electron-positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and by the International Linear Collider and/or by a high-energy electron-proton collider. This contribution describes the various future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward.

  3. Constraints on sneutrino dark matter from LHC Run 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arina, Chiara [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris,98bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); GRAPPA Institute, University of Amsterdam,Science Park 904, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands); Catalan, Maria Eugenia Cabrera [GRAPPA Institute, University of Amsterdam,Science Park 904, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands); Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo,São Paulo (Brazil); Instituto de Física Teórica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, UniversityA.M. Cantoblanco,28049 Madrid (Spain); Kraml, Sabine [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Université Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3,53 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38026 Grenoble (France); Kulkarni, Suchita; Laa, Ursula [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Université Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3,53 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38026 Grenoble (France); Institut für Hochenergiephysik, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften,Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Wien (Austria)

    2015-05-27

    A mostly right-handed sneutrino as the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is an interesting dark matter candidate, leading to LHC signatures which can be quite distinct from those of the conventional neutralino LSP. Using SMODELS v1.0.1 for testing the model against the limits published by ATLAS and CMS in the context of so-called Simplified Model Spectra (SMS), we investigate to what extent the supersymmetry searches at Run 1 of the LHC constrain the sneutrino-LSP scenario. Moreover, we discuss the most relevant topologies for which no SMS results are provided by the experimental collaborations but which would allow to put more stringent constraints on sneutrino LSPs. These include, for instance, the mono-lepton signature which should be particularly interesting to consider at Run 2 of the LHC.

  4. WISE An Adaptative Simulation of the LHC Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, P; Koutchouk, Jean-Pierre; Risselada, Thys; Sanfilippo, S; Todesco, E; Wildner, E

    2006-01-01

    The beam dynamics in LHC requires a tight control of the field quality and geometry of the magnets. As the production advances, decisions have to be made on the acceptance of possible imperfections. To ease decision making, an adaptative model of the LHC optics has been built, based on the information available on the day (e.g. magnetic measurements at warm or cold, magnet allocation to machine slots) as well as on statistical evaluations for the missing information (e.g. magnets yet to be built, measured, or for non-allocated slots). The uncertainties are included: relative and absolute measurement errors, warm-to-cold correlations for the fraction of magnets not measured at cold, hysteresis and power supply accuracy. The pre-processor WISE generates instances of the LHC field errors for the MAD-X program, with the possibility of selecting various sources. We present an application to estimate the expected beta-beating.

  5. Protection of the LHC against Unsynchronised Beam Aborts

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, B; Carlier, E; Uythoven, J; Wenninger, J; Weterings, W

    2006-01-01

    An unsynchronised beam abort in the LHC could damage downstream accelerator components, in particular the extraction septum magnets, the experimental low-beta triplet magnet apertures and the tertiary collimators. Although the LHC beam dumping system includes design features to minimise their frequency, such unsynchronised aborts cannot be excluded. A system of protection devices comprising fixed and moveable diluters and collimators will protect the downstream LHC aperture from the misdirected bunches in case of such a failure. The sources of unsynchronised aborts are described, together with the requirements and design of the protection devices and their expected performance. The accompanying operational requirements and envisaged solutions are discussed, in particular the problem of ensuring the local orbit at the protection devices.

  6. Study of Diffraction with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rafal, Staszewski; Royon, Christophe

    The thesis is devoted to the study of diffractive physics with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. After a short introduction to diffractive physics including soft and hard diffraction, we discuss diffractive exclusive production at the LHC whichis particularly interesting for Higgs and jet production. The QCD mechanism described by the Khoze Martin Ryskin and the CHIDe models are elucidated in detail. The uncertainties on these models are still large and a new possible exclusive jetmeasurement at the LHC will allow to reduce the uncertainty on diffarctive Higgs boson production to a factor 2 to 3. An additional measurement of exclusive pion production pp ! p_+_−p allows to constrain further exclusive model relying on theuse of the ALFA stations, which are used in the ATLAS Experiment for detection of protons scattered in elastic and diffractive interactions. In the last part of the thesis, the AFP detectors, aiming at measuring the protons scattered in diffractive interactions, are presented. They allow to exte...

  7. Physics validation of detector simulation tools for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Beringer, J

    2004-01-01

    Extensive studies aimed at validating the physics processes built into the detector simulation tools Geant4 and Fluka are in progress within all Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments, within the collaborations developing these tools, and within the LHC Computing Grid (LCG) Simulation Physics Validation Project, which has become the primary forum for these activities. This work includes detailed comparisons with test beam data, as well as benchmark studies of simple geometries and materials with single incident particles of various energies for which experimental data is available. We give an overview of these validation activities with emphasis on the latest results.

  8. Highlights of the SM Physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Haijun; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    This talk shows the recent highlights of the SM physics from the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC. It includes the precision measurements of diboson, triboson, vector boson scattering, and indirect search for new physics via anomalous triple/quartic gauge boson couplings etc. Some latest results from LHC Run2 @ 13 TeV will also be presented. The talk was invited to present at the 5th KIAS Workshop on Particle Physics and Cosmology in Seoul on November 9-13, 2015.

  9. Commissioning and First Performance of the LHC Beam Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, O R

    2010-01-01

    This paper will outline the progress with LHC commissioning to date, detailing the performance achieved with all the main LHC beam instrumentation systems. It will include an overview of the beam loss system and its role in machine protection, along with that of the beam position system and its use for automatic orbit control. Results will be shown from the highly sensitive base band tune system as well as the bunch-bybunch and DC beam current transformer systems, the synchrotron light monitoring systems, the wire scanner system and OTR screens.

  10. Top quark physics from run 1 of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Onofre, Antonio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Top quark physics from run 1 of the LHC (plenary) The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle and understanding it is key to verifying the Standard Model of particle physics. Selected results on top quark physics from run 1 of the LHC are reviewed. They include precision cross­section measurements, measurements of the mass of the top quark and detailed studies of the properties of the top quark. Finally, the importance of top in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model is also reviewed.

  11. Heavy meson fragmentation at LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Gomshi Nobary

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available   Large Hadron Collider (LHC at CERN will provide excellent opportunity to study the production and decay of heavy mesons and baryons with high statistics. We aim at the heavy mesons in this work and calculate their fragmentation functions consistent with this machine and present their total fragmentation probabilities and average fragmentation parameters.

  12. LHC Availability 2016: Proton Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Benjamin; Apollonio, Andrea; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    This document summarises the LHC machine availability for the period of Restart to Technical Stop 3 (TS3) in 2016. This covers the whole proton physics production period of 2016. This note has been produced and ratified by the Availability Working Group which has complied fault information for the period in question using the Accelerator Fault Tracker.

  13. SPS in training for LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 8 and 9 September the new beam extraction system of the SPS and the downstream transfer line were successfully commissioned and tested. Using this extraction, a beam will be sent towards LHC in 2004 and to the CNGS facility in 2006.

  14. Post-LHC accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourlay, Stephen A.

    2001-06-10

    The design and practicality of future accelerators, such as hadron colliders and neutrino factories being considered to supercede the LHC, will depend greatly on the choice of superconducting magnets. Various possibilities will be reviewed and discussed, taking into account recent progress and projected improvements in magnet design and conductor development along with the recommendations from the 2001 Snowmass workshop.

  15. Dark Matter Searches at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Terashi, Koji; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This talk will present dark matter searches at the LHC in the PIC2017 conference. The main emphasis is placed on the direct dark matter searches while the interpretation of searches for SUSY and invisible Higgs signals for the dark matter is also presented.

  16. Replacing magnets at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    LHC, LSI2, Point 4

    2013-01-01

    CERN engineers have been working through the night this week to move the final replacement dipole magnets into position on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Though there are several still to go, the teams expect to have completed the task by the end of this month. Dipole magnets bend the paths of particles as they travel around the circular accelerator. Of the LHC's 1232 dipoles – each 15 metres long and weighing 35 tonnes – 15 are being replaced as part of the long shutdown of CERN's accelerator complex. These 15 magnets suffered wear and tear during the LHC's first 4-year run. Three quadrupole-magnet assemblies – which help to focus particles into a tight beam – have also been replaced. Moving such heavy magnets requires specially adapted cranes and trailers both above and below ground. There are several access points on the LHC. Some, such as the 100-metre vertical access shaft down to the ALICE experiment, are equipped with lifts to allow technical personnel and visitors down to the caverns. Other ...

  17. LHC Report: focus on luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes Alemany Fernandez for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    The intensity ramp-up of the LHC beams resumed last Friday after the main powering system of the PS accelerator was put back in service.    The image above shows the last twenty four hours of fill #4947 in the machine. The LHC operations team kept the beams of this fill in the machine for a record 35 and a half hours.  Beams are back in the LHC. On Friday, the accelerator resumed the intensity ramp-up, reaching 1752 bunches per beam last week-end. The intensity ramp-up was interrupted on 20 May because of a problem with the PS’s main power supply (see box). A steady increase in the total number of bunches per beam is required to check out all aspects of beam operation and make sure the LHC is fully safe before the nominal number of bunches per beam can be brought into collision. At present, four intensity steps have been completed: 313, 601, 889, and 1177 bunches per beam. The qualification of the next step with 1752 bunches is in progress. At every s...

  18. The LHC ring lit up

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez; Adrien Billet

    2004-01-01

    On the date of CERN's 50th Anniversary, 29 September 2004, the Organization's Host State authorities gave the Laboratory a gift of light. As night fell, 24 powerful floodlights blazed into the night sky from the eight access points to the future LHC. (View from Mourex, France)

  19. A table-top LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Warmbein

    2011-01-01

    Many years ago, when ATLAS was no more than a huge empty underground cavern and Russian artillery shell casings were being melted down to become part of the CMS calorimetry system, science photographer Peter Ginter started documenting the LHC’s progress. He was there when special convoys of equipment crossed the Jura at night, when cranes were lowering down detector slices and magnet coils were being wound in workshops. Some 18 years of LHC history have been documented by Ginter, and the result has just come out as a massive coffee table book full of double-page spreads of Ginter’s impressive images.   The new coffee table book, LHC: the Large Hadron Collider. Published by the Austrian publisher Edition Lammerhuber in cooperation with CERN and UNESCO Publishing, LHC: the Large Hadron Collider is an unusual piece in the company’s portfolio. As the publisher’s first science book, LHC: the Large Hadron Collider weighs close to five kilos and comes in a s...

  20. ELECTRONICS FOR CALORIMETERS AT LHC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RADEKA,V.

    2001-09-11

    Some principal design features of front-end electronics for calorimeters in experiments at the LHC will be highlighted. Some concerns arising in the transition from the research and development and design phase to the construction will be discussed. Future challenges will be indicated.