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Sample records for leukemia group palg

  1. Addition of cladribine to the standard induction treatment improves outcomes in a subset of elderly acute myeloid leukemia patients. Results of a randomized Polish Adult Leukemia Group (PALG) phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, Agnieszka; Robak, Tadeusz; Wrzesien-Kus, Agata; Katarzyna Budziszewska, Bozena; Sulek, Kazimierz; Wawrzyniak, Ewa; Czemerska, Magdalena; Zwolinska, Malgorzata; Golos, Aleksandra; Holowiecka-Goral, Aleksandra; Kyrcz-Krzemien, Slawomira; Piszcz, Jaroslaw; Kloczko, Janusz; Mordak-Domagala, Monika; Lange, Andrzej; Razny, Małgorzata; Madry, Krzysztof; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw; Grosicki, Sebastian; Butrym, Aleksandra; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Holowiecki, Jerzy; Giebel, Sebastian; Szydlo, Richard; Wierzbowska, Agnieszka

    2017-04-01

    Intensive induction chemotherapy using anthracycline and cytarabine backbone is considered the most effective upfront therapy in physically fit older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, outcomes of the standard induction in elderly AML are inferior to those observed in younger patients, and they are still unsatisfactory. As addition of cladribine to the standard induction therapy is known to improve outcome in younger AML patients. The present randomized phase II study compares efficacy and toxicity of the DAC (daunorubicin plus cytarabine plus cladribine) regimen with the standard DA (daunorubicin plus cytarabine) regimen in the newly diagnosed AML patients over 60 years of age. A total of 171 patients were enrolled in the study (DA, 86; DAC, 85). A trend toward higher complete remission (CR) was observed in the DAC arm compared to the DA arm (44% vs. 34%; P = .19), which did not lead to improved median overall survival, which in the case of the DAC group was 8.6 months compared to in 9.1 months in the DA group (P = .64). However, DAC appeared to be superior in the group of patients aged 60-65 (CR rate: DAC 51% vs. DA 29%; P = .02). What is more, a subgroup of patients, with good and intermediate karyotypes, benefited from addition of cladribine also in terms of overall survival (P = .02). No differences in hematological and nonhematological toxicity between the DA and DAC regimens were observed.

  2. Immune thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with cladribine-based regiments or chlorambucil--follow-up of PALG-CLL randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonski, Jerzy Z; Robak, Tadeusz; Chojnowski, Krzysztof; Gora-Tybor, Joanna; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Ceglarek, Bernadetta; Seferynska, Ilona; Calbecka, Malgorzata; Kostyra, Aleksandra; Stella-Holowiecka, Beata; Kloczko, Janusz; Dmoszynska, Anna; Kowal, Malgorzata; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Dwilewicz-Trojaczek, Jadwiga; Wiater, Elzbieta; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Potoczek, Stanislaw; Hellmann, Andrzej; Mital, Andrzej; Skotnicki, Aleksander; Nowak, Wieslaw; Sulek, Kazimierz; Zawilska, Krystyna; Trelinski, Jacek

    2013-07-01

    The relationship between treatments of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with cladribine (2-CdA) or chlorambucil and immune thrombocytopenia (IT) has not been yet determined. The records of 777 patients in two randomized Polish Adult Leukemia Group (PALG)-CLL programs treated with these agents were retrospectively analyzed. Immune thrombocytopenia occurred in 55 of 777 (7.1%) patients. No significant differences in IT prevalence were seen between patients on chlorambucil or 2-CdA-based regiments (P = 0.33). IT developed at a median time of 0.499 yr (0.06-4.8) from the start of CLL therapy. This time was significantly longer in patients treated with chlorambucil (2.03 yr, 95% CI: 0.06-4.22) in relation to patients treated with 2-CdA-based regiments (0.52 yr, 95%CI: 0.34-0.69, P = 0.049). Overall survival (OS) of patients with IT and those without IT were similar (2.65 yr vs. 3.2 yr P = 0.23) but the severity of bleeding was more pronounced in the 2-CdA group. The responses to IT therapy were 35%, 54% and 75% for steroids, chemotherapy and splenectomy, respectively. In this study, an unexpectedly high percentage of IT incidence was demonstrated in patients with CLL requiring chemotherapy. Although no marked differences were seen in IT frequency in patients treated with 2-CdA-based regiments compared to chlorambucil regimen, the clinical course of hemorrhagic diathesis was more severe in 2-CdA group. Also, the time elapsed from study screening to IT diagnosis was significantly shorter in the 2-CdA group than in the chlorambucil group suggesting a causative relationship. The appearance of IT did not influence the median time of OS. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Elias seilab Eesti rannale / Piia Palge-Lepik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Palge-Lepik, Piia

    2008-01-01

    Tutvustus: Elias : väike päästekaater / teksti autorid Espen Fyksen ja Oyvind Rune Stalen ; põhineb Alf Knutseni ja Sigurd Slattebrekki algupärandil ; pildid joonistanud Olav Asland ; [norra keelest tõlkinud Piia Palge-Lepik]. Tallinn : Ilo, 2008

  4. Elias seilab Eesti rannale / Piia Palge-Lepik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Palge-Lepik, Piia

    2008-01-01

    Tutvustus: Elias : väike päästekaater / teksti autorid Espen Fyksen ja Oyvind Rune Stalen ; põhineb Alf Knutseni ja Sigurd Slattebrekki algupärandil ; pildid joonistanud Olav Asland ; [norra keelest tõlkinud Piia Palge-Lepik]. Tallinn : Ilo, 2008

  5. Blood group change in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Rakul K.; Prakash, N. P.; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    2017-01-01

    Blood group antigens are either sugars or proteins found attached to the red blood cell membrane. ABO blood group antigens are the most clinically important antigens because they are the most immunogenic. As red blood cell antigens are inherited traits, they are usually not altered throughout the life of an individual. There have been occasional case reports of ABO blood group antigen change in malignant conditions. We report two such cases of ABO antigen alteration associated with acute myeloid leukemia. These patients had suppression of their blood group antigens during their leukemic phase, and the antigens were reexpressed when the patients attained remission.

  6. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower part of the spinal column, after a small area on the lower back is numbed. These treatments are given in addition to treatment that is used to kill leukemia cells in the rest of the body. All children ...

  7. Relationship between ABO blood group and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavasolian, F; Abdollahi, E; Vakili, M; Amini, A

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) constitute a family of genetically heterogeneous lymphoid neoplasms derived from B- and T-lymphoid progenitors. ALL affects both children and adults. Diagnosis is based on morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features that allow differentiation from normal progenitors and other hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic neoplasms. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between ALL and ABO blood group. This is a case-control study that was carried out in Amir Oncology Hospital in Shiraz during 2011 to2013. The case group consisted of 293 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. And compared with 300 subject in control group ( the age in the case group was between 2-5 year, and the age in the control group was between 2-45 year) .Statistical analyzes was done performed by chi -square test. The results was considered significant when p value ABO blood group distribution was 82(A), 59 (B), 24 (AB) and 128(O) in patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and the blood group of 300 participants in the control group include, 63% (25) A, 69% (25.6) B, 18 % 06.8) AB and 101% (42.6) O. The ABO blood group distribution showed that there is significant differences between ABO blood group and patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia . This study showed significant association between ALL and ABO blood group and showed that blood group AB was associated with a higher risk of All (p value<0.001).

  8. [Myelogenous leukemia in children. ANLL9205 study by Children's Cancer and Leukemia Study Group (CCLSG)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimaya, J; Horikoshi, Y; Shimizu, H; Maeda, H; Koizumi, S; Kawakami, K; Watanabe, A; Utsumi, J; Kikuta, A; Oka, T; Mugishima, H; Kawamura, N; Gushiken, T; Ohta, S; Yamamura, Y; Ishida, Y; Sekine, I; Okada, N; Fujimoto, T

    1997-02-01

    Treatment results were evaluated in 45 children with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) treated on the ANLL-9205 protocol of the Children's Cancer Leukemia Study Group (CCLSG, Japan). In this protocol, terarubicin (THP-ADR), vincristine and continuous infusion of cytosine arabinoside (Ara C) were applied for remission induction therapy (AVC), and VP16+ high dose Ara C were used sequentially for 32 or 48 weeks. Eleven patients received stem cell transplantation. Thirty-eight out of the 43 eligible patients (88.4%) achieved complete remission, and the overall 3-year event-free survival (EFS) was 55.6% (S.E.,10%). This favorable response was attributed mainly to the high induction rate of patients with the M5, M7 FAB subtypes and higher WBC counts (> or = 10 x 10(9)/L). There was no difference in the 3-year EFS of these patients who discontinued treatment between 32 weeks and 48 weeks. Serious toxicities were not observed in this study. These findings suggest that the ANLL-9205 protocol is an effective and safe treatment regimen for childhood AML. When comparing the treatment period of 32 or 48 weeks, the difference was not statistically significant.

  9. PALG METAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is a routine scheduled observation and is the primary observation code used in the United States to satisfy requirements for reporting surface meteorological...

  10. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... Chronic myelogenous leukemia is grouped into phases: Chronic Accelerated Blast crisis The chronic phase can last for ...

  11. Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  12. Association of acute myeloid leukemia's most immature phenotype with risk groups and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Jonathan M; Zeidner, Joshua F; Morse, Sarah; Blackford, Amanda L; Perkins, Brandy; Yanagisawa, Breann; Zhang, Hao; Morsberger, Laura; Karp, Judith; Ning, Yi; Gocke, Christopher D; Rosner, Gary L; Smith, B Douglas; Jones, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    The precise phenotype and biology of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells remain controversial, in part because the "gold standard" immunodeficient mouse engraftment assay fails in a significant fraction of patients and identifies multiple cell-types in others. We sought to analyze the clinical utility of a novel assay for putative leukemia stem cells in a large prospective cohort. The leukemic clone's most primitive hematopoietic cellular phenotype was prospectively identified in 109 newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia patients, and analyzed against clinical risk groups and outcomes. Most (80/109) patients harbored CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells. The CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells in 47 of the 80 patients displayed intermediate aldehyde dehydrogenase expression, while normal CD34(+)CD38(-) hematopoietic stem cells expressed high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase. In the other 33/80 patients, the CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells exhibited high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and most (28/33, 85%) harbored poor-risk cytogenetics or FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem translocations. No CD34(+) leukemia cells could be detected in 28/109 patients, including 14/21 patients with nucleophosmin-1 mutations and 6/7 acute promyelocytic leukemia patients. The patients with CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity manifested a significantly lower complete remission rate, as well as poorer event-free and overall survivals. The leukemic clone's most immature phenotype was heterogeneous with respect to CD34, CD38, and ALDH expression, but correlated with acute myeloid leukemia risk groups and outcomes. The strong clinical correlations suggest that the most immature phenotype detectable in the leukemia might serve as a biomarker for "clinically-relevant" leukemia stem cells. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01349972. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  13. Supportive care for children with acute leukemia - Report of a survey on supportive care by the Dutch Childhood Leukemia Study Group. Part I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, A; Van Leeuwen, EF; Gerritsen, EJA; Roord, JJ; De vries-Hospers, HG

    1998-01-01

    The Dutch Childhood Leukemia Study Group celebrated its 20th anniversary by conducting a nationwide survey on supportive care for children with leukemia. Pediatricians were asked about daily practice and current perceptions with regard to supportive care. The results are discussed and compared to re

  14. Response of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients to COAP-splenectomy. A Southwest Oncology Group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, J P; Waddell, C C; Coltman, C A; Morrison, F S; Stephens, R L; Balcerzak, S P; Baker, L H; Chen, T T

    1984-11-01

    Eighty-seven patients from 18 institutions with a confirmed diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia were registered on a Southwest Oncology Group protocol for multiagent induction and single-agent maintenance chemotherapy, with randomization to an immunotherapy arm. Elective surgical splenectomy was performed for 42 patients at the completion of 3 months of induction therapy. Final analysis of the study revealed statistically significant survival advantages were correlated with age, splenectomy, the absence of hepatic leukemic infiltrate at the time of splenectomy, and race.

  15. Loss of blood group A in acute leukemia. Morphologic and biochemical studies of red cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, J B; Tanley, P C; Wallas, C H

    1987-01-01

    A patient with blood type A had acute myelomonocytic leukemia; his red cells (RBCs) typed as O and his serum had anti-B. RBC membranes were isolated from the patient as well as from controls with group A and O red cells. The membranes were incubated with uridine diphosphate (UDP)-N-acetyl-D-14C galactosamine in plasma from the patient and controls with group A and O red cells. RBC membranes from the patient behaved normally in that they incorporated the terminal carbohydrate responsible for blood group A activity. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the patient's RBCs had striking morphologic changes, with marked crenation and numerous knisocytes and dacryocytes. It was concluded that loss of the A antigen in this patient was not due to an abnormality of the enzyme required to convert H substance to A substance. It was postulated that weakening of the A antigen in some patients with leukemia may be related to a steric modification associated with abnormal red cell morphology.

  16. Association of acute myeloid leukemia's most immature phenotype with risk groups and outcomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerber, Jonathan M; Zeidner, Joshua F; Morse, Sarah; Blackford, Amanda L; Perkins, Brandy; Yanagisawa, Breann; Zhang, Hao; Morsberger, Laura; Karp, Judith; Ning, Yi; Gocke, Christopher D; Rosner, Gary L; Smith, B Douglas; Jones, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The precise phenotype and biology of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells remain controversial, in part because the "gold standard" immunodeficient mouse engraftment assay fails in a significant fraction...

  17. Mus cervicolor murine leukemia virus isolate M813 belongs to a unique receptor interference group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prassolov, V; Hein, S; Ziegler, M; Ivanov, D; Münk, C; Löhler, J; Stocking, C

    2001-05-01

    Murine leukemia virus (MuLV) M813 was originally isolated from the Southeast Asian rodent Mus cervicolor. As with the ecotropic MuLVs derived from Mus musculus, its host range is limited to rodent cells. Earlier studies have mapped its receptor to chromosome 2, but it has not been established whether M813 shares a common receptor with any other MuLVs. In this study, we have performed interference assays with M813 and viruses from four interference groups of MuLV. The infection efficiency of M813 was not compromised in cells expressing any one of the other MuLVs, demonstrating that M813 must use a distinct receptor for cell entry. The entire M813 env coding region was molecularly cloned. Sequence analysis revealed high similarity with other MuLVs but with a unique receptor-binding domain. Substitution of M813 env sequences in Moloney MuLV resulted in a replication-competent virus with a host range and interference profile similar to those of the biological clone M813. M813 thus defines a novel receptor interference group of type C MuLVs.

  18. Long-term results in the treatment of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia: a Pediatric Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischer, J P; Steuber, C P; Vietti, T J; Culbert, S J; Ragab, A H; Morgan, S K; Berry, D H; Hvizdala, E; Thomas, P J; Land, V J

    1989-01-01

    Complete remission (CR), 5-year remission duration (RD), and overall 5-year survival rates are 74%, 28% and 25%, respectively, for previously untreated children with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia diagnosed between 1977 and 1981, following induction therapy with vincristine, doxorubicin and prednisone (VAP), consolidation therapy with 6-thioguanine, cytosine arabinoside (TA) and cyclophosphamide/vincristine/cytosine arabinoside/prednisone (COAP), and maintenance therapy of alternating TA and COAP with or without VAP pulses. Approximately 20% are free of their disease for more than 5 years. High white blood cell counts (WBC) at diagnosis and M3 and M6 morphology were associated with lower CR rates, while M5 morphology was associated with higher CR rates. Patients with M1 morphology had shorter remission duration as compared to those with M4 or M5 morphology. Low WBC and age between 2 and 10 years at diagnosis were associated with longer remission durations and survival. Patients with M4 morphology also survived longer. The observed CR rates are comparable to other studies initiated at the same time as this study but survival is less than those reported more recently. Low WBC at diagnosis and M4/M5 morphology may identify relatively favorable prognostic groups.

  19. Dexamethasone compared to prednisolone for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma: final results of the ALL-4 randomized, phase III trial of the EORTC Leukemia Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labar, Boris; Suciu, Stefan; Willemze, Roel; Muus, Petra; Marie, Jean-Pierre; Fillet, Georges; Berneman, Zwi; Jaksic, Branimir; Feremans, Walter; Bron, Dominique; Sinnige, Harm; Mistrik, Martin; Vreugdenhil, Gerard; De Bock, Robrecht; Nemet, Damir; Gilotay, Caroline; Amadori, Sergio; de Witte, Theo

    2010-01-01

    Background Corticosteroids are a standard component of the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoblastic lymphoma. Our aim was to determine whether dexamethasone results in a better outcome than prednisolone. Design and Methods Adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma were randomized to receive, as part of their induction therapy on days 1–8 and 15–22, either dexamethasone 8 mg/m2 or prednisolone 60 mg/m2. Those who reached complete remission were given two courses of consolidation therapy with high-dose cytarabine and mitoxantrone and methotrexate and asparaginase. Subsequently patients younger than 50 years, with a suitable donor, were to undergo allogeneic stem cell transplantation, whereas the others were planned to receive either an autologous stem cell transplant or high-dose maintenance chemotherapy with prophylactic central nervous system irradiation. Randomization was done with a minimization technique. The primary endpoint was event-free survival and the analyses was conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Results Between August 1995 and October 2003, 325 patients between 15 to 72 years of age were randomized to receive either dexamethasone (163 patients) or prednisolone (162 patients). After induction and the course of first consolidation therapy, 131 (80.4%) patients in the dexamethasone group and 124 (76.5%) in the prednisolone group achieved complete remission. No significant difference was observed between the two treatment groups with regards to 6-year event-free survival rates (±SE) which were 25.9% (3.6%) and 28.7% (3.5%) in the dexamethasone and prednisolone groups, respectively (P=0.82, hazard ratio 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.75–1.25). Disease-free survival after complete remission was also similar in the dexamethasone and prednisolone groups, the 6-year rates being 32.3% and 37.5%, respectively (hazard ratio 1.03; 95% confidence interval 0.76–1.40). The 6-year cumulative

  20. Assessment of corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis in children undergoing chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a report from the Japanese Childhood Cancer and Leukemia Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyakuna, Nobuyuki; Shimomura, Yasuto; Watanabe, Arata; Taga, Takashi; Kikuta, Atsushi; Matsushita, Takeji; Kogawa, Kazuhiro; Kawakami, Chihiro; Horikoshi, Yasuo; Iwai, Tsuyako; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Tsurusawa, Masahito; Asami, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    Steroid-induced osteonecrosis (ON) is a challenging complication encountered during modern chemotherapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We retrospectively assessed the incidence of ON and its risk factors in a total of 1095 patients enrolled in 3 consecutive Japanese Children's Cancer and Leukemia Study Group ALL studies (ALL941 [1994 to 2000], n=464; ALL2000 [2000 to 2004], n=305; and ALL2004 [2004 to 2010], n=326). ON was diagnosed in 16 patients, of whom 15 were symptomatic. The cumulative incidence of ON was 0.76% in ALL941, 0.35% in ALL2000, and 3.6% in ALL2004. The incidence of ON in ALL941/2000, in which only prednisolone was administered as a steroid, was significantly lower than that in ALL2004, in which dexamethasone was used as a partial substitute for prednisolone (P<0.01). In ALL2004, sex and age were significantly correlated with the incidence of ON (1.3% in boys vs. 6.7% in girls, P=0.0132; 0.42% for age <10 y vs. 15.6% for age ≥10 y, P<0.0001), suggesting that girls aged 10 years and above are at a greater risk of ON onset. These results indicate that the risk of ON should be considered when administering dexamethasone as part of ALL protocol treatment in girls aged 10 years and above.

  1. The cancer and leukemia group B oncology nursing committee (1983-2006): a history of passion, commitment, challenge, and accomplishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ellen Lavoie; Skosey, Consuelo; Armer, Jane; Berg, Deborah; Cirrincione, Constance; Henggeler, Mary

    2006-06-01

    The Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Oncology Nursing Committee (ONC) was initially established in 1983 as a working group with the specific aim of promoting protocol compliance through collaboration, communication, and education to enhance the scientific goals of the Group. Due to the efforts of its members, the committee gained full committee status. ONC members now serve as principal investigators and coinvestigators on research studies, continue to sponsor biannual educational sessions individually and in concert with other CALGB committees, and continue to develop tools to enlighten patients about their disease and the clinical trial process. The ONC, an administrative group of 12 members, provides leadership within CALGB. Although ONC members have always acted as liaisons to the disease and modality committees, three positions have recently been designated specifically for doctorally prepared nurse scientists. Since its inception, general nurse membership within the group has more than doubled to a total of more than 500 members.

  2. Lymphoblastic leukemia in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas Castrillo, Yaoska; Guevara González, José Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Acute Leukemia occurs mainly in age groups of children under 5 years and in elderly patients, however; can also be seen in women of reproductive age. The prevalence of adult acute leukemia in young pregnant women is very rare, one case in 75,000 pregnancies and only 28% of them correspond to Lymphoblastic Leukemia occurs. The association between Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia and pregnancy poses a complex situation where you should not take or delay treatment, but the use of antineoplastic drug c...

  3. Cancer and Leukemia Group B Pathology Committee guidelines for tissue microarray construction representing multicenter prospective clinical trial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimm, David L; Nielsen, Torsten O; Jewell, Scott D; Rohrer, Daniel C; Broadwater, Gloria; Waldman, Frederic; Mitchell, Kisha A; Singh, Baljit; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Frankel, Wendy L; Magliocco, Anthony M; Lara, Jonathan F; Hsi, Eric D; Bleiweiss, Ira J; Badve, Sunil S; Chen, Beiyun; Ravdin, Peter M; Schilsky, Richard L; Thor, Ann; Berry, Donald A

    2011-06-01

    Practice-changing evidence requires confirmation, preferably in multi-institutional clinical trials. The collection of tissue within such trials has enabled biomarker studies and evaluation of companion diagnostic tests. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) have become a standard approach in many cooperative oncology groups. A principal goal is to maximize the number of assays with this precious tissue. However, production strategies for these arrays have not been standardized, possibly decreasing the value of the study. In this article, members of the Cancer and Leukemia Group B Pathology Committee relay our experiences as array facility directors and propose guidelines regarding the production of high-quality TMAs for cooperative group studies. We also discuss statistical issues arising from having a proportion of patients available for TMAs and the possibility that patients with TMAs fail to represent the greater study population.

  4. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia: A study of 61 cases using World Health Organization and European Group for the Immunological Classification of Leukaemias criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Olga K; Seetharam, Mahesh; Ren, Li; Alizadeh, Ash; Arber, Daniel A

    2014-12-01

    The 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification system grouped bilineal and biphenotypic acute leukemias together under a new heading of mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL). The lineage-specific marker criteria have also changed for a diagnosis of MPAL. The goal of this study was to characterize clinical significance of this new group. Sixty-one patients diagnosed with MPAL using either European Group for the Immunological Classification of Leukaemias (EGIL) criteria or 2008 WHO criteria were included in this study. Sixteen patients (26%) diagnosed with acute biphenotypic leukemia using EGIL criteria did not fulfill 2008 WHO criteria for MPAL. Cytogenetic data were available for 32 patients, and the most common abnormality was t(9;22) (five of 32 cases). Clinical outcome data suggested that younger patients with MPAL (≤21 years) had better overall survival (OS) in both the EGIL and WHO groups (EGIL, P = .0403; WHO, P = .0601). Compared with 177 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), MPAL patients had better OS (P = .0003) and progression-free survival (P = .0001). However, no difference in OS between MPAL and 387 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia was present (P = .599). As defined by the 2008 WHO classification, fewer patients are now classified as having MPAL than with the EGIL criteria. In this study, patients with MPAL have a better clinical outcome compared with patients with AML. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  5. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia- Initiating Cells Require Polycomb Group Protein EZH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huafeng; Peng, Cong; Huang, Jialiang; Li, Bin E; Kim, Woojin; Smith, Elenoe C; Fujiwara, Yuko; Qi, Jun; Cheloni, Giulia; Das, Partha P; Nguyen, Minh; Li, Shaoguang; Bradner, James E; Orkin, Stuart H

    2016-11-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have revolutionized chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) management. Disease eradication, however, is hampered by innate resistance of leukemia-initiating cells (LIC) to TKI-induced killing, which also provides the basis for subsequent emergence of TKI-resistant mutants. We report that EZH2, the catalytic subunit of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2), is overexpressed in CML LICs and required for colony formation and survival and cell-cycle progression of CML cell lines. A critical role for EZH2 is supported by genetic studies in a mouse CML model. Inactivation of Ezh2 in conventional conditional mice and through CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing prevents initiation and maintenance of disease and survival of LICs, irrespective of BCR-ABL1 mutational status, and extends survival. Expression of the EZH2 homolog EZH1 is reduced in EZH2-deficient CML LICs, creating a scenario resembling complete loss of PRC2. EZH2 dependence of CML LICs raises prospects for improved therapy of TKI-resistant CML and/or eradication of disease by addition of EZH2 inhibitors. This work defines EZH2 as a selective vulnerability for CML cells and their LICs, regardless of BCR-ABL1 mutational status. Our findings provide an experimental rationale for improving disease eradication through judicious use of EZH2 inhibitors within the context of standard-of-care TKI therapy. Cancer Discov; 6(11); 1237-47. ©2016 AACR.See related article by Scott et al., p. 1248This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1197. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. An early thymic precursor phenotype predicts outcome exclusively in HOXA-overexpressing adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a Group for Research in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Jonathan; Marchand, Tony; Touzart, Aurore; Cieslak, Agata; Trinquand, Amélie; Sutton, Laurent; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Ifrah, Norbert; Hamel, Jean-François; Asnafi, Vahid

    2016-06-01

    Gene expression studies have consistently identified a HOXA-overexpressing cluster of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, but it is unclear whether these constitute a homogeneous clinical entity, and the biological consequences of HOXA overexpression have not been systematically examined. We characterized the biology and outcome of 55 HOXA-positive cases among 209 patients with adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia uniformly treated during the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL)-2003 and -2005 studies. HOXA-positive patients had markedly higher rates of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype (40.8% versus 14.5%, P=0.0004), chemoresistance (59.3% versus 40.8%, P=0.026) and positivity for minimal residual disease (48.5% versus 23.5%, P=0.01) than the HOXA-negative group. These differences were due to particularly high frequencies of chemoresistant early thymic precursor-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia in HOXA-positive cases harboring fusion oncoproteins that transactivate HOXA Strikingly, the presence of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype was associated with marked outcome differences within the HOXA-positive group (5-year overall survival 31.2% in HOXA-positive early thymic precursor versus 66.7% in HOXA-positive non-early thymic precursor, P=0.03), but not in HOXA-negative cases (5-year overall survival 74.2% in HOXA-negative early thymic precursor versus 57.2% in HOXA-negative non-early thymic precursor, P=0.44). Multivariate analysis further revealed that HOXA positivity independently affected event-free survival (P=0.053) and relapse risk (P=0.039) of chemoresistant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. These results show that the underlying mechanism of HOXA deregulation dictates the clinico-biological phenotype, and that the negative prognosis of early thymic precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia is exclusive to HOXA-positive patients, suggesting that early treatment intensification is currently

  7. Impact of cytogenetics on the outcome of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results of Southwest Oncology Group 9400 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullarkat, Vinod; Slovak, Marilyn L; Kopecky, Kenneth J; Forman, Stephen J; Appelbaum, Frederick R

    2008-03-01

    We examined the prognostic impact of cytogenetics on the outcome of 200 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients 15 to 65 years of age enrolled in Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG)-9400 study. Evaluable cytogenetics or fluorescence in situ hybridization studies were available in 140 (70%) patients. Four karyotype categories (normal [n = 31, 22%], t(9;22)/BCR/ABL1 [n = 36, 26%], other unfavorable [-7, +8, or 11q23 rearrangement, n = 19, 13%], and miscellaneous [n = 54, 39%]) and the biologically and clinically relevant ALL ploidy subgroups were prospectively defined. Overall survival (OS) decreased significantly with increasing age (P = .009) and varied with karyotype category (P cytogenetics as the most important prognostic factor in adult ALL. This trial was registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov as #NCT00002665.

  8. Deregulated expression of EVI1 defines a poor prognostic subset of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemias: A study of the German-Austrian Acute Myeloid Leukemia Study Group and the Dutch-Belgian-Swiss HOVON/SAKK Cooperative Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Gröschel (Stefan); R.F. Schlenk (Richard); J. Engelmann; V. Rockova (Veronika); V. Teleanu (Veronica); M.W.M. Kühn (Michael); K. Eiwen (Karina); C.A.J. Erpelinck (Claudia); M. Havermans (Marije); M. Lübbert (Michael); U. Germing (Ulrich); I.G.H. Schmidt-Wolf; H.B. Beverloo (Berna); G.J. Schuurhuis (Gerrit Jan); G.J. Ossenkoppele (Gert); B. Schlegelberger (Brigitte); L.F. Verdonck (Leo); E. Vellenga (Edo); G.E.G. Verhoef (Gregor); P. Vandenberghe (Peter); T. Pabst (Thomas); M. Bargetzi (Mario); J. Krauter; A. Ganser (Arnold); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); B. Löwenberg (Bob); K. Döhner (Konstanze); H. Döhner (Hartmut); H.R. Delwel (Ruud)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of ecotropic viral integration 1 gene (EVI1) overexpression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with MLL gene rearrangements. Patients and Methods: We identified 286 patients with AML with t(11q23) enrolled onto German-Austrian Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Central nervous system involvement in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia at diagnosis and/or at first relapse: results from the GET-LALA group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reman, Oumedaly; Pigneux, Arnaud; Huguet, Françoise; Vey, Norbert; Delannoy, André; Fegueux, Nathalie; de Botton, Stéphane; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Tournilhac, Olivier; Buzyn, Agnès; Charrin, Christiane; Boucheix, Claude; Gabert, Jean; Lhéritier, Véronique; Vernant, Jean-Paul; Fière, Denis; Dombret, Hervé; Thomas, Xavier

    2008-11-01

    Outcome of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with central nervous system (CNS) involvement is not clearly defined. We studied 104 patients presenting with CNS involvement at diagnosis among 1493 patients (7%) included into the LALA trials, and 109 patients presenting CNS disease at the time of first relapse among the 709 relapsing patients (15%). Eighty-seven patients (84%) with CNS leukemia at diagnosis achieved complete remission (CR). Fifty-three patients underwent stem cell transplantation (SCT): 25 allogeneic SCT, 28 autologous SCT, while 34 continued with chemotherapy alone. Seven-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 34% and 35%, respectively. There were no significant differences in terms of CR, OS and DFS among patients with CNS involvement at diagnosis and those without CNS disease. There were also no differences among the two groups regarding T lineage ALL, B lineage ALL, and among those who underwent SCT. After a first relapse, 38 patients with CNS recurrence (35%) achieved a second CR. The median OS was 6.3 months. Outcome was similar to that of relapsing patients without CNS disease. CNS leukemia in adult ALL is uncommon at diagnosis as well as at the time of first relapse. With intensification therapy, patients with CNS leukemia at diagnosis have a similar outcome than those who did not present with CNS involvement. CNS leukemia at first relapse remains of similar poor prognosis than all other adult ALL in first relapse.

  10. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Zixing; Wang Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To highlight the current understanding of mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL).Data sources We collected the relevant articles in PubMed (from 1985 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia","hybrid acute leukemia","biphenotypic acute leukemia",and "mixed lineage leukemia".We also collected the relevant studies in WanFang Data base (from 2000 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia" and "hybrid acute leukemia".Study selection We included all relevant studies concerning mixed phenotype acute leukemia in English and Chinese version,with no limitation of research design.The duplicated articles are excluded.Results MPAL is a rare subgroup of acute leukemia which expresses the myeloid and lymphoid markers simultaneously.The clinical manifestations of MPAL are similar to other acute leukemias.The World Health Organization classification and the European Group for Immunological classification of Leukaemias 1998 cdteria are most widely used.MPAL does not have a standard therapy regimen.Its treatment depends mostly on the patient's unique immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features,and also the experience of individual physician.The lack of effective treatment contributes to an undesirable prognosis.Conclusion Our understanding about MPAL is still limited.The diagnostic criteria have not been unified.The treatment of MPAL remains to be investigated.The prognostic factor is largely unclear yet.A better diagnostic cdteria and targeted therapeutics will improve the therapy effect and a subsequently better prognosis.

  11. Characterization of children with FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia: a report from the AIEOP AML-2002 study group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, E; Basso, G; Zampini, M; Buldini, B; Tregnago, C; Rondelli, R; Masetti, R; Bisio, V; Frison, M; Polato, K; Cazzaniga, G; Menna, G; Fagioli, F; Merli, P; Biondi, A; Pession, A; Locatelli, F; Pigazzi, M

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent molecular markers have been routinely used in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) for risk assessment at diagnosis, whereas their post-induction monitoring still represents a debated issue. We evaluated the prognostic value and biological impact of minimal residual disease (MRD) and of the allelic ratio (AR) of FLT3-internal-tandem duplication (ITD) in childhood AML. We retrospectively screened 494 children with de novo AML for FLT3-ITD mutation, identifying 54 harboring the mutation; 51% of them presented high ITD-AR at diagnosis and had worse event-free survival (EFS, 19.2 versus 63.5% for low ITD-AR, <0.05). Forty-one percent of children with high levels of MRD after the 1st induction course, measured by a patient-specific real-time-PCR, had worse EFS (22.2 versus 59.4% in low-MRD patients, P<0.05). Next, we correlated these parameters with gene expression, showing that patients with high ITD-AR or persistent MRD had characteristic expression profiles with deregulated genes involved in methylation and acetylation. Moreover, patients with high CyclinA1 expression presented an unfavorable EFS (20.3 versus 51.2% in low CyclinA1 group, P<0.01). Our results suggest that ITD-AR levels and molecular MRD should be considered in planning clinical management of FLT3-ITD patients. Different transcriptional activation of epigenetic and oncogenic profiles may explain variability in outcome among these patients, for whom novel therapeutic approaches are desirable.

  12. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children with Down syndrome: A retrospective analysis from the Ponte di Legno study group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.D. Buitenkamp (Trudy); S. Izraeli (Shai); M. Zimmermann (Martin); E. Forestier (Erik); N.A. Heerema (Nyla); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); R. Pieters (Rob); C.M. Korbijn (Carin); L.B. Silverman (Lewis); K. Schmiegelow (Kjeld); D.-C. Liang (Der-Cheng); K. Horibe (Keizo); M. Aricò (Maurizio); A. Biondi (Andrea); G. Basso (Giuseppe); K.R. Rabin (Karin); M. Schrappe (Martin); G. Cario (Gunnar); G. Mann (Georg); M. Morak (Maria); R. Panzer-Grümayer (Renate); V. Mondelaers (Veerle); T. Lammens (Tim); H. Cavé (Hèléne); B. Stark (Batia); I. Ganmore (Ithamar); A.V. Moorman (Anthony); A. Vora (Ajay); S.P. Hunger (Stephen); C.H. Pui (Ching-Hon); C.G. Mullighan (Charles); A. Manabe (Atsushi); G. Escherich (Gabriele); J.R. Kowalczyk (Jerzy R.); J.A. Whitlock (James); C.M. Zwaan (Michel)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractChildren with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk of B-cell precursor (BCP) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The prognostic factors and outcome of DS-ALL patients treated in contemporary protocols are uncertain. We studied 653 DS-ALL patients enrolled in 16 international trials

  13. Childhood Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fast growing type while chronic leukemia grows slowly. Children with leukemia usually have one of the acute types. Symptoms include Infections Fever Loss of appetite Tiredness Easy bruising or bleeding Swollen lymph nodes ...

  14. P-glycoprotein inhibition using valspodar (PSC-833) does not improve outcomes for patients younger than age 60 years with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia: Cancer and Leukemia Group B study 19808.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolitz, Jonathan E; George, Stephen L; Marcucci, Guido; Vij, Ravi; Powell, Bayard L; Allen, Steven L; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Shea, Thomas C; Stock, Wendy; Baer, Maria R; Hars, Vera; Maharry, Kati; Hoke, Eva; Vardiman, James W; Bloomfield, Clara D; Larson, Richard A

    2010-09-01

    Cancer and Leukemia Group B 19808 (CALGB 19808) is the only randomized trial of a second-generation P-glycoprotein (Pgp) modulator in untreated patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) younger than age 60 years. We randomly assigned 302 patients to receive induction chemotherapy regimens consisting of cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C; A), daunorubicin (D), and etoposide (E), without (ADE) or with (ADEP) PSC-833 (P). The incidence of complete remission was 75% with both regimens. Reversible grade 3 and 4 liver and mucosal toxicities were significantly more common with ADEP. Therapy-related mortality was 7% and did not differ by induction arm. Excess cardiotoxicity was not seen with high doses of D in ADE. The median disease-free survival was 1.34 years in the ADE arm and 1.09 years in the ADEP arm (P = .74, log-rank test); the median overall survival was 1.86 years in the ADE arm and 1.69 years in the ADEP arm (P = .82). There was no evidence of a treatment difference within any identifiable patient subgroup. Inhibition of Pgp-mediated drug efflux by PSC-833 did not improve clinical outcomes in younger patients with untreated AML. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00006363.

  15. Phenotype in combination with genotype improves outcome prediction in acute myeloid leukemia: a report from Children's Oncology Group protocol AAML0531.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Andrew P; Eidenschink Brodersen, Lisa; Alonzo, Todd A; Gerbing, Robert B; Menssen, Andrew J; Wilson, Elisabeth R; Kahwash, Samir; Raimondi, Susana C; Hirsch, Betsy A; Gamis, Alan S; Meshinchi, Soheil; Wells, Denise A; Loken, Michael R

    2017-09-07

    Diagnostic biomarkers can be used to determine relapse risk in acute myeloid leukemia, and certain genetic aberrancies have prognostic relevance. A diagnostic immunophenotypic expression profile, which quantifies the amounts of distinct gene products, not just their presence or absence, was established to improve outcome prediction for patients with acute myeloid leukemia. The immunophenotypic expression profile, which defines each patient's leukemia as a location in 15-dimensional space, was generated for 769 patients enrolled in the Children's Oncology Group AAML0531 protocol. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering grouped patients with similar immunophenotypic expression profiles into eleven patient cohorts, demonstrating high associations among phenotype, genotype, morphology, and outcome. Of 95 patients with inv(16), 79% segregated in Cluster A. Of 109 patients with t(8;21), 92% segregated in Clusters A and B. Of 152 patients with 11q23 alterations, 78% segregated in Clusters D, E, F, G, or H. For both inv(16) and 11q23 abnormalities, differential phenotypic expression identified patient groups with different survival characteristics (P<0.05). Clinical outcome analysis revealed that Cluster B (predominantly t(8;21)) was associated with favorable outcome (P<0.001) and Clusters E, G, H, and K were associated with adverse outcomes (P<0.05). Multivariable regression analysis revealed that Clusters E, G, H, and K were independently associated with worse survival (P range <0.001 to 0.008). The Children's Oncology Group AAML0531 trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00372593. Copyright © 2017, Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  16. Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia; Leukemia Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL); Leukemia Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL); Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

  17. Leukemia cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varuna Mallya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with leukemia may show involvement of the skin. This skin involvement can be due to infiltration of skin by leukemic cells or it may be a part of nonspecific cutaneous manifestations. Leukemia cutis is the infiltration of neoplastic leucocytes or their precursors into the skin resulting in extensive clinical manifestations. Described mostly in acute myeloid leukemia and acute myelocytic monocytic leukemia, it is rare in chronic myeloid leukemia and is seen mostly during the blast crises. Its presence signals poor prognosis.

  18. Treatment of children with early pre-B and pre-B acute lymphocytic leukemia with antimetabolite-based intensification regimens: a Pediatric Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M B; Shuster, J J; Pullen, J; Borowitz, M J; Carroll, A J; Behm, F G; Camitta, B; Land, V J

    2000-09-01

    Between May 1987 and January 1991, 1354 patients, 1-21 years old, with standard or poor prognosis B-lineage acute lymphocytic leukemia were treated on the Pediatric Oncology Group Study 8602. One thousand three hundred and twenty-three patients entered remission and 1051 patients were randomized on day 43 to an intensification regimen containing L-asparaginase and intermediate-dose methotrexate (regimen B) or cytarabine and intermediate dose methotrexate (regimen C). After completion of intensification at week 25, all patients received the same maintenance therapy until 3 years from diagnosis. Overall 5-year continuous complete remission (CCR) for regimen B was 72+/-2% (s.e.) and for regimen C, 73+/-2% (P = 0.72 by log-rank analysis). Significant differences between treatments for CCR, testicular, CNS relapses overall or with regard to phenotype (pre-B vs early pre-B), gender, or race were not detected. During intensification, regimen C had significantly more bacterial infections (P = 0.05) and days spent in the hospital (P intensification phase of therapy in children with B-lineage acute lymphocytic leukemia.

  19. Very late recurrences of leukemia: why does leukemia awake after many years of dormancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, Maxim; Uberti, Joseph P; Schiffer, Charles A

    2011-02-01

    We report a heterogeneous group of very late recurrences of leukemia occurring more than 10 years after initial treatment including 2 cases of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) which recurred after more than 20 years of remission, 2 cases of donor cell leukemia which developed more than 10 years after allograft for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and high risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and 2 cases of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) relapsing 13 and 17 years after allograft. Case descriptions are followed by a discussion regarding possible mechanisms leading to leukemia recurrence and a review of the literature. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prospective comparative study of bone marrow transplantation and postremission chemotherapy for childhood acute myelogenous leukemia. The Associazione Italiana Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica Cooperative Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadori, S; Testi, A M; Aricò, M; Comelli, A; Giuliano, M; Madon, E; Masera, G; Rondelli, R; Zanesco, L; Mandelli, F

    1993-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess the comparative values of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) with sequential postremission chemotherapy (SPC) in children with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in first remission. From March 1987 to March 1990, 161 assessable patients younger than 15 years of age with newly diagnosed AML were treated uniformly with two courses of daunorubicin and standard-dose cytarabine. After initial consolidation with a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and thioguanine (DAT), patients in complete remission (CR) were randomized to receive either ABMT or SPC, except for those with an HLA-matched sibling who were assigned to undergo BMT. SPC consisted of three additional courses of DAT, followed by three pairs of drugs administered sequentially for a total of six cycles. Overall, 127 of 161 patients attained CR (79%). The estimated probabilities of survival and event-free survival (EFS) at 5 years for all patients were 42% and 25%, respectively (median follow-up, 28 months). For the 127 complete responders, the 5-year probability of disease-free survival (DFS) was 31%, with a cumulative risk of relapse of 64%. For the purpose of this study, all complete responders were evaluated for analysis of disease outcome according to the intent-to-treat principle, regardless of whether they actually received the intended therapy. The 5-year DFS was 51% for the BMT group (n = 24), significantly higher (P = .03) than that observed for the other cohorts: 21% for ABMT (n = 35), 27% for SPC (n = 37), and 34% for a group of 31 nonrandomized (NR) patients. Bone marrow relapse was the most frequent cause of postremission failure in all therapeutic subgroups, including the BMT cohort, in which no deaths attributable to the toxicity of the procedure were recorded. The results of this study show that BMT is more effective than ABMT or SPC in preventing leukemia relapse and extending DFS duration in children

  1. THE DIFFERENTIATION SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA: EXPERIENCE OF THE PETHEMA GROUP AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Montesinos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation syndrome (DS, formerly known as retinoic acid syndrome, is the main life-threatening complication of therapy with differentiating agents (all-trans retinoic acid [ATRA] or arsenic trioxide [ATO] in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. The differentiation of leukemic blasts and promyelocytes induced by ATRA and/or ATO may lead to cellular migration, endothelial activation, and release of interleukins and vascular factors responsible of tissue damage. Roughly one quarter of patients with APL undergoing induction therapy will develop the DS, characterized by unexplained fever, acute respiratory distress with interstitial pulmonary infiltrates, and/or a vascular capillary leak syndrome leading to acute renal failure. Although the development of the DS, particularly of the severe form, is still associated with a significant increase in morbidity and mortality during induction, the early administration of high-dose dexamethasone at the onset of the first symptoms seems likely to have dramatically reduced the mortality rate of this complication. In this article, we will review the clinical features, incidence, prognostic factors, management, and outcome of the DS reported in the scientific literature. We will make focus in the experience of the three consecutive Programa Español de Tratamientos en Hematología trials (PETHEMA LPA96, LPA99, and LPA2005, in which more than one thousand patients were treated with ATRA plus idarubicin for induction.

  2. THE DIFFERENTIATION SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA: EXPERIENCE OF THE PETHEMA GROUP AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Montesinos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Differentiation syndrome (DS, formerly known as retinoic acid syndrome, is the main life-threatening complication of therapy with differentiating agents (all-trans retinoic acid [ATRA] or arsenic trioxide [ATO] in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. The differentiation of leukemic blasts and promyelocytes induced by ATRA and/or ATO may lead to cellular migration, endothelial activation, and release of interleukins and vascular factors responsible of tissue damage. Roughly one quarter of patients with APL undergoing induction therapy will develop the DS, characterized by unexplained fever, acute respiratory distress with interstitial pulmonary infiltrates, and/or a vascular capillary leak syndrome leading to acute renal failure. Although the development of the DS, particularly of the severe form, is still associated with a significant increase in morbidity and mortality during induction, the early administration of high-dose dexamethasone at the onset of the first symptoms seems likely to have dramatically reduced the mortality rate of this complication. In this article, we will review the clinical features, incidence, prognostic factors, management, and outcome of the DS reported in the scientific literature. We will make focus in the experience of the three consecutive Programa Español de Tratamientos en Hematología trials (PETHEMA LPA96, LPA99, and LPA2005, in which more than one thousand patients were treated with ATRA plus idarubicin for induction.

  3. Risk-adapted treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline monochemotherapy : long-term outcome of the LPA 99 multicenter study by the PETHEMA Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanz, Miguel A.; Montesinos, Pau; Vellenga, Edo; Rayon, Consuelo; de la Serna, Javier; Parody, Ricardo; Bergua, Juan M.; Leon, Angel; Negri, Silvia; Gonzalez, Marcos; Rivas, Concha; Esteve, Jordi; Milone, Gustavo; Gonzalez, Jose D.; Amutio, Elena; Brunet, Salut; Garcia-Larana, J.; Colomer, Dolors; Calasanz, Maria J.; Chillon, Carmen; Barragan, Eva; Bolufer, Pascual; Lowenberg, Bob

    2008-01-01

    A previous report of the Programa de Estudio y Tratamiento de las Hemopatias Malignas (PETHEMA) Group showed that a risk-adapted strategy combining all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and anthracycline monochemotherapy for induction and consolidation in newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia

  4. Risk-adapted treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline monochemotherapy : long-term outcome of the LPA 99 multicenter study by the PETHEMA Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanz, Miguel A.; Montesinos, Pau; Vellenga, Edo; Rayon, Consuelo; de la Serna, Javier; Parody, Ricardo; Bergua, Juan M.; Leon, Angel; Negri, Silvia; Gonzalez, Marcos; Rivas, Concha; Esteve, Jordi; Milone, Gustavo; Gonzalez, Jose D.; Amutio, Elena; Brunet, Salut; Garcia-Larana, J.; Colomer, Dolors; Calasanz, Maria J.; Chillon, Carmen; Barragan, Eva; Bolufer, Pascual; Lowenberg, Bob

    2008-01-01

    A previous report of the Programa de Estudio y Tratamiento de las Hemopatias Malignas (PETHEMA) Group showed that a risk-adapted strategy combining all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and anthracycline monochemotherapy for induction and consolidation in newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia result

  5. Molecular detection of minimal residual disease is a strong predictive factor of relapse in childhood B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with medium risk features. A case control study of the International BFM study group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biondi, A; Valsecchi, MG; Seriu, T; D'Aniello, E; Willemse, MJ; Fasching, K; Pannunzio, A; Gadner, H; Schrappe, M; Kamps, WA; Bartram, CR; van Dongen, JJM; Panzer-Grumayer, ER

    2000-01-01

    The medium-risk B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) accounts for 50-60% of total childhood ALL and comprises the largest number of relapses still unpredictable with diagnostic criteria. To evaluate the prognostic impact of minimal residual disease (MRD) in this specific group, a case

  6. The long-term outcome of reduced-intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a matched related or unrelated donor, or haploidentical family donor in patients with leukemia: a retrospective analysis of data from the China RIC Cooperative Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chang-Lin; Zheng-Dong; Qiao, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Jian-Min; Huang-He; Liang, Ying-Min; Wu, De-Pei; Chen, Bao-An; Bai-Hai; Shi, Bao-Fu; Sun, Wan-Jun; Qiao, Jun-Xiao; Guo, Mei; Qiao, Jian-Hui; Sun, Qi-Yun; Hu, Kai-Xun; Huang, Ya-Jing; Zuo, Hong-Li; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Ai, Hui-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    This study compared 6-year follow-up data from patients undergoing reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) transplantation with an HLA-matched related donor (MRD), an HLA-matched unrelated donor (MUD), or an HLA-haploidentical donor (HID) for leukemia. Four hundred and twenty-seven patients from the China RIC Cooperative Group were enrolled, including 301 in the MRD, 79 in the HID, and 47 in the MUD groups. The conditioning regimen involved fludarabine combined with anti-lymphocyte globulin and cyclophosphamide. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis was administered using cyclosporin A (CsA) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Four hundred and nineteen patients achieved stable donor chimerism. The incidence of stage II-IV acute GVHD in the HID group was 44.3 %, significantly higher than that in the MRD (23.6 %) and MUD (19.1 %) groups. The 1-year transplantation-related mortality (TRM) rates were 44.3, 17.6, and 21.3, respectively. Event-free survival (EFS) at 6 years in the HID group was 36.7 %, significantly lower than that of the MRD and MUD groups (59.1 and 66.0 %, P  0.05), respectively. RIC transplantation with MRD and MUD had similar outcome in leukemia which is better than that with HID. RIC transplantation with HID had lower relapsed with higher TRM and GVHD rate, particularly in advanced leukemias. RIC transplantation with MRD and MUD had similar outcomes in leukemia and they were better than those with HID. RIC transplantation with HID had a lower relapse rate but higher TRM and GVHD rates, particularly in cases of advanced leukemia.

  7. Leukemia cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angoori G Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia cutis is the infiltration of neoplastic leukocytes or their precursors into the epidermis, the dermis, or the subcutis, resulting in clinically identifiable cutaneous lesions. Leukemia cutis may follow, precede or occur concomitantly with the diagnosis of systemic leukemia. A 50-year-old woman presented with asymptomatic multiple cutaneous nodules all over the body of 4 months duration. Cutaneous examination showed multiple hyperpigmented nodules and plaques involving face, trunk, and extremities. Peripheral smear showed abnormally elevated leucocyte count (TLC-70,000 with abnormal cells: myeloblasts 40%, promyelocytes 8% and myelocytes 39%. Auer rods were present in few myeloblasts. Bone marrow aspiration showed increased cellularity, erythroid hyperplasia with megaloblastic change, increased myeloblasts with maturation arrest. Immunohistochemistry showed strongly positive myeloperoxidase infiltrating cells and negative for CD20 and CD3 consistent with the diagnosis of AML-M 2 with leukemia cutis. This case is reported for its rarity.

  8. Understanding Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... material presented in this publication Jane Liesveld, MD Professor, Department of Medicine, Hematology/Oncology Clinical Director, Blood ... of leukemia cell. The marrow has two main jobs. The first job is to form myeloid cells. ...

  9. Risk group assignment differs for children and adults 1-45 yr with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated by the NOPHO ALL-2008 protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Nina; Birgens, Henrik; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia is poorer in adults than in children. Studies have indicated that young adults benefit from pediatric treatment, although no upper age limit has been defined.......The prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia is poorer in adults than in children. Studies have indicated that young adults benefit from pediatric treatment, although no upper age limit has been defined....

  10. Daunorubicin Versus Mitoxantrone Versus Idarubicin As Induction and Consolidation Chemotherapy for Adults With Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The EORTC and GIMEMA Groups Study AML-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelli, Franco; Vignetti, Marco; Suciu, Stefan; Stasi, Roberto; Petti, Maria-Concetta; Meloni, Giovanna; Muus, Petra; Marmont, Filippo; Marie, Jean-Pierre; Labar, Boris; Thomas, Xavier; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Willemze, Roel; Liso, Vincenzo; Ferrara, Felicetto; Baila, Liliana; Fazi, Paola; Zittoun, Robert; Amadori, Sergio; de Witte, Theo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To compare the antitumor efficacy of three different anthracyclines in combination with cytarabine and etoposide in adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients and Methods We randomly assigned 2,157 patients (age range, 15 to 60 years) to receive intensive induction-consolidation chemotherapy containing either daunorubicin, idarubicin, or mitoxantrone. After achieving complete remission (CR), patients were assigned to undergo either allogeneic or autologous stem-cell transplantation (SCT), depending on the availability of a sibling donor. Results The overall CR rate (69%) was similar in the three groups. Autologous SCT was performed in 37% of cases in the daunorubicin arm versus only 29% and 31% in mitoxantrone and idarubicin, respectively (P < .001). However, the disease-free survival (DFS) and survival from CR were significantly shorter in the daunorubicin arm: the 5-year DFS was 29% versus 37% and 37% in mitoxantrone and idarubicin, respectively. The proportion of patients who underwent allogeneic SCT (22%) was equivalent in the three treatment groups, and the outcome was similar as well: the 5-year overall survival rates were 34%, 34%, and 31%, respectively. Conclusion In adult patients with AML who do not receive an allogeneic SCT, the use of mitoxantrone or idarubicin instead of daunorubicin enhances the long-term efficacy of chemotherapy. PMID:19826132

  11. A retrospective comparison of autologous and unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation in myelodysplastic syndrome and secondary acute myeloid leukemia: a report on behalf of the Chronic Leukemia Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Ali, H.K.; Brand, R.; Biezen, A. van; Finke, J.; Boogaerts, M.; Fauser, A.A.; Egeler, M.; Cahn, J.Y.; Arnold, R.; Biersack, H.; Niederwieser, D.; Witte, T.J.M. de

    2007-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an effective treatment for myelodysplasia (MDS) and secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML). In this study, outcome of 593 patients with MDS/sAML after autologous and allogeneic HCT from a matched unrelated donor (MUD) were compared. A total of 167 (28%) p

  12. Outcome of conditioning intensity in acute myeloid leukemia with monosomal karyotype in patients over 45 year-old : A study from the acute leukemia working party (ALWP) of the European group of blood and marrow transplantation (EBMT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poire, Xavier; Labopin, Myriam; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Volin, Liisa; Richard Espiga, Carlos; Veelken, J. Hendrik; Milpied, Noel; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Yacoub-Agha, Ibrahim; van Imhoff, Gustaaf W.; Michallet, Mauricette; Michaux, Lucienne; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia with monosomal karyotype (MK AML) carries a very poor prognosis, even after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). However, SCT remains the only curative option in this high-risk population. Because myeloablative conditioning regimen (MAC) is associated with less relapse,

  13. Clinical management of primary non-acute promyelocytic leukemia acute myeloid leukemia: Practice Guidelines by the Italian Society of Hematology, the Italian Society of Experimental Hematology, and the Italian Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, Enrica; Barosi, Giovanni; Bosi, Alberto; Ferrara, Felicetto; Locatelli, Franco; Marchetti, Monia; Martinelli, Giovanni; Mecucci, Cristina; Vignetti, Marco; Tura, Sante

    2009-01-01

    As many options are now available to treat patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia, the Italian Society of Hematology and two affiliated societies (SIES and GITMO) commissioned project to an Expert Panel aimed at developing clinical practice guidelines for acute myeloid leukemia treatment. After systematic comprehensive literature review, the Expert Panel formulated recommendations for the management of primary acute myeloid leukemia (with the exception of acute promyelocytic leukemia) and graded them according to the supporting evidence. When evidence was lacking, consensus-based statements have been added. First-line therapy for all newly diagnosed patients eligible for intensive treatment should include one cycle of induction with standard dose cytarabine and an anthracycline. After achieving complete remission, patients aged less than 60 years should receive consolidation therapy including high-dose cytarabine. Myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation from an HLA-compatible sibling should be performed in first complete remission: 1) in children with intermediate-high risk cytogenetics or who achieved first complete remission after the second course of therapy; 2) in adults less than 40 years with an intermediate-risk; in those aged less than 55 years with either high-risk cytogenetics or who achieved first complete remission after the second course of therapy. Stem cell transplantation from an unrelated donor is recommended to be performed in first complete remission in adults 30 years old or younger, and in children with very high-risk disease lacking a sibling donor. Alternative donor stem cell transplantation is an option in high-risk patients without a matched donor who urgently need transplantation. Patients aged less than 60 years, who either are not candidate for allogeneic stem cell transplantation or lack a donor, are candidates for autologous stem cell transplantation. We describe the results of a systematic literature review and an

  14. Induction of apoptosis in leukemia cell lines by new copper(II) complexes containing naphthyl groups via interaction with death receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Christiane; Horn, Adolfo; Lopes, Bruna F; Bull, Erika S; Azeredo, Nathália F B; Kanashiro, Milton M; Borges, Franz V; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Pires, Anderson B; Franco, Roberto W A; Almeida, João Carlos de A; Maciel, Leide L F; Resende, Jackson A L C; Schenk, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis, physico-chemical characterization and cytotoxicity of four new ligands and their respective copper(II) complexes toward two human leukemia cell lines (THP-1 and U937) are reported (i.e. [(HL1)Cu(μ-Cl)2Cu(HL1)]Cl2·H2O (1), [(H2L2)Cu(μ-Cl)2Cu(H2L2)]Cl2·5H2O (2), [(HL3)Cu(μ-Cl)2Cu(HL3)]Cl2·4H2O (3), [(H2L4)Cu(μ-Cl)2Cu(H2L4)]Cl2·6H2O (4)). Ligands HL1 and HL3 contain two pyridines, amine and alcohol moieties with a naphthyl pendant unit yielding a N3O coordination metal environment. Ligands H2L2 and H2L4 have pyridine, phenol, amine and alcohol groups with a naphthyl pendant unit providing a N2O2 coordination metal environment. These compounds are likely to be dinuclear in the solid state but form mononuclear species in solution. The complexes have an antiproliferative effect against both leukemia cell lines; complex (2) exhibits higher activity than cisplatin against U937 (8.20 vs 16.25μmoldm(-3)) and a comparable one against THP-1. These human neoplastic cells are also more susceptible than peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) toward the tested compounds. Using C57BL/6 mice an LD50 of 55mgkg(-1) was determined for complex (2), suggesting that this compound is almost four times less toxic than cisplatin (LD50=14.5mgkg(-1)). The mechanism of cell death promoted by ligand H2L2 and by complexes (2) and (4) was investigated by a range of techniques demonstrating that the apoptosis signal triggered at least by complex (2) starts from an extrinsic pathway involving the activation of caspases 4 and 8. This signal is amplified by mitochondria with the concomitant release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase 9.

  15. Gene expression profiles predictive of outcome and age in infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A Children's Oncology Group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Kang; C.S. Wilson (Carla); R. Harvey (R.); I.-M. Chen (I.-Ming); M.H. Murphy (Maurice); S.R. Atlas (Susan); E.J. Bedrick (Edward); M. Devidas (Meenakshi); A.J. Carroll; B.W. Robinson (Blaine); R.W. Stam (Ronald); M.G. Valsecchi (Maria Grazia); R. Pieters (Rob); N.A. Heerema (Nyla); J.M. Hilden (Joanne); C.A. Felix (Carolyn); G.H. Reaman (Gregory); B. Camitta (Bruce); N.J. Winick (Naomi); W.L. Carroll (William); S.D. Dreyer; S.P. Hunger (Stephen); S.F. Willman (Sami )

    2012-01-01

    textabstractGene expression profiling was performed on 97 cases of infant ALL from Children's Oncology Group Trial P9407. Statistical modeling of an outcome predictor revealed 3 genes highly predictive of event-free survival (EFS), beyond age and MLL status: FLT3, IRX2, and TACC2. Low FLT3 expressio

  16. Cognitive function in older women with breast cancer treated with standard chemotherapy and capecitabine on Cancer and Leukemia Group B 49907.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Rachel A; Pitcher, Brandelyn; Keating, Nancy L; Ballman, Karla V; Mandelblatt, Jeanne; Kornblith, Alice B; Kimmick, Gretchen G; Hurria, Arti; Winer, Eric P; Hudis, Clifford A; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Muss, Hyman B

    2013-06-01

    Cognitive changes in older women receiving chemotherapy are poorly understood. We examined self-reported cognitive function for older women who received adjuvant chemotherapy on Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 49907. CALGB 49907 randomized 633 women aged ≥65 with stage I-III breast cancer to standard adjuvant chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide-methotrexate-5-fluorouracil or doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide) versus capecitabine. We examined self-reported cognitive function in 297 women (CALGB 361002) who enrolled on the quality of life substudy and had no gross impairment on cognitive screening. Women were evaluated using an 18-item instrument at six time points (baseline through 24 months). At each time point for each patient, we calculated a cognitive function score (CFS) defined as the mean response of items 1-18 and defined impairment as a score >1.5 standard deviations above the overall average baseline score. Differences in scores by patient characteristics were evaluated using a Kruskal-Wallis test. A linear mixed-effects model was used to assess CFSs by treatment over time. Among 297 women, the median age was 71.5 (range 65-85) and 73 % had performance status of 0. Baseline depression and fatigue were reported in 6 and 14 % of patients, respectively. The average CFS at baseline was 2.08 (corresponding to "normal ability"), and baseline cognitive function did not differ by treatment regimen (p = 0.350). Over 24 months, women reported minimal changes at each time point and insignificant differences by treatment arm were observed. In a healthy group of older women, chemotherapy was not associated with longitudinal changes in self-reported cognitive function.

  17. Ethical aspects of participation in the database of genotypes and phenotypes of the National Center for Biotechnology Information: the Cancer and Leukemia Group B Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Shapira, Iuliana; Deshields, Teressa; Kroetz, Deanna; Friedman, Paula; Spears, Patricia; Collyar, Deborah E; Shulman, Lawrence N; Dressler, Lynn; Bertagnolli, Monica M

    2012-10-15

    The rapid pace of genetics research, coupled with evolving standards for informed consent, can create ethical challenges regarding future use of tissue or information from completed clinical trials. The Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Oncology Cooperative Group was faced with an ethical dilemma regarding sharing genetic data from a completed genome-wide association study (GWAS) that was conducted as part of a large, multicenter breast cancer clinical trial with a national database: the Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes National Center for Biotechnology Information (dbGaP). The CALGB Ethics Committee conducted a series of multidisciplinary meetings and teleconferences involving patient advocates, bioethicists, clinical researchers, and clinical oncologists to evaluate the ethical issues raised by this case and to identify lessons for improving informed consent to future genetics research in oncology trials. The Ethics Committee recommended that GWAS data be provided to dbGaP consistent with documented consent for future use of tissue among trial participants. Ethical issues, including adequacy of informed consent to future research, limitations of privacy in modern genetics research, the potential impact of population-based genetics research on health disparities, and recontact of research participants for clinical care or further research, were identified as major ethical considerations in this area. Although modern standards for informed consent should not prohibit research or sharing of data consistent with participant's intent and the public interest, there is an urgent need for national consensus on the appropriate use of archived tissue and standardized informed consent for future research among cancer clinical trial participants. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  18. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children. PMID:25692130

  19. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Carolina Bekker-Méndez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child’s diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7% patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4% patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1% patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8% patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4% patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children.

  20. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells ... their treatment is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts ...

  1. What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells ... body, including the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts ...

  2. NUP98/NSD1 characterizes a novel poor prognostic group in acute myeloid leukemia with a distinct HOX gene expression pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollink, Iris H I M; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Arentsen-Peters, Susan T C J M; Pratcorona, Marta; Abbas, Saman; Kuipers, Jenny E; van Galen, Janneke F; Beverloo, H Berna; Sonneveld, Edwin; Kaspers, Gert-Jan J L; Trka, Jan; Baruchel, Andre; Zimmermann, Martin; Creutzig, Ursula; Reinhardt, Dirk; Pieters, Rob; Valk, Peter J M; Zwaan, C Michel

    2011-09-29

    Translocations involving nucleoporin 98kD (NUP98) on chromosome 11p15 occur at relatively low frequency in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but can be missed with routine karyotyping. In this study, high-resolution genome-wide copy number analyses revealed cryptic NUP98/NSD1 translocations in 3 of 92 cytogenetically normal (CN)-AML cases. To determine their exact frequency, we screened > 1000 well-characterized pediatric and adult AML cases using a NUP98/NSD1-specific RT-PCR. Twenty-three cases harbored the NUP98/NSD1 fusion, representing 16.1% of pediatric and 2.3% of adult CN-AML patients. NUP98/NSD1-positive AML cases had significantly higher white blood cell counts (median, 147 × 10⁹/L), more frequent FAB-M4/M5 morphology (in 63%), and more CN-AML (in 78%), FLT3/internal tandem duplication (in 91%) and WT1 mutations (in 45%) than NUP98/NSD1-negative cases. NUP98/NSD1 was mutually exclusive with all recurrent type-II aberrations. Importantly, NUP98/NSD1 was an independent predictor for poor prognosis; 4-year event-free survival was < 10% for both pediatric and adult NUP98/NSD1-positive AML patients. NUP98/NSD1-positive AML showed a characteristic HOX-gene expression pattern, distinct from, for example, MLL-rearranged AML, and the fusion protein was aberrantly localized in nuclear aggregates, providing insight into the leukemogenic pathways of these AMLs. Taken together, NUP98/NSD1 identifies a previously unrecognized group of young AML patients, with distinct characteristics and dismal prognosis, for whom new treatment strategies are urgently needed.

  3. [Comparison of 2 chemotherapy protocols in adult acute myeloblastic leukemia. Results of the Instituto Nacional de la Nutrición Salvador Zubirán cooperative group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato-Mendizábal, E; Ruiz-Argüelles, G J; Labardini-Méndez, J; Gómez-Almaguer, D; Ganci-Cerrud, G; Lozano-de-la-Vega, A

    1992-01-01

    Up to now, the best treatment for patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is the induction of bone marrow hypoplasia by ablative combined chemotherapy; the prototype of these schedules is the so-called 7 + 3 (seven days of continuous infusion of cytarabine and three days of one-hour infusion of any anthracycline); these schedules require the support of both platelet transfusions and antibiotics. Other non-ablative schedules have also been tried in the treatment of such patients. Here we analyze the results of the treatment of 76 adult patients with AML; 43 were treated with the classical 7 + 3 schedule, whereas 33 were treated with a combination of chemotherapy used in non-ablative doses (TADOP: thioguanine, arabinosyl-citosine, doxorrubicin, vincristine and prednisone). The results were as follows, respectively, for 7 + 3 and TADOP: complete remission (CR) was achieved in 60 and 48% of patients (p NS); the number of cycles to achieve CR had a median of 1 and 5 months (p less than 0.001); the median duration of the CR was 21 and 10 months (p less than 0.05); fatal myelotoxicity was 30 and 42% (p NS), one-year disease free survival (DFS) was 45 and 46% (p NS) and three-year survival was 22% and 15% (p NS). Additionally, patients treated with 7 + 3 were divided into two groups according to the type of platelet transfusion support; those supported with apheresis equipment and those with centrifugation-derived platelets.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Raaschou-Jensen, Klas Kræsten

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The main aim of the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) was to obtain information about the epidemiology of the hematologic cancers acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). STUDY POPULATION: The registry...... was established in January 2000 by the Danish Acute Leukemia Group and has been expanded over the years. It includes adult AML patients diagnosed in Denmark since 2000, ALL patients diagnosed since 2005, and MDS patients diagnosed since 2010. The coverage of leukemia patients exceeds 99%, and the coverage of MDS...... years. To ensure this high coverage, completeness, and quality of data, linkage to the Danish Civil Registration System and the Danish National Registry of Patients, and several programmed data entry checks are used. CONCLUSION: The completeness and positive predictive values of the leukemia data have...

  5. The impact of the combination of baseline risk group and cytogenetic response on the survival of patients with chronic myelold leukemia treated with interferon-alpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasford, J; Pfirrmann, M; Shepherd, P; Guilhot, J; Hehlmann, R; Mahon, FX; Kluin-Nelemans, HC; Ohnishi, K; Steegmann, JL; Thaler, J

    Background and Objectives. This study was aimed at examining major cytogenetic response (MCR) as a valid predictor of the course of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and at assessing the survival of CML patients treated with interferon alpha (IFN) in dependence on the combination of MCR (yes or no)

  6. Value of routine bone marrow examination in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) : A study of the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, Ilse M. G.; Peek, Annemarie M. L.; de Haas, Valerie; Damen-Korbijn, Carin M.; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Background The outcome of the treatment of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still disappointing, due to relatively high treatment-related mortality and relapse rates (3040%). Past treatment protocols have called for routine screening via bone marrow aspiration (BMA) after achievement of fir

  7. Daunorubicin versus mitoxantrone versus idarubicin as induction and consolidation chemotherapy for adults with acute myeloid leukemia: the EORTC and GIMEMA Groups Study AML-10.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandelli, F.; Vignetti, M.; Suciu, S.; Stasi, R.; Petti, M.C.; Meloni, G.; Muus, P.; Marmont, F.; Marie, J.P.; Labar, B.; Thomas, X.; Raimondo, F. Di; Willemze, R.; Liso, V.; Ferrara, F.; Baila, L.; Fazi, P.; Zittoun, R.; Amadori, S.; Witte, T.J.M. de

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the antitumor efficacy of three different anthracyclines in combination with cytarabine and etoposide in adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We randomly assigned 2,157 patients (age range, 15 to 60 years) to receive intensive

  8. Daunorubicin versus mitoxantrone versus idarubicin as induction and consolidation chemotherapy for adults with acute myeloid leukemia: the EORTC and GIMEMA Groups Study AML-10.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandelli, F.; Vignetti, M.; Suciu, S.; Stasi, R.; Petti, M.C.; Meloni, G.; Muus, P.; Marmont, F.; Marie, J.P.; Labar, B.; Thomas, X.; Raimondo, F. Di; Willemze, R.; Liso, V.; Ferrara, F.; Baila, L.; Fazi, P.; Zittoun, R.; Amadori, S.; Witte, T.J.M. de

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the antitumor efficacy of three different anthracyclines in combination with cytarabine and etoposide in adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We randomly assigned 2,157 patients (age range, 15 to 60 years) to receive intensive in

  9. Leukemia revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronkite, E P

    1980-01-01

    Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately.

  10. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Phase I Study of Valspodar (PSC-833) with Mitoxantrone and Etoposide in Refractory and Relapsed Pediatric Acute Leukemia: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Maureen M.; Lacayo, Norman J.; Lum, Bert L.; Kshirsagar, Smita; Buck, Steven; Ravindranath, Yaddanapudi; Bernstein, Mark; Weinstein, Howard; Chang, Myron N.; Arceci, Robert J.; Sikic, Branimir I.; Dahl, Gary V.

    2009-01-01

    Background Valspodar, a non-immunosuppressive analog of cylosporine, is a potent P-glycoprotein (MDR1) inhibitor. As MDR1-mediated efflux of chemotherapeutic agents from leukemic blasts may contribute to drug resistance, a phase 1 study of valspodar combined with mitoxantrone and etoposide in pediatric patients with relapsed or refractory leukemias was performed. Procedure Patients received a valspodar loading dose (2 mg/kg) followed by a five-day continuous valspodar infusion (8, 10, 12.5 or 15 mg/kg/day) combined with lower than standard doses of mitoxantrone and etoposide. The valspodar dose was escalated using a standard 3 + 3 phase I design. Results 21 patients were evaluable for toxicity and 20 for response. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of valspodar was 12.5 mg/kg/day, combined with 50% dose-reduced mitoxantrone and etoposide. The clearance of mitoxantrone and etoposide was decreased by 64% and 60%, respectively, when combined with valspodar. Dose-limiting toxicities included stomatitis, ataxia, and bone marrow aplasia. Three of 11 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) had complete responses while no patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) had an objective response. In vitro studies demonstrated P-glycoprotein expression on the blasts of five of 14 patients, although only one had inhibition of rhodamine efflux by valspodar. Conclusions While this regimen was tolerable, responses in this heavily pretreated population were limited to a subset of patients with ALL. PMID:20209646

  12. Platelet enzyme abnormalities in leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: The aim of this study was to evaluate platelet enzyme activity in cases of leukemia. Materials and Methods: Platelet enzymes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, pyruvate kinase (PK and hexokinase (HK were studied in 47 patients of acute and chronic leukemia patients, 16 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML(13 relapse, three in remission, 12 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL (five in relapse, seven in remission, 19 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Results: The platelet G6PD activity was significantly low in cases of AML, ALL and also in CML. G6PD activity was normalized during AML remission. G6PD activity, although persistently low during ALL remission, increased significantly to near-normal during remission (P < 0.05 as compared with relapse (P < 0.01. Platelet PK activity was high during AML relapse (P < 0.05, which was normalized during remission. Platelet HK however was found to be decreased during all remission (P < 0.05. There was a significant positive correlation between G6PD and PK in cases of AML (P < 0.001 but not in ALL and CML. G6PD activity did not correlate with HK activity in any of the leukemic groups. A significant positive correlation was however seen between PK and HK activity in cases of ALL remission (P < 0.01 and CML (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Both red cell and platelet enzymes were studied in 36 leukemic patients and there was no statistically significant correlation between red cell and platelet enzymes. Platelet enzyme defect in leukemias suggests the inherent abnormality in megakaryopoiesis and would explain the functional platelet defects in leukemias.

  13. The price of drugs for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a reflection of the unsustainable prices of cancer drugs: from the perspective of a large group of CML experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Camille; Berman, Ellin; Cohen, Adam; Cortes, Jorge; DeAngelo, Daniel; Deininger, Michael; Devine, Steven; Druker, Brian; Fathi, Amir; Jabbour, Elias; Jagasia, Madan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Khoury, Jean; Laneuville, Pierre; Larson, Richard; Lipton, Jeffrey; Moore, Joseph O.; Mughal, Tariq; O’Brien, Susan; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Quintas-Cardama, Alfonso; Radich, Jerald; Reddy, Vishnu; Schiffer, Charles; Shah, Neil; Shami, Paul; Silver, Richard T.; Snyder, David; Stone, Richard; Talpaz, Moshe; Tefferi, Ayalew; Van Etten, Richard A.; Wetzler, Meir; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Apperley, Jane; Breccia, Massimo; Byrne, Jenny; Cervantes, Francisco; Chelysheva, Ekaterina; Clark, R. E.; de Lavallade, Hugues; Dyagil, Iryna; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Goldman, John; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim; Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik; Holyoake, Tessa; Huntly, Brian; le Coutre, Philipp; Lomaia, Elza; Mahon, Francois-Xavier; Marin-Costa, David; Martinelli, Giovanni; Mayer, Jiri; Milojkovic, Dragana; Olavarria, Eduardo; Porkka, Kimmo; Richter, Johan; Rousselot, Philippe; Saglio, Giuseppe; Saydam, Guray; Stentoft, Jesper; Turkina, Anna; Vigneri, Paolo; Zaritskey, Andrey; Aguayo, Alvaro; Ayala, Manuel; Bendit, Israel; Maria Bengio, Raquel; Best, Carlos; Bullorsky, Eduardo; Cervera, Eduardo; DeSouza, Carmino; Fanilla, Ernesto; Gomez-Almaguer, David; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Lopez, Jose; Magarinos, Alicia; Meillon, Luis; Milone, Jorge; Moiraghi, Beatriz; Pasquini, Ricardo; Pavlovsky, Carolina; Ruiz-Arguelles, Guillermo J.; Spector, Nelson; Arthur, Christopher; Browett, Peter; Grigg, Andrew; Hu, Jianda; Huang, Xiao-jun; Hughes, Tim; Jiang, Qian; Jootar, Saengsuree; Kim, Dong-Wook; Malhotra, Hemant; Malhotra, Pankaj; Matsumura, Itaru; Melo, Junia; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Ohno, Ryuzo; Saikia, Tapan; Schwarer, Anthony P.; Takahashi, Naoto; Tam, Constantine; Tauchi, Tetsuzo; Usuki, Kensuke; Wang, Jianxiang; Abdel-Rahman, Fawzi; Deeb Saeed Aljurf, Mahmoud; Bazarbachi, Ali; Ben Yehuda, Dina; Chaudhri, Naeem; Durosinmi, Muheez; Kamel, Hossam; Louw, Vernon; Francis Matti, Bassam; Nagler, Arnon; Raanani, Pia; Salem, Ziad

    2013-01-01

    As a group of more than 100 experts in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), we draw attention to the high prices of cancer drugs, with the particular focus on the prices of approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of CML. This editorial addresses the multiple factors involved in cancer drug pricing and their impact on individual patients and health care policies, and argues for the need to (1) lower the prices of cancer drugs to allow more patients to afford them and (2) maintain sound long-term health care policies. PMID:23620577

  14. Kelainan Hemostasis pada Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelly Dia Rofinda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Leukemia adalah penyakit keganasan pada jaringan hematopoietik yang ditandai denganpenggantian elemen sumsum tulang normal oleh sel darah abnormal atau sel leukemik. Salah satu manifestasi klinisdari leukemia adalah perdarahan yang disebabkan oleh berbagai kelainan hemostasis.Kelainan hemostasis yang dapat terjadi pada leukemia berupa trombositopenia, disfungsi trombosit,koagulasi intravaskuler diseminata, defek protein koagulasi, fibrinolisis primer dan trombosis. Patogenesis danpatofosiologi kelainan hemostasis pada leukemia tersebut terjadi dengan berbagai mekanisme.Kata kunci: leukemia, kelainan hemostasisAbstractBackground: AbstractLeukemia is a malignancy of hematopoietic tissue which is characterized bysubstituted of bone marrow element with abnormal blood cell or leukemic cell. One of clinical manifestation ofleukemia is bleeding that is caused by several hemostasis disorders.Hemostasis disorders in leukemia such asthrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, disseminated intravascular coagulation, coagulation protein defect, primaryfibrinolysis and thrombosis. Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of thus hemostasis disorders in leukemia occur withdifferent mechanism.Keywords: leukemia, hemostasis disorder

  15. Addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia at older age : a randomized phase 2 trial of the Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial Group for Hemato-Oncology (HOVON) and the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (SAKK)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Stussi, Georg; Maertens, Johan; van Montfort, Kees; Biemond, Bart J; Breems, Dimitri; Ferrant, August; Graux, Carlos; de Greef, Georgine E; Halkes, C J M; Hoogendoorn, Mels; Hollestein, Rene M; Jongen-Lavrencic, Mojca; Levin, Mark D; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; van Marwijk Kooij, Marinus; van Norden, Yvette; Pabst, Thomas; Schouten, Harry C; Vellenga, Edo; Verhoef, Gregor E G; de Weerdt, Okke; Wijermans, Pierre; Passweg, Jakob R; Löwenberg, Bob

    2012-01-01

    An urgent need for new treatment modalities is emerging in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We hypothesized that targeting VEGF might furnish an effective treatment modality in this population. Elderly patients with AML were randomly assigned in this phase 2 study (n = 171) to rec

  16. Addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia at older age: A randomized phase 2 trial of the Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial Group for Hemato-Oncology (HOVON) and the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (SAKK)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. Ossenkoppele (Gert); G. Stussi (Georg); J. Maertens (Johan); C.A.G.M. Montfort (Kees); B.J. Biemond (Bart); D.A. Breems (Dimitri); A. Ferrant (Augustin); C. Graux (Carlos); G.E. de Greef (Georgine); C.J.M. Halkes (Constantijn ); M. Hoogendoorn (Mels); L.M. Hollestein (Loes); M. Jongen-Lavrencic (Mojca); M.-D. Levin (Mark-David); A.A. van de Loosdrecht (Arjan); M. Van Marwijk Kooij (Marinus); Y. van Norden (Yvette); T. Pabst (Thomas); H. Schouten (Harry); E. Vellenga (Edo); G.E.G. Verhoef (Gregor); O. de Weerdt (O.); P.W. Wijermans (Pierre); J. Passweg (Jakob Robert); B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAn urgent need for new treatment modalities is emerging in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We hypothesized that targeting VEGF might furnish an effective treatment modality in this population. Elderly patients with AML were randomly assigned in this phase 2 study (n =

  17. Markedly improved outcomes and acceptable toxicity in adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia following treatment with a pediatric protocol: a phase II study by the Japan Adult Leukemia Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, F; Sakura, T; Yujiri, T; Kondo, E; Fujimaki, K; Sasaki, O; Miyatake, J; Handa, H; Ueda, Y; Aoyama, Y; Takada, S; Tanaka, Y; Usui, N; Miyawaki, S; Suenobu, S; Horibe, K; Kiyoi, H; Ohnishi, K; Miyazaki, Y; Ohtake, S; Kobayashi, Y; Matsuo, K; Naoe, T

    2014-10-17

    The superiority of the pediatric protocol for adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has already been demonstrated, however, its efficacy in young adults remains unclear. The ALL202-U protocol was conducted to examine the efficacy and feasibility of a pediatric protocol in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with BCR-ABL-negative ALL. Patients aged 15-24 years (n=139) were treated with the same protocol used for pediatric B-ALL. The primary objective of this study was to assess the disease-free survival (DFS) rate and its secondary aims were to assess toxicity, the complete remission (CR) rate and the overall survival (OS) rate. The CR rate was 94%. The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 67% (95% confidence interval (CI) 58-75%) and 73% (95% CI 64-80%), respectively. Severe adverse events were observed at a frequency that was similar to or lower than that in children treated with the same protocol. Only insufficient maintenance therapy significantly worsened the DFS (hazard ratio 5.60, P<0.001). These results indicate that this protocol may be a feasible and highly effective treatment for AYA with BCR-ABL-negative ALL.

  18. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Nonlymphocytic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym ANLL; Acute Nonlymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Nonl...ymphoblastic Leukemias; Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemias; Leukemia, Acute Nonly...mphoblastic; Leukemia, Acute Nonlymphocytic; Leukemia, Nonlymphoblastic, Acute; Leukemias, Acute Nonlymphoblastic; Leukemias, Acute... Nonlymphocytic; Nonlymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute; Nonlymphoblastic Leukemias, Acut...e; Nonlymphocytic Leukemia, Acute; Nonlymphocytic Leukemias, Acute PharmGKB Accessi

  19. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  20. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  1. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  2. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  3. Phase 1 trial of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in combination with enocitabine and daunorubicin for elderly patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia: Japan Adult Leukemia Study Group (JALSG)-GML208 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoshikazu; Wakita, Atsushi; Takada, Satoru; Mihara, Masahiro; Gotoh, Moritaka; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Ohtake, Shigeki; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Naoe, Tomoki

    2012-10-01

    We conducted a phase 1 study of a combination of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) plus conventional chemotherapy in elderly patients (≥ 65 years old) with relapsed or refractory CD33-positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients received a standard dose of enocitabine (200 mg/m² × 8 days) and daunorubicin (30 mg/m² × days 1-3) plus an escalating dose of GO (1.5-5 mg/m² on day 4). The dose escalation of GO was done according to a standard 3 + 3 design following a modified Fibonacci sequence. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed in three patients (median age, 71) at level 1 (1.5 mg/m²) or in three patients (median age, 73) at level 2 (3 mg/m²). Neither veno-occlusive diseases nor sinusoidal obstructive syndromes were noted at either level. However, as GO was withdrawn from the US market in June 2010, based on a randomized study in newly diagnosed AML, we decided not to proceed to the level 3 (5 mg/m²) in order to avoid possibly more severe adverse effects, and also because all six patients experienced grade 4 myelosuppression, with complete remission in three. This study showed that 3 mg/m² of GO in combination with enocitabine and daunorubicin may be a recommendable dose for a phase 2 study in Japanese elderly patients with CD33-positive AML. The study was registered at the University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN) Clinical Trials Registry ( http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/ ) as UMIN000002603.

  4. IDH mutations in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakheja, Dinesh; Konoplev, Sergej; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Chen, Weina

    2012-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous group of diseases. Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes represent a novel class of point mutations in acute myeloid leukemia. These mutations prevent oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate and confer novel enzymatic activity, facilitating the reduction of α-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutarate, a putative oncometabolite. IDH1/IDH2 mutations are heterozygous, and their combined frequency is approximately 17% in unselected acute myeloid leukemia cases, 27% in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia cases, and up to 67% in acute myeloid leukemia cases with cuplike nuclei. These mutations are largely mutually exclusive. Despite many similarities of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations, it is possible that they represent distinct molecular or clinical subgroups of acute myeloid leukemia. All known mutations involve arginine (R), in codon 132 of IDH1 or codon 140 or 172 of IDH2. IDH1(R132) and IDH2(R140) mutations are frequently accompanied by normal cytogenetics and NPM1 mutation, whereas IDH2(R172) is frequently the only mutation detected in acute myeloid leukemia. There is increasing evidence that the prognostic impact of IDH1/2 mutations varies according to the specific mutation and also depends on the context of concurrent mutations of other genes. IDH1(R132) mutation may predict poor outcome in a subset of patients with molecular low-risk acute myeloid leukemia, whereas IDH2(R172) mutations confer a poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Expression of IDH1/2 mutants induces an increase in global DNA hypermethylation and inhibits TET2-induced cytosine 5-hydroxymethylation, DNA demethylation. These data suggest that IDH1/2 mutations constitute a distinct mutational class in acute myeloid leukemia, which affects the epigenetic state, an important consideration for the development of therapeutic agents.

  5. Leukemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firas, Al Sabty; Demeckova, E; Mistrik, M

    2008-01-01

    Pregnancy complicated with leukemia is rare. Validated data, out of which conclusions may be drawn regarding the management of pregnancy with leukemia are sparse. We report 5 cases of leukemia diagnosed during pregnancy with an overview of published literature (Ref. 19). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  6. Acute leukemia in early childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Emerenciano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia in early childhood is biologically and clinically distinct. The particular characteristics of this malignancy diagnosed during the first months of life have provided remarkable insights into the etiology of the disease. The pro-B, CD10 negative immunophenotype is typically found in infant acute leukemia, and the most common genetic alterations are the rearrangements of the MLL gene. In addition, the TEL/AML1 fusion gene is most frequently found in children older than 24 months. A molecular study on a Brazilian cohort (age range 0-23 months has detected TEL/AML1+ve (N = 9, E2A/PBX1+ve (N = 4, PML/RARA+ve (N = 4, and AML1/ETO+ve (N = 2 cases. Undoubtedly, the great majority of genetic events occurring in these patients arise prenatally. The environmental exposure to damaging agents that give rise to genetic changes prenatally may be accurately determined in infants since the window of exposure is limited and known. Several studies have shown maternal exposures that may give rise to leukemogenic changes. The Brazilian Collaborative Study Group of Infant Acute Leukemia has found that mothers exposed to dipyrone, pesticides and hormones had an increased chance to give birth to babies with infant acute leukemia [OR = 1.48 (95%CI = 1.05-2.07, OR = 2.27 (95%CI = 1.56-3.31 and OR = 9.08 (95%CI = 2.95-27.96], respectively. This review aims to summarize recent clues that have facilitated the elucidation of the biology of early childhood leukemias, with emphasis on infant acute leukemia in the Brazilian population.

  7. Cytogenetics in the management of acute myeloid leukemia: an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquet, Isabelle; Bidet, Audrey; Cuccuini, Wendy; Lafage-Pochitaloff, Marina; Mozziconacci, Marie-Joëlle; Terré, Christine

    2016-10-01

    The karyotype is critical for the evaluation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at diagnosis. Cytogenetic abnormalities detected in AML are one of the most powerful independent prognostic factors. It impacts on the choice of treatment in clinical trials. All chromosomes can be targeted, common chromosomal abnormalities are recurrent and may be associated with a cytological well-defined type. In 40% of the cases, the karyotype is normal and must be associated with molecular biology studies that can refine the prognosis. The usefulness of the karyotype is more limited during the follow-up of the patient due to its limited sensitivity, but it is still useful in the clinical management of relapse. Since 2001, the WHO (World Health Organization) classification of hematological malignancies integrates cytogenetic data in the classification of AML. Karyotype is therefore mandatory in the diagnosis of AML.

  8. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is infrequent in Mexican mestizos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Argüelles, G J; Velázquez, B M; Apreza-Molina, M G; Pérez-Romano, B; Ruiz-Reyes, G; Ruiz-Argüelles, A

    1999-06-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most frequent leukemia in adults living in Western countries, and accounts for approximately 30% of adult leukemias. In a 15-year period in a single institution, we identified 19 patients with CLL in a group of 211 adults with leukemia (9% of adult leukemias). Of these 19 CLL patients, 8 had a Caucasian phenotype, 4 were born outside the country, and only 11 were Mexican mestizos. On the other hand, in a multicenter experience involving 1968 Mexican adults with leukemia, CLL represented 6.6% of the cases, a figure significantly lower than that reported in Caucasians (P mestizos, and this low prevalence may stem from the genetic origin of this racial group. The data also suggest a genetic predisposition of Caucasians to suffer from this disease.

  9. Surface localization of high-mobility group nucleosome-binding protein 2 on leukemic B cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia is related to secondary autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morande, Pablo E; Borge, Mercedes; Abreu, Cecilia; Galletti, Jeremías; Zanetti, Samanta R; Nannini, Paula; Bezares, Raimundo F; Pantano, Sergio; Dighiero, Guillermo; Oppezzo, Pablo; Gamberale, Romina; Giordano, Mirta

    2015-04-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the main cause of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AHA). However, the cellular basis underlying this strong association remains unclear. We previously demonstrated that leukemic B cells from patients with CLL recognize the erythrocyte protein Band 3, a prevalent autoantigen in AHA. Here we show that the major binding site of Band 3 on leukemic cells is an extrinsic protein identified as high-mobility group nucleosome binding protein 2 (HMGN2), a nucleosome-interacting factor which has not been previously reported at the cell surface. T lymphocytes do not express HMGN2 or bind Band 3. Removal of HMGN2 from the cell membrane abrogated the capacity of Band 3-pulsed CLL cells to induce CD4 + T cell proliferation. We conclude that surface HMGN2 in leukemic B cells is involved in Band 3 binding, uptake and presentation to CD4 + T lymphocytes, and as such may favor the initiation of AHA secondary to CLL.

  10. Parental exposure to medications and hydrocarbons and ras mutations in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A report from the Children's Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, X.O.; Perentesis, J.P.; Wen, W.Q.; Buckley, J.D.; Boyle, E.; Ross, J.A.; Robison, L.L. [Childrens Oncology Group, Arcadia, CA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Using data from a large case-control study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; age < 15 years), we used a case-case comparison approach to examine whether reported parental exposure to hydrocarbons at work or use of specific medications are related to ras gene mutations in the leukemia cells of children with ALL. We examined mutations in K-ras and N-ras genes atcodons 12, 13, and 61 by PCR and allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization and confirmed them by DNA sequencing. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived from logistic regression to examine the association of parental exposures with ras mutations. A total of 127 (15.2%) cases had ras mutations (K-ras 4.7% and N-ras 10.68%). Both maternal (OR 3.2,95% CI 1.7-6.1) and paternal (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.7) reported use of mind-altering drugs were associated with N-ras mutations. Paternal use of amphetamines or diet pills was associated with N-ras mutations (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.1-15.0). Maternal exposure to solvents (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.0-9.7) and plastic materials (OR 6.9, 95% CI 1.2-39.7) during pregnancy and plastic materials after pregnancy (OR 8.3, 95% CI 1.4-48.8) were related to K-ras mutation. Maternal over exposure to oil and coal products before case diagnosis (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.1-4.8) and during the postnatal period (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.0-5.5) and paternal exposure to plastic materials before index pregnancy (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.1-5.1) and other hydrocarbons during the postnatal period (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.0-1.3) were associated with N-ras mutations. This study suggests that parental exposure to specific chemicals may be associated with distinct ras mutations in children who develop ALL.

  11. [Psychological functions in children treated for acute lymphatic leukemia. A 5-year follow-up of three different age groups of children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossen, A

    1997-05-30

    All the children, five girls and ten boys aged 8-16 years, mean 11 years, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia which had been diagnosed in 1980, 1981 or 1983 and was still in remission in 1990, were examined. The treatment included intratecal methotrexate, but no irradiation. Mean age at the time of diagnosis was 4.5 years. All the WISC-R IQ-scores were within the normal range (mean Full Scale IQ 109, range 93-142). Six children had a high negative Verbal/Performance split score (mean +/- 23, range -15 to -33). This indicated dysfunction in verbal compared with nonverbal problem solving ability. Only one child had a high positive WISC-R split score (+23). Except for one child, all the scores on the Visual-Motor Integration Test were within the normal range. The Achenbach checklists were completed by parents and teachers. A small increase was found in the total problem scores, but most of the children were evaluated as well adapted.

  12. The prognostic value of polycomb group protein B-cell-specific moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site 1 in stage II colon cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken L. M.; Linnemann, Dorte; Christensen, Ib J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of B-cell-specific moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site 1 (BMI1) protein expression in primary tumors of stage II colon cancer patients. BMI1 protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in a retrospective patient...... cohort consisting of 144 stage II colon cancer patients. BMI1 expression at the invasive front of the primary tumors correlated with mismatch repair status of the tumors. Furthermore, BMI1 expression at the luminal surface correlated with T-stage, tumor location, and the histological subtypes....... Likewise, there was no association between 5-year overall survival and BMI1 expression at the invasive front (HR: 1.12; 95% CI 0.80–1.56; p = 0.46) or at the luminal surface of the tumor (HR: 1.16; 95% CI 0.86–1.60; p = 0.33). In conclusion, BMI1 expression in primary tumors of stage II colon cancer...

  13. Interim results of the Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment in adult patients (results of Russian research group of ALL treatment (RALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Parovichnikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An interim analysis of long-term treatment results for 202 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, aged 15–60 years, received therapy according protocol ALL-2009 was shown. The basic principle of ALL-2009 was non-aggressive, but continued cytostatic exposure, as well as the reproducibility in a regional hematology centers. Long-term treatment results of ALL-2009 are 2 times higher than the previously obtained in adult ALL patients within the Russian clinical multicenter studies of adult ALL. The 5‑year overall survival of patients younger than 30 years was 73.6 %, relapse-free survival (RFS – 71.5 %, compared with 52.7 % and 61.8 % in patients aged 30 years and older, respectively. In patients with B-precursor ALL with normal karyotype of blast cells significantly higher 5‑year RFS (82.1 % compared to patients with abnormal karyotype (58.8 % was registered. For T-ALL cytogenetic characteristics of blast cells had no prognostic significance. For patients with T-ALL important to perform autologous stem cell transplantation as a later consolidation, as this significantly reducerelapse rate (from 33 to 0 %.

  14. Interim results of the Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment in adult patients (results of Russian research group of ALL treatment (RALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Parovichnikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An interim analysis of long-term treatment results for 202 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, aged 15–60 years, received therapy according protocol ALL-2009 was shown. The basic principle of ALL-2009 was non-aggressive, but continued cytostatic exposure, as well as the reproducibility in a regional hematology centers. Long-term treatment results of ALL-2009 are 2 times higher than the previously obtained in adult ALL patients within the Russian clinical multicenter studies of adult ALL. The 5‑year overall survival of patients younger than 30 years was 73.6 %, relapse-free survival (RFS – 71.5 %, compared with 52.7 % and 61.8 % in patients aged 30 years and older, respectively. In patients with B-precursor ALL with normal karyotype of blast cells significantly higher 5‑year RFS (82.1 % compared to patients with abnormal karyotype (58.8 % was registered. For T-ALL cytogenetic characteristics of blast cells had no prognostic significance. For patients with T-ALL important to perform autologous stem cell transplantation as a later consolidation, as this significantly reducerelapse rate (from 33 to 0 %.

  15. Leukemia microvesicles affect healthy hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmkhah, Farnaz; Soleimani, Masoud; Mehrabani, Davood; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Amini Kafi-Abad, Sedigheh; Ramzi, Mani; Iravani Saadi, Mahdiyar; Kakoui, Javad

    2017-02-01

    Microvesicles are released by different cell types and shuttle mRNAs and microRNAs which have the possibility to transfer genetic information to a target cell and alter its function. Acute myeloid leukemia is a malignant disorder, and leukemic cells occupy all the bone marrow microenvironment. In this study, we investigate the effect of leukemia microvesicles on healthy umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells to find evidence of cell information transferring. Leukemia microvesicles were isolated from acute myeloid leukemia patients and were co-incubated with healthy hematopoietic stem cells. After 7 days, cell count, hematopoietic stem cell-specific cluster of differentiation (CD) markers, colony-forming unit assay, and some microRNA gene expressions were assessed. Data showed a higher number of hematopoietic stem cells after being treated with leukemia microvesicles compared with control (treated with no microvesicles) and normal (treated with normal microvesicles) groups. Also, increased levels of microRNA-21 and microRNA-29a genes were observed in this group, while colony-forming ability was still maintained and high ranges of CD34(+), CD34(+)CD38(-), CD90(+), and CD117(+) phenotypes were observed as stemness signs. Our results suggest that leukemia microvesicles are able to induce some effects on healthy hematopoietic stem cells such as promoting cell survival and some microRNAs deregulation, while stemness is maintained.

  16. Determination of the Prevalence of HGV Infection in Leukemia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Yaghoubi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The potential of acute and chronic viral hepatitis infections in blood leukocytes is one of the possible risk factors of leukemia. Between hepatitis viruses, HGV is important for unknown mechanism of pathogenesis in affecting the outcome of leukemia. In this research the prevalence of HGV infection was studied for evaluation of the possible role of this viral infection in the pathophysiology of leukemia. Methods: In this study, 100 EDTA treated blood samples were collected for 2 and half a year from different types of leukemia and also healthy control group, respectively. The plasma of these blood samples were harvested and stored at -80°C till laboratory tests were performed. Serological and antigenic markers of HBV, HCV and HGV were analyzed by ELISA methods. The HGV viremia was also studied by an in-house nested-RT-PCR method in plasma samples of patients with leukemia and control population. Results: Anti-E2-Ab was detected in 1(1% of leukemia patients who has not the history of HBV and HCV infections. HGV-RNA was diagnosed in 4(4% of patients with leukemia and 1(1% of control group. Simultaneous infection of HGV-RNA and HBsAg was detected in one of patients with leukemia. Significant difference was seen between the prevalence of HBV infection in leukemia patients and control group (P=0.02. Also significant correlation was detected between sex and the prevalence of HBV infection in leukemia patients (P=0.02. None of studied risk factors of leukemia were not significantly correlated with HGV infection. Conclusion: In this study the low prevalence of active and persistent HGV infections in leukemia patients in comparing with control population was confirmed. Also detection of HGV and HBV co-infection in these patients, announced the need of completed studies in different populations with different hematological malignancies and/or abnormalities, for better therapeutic and laboratory management of these cancers.

  17. Outcome of Short Period and Intermittent ImatinibPhased Chemotherapy (Northern Italy Leukemia Group Protocol 09/00) as Therapy for Ph+ ALL%短程、间歇伊马替尼联合传统化疗(N ILG09/00方案)在Ph+ ALL治疗中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜欣; 凌伟

    2011-01-01

    1 文献来源Renato B,Giuseppe R,Enrico MP,et al.Chemotherapy-phased Imatinib pulses improve longterm outcome of adult patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia:Northern Italy leukemia group protocol 09/00[J].J Clin Oncol,2010,28(22):3644-3652.2 证据水平3a.3背景·作为一种ABL1酪氨酸激酶抑制剂,伊马替尼在费城染色体(Philadelphia chromosome,Ph)阳性急性淋巴细胞白血病(acute lymphoblastic leukemia,ALL)患者的治疗中担当重要角色.%Department of Hemalology, Cancer Center, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou 510080, China

  18. Outcome of Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Patients Transformed to Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Leukemia from Severe Aplastic Anemia: A Report from the MDS Subcommittee of the Chronic Malignancies Working Party and the Severe Aplastic Anemia Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussein, A.A.; Halkes, C.M.; Socie, G.; Tichelli, A.; Borne, P.A. von dem; Schaap, M.N.; Foa, R.; Ganser, A.; Dufour, C.; Bacigalupo, A.; Locasciulli, A.; Aljurf, M.; Peters, C.; Robin, M.; Biezen, A.A. van; Volin, L.; Witte, T.J. de; Marsh, J.; Passweg, J.R.; Kroger, N.

    2014-01-01

    One hundred and forty patients who had undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) transformation after treatment of severe aplastic anemia (SAA) were identified in the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplanta

  19. Congenital acute megakaryocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N B Mathur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital leukemia (CL is an extremely rare disorder in the newborn, significant proportion of which is of myeloid origin, primarily of M4 or M5 morphology. As compared to pediatric leukemia, CL is a more aggressive disease. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M7 or acute megakaryocytic leukemia is a rare type of AML with an incidence of 0.5 per million per year. Median age of presentation is 6 years, and children may present with a broad variety of symptoms including low-grade fever, diarrhea, easy bruising, failure to gain weight and life-threatening conditions.

  20. Role of cranial radiotherapy for childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with high WBC count and good response to prednisone. Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica and the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conter, V; Schrappe, M; Aricó, M; Reiter, A; Rizzari, C; Dördelmann, M; Valsecchi, M G; Zimmermann, M; Ludwig, W D; Basso, G; Masera, G; Riehm, H

    1997-08-01

    The ALL-BFM 90 and AIEOP-ALL 91 studies share the same treatment backbone and have 5-year event-free survival (EFS) rates close to 75%. This study evaluated the impact of differing presymptomatic CNS therapies in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients with a good response to prednisone (PGR) according to WBC count and Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (BFM) risk factor (RF). A total of 192 patients (141 boys; median age, 7.5 years) with T-ALL, PGR, RF less than 1.7, and no CNS leukemia diagnosed between 1990 and 1995 were enrolled onto the ALL-BFM 90 (n = 123) or AIEOP-ALL 91 (n = 69) study. Presymptomatic CNS therapy consisted of cranial radiation (CRT) and intrathecal methotrexate (I.T. MTX) (11 doses) in the BFM study and of extended triple intrathecal therapy (T.I.T.) (17 doses) in the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) study. Patients were divided into a low-WBC group (WBC count 100,000/microL). EFS was compared using the log-rank test. For patients treated with CRT and I.T. MTX (BFM group), the 3-year EFS rate was 89.8% (SE = 3.5) for 99 patients in the low-WBC group versus 81.9% (SE = 8.2) in the high-WBC group (difference not significant). Conversely, for patients treated with T.I.T. alone (AIEOP group), the EFS rate was 80.6% (SE = 5.6) in 55 patients with a low WBC count versus 17.9% (SE = 11.0) in 14 patients with a high WBC count (P < .001). These data suggest that CRT may not be necessary in PGR T-ALL patients with a WBC count less than 100,000/microL; on the contrary, in patients with a high count, extended T.I.T. may be inferior to CRT and I.T. MTX.

  1. The biology and targeting of FLT3 in pediatric leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen eAnnesley

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite remarkable improvement in treatment outcomes in pediatric leukemia over the past several decades, the prognosis for high risk groups of acute myeloid leukemia (AML and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, as well as for relapsed leukemia, remains poor. Intensified chemotherapy regimens have somewhat improved success rates, but at the cost of drastically increased morbidity and long term adverse effects. With the success of imatinib in Philadelphia-chromosome positive leukemia and all-trans retinoic acid in acute promyelocytic leukemia, the quest to find additional molecularly targeted therapies has generated much excitement over the past 15 years. Another such possible target in pediatric acute leukemia is FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3. FLT3 aberrations are among the most frequently identified transforming events in AML, and have significant clinical implications in both high risk pediatric AML and in certain high risk groups of pediatric ALL. Therefore, the successful targeting of FLT3 has tremendous potential to improve outcomes in these subsets of patients. This article will give an overview of the molecular function and signaling of the FLT3 receptor, as well as its pathogenic role in leukemia. We review the discovery of targeting FLT3, discuss currently available FLT3 inhibitors in pediatric leukemia and results of clinical trials to date, and finally, consider the future promise and challenges of FLT3 inhibitor therapy.

  2. [Acute plasma cell leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalbe, V; Domíngues, C; Roa, I; Busel, D; González, S

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Cell Leukemia is a very rare form of plasmocytic dyscrasia, whose clinical and pathological characteristics warrant its recognition as a distinct subentity. We report the case of a 60 years old man who presented a rapidly fatal acute plasma cell leukemia, with multiple osteolytic lesions, hipercalcemia, renal and cardiac failure.

  3. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-18

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  4. Randomized comparison of low-dose versus high-dose interferon-alfa in chronic myeloid leukemia: prospective collaboration of 3 joint trials by the MRC and HOVON groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C; Buck, Georgina; le Cessie, Saskia; Richards, Sue; Beverloo, H Berna; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Littlewood, Tim; Muus, Petra; Bareford, David; van der Lelie, Hans; Green, Anthony R; Roozendaal, Klaas J; Milne, Alison E; Chapman, Claire S; Shepherd, Patricia

    2004-06-15

    The optimal dose of interferon-alfa (IFN) for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is unknown. Retrospective analyses suggest that low doses are as effective as high doses, with less toxicity and fewer patients abandoning the drug. The Dutch Hemato-Oncology Association (HOVON) and British Medical Research Council (MRC) cooperative groups jointly performed randomized trials in newly diagnosed CML patients, comparing high-dose IFN (5 MIU/m(2) daily) with low-dose (3 MIU, 5 times a week). Both arms allowed additional hydroxyurea to keep the white blood cell count lower than 5 x 10(9)/L. Quality of life data were collected in a subset of patients. Between 1993 and 2001, 407 patients were randomized. At a median follow-up of 53 months, there were no significant differences in overall survival (odds ratio = 1.09, 95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.46), progression-free survival, and complete hematologic or major cytogenetic responses. Fewer patients in the low-dose group abandoned IFN for reasons other than transplant or progressive disease (P =.002, 58% vs 72% at 5 years). Quality of life data showed comparable results in both arms for most factors. There is no evidence of benefit for high-dose IFN compared with low-dose for the treatment of CML. Therefore, when IFN is combined with other drugs, low-dose IFN is advised, to minimize toxicity and costs.

  5. A report from the LALA-94 and LALA-SA groups on hypodiploidy with 30 to 39 chromosomes and near-triploidy: 2 possible expressions of a sole entity conferring poor prognosis in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrin, Christiane; Thomas, Xavier; Ffrench, Martine; Le, Quoc-Hung; Andrieux, Joris; Mozziconacci, Marie-Joelle; Laï, Jean-Luc; Bilhou-Nabera, Chrystele; Michaux, Lucienne; Bernheim, Alain; Bastard, Christian; Mossafa, Hossein; Perot, Christine; Maarek, Odile; Boucheix, Claude; Lheritier, Véronique; Delannoy, André; Fière, Denis; Dastugue, Nicole

    2004-10-15

    To reveal the relationship between hypodiploidy with 30 to 39 chromosomes and near-triploidy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), we studied 24 patients presenting with one of these aneuploidies among 623 adults with ALL registered in the Leucemie Aigue Lymphoblastique de l'Adulte (LALA) protocols. The 2 ploidy groups presented a striking similarity of their cytogenetic profiles: chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 7, 13, 15, 16, and 17, significantly monosomic in hypodiploidy 30 to 39, were also frequently disomic in near-triploidy, whereas those retained in pairs in hypodiploidy 30 to 39 were frequently tetrasomic in near-triploidy. DNA content data revealed the simultaneous presence of 2 aneuploid peaks in most tested cases (DNA indexes: 0.72-0.87/1.39-1.89) and a multiple correspondence analysis applied on cytogenetic profiles ascertained their strong relationship. We thus assumed that near-triploidy derives from the duplication of hypodiploidy with 30 to 39 chromosomes and that both aneuploid groups are 2 expressions of the same disease. These 24 patients presented with B-cell phenotype, low leukocytoses (median white blood cell count, 4.2 x 10(9)/L), and poor prognosis (complete remission, 57%; median disease-free-survival, 8 months; median survival, 10.4 months) comparable to that of Ph(+) patients treated according to the same protocol. We suggest that hypodiploidy with 30 to 39 chromosomes or near-triploidy should be regarded as a new high-risk factor in the risk stratification of adult ALL protocols.

  6. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemias; Acute... myelomonocytic leukaemia (clinical); Acute myelomonocytic leukemia (clinical); Acute mye...lomonocytic leukemia, FAB M4; Leukemia, Acute Myelomonocytic; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute, M4; Leukemia, Myeloi...d, Naegeli-Type; Leukemia, Naegeli-Type Myeloid; Leukemias, Acute Myelomonocytic; Myeloid Leukemia, Acute..., M4; Myeloid Leukemia, Naegeli Type; Myeloid Leukemia, Naegeli-Type; Myelomonocytic Leukemia, Acute

  7. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Monocytic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Acute Monoblastic Leukemias; Acute... Monocytic Leukemia; Acute Monocytic Leukemias; Acute monoblastic leukaemia; Acute monoblastic leukemia; Acute... monocytic leukaemia; Acute monocytic leukemia, morphology; Acute monocytoid leukemia; Leukemia, Acute... Monoblastic; Leukemia, Acute Monocytic; Leukemia, Monoblastic, Acute; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute... Schilling-Type Myeloid; Leukemias, Acute Monoblastic; Leukemias, Acute Monocytic; M5a - Acute monoblastic leukaemia; M5a - Acute

  8. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (Mylotarg) as single-agent treatment for frail patients 61 years of age and older with acute myeloid leukemia: final results of AML-15B, a phase 2 study of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche dell'Adulto Leukemia Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadori, S; Suciu, S; Stasi, R; Willemze, R; Mandelli, F; Selleslag, D; Denzlinger, C; Muus, P; Stauder, R; Berneman, Z; Pruijt, J; Nobile, F; Cassibba, V; Marie, J-P; Beeldens, F; Baila, L; Vignetti, M; de Witte, T

    2005-10-01

    The therapeutic activity and toxicity profile of gemtuzumab ozogamicin were assessed in 40 patients >60 years of age with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who were not considered eligible for conventional chemotherapy because of advanced age or poor performance status. The drug was administered at the dose of 9 mg/m2 as a single 2-h i.v. infusion on days 1 and 15. Patients who achieved a complete remission (CR/CRp) were to receive a consolidation with two additional injections of the immunotoxin at the same dose. The overall CR/CRp rate was 17% (95% CI, 8-32%). The CR/CRp rate in patients 61-75 years old was 33% (6/18), and 5% (1/22) in patients older than 75 years. Induction death occurred in seven patients (17%), all aged above 75 years. Overall survival was significantly longer in patients aged 61-75 years than in older individuals (P=0.05), and in CD33+ cases than in CD33- cases (P=0.05). We conclude that the dose/schedule of gemtuzumab ozogamicin used in this trial is too toxic in the age group over 75 years. For these patients, additional studies with reduced doses of the immunotoxin are warranted.

  9. Autologous bone marrow transplantation for treatment of isolated central nervous system relapse of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. AIEOP/FONOP-TMO group. Associzione Italiana Emato-Oncologia Pediatrica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, C; Valsecchi, M G; Aricò, M; Locatelli, F; Rossetti, F; Rondelli, R; Cesaro, S; Uderzo, C; Conter, V; Pession, A; Sotti, G; Loiacono, G; Santoro, N; Miniero, R; Dini, G; Favre, C; Meloni, G; Testi, A M; Werner, B; Silvestri, D; Arrighini, A; Varotto, S; Pillon, M; Basso, G; Zanesco, L

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the role of ABMT in children with ALL who are in 2nd CR after an early isolated CNS relapse. All children experiencing an isolated CNS relapse at 10 AIEOP centers (Associazione Italiana Emato-Oncologia Pediatrica) from 1986 to 1992 were eligible for this study. The series included 69 patients who relapsed within 3 years from diagnosis: 19 underwent ABMT, nine patients underwent ALLO-BMT from an HLA-identical sibling, and 41 received conventional chemotherapy (CHEMO). Statistical analysis was performed using a Cox's regression model, adjusting for the waiting time before transplantation and prognostic factors. The 5 years DFS was 56.3% (s.e. 12.3) for patients in the ABMT group. This compared favorably with the poor result (12.6% (s.e. 5.9)) seen in the CHEMO group. The risk of failures was reduced by one-third in the ABMT group as compared to the CHEMO group in the multivariate analysis (P < 0.01). In the ALLO group four out of nine patients were in CCR 4-5 years post-transplant. This study suggests that ABMT may also represent a valuable therapeutic choice for patients lacking a matched familiar donor in 2nd CR after an early isolated CNS relapse.

  10. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to ... acute granulocytic leukemia, and acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. Enlarge Anatomy of the bone. The bone is made up ...

  11. OPHTHALMIC MANIFESTATIONS OF LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Grishina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ophthalmic manifestations of leukemia are variable and are predominantly represented by leukemic infiltration of the eye and hemodynamic abnormalities in the retinal vasculature. Leukemic infiltration of the retina should be differentiated from an inflammatory process, such as retinitis, chorioretinitis of viral or fungal origin that are not uncommon in patients with hematological malignancies. Retinal involvement is mainly seen in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia and is less common in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Retinopathy is more frequent during relapses of the underlying disease. Also, retinopathy can be the first sign of the disease. Leukemia should be included into the list for differential diagnosis with disorders that can be associated with optical nerve edema and retinal hemorrhages. Fundus abnormalities correlate with peripheral blood parameters. Retinopathy and leukemic optic neuropathy are predictors of unfavorable prognosis. Early diagnostics and timely and adequate treatment may fully eliminate ocular symptoms and improve quality of life in patients with hemoblastoses.

  12. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for information in your local library and on the Internet. Good sources include the National Cancer Institute, the ... mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/acute-lymphocytic-leukemia/basics/definition/CON-20042915 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  13. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for information in your local library and on the Internet. Good sources include the National Cancer Institute, the ... mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/acute-myelogenous-leukemia/basics/definition/CON-20043431 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  14. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  15. Occupation and leukemia in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talibov, Madar; Kautiainen, Susanna; Martinsen, Jan Ivar

    2012-01-01

    We studied occupational variation of the risk of acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and other leukemia in Nordic countries.......We studied occupational variation of the risk of acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and other leukemia in Nordic countries....

  16. [Chronic lymphatic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Manuela; Wendtner, Clemens-Martin

    2015-04-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common form of leukemia in the Western world. Median age at diagnosis is around 70 years. To confirm the diagnosis more than 5000 B-lymphocytes/µl need to be present. The expression of the typical surface markers CD5, CD19, CD20 and CD23 has to be confirmed by flow cytometry. A bone marrow biopsy is not mandatory for the diagnosis. Before start of treatment the assessment of 17 p deletion and/or TP53-mutational status is recommended. Treatment indications include stage Binet C or signs of an active disease as rapidly progressive lymphadenopathy or organomegaly together with physical limitation, B symptoms that cannot be tolerated, rapidly deteriorating blood values, or rapidly increasing leukocyte counts (Lymphocyte doubling time less than 6 months). The patient's physical condition has major impact on the treatment decision. Currently immunochemotherapy with fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and the CD20-antibody rituximab (FCR) is the standard of care in previously untreated and physically fit patients. An alternative regimen is the combination of bendamustine and rituximab (BR) or ofatumumab. Physically compromised patients can be treated with the oral drug chlorambucil in combination with an anti-CD20 antibody. Due to high morbidity and mortality, allogeneic stem cell transplantation is limited to a small group of patients and should be discussed in a high-risk situation, such as 17 p deletion and/or TP53-mutation, lack of response to standard therapy or early relapse. Recently several new chemo-free treatment options have been introduced within clinical trials. Among them are monoclonal antibodies, most of them targeting the CD20 molecule: besides the licensed drugs rituximab and ofatumumab, obinutuzumab, in combination with chemotherapy, has recently shown high clinical efficacy in front-line treatment of elderly patients with CLL. Novel agents have been designed to block aberrant signaling from the B

  17. Myeloid leukemia after hematotoxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, R.A.; LeBeau, M.M.; Vardiman, J.W.; Rowley, J.D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-12-01

    One of the most serious consequences of cancer therapy is the development of a second cancer, especially leukemia. Several distinct subsets of therapy-related leukemia can now be distinguished. Classic therapy-related myeloid leukemia typically occurs 5 to 7 years after exposure to alkylating agents and/or irradiation, has a myelodysplastic phase with trilineage involvement, and is characterized by abnormalities of the long arms of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. Response to treatment is poor, and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is recommended. Leukemia following treatment with agents that inhibit topoisomerase 11, however, has a shorter latency, no preleukemic phase, a monoblastic, myelomonocytic, or myeloblastic phenotype, and balanced translocations, most commonly involving chromosome bands 11 q23 or 21 q22. The MLL gene at 11 q23 or the AML1 gene at 21 q22 are almost uniformly rearranged. MLL is involved with many fusion gene partners. Therapy-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia also occurs with 1 1 q23 rearrangements. Therapy-related leukemias with 11 q23 or 21 q22 rearrangements, inv(16) or t(15;17), have a more favorable response to treatment and a clinical course similar to their de novo counterparts. 32 refs., 4 tabs.

  18. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  19. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside ... develops quickly. Both adults and children can get acute myeloid leukemia ( AML ). This article is about AML in children.

  20. Prognostic factors of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) allografted in first complete remission: an analysis of the EORTC-GIMEMA AML 8A trial. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche Maligne dell' Adulto (GIMEMA) Leukemia Cooperative Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, S; Suciu, S; de Witte, T; Mandelli, F; Willemze, R; Resegotti, L; Broccia, G; Thaler, J; Labar, B; Damasio, E; Bizzi, B; Rotoli, B; Vekhoff, A; Muus, P; Petti, M C; Dardenne, M; Solbu, G; Vegna, M L; Zittoun, R A

    1996-06-01

    The Leukemia Cooperative Groups of the EORTC and the GIMEMA conducted a prospective randomized phase III trial, in order to assess the value of autologous BMT (ABMT) vs a second intensive consolidation course (IC2), following a common intensive consolidation course (IC1) for patients with AML. Patients with an HLA-identical sibling donor were not randomized, but were included in an allogeneic BMT (alloBMT) program. This is an analysis of prognostic factors which influence the outcome of treatment after alloBMT in first complete remission (CR). The study included 730 patients < 46 years of age in CR, 270 having a histocompatible sibling donor. In 169 of these patients alloBMT was performed in first CR. Early remitters (122 patients achieving CR with one course of treatment) had a DFS at 3 years of 67%, significantly longer than that of 44% for late remitters (47 patients achieving CR after more than one course of treatment) (P = 0.006). The relapse risk for early vs late remitters was 16 and 40% at 3 years (P = 0.001) and the treatment-related mortality (TRM) at 2 years was 21 vs 27%. Age appeared to be a prognostic factor for TRM, WBC for DFS, whereas the FAB classification was not of prognostic importance. Patients with poor risk cytogenetic abnormalities showed a trend towards a higher relapse risk. Patients transplanted shortly after achieving CR appeared to have a worse prognosis than those transplanted further into remission. Overall, the number of courses of induction therapy needed to achieve CR was the most important prognostic factor for outcome after allogeneic BMT.

  1. [Therapeutic effect of focal adhesion kinase gene silence on leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lü-Hong; Fang, Jian-Pei; Weng, Wen-Jun; Xu, Hong-Gui; Zhang, Ya-Ting

    2011-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) gene silence on leukemia cell growth, leukemogenesis and efficacy of chemotherapy drug. Vector containing lentiviral-FAK-shRNA was constructed and transfected into BCR/ABL-BaF3 leukemic cells, the cell growth and apoptosis were detected in vitro. The effect of FAK shRNA on leukemogenesis was studied in a murine model with leukemia. The apoptosis of leukemia cells and survival of leukemic mice treated by FAK shRNA combined with drug STI571 were monitored. The results showed that FAK gene expression was knocked down by lentiviral-FAK-shRNA. FAK gene silencing inhibited leukemia cell growth in vitro. The apoptosis test results showed that the percentages of Annexin V(+) cells in vector control group and FAK shRNA group were (3.46 ± 0.56)% and (7.3 ± 0.79)%, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p silence combined with drug STI571 could enhance the apoptosis of leukemia cells and prolong survival time of leukemic mice. It is concluded that FAK gene silence inhibits leukemogenesis and promotes efficacy of chemotherapy drug on leukemia cells, indicating FAK gene silence may be considered as a new therapeutic strategy for leukemia.

  2. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (Mylotarg) as single-agent treatment for frail patients 61 years of age and older with acute myeloid leukemia: final results of AML-15B, a phase 2 study of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche dell'Adulto Leukemia Groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amadori, S.; Suciu, S.; Stasi, R.; Willemze, R.; Mandelli, F.; Selleslag, D.; Denzlinger, C.; Muus, P.; Stauder, R.; Berneman, Z.; Pruijt, J.F.M.; Nobile, F.; Cassibba, V.; Marie, J.P.; Beeldens, F.; Baila, L.; Vignetti, M.; Witte, T.J.M. de

    2005-01-01

    The therapeutic activity and toxicity profile of gemtuzumab ozogamicin were assessed in 40 patients >60 years of age with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who were not considered eligible for conventional chemotherapy because of advanced age or poor performance status. The drug was administered at

  3. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (Mylotarg) as single-agent treatment for frail patients 61 years of age and older with acute myeloid leukemia: final results of AML-15B, a phase 2 study of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche dell'Adulto Leukemia Groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amadori, S.; Suciu, S.; Stasi, R.; Willemze, R.; Mandelli, F.; Selleslag, D.; Denzlinger, C.; Muus, P.; Stauder, R.; Berneman, Z.; Pruijt, J.F.M.; Nobile, F.; Cassibba, V.; Marie, J.P.; Beeldens, F.; Baila, L.; Vignetti, M.; Witte, T.J.M. de

    2005-01-01

    The therapeutic activity and toxicity profile of gemtuzumab ozogamicin were assessed in 40 patients >60 years of age with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who were not considered eligible for conventional chemotherapy because of advanced age or poor performance status. The drug was administered at th

  4. Incidence and clinical relevance of TEL/AML1 fusion genes in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia enrolled in the German and Italian multicenter therapy trials. Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica and the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkhardt, A; Cazzaniga, G; Viehmann, S; Valsecchi, M G; Ludwig, W D; Burci, L; Mangioni, S; Schrappe, M; Riehm, H; Lampert, F; Basso, G; Masera, G; Harbott, J; Biondi, A

    1997-07-15

    The molecular approach for the analysis of leukemia associated chromosomal translocations has led to the identification of prognostic relevant subgroups. In pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common translocations, t(9;22) and t(4;11), have been associated with a poorer clinical outcome. Recently the TEL gene at chromosome 12p13 and the AML1 gene at chromosome 21q22 were found to be involved in the translocation t(12;21)(p13;q22). By conventional cytogenetics, however, this chromosomal abnormality is barely detectable and occurs in less than 0.05% of childhood ALL. To investigate the frequency of the molecular equivalent of the t(12;21), the TEL/AML1 gene fusion, we have undertaken a prospective screening in the running German Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (BFM) and Italian Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) multicenter ALL therapy trials. We have analyzed 334 unselected cases of pediatric ALL patients consecutively referred over a period of 5 and 9 months, respectively. The overall incidence of the t(12;21) in pediatric ALL is 18.9%. The 63 cases positive for the TEL/AML1 chimeric products ranged in age between 1 and 12 years, and all but one showed CD10 and pre-B immunophenotype. Interestingly, one case displayed a pre-pre-B immunophenotype. Among the B-lineage subgroup, the t(12;21) occurs in 22.0% of the cases. Fifteen of 61 (24.6%) cases coexpressed at least two myeloid antigens (CD13, CD33, or CDw65) in more than 20% of the gated blast cells. DNA index was available for 59 of the 63 TEL/AML1 positive cases; a hyperdiploid DNA content (> or = 1.16) was detected in only four patients, being nonhyperdiploid in the remaining 55. Based on this prospective analysis, we retrospectively evaluated the impact of TEL/AML1 in prognosis by identifying the subset of B-lineage ALL children enrolled in the closed German ALL-BFM-90 and Italian ALL-AIEOP-91 protocols who had sufficient material for analysis. A total of 342 children

  5. RUNX1-ETO Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan; Mulloy, James C; Goyama, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    AML1-ETO leukemia is the most common cytogenetic subtype of acute myeloid leukemia, defined by the presence of t(8;21). Remarkable progress has been achieved in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of AML1-ETO leukemia. Proteomic surveies have shown that AML-ETO forms a stable complex with several transcription factors, including E proteins. Genome-wide transcriptome and ChIP-seq analyses have revealed the genes directly regulated by AML1-ETO, such as CEBPA. Several lines of evidence suggest that AML1-ETO suppresses endogenous DNA repair in cells to promote mutagenesis, which facilitates acquisition of cooperating secondary events. Furthermore, it has become increasingly apparent that a delicate balance of AML1-ETO and native AML1 is important to sustain the malignant cell phenotype. Translation of these findings into the clinical setting is just beginning.

  6. Prognosis of children with mixed phenotype acute leukemia treated on the basis of consistent immunophenotypic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejstrikova, Ester; Volejnikova, Jana; Fronkova, Eva; Zdrahalova, Katerina; Kalina, Tomas; Sterba, Jaroslav; Jabali, Yahia; Mihal, Vladimir; Blazek, Bohumir; Cerna, Zdena; Prochazkova, Daniela; Hak, Jiri; Zemanova, Zuzana; Jarosova, Marie; Oltova, Alexandra; Sedlacek, Petr; Schwarz, Jiri; Zuna, Jan; Trka, Jan; Stary, Jan; Hrusak, Ondrej

    2010-06-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) represents a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. The European Group for the Immunological Classification of Leukemias (EGIL) scoring system unambiguously defines MPAL expressing aberrant lineage markers. Discussions surrounding it have focused on scoring details, and information is limited regarding its biological, clinical and prognostic significance. The recent World Health Organization classification is simpler and could replace the EGIL scoring system after transformation into unambiguous guidelines. Simple immunophenotypic criteria were used to classify all cases of childhood acute leukemia in order to provide therapy directed against acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia. Prognosis, genotype and immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangement status were analyzed. The incidences of MPAL were 28/582 and 4/107 for children treated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia regimens, respectively. In immunophenotypic principal component analysis, MPAL treated as T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia clustered between cases of non-mixed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, while other MPAL cases were included in the respective non-mixed B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia clusters. Analogously, immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangements followed the expected pattern in patients treated as having acute myeloid leukemia (non-rearranged, 4/4) or as having B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (rearranged, 20/20), but were missing in 3/5 analyzed cases of MPAL treated as having T-cell acute lymphobastic leukemia. In patients who received acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment, the 5-year event-free survival of the MPAL cases was worse than that of the non-mixed cases (53+/-10% and 76+/-2% at 5 years, respectively, P=0.0075), with a more pronounced difference among B lineage cases. The small numbers of MPAL cases

  7. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Biphenotypic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute bilineal leukaemia; Acute bilineal leukemia; Acute... biphenotypic leukaemia; Acute biphenotypic leukemia; Acute mixed lineage leukaemia; Acute mixed line...age leukemia; B and T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B and T Cell Leukemia, Acute; B- and T-Cell Acute L...ymphoblastic Leukemia; B- and T-Cell Leukemia, Acute; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute..., Mixed Cell; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Mixed-Cell; Leukemia, Mixed Cell; Leukemia, Mixed, B and T Cell

  8. Does microgranular variant morphology of acute promyelocytic leukemia independently predict a less favorable outcome compared with classical M3 APL? A joint study of the North American Intergroup and the PETHEMA Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tallman, Martin S.; Kim, Haesook T.; Montesinos, Pau; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; de la Serna, Javier; Bennett, John M.; Deben, Guillermo; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Gonzalez, Jose; Feusner, James H.; Gonzalez, Marcos; Gallagher, Robert; Gonzalez-San Miguel, Jose D.; Larson, Richard A.; Milone, Gustavo; Paietta, Elisabeth; Rayon, Chelo; Rowe, Jacob M.; Rivas, Concha; Schiffer, Charles A.; Vellenga, Edo; Shepherd, Lois; Slack, James L.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Sanz, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have examined the outcome of large numbers of patients with the microgranular variant (M3V) of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in the all-trans retinoic acid era. Here, the outcome of 155 patients treated with all-transretinoic acid-based therapy on 3 clinical trials, North American I

  9. Randomized comparison of low-dose versus high-dose interferon-alfa in chronic myeloid leukemia: prospective collaboration of 3 joint trials by the MRC and HOVON groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluin-Nelemans, H.C.; Buck, G.; Cessie, S. le; Richards, S.; Beverloo, H.B.; Falkenburg, J.H.F.; Littlewood, T.; Muus, P.; Bareford, D.; Lelie, H. van der; Green, A.R.; Roozendaal, K.J.; Milne, A.E.; Chapman, C.S.; Shepherd, P.

    2004-01-01

    The optimal dose of interferon-alfa (IFN) for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is unknown. Retrospective analyses suggest that low doses are as effective as high doses, with less toxicity and fewer patients abandoning the drug. The Dutch Hemato-Oncology Association (HOVON) and British Medical Research

  10. Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with t(8;16)(p11;p13), a distinct clinical and biological entity: A collaborative study by the International-Berlin- Frankfurt-Münster AML-study group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A. Coenen (Eva); C.M. Zwaan (Christian Michel); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); C.J. Harrison (Christine); O.A. Haas (Oskar); V. de Haas (Valerie); V. Mihál (Vladimir); B. de Moerloose (Barbara); M. Jeison (Marta); J.E. Rubnitz (Jeffrey); D. Tomizawa (Daisuke); D. Johnston (Donna); T.A. Alonzo (Todd); H. Hasle (Henrik); A. Auvrignon (Anne); M.N. Dworzak (Michael); A. Pession (Andrea); V.H.J. van der Velden (Vincent); J. Swansbury (John); K.-F. Wong (Kit-Fai); N. Terui (Nobuhiko); S. Savasan (Sureyya); M. Winstanley (Mark); G. Vaitkeviciene (Goda); M. Zimmermann (Martin); R. Pieters (Rob); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), cytogenetic abnormalities are strong indicators of prognosis. Some recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities, such as t(8;16)(p11;p13), are so rare that collaborative studies are required to define their prognostic impact. We collected the clinical

  11. Long-term survival and late events after allogeneic stem cell transplantation from HLA-matched siblings for acute myeloid leukemia with myeloablative compared to reduced-intensity conditioning: a report on behalf of the acute leukemia working party of European group for blood and marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avichai Shimoni

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myeloablative (MAC and reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC are established approaches for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Most deaths after MAC occur within the first 2 years after SCT, while patients surviving leukemia-free for 2 years can expect a favorable long-term outcome. However, there is paucity of data on the long-term outcome (beyond 10 years and the pattern of late events following RIC due to the relative recent introduction of this approach. Methods We analyzed long-term outcomes in a cohort of 1423 AML patients, age ≥50 years, after SCT from HLA-matched siblings, during the years 1997–2005, median follow-up 8.3 years (0.1–17. Results The 10-year leukemia-free survival (LFS was 31 % (95CI, 27–35 and 32 % (28–35 after MAC and RIC, respectively (P = 0.57. The 10-year GVHD/ relapse-free survival (GRFS, a surrogate for quality of life was 22 % (18–25 and 21 % (18–24, respectively (P = 0.79. The 10-year non-relapse mortality (NRM was higher and relapse rate was lower after MAC, throughout the early and late post-transplant course. The 10-year LFS among 584 patients surviving leukemia-free 2 years after SCT was 71 % (65–76 and 73 % (67–78 after MAC and RIC, respectively (P = 0.76. Advanced leukemia at SCT was the major predictor of LFS subsequent to the 2-year landmark. Relapse was the major cause of late death after both regimens; however, NRM and in particular chronic graft-versus-host disease and second cancers were more common causes of late death after MAC. Conclusions Long-term LFS and GRFS are similar after RIC and MAC. Most events after RIC or MAC occur within the first 2 years after SCT. Patients who are leukemia-free 2 years after SCT can expect similar good subsequent outcome after both approaches.

  12. Aberrant expression of leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is associated with tubal pregnancy occurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yong; Sun, Lizhou; ZHAO, Denmei; Ouyang, Jun; Xiang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Tubal pregnancy is a major cause of maternal death in the first trimester and exploration of its underlying molecular mechanism is of great importance. This study aimed to explore the association of tubal pregnancy with leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) expression in oviduct tissues. Materials and methods: Immunohistochemistry was performed to probe the differential expression of LIF and LIFR in oviduct tissues among a control group (including NP...

  13. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Amino Acid Translations are all sourced from dbSNP 144 Overview Alternate Names: Synonym AML - Acute... myeloblastic leukaemia; Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloblastic Leukemias; Acute... Myelocytic Leukemia; Acute Myelocytic Leukemias; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myelogenous Leukemias; Acute... granulocytic leukaemia; Acute myeloblastic leukemia; Acute myeloid leukaemia; Acute myeloid leukaemia - category; Acute... myeloid leukaemia, disease; Acute myeloid leukemia; Acute myelo

  14. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Yang, Jun J; Hunger, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. METHODS: A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article...

  15. Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia by Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Myeloid Leukemia (CML) Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia by Phase Treatment options for people ... a stem cell donor with matching tissue type. Chronic phase The standard treatment for chronic phase CML ...

  16. Mixed-phenotype acute leukemia: historical overview and a new definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, O K; Arber, D A

    2010-11-01

    Acute leukemia with a mixed phenotype is a rare disease and comprises 2-5% of all acute leukemias. These disorders have been known historically by a variety of names, such as mixed lineage leukemia, bilineal leukemia and biphenotypic leukemia, and the criteria for diagnosis have often been arbitrary. The scoring criteria proposed by the European Group for the Immunological Characterization of Leukemias represented a major attempt to define this disorder. However, the relative weight given to some markers and the lack of lineage specificity of most markers have raised questions regarding the significance of this approach. In 2008, the World Health Organization classification of hematopoietic and lymphoid tumors proposed a simpler diagnostic algorithm, which relies on fewer and more lineage-specific markers to define mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL). MPAL with t(9;22) and MLL rearrangement have been separated. Several studies have suggested that patients with acute leukemia of mixed phenotype have a worse clinical outcome when compared with matched controls with acute myeloid leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Further studies are needed to confirm the significance of MPAL as currently defined, to determine a standardized treatment approach and to better understand the biological and clinical aspects of this disease.

  17. [Donor cell leukemia (DCL): A prospective study of its identification and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; Hernández-Reyes, Jesús; González-Ramírez, Mónica Patricia; Martagón-Herrera, Nora Ángela; Garcés-Eisele, Javier; Ruiz-Argüelles, Alejandro; González-Cortés, Angélica; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2015-01-01

    Donor-derived malignancies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and after solid organ transplantation are considered as rare diseases. We have prospectively searched for donor cell leukemia in a 12-year period, in a single institution, in a group of 106 consecutive patients allografted because of leukemia. We have identified seven cases of donor cell leukemia; six were allografted because of relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia and one because of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria/aplastic anemia. These figures suggest that the real incidence of donor cell leukemia has been underestimated. The six patients with lymphoblastic donor cell leukemia were treated prospectively with a pediatric-inspired combined chemotherapy schedule designed for de novo acute leukemia. A complete response was obtained in three out of six patients with lymphoblastic donor cell leukemia. It is possible to obtain favorable responses in donor cell leukemia patients employing combined chemotherapy. The long-term donor cell leukemia survivors remain as full chimeras and have not needed a second transplant.

  18. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Eosinophilic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Acute Eosinophilic Leukemias; Acute... eosinophilic leukemia; Eosinophilic Leukemia, Acute; Eosinophilic Leukemias, Acute; Leukemia, Acute... Eosinophilic; Leukemias, Acute Eosinophilic PharmGKB Accession Id: PA446179 External Vocabularies Me...SH: Leukemia, Eosinophilic, Acute (D015472) SnoMedCT: Acute eosinophilic leukemia... (277604002) UMLS: C0023439 (C0023439) NDFRT: Leukemia, Eosinophilic, Acute [Disease/Finding] (N0000003269)

  20. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  1. Psychiatric aspects of adult leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, J A; Lesko, L M

    1990-02-01

    This report has discussed the normal psychological responses associated with diagnosis and treatment of leukemia, specific psychological disorders that are encountered in the context of treatment, and psychological issues that develop after definitive treatment as patients become survivors from leukemia. Psychopharmacologic and psychotherapeutic strategies to treat the specific disorders of anxiety, depression, and delirium have been outlined. Similarly, survival issues have been considered as an ever-growing number of patients are cured of leukemia.

  2. Festivali erinevad palged / Niina Kotsarenko ; tõlk. Madis Kolk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kotsarenko, Niina

    2007-01-01

    Mõnedest selleaastasele teatrifestivalile "Talveöö unenägu 2006" iseloomulikest joontest. Erinevatest meistriklassidest, lühidalt etendustest: "Söör Vantes. Donki Hot" - lavastaja Dmitri Krõmovislandi, "Saja-aastane maja" Fru Emilia Teatri esituses, jaapanlase Issei Ogata monoetendus "Linnaelu kataloog" - lavastaja Yuzo Morita, Ghana tantsuansambli Kusum Gboo tantsusetendus "Somu" Richard Danguah lavastuses. Vene teatrikriitikustNatalja Krõmovast, tema sidemetest Eestiga ja tema raamatu "Nimed" presentatsioonist Linnateatris. Lk. 36-38 lühiintervjuud lavastaja Dmitri Krõmovi, tõlkija ja dramaturg Fredrik Linde ning festivali kunstilise juhi Jaanus Rohumaaga

  3. Festivali erinevad palged / Niina Kotsarenko ; tõlk. Madis Kolk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kotsarenko, Niina

    2007-01-01

    Mõnedest selleaastasele teatrifestivalile "Talveöö unenägu 2006" iseloomulikest joontest. Erinevatest meistriklassidest, lühidalt etendustest: "Söör Vantes. Donki Hot" - lavastaja Dmitri Krõmovislandi, "Saja-aastane maja" Fru Emilia Teatri esituses, jaapanlase Issei Ogata monoetendus "Linnaelu kataloog" - lavastaja Yuzo Morita, Ghana tantsuansambli Kusum Gboo tantsusetendus "Somu" Richard Danguah lavastuses. Vene teatrikriitikustNatalja Krõmovast, tema sidemetest Eestiga ja tema raamatu "Nimed" presentatsioonist Linnateatris. Lk. 36-38 lühiintervjuud lavastaja Dmitri Krõmovi, tõlkija ja dramaturg Fredrik Linde ning festivali kunstilise juhi Jaanus Rohumaaga

  4. Down syndrome preleukemia and leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Kelly W; Taub, Jeffrey W; Ravindranath, Yaddanapudi; Roberts, Irene; Vyas, Paresh

    2015-02-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) and acute leukemias acute have unique biological, cytogenetic, and intrinsic factors that affect their treatment and outcome. Myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome (ML-DS) is associated with high event-free survival (EFS) rates and frequently preceded by a preleukemia condition, the transient abnormal hematopoiesis (TAM) present at birth. For acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), their EFS and overall survival are poorer than non-DS ALL, it is important to enroll them on therapeutic trials, including relapse trials; investigate new agents that could potentially improve their leukemia-free survival; and strive to maximize the supportive care these patients need.

  5. Bovine leukemia virus high tax molecular clone experimentally induces leukemia/lymphoma in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kosuke; Nakae, Norihiro; Kuramochi, Konomi; Yin, Shan-ai; Ikeda, Manabu; Takami, Shigeaki; Hirata, Tou-ichi; Goryo, Masanobu; Numakunai, Shigeru; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tajima, Shigeru; Konnai, Satoru; Onuma, Misao; Aida, Yoko

    2005-12-01

    Sheep were inoculated with high tax coded pBLV-IF (H group, Nos.1-5) of bovine leukemia virus (BLV), wild tax coded pBLV-IF (W group, Nos. 6-11), or control plasmid (C group, Nos. 12-14). During the observation period (4 to 46 months), 5 of 5 cases in H group and 3 of 6 cases (Nos. 6, 7, 9) in W group became positive for gp 51. Only 1 case in H group became leukemic, and one case each of H and W groups developed lymphoma. In No. 3, lesions were found in multiple organs including the lymph nodes, gastrointestinal tract following abomasum, and heart. In No. 6, lesions of lymphoma were found only in the jejunum and heart. Morphologically, small to middle-sized lymphocytic neoplastic (NP) cells were found in both cases, but lymphoblastic NP cells were found only in No. 3. By immunohistochemical examination, the phenotypes of NP cells were determined as CD1-, CD4-, CD5- -, CD8alpha-, sIgM+, lambda light chain+, B-B4+, MHC class II+ in both case. The results of this study indicate that inoculation of pBLV-IF can induce lymphocytic and lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma in sheep. Additionally, it is suggested that the expression rate of tax gene is not associated with the development of leukemia/lymphoma in sheep experimentally inoculated with pBLV-IF.

  6. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Evaluation of Serum Leptin Level in Children With Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Shahramian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Leptin is a multifunctional hormone plays an important role in regulating lipid, energy, homeostasis, angiogenesis, inflammation, hematopoiesis and cell cycle. This polypeptide is effective in growth and differentiation of leukemic cells through an Ob-R receptor expressed by them. Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate serum leptin levels in patients with acute leukemia and compare it in lymphoid and myeloid groups. Patients and Methods This analytical case-control study, conducted on 60 children in age ranged from 6 months to 16 years in two case and control groups in Ali ibn Abi Talib hospital, Zahedan. They matched based on age and gender and examined after their parent’s satisfaction according to the parental consent forms. None of patients had heart disease, digestive, glandular and metabolic problems, iron deficiency anemia and chronic kidney disease. After collecting the samples, leptin levels of both groups were measured with ELISA kit. Then, the gathered data were analyzed in SPSS-20 software, using independent t-test in considering of 95% confidence interval. Results Leptin serum levels in patients with acute leukemia and controls showed significant difference (P < 0.05. Leptin serum levels in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloblastic leukemia showed significant difference (P < 0.05. Leptin serum level in relation to age and gender groups was not statistically significant. Conclusions The findings of this study showed that in patients with acute leukemia, leptin serum levels increase independently of age and gender. In addition, leptin serum levels in acute lymphoid leukemia were higher than acute myeloid leukemia in this study.

  8. Epigenetic mechanisms in leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Trombly, Daniel J; Dowdy, Christopher R; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; van Wijnen, Andre J; Stein, Gary S

    2012-09-01

    Focal organization of regulatory machinery within the interphase nucleus is linked to biological responsiveness and perturbed in cancer. Lineage determinant Runx proteins organize and assemble multi-protein complexes at sites of transcription within the nucleus and regulate both RNA polymerase II- and I-mediated gene expression. In addition, Runx proteins epigenetically control lineage determining transcriptional programs including: 1) architectural organization of macromolecular complexes in interphase, 2) regulation of gene expression through bookmarking during mitosis, and 3) microRNA-mediated translational control in the interphase nucleus. These mechanisms are compromised with the onset and progression of cancer. For example, the oncogenic AML1-ETO protein, which results from a chromosomal translocation between chromosomes 8 and 21, is expressed in nearly 25% of all acute myelogenous leukemias, disrupts Runx1 subnuclear localization during interphase and compromises transcriptional regulation. Epigenetically, the leukemic protein redirects the Runx1 DNA binding domain to leukemia-specific nuclear microenvironments, modifies regulatory protein accessibility to Runx1 target genes by imprinting repressive chromatin marks, and deregulates the microRNA (miR) profile of diseased myeloid cells. Consequently, the entire Runx1-dependent transcriptional program of myeloid cells is deregulated leading to onset and progression of acute myeloid leukemia and maintenance of leukemic phenotype. We discuss the potential of modified epigenetic landscape of leukemic cells as a viable therapeutic target.

  9. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF EXPRESSION OF SURVIVIN IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓娟; 戴国仪; 曹利民; 王国华; 朱慧芬; 张悦; 沈关心

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of survivin gene and its significance in acute leukemia. Methods: The expression of surviving in 134 acute leukemia patients and 4 leukemia cell lines was detected by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis. Results: We detected survivin expression in 78 of 134 acute leukemia patients and all the cell lines but not in normal controls and anemia patients. Survivin gene expression correlated with a lower white blood cell count, which was 11×109/L and 48×109/L in the positive and negative group respectively (P<0.01 by the Mann-Whitney test). In 55 cases of FAB M1/M2/M3, it was associated with leukemic cell maturation(P<0.01 by the Fisher test). Survivin expression was strongly related to survival time of acute leukemia patients (P<0.05). Conclusion: These data suggest that survivin expression may be considered as a new unfavorable prognostic factor for acute leukemia due to its important role in apoptosis inhibition that influences disease outcome.

  11. Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia Presenting as Leukemia Cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia cutis (LC is defined as infiltration of the skin by leukemic cells resulting in clinically recognizable cutaneous lesions. It is common in congenital leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. However, LC has rarely been reported with mixed phenotypic acute leukemia (MPAL. We report the case of a lady who presented with erythematous papular and nodular lesions all over the body. Skin biopsy showed leukemic infiltration and bone marrow aspiration showed MPAL of the T/myeloid with monocytic differentiation lineage. This is the first report of an adult patient with MPAL of the T/myeloid with monocytic differentiation type presenting with leukemia cutis. She was started on chemotherapy with Hyper-CVAD. There is complete resolution of the skin lesions and she has achieved bone marrow remission after the first cycle of chemotherapy.

  12. New treatment strategies in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia : Hypomethylating agents and proteasome inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Helm, Lidia Henrieke

    2016-01-01

    New treatment strategies in leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging, especially in the large group of patients older than 60 years. In these patients, results of standard chemotherapy are often disappointing

  13. Histamine revisited: Role in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasan R Bhandari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Histamine dihydrochloride (HDC is derived from biogenic amine histamine. It suppresses the production of reactive oxygen species which inhibits the stimulation of T cells and natural killer (NK cells. Co-administration of the cytokine interleukin (IL-2 and HDC assists the activation of T cells and NK cells by IL-2, causing in the destruction of cancer cells, including those of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. A significantly longer leukemia-free survival (LFS; primary endpoint was demonstrated in a phase III trial in adult patients with AML in first or subsequent remission, in those who received subcutaneous HDC and concomitant subcutaneous IL-2 as maintenance therapy compared to that of patients receiving no treatment. However, the difference in overall survival (OS between the two groups was not significant. Patients had acceptable levels of adverse effects. Thus, HDC in addition to IL-2 appears to be a useful maintenance therapy option for adult patients with AML in remission.

  14. Optimization of experimental human leukemia models (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Pankov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actual problem of assessing immunotherapy prospects including antigenpecific cell therapy using animal models was covered in this review.Describe the various groups of currently existing animal models and methods of their creating – from different immunodeficient mice to severalvariants of tumor cells engraftment in them. The review addresses the possibility of tumor stem cells studying using mouse models for the leukemia treatment with adoptive cell therapy including WT1. Also issues of human leukemia cells migration and proliferation in a mice withdifferent immunodeficiency degree are discussed. To assess the potential immunotherapy efficacy comparison of immunodeficient mouse model with clinical situation in oncology patients after chemotherapy is proposed.

  15. Optimization of experimental human leukemia models (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Pankov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Actual problem of assessing immunotherapy prospects including antigenpecific cell therapy using animal models was covered in this review.Describe the various groups of currently existing animal models and methods of their creating – from different immunodeficient mice to severalvariants of tumor cells engraftment in them. The review addresses the possibility of tumor stem cells studying using mouse models for the leukemia treatment with adoptive cell therapy including WT1. Also issues of human leukemia cells migration and proliferation in a mice withdifferent immunodeficiency degree are discussed. To assess the potential immunotherapy efficacy comparison of immunodeficient mouse model with clinical situation in oncology patients after chemotherapy is proposed.

  16. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usvasalo, Anu; Räty, Riikka; Knuutila, Sakari; Vettenranta, Kim; Harila-Saari, Arja; Jantunen, Esa; Kauppila, Marjut; Koistinen, Pirjo; Parto, Katriina; Riikonen, Pekka; Salmi, Toivo T; Silvennoinen, Raija; Elonen, Erkki; Saarinen-Pihkala, Ulla M

    2008-08-01

    Interest has recently been paid to adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, particularly because all reports so far published indicate that these patients have a better outcome when treated with pediatric rather than adult therapeutic protocols. There are different biological subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with distinct features and prognoses; the distribution of these subtypes is not well known among adolescents. We, therefore, studied acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults aged 10 to 25 years in Finland. This population-based study included 225 consecutive patients aged 10-25 years diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during 1990-2004. One hundred and twenty-eight patients (10-16 years) were treated with pediatric Nordic (NOPHO) protocols, and 97 patients (17-25 years) with Finnish Leukemia Group National protocols. We characterized the biological subtypes, clinical features and outcome of these patients. For the whole cohort, the remission rate was 96%, 5-year event-free survival 62% and overall survival 72%. The 5-year event-free survival was 67% for the pediatric treatment group and 60% for the adult treatment group (p=n.s.). Patients with inferior outcome were those with a white blood cell count >or= 100 x 10(9)/L, the Philadelphia chromosome and MLL. Good prognostic features were TEL-AML1, hyperdiploidy, and pediatric intermediate risk stratification. Unlike all previous studies, we found that the outcome of adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with pediatric or adult therapeutic protocols was comparable. The success of the adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy emphasizes the benefit of central referral of patients to academic centers and adherence to research protocols.

  17. Revisiting guidelines for integration of flow cytometry results in the WHO classification of myelodysplastic syndromes-proposal from the International/European LeukemiaNet Working Group for Flow Cytometry in MDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porwit, A; van de Loosdrecht, A A; Bettelheim, P; Brodersen, L Eidenschink; Burbury, K; Cremers, E; Della Porta, M G; Ireland, R; Johansson, U; Matarraz, S; Ogata, K; Orfao, A; Preijers, F; Psarra, K; Subirá, D; Valent, P; van der Velden, V H J; Wells, D; Westers, T M; Kern, W; Béné, M C

    2014-09-01

    Definite progress has been made in the exploration of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) by flow cytometry (FCM) since the publication of the World Health Organization 2008 classification of myeloid neoplasms. An international working party initiated within the European LeukemiaNet and extended to include members from Australia, Canada, Japan, Taiwan and the United States has, through several workshops, developed and subsequently published consensus recommendations. The latter deal with preanalytical precautions, and propose small and large panels, which allow evaluating immunophenotypic anomalies and calculating myelodysplasia scores. The current paper provides guidelines that strongly recommend the integration of FCM data with other diagnostic tools in the diagnostic work-up of MDS.

  18. Obinutuzumab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Jehan

    2015-09-01

    Obinutuzumab is the second next-generation monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody (after ofatumumab) to enter clinical practice in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Its superiority in association with chlorambucil as compared with chlorambucil alone has led to its approval as a first-line treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, for patients who are not candidates for a more intensive treatment.

  19. Intensive therapy before or during the conditioning regimen of allogeneic marrow transplantation in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: we must choose to reduce Toxicity--a Groupe Ouest-Est d'Etude des Leucemies et Autres Maladies du Sang study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deconinck, Eric; Hunault, Mathilde; Milpied, Noël; Bernard, Marc; Renaud, Marc; Desablens, Bernard; Delain, Martine; Witz, Francis; Lioure, Bruno; Pignon, Bernard; Guyotat, Denis; Berthou, Christian; Jouet, Jean-Pierre; Casassus, Phillipe; Ifrah, Norbert; Boiron, Jean-Michel

    2005-06-01

    To improve the results in the treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, different strategies have been proposed. The intensification could concern the induction and early consolidation phases, the conditioning regimen before allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (alloBMT), or both. We analyzed 2 consecutive trials for adult patients in first remission and with the same prognostic features. The Leucemie Aigue Lymphoblastique Paris-Ouest-France (LALPOF) protocol proposed alloBMT with standard conditioning after a classic induction and intensified consolidation scheme; the Groupe Ouest Est des Leucemies Aigues Lymphoblastiques (GOLEAL1) protocol tested an intensified induction and consolidation course before alloBMT with a reinforced conditioning regimen. The 4-year survival rates after alloBMT for LALPOF and GOELAL1 were, respectively, 71% +/- 12% and 36% +/- 13% ( P = .009). The 4-year disease-free survival reached 75% +/- 11% in the LALPOF study and 69% +/- 13% in the GOELAL1 study ( P = .30). The toxic death rate was significantly lower in the LALPOF (2/18) than in the GOELAL1 (6/15) group. Event-free survival at 4 years was significantly higher in LALPOF than in GOELAL1: 66% +/- 11% and 35% +/- 11%, respectively ( P = .02). For adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients in first remission, the intensification of chemotherapy before a reinforced conditioning regimen before alloBMT may lead to an increased toxic death rate.

  20. Outcomes after HLA-matched sibling transplantation or chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a second remission after an isolated central nervous system relapse: a collaborative study of the Children's Oncology Group and the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, M; Zhang, M-J; Devidas, M; Raetz, E; Barredo, J C; Ritchey, A K; Godder, K; Grupp, S; Lewis, V A; Malloy, K; Carroll, W L; Davies, S M; Camitta, B M

    2008-02-01

    In children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse and a human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling, the optimal treatment after attaining second remission is unknown. We compared outcomes in 149 patients enrolled on chemotherapy trials and 60 HLA-matched sibling transplants, treated in 1990-2000. All patients achieved a second complete remission. Groups were similar, except the chemotherapy recipients were younger at diagnosis, less likely to have T-cell ALL and had longer duration (> or = 18 months) first remission. To adjust for time-to-transplant bias, left-truncated Cox's regression models were constructed. Relapse rates were similar after chemotherapy and transplantation. In both treatment groups, relapse rates were higher in older children (11-17 years; RR 2.81, P=0.002) and shorter first remission (< 18 months; RR 3.89, P<0.001). Treatment-related mortality rates were higher after transplantation (RR 4.28, P=0.001). The 8-year probabilities of leukemia-free survival adjusted for age and duration of first remission were similar after chemotherapy with irradiation and transplantation (66 and 58%, respectively). In the absence of an advantage for one treatment option over another, the data support use of either intensive chemotherapy with irradiation or HLA-matched sibling transplantation with total body irradiation containing conditioning regimen for children with ALL in second remission after an isolated CNS relapse.

  1. Successful acute lymphoblastic leukemia-type therapy in two children with mixed-phenotype acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsubo, Keisuke; Yabe, Miharu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Fukumura, Akiko; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Masahiko; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) is a rare type of leukemia expressing both myeloid and lymphoid markers. There is limited information, especially on pediatric cases. Therefore, the optimal therapeutic approach to pediatric MPAL has not been defined. Here, we report two pediatric cases of MPAL. According to the 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification and European Group for the Immunological Characterization of Leukemias (EGIL) criteria, patient 1 was diagnosed with overt MPAL positive for the myeloid marker myeloperoxidase (MPO), and B-lymphoid markers. Patient 2 was diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) using EGIL criteria. According to the 2008 WHO classification, however, patient 2 was diagnosed with overt MPAL positive for CD3, T-lymphoid markers and MPO. We chose an ALL-type therapy consisting of both lymphoid- and myeloid-directed agents; these patients have maintained complete remission following treatment. Further information on pediatric MPAL is needed to establish an appropriate therapeutic strategy including stem cell transplantation for this rare condition. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. KEGG PATHWAY / Acute myeloid leukemia [KEGG

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PATHWAY: map05221 Entry map05221Pathway Name Acute myeloid leukemia Description Acute...Class Human Diseases; Cancers Pathwaymap map05221Acute myeloid leukemia Disease H00003Acute myeloid leukemia...inkDB DBGET integrated database retrieval system KEGG PATHWAY / Acute myeloid leukemia ...

  3. Decitabine versus best supportive care in older patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation (RAEBt) - results of a subgroup analysis of the randomized phase III study 06011 of the EORTC Leukemia Cooperative Group and German MDS Study Group (GMDSSG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Heiko; Suciu, Stefan; Rüter, Björn Hans; Platzbecker, Uwe; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Labar, Boris; Germing, Ulrich; Salih, Helmut R; Muus, Petra; Pflüger, Karl-Heinz; Hagemeijer, Anne; Schaefer, Hans-Eckart; Fiaccadori, Valeria; Baron, Frédéric; Ganser, Arnold; Aul, Carlo; de Witte, Theo; Wijermans, Pierre W; Lübbert, Michael

    2015-12-01

    In the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)/GMDSSG phase III trial 06011, we compared decitabine (15 mg/m(2) every 8 h for 3 days) with best supportive care (BSC) in patients ≥60 years with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) by French-American-British (FAB) criteria. Here, we reinvestigate trial 06011 for the activity and efficacy specifically in patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation (RAEBt). Response rates in the decitabine arm (N = 40) were as follows: complete or partial remission, 15 %; hematologic improvement, 15 %; resistant disease, 30 %. RAEBt patients in the decitabine arm had longer progression-free survival (PFS; hazard ratio (HR) 0.30, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.18-0.51; median, 6.2 vs 2.8 months) and overall survival (OS; HR 0.68, 95 % CI 0.42-1.11; median, 8.0 vs 6.0 months) than in the BSC arm (N = 35). Censoring at allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the OS difference between the treatment groups increased, particularly among patients aged 60-74 years (HR 0.48, 95 % CI 0.26-0.89). After regrouping the study cohort according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (i.e., ≥20 % blasts) in the decitabine arm (N = 27) also had longer PFS than in the BSC arm (N = 23) (HR 0.46, 95 % CI 0.26-0.83; median, 6.2 vs 2.8 months). In conclusion, 3-day decitabine displays clinical activity and efficacy in MDS and/or AML with 5-30 % blood or 20-30 % marrow blasts.

  4. Analysis of childhood leukemia mortality trends in Brazil, from 1980 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciane F. Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Leukemias comprise the most common group of cancers in children and adolescents. Studies conducted in other countries and Brazil have observed a decrease in their mortality.This study aimed to evaluate the trend of mortality from leukemia in children under 19 years of age in Brazil, from 1980 to 2010. METHODS: This was an ecological study, using retrospective time series data from the Mortality Information System, from 1980 to 2010. Calculations of mortality rates were performed, including gross, gender-specific, and age-based. For trend analysis, linear and semi-log regression models were used. The significance level was 5%. RESULTS: Mortality rates for lymphoid and myeloid leukemias presented a growth trend, with the exception of lymphoid leukemia among children under 4 years of age (percentage decrease: 1.21% annually, while in the sub-group "Other types of leukemia", a downward trend was observed. Overall, mortality from leukemia tended to increase for boys and girls, especially in the age groups 10-14 years (annual percentage increase of 1.23% for males and 1.28% for females and 15-19 years (annual percentage increase of 1.40% for males and 1.62% for females. CONCLUSIONS: The results for leukemia generally corroborate the results of other similar studies. A detailed analysis by subgroup of leukemia, age, and gender revealed no trends shown in other studies, thus indicating special requirements for each variable in the analysis.

  5. Bendamustine Plus Alemtuzumab for Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  6. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Blasts Under 10 Percent of Bone Marrow Nucleated Cells; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Therapy reduction in patients with Down syndrome and myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uffmann, Madita; Rasche, Mareike; Zimmermann, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Children with myeloid leukemia associated with Down syndrome (ML-DS) have superior outcome compared with non-DS patients, but suffer from higher constitutional cytotoxic drug susceptibility. We analyzed the outcome of 170 pediatric patients with ML-DS enrolled in the prospective, multicenter, open......-label, nonrandomized ML-DS 2006 trial by Nordic Society for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (NOPHO), Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG), and Acute Myeloid Leukemia-Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (AML-BFM) study group. Compared with the historical control arm (reduced-intensity protocol for ML-DS patients from the AML...

  8. Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faderl, Stefan; O’Brien, Susan; Pui, Ching-Hon; Stock, Wendy; Wetzler, Meir; Hoelzer, Dieter; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a clonal expansion of hematopoietic blasts, is a highly heterogeneous disease comprising many entities for which distinct treatment strategies are pursued. Although ALL is a success story in pediatric oncology, results in adults lag behind those in children. An expansion of new drugs, more reliable immunologic and molecular techniques for the assessment of minimal residual disease, and efforts at more precise risk stratification are generating new aspects of adult ALL therapy. For this review, the authors summarized pertinent and recent literature on ALL biology and therapy, and they discuss current strategies and potential implications of novel approaches to the management of adult ALL. PMID:20101737

  9. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Expression of CD133 in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolba, Fetnat M; Foda, Mona E; Kamal, Howyda M; Elshabrawy, Deena A

    2013-06-01

    There have been conflicting results regarding a correlation between CD133 expression and disease outcome. To assess CD133 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to evaluate its correlation with the different clinical and laboratory data as well as its relation to disease outcome, the present study included 60 newly diagnosed acute leukemic patients; 30 ALL patients with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1 and their ages ranged from 9 months to 48 years, and 30 AML patients with a male to female ratio of 1:1 and their ages ranged from 17 to 66 years. Flow cytometric assessment of CD133 expression was performed on blast cells. In ALL, no correlations were elicited between CD133 expression and some monoclonal antibodies, but in AML group, there was a significant positive correlation between CD133 and HLA-DR, CD3, CD7 and TDT, CD13 and CD34. In ALL group, patients with negative CD133 expression achieved complete remission more than patients with positive CD133 expression. In AML group, there was no statistically significant association found between positive CD133 expression and treatment outcome. The Kaplan-Meier curve illustrated a high significant negative correlation between CD133 expression and the overall survival of the AML patients. CD133 expression is an independent prognostic factor in acute leukemia, especially ALL patients and its expression could characterize a group of acute leukemic patients with higher resistance to standard chemotherapy and relapse. CD133 expression was highly associated with poor prognosis in acute leukemic patients.

  11. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym AML M6; Acute Erythroblastic Leukemia; Acute Erythroblastic Leukemias; Acu...te erythraemic myelosis [obs]; Acute erythremia [obs]; Acute erythremic myelosis [obs]; Acute... erythroid leukaemia; Acute erythroid leukemia; Acute myeloid leukaemia, M6 type; Acute myeloid le...Erythroblastic Leukemia, Acute; Erythroblastic Leukemias, Acute; Erythroleukaemia...; Erythroleukemia; Erythroleukemias; FAB M6; Leukemia, Acute Erythroblastic; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute, M6; Leukemias, Acute

  13. Decitabine and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Childhood Leukemia and Electromagnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpaslan Türkkan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the relationship between very low frequency electromagnetic fields, originating from high voltage powerlines, and childhood leukemia was evaluated. Electromagnetic fields have biological effects. Whole populations are effected by different levels of electromagnetic fields but children are more sensible. In urban areas high voltage powerlines are the main sources of electromagnetic fields. The relation of electromagnetic fields due to high voltage powerlines and leukemia with consideration of dose-response and distance is investigated in several studies. There are different opinions on the effects of electromagnetic fields on general health. The relation between electromagnetic fields and childhood leukemia must be considered separately. Although there is no limit value, it is generally accepted that exposure to 0.4 µT and over doubles the risk of leukemia in children 15 years and younger. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2009; 7: 137-41

  15. From dissection of disease pathogenesis to elucidation of mechanisms of targeted therapies: leukemia research in the genomic era

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-biao ZHOU; Guo LI; Sai-juan CHEW; Zhu CHEN

    2007-01-01

    Leukemia is a group of heterozygous diseases of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells that involves dynamic change in the genome. Dissection of genetic abnor-malities critical to leukemia initiation provides insights into the elusive leukemogenesis, identifies distinct subsets of leukemia and predicts prognosisindividually, and can also provide rational therapeutic targets for curative approaches. The past three decades have seen tremendous advances in the analysis of genotype-phenotype connection of leukemia, and in the identifica-tion of molecular biomarkers for leukemia subtypes. Intriguingly, differentiation therapy, targeted therapy and chemotherapy have turned several subtypes of leukemia from highly fatal to highly curable. The use of all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide, which trigger degradation of PML-RARα, the causative fusion protein generated by t (15;17) translocation in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL),has led to a dramatic improvement of APL clinical outcome. Imatinib mesylate/Gleevec/STI571, which inhibits the tyrosine kinase activity of BCR-ABL oncoprotein, has now become the new gold standard for the treatmtent of chronic myeloid leukemia. Optimal use of chemotherapeutic agents together with a strin-gent application of prognostic factors for risk-directed therapy in clinical trials has resulted in a steady improvement in the treatment outcome of acute lympho-blastic leukemia. Hence, the pace of progress extrapolates to a prediction of leukemia control in the twenty-first century.

  16. MORPHOLOGIC & FLOWCYTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF ACUTE LEUKEMIAS IN A TEACHING HOSPITAL IN CHHATTISGARH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Parveen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Immunophenotyping of leukemi a by flowcytometry offers a better classification of the hematopoietic lineage of malignant cells as compared to morphology. AIM : To determine the immunophenotypic subtypes of acute leukemia in a tertiary care teaching hospital. MATERIAL & METHODS : A one y ear study of morphologic & flowcytometric data of patients with acute leukemia. RESULTS : Total numbers of acute leukemia patients diagnosed morphologically were 45, out of which 20 patients underwent immunophenotyping by flowcytometry. Maximum patients wer e in the age group of 0 - 10 yrs followed by 11 - 20 yrs with males outnumbering female. Immunophenotypically they belonged to ALL - B cell lineage, ALL - T cell lineage, AML, biphenotypic, inconclusive. CONCLUSION : Immunophenotyping of acute leukemias by flowcyto metry, not only helps to confirm the morphologic diagnosis but also helps in assigning specific lineage to the blasts, particularly in acute lymphoid leukemia

  17. Mast cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Dubreuil, Patrice; Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Hermine, Olivier; Damaj, Gandhi

    2013-02-21

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is a very rare form of aggressive systemic mastocytosis accounting for mast cell activation-involvement of the liver, spleen, peritoneum, bones, and marrow-are frequent. Diagnosis is based on the presence of ≥ 20% atypical mast cells in the marrow or ≥ 10% in the blood; however, an aleukemic variant is frequently encountered in which the number of circulating mast cells is < 10%. The common phenotypic features of pathologic mast cells encountered in most forms of mastocytosis are unreliable in MCL. Unexpectedly, non-KIT D816V mutations are frequent and therefore, complete gene sequencing is necessary. Therapy usually fails and the median survival time is < 6 months. The role of combination therapies and bone marrow transplantation needs further investigation.

  18. Treatment of prolymphocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollister, S. Jr.; Coleman, M.

    1982-11-01

    Prolymphocytic leukemia is characterized by marked splenomegaly, distinctive cellular morphologic characteristics, and a poor clinical course. Five patients with typical PL were treated systematically with vincristine/prednisone, chlorambucil/prednisone, splenic irradiation, splenectomy, and other chemotherapy regimens. No patient responded to vincristine/prednisone. Two patients responded to chlorambucil/prednisone, and four patients had brief responses to splenic irradiation. Two patients underwent splenectomy, one of whom had a prolonged clinical remissions. No other chemotherapy combinations were of value. The median survival was 33 months. Recommendations are made to use chlorambucil/prednisone or splenic irradiation as initial treatment. Splenectomy should be considered in patients refractory to these modalities. The course of PL may be more protracted than originally reported.

  19. Treatment of prolymphocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollister, D. Jr.; Coleman, M.

    1982-11-01

    Prolymphocytic leukemia is characterized by marked splenomegaly, distinctive cellular morphologic characteristics, and a poor clinical course. Five patients with typical PL were treated systematically with vincristine/prednisone, chlorambucil/prednisone, splenic irradiation, splenectomy, and other chemotherapy regimens. No patient responded to vincristine/prednisone. Two patients responded to chlorambucil/prednisone, and four patients had brief responses to splenic irradiation. Two patients underwent splenectomy, one of whom had a prolonged clinical remission. There were no complete remissions. No other chemotherapy combinations were of value. The median survival was 33 months. Recommendations are made to use chlorambucil/prednisone or splenic irradiation as initial treatment. Splenectomy should be considered in patients refractory to these modalities. The course of PL may be more protracted than originally reported.

  20. Plasma cell leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández de Larrea, C; Kyle, R A; Durie, B G M

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic......-pathological entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10(9)/l) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds...... regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding...

  1. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-24

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Second Malignant Neoplasms After Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Attarbaschi, Andishe

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are rare events. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed data on risk factors and outcomes of 642 children with SMNs occurring after treatment for ALL from 18 collaborative study groups between 1980...... and 2007. RESULTS: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 186), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; n = 69), and nonmeningioma brain tumor (n = 116) were the most common types of SMNs and had the poorest outcome (5-year survival rate, 18.1% ± 2.9%, 31.1% ± 6.2%, and 18.3% ± 3.8%, respectively). Five-year survival...

  3. Molecular diagnosis of lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalal Iravathy Goud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mixed lineage leukemia (MLL gene at chromosome band 11q23 is commonly involved in reciprocal translocations that is detected in acute leukemia. The MLL gene, coomonly known as mixed lineage leukemia or myeloid lymphoid leukemia, has been independently identified and cloned from the 11q23 breakpoint of acute leukemia. We describe a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia whose cells had shown reciprocal translocation between short arm (p21 of chromosome 2 and long arm (q23 of chromosome number 11 [t(2;11 (p21;q23] by cytogenetic analysis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH was also performed for reconfirmation with a probe for MLL which showed split signals, hybridizing to both the derivative 2 and 11 chromosomes. Our study confirmed FISH as the most suitable assay for detecting MLL rearrangements because of its sensitivity and speed. It recommended that FISH should be used as complementary to conventional cytogenetic analysis. In conclusion, evaluation of the t(2;11(p21;q23 was done by molecular clarification and flow cytometry.

  4. Randomized trial of two schedules of low-dose gemtuzumab ozogamicin as induction monotherapy for newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia in older patients not considered candidates for intensive chemotherapy. A phase II study of the EORTC and GIMEMA leukemia groups (AML-19)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadori, Sergio; Suciu, Stefan; Selleslag, Dominik; Stasi, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana; Baila, Liliana; Rizzoli, Vittorio; Borlenghi, Erika; Gaidano, Gianluca; Magro, Domenico; Torelli, Giuseppe; Muus, Petra; Venditti, Adriano; Cacciola, Emma; Lauria, Francesco; Vignetti, Marco; de Witte, Theo

    2010-01-01

    Summary This study compared two schedules of low-dose gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) as induction monotherapy for untreated acute myeloid leukemia in older patients unfit for intensive chemotherapy, to identify the more promising regimen for further study. Patients were randomized to receive either best supportive care or a course of GO according to one of two schedules: 3 mg/m2 on days 1, 3 and 5 (arm A), or GO 6 mg/m2 on day 1 and 3 mg/m2 on day 8 (arm B). Primary endpoint was the rate of disease non-progression (DnP), defined as the proportion of patients either achieving a response or maintaining a stable disease following GO induction in each arm. Fifty-six patients were randomized in the two GO arms (A, n=29; B, n=27). The rate of DnP was 38% (90% confidence interval [CI], 23%–55%) in arm A, and 63% (90% CI, 45%–78%) in arm B. Peripheral cytopenias were the most common adverse events for both regimens. The all-cause early mortality rate was 14% in arm A and 11% in arm B. The day 1+8 schedule, which was associated with the highest rate of DnP, met the statistical criteria to be selected as the preferred regimen for phase III comparison with best supportive care. PMID:20230405

  5. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekker-Méndez Vilma

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR, and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level. Results Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3; acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million, followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million, and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million. The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million. For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million. The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8% were

  6. Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation with azacitidine and donor lymphocyte infusions--a retrospective multicenter analysis from the German Cooperative Transplant Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Thomas; Rachlis, Elena; Bug, Gesine; Stelljes, Matthias; Klein, Stefan; Steckel, Nina Kristin; Wolf, Dominik; Ringhoffer, Mark; Czibere, Akos; Nachtkamp, Kathrin; Dienst, Ariane; Kondakci, Mustafa; Stadler, Michael; Platzbecker, Uwe; Uharek, Lutz; Luft, Thomas; Fenk, Roland; Germing, Ulrich; Bornhäuser, Martin; Kröger, Nicolaus; Beelen, Dietrich W; Haas, Rainer; Kobbe, Guido

    2015-04-01

    To expand the current knowledge about azacitidine (Aza) and donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) as salvage therapy for relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) and to identify predictors for response and survival, we retrospectively analyzed data of 154 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, n = 124), myelodysplastic (MDS, n = 28), or myeloproliferative syndrome (n = 2). All patients received a median number of 4 courses of Aza (range, 4 to 14) and DLI were administered to 105 patients (68%; median number of DLI, 2; range, 1 to 7). Complete and partial remission rates were 27% and 6%, respectively, resulting in an overall response rate of 33%. Multivariate analysis identified molecular-only relapse (hazard ratio [HR], 9.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0 to 43.5; P = .004) and diagnosis of MDS (HR, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.4 to 12.2; P = .011) as predictors for complete remission. Overall survival (OS) at 2 years was 29% ± 4%. Molecular-only relapse (HR, .14; 95% CI, .03 to .59; P = .007), diagnosis of MDS (HR, .33; 95% CI, .16 to .67; P = .002), and bone marrow blasts after allo-HSCT, in particular those with MDS or AML and low disease burden. The latter finding emphasizes the importance of stringent disease monitoring and early intervention.

  7. Health-related Quality of Life (HR-QOL) and Chronic Health Conditions in Survivors of Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) with Down Syndrome (DS): A Report From the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kris Ann P; Chen, Lu; Kunin-Batson, Alicia; Chen, Zhengjia; Woods, William G; Gamis, Alan; Kawashima, Toana; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Nicholson, H Stacy; Neglia, Joseph P

    2017-01-01

    Survival rates for children with Down syndrome (DS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are high; however, little is known regarding the health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) of these survivors. Individuals who survived ≥5 years following diagnosis of childhood AML were invited to complete parent or patient-report surveys measuring HR-QOL and chronic health conditions. In total, 26 individuals with DS had a median age at diagnosis of 1.8 years (range, 0.77 to 10.9 y) and median age at interview of 15 years (range, 8.3 to 27.6 y). Participants with DS and AML were compared with AML survivors without DS whose caregiver completed a HR-QOL survey (CHQ-PF50). In total, 77% of survivors with DS reported ≥1 chronic health condition compared with 50% of AML survivors without DS (P=0.07). Mean physical and psychosocial QOL scores for children with DS and AML were statistically lower than the population mean, though not discrepant from AML survivors without DS. Although the overall prevalence of chronic health conditions in survivors with DS is higher than in survivors without DS, prior studies of children with DS have reported similarly high rates of chronic health conditions, suggesting that AML therapy may not substantially increase this risk.

  8. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-14

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Coping With Your Child's Cancer: Liz Scott's Story Side Effects of Chemotherapy and ... Stem Cell Transplants Caring for a Seriously Ill Child Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Cancer Center Chemotherapy Some Kinds of Cancer Kids Get ...

  10. Tailoring of chronic lymphatic leukemia therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Elhefni, Ashraf M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains an incurable disease, with all patients who require therapy destined to relapse and understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic lymphocytic leukemia has advanced significantly. It is now clear that chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a relatively proliferative disorder that requires the help of its microenvironment to be maintained and to progress. The stimulation of the chronic lymphatic leukemia cell occurs in most, if not all, patients through ant...

  11. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  12. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia.

  13. A Case of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Leukemia

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    Köpeczi Judit Beáta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia is a rare subtype of acute leukemia, which has recently been established as a distinct pathologic entity that typically follows a highly aggressive clinical course in adults. The aim of this report is to present a case of plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia due to its rarity and difficulty to recognize and diagnose it.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia. Antibod

  15. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. A phase II randomized trial comparing standard and low dose rituximab combined with alemtuzumab as initial treatment of progressive chronic lymphocytic leukemia in older patients: a trial of the ECOG-ACRIN cancer research group (E1908).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zent, Clive S; Victoria Wang, Xin; Ketterling, Rhett P; Hanson, Curtis A; Libby, Edward N; Barrientos, Jacqueline C; Call, Timothy G; Chang, Julie E; Liu, Jane J; Calvo, Alejandro R; Lazarus, Hillard M; Rowe, Jacob M; Luger, Selina M; Litzow, Mark R; Tallman, Martin S

    2016-03-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL) patients requiring initial therapy are often older and frailer and unsuitable candidates for standard chemoimmunotherapy regimens. Shorter duration combination monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy using alemtuzumab and rituximab has been shown to be effective and tolerable treatment for CLL. Standard dose anti-CD20 mAb therapy causes loss of CD20 expression by surviving CLL cells, which can be minimized by decreasing the mAb dose. We report a randomized phase II clinical trial enrolling older (≥ 65 years) patients (median age 76 years, n = 31) with treatment naïve progressive CLL. Patients received 8-12 weeks of standard subcutaneous alemtuzumab with either intravenous standard (375 mg/m(2) weekly)(n = 16) or low dose (20 mg/m(2) 3x week)(n = 15) rituximab. This study was closed before full accrual because the manufacturer withdrew alemtuzumab for treatment of CLL. The overall response rate was 90% with an 45% complete response rate, median progression-free survival of 17.9 months and no significant differences in outcome between the low and standard dose rituximab arms. The major toxicities were cytopenia and infection with one treatment fatality caused by progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy but no other opportunistic infections. Combination mAb therapy was effective and tolerable treatment for older and frailer patients with progressive CLL, achieving a high rate of complete remissions. These data support the role of mAb in therapy for less fit CLL patients and the further study of low dose higher frequency anti-CD20 mAb therapy as a potentially more effective use of anti-CD20 mAb in the treatment of CLL.

  18. PLASMA CELL LEUKEMIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Larrea, Carlos Fernandez; Kyle, Robert A.; Durie, Brian GM; Ludwig, Heinz; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H.; Hajek, Roman; Miguel, Jésus San; Sezer, Orhan; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kumar, Shaji K.; Mahindra, Anuj; Comenzo, Ray; Palumbo, Antonio; Mazumber, Amitabha; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Caers, Jo; Cavo, Michele; LeLeu, Xavier; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Chim, CS; Schots, Rik; Noeul, Amara; Fantl, Dorotea; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Landgren, Ola; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Moreau, Philippe; Fonseca, Rafael; Merlini, Giampaolo; Lahuerta, JJ; Bladé, Joan; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Shah, Jatin J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathologic entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10 9/L) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be reexamined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL. PMID:23288300

  19. Mixed-phenotype acute leukemia: suboptimal treatment when the 2008/2016 WHO classification is used

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantz, Alan; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Demichelis-Gomez, Roberta; Barrera-Lumbreras, Georgina; Barrales-Benitez, Olga; Lopez-Karpovitch, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Background Different criteria have been used to diagnose mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL), which has impacted the number of individuals diagnosed with this pathology. Better outcomes have been reported when using acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)-type chemotherapy in the treatment of MPAL. Methods We compared the outcome of 4 groups of patients with MPAL. Group 1 included patients diagnosed using the 2008/2016 World Health Organization (WHO) classification; group 2 included patients diagnosed using the European Group for the Immunological Characterization of Leukemias (EGIL) criteria; group 3 included patients diagnosed using either the EGIL or the 2008/2016 WHO criteria; and group 4 was comprised of patients diagnosed with MPAL using the EGIL classification only. Results We found a significantly worse disease-free survival (groups 1-4) and overall survival (OS) (groups 2 and 3) when comparing MPAL patients to other acute leukemia (AL) patients. A significantly better OS was obtained in patients (groups 2-4) treated with ALL-type chemotherapy compared to acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-type regimens. Conclusion In light of these results, and because a trend (P=0.06) was found with regard to a better OS in group 4 when compared to other AL patients, an argument can be made that the 2008/2016 WHO classification is underpowered to diagnose all MPAL cases, potentially resulting in the suboptimal treatment of some individuals with AL. PMID:28090485

  20. Development of acute leukemia in a known case of fanconi anaemia ( aplastic anaemai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Jhaveri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia is an autosomal recessive disease associated with an abnormal DNA damage. Although Fanconi anemia is well known for its association of Aplastic anemia and characteristic birth defects, leukemia and solid tumors also occur at a high rate in this group of patients. A patient male / 20yrs, known case of Fanconi anemia presented with ulcer over left lower limb. On further evaluation, the patient was found to have pancytopenia and his peripheral smear revealed many atypical blast like cells. So bone marrow study was done which revealed it to be Acute leukemia probably Acute Myeloid leukemia.

  1. Aptamer-Functionalized Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles for Highly Sensitive Detection of Leukemia Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Juntao; Yang, Nuo; Hu, Zixi; Su, Jing; Zhong, Jianhong; Yang, Yang; Yu, Yating; Zhu, Jianmeng; Xue, Dabin; Huang, Yingying; Lai, Zongqiang; Huang, Yong; Lu, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2016-06-01

    A simple, highly sensitive method to detect leukemia cells has been developed based on aptamer-modified fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs). In this strategy, the amine-labeled Sgc8 aptamer was conjugated to carboxyl-modified FSNPs via amide coupling between amino and carboxyl groups. Sensitivity and specificity of Sgc8-FSNPs were assessed using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. These results showed that Sgc8-FSNPs detected leukemia cells with high sensitivity and specificity. Aptamer-modified FSNPs hold promise for sensitive and specific detection of leukemia cells. Changing the aptamer may allow the FSNPs to detect other types of cancer cells.

  2. High-Risk Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Howard, Scott C.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2009-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are cured, certain subsets have a high risk of relapse. Relapse risk can be predicted by early response to therapy, clinical and pharmacogenetic features of the host, and genetic characteristics of leukemic cells. Though early treatment response can be assessed by the peripheral blast cell count after 1 week of single-agent glucocorticoid treatment or percent of bone marrow blasts by morphology after 1 or 2 weeks of multiagent induction treatment, determination of minimal residual disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or flow cytometry after 2 to 6 weeks of induction is the most precise and useful measure. Augmented therapy has improved outcome for the poor responders to initial treatment. Infants with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL)–rearranged ALL comprise a very poor-risk group wherein further intensification of chemotherapy causes significant toxicity. Hybrid protocols incorporating drugs effective for acute myeloid leukemia could improve survival, a strategy being tested in international trials. Studies on the biology of MLL-induced leukemogenesis have prompted the development of novel targeted agents, currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Short-term outcomes of patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)–positive ALL have improved significantly by adding tyrosine kinase inhibitors to standard chemotherapy regimens. New agents and methods to overcome resistance are under investigation, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation is recommended for certain subsets of patients, for example those with Ph+ and T-cell ALL with poor early response. Genome-wide interrogation of leukemic cell genetic abnormalities and germline genetic variations promise to identify new molecular targets for therapy. PMID:19778845

  3. Leukemia following the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Geoffrey R

    2007-11-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine in 1986 led to a substantial increase of thyroid cancer among those exposed as children. The other cancer that is the most sensitive to the effects of ionizing radiation is leukemia, and this paper evaluates the evidence relating exposure to Chernobyl radioactivity and leukemia risk. Two types of objectives are identified, namely, scientific evidence and public health, and two approaches to addressing such objectives are discussed. Empirical studies in affected populations are summarized, and it is concluded that, possibly apart from Russian cleanup workers, no meaningful evidence of any statistical association between exposure and leukemia risk as yet exists. However, it is important to carry on with such studies to satisfy various public health objectives.

  4. ABO genotyping in leukemia patients reveals new ABO variant alleles

    OpenAIRE

    Novaretti,M.C.Z.; DOMINGUES, A. E.; MANHANI, R.; Pinto, E M; Dorlhiac-Llacer, P.E.; Chamone, D.A.F.

    2008-01-01

    The ABO blood group is the most important blood group system in transfusion medicine and organ transplantation. To date, more than 160 ABO alleles have been identified by molecular investigation. Almost all ABO genotyping studies have been performed in blood donors and families and for investigation of ABO subgroups detected serologically. The aim of the present study was to perform ABO genotyping in patients with leukemia. Blood samples were collected from 108 Brazilian patients with chronic...

  5. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Bullous leukemia cutis mimicking facial cellulitis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldato, Luciana de Sales; Britto, Juliana de Sousa; Niero-Melo, Ligia; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2016-01-01

    Bullous leukemia cutis is an uncommon clinical manifestation of cutaneous infiltration by leukemic cells, from B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We present the case of a 67-year-old, female, chronic lymphocytic leukemia patient. She was taking chlorambucil and developed facial edema with erythema and warmth, misjudged as facial cellulitis. Two days later, she developed bullous lesions in the arms, legs, neck and face. The histopathology of facial and bullous lesions confirmed leukemia cutis. All lesions disappeared following the administration of rituximab combined with cycles of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide. Although soft tissue infections are common complications in patients undergoing chemotherapy, leukemia cutis can also resemble cellulitis. PMID:27192532

  7. Outcomes after Induction Failure in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrappe, Martin; Hunger, Stephen P.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Saha, Vaskar; Gaynon, Paul S.; Baruchel, André; Conter, Valentino; Otten, Jacques; Ohara, Akira; Versluys, Anne Birgitta; Escherich, Gabriele; Heyman, Mats; Silverman, Lewis B.; Horibe, Keizo; Mann, Georg; Camitta, Bruce M.; Harbott, Jochen; Riehm, Hansjörg; Richards, Sue; Devidas, Meenakshi; Zimmermann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Failure of remission-induction therapy is a rare but highly adverse event in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). METHODS We identified induction failure, defined by the persistence of leukemic blasts in blood, bone marrow, or any extramedullary site after 4 to 6 weeks of remission-induction therapy, in 1041 of 44,017 patients (2.4%) 0 to 18 years of age with newly diagnosed ALL who were treated by a total of 14 cooperative study groups between 1985 and 2000. We analyzed the relationships among disease characteristics, treatments administered, and outcomes in these patients. RESULTS Patients with induction failure frequently presented with high-risk features, including older age, high leukocyte count, leukemia with a T-cell phenotype, the Philadelphia chromosome, and 11q23 rearrangement. With a median follow-up period of 8.3 years (range, 1.5 to 22.1), the 10-year survival rate (±SE) was estimated at only 32±1%. An age of 10 years or older, T-cell leukemia, the presence of an 11q23 rearrangement, and 25% or more blasts in the bone marrow at the end of induction therapy were associated with a particularly poor outcome. High hyperdiploidy (a modal chromosome number >50) and an age of 1 to 5 years were associated with a favorable outcome in patients with precursor B-cell leukemia. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation from matched, related donors was associated with improved outcomes in T-cell leukemia. Children younger than 6 years of age with precursor B-cell leukemia and no adverse genetic features had a 10-year survival rate of 72±5% when treated with chemotherapy only. CONCLUSIONS Pediatric ALL with induction failure is highly heterogeneous. Patients who have T-cell leukemia appear to have a better outcome with allogeneic stem-cell transplantation than with chemotherapy, whereas patients who have precursor B-cell leukemia without other adverse features appear to have a better outcome with chemotherapy. (Funded by Deutsche

  8. A comprehensive review of occupational and general population cancer risk: 1,3-Butadiene exposure-response modeling for all leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, myeloid neoplasm and lymphoid neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielken, Robert L; Valdez-Flores, Ciriaco

    2015-11-05

    Excess cancer risks associated with 1,3-butadiene (BD) inhalation exposures are calculated using an extensive data set developed by the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) from an epidemiology study of North American workers in the styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) industry. While the UAB study followed SBR workers, risk calculations can be adapted to estimate both occupational and general population risks. The data from the UAB SBR study offer an opportunity to quantitatively evaluate the association between cumulative exposure to BD and different types of cancer, accounting for the number of tasks involving high-intensity exposures to BD as well as confounding associated with the exposures to the multiple other chemicals in the SBR industry. Quantitative associations of BD exposure and cancer, specifically leukemia, can be further characterized by leukemia type, including potential associations with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and the groups of lymphoid and myeloid neoplasms. Collectively, these multiple evaluations lead to a comprehensive analysis that makes use of all of the available information and is consistent with the risk assessment goals of the USEPA and other regulatory agencies, and in line with the recommendations of the USEPA Science Advisory Board. While a range of cancer risk values can result from these multiple factors, a preferred case for occupational and general population risk is highlighted. Cox proportional hazards models are used to fit exposure-response models to the most recent UAB data. The slope of the model with cumulative BD ppm-years as the predictor variable is not statistically significantly greater than zero for CML, AML, or, when any one of eight exposure covariates is added to the model, for all leukemias combined. The slope for CLL is statistically significantly different from zero. The slope for myeloid neoplasms is not statistically

  9. Applying molecular epidemiology in pediatric leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    Molecular epidemiology is the study of genetic and environmental risk for disease, with much effort centered on cancer. Childhood leukemia occurs in nearly a third of all patients newly diagnosed with pediatric cancer. only a small percentage of these new cases of childhood leukemia are associated with high penetrant hereditary cancer syndromes. Childhood leukemia, especially acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been associated with a dysregulated immune system due to delayed infectious exposure at a young age. Identical twins with childhood leukemia suggest that acute lymphoblastic leukemia begins in utero and that the concordant presentation is due to a shared preleukemia subclone via placental transfer. Investigation of single nucleotide polymorphisms within candidate genes find that leukemia risk may be attributed to population-based polymorphisms affecting folate metabolism, xenobiotic metabolism, DNA repair, immunity, and B-cell development. More recently, genome-wide association studies for leukemia risk has led investigators to genes associated with B-cell development. When describing leukemia predisposition due to hereditary cancer syndromes, the following 6 categories become apparent on the basis of biology and clinical presentation: (1) genetic instability/DNA repair syndromes, (2) cell cycle/differentiation syndromes, (3) bone marrow failure syndromes, (4) telomere maintenance syndromes, (5) immunodeficiency syndromes, and (6) transcription factor syndromes and pure familial leukemia. understanding the molecular epidemiology of childhood leukemia can affect the treatment and tumor surveillance strategies for these high risk patients and their family members.

  10. Targeted therapy: The new lease on life for acute promyelocytic leukemia, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sai-Juan; Zhou, Guang-Biao

    2012-08-01

    Leukemia, a group of hematological malignancies characterized by abnormal proliferation, decreased apoptosis, and blocked differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, is a disease involving dynamic change in the genome. Chromosomal translocation and point mutation are the major mechanisms in leukemia, which lead to production of oncogenes with dominant gain of function and tumor suppressor genes with recessive loss of function. Targeted therapy refers to treatment strategies perturbing the molecules critical for leukemia pathogenesis. The t(15;17) which generates PML-RARα, t(8;21) that produces AML1-ETO, and t(9;22) which generates BCR-ABL are the three most frequently seen chromosomal translocations in myeloid leukemia. The past two to three decades have witnessed tremendous success in development of targeted therapies for acute and chronic myeloid leukemia caused by the three fusion proteins. Here, we review the therapeutic efficacies and the mechanisms of action of targeted therapies for myeloid leukemia and show how this strategy significantly improve the clinical outcome of patients and even turn acute promyelocytic leukemia from highly fatal to highly curable.

  11. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, B-Cell, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available UTR Alleles, Functions, and Amino Acid Translations are all sourced from dbSNP 144 Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute... B-Cell Leukemia; Acute B-Cell Leukemias; Acute B-Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute... B-Lymphocytic Leukemias; Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, Burkitt's type; Acute lymphoblastic leuka...emia, mature B-cell type; Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Burkitt's type; Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, mature... B-cell type; B Cell Leukemia, Acute; B Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute; B-ALL; B-Cell Leukemia, Acute

  12. Cytogenetics of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manola, Kalliopi N

    2009-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease accounting for 15-20% of all childhood acute leukemias, while it is responsible for more than half of the leukemic deaths in these patients. This article focuses on the significance of cytogenetic analysis in pediatric AML supporting the importance of cytogenetic analysis in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, follow-up and treatment selection in childhood AML. It reviews in detail the types and frequencies of most common chromosomal aberrations, their molecular background, their correlation with French American British (FAB) subtypes and age distribution and their prognostic relevance. It also summarizes some less frequent or rare chromosome aberrations in which the prognostic classification has not been determined yet owning to the small number of patients and the variable treatment modalities used in different study groups. Furthermore, it discusses the association of specific chromosome rearrangements with prenatal exposure to carcinogenic agents or therapeutic agents and highlights the ongoing and future research on pediatric AML in the evolving field of Cytogenetics.

  13. Investigation and analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription genes with leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yuejiao; Wu, Jianzhong; Chen, Baoan; Ma, Rong; Cao, Haixia; Wang, Zhuo; Cheng, Lu; Ding, Jiahua; Feng, Jifeng

    2012-06-01

    Aberrant activation of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway may predispose to leukemia due to deregulation of proliferation, differentiation or apoptosis. This study was conducted to investigate whether any association exists between genetic polymorphisms in the JAK2, STAT3 and STAT5 genes and individual susceptibility to leukemia. A case-control study was carried out using a Chinese sample set with 344 cases of leukemia and 346 controls matched by age and ethnicity. Genomic DNA was assayed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) on 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genotype analyses showed that two SNPs, namely rs17886724 and rs2293157 located in STAT3 and STAT5, respectively, were significantly associated with leukemia (p p > 0.05). Linkage disequilibrium existed between rs11079041 and rs2293157 in both leukemia and control groups (r(2) = 0.7). The haplotypes displayed significant association between rs11079041 and rs2293157 in both leukemia and control groups (p classification model in making a prediction of leukemia was 97%. The results indicated that STAT3 and STAT5 gene SNPs may be prognostic of leukemia.

  14. How Is Childhood Leukemia Classified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tissues and organs beyond the bone marrow. These children often have fever, poor appetite, and weight loss. At this point the CML acts much like an aggressive acute leukemia (AML or, less often, ALL). Not ... questions about what phase your child’s CML is in, be sure to have the ...

  15. Treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; O'Brien, Susan M

    2004-04-01

    Treatment options for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia have changed over the past two decades. This article reviews the experience accumulated with the use of alkylating agents alone and in combination; purine analogues alone and in combination and monoclonal antibodies such as rituximab, and alemtuzumab alone and in combination. The results obtained with different treatment strategies are summarized, compared, and reviewed.

  16. Emodin Induces Apoptotic Death in Murine Myelomonocytic Leukemia WEHI-3 Cells In Vitro and Enhances Phagocytosis in Leukemia Mice In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Chang Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Emodin is one of major compounds in rhubarb (Rheum palmatum L., a plant used as herbal medicine in Chinese population. Although many reports have shown that emodin exhibits anticancer activity in many tumor cell types, there is no available information addressing emodin-affected apoptotic responses in the murine leukemia cell line (WEHI-3 and modulation of the immune response in leukemia mice. We investigated that emodin induced cytotoxic effects in vitro and affected WEHI-3 cells in vivo. This study showed that emodin decreased viability and induced DNA fragmentation in WEHI-3 cells. Cells after exposure to emodin for 24 h have shown chromatin condensation and DNA damage. Emodin stimulated the productions of ROS and Ca2+ and reduced the level of ΔΨm by flow cytometry. Our results from Western blotting suggest that emodin triggered apoptosis of WEHI-3 cells through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, caspase cascade-dependent and -independent mitochondrial pathways. In in vivo study, emodin enhanced the levels of B cells and monocytes, and it also reduced the weights of liver and spleen compared with leukemia mice. Emodin promoted phagocytic activity by monocytes and macrophages in comparison to the leukemia mice group. In conclusions, emodin induced apoptotic death in murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells and enhanced phagocytosis in the leukemia animal model.

  17. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Myelodysplastic Syndrome with Myelofibrosis Transformed to a Precursor B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Case Report with Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic cell disorders characterized by cytopenias, bone marrow hypercellularity, and increased risk of transformation to acute leukemias. MDS usually transformed to acute myeloid leukemia, and transformation to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is rare. Herein, we report a unique patient who presented with MDS with myelofibrosis. Two months after the initial diagnosis, she progressed to a precursor B-cell acute l...

  19. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. [Therapeutic results in patients with biphenotypic acute leukemia at Sapporo Medical University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kazuyuki; Iyama, Satoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Takimoto, Rishu; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2010-10-01

    We reviewed the results of 6 patients with biphenotypic acute leukemia (BAL) which the diagnostic standard of the European Group for the Immunological Characterization of Leukemia (EGIL) at Sapporo Medical University Hospital between 2006 and 2008. There were 5 males and 1 females with an average age of 35 years. Among them, 4 were B lymphoid and myeloid, 2 were T lymphoid and myeloid, and one was T/B lymphoid. Two of 4 patients did not attain complete remission, and two relapsed after first treatment with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) protocol. On the other hand, two showed complete remission after the acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) protocol. One of 4 patients survived who had been treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as a post-remission therapy. The ALL protocol was good for the induction therapy. However, overall treatment-related deaths were 4 patients and considerable caution was necessary.

  1. Risk of leukemia in first degree relatives of patients with nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo GONÇALVES

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of leukemia in parents of patients with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or cleft palate (NSCL/P. This case-control study evaluated first-degree family members of 358 patients with NSCL/P and 1,432 subjects without craniofacial alterations or syndromes. Statistical analysis was carried out using Fisher’s test. From the 358 subjects with NSCL/P, 3 first-degree parents had history of leukemia, while 2 out of 1,432 subjects from the unaffected group had a family history of leukemia. The frequency of positive family history of leukemia was not significantly increased in first-degree relatives of patients with NSCL/P.

  2. Chronic B-Cell Leukemias and Agent Orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Chronic B-cell Leukemias and Agent Orange Veterans who ... receive VA health care and disability compensation. About chronic B-cell leukemias Leukemia is a cancer of ...

  3. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  4. Predictive role of cerebrospinal fluid hydrogen sulfide in central nervous system leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Shu-xu; XIAO Jiang; GUAN Feng; SUN Li-ming; WU Wan-shui; TANG Hong; DU Jun-bao; TANG Chao-shu; JIN Hong-fang

    2011-01-01

    Background Central nervous system leukemia (CNSL) is an important relapse in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).We investigated the possible role of endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in predicting CNSL.Methods From August 2008 to December 2010,380 children were enrolled in this study at Shijitan Hospital,China.These children were from 2 to 16 years old,and the median age was 6.5 years.They were divided into a CNSL group (7 cases),a leukemia group (307 cases),a non-leukemia group (26 cases) and a healthy group (40 children).CSF specimens were obtained from conventional lumbar punctured,then centrifuged and supernatants preserved for H2Sdetection.Leukemic cells precipitates from CSF were found in three cases,the hCSE and hCBS mRNA expression was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR),and H2S levels in serum were also measured.The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and area under curve (AUC) were used to assess the predictive diagnosis role of CSF H2S in children with ALL and CNSL.Results The serum H2S contents of the CNSL and leukemia groups were (96.98+15.77) μmol/L and (93.35+17.16)μmol/L respectively,much higher than those of healthy,(44.29+2.15) μmol/L,and non-leukemia,(46.32±6.54) μmol/L,groups (P <0.01).Compared with the leukemia group,CSF H2S content of the CNSL group was significantly high (P <0.01).Meanwhile,in contrast to the non-leukemia group,CSF H2S contents of the CNSL and leukemia groups were both significantly increased (P <0.01).In addition,leukemic cells from CSF precipitations could express CBS and CSE mRNA.Furthermore,the ROC analysis showed the UAC was 0.929 (95% Cl:0.857-1.000),and the optimum cut-off value of CSF H2S was 12.08μmol/L,and the sensitivity and specificity were 83.3% and 97.2% respectively.Conclusions CSF H2S contents were significantly increased in children with CNSL.After treatment,H2S contents were decreased subsequently

  5. Childhood leukemia and residential proximity to industrial and urban sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Pérez, Javier, E-mail: jgarcia@isciii.es [Cancer and Environmental Epidemiology Unit, National Center for Epidemiology, Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP) (Spain); López-Abente, Gonzalo, E-mail: glabente@isciii.es [Cancer and Environmental Epidemiology Unit, National Center for Epidemiology, Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP) (Spain); Gómez-Barroso, Diana, E-mail: dgomez@externos.isciii.es [CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP) (Spain); National Center for Epidemiology, Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid (Spain); Morales-Piga, Antonio, E-mail: amorales@isciii.es [Rare Disease Research Institute (IIER), Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid (Spain); Consortium for Biomedical Research in Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Madrid (Spain); Pardo Romaguera, Elena, E-mail: elena.pardo@uv.es [Spanish Registry of Childhood Tumors (RETI-SEHOP), University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Tamayo, Ibon, E-mail: ibontama@gmail.com [Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BIODonostia Research Institute, Department of Health of the Regional Government of the Basque Country, Donostia (Spain); Fernández-Navarro, Pablo, E-mail: pfernandezn@isciii.es [Cancer and Environmental Epidemiology Unit, National Center for Epidemiology, Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP) (Spain); and others

    2015-07-15

    Background: Few risk factors for the childhood leukemia are well established. While a small fraction of cases of childhood leukemia might be partially attributable to some diseases or ionizing radiation exposure, the role of industrial and urban pollution also needs to be assessed. Objectives: To ascertain the possible effect of residential proximity to both industrial and urban areas on childhood leukemia, taking into account industrial groups and toxic substances released. Methods: We conducted a population-based case–control study of childhood leukemia in Spain, covering 638 incident cases gathered from the Spanish Registry of Childhood Tumors and for those Autonomous Regions with 100% coverage (period 1990-2011), and 13,188 controls, individually matched by year of birth, sex, and autonomous region of residence. Distances were computed from the respective subject’s residences to the 1068 industries and the 157 urban areas with ≥10,000 inhabitants, located in the study area. Using logistic regression, odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for categories of distance to industrial and urban pollution sources were calculated, with adjustment for matching variables. Results: Excess risk of childhood leukemia was observed for children living near (≤2.5 km) industries (OR=1.31; 95%CI=1.03–1.67) – particularly glass and mineral fibers (OR=2.42; 95%CI=1.49–3.92), surface treatment using organic solvents (OR=1.87; 95%CI=1.24–2.83), galvanization (OR=1.86; 95%CI=1.07–3.21), production and processing of metals (OR=1.69; 95%CI=1.22–2.34), and surface treatment of metals (OR=1.62; 95%CI=1.22–2.15) – , and urban areas (OR=1.36; 95%CI=1.02–1.80). Conclusions: Our study furnishes some evidence that living in the proximity of industrial and urban sites may be a risk factor for childhood leukemia. - Highlights: • We studied proximity to both industrial and urban sites on childhood leukemia. • We conducted a case–control study in

  6. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  7. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Promyelocytic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym APL - Acute promyelocytic leukaemia; APL - Acute ...promyelocytic leukemia; APML - Acute promyelocytic leukaemia; APML - Acute promyelocytic leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acut...e Promyelocytic Leukemias; Acute myeloid leukaemia, PML/RAR-alpha; Acute myeloid le...ukemia, PML/RAR-alpha; Acute myeloid leukemia, t(15;17)(q22;q11-12); Acute promye...locytic leukaemia (clinical); Acute promyelocytic leukaemia, FAB M3; Acute promyelocytic leukaemia, PML/RAR-alpha; Acute

  8. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Karyotypic findings in chronic myeloid leukemia cases undergoing treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Anupam Kaur; Simran Preet Kaur; Amarjit Singh; Jai Rup Singh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative expansion of primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells. Materials and Methods: In the present study, CML samples were collected from various hospitals in Amritsar, Jalandhar and Ludhiana. Results: Chromosomal alterations seen in peripheral blood lymphocytes of these treated and untreated cases of CML were satellite associations, double minutes, random loss, gain of C group chromosomes and presence of marker chr...

  10. Importance of genetics in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pippa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML comprises a biologically and clinically heterogeneous group of aggressive disorders that occur as a consequence of a wide variety of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities in hematopoietic progenitors. Despite significant advances in the understanding of the biology of AML, most patients will die from relapsed disease. Whole-genome studies have identified novel recurrent gene mutations with prognostic impact in AML; furthermore, it is likely that in the near future genome-wide sequencing will become a routine for newly diagnosed patients with AML. Therefore, future clinical trials should aim to identify genetically defined high-risk patients, and further research is necessary to identify effective agents and develop new individualized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of this deadly disease.

  11. Cytomegalovirus Reactivation after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation is Associated with a Reduced Risk of Relapse in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Survived to Day 100 after Transplantation: The Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Transplantation-related Complication Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Katsuto; Nishida, Tetsuya; Asano-Mori, Yuki; Oshima, Kumi; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Mori, Takehiko; Kanamori, Heiwa; Miyamura, Koichi; Kato, Chiaki; Kobayashi, Naoki; Uchida, Naoyuki; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Morishima, Yasuo; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Fukuda, Takahiro

    2015-11-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a major infectious complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Recently, it was reported that CMV reactivation is associated with a decreased risk of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of early CMV reactivation on the incidence of disease relapse after allo-HSCT in a large cohort of patients. The Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation's Transplantation-Related Complication Working Group retrospectively surveyed the database of the Transplant Registry Unified Management Program at the Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation. Patients with AML (n = 1836), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n = 911), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, n = 223), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, n = 569) who underwent their first allo-HSCT from HLA-matched related or unrelated donors between 2000 and 2009 and who survived without disease relapse until day 100 after transplantation were analyzed. Patients who received umbilical cord blood transplantation were not included. Patients underwent surveillance by pp65 antigenemia from the time of engraftment, and the beginning of preemptive therapy was defined as CMV reactivation. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the risk factors of relapse, nonrelapse, and overall mortality. CMV reactivation and acute/chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were evaluated as time-dependent covariates. CMV reactivation was associated with a decreased incidence of relapse in patients with AML (20.3% versus 26.4%, P = .027), but not in patients with ALL, CML, or MDS. Among 1836 patients with AML, CMV reactivation occurred in 795 patients (43.3%) at a median of 42 days, and 436 patients (23.7%) relapsed at a median of 221 days after allo-HSCT. Acute GVHD grades II to IV developed in 630 patients (34.3%). By multivariate analysis considering competing risk factors, 3

  12. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with gross hematuria

    OpenAIRE

    Kalbani, Naifain Al; Weitzman, Sheila; Abdelhaleem, Mohamed; Carcao, Manuel; Abla, Oussama

    2007-01-01

    A case of a six-year-old boy presenting with gross hematuria is reported. Investigations revealed the etiology of the hematuria to be thrombocytopenia in the setting of newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The diagnosis of leukemia was confirmed by bone marrow examination. The patient’s hematuria completely resolved with platelet transfusions. Although thrombocytopenia is a very common presenting feature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, gross hematuria is exceedingly rare. Thus, thro...

  13. Profile of imatinib in pediatric leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke MJ

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Michael J BurkeDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology/Bone Marrow Transplantation, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USAAbstract: Using targeted therapy for treatment of cancer has become the paradigm to which clinical trials aspire. Imatinib, the BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI, was the first of its kind to specifically target and inhibit the underlying Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+ oncogene found to be driving chronic myeloid leukemia in adults, and has since become standard of care for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia in children. Imatinib, with its ability to target Ph+ leukemia, has been successfully incorporated into the treatment of not only pediatric chronic myeloid leukemia but also Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. With the incorporation of imatinib into combination chemotherapy for pediatric Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia, current survival rates are far higher than at any other time for this once dreadful disease. With more children today receiving treatment with imatinib for either chronic myeloid leukemia or Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia, knowledge is accumulating surrounding the short-term and long-term toxicities observed in children, adolescents, and young adults treated with this TKI. In summary, the TKI imatinib has made a historic impact in the treatment of pediatric Ph+ leukemias, transforming what were once very high-risk diseases with considerable morbidity and mortality into ones that are now very treatable but with a new awareness surrounding the long-term toxicities that may come with this price for cure.Keywords: imatinib, leukemia, lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, pediatric

  14. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  15. Risk-adapted treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline monochemotherapy: Long-term outcome of the LPA 99 multicenter study by the PETHEMA Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Sanz (Miguel Angel); P. Montesinos (Pau); E. Vellenga (Edo); C. Rayón (Consuelo); J. de Serna (Javier); R. Parody (Ricardo); J.M. Bergua (Juan Miguel); A. León (Angel); S. Negri (Silvia); M. González (Marcos); C. Rivas (Concha); J. Esteve (Jordi); G. Milone (Gustavo); E. Amutio (Elena); S. Brunet (Salut); J. García-Laraña; D. Colomer (Dolors); M.J. Calasanz (Maria); C. Chillón (Carmen); E. Barragán (Eva); P. Bolufer (Pascual); B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractA previous report of the Programa de Estudio y Tratamiento de las Hemopatfas Malignas (PETHEMA) Group showed that a risk-adapted strategy combining all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and anthracycline monochemotherapy for induction and consolidation in newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic

  16. Risk-adapted treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline monochemotherapy: Long-term outcome of the LPA 99 multicenter study by the PETHEMA Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Sanz (Miguel Angel); P. Montesinos (Pau); E. Vellenga (Edo); C. Rayón (Consuelo); J. de Serna (Javier); R. Parody (Ricardo); J.M. Bergua (Juan Miguel); A. León (Angel); S. Negri (Silvia); M. González (Marcos); C. Rivas (Concha); J. Esteve (Jordi); G. Milone (Gustavo); E. Amutio (Elena); S. Brunet (Salut); J. García-Laraña; D. Colomer (Dolors); M.J. Calasanz (Maria); C. Chillón (Carmen); E. Barragán (Eva); P. Bolufer (Pascual); B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractA previous report of the Programa de Estudio y Tratamiento de las Hemopatfas Malignas (PETHEMA) Group showed that a risk-adapted strategy combining all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and anthracycline monochemotherapy for induction and consolidation in newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leu

  17. Infection and childhood leukemia: review of evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel da Rocha Paiva Maia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE : To analyze studies that evaluated the role of infections as well as indirect measures of exposure to infection in the risk of childhood leukemia, particularly acute lymphoblastic leukemia. METHODS : A search in Medline, Lilacs, and SciELO scientific publication databases initially using the descriptors “childhood leukemia” and “infection” and later searching for the words “childhood leukemia” and “maternal infection or disease” or “breastfeeding” or “daycare attendance” or “vaccination” resulted in 62 publications that met the following inclusion criteria: subject aged ≤ 15 years; specific analysis of cases diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or total leukemia; exposure assessment of mothers’ or infants’ to infections (or proxy of infection, and risk of leukemia. RESULTS : Overall, 23 studies that assessed infections in children support the hypothesis that occurrence of infection during early childhood reduces the risk of leukemia, but there are disagreements within and between studies. The evaluation of exposure to infection by indirect measures showed evidence of reduced risk of leukemia associated mainly with daycare attendance. More than 50.0% of the 16 studies that assessed maternal exposure to infection observed increased risk of leukemia associated with episodes of influenza, pneumonia, chickenpox, herpes zoster, lower genital tract infection, skin disease, sexually transmitted diseases, Epstein-Barr virus, and Helicobacter pylori . CONCLUSIONS : Although no specific infectious agent has been identified, scientific evidence suggests that exposure to infections has some effect on childhood leukemia etiology.

  18. Leukemia, an effective model for chemical biology and target therapy1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-qiang CHEN; Li-shun WANG; Ying-li WU; Yun YU

    2007-01-01

    The rapid rise of chemical biology aimed at studying signaling networks for basic cellular activities using specific, active small molecules as probes has greatly accelerated research on pathological mechanisms and target therapy of diseases.This research is especially important for malignant tumors such as leukemia, a heterogeneous group of hematopoietic malignancies that occurs worldwide. With the use of a chemical approach combined with genetic manipulation, great progresshas been achieved over the past few decades on the biological, molecular and cytogenetic aspects of leukemia, and in its diagnosis and therapy. In particular,discoveries of the clinical effectiveness of all-trans rctinoic acid and arsenic trioxide in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia and the kinase inhibitorsImatinib and Dasatinib in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia not only make target therapy of leukemia a reality, but also push mechanisms of leukemo-genesis and leukemic cell activities forward. This review will outline advances in chemical biology that help our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cell differentiation and apoptosis induction and target therapy of leukemia.

  19. Solitary expression of CD7 among T-cell antigens in acute myeloid leukemia: identification of a group of patients with similar T-cell receptor beta and delta rearrangements and course of disease suggestive of poor prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A W; Hokland, M; Jørgensen, H

    1991-01-01

    to the French-American-British type M4, and four were under the age of 40. Despite intensive chemotherapy, four never obtained a complete remission and the fifth died of relapse after an allogenic bone marrow transplantation. While 12 randomly selected T-cell antigen negative AML patients showed only few....... These data suggest that the solitary presence of CD7 among T-cell antigens in otherwise clearcut AML cases identifies a group of patients with similarities in antigen receptor gene configuration as well as outcome. Udgivelsesdato: 1991-Sep-1...

  20. Maternal acute lymphoctic leukemia with rearrangement of the mixed lineage leukemia gene occurring during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljurf, Mahmoud; Nassar, Amr; Saleh, Abu J; Almhareb, Fahed; Alzahrani, Hazzaa; Walter, Claudia; Bakr, Mohammad; Ahmed, Syed Osman; Chaudhri, Naeem

    2009-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a relatively rare disease during pregnancy, accounting for about 15% of all cases of pregnancy-associated leukemia. Although mixed lineage leukemia gene (MLL) rearrangement is the dominant genetic aberration in infantile acute leukemia, the occurrence of MLL gene rearrangement in maternal ALL occurring during pregnancy has not been reported. Out of 31 cases of maternal leukemia diagnosed during pregnancy at our institution, 5 were ALL cases. Three of the 5 patients had MLL gene rearrangement. The data for these 5 patients are presented in this report. We believe that the association of MLL gene rearrangement with maternal leukemia is biologically plausible and this observation needs to be validated in a larger cohort of pregnancy-associated maternal leukemia cases.

  1. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, Joseph K., E-mail: joseph.salama@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Stinchcombe, Thomas E. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei [CALGB Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Morano, Karen [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, RI (United States); Bogart, Jeffrey A. [State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY (United States); Crawford, Jeffrey C. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Socinski, Mark A. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Blackstock, A. William [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Vokes, Everett E. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  2. Effect of Taurine on Febrile Episodes in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Islambulchilar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of oral taurine on the incidence of febrile episodes during chemotherapy in young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Forty young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, at the beginning of maintenance course of their chemotherapy, were eligible for this study. The study population was randomized in a double blind manner to receive either taurine or placebo (2 gram per day orally. Life quality and side effects including febrile episodes were assessed using questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s Chi square test. Results: Of total forty participants, 43.8% were female and 56.3 % were male. The mean age was 19.16±1.95 years (ranges: 16-23 years. The results indicated that the levels of white blood cells are significantly (P<0.05 increased in taurine treated group. There was no elevation in blasts count. A total of 70 febrile episodes were observed during study, febrile episodes were significantly (P<0.05 lower in taurine patients in comparison to the control ones. Conclusion: The overall incidence of febrile episodes and infectious complications in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving taurine was lower than placebo group. Taurine’s ability to increase leukocyte count may result in lower febrile episodes.

  3. Parental Tobacco Smoking and Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metayer, Catherine; Petridou, Eleni; Aranguré, Juan Manuel Mejía; Roman, Eve; Schüz, Joachim; Magnani, Corrado; Mora, Ana Maria; Mueller, Beth A; de Oliveira, Maria S Pombo; Dockerty, John D; McCauley, Kathryn; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hatzipantelis, Emmanouel; Rudant, Jérémie; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Kaatsch, Peter; Miligi, Lucia; Wesseling, Catharina; Doody, David R; Moschovi, Maria; Orsi, Laurent; Mattioli, Stefano; Selvin, Steve; Kang, Alice Y; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2016-08-15

    The association between tobacco smoke and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is well established in adults but not in children. Individual-level data on parental cigarette smoking were obtained from 12 case-control studies from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC, 1974-2012), including 1,330 AML cases diagnosed at age <15 years and 13,169 controls. We conducted pooled analyses of CLIC studies, as well as meta-analyses of CLIC and non-CLIC studies. Overall, maternal smoking before, during, or after pregnancy was not associated with childhood AML; there was a suggestion, however, that smoking during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk in Hispanics (odds ratio = 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20, 3.61) but not in other ethnic groups. By contrast, the odds ratios for paternal lifetime smoking were 1.34 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.62) and 1.18 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.51) in pooled and meta-analyses, respectively. Overall, increased risks from 1.2- to 1.3-fold were observed for pre- and postnatal smoking (P < 0.05), with higher risks reported for heavy smokers. Associations with paternal smoking varied by histological type. Our analyses suggest an association between paternal smoking and childhood AML. The association with maternal smoking appears limited to Hispanic children, raising questions about ethnic differences in tobacco-related exposures and biological mechanisms, as well as study-specific biases.

  4. Treatment of Aggressive NK-Cell Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Anders Kindberg; Jensen, Paw; Johansen, Preben

    2011-01-01

    Aggressive NK-cell leukemia is a rare malignancy with neoplastic proliferation of natural killer cells. It often presents with constitutional symptoms, a rapid declining clinical course, and a poor prognosis with a median survival of a few months. The disease is usually resistant to cytotoxic...... literature concerning treatment of aggressive NK-cell leukemia....

  5. The Danish National Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Cunha-Bang, Caspar; Geisler, Christian Hartmann; Enggaard, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    AIM: In 2008, the Danish National Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Registry was founded within the Danish National Hematology Database. The primary aim of the registry is to assure quality of diagnosis and care of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in Denmark. Secondarily, to evaluate...

  6. Successful pregnancy in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre, A; Chunchurreta, R; Rodriguez-Alarcon, J; Cruz, E; Prada, M

    1982-01-01

    A successful pregnancy with a normal baby in a woman with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with daunorubicin from the ninth week of gestation is reported. Daunorubicin is an effective agent against this leukemia during pregnancy. That daunorubicin may be safely used, when required during the early gestation, is suggested.

  7. SnapShot: chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccone, Maria; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael J; Calin, George A

    2014-11-10

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia among adults in western countries. This SnapShot depicts the origins and evolution of this B cell malignancy, describes prognostic factors and CLL animal models, and illustrates therapies in preclinical and clinical development against CLL.

  8. Treatment-associated leukemia following testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Travis, LB; Andersson, M; Gospodarowicz, M; van Leeuwen, FE; Bergfeldt, K; Lynch, CF; Curtis, RE; Kohler, BA; Wiklund, T; Storm, H; Holowaty, E; Hall, P; Pukkala, E; Sleijfer, DT; Clarke, EA; Boice, JD; Stovall, M; Gilbert, E

    2000-01-01

    Background: Men with testicular cancer are at an increased risk of leukemia, but the relationship to prior treatments is not well characterized. The purpose of our study was to describe the risk of leukemia following radiotherapy and chemotherapy for testicular cancer. Methods: Within a

  9. The discovery and early understanding of leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, Kim R.

    2012-01-01

    The early history of leukemia reaches back 200 years. In 1811, Peter Cullen defined a case of splenitis acutus with unexplainable milky blood. Alfred Velpeau defined the leukemia associated symptoms, and observed pus in the blood vessels (1825). Alfred Donne detected a maturation arrest of the white

  10. Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescents and Young Adults Treated in Pediatric and Adult Departments in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wennström, Lovisa; Edslev, Pernille Wendtland; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2016-01-01

    countries. RESULTS: The incidence of AML was 4.9/million/year for the age group 10-14 years, 6.5 for 15-18 years, and 6.9 for 19-30 years. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) was more frequent in adults and in females of all ages. Pediatric patients with APL had similar overall survival as pediatric patients......BACKGROUND: Studies on adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia suggest better results when using pediatric protocols for adult patients, while corresponding data for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are limited. PROCEDURE: We investigated disease characteristics and outcome...

  11. Risk of leukemia among survivors of testicular cancer: a population-based study of 42,722 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howard, R.; Gilbert, E.; Lynch, C.F.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to quantify excess absolute risk (EAR) and excess relative risk (ERR) of secondary leukemia among a large population-based group of testicular cancer survivors. METHODS: We identified 42,722 1-year survivors of testicular cancer within 14 population-based cancer...... among patients whose initial management included chemotherapy compared to those receiving radiotherapy alone (p = 0.1). Excess cumulative leukemia risk was approximately 0.23% by 30 years after testicular cancer diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Although ERR of leukemia following testicular cancer is large, EAR...

  12. Tailoring of chronic lymphatic leukemia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhefni, Ashraf M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains an incurable disease, with all patients who require therapy destined to relapse and understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic lymphocytic leukemia has advanced significantly. It is now clear that chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a relatively proliferative disorder that requires the help of its microenvironment to be maintained and to progress. The stimulation of the chronic lymphatic leukemia cell occurs in most, if not all, patients through antigen stimulation via the B cell receptors. In addition, there is now a appreciation of the role of the p53 pathway leading to chemoresistance and the elucidation of the molecular and intracellular signaling mechanisms of disease is just beginning to facilitate the development of several targeted small molecules that promise to revolutionize the treatment of Chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  13. Randomized study of granulocyte colony stimulating factor for childhood B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a report from the Japanese pediatric leukemia/lymphoma study group B-NHL03 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurusawa, Masahito; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Gosho, Masahiko; Mori, Tetsuya; Mitsui, Tetsuo; Sunami, Shosuke; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Fukano, Reiji; Tanaka, Fumiko; Fujita, Naoto; Inada, Hiroko; Sekimizu, Masahiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Komada, Yoshihiro; Saito, Akiko M; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Horibe, Keizo

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of the primary prophylaxis of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the management of childhood B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Patients with advanced-stage mature B-NHL were randomized to receive prophylactic G-CSF (G-CSF+) or not receive G-CSF (G-CSF-) based on protocols of the B-NHL03 study. The G-CSF group received 5 μg/kg/d Lenograstim from day 2 after each course of six chemotherapy courses. Fifty-eight patients were assessable, 29 G-CSF + and 29 G-CSF-. G-CSF + patients showed a positive impact on the meantime to neutrophil recovery and hospital stay. On the other hand, they had no impact in the incidences of febrile neutropenia, serious infections, stomatitis and total cost. Our study showed that administration of prophylactic G-CSF through all six chemotherapy courses for childhood B-NHL showed no clinical and economic benefits for the management of childhood B-NHL treatment.

  14. Parental and infant characteristics and childhood leukemia in Minnesota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Julie A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leukemia is the most common childhood cancer. With the exception of Down syndrome, prenatal radiation exposure, and higher birth weight, particularly for acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL, few risk factors have been firmly established. Translocations present in neonatal blood spots and the young age peak of diagnosis suggest that early-life factors are involved in childhood leukemia etiology. Methods We investigated the association between birth characteristics and childhood leukemia through linkage of the Minnesota birth and cancer registries using a case-cohort study design. Cases included 560 children with ALL and 87 with acute myeloid leukemia (AML diagnoses from 28 days to 14 years. The comparison group was comprised of 8,750 individuals selected through random sampling of the birth cohort from 1976–2004. Cox proportional hazards regression specific for case-cohort studies was used to compute hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results Male sex (HR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.16–1.70, white race (HR = 2.32, 95% CI 1.13–4.76, and maternal birth interval ≥ 3 years (HR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.01–1.70 increased ALL risk, while maternal age increased AML risk (HR = 1.21/5 year age increase, 95% CI 1.0–1.47. Higher birth weights (>3798 grams (HRALL = 1.46, 1.08–1.98; HRAML = 1.97, 95% CI 1.07–3.65, and one minute Apgar scores ≤ 7 (HRALL = 1.30, 95% CI 1.05–1.61; HRAML = 1.62, 95% CI 1.01–2.60 increased risk for both types of leukemia. Sex was not a significant modifier of the association between ALL and other covariates, with the exception of maternal education. Conclusion We confirmed known risk factors for ALL: male sex, high birth weight, and white race. We have also provided data that supports an increased risk for AML following higher birth weights, and demonstrated an association with low Apgar scores.

  15. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-19

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. The expression and clinical significance of survivin gene in leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of survivin in leukemia and the prognostic significance in acute leukemia(AL). Methods The expression of survivin mRNA was measured in 105 AL and 21 chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients with semi-quantity reverse transcription (RT)-PCR.15 adults were tested as normal

  17. 42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public... Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more probability of causation estimates from up to three of the four alternate leukemia risk models included...

  18. Prognostic significance of the initial cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) involvement of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) treated without cranial irradiation: results of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Children Leukemia Group study 58881.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirvent, Nicolas; Suciu, Stefan; Rialland, Xavier; Millot, Frédéric; Benoit, Yves; Plantaz, Dominique; Ferster, Alice; Robert, Alain; Lutz, Patrick; Nelken, Brigitte; Plouvier, Emmanuel; Norton, Lucilia; Bertrand, Yves; Otten, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of the initial cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) involvement of children with ALL enrolled from 1989 to 1996 in the EORTC 58881 trial. Patients (2025) were categorised according to initial central nervous system (CNS) status: CNS-1 (CNS negative, n=1866), CNS-2 (<5 leucocytes/mm(3), CSF with blasts, n=50), CNS-3 (CNS positive, n=49), TLP+ (TLP with blasts, n=60). CNS-directed therapy consisted in intravenous (i.v.) methotrexate (5 g/sqm) in 4-10 courses, and intrathecal methotrexate injections (10-20), according to CNS status. Cranial irradiation was omitted in all patients. In the CNS1, TLP+, CNS2 and CNS3 group the 8-year EFS rate (SE%) was 69.7% (1.1%), 68.8% (6.2%), 71.3% (6.5%) and 68.3% (6.2%), respectively. The 8-year incidence of isolated CNS relapse (SE%) was 3.4% (0.4%), 1.7% (1.7%), 6.1% (3.5%) and 9.4% (4.5%), respectively, whereas the 8-year isolated or combined CNS relapse incidence was 7.6% (0.6%), 3.5% (2.4%), 10.2% (4.4%) and 11.7% (5.0%), respectively. Patients with CSF blasts had a higher rate of initial bad risk features. Multivariate analysis indicated that presence of blasts in the CSF had no prognostic value: (i) for EFS and OS; (ii) for isolated and isolated or combined CNS relapse; WBC count<25 × 10(9)/L and Medac E-coli asparaginase treatment were each related to a lower CNS relapse risk. The presence of initial CNS involvement has no prognostic significance in EORTC 58881. Intensification of CNS-directed chemotherapy, without CNS radiation, is an effective treatment of initial meningeal leukaemic involvement. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; RAEB-1; RAEB-2; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Conventional chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia: a Brazilian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Borgia Barbosa Pagnano

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Young patients affected by acute myeloid leukemia (AML achieve complete remission (CR using conventional chemotherapy in about 55-85%. However, 30% of patients fail to achieve CR and the remission duration is often only about 12 months. More intensive treatment after CR seems to be necessary in order to maintain CR and obtain a definitive cure. In Brazil, few reports have been published on this important subject. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe a Brazilian experience in the treatment of "de novo" acute myeloid leukemia (AML in younger adult patients (age < 60 years. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. SETTING: University Hospital, Hematology and Hemotherapy Center, State University of Campinas, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: Newly diagnosed cases of "de novo" AML in the period from January 1994 to December 1998 were evaluated retrospectively, in relation to response to treatment, overall survival (OS and disease free survival (DFS. Cases with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL were also included in this analysis. RESULTS: On the basis of an intention to treat, 78 cases of AML, including 17 cases of APL, were evaluated. The overall median follow-up was 272 days. The complete remission (CR rate was 63.6% in the AML group (excluding APL and 78% in the APL group. The 5-year estimated disease-free survival (DFS was 80% for the APL group and 34% for the AML group (P = 0.02. The 5-year estimated overall survival (OS was 52% for the APL group and 20.5% for the AML group, respectively (P = NS. Relapse was observed in 12/39 (30.7% patients with AML and 1/11 (9% with APL. CONCLUSIONS: These results are similar to those reported in the literature. However, relapse and mortality rates remain high, and a search for more aggressive strategies in order to prevent relapse is recommended.

  1. Polymorphisms in the glutathione S-transferase theta and mu genes and susceptibility to myeloid leukemia in Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Lima Souza

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The null genotype for glutathione S-transferase (GST, EC 2.5.1.18 gene polymorphisms is considered a risk factor for leukemia in different populations. In this work we investigated the GSTT1 and GSTM1 polymorphisms using multiplex PCR in 53 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, 23 with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL and 304 apparently healthy controls. In this association study we found that the GSTT1null genotype was more frequent in our group of APL patients than in the control group [OR = 2.75 (95% CI = 1.10-6.88], providing evidence that a deletion in the GSTT1 gene could be a risk factor for this type of leukemia.

  2. Acute myelogenous leukemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Emilio, A; Dragone, P; De Negri, G; Montaldi, A; Stella, M; Battista, R

    1989-01-01

    We report on a patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia diagnosed at the 22nd week of pregnancy. She received chemotherapeutic treatment and reached a complete remission. At the 28th week of gestation the patient delivered, by cesarean section, a normal male infant. At present the mother is still disease-free 27 months after diagnosis. The child, too, is in good health. We point out the possibility of producing live babies with current chemotherapy regimens without exposing either the mother or the fetus to excessive risks.

  3. Physiologically based toxicokinetic modeling of secondary acute myelolytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Manas Kumar; Nath, Debjani

    2014-01-01

    Benzene, designated as environmental and occupational carcinogen and hematotoxin, has been associated with secondary leukemia. To develop a toxicokinetic model of AML, benzene can be used as leukemogenic agent. The aim of the present study was to optimize the dose, period and time of cumulative benzene exposure of Swiss Albino mice and to analyze survival rate; alteration in cell cycle regulation and other clinical manifestations in mice exposed to benzene vapour at a dose 300 ppm × 6 h/day × 5 days/week for 2 weeks, i.e., 9000(a)ppm cumulative dose. Analyzing physiological parameters like plasma enzyme profile, complete hematology (Hb %, RBC indices and WBC differentials), hematopoietic cells morphology, expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, tissue histology and analysis of DNA fragmentation, optimum conditions were established. Down regulation of p53 and p21 and up regulation of CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D1 and E in this exposed group were marked as the optimum conditions of cellular deregulation for the development of secondary AML. Elevated level of Plasma AST/ALT with corresponding changes in liver histology showing extended sinusoids within the hepatocytic cell cords in optimally exposed animals also confirmed the toxicokinetic relation of benzene with leukemia. It can be concluded from the above observations that the 9000(a)ppm exposed animals can serve as the induced laboratory model of secondary acute myeloid leukemia.

  4. Role of allogeneic transplantation in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the era of novel therapies: a review

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common form of adult leukemia and is characterized by a highly variable clinical course. In the past decade, several prognostic risk factors have been identified facilitating the classification of CLL into various risk groups. Patients with poor risk disease, such as poor cytogenetics or relapsing after purine-based analogues, had limited therapeutic options, with allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-SCT) the only known therapy wit...

  5. RESULTS OF HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN PEDIATRIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mousavi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT is an accepted treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML in first remission, the treatment of choice for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML and high risk groups of ALL who relapse with conventional chemotherapy. We assessed results of HCT for pediatric leukemia in our center. A total of 92 children, 63 with diagnose of AML, 23 with ALL and 6 with CML received allogeneic transplantation from HLA full matched siblings (57.6% and autologous transplantation (42.4%. Source of hematopoietic cells were peripheral blood 83.7%, bone marrow 15.2% and cord blood 1.6%. The median transplanted nucleated cells were 6.4 ± 4.7 ×108 /Kg (body weight of patients and mononuclear cells were 5.5 ± 2.9×108/Kg. The most common conditioning regimens were cyclophosphamide + busulfan. Prophylaxis regimen for GVHD was cyclosporin ± methotrexate. GVHD occurred in 50 (54.3% patients. Eighty five of children had engraftment, 26 (28.6% relapsed and 57 (62% are alive. The most common cause of death was relapse (68.6%. Five years overall survival of patients with AML and ALL were 49% and 44% respectively and disease free survival of them were 52% and 49%. One year overall survival and disease free survival of CML was 57%. Overall survival increased with increasing age of patients at transplantation time (P = 0.06. Longer survival significantly related to earlier WBC and platelet recovery (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.006 respectively. Considering acceptable overall and disease free survival of patients after HCT, we concluded that is a good modality in treatment of leukemia of children.

  6. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. [Clinical and hematologic features of pediatric leukemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanbegović, Edo

    2006-01-01

    to present main clinical and hematologic features of pediatric leukemias treated at Hematooncologic department of Pediatric Clinic in Sarajevo during last 7 years. In retrospective study we followed up children with leukemia aged 0-15 who were treated during period of 01.01.1997-31.12.2003. at Hematooncologic department on Pediatric Clinic in Sarajevo. A total number of patient with leukemia was 130 of them 112 (83.2%) had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 16 (12.3%) of them had acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 2 (1.5%) patients had chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). There were 84 (64.6%) boys and 46 (35.4%) girls. Median age of newly diagnosed patients was 6 years and 4 months. Dominant clinical signs were: high temperature-72.9%, fatigue and paleness-74.8% and bone pain-87.9%. Most of the children had leucocitosis (51.5%), anemia (56.1%) and trombocitopenia (57.5%). Most frequent signs at the beginning of the illness are general symptoms like fatigue, unclear febrile state and accented bone pains. Those united signs with complete blood picture finding should be enough reason for suspicion under possible leukemia.

  8. Autologous and allogeneic typing of human leukemia cells: definition of surface antigens restricted to lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Naito, K.; Yamaguchi, H; Horibe, K; Shiku, H.; Takahashi, T.; Suzuki, S; Yamada, K.

    1983-01-01

    Serum from a patient (CO) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia was reactive in immunoadherence assays with autologous leukemia cells but not with autologous blood lymphocytes or bone marrow cells during complete remission. Extensive absorption tests with an array of leukemia cells and normal cells were performed in order to define the specificity of the reaction. The autologous leukemia reactivity was either completely or partially absorbed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells obtained from 1...

  9. Leukemia and ionizing radiation revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttler, J.M. [Cuttler & Associates Inc., Vaughan, Ontario (Canada); Welsh, J.S. [Loyola University-Chicago, Dept. or Radiation Oncology, Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, Illinois (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A world-wide radiation health scare was created in the late 19508 to stop the testing of atomic bombs and block the development of nuclear energy. In spite of the large amount of evidence that contradicts the cancer predictions, this fear continues. It impairs the use of low radiation doses in medical diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy. This brief article revisits the second of two key studies, which revolutionized radiation protection, and identifies a serious error that was missed. This error in analyzing the leukemia incidence among the 195,000 survivors, in the combined exposed populations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, invalidates use of the LNT model for assessing the risk of cancer from ionizing radiation. The threshold acute dose for radiation-induced leukemia, based on about 96,800 humans, is identified to be about 50 rem, or 0.5 Sv. It is reasonable to expect that the thresholds for other cancer types are higher than this level. No predictions or hints of excess cancer risk (or any other health risk) should be made for an acute exposure below this value until there is scientific evidence to support the LNT hypothesis. (author)

  10. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: present status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat, E; Rozman, C

    1995-03-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the form of leukemia which occurs most frequently in Western countries. Its etiology is unknown, and no relationship with viruses or genes has been demonstrated. Epidemiological data suggest that genetic and ambiental factors might be of some significance. Clinical features of CLL are due to the accumulation of leukemic cells in bone marrow and lymphoid organs as well as the immune disturbances that accompany the disease. The prognosis of patients with CLL varies. Treatment is usually indicated by the risk of the individual patient, which is clearly reflected by the stage of the disease. In the early stage (Binet A, Rai O) it is reasonable to defer therapy until disease progression is observed. By contrast, because their median survival is less than five years, patients with more advanced stages require therapy. For almost 50 years, no major advances in the management of CLL, which has revolved around the use of alkylating agents, have been made. In recent years, the therapeutic approach in patients with CLL has changed as a result of the introduction of combination chemotherapy regimens and, in particular, purine analogues. The latter are already the treatment of choice for patients not responding to standard therapies, and their role as front-line therapy is being investigated. Bone marrow transplants are also being increasingly used. It is to be hoped that in years to come the outcome of patients with CLL will be improved by these advances.

  11. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Progress Through Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun J.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Pieters, Rob; Schrappe, Martin; Biondi, Andrea; Vora, Ajay; Baruchel, André; Silverman, Lewis B.; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Escherich, Gabriele; Horibe, Keizo; Benoit, Yves C.M.; Izraeli, Shai; Yeoh, Allen Eng Juh; Liang, Der-Cherng; Downing, James R.; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. Methods A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article was reviewed and revised by the committee chairs of the major ALL study groups. Results With long-term survival rates for ALL approaching 90% and the advent of high-resolution genome-wide analyses, several international study groups or consortia were established to conduct collaborative research to further improve outcome. As a result, treatment strategies have been improved for several subtypes of ALL, such as infant, MLL-rearranged, Philadelphia chromosome–positive, and Philadelphia chromosome–like ALL. Many recurrent genetic abnormalities that respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors and multiple genetic determinants of drug resistance and toxicities have been identified to help develop targeted therapy. Several genetic polymorphisms have been recognized that show susceptibility to developing ALL and that help explain the racial/ethnic differences in the incidence of ALL. Conclusion The information gained from collaborative studies has helped decipher the heterogeneity of ALL to help improve personalized treatment, which will further advance the current high cure rate and the quality of life for children and adolescents with ALL. PMID:26304874

  12. Ginsenoside Rh2 Mitigates Pediatric Leukemia Through Suppression of Bcl-2 in Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoru Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a severe malignant cancer worldwide, in both adult and pediatric patients. Since bone marrow cell transplantation is seriously limited by the availability of the immune-paired donor sources, the therapy for pediatric leukemia remains challenging. Ginsenoside Rh2 (GRh2 is a well-characterized component in red ginseng, and has established therapeutic effects for different diseases, although whether GRh2 may have a therapeutic effect on pediatric leukemia has not been investigated. Methods: We examined the effects of GRh2 on the survival of mice in an acute leukemia model. We analyzed the effects of GRh2 on the cell viability of leukemia cell lines in vitro, using a CCK-8 assay and an MTT assay. We analyzed the effects of GRh2 on the apoptosis of leukemia cell lines in vitro, by flow cytometry. We analyzed the levels of Bcl-2 and microRNA-21 (miR-21 in GRh2-treated leukemia cells. Prediction of binding between miR-21 and 3'-UTR of Bcl-2 mRNA was performed by a bioinformatics algorithm and confirmed by a dual luciferase reporter assay. Results: GRh2 significantly prolonged the survival of mice with pediatric leukemia. GRh2 significantly decreased the viability of leukemia cells in vitro, through induction of apoptosis. GRh2 significantly decreased the levels of an anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in leukemia cells, possibly through induction of miR-21, which suppressed the translation of Bcl-2 mRNA via 3'-UTR binding. Conclusion: GRh2 may be an effective treatment for pediatric leukemia, and GRh2 may induce apoptosis of leukemia cells through miR-21-modulated suppression of Bcl-2.

  13. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-29

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia by Risk Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a monoclonal antibody like rituximab (Rituxan) or obinutuzumab (Gazyva). Other options include ibrutinib (Imbruvica), rituximab alone, ... Oncovin), and prednisone Chlorambucil combined with prednisone, rituximab, obinutuzumab, or ofatumumab PCR: pentostatin (Nipent), cyclophosphamide, and rituximab ...

  15. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-07

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  18. The Application of Rational-Emotive Behavior Therapy to Reduce Stress among Mother with Leukemia Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuni Sufyanti Arief

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A child who is diagnosed with Leukemia will undergo several procedures are long and painful action. During the process of hospitalization due to leukemia children and parents can experience a variety of events or actions handling according to various studies shown by the experience very traumatic and stressful (Supartini 2004 in Arif, SY, 2007. Some of the methods used to deal with anxiety is psikoprofilaksis, relaxation and imagination (Reeder et al., 2011. Rational-emotive behavior therapy by Albert Ellis in 1990 describes a unique man who is basically have a tendency to think rational and irrational. Methods: aim of this study is to explain the effect of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT for stress levels of mothers with children suffering from Leukemia. The study design used was a pre-experiment Quasy-post control group design. The sample was 10 mothers of children diagnosed with leukemia are treated in a child hematology ward Soetomo hospital. Variable in this study is the level of depression and anxiety mothers with children suffering from leukemia. Result: Based on the results obtained Wilcoxon statistical test p = 0.025 in the treatment group and p = 0.32 in the control group. Mann Whitney test results obtained p = 0.012. Conclution: Rational-emotive behavior therapy can reduce levels of depression and anxiety (stress mothers with children suffering from leukemia. It is expected that the application of rational -emotive behavior therapy can be done to reduce depression and anxiety in women with chronic disease cases while maintaining the effectiveness the goal of REBT. Keywords: stress, anxiety, depression, rational-emotive behavior

  19. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Chronic myelogenous leukemia and benzene exposure: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the case-control literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Steven H; Engel, Arnold; Joshi, Kiran P; Byrd, Daniel M; Chen, Rusan

    2009-12-10

    Benzene exposure is well demonstrated as a cause of acute myelogenous leukemia, but not of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Previous literature reviews based on case series and cohort studies have not shown an association. We have now conducted a literature search for case-control studies that examine the association between benzene exposure and chronic myelogenous leukemia. Six case-control studies have been found. These derive from occupational groups, cancer registries, and a clinical laboratory. Their exposure ascertainments are all based on job histories, job-exposure matricies, or industrial hygiene data. The odds ratios (ORs) for individual studies range from 0.73 to 1.2. The pooled OR is 1.003 with 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.94-1.07 (p=0.98) for both a fixed effects model and a random effects model. The case-control literature indicates that chronic myelogenous leukemia does not appear to be related to benzene exposure.

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower part of the spinal column, after a small area on the lower back is numbed. These treatments are given in addition to treatment that is used to kill leukemia cells in the rest of the body. All children ...

  3. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower part of the spinal column, after a small area on the lower back is numbed. These treatments are given in addition to treatment that is used to kill leukemia cells in the rest of the body. All children ...

  4. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower part of the spinal column, after a small area on the lower back is numbed. These treatments are given in addition to treatment that is used to kill leukemia cells in the rest of the body. All children ...

  5. Increased leukemia risk in Chernobyl cleanup workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new study found a significantly elevated risk for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among workers who were engaged in recovery and clean-up activities following the Chernobyl power plant accident in 1986.

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute ... bleeding and forming blood clots. Smoking, previous chemotherapy treatment, and exposure to radiation may affect the risk ...

  7. Monoclonal antibodies in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Keating, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Multiple options are now available for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Over the last 10 years, monoclonal antibodies have become an integral part of the management of this disease. Alemtuzumab has received approval for use in patients with fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Rituximab has been investigated extensively in chronic lymphocytic leukemia both as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy and other monoclonal antibodies. Epratuzumab and lumiliximab are newer monoclonal antibodies in the early phase of clinical development. This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the results obtained with monoclonal antibodies as single agents and in combination with chemotherapy, and other biological agents and newer compounds undergoing clinical trials.

  8. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lymphoid tissue is found in lymph nodes, the thymus, the spleen, the tonsils and adenoids, and is ... destroy some germs by surrounding and digesting them. Development of leukemia Any type of early blood-forming ...

  9. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute ... bleeding and forming blood clots. Smoking, previous chemotherapy treatment, and exposure to radiation may affect the risk ...

  10. Supportive Care for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... low red blood cell counts, it is called autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). This also can be treated with drugs ... Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treatment After Treatment Back To Top ...

  11. Viewpoints on the proinflammation state of leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Kefu; MA Xiaotong

    2003-01-01

    Proinflammation represents a pathophysiological state on the early stage of a number of diseases, especially the infectious and immunological ones. In recent years, proinflammation has attracted much attention, and the term "proinflammation factors" appears frequently in the literature. While investigating leukemia and leukemic cells from the angle of "proinflammation state", we got some intriguing findings, e.g. we detected the significantly elevated expression of proinflammation factor IL-18 in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which could up-regulate matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and specific tissue inhibitors (TIMPs). The increased MMP may play a role in the aggressiveness of myeloid leukemic cells, and be associated with a poor prognosis. This phenomenon reflects an ignored aspect of leukemia. Investigations from the angle of "proinflammation state" have broaden the fields of tumor and leukemia study.

  12. The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Raaschou-Jensen, Klas Kræsten;

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The main aim of the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) was to obtain information about the epidemiology of the hematologic cancers acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). STUDY POPULATION: The registry...... patients is currently 90%. MAIN VARIABLES AND DESCRIPTIVE DATA: Approximately, 250 AML patients, 25 ALL patients, and 230 MDS patients are registered in the DNLR every year. In January 2015, the registry included detailed patient characteristics, disease characteristics, treatment characteristics...... years. To ensure this high coverage, completeness, and quality of data, linkage to the Danish Civil Registration System and the Danish National Registry of Patients, and several programmed data entry checks are used. CONCLUSION: The completeness and positive predictive values of the leukemia data have...

  13. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea. PMID:27695173

  14. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Nair, Sreejith G.; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea.

  15. Autonomous growth potential of leukemia blast cells is associated with poor prognosis in human acute leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowski Ann A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have described a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse model that permits the subcutaneous growth of primary human acute leukemia blast cells into a measurable subcutaneous nodule which may be followed by the development of disseminated disease. Utilizing the SCID mouse model, we examined the growth potential of leukemic blasts from 133 patients with acute leukemia, (67 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and 66 acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the animals after subcutaneous inoculation without conditioning treatment. The blasts displayed three distinct growth patterns: "aggressive", "indolent", or "no tumor growth". Out of 133 leukemias, 45 (33.8% displayed an aggressive growth pattern, 14 (10.5% displayed an indolent growth pattern and 74 (55.6% did not grow in SCID mice. The growth probability of leukemias from relapsed and/or refractory disease was nearly 3 fold higher than that from patients with newly diagnosed disease. Serial observations found that leukemic blasts from the same individual, which did not initiate tumor growth at initial presentation and/or at early relapse, may engraft and grow in the later stages of disease, suggesting that the ability of leukemia cells for engraftment and proliferation was gradually acquired following the process of leukemia progression. Nine autonomous growing leukemia cell lines were established in vitro. These displayed an aggressive proliferation pattern, suggesting a possible correlation between the capacity of human leukemia cells for autonomous proliferation in vitro and an aggressive growth potential in SCID mice. In addition, we demonstrated that patients whose leukemic blasts displayed an aggressive growth and dissemination pattern in SClD mice had a poor clinical outcome in patients with ALL as well as AML. Patients whose leukemic blasts grew indolently or whose leukemia cells failed to induce growth had a significantly longer DFS and more favorable clinical course.

  16. Lenalidomide and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pilar González-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lenalidomide is an oral immunomodulatory drug used in multiple myeloma and myelodysplastic syndrome and most recently it has shown to be effective in the treatment of various lymphoproliferative disorders such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The mechanism of action of lenalidomide varies depending on the pathology, and in the case of CLL, it appears to primarily act by restoring the damaged mechanisms of tumour immunosurveillance. This review discusses the potential mechanism of action and efficacy of lenalidomide, alone or in combination, in treatment of CLL and its toxic effects such as tumor lysis syndrome (TLS and tumor flare reaction (TFR, that make its management different from other hematologic malignancies.

  17. Ofatumumab, Pentostatin, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-30

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  18. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With HTLV-Associated T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-26

    Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; CD3 Positive; CD4-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Chronic Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; HTLV-1 Infection; Hypercalcemia; Lymphomatous Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Smoldering Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  19. Traumatic stress in acute leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Gary; Yuen, Dora; Mischitelle, Ashley; Minden, Mark D; Brandwein, Joseph; Schimmer, Aaron; Marmar, Charles; Gagliese, Lucia; Lo, Christopher; Rydall, Anne; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Objective Acute leukemia is a condition with an acute onset that is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. However, the psychological impact of this life-threatening condition and its intensive treatment has not been systematically examined. In the present study, we investigate the prevalence and correlates of post-traumatic stress symptoms in this population. Methods Patients with acute myeloid, lymphocytic, and promyelocytic leukemia who were newly diagnosed, recently relapsed, or treatment failures were recruited at a comprehensive cancer center in Toronto, Canada. Participants completed the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire, Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, CARES Medical Interaction Subscale, and other psychosocial measures. A multivariate regression analysis was used to assess independent predictors of post-traumatic stress symptoms. Results Of the 205 participants, 58% were male, mean age was 50.1 ± 15.4 years, 86% were recently diagnosed, and 94% were receiving active treatment. The mean Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire score was 30.2 ± 22.5, with 27 of 200 (14%) patients meeting criteria for acute stress disorder and 36 (18%) for subsyndromal acute stress disorder. Post-traumatic stress symptoms were associated with more physical symptoms, physical symptom distress, attachment anxiety, and perceived difficulty communicating with health-care providers, and poorer spiritual well-being (all p relationships with health-care providers, and with individual psychological characteristics. Longitudinal study is needed to determine the natural history, but these findings suggest that intervention may be indicated to alleviate or prevent traumatic stress in this population. PMID:22081505

  20. Genomic profiling of thousands of candidate polymorphisms predicts risk of relapse in 778 Danish and German childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesolowska, Agata; Borst, L.; Dalgaard, Marlene Danner;

    2015-01-01

    associated with risk of relapse across protocols. SNP and biologic pathway level analyses associated relapse risk with leukemia aggressiveness, glucocorticosteroid pharmacology/response and drug transport/metabolism pathways. Classification and regression tree analysis identified three distinct risk groups...

  1. Preventive central nervous system irradiation in children with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. [Complications of. gamma. radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, G.V.; Simone, J.V.; Hustu, H.O.; Mason, C.

    1978-11-01

    In this study of children with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia an attempt was made to prevent central nervous system relapse and to determine whether this therapy, coupled with multiagent chemotherapy, would be successful in prolonging durations of complete remission. Central nervous system relapses were prevented by irradiation, although patients who received this therapy did no better than those who did not receive irradiation. A small group of patients received irradiation to the liver and spleen, but this modality also failed to improve the duration of remission. Control of extramedullary leukemia, in this study, failed to improve remission duration because bone marrow relapse was not prevented or delayed. It is unlikely that focal therapy will have a significant impact in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia until longer marrow remissions are achieved.

  2. Non-infectious chemotherapy-associated acute toxicities during childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Müller, Klaus; Mogensen, Signe Sloth; Mogensen, Pernille Rudebeck; Wolthers, Benjamin Ole; Stoltze, Ulrik Kristoffer; Tuckuviene, Ruta; Frandsen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    During chemotherapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, all organs can be affected by severe acute side effects, the most common being opportunistic infections, mucositis, central or peripheral neuropathy (or both), bone toxicities (including osteonecrosis), thromboembolism, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, endocrinopathies (especially steroid-induced adrenal insufficiency and hyperglycemia), high-dose methotrexate-induced nephrotoxicity, asparaginase-associated hypersensitivity, pancreatitis, and hyperlipidemia. Few of the non-infectious acute toxicities are associated with clinically useful risk factors, and across study groups there has been wide diversity in toxicity definitions, capture strategies, and reporting, thus hampering meaningful comparisons of toxicity incidences for different leukemia protocols. Since treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia now yields 5-year overall survival rates above 90%, there is a need for strategies for assessing the burden of toxicities in the overall evaluation of anti-leukemic therapy programs. PMID:28413626

  3. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma associated with HTLV-1 infection in a Brazilian adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VALLE Antonio Carlos Francesconi do

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 15-year-old patient infected with HTLV-1 who developed a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, confirmed by histopathological and immunohistochemical examination, as well as clinically and hematologically confirmed leukemia. The patient died 3 months after initial presentation of the disease. The rarity of the disease in this age group justifies the present report.

  4. Acute nonlymphocytic leukemia in adults: correlations with Q-banded chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golomb, H.M.; Vardiman, J.; Rowley, J.D.

    1976-07-01

    Chromosome banding patterns were obtained for 50 of 55 consecutive adult patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia during a 5-yr period. Twenty-two of the 50 cases were diagnosed as acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), 24 as acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMMol), 2 as acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), and 2 as erythroleukemia. Twenty-five patients had initial chromosome abnormalities, and five more patients developed abnormalities during the course of the disease. The median survival of patients with normal chromosomes initially (group 1) was 10 mo, whereas that of patients with abnormal chromosomes initially (group II) was 2 mo. Similar times were obtained for treated patients with AML and AMMol. However, when the AML patients were separated into those with and those without a chromosome abnormality, the median survival times were markedly different (2 mo versus 18 mo, respectively). Patients with AMMol demonstrated no difference in median survival times when subgrouped according to the presence or absence of chromosome abnormalities. The treated group II patients whose marrow samples had only abnormal metaphases had a poorer response (10 percent complete remission) and median survival (2 mo) than the group II patients who had at least one normal metaphase (42 percent complete remission with a median survival of 9 mo). The two cases of APL demonstrated a deletion of the long arm of No. 17 which occurred in the same region of the chromosome in each case. Both patients had similar clinical histories, with disseminated intravascular coagulation, and neither responded to therapy.

  5. Role of the polycomb repressive complex 2 in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Raffaella; Pasini, Diego; Gutierrez, Arantxa;

    2007-01-01

    Epigenetic changes are common alterations in cancer cells. Here, we have investigated the role of Polycomb group proteins in the establishment and maintenance of the aberrant silencing of tumor suppressor genes during transformation induced by the leukemia-associated PML-RARalpha fusion protein. We...

  6. Erroneous exchange of asparaginase forms in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, K.C.; Bemt, P.M. van den; Torringa, M.L.; Tamminga, R.Y.; Pieters, R.; Smet, P.A. de

    2011-01-01

    For the treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), Dutch pediatric oncologists use the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group ALL 10 protocol. This protocol is complex, as it comprises many different drug regimens. One of the drugs is asparaginase which is available in different forms wi

  7. Erroneous Exchange of Asparaginase Forms in the Treatment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, Ka-Chun; van den Bemt, Patricia M. L. A.; Torringa, Maarten L. J.; Tamminga, Rienk Y. J.; Pieters, Rob; de Smet, Peter A. G. M.

    2011-01-01

    For the treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), Dutch pediatric oncologists use the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group ALL 10 protocol. This protocol is complex, as it comprises many different drug regimens. One of the drugs is asparaginase which is available in different forms wi

  8. The significance of change of Th22 cells in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘立民

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the proportion of Th22 cells in peripheral blood of patients with acute lympho-blastic leukemia(ALL) and evaluate its significance.Methods The proportions of Th22 cells in peripheral blood of B-ALL and T-ALL patients before therapy(group 1),

  9. Minimal residual disease diagnostics in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Need for sensitive, fast, and standardized technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques); V.H.J. van der Velden (Vincent); M. Brüggemann (Monika); A. Orfao (Alberto)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMonitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) has become routine clinical practice in frontline treatment of virtually all childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and in many adult ALL patients. MRD diagnostics has proven to be the strongest prognostic factor, allowing for risk group

  10. Deterioration of Intellect among Children Surviving Leukemia: IQ Test Changes Modify Estimates of Treatment Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulhern, Raymond, K; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Assessed association of young age at treatment, cranial irradiation, and time since treatment with intellectual deterioration among 49 long-term survivors of childhood leukemia. Found no significant effects of treatment group (low-dose cranial irradiation versus high-dose chemotherapy) or age at treatment. Small but statistically significant…

  11. DNA methylation-based subtype prediction for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordlund, Jessica; Bäcklin, Christofer L; Zachariadis, Vasilios

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We present a method that utilizes DNA methylation profiling for prediction of the cytogenetic subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells from pediatric ALL patients. The primary aim of our study was to improve risk stratification of ALL patients into treatment groups using DNA...

  12. [Nursing diagnosis in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Luccas Melo; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2006-09-01

    This case study aimed at identifying Nursing Diagnosis (ND) in adult patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, with the purpose of contributing to the Systematization of Nurse Care. Interviews and observation were used for data collection, in addition to Nursing Process application. During the three months of data collection, other NDs were obtained by searching the files of the 6 patients. The 32 ND found in this study were grouped according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Out of these 32 ND, 15 corresponded to changes in Physiological Needs, and 10 to changes in Protection and Safety Needs.

  13. Acute myeloid leukemia: conventional cytogenetics, FISH, and moleculocentric methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Bagg, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a complex group of hematologic neoplasms characterized by distinctive morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic abnormalities. However, it has become evident that genetic aberrations are central to the genesis of AML and have assumed an increasingly relevant role in the classification of AML. Here we discuss hallmark recurrent translocations that define specific World Health Organization (WHO) entities and other frequently encountered genetic aberrations that do not (yet) define specific entities. Additionally, we discuss emerging technologies and their application to the discovery of new abnormalities and to their potential role in the future diagnosis and classification of AML.

  14. Karyotypic findings in chronic myeloid leukemia cases undergoing treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a clonal myeloproliferative expansion of primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells. Materials and Methods: In the present study, CML samples were collected from various hospitals in Amritsar, Jalandhar and Ludhiana. Results: Chromosomal alterations seen in peripheral blood lymphocytes of these treated and untreated cases of CML were satellite associations, double minutes, random loss, gain of C group chromosomes and presence of marker chromosome. No aberrations were observed in control samples. Karyotypic abnormalities have also been noted in the Ph-negative cells of some patients in disease remission. Conclusion: This is a novel phenomenon whose prognostic implications require thorough and systematic evaluation.

  15. Chronic myelogenous leukemia: molecular monitoring in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Ryabchikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib has led to significant progress in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML treatment. To date, genetic monitoring is a mandatory attribute of therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The purpose of this study was to access the imatinib therapy efficacy in CML patients using complete molecular genetic monitoring by standard cytogenetics, realtime polymerase chain reaction and mutational analysis. Correlation between cytogenetic and molecular response was shown. Heterogeneity of molecular response in each patient group was revealed by expression of BCR-ABL. Kinase domain mutations were detected in 32 % of CML patients resistant to imatinib.

  16. INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnaMaria Nosari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Infectious complications have been known to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CLL patients who are predisposed to infections because of both the humoral immunodepression inherent to hematologic disease, which is related to stage and duration of CLL, and to further immunosuppression related to therapy. The majority of infections in CLL patients treated with alkilating agents is of bacterial origin. The immunodeficiency and natural infectious history of alkylator-resistant, corticosteroid-treated patients appears to have changed with the administration of purine analogs, which has been complicated by very severe and unusual infections and also more viral infections due to sustained reduction of CD4-positive T lymphocytes. The following introduction of monoclonal antibody therapies, in particular alemtuzumab, further increased the immunodepression, increasing also infections which appeared more often in patients with recurrent neutropenia due to chemotherapy cycles.

    Epidemiological data regarding fungal infections in lymphoproliferative disorders are scarce. Italian SEIFEM group in a retrospective multicentre study regarding CLL patients reported an incidence of mycoses 0.5%; however, chronic lymphoproliferative disorders emerged as second haematological underlying disease after acute leukemia in a French study on aspergillosis; in particular CLL with aspergillosis accounted for a third of these chronic lymphoproliferative diseases presenting mould infection.

  17. INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnaMaria Nosari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Infectious complications have been known to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CLL patients who are predisposed to infections because of both the humoral immunodepression inherent to hematologic disease, which is related to stage and duration of CLL, and to further immunosuppression related to therapy. The majority of infections in CLL patients treated with alkilating agents is of bacterial origin. The immunodeficiency and natural infectious history of alkylator-resistant, corticosteroid-treated patients appears to have changed with the administration of purine analogs, which has been complicated by very severe and unusual infections and also more viral infections due to sustained reduction of CD4-positive T lymphocytes. The following introduction of monoclonal antibody therapies, in particular alemtuzumab, further increased the immunodepression, increasing also infections which appeared more often in patients with recurrent neutropenia due to chemotherapy cycles. Epidemiological data regarding fungal infections in lymphoproliferative disorders are scarce. Italian SEIFEM group in a retrospective multicentre study regarding CLL patients reported an incidence of mycoses 0.5%; however, chronic lymphoproliferative disorders emerged as second haematological underlying disease after acute leukemia in a French study on aspergillosis; in particular CLL with aspergillosis accounted for a third of these chronic lymphoproliferative diseases presenting mould infection.

  18. Elastase mediated fibrinolysis in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudijk, E J; Nieuwenhuis, H K; Bos, R; Fijnheer, R

    2000-06-01

    The bleeding syndrome of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is complex and consists of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and hyperfibrinolysis. Elastase, derived from malignant promyelocytes, is believed to mediate the fibrinogeno- and fibrinolysis by aspecific proteolysis. In this study we measured the role of elastase in fifteen patients with APL by using an assay for elastase degraded fibrin(ogen) and the results were compared with those obtained in patients with sepsis induced DIC. High levels of elastase were observed in sepsis and APL. The levels of fibrinogen and fibrin degradation products were significantly higher in APL patients compared to patients with sepsis induced DIC. Nevertheless, the level of elastase degraded fibrin(ogen) was higher in the sepsis group (635.3 ng/ml, compared to 144.3 ng/ml in APL; p <0.0001). So, the enormous increase in fibrin and fibrinogen degradation products in APL cannot be explained by elastase activity. This study suggests a minor role for elastase mediated proteolysis in the hemorrhagic diathesis in APL patients.

  19. Infections in acute leukemia in Indian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Roy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In the present study acute leukemic children were studied to determine the incidence and principal site of infection, correlation with absolute neutrophil count, causative organisms and to standardize the initial empirical anti microbial therapy. Materials and methods: A total 40 children in the age group 6 month to 12 year with acute leukemia relapse were included in this study. A total 82 infectious episodes including 61 febrile episodes were investigated for infectious etiology. Results: We found that the frequency of infections increased significantly with the degree of immunocompromisation specially neutropenia (ANC < 500/cmm. The skin and soft tissue was the commonest site of infection (26.83%, followed by respiratory tract (21.95%. Staphylococcus nonhemolytic coagulase-negative (34%, followed by Klebsiella (17% were the most common organisms isolated from blood. Staphylococcus non-hemolytic coagulase-negative was also the commonest isolate (26% from other sites of infection. Most strains were sensitive to Cloxacillin, cephalosporin and aminoglycosides. Conclusion: For the treatment of febrile episodes, empirical use of beta-lactamase resistant penicillin e.g. Cloxacillin or cephalosporin combined with an aminoglycosides with a broad spectrum antifungal like fluconazole in selective cases at the first sign of infection is recommended. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-1, 40-47 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v9i1.9672

  20. Addition of Arsenic Trioxide into Induction Regimens Could Not Accelerate Recovery of Abnormality of Coagulation and Fibrinolysis in Patients with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Zhang

    Full Text Available All-trans retinoic acid combined to anthracycline-based chemotherapy is the standard regimen of acute promyelocytic leukemia. The advent of arsenic trioxide has contributed to improve the anti-leukemic efficacy in acute promyelocytic leukemia. The objectives of the current study were to evaluate if dual induction by all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide could accelerate the recovery of abnormality of coagulation and fibrinolysis in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia.Retrospective analysis was performed in 103 newly-diagnosed patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Hemostatic variables and the consumption of component blood were comparably analyzed among patients treated by different induction regimen with or without arsenic trioxide.Compared to patients with other subtypes of de novo acute myeloid leukemia, patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia had lower platelet counts and fibrinogen levels, significantly prolonged prothrombin time and elevated D-dimers (P<0.001. Acute promyelocytic leukemia patients with high or intermediate risk prognostic stratification presented lower initial fibrinogen level than that of low-risk group (P<0.05. After induction treatment, abnormal coagulation and fibrinolysis of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia was significantly improved before day 10. The recovery of abnormal hemostatic variables (platelet, prothrombin time, fibrinogen and D-dimer was not significantly accelerated after adding arsenic trioxide in induction regimens; and the consumption of transfused component blood (platelet and plasma did not dramatically change either. Acute promyelocytic leukemia patients with high or intermediate risk prognostic stratification had higher platelet transfusion demands than that of low-risk group (P<0.05.Unexpectedly, adding arsenic trioxide could not accelerate the recovery of abnormality of coagulation and fibrinolysis in acute promyelocytic leukemia patients who received all

  1. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiying [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Rao, Qing, E-mail: raoqing@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China)

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  2. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Treatment Outcome in Older Patients with Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Pounds, Stanley; Cao, Xueyuan; Jenkins, Laura; Dahl, Gary; Bowman, W. Paul; Taub, Jeffrey W; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Campana, Dario; Inaba, Hiroto

    2013-01-01

    Background Older age has historically been an adverse prognostic factor in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The impact of age relative to that of other prognostic factors on the outcome of patients treated in recent trials is unknown. Methods Clinical outcome and causes of treatment failure of 351 patients enrolled on three consecutive protocols for childhood AML between 1991 and 2008 were analyzed according to age and protocol. Results The more recent protocol (AML02) produced improved outcomes for 10- to 21-year-old patients compared to 2 earlier studies (AML91 and 97), with 3-year rates of event-free survival (EFS), overall survival (OS) and cumulative incidence of refractory leukemia or relapse (CIR) for this group similar to those of 0- to 9-year old patients: EFS, 58.3% ± 5.4% vs. 66.6% ± 4.9%, P=.20; OS, 68.9% ± 5.1% vs. 75.1% ± 4.5%, P=.36; cumulative incidence of refractory leukemia or relapse, 21.9% ± 4.4%; vs. 25.3% ± 4.1%, P=.59. EFS and OS estimates for 10–15-year-old patients overlapped those for 16–21-year-old patients. However, the cumulative incidence of toxic death was significantly higher for 10- to 21-year-old patients compared to younger patients (13.2% ± 3.6 vs. 4.5% ± 2.0%, P=.028). Conclusion The survival rate for older children with AML has improved on our recent trial and is now similar to that of younger patients. However, deaths from toxicity remain a significant problem in the older age group. Future trials should focus on improving supportive care while striving to develop more effective antileukemic therapy. PMID:22674050

  4. Dietary intake and childhood leukemia: The Diet and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (DALLT) cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladas, Elena J; Orjuela, Manuela; Stevenson, Kristen; Cole, Peter D; Lin, Meiko; Athale, Uma H; Clavell, Luis A; Leclerc, Jean-Marie; Michon, Bruno; Schorin, Marshall A; Welch, Jennifer Greene; Asselin, Barbara L; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Kelly, Kara M

    2016-10-01

    Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at elevated risk for nutrition-related morbidity both during and after therapy. We present the demographic characteristics and nutrient intake at study entry of a prospective cohort in which evaluating dietary intake in children diagnosed with ALL was investigated. Dietary intake data were collected for participants enrolled on the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute ALL Consortium Protocol. Dietary intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire and was compared with the dietary reference intake by ALL risk group (standard and high risk). Dietary intake data were collected from 81% of participants (n = 640). We found that 27% of participants were overweight/obese. Intake of total calories and other nutrients exceeded the dietary reference intake in up to 79% of children. This was evident in both risk groups and was pronounced among younger children. For micronutrients, dietary intake of calcium, vitamin D (females only), and zinc differed significantly between patients with standard-risk and those with high-risk ALL. This study was successful in collecting dietary intake data at the time of cancer diagnosis in a multicenter setting in a pediatric population at high-risk for nutrition-related morbidity. We identified "at-risk" dietary intakes, which vary by sex and ALL risk group; such patients may benefit from future dietary interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Association of acute myeloid leukemia’s most immature phenotype with risk groups and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Jonathan M.; Zeidner, Joshua F.; Morse, Sarah; Blackford, Amanda L.; Perkins, Brandy; Yanagisawa, Breann; Zhang, Hao; Morsberger, Laura; Karp, Judith; Ning, Yi; Gocke, Christopher D.; Rosner, Gary L.; Smith, B. Douglas; Jones, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The precise phenotype and biology of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells remain controversial, in part because the “gold standard” immunodeficient mouse engraftment assay fails in a significant fraction of patients and identifies multiple cell-types in others. We sought to analyze the clinical utility of a novel assay for putative leukemia stem cells in a large prospective cohort. The leukemic clone’s most primitive hematopoietic cellular phenotype was prospectively identified in 109 newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia patients, and analyzed against clinical risk groups and outcomes. Most (80/109) patients harbored CD34+CD38− leukemia cells. The CD34+CD38− leukemia cells in 47 of the 80 patients displayed intermediate aldehyde dehydrogenase expression, while normal CD34+CD38− hematopoietic stem cells expressed high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase. In the other 33/80 patients, the CD34+CD38− leukemia cells exhibited high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and most (28/33, 85%) harbored poor-risk cytogenetics or FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem translocations. No CD34+ leukemia cells could be detected in 28/109 patients, including 14/21 patients with nucleophosmin-1 mutations and 6/7 acute promyelocytic leukemia patients. The patients with CD34+CD38− leukemia cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity manifested a significantly lower complete remission rate, as well as poorer event-free and overall survivals. The leukemic clone’s most immature phenotype was heterogeneous with respect to CD34, CD38, and ALDH expression, but correlated with acute myeloid leukemia risk groups and outcomes. The strong clinical correlations suggest that the most immature phenotype detectable in the leukemia might serve as a biomarker for “clinically-relevant” leukemia stem cells. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01349972. PMID:26819054

  6. Relative biological effectiveness of tritium for induction of myeloid leukemia in CBA/H mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.R. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs., Health Protection Branch, Health Div., Richland, WA (United States); Myers, D.K.; Jackson, J.S.; Dunford, D.W.; Gragtmans, N.J.; Wyatt, H.M.; Jones, A.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontairo (Canada); Percy, D.H. [Univ. of Guelph, Ontario Veterinary College, Guelph, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-07-01

    To help resolve uncertainties as to the most appropriate weighting factor for tritium {beta} rays, a large experiment was carried out to measure the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritiated water compared to X rays for the induction of myeloid leukemia in male mice of the CBA/H strain. The study was designed to estimate the lifetime incidence of myeloid leukemia in seven groups of about 750 mice each; radiation exposures were approximately 0, 1, 2 and 3 Gy both for tritiated water and for X rays. The lifetime incidence of leukemia in these mice increased from 0.13% in the control group to 6-8% in groups exposed to higher radiation doses. The results were fitted to various equations relating leukemia incidence to radiation dose, using both the raw data and data corrected for cumulative mouse-days at risk. The calculated RBE values for tritium 13 rays compared to X rays ranged from 1.0 {+-} 0.5 to 1.3 {+-} 0.3. A best estimate of the RBE for this experiment was about 1.2 {+-} 0.3. A w{sub R} value of 1 would thus appear to be more appropriate than a W{sub R} of 2 for tritium {beta} rays. (author)

  7. Relative biological effectiveness of tritium for induction of myeloid leukemia in CBA/H mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J R; Myers, D K; Jackson, J S; Dunford, D W; Gragtmans, N J; Wyatt, H M; Jones, A R; Percy, D H

    1995-10-01

    To help resolve uncertainties as to the most appropriate weighting factor for tritium beta rays, a large experiment was carried out to measure the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritiated water compared to X rays for the induction of myeloid leukemia in male mice of the CBA/H strain. The study was designed to estimate the lifetime incidence of myeloid leukemia in seven groups of about 750 mice each; radiation exposures were approximately 0, 1, 2 and 3 Gy both for tritiated water and for X rays. The lifetime incidence of leukemia in these mice increased from 0.13% in the control group to 6-8% in groups exposed to higher radiation doses. The results were fitted to various equations relating leukemia incidence to radiation dose, using both the raw data and data corrected for cumulative mouse-days at risk. The calculated RBE values for tritium beta rays compared to X rays ranged from 1.0 +/- 0.5 to 1.3 +/- 0.3. A best estimate of the RBE for this experiment was about 1.2 +/- 0.3. A wR value of 1 would thus appear to be more appropriate than a wR of 2 for tritium beta rays.

  8. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia with pregnancy: a rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi Bhargava

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy complicated with leukemia is rare. Validated data out of which conclusions may be drawn regarding management of pregnancy with leukemia are sparse. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(3.000: 887-888

  9. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia with pregnancy: a rare case

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy complicated with leukemia is rare. Validated data out of which conclusions may be drawn regarding management of pregnancy with leukemia are sparse. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(3.000): 887-888

  10. Genetics Home Reference: PDGFRB-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... link) Genetic Testing Registry: Myeloproliferative disorder, chronic, with eosinophilia Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (3 links) Cancer. ... leukemia chronic myelomonocytic leukemia chronic myeloproliferative disorder ... eosinophilia with chronic myeloproliferative disorder primary eosinophilia ...

  11. Cytogenetic risk stratification in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Such, Esperanza; Cervera, José; Costa, Dolors; Solé, Francesc; Vallespí, Teresa; Luño, Elisa; Collado, Rosa; Calasanz, María J.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.; Cigudosa, Juan C.; Nomdedeu, Benet; Mallo, Mar; Carbonell, Felix; Bueno, Javier; Ardanaz, María T.; Ramos, Fernando; Tormo, Mar; Sancho-Tello, Reyes; del Cañizo, Consuelo; Gómez, Valle; Marco, Victor; Xicoy, Blanca; Bonanad, Santiago; Pedro, Carmen; Bernal, Teresa; Sanz, Guillermo F.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prognostic value of cytogenetic findings in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is unclear. Our purpose was to evaluate the independent prognostic impact of cytogenetic abnormalities in a large series of patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia included in the database of the Spanish Registry of Myelodysplastic Syndromes. Design and Methods We studied 414 patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia according to WHO criteria and with a successful conventional cytogenetic analysis at diagnosis. Different patient and disease characteristics were examined by univariate and multivariate methods to establish their relationship with overall survival and evolution to acute myeloid leukemia. Results Patients with abnormal karyotype (110 patients, 27%) had poorer overall survival (P=0.001) and higher risk of acute myeloid leukemia evolution (P=0.010). Based on outcome analysis, three cytogenetic risk categories were identified: low risk (normal karyotype or loss of Y chromosome as a single anomaly), high risk (presence of trisomy 8 or abnormalities of chromosome 7, or complex karyotype), and intermediate risk (all other abnormalities). Overall survival at five years for patients in the low, intermediate, and high risk cytogenetic categories was 35%, 26%, and 4%, respectively (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed that this new CMML-specific cytogenetic risk stratification was an independent prognostic variable for overall survival (P=0.001). Additionally, patients belonging to the high-risk cytogenetic category also had a higher risk of acute myeloid leukemia evolution on univariate (P=0.001) but not multivariate analysis. Conclusions Cytogenetic findings have a strong prognostic impact in patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. PMID:21109693

  12. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-21

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. cDNA cloning, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of myelodysplasia/Myeloid Leukemia Factor 2 (MLF2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuefer, M.U.; Valentine, V.; Behm, F.G. [St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-15

    A fusion gene between nucleophosmin (NPM) and myelodysplasia/myeloid leukemia factor 1 (MLF1) and myelodysplasia/myeloid leukemia factor 1 (MLF1) is formed by a recurrent t(3;5)(q25.1;q34) in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia. Here we report the identification of a novel gene, MLF2, which contains an open reading frame of 744 bp encoding a 248-amino-acid protein highly related to the previously identified MLF1 protein (63% similarity, 40% identity). In contrast to the tissue-restricted expression pattern of MLF1, and MLF2 messenger RNA is expressed ubiquitously. The MLF2 gene locus was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to human chromosome 12p13, a chromosomal region frequently involved in translocations and deletions in acute leukemias of lymphoid or myeloid lineage. In a physical map of chromosome 12, MLF2 was found to reside on the yeast artificial chromosome clone 765b9. Southern blotting analysis of malignant cell DNAs prepared from a series of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases with translocations involving chromosome arm 12p, as well as a group of acute myeloid leukemias with various cytogenetic abnormalities, failed to reveal MLF2 gene rearrangements. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Leukemia in donor cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The development of leukemia in donor cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant is an extremely rare event. We report here the case of a patient who developed myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia, in cells of donor origin 3.5 years after related donor HSCT for refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia and therapy-induced myelodysplastic syndrome. The origin of the leukemia was determined by analysis of minisatillite polymorphism tested on CD34(+) cells.

  15. In vitro radiosensitivity of human leukemia cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Greenberger, J.S.; Schmidt, A.; Karpas, A.; Moloney, W.C.; Little, J.B.

    1981-05-01

    The in vitro radiobiologic survival values (anti n, D/sub 0/) of four tumor lines derived from human hematopoietic tumors were studied. These cell lines were HL60 promyelocytic leukemia; K562 erythroleukemia; 45 acute lymphocytic leukemia; and 176 acute monomyelogenous leukemia. More cell lines must be examined before the exact relationship between in vitro radiosensitivity and clinical radiocurability is firmly established.

  16. Acute Myeloid Leukemia - Genetics Home Reference [Genetics Home Reference (Conditions)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Conditions Genes Chromosomes Handbook Glossary Resources Conditions > Acute Myeloid...te myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA Fanconi anemia You may also search Genetics Home Reference for Acut...e Myeloid Leukemia for additional information. Published : October 27, 2014 Acute Myeloid Leukemia - Genetics Home Reference ...

  17. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, Julian; Burmeister, T;

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia ...

  18. Hairy Cell Leukemia: the good news of a bad disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Seidi

    2017-03-01

    The authors decided to report a clinical case of hairy cells leukemia in an asymptomatic patient due to the rarity of this neoplasia (2% of all leukemias and less than 1% of limphoids neoplasms and because it corresponds to the most successfully treatable leukemia.

  19. Cyclophosphamide, Alvocidib, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With High Risk B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-10

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  20. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. How I treat leukemia during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojkovic, Dragana; Apperley, Jane F

    2014-02-13

    Leukemia in pregnancy remains a challenging therapeutic prospect. The prevalence is low at ∼1 in 10 000 pregnancies, and as a result data are limited to small retrospective series and case reports, rendering evidence-based recommendations for management strategies difficult. The management of the leukemias in pregnancy requires close collaboration with obstetric and neonatology colleagues as both the maternal and fetal outcomes must be taken into consideration. The decision to introduce or delay chemotherapy must be balanced against the impact on maternal and fetal survival and morbidity. Invariably, acute leukemia diagnosed in the first trimester necessitates intensive chemotherapy that is likely to induce fetal malformations. As delaying treatment in this situation is usually inappropriate, counseling with regard to termination of pregnancy is often essential. For chronic disease and acute leukemia diagnosed after the second trimester, therapeutic termination of the pregnancy is not inevitable and often, standard management approaches similar to those in nongravid patients can be used. Here, the management of the acute and chronic leukemias will be addressed.

  2. Acute promyelocytic leukemia and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giagounidis, A A; Beckmann, M W; Giagounidis, A S; Aivado, M; Emde, T; Germing, U; Riehs, T; Heyll, A; Aul, C

    2000-04-01

    In acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the use of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) as a differentiating agent induces complete remission in a high percentage of patients. In pregnancy, however, this drug bears the risk of severe teratogenicity to the child. We report the case of a 23-yr-old woman at 21 weeks' gestation suffering from APL. She was treated with ATRA (45 mg/m2) for 40 d and two courses of standard chemotherapy. The mother achieved complete remission within 22 d of treatment. Fetal development was normal, and a healthy premature girl was born in the 35th week of pregnancy. In a review of the literature we have identified 14 cases of APL in pregnancy treated with ATRA alone or in combination with chemotherapy. ATRA has been used as early as in the 3rd week of gestation and in no case have malformations or other teratogenic effects occurred. Side-effects, however, ranged from fetal cardiac arrhythmias to induction of labour. Although known to exhibit severe teratogenic effects during the first trimester of pregnancy, ATRA seems to be reasonably safe during the second and third trimesters in the treatment of APL. However, careful obstetric follow-up is mandatory regarding fetal cardiac complications.

  3. Obinutuzumab for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioufol, Catherine; Salles, Gilles

    2014-10-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a frequent hematological malignancy that is incurable using standard approaches. Two anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb), rituximab and ofatumumab, have been approved for CLL treatment. A new glycoengineered type II humanized anti-CD20 mAb, obinutuzumab (GA101), has been developed and demonstrates increased activity against B-cell malignancies by inducing direct cell death and better antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In a recent randomized Phase III study in patients with newly diagnosed CLL and coexisting conditions, obinutuzumab plus chlorambucil demonstrated significant improvement in progression-free survival and several other outcome parameters, in contrast to rituximab plus chlorambucil. Grade 3-4 infusion-related reactions and neutropenia occurred more frequently in patients who received obinutuzumab compared with those who received rituximab; however, the rate of serious infections was similar. Obinutuzumab represents a promising new option for patients with CLL and must be investigated with other chemotherapy regimens or with new targeted agents.

  4. Paranasal Manifestations of Early Stage Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceren Günel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the most common adult leukemia. A few studies have been reported about the relationship between CLL and paranasal sinuses. We aimed to investigate the paranasal manifestations of CLL and to determine the expression of nuclear factor-ĸB (NF-kB and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α in the nasal mucosa in patients with CLL. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was a clinical trial that involved 40 patients. Group CLL (n=20 consisted of patients with early-stage CLL who were followed-up at the hematology clinic and who did not receive any treatment. The control group (n=20 consisted of patients who had undergone concha surgery because of nasal obstruction. Paranasal sinus computer tomography scans of all patients were taken, they were scored on the basis of the Lund–Mackay system, and sinusitis findings were recorded. The biopsy material taken from the inferior concha head of all patients was immunohistochemically stained with primary antibodies against NF-kB and TNF-α. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to NF-κB (p=0.716 and TNF-α staining scores (p=1.000. The Lund–Mackay scores were significantly higher in the CLL group than in the control group (p=0.004. Fourteen patients had sinusitis at different locations, while the most common diagnosis was maxillary sinusitis (n=8 in the CLL group. CONCLUSION: This study showed that patients with early-stage CLL tend to have rhinosinusitis. However, NF-kB and TNF-α may not have a role in the inflammatory process involving the paranasal sinuses in patients with CLL.

  5. Computational identification of CDR3 sequence archetypes among immunoglobulin sequences in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, Bradley T; Raphael, Benjamin J; Aerni, Sarah J; Widhopf, George F; Rassenti, Laura Z; Gribben, John G; Kay, Neil E; Kipps, Thomas J

    2009-03-01

    The leukemia cells of unrelated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) display a restricted repertoire of immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangements with preferential usage of certain Ig gene segments. We developed a computational method to rigorously quantify biases in Ig sequence similarity in large patient databases and to identify groups of patients with unusual levels of sequence similarity. We applied our method to sequences from 1577 CLL patients through the CLL Research Consortium (CRC), and identified 67 similarity groups into which roughly 20% of all patients could be assigned. Immunoglobulin light chain class was highly correlated within all groups and light chain gene usage was similar within sets. Surprisingly, over 40% of the identified groups were composed of somatically mutated genes. This study significantly expands the evidence that antigen selection shapes the Ig repertoire in CLL.

  6. RETRACTED: Clinical significance of ITPA rs67002563 polymorphism in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with 6-mercaptopurine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Fatemeh; Esmaeilzadeh, Abdolreza; Ramazani, Ali

    2015-12-01

    This article has been retracted at the request of the Authors as it was published without the knowledge of the full research group, using data that had already been published by the same research group in another study in Leukemia Research (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leukres.2015.06.016).

  7. Rare cytogenetic abnormalities and alteration of microRNAs in acute myeloid leukemia and response to therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shahjahani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is the most common acute leukemia in adults, which is heterogeneous in terms of morphological, cytogenetic and clinical features. Cytogenetic abnormalities, including karyotype aberrations, gene mutations and gene expression abnormalities are the most important diagnostic tools in diagnosis, classification and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemias. Based on World Health Organization (WHO classification, acute myeloid leukemias can be divided to four groups. Due to the heterogeneous nature of AML and since most therapeutic protocols in AML are based on genetic alterations, gathering further information in the field of rare disorders as well as common cytogenetic abnormalities would be helpful in determining the prognosis and treatment in this group of diseases. Recently, the role of microRNAs (miRNAs in both normal hematopoiesis and myeloid leukemic cell differentiation in myeloid lineage has been specified. miRNAs can be used instead of genes for AML diagnosis and classification in the future, and can also play a decisive role in the evaluation of relapse as well as response to treatment in the patients. Therefore, their use in clinical trials can affect treatment protocols and play a role in therapeutic strategies for these patients. In this review, we have examined rare cytogenetic abnormalities in different groups of acute myeloid leukemias according to WHO classification, and the role of miRNA expression in classification, diagnosis and response to treatment of these disorders has also been dealt with.

  8. [Advances of study on prognostic factors of molecular biology in acute myeloid leukemia with normal cytogenetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tian-Jie; Xu, Xiao-Ping

    2010-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a group of diseases with a conspicuous heterogeneity. Following the development of cytogenetics, multiple reproducible chromosome aberrations have been discovered in AML, many of which not only are diagnostic markers for specific AML subtypes but also significant prognostic factors for determining complete remission (CR), relapse risk, and overall survival (OS). However, with the foundation of available chromosome analysis, a large group of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, 40% to 49% of adults and 25% of children had not been found abnormality of chromosome karyotype under microscope. These so-called cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients have usually been classified in an intermediate-risk prognostic category. Nevertheless, the outcome of the CN-AML patients are varied in clinical studies, likely because there exist diverse gene mutations in these patients according to recent researches. Those mutations at the molecular level, on basis of which AML could be further classified, are significantly associated with CN-AML patients and offer potential targets for specific therapeutic studies. The review focuses on research advances abroad in this field including gene mutations suggesting bad prognosis such as FMS-related tyrosine kinase 3 gene mutation, Baalc gene and ETS-related gene hyperexpression, Wilms' tumor gene mutation and other gene mutations as well as gene mutations suggesting good prognosis such as nucleophosmin gene mutation, mixed lineage leukemia-partial tandem duplication, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α gene mutation.

  9. Management of acute myeloid leukemia during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avivi, Irit; Brenner, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Diagnosis of acute leukemia during pregnancy presents significant medical challenges. Pancytopenia, caused by bone marrow substitution with leukemic cells, impairs maternal and fetal health. Chemotherapeutic agents required to be immediately used to save the mother's life are likely to adversely affect fetal development and outcome, especially if administered at an early gestational stage. Patients diagnosed with acute leukemia during the first trimester are, therefore, recommended to undergo pregnancy termination. At later gestational stages, antileukemic therapy can be administered, although in this case, fetal outcome is still associated with increased incidence of growth restriction and loss. Special attention to the issue of future reproduction, adopting a personalized fertility preservation approach, is required. This article addresses these subjects, presenting women diagnosed with acute myeloid and acute promyelocytic leukemia in pregnancy. The rarity of this event, resulting in insufficient data, emphasizes the need for collaborative efforts to optimize management of this complicated clinical condition.

  10. Acute myeloid leukemia in the pregnant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    Although acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mostly occurs in older patients, it could be seen in women of childbearing age. It is therefore not surprising that in some patients, the management of AML will be complicated by a coexistent pregnancy. However, the association of leukemia and pregnancy is uncommon. Its incidence is estimated to be 1 in 75,000-100,000 pregnancies. During pregnancy, most leukemias are acute: two-thirds are myeloid and one-third are lymphoblastic. There is no standard approach for this clinical dilemma, in part because of variables such as the type of AML, the seriousness of the symptoms, and the patient's personal beliefs. In many cases, the diagnostic workup has to be altered because of the pregnancy, and often available treatments have varying risks to the fetus. While chemotherapy is reported to have some risks during the first trimester, it is admitted that it can be administered safely during the second and the third trimesters.

  11. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  12. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: case-based session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, K R; Döhner, H; Keating, M J; Montserrat, E

    2001-01-01

    Drs. Hartmut Döhner, Michael J. Keating, Kanti R. Rai and Emili Montserrat form the panel to review chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) while focusing on the clinical features of a particular patient. The pace of progress in CLL has accelerated in the past decade. The pathophysiological nature of this disease, as had been known in the past, was based largely on the intuitive and empiric notions of two leaders in hematology, William Dameshek and David Galton. Now the works of a new generation of leaders are providing us with the scientific explanations of why CLL is a heterogeneous disease, perhaps consisting of at least two separate entities. In one form of CLL, the leukemic lymphocytes have a surface immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region gene that has undergone somatic mutations, with tell-tale markers suggesting that these cells had previously traversed the germinal centers. Such patients have a distinctly superior prognosis than their counterparts whose leukemic lymphocytes IgV genes have no mutations (these are indeed immunologically naive cells), who have a worse prognosis. The introduction of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique has provided us with new insights into the diverse chromosomal abnormalities that can occur in CLL, and which have significant impact on the clinical behavior and prognosis of patients with this disease. Major advances in therapeutics of CLL also have occurred during the past decade. Two monoclonal antibodies, Campath-1H (anti-CD52) and rituximab (anti-CD20), and one nucleoside analogue, fludarabine, have emerged as three agents of most promise in the front-line treatment of this disease. Studies currently in progress reflect our attempts to find the most effective manner of combining these agents to improve the overall survival statistics for CLL patients. As in many other hematological malignancies, high dose chemotherapy followed by autologous or HLA-compatible allogeneic stem cells rescue strategies are under study as

  13. Chronic neutrophilic leukemia: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menezes J

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Juliane Menezes, Juan Cruz Cigudosa Molecular Cytogenetics Group, Human Cancer Genetics Program, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre – CNIO, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL is a rare myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN that includes only 150 patients described to date meeting the latest World Health Organization (WHO criteria and the recently reported CSF3R mutations. The diagnosis is based on morphological criteria of granulocytic cells and the exclusion of genetic drivers that are known to occur in others MPNs, such as BCR-ABL1, PDGFRA/B, or FGFR1 rearrangements. However, this scenario changed with the identification of oncogenic mutations in the CSF3R gene in approximately 83% of WHO-defined and no monoclonal gammopathy-associated CNL patients. CSF3R T618I is a highly specific molecular marker for CNL that is sensitive to inhibition in vitro and in vivo by currently approved protein kinase inhibitors. In addition to CSF3R mutations, other genetic alterations have been found, notably mutations in SETBP1, which may be used as prognostic markers to guide therapeutic decisions. These findings will help to understand the pathogenesis of CNL and greatly impact the clinical management of this disease. In this review, we discuss the new genetic alterations recently found in CNL and the clinical perspectives in its diagnosis and treatment. Fortunately, since the diagnosis of CNL is not based on exclusion anymore, the molecular characterization of the CSF3R gene must be included in the WHO criteria for CNL diagnosis. Keywords: CSF3R, SETBP1, CNL, neutrophilic, WHO, PTK inhibitors

  14. Altered brain function in new onset childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia before chemotherapy: A resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhanqi; Zou, Dongfang; Mai, Huirong; Yuan, Xiuli; Wang, Lihong; Li, Yue; Liao, Jianxiang; Liu, Liwei; Liu, Guosheng; Zeng, Hongwu; Wen, Feiqiu

    2017-10-01

    Cognitive impairments had been reported in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, what caused the impairments needed to be demonstrated, chemotherapy-related or the disease itself. The primary aim of this exploratory investigation was to determine if there were changes in brain function of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia before chemotherapy. In this study, we advanced a measure named regional homogeneity to evaluate the resting-state brain activities, intelligence quotient test was performed at same time. Using regional homogeneity, we first investigated the resting state brain function in patients with new onset childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia before chemotherapy, healthy children as control. The decreased ReHo values were mainly founded in the default mode network and left frontal lobe, bilateral inferior parietal lobule, bilateral temporal lobe, bilateral occipital lobe, precentral gyrus, bilateral cerebellum in the newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients compared with the healthy control. While in contrast, increased ReHo values were mainly shown in the right frontal lobe (language area), superior frontal gyrus-R, middle frontal gyrus-R and inferior parietal lobule-R for acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients group. There were no significant differences for intelligence quotient measurements between the acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient group and the healthy control in performance intelligence quotient, verbal intelligence quotient, total intelligence quotient. The altered brain functions are associated with cognitive change and language, it is suggested that there may be cognition impairment before the chemotherapy. Regional homogeneity by functional magnetic resonance image is a sensitive way for early detection on brain damage in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Oral health in children with leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Prakash Mathur

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia is one of the most common malignancies affecting children in India. These children usually suffer from various oral complications, which may be due to the leukemia or due to the chemotherapeutic agents and/or radiotherapy. The complications may include some of the opportunistic infections like candidiasis, herpes simplex; hemorrhage, mucositis, taste alterations and increased incidence of dental caries etc. These complications can cause significant morbidity and mortality in the patients. The aim of this review is to summarize the various oral complications in these children and the methods of prevention and management.

  16. Psychological Risk Factors in Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouva M.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Several theoretical models have been occasionally proposed to account for the involvement of psychological factors in cancer genesis. Family environment and relations as well as certain personality traits were correlated to cancer onset. However, little is known in the case of acute leukemia. The present study examined family environment, state-trait anxiety, hostility and the direction of hostility as well as alexithymia in 41 acute leukemia patients and their first degree relatives (70. In accordance with previous findings, the present results showed that family cohesion, conflict and organization as well as guilt, state anxiety and alexithymia were significant risk factors for the development of the disease.

  17. Detection of leukemia using electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, David L.; Monk, Peter

    1995-10-01

    The presence of leukemia in bone marrow causes an increase in the electric permittivity and a decrease in the conductivity of the marrow. This suggests the possibility of detecting leukemia by electromagnetic imaging. We show how this can be done for the case of an absorbing host medium (i.e. water) and provide numerical experiments using synthetic data for detecting proliferated tissue at localized portions of the bone marrow. We do not assume that the refractive index of the fat, bone, and muscle are known but will instead recover these values as part of the imaging process.

  18. CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL STUDY OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA - A MULTIPARAMETER STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagannath

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL, a malignancy of lymphoid lineage cells, has excellent prognosis in children. Leukemia is the most prevalent childhood cancer and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL constitutes 75% of all cases. The most frequent presenting symptoms are fever, weight loss and pallor. Early detection of clinical symptoms positively affects timely diagnosis. AIMS & OBJECTIVES The objectives of the present study were to assess frequency of presenting symptoms, laboratory data and prognostic factors in children with diagnosis of ALL. MATERIALS & METHODS The present study (2014 was performed in the hematology section of Department of Pathology of Gajra Raja Medical College, Gwalior over a period of 12 months from 1st October 2013 to 30th September 2014. This was a prospective study. The blood samples were received from various departments of Jayarogya hospital especially from the Pediatric and Medicine departments. RESULTS Out of the 37 cases diagnosed as Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, 25(67.57% were male and 12(32.43%, were female, (male:female ratio: 2.1:1. 43.35% of patients which comprises highest number of cases belonged to 11-20 years of age group. The most frequent presenting symptoms was fever (83.78% followed by weakness (70.27% and loss of appetite (27% while most frequent presenting sign was pallor (86.48% followed by lymphadenopathy (67.57% and splenomegaly (48.65%. Complete blood cell count was abnormal in all of the patients, and pancytopenia was detected in 10.81% of the patients. Of all the patients, 91.89% had abnormal white blood cell (WBC count at presentation, 10.81% had leucopenia and 80% had leucocytosis. FAB L1 subtype was more common as compared to FAB L2 subtype. CONCLUSION In our study (2014, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia was more prevalent in males than in females and more common in childhood than in adult. FAB L1 subtype was more common as compared to FAB L2 subtype.

  19. [Pulmonary function of children with acute leukemia in maintenance phase of chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macêdo, Thalita Medeiros Fernandes; Campos, Tania Fernandes; Mendes, Raquel Emanuele de França; França, Danielle Corrêa; Chaves, Gabriela Suéllen da Silva; de Mendonça, Karla Morganna Pereira Pinto

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the pulmonary function of children with acute leukemia. Cross-sectional observational analytical study that enrolled 34 children divided into groups A (17 with acute leukemia in the maintenance phase of chemotherapy) and B (17 healthy children). The groups were matched for sex, age and height. Spirometry was measured using a spirometer Microloop Viasys(®) in accordance with American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society guidelines. Maximal respiratory pressures were measured with an MVD300 digital manometer (Globalmed(®)). Maximal inspiratory pressures and maximal expiratory pressures were measured from residual volume and total lung capacity, respectively. Group A showed a significant decrease in maximal inspiratory pressures when compared to group B. No significant difference was found between the spirometric values of the two groups, nor was there any difference between maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure values in group A compared to the lower limit values proposed as reference. Children with acute leukemia, myeloid or lymphoid, during the maintenance phase of chemotherapy exhibited unchanged spirometric variables and maximal expiratory pressure; However, there was a decrease in inspiratory muscle strength. Copyright © 2014 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Intensive Induction Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. LONG-TERM EFFECT OF HOMOHARRINGTONINE ON CHRONIC GRANULOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-feng; ZHU Jia-bin; WANG Chun-ling; DING Bang-he; LI Yuan-yuan; XUAN Heng-bao; QIAN Mo-sheng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the long-term effect of homoharringtonine (HHT) on chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL) and its pharmacological mechanism. Methods: 76 patients with newly diagnosed early chronic phase CGL received treatment of merely 1.5 mg/m2 daily HHT for induction remission and long-term maintenance treatment. The apoptosis rate of bone marrow CD34+ cells induced by HHT was assayed with flow cytometer. Results: 86.8% patients achieved CHR, 13.2% patients PHR and 31.8% patients got cytogenetic response in HHT treatment group, which was longer than 31 (8-54) months in hydroxyurea (HU) group (P<0.05). The effect of apoptosis induction HHT was stronger on CGL-CP patients bone marrow CD34+ cells than on normal person bone marrow CD34+ cells. Conclusion: HHT is a very effective drug for remission induction and long-term maintenance treatment in early chronic phase CGL patients.

  3. Small?molecule Hedgehog inhibitor attenuates the leukemia?initiation potential of acute myeloid leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fukushima, Nobuaki; Minami, Yosuke; Kakiuchi, Seiji; Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Jamieson, Catoriona; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway has been implicated in the maintenance of leukemia stem cell populations in several model systems. PF?04449913 (PF?913) is a selective, small?molecule inhibitor of Smoothened, a membrane protein that regulates the Hedgehog pathway. However, details of the proof?of?concept and mechanism of action of PF?913 following administration to patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are unclear. This study examined the role of the Hedgehog signali...

  4. The mystery of electroencephalography in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Cohen, Rony; Pollak, Lea; Kivity, Sara; Eidlitz-Markus, Tal; Stark, Batya; Yaniv, Isaac; Shuper, Avinoam

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings during the course of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children. The study group consisted of 48 children with ALL who underwent a total of 72 EEGs at various stages of the disease. The medical files were reviewed for pertinent clinical data, and the EEGs were evaluated for changes in brain activity. Abnormal background activity was noted in 52.2% of the EEGs done at 1-10 days of therapy, in 43.5% of those done at 10-60 days, and only 4.3% of those done at later stages (p=0.037). These findings, together with earlier reports, suggest that early-stage ALL, even before treatment, may be associated with excessive slow EEG activity, which improves over time. The EEG changes, by themselves, are not an indication of central nervous system leukemia or a predictor of later seizures or other central nervous system involvement.

  5. Role of bendamustine in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Jamshed

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Saad Jamshed, Bruce D ChesonGeorgetown University Hospital, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington, DC, USAAbstract: Major advances in the management of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL include an enhanced ability to make an accurate diagnosis and define clinically meaningful prognostic groups, while improving outcome through more effective therapeutic regimens and supportive care. Nevertheless, CLL remains an incurable disorder and new, active agents are needed. Bendamustine, a unique cytotoxic agent with structural similarities to both alkylating agents and antimetabolites, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of CLL and rituximab-refractory indolent non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. In a randomized trial, bendamustine was superior to chlorambucil, with comparable toxicity. Combinations with other active agents including rituximab and lenalidomide are in development. Nevertheless, numerous questions concerning the ideal use of this agent remain to be addressed, including the optimal dose and schedule and mechanisms of resistance. The availability of bendamustine provides another effective treatment option for patients with lymphoproliferative disorders. Rational development of combination regimens will improve the outlook for patients with CLL.Keywords: bendamustine, chemotherapy, chronic lymphocytic leukemia

  6. Alvocidib in Treating Patients With B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  7. KRAS (G12D Cooperates with AML1/ETO to Initiate a Mouse Model Mimicking Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmin Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: It has been demonstrated that KRAS mutations represent about 90% of cancer-associated mutations, and that KRAS mutations play an essential role in neoplastic transformation. Cancer-associated RAS mutations occur frequently in acute myeloid leukemia (AML, suggesting a functional role for Ras in leukemogenesis. Methods: We successfully established a mouse model of human leukemia by transplanting bone marrow cells co-transfected with the K-ras (G12D mutation and AML1/ETO fusion protein. Results: Mice transplanted with AML/ETO+KRAS co-transduced cells had the highest mortality rate than mice transplanted with AML/ETO- or KRAS-transduced cells (115d vs. 150d. Upon reaching a terminal disease stage, EGFP-positive cells dominated their spleen, lymph nodes, peripheral blood and central nervous system tissue. Immunophenotyping, cytologic analyses revealed that AML/ETO+KRAS leukemias predominantly contained immature myeloid precursors (EGFP+/c-Kit+/Mac-1-/Gr-1-. Histologic analyses revealed that massive leukemic infiltrations were closely packed in dense sheets that effaced the normal architecture of spleen and thymus in mice transplanted with AML1/ETO + KRAS co-transduced cells. K-ras mRNA and protein expression were upregulated in bone marrow cells of the K-ras group and AML1/ETO + Kras group. The phosphorylation of MEK/ERK was significantly enhanced in the AML1/ETO + Kras group. The similar results of the AML1/ETO + Nras group were consistent with those reported previously. Conclusion: Co-transduction of KrasG12D and AML1/ETO induces acute monoblastic leukemia. Since expression of mutant K-ras alone was insufficient to induce leukemia, this model may be useful for investigating the multi-step leukemogenesis model of human leukemia.

  8. mRNA overexpression of BAALC: A novel prognostic factor for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    AZIZI, ZAHRA; RAHGOZAR, SOHEILA; MOAFI, ALIREZA; DABAGHI, MOHAMMAD; NADIMI, MOTAHAREH

    2015-01-01

    BAALC is a novel molecular marker in leukemia that is highly expressed in patients with acute leukemia. Increased expression levels of BAALC are known as poor prognostic factors in adult acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of the BAALC gene expression levels in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its association with MDR1. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), the mRNA expression levels of BAALC and MRD1 were measured in bone marrow samples of 28 new diagnosed childhood ALL patients and 13 children without cancer. Minimal residual disease (MRD) was measured one year after the initiation of the chemotherapy using the RT-qPCR method. The high level expression of BAALC had a significant association with the pre-B-ALL subtype, leukocytosis and positive MRD after one year of treatment in leukemic patients. In addition, a positive correlation between BAALC and MDR1 mRNA expression was shown in this group. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the increase of BAALC expression as a poor prognostic factor for childhood ALL is shown for the first time. Additionally, the correlation between BAALC and MDR1 in mRNA expression levels can aid for an improved understanding of the mechanism through which BAALC may function in ALL and multidrug resistance. PMID:26137238

  9. mRNA overexpression of BAALC: A novel prognostic factor for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Zahra; Rahgozar, Soheila; Moafi, Alireza; Dabaghi, Mohammad; Nadimi, Motahareh

    2015-05-01

    BAALC is a novel molecular marker in leukemia that is highly expressed in patients with acute leukemia. Increased expression levels of BAALC are known as poor prognostic factors in adult acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of the BAALC gene expression levels in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its association with MDR1. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), the mRNA expression levels of BAALC and MRD1 were measured in bone marrow samples of 28 new diagnosed childhood ALL patients and 13 children without cancer. Minimal residual disease (MRD) was measured one year after the initiation of the chemotherapy using the RT-qPCR method. The high level expression of BAALC had a significant association with the pre-B-ALL subtype, leukocytosis and positive MRD after one year of treatment in leukemic patients. In addition, a positive correlation between BAALC and MDR1 mRNA expression was shown in this group. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the increase of BAALC expression as a poor prognostic factor for childhood ALL is shown for the first time. Additionally, the correlation between BAALC and MDR1 in mRNA expression levels can aid for an improved understanding of the mechanism through which BAALC may function in ALL and multidrug resistance.

  10. [Analysis of PTPN11 mutation in children leukemia and its clinical significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, San-Zhen; Chen, Bing-Qiang; Lu, Su-Ying; Zhang, Bi-Hong; Xue, Hong-Man; Chen, Chun

    2012-02-01

    This study was aimed to explore the frequency of PTPN11 mutation in children with leukemia and its clinical significance. Genomic DNAs were extracted from peripheral leukocytes of 131 patients with leukemia, including 101 cases of ALL, 26 cases of AML, 3 cases of CML and 1 case of juvenil myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML). The sequences of PTPN11 exons 3, 8, 13 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the clinical characteristics of positive patients were analyzed. The results indicated that the PTPN11 mutation was found in 10 cases (9.9%) from newly diagnosed 101 cases of ALL. Grouping the newly diagnosed ALL children by various clinical features, it was found that the PTPN11 mutation did not show associations with sex, age, white blood cell (WBC) count, prednisone test sensitivity, clinical risk and disease recurrences at the first visit (P > 0.05). PTPN11 mutations were found in 2 cases out of 26 AML patients, including one AML-M(2) and one AML-M(4). No PTPN11 mutation in 3 CML patients was found. Exon 13 mutation of PTPN11 gene was found in 1 case of JMML. It is concluded that the E76 of exon 3 is the hot spot of PTPN11 mutation in children leukemia. The novel G503E (1508G > A) mutation is detected in one JMML patient. The PTPN11 mutation does not associate with the sex, age, WBC count, prednisone sensitive test and early recurrence.

  11. Philadelphia chromosome-positive mixed phenotype acute leukemia in the imatinib era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hiroaki; Yokohama, Akihiko; Hatsumi, Nahoko; Takada, Satoru; Handa, Hiroshi; Sakura, Toru; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2014-10-01

    Although the introduction of imatinib dramatically improved the outcomes for patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph + BCP-ALL), the survival benefit of imatinib has not been assessed in the context of Ph + mixed phenotype acute leukemia (Ph + MPAL). To clarify this important issue, we studied 42 Ph+ acute leukemia (Ph + AL) patients who received intensive chemotherapy and concurrent administration of imatinib. Of the 42 Ph + AL patients, 13 (31%) patients were categorized as Ph + MPAL (positive for both myeloid and B-cell lineage), 27 (64%) were categorized as Ph + BCP-ALL, and two (5%) were categorized as Ph + acute myeloid leukemia. The complete remission rates after the initial induction therapy were not significantly different when comparing Ph + MPAL and Ph + BCP-ALL patients (100% vs. 85%, respectively, P = 0.14). Likewise, there were no significant differences in the 5-yr overall survival (OS) or disease-free survival (DFS) rates when comparing the MPAL and BCP-ALL groups (OS: 55% vs. 53%, respectively, P = 0.87, DFS: 46% vs. 42%, respectively, P = 0.94). These findings suggest that concurrent imatinib administration with chemotherapy improved the outcomes of Ph + MPAL patients to the level seen in Ph+BCP-ALL patients and should, therefore, be considered as the standard therapy for these patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Epigenetic regulators and their impact on therapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Friederike; Levine, Ross L

    2016-03-01

    Genomic studies of hematologic malignancies have identified a spectrum of recurrent somatic alterations that contribute to acute myeloid leukemia initiation and maintenance, and which confer sensitivities to molecularly targeted therapies. The majority of these genetic events are small, site-specific alterations in DNA sequence. In more than two thirds of patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia mutations epigenetic modifiers are detected. Epigenetic modifiers encompass a large group of proteins that modify DNA at cytosine residues or cause post-translational histone modifications such as methylations or acetylations. Altered functions of these epigenetic modifiers disturb the physiological balance between gene activation and gene repression and contribute to aberrant gene expression regulation found in acute myeloid leukemia. This review provides an overview of the epigenetic modifiers mutated in acute myeloid leukemia, their clinical relevance and how a deeper understanding of their biological function has led to the discovery of new specific targets, some of which are currently tested in mechanism-based clinical trials.

  13. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Gocek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17(q22;q12 chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  14. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa, E-mail: ema@cs.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, ul Tamka 2, Wroclaw 50-137 (Poland)

    2011-05-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  15. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han Li-na, [No Value; Zhou Jin, [No Value; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Vellenga, Edo

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials. Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant Engl

  16. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han Li-na, [No Value; Zhou Jin, [No Value; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Vellenga, Edo

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials. Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant

  17. Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a shortage of normal white and red blood cells and platelets in the body, which causes many of the signs and symptoms of the condition. People with acute promyelocytic leukemia are especially susceptible to developing bruises, small red dots under the skin (petechiae), nosebleeds, bleeding ...

  18. General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of hairy cell leukemia include infections, tiredness, and pain below the ribs. These and other signs and symptoms may be ... of breath. Weight loss for no known reason. Pain or a feeling of fullness below the ribs. Painless lumps in the neck, underarm, stomach , or ...

  19. Dental Treatment in Patients with Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Zimmermann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental treatment of patients with leukemia should be planned on the basis of antineoplastic therapy which can be chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. Many are the oral manifestations presented by these patients, arising from leukemia and/or treatment. In addition, performing dental procedures at different stages of treatment (before, during, or after must follow certain protocols in relation to the haematological indices of patients, aimed at maintaining health and contributing to the effectiveness of the results of antineoplastic therapy. Through a literature review, the purpose of this study was to report the hematological abnormalities present in patients with leukemia, trying to correlate them with the feasibility of dental treatment at different stages of the disease. It is concluded in this paper that dental treatment in relation to haematological indices presented by patients with leukemia must follow certain protocols, mainly related to neutrophil and platelet counts, and the presence of the dentist in a multidisciplinary team is required for the health care of this patient.

  20. Trisomy 8 in leukemia: A GCRI experience

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    Sonal R Bakshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trisomy of chromosome 8 is frequently reported in myeloid lineage disorders and also detected in lymphoid neoplasms as well as solid tumors suggesting its role in neoplastic progression in general. It is likely to be a disease-modulating secondary event with underlying cryptic aberrations as it has been frequently reported in addition to known abnormalities contributing to clinical heterogeneity and modifying prognosis. Here, we share our findings of trisomy 8 in leukemia patients referred for diagnostic and prognostic cytogenetic assessment. Total 60 cases of trisomy 8, as a sole anomaly or in addition to other chromosomal aberrations, were reported (January 2005-September 2008. Unstimulated bone marrow or blood samples were cultured, followed by GTG banding and karyotyping as per the ISCN 2005. Patients with +8 were chronic myeloid leukemia (CML (36, acute myeloid leukemia (AML (17, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL (7. In 7 patients, trisomy 8 was the sole anomaly, whereas in 6 patients +8 was in addition to normal clone, in 47 patients, the +8 was in addition to t(9;22, t(15;17, and others, including 3 with tetrasomy 8. Only one patient showed constitutional +8. The present study will form the basis of further cumulative studies to correlate potential differential effects of various karyotypic anomalies on disease progression and survival following a therapeutic regime. To unravel the role of extra 8 chromosome, constitutional chromosomal analysis and uniparental disomy will be considered.

  1. Cytarabine dose for acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Löwenberg (Bob); T. Pabst (Thomas); E. Vellenga (Edo); W. van Putten; H.C. Schouten (Harry); C. Graux (Carlos); A. Ferrant (Augustin); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); B.J. Biemond (Bart); A. Gratwohl (Alois); G.E. de Greef (Georgine); L.F. Verdonck (Leo); M.R. Schaafsma (Martijn); M. Gregor (Michael); M. Theobald; U. Schanz (Urs); J. Maertens (Johan); G.J. Ossenkoppele (Gert)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Cytarabine (ara-C) is an important drug in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). High-dose cytarabine (2000 to 3000 mg per square meter of body-surface area) is toxic but results in higher rates of relapse-free survival than does the conventional dose of 100 to 400 m

  2. Cytarabine Dose for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowenberg, Bob; Pabst, Thomas; Vellenga, Edo; van Putten, Wim; Schouten, Harry C.; Graux, Carlos; Ferrant, Augustin; Sonneveld, Pieter; Biemond, Bart J.; Gratwohl, Alois; de Greef, Georgine E.; Verdonck, Leo F.; Schaafsma, Martijn R.; Gregor, Michael; Theobald, Matthias; Schanz, Urs; Maertens, Johan; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cytarabine (ara-C) is an important drug in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). High-dose cytarabine (2000 to 3000 mg per square meter of body-surface area) is toxic but results in higher rates of relapse-free survival than does the conventional dose of 100 to 400 mg per square

  3. 47,XYY karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanduz, S; Aktan, M; Ozturk, S; Tutkan, G; Cefle, K; Pekcelen, Y

    1998-10-01

    A case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMMoL; M4) with a 47,XYY karyotype is reported. This chromosome aneuploidy was found in both bone marrow cells and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes. The contribution of XYY chromosomal constitution in the pathogenesis of AMMoL is controversial.

  4. TARGETED NANOPARTICLES FOR PEDIATRIC LEUKEMIA THERAPY

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    Riyaz eBasha

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The two major forms of leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and acute myeloid leukemia (AML account for about one third of the malignancies diagnosed in children. Despite the marked successes in ALL and AML treatment, concerns remain regarding the occurrence of resistant disease in subsets of patients the residual effects of therapy that often persist for decades beyond the cessation of treatment. Therefore, new approaches are needed to reduce or to avoid off target toxicities, associated with chemotherapy and their long term residual effects. Recently, nanotechnology has been employed to enhance cancer therapy, via improving the bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy of anti-cancer agents. While in the last several years, numerous review articles appeared detailing the size, composition, assembly and performance evaluation of different types of drug carrying nanoparticles, the description and evaluation of lipoprotein based drug carriers have been conspicuously absent from most of these major reviews. The current review focuses on such information regarding nanoparticles with an emphasis on high density lipoprotein (HDL-based drug delivery systems to examine their potential role(s in the enhanced treatment of children with leukemia.

  5. Novel transforming genes in murine myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.S. Joosten (Marieke)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractLeukemia is characterised by an accumulation in the bone marrow of non-functional blood cells arrested at a particular stage of differentiation. In the process of normal hematopoiesis, errors may occur as the result of mutations in the DNA of hematopoietic precursor cells. These genetic

  6. Molecular Insights in MLL Rearranged Acute Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Stam (Ronald)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAcute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants (<1 year of age) is characterized by a high incidence (~80%) of rearrangements of the MLL gene, resistance to several important chemotherapeutic drugs, and a poor treatment outcome. With overall survival rates for infant ALL not exceeding 50%

  7. Prognostic significance of SETBP1 mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, and chronic neutrophilic leukemia: A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Li-Hong; Cao, Dan; Dong, Xiao-Hui; Fang, Qiu; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Yan; Fei, Ju-Ping; Xu, Bao-Lian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This meta-analysis investigates the prognostic effect of SET binding protein 1 (SETBP1) mutations in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), or chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL). Methods Eligible studies from Pubmed, Embase, and Web of Science were searched from database inception through April 2016. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of overall survival (OS) were pooled to calculate the prognostic significance of SETBP1 mutation in patients. Results A total of 12 studies with 2321 patients were included in this meta-analysis; 4 studies for MDS, 5 studies for CMML, and 3 studies for CNL. Pooled results suggested that MDS and CMML patients with SETBP1 mutations had a significantly poorer prognosis when compared with patients with wild-type SETBP1 (MDS: HR = 1.808, 95% CI (1.218–2.685), P = 0.001; CMML: HR = 2.223, 95% CI (1.493–3.308), P<0.001). SETBP1 mutations in CNL patients however, showed no significant effect on the overall survival (HR = 1.773, 95% CI (0.877–3.582), P = 0.111). The Begg’s and Egger’s tests did not show significant publication bias in any groups. Conclusions Current evidence shows that SETBP1 mutation is associated with a poor prognosis in patients with MDS and CMML, but not in patients with CNL. PMID:28158286

  8. ASSOCIATION OF POLYMORPHISM IN BIOTRANSFORMATION SYSTEM GENES CYP1A1 AND GST WITH RISK OF RELAPSE IN CHILDHOOD ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Gra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Presence of polymorphism in genes coding biotransformation system may play an important role in formation of primary childhood acute leukemia, and affects the incidence and features of relapse. We developed a biological microchip which allows to analyze 14 mutations in eight genes of biotransfor mation system: cyp1a1, cyp2d6, gstt1, gstm1, nat2, mthfr, cyp2c9 and cyp2c19. This biochip has been used to study DNA samples from 332 children with diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all and 71 children with diagnosis of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML. it was obtained that variant genotype cyp1a1 *1/*2а more often occur in children with relapse of disease than in children with primary diagnosed leukemia (or = 2,11, p = 0,0291. Also it has been shown, that «null» gstt1 genotype is less frequent in children with relapse of disease than in children with primary diagnosed leukemia (or = 0,55, p = 0,0265. Upon sex stratification, boys with relapse of all demonstrated an increased occurrence of the cyp1a1 genotype *1/*2а in combination with the gstt1 «nonnull» genotype relative to patients with primarily diagnosed all (or = 3,09, p = 0,0254. In addition, girls with relapse of acute leukemia displayed a 2,4_fold lower frequency of the «null» gstm1 genotype as compared with the girls group with primary leukemia (or = 0,41, p = 0,0175. Thus, it was shown that studied genotypes cyp1a1 and GST might be prognostic risk factors of relapse in childhood acute leukemia.Key words: acute leukemia, drug resistance, cytochrome p 450, glutathione-s-transferases, polymorphism, oligonucleotide biochips.

  9. Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 define subgroups of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Starza, Roberta; Barba, Gianluca; Demeyer, Sofie; Pierini, Valentina; Di Giacomo, Danika; Gianfelici, Valentina; Schwab, Claire; Matteucci, Caterina; Vicente, Carmen; Cools, Jan; Messina, Monica; Crescenzi, Barbara; Chiaretti, Sabina; Foà, Robin; Basso, Giuseppe; Harrison, Christine J; Mecucci, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Recurrent deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 were detected in 23/200 cases of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Genomic studies identified two types of deletions: interstitial and terminal. Interstitial 5q deletions, found in five cases, were present in both adults and children with a female predominance (chi-square, P=0.012). Interestingly, these cases resembled immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia showing significant down-regulation of five out of the ten top differentially expressed genes in this leukemia group, including TCF7 which maps within the 5q31 common deleted region. Mutations of genes known to be associated with immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, i.e. WT1, ETV6, JAK1, JAK3, and RUNX1, were present, while CDKN2A/B deletions/mutations were never detected. All patients had relapsed/resistant disease and blasts showed an early differentiation arrest with expression of myeloid markers. Terminal 5q deletions, found in 18 of patients, were more prevalent in adults (chi-square, P=0.010) and defined a subgroup of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia characterized by 130 up- and 197 down-regulated genes. Down-regulated genes included TRIM41, ZFP62, MAPK9, MGAT1, and CNOT6, all mapping within the 1.4 Mb common deleted region at 5q35.3. Of interest, besides CNOT6 down-regulation, these cases also showed low BTG1 expression and a high incidence of CNOT3 mutations, suggesting that the CCR4-NOT complex plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with terminal 5q deletions. In conclusion, interstitial and terminal 5q deletions are recurrent genomic losses identifying distinct subtypes of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  10. Midostaurin and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and FLT3 Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Gene Mutations; FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Domain Point Mutation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Cx25 contributes to leukemia cell communication and chemosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinyuk, Maksim; Alvarado, Alvaro G; Nesmiyanov, Pavel; Shaw, Jeremy; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E; Eurich, Jennifer T; Hale, James S; Bogdanova, Anna; Hitomi, Masahiro; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Huang, Alex Y; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Lathia, Justin D

    2015-10-13

    Leukemia encompasses several hematological malignancies with shared phenotypes that include rapid proliferation, abnormal leukocyte self-renewal, and subsequent disruption of normal hematopoiesis. While communication between leukemia cells and the surrounding stroma supports tumor survival and expansion, the mechanisms underlying direct leukemia cell-cell communication and its contribution to tumor growth are undefined. Gap junctions are specialized intercellular connections composed of connexin proteins that allow free diffusion of small molecules and ions directly between the cytoplasm of adjacent cells. To characterize homotypic leukemia cell communication, we employed in vitro models for both acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and measured gap junction function through dye transfer assays. Additionally, clinically relevant gap junction inhibitors, carbenoxolone (CBX) and 1-octanol, were utilized to uncouple the communicative capability of leukemia cells. Furthermore, a qRT-PCR screen revealed several connexins with higher expression in leukemia cells compared with normal hematopoietic stem cells. Cx25 was identified as a promising adjuvant therapeutic target, and Cx25 but not Cx43 reduction via RNA interference reduced intercellular communication and sensitized cells to chemotherapy. Taken together, our data demonstrate the presence of homotypic communication in leukemia through a Cx25-dependent gap junction mechanism that can be exploited for the development of anti-leukemia therapies.

  12. Methylation of Gene CHFR Promoter in Acute Leukemia Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Hui; LIU Wengli; ZHOU Jianfeng; XU Huizhen

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order to explore whether gene CHFR was inactivated by methylation in leukemia cells, the expression of CHFR was examined before and after treatment with demethylation agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 leukemia cell lines by means of RT-PCR. The methylation of promoter in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 cells as well as 41 acute leukemia patients was analyzed by MS-PCR. The results showed that methylation of CHFR promoter was inactivated and could be reversed by treatment with a demethylating agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937. CHFR promoter methylation was detected in 39 % of acute leukemia patients. There was no difference in incidence of CHFR promoter methylation between acute myelocytic leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia. In conclusion, CHFR is frequently inactivated in acute leukemia and is a good candidate for the leukemia supper gene. By affecting mitotic checkpoint function, CHFR inactivation likely plays a key role in tumorigenesis in acute leukemia. Moreover, the methylation of gene CHFR appears to be a good index with which to predict the sensitivity of acute leukemia to microtubule inhibitors.

  13. Tretinoin, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride With or Without Arsenic Trioxide Followed by Tretinoin With or Without Mercaptopurine and Methotrexate in Treating Patients With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  14. Open Label, Phase II Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Oral Nilotinib in Philadelphia Positive (Ph+) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-07

    Leukemia; Leukemia,Pediatric; Leukemia, Myleiod; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Chronic; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Accelerated; BCR-ABL Positive; Myeloproliferative Disorder; Bone Marrow Disease; Hematologic Diseases; Neoplastic Processes; Imatinib; Dasatinib; Enzyme Inhibitor; Protein Kinase Inhibitor

  15. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  16. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  17. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor-primed Bone Marrow: An Excellent Stem-cell Source for Transplantation in Acute Myelocytic Leukemia and Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhang Li; Min Jiang; Chen Xu; Jianlin Chen; Botao Li; Jun Wang; Jiangwei Hu

    2015-01-01

    Background:Steady-state bone marrow (SS-BM) and granulocyte colony-stimulating growth factor-primed BM/peripheral blood stem-cell (G-BM/G-PBSC) are the main stem-cell sources used in allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.Here,we evaluated the treatment effects of SS-BM and G-BM/G-PBSC in human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling transplantation.Methods:A total of 226 patients (acute myelogenous leukemia-complete remission 1,chronic myelogenous leukemia-chronic phase 1) received SS-BM,G-BM,or G-PBSC from an HLA-identical sibling.Clinical outcomes (graft-versus-host disease [GVHD],overall survival,transplant-related mortality [TRM],and leukemia-free survival [LFS]) were analyzed.Results:When compared to SS-BM,G-BM gave faster recovery time to neutrophil or platelet (P < 0.05).Incidence of grade Ⅲ-Ⅳ acute GVHD and extensive chronic GVHD (cGVHD) was lower than seen with SS-BM (P < 0.05) and similar to G-PBSC.Although the incidence of cGVHD in the G-BM group was similar to SS-BM,both were lower than G-PBSC (P < 0.05).G-BM and G-PBSC exhibited similar survival,LFS,and TRM,but were significantly different from SS-BM (P < 0.05).There were no significant differences in leukemia relapse rates among the groups (P > 0.05).Conclusions:G-CSF-primed bone marrow shared the advantages of G-PBSC and SS-BM.We conclude that G-BM is an excellent stem-cell source that may be preferable to G-PBSC or SS-BM in patients receiving HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

  19. Myelodysplastic Syndrome with Myelofibrosis Transformed to a Precursor B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Case Report with Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayed A. Algarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS comprise a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic cell disorders characterized by cytopenias, bone marrow hypercellularity, and increased risk of transformation to acute leukemias. MDS usually transformed to acute myeloid leukemia, and transformation to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is rare. Herein, we report a unique patient who presented with MDS with myelofibrosis. Two months after the initial diagnosis, she progressed to a precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. She was treated with induction therapy followed by allogenic stem cell transplantation. She was alive and doing well upon last followup. We have also reviewed the literature and discussed the clinicopathologic features of 36 MDS patients who progressed to ALL reported in the literature.

  20. 76 FR 3075 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA... testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector. The.... Product: Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector. Field Test Locations: Alabama,...

  1. File list: Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid mm9 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Myeloid http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid mm9 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Lymphoid htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid mm9 Unclassified Blood Leukemia, Lymphoid http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid mm9 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Myeloid http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid mm9 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Myeloid http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid mm9 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Lymphoid htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid hg19 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Myeloid http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid hg19 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Myeloid http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid hg19 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Myeloid http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid mm9 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Lymphoid htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid mm9 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Myeloid http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid.bed ...

  17. Study on blocking the leukemia immune escape after BMT by Fas-Fas ligand pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡中波; 邹萍; 李爱香; 张友山; 王良利; 刘凌波

    2004-01-01

    Background To investigate if bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) transducted with murine soluble Fas gene (sFas) using adenovirus vector could block the immune escape of leukemia cells eliminate the residual leukemia cells and reduce their relapse.Methods The recombinant adenovirus vector with murine sFas, adsFas, and the control vector adEGFP were constructed using homologous recombination between two plasmids in Escherichia coli. BMT was carried out after the BMMCs were infected with Adenoviruses. The mice models of leukemia/lymphoma were constructed by inoculating female C57BL/6 mice (H-2b) with 105 EL4 cells/mouse through caudal vein. Donors of bone marrow grafts were syngeneic male mice. BMMCs were infected with AdsFas or AdEGFP 24 hours before (Group D or E). The following three groups were simultaneously used: Group A, no BMMCs transplanted; Group B, transplanted with BMMCs not infected with adenoviruses; Group C, only transfusing EL4 cells, neither irradiation nor BMT. The hematopoietic reconstitution, generation of leukemia/lymphoma and the survival rate were observed in all groups after BMT.Results The adenovirus vectors were successfully constructed. The titre of virus after purification was up to 2.5×1011pfu/ml. Spleen indices examined 11 days after BMT were not obviously different among Group B, D and E (P>0.05), but indices in Group A were significantly lower than those in the latter three groups (P<0.01). Counts of leukocytes and platelets on +30 day showed mice were reconstituted satisfactorily in Group B and D, but very low in Group C and E. The Y-chromosomes existed 2 months after BMT and examination of bone marrow cytology showed that Group B and D were almost normal, but Group C and E had plenty of lymphoblast-like tumor cells. Tumors were obviously observed in the mice of Group C and E by histopathological examination, but the mice in Group B and D were normal. The survival rates were 0 (0/4) in Group A

  18. A different approach to telomere analysis with ddPRINS in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palanduz, Sukru; Serakinci, Nedime; Cefle, Kivanc;

    2006-01-01

    Telomeric sequences, located at the very end of the chromosomes, compensate for the chromosomal shortening as it happens after each round of cell division. Telomeric sequences influence the progress of cellular senescence and cancer progression. It has been reported that telomeres are shortened...... in acute leukemias where the cell turnover is high. B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a particularly interesting haematological malignancy in regard to telomere dynamics because most of the malignant cells in CLL are mitotically inactive. In this study, we analysed the telomere length...... in patients with B-cell CLL in a comparison with the control group by using ddPRINS technique. Twenty patients with CLL and four healthy donors as a control group were included. We found short telomeres and no detectable telomeric repeats at the sites of chromosome fusion. We hypothesise that the telomeric...

  19. Effect of Linezolid on Hematologic Recovery in Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Following Induction Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedved, Adrienne N; DeFrates, Sean R; Hladnik, Lindsay M; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith E

    2016-10-01

    Assess the effects of linezolid on hematologic outcomes in newly diagnosed patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) following induction chemotherapy. Single-center, retrospective, observational, cohort study. Large, tertiary care academic medical center. A total of 225 patients ≥ 18 years admitted between December 2010 and 2013 with newly diagnosed AML were assessed for inclusion. Patients were identified through the use of ICD-9 codes and chemotherapy ordered via the computerized physician order entry system. Sixty-eight patients met inclusion criteria and were grouped into two arms based on antimicrobial treatment: LZD group (linezolid plus gram-negative antimicrobial, n=21) or control group (vancomycin or daptomycin plus gram-negative antimicrobial, n=47). The LZD group received linezolid ≥ 72 hours. The control group received vancomycin or daptomycin ≥ 72 hours. If patients switched extended gram-positive therapy, they were included in the LZD group as long as they had received ≥ 72 hours of linezolid. The primary end point of time to neutrophil recovery was not statistically different (28 days for LZD group vs 26 days for control group; p=0.675). The preplanned subgroup analysis of patients who received ≥ 14 days of linezolid demonstrated statistically similar median times to neutrophil recovery (29 days for LZD group vs 26 days for control group; p=0.487). Total duration of extended gram-positive antimicrobial therapy was significantly longer in the LZD group (27 days vs 16 days; pchemotherapy. This study provides new insight with a primary focus on the effects of hematologic outcomes when using linezolid in a well-defined acute leukemia population. Further study is warranted with larger populations to assess the potential adverse effects linezolid may have in patients with acute leukemia. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  20. Exposure to armament wastes and leukemia: a case-control study within a cluster of AML and CML in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, P H; Skrzypek, S; Becker, N; Havemann, K

    2001-10-01

    An unusually high incidence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) concentrated in a specific locality of a region in Germany motivated a descriptive incidence study in that region which showed a near 10-fold increased risk of CML among males but not among females (Kolb G, Becker N, Scheller S, Zugmaier G, Pralle H, Wahrendorf J, Havemann K. Increased risk of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in a County of Hesse, Germany, Soc Prev Med 1993;38:190-195). Since a serious environmental contamination of areas in this locality with armament wastes containing toluene-derivatives has been known for a long time, the hypothesis arose that TNT production and the related severe contamination of soil and water might be responsible for the observed higher risk. We carried out a case-control study within the cluster to test this hypothesis. Overall, the results do not confirm the hypothesis. There is an indication of a relationship of an increased odds ratio with the exposure for a small group of persons who lived at a particular site in one of the two communities involved during the peak phase of TNT production during the 1940s. However, this finding is spurious and cannot explain the large majority of cases which occurred in that area in the 1980s. At the moment, no other explanation can be given for the increased risk of leukemias in that area.

  1. Incidence and risk factors for central nervous system relapse in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancela, Camila Silva Peres; Murao, Mitiko; Viana, Marcos Borato; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite all the advances in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, central nervous system relapse remains an important obstacle to curing these patients. This study analyzed the incidence of central nervous system relapse and the risk factors for its occurrence in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods This study has a retrospective cohort design. The studied population comprised 199 children and adolescents with a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia followed up at Hospital das Clinicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (HC-UFMG) between March 2001 and August 2009 and submitted to the Grupo Brasileiro de Tratamento de Leucemia da Infância - acute lymphoblastic leukemia (GBTLI-LLA-99) treatment protocol. Results The estimated probabilities of overall survival and event free survival at 5 years were 69.5% (± 3.6%) and 58.8% (± 4.0%), respectively. The cumulative incidence of central nervous system (isolated or combined) relapse was 11.0% at 8 years. The estimated rate of isolated central nervous system relapse at 8 years was 6.8%. In patients with a blood leukocyte count at diagnosis ≥ 50 x 109/L, the estimated rate of isolated or combined central nervous system relapse was higher than in the group with a count 50 x 109/L at diagnosis seems to be a significant prognostic factor for a higher incidence of central nervous system relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:23323068

  2. Posttranslational regulation of self-renewal capacity: insights from proteome and phosphoproteome analyses of stem cell leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, Matthias; Sauvageau, Martin; Hérault, Olivier; Deleris, Paul; Pomiès, Christelle; Chagraoui, Jalila; Mayotte, Nadine; Meloche, Sylvain; Sauvageau, Guy; Thibault, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    We recently generated 2 phenotypically similar Hoxa9+Meis1 overexpressing acute myeloid leukemias that differ by their in vivo biologic behavior. The first leukemia, named FLA2, shows a high frequency of leukemia stem cells (LSCs; 1 in 1.4 cells), whereas the second, FLB1, is more typical with a frequency of LSCs in the range of 1 per several hundred cells. To gain insights into possible mechanisms that determine LSC self-renewal, we profiled and compared the abundance of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins and phosphoproteins from these leukemias using quantitative proteomics. These analyses revealed differences in proteins associated with stem cell fate, including a hyperactive p38 MAP kinase in FLB1 and a differentially localized Polycomb group protein Ezh2, which is mostly nuclear in FLA2 and predominantly cytoplasmic in FLB1. Together, these newly documented proteomes and phosphoproteomes represent a unique resource with more than 440 differentially expressed proteins and 11 543 unique phosphopeptides, of which 80% are novel and 7% preferentially phosphorylated in the stem cell–enriched leukemia. PMID:22802335

  3. Incidence and risk factors for central nervous system relapse in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Silva Peres Cancela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite all the advances in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, central nervous system relapse remains an important obstacle to curing these patients. This study analyzed the incidence of central nervous system relapse and the risk factors for its occurrence in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. METHODS: This study has a retrospective cohort design. The studied population comprised 199 children and adolescents with a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia followed up at Hospital das Clinicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (HC-UFMG between March 2001 and August 2009 and submitted to the Grupo Brasileiro de Tratamento de Leucemia da Infância - acute lymphoblastic leukemia (GBTLI-LLA-99 treatment protocol. RESULTS: The estimated probabilities of overall survival and event free survival at 5 years were 69.5% ( 3.6% and 58.8% ( 4.0%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of central nervous system (isolated or combined relapse was 11.0% at 8 years. The estimated rate of isolated central nervous system relapse at 8 years was 6.8%. In patients with a blood leukocyte count at diagnosis > 50 x 10(9/L, the estimated rate of isolated or combined central nervous system relapse was higher than in the group with a count 50 x 10(9/L at diagnosis seems to be a significant prognostic factor for a higher incidence of central nervous system relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  4. A comparison between allogeneic stem cell transplantation from unmanipulated haploidentical and unrelated donors in acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Piemontese

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the absence of a HLA-matched related or matched unrelated donor, allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT from mismatched unrelated donors or haploidentical donors are potential alternatives for patients with acute leukemia with an indication to allo-SCT. The objective of this study was to compare the outcome of allo-SCT from T cell-replete haploidentical (Haplo versus matched (MUD 10/10 or mismatched unrelated donor at a single HLA-locus (MMUD 9/10 for patients with acute leukemia in remission. Methods Two hundred sixty-five adult patients with de novo acute leukemia in first or second remission that received a Haplo-SCT between January 2007 and December 2013 were compared with 2490 patients receiving a MUD 10/10 and 813 receiving a MMUD 9/10. Propensity score weighted analysis was conducted in order to control for disease risk imbalances between the groups. Results The weighted 3-year non-relapse mortality and relapse incidence were 29 and 30% for Haplo, 21 and 29% for MUD 10/10, and 29 and 25% for MMUD 9/10, respectively. The weighted 3-year leukemia-free survival (LFS and overall survival (OS were 41 and 46% for Haplo, 50 and 56% for MUD 10/10, and 46 and 48% for MMUD 9/10, respectively. Using weighted Cox model, both LFS and OS were significantly higher in transplants from MUD 10/10 compared from those in Haplo but not different between transplants from MMUD 9/10 and Haplo. The type of donor was not significantly associated with neither acute nor chronic graft-versus-host disease. Conclusions Patients with acute leukemia in remission have better outcomes if transplanted from a MUD 10/10. We did not find any significant difference in outcome between transplants from MMUD 9/10 and Haplo, suggesting that both can be equally used in the absence of a 10/10 MUD. Key point 1 Better outcomes using fully (10/10 matched unrelated donor for allo-SCT in acute leukemia in remission. Key point 2 Similar outcomes after allo

  5. Refined diagnostic criteria and classification of mast cell leukemia (MCL) and myelomastocytic leukemia (MML): a consensus proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, P; Sotlar, K; Sperr, W R; Escribano, L; Yavuz, S; Reiter, A; George, T I; Kluin-Nelemans, H C; Hermine, O; Butterfield, J H; Hägglund, H; Ustun, C; Hornick, J L; Triggiani, M; Radia, D; Akin, C; Hartmann, K; Gotlib, J; Schwartz, L B; Verstovsek, S; Orfao, A; Metcalfe, D D; Arock, M; Horny, H-P

    2014-09-01

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL), the leukemic manifestation of systemic mastocytosis (SM), is characterized by leukemic expansion of immature mast cells (MCs) in the bone marrow (BM) and other internal organs; and a poor prognosis. In a subset of patients, circulating MCs are detectable. A major differential diagnosis to MCL is myelomastocytic leukemia (MML). Although criteria for both MCL and MML have been published, several questions remain concerning terminologies and subvariants. To discuss open issues, the EU/US-consensus group and the European Competence Network on Mastocytosis (ECNM) launched a series of meetings and workshops in 2011-2013. Resulting discussions and outcomes are provided in this article. The group recommends that MML be recognized as a distinct condition defined by mastocytic differentiation in advanced myeloid neoplasms without evidence of SM. The group also proposes that MCL be divided into acute MCL and chronic MCL, based on the presence or absence of C-Findings. In addition, a primary (de novo) form of MCL should be separated from secondary MCL that typically develops in the presence of a known antecedent MC neoplasm, usually aggressive SM (ASM) or MC sarcoma. For MCL, an imminent prephase is also proposed. This prephase represents ASM with rapid progression and 5%-19% MCs in BM smears, which is generally accepted to be of prognostic significance. We recommend that this condition be termed ASM in transformation to MCL (ASM-t). The refined classification of MCL fits within and extends the current WHO classification; and should improve prognostication and patient selection in practice as well as in clinical trials.

  6. Recognition of adult and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torelli, Giovanni F; Peragine, Nadia; Raponi, Sara; Pagliara, Daria; De Propris, Maria S; Vitale, Antonella; Bertaina, Alice; Barberi, Walter; Moretta, Lorenzo; Basso, Giuseppe; Santoni, Angela; Guarini, Anna; Locatelli, Franco; Foà, Robin

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the pathways of recognition of acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells and to verify whether differences in natural killer cell activating receptor ligand expression among groups defined by age of patients, or presence of cytogenetic/molecular aberrations correlate with the susceptibility to recognition and killing. We analyzed 103 newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: 46 adults and 57 children. Pediatric blasts showed a significantly higher expression of Nec-2 (P=0.03), ULBP-1 (P=0.01) and ULBP-3 (P=0.04) compared to adult cells. The differential expression of these ligands between adults and children was confined to B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with no known molecular alterations. Within molecularly defined subgroups of patients, a high surface expression of NKG2D and DNAM1 ligands was found on BCR-ABL(+) blasts, regardless of patient age. Accordingly, BCR-ABL(+) blasts proved to be significantly more susceptible to natural killer-dependent lysis than B-lineage blasts without molecular aberrations (P=0.03). Cytotoxic tests performed in the presence of neutralizing antibodies indicated a pathway of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell recognition in the setting of the Nec-2/DNAM-1 interaction. These data provide a biological explanation of the different roles played by alloreactive natural killer cells in pediatric versus adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest that new natural killer-based strategies targeting specific subgroups of patients, particularly those BCR-ABL(+), are worth pursuing further. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  7. Fludarabine Phosphate, Radiation Therapy, and Rituximab in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Rituximab for High-Risk Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  8. Transformation of myelodysplastic syndromes into acute myeloid leukemias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施均; 邵宗鸿; 刘鸿; 白洁; 曹燕然; 何广胜; 凃梅峰; 王秀丽; 郝玉书; 杨天楹; 杨崇礼

    2004-01-01

    Background Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs), also called preleukemias, are a group of myeloid hematopoietic malignant disorders. We studied the transformation of MDS into acute myeloid leukemia (AML).Methods Leukemic transformation in 151 patients with MDS was dynamically followed up. The clinical manifestation, peripheral blood and bone marrow condition, karyotypes, immunophenotypes, response to treatment, and prognosis of AML evolution from MDS (MDS-AML) were also observed.Results During the course of this study, over the past eight years and seven months, 21 (13.91%) of 151 MDS patients progressed to overt leukemia, with a median interval of 5 (1-23) months. There were no significant differences between rates of leukemic transformation in comparison with the refractory anemia (RA), RA with excess of blasts (RAEB), and RAEB in transformation (RAEB-t) patient groups. Transformation occurred either gradually or rapidly. There were five parameters positively correlated to leukemic transformation: under 40 years of age, pancytopenia of 3 lineages, more than 15% blasts in the bone marrow, at least two abnormal karyotypes, and treatment with combined chemotherapy. All of the 21 patients with leukemia suffered from MDS-AML, and most of them were M2, M4, or M5. Two (9.52%) MDS-AML patients developed extramedullary infiltration. Leukopenia was found in 47.62% of these patients. Two thirds of these patients, whose bone marrows were generally hypercellular, suffered from neutropenia. After developing AML, 8 (47.06%) patients developed abnormal karyotypes. High expression of immature myeloid antigens, including CD33 [(49.83±24.50)%], CD13 [(36.38±33.84)%], monocytic antigen CD14 [(38.50±24.60)%], and stem cell marker CD34 [(34.67±30.59)%], were found on bone marrow mononuclear cells from MDS-AML patients after leukemic transformation. In some cases, lymphoid antigens, such as CD5, CD7, CD9, and CD19, coexisted with myeloid antigens. A low complete remission rate (31

  9. [Cytogenetic abnormalities and gene mutations in myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Naoko; Kitamura, Toshio

    2009-10-01

    Myeloid leukemia is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease. Cytogenetic studies have revealed specific chromosomal abnormalities, such as translocations, and inversions. Fusion proteins derived from these abnormalities were identified in various subtypes of leukemia. Because most of these fusion proteins were not sufficient to induce leukemia by themselves in mouse models, additional oncogenic events have been thought to be necessary for leukemogenesis. Recently, a hypothesis called "two-hit model" for leukemia has been proposed. Two broad classes of mutations that proliferative or survival advantage of hematopoietic progenitors and impaired differentiation are required for inducing leukemia. In this article, we summarize some typical chromosomal abnormalities or gene mutations associated with myeloid leukemia on the basis of this hypothesis.

  10. Frank hematuria as the presentation feature of acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suriya Owais

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Muco-cutaneous bleeding is a common presenting feature of acute leukemias. Mucosal bleeding usually manifests as gum bleeding and/or epistaxis but may occur in any mucosal surface of the body. Hematuria as an isolated or main presenting feature of acute leukemia is rare. We describe two cases of acute leukemia, a 19 year old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a 52 year old male with acute myeloid leukemia, both presenting with gross hematuria. There was no demonstrable leukemic infiltration of the urinary tract on imaging studies. Hematuria in these patients was likely to be due to occult leukemic infiltration of the urinary system, aggravated by thrombocytopenia, as it subsided after starting chemotherapy. Our cases highlight that hematuria should be remembered as a rare presenting feature of acute leukemia.

  11. DNA polymorphism at the BoLA-DRB3 gene of cattle in relation to resistance and susceptibility to leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulimova, G.E.; Udina, I.G.; Shaikhaev, G.O. [Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Polymorphism of exon 2 of the BoLA-DRB3 gene was investigated by the PCR-RFLP method in a sample of healthy and leukemia-afflicted Black Pied cattle. Allele variety was studied and allele frequencies were determined in a total sample and in the two groups. Alleles mediating resistance (BoLA-DRB3.2{sup *}11, {sup *}23, and {sup *}28) and susceptibility to leukemia (DRB3.2{sup *}22, {sup *}24, {sup *}16, and {sup *}8) were revealed in Black Pied cattle. The dominant type of inheritance of the disease resistance was confirmed. On the basis of original and published data obtained earlier for Holstein-Friesian cattle, a conclusion was made about the universal character of the spectrum of BoLA-DRB3 alleles providing resistance and susceptibility to leukemia. 18 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. [DNA polymorphism of the BoLA-DRB3 gene in cattle in connection with resistance and susceptibility to leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulimova, G E; Udina, I G; Shaĭkhaev, G O; Zakharov, I A

    1995-09-01

    Polymorphism of exon 2 of the BoLA-DRB3 gene was investigated by the PCR-RFLP method in a sample of healthy and leukemia-afflicted Black Pied cattle. Allele variety was studied and allele frequencies were determined in a total sample and in the two groups. Alleles mediating resistance (BoLA-DRB3.2*11, *23, and *28) and susceptibility to leukemia (DRB3.2*22, *24, *16, and *8) were revealed in Black Pied cattle. The dominant type of inheritance of the disease resistance was confirmed. On the basis of original and published data obtained earlier for Holstein-Friesian cattle, a conclusion was made about the universal character of the spectrum of BoLA-DRB3 alleles providing resistance and susceptibility to leukemia.

  13. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the elderly: clinico-biological features, outcomes, and proposal of a prognostic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Tycho; Delgado, Julio; Santacruz, Rodrigo; Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Royo, Cristina; Navarro, Alba; Pinyol, Magda; Rozman, María; Pereira, Arturo; Villamor, Neus; Aymerich, Marta; López, Cristina; Carrió, Anna; Montserrat, Emili

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the clinico-biological features, outcomes, and prognosis of 949 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia according to age. No biological differences (cytogenetics by fluorescent in situ hybridization, IGHV, ZAP-70, CD38, NOTCH1, SF3B1) were found across age groups. Elderly patients (>70 years; n=367) presented more frequently with advanced disease (Binet C/Rai III-IV: 10/12% versus 5/5%; P4; hazard ratio 2.2, P<0.001) and response (treatment failure versus response: hazard ratio 1.60, P<0.04) were the most important prognostic factors for overall survival. In conclusion, in our series, elderly patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia did not present with any biological features distinct from those of younger patients, but did have a poorer clinical outcome. This study highlights the importance of comprehensive medical care, achieving response to therapy, and specific management strategies for elderly patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  14. Cure rates of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Lithuania and the benefit of joining international treatment protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaitkevičienė, Goda; Matuzevičienė, Rėda; Stoškus, Mindaugas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) represents the largest group of pediatric malignancies with long-term survival rates of more than 80% achieved in developed countries. Epidemiological data and survival rates of childhood ALL in Lithuania were lacking. Therefore, the aim of...

  15. Cytogenetics of childhood acute myeloid leukemia: United Kingdom Medical Research Council Treatment trials AML 10 and 12.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison, C.J.; Hills, R.K.; Moorman, A.V.; Grimwade, D.J.; Hann, I.; Webb, D.K.; Wheatley, K.; Graaf, S.S.N. de; Berg, E. van den; Burnett, A.K.; Gibson, B.E.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Karyotype is an independent indicator of prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that is widely applied to risk-adapted therapy. Because AML is rare in children, the true prognostic significance of individual chromosomal abnormalities in this age group remains unclear. PATIENTS AND METHOD

  16. Dose-finding study of imatinib in combination with intravenous cytarabine: feasibility in newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenik, W.; van der Holt, B.; Verhoef, G.E.G.; Smit, W.M.; Kersten, M.J.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke; Verdonck, L.F.; Ferrant, A.; Schattenberg, A.V.M.B.; Janssen, J.J.W.M.; Sonneveld, P.; Kooy, M.V.; Wittebol, S.; Willemze, R.; Wijermans, P.W.; Westveer, P.H.M.; Beverloo, H.B.; Valk, P.; Lowenberg, B.; Ossenkoppele, G.J.; Cornelissen, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    The HOVON cooperative study group performed a feasibility study of escalated imatinib and intravenous cytarabine in 165 patients with early chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Patients received 2 cycles of intravenous cytarabine (200 mg/m(2) or 1000 mg/m(2) days 1-7) in conjunction with im

  17. The Eleventh International Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Workshop Report: Ponte di Legno, Italy, 6-7 May 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, A; Baruchel, A; Hunger, S

    2009-01-01

    An international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)working group was formed during the 27th annual meeting of the International Society of Pediatric Oncology in 1995. Since then, 10 workshops have been held to address many issues that help advance treatment outcome of childhood ALL...

  18. Obinutuzumab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: design, development and place in therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Sawaf O; Fischer K; Engelke A; Pflug N; Hallek M; Goede V

    2017-01-01

    Othman Al-Sawaf, Kirsten Fischer, Anja Engelke, Natali Pflug, Michael Hallek, Valentin Goede German CLL Study Group, Department I of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany Abstract: For decades, treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has been based on chemotherapy. This changed when the first CD20 antibody rituximab was introduced. Since 2008, the combination of chemotherapy and CD20 antibodies has become the standard of care for most patients, and a si...

  19. Leydig cell damage after testicular irradiation for lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalet, S.M.; Horner, A.; Ahmed, S.R.; Morris-Jones, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of testicular irradiation on Leydig cell function has been studied in a group of boys irradiated between 1 and 5 years earlier for a testicular relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Six of the seven boys irradiated during prepubertal life had an absent testosterone response to HCG stimulation. Two of the four boys irradiated during puberty had an appropriate basal testosterone level, but the testosterone response to HCG stimulation was subnormal in three of the four. Abnormalities in gonadotropin secretion consistent with testicular damage were noted in nine of the 11 boys. Evidence of severe Leydig cell damage was present irrespective of whether the boys were studied within 1 year or between 3 and 5 years after irradiation, suggesting that recovery is unlikely. Androgen replacement therapy has been started in four boys and will be required by the majority of the remainder to undergo normal pubertal development.

  20. Treatment of younger patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Younger patients (defined as patients younger than 50-55 years of age) represent a small group of newly diagnosed patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, accounting only for 10% to 20% of newly diagnosed cases. However, once these patients become symptomatic and require treatment, their life expectancy is significantly reduced. Therapeutic approaches for younger patients should be directed at improving survival by achieving a complete remission and, where possible, eradicating minimal residual disease. Chemoimmunotherapy combinations carry the highest response rates and are commonly offered to younger patients. Additional strategies that should be considered for younger patients include early referral for stem-cell transplantation and clinical trials of consolidation therapy to eliminate minimal residual disease.

  1. Endogenous murine leukemia virus-encoded proteins in radiation leukemias of BALB/c mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tress, E.; Pierotti, M.; DeLeo, A.B.; O' Donnell, P.V.; Fleissner, E.

    1982-02-01

    To explore the role of endogenous retroviruses in radiation-induced leukemogenesis in the mouse, we have examined virus-encoded proteins in nine BALB/c leukemias by pulsechase labeling procedures and serological typing with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. The major gag precursor protein, Pr65/sup gag/, was observed in all cases, but only three leukemias expressed detectable amounts of the glycosylated gag species, gP95/sup gag/, or its precursor, Pr75/sup gag/. No evidence was found for synthesis of gag-host fusion proteins. None of the leukemias released infectious xenotropic or dualtropic virus, but all nine expressed at least one env protein with xenotropic properties. In two instances a monoclonal antibody, 35/56, which is specific for the NuLV G/sub IX/ antigen, displayed a distinctive reactivity with this class of env protein, although this antibody is unreactive with replicating xenotropic viruses. An ecotropic/xenotropic recombinant env protein with the same 35/56 phenotype was observed in a leukemia induced by a strongly leukemogenic virus isolated from a BALB/c radiation leukemia.

  2. Pregnancy, Maternal Tobacco Smoking, and Early Age Leukemia in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cigarette smoking has been associated with acute myeloid leukemia but hypothesis on the association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and childhood leukemia is unclear. Objectives: To investigate the association between maternal exposure to tobacco smoking during pregnancy and early age (< 2 yr.) leukemia (EAL). Methods: A hospital-based multicenter case-control study aiming to explore EAL risk factors was carried out in Brazil during 1999-2007. Data were collected by ...

  3. Zoonotic Infections in Pediatric Patients With Acute Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have described the impact of zoonotic diseases in children with leukemia. This study aimed to describe the frequency of and associated demographic factors for zoonotic diseases in pediatric acute leukemia patients. Descriptive and comparative statistics relative to age, sex, and patient region were performed on an assembled 11-year retrospective cohort of acute leukemia patients. Of 10,197 patients, 88 patients (0.86%) were found to have a zoonotic infection. Gastrointestinal dise...

  4. Role of Setbp1 in Myeloid Leukemia Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-05

    Myelomonocytic leukemia CSCs Cancer Stem Cells DOT1L DOT1-like histone H3K79 ethyltransferase FACS Fluorescence –Activated Cell... leukemia and had multiple integration which likely represent cooperating cancer genes (79). When murine stem cell retrovirus (MSCV) carrying Sox4... cancers , acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is also a consequence of multiple mutations (49). Therefore, we sought to identify the mutations that might

  5. [Acute myeloid leukemia originating from the same leukemia clone after the complete remission of acute lymphoid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Isao; Nakamaki, Tsuyoshi; Amaya, Hiroshi; Kiyosaki, Masanobu; Kawakami, Keiichiro; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokoyama, Akihiro; Hino, Ken-ichiro; Tomoyasu, Shigeru

    2003-09-01

    A 22-year-old female was diagnosed as having acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) in February 1995, from the findings of peroxidase negative, CD10+, CD19+, TdT+ and rearrangement of IgH and TCR beta. AdVP (doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone) therapy achieved a complete remission (CR). Bone marrow transplantation had to be abandoned because of the lack of an HLA-identical donor. Intensification therapy was thus carried out repeatedly. In June 1998, myeloblast with Auer rods, peroxidase positive, CD13+, CD33+ and HLA-DR+, appeared. The patient was diagnosed as having lineage switch acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from ALL. Though A-DMP (cytosine arabinoside, daunorubicin, 6-mercaptopurine) therapy was resistant, AdVP therapy led to a CR. The patient died of cardiotoxicity from anthracyclines in February 1999. From the results of the Ramasamy method using the clonal rearrangements of the Ig heavy chain gene locus, the origin of the pathological cells of ALL and AML was indicated to be the same leukemia clone.

  6. Decitabine, Vorinostat, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Prognostic significance of cell surface phenotype in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiek Aejaz Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: To find out the phenotypic character of lymphoblasts of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients in our study cohort and their possible effect on the prognosis. Aims: To investigate the phenotype in ALL in our demographic population and to prognosticate various upfront current protocols employed in our hospital. Settings and Design: The study spanned over a period of 4 years with retrospective and prospective data of January 2008 through December 2011. Materials and Methods: 159 patients of all age groups were enrolled for the study, of which flow cytometry was done in 144 patients. Statistical Analysis Used: Analysis was done using the variables on SPSS (statistical package for social sciences software on computer. Survival curves were estimated by method of Kaplan-Meir. Results: Majority of the patients were of B-cell (68.1% and 30.6% patients were of T-cell lineage. Of these, 80.6% patients were having cALLa positivity. Complete remission (CR was achieved in 59.1%, 16.4% relapsed, and 20.1% patients died. Conclusions: Phenotyping has become an important and integral part of diagnosis, classification, management and prognosticating in ALL. B-cell has been found to have a better survival over T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia. cALLa antigen positivity has good impact in achieving CR in only B-cell lineage, myeloid coexpression has no significant effect on the outcome. BFM (Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster based protocols though showed a higher CR and survival vis-a-vis UKALL-XII. However, patients enrolled in former group being of low risk category and lesser in numbers cannot be compared statistically with a fair degree of confidence.

  8. Incidence of childhood leukemia and oil exploitation in the Amazon basin of Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtig, Anna-Karin; San Sebastián, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    To determine whether there was any difference in childhood leukemia incidence rates between populations living in the proximity to oil fields and those living in areas free from oil exploitation in the Amazon basin of Ecuador, 91 cancer cases among children (0-14 years) from the provinces of Sucumbios, Orellana, Napo, and Pastaza during the period 1985-2000 were studied. The relative risks for all leukemias indicated significantly elevated levels in the youngest age group (0-4 years), both genders combined (RR 3.48, 95% CI 1.25-9.67), and in all age groups (0-14 years) combined for females (RR 2.60, 95% CI 1.11-6.08) and both genders combined (RR 2.56, 95% CI 1.35-4.86). There was no significant difference between the two groups in all other cancer sites combined. Study results are compatible with a relationship between childhood leukemia incidence and living in the proximity of oil fields in the Ecuadorian Amazon.

  9. PROGNOSTIC VALUE OF BRAIN AND ACUTE LEUKEMIA CYTOPLASMIC GENE EXPRESSION IN EGYPTIAN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    adel abd elhaleim hagag

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract      Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML accounts for 25%-35% of the acute leukemia in children. BAALC (Brain and Acute Leukemia, Cytoplasmic gene is a recently identified gene on chromosome 8q22.3 that has prognostic significance in AML.  The aim of this work was to study the impact of BAALC gene expression on prognosis of AML in Egyptian children. Patients and methods: This study was conducted on 40 patients of newly diagnosed AML who were subjected to the following: Full history taking, clinical examination, laboratory investigations including: complete blood count, LDH, bone marrow aspiration, cytochemistry and immunophenotyping, assessment of BAALC Gene by real time PCR in bone marrow aspirate mononuclear cells before the start of chemotherapy. Results: BAALC gene expression showed positive expression in 24 cases (60% and negative expression in 16 cases (40%. Patients who showed positive BAALC gene expression included 10 patients achieved complete remission, 8 patients died and 6 relapsed patients, while patients who showed negative expression include 12 patients achieved complete remission, 1 relapsed patient and 3 patients died. There was significant association between BAALC gene expression and FAB classification of patients of AML patientsas positive BAALC expression is predominantly seen in FAB subtypes M1 and M2 compared with negative BAALC gene expression that was found more in M3 and M4 (8 cases with M1, 12 cases with M2, 1 case with M3 and 3 cases with M4 in positive BAALC expression versus 2 cases with M1, 3 cases with M2, 4 cases with M3 and 7 cases with M4 in BAALC gene negative expression group with significant difference regarding FAB subtypes. As regard age, sex, splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, pallor, purpura, platelets count, WBCs count, and percentage of blast cells in BM, the present study showed no significant association with BAALC. Conclusion: BAALC expression is an important prognostic factor in AML

  10. Induction of T-cell immunity against leukemia by dendritic cells pulsed with total RNA isolated from leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李牧; 尤胜国; 葛薇; 马双; 马楠; 赵春华

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility and efficacy of eliciting leukemia-specific T-cell responses in syngeneic mice in vitro and in vivo using dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with total RNA from leukemia cells.Methods DCs generated from bone marrow culture in vitro in the presence of combined cytokines were pulsed with cellular total RNA isolated from cultured L615 cells by cationic lipid 1,2-dioleoyloxy-3-(trimethylammonium) propane (DOTAP). T-cell responses were evaluated by in vitro proliferation, and cytotoxicity assay. And in vivo immune protection and proghosis of mice with leukemia were studied.Conclusions These data support the use of DCs/RNA vaccine as a feasible and effective route to elicit leukemia immunity against unidentified leukemia-associated antigens for treatment of leukemia-bearing animals.

  11. Zoonotic infections in pediatric patients with acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lothstein, Katherine; Fisher, Brian; Li, Yimei; Seif, Alix; Harris, Tracey; Torp, Kari; Kavcic, Marko; Huang, Yuan-Shung V; Rheingold, Susan R; Aplenc, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Few studies have described the impact of zoonotic diseases in children with leukemia. This study aimed to describe the frequency of and associated demographic factors for zoonotic diseases in pediatric acute leukemia patients. Descriptive and comparative statistics relative to age, sex, and patient region were performed on an assembled 11-year retrospective cohort of acute leukemia patients. Of 10,197 patients, 88 patients (0.86%) were found to have a zoonotic infection. Gastrointestinal diseases were the most commonly (86.4%) identified zoonotic illnesses. Although rare, zoonotic diseases do occur in children with leukemia and frequency varies by age, region, and gender.

  12. Outcomes in patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachir, Fatima; Zerrouk, Jihane; Howard, Scott C; Graoui, Omar; Lahjouji, Ali; Hessissen, Leila; Bennani, Sanae; Quessar, Assmae; El Aouad, Rajae

    2014-08-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) includes biphenotypic and bilineal types of leukemia, which constitute rare subtypes that require individualized therapy. Outcomes in Moroccan patients with MPAL are unknown. Among 1264 patients with acute leukemia, 20 were classified as having MPAL, including 17 with biphenotypic acute leukemia (1.3%) and 3 with bilineal leukemia (0.2%). There were 8 adults and 12 children. In 12 cases (60%), leukemic blasts expressed myeloid and T-lymphoid antigens, and, in 5 cases (25%), leukemic blasts expressed B lymphoid antigens plus myeloid antigens. Patients were initially treated on protocols for acute myeloid leukemia (n=4), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n=14), or with palliative care (n=2). The probability of survival at 2 years in MPAL cases was 52%± 14%. Six of the 12 patients younger than 15 years remain alive versus 1 of 8 adult patients. Patients treated with ALL-directed therapy had significantly higher overall survival than those treated with acute myeloid leukemia-directed therapy (P=0.003). There was no association between the phenotypic characteristics and the clinical outcome (P=0.83). In conclusion, MPAL represents 1.5% of acute leukemia in Morocco. The prognosis is poor, but initial treatment with therapy directed toward ALL, improved supportive care, and the prevention of abandonment of therapy may improve outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  13. JAK Mutations in High-Risk Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Charles G. Mullighan; Jinghui Zhang; Richard C. Harvey; J. Racquel Collins-Underwood; Brenda A. Schulman; Letha A. Phillips; Sarah K. Tasian; Mignon L. Loh; Xiaoping Su; Wei Liu; Meenakshi Devidas; Susan R. Atlas; I-Ming Chen; Robert J. Clifford; Daniela S. Gerhard; William L. Carroll; Gregory H. Reaman; Malcolm Smith; James R. Downing; Stephen P. Hunger; Cheryl L. Willman; Janet D. Rowley

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease consisting of distinct clinical and biological subtypes that are characterized by specific chromosomal abnormalities or gene mutations...

  14. Global characteristics of childhood acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Samad, A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Scelo, G; Smith, M T; Feusner, J; Wiemels, J L; Metayer, C

    2015-03-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) comprises approximately 5-10% of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases in the US. While variation in this percentage among other populations was noted previously, global patterns of childhood APL have not been thoroughly characterized. In this comprehensive review of childhood APL, we examined its geographic pattern and the potential contribution of environmental factors to observed variation. In 142 studies (spanning >60 countries) identified, variation was apparent-de novo APL represented from 2% (Switzerland) to >50% (Nicaragua) of childhood AML in different geographic regions. Because a limited number of previous studies addressed specific environmental exposures that potentially underlie childhood APL development, we gathered 28 childhood cases of therapy-related APL, which exemplified associations between prior exposures to chemotherapeutic drugs/radiation and APL diagnosis. Future population-based studies examining childhood APL patterns and the potential association with specific environmental exposures and other risk factors are needed.

  15. Cytogenetic patterns in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, J.R.; Rowley, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of chromosomal banding patterns in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) reveals that approximately 50% of patients have an abnormal karyotype. Although there is substantial variability, certain nonrandom abnormalities occur, e.g., +8, -7, and the 8;21 translocation (often accompanied by loss of an X or Y chromosome). The 15;17 translocation appears to be highly specific for acute promyelocytic leukemia. These abnormalities usually are not seen in remission, but reappear in relapse, sometimes exhibiting further clonal evolution; a +8 is the most frequently observed evolutionary change. Patients with ANLL following treatment of a malignant lymphoma tend to have hypodiploid modal numbers and frequently show loss of a chromosome No. 5 or No. 7.

  16. Fungal natural products targeting chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladt, Tanja Thorskov; Kildgaard, Sara; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in adults from the western world. No curative treatments of CLL are presently known so the treatment strategy today is primarily to prolong patient survival,1 why we have initiated new activities towards discovery of novel compounds...... with potential tumor specificity. Our starting point is a diverse fungal collection of thousands of Penicillium and Aspergillus species. These fungi have proven to be a very rich source of various bioactive compounds and yet our dereplication investigations have demonstrated that there are still numerous unknown...... compounds to be identified within these species. Until now we have found that 11 out of 289 fungal extracts are active against CLL cells. Using our established chemotaxonomic discovery approach we have dereplicated and fractionated these extracts to track the activity into single fractions/compounds.2...

  17. The Genomic Landscape of Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tiffany Y.; Gelston, Laura C.; Wang, Yong-Dong; Mazor, Tali; Esquivel, Emilio; Yu, Ariel; Seepo, Sara; Olsen, Scott; Rosenberg, Mara; Archambeault, Sophie L.; Abusin, Ghada; Beckman, Kyle; Brown, Patrick A.; Briones, Michael; Carcamo, Benjamin; Cooper, Todd; Dahl, Gary V.; Emanuel, Peter D.; Fluchel, Mark N.; Goyal, Rakesh K.; Hayashi, Robert J.; Hitzler, Johann; Hugge, Christopher; Liu, Y. Lucy; Messinger, Yoav H.; Mahoney, Donald H.; Monteleone, Philip; Nemecek, Eneida R.; Roehrs, Philip A.; Schore, Reuven J.; Stine, Kimo C.; Takemoto, Clifford M.; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Costello, Joseph F.; Olshen, Adam B.; Stewart, Chip; Li, Yongjin; Ma, Jing; Gerbing, Robert B.; Alonzo, Todd A.; Getz, Gad; Gruber, Tanja; Golub, Todd; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Loh, Mignon L.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) of childhood with a poor prognosis. Mutations in NF1, NRAS, KRAS, PTPN11 and CBL occur in 85% of patients, yet there are currently no risk stratification algorithms capable of predicting which patients will be refractory to conventional treatment and therefore be candidates for experimental therapies. In addition, there have been few other molecular pathways identified aside from the Ras/MAPK pathway to serve as the basis for such novel therapeutic strategies. We therefore sought to genomically characterize serial samples from patients at diagnosis through relapse and transformation to acute myeloid leukemia in order to expand our knowledge of the mutational spectrum in JMML. We identified recurrent mutations in genes involved in signal transduction, gene splicing, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and transcription. Importantly, the number of somatic alterations present at diagnosis appears to be the major determinant of outcome. PMID:26457647

  18. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Catherine C; Falchi, Lorenzo; Weinberg, J Brice; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Lanasa, Mark C

    2012-11-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most prevalent leukemia in the United States with almost 4390 attributable deaths per year. Epidemiologic data compiled by the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program identifies important differences in incidence and survival for African Americans with CLL. Although the incidence of CLL is lower among African Americans than among Caucasians (4.6 and 6.2 per 100 000 men, respectively), age-adjusted survival is inferior. African American patients with CLL are almost twice as likely to die from a CLL-related complication in the first 5 years after diagnosis as are Caucasian patients with CLL. The biologic basis for these observations is almost entirely unexplored, and a comprehensive clinical analysis of African American patients with CLL is lacking. This is the subject of the present review.

  19. The Danish National Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Cunha-Bang, Caspar; Geisler, Christian Hartmann; Enggaard, Lisbeth;

    2016-01-01

    , and for decision on treatment initiation as well as characteristics included in the CLL International Prognostic Index are collected. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: To ensure full coverage of Danish CLL patients in the registry, both continuous queries in case of missing data, and cross-referencing with the Danish National......, 3,082 patients have been registered. CONCLUSION: The Danish National CLL Registry is based within the Danish National Hematology Database. The registry covers a cohort of all patients diagnosed with CLL in Denmark since 2008. It forms the basis for quality assessment of CLL treatment in Denmark......AIM: In 2008, the Danish National Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Registry was founded within the Danish National Hematology Database. The primary aim of the registry is to assure quality of diagnosis and care of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in Denmark. Secondarily, to evaluate...

  20. Metabolism pathways in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozovski, Uri; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Barzilai, Merav; Keating, Michael J; Estrov, Zeev

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cell metabolism have been studied by several investigators. Unlike normal B lymphocytes or other leukemia cells, CLL cells, like adipocytes, store lipids and utilize free fatty acids (FFA) to produce chemical energy. None of the recently identified mutations in CLL directly affects metabolic pathways, suggesting that genetic alterations do not directly contribute to CLL cells' metabolic reprogramming. Conversely, recent data suggest that activation of STAT3 or downregulation of microRNA-125 levels plays a crucial role in the utilization of FFA to meet the CLL cells' metabolic needs. STAT3, known to be constitutively activated in CLL, increases the levels of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) that mediates lipoprotein uptake and shifts the CLL cells' metabolism towards utilization of FFA. Herein, we review the evidence for altered lipid metabolism, increased mitochondrial activity and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in CLL cells, and discuss the possible therapeutic strategies to inhibit lipid metabolism pathways in patient with CLL.

  1. Cell size variations of large granular lymphocyte leukemia: Implication of a small cell subtype of granular lymphocyte leukemia with STAT3 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Nodoka; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Takezawa, Yuka; Ito, Toshiro; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Ichikawa, Naoaki; Nishina, Sayaka; Senoo, Noriko; Sakai, Hitoshi; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Ishida, Fumihiro

    2016-06-01

    Large granular lymphocyte leukemia (LGL-L) has been morphologically defined as a group of lymphoproliferative disorders, including T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (T-LGL-L), chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK) and aggressive NK cell leukemia. We investigated the morphological features of LGL leukemic cells in 26 LGL-L patients in order to elucidate relationships with current classifications and molecular backgrounds. LGL-L cells were mostly indistinguishable from normal LGL. Patients with STAT3 SH2 domain mutations showed significantly smaller cells compared with patients without STAT3 mutations. Four patients with T-LGL-L showed smaller granular lymphocytes with a median diameter of less than 13μm, which were rarely seen in normal subjects. This small subtype of T-LGL-L was recognized among rather young patients and was associated with D661Y mutations in the STAT3 gene SH2 domain. In addition, all of them showed anemia including two cases with pure red cell aplasia. These results suggest the heterogeneity of T-LGL-L and a specific subtype with small variants of T-LGL-L. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Philadelphia chromosome positive leukemia including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia and accelerate phase myeloid leukemia. | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available udio in aperto di fase II per determinare la tollerabilita` e l`efficacia antileucemica di STI571 in pazienti adulti con leucemia... Ph+ incluse la leucemia linfoblastica acuta, la leucemia mieloide acuta e la leucemia ...e phase myeloid leukemia. leucemia Ph+ incluse la leucemia linfoblastica acuta, la leucemia... mieloide acuta e la leucemia mieloide cronica in fase accelerata. E.1.1.2Therapeutic area Disease

  3. B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Haeri, Sina; Baker, Arthur M; Boles, Jeremiah; Brown, Mark

    2011-08-01

    Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is a rare occurrence in pregnancy and can be rapidly fatal if left untreated. The need for immediate treatment of ALL, coupled with the maternal-fetal risks from the chemotherapy regimen render a therapeutic dilemma in pregnant women with ALL. We report a case of ALL diagnosed in the 24th week of pregnancy to outline our management strategy, to demonstrate the feasibility of treatment with multi-agent chemotherapy, and to provide a review of the literature.

  4. Mast cell leukemia: an extremely rare disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dai-Yin; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Hong, Ying-Chung; Liu, Chun-Yu; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Chen, Po-Min; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai

    2014-08-01

    Systemic mastocytosis is characterized by pathologic proliferation and accumulation of mast cells in at least one extracutaneous organ such as liver, spleen, bone marrow, or lymph nodes. The clinical features are highly variable depending on impairment of the involved organ systems. It often raises diagnostic challenges. Here we report a case of a 78-year-old patient with mast cell leukemia. The literature is reviewed regarding the diagnosis and updated management of this rare disease.

  5. The Application of Spectral Karyotyping in Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Guo; Wanming Da; Xiaoping Han

    2006-01-01

    Spectral karyotyping (SKY) is a novel cytogenetic technique, which has been developed to unambiguously display and identify all 24 human chromosomes at one time without previous knowledge of any abnormalities involved. SKY can discern aberrations that fail to be easily detected by conventional banding techniques and by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Therefore SKY is highly accurate, highly sensitive, and highly prognostic. In this report the featurese and application of SKY in studies of leukemia are reviewed.

  6. Myc Roles in Hematopoiesis and Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, M. Dolores; León, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is a process capable of generating millions of cells every second, as distributed in many cell types. The process is regulated by a number of transcription factors that regulate the differentiation along the distinct lineages and dictate the genetic program that defines each mature phenotype. Myc was first discovered as the oncogene of avian leukemogenic retroviruses; it was later found translocated in human lymphoma. From then on, evidence accumulated showing that c-Myc is one of the transcription factors playing a major role in hematopoiesis. The study of genetically modified mice with overexpression or deletion of Myc has shown that c-Myc is required for the correct balance between self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Enforced Myc expression in mice leads to reduced HSC pools owing to loss of self-renewal activity at the expense of increased proliferation of progenitor cells and differentiation. c-Myc deficiency consistently results in the accumulation of HSCs. Other models with conditional Myc deletion have demonstrated that different lineages of hematopoietic cells differ in their requirement for c-Myc to regulate their proliferation and differentiation. When transgenic mice overexpress c-Myc or N-Myc in mature cells from the lymphoid or myeloid lineages, the result is lymphoma or leukemia. In agreement, enforced expression of c-Myc blocks the differentiation in several leukemia-derived cell lines capable of differentiating in culture. Not surprising, MYC deregulation is recurrently found in many types of human lymphoma and leukemia. Whereas MYC is deregulated by translocation in Burkitt lymphoma and, less frequently, other types of lymphoma, MYC is frequently overexpressed in acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemia, through mechanisms unrelated to chromosomal translocation, and is often associated with disease progression. PMID:21779460

  7. Immunophenotyping in leukemia and its diagnostic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Kresno

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The identification of cell surface markers, defined as clusters of differentiation antigens (CD’s could be used to classify and sub-classify leukemia. Although the same antigens are expressed on normal cells, the phenotype on malignant cells are aberrantly and frequently asynchronously expressed and may be present in combinations not observed in normal blood or bone marrow. Aberrant expression of surface antigens corresponds with poor therapeutic response and short survival. Additional surface marker analysis complementary to morphologic evaluation and cytochemical staining has greatly improved our ability to characterize hematologic malignancies. A review and illustration on the diagnostic significance of immunophenotyping in leukemia will be presented. Data from 225 patients having complete assessments including morphology, cytochemistry and immunophenotyping in the period of 1994-2001 were collected and analyzed. Based on morphologic evaluation and cytochemistry, the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia were established in 51.1% and 48.9% of cases, respectively. Based on immunophenotyping AML was found in 49.0% of the cases. ALL could be classified into 4.9% pre-B-ALL, 18.7% B-ALL, and 14.7% T-ALL. Cases expressing cross-lineage antigens were found in 12.7%. The prognostic significance of these aberrant expression of antigens for those cases has yet to be established but some of the cases responded poorly to therapy. Immunophenotyping provides the tool to: 1 distinguish normal from clonal populations of leukemic cells; 2 define lineage and reveal the stage of maturation; 3 identify inappropriate expression of lineage associated antigens; 4 provides more informations to establish diagnosis and prognosis compared to standard methods. (Med J Indones 2004; 13: 195-202 Keywords: Immunophenotyping, clusters of differentiation antigens, lineage associated antigens

  8. Terson syndrome and leukemia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzi U

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Umberto Lorenzi, Elisa Buschini, Antonio Fea, Federica Machetta, Federico Maria GrignoloOphthalmic Section, Department of Clinical Pathophysiology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy Abstarct: Terson syndrome is defined as intraocular hemorrhage associated with intracranial bleeding. This syndrome can occur in the event of intracranial hemorrhage or elevated intracranial pressure. To our knowledge, it has never been associated with chronic myeloid leukemia. A 45-year-old woman suffering from chronic myeloid leukemia was referred to our clinic with Terson syndrome after intracranial bleeding. We followed this patient for a year, performing visual acuity assessment, fundus examination, color retinography, and A-scan and B-scan ultrasonography. At presentation, her best-corrected visual acuity on the right was 20/63 and on the left was 20/320. In the right eye, retinoscopy showed blurring of the optic margins surrounded by retinal and preretinal hemorrhages, preretinal fibrosis of the optic disc along the vascular arcades, and perivascular retinal infiltrates. In the left eye, the optic disc was surrounded by retinal and preretinal hemorrhages, and massive fibrosis with hard exudates and severe preretinal hemorrhage were observed at the posterior pole. Roth spots and many circular hemorrhages were noted at the periphery of the retina. A-scan and B-scan ultrasonography did not show intraocular leukemic infiltration. The clinical picture remained stable over the following 12 months. In this patient, we observed the ophthalmoscopic features of chronic myeloid leukemia, but also coexistence of features typical of Terson syndrome. To our knowledge, no similar cases have been reported previously.Keywords: retinal disease, chronic myeloid leukemia, eye hemorrhage, intracranial hemorrhage

  9. Renal lymphangiectasia associated with chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastogi Rajul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal lymphangiectasia is a rare disorder characterized by dilatation of peripelvic, renal and perirenal lymphatic ducts. The exact etiology is not known. Congenital forms and ac-quired forms have been described. The latter has been attributed to obstruction of draining retro-peritoneal lymphatic ducts caused by either infection, inflammation or any other cause. We des-cribe the rare association of renal lymphangiectasia with chronic myeloid leukemia, which is probably not yet reported in the medical literature.

  10. Impact of ABO incompatibility on patients’ outcome after haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia - a report from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaani, Jonathan; Savani, Bipin N; Labopin, Myriam; Huang, Xiao-jun; Ciceri, Fabio; Arcese, William; Tischer, Johanna; Koc, Yener; Bruno, Benedetto; Gülbas, Zafer; Blaise, Didier; Maertens, Johan; Ehninger, Gerhard; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-01-01

    A significant proportion of hematopoietic stem cell transplants are performed with ABO-mismatched donors. The impact of ABO mismatch on outcome following transplantation remains controversial and there are no published data regarding the impact of ABO mismatch in acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving haploidentical transplants. Using the European Blood and Marrow Transplant Acute Leukemia Working Group registry we identified 837 patients who underwent haploidentical transplantation. Comparative analysis was performed between patients who received ABO-matched versus ABO-mismatched haploidentical transplants for common clinical outcome variables. Our cohort consisted of 522 ABO-matched patients and 315 ABO-mismatched patients including 150 with minor, 127 with major, and 38 with bi-directional ABO mismatching. There were no significant differences between ABO matched and mismatched patients in terms of baseline disease and clinical characteristics. Major ABO mismatching was associated with inferior day 100 engraftment rate whereas multivariate analysis showed that bi-directional mismatching was associated with increased risk of grade II–IV acute graft-versus-host disease [hazard ratio (HR) 2.387; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22–4.66; P=0.01). Non-relapse mortality, relapse incidence, leukemia-free survival, overall survival, and chronic graft-versus-host disease rates were comparable between ABO-matched and -mismatched patients. Focused analysis on stem cell source showed that patients with minor mismatching transplanted with bone marrow grafts experienced increased grade II–IV acute graft-versus-host disease rates (HR 2.03; 95% CI: 1.00–4.10; P=0.04). Patients with major ABO mismatching and bone marrow grafts had decreased survival (HR=1.82; CI 95%: 1.048 – 3.18; P=0.033). In conclusion, ABO incompatibility has a marginal but significant clinical effect in acute myeloid leukemia patients undergoing haploidentical transplantation. PMID:28255020

  11. Targeting the TAM Receptors in Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeline G. Huey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Targeted inhibition of members of the TAM (TYRO-3, AXL, MERTK family of receptor tyrosine kinases has recently been investigated as a novel strategy for treatment of hematologic malignancies. The physiologic functions of the TAM receptors in innate immune control, natural killer (NK cell differentiation, efferocytosis, clearance of apoptotic debris, and hemostasis have previously been described and more recent data implicate TAM kinases as important regulators of erythropoiesis and megakaryopoiesis. The TAM receptors are aberrantly or ectopically expressed in many hematologic malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia, B- and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and multiple myeloma. TAM receptors contribute to leukemic phenotypes through activation of pro-survival signaling pathways and interplay with other oncogenic proteins such as FLT3, LYN, and FGFR3. The TAM receptors also contribute to resistance to both cytotoxic chemotherapeutics and targeted agents, making them attractive therapeutic targets. A number of translational strategies for TAM inhibition are in development, including small molecule inhibitors, ligand traps, and monoclonal antibodies. Emerging areas of research include modulation of TAM receptors to enhance anti-tumor immunity, potential roles for TYRO-3 in leukemogenesis, and the function of the bone marrow microenvironment in mediating resistance to TAM inhibition.

  12. Invasive fungal infections in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Vijaya R; Viola, George M; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-08-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed.

  13. [Predictors of Resilience in Adolescents with Leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Sil; Park, Ho Ran

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the factors relating to resilience for adolescents with leukemia and examine the relationship between these factors. From June to September in 2014, 199 adolescents aged 11 to 21 participated in the study as they visited the out-patient clinic at C university hospital for follow-up care. To verify the predictors and the effects of resilience, uncertainty, symptom distress, perceived social support, spiritual perspective, defensive coping, courageous coping, hope, and self-transcendence were measured. Collected data were analyzed using hierarchical regression analysis with the SAS statistics program. The final regression model showed that courageous coping, hope, and self-transcendence were significant predictors related to resilience in adolescents with leukemia and explained for 63% of the variance in resilience. The findings indicate that adolescent-oriented intervention programs enhancing courageous coping, hope, and self-transcendence should be provide for adolescents with leukemia in order to overcome illness-related stress and support physical, psychological and social adjustment.

  14. An Immunocompetent Mouse Model for MLL/AF9 Leukemia Reveals the Potential of Spontaneous Cytotoxic T-Cell Response to an Antigen Expressed in Leukemia Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Hasegawa

    Full Text Available Leukemia differs substantially with respect to stromal milieu from tumors that progress locally as solid masses, and the physiological importance of immunosurveillance in leukemia remains unclear. However, currently available mouse leukemia models have critical limitations in the context of analyzing immunological regulation of leukemia development. In this study, we transferred mouse MLL/AF9 leukemia-initiating cells into immunocompetent recipient mice without any pre-conditioning such as irradiation, and then analyzed the spontaneous T cell response to an immunogenic antigen expressed in leukemia cells. When the minimum numbers of leukemia-initiating cells for engraftment were transferred, leukemia cells were eradicated by the adaptive immune response in most, if not all, wild-type mice, but not in Rag2-/- recipient mice, which lack adaptive immunity. By contrast, mice transplanted with larger numbers of leukemia cells always developed leukemia. In mice with advanced leukemia, antigen-specific CTLs were also expanded, but were unresponsive to antigen stimulation and expressed high levels of PD-1 and LAG-3. These results provide the first clear demonstration that the spontaneous CTL response to a tumor-cell antigen has the potential to eradicate leukemia, whereas antigen-specific CTLs are exhausted in animals with advanced leukemia. This immunocompetent mouse leukemia model provides a useful platform for developing effective immunotherapies against leukemia.

  15. Home pesticide exposures and risk of childhood leukemia: Findings from the childhood leukemia international consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Helen D; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Metayer, Catherine; Clavel, Jacqueline; Lightfoot, Tracy; Kaatsch, Peter; Roman, Eve; Magnani, Corrado; Spector, Logan G; Th Petridou, Eleni; Milne, Elizabeth; Dockerty, John D; Miligi, Lucia; Armstrong, Bruce K; Rudant, Jérémie; Fritschi, Lin; Simpson, Jill; Zhang, Luoping; Rondelli, Roberto; Baka, Margarita; Orsi, Laurent; Moschovi, Maria; Kang, Alice Y; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Some previous studies have suggested that home pesticide exposure before birth and during a child's early years may increase the risk of childhood leukemia. To further investigate this, we pooled individual level data from 12 case-control studies in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Exposure data were harmonized into compatible formats. Pooled analyses were undertaken using multivariable unconditional logistic regression. The odds ratio (ORs) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) associated with any pesticide exposure shortly before conception, during pregnancy and after birth were 1.39 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25, 1.55) (using 2,785 cases and 3,635 controls), 1.43 (95% CI: 1.32, 1.54) (5,055 cases and 7,370 controls) and 1.36 (95% CI: 1.23, 1.51) (4,162 cases and 5,179 controls), respectively. Corresponding ORs for risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were 1.49 (95% CI: 1.02, 2.16) (173 cases and 1,789 controls), 1.55 (95% CI: 1.21, 1.99) (344 cases and 4,666 controls) and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.76, 1.53) (198 cases and 2,655 controls), respectively. There was little difference by type of pesticide used. The relative similarity in ORs between leukemia types, time periods and pesticide types may be explained by similar exposure patterns and effects across the time periods in ALL and AML, participants' exposure to multiple pesticides, or recall bias. Although some recall bias is likely, until a better study design can be found to investigate the associations between home pesticide use and childhood leukemia in an equally large sample, it would appear prudent to limit the use of home pesticides before and during pregnancy, and during childhood.

  16. Leukemia Associated Antigens: Their Dual Role as Biomarkers and Immunotherapeutic Targets for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schmitt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia associated antigens (LAAs are being increasingly identified by methods such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL cloning, serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries (SEREX and mass spectrometry (MS. In additional, large scale screening techniques such as microarray, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE have expanded our understanding of the role that tumor antigens play in the biological processes which are perturbed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. It has become increasingly apparent that these antigens play a dual role, not only as targets for immunotherapy, but also as biomarkers of disease state, stage, response to treatment and survival. We need biomarkers to enable the identification of the patients who are most likely to benefit from specific treatments (conventional and/or novel and to help clinicians and scientists improve clinical end points and treatment design. Here we describe the LAAs identified in AML, to date, which have already been shown to play a dual role as biomarkers of AML disease.Abbreviations: AML: acute myeloid leukemia; APL: acute promyelocytic leukemia; ATRA: all-trans-retinoic acid; B-CLL: B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia; CT: cancer-testis; CTL: cytotoxic T-lymphocyte; FAB: French-American-British; HI: hypusination inhibitors; HSP: heat shock protein; ITD: internal tandem duplication; LAA: leukemia associated antigen; MDS: myelodysplastic syndrome; MGEA6: meningioma antigen 6; MPD: myeloproliferative disease; MS: mass spectrometry; NK: natural killer; PRAME: preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma; PRTN3: proteinase 3; RAGE-1: renal antigen 1; RHAMM: receptor for hyaluronic acid-mediated motility; RQ-PCR: real-time PCR; SAGE: serial analysis of gene expression; SCT: stem cell transplant; SEREX: serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries; SNPs: single nucleotide polymorphisms; UPD

  17. Leukemia Mediated Endothelial Cell Activation Modulates Leukemia Cell Susceptibility to Chemotherapy through a Positive Feedback Loop Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Pezeshkian

    Full Text Available In acute myeloid leukemia (AML, the chances of achieving disease-free survival are low. Studies have demonstrated a supportive role of endothelial cells (ECs in normal hematopoiesis. Here we show that similar intercellular relationships exist in leukemia. We demonstrate that leukemia cells themselves initiate these interactions by directly modulating the behavior of resting ECs through the induction of EC activation. In this inflammatory state, activated ECs induce the adhesion of a sub-set of leukemia cells through the cell adhesion molecule E-selectin. These adherent leukemia cells are sequestered in a quiescent state and are unaffected by chemotherapy. The ability of adherent cells to later detach and again become proliferative following exposure to chemotherapy suggests a role of this process in relapse. Interestingly, differing leukemia subtypes modulate this process to varying degrees, which may explain the varied response of AML patients to chemotherapy and relapse rates. Finally, because leukemia cells themselves induce EC activation, we postulate a positive-feedback loop in leukemia that exists to support the growth and relapse of the disease. Together, the data defines a new mechanism describing how ECs and leukemia cells interact during leukemogenesis, which could be used to develop novel treatments for those with AML.

  18. Chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, and prednisone (COAP) in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallan, S E; Camitta, B M; Chan, D M; Traggis, D; Jaffe, N

    1977-01-01

    Three groups of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were treated with intermittent cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, and prednisone (COAP). Group A (no prior relapse) and Group B (prior single-agent relapse) received COAP after 12 months on another chemotherapy regimen. Children in Group C (prior relapse on multiagent regimens) received COAP following A-COAP (asparaginase plus COAP) reinduction. Median disease-free survival after beginning COAP was not reached for Group A, but was only 7 months for Groups B and C. As of November 1976, there were 8 of 15 Group A patients, 1 of 12 Group B patients, and 1 of 28 Group C patients who had remained disease-free from 38 to 60 (median 54.5) months and were off chemotherapy. COAP has activity in childhood ALL. However, effectiveness is markedly diminished in patients with prior bone marrow relapse.

  19. A New Three-Way Translocation t(4;11;7(q21;q23;q22 in a Mixed-Phenotype Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Takasaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 68-year-old man was admitted to our hospital in September 2008 because of a left-sided chest pain. Bone marrow examination showed that 85.5% of leukemic cells were positive for myeloperoxidase (MPO and were negative for esterase stain. Flow cytometric analysis (FCM revealed the expression of CD19, CD79a, CD13, CD33, CD34, and HLA-DR on the blasts. Cytogenetic analysis of bone marrow cells using the G-banding technique demonstrated 47, XY, +X, t(4;11;7(q21;q23;q22 in five of the 20 analyzed cells. The patient was diagnosed as having mixed biphenotypic acute leukemia according to the European Group for Immunologic Classification of Leukemia criteria. Mixed-phenotype acute leukemia is a rare, difficult to diagnose entity. Whether patients with mixed-phenotype acute leukemia should be treated with regimens designed for acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or both remains unclear.

  20. Low-Dose lnterleukin-2 Immunotherapy Does Not Improve Outcome of Patients Age 60 Years and Older with Acute Myeloid Leukemia in First Complete Remission%首次缓解后使用小剂量IL-2免疫治疗不能改善≥60岁老年急性髓性白血病患者预后

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马军; 吴穗晶; 杜欣

    2009-01-01

    @@ 1文献来源 Low-dose Interleukin-2 immunotherapy does not improve outcome of patients age 60 years and older with acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission: Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study 9720. [J]. J Clin Oncol, 2008,12(26):4934-4939.

  1. 急性髓性白血病的年龄相关危险因素特征及化疗剂量敏感性研究的评价%Assessment of the Age-Related Risk Profile and Chemotherapy Dose Response in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜欣; 郭荣

    2009-01-01

    @@ 1 文献来源 Buchner T, Berdel WE, Haferlach C, et al, Age-related risk profile and chemotherapy dose response in acute myeloid leukemia: A study by the German Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cooperative Group [J]. J Clin Oncol, 2009,27(1):61-69.

  2. Parenting Behaviors and Nutrition in Children with Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lauren Kendrea; Lamb, Karen Elaine; McCarthy, Maria Catherine

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether parenting behaviors are associated with child nutrition amongst pre-school children receiving treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and to determine whether this association differs from that observed amongst a healthy population. Participants were 73 parents of children aged 2-6 years. The children were either a) receiving treatment for ALL (n = 43), or b) had no major medical history (n = 30). Participants completed psychometrically validated questionnaires that assessed parenting behaviors and child diet. Increased parental overprotection was associated with higher fruit and vegetable consumption for the control group but lower fruit and vegetable consumption for the ALL group. Parental overprotection, inconsistent discipline and emotional feeding were positively associated with non-core ("junk") food consumption for the ALL group, particularly those who had recently received steroid treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show that certain parenting behaviors may be associated with poor nutrition during treatment for ALL. In light of these results, parenting interventions, specifically targeting parenting behaviors such as assertive discipline, may be a mechanism for nutrition promotion amongst this vulnerable group.

  3. Molecular remission in PML/RAR alpha-positive acute promyelocytic leukemia by combined all-trans retinoic acid and idarubicin (AIDA) therapy. Gruppo Italiano-Malattie Ematologiche Maligne dell'Adulto and Associazione Italiana di Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica Cooperative Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelli, F; Diverio, D; Avvisati, G; Luciano, A; Barbui, T; Bernasconi, C; Broccia, G; Cerri, R; Falda, M; Fioritoni, G; Leoni, F; Liso, V; Petti, M C; Rodeghiero, F; Saglio, G; Vegna, M L; Visani, G; Jehn, U; Willemze, R; Muus, P; Pelicci, P G; Biondi, A; Lo Coco, F

    1997-08-01

    Two hundred fifty-three patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) were eligible to enter the multicentric GIMEMA-AIEOP "AIDA" trial during the period July 1993 to February 1996. As a mandatory prerequisite for eligibility, all patients had genetic evidence of the specific t(15;17) lesion in their leukemic cells confirmed by karyotyping or by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of the PML/RAR alpha fusion gene (the latter available in 247 cases). Median age was 37.8 years (range, 2.2 to 73.9). Induction treatment consisted of oral all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), 45 mg/m2/d until complete remission (CR), given with intravenous Idarubicin, 12 mg/m2/d on days 2, 4, 6, and 8. Three polychemotherapy cycles were given as consolidation. Hematologic and molecular response by RT-PCR was assessed after induction and after consolidation. At the time of analysis, 240 of the 253 eligible patients were evaluable for induction. Of these, 11 (5%) died of early complications and 229 (95%) achieved hematologic remission. No cases of resistant leukemia were observed. Of 139 cases studied by RT-PCR after induction, 84 (60.5%) were PCR-negative and 55 (39.5%) PCR-positive. One hundred sixty-two patients were evaluable by RT-PCR at the end of consolidation. Of these, 159 (98%) tested PCR-negative and 3 (2%), PCR-positive. After a median follow up of 12 months (range, 0 to 33), the estimated actuarial event-free survival for the whole series of 253 eligible patients was 83% +/- 2.6% and 79% +/- 3.2% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. This study indicates that the AIDA protocol is a well-tolerated regimen that induces molecular remission in almost all patients with PML/RAR alpha-positive APL. Preliminary survival data suggest that a remarkable cure rate can be obtained with this treatment.

  4. Neuropsychological late effects of treatment for acute leukemia in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncadin, Caroline; Hitzler, Johann; Downie, Andrea; Montour-Proulx, Isabelle; Alyman, Cheryl; Cairney, Elizabeth; Spiegler, Brenda J

    2015-05-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have an elevated risk of developing acute leukemia, but little is known about treatment-related neuropsychological morbidity because they are systematically excluded from research in this area. The current study investigated neuropsychological outcomes in children with DS treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) compared to children with DS with no history of cancer. Participants were 4 to 17 years of age at testing and were administered measures of intelligence, academic achievement, language, visual-motor and fine-motor skills, and adaptive function. Patients had been off treatment for at least 2 years. The AML group (N = 12) had significantly lower verbal intelligence and receptive vocabulary compared to controls (N = 21). By contrast, the ALL group (N = 14) performed significantly worse than controls on measures of verbal intelligence, spelling, receptive and expressive vocabulary, visual-motor skills, and adaptive function. Patients with DS treated for AML may have specific post-treatment morbidity in verbal function, whereas those treated for ALL have broader morbidity affecting multiple neuropsychological domains and overall adaptive function. We hypothesize that the broader impairment profile of ALL survivors may be related to a combination of the longer duration of central nervous system-directed treatment for ALL compared to AML and the concomitant limited access to intervention opportunities during active treatment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Structure-activity relationship of lysophosphatidylcholines in HL-60 human leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eun-heeLEE; Mi-ranYUN; Wei-hongWANG; JeeHJUNG; Dong-soonIM

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the structure-activity relationship of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and lysolipid molecules from a marine sponge and ladybirds. METHODS: We tested three synthetic LPCs and four natural lysolipids on Ca2+ mobilization in HL-60 human leukemia cells. RESULTS: We observed lysolipid-mediated Ca2+ mobilization. The activity was the same in both ester-and ether-linked lysolipids, and introduction of a double bond or methoxy group on the alkyl chain did not significantly modulate the activity. However, replacement of trimethylammonium moiety in the choline structure with ammonium moiety reduced the activity. Furthermore, change of the alkyl chain length influenced the Ca2+ response. CONCLUSION: LPC-induced Ca2+ mobilization might be dependent on the length of alkyl chain and the presence of choline moiety in HL-60 leukemia cells.

  6. Structure-activity relationship of lysophosphatidylcholines in HL-60 human leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eun-hee LEE; Mi-ran YUN; Wei-hong WANG; Jee H JUNG; Dong-soon IM

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the structure-activity relationship of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and lysolipid molecules from a marine sponge and ladybirds. METHODS: We tested three synthetic LPCs and four natural lysolipids on Ca2+mobilization in HL-60 human leukemia cells. RESULTS: We observed lysolipid-mediated Ca2+ mobilization. The activity was the same in both ester- and ether-linked lysolipids, and introduction of a double bond or methoxy group on the alkyl chain did not significantly modulate the activity. However, replacement of trimethylammonium moiety in the choline structure with ammonium moiety reduced the activity. Furthermore, change of the alkyl chain length influenced the Ca2+ response. CONCLUSION: LPC-induced Ca2+ mobilization might be dependent on the length of alkyl chain and the presence of choline moiety in HL-60 leukemia cells.

  7. Pharmacogenetics predictive of response and toxicity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lin; Ontiveros, Evelena P.; Griffiths, Elizabeth A.; Thompson, James E.; Wang, Eunice S.; Wetzler, Meir

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a relatively rare disease in adults accounting for no more than 20% of all cases of acute leukemia. By contrast with the pediatric population, in whom significant improvements in long term survival and even cure have been achieved over the last 30 years, adult ALL remains a significant challenge. Overall survival in this group remains a relatively poor 20–40%. Modern research has focused on improved pharmacokinetics, novel pharmacogenetics and personalized principles to optimize the efficacy of the treatment while reducing toxicity. Here we review the pharmacogenetics of medications used in the management of patients with ALL, including L-asparaginase, glucocorticoids, 6-mercaptopruine, methotrexate, vincristine and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Incorporating recent pharmacogenetic data, mainly from pediatric ALL, will provide novel perspective of predicting response and toxicity in both pediatric and adult ALL therapy. PMID:25614322

  8. Pro-apoptotic activity of α-bisabolol in preclinical models of primary human acute leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fato Romana

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously demonstrated that the plant-derived agent α-bisabolol enters cells via lipid rafts, binds to the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein BID, and may induce apoptosis. Here we studied the activity of α-bisabolol in acute leukemia cells. Methods We tested ex vivo blasts from 42 acute leukemias (14 Philadelphia-negative and 14 Philadelphia-positive B acute lymphoid leukemias, Ph-/Ph+B-ALL; 14 acute myeloid leukemias, AML for their sensitivity to α-bisabolol in 24-hour dose-response assays. Concentrations and time were chosen based on CD34+, CD33+my and normal peripheral blood cell sensitivity to increasing α-bisabolol concentrations for up to 120 hours. Results A clustering analysis of the sensitivity over 24 hours identified three clusters. Cluster 1 (14 ± 5 μM α-bisabolol IC50 included mainly Ph-B-ALL cells. AML cells were split into cluster 2 and 3 (45 ± 7 and 65 ± 5 μM IC50. Ph+B-ALL cells were scattered, but mainly grouped into cluster 2. All leukemias, including 3 imatinib-resistant cases, were eventually responsive, but a subset of B-ALL cells was fairly sensitive to low α-bisabolol concentrations. α-bisabolol acted as a pro-apoptotic agent via a direct damage to mitochondrial integrity, which was responsible for the decrease in NADH-supported state 3 respiration and the disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Conclusion Our study provides the first evidence that α-bisabolol is a pro-apoptotic agent for primary human acute leukemia cells.

  9. GSTM1 and GSTT1 null polymorphisms and childhood acute leukemia risk: evidence from 26 case-control studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuqin Tang

    Full Text Available Several molecular epidemiological studies have been conducted to examine the association between glutathione S-transferase mu-1 (GSTM1 and glutathione S-transferase theta-1 (GSTT1 null polymorphisms and childhood acute leukemia; however, the conclusions remain controversial. We performed an extensive meta-analysis on 26 published case-control studies with a total of 3252 cases and 5024 controls. Crude odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence interval were used to assess the strength of association between childhood acute leukemia risk and polymorphisms of GSTM1 and GSTT1. With respect to GSTM1 polymorphism, significantly increased risk of childhood acute leukemia was observed in the overall analysis (OR = 1.30; 95%CI, 1.11-1.51. Furthermore, a stratification analysis showed that the risk of GSTM1 polymorphism are associated with childhood acute leukemia in group of Asians (OR = 1.94; 95%CI, 1.53-2.46, Blacks (OR = 1.76; 95%CI, 1.07-2.91, ALL (OR = 1.33; 95%CI, 1.13-1.58, '< 100 cases and <100 controls' (OR = 1.79; 95%CI, 1.21-2.64, '≥ 100 cases and ≥ 100 controls' (OR = 1.25; 95%CI, 1.02-1.52, and population-based control source (OR = 1.40; 95%CI, 1.15-1.69. With respect to GSTT1 polymorphism, significant association with childhood acute leukemia risk was only found in subgroup of Asian. This meta-analysis supports that GSTM1 null polymorphism is capable of causing childhood acute leukemia susceptibility.

  10. Molecular mechanisms in differentiation-induction in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nigten, Jeannet

    2007-01-01

    Leukemia is a hematological malignancy that is characterized by the clonal expansion of immature hematopoietic cells, which have escaped from the tightly coordinated cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis controls. In general, leukemia is characterized by a variety of mutations in path

  11. Data quality in the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Severinsen, Marianne Tang

    2013-01-01

    The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data.......The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data....

  12. Acute acalculous cholecystitis complicating chemotherapy for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Olfa Kassar; Feten Kallel; Manel Ghorbel; Hatem. Bellaaj; Zeineb Mnif; Moez Elloumi

    2015-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a rare complication in the treatment of acute myeloblastic leukemia. Diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis remains difficult during neutropenic period. We present two acute myeloblastic leukemia patients that developed acute acalculous cholecystitis during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. They suffered from fever, vomiting and acute pain in the epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder. Surgical management was required in one patie...

  13. MicroRNA miR-125b causes leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Marina; Harris, Marian H; Zhou, Beiyan; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-12-14

    MicroRNA miR-125b has been implicated in several kinds of leukemia. The chromosomal translocation t(2;11)(p21;q23) found in patients with myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia leads to an overexpression of miR-125b of up to 90-fold normal. Moreover, miR-125b is also up-regulated in patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia carrying the t(11;14)(q24;q32) translocation. To decipher the presumed oncogenic mechanism of miR-125b, we used transplantation experiments in mice. All mice transplanted with fetal liver cells ectopically expressing miR-125b showed an increase in white blood cell count, in particular in neutrophils and monocytes, associated with a macrocytic anemia. Among these mice, half died of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or a myeloproliferative neoplasm, suggesting an important role for miR-125b in early hematopoiesis. Furthermore, coexpression of miR-125b and the BCR-ABL fusion gene in transplanted cells accelerated the development of leukemia in mice, compared with control mice expressing only BCR-ABL, suggesting that miR-125b confers a proliferative advantage to the leukemic cells. Thus, we show that overexpression of miR-125b is sufficient both to shorten the latency of BCR-ABL-induced leukemia and to independently induce leukemia in a mouse model.

  14. Serological identification of immunogenic antigens in acute monocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Wanggang; Cao, Xingmei; Li, Fuyang; Liu, Xinping; Yao, Libo

    2005-05-01

    In order to improve disease-free survival and potentially a cure, it is necessary to identify more potent leukemia antigen. Here, we defined the acute monocytic leukemia-associated antigen (LAA) recognized by the humoral immune system for the first time. We have applied the method of serologic analysis of recombinant cDNA expression library (SEREX) on acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5), followed by DNA sequencing and analyzing of positive clones. Then, the reactivity of normal and other leukemia sera with positive clones were performed. Thirty-five distinct novel antigens reactive with autologous IgG were identified by SEREX analysis on an acute monocytic leukemia patient and were characterized according to cDNA sequence and the reactivity with allogeneic sera. Twenty of the 35 antigens identified in this study were recognized by IgG antibodies in normal sera, and the remaining 15 were recognized exclusively by sera from allogeneic leukemia patients but not by normal donor sera, suggested that the immune response to these 15 antigens are leukemia related. The 15 immunogenic antigens detected by immune responses in the autologous host facilitate the identification of epitopes recognized by antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and are potential candidates for diagnosis and immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  15. Epigenetic regulation of putative tumor suppressor TGFBI in human leukemias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Hongbo; Liu Jing; Guo Dan; Liu Peixiang; Zhao Yongliang

    2014-01-01

    Background Both in vitro and in vivo data have demonstrated the TGFBI gene functions as a putative tumor suppressor and is frequently downregulated in human tumors of different histological types.The hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter,as one of the main regulatory mechanisms,is associated with TGFBI silencing.In this study,we used a methylation-specific PCR (MSP) method to evaluate the methylation status of the TGFBI promoter in human leukemias.Methods Real-time RT-PCR and methylation-specific PCR approaches were performed to define the TGFBI expression and promoter methylation in human leukemia call lines and clinical samples.Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leukemia patients,bisulfite-converted,and analyzed by the MSP method.Results Hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter occurred in leukemia cell lines and demethylation treatment reexpressed TGFBI at a substantially increased level in most of leukemia cell lines tested.Furthermore,a much higher level of CpG island methylation and a significantly lower TGFBI expression were also identified in clinical leukemia samples.Conclusion The results suggest an important role of promoter methylation in regulating TGFBI expression in leukemia,which provides a useful diagnostic marker for clinical management of human leukemias.

  16. Surviving childhood leukemia: career, family, and future expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Chris; Pikler, Vanessa I; Lavish, Lea A; Keune, Kristen M; Hutto, C J

    2008-01-01

    The authors examine the impact of childhood leukemia on the career development of 11 young adult survivors, using consensual qualitative research. They discuss the results and implications of childhood leukemia on the survivor's career, family, and future expectations, and provide recommendations for addressing the critical coping and management challenges encountered by survivors, their families, and the helping professionals who treat them.

  17. Prolymphocytic leukemia: postmortem findings after long-term survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, J; Hillman, N; Lin, J; Batata, A

    1983-07-01

    A patient had prolymphocytic leukemia and survived for 44 months. A partial remission for more than 11 months and a short complete remission were induced by agents commonly used for the treatment of acute myelocytic leukemia. However, surface markers identified the disease as of B-cell origin.

  18. The expanding role of bendamustine in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Nair KS; Ujjani C

    2015-01-01

    Kruti Sheth Nair, Chaitra Ujjani Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medstar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: As the most prevalent form of adult leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) affects thousands of patients each year. Given the indolent nature of the disease, symptomatic patients frequently experience multiple relapses throughout their clinical course. Better therapeutic options are needed, particularly for the elderly population that characterize...

  19. Aggravated bone density decline following symptomatic osteonecrosis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hoed, Marissa A H; Pluijm, Saskia M F; te Winkel, Mariël L; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester A; Fiocco, Martha; Hoogerbrugge, Peter; Leeuw, Jan A; Bruin, Marrie C A; van der Sluis, Inge M; Bresters, Dorien; Lequin, Maarten H; Roos, Jan C; Veerman, Anjo J P; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M

    2015-12-01

    Osteonecrosis and decline of bone density are serious side effects during and after treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It is unknown whether osteonecrosis and low bone density occur together in the same patients, or whether these two osteogenic side-effects can mutually influence each other's development. Bone density and the incidence of symptomatic osteonecrosis were prospectively assessed in a national cohort of 466 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (4-18 years of age) who were treated according to the dexamethasone-based Dutch Child Oncology Group-ALL9 protocol. Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (BMDLS) (n=466) and of the total body (BMDTB) (n=106) was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Bone density was expressed as age- and gender-matched standard deviation scores. Thirty patients (6.4%) suffered from symptomatic osteonecrosis. At baseline, BMDLS and BMDTB did not differ between patients who did or did not develop osteonecrosis. At cessation of treatment, patients with osteonecrosis had lower mean BMDLS and BMDTB than patients without osteonecrosis (respectively, with osteonecrosis: -2.16 versus without osteonecrosis: -1.21, Posteonecrosis: -1.73 versus without osteonecrosis: -0.57, Posteonecrosis had steeper BMDLS and BMDTB declines during follow-up than patients without osteonecrosis (interaction group time, Posteonecrosis. Bone density declines from the time that osteonecrosis is diagnosed; this suggests that the already existing decrease in bone density during acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy is further aggravated by factors such as restriction of weight-bearing activities and destruction of bone architecture due to osteonecrosis. Osteonecrosis can, therefore, be considered a risk factor for low bone density in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  20. Activation of a promyelocytic leukemia-tumor protein 53 axis underlies acute promyelocytic leukemia cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablain, Julien; Rice, Kim; Soilihi, Hassane; de Reynies, Aurélien; Minucci, Saverio; de Thé, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is driven by the promyelocytic leukemia (PML)-retinoic acid receptor-α (PML-RARA) fusion protein, which interferes with nuclear receptor signaling and PML nuclear body (NB) assembly. APL is the only malignancy definitively cured by targeted therapies: retinoic acid (RA) and/or arsenic trioxide, which both trigger PML-RARA degradation through nonoverlapping pathways. Yet, the cellular and molecular determinants of treatment efficacy remain disputed. We demonstrate that a functional Pml-transformation-related protein 53 (Trp53) axis is required to eradicate leukemia-initiating cells in a mouse model of APL. Upon RA-induced PML-RARA degradation, normal Pml elicits NB reformation and induces a Trp53 response exhibiting features of senescence but not apoptosis, ultimately abrogating APL-initiating activity. Apart from triggering PML-RARA degradation, arsenic trioxide also targets normal PML to enhance NB reformation, which may explain its clinical potency, alone or with RA. This Pml-Trp53 checkpoint initiated by therapy-triggered NB restoration is specific for PML-RARA-driven APL, but not the RA-resistant promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF)-RARA variant. Yet, as NB biogenesis is druggable, it could be therapeutically exploited in non-APL malignancies.