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Sample records for leg ulcer healing

  1. The use of biatain Ag in hard-to-heal venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leaper, David; Münter, Christian; Meaume, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are common, troublesome, and their failure to heal is often related to a heavy bio-burden. Ionized silver has both anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties. The ulcer healing properties of the silver releasing foam dressing Biatain Ag has been examined in 4 randomized cont...

  2. A Bioengineered Living Cell Construct Activates an Acute Wound Healing Response in Venous Leg Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, Rivka C.; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Rosa, Ashley M.; Ramirez, Horacio A.; Badiavas, Evangelos; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2017-01-01

    Chronic non-healing venous leg ulcers (VLUs) are widespread and debilitating, with high morbidity and associated costs; approximately $15 billion is spent annually on the care of VLUs in the US. Despite this, there is a paucity of treatments for VLUs, due to the lack of pathophysiologic insight into ulcer development as well as the lack of knowledge regarding biologic actions of existing VLU-targeted therapies. The bioengineered bilayered living cellular construct (BLCC) skin substitute is an...

  3. Cost-effective use of silver dressings for the treatment of hard-to-heal chronic venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jemec, Gregor B E; Kerihuel, Jean Charles; Ousey, Karen

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the cost-effectiveness of silver dressings using a health economic model based on time-to-wound-healing in hard-to-heal chronic venous leg ulcers (VLUs). BACKGROUND: Chronic venous ulceration affects 1-3% of the adult population and typically has a protracted course of healing....... METHODS: A decision tree was constructed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of treatment with silver compared with non-silver dressings for four weeks in a primary care setting. The outcomes: 'Healed ulcer', 'Healing ulcer' or 'No improvement' were developed, reflecting the relative reduction in ulcer...

  4. Evaluation of a muscle pump-activating device for non-healing venous leg ulcers.

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    Harris, Connie; Duong, Rochelle; Vanderheyden, Gwen; Byrnes, Beth; Cattryse, Renee; Orr, Ava; Keast, David

    2017-12-01

    This evaluation involves an innovative muscle pump-activating device (geko™) as an adjunctive therapy with best practices for non-healing venous leg ulcers (VLUs). Stimulating the common peroneal nerve (at the fibular head), the geko™ device creates a response that acts as foot and calf muscle pumps, increasing venous, arterial and microcirculatory flow. The aim was to evaluate and determine if the geko™ is effective in this population and if it should be added to the medical supply formulary. In all, 12 patients with 18 recalcitrant VLUs (defined as less than 30% reduction in wound size in 30 days with best practices) in two community settings in Ontario consented to the evaluation and were treated with the geko™ for up to 20 weeks. A total of 44% of wounds healed, and 39% decreased in size. One patient non-adherent with the geko™ and best practices had deterioration in his or her wounds. With the patients as their own control, the mean weekly healing rate with the geko™ was 9·35% (±SD 0·10) compared to 0·06% (±SD 0·10) prior to baseline, which was statistically significant (P devices in 7 of 12 (58%) patients. One patient stopped the device due to rash, while another had to take breaks from using the device. Subsequently, the manufacturer (FirstKind Ltd) has developed a new device and protocol specific to the requirements of wound therapy to minimise this response. This small case series demonstrated the highly significant effectiveness of the geko™ device in these hard-to-heal VLUs. Further evaluations to determine dose and patient selection criteria are underway. © 2017 The Authors. International Wound Journal published by Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Leg ulcers due to hyperhomocysteinemia

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    Krupa Shankar D

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic leg ulcers are rare in young adults and generally indicate a vascular cause. We report a case of a 26-year-old man with leg ulcers of eight months duration. Doppler study indicated venous incompetence and a postphlebitic limb. However, as the distribution and number of ulcers was not consistent with stasis alone and no features of collagen vascular disease were noted, a hyperviscosity state was considered and confirmed with significantly elevated homocysteine level in the serum. Administration of vitamins B1, B2, B6 and B12, trimethyl-glycine, mecobalamine, folic acid and povidone iodine dressings with culture-directed antibiotic therapy led to a satisfactory healing of ulcers over a period of one month. Hyperhomocysteinemia must be considered in the differential diagnosis of leg ulcers in young individuals.

  6. Use of skin graft "punch graft" type for the healing of leg ulcers in treated hansen's disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cardia, Carla Christiane de Oliveira

    2006-01-01

    Hansen's disease is an infectious illness caused by Mycobacterium leprae. It affects preferentially the skin and the peripheral nervous system leading to incapacities, such as leg ulcers, which happens due to the direct action of the bacillus on the organs or its indirect action on the peripheral nervous system. Leg ulcers can occur by two physiopathologic processes. There are many treatments for general leg ulcers, which include the ones caused by Hansen's disease sequels. Among them, surgic...

  7. The influence of different sub-bandage pressure values on venous leg ulcers healing when treated with compression therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milic, Dragan J; Zivic, Sasa S; Bogdanovic, Dragan C; Jovanovic, Milan M; Jankovic, Radmilo J; Milosevic, Zoran D; Stamenkovic, Dragan M; Trenkic, Marija S

    2010-03-01

    Venous leg ulcers (VLU) have a huge social and economic impact. An estimated 1.5% of European adults will suffer a venous ulcer at some point in their lives. Despite the widespread use of bandaging with high pressure in the treatment of this condition, recurrence rates range between 25% to 70%. Numerous studies have suggested that the compression system should provide sub-bandage pressure values in the range from 35 mm Hg to 45 mm Hg in order to achieve the best possible healing results. An open, randomized, prospective, single-center study was performed in order to determine the healing rates of VLU when treated with different compression systems and different sub-bandage pressure values. One hundred thirty-one patients (72 women, 59 men; mean age, 59-years-old) with VLU (ulcer surface >3 cm(2); duration >3 months) were randomized into three groups: group A - 42 patients who were treated using an open-toed, elastic, class III compression device knitted in tubular form (Tubulcus, Laboratoires Innothera, Arcueil, France); group B - 46 patients treated with the multi-component bandaging system comprised of Tubulcus and one elastic bandage (15 cm wide and 5 cm long with 200% stretch, Niva, Novi Sad, Serbia); and group C - forty-three patients treated with the multi-component bandaging system comprised of Tubulcus and two elastic bandages. Pressure measurements were taken with the Kikuhime device (TT MediTrade, Soro, Denmark) at the B1 measuring point in the supine, sitting, and standing positions under the three different compression systems. The median resting values in the supine and standing positions in examined study groups were as follows: group A - 36.2 mm Hg and 43.9 mm Hg; group B - 53.9 mm Hg and 68.2 mm Hg; group C - 74.0 mm Hg and 87.4 mm Hg. The healing rate during the 26-week treatment period was 25% (13/42) in group A, 67.4% (31/46) in group B, and 74.4% (32/43) in group C. The success of compression treatment in group A was strongly associated with the

  8. Venous leg ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide, thromboxane alpha2 antagonists, zinc), peri-ulcer

  9. The effects of intermittent negative pressure on the lower extremities' peripheral circulation and wound healing in four patients with lower limb ischemia and hard-to-heal leg ulcers: a case report.

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    Sundby, Øyvind H; Høiseth, Lars Ø; Mathiesen, Iacob; Jørgensen, Jørgen J; Sundhagen, Jon O; Hisdal, Jonny

    2016-10-01

    Peripheral circulation is severely compromised in the advanced stages of peripheral arterial disease. Recently, it was shown that the application of -40 mmHg intermittent negative pressure (INP) to the lower leg and foot enhances macro- and microcirculation in healthy volunteers. In this case report, we describe the effects of INP treatment on four patients with lower limb ischemia and hard-to-heal leg and foot ulcers. We hypothesized that INP therapy may have beneficial hemodynamic and clinical effects in the patients. Four patients (age range: 61-79 years) with hard-to-heal leg and foot ulcers (6-24 months) and ankle-brachial pressure indices of ≤0.60 on the affected side were included. They were treated with an 8-week intervention period of -40 mmHg INP (10 sec negative pressure and 7 sec atmospheric pressure) on the lower limbs. A custom-made vacuum chamber was used to apply INP to the affected lower leg and foot for 2 h per day. After 8 weeks of INP therapy, one ulcer healed completely, while the other three ulcers were almost completely healed. These cases suggest that INP may facilitate wound healing. The theoretical foundation is that INP assists wound healing by improving blood flow to the small blood vessels in the affected limb, increasing the flow of oxygen and nutrients to the cells. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  10. Amelogenin, an extracellular matrix protein, in the treatment of venous leg ulcers and other hard-to-heal wounds: Experimental and clinical evidence  ||FREE PAPER||

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    Marco Romanelli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Marco Romanelli1, Valentina Dini1, Peter Vowden2, Magnus S Ågren31Department of Dermatology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 2Vascular Unit, Bradford Royal Infirmary, Bradford, United Kingdom; 3Department of Surgery K, Bispebjerg Hospitals, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: Amelogenins are extracellular matrix proteins that, under physiological conditions, self-assemble into globular aggregates up to micron-sizes. Studies with periodontal fibroblasts indicate that attachment to these structures increases the endogenous secretion of multiple growth factors and cell proliferation. Pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate that cutaneous wounds benefit from treatment with amelogenins. A randomized controlled trial (RCT involving patients with hard-to-heal venous leg ulcers (VLUs (ie, ulcers with a surface area ≥10 cm2 and duration of ≥6 months showed that the application of amelogenin (Xelma®, Molnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden as an adjunct treatment to compression results in significant reduction in ulcer size, improvement in the state of ulcers, reduced pain, and a larger proportion of ulcers with low levels of exudate, compared with treatment with compression alone. Amelogenin therapy was also shown to be safe to use in that there were no significant differences in adverse events noted between patients treated with amelogenin plus compression and those treated with compression alone. Case study evaluations indicate that the benefits of amelogenin therapy demonstrated in the RCT are being repeated in “real life” situations and that amelogenin therapy may also have a role to play in the treatment of other wound types such as diabetic foot ulcers.Keywords: extracellular matrix, amelogenin, venous leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers, pyoderma gangrenosum

  11. Comparative Clinical Study of the Wound Healing Effects of a Novel Micropore Particle Technology: Effects on Wounds, Venous Leg Ulcers, and Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilyayeva, Olga O; Neshta, Viacheslav V; Golub, Alexander A; Sams-Dodd, Frank

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the wound healing effects of Acapsil, a white, odorless powder based on micropore particle technology (MPPT) (Willingsford Ltd, Southampton, UK) by comparing it to Gentaxane (Gentaksan, Borshchagovsky CCP, Kyiv, Ukraine) (polydimethylsiloxane powder with gentamicin antibiotic) and Ioddicerin (Farmak, Kyiv, Ukraine) (iodine with dimethyl sulfoxide [DMSO]). The study included 266 patients with primarily trophic ulcers caused by pancreatic diabetes and venous insufficiency of the lower extremities, carbuncles, phlegmons, infected third- or fourth-degree heat burns, and infiltrations of postoperative wounds. The products were applied once daily to the wound until it was clean (ie, free from necrosis, pus, and fibrinogenous thickenings). The number of days (mean ± standard deviation) to a clean wound was 3.0 ± 0.9 for MPPT (n = 88) compared with 7.0 ± 1.2 and 8.0 ± 1.1 for Gentaxane (n = 90) and iodine/DMSO (n = 88), respectively. Thus, MPPT reduced the time to reach a clean wound by 57% and 62%, respectively. Products were used once daily until a clean wound was reached, which also reflects the number of applications. Days to onset of granulation for MPPT, Gentaxane, and iodine/DMSO were 4.5 ± 0.8, 9.2 ± 1.4, and 10.3 ± 1.5 days, respectively; and days to onset of epithelialization were 7.8 ± 1.1, 14.1 ± 1.9, and 16.4 ± 2.7 days, respectively. Subgroup analysis of patients with diabetic foot and venous leg ulcers found that each of these demonstrated the same pattern of healing as the overall study. The number of hospitalization days was 14.6 ± 5.6 for MPPT, 21.0 ± 10.7 for Gentaxane, and 24.0 ± 7.9 for iodine/DMSO. Compared with Gentaxane, patients receiving MPPT had a 31% reduction in hospitalization duration and a 39% reduction compared with iodine/DMSO. These findings demonstrate that MPPT represents a valuable new approach to wound care.

  12. [Physical treatment modalities for chronic leg ulcers].

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    Dissemond, J

    2010-05-01

    An increasing numbers of physical treatment options are available for chronic leg ulcer. In this review article, compression therapy, therapeutic ultrasound, negative pressure therapy, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, electrostimulation therapy, electromagnetic therapy, photodynamic therapy, water-filtered infrared-A-radiation and hydrotherapy are discussed in terms of their practical applications and the underlying evidence. With the exception of compression therapy for most of these treatments, good scientific data are not available. However this is a widespread problem in the treatment of chronic wounds. Nevertheless, several of the described methods such as negative pressure therapy represent one of the gold standards in practical treatment of patients with chronic leg ulcers. Although the use of physical treatment modalities may improve healing in patients with chronic leg ulcers, the diagnosis and treatment of the underlying causes are essential for long-lasting success.

  13. Improving venous leg ulcer management

    OpenAIRE

    Weller, Carolina Dragica

    2017-01-01

    This thesis reports several different methods to develop and evaluate complex interventions designed to improve venous leg ulcer management. Chronic venous leg ulcers (VLU) are the most common chronic wound problem in the community. Its health and economic burden is predicted to increase due to ageing of the community and increase in prevalence of diabetes and obesity. Although many patients seek health care for VLU, most do not receive the most effective management. Patients with this condi...

  14. Inter rater reliability of Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH in patients with chronic leg ulcers Confiabilidad inter-observadores del Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH en pacientes con úlceras crónicas en la pierna Confiabilidade interobservadores do Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH, em pacientes com úlceras crônicas de perna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia Conceição de Gouveia Santos

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the inter rater reliability of the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH, in its version adapted to the Portuguese language, in patients with chronic leg ulcers. Kappa index was used for the analysis. After accomplishing ethical issues, 41 patients with ulcers were examined. A total of 49% of the ulcers were located in the right leg and 36% of them were venous ulcers. The Kappa indices (0.97 to 1.00 obtained in the comparison between the observations of the clinical nurses and the stomal therapists for all sub-scales and for total score, confirmed the tool inter rater reliability, with statistical significance (pEl objetivo del estúdio fue probar la confiabilidad inter-observadores del Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH, en su versión adaptada al portugués, en pacientes con úlceras crónicas en la pierna. Para el análisis de concordancia se utilizó el Indice Kappa. Posterior a la aprobación del Comité de Ética, 41 pacientes con úlcera fueron examinados, siendo que 49% de las úlceras se localizaron a la derecha y 36% eran de etiología venosa. Los indices Kappa obtenidos (0,97 a 1,00, con un nivel significativo de pTestar a confiabilidade interobservadores do Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH, em sua versão adaptada para o português, em pacientes com úlceras crônicas de perna foi o objetivo deste estudo. Para a análise de concordância, utilizou-se o índice Kappa. Após aprovação pelo Comitê de Ética, pacientes com úlceras (41 úlceras foram examinados, sendo que 49% das úlceras localizavam-se à direita e 36% eram de etiologia venosa. Os índices Kappa obtidos (0,97 a 1,00, com significância estatística (p<0,001, ratificaram a confiabilidade interobservadores, ao ser obtida concordância de muito boa a total entre as observações de enfermeiros clínicos e especialistas em estomaterapia (padrão-ouro, para todas as subescalas do PUSH, como para o escore total. Esses resultados

  15. [Etiological diagnosis of leg ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debure, Clélia

    2010-09-20

    Etiological diagnosis of leg ulcers must be the first step of treatment, even if we know that veinous disease is often present. We can build a clinical decisional diagram, which helps us to understand and not forget the other causes of chronic wounds and choose some basic examination, like ultrasound and histological findings. This diagnosis helps to choose the right treatment in order to cure even the oldest venous ulcers. Educational programs should be improved to prevent recurrence.

  16. Diabetic foot disease: impact of ulcer location on ulcer healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickwell, KM; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Kars, M

    2013-01-01

    Healing of heel ulcers in patients with diabetes is considered to be poor, but there is relatively little information on the influence of ulcer location on ulcer healing.......Healing of heel ulcers in patients with diabetes is considered to be poor, but there is relatively little information on the influence of ulcer location on ulcer healing....

  17. Comparison Between a New, Two-component Compression System With Zinc Paste Bandages for Leg Ulcer Healing: A Prospective, Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled Trial Monitoring Sub-bandage Pressures.

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    Mosti, Giovanni; Crespi, Aldo; Mattaliano, Vincenzo

    2011-05-01

    Compression therapy is standard treatment for venous leg ulcers. The authors prefer multi-layer, multi-component, stiff, high-pressure bandages to treat venous leg ulcers. The Unna boot (UB) is an example of this type of bandage. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and tolerability of UB to a new, two-component bandage. One hundred (100) patients with venous ulcers were randomized into two groups: group A (n = 50) received UB and group B (n = 50) 3M™ Coban™ 2 Layer Compression System (C2L). All patients were followed weekly for 3 months and then monthly until complete healing was achieved. The primary outcomes were: ulcer healing or surface reduction; pain; and exudate control. The secondary outcomes were: ease of application and removal of the bandage, pressure exerted in the supine and standing position after application and before removal, and bandage comfort. C2L was associated with 100% ulcer healing; 47 out of 50 cases healed within the first 3 months after application of the bandage. Compared with the UB, there was no statistically significant difference. In both groups the effect of compression on pain and overall well being was excellent; pain decreased by 50% within 1-2 weeks and remained low throughout the duration of treatment and overall well being improved significantly. There was no significant difference between the two systems concerning level of comfort. C2L proved to be effective in treating venous ulcers due to its stiffness and pressure. Its effectiveness was similar to UB, which is often considered the gold-standard compression device for venous ulcers. This fact, in combination with high tolerability and ease of application and removal, make this new bandage particularly suitable for the treatment of venous leg ulcers. .

  18. Pinch grafting for chronic venous leg ulcers in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Steele, Keith

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with chronic venous leg ulcers were treated in general practice by pinch grafting. Fifteen of the ulcers (60%) were completely healed one year after grafting. Prior to grafting 19 patients (76%) complained of daily pain in the ulcer. These patients experienced complete relief from pain after grafting. Pinch grafting is a simple, safe and effective therapy when applied in a domiciliary environment.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of wound management in France: pressure ulcers and venous leg ulcers.

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    Meaume, S; Gemmen, E

    2002-06-01

    This study set out to define realistic protocols of care for the treatment of chronic venous leg ulcers and pressure ulcers in France and, by developing cost-effectiveness models, to compare the different protocols of care for the two ulcer groups, enabling a calculation of direct medical costs per ulcer healed in a typical French health insurance plan. Clinical outcomes and some treatment patterns were obtained from published literature. Validations of different treatment patterns were developed using an expert consensus panel similar to the Delphi approach. Costs were calculated based on national averages and estimates from the UK and Germany. The models were used to measure costs per healed ulcer over a 12-week period. For both the pressure ulcer and venous leg ulcer models, three protocols of care were identified. For pressure ulcers and venous leg ulcers, the hydrocolloid DuoDERM (ConvaTec, also known as Granuflex in the UK and Varihesive in Germany) was most cost-effective in France. The combination of published data and expert consensus opinion is a valid technique, and in this case suggests that treating pressure ulcers and venous leg ulcers with hydrocolloid dressings is more cost-effective than treating them with saline gauze, in spite of the lower unit cost of the latter.

  20. The bacteriology of chronic venous leg ulcer examined by culture-independent molecular methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Trine R; Aasholm, Martin S; Rudkjøbing, Vibeke B

    2010-01-01

    The bacterial microbiota plays an important role in the prolonged healing of chronic venous leg ulcers. The present study compared the bacterial diversity within ulcer material from 14 skin graft operations of chronic venous leg ulcers using culture-based methods and molecular biological methods...

  1. The silver-releasing foam dressing, Contreet Foam, promotes faster healing of critically colonised venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bo; Price, Patricia; Andersen, Klaus E

    2005-01-01

    in all respects. After 4 weeks, there was a significantly greater reduction in ulcer area in the Contreet Foam group (45%) than in the Allevyn Hydrocellular group (25%). After 1 and 4 weeks, odour was present in significantly less of the ulcers in the Contreet Foam group (17% and 19%, respectively...

  2. A Hydroxyurea-induced Leg Ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Seon-Wook; Hong, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Seo, Jong-Keun; Lee, Deborah; Sung, Ho-Suk

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is a cytostatic agent that has recently become the drug of choice in the treatment of various myeloproliferative diseases. The cutaneous side effects of hydroxyurea include xerosis, hyperpigmentation, nail discoloration, and scaling. Leg ulcers have only rarely been reported in association with hydroxyurea treatment. A 75-year-old woman presented with leg ulcers, nail discoloration, and xerosis. The leg ulcers were refractory to conventional treatment. She had been taking oral hyd...

  3. A Case of Nonhealing Leg Ulcer: Basal Cell Carcinoma

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    Didem Didar Balcı

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A 75-year-old woman was admitted to our outpatient clinic with a three-year history of a painless, nonhealing ulcer located on the left lower leg. She had no response to previous therapy with local wound care. Skin examination revealed an ulcer 2.7 x 3.7 cm in size, and the surrounding skin showed minimal erythema. The surface of the ulcer demonstrated shiny granulation tissue. Biopsy of the ulcer edge and base showed basal cell carcinoma. Venous Doppler ultrasonography and dermatological examination did not reveal chronic venous insufficiency. Basal cell carcinomas rarely arise from previous long-term ulcers or developing de novo. We suggest that patients who develop non-healing leg ulcers, should be examined for basal cell carcinoma.

  4. Adjuvant Biological Therapies in Chronic Leg Ulcers

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    Natalia Burgos-Alonso

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Current biological treatments for non-healing wounds aim to address the common deviations in healing mechanisms, mainly inflammation, inadequate angiogenesis and reduced synthesis of extracellular matrix. In this context, regenerative medicine strategies, i.e., platelet rich plasmas and mesenchymal stromal cell products, may form part of adjuvant interventions in an integral patient management. We synthesized the clinical experience on ulcer management using these two categories of biological adjuvants. The results of ten controlled trials that are included in this systematic review favor the use of mesenchymal stromal cell based-adjuvants for impaired wound healing, but the number and quality of studies is moderate-low and are complicated by the diversity of biological products. Regarding platelet-derived products, 18 controlled studies investigated their efficacy in chronic wounds in the lower limb, but the heterogeneity of products and protocols hinders clinically meaningful quantitative synthesis. Most patients were diabetic, emphasizing an unmet medical need in this condition. Overall, there is not sufficient evidence to inform routine care, and further clinical research is necessary to realize the full potential of adjuvant regenerative medicine strategies in the management of chronic leg ulcers.

  5. A single-arm trial indirect comparison investigation: a proof-of-concept method to predict venous leg ulcer healing time for a new acellular synthetic matrix matched to standard care control

    OpenAIRE

    Shannon, R; Nelson, A

    2017-01-01

    To compare data on time to healing from two separate cohorts: one treated with a new acellular synthetic matrix plus standard care (SC) and one matched from four large UK pragmatic, randomised controlled trials [venous leg ulcer (VLU) evidence network]. We introduce a new proof-of-concept strategy to a VLU clinical evidence network, propensity score matching and sensitivity analysis to predict the feasibility of the new acellular synthetic matrix plus SC for success in future randomised, cont...

  6. Extracorporal Shock Waves Activate Migration, Proliferation and Inflammatory Pathways in Fibroblasts and Keratinocytes, and Improve Wound Healing in an Open-Label, Single-Arm Study in Patients with Therapy-Refractory Chronic Leg Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschermann, Ilknur; Noor, Seema; Venturelli, Sascha; Sinnberg, Tobias; Mnich, Christian D; Busch, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Chronic leg ulcers (CLUs) are globally a major cause of morbidity and mortality with increasing prevalence. Their treatment is highly challenging, and many conservative, surgical or advanced therapies have been suggested, but with little overall efficacy. Since the 1980s extracorporal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has gained interest as treatment for specific indications. Here, we report that patients with CLU showed wound healing after ESWT and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. We performed cell proliferation and migration assays, FACS- and Western blot analyses, RT-PCR, and Affymetrix gene expression analyses on human keratinocytes and fibroblasts, and a tube formation assay on human microvascular endothelial cells to assess the impact of shock waves in vitro. In vivo, chronic therapy-refractory leg ulcers were treated with ESWT, and wound healing was assessed. Upon ESWT, we observed morphological changes and increased cell migration of keratinocytes. Cell-cycle regulatory genes were upregulated, and proliferation induced in fibroblasts. This was accompanied by secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines from keratinocytes, which are known to drive wound healing, and a pro-angiogenic activity of endothelial cells. These observations were transferred "from bench to bedside", and 60 consecutive patients with 75 CLUs with different pathophysiologies (e.g. venous, mixed arterial-venous, arterial) were treated with ESWT. In this setting, 41% of ESWT-treated CLUs showed complete healing, 16% significant improvement, 35% improvement, and 8% of the ulcers did not respond to ESWT. The induction of healing was independent of patient age, duration or size of the ulcer, and the underlying pathophysiology. The efficacy of ESWT needs to be confirmed in controlled trials to implement ESWT as an adjunct to standard therapy or as a stand-alone treatment. Our results suggest that EWST may advance the treatment of chronic, therapy-refractory ulcers. © 2017 The Author

  7. Extracorporal Shock Waves Activate Migration, Proliferation and Inflammatory Pathways in Fibroblasts and Keratinocytes, and Improve Wound Healing in an Open-Label, Single-Arm Study in Patients with Therapy-Refractory Chronic Leg Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilknur Aschermann

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Chronic leg ulcers (CLUs are globally a major cause of morbidity and mortality with increasing prevalence. Their treatment is highly challenging, and many conservative, surgical or advanced therapies have been suggested, but with little overall efficacy. Since the 1980s extracorporal shock wave therapy (ESWT has gained interest as treatment for specific indications. Here, we report that patients with CLU showed wound healing after ESWT and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. Methods: We performed cell proliferation and migration assays, FACS- and Western blot analyses, RT-PCR, and Affymetrix gene expression analyses on human keratinocytes and fibroblasts, and a tube formation assay on human microvascular endothelial cells to assess the impact of shock waves in vitro. In vivo, chronic therapy-refractory leg ulcers were treated with ESWT, and wound healing was assessed. Results: Upon ESWT, we observed morphological changes and increased cell migration of keratinocytes. Cell-cycle regulatory genes were upregulated, and proliferation induced in fibroblasts. This was accompanied by secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines from keratinocytes, which are known to drive wound healing, and a pro-angiogenic activity of endothelial cells. These observations were transferred “from bench to bedside”, and 60 consecutive patients with 75 CLUs with different pathophysiologies (e.g. venous, mixed arterial-venous, arterial were treated with ESWT. In this setting, 41% of ESWT-treated CLUs showed complete healing, 16% significant improvement, 35% improvement, and 8% of the ulcers did not respond to ESWT. The induction of healing was independent of patient age, duration or size of the ulcer, and the underlying pathophysiology. Conclusions: The efficacy of ESWT needs to be confirmed in controlled trials to implement ESWT as an adjunct to standard therapy or as a stand-alone treatment. Our results suggest that EWST may advance the

  8. Clinical quality indicators of venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Monica L; Mainz, Jan; Soernsen, Lars T

    2005-01-01

    In the clinical setting, diagnosis and treatment of venous leg ulcers can vary considerably from patient to patient. The first step to reducing this variation is to document venous leg ulcer care through use of quantitative scientific documentation principles. This requires the development of val...

  9. Sustained compression and healing of chronic venous ulcers.

    OpenAIRE

    Blair, S. D.; Wright, D. D.; Backhouse, C. M.; Riddle, E.; McCollum, C. N.

    1988-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--Comparison of four layer bandage system with traditional adhesive plaster bandaging in terms of (a) compression achieved and (b) healing of venous ulcers. DESIGN--Part of larger randomised trial of five different dressings. SETTING--Outpatient venous ulcer clinic in university hospital. PATIENTS--(a) Pressure exerted by both bandage systems was measured in the same 20 patients. (b) Healing with the four layer bandage was assessed in 148 legs in 126 consecutive patients (mean ...

  10. [Innovative therapy for leg ulcers: Electrostimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, H

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wounds can take a long time to heal despite appropriate therapy based upon aetiology and use of suitable dressings. The success of electrostimulation is based upon the existence within the skin of the endogenous currents involved in the wound healing process. Where skin continuity is broken by a wound, these electrical potentials are short-circuited, resulting in leakage of electrical current. Woundel(®) therapy is the only such treatment currently available in France and is based on the use of continuous pulsed current that generates an electrical field near the endogenous electrical fields. It utilises a console to deliver the electrical impulses, a dressing electrode and a dispersion electrode. The electrode dressing is left on the wound for 3 days, and venous compression bandaging may be applied to the leg, taking care to leave the connector free. Negative polarity stimulates migration of fibroblasts, resulting in elimination of fibrin. Positive polarity causes keratinocyte migration, which in turn leads to epidermisation. Electrostimulation is of recognised utility in the healing of chronic wounds: it has been assigned a high-level recommendation in the European and American guidelines for the treatment of venous ulcers and bedsores with proof level of A. Further, the analgesic effect of electrostimulation has been demonstrated in several studies. Electrostimulation is already well developed in France among wound specialists, but prospective studies are planned so that it may be used at patients' homes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cell in venous leg ulcer: An intoxicating therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanerey, Anjali; Patra, Pradeep Kumar; Kumar, Awanish

    2017-08-01

    Venous leg ulcers (VLU) are a prevalent and reoccurring type of complicated wound, turning as a considerable public healthcare issue, with critical social and economic concern. There are both medical and surgical therapies to treat venous leg ulcers; however, a cure does not yet exist. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are capable and proved of accelerating wound healing in vivo and their study with human chronic wounds is currently awaited. MSCs are a promising source of adult progenitor cells for cellular therapy and have been demonstrated to differentiate into various mesenchymal cell lineages. They have a crucial and integral role in native wound healing by regulating immune response and inflammation. Improved understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms at work in delayed wound healing compels to the development of cellular therapy in VLU. This review focuses on the current treatment option of VLU and further emphasizing the role of MSCs in accelerating the healing process. With further understanding of the mechanism of action of these cells in wound improvement and, the involvement of cytokines can also be revealed that could be used for the therapeutic purpose for VLU healing. Clinical uses of MSCs have been started already, and induced MSCs are surely a promising tool or compelling therapy for VLU. Copyright © 2017 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chronic leg ulcer caused by Mycobacterium immunogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loots, Miriam A. M.; de Jong, Menno D.; van Soolingen, Dick; Wetsteyn, José C. F. M.; Faber, William R.

    2005-01-01

    Rare tropical skin diseases are seen more frequently in Western countries because of the increased popularity of visiting tropical regions. A 55-year-old white man developed a painless leg ulcer after traveling in Guatemala and Belize. A mycobacterium was cultured from a biopsy specimen and was

  13. History of venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfaldoni, S; Wollina, U; Lotti, J; Gianfaldoni, R; Lotti, T; Fioranelli, M; Roccia, M G

    To retrieve the history of venous ulcers and of skin lesions in general, we must go back to the appearance of human beings on earth. It is interesting to note that cutaneous injuries evolved parallel to human society. An essential first step in the pathogenesis of ulcers was represented by the transition of the quadruped man to Homo Erectus. This condition was characterized by a greater gravitational pressure on the lower limbs, with consequences on the peripheral venous system. Furthermore, human evolution was characterized by an increased risk of traumatic injuries, secondary to his natural need to create fire and hunt (e.g. stones, iron, fire, animal fighting). Humans then began to fight one another until they came to real wars, with increased frequency of wounds and infectious complications. The situation degraded with the introduction of horse riding, introduced by the Scites, who first tamed animals in the 7th century BC. This condition exhibited iliac veins at compression phenomena, favouring the venous stasis. With time, man continued to evolve until the modern age, which is characterized by increased risk factors for venous wounds such as poor physical activity and dietary errors (1, 2).

  14. Evaluating the effectiveness of a self-management exercise intervention on wound healing, functional ability and health-related quality of life outcomes in adults with venous leg ulcers: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jane; Finlayson, Kathleen; Kerr, Graham; Edwards, Helen

    2017-02-01

    Exercise that targets ankle joint mobility may lead to improvement in calf muscle pump function and subsequent healing. The objectives of this research were to assess the impact of an exercise intervention in addition to routine evidence-based care on the healing rates, functional ability and health-related quality of life for adults with venous leg ulcers (VLUs). This study included 63 patients with VLUs. Patients were randomised to receive either a 12-week exercise intervention with a telephone coaching component or usual care plus telephone calls at the same timepoints. The primary outcome evaluated the effectiveness of the intervention in relation to wound healing. The secondary outcomes evaluated physical activity, functional ability and health-related quality of life measures between groups at the end of the 12 weeks. A per protocol analysis complemented the effectiveness (intention-to-treat) analysis to highlight the importance of adherence to an exercise intervention. Intention-to-treat analyses for the primary outcome showed 77% of those in the intervention group healed by 12 weeks compared to 53% of those in the usual care group. Although this difference was not statistically significant due to a smaller than expected sample size, a 24% difference in healing rates could be considered clinically significant. The per protocol analysis for wound healing, however, showed that those in the intervention group who adhered to the exercise protocol 75% or more of the time were significantly more likely to heal and showed higher rates for wound healing than the control group (P = 0·01), that is, 95% of those who adhered in the intervention group healed in 12 weeks. The secondary outcomes of physical activity, functional ability and health-related quality of life were not significantly altered by the intervention. Among the secondary outcomes (physical activity, functional ability and health-related quality of life), intention-to-treat analyses did not support the

  15. [Nocardia brasiliensis leg ulcer and nodular lymphangitis in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, M; Friedel, J; Siré, C; Semon, J

    2005-01-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is a very rarely reported cause of chronic phagedenic ulcerations. We report the case of an elderly woman who developed such an infection after falling on her right leg on the road in the Bresse country (an essentially agricultural and bovine-cattle breading region) and developed a chronic phagedenic ulcer secondarily complicated by nodular lymphangitis of the thigh. A 75 year-old woman fell on her right leg on the side of the main road outside her hamlet in the Bresse country and secondarily developed a chronique phagedenic ulceration. We first considered her as suffering from pyoderma gangrenosum. A complete scanning only revealed an autoimmune thyroiditis and a rapidly healing gastric ulceration, and none of the treatments, either local or systemic, helped the skin condition to heal. After 3 weeks of application of a local corticoid ointment, the patient developed fever, general malaise, an exacerbation of her wound and an infiltration of the skin round her knee, together with nodular lymphangitic dissemination. A supplementary bacterial swab disclosed massive proliferation of a slow-growing Gram-positive bacillus, which proved to be Nocardia brasiliensis, together with a methicillino-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. The treatment with sulfamethoxazole-trimetoprim gave a rash after 12 hours and was changed to amoxicillin and clavulanic acid, which rapidly proved to be permanently effective. The revelation of this particular slow-growing bacteria is difficult and requires bacterial swabs. Nocardia brasiliensis is relatively rare in primary skin ulcerations and we discuss the reasons why an elderly women should find this bacteria on the road outside her hamlet in the French countryside. This particular infectious condition requires general scanning, to make sure that the primary skin condition does not extend to other organs. We review the therapeutical options for patients who exhibit allergic reactions to the classically effective

  16. Allogeneic epidermal substitutes in the treatment of chronic diabetic leg and foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Marchesi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Diabetic foot ulcers are the most common cause of nontraumatic lower extremity amputations in the industrialized world. Tissue-engineering products offer a lower extremity salvage strategy when healing does not proceed according to the standard of care. New allogeneic sheets are available for the management of diabetic leg and foot ulcers. Methods: The endpoints of this case series study regard preliminary outcomes of the application of allogeneic keratinocytes composed of benzyl ester of hyaluronic acid to 16 diabetic foot and leg ulcers in 11 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results: Between 21 and 70 days after cellular therapy, 6 out of 16 lesions were completely healed, reducing the wound dimension by 70% and improving the wound bed score by 52%. Conclusion: The clinical results of the new allogeneic sheets indicate that allogeneic keratinocytes may represent an effective and safe therapy for diabetic foot and leg ulcers in the multidisciplinary approach to this diabetes-related complication.

  17. Cost consequences due to reduced ulcer healing times - analyses based on the Swedish Registry of Ulcer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öien, Rut F; Forssell, Henrik; Ragnarson Tennvall, Gunnel

    2016-10-01

    Resource use and costs for topical treatment of hard-to-heal ulcers based on data from the Swedish Registry of Ulcer Treatment (RUT) were analysed in patients recorded in RUT as having healed between 2009 and 2012, in order to estimate potential cost savings from reductions in frequency of dressing changes and healing times. RUT is used to capture areas of improvement in ulcer care and to enable structured wound management by registering patients with hard-to-heal leg, foot and pressure ulcers. Patients included in the registry are treated in primary care, community care, private care, and inpatient hospital care. Cost calculations were based on resource use data on healing time and frequency of dressing changes in Swedish patients with hard-to-heal ulcers who healed between 2009 and 2012. Per-patient treatment costs decreased from SEK38 223 in 2009 to SEK20 496 in 2012, mainly because of shorter healing times. Frequency of dressing changes was essentially the same during these years, varying from 1·4 to 1·6 per week. The total healing time was reduced by 38%. Treatment costs for the management of hard-to-heal ulcers can be reduced with well-developed treatment strategies resulting in shortened healing times as shown in RUT. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Sustained compression and healing of chronic venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, S. D.; Wright, D. D.; Backhouse, C. M.; Riddle, E.; McCollum, C. N.

    1988-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--Comparison of four layer bandage system with traditional adhesive plaster bandaging in terms of (a) compression achieved and (b) healing of venous ulcers. DESIGN--Part of larger randomised trial of five different dressings. SETTING--Outpatient venous ulcer clinic in university hospital. PATIENTS--(a) Pressure exerted by both bandage systems was measured in the same 20 patients. (b) Healing with the four layer bandage was assessed in 148 legs in 126 consecutive patients (mean age 71 (SE 2); range 30-96) with chronic venous ulcers that had resisted treatment with traditional bandaging for a mean of 27.2 (SE 8) months. INTERVENTIONS--(a) Four layer bandage system or traditional adhesive plaster bandaging for pressure studies; (b) four layer bandaging applied weekly for studies of healing. END POINTS--(a) Comparison of pressures achieved at the ankle for up to one week; (b) complete healing within 12 weeks. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--(a) Four layer bandage produced higher initial pressures at the ankle of 42.5 (SE 1) mm Hg compared with 29.8 (1.8) for the adhesive plaster (p less than 0.001; 95% confidence interval 18.5 to 6.9). Pressure was maintained for one week with the four layer bandage but fell to 10.4 (3.5) mm Hg at 24 hours with adhesive plaster bandaging. (b) After weekly bandaging with the four layer bandage 110 of 48 venous ulcers had healed completely within 12 (mean 6.3 (0.4)) weeks. CONCLUSION--Sustained compression of over 40 mm Hg achieved with a multilayer bandage results in rapid healing of chronic venous ulcers that have failed to heal in many months of compression at lower pressures with more conventional bandages. PMID:3144330

  19. Wound care matrices for chronic leg ulcers: role in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sano H

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hitomi Sano,1 Sachio Kouraba,2 Rei Ogawa11Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan; 2Sapporo Wound Care and Anti-Aging Laboratory, Sapporo, JapanAbstract: Chronic leg ulcers are a significant health care concern. Although deep wounds are usually treated by flap transfers, the operation is invasive and associates with serious complications. Skin grafts may be a less invasive means of covering wounds. However, skin grafts cannot survive on deep defects unless high-quality granulation tissue can first be generated in the defects. Technologies that generate high-quality granulation tissue are needed. One possibility is to use wound care matrices, which are bioengineered skin and soft tissue substitutes. Because they all support the healing process by providing a premade extracellular matrix material, these matrices can be termed “extracellular matrix replacement therapies”. The matrix promotes wound healing by acting as a scaffold for regeneration, attracting host cytokines to the wound, stimulating wound epithelialization and angiogenesis, and providing the wound bed with bioactive components. This therapy has lasting benefits as it not only helps large skin defects to be closed with thin skin grafts or patch grafts but also restores cosmetic appearance and proper function. In particular, since it acts as a layer that slides over the subcutaneous fascia, it provides skin elasticity, tear resistance, and texture. Several therapies and products employing wound care matrices for wound management have been developed recently. Some of these can be applied in combination with negative pressure wound therapy or beneficial materials that promote wound healing and can be incorporated into the matrix. To date, the clinical studies on these approaches suggest that wound care matrices promote spontaneous wound healing or can be used to facilitate skin grafting, thereby avoiding the need to use

  20. Expression of natural antimicrobial peptide β-defensin-2 and Langerhans cell accumulation in epidermis from human non-healing leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Wojewodzka

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds like venous calf and diabetic foot ulcers are frequently contaminated and colonized by bacteria and it remains unclear whether there is sufficient expression of defensins and recruitment of epidermal Langerhans cells in the margin of ulcer compared to normal skin. The aim of this study was to examine immunohistochemically the expression of β-defensin-2 (hBD2, GM-CSF, VEGF growth factors and accumulation of CD1a+ Langerhans cells (LC in epidermis from chronic skin ulcers and to compare it to normal skin from the corresponding areas. Studies were carried out in 10 patients with diabetic foot, 10 patients with varicous ulcers of the calf and 10 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery (normal skin for control. Biopsy specimens were immunostained using specific primary antibodies, LSAB+ kit based on biotin-avidinperoxidase complex technique and DAB chromogen. Results were expressed as a mean staining intensity. Statistical analysis of staining showed significantly higher staining of hBD2 in both normal and ulcerated epidermis from foot sole skin compared to calf skin (normal and ulcerated, p<0.05. Chronic ulcers showed the same expression of hBD2 as normal skin. There was significantly lower accumulation of CD1a+ LC in normal epidermis from foot sole skin compared to normal calf skin (p<0.05. Accumulation of CD1a+ LC and GM-CSF upregulation at the border area of diabetic foot ulcer and reduction of LC concentration at the margin of venous calf ulcer compared to normal skin were observed. It seems that normal calf and sole epidermis is, unlike in the mechanisms of innate immunity, influenced by the different keratinocyte turnover and bacterial flora colonizing these regions. Insufficient upregulation of hBD2 in both diabetic foot and venous calf ulcers may suggest the pathological role of this protein in the chronicity of ulcers.

  1. Compression stockings for treating venous leg ulcers: measurement of interface pressure under a new ulcer kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partsch, B; Partsch, H

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the interface pressure of a newly designed two-layer compression stocking (Mediven ulcer kit Medi QMBH, Bayreuth, Germany) in different body positions and to compare the values with those obtained with another two-layer product. Interface pressure was measured on the distal medial leg in 16 legs of volunteers, with the basic layer alone and with the whole stocking kit in the supine, sitting and standing position for both stocking systems. The literature concerning ulcer-healing rates is reviewed. Mediven ulcerkit produced statistically significant higher pressure values than the ulcer stocking with a median resting value of 35.5 mmHg in the supine and 42.5 mmHg in the standing position. The pressure while standing comes close to values exerted by bandages. The basic layer alone applies a pressure of 20.5 mmHg. Especially designed compression stockings exerting sufficient interface pressure may be indicated in patients with small ulcers of short duration.

  2. Frozen allogeneic human epidermal cultured sheets for the cure of complicated leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolívar-Flores, Y J; Kuri-Harcuch, W

    1999-08-01

    Skin ulcers due to venous stasis or diabetes are common among the elderly and are difficult to treat. Repeated applications of cell-based products have been reported to result in cure or improvement of leg ulcers of small size in a fraction of patients. To examine the effects of frozen human allogeneic epidermal cultures for the treatment of acute and chronic ulcers. We treated a series of 10 consecutive patients with leg ulcers of different etiology and duration with frozen human allogeneic epidermal cultures stored frozen and thawed for 5-10 minutes at room temperature before application. Three patients had ulcers with exposed Achilles or extensor tendon. The ulcers treated were as large as 160 cm2 in area and of up to 20-years' duration. After preliminary preparation of the wounds by debridement to remove necrotic tissue and application of silver sulfadiazine to control infection, thawed cultures were applied biweekly from 2 to 15 times depending on the size and complexity of the ulcer. All ulcers healed, including those with tendon exposure. After the first few applications, granulation tissue formed in the ulcer bed and on exposed tendons, and epidermal healing took place through proliferation and migration of cells from the margins of the wound. The time required for complete healing ranged from 1 to 31 weeks after the first application. The use of frozen human allogeneic epidermal cultures is a safe and effective treatment for venous or diabetic ulcers, even those with tendon exposure. It seems possible that any leg ulcer will be amenable to successful treatment by this method.

  3. Amelogenin, an extracellular matrix protein, in the treatment of venous leg ulcers and other hard-to-heal wounds: experimental and clinical evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanelli, M.; Dini, V.; Vowden, P.

    2008-01-01

    Amelogenins are extracellular matrix proteins that, under physiological conditions, self-assemble into globular aggregates up to micron-sizes. Studies with periodontal fibroblasts indicate that attachment to these structures increases the endogenous secretion of multiple growth factors and cell...... that the application of amelogenin (Xelma, Molnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden) as an adjunct treatment to compression results in significant reduction in ulcer size, improvement in the state of ulcers, reduced pain, and a larger proportion of ulcers with low levels of exudate, compared with treatment...... therapy demonstrated in the RCT are being repeated in "real life" situations and that amelogenin therapy may also have a role to play in the treatment of other wound types such as diabetic foot ulcers Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  4. Leg ulcer treatment outcomes with new ovine collagen extracellular matrix dressing: a retrospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Gregory A; Gass, Kimberly

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the rate of closure observed in venous leg ulcers during treatment with ovine collagen extracellular matrix dressings and compression. Fourteen patients with 23 wounds were retrospectively evaluated with respect to healing rates, time to closure, and weekly facility charge fees.

  5. Venous leg ulcer patient priorities and quality of care: results of a survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Monica Linda; Mainz, Jan; Sorensen, Lars Tue

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive patient evaluation of quality of care encompasses assessment and patient-rated prioritization of the various provisions of care. One hundred consecutive venous leg ulcer patients treated in a multidisciplinary wound healing center were invited to participate in a cross-sectional s...

  6. Secondary hyperparathyroidism: Uncommon cause of a leg ulcer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijssen, L. B.; Brenninkmeijer, E. E. A.; Nieveen van Dijkum, E. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Most leg ulcers are vascular based. Only if vascular therapy fails other causes are considered. We report the case of a female with incapacitating leg ulcers caused by a rare condition which was only diagnosed after failing treatment. PRESENTATION OF CASE: The female had an extensive previous

  7. Value of combined exercise and ultrasound as an adjunct to compression therapy in chronic venous leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehab A.E Sallam

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion Combined prescription of exercises and ultrasound as an adjunct to compression therapy would be a more effective means of promoting chronic venous ulcer healing, when standard compression therapy have failed. It is safe, easy and well tolerated and should be considered as adjunctive therapy in patients with venous leg ulcers.

  8. Impact of UK NICE clinical guidelines 168 on referrals to a specialist academic leg ulcer service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Huw Ob; Popplewell, Matthew; Bate, Gareth; Kelly, Lisa; Darvall, Katy; Bradbury, Andrew W

    2018-03-01

    Background Leg ulcers are a common cause of morbidity and disability and result in significant health and social care expenditure. The UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Clinical Guideline (CG)168, published in July 2013, sought to improve care of patients with leg ulcers, recommending that patients with a break in the skin below the knee that had not healed within two weeks be referred to a specialist vascular service for diagnosis and management. Aim Determine the impact of CG168 on referrals to a leg ulcer service. Methods Patients referred with leg ulceration during an 18-month period prior to CG168 (January 2012-June 2013) and an 18-month period commencing six months after (January 2014-June 2015) publication of CG168 were compared. Results There was a two-fold increase in referrals (181 patients, 220 legs vs. 385 patients, 453 legs) but no change in mean age, gender or median-duration of ulcer at referral (16.6 vs. 16.2 weeks). Mean-time from referral to specialist appointment increased (4.8 vs. 6 weeks, p = 0.0001), as did legs with superficial venous insufficiency (SVI) (36% vs. 44%, p = 0.05). There was a trend towards more SVI endovenous interventions (32% vs. 39%, p = 0.271) with an increase in endothermal (2 vs. 32 legs, p = 0.001) but no change in sclerotherapy (24 vs. 51 legs) treatments. In both groups, 62% legs had compression. There was a reduction in legs treated conservatively with simple dressings (26% vs. 15%, p = 0.0006). Conclusions Since CG168, there has been a considerable increase in leg ulcer referrals. However, patients are still not referred until ulceration has been present for many months. Although many ulcers are multi-factorial and the mainstay of treatment remains compression, there has been an increase in SVI endovenous intervention. Further efforts are required to persuade community practitioners to refer patients earlier, to educate patients and encourage further investment in

  9. Mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Coskun, Mehmet; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2013-01-01

    . With the introduction of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors for the treatment of UC, it has become increasingly evident that the disease course is influenced by whether or not the patient achieves mucosal healing. Thus, patients with mucosal healing have fewer flare-ups, a decreased risk of colectomy......, and a lower probability of developing colorectal cancer. Understanding the mechanisms of mucosal wound formation and wound healing in UC, and how they are affected therapeutically is therefore of importance for obtaining efficient treatment strategies holding the potential of changing the disease course of UC....... This review is focused on the pathophysiological mechanism of mucosal wound formation in UC as well as the known mechanisms of intestinal wound healing. Regarding the latter topic, pathways of both wound healing intrinsic to epithelial cells and the wound-healing mechanisms involving interaction between...

  10. Does cryotherapy improve skin circulation compared with compression and elevation in preventing venous leg ulcers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelechi, Teresa J; Mueller, Martina; Madisetti, Mohan; Prentice, Margie A; Dooley, Mary J

    2017-08-01

    This trial compared skin blood flow, temperature and incidence of venous leg ulcers in patients with chronic venous disease using compression wraps and elevation pillows. Patients with CEAP C4 skin damage and C5 history of ulcers were randomly assigned to a cryotherapy intervention (n = 138) or placebo cuff control (n = 138) applied to the lower legs over 9 months. The time the ulcers healed prior to enrollment in the study for the cryotherapy group ranged from 1 to 2218 days (n = 8, median = 32 days); for the control group, the range was 24 to 489 days (n = 6, median = 390 days). There were no statistically significant blood flow changes measured in perfusion units with a laser Doppler flowmetre within or between the groups; mean difference between the groups was 0·62, P = 0·619. No differences were noted in skin temperature measured with an infrared thermometer within and between the groups; mean difference between the groups was -0·17°C, P = 0·540. Cryotherapy did not improve skin blood flow or temperature and did not show efficacy in preventing ulcers. However, at least 30% of intervention and 50% of control participants were anticipated to develop an ulcer during the study; only ∼7% occurred. These findings suggest that strict adherence to standard of care decreases the incidence of leg ulcers and remains a best practice for leg ulcer prevention. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Use of ultraportable vacuum therapy systems in the treatment of venous leg ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, Roberto; Nisi, Giuseppe; Grimaldi, Luca; Brandi, Cesare; D'Aniello, Carlo

    2017-10-23

    The high incidence of venous leg ulcers and the difficult to give a complete healing involves in an increase of costs for National Health System. Main therapies to obtain a fast healing are compressive bandages, treatment of abnormal venous flow and in-situ-strategies of wound care. Negative pressure therapy does not conventionally used, because these systems not allow the use of compression bandages. Recently the development of ultraportable devices has improved the compliance and the results. Ten patients with venous chronic ulcer on the lower extremities were recruited for this study: all patients had venous leg ulcers from at least one year. We treated the patients with autologous partial thickness skin graft and subsequently we applied NANOVA device included in compressive bandage. We used NANOVA for fourteen days and after we made traditional medications. We submitted a questionnaire to evaluate the impact of dressing and NANOVA device in the quality of life of patients. The device contributed to the formation of granulation tissue and increased the success rate of autologous skin graft without limiting mobility of patient. In addition to this, we have been able to perform compression bandages thanks to small size of this device. Eight ulcers healed within 90 days of medication. We believe that ultraportable negative pressure systems are useful devices for treatment of venous leg ulcers because them allows to realize a compressive bandage without mobility limitations.

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Rituximab in the Treatment of Vasculitic Leg Ulcers Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Bonilla-Abadía

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasculitic leg ulcers are a cutaneous manifestation of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection often associated with cryoglobulinemia. Their treatment is difficult and is based on steroids and immunosuppressive drugs with an erratic response and a high probability of adverse reaction. We report three patients with vasculitic leg ulcers associated with hepatitis C virus infection who were treated successfully with rituximab. The pain control and healing were achieved quickly. No adverse effects with rituximab in these patients were presented.

  13. Chronic venous leg ulcers – role of topical zinc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher SF

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sara F Maher Physical Therapy Program, Department of Healthcare Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: Topical zinc has been used in the treatment of wounds for over 3,000 years, and is reported to have antiseptic, astringent, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and wound healing properties. Fourteen studies were identified and reviewed, to assess the efficacy of this treatment modality as either a bandage or skin protectant in the treatment of venous ulcers. The authors of three studies reported improved healing time or success rate in wounds treated with zinc-based products. However, the authors of one study attributed the faster healing rate mainly to the extra compression (that improved venous blood return, delivered by the non-elastic paste bandage, and not by the zinc oxide alone. The quality of evidence is fair, as 50% of the studies were conducted prior to 2000 and 50% of the studies utilized fewer than 45 patients randomized to two or more groups. Other treatments have been reported to be more cost-effective than zinc, including hydrocolloids, four-layer compression systems, and CircAid Thera-boots. Finally, zinc was reported to be less comfortable, less easy to use, and caused increased pain, in comparison to other products on the market. This literature review, therefore, demonstrated that current evidence is insufficient to determine the effectiveness of zinc-based products in the treatment of venous wounds. Future research is needed focusing on larger, high-quality trials with an emphasis on quality of life issues and cost-effectiveness of treatment. Keywords: chronic wounds, leg ulcers, venous insufficiency, topical zinc

  14. Maggots as a wound debridement agent for chronic venous leg ulcers under graduated compression bandages: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, C E; Woolfrey, G; Hogg, N; Dyer, J; Cooper, A; Waldron, J; Bulbulia, R; Whyman, M R; Poskitt, K R

    2015-12-01

    Slough in chronic venous leg ulcers may be associated with delayed healing. The purpose of this study was to assess larval debridement in chronic venous leg ulcers and to assess subsequent effect on healing. All patients with chronic leg ulcers presenting to the leg ulcer service were evaluated for the study. Exclusion criteria were: ankle brachial pressure indices 1.25, no venous reflux on duplex and ulcer surface covered with slough. Participants were randomly allocated to either 4-layer compression bandaging alone or 4-layer compression bandaging + larvae. Surface areas of ulcer and slough were assessed on day 4; 4-layer compression bandaging was then continued and ulcer size was measured every 2 weeks for up to 12 weeks. A total of 601 patients with chronic leg ulcers were screened between November 2008 and July 2012. Of these, 20 were randomised to 4-layer compression bandaging and 20 to 4-layer compression bandaging + larvae. Median (range) ulcer size was 10.8 (3-21.3) cm(2) and 8.1 (4.3-13.5) cm(2) in the 4-layer compression bandaging and 4-layer compression bandaging + larvae groups, respectively (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.184). On day 4, median reduction in slough area was 3.7 cm(2) in the 4-layer compression bandaging group (P bandaging + larvae group. Median percentage area reduction of slough was 50% in the 4-layer compression bandaging group and 84% in the 4-layer compression bandaging + larvae group (Mann-Whitney U test, P bandaging and 4-layer compression bandaging + larvae groups, respectively (Kaplan-Meier analysis, P = 0.664). Larval debridement therapy improves wound debridement in chronic venous leg ulcers treated with multilayer compression bandages. However, no subsequent improvement in ulcer healing was demonstrated. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Proliferation and mitogenic response to PDGF-BB of fibroblasts isolated from chronic venous leg ulcers is ulcer-age dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agren, M S; Steenfos, H H; Dabelsteen, S

    1999-01-01

    Several pathophysiologic mechanisms have been proposed to explain slow-healing leg ulcers, but little is known about the growth behavior of cells in these wounds. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB applied topically to chronic wounds has shown beneficial effects, although the effects have been less...... pronounced than would have been expected based on studies on acute wounds. The objective of this study was to compare fibroblasts in culture obtained from chronic wounds (non-healing chronic venous leg ulcers), acute wounds and normal dermis regarding growth, mitogenic response to platelet-derived growth...... chronic wounds have approached or even reached the end of their lifespan (phase III). This might provide one explanation for the non-healing state and therapy resistance to topical platelet-derived growth factor-BB of some venous leg ulcers....

  16. Mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Coskun, Mehmet; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2013-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a colonic inflammatory condition with a substantial impact on the quality of life of affected persons. The disease carries a cumulative risk of need of colectomy of 20-30% and an estimated cumulative risk of colorectal cancer of 18% after 30 years of disease duration. W...

  17. Collagen types I and III propeptides as markers of healing in chronic leg ulcers. A noninvasive method for the determination of procollagen propeptides in wound fluid--influence of growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, L H; Jensen, L T; Avnstorp, C

    1992-01-01

    .25, and 1 IU/cm2/day), each dose for 1 week, followed by 1 week washout. On alternate days, three and two times during treatment and washout periods, respectively, the ulcers were washed and incubated for 30 minutes with sterile water. No changes in healing rates in relation to growth hormone application......%), in the fourth week, (p healing rates (r = 0.57, p = 0.04; and r = 0.64, p = 0.01, respectively). The authors conclude that propeptide measurements may be useful markers of healing in clinical studies....

  18. Saphenofemoral ligation as a safe and effective alternative for the treatment of chronic venous leg ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hafez, Emad A.; Seleem, Mohamed I.

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of isolated saphenofemoral junction ligation for the treatment of chronic venous leg ulcer in comparison to traditional stripping procedure. 36 patients (28 men and 8 women) with mean age of 42.3+-8.7, presented with a venous leg ulcer. After taking the full history, they underwent examination for presence of edema, cellulitis or local ulcer infection. The site and size of ulceration were recorded and ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) was measured, Venous valvular incompetence was assessed using Valsalva testand calf compression. Patients were divided into 2 groups. Group I, (n=10) assigned for long saphenous stripping, while group II (n=26) assigned for saphenofemoral ligationan and divided combined with ligation of major tributaries under local infiltration anesthesia. Mean operative time, postoperative complications and hospital stay were recorded. The study was carried out in Benha University Hospital, Egypt and Armed Forces Hospital, Southern Region, Khamis Mushayt, Sadi Arabia between January 2000 and December 2001. The mean operative time and the hospital stay were significantly (p<0.05) reduced in group II compared to group I. The postoperative complications were signficantly (x=7.5, p<0.05) reduced in group II. Ulcer healing started after 3 months in group II and six months in group I, but by 12 month, group II had significant (x=6.7, p<0.05) number of healed ulcers (n=22, 84.6%), compared to group I (n=7, 70%). The isolated ligation of of saphenofemoral junction is a minimally invasive, safe and effective modality for treatment of chronic leg ulcer, and being easily performed under local anesthesia and considerd to be a satisfactory procedure for treatment of leg ulcer in patients who are unfit for general anesthesia. (author)

  19. Effect of Multi-layer Compression Bandage Systems on Leg Ulcers Associated with Chronic Venous Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Kuplay

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Venous leg ulcer is a major health problem in terms of high prevalence and high cost for treatment. Multi-layer compression bandage systems for venous leg ulcers are supposed to be the gold standard for the treatment of venous ulcers. The aim of the current study is to investigate the effectiveness of multi-layer compression bandage systems for the treatment of venous leg ulcers.Patients and Methods: Nineteen consecutive patients diagnosed to have leg ulcers were evaluated and four patients were excluded from the study due to the peripheral arterial disease. Fifteen patients, enrolled in the study, were classified according to CEAP classification and belonged to the same class. Betaven® multi-layer compression bandage was applied to patients. Patients were followed-up in terms of wound healing and reduction in wound diameter.Results: Twelve male and three female patients underwent multi-layer bandage system. Mean age of patients was 38.2 ± 4.2 years. Ulcer size was measured planimetrically and baseline ulcer size was 4-10 cm². The location of ulcer was on medial malloelus in seven patients, lateral malleolus in three patients, anterior surface of the leg in four patients and lateral side of the leg in one patient. Patients had chronic venous insuuficiency for a mean of 5.1 ± 2.1 years. CEAP classifications were C6, Ep, As2,3-p18, Pr2,3, 18. Each bandage was changed five days after application along with wound care. Mean duration of treatment was 6 ± 2 weeks. Complete healing of the venous ulcers occurred in all patients except for one. This patient was referred to plastic surgery clinic for reconstruction.Conclusion: Multi-layer compression bandage system is an effective method of treatment for venous leg ulcers associated with chronic venous insufficiency by reducing venous return and increasing intertitial tissue pressure. This effect occurred in the shortrun as well as with a low cost and prevented loss of labor.

  20. Epidemiology, etiology, and treatment of chronic leg ulcer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic leg ulcer (CLU) is reported to have an impact on virtually all ... Conclusion: Most patients benefited from debridement with or without split thickness skin graft or flap. .... low incidence of arterial and venous diseases in.

  1. Quality of Life in People with Leg Ulcer, Integrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Alves

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the main changes in the daily life of people with leg ulcer and how that affects the person’s quality of life. Methodology: We used the methodology PI [C] OD and selected four research articles, taken from EBSCO, PubMed, and EWMA. Results: The main changes identified in the people’s daily live with leg ulcers are physical (pain, decreased mobility, presence of exudate, bad smell from the wound and change in the style of clothing, psychological (sleep disorders, depression, anxiety, feelings of rejection and low self-steem, social (isolation, restriction in leisure activities, inability to perform household chores. Conclusions: The literature about the person’s quality of life with leg ulcer reported a significant impact in the daily life. The care provided by nurses should be centered on the person, integrating all the kind of needs and the leg ulcer must not be the sole focus of care

  2. Leg ulcer assessment techniques in a remote rural area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Julia

    Community-based leg ulcer clinics are a cost-effective and efficient way of managing patients with leg ulcers in the community (Blair et al, 1988; Moffatt and Oldroyd, 1994). According to the Scottish Clinical Standards for Vascular Services (NHS Quality Improvement Scotland, 2003): 'It is essential that all vascular patients are seen by a nurse with vascular expertise, who is able to provide information, support and health promotion advice'.

  3. Clinical performance of a new silver dressing, Contreet Foam, for chronic exuding venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsmark, T; Agerslev, R H; Bendz, S H

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the safety and performance of a new sustained silver-releasing dressing, Contreet Foam (Coloplast A/S), in the treatment of moderately to highly exuding chronic venous leg ulcers in which healing is delayed due to the presence of bacteria. METHOD: The clini......OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the safety and performance of a new sustained silver-releasing dressing, Contreet Foam (Coloplast A/S), in the treatment of moderately to highly exuding chronic venous leg ulcers in which healing is delayed due to the presence of bacteria. METHOD......'s effect on the peri-ulcer area. Blood samples were analysed for silver content. RESULTS: Twenty-three out of 25 patients completed the study. One ulcer healed and no wound infections occurred during the study period. A mean 56% reduction in ulcer area (from 15.6 to 6.9 cm2) was recorded during the four...... weeks, and there was a mean 25% reduction in granulation tissue from dull to healthy after one week. Wound odour reduced significantly after one week. Mean dressing wear time was 3.1 days, and there were only minimal incidences of leakage. Serum silver levels did not exceed reference values. CONCLUSION...

  4. Comparative study of quality of life and psychosocial characteristics in patients with psoriasis and leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris, Anargyros; Christodoulou, Christos; Efstathiou, Vasiliki; Tsatovidou, Revekka; Torlidi-Kordera, Evangelia; Zouridaki, Eftychia; Kontochristopoulos, George

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis and leg ulcers have a marked impact on the patient's quality of life and represent a life-long burden for affected patients. The aim of this study is to compare the quality of life, anxiety and depression, self-esteem, and loneliness in patients with psoriasis and leg-ulcer patients. Eighty patients with leg ulcers, eighty patients with psoriasis, and eighty healthy controls were included in this study. The quality of life, depression and anxiety, loneliness of the patient, and self-esteem were assessed using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the UCLA loneliness Scale (UCLA-Version 3), and the Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale (RSES), respectively. The DLQI score among patients with psoriasis was 12.74 ± 4.89 and leg ulcer patients was 13.28 ± 2.57. The patients with psoriasis presented statistically significant higher anxiety (9.87 ± 4.56) than both leg ulcer patients (8.26 ± 2.82) and controls (6.45 ± 1.89), while leg ulcer patients also presented higher anxiety than controls. Regarding self-esteem, although there were no significant differences between the patients with psoriasis (15.25 ± 3.20) and the ones with leg ulcers (15.89 ± 2.93), they both presented statistically significant lower self-esteem scores than control group (18.53 ± 3.04). The patients with psoriasis presented statistically significant higher levels of loneliness and social isolation (46.18 ± 6.63) compared to leg ulcer patients (43.73 ± 5.68) than controls (42.49 ± 3.41). Psoriasis and leg ulcers are long-term skin diseases associated with significant impairment of the patient's quality of life, anxiety, and self-esteem, which are frequently under-recognized. © 2016 by the Wound Healing Society.

  5. Healed corneal ulcer with keloid formation

    OpenAIRE

    Alkatan, Hind M.; Al-Arfaj, Khalid M.; Hantera, Mohammed; Al-Kharashi, Soliman

    2012-01-01

    We are reporting a 34-year-old Arabic white female patient who presented with a white mass covering her left cornea following multiple ocular surgeries and healed corneal ulcer. The lesion obscured further view of the iris, pupil and lens. The patient underwent penetrating keratoplasty and the histopathologic study of the left corneal button showed epithelial hyperplasia, absent Bowman’s layer and subepithelial fibrovascular proliferation. The histopathologic appearance was suggestive of a co...

  6. Leg ulcers in older people: a national study addressing variation in diagnosis, pain and sleep disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Amanda; Nilsson, Camilla; Nilsson, Annina; Fagerström, Cecilia

    2016-01-21

    Leg ulcers commonly emerge as a symptom of other comorbidities, often in older people. As a consequence of the ulcer, pain and sleep disturbances might occur. Due to the complex illness, the responsibility of treatment is unclear between health caregivers. The interaction between ulcer type, sleep and pain has not previously been investigated. This study aimed to explore pain in older men and women (65 years and older) with different diagnoses of leg ulcers and to investigate the associations of sleep disturbances and pain in people with leg ulcer diagnosis. The study used a cross-sectional design and data from the Swedish Registry of Ulcer Treatment, collected between May 2009 and December 2013. One thousand and eight hundred and twenty four people were included, and 62.9% were women. The mean age was 83.4 years (SD 8.8). For the analyses, the chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U-test, t-test, one-way ANOVA and logistic regression was performed. Pain was measured by the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), and sleep disturbances was assessed dichotomously. We found the prevalence of pain intensity ≥ 5 on the NRS to be 34.8% in those reporting pain. Additionally, the pain intensity was associated with the number of ulcers (p = 0.003). Sleep disturbances were associated with pain (p pain and scored higher on the NRS, no significant gender difference in sleep disturbances was found (p = 0.606). The mean NRS scores did not differ significantly between the ulcer types; however, arterial and venous-arterial ulcers increased the risk of sleep disturbances, as did higher pain scores. The majority of the participants were of advanced age (>80 years) and frequently suffered from pain and sleep disturbances. Further research is needed regarding pain, sleep and wound healing in the oldest old with leg ulcers. Ulcer pain sometimes appears to receive less attention in ulcer management, as do sleep disturbances, implying that individual needs might not be satisfactorily met

  7. Sequential changes in histologic pattern and extracellular matrix deposition during the healing of chronic venous ulcers.

    OpenAIRE

    Herrick, S. E.; Sloan, P.; McGurk, M.; Freak, L.; McCollum, C. N.; Ferguson, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    As part of a major clinical trial, sequential biopsies were taken from the margins of venous leg ulcers during their healing. The changing patterns of tissue architecture and extracellular matrix synthesis during healing were documented histologically and immunocytochemically. Initial biopsies were similar in appearance: prominent fibrin cuffs, variable inflammation, hemosiderin, and red blood cell extravasation. So called "fibrin cuffs" were highly organized structures composed of laminin, f...

  8. Compression therapy in patients with venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemond, Joachim; Assenheimer, Bernd; Bültemann, Anke; Gerber, Veronika; Gretener, Silvia; Kohler-von Siebenthal, Elisabeth; Koller, Sonja; Kröger, Knut; Kurz, Peter; Läuchli, Severin; Münter, Christian; Panfil, Eva-Maria; Probst, Sebastian; Protz, Kerstin; Riepe, Gunnar; Strohal, Robert; Traber, Jürg; Partsch, Hugo

    2016-11-01

    Wund-D.A.CH. is the umbrella organization of the various wound care societies in German-speaking countries. The present consensus paper on practical aspects pertinent to compression therapy in patients with venous leg ulcers was developed by experts from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. In Europe, venous leg ulcers rank among the most common causes of chronic wounds. Apart from conservative and interventional wound and vein treatment, compression therapy represents the basis of all other therapeutic strategies. To that end, there are currently a wide variety of materials and systems available. While especially short-stretch bandages or multicomponent systems should be used in the initial decongestion phase, ulcer stocking systems are recommended for the subsequent maintenance phase. Another - to date, far less common - alternative are adaptive Velcro bandage systems. Medical compression stockings have proven particularly beneficial in the prevention of ulcer recurrence. The large number of treatment options currently available enables therapists to develop therapeutic concepts geared towards their patients' individual needs and abilities, thus resulting in good acceptance and adherence. Compression therapy plays a crucial role in the treatment of patients with venous leg ulcers. In recent years, a number of different treatment options have become available, their use and application differing among German-speaking countries. The present expert consensus is therefore meant to outline concrete recommendations for routine implementation of compression therapy in patients with venous leg ulcers. © 2016 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Dose-modifying factors for skin ulceration in mouse legs exposed to gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Kouji; Miyoshi, Makoto; Uehara, Satoru; Omagari, Junichi; Withers, H.R.

    1996-01-01

    To assess the dose-modifying factors for skin ulceration, the hind legs of mice were irradiated using gamma-rays of various doses in single exposures. The skin ulceration began to occur 2 months after irradiation, after early skin reactions such as wet desquamation, had healed completely. No new skin ulceration was observed more than 8 months after irradiation even though the observations were continued until 12 months post-irradiation. The ulceration dose 50 (UD50), a dose required to produce skin ulceration in from 2 to 8 months in 50% of the tested animals, was calculated for each treatment schedule. The preliminary shaving procedure reduced the UD50 dose to 0.85 that of the untreated controls. The ventral aspect of the hind leg was more radioresistant to single-dose irradiation than was to the dorsal aspect. The UD50 for the ventral aspect was 1.29 times that for the dorsal aspect when the skin had been previously shaved, and 1.46 times that for the unshaved control legs. The UD50 was 7 and 14% larger when mice were kept in the dorsal rather than the abdominal position during irradiation, for the preliminarily shaved and unshaved skin, respectively. (author)

  10. Venous leg ulcer management: single use negative pressure wound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsett, Caroline; Grothier, Lorraine; Henderson, Valerie; Leak, Kathy; Milne, Jeanette; Davis, Lynn; Bielby, Alistair; Timmons, John

    2013-06-01

    A number of leg ulcer specialist/tissue viability specialists from across the UK were invited to evaluate PICO (Smith and Nephew, Hull) as a treatment for venous leg ulcers also in conjunction with a variety of compression bandages and garments. Patients across 5 sites had PICO applied in conjunction with compression therapy. This group of treating clinicians were then asked to give feedback on the outcome of the patients on whom they had used the new device. All feedback was recorded at a meeting and this was used to create a guideline for use.

  11. A prospective, multi-centre, randomised, open label, parallel, comparative study to evaluate effects of AQUACEL(®) Ag and Urgotul(®) Silver dressing on healing of chronic venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harding, Keith; Gottrup, Finn; Jawień, Arkadiusz

    2011-01-01

    This study compared wound healing efficacy of two silver dressings, AQUACEL(®) Ag and Urgotul(®) Silver, against venous ulcers at risk of infection, over 8 weeks of treatment. The primary objective was to show non inferiority of AQUACEL(®) Ag to Urgotul(®) Silver. Patients (281) were randomised......, safety events and ulcer healing were compared. After 8 weeks of treatment, the AQUACEL(®) Ag group had a relative wound size reduction (49·65% ± 52·53%) compared with the Urgotul(®) Silver group (42·81% ± 60·0%). The non inferiority of the AQUACEL(®) Ag group to the Urgotul(®) Silver group...... was established based on the difference between them (6·84% ± 56·3%, 95% confidence interval -6·56 to 20·2) and the pre-defined non inferiority margin (-15%). Composite wound healing analysis showed that the AQUACEL(®) Ag group had statistically higher percentage of subjects with better wound progression (66...

  12. Epidemiology, etiology, and treatment of chronic leg ulcer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    recovered accounting for 32.61% and 23.91%, respectively. Radiological investigation with plain. X-ray showed evidence of bony involvement in two patients. We managed our patients with wound dressing using. Table 1: Associated medical conditions seen in patients with chronic leg ulcer (n=60). Frequency Percent.

  13. Delivery of Compression Therapy for Venous Leg Ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarchi, Kian; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2014-01-01

    adequate subbandage pressure when treating patients with venous leg ulcers and the factors that predict the ability to achieve optimal pressure. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: We performed a cross-sectional study from March 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012, in home care centers in 2 Danish...

  14. Physical therapy in the treatment of venous leg ulcers: biophysical mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taradaj, Jakub; Franek, Andrzej; Blaszczak, Edward; Polak, Anna; Chmielewska, Daria; Krol, Piotr; Dolibog, Patrycja

    2012-05-01

     The present study sought to estimate the hemodynamic effects inside wounds after applying infrared thermography. Clinical results were analyzed to evaluate any correspondence with hemodynamic events occurring inside the wounds. Group 1 consisted of 20 patients with venous leg ulcers (12 women, 8 men). Patients from group 1 received 1 high-voltage stimulation (HVS) procedure. Group 2 consisted of 23 patients (16 women, 7 men). Patients from group 2 received 1 ultrasound (US) procedure. Group 3 consisted of 21 patients (13 women, 8 men). Patients from group 3 received 1 low-level laser therapy (LLLT) procedure. Group 4 consisted of 23 patients (15 women, 8 men). Patients from group 4 received 1 compression therapy (CT) procedure. Group 5 consisted of 19 patients (11 women, 8 men). Patients from group 5 received 1 quasi-CT procedure. Infrared thermography was used to monitor arterial hemodynamic effects for each ulcer. Infrared thermography, based on analysis of wound surface temperatures, was used to reflect normal or abnormal arterial circulation in capillaries. The average and maximal temperatures before and after each physical procedure were measured 5, 10, 15, and 30 minutes afterward. The application of HVS and LLLT did not change the temperature inside the wounds. A significant temperature increase was noted after application of US and CT. The quasi-CT induced a thermal effect (only for a few minutes), but was not as intense as the effect of the compression stockings. The measurements showed a prolonged and steady thermal effect. The hemodynamic effect (improvement of arterial microcirculation inside the venous leg ulcer) is one of the most significant biophysical mechanisms of healing after clinically efficient compression therapy. Hemodynamic reactions are not basic mechanisms of high voltage stimulation and ultrasound therapy during the healing of venous leg ulcers. Computed thermography is a simple and useful tool to measure hemodynamic

  15. Quality of life of elderly patients with leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Cardoso Tavares

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: To identify compromised domains of the 36-Item Short Form Survey (SF-36 for elderly individuals with leg ulcers and correlate their clinical and sociodemographic variables with the SF-36's components. Method: Exploratory and cross-sectional study conducted with 50 elderly individuals with leg ulcers. The instruments were the sociodemographic and clinical form and the SF-36. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences was used to analyze data. Results: Most were married, retired, and received one times the minimum wage, were Caucasians or of mixed race, and had hypertension. In regard to the SF-36, the most compromised domain was physical limitations, while social aspects and general health status were the less compromised domains. The SF-36 domains were not correlated with age, income, duration or size of the lesion or pain. Conclusion: The ulcer-related biopsychosocial aspects need to be considered in order to devise more effective nursing interventions.

  16. Clinical and cost-effectiveness of compression hosiery versus compression bandages in treatment of venous leg ulcers (Venous leg Ulcer Study IV, VenUS IV): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Rebecca L; Gabe, Rhian; Ali, Shehzad; Adderley, Una; Bland, J Martin; Cullum, Nicky A; Dumville, Jo C; Iglesias, Cynthia P; Kang'ombe, Arthur R; Soares, Marta O; Stubbs, Nikki C; Torgerson, David J

    2014-03-08

    Drawbacks exist with the standard treatment (four-layer compression bandages) for venous leg ulcers. We have therefore compared the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two-layer compression hosiery with the four-layer bandage for the treatment of such ulcers. We undertook this pragmatic, open, randomised controlled trial with two parallel groups in 34 centres in England and Northern Ireland. The centres were community nurse teams or services, family doctor practices, leg ulcer clinics, tissue viability clinics or services, and wound clinics. Participants were aged 18 years or older with a venous leg ulcer and an ankle brachial pressure index of at least 0·8, and were tolerant of high compression. We randomly allocated participants (1:1) to receive two-layer compression hosiery or a four-layer bandage, using a remote randomisation service and prevalidated computer randomisation program. Participants were stratified by ulcer duration and ulcer area with permuted blocks (block sizes four and six). The primary endpoint was time to ulcer healing, with a maximum follow-up of 12 months. Although participants and health-care providers were not masked to treatment allocation, the primary endpoint was measured by masked assessment of photographs. Primary analysis was intention to treat with Cox regression, with adjustment for ulcer area, ulcer duration, physical mobility, and centre. This trial is registered with the ISRCTN register, number ISRCTN49373072. We randomly allocated 457 participants to the two treatment groups: 230 to two-layer hosiery and 227 to the four-layer bandage, of whom 453 (230 hosiery and 223 bandage) contributed data for analysis. Median time to ulcer healing was 99 days (95% CI 84-126) in the hosiery group and 98 days (85-112) in the bandage group, and the proportion of ulcers healing was much the same in the two groups (70·9% hosiery and 70·4% bandage). More hosiery participants changed their allocated treatment (38·3% hosiery vs 27

  17. VenUS I: a randomised controlled trial of two types of bandage for treating venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, C; Nelson, E A; Cullum, N A; Torgerson, D J

    2004-07-01

    To compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of two different compression bandages for the healing of venous leg ulcers. A pragmatic, randomised controlled trial with an economic evaluation. Community, district nurse-led services; community leg ulcer clinics; hospital leg ulcer clinics with community outreach. A range of urban and rural settings in England and Scotland. Patients with a venous leg ulcer of at least 1-week's duration, at least 1 cm in length or width and an ankle:brachial pressure index of at least 0.8. The four-layer bandage (4LB) (which is multilayer elastic compression) compared with the short-stretch bandage (SSB) (multilayer, inelastic compression). The primary end-point was complete healing of all the ulcers on the trial leg. Secondary outcomes were the proportion of patients healed at 12 and 24 weeks, rate of recurrence, costs of leg ulcer treatment and quality of life. Between April 1999 and December 2000 the trial recruited 387 people aged from 23 to 97 years at trial entry. The majority of patients in this trial (82%; 316/387) had a reference ulcer of area bandage groups, the distribution of the cumulative times to healing of individuals in the two trial groups was compared using the log-rank test. The difference in the distribution of cumulative healing times between the individuals in the two groups was not statistically significant at the 5% level. Adjusting for the effects of variables which may influence healing (centre, baseline ulcer area, duration, episodes, ankle mobility, weight) in a Cox proportional hazards model, a statistically significant treatment effect in favour of the 4LB was identified. At any point in time, the probability of healing for individuals in the SSB treatment arm is significantly lower than that for people treated with the 4LB. Our base case economic analysis showed that the 4LB is the dominant strategy, that is, it is associated with a greater health benefit and lower costs than the SSB, although the

  18. A review of a bi-layered living cell treatment (Apligraf® in the treatment of venous leg ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Zaulyanov

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Larissa Zaulyanov, Robert S Kirsner Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery; University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USAAbstract: Apligraf® (Organogenesis, Canton, MA is a bi-layered bioengineered skin substitute and was the first engineered skin US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved to promote the healing of ulcers that have failed standard wound care. Constructed by culturing human foreskin-derived neonatal fibroblasts in a bovine type I collagen matrix over which human foreskin-derived neonatal epidermal keratinocytes are then cultured and allowed to stratify, Apligraf provides both cells and matrix for the nonhealing wound. Its exact mechanism of action is not known, but it is known to produce cytokines and growth factors similar to healthy human skin. Initially approved by the FDA in 1998 for the treatment of venous ulcers greater than one-month duration that have not adequately responded to conventional therapy, Apligraf later received approval in 2000 for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers of greater than three weeks duration. Herein, we review the use of Apligraf in the treatment of chronic venous leg ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers. Our goal is to provide a working understanding of appropriate patient selection and proper use of the product for any physician treating this segment of the aging population.Keywords: wound healing, Apligraf®, venous leg ulcer, diabetic foot ulcer

  19. Healed corneal ulcer with keloid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkatan, Hind M; Al-Arfaj, Khalid M; Hantera, Mohammed; Al-Kharashi, Soliman

    2012-04-01

    We are reporting a 34-year-old Arabic white female patient who presented with a white mass covering her left cornea following multiple ocular surgeries and healed corneal ulcer. The lesion obscured further view of the iris, pupil and lens. The patient underwent penetrating keratoplasty and the histopathologic study of the left corneal button showed epithelial hyperplasia, absent Bowman's layer and subepithelial fibrovascular proliferation. The histopathologic appearance was suggestive of a corneal keloid which was supported by further ultrastructural study. The corneal graft remained clear 6 months after surgery and the patient was satisfied with the visual outcome. Penetrating keratoplasty may be an effective surgical option for corneal keloids in young adult patients.

  20. Maintenance therapy with sucralfate in duodenal ulcer: genuine prevention or accelerated healing of ulcer recurrence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, T E; Koch, G G

    1991-08-08

    We sought to compare the efficacy of sucralfate to placebo for the prevention of duodenal ulcer recurrence and to determine that the efficacy of sucralfate was due to a true reduction in ulcer prevalence and not due to secondary effects such as analgesic activity or accelerated healing. This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel groups, multicenter clinical study with 254 patients. All patients had a past history of at least two duodenal ulcers with at least one ulcer diagnosed by endoscopic examination 3 months or less before the start of the study. Complete ulcer healing without erosions was required to enter the study. Sucralfate or placebo were dosed as a 1-g tablet twice a day for 4 months, or until ulcer recurrence. Endoscopic examinations once a month and when symptoms developed determined the presence or absence of duodenal ulcers. If a patient developed an ulcer between monthly scheduled visits, the patient was dosed with a 1-g sucralfate tablet twice a day until the next scheduled visit. Statistical analyses of the results determined the efficacy of sucralfate compared with placebo for preventing duodenal ulcer recurrence. Comparisons of therapeutic agents for preventing duodenal ulcers have usually been made by testing for statistical differences in the cumulative rates for all ulcers developed during a follow-up period, regardless of the time of detection. Statistical experts at the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and on the FDA Advisory Panel expressed doubts about clinical study results based on this type of analysis. They suggested three possible mechanisms for reducing the number of observed ulcers: (a) analgesic effects, (b) accelerated healing, and (c) true ulcer prevention. Traditional ulcer analysis could miss recurring ulcers due to an analgesic effect or accelerated healing. Point-prevalence analysis could miss recurring ulcers due to accelerated healing between endoscopic examinations. Maximum ulcer

  1. [Necrotic leg ulcer revealing vasculitis induced by vitamin K antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabli, H; Hocar, O; Akhdari, N; Amal, S; Hakkou, M; Hamdaoui, A

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin K antagonists are widely used in thromboembolic diseases. Hemorrhagic complications related to drug overdose represent their main side effect. We report a rare side effect, a severe and unexpected type of skin vasculitis - necrotic leg ulcer - induced by vitamin K antagonist. A 63-year-old female with a history of diabetes developed hyperalgesic necrotic ulcerations on the lower limbs one month after starting an acenocoumarol-based treatment for ischemic heart disease. Histological examination revealed lymphocytic vasculitis with fibrinoid necrosis. Etiological explorations searching for vasculitis were negative. In the absence of a precise etiology, drug-induced ulcer was suspected. Low molecular weight heparin was prescribed to replace acenocoumarol. The lesions slowly resolved with topical treatment. The chronological criteria and the negativity of etiological explorations allowed the diagnosis of vitamin K antagonist-induced necrotic skin ulcer. Clinicians should be aware of this rare complication induced by oral anticoagulants because of its practical therapeutic implications. This is the first case of necrotic leg ulcer induced by acenocoumarol corresponding histologically to necrotising lymphocytic vasculitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. The influence of polymorbidity, revascularization, and wound therapy on the healing of arterial ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Tautenhahn

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Joerg Tautenhahn1, Ralf Lobmann2, Brigitte Koenig3, Zuhir Halloul1, Hans Lippert1, Thomas Buerger11Department of General, Visceral and Vascular Surgery; 2Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism; 3Institute for Medical Microbiology, Medical School, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, GermanyObjective: An ulcer categorized as Fontaine’s stage IV represents a chronic wound, risk factor of arteriosclerosis, and co-morbidities which disturb wound healing. Our objective was to analyze wound healing and to assess potential factors affecting the healing process.Methods: 199 patients were included in this 5-year study. The significance levels were determined by chi-squared and log-rank tests. The calculation of patency rate followed the Kaplan-Meier method.Results: Mean age and co-morbidities did not differ from those in current epidemiological studies. Of the patients with ulcer latency of more than 13 weeks (up to one year, 40% required vascular surgery. Vascular surgery was not possible for 53 patients and they were treated conservatively. The amputation rate in the conservatively treated group was 37%, whereas in the revascularizated group it was only 16%. Ulcers in patients with revascularization healed in 92% of cases after 24 weeks. In contrast, we found a healing rate of only 40% in the conservatively treated group (p < 0.001. Revascularization appeared more often in diabetic patients (n = 110; p < 0.01 and the wound size and number of infections were elevated (p = 0.03. Among those treated conservatively, wound healing was decelerated (p = 0.01/0.02; χ² test.Conclusions: The success of revascularization, presence of diabetes mellitus, and wound treatment proved to be prognostic factors for wound healing in arterial ulcers.Keywords: arterial leg ulcer, wound management, risk factors, revascularization

  3. Low dose aspirin as adjuvant treatment for venous leg ulceration: pragmatic, randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial (Aspirin4VLU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jull, Andrew; Wadham, Angela; Bullen, Chris; Parag, Varsha; Kerse, Ngaire; Waters, Jill

    2017-11-24

    Objective  To determine the effect of low dose aspirin on ulcer healing in patients with venous leg ulcers. Design  Pragmatic, community based, parallel group, double blind, randomised controlled trial. Setting  Five community nursing centres in New Zealand. Participants  251 adults with venous leg ulcers who could safely be treated with aspirin or placebo: 125 were randomised to aspirin and 126 to placebo. Interventions  150 mg oral aspirin daily or matching placebo for up to 24 weeks treatment, with compression therapy as standard background treatment. Main outcome measures  The primary outcome was time to complete healing of the reference ulcer (largest ulcer if more than one ulcer was present). Secondary outcomes included proportion of participants healed, change in ulcer area, change in health related quality of life, and adverse events. Analysis was by intention to treat. Results  The median number of days to healing of the reference ulcer was 77 in the aspirin group and 69 in the placebo group (hazard ratio 0.85, 95% confidence interval 0.64 to 1.13, P=0.25). The number of participants healed at the endpoint was 88 (70%) in the aspirin group and 101 (80%) in the placebo group (risk difference -9.8%, 95% confidence interval -20.4% to 0.9%, P=0.07). Estimated change in ulcer area was 4.1 cm 2 in the aspirin group and 4.8 cm 2 in the placebo group (mean difference -0.7 cm 2 , 95% confidence interval -1.9 to 0.5 cm 2 , P=0.25). 40 adverse events occurred among 29 participants in the aspirin group and 37 adverse events among 27 participants in the placebo group (incidence rate ratio 1.1, 95% confidence interval 0.7 to 1.7, P=0.71). Conclusion  Our findings do not support the use of low dose aspirin as adjuvant treatment for venous leg ulcers. Trial registration  ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02158806. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. ImageJ: A Free, Easy, and Reliable Method to Measure Leg Ulcers Using Digital Pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Quintana-Marrero, Yurena; Aragón-Hernández, Cristina; Hernández-Herero, María José

    2017-12-01

    Wound measurement to document the healing course of chronic leg ulcers has an important role in the management of these patients. Digital cameras in smartphones are readily available and easy to use, and taking pictures of wounds is becoming a routine in specialized departments. Analyzing digital pictures with appropriate software provides clinicians a quick, clean, and easy-to-use tool for measuring wound area. A set of 25 digital pictures of plain foot and leg ulcers was the basis of this study. Photographs were taken placing a ruler next to the wound in parallel with the healthy skin with the iPhone 6S (Apple Inc, Cupertino, CA), which has a camera of 12 megapixels using the flash. The digital photographs were visualized with ImageJ 1.45s freeware (National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD; http://imagej.net/ImageJ ). Wound area measurement was carried out by 4 raters: head of the department, wound care nurse, physician, and medical student. We assessed intra- and interrater reliability using the interclass correlation coefficient. To determine intraobserver reliability, 2 of the raters repeated the measurement of the set 1 week after the first reading. The interrater model displayed an interclass correlation coefficient of 0.99 with 95% confidence interval of 0.999 to 1.000, showing excellent reliability. The intrarater model of both examiners showed excellent reliability. In conclusion, analyzing digital images of leg ulcers with ImageJ estimates wound area with excellent reliability. This method provides a free, rapid, and accurate way to measure wounds and could routinely be used to document wound healing in daily clinical practice.

  5. Ulcer-related problems and health care needs in patients with venous leg ulceration: a descriptive, cross-sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Persoon, J.W.B.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Kooijmans-Otero, M.E.; Achterberg, T. van

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with leg ulceration often have long lasting and recurrent wounds. The treatment exists mainly of wound-care and compression therapy. International literature shows several indications of problems in relation to leg ulceration, but no studies were performed to give a

  6. [Weight loss and healing of ulcers - case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seremet, Jasmina; Laginja, Stanislava; Marinović, Marin

    2013-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 is one of the most common diseases with a prevalence increasing with age. If blood sugar is not controlled, complications arise and diabetic foot ulcer occurs. Depending on the blood vessels involved, we distinguish venous and arterial ulcers. Venous ulcers respond very well to modern methods of treatment such as compression therapy and hydrocolloid dressings, but for arterial ulcer prevention is most significant, e.g. weight loss, dietary modification, etc. The aim of this study was to show that despite all the available therapeutic options, we cannot cure ulcers completely because the patient's readiness to change his lifestyle plays a decisive role. Therefore, we present a patient having suffered from venous ulcers for several years and arterial ulcer that healed only after the patient had lost about 20 pounds.

  7. Leg ulcer in Werner syndrome (adult progeria): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumo, Giuseppe; Pau, Monica; Patta, Federico; Aste, Nicola; Atzori, Laura

    2013-03-15

    Werner syndrome (WS; MIM#277700) or adult progeria, is a rare disease, associated with mutations of a single gene (RECQL2 or WRN), located on chromosome 8 (8p12). It codes a DNA-helicase, whose defects cause genomic instability. The highest incidences are reported in Japan and Sardinia (Italy). On this major island of the Mediterranean Basin, the WS cases have been observed in the northern areas. The authors describe the apparently first case reported in southern Sardinia, a 51-year-old woman, who was born in and resides in the province of Cagliari. She presented with a 9-year history of an intractable leg ulcer and other characteristic symptoms, including "bird-like" face, high-pitched voice, premature greying, short stature, abdominal obesity in contrast with thin body type, scleroderma-like legs, decreased muscle mass, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and premature menopause. A specialized genetic Institute of Research (IRCCS-IDI, Rome) confirmed the clinical diagnosis. There is no cure or specific treatment and patients must be periodically screened for an increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease and malignancies. Among the many findings, leg ulcers significantly affect the patient's quality of life. This problem may send the patient to the dermatologist, who finally suspects the diagnosis. Poor response to medical treatment may require aggressive repeated surgery, with poor or temporary results.

  8. Endomicroscopy for assessing mucosal healing in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghe, Cristian; Cotruta, Bogdan; Iacob, Razvan; Becheanu, Gabriel; Dumbrava, Mona; Gheorghe, Liana

    2011-12-01

    The assessment of tissue healing has emerged as an important treatment goal in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), mucosal healing may represent the ultimate therapeutic goal due to the fact that the inflammation is limited to the mucosal layer. Mucosal and histological healing may indicate a subset of UC patients in long-term clinical, endoscopic and histological remission in whom immunomodulators, biologics, and even aminosalicylates may be withdrawn. Confocal laser endomicroscopy allows the assessment of residual cellular inflammation, crypt and vessel architecture distortion during ongoing endoscopy, and therefore permits a real-time evaluation of histological healing in patients with ulcerative proctitis. Images of conventional optical microscopy and confocal laser endomicroscopy in patients with ulcerative proctitis in remission are presented.

  9. Shewanella alga bacteremia in two patients with lower leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domínguez, H.; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Gram, Lone

    1996-01-01

    of infection. Both patients survived; however, one of them had extensive myonecrosis, while the other patient had an uncomplicated course. The strains were initially believed to be Shewanella putrefaciens on the basis of key characteristics and results of the API 20NE identification system (bioMerieux, Marcy l......The first Danish cases of Shewanella alga bacteremia in two patients with chronic lower leg ulcers are reported. Both patients were admitted to the hospital during the same month of a very warm summer and had been exposed to the same marine environment, thereby suggesting the same source...

  10. Delivery of compression therapy for venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarchi, Kian; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2014-07-01

    Despite the documented effect of compression therapy in clinical studies and its widespread prescription, treatment of venous leg ulcers is often prolonged and recurrence rates high. Data on provided compression therapy are limited. To assess whether home care nurses achieve adequate subbandage pressure when treating patients with venous leg ulcers and the factors that predict the ability to achieve optimal pressure. We performed a cross-sectional study from March 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012, in home care centers in 2 Danish municipalities. Sixty-eight home care nurses who managed wounds in their everyday practice were included. Participant-masked measurements of subbandage pressure achieved with an elastic, long-stretch, single-component bandage; an inelastic, short-stretch, single-component bandage; and a multilayer, 2-component bandage, as well as, association between achievement of optimal pressure and years in the profession, attendance at wound care educational programs, previous work experience, and confidence in bandaging ability. A substantial variation in the exerted pressure was found: subbandage pressures ranged from 11 mm Hg exerted by an inelastic bandage to 80 mm Hg exerted by a 2-component bandage. The optimal subbandage pressure range, defined as 30 to 50 mm Hg, was achieved by 39 of 62 nurses (63%) applying the 2-component bandage, 28 of 68 nurses (41%) applying the elastic bandage, and 27 of 68 nurses (40%) applying the inelastic bandage. More than half the nurses applying the inelastic (38 [56%]) and elastic (36 [53%]) bandages obtained pressures less than 30 mm Hg. At best, only 17 of 62 nurses (27%) using the 2-component bandage achieved subbandage pressure within the range they aimed for. In this study, none of the investigated factors was associated with the ability to apply a bandage with optimal pressure. This study demonstrates the difficulty of achieving the desired subbandage pressure and indicates that a substantial proportion of

  11. Healing ulcers and preventing their recurrences in the diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Raja Sabapathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen percent of people with diabetes develop an ulcer in the course of their lifetime. Eighty-five percent of the major amputations in diabetes mellitus are preceded by an ulcer. Management of ulcers and preventing their recurrence is important for the quality of life of the individual and reducing the cost of care of treatment. The main causative factors of ulceration are neuropathy, vasculopathy and limited joint mobility. Altered bio-mechanics due to the deformities secondary to neuropathy and limited joint mobility leads to focal points of increased pressure, which compromises circulation leading to ulcers. Ulcer management must not only address the healing of ulcers but also should correct the altered bio-mechanics to reduce the focal pressure points and prevent recurrence. An analysis of 700 patients presenting with foot problems to the Diabetic Clinic of Ganga Hospital led to the stratification of these patients into four classes of incremental severity. Class 1 – the foot at risk, Class 2 – superficial ulcers without infection, Class 3 – the crippled foot and Class 4 – the critical foot. Almost 77.5% presented in either Class 3 or 4 with complicated foot ulcers requiring major reconstruction or amputation. Class 1 foot can be managed conservatively with foot care and appropriate foot wear. Class 2 in addition to measures for ulcer healing would need surgery to correct the altered bio-mechanics to prevent the recurrence. The procedures called surgical offloading would depend on the site of the ulcer and would need an in-depth clinical study of the foot. Class 3 would need major reconstructive procedures and Class 4 would need amputation since it may be life-threatening. As clinicians, our main efforts must be focused towards identifying patients in Class 1 and offer advice on foot care and Class 2 where appropriate surgical offloading procedure would help preserve the foot.

  12. The effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Neglecting polarized light as an adjuvant therapy for pressure ulcers and methodology distinctions in the trials engaging polarized light are the reasons for many dilemmas and contradictions. The aim of this study was to establish the effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing. Methods. This prospective randomized single-blind study involved 40 patients with stage I-III of pressure ulcer. The patients in the experimental group (E were subjected, besides polarized light therapy, to standard wound cleaning and dressing. Standard wound cleaning and dressing were the only treatment used in the control group (C. A polarized light source was a Bioptron lamp. Polarized light therapy was applied for six min daily, five times a week, four weeks. The Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH was used in the assessment of outcome. Statistic analysis included Mann Whitney Test, Fisher Exact Test, Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. Results. There were significant differences between the groups at the end of the treatment regarding the surface of pressure ulcer (E: 10.80±19.18; C: 22,97±25,47; p = 0.0005, rank of pressure ulcer (E: 5.90±2.48; C: 8.6±1.05; p = 0.0005 and total PUSH score (E: 7.35±3.17; C: 11.85±2.35; p = 0,0003. The patients in the experimental group had significantly better values of the parameters monitored than the patients in the control group. Conclusion. After a four-week polarized light therapy 20 patients with stage I-III ulcer had significant improvement in pressure ulcer healing, so it could be useful to apply polarized light in the treatment of pressure ulcers.

  13. The effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durović, Aleksandar; Marić, Dragan; Brdareski, Zorica; Jevtić, Miodrag; Durdević, Slavisa

    2008-12-01

    Neglecting polarized light as an adjuvant therapy for pressure ulcers and methodology distinctions in the trials engaging polarized light are the reasons for many dilemmas and contradictions. The aim of this study was to establish the effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing. This prospective randomized single-blind study involved 40 patients with stage I-III of pressure ulcer. The patients in the experimental group (E) were subjected, besides polarized light therapy, to standard wound cleaning and dressing. Standard wound cleaning and dressing were the only treatment used in the control group (C). A polarized light source was a Bioptron lamp. Polarized light therapy was applied for six min daily, five times a week, four weeks. The Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) was used in the assessment of outcome. Statistic analysis included Mann Whitney Test, Fisher Exact Test, Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. There were significant differences between the groups at the end of the treatment regarding the surface of pressure ulcer (E: 10.80 +/- 19.18; C: 22,97 +/- 25,47; p = 0.0005), rank of pressure ulcer (E: 5.90 +/- 2.48; C: 8.6 +/- 1.05; p = 0.0005) and total PUSH score (E: 7.35 +/- 3.17; C: 11.85 +/- 2.35; p = 0,0003). The patients in the experimental group had significantly better values of the parameters monitored than the patients in the control group. After a four-week polarized light therapy 20 patients with stage I-III ulcer had significant improvement in pressure ulcer healing, so it could be useful to apply polarized light in the treatment of pressure ulcers.

  14. Diurnal variations in lower leg subcutaneous blood flow rate in patients with chronic venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, J H; Kastrup, J; Kristensen, J K

    1991-01-01

    The blood flow rate in subcutaneous adipose tissue was measured on the lower legs of 11 patients with chronic lower-leg venous insufficiency and ulceration and in eight age-matched control subjects for 12-20 h, under ambulatory conditions, using the 133Xe wash-out technique with portable Cadmium...... telluride (CdTe(Cl)) detectors. In both groups, the change from an upright to a supine position at the beginning of the night period elicited an instantaneous increment in the blood flow rate of 30-40% with a decrease in the central and local postural sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity. After...... approximately 1 h of sleep, a considerable increase in blood flow rate was seen in both patient and control groups which persisted for nearly 100 min. In the patient group, the mean increase was 137% compared to a mean increase of 68% in the control group (P less than 0.01). The blood flow then returned...

  15. Effects of low-frequency ultrasound on microcirculation in venous leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Therapeutic low-frequency ultrasound (US has been used for many years to improve wound healing in chronic wounds like venous leg ulcers. No human data are available for the possible effects of single US applications on microcirculation and their frequency-dependency. Aims: To investigated the role of therapeutic low-frequency US on microcirculation of venous leg ulcers in vivo. Patients and Methods: This is a pilot study on an inpatient basis. We use a newly developed low-frequency continuous-wave US-equipment composed of a US transducer based on piezo-fiber composites that allow the change of frequency. In this study, we apply US of 34 kHz, 53.5 kHz, and 75 kHz respectively. Twelve patients with chronic venous leg ulcers are analyzed. As an adjunct to good ulcer care, therapeutic US is applied, non-contacting, once a day, in a subaqual position for 10 minutes. Microcirculation is assessed in the ulcers adjacent to skin before US-therapy, immediately after the treatment and 30 minutes later. We use a micro-light guide spectrophotometer (O2C, LEA Medizintechnik GmbH, Gieίen, Germany for calculation of blood flow velocity, hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SCO 2 and relative hemoglobin concentration (rHb in 2 and 8 mm depth. Contact-free remission spectroscopy (SkinREM3, Color Control Chemnitz GmbH, Chemnitz, Germany allows contact free measurements in the VIS-NIR range of the spectrum (400 ± 1600 nm. Results: It is seen that therapeutic US is well tolerated. One patient dropped out from a treatment series since he developed erysipelas responding to standard antibiotic. Effects were seen at 34 kHz only. The SO 2 values increased after single US application. The values for rHb were higher in the superficial layer of the wound bed (depth 2 mm compared to deeper parts (8 mm depth. US treatment did not result in significant changes of rHb and blood cell velocity. The data obtained by remission spectroscopy disclose an increase of oxygenized

  16. Venous leg ulcer management in clinical practice in the UK: costs and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Julian F; Fuller, Graham W; Vowden, Peter

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the patterns of care and annual levels of health care resource use attributable to managing venous leg ulcers (VLUs) in clinical practice by the UK's National Health Service (NHS) and the associated costs of patient management. This was a retrospective cohort analysis of the records of 505 patients in The Health Improvement Network (THIN) Database. Patients' characteristics, wound-related health outcomes and health care resource use were quantified, and the total NHS cost of patient management was estimated at 2015/2016 prices. Overall, 53% of all VLUs healed within 12 months, and the mean time to healing was 3·0 months. 13% of patients were never prescribed any recognised compression system, and 78% of their wounds healed. Of the 87% who were prescribed a recognised compression system, 52% of wounds healed. Patients were predominantly managed in the community by nurses with minimal clinical involvement of specialist clinicians. Up to 30% of all the VLUs may have been clinically infected at the time of presentation, and only 22% of patients had an ankle brachial pressure index documented in their records. The mean NHS cost of wound care over 12 months was an estimated £7600 per VLU. However, the cost of managing an unhealed VLU was 4·5 times more than that of managing a healed VLU (£3000 per healed VLU and £13 500 per unhealed VLU). This study provides important insights into a number of aspects of VLU management in clinical practice that have been difficult to ascertain from other studies and provides the best estimate available of NHS resource use and costs with which to inform policy and budgetary decisions. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Personalized holistic approach to a patient with mixed leg ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacević, Jadranka; Sinozić, Tamara

    2014-10-01

    Holistic approach as the philosophical orientation to care underpins the fundamental wholeness of human being and emphasizes the importance of balance within the person and between the person and his/her environment. It includes elements of the physiological, sociological, economic, psychological and spiritual dimensions, and thus providesan opportunity to assess the patient as a whole and in relation to his/ her living context. Such an integrated approach is part of the basic knowledge and skills of general practitioners/family doctors and makes them equal members of a multidisciplinary team in chronic wound patient care. In this case report on a patient with mixed leg ulcer, we will try to bring closer holistic approach in care for this kind of patients in daily practice of general practitioners/family doctors.

  18. A prospective cohort study of prognostic factors for the healing of heel pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Elizabeth; Greenwood, Darren C; Nelson, E Andrea; Nixon, Jane

    2014-03-01

    pressure ulcers, 25-30% of which are on the heels are a major burden to patients and healthcare systems. A better understanding of factors associated with healing is required to inform treatment and research priorities. to identify patient and pressure ulcer characteristics associated with the healing of heel pressure ulcers. patients with heel pressure ulcers were recruited to a prospective cohort study in a large teaching hospital in the UK, with a maximum 18-month follow-up. Cox proportional hazards model regression analysis was used to identify prognostic factors for healing. one hundred and forty of 148 patients recruited were analysed. They had 183 pressure ulcers: 77 ulcers healed, 5 were on limbs amputated prior to ulcer healing, 88 were on patients who died prior to healing, 11 were present at the end of the study and 2 were lost to follow-up. The median time to healing was 121 (range 8-440) days. Of 12 variables associated with healing (P ≤ 0.2), multi-variable analysis identified two factors which were independently predictive of healing including the presence of a severe (versus superficial) ulcer (hazard ratio = 0.48, P ulcer severity and the presence of peripheral arterial disease significantly reduced the probability of healing. Treatments for heel pressure ulcers should consider the severity of the ulcer and the presence of peripheral arterial disease.

  19. The expression of inflammatory cytokines, TAM tyrosine kinase receptors and their ligands is upregulated in venous leg ulcer patients: a novel insight into chronic wound immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filkor, Kata; Németh, Tibor; Nagy, István; Kondorosi, Éva; Urbán, Edit; Kemény, Lajos; Szolnoky, Győző

    2016-08-01

    The systemic host defence mechanisms, especially innate immunity, in venous leg ulcer patients are poorly investigated. The aim of the current study was to measure Candida albicans killing activity and gene expressions of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and innate immune response regulators, TAM receptors and ligands of peripheral blood mononuclear cells separated from 69 venous leg ulcer patients and 42 control probands. Leg ulcer patients were stratified into responder and non-responder groups on the basis of wound healing properties. No statistical differences were found in Candida killing among controls, responders and non-responders. Circulating blood mononuclear cells of patients overexpress pro-inflammatory (IL-1α, TNFα, CXCL-8) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines as well as TAM receptors (Tyro, Axl, MerTK) and their ligands Gas6 and Protein S compared with those of control individuals. IL-1α is notably overexpressed in venous leg ulcer treatment non-responders; in contrast, Axl gene expression is robustly stronger among responders. These markers may be considered as candidates for the prediction of treatment response among venous leg ulcer patients. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type VIII: A Rare Cause of Leg Ulcers in Young Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Ronceray

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIII (EDS-VIII is a very rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by early-onset periodontitis associated with features of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We report a 32-year-old man whose chronic leg ulcer led to the diagnosis of EDS-VIII. He had severe periodontitis with complete loss of permanent teeth and skin fragility with thin skin, atrophic scars, and brownish atrophic pretibial plaques. Leg ulcer is not a prominent feature of EDS-VIII. We suggest adding EDS-VIII to the list of rare diseases accounting for chronic leg ulcers, if this case report prompts others to report leg ulcers associated with EDS-VIII.

  1. The use of a dermal substitute and thin skin grafts in the cure of "complex" leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonico, Silvestro; Campitiello, Ferdinando; Della Corte, Angela; Fattopace, Andrea

    2009-02-01

    In some chronic leg ulcers, a reconstructive operation using skin grafts may be extremely difficult or is quite likely to fail as a result of the position, the width, and the depth of the lesions. To evaluate the effectiveness of a dermal substitute and thin skin grafts in the treatment of patients suffering from deep and wide chronic leg ulcers. Twenty-six consecutive patients with leg ulcers at least 1 year old were admitted to the study. The ulcers were large (>100 cm2) and deep (>3 mm) over at least 50% of the surface area. After surgical debridement of the wounds, the dermal matrix was modeled and applied. After 21 days, the attachment of the artificial dermis was tested, and in positive cases, the patient was re-admitted for "thin" skin grafting. In all patients, at the first follow-up, a notable reduction in pain, exudate, and perilesional edema was ascertained. After 2 weeks, the progressive substitution of granulation tissue with new yellow or gold derma became evident in all patients. After 21 days, the dermal matrix was completely integrated with the guest tissue. In 23 patients (88.5%), attachment of the skin graft was complete, and in three patients (11.5%), it was partial but nevertheless larger than 70% of the surface. Even in these cases, complete healing of the lesions was achieved within 4 weeks at most. All patients were checked for a minimum of 3 months, and none suffered an ulcerous recurrence. In our series, the use of this dermal matrix allowed for the complete refilling of the loss of tissue, the rapid disappearance of pain, and the rapid regeneration of a permanent dermis.

  2. Chosen aspects of quality of life in patients with venous leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Miertová

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the paper was to describe chosen aspects of quality of life in patients with venous leg ulcers treated at home in the Turiec region, and to find differences in assessing quality of life in relation to degree of adherence to external compression therapy. Design: A quantitative cross-sectional study. Methods: There were 61 patients with venous leg ulcers at 68.59 ± 9.49 years of age, with an average length of wound treatment of 6.34 ± 5.51 years. The adapted self-assessment questionnaire, the Freiburg Life Quality Assessment wound module (FLQA-w, was used to gain empirical data. Results: The findings revealed that the worst score was achieved in the category of everyday life (3.61 ± 0.93. Statistically significant differences were found between the group of respondents who apply bandages on a daily basis and those who did not use them at all. Regular bandage application is closely connected with positive assessment of wound therapy (p = 0.043, psychosocial life (p = 0.023, verbalisation of well-being in various categories (p = 0.001, assessment of state of the wound (p = 0.032, assessment of health condition (p = 0.019, and overall quality of life (p = 0.014. Length of wound treatment is related to assessments of quality of life. Conclusion: Non-healing wounds, the associated therapy and financial means required to treat them, and the pain resulting from them, are connected with physical difficulty, experience of negative emotions, and, thus, the worsening of patientsʼ quality of life. The results of the study could form the basis for further studies on similar issues.

  3. Supporting adherence and healthy lifestyles in leg ulcer patients: systematic development of the Lively Legs program for dermatology outpatient clinics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Bartholomew, L.K.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Achterberg, T. van

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of our project was to develop a lifestyle program for leg ulcer patients at outpatient clinics for dermatology. METHODS: We used the intervention-mapping (IM) framework for systematically developing theory and evidence based health promotion programs. We started with a

  4. Local blockage of EMMPRIN impedes pressure ulcers healing in a rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xi-Lan; Luo, Xiao; Wang, Ze-Xin; Yang, Guo-Li; Liu, Ji-Zhong; Liu, Ya-Qiong; Li, Ming; Chen, Min; Xia, Yong-Mei; Liu, Jun-Jie; Qiu, Shu-Ping; Gong, Xiao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Excessive extracellular matrix degradation caused by the hyperfunction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) has been implicated in the failure of pressure ulcers healing. EMMPRIN, as a widely expressed protein, has emerged as an important regulator of MMP activity. We hypothesize that EMMPRIN affects the process of pressure ulcer healing by modulating MMP activity. In the rat pressure ulcer model, the expression of EMMPRIN in ulcers detected by Western blot was elevated compared with that obse...

  5. [AA amyloidosis: a little-known complication of chronic leg ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waton, J; Fays-Michel, S; Chandeclerc, M L; Corby, S; Cuny, J F; Barbaud, A; Schmutz, J-L

    2008-02-01

    AA amyloidosis, secondary to inflammatory chronic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, is often complicated by renal failure. Chronic inflammatory dermatoses constitute rare causes of AA amyloidosis. We describe two cases of AA amyloidosis discovered after renal failure in patients presenting leg ulcers for several years. AL amyloidosis was suspected in both cases because of a history of monoclonal gammopathy in one patient and of plasmocytoma in the other. The diagnosis of AA amyloidosis was confirmed on renal histology through the detection of AA antibodies in amyloid deposits. No extrarenal amyloidosis was seen in either patient and there were no inflammatory diseases other than chronic leg ulcers. AA amyloidosis is caused by serum amyloid protein A (SAA), a reactive inflammatory protein. AA amyloidosis is thus caused by chronic inflammatory diseases, but only rarely by cutaneous inflammatory diseases. To our knowledge, the literature contains only seven other published cases of AA amyloidosis secondary to chronic leg ulcers. A review of the literature does not indicate whether cure of ulcers has any effect on the accompanying renal failure. We imagine that AA amyloidosis secondary to leg ulcer is in fact under-diagnosed. However, since the first specific treatment for AA amyloidosis is currently being evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration, it is essential that this serious complication of chronic leg ulcers be widely recognised.

  6. Leg ulcers associated with Klinefelter’s syndrome: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; Tsagaris, Katina C; Attinger, Christopher E

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a young man with type II diabetes, stage III chronic kidney disease, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea and diabetes who presented to the Georgetown University Hospital Center for Wound Healing with refractory lower extremity ulcers. Autoimmune work-up was negative. However, chromosome analysis showed a genetic variant of Klinefelter’s syndrome (48 XXYY). Lower extremity ulceration is a recognised complication of Klinefelter’s syndrome. The pathogenesis of ulcers in ...

  7. In search of optimal compression therapy for venous leg ulcers: a meta-analysis of studies comparing diverse [corrected] bandages with specifically designed stockings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsler, Felix; Willenberg, Torsten; Blättler, Werner

    2009-09-01

    In search of an optimal compression therapy for venous leg ulcers, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed of randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing compression systems based on stockings (MCS) with divers bandages. RCT were retrieved from six sources and reviewed independently. The primary endpoint, completion of healing within a defined time frame, and the secondary endpoints, time to healing, and pain were entered into a meta-analysis using the tools of the Cochrane Collaboration. Additional subjective endpoints were summarized. Eight RCT (published 1985-2008) fulfilled the predefined criteria. Data presentation was adequate and showed moderate heterogeneity. The studies included 692 patients (21-178/study, mean age 61 years, 56% women). Analyzed were 688 ulcerated legs, present for 1 week to 9 years, sizing 1 to 210 cm(2). The observation period ranged from 12 to 78 weeks. Patient and ulcer characteristics were evenly distributed in three studies, favored the stocking groups in four, and the bandage group in one. Data on the pressure exerted by stockings and bandages were reported in seven and two studies, amounting to 31-56 and 27-49 mm Hg, respectively. The proportion of ulcers healed was greater with stockings than with bandages (62.7% vs 46.6%; P bandages better than MCS. Pain was assessed in three studies (219 patients) revealing an important advantage of stockings (P bandages, has a positive impact on pain, and is easier to use.

  8. Pulmonary hypertension in patients with Martorell hypertensive leg ulcer: a case control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Martorell hypertensive ischemic leg ulcer (Martorell ulcer) is characterized by distinct alterations in the arteriolar wall of subcutaneous vessels, leading to progressive narrowing of the vascular lumen and increase of vascular resistance. These changes are similar to the alterations observed in pulmonary arterioles in patients with chronic pulmonary hypertension (PH). This study was aimed to assess an association between the two disorders. Methods In this case–control study, 14 patients with Martorell ulcer were clinically assessed for the presence of pulmonary hypertension using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. Data from patients were compared to 28 matched hypertensive controls. Results Systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP) in patients with Martorell ulcer was significantly higher than in the control group (33.8 ± 16.9 vs 25.3 ± 6.5 mmHg, p = 0.023); the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension was 31% (5/14) in patients and 7% (2/28) in controls (p = 0.031). No differences were seen in left heart size and function between patients and controls. Conclusion This study provides first evidence that subcutaneous arteriolosclerosis, the hallmark of Martorell ulcer, is associated with PH. These findings suggest that patients with Martorell leg ulcer might be at significant risk to develop elevated pulmonary arterial pressure. Patients with leg ulcers who present with dyspnea should be evaluated by echocardiography for the presence of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22686459

  9. Racial and ethnic disparities in the healing of pressure ulcers present at nursing home admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Donna Z; Gurvich, Olga; Savik, Kay; Eberly, Lynn E; Harms, Susan; Mueller, Christine; Garrard, Judith; Cunanan, Kristen; Wiltzen, Kjerstie

    2017-09-01

    Pressure ulcers increase the risk of costly hospitalization and mortality of nursing home residents, so timely healing is important. Disparities in healthcare have been identified in the nursing home population but little is known about disparities in the healing of pressure ulcers. To assess racial and ethnic disparities in the healing of pressure ulcers present at nursing home admission. Multi-levels predictors, at the individual resident, nursing home, and community/Census tract level, were examined in three large data sets. Minimum Data Set records of older individuals admitted to one of 439 nursing homes of a national, for-profit chain over three years with a stages 2-4 pressure ulcer (n=10,861) were searched to the 90-day assessment for the first record showing pressure ulcer healing. Predictors of pressure ulcer healing were analyzed for White admissions first using logistic regression. The Peters-Belson method was used to assess racial or ethnic disparities among minority group admissions. A significantly smaller proportion of Black nursing home admissions had their pressure ulcer heal than expected had they been part of the White group. There were no disparities in pressure ulcer healing disadvantaging other minority groups. Significant predictors of a nonhealing of pressure ulcer were greater deficits in activities of daily living and pressure ulcer severity. Reducing disparities in pressure ulcer healing is needed for Blacks admitted to nursing homes. Knowledge of disparities in pressure ulcer healing can direct interventions aiming to achieve equity in healthcare for a growing number of minority nursing home admissions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Risk factors of delayed ulcer healing after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joo Hyun; Kim, Sang Gyun; Choi, Jeongmin; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2015-12-01

    Although post-endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) iatrogenic ulcer is known to heal faster than peptic ulcer, some iatrogenic ulcers show delayed healing. The aim of this study was to clarify risk factors of delayed ulcer healing after gastric ESD. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of all patients who had ESD for gastric neoplasms (866 adenomas and 814 early gastric cancers) between January 2005 and February 2011. Of 1680 subjects, 95 had delayed ulcer healing in 3-month follow-up. Multivariate analysis showed that diabetes (OR 1.743; 95% CI 1.017-2.989, p = 0.043), coagulation abnormality (OR 3.195; 95% CI 1.535-6.650, p = 0.002), specimen size greater than 4 cm (OR 2.999; 95% CI 1.603-5.611, p = 0.001), and electrocoagulation (OR 7.149; 95% CI 1.738-29.411, p = 0.006) were revealed to be independent risk factors of delayed ulcer healing. Meanwhile, persistent Helicobacter pylori infection was not related to the delayed ulcer healing. Large iatrogenic ulcer by ESD with massive hemostasis, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus or coagulation abnormalities, tends to take more than 3 months to heal. For such cases, initial dosage increment of PPI or addition of other anti-ulcer agents after ESD may be beneficial.

  11. Increased healing in diabetic toe ulcers in a multidisciplinary foot clinic-An observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almdal, T; Nielsen, A Anker; Nielsen, K E; Jørgensen, M E; Rasmussen, A; Hangaard, S; Siersma, V; Holstein, P E

    2015-12-01

    To study toe ulcer healing in patients with diabetic foot ulcers attending a multidisciplinary foot clinic over a 10 years period. The study was retrospective, consecutive and observational during 2001 through 2011. The patients were treated according to the International Consensus on the Diabetic Foot. During the period the chiropodist staffing in the foot clinic was doubled; new offloading material and orthopedic foot corrections for recalcitrant ulcers were introduced. Healing was investigated in toe ulcers in Cox regression models. 2634 patients developed foot ulcers, of which 1461 developed toe ulcers; in 790 patients these were neuropathic, in 551 they were neuro-ischemic and in 120 they were critically ischemic. One-year healing rates increased in the period 2001-2011 from 75% to 91% for neuropathic toe ulcers and from 72% to 80% for neuro-ischemic toe ulcers, while no changes was observed for ischemic toe ulcers. Adjusted for changes in the patient population, the overall rate of healing for neuropathic and neuro-ischemic toe ulcers almost doubled (HR=1.95 [95% CI: 1.36-2.80]). The results show that the healing of toe ulcers improved. This outcome could not be explained by changes in the patient characteristics, but coincided with a number of improvements in organization and therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Local blockage of EMMPRIN impedes pressure ulcers healing in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xi-Lan; Luo, Xiao; Wang, Ze-Xin; Yang, Guo-Li; Liu, Ji-Zhong; Liu, Ya-Qiong; Li, Ming; Chen, Min; Xia, Yong-Mei; Liu, Jun-Jie; Qiu, Shu-Ping; Gong, Xiao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Excessive extracellular matrix degradation caused by the hyperfunction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) has been implicated in the failure of pressure ulcers healing. EMMPRIN, as a widely expressed protein, has emerged as an important regulator of MMP activity. We hypothesize that EMMPRIN affects the process of pressure ulcer healing by modulating MMP activity. In the rat pressure ulcer model, the expression of EMMPRIN in ulcers detected by Western blot was elevated compared with that observed in normal tissue. To investigate the role of EMMPRIN in regulating ulcer healing, specific antibodies against EMMPRIN were used via direct administration on the pressure ulcer. Local blockage of EMMPRIN resulted in a poor ulcer healing process compared with control ulcers, which was the opposite of our expectation. Furthermore, inhibiting EMMPRIN minimally impacted MMP activity. However, the collagen content in the pressure ulcer was reduced in the EMMPRIN treated group. Angiogenesis and the expression of angiogenic factors in pressure ulcers were also reduced by EMMPRIN local blockage. The results in the present study indicate a novel effect of EMMPRIN in the regulation of pressure ulcer healing by controlling the collagen contents and angiogenesis rather than MMPs activity.

  13. Increased healing in diabetic toe ulcers in a multidisciplinary foot clinic—An observational cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, Thomas Peter; Nielsen, A.A.; Nielsen, K.E.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study toe ulcer healing in patients with diabetic foot ulcers attending a multidisciplinary foot clinic over a 10 years period. METHODS: The study was retrospective, consecutive and observational during 2001 through 2011. The patients were treated according to the International Consensus...... on the Diabetic Foot. During the period the chiropodist staffing in the foot clinic was doubled; new offloading material and orthopedic foot corrections for recalcitrant ulcers were introduced. Healing was investigated in toe ulcers in Cox regression models. RESULTS: 2634 patients developed foot ulcers, of which...

  14. An exploration of current leg ulcer management practices in an Irish community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke-Moloney, M; Keane, N; Kavanagh, E

    2006-10-01

    To establish the prevalence of leg ulceration in the Irish Health Service Executive (HSE) mid-western region and to determine the level of assessment and treatment patients have been receiving in the local community. Before the introduction of a Doppler training programme, all public health and community health nurses working in the Irish HSE mid-western area were requested to complete an audit form on each patient being treated for leg ulceration during a predefined one-week period. This form recorded details on patient demographics, ulcer aetiology, assessment and treatment. Out of 97 nurses, 96 responded to this audit, giving a response rate of 98.9%. A total of 429 patients with 449 leg ulcers were identified. Mean age was 75.5 years (standard deviation 10.7). Overall prevalence was 0.12%, which increased to 1.2% in those aged 70 years and over. Women were almost twice as likely as men to be affected (ratio of 1.8:1). The main causes of ulceration were reported as venous incompetence accounting for 63.3% (284/449) and arterial insufficiency accounting for 8% (36/449) of all ulcers. Only 59.9% (269/449) of all ulcerated limbs had ABPI measurements performed. Of those reported as venous in origin, 71.8% (204/284) had ABPI measurements recorded. Evidence-based care was generally apparent in this group, with 47.5% (97/204) receiving high compression and 18.1% (37/204) receiving reduced compression. However, in venous leg ulcers where ABPIs were not recorded (n=80) care appeared haphazard and inappropriate. Our study has identified the benefit of ABPI Doppler assessment.This assessment could be done in local health centres by trained nurses who could provide more appropriate and timely care to patients, thereby improving outcomes and relieving pressure on acute hospital clinics.

  15. Atypical leg ulcers after sclerotherapy for treatment of varicose veins: Case reports and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Mwipatayi, Bibombe P.; Western, Catherine E.; Wong, Jackie; Angel, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Skin necrosis is a rare complication of foam sclerotherapy, a common form of treatment for varicose veins. Presentation of case: Both patients presented to the outpatient clinic within 2–14 days after foam sclerotherapy with Aethoxysklerol® 1%, with severe soft tissue and skin necrosis. Further aggressive treatment of the ulcer was required to resolve the necrosis, resulting in marked residual scar and well granulated leg ulcer respectively. Discussion: Foam sclerotherapy ...

  16. Management of venous leg ulcers in general practice - a practical guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sankar; Sreedharan, Sadhishaan

    2014-09-01

    Chronic venous leg ulcers are the most common wounds seen in general practice. Their management can be both challenging and time-consuming. To produce a short practical guideline incorporating the TIME concept and A2BC2D approach to help general practitioners and their practice nurses in delivering evidence-based initial care to patients with chronic venous leg ulcers. Most chronic venous leg ulcers can be managed effectively in the general practice setting by following the simple, evidence-based approach described in this article. Figure 1 provides a flow chart to aid in this process. Figure 2 illustrates the principles of management in general practice. Effective management of chronic ulcers involves the assessment of both the ulcer and the patient. The essential requirements of management are to debride the ulcer with appropriate precautions, choose dressings that maintain adequate moisture balance, apply graduated compression bandage after evaluation of the arterial circulation and address the patient's concerns, such as pain and offensive wound discharge.

  17. The efficacy of topical Royal Jelly on diabetic foot ulcers healing: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Siavash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Foot ulcers and infections are the major sources of morbidity in individuals with diabetes mellitus. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of topical Royal Jelly (a worker honey bee product on healing diabetic foot ulcers. Methods: Diabetic patients with foot ulcers that were referred to our clinic at Khorshid Hospital, Isfahan, Iran; were evaluated three times a week and treated according to standard treatments consisted of offloading, infection control, vascular improvement and debridement if required. In addition, all ulcers were measured and then topical sterile 5% Royal Jelly was applied on the total surface area of the wounds. Eventually, they were covered with sterile dressings. Each patient was followed for a period of three months or until the complete healing. Results: A total of eight patients were enrolled in this study. Of these, two had two ulcers and, therefore, ten ulcers were evaluated. Two ulcers were excluded. Seven of the remained eight ulcers healed. Mean duration of complete healing was 41 days. One ulcer did not completely heal but improved to 40% smaller in length, 32% in width and 28% in depth. The mean length, width and depth reduction rates were 0.35 mm/day, 0.28 mm/day and 0.11 mm/day, respectively. Conclusions: Royal Jelly dressing may be an effective method for treating diabetic foot ulcers besides standard treatments.

  18. Chronic ulceration of the leg following extensive scarring due to a snake bite complicated by squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, L.F.B.; Barcelos, M.G.; Nogueira Neto, N.C.; Meohas, W.; Pinto, L.W.; Melo, P.A.; Smith, J.

    2000-01-01

    Chronic ulcers of the leg are common in Brazil, perhaps more common than in the developed world. We report a case of a chronic ulcer of the leg following extensive scarring due to a bite by a venomous snake, which eventually led to a squamous cell carcinoma. (orig.)

  19. Coping style and depression influence the healing of diabetic foot ulcers: observational and mechanistic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedhara, K; Miles, J N V; Wetherell, M A; Dawe, K; Searle, A; Tallon, D; Cullum, N; Day, A; Dayan, C; Drake, N; Price, P; Tarlton, J; Weinman, J; Campbell, R

    2010-08-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that the healing of diabetic foot ulcers is affected by psychosocial factors such as distress. We examined this proposal in a prospective study, in which we considered the role of psychological distress and coping style in the healing of diabetic foot ulcers over a 24 week period. We also explored the role of salivary cortisol and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as potential mechanisms. For this prospective observational study we recruited 93 (68 men; mean age 60 years) patients with neuropathic or neuroischaemic diabetic foot ulcers from specialist podiatry clinics in secondary care. Clinical and demographic determinants of healing, psychological distress, coping, salivary cortisol and both MMP2 and MMP9 were assessed at baseline. Ulcers were assessed at baseline and at 6, 12 and 24 weeks post-baseline. The primary outcome was ulcer status at 24 weeks, i.e. healed vs not healed. After controlling for clinical and demographic determinants of healing, ulcer healing at 24 weeks was predicted by confrontation coping, but not by depression or anxiety. Patients with unhealed ulcers exhibited greater confrontation coping (model including depression: OR 0.809, 95% CI 0.704-0.929, p = 0.003; model including anxiety: OR 0.810, 95% CI 0.704-0.930, p = 0.003). However, change in ulcer size over the observation period was associated with depression only (p = 0.04, d = 0.31). Healed ulcers by 24 weeks were also associated with lower evening cortisol, higher precursor MMP2 and a greater cortisol awakening response. Confrontation coping and depression predict ulcer healing. Our preliminary enquiry into biological mechanisms suggests that cortisol and precursor MMP2 may underlie these relationships.

  20. A systematic review on the impact of leg ulceration on patients' quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rieger Monika A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A systematic review was conducted to analyse journal articles that describe or measure the impact of leg ulceration on patients' quality of life (QoL in order to improve the content of an educational programme that aims to enhance self-care agency in leg ulcer patients. Method Original articles published in English and German between 1990 and 2006 were included if the findings were analysed at the level of patients. Articles were excluded if (1 they investigated the impact of specific treatments or settings on QoL or (2 focused mainly on arterial ulcers or diabetic foot ulcers. Results Twenty-four original research articles met the inclusion criteria; 11 studies used a quantitative, 11 studies a qualitative, and 2 used a mixed method approach. The findings were collapsed into 5 core domains. Quantitative studies commonly investigated the parameters of pain, sleep, social isolation, and physical mobility. Patients had significantly more pain, more restrictions regarding social functioning, less vitality, and limitations with respect to emotional roles compared to the respective controls. Other problem areas identified were restrictions in work capacity, recreation, social interaction, psychological well-being, as well as problems caused by treatment regimes. Inconclusive results were obtained regarding pain intensity, physical restrictions, and gender effects. Limitations Numerous original studies neither undertook a differentiation of participants by ulcer aetiology nor did they analyse the results according to gender differences. Conclusion As leg ulceration has an impact on QoL, national guidelines on the treatment of leg ulceration need to more specifically address these far-ranging effects identified in this review.

  1. Compression therapies for chronic venous leg ulcers: interventions and adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latz CA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Christopher A Latz,1 Kellie R Brown,2 Ruth L Bush11Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Bryan, TX, USA; 2Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USAAbstract: Compression therapy has been the mainstay for the treatment of lower extremity edema, venous insufficiency, and particularly, venous ulcerative disease. Though modern surgical treatments exist, none are completely effective without good compressive options to allow for decreased swelling and better oxygenation of damaged tissues. This review article will describe the pathophysiology and presentation of lower extremity venous ulcerations, as well as current options for compression therapy. The benefits, along with the major pitfall of nonadherence, will also be discussed.Keywords: venous disease, chronic venous insufficiency, venous ulceration

  2. Treatment of a non-healing diabetic foot ulcer with platelet-rich plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak H Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lower extremity ulcers and amputations are an increasing problem among individuals with diabetes. Among diabetes mellitus-related complications, foot ulceration is the most common, affecting approximately 15% of diabetic patients during their lifetime. The pathogenesis of diabetic ulcer is peripheral sensory neuropathy, calluses, oedema and peripheral vascular disease. Diabetic ulcer is managed by adequate control of infections and blood sugar levels, surgical debridement with various dressings and off loading of the foot from pressure. In spite of these standard measures, some recalcitrant non-healing ulcers need additional growth factors for healing. Autologous platelet-rich plasma is easy and cost-effective method in treating diabetic ulcers as it provides necessary growth factors which enhance healing.

  3. The Canadian Bandaging Trial: Evidence-informed leg ulcer care and the effectiveness of two compression technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopman Wilma M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Objective: To determine the relative effectiveness of evidence-informed practice using two high compression systems: four-layer (4LB and short-stretch bandaging (SSB in community care of venous leg ulcers. Design and Setting: Pragmatic, multi-centre, parallel-group, open-label, randomized controlled trial conducted in 10 centres. Cognitively intact adults (≥18 years referred for community care (home or clinic with a venous ulceration measuring ≥0.7cm and present for ≥1 week, with an ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI ≥0.8, without medication-controlled Diabetes Mellitus or a previous failure to improve with either system, were eligible to participate. Methods Consenting individuals were randomly allocated (computer-generated blocked randomization schedule to receive either 4LB or SSB following an evidence-informed protocol. Primary endpoint: time-to- healing of the reference ulcer. Secondary outcomes: recurrence rates, health-related quality of life (HRQL, pain, and expenditures. Results 424 individuals were randomized (4LB n = 215; SSB n = 209 and followed until their reference ulcer was healed (or maximum 30 months. An intent-to-treat analysis was conducted on all participants. Median time to ulcer healing in the 4LB group was 62 days [95% confidence interval (CI 51 to 73], compared with 77 days (95% CI 63 to 91 in the SSB group. The unadjusted Kaplan-Meier curves revealed the difference in the distribution of cumulative healing times was not significantly different between group (log rank χ2 = 0.001, P = 0.98 nor ulcers recurrence (4LB, 10.1%; SSB, 13.3%; p = 0.345. Multivariable Cox Proportional Hazard Modeling also showed no significant between-bandage differences in healing time after controlling for significant covariates (p = 0.77. At 3-months post-baseline there were no differences in pain (no pain: 4LB, 22.7%; SSB, 26.7%; p = 0.335, or HRQL (SF-12 Mental Component Score: 4LB, 55.1; SSB, 55.8; p = 0.615; SF

  4. The Canadian Bandaging Trial: Evidence-informed leg ulcer care and the effectiveness of two compression technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Objective: To determine the relative effectiveness of evidence-informed practice using two high compression systems: four-layer (4LB) and short-stretch bandaging (SSB) in community care of venous leg ulcers. Design and Setting: Pragmatic, multi-centre, parallel-group, open-label, randomized controlled trial conducted in 10 centres. Cognitively intact adults (≥18 years) referred for community care (home or clinic) with a venous ulceration measuring ≥0.7cm and present for ≥1 week, with an ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) ≥0.8, without medication-controlled Diabetes Mellitus or a previous failure to improve with either system, were eligible to participate. Methods Consenting individuals were randomly allocated (computer-generated blocked randomization schedule) to receive either 4LB or SSB following an evidence-informed protocol. Primary endpoint: time-to- healing of the reference ulcer. Secondary outcomes: recurrence rates, health-related quality of life (HRQL), pain, and expenditures. Results 424 individuals were randomized (4LB n = 215; SSB n = 209) and followed until their reference ulcer was healed (or maximum 30 months). An intent-to-treat analysis was conducted on all participants. Median time to ulcer healing in the 4LB group was 62 days [95% confidence interval (CI) 51 to 73], compared with 77 days (95% CI 63 to 91) in the SSB group. The unadjusted Kaplan-Meier curves revealed the difference in the distribution of cumulative healing times was not significantly different between group (log rank χ2 = 0.001, P = 0.98) nor ulcers recurrence (4LB, 10.1%; SSB, 13.3%; p = 0.345). Multivariable Cox Proportional Hazard Modeling also showed no significant between-bandage differences in healing time after controlling for significant covariates (p = 0.77). At 3-months post-baseline there were no differences in pain (no pain: 4LB, 22.7%; SSB, 26.7%; p = 0.335), or HRQL (SF-12 Mental Component Score: 4LB, 55.1; SSB, 55.8; p = 0.615; SF-12 Physical

  5. Quality of life psychosocial characteristics in Greek patients with leg ulcers: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris, Anargyros; Armyra, Kalliopi; Christodoulou, Christos; Sgontzou, Themis; Karypidis, Dimitrios; Kontochristopoulos, George; Liordou, Fotini; Zakopoulou, Nikoletta; Zouridaki, Eftychia

    2016-10-01

    Chronic leg ulcers are a public health problem that can have a significant impact on the patient's physical, socioeconomic and psychological status. The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of life, anxiety and depression, self-esteem and loneliness in patients suffering from leg ulcers. A total of 102 patients were enrolled in the study. The quality of life, anxiety and depression, self-esteem and loneliness of the patient were assessed using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale (RSES) and the UCLA Loneliness Scale (UCLA-Version 3), respectively. The mean DLQI score was 13·38 ± 2·59, suggesting a serious effect on the quality of life of patients. Those with leg ulcers had statistically significant higher scores according to the HADS-total scale (P = 0·031) and HADS-anxiety subscale (P = 0·015) compared with healthy volunteers. Moreover, a statistically significant difference was found between the two groups concerning the UCLA-scale (P = 0·029). Female patients presented with a higher score of anxiety (P = 0·027) and social isolation (P = 0·048), and worse quality of life (P = 0·018) than male patients. A severe quality of life impairment was documented, reflecting a significant psychosocial impact on patients with leg ulcers. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Do ready-made compression stockings fit the anatomy of the venous leg ulcer patient?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, S; Bermark, S; Gottrup, F

    2014-01-01

    . CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that there is a need to standardise measuring methods in the selection of ready-made below-knee compression stockings and a need for an evaluation of the present stocking sizes in relation to the anatomy of the venous leg ulcer patient. This study has shown that ready...

  7. Myeloid Sarcoma Developing in Prexisting Hydroxyurea-Induced Leg Ulcer in a Polycythemia Vera Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim Nafil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma (MS is an extramedullary tumour consisting of myeloblasts or immature myeloid cells located in an extramedullary site. It may occur at presentation of AML, at relapse, or prior to the onset of frank leukemia. We report a rare case of MS developing in prexisting Hydroxyurea-induced leg Ulcer in a 70-year-old woman.

  8. Venous Leg Ulcers: Effectiveness of new compression therapy/moist ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (Cutimed Sorbact) and compression bandages (Comprilan,. Tensoplast) in the initial oedema phase, followed by a compression stocking system delivering 40mmHg (JOBST. UlcerCARE). Due to their high stiffness characteristics, these compression products exert a high working pressure during walking and a comfortably ...

  9. Supporting adherence and healthy lifestyles in leg ulcer patients: systematic development of the Lively Legs program for dermatology outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Maud M; Bartholomew, L Kay; Wensing, Michel; van de Kerkhof, Peter; van Achterberg, Theo

    2006-05-01

    The objective of our project was to develop a lifestyle program for leg ulcer patients at outpatient clinics for dermatology. We used the intervention-mapping (IM) framework for systematically developing theory and evidence based health promotion programs. We started with a needs-assessment. A multidisciplinary project group of health care workers and patients was involved in all five IM steps; formulating proximal program objectives, selecting methods and strategies, producing program components, planning for adoption and implementation and planning for evaluation. Several systematic literature reviews and original studies were performed to support this process. Social Cognitive Theory was selected as the main theory behind the program 'Lively Legs' and was combined with elements of Goal-Setting Theory, the precaution adoption model and motivational interviewing. The program is conducted through health counseling by dermatology nurses and was successfully pre-tested. Also, an implementation and evaluation plan were made. Intervention mapping helped us to succeed in developing a lifestyle program with clear goals and methods, operational strategies and materials and clear procedures. Coaching leg ulcer patients towards adherence with compression therapy and healthy lifestyles should be taken on without delay. Systematic development of lifestyle programs for other patient groups should be encouraged.

  10. Can Wound Exudate from Venous Leg Ulcers Measure Wound Pain Status?: A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taichi Goto

    Full Text Available We investigated the associations between the self-evaluated pain status and two pain biomarker candidates, nerve growth factor and S100A8/A9, in exudate from venous leg ulcer to finally develop an objective pain evaluation method. Patients with venous leg ulcer participated in this cross-sectional observational study conducted between April and October 2014 at two medical facilities. During routine wound care, each participant self-evaluated their pain status at each examination using the 10-point numerical rating scale (present pain intensity and the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire 2 (continuous pain, intermittent pain, neuropathic pain, affective descriptors, and total score. Venous leg ulcer exudate sample was collected after wound cleansing. The nerve growth factor and S100A8/A9 concentrations in the venous leg ulcer exudate were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and standardized according to the wound area. The association between each pain status and the two standardized protein concentrations was evaluated using Spearman's correlation coefficient. In 30 sample collected from 13 participants, the standardized nerve growth factor concentration was negatively correlated with continuous pain (ρ = -0.47, P = 0.01, intermittent pain (ρ = -0.48, P = 0.01, neuropathic pain (ρ = -0.51, P = 0.01, and total score (ρ = -0.46, P = 0.01. The standardized S100A8/A9 concentration was positively correlated with present pain intensity (ρ = 0.46, P = 0.03 and continuous pain (ρ = 0.48, P = 0.03. Thus, these two proteins may be useful for objective evaluation of wound pain in venous leg ulcer patients.

  11. Effectivity of artrihpi irrigation for diabetic ulcer healing: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayatri, Dewi; Asmorohadi, Aries; Dahlia, Debie

    2018-02-01

    The healing process of diabetic ulcer is often impeded by inflammation, infection, and decreased immune state. High pressure irrigation (10-15 psi) may be used to control the infection level. This research was designed to identify the effectiveness of artrihpi irrigation device towards diabetic ulcers in public hospitals in the Central Java. This research is a randomized control trial with cross over design. Sixty four subjects were selected using block randomization technique, and were divided into control and intervention group. The intervention was given in 6 days along with wound healing evaluation in every 3 days. The results demonstrated that there was a significant difference decrease scoring healing after treatment, even though the difference scoring healing between both groups was not statistically significant. However, it means difference was found that in the intervention artrihpi the wound healing was better than the spuit. These results illustrates the artrihpi may be solution of using high pressure irrigation to help healing process diabetic ulcers.

  12. Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia: An unusual cause of nonhealing leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navjyot Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM is one of the rare hematological malignancies and accounts for 1%–2% of all blood cancers. While fatigue is the most common presentation; hyperviscosity syndrome, symptomatic cryoglobulinemia, and cold agglutinin disease (CAD are the characteristic symptoms. However, they occur only in 5%–15% of all patients of WM. We discuss a 63-year-old patient who presented with nonhealing ulcers on both lower limbs and severe anemia. His blood clotted in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid sample tubes, and there was difficulty in getting blood cross matched for transfusing him. During evaluation, he was found to have high erythrocyte sedimentation rate, albumin globulin reversal with serum protein electrophoresis, and immunofixation suggestive of immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy. There was evidence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and skin biopsy from ulcers revealed hyaline thrombosis and deposition of cryoglobulins. He was diagnosed to have WM with cryoglobulinemia and CAD.

  13. [Magnetic therapy in treatment of patients with leg ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseenko, A V; Gusak, V V; Tarabanchuk, V V; Iftodiĭ, A G; Sherban, N G; Stoliar, V F

    1998-01-01

    Various magnetic (continuous current, alternating current and "running" impulse) fields were applied in 74 patients with trophic ulcers of lower limbs. 10-12 days after the beginning of the magnetic therapy wound surface has completely cleaned from necrotic tissues, surrounding inflammatory changes eliminated, epithelization of the wounds began. The most pronounced clinical effect was observed after the use of "running" impulse of magnetic field.

  14. Topical Administration of Pirfenidone Increases Healing of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Randomized Crossover Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Janka-Zires

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Only 30 percent of chronic diabetic foot ulcers heal after 20 weeks of standard treatment. Pirfenidone is a drug with biological, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of topical pirfenidone added to conventional treatment in noninfected chronic diabetic foot ulcers. This was a randomized crossover study. Group 1 received topical pirfenidone plus conventional treatment for 8 weeks; after this period, they were switched to receive conventional treatment only for 8 more weeks. In group 2, the order of the treatments was the opposite. The end points were complete ulcer healing and size reduction. Final data were obtained from 35 ulcers in 24 patients. Fifty-two percent of ulcers treated with pirfenidone healed before 8 weeks versus 14.3% treated with conventional treatment only (P=0.025. Between 8 and 16 weeks, 30.8% ulcers that received pirfenidone healed versus 0% with conventional treatment (P=0.081. By week 8, the reduction in ulcer size was 100% [73–100] with pirfenidone versus 57.5% with conventional treatment [28.9–74] (P=0.011. By week 16, the reduction was 93% [42.7–100] with pirfenidone and 21.8% [8–77.5] with conventional treatment (P=0.050. The addition of topical pirfenidone to conventional treatment significantly improves the healing of chronic diabetic noninfected foot ulcers.

  15. Gastroprotective and ulcer healing effects of Piptadeniastrum Africanum on experimentally induced gastric ulcers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateufack, Gilbert; Domgnim Mokam, Elisabeth Carol; Mbiantcha, Marius; Dongmo Feudjio, Rostand Breuil; David, Nana; Kamanyi, Albert

    2015-07-08

    Gastric peptic ulcer is one of the common disorders of gastrointestinal tract, which occur due to an imbalance between the offensive and defensive factors. It is an illness that affects a considerable number of people worldwide. This study was conducted to evaluate the antiulcerogenic and antiulcer effects and recognize the basic mechanism of action of Piptadeniastrum africanum stem bark extracts. The aqueous and methanol extracts of Piptadeniastrum africanum were administered at the doses 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg to evaluate their effects on gastric ulcer induced by the HCl/ethanol mixture, indomethacin and acetic acid in Wistar strain male adult rats, aged between 12 and 16 weeks and weighing between 180 and 220 g. Ranitidine, Maalox and Misoprostol were used as standard drugs. Histopathological examination and nitric oxide level were performed to evaluate the basic mechanism of action of Piptadeniastrum africanum. Phytochemical screening was carried out to identify known phytochemicals present in these extracts. The aqueous and methanol extracts of stem bark of Piptadeniastrum africanum significantly inhibited (p ulceration induced by HCl/ethanol to the percentages of inhibition of 81.38; 98.75 and 100 % for the aqueous extract and then 75.83, 89.76 and 96.52 % for the methanol extract, and with the Indomethacin-induced ulcers, aqueous and methanol extracts of bark of Piptadeniastrum africanum reduce significantly (p cure 35.75; 52.33 and 98.58 % for the aqueous extract, and 33.7; 51.97; and 65.93 to the methanol extract. The results revealed a significant reduction of ulcerated surface in both extracts and increase of nitric oxide (NO) level with methanol extract. When compared to methanol extract, aqueous extract showed more pronounced effects, corresponding to percentages of healing of 59. 92; 84.12 and 59.65 % for the aqueous extract; and 70.43; 55.49 and 57.59 % for the methanol extract in the ulcer induced by acetic acid, all at the respective doses of

  16. The Role of Complex Treatment in Mixed Leg Ulcers - A Case Report of Vascular, Surgical and Physical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollina, Uwe; Heinig, Birgit; Stelzner, Christian; Hansel, Gesina; Schönlebe, Jacqueline; Tchernev, Georgi; Lotti, Torello

    2018-01-25

    Leg ulcers are a burden to patients, their families and society. The second most common cause of chronic leg ulcers is the mixed arterio-venous type. An 80-year-old female patient presented to our department due to painful enlarging chronic leg ulcer of mixed arteriovenous origin on her left lower leg. She suffered from peripheral arterial occlusive disease stage I and chronic venous insufficiency Widmer grade IIIa, and a number of comorbidities. The aim of our ulcer treatment was a complete and stable wound closure that was hampered by arterial occlusion, exposed tendon, and renal insiffuciency. To improve the prognosis for ulcer surgery, we performed percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, transcutaneous CO 2 and deep ulcer shaving. The wound was closed by sandwich transplantation using elastin-collagen dermal template and meshed split skin graft. She had a 100% graft take with rapid reduction of severe wound pain. Complex approaches are necessary, to gain optimum results in leg ulcer therapy in mixed leg ulcers. Therapeutic nihilism should be abandonend.

  17. Calciphylaxis and Martorell Hypertensive Ischemic Leg Ulcer: Same Pattern - One Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    This review presents a closer look at four diseases which are probably closely related to one another pathophysiologically: (a) calciphylaxis (distal pattern); (b) calciphylaxis (proximal pattern); (c) Martorell hypertensive ischemic leg ulcer; (d) calciphylaxis with normal renal and parathyroid function (synonym: eutrophication). The four diseases have largely the same risk factors: (1) arterial hypertension, (2) diabetes mellitus (types 1 and 2), (3) secondary or tertiary hyperparathyroidism (in end-stage kidney disease) and (4) oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists. They share the same clinical patterns: necrotizing livedo, skin infarctions at typical locations and acral gangrene in calciphylaxis. They also share the same histopathology: ischemic subcutaneous arteriolosclerosis and small-artery disease and 'miniaturizing' Mönckeberg medial calcinosis. The treatment concept for the acute phase of the diseases is also broadly similar. In addition to an optimized control of the cardiovascular risk factors, a proactive wound approach (necrosectomy, negative pressure wound treatment with vacuum dressings, and early skin grafts supported by systemic antibiotic therapy) leads most rapidly and effectively to a reduction of the initially severe wound pain, and finally to complete healing of the wound. Oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists should be stopped. In extensive cases, the use of intravenous sodium thiosulfate is recommended. All four diagnoses are little known in the medical schools of most countries. The need to improve familiarity with these four closely related disorders is therefore great. In particular, the risk of confusion with pyoderma gangrenosum is a major diagnostic problem which can lead to false and even damaging treatment. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Changes in patient's quality of life comparing conservative and surgical treatment of venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankūnas, Vytautas; Rimdeika, Rytis; Jasenas, Marius; Samsanavicius, Donatas

    2004-01-01

    Leg ulcers of different etiology disable up to 1% of total population, and up to 15% individuals over 70 years old. It is an old disease, which troubles the patients and medical personnel and is hard to cure. It might take several years to cure the ulcer fully. Most of the patients with leg ulcers are being treated at home, not in the outpatient departments or hospitals; therefore there is not much information on how the ulcer affects the patient's everyday life and its quality. The researchers often analyze only the financial part of this disorder forgetting its human part: pain, social isolation, and decreased mobility. There are many questionnaires and methods to analyze the quality of life of the patients with leg ulceration. It is often unclear if we should treat the ulcer conservatively for a long time or if part of resources should be used for operation (skin grafting) and the time of treatment should be shortened. To see the advantage of both methods and the influence of the ulcer treatment to the quality of life we decided to estimate the functionality of surgical and conservative treatment. We have analyzed the case histories and the data of special questionnaires of 44 patients, which were treated in Department of Plastic Surgery and Burns of Kaunas University of Medicine Hospital in the period of 2001 January-2004 February and had large trophic leg ulcers (m=254 cm2) for 6 months or more. Ten patients were treated conservatively and 34 patients were treated by skin grafting. All of them were interviewed after 3-6 months. We found that the pain in the place of the ulcers has decreased for the patients, who were treated surgically. By making the differences of the pain more exact we found out, that the patients have been feeling pain before the operation and when interviewing them the second time they told that they felt discomfort, not pain. The intensity of pain remained the same for the patients treated conservatively. The regression of pain also

  19. Effect of sialoadenectomy and synthetic human urogastrone on healing of chronic gastric ulcers in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    1986-01-01

    The effect of extirpation of the submandibular glands, an exocrine organ for epidermal growth factor/urogastrone (EGF/URO), and the effect of oral administration of synthetic human (EGF/URO) on healing of chronic gastric ulcers in rats has been investigated. Removal of the submandibular glands...... delayed healing of chronic gastric ulcers when examined after 50, 100, and 200 days. Oral administration of synthetic human EGF/URO stimulated gastric ulcer healing when examined after 25 and 50 days of treatment. The effect of synthetic human EGF/URO was comparable with that of cimetidine. The combined...... administration of synthetic human EGF/URO and cimetidine further increased healing of gastric ulcers compared with administration of each substance. Neither synthetic human EGF/URO, nor removal of the submandibular glands had any influence on gastric acid secretion. This study showed that the submandibular...

  20. [Comparison of the effectiveness and cost of treatment with humid environment as compared to traditional cure. Clinical trial on primary care patients with venous leg ulcers and pressure ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capillas Pérez, R; Cabré Aguilar, V; Gil Colomé, A M; Gaitano García, A; Torra i Bou, J E

    2000-01-01

    The discovery of moist environment dressings as alternatives to the traditional treatments based on exposing wounds to air, opened new expectations for the care and treatment of chronic wounds. Over the years, these expectations have led to the availability of new moist environment dressings which have made it possible to improve the care provided to patients suffering this kind of wounds, as well as providing important reasons to weigh in terms of cost-benefit-effectiveness at the time of selecting which type of treatment should be employed. The lack of comparative analysis among traditional treatments and moist environment treatments for chronic wounds among patients receiving primary health care led the authors to perform an analysis comparing these aforementioned options of treatment on patients suffering venous leg ulcers or pressure ulcers. The authors designed a Randomized Clinical Trial involving patients receiving ambulatory care in order to compare the effectiveness and cost-benefit of traditional versus moist environment dressing during the treatment of patients suffering stage II or III pressure ulcers or venous leg ulcers. In this trial, variables related to effectiveness of both treatments, as well as their costs were analyzed. 70 wounds were included in this Randomized Clinical Trial, 41 were venous leg ulcers of which 21 received a moist environment treatment while 20 received traditional cure, the other 29 wounds were pressure ulcers of which 15 received moist environment dressings treatment and 14 received traditional dressings. No statistically significant differences were found among the defining variables for these lesions in either group under treatment. In the venous leg ulcer study group, the authors conclusions were an average of 18.13 days, 16.33 treatment sessions and a cost of 10,616 pesetas to heal one square centimeter of the initial surface area of a wound on patients treated with traditional treatment compared to an average of 18

  1. High probability of healing without amputation of plantar forefoot ulcers in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örneholm, Hedvig; Apelqvist, Jan; Larsson, Jan; Eneroth, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is an important entity which in many cases is the first serious complication in diabetes. Although a plantar forefoot location is common, there are few studies on larger cohorts and in such studies there is often a combination of various types of ulcer and ulcer locations. The purpose of this study is to discern the outcome of plantar forefoot ulcers and their specific characteristics in a large cohort. All patients (n = 770), presenting with a plantar forefoot ulcer at a multidisciplinary diabetes foot clinic from January 1, 1983 to December 31, 2012 were considered for the study. Seven hundred one patients (median age 67 [22-95]) fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were followed according to a preset protocol until final outcome (healing or death). Severe peripheral vascular disease was present in 26% of the patients and 14% had evidence of deep infection upon arrival at the foot clinic. Fifty-five percent (385/701) of the patients healed without foot surgery, 25% (173/701) healed after major debridement, 9% (60/701) healed after minor or major amputation and 12% (83/701) died unhealed. Median healing time was 17 weeks. An ulcer classified as Wagner grade 1 or 2 at inclusion and independent living were factors associated with a higher healing rate. Seventy-nine percent of 701 patients with diabetes and a plantar forefoot ulcer treated at a multidisciplinary diabetes foot clinic healed without amputation. For one third some form of foot surgery was needed to achieve healing. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  2. The effect of nitric oxide releasing cream on healing pressure ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Saidkhani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pressure ulcer is one of the main concerns of nurses in medical centers around the world, which, if untreated, causes irreparable problems for patients. In recent years, nitric oxide (NO has been proposed as an effective method for wound healing. This study was conducted to determine the effect of nitric oxide on pressure ulcer healing. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 58 patients with pressure ulcer at hospitals affiliated to Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences were homogenized and later divided randomly into two groups of treatment (nitric oxide cream; n = 29 and control (placebo cream; n = 29. In this research, the data collection tool was the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH. At the outset of the study (before using the cream, the patients' ulcers were examined weekly in terms of size, amount of exudates, and tissue type using the PUSH tool for 3 weeks. By integrating these three factors, wound healing was determined. Data were analyzed using SPSS. Results: Although no significant difference was found in terms of the mean of score size, the amount of exudates, and the tissue type between the two groups, the mean of total score (healing between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.04. Conclusions: Nitric oxide cream seems to accelerate wound healing. Therefore, considering its easy availability and cost-effectiveness, it can be used for treating pressure ulcers in the future.

  3. The effect of nitric oxide releasing cream on healing pressure ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidkhani, Vahid; Asadizaker, Marziyeh; Khodayar, Mohammad Javad; Latifi, Sayed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pressure ulcer is one of the main concerns of nurses in medical centers around the world, which, if untreated, causes irreparable problems for patients. In recent years, nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed as an effective method for wound healing. This study was conducted to determine the effect of nitric oxide on pressure ulcer healing. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 58 patients with pressure ulcer at hospitals affiliated to Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences were homogenized and later divided randomly into two groups of treatment (nitric oxide cream; n = 29) and control (placebo cream; n = 29). In this research, the data collection tool was the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH). At the outset of the study (before using the cream), the patients' ulcers were examined weekly in terms of size, amount of exudates, and tissue type using the PUSH tool for 3 weeks. By integrating these three factors, wound healing was determined. Data were analyzed using SPSS. Results: Although no significant difference was found in terms of the mean of score size, the amount of exudates, and the tissue type between the two groups, the mean of total score (healing) between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.04). Conclusions: Nitric oxide cream seems to accelerate wound healing. Therefore, considering its easy availability and cost-effectiveness, it can be used for treating pressure ulcers in the future. PMID:27186212

  4. Effect of Infrared Radiation on the Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Ashrafalsadat; Sadeghi Moghadam, Ali; Shariati, Abdalali; karimi, Hamid; Haghighizadeh, Mohamad Hossien

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot ulcer is a worldwide health care concern affecting tens of thousands of patients. If these ulcers left untreated, they can create severe complications. Objectives This study was designed to examine the effect of infrared radiation on the healing of diabetic foot ulcer. Patients and Methods This clinical trial was performed on 50 patients referred to Dr. Ganjavian hospital in Dezful city, Iran, with diabetic foot ulcer degree 1 and 2 (based on Wegener Scale). Sample size was determined based on relevant studies of the recent decade. Patients were classified into the intervention and control groups (n = 25 in each group) in terms of age, gender, degree of ulcer, ulcer site and body mass index. In this study, work progress was evaluated according to the checklist of diabetic foot ulcer healing evaluation. Results The results of the current study showed that there was a statistically significant difference in healing ulcers (P < 0.05) and mean healing time (P < 0.05) between the two groups. Conclusions Using the infrared plus routine dressing is more effective than using merely routine dressing. PMID:27942260

  5. Topical application of amelogenin extracellular matrix protein in non-healing venous ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burçin Abud

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Treatment of chronic venous ulcers of the lower extremity is still an important difficulty. The principal treatment of these ulcers includes compression therapy, local wound care and surgery. Unresponsiveness to these standard treatments is a frequent situation with negative effects on life quality and reductions in personal productivity. Therefore, there is a need for new applications to increase the effectiveness of treatment in treatment-resistant cases. In the present study, we retrospectively evaluated the results of topical application of amelogenin extracellular matrix protein in resistant venous ulcers. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the records of patients with treatment-resistant venous ulceration who were treated with amelogenin extracellular matrix protein between June 2011 and December 2012.. Results: 26 patients (21 male and 5 female with a total number of 28 ulcers (24 patients with 1 ulcer, 2 patients with two ulcers were evaluated. The patients were treated with topically applied amelogenin extracellular matrix protein and regional four bandage compression. Bandages were changed weekly. Each cure continued for six weeks. In fourteen patients (15 ulcers, we observed a complete healing by the end of the first cure. In another twelve cases (13 ulcers, the same period resulted with a reduction in wound diameter. We continued to the second cure for these patients. By the end of the second cure, complete healing was achieved in five cases (6 ulcers. Conclusion: Topical application of amelogenin extracellular matrix protein may be considered as an effective therapeutic choice for refractory venous ulcers.

  6. Educational challenges and requirements for managing leg ulcers in the community.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Fiona

    2014-06-01

    The significant impact of leg ulcers upon quality of life and disease burden cannot be overemphasised, with the financial and economic impact from an individual, local and national perspective being widely acknowledged. This article attempts to highlight issues relating to education in leg ulcer management while identifying some current and emerging challenges faced in this area by professionals. With regard to education, formal training and perception of professionals, the provision of more specialised and focused training, increased use of patient-related outcome measures and the concept of knowledge brokering have been identified as important aspects in the planning and further development of education. Issues in the domains of community nursing, technology, pain management, nursing diagnosis, availability of research and recurrence were also highlighted.

  7. Combined use of an ibuprofen-releasing foam dressing and silver dressing on infected leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, B.; Gottrup, F.; Karlsmark, T.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect and safety of an ibuprofen-releasing foam (Biatain-Ibu, Coloplast A/S) combined with an ionised silver-releasing wound contact layer (Physiotulle Ag, Coloplast A/S) on painful, infected venous leg ulcers. METHOD: This open non-comparative study involved 24...... patients with painful, exuding, locally infected, and stalled venous leg ulcers. Persistent pain and pain at dressing change were monitored using a 11-point numerical box scale (NBS). The composition of the wound bed, the dressing combination's ability to absorb exudate and minimise leakage, ibuprofen...... dressing application, the mean concentration of ibuprofen in the wound exudate reached a constant level of 35 +/- 21 microg/ml.After 31 days, the relative wound area had reduced by 42%, with an associated decrease in fibrin and an increase in granulation tissue.The number of patients with wound malodour...

  8. Low anti-streptokinase IgG concentrations following streptokinase-streptodornase treatment of leg ulcer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkvad, S; Breuning, L; Tvedskov, Jesper

    1994-01-01

    We have evaluated whether neutralising anti-streptokinase IgG antibodies are produced following streptokinase-streptodornase therapy of leg ulcer patients. Serum anti-streptokinase IgG concentrations in 10 leg ulcer patients were determined before, and 1 week, 2 weeks, and 3 weeks following the t...... the treatment. We observed only a negligible increase in neutralizing anti-streptokinase IgG concentrations during the observation period, which was probably of no therapeutical significance....

  9. [Research progress of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors on healing of chronic diabetic foot ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yunyi; Liang, Yujie; Ran, Xingwu

    2018-05-01

    To review the effect of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors on the wound healing and its mechanisms in chronic diabetic foot ulcers. The latest literature concerning DPP-4 inhibitors for chronic diabetic foot ulcers was extensively reviewed, as well as the potential benefit and mechanism of DPP-4 inhibitors on wound healing of diabetic foot ulcers was analyzed thoroughly. DPP-4 inhibitors can accelerated the ulcer healing. The mechanisms probably include inhibiting the expression of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and restoring the balance of the wound MMP and the tissue inhibitors of MMP; promoting recruitment of endothelial progenitor cells and augmenting angiogenesis; optimizing extracellular matrix construction and the immune response to persistent hypoxia in chronic diabetes wounds, and so on. At present, clinical researches show that DPP-4 inhibitors may be considered as an adjuvant treatment for chronic diabetic foot ulcers. DPP-4 inhibitors show promise in the local wound healing of chronic diabetic foot ulcers. However, more strictly designed, adequately powered, long-term follow-up, and high-quality randomized control trials are needed to further verify their efficacy and safety for chronic diabetic foot ulcers.

  10. The Probiotic Mixture VSL#3 Accelerates Gastric Ulcer Healing by Stimulating Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmani, Poonam; De Simone, Claudio; Chadee, Kris

    2013-01-01

    Studies assessing the effect and mechanism of probiotics on diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GI) including gastric ulcers are limited despite extensive work and promising results of this therapeutic option for other GI diseases. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which the probiotic mixture VSL#3 (a mixture of eight probiotic bacteria including Lactobacilli, Bifidobacteria and Streptococcus species) heals acetic acid induced gastric ulcer in rats. VSL#3 was administered orally at low (6×109 bacteria) or high (1.2×1010 bacteria) dosages from day 3 after ulcer induction for 14 consecutive days. VSL#3 treatments significantly enhanced gastric ulcer healing in a dose-dependent manner. To assess the mechanism(s) whereby VSL#3 exerted its protective effects, we quantified the gene expression of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, protein and expression of stomach mucin-Muc5ac, regulatory cytokine-IL-10, COX-2 and various growth factors. Of all the components examined, only expression and protein production of VEGF was increased 332-fold on day 7 in the ulcerated tissues of animals treated with VSL#3. Predictably, animals treated with VEGF neutralizing antibody significantly delayed gastric ulcer healing in VSL#3 treated animals. This is the first report to demonstrate high efficacy of the probiotic mixture VSL#3 in enhancing gastric ulcer healing. Probiotic efficacy was effective at higher concentrations of VSL#3 by specifically increasing the expression and production of angiogenesis promoting growth factors, primarily VEGF. PMID:23484048

  11. A new method for evaluating gastric ulcer healing by endoscopic ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, Y.; Nakazawa, S.; Tsukamoto, Y. (and others) (Ichinomiya Municipal Hospital (JP))

    1991-01-01

    The authors observed the quantitative estimation of the transmural changes associated with gastric ulcer healing by using endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). It was possible to diagnose the depth of ulcer by EUS. 48 patients were divided into three treatment groups. Group A (n=16) was treated with 800 mg cimetidine daily, group B (n=22) with 20 mg omeprazole daily, and group C (n=10) with 400 mg cimetidine + 300 mg gefarnate daily. EUS was performed before and after 2, 4 and 8 weeks of treatment. The groups were compared from the viewpoints of endoscopic findings and contraction rate of the length and the cross-sectional area of the ulcer in EUS pictures. The best healing of both the endoscopic and EUS findings was seen in group B. By estimating the changes inside the ulcer, EUS may provide useful information for choice of anti-ulcer agents. 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Factors Affecting Wound Healing in Individuals With Pressure Ulcers: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Azize; AAbbasoğlu, Aysel; Işık, Sevcan Avcı; Çevik, Banu; Saltan, Çiğdem; Elbaş, Nalan Özhan; Yalılı, Ayşe

    2018-02-01

    Owing to the number and severity of concomitant factors, pressure ulcers remain a significant problem. A retrospective study of data from adult patients with a pressure ulcer was conducted to identify factors that may affect their healing. Data from patients who were hospitalized between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2015, in a private Turkish university hospital who had a Stage 2, Stage 3, Stage 4, or unstageable pressure ulcer that was assessed using the Bates-Jensen Wound Assessment Tool (BWAT) were abstracted. The following variables were examined: demographic characteristics (gender, age, hospital unit, duration of hospitalization), health status and disease data (vital signs, mobility, nutrition, diagnosis, chronic diseases, medication), laboratory values (albumin, hemoglobin, blood glucose), and pressure ulcer characteristics (stage, location, healing status, duration) and pressure ulcer risk status as determined by patient Braden Scale score. Seventy-eight (78) patient records were identified. Patient mean age was 70.8 ± 13.47 years, and length of hospitalization was on average 32.52 ± 27.2 days. Most ulcers (62; 79.5%) were Stage 2 and located in the sacral area (59; 75.6%). Thirty-four (34) patients (43.6%) were discharged and 44 (56.4%) died. At the time of discharge or death, 65.4% of the ulcers had not healed. Patients whose wounds were healed were significantly more likely to have higher hemoglobin and mean arterial pressure, better mobility, received oral nutrition, and discharged from the hospital than patients whose ulcers did not heal. The results suggest that these variables, including Braden Scale and BWAT scores, might be considered when developing a treatment plan of care. Additional studies examining risk factors for nonhealing pressure ulcers, including studies with large samples to facilitate multivariate analyses, are needed.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of nutritional intervention on healing of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisashige, Akinori; Ohura, Takehiko

    2012-12-01

    Pressure ulcers not only affect quality of life among the elderly, but also bring a large economic burden. There is limited evidence available for the effectiveness of nutritional interventions for treatment of pressure ulcers. In Japan, recently, a 60-patient randomized controlled trial of nutritional intervention on pressure ulcers demonstrated improvement in healing of pressure ulcers, compared with conventional management. To evaluate value for money of nutritional intervention on healing of pressure ulcers, cost-effective analysis was carried out using these trial results. The analysis was carried out from a societal perspective. As effectiveness measures, pressure ulcer days (PUDs) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were estimated. Prevalence of pressure ulcers was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Utility score for pressure ulcers is derived from a cross-sectional survey among health professionals related to pressure ulcers. Costs (e.g., nutritional interventions and management of pressure ulcers) were estimated from trial data during observation and follow-up. Stochastic and qualitative sensitivity analyses were performed to examine the robustness of results. For observation (12 weeks) and follow-up (12-week observation plus 4-week follow-up), nutritional intervention reduced PUDs by 9.6 and 16.2 per person, and gained 0.226 × 10(-2) QALYs and 0.382 × 10(-2) QALYs per person, respectively. In addition, costs were reduced by $542 and $881 per person, respectively. This means nutritional intervention is dominant (cost savings and greater effectiveness). The sensitivity analyses showed the robustness of these results. Economic evaluation of nutritional intervention on healing pressure ulcers from a small randomized controlled trial showed that this intervention is cost saving with health improvement. Further studies are required to determine whether this is a cost-effective intervention for widespread use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and

  14. The Role of Pressure Offloading on Diabetic Foot Ulcer Healing and Prevention of Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A

    2016-09-01

    An increased plantar pressure is a causative factor in the development of plantar foot ulcers in people with diabetes mellitus, and ulcers are a precursor of lower extremity amputation. In this article, the evidence is reviewed that relieving areas of increased plantar pressure (ie, offloading) can heal plantar foot ulcers and prevent their recurrence. Noninfected, nonischemic neuropathic plantar forefoot ulcers should heal in 6 to 8 weeks with adequate offloading. Recent meta-analyses and systematic reviews show that nonremovable knee-high devices are most effective. This is probably because they eliminate the problem of nonadherence with the use of a removable device. Studies show a large discrepancy between evidence-based recommendations on offloading and what is used in clinical practice. Many clinics continue to use methods that are less effective or have not been proven to be effective, while ignoring evidence-based methods. Strategies are proposed to address this issue, notably the adoption and implementation of recent international guidelines by professional societies and a stronger focus of clinicians on expedited healing. For the prevention of plantar foot ulcer recurrence in high-risk patients, 2 recent trials have shown that the incidence of recurrence can be significantly reduced with custom-made footwear that has a demonstrated pressure-relieving effect through guidance by plantar pressure measurements, under the condition that the footwear is worn. This review helps to inform clinicians about effective offloading treatment for healing plantar foot ulcers and preventing their recurrence.

  15. An innovative sealed shoe to off-load and heal diabetic forefoot ulcers - a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarl, Gustav; Tranberg, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Background : Non-removable knee-high devices are the gold standard to treat diabetic foot ulcers located on the plantar forefoot, but they immobilize the ankle, which restricts daily life activities and has negative effects on joint functioning. Objective : To investigate the feasibility of sealing a therapeutic shoe to off-load and heal diabetic forefoot ulcers. Design : A case series of seven men with type 2 diabetes and a metatarsal head ulcer were prescribed therapeutic shoes and custom-made insoles. The shoe was sealed with a plastic band. Off-loading was assessed with the F-scan pressure measurement system. Adherence to wearing the shoe was assessed with a temperature sensor and by documenting the status of the seal. Results : The off-loading was effective and all ulcers healed. Median time to healing was 56 days (range 8-160). Complications were secondary ulcer ( n  = 1) and plantar hematoma ( n  = 1). Five of seven participants did not disturb the seal. Conclusions : Sealing a therapeutic shoe is a feasible way to off-load and heal forefoot ulcers. A controlled trial is needed to compare the effectiveness and safety of a sealed shoe to other non-removable devices.

  16. A mutein of human basic fibroblast growth factor TGP-580 accelerates colonic ulcer healing by stimulating angiogenesis in the ulcer bed in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, H; Szabo, S

    2015-10-01

    Previously, we reported that TGP-580, a mutein of human basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), accelerated the healing of gastric and duodenal ulcers in rats. In the present study, we examined the effect of TGP-580 on the healing of colonic ulcers. In male Sprague Dawley rats, ulcers were induced in the colon 6 cm from the anus by enema of 50 μl of 3% N-ethylmaleimide, a sulfhydryl alkylator. The lesions were examined under a dissecting microscope (x10). The concentration of bFGF in the ulcerated colon was measured by enzyme immunoassay, and both the distribution of bFGF and the density of microvessels in the ulcer bed were examined by immunohistochemical staining. The content of bFGF in the ulcerated colon was markedly increased associated with ulcer healing, and ulcer healing was significantly delayed by intravenous administration of a monoclonal antibody for bFGF (MAb 3H3) once daily for 10 days. In the ulcer bed, many cells such as fibroblasts, vascular endothelial cells and macrophages were positively stained with bFGF antiserum. TGP-580, human bFGF or dexamethasone was given intracolonally twice daily for 10 days, starting the day after ulcer induction. TGP-580 (0.2 - 20 μg/ml, 200 μl/rat) dose-dependently accelerated ulcer healing, and its effect was more than 10 times stronger than that of human bFGF. Density (μm/0.01 mm(2)) of microvessels in the ulcer bed was significantly increased by treatment with TGP-580, and there was a good correlation between the density of microvessels and the decrease of ulcerated area (R(2) = 0.633). On the other hand dexamethasone (20 μg/ml) inhibited angiogenesis in the ulcer bed and delayed ulcer healing. These results suggest that angiogenesis in the ulcer bed plays an important role in ulcer healing, and that bFGF mutein TGP-580 accelerated colonic ulcer healing, at least in part, by stimulating angiogenesis, whereas glucocorticoids may delay the healing by inhibiting angiogenesis.

  17. The Impact of Venous Leg Ulcers on Body Image and Self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomé, Geraldo Magela; de Almeida, Sergio Aguinaldo; de Jesus Pereira, Maria Teresa; Massahud, Marcelo Renato; de Oliveira Moreira, Carmelita Naira; de Brito, Maria José Azevedo; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate self-esteem and body image in patients with venous leg ulcers (VLUs). A multicenter, prospective, descriptive, analytical, clinical study. A nursing care and education center of a university hospital, a health center, and an outpatient wound care clinic in Brazil. Fifty-nine consecutive adult patients with VLUs and Doppler ankle-brachial index ranging from 0.8 to 1.0 were recruited for the study. Exclusion criteria were mixed ulcers, arterial ulcers, and diabetic foot ulcers. A questionnaire assessing sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of patients, the Brazilian version of the Body Investment Scale, and the Rosenberg Self-esteem (RSE)/UNIFESP-EPM (São Paulo da Universidade Federal de São Paulo-Escola Paulista de Medicina) scale were administered to all patients. Most participants were women, aged between 60 and 70 years, and smokers; 33 (56%) were divorced, widowed, or single, and 26 (44%) were married. The patients had the ulcer for a mean of 5.42 years. Exudate and foul odor were present in most cases. Twenty-one ulcers (36%) measured 29 cm or less in surface area, and 17 (29%) ulcers measured between 30 and 49 cm (mean, 3.39 cm). The mean RSE score was 22.66, indicating low self-esteem. The mean Body Investment Scale total score was 27.49, and the scores on the body image and body touch subscales were also low, indicating negative feelings about the body. Patients with VLUs had low self-esteem and negative feelings about their bodies.

  18. Topical propolis improves wound healing in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkhamizadeh, Mozhgan; Aboutorabi, Robab; Ravari, Hassan; Fathi Najafi, Mohsen; Ataei Azimi, Sajad; Javadian Langaroodi, Adineh; Yaghoubi, Mohammad Ali; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-08-22

    In this randomized controlled trial, diabetic patients with foot ulcers (Wagner grades 1 and 2) were randomly assigned to conventional therapies for diabetic foot ulcer plus topical propolis ointment (5%; twice daily) or conventional therapies alone. The process of ulcer healing was observed during 4 weeks and compared between the two groups regarding the size, erythema, exudates, white blood cell (WBC) count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). The process of ulcer size reduction during the four-week period of study was significantly different between the groups. However, this difference was not significant between the third and fourth weeks. There was no significant difference between two groups regarding erythema and exudate reduction as well as WBC count and ESR. Administration of topical propolis ointment in addition to the conventional treatments of diabetic foot ulcer could reduce the size of ulcers with Wagner grades 1 and 2.

  19. Role of topical use of insulin in healing of chronic ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Goenka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Chronic wounds, especially non-healing types, are one of the most common surgical conditions a surgeon comes across. The peculiarity of a chronic wound is that, whatever management you give, they refuse to heal, especially the pressure ulcers or bed sores. Many therapeutic methods are available to effect wound healing such as topical application of insulin, growth factors, negative pressure-assisted wound closure, oxidized regenerated cellulose/collagen, hyaluronic acid conjugated with glycidyl methacrylate or gelatin dressings. A less clinically and economically complicated approach to healing chronic wounds seems necessary. Objectives: To study the efficacy of topical use of insulin in wound healing in following terms:-(1 rate of wound healing; (2 safety evaluation; (3 hospital stay. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study carried out in a tertiary health centre from July 2010 to September 2012 in 50 patients after taking an informed and written consent of the patients having chronic ulcer. All the patients who were satisfying inclusion/exclusion criteria patient were randomized into two groups, Group A and Group B. Each group was again sub-divided into 1 and 2 i.e. sub-group A1, A2 and sub-group B1, B2. Patients with diabetes were grouped as A1 and B1 and non-diabetic patients were grouped as A2 and B2. Group A patients were treated with insulin dressings and Group B patient′s ulcers were treated with normal saline dressings. Ulcer size and healing was recorded on weekly basis. Strict glycemic control was maintained in all diabetic patients. Results were compared at complete healing or at the end of 12 weeks which ever was earlier. Results: Our study included both diabetic and non-diabetic patients. There was no significant change in BSL(R values after use of insulin on wounds. The number of days required for wound healing in Group A patients in both subgroups (A1 and A2 was significantly less as compared to Group B

  20. Hard-to-heal diabetes-related foot ulcers: current challenges and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nube V

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Vanessa Nube,1 Georgina Frank,1 Jessica White,1 Sarah Stubbs,1 Sara Nannery,2 Louise Pfrunder,2 Stephen M Twigg,3 Susan V McLennan4 1Department of Podiatry, Sydney Local Health District, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 2Diabetes Centre High Risk Foot Service, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 3Discipline of Medicine, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4Department of Endocrinology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Diabetes-related foot ulceration is a frequent cause for hospital admission and the leading cause of nontraumatic lower limb amputation, placing a high burden on the health system, patient, and their families. Considerable advances in treatments and the establishment of specialized services and teams have improved healing rates and reduced unnecessary amputations. However, amputation rates remain high in some areas, with unacceptable variations within countries yet to be resolved. Specific risk factors including infection, ischemia, ulcer size, depth, and duration as well as probing to bone (or osteomyelitis, location of ulcer, sensory loss, deformity (and high plantar pressure, advanced age, number of ulcers present, and renal disease are associated with poor outcome and delayed healing. To assist in prediction of difficult-to-heal ulcers, more than 13 classification systems have been developed. Ulcer depth (or size, infection, and ischemia are the most common risk factors identified. High-quality treatment protocols and guidelines exist to facilitate best practice in the standard of care. Under these conditions, 66%–77% of foot ulcers will heal. The remaining proportion represents a group unlikely to heal and who will live with a non-healing wound or undergo amputation. The authors have applied their experience of managing patients in this discussion of why some ulcers are harder to heal. The article explores the effects of

  1. Treatment of chronic non-healing ulcers using autologous platelet rich plasma: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthar, Manish; Gupta, Saniya; Bukhari, Suhail; Ponemone, Venkatesh

    2017-02-27

    Non-healing ulcers are a major health problem worldwide and have great impact at personal, professional and social levels, with high cost in terms of human and material resources. Recalcitrant non-healing ulcers are inevitable and detrimental to the lower limb and are a major cause of non-traumatic lower limb amputations. Application of autologous Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) has been a major breakthrough for the treatment of non-healing and diabetic foot ulcers, as it is an easy and cost-effective method, and provides the necessary growth factors that enhance tissue healing. PRP is a conglomeration of thrombocytes, cytokines and various growth factors which are secreted by α-granules of platelets that augment the rate of natural healing process with decrease in time. The purpose of this case series was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of autologous platelet rich plasma for the treatment of chronic non-healing ulcers on the lower extremity. Autologous PRP was prepared from whole blood utilizing a rapid, intraoperative point-of-care system that works on the principle of density gradient centrifugation. Twenty Four (24) patients with non-healing ulcers of different etiologies, who met the inclusion criteria, were treated with single dose of subcutaneous PRP injections along with topical application of PRP gel under compassionate use. The mean age of the treated patients was 62.5 ± 13.53 years and they were followed-up for a period of 24 weeks. All the patients showed signs of wound healing with reduction in wound size, and the mean time duration to ulcer healing was 8.2 weeks. Also, an average five fold increase in the platelet concentrate was observed in the final PRP product obtained using the rapid point-of-care device, and the average platelet dose administered to the patients was 70.10 × 10 8 . This case series has demonstrated the potential safety and efficacy of autologous platelet rich plasma for the treatment of chronic non-healing ulcers. NCT

  2. Management of leg and pressure ulcer in hospitalized patients: direct costs are lower than expected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadian, Ojan; Oswald, Joseph S; Leisten, Rainer; Hinz, Peter; Daeschlein, Georg; Kramer, Axel

    2011-01-01

    In Germany, cost calculations on the financial burden of wound treatment are scarce. Studies for attributable costs in hospitalized patients estimate for pressure ulcer additional costs of € 6,135.50 per patient, a calculation based on the assumption that pressure ulcers will lead to prolonged hospitalization averaging 2 months. The scant data available in this field prompted us to conduct a prospective economical study assessing the direct costs of treatment of chronic ulcers in hospitalized patients. The study was designed and conducted as an observational, prospective, multi-centre economical study over a period of 8 months in three community hospitals in Germany. Direct treatment costs for leg ulcer (n=77) and pressure ulcer (n=35) were determined observing 67 patients (average age: 75±12 years). 109 treatments representing 111 in-ward admissions and 62 outpatient visits were observed. During a total of 3,331 hospitalized and 867 outpatient wound therapies, 4,198 wound dressing changes were documented. Costs of material were calculated on a per item base. Direct costs of care and treatment, including materials used, surgical interventions, and personnel costs were determined. An average of € 1,342 per patient (€ 48/d) was spent for treatment of leg ulcer (staff costs € 581, consumables € 458, surgical procedures € 189, and diagnostic procedures € 114). On average, each wound dressing change caused additional costs of € 15. For pressure ulcer, € 991 per patient (€ 52/d) was spent on average (staff costs € 313, consumables € 618, and for surgical procedures € 60). Each wound dressing change resulted in additional costs of € 20 on average. When direct costs of chronic wounds are calculated on a prospective case-by-case basis for a treatment period over 3 months, these costs are lower than estimated to date. While reduction in prevalence of chronic wounds along with optimised patient care will result in substantial cost saving, this

  3. Effect of antisecretory agents and vagotomy on healing of "chronic" cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcers in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1986-01-01

    Penetrated cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcers in rats have a very prolonged course of healing. In this study, it was investigated how much the healing of these ulcers is accelerated by some treatments. The treatments included omeprazole, cimetidine, and truncal vagotomy. In addition, the effect o...

  4. Anti-ulcer and wound healing activities of Sida corymbosa in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John-Africa, Lucy Binda; Yahaya, Tijani Adeniyi; Isimi, Christianah Yetunde

    2014-01-01

    There are strong beliefs in the efficacy of traditional medical systems worldwide. Many herbs have been acclaimed to possess antiulcer effects and could be unexplored sources of new lead compounds. Sida corymbosa R. E. Fries (Malvaceae) is used in Northern Nigeria to treat ulcers and wounds. This work aimed to investigate the usefulness of Sida corymbosa in treatments of stomach ulcers and wounds in traditional medicine. Effect of the aqueous extract was determined on gastric ulceration, rate of wound healing and inflammation using ethanol-induced and diclofenac-induced ulceration, wound excision model and albumin-induced inflammation respectively in rats. The study demonstrated the anti-ulcer activity of Sida corymbosa as the extract (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg) showed a dose-dependent, significant (PSida corymbosa on surgically created incisions produced an increase in the rate of healing of the wounds. The extract of Sida corymbosa exhibited a significant (P Sida corymbosa has constituents with the ability to reduce the severity of haemorrhagic gastric lesions, promote wound healing and reduce inflammation. These actions may be attributed to any one of the active constituents or as a result of synergistic effects of these phytoconstituents. This study validates the use of the plant in traditional medicine for the treatment of stomach ulcers and wounds.

  5. Wound Healing Society (WHS) venous ulcer treatment guidelines: what's new in five years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jennifer C; Marston, William A; Kirsner, Robert S

    2012-01-01

    Since the establishment of the guidelines for the treatment of venous ulcers by the Wound Healing Society in 2006, there has been an abundance of new literature, both in accord and discord with the guidelines. The goal of this update is to highlight new findings since the publication of these guidelines to assist practitioner and patient in appropriate health care decisions, as well as to drive future research endeavors. © 2012 by the Wound Healing Society.

  6. Piper umbellatum L.: A medicinal plant with gastric-ulcer protective and ulcer healing effects in experimental rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Junior, Iberê Ferreira; Balogun, Sikiru Olaitan; de Oliveira, Ruberlei Godinho; Damazo, Amílcar Sabino; Martins, Domingos Tabajara de Oliveira

    2016-11-04

    Piper umbellatum L. (Piperaceae) is a shrub found in the Amazon, Savannah and Atlantic Forest region of Brazil. It is widely used in folk medicine in many countries primarily for the treatment of gastric disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the gastroprotective and anti-ulcer effects of hydroethanolic extract of P. umbellatum (HEPu) leaves in experimental rodents. In addition, the anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of the extract was assessed. The leaves of P. umbellatum were macerated in 75% (1:3w/v) hydroethanolic solution to obtain HEPu. The gastroprotective and ulcer healing activities of HEPu were evaluated using acidified ethanol (acute) and acetic acid (chronic) gastric ulcer models in rodents. The anti-H. pylori activity was evaluated by in vitro broth microdilution assay using H. pylori cagA + and vacA + strain. The probable mechanism of action of HEPu was evaluated by determining gastric secretory parameters, antioxidant enzyme (catalase), non-protein sulfhydryl (glutathione) and malondialdehyde levels in gastric tissue, including pro-inflammatory (IL-1β, TNF-a, IL -17, RANTES, IFN-γ and MIP-2) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines. HEPu demonstrated potent gastroprotection against acute ulcer induced by acidified ethanol and excellent healing effect of the chronic ulcer induced by acetic acid. The gastroprotective activity in acidified ethanol is partly attributed to the antioxidant mechanisms, while anti-secretory, anti-inflammatory and regeneration of the gastric mucosa are evoked as part of its antiulcer mechanism of action. The gastric ulcer healing of HEPu also involves restoration of the altered cytokines levels to near normal. However, it has no in vitro anti-H. pylori activity. The results of this study showed that HEPu possesses preventive and curative effects in experimental models of gastric ulcers in animals. These effects are partially dependent on antioxidant, antisecretory, anti-inflammatory and mucosa regeneration. It is

  7. Effectiveness of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the healing of chronic diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nather, Aziz; Chionh, Siok Bee; Han, Audrey Y Y; Chan, Pauline P L; Nambiar, Ajay

    2010-05-01

    This is the fi rst prospective study done locally to determine the effectiveness of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the healing of chronic diabetic foot ulcers. An electronic vacuum pump was used to apply controlled negative pressure evenly across the wound surface. Changes in wound dimension, presence of wound granulation and infection status of diabetic foot ulcers in 11 consecutive patients with diabetes were followed over the course of VAC therapy. Healing was achieved in all wounds. Nine wounds were closed by split-skin grafting and 2 by secondary closure. The average length of treatment with VAC therapy was 23.3 days. Ten wounds showed reduction in wound size. All wounds were satisfactorily granulated and cleared of bacterial infection at the end of VAC therapy. VAC therapy was useful in the treatment of diabetic foot infection and ulcers, which after debridement, may present with exposed tendon, fascia and/or bone. These included ray amputation wounds, wounds post-debridement for necrotising fasciitis, wounds post-drainage for abscess, a heel ulcer and a sole ulcer. It was able to prepare ulcers well for closure via split-skin grafting or secondary closure in good time. This reduced cost of VAC therapy, as therapy was not prolonged to attain greater reduction in wound area. VAC therapy also provides a sterile, more controlled resting environment to large, exudating wound surfaces. Large diabetic foot ulcers were thus made more manageable.

  8. Gastric secretion, proinflammatory cytokines and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the delayed healing of lingual and gastric ulcerations by testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machowska, A; Brzozowski, T; Sliwowski, Z; Pawlik, M; Konturek, P C; Pajdo, R; Szlachcic, A; Drozdowicz, D; Schwarz, M; Stachura, J; Konturek, S J; Pawlik, W W

    2008-02-01

    Hormonal fluctuations are known to predispose ulceration of the upper gastrointestinal tract, but to date no comparative study of their effects on the healing of pre-existing ulcers in the oral cavity and stomach has been made. We studied the effects of depletion of testosterone and of EGF on the healing of acetic acid-induced ulcers using rats having undergone bilateral orchidectomy and/or salivectomy respectively. We measured alterations in gastric acid secretion and blood flow at ulcer margins, as well as plasma levels of testosterone, gastrin and the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha. Testosterone (0.01-10 mg/kg/day i. m.) dose-dependently delayed oral and gastric ulcer healing. When applied in an optimal dose of 1 mg/kg/day, this hormone significantly raised gastric acid secretion and plasma IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha levels. Attenuation of plasma testosterone levels via bilateral orchidectomy inhibited gastric acid secretion and accelerated the healing of oral and gastric ulcers, while increasing plasma gastrin levels and these effects were reversed by testosterone. Salivectomy raised plasma testosterone levels, and delayed oral and gastric ulcer healing. Treatment of salivectomised animals with testosterone further inhibited ulcer healing, and this effect was counteracted by EGF. We propose that testosterone delays ulcer healing via a fall in blood flow at the ulcer margin, a rise in plasma levels of IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha and, in the case of gastric ulcers, an increase in gastric acid secretion. EGF released from the salivary glands plays an important role in limitation of the deleterious effects of testosterone on ulcer healing.

  9. Healing Potential of Picrorhiza kurroa (Scrofulariaceae rhizomes against indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration: a mechanistic exploration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandyopadhyay Sandip K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of the rhizomes of the Indian medicinal plant, Picrorhiza kurroa in healing indomethacin-induced acute stomach ulceration in mice and examine its capacity to modulate oxidative stress and the levels of prostaglandin (PGE2 and EGF during the process. Methods Male swiss albino mice, ulcerated with indomethacin (18 mg/kg, p. o., single dose were treated up to 7 days with different doses of the methanol extract of P. kurroa rhizomes (designated as PK. The healing capacity of the most effective dose of PK (20 mg/kg, p. o. × 3 d was compared with that of omeprazole (Omez (3 mg/kg, p. o. × 3 d. The effects of the drug-treatment for one and three days on the biochemical parameters were assessed by comparing the results with that of untreated mice of the 1st and 3rd day of ulceration. The stomach tissues of the mice were used for the biochemical analysis. Results The macroscopic indices revealed maximum ulceration on the 3rd day after indomethacin administration, which was effectively healed by PK. Under the optimized treatment regime, PK and Omez reduced the ulcer indices by 45.1% (P P Compared to the ulcerated untreated mice, those treated with PK for 3 days showed decreased the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS (32.7%, P P P 2 (21.4%, P P P P P P P Conclusion PK (20 mg/kg, p. o. × 3 days could effectively heal indomethacin-induced stomach ulceration in mice by reducing oxidative stress, and promoting mucin secretion, prostaglandin synthesis and augmenting expressions of cyclooxygenase enzymes and growth factors.

  10. Laser therapy in pressure ulcers: evaluation by the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing and Nursing Outcomes Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Palagi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVETo describe the pressure ulcer healing process in critically ill patients treated with conventional dressing therapy plus low-intensity laser therapy evaluated by the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH and the result of Wound Healing: Secondary Intention, according to the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC.METHODCase report study according to nursing process conducted with an Intensive Care Unit patient. Data were collected with an instrument containing the PUSH and the result of the NOC. In the analysis we used descriptive statistics, considering the scores obtained on the instrument.RESULTSA reduction in the size of lesions of 7cm to 1.5cm of length and 6cm to 1.1cm width, in addition to the increase of epithelial tissue and granulation, decreased secretion and odor.CONCLUSIONThere was improvement in the healing process of the lesion treated with adjuvant therapy and the use of NOC allowed a more detailed and accurate assessment than the PUSH.

  11. Confidence and clinical judgement in community nurses managing venous leg ulceration - A judgement analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adderley, Una J; Thompson, Carl

    2017-11-01

    The variation in the management of venous leg ulceration in the UK is partly attributable to an uncertain clinical environment but the quality of judgements is influenced by the how well nurses' confidence and accuracy are aligned. To assess UK community nurses' confidence in the accuracy of their diagnostic judgements and treatment choices when managing venous leg ulceration. Judgement Analysis. UK community and primary care nursing services. 18 community non-specialist nurses working in district (home) nursing teams and general practitioner services and 18 community tissue viability specialist nurses. Using judgement analysis methods, 18 community non-specialist nurses and 18 community tissue viability specialist nurses made diagnoses and treatment judgements about compression therapy for 110 clinical scenarios and indicated their confidence for each judgement. An expert panel made consensus judgements for the same scenarios and these judgements were used as a standard against which to compare the participants. Confidence analysis was used to assess the nurses' confidence about their diagnostic judgements and treatment choices. Despite being very experienced, both non-specialist nurses' and specialist tissue viability nurses' levels of confidence were not well calibrated with their levels of accuracy. The results of this study are important as errors resulting from both over and under-confidence at the diagnostic phase of management may influence treatment choices, and thus increase the chances of treatment error. Copyright © 2017 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Effectiveness of Hypochlorous Acid Solution on Healing of Infected Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, Islam I.; Kamal, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Wound cleansing remains a corner stone in the management of diabetic foot ulcer. Hydrogen Peroxide (H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2]) and Povidone Iodine are topical antimicrobial agents but known to be toxic to cells involved in the wound healing cascade. The biggest challenge for the physicians and nurses is searching for a safe, noncytotoxic and…

  13. Preparation of hydrogel by radiation for the healing of diabetic ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nho, Young-Chang; Park, Jong-Seok; Lim, Youn-Mook

    2014-01-01

    Honey has been used in wound care for thousands of years. The major advantage of honey in wound care is the high osmotic activity, which accelerates the debridement of necrotic tissue and procures an antibacterial effect. It has been reported that the ancient Greeks and Romans used honey as a topical antiseptic for sores and skin ulcers. The aims of this study were to evaluate the antibacterial activities and the healing effect for diabetic ulcers from carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) hydrogel involving honey. Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and honey were dissolved in deionized (DI) water, and then irradiated by a gamma-ray to make a honey hydrogel dressing. The physical properties such as gelation and swelling were examined to evaluate the hydrogel for wound dressing. The antibacterial activities were investigated in detail against the Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains. Antibacterial tests indicated that honey hydrogel dressings have a good antibacterial activity. Female db/db mice (weight between 18 and 24 g, aged 5 weeks) were given an in vivo wound healing assessment. The wound dressing was changed every 2 days, and the rate of wound contraction and microscopic observations were observed. The honey hydrogel dressings displayed a prominent healing effect for diabetic ulcers. - Highlights: • The CMC hydrogel involving chestnut honey was prepared by gamma radiation. • The physical properties such as swelling percent and gelation were examined. • The chestnut hydrogel dressings displayed a prominent healing effect for diabetic ulcers

  14. Healing of ulcers on the feet correlated with distal blood pressure measurements in occlusive arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P; Lassen, N A

    1980-01-01

    The frequency of healing in subchronic ulcers in 66 feet in 62 patients with arterial occlusive disease was correlated with the systolic digital blood pressure (SDBP) and the systolic ankle blood pressure (SABP), both measured with a strain gauge, and with the skin perfusion pressure on the heel...

  15. Success rate of split-thickness skin grafting of chronic venous leg ulcers depends on the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgsberg, Trine; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Thomsen, Jens Schiersing

    2011-01-01

    that once chronic venous leg ulcers were colonized (weeks or months preoperatively) by P. aeruginosa, the success rate of skin grafting deteriorated despite aggressive treatment. To investigate this, a retrospective study was performed on the clinical outcome of 82 consecutive patients with chronic venous...... regression analysis was carried out leaving P. aeruginosa as the only predictor left in the model (p¿=¿0.001). This study supports our hypothesis that P. aeruginosa in chronic venous leg ulcers, despite treatment, has considerable impact on partial take or rejection of split-thickness skin grafts....

  16. Compression for the management of venous leg ulcers: which material do we have?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partsch, Hugo

    2014-05-01

    Compression therapy is the most important basic treatment modality in venous leg ulcers. The review focusses on the materials which are used: 1. Compression bandages, 2. Compression stockings, 3. Self-adjustable Velcro-devices, 4. Compression pumps, 5. Hybrid devices. Compression bandages, usually applied by trained staff, provide a wide spectrum of materials with different elastic properties. To make bandaging easier, safer and more effective, most modern bandages combine different material components. Self-management of venous ulcers has become feasible by introducing double compression stockings ("ulcer kits") and self-adjustable Velcro devices. Compression pumps can be used as adjunctive measures, especially for patients with restricted mobility. The combination of sustained and intermittent compression ("hybrid device") is a promising new tool. The interface pressure corresponding to the dosage of compression therapy determines the hemodynamic efficacy of each device. In order to reduce ambulatory venous hypertension compression pressures of more than 50 mm Hg in the upright position are desirable. At the same time pressure should be lower in the resting position in order to be tolerated. This prerequisite may be fulfilled by using inelastic, short stretch material including multicomponent bandages and cohesive surfaces, all characterized by high stiffness. Such materials do not give way when calf muscles contract during walking which leads to high peaks of interface pressure ("massaging effect"). © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Efficacy and safety evaluation of systemic extremely low frequency magnetic fields used in the healing of diabetic foot ulcers--phase II data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañedo-Dorantes, Luis; Soenksen, Luis R; García-Sánchez, Clara; Trejo-Núñez, Daphny; Pérez-Chávez, Fernando; Guerrero, Arturo; Cardona-Vicario, Melisa; García-Lara, Carlos; Collí-Magaña, Dianelly; Serrano-Luna, Gregorio; Angeles Chimal, José S; Cabrera, Guillermo

    2015-08-01

    Cellular and animal models investigating extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) have reported promotion of leukocyte-endothelial interactions, angiogenesis, myofibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation, improvement of peripheral neuropathy and diabetic wound healing. In humans, it has also been reported that systemic exposure to ELF-MF stimulates peripheral blood mononuclear cells, promoting angiogenesis and healing of chronic leg ulcers. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of exposing different blood volumes to specific ELF-MFs (120 Hz sinusoidal waves of 0.4-0.9 mT RMS) to induce healing of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). Twenty six diabetic patients with non-responsive DFUs were divided into two exposure groups to receive treatment and record healing time. The forearm group, exposed to ELF-MF 2 h/day, twice weekly (3.6 l of blood/session); and the thorax group, exposed 25 min/day, 2 times/week (162.5 l of blood/session). Treatment period was 100 days or upon complete healing. Ulcer recurrences and adverse effects were investigated during short-term (<1 year) and long-term (3.4-7.8 years) follow-up. Mean healing time was 61.48 ± 33.08 days in the forearm group and 62.56 ± 29.33 days for the thorax group. No adverse effects or ulcer recurrences in the original ulcer site were reported during treatment, the short-term follow-up period or the long-term follow-up period in both groups. Healing time was independent of the amount of blood exposed to ELF-MF used in this trial. ELF-MFs are effective and safe and could be applied to non-healing DFUs in conjunction with other preventive interventions to reduce DFUs complications. Copyright © 2015 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radionuclide angiography and blood pool imaging to assess skin ulcer healing prognosis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alazraki, N.; Lawrence, P.F.; Syverud, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Several non-invasive diagnostic techniques including segmental limb blood pressures, skin fluoresence, and photo plethysmography, have been evaluated as predictors of skin ulcer healing in patients with peripheral vascular disease, but none are widely used. Using 20mCi of Tc-99m phosphate compounds, four phase bone scans were obtained, including (1) radionuclide angiogram (2) blood pool image (3) 2 hour and 4-6 hour static images and (4) 24 hour static delayed images. The first two phases were used to assess vacularity to the region of distal extremity ulceration; the last two phases evaluated presence or absence of osteomyelitis. Studies were performed in 30 patients with non-healing ulcers of the lower extremities. Perfusion to the regions of ulceration on images was graded as normal, increased, or reduced with respect to the opposite (presumed normal) limb or some other normal reference area. Hypervascular response was interpreted as good prognosis for healing unless osteomyelitis was present. Clinicians followed patients for 14 days to assess limb healing with optimum care. If there was no improvement, angiography and/or surgery (reconstructive surgery, sympathectomy, or amputation) was done. Results showed: sensitivity for predicting ulcer healing was 94%, specificity 89%. Patients who failed to heal their ulcers showed reduced perfusion, no hypervascular response, or osteomyelitis. Microcirculatory adequacy for ulcer healing appear predictable by this technique

  19. The LeucoPatch® system in the management of hard-to-heal diabetic foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Game, Frances; Jeffcoate, William; Tarnow, Lise

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetic foot ulcers are a common and severe complication of diabetes mellitus. Standard treatment includes debridement, offloading, management of infection and revascularisation where appropriate, although healing times may be long. The LeucoPatch® device is used to generate...... results have been obtained in non-controlled studies this system, but this now needs to be tested in a randomised controlled trial (RCT). If confirmed, the LeucoPatch® may become an important new tool in the armamentarium in the management of diabetic foot ulcers which are hard-to-heal. METHODS: People...... with diabetes and hard-to-heal ulcers of the foot will receive either pre-specified good standard care or good standard care supplemented by the application of the LeucoPatch® device. The primary outcome will be the percentage of ulcers healed within 20 weeks. Healing will be defined as complete...

  20. Honey for Wound Healing, Ulcers, and Burns; Data Supporting Its Use in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noori Al-Waili

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread existence of unhealed wounds, ulcers, and burns has a great impact on public health and economy. Many interventions, including new medications and technologies, are being used to help achieve significant wound healing and to eliminate infections. Therefore, to find an intervention that has both therapeutic effect on the healing process and the ability to kill microbes is of great value. Honey is a natural product that has been recently introduced in modern medical practice. Honey's antibacterial properties and its effects on wound healing have been thoroughly investigated. Laboratory studies and clinical trials have shown that honey is an effective broad-spectrum antibacterial agent. This paper reviews data that support the effectiveness of natural honey in wound healing and its ability to sterilize infected wounds. Studies on the therapeutic effects of honey collected in different geographical areas on skin wounds, skin and gastric ulcers, and burns are reviewed and mechanisms of action are discussed. (Ulcers and burns are included as an example of challenging wounds. The data show that the wound healing properties of honey include stimulation of tissue growth, enhanced epithelialization, and minimized scar formation. These effects are ascribed to honey's acidity, hydrogen peroxide content, osmotic effect, nutritional and antioxidant contents, stimulation of immunity, and to unidentified compounds. Prostaglandins and nitric oxide play a major role in inflammation, microbial killing, and the healing process. Honey was found to lower prostaglandin levels and elevate nitric oxide end products. These properties might help to explain some biological and therapeutic properties of honey, particularly as an antibacterial agent or wound healer. The data presented here demonstrate that honeys from different geographical areas have considerable therapeutic effects on chronic wounds, ulcers, and burns. The results encourage the use of honey

  1. Efficacy of Honey Dressing Versus Mechanical Debridement in Healing of Ulcers with Biofilms: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryaprakash A

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic and delayed healing wounds are the significant health problems globally. Microbial bio burden in the form of biofilms contribute significantly for chronicity and delayed healing. Management of biofilm is complex task. Effective management of biofilms significantly reduces healing time. Raw unprocessed honey has several antibacterial properties and factors stimulating wound healing. Aim and Objectives: Acomparative study was taken to compare the efficacy of local application of raw unprocessed honey versus mechanical debridement and antiseptic application in terms of biofilm eradication and enhanced wound healing. Method and Materials: Ninety patients with non healing wounds having biofilms were included and divided equally (forty five each for local application of honey and mechanical debridement respectively. They were managed similarly and assessed for presence or eradication of biofilms, healing process and final outcome regularly. Results: Data analysed showed presence of biofilms in chronic wounds was 60% and 68% in study and control groups respectively. Time for appearance of healthy granulation tissue was significantly less (P=0.022 Mean duration for eradication of biofilms was less with (P=0.025 Mean hospital stay was also reduced (P=0.004. Conclusion: Raw unprocessed honey is a good, simple and effective solution for eradication of biofilms and enhances healing in non healing ulcers.

  2. A multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial evaluating the use of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allografts and multilayer compression therapy vs. multilayer compression therapy alone in the treatment of venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serena, Thomas E; Carter, Marissa J; Le, Lam T; Sabo, Matthew J; DiMarco, Daniel T

    2014-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers produce significant clinical and economic burdens on society and often require advanced wound therapy. The purpose of this multicenter, randomized, controlled study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of one or two applications of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft and multilayer compression therapy vs. multilayer compression therapy alone in the treatment of venous leg ulcers. The primary study outcome was the proportion of patients achieving 40% wound closure at 4 weeks. Of the 84 participants enrolled, 53 were randomized to receive allograft and 31 were randomized to the control group of multilayer compression therapy alone. At 4 weeks, 62% in the allograft group and 32% in the control group showed a greater than 40% wound closure (p = 0.005), thus showing a significant difference between the allograft-treated groups and the multilayer compression therapy alone group at the 4-week surrogate endpoint. After 4 weeks, wounds treated with allograft had reduced in size a mean of 48.1% compared with 19.0% for controls. Venous leg ulcers treated with allograft had a significant improvement in healing at 4 weeks compared with multilayer compression therapy alone. © 2014 by the Wound Healing Society.

  3. An exploratory study on differences in cumulative plantar tissue stress between healing and non-healing plantar neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Bril, Adriaan; Wissink, Marieke; Bus, Sicco A.

    2018-01-01

    Mechanical stress is important in causing and healing plantar diabetic foot ulcers, but almost always studied as peak pressure only. Measuring cumulative plantar tissue stress combines plantar pressure and ambulatory activity, and better defines the load on ulcers. Our aim was to explore differences

  4. Topical 5% potassium permanganate solution accelerates the healing process in chronic diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Madrigal-Perez, Violeta M; Lara-Esqueda, Agustin; Diaz-Sanchez, Martha G; Guzman-Esquivel, Jose; Rosas-Vizcaino, Luis E; Virgen-Jimenez, Oscar O; Kleiman-Trujillo, Juleny; Lagarda-Canales, Maria R; Ceja-Espiritu, Gabriel; Rangel-Salgado, Viridiana; Lopez-Lemus, Uriel A; Delgado-Enciso, Josuel; Lara-Basulto, Agustin D; Soriano Hernández, Alejandro D

    2018-02-01

    Potassium permanganate has been reported to be an effective treatment for certain types of wounds. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of potassium permanganate in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. A single-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus that presented with a foot ulcer persisting for >3 months. The control group (n=10) was treated with the current standard treatment, which comprises of measures for reducing pressure in the ulcerated area, daily cleansing of the ulcer with potable water and antiseptic wash solution, and the application of a disinfectant solution on the entire surface area of the ulcer; while the intervention group (n=15) received the standard treatment plus 5% topical potassium permanganate solution applied once a day for 21 days. In the intervention group, 1 patient did not tolerate the treatment and was eliminated from the study on the first day. The remaining patients tolerated the interventions well. At the end of the treatment period, ulcers in the control group had decreased by 38% whereas those in the intervention group decreased by 73% (Ppermanganate is well tolerated and significantly accelerates the healing process of diabetic foot ulcers.

  5. Effectiveness of Enteral Nutritional Therapy in the Healing Process of Pressure Ulcers: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisely Blanc

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effectiveness of enteral nutritional therapy (ENT in the healing process of pressure ulcers (PU in adults and the elderly. METHOD A systematic review whose studies were identified through the databases of Cochrane, MEDLINE/PubMed, SciELO, LILACS, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and manual searches. It included randomized clinical trials (RCTs without delimiting the period or language of publication, which addressed adults and elderly patients with pressure ulcers in a comparative treatment of enteral nutritional therapy and placebo or between enteral nutritional therapy with different compositions and dosages. RESULTS We included ten studies that considered different interventions. It resulted in more pressure ulcers healed in the groups that received the intervention. The included studies were heterogeneous with regard to patients, the type of intervention, the sample and the follow-up period, all of which made meta-analysis impossible. CONCLUSION Although the enteral nutritional therapy demonstrates a promotion of pressure ulcer healing, sufficient evidence to confirm the hypothesis was not found.

  6. The efficacy and safety of natural honey on the healing of foot ulcers: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Hashim; Salma, Mansour Abu; Al Lenjawi, Badriya; Abdi, Seham; Gouda, Zaghloul; Barakat, Nour; Elmahdi, Hisham; Abraham, Sisy; Hamza, Abdul Hakeem; Al Khozaei, Dhyiaa; Al Majid, Shawqia; Al Majid, Hanaa; Abdini, Johina; Al Jaber, Maryam; Al Masseh, Fareeda; Al Ali, Amal Abdulla

    2015-04-01

    This clinical observation investigated the efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and acceptability of natural honey on the healing of a variety of chronic foot ulcers at the primary care level. A total of 12 patients with foot ulcers utilizing natural honey as an effective alternative to more expensive, advanced wound products were followed. Cases were referred to Umgwailinah Primary Health Care Center, Doha, Qatar from different health centers and from Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar. There were also self-referred cases. After rinsing the site with normal saline, natural honey was applied and the wound was covered by glycerin-impregnated gauze (Adaptic Non-Adhering Dressing, Systagenix, San Antonio, TX) to prevent the absorption of honey into the cotton gauze and away from the wound site. Patients were followed on a daily basis for an average of 4 weeks. All ulcers healed with no contractures or scars with a mean healing time of 3 weeks. There was a 75% reduction in the dressing budget of the health center and a high level of satisfaction among both health professionals and patients. Patients' pain levels were reduced significantly after using natural honey, as evidenced by the use of the Visual Analog Scale. The use of natural honey in the management of chronic foot ulcers proved to be efficacious, cost-effective, and acceptable by both clinicians and patients.

  7. Increased Number of Langerhans Cells in the Epidermis of Diabetic Foot Ulcers Correlates with Healing Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojadinovic, Olivera; Yin, Natalie; Lehmann, Janin; Pastar, Irena; Kirsner, Robert S.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are a specialized subset of epidermal dendritic cells. They represent one of the first cells of immunological barrier and play an important role during the inflammatory phase of acute wound healing. Despite considerable progress in our understanding of the immunopathology of diabetes mellitus and its associated co-morbidities such as diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), considerable gaps in our knowledge exist. In this study, we utilized the human ex vivo wound model and confirmed the increased epidermal LCs at wound edges during early phases of wound healing. Next, we aimed to determine differences in quantity of LCs between normal human and diabetic foot skin and to learn if the presence of LCs correlates with the healing outcome in DFUs. We utilized immunofluorescence to detect CD207+ LCs in specimens from normal and diabetic foot skin and DFU wound edges. Specimens from DFUs were collected at the initial visit and 4 weeks at the time when the healing outcome was determined. DFUs that decreased in size by >50% were considered to be healing, while DFUs with a size reduction of healing. Quantitative assessment of LCs showed a higher number of LCs in healing when compared to non–healing DFU’s. Our findings provide evidence that LCs are present in higher number in diabetic feet than normal foot skin. Healing DFUs show a higher number of LCs compared to non-healing DFUs. These findings indicate that the epidermal immune barrier plays an important role in the DFU healing outcome and may offer new therapeutic avenues targeting LC in non-healing DFUs. PMID:24277309

  8. The personality pattern of duodenal ulcer patients in relation to spontaneous ulcer healing and relapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, P; von der Lieth, L; Matzen, Peter

    1989-01-01

    One hundred consecutive out-patients with duodenal ulceration from a hospital and a gastroenterological clinic were tested with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). This was carried out in order to investigate whether neuroticism or other personality disorders were characterist......One hundred consecutive out-patients with duodenal ulceration from a hospital and a gastroenterological clinic were tested with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). This was carried out in order to investigate whether neuroticism or other personality disorders were...

  9. Prediction of Wound Healing in Diabetic Foot Ulcers: an Observational Study in Tertiary Hospital in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradana Soewondo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to evaluate the role of clinical characteristics, functional markers of vasodilation, inflammatory response, and atherosclerosis in predicting wound healing in diabetic foot ulcer. Methods: a cohort study (February – October 2010 was conducted from 40 subjects with acute diabetic foot ulcer at clinical ward of Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National Central General Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Each subject underwent at least two variable measurements, i.e. during inflammatory phase and proliferation phase. The studied variables were clinical characteristics, complete peripheral blood count (CBC and differential count, levels of HbA1c, ureum, creatinine, lipid profile, fasting blood glucose (FBG, marker of endothelial dysfunction (asymmetric dimethylarginine/ADMA, endothelin-1/ET-1, and flow-mediated dilation/FMD of brachial artery, and marker of vascular calcification (osteoprotegerin/OPG. Results: median of time achieving 50% granulation tissue in our study was 21 days. There were nine factors that contribute in the development of 50% granulation tissue, i.e. family history of diabetes mellitus (DM, previous history of wound, wound area, duration of existing wound, captopril and simvastatin medications, levels of ADMA, ET-1, and OPG. There were three out of the nine factors that significantly correlated with wound healing, i.e. wound area, OPG levels, and simvastatin medications. Conclusion: in acute diabetic foot ulcers, wound area and OPG levels had positive correlation with wound healing, whereas simvastatin medications had negative correlation with wound healing.

  10. Prediction of Wound Healing in Diabetic Foot Ulcers: an Observational Study in Tertiary Hospital in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soewondo, Pradana; Suyono, Slamet; Sastrosuwignyo, Mpu Kanoko; Harahap, Alida R; Sutrisna, Bambang; Makmun, Lukman H

    2017-01-01

    to evaluate the role of clinical characteristics, functional markers of vasodilation, inflammatory response, and atherosclerosis in predicting wound healing in diabetic foot ulcer. a cohort study (February - October 2010) was conducted from 40 subjects with acute diabetic foot ulcer at clinical ward of Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National Central General Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Each subject underwent at least two variable measurements, i.e. during inflammatory phase and proliferation phase. The studied variables were clinical characteristics, complete peripheral blood count (CBC) and differential count, levels of HbA1c, ureum, creatinine, lipid profile, fasting blood glucose (FBG), marker of endothelial dysfunction (asymmetric dimethylarginine/ADMA, endothelin-1/ET-1, and flow-mediated dilation/FMD of brachial artery), and marker of vascular calcification (osteoprotegerin/OPG). median of time achieving 50% granulation tissue in our study was 21 days. There were nine factors that contribute in the development of 50% granulation tissue, i.e. family history of diabetes mellitus (DM), previous history of wound, wound area, duration of existing wound, captopril and simvastatin medications, levels of ADMA, ET-1, and OPG. There were three out of the nine factors that significantly correlated with wound healing, i.e. wound area, OPG levels, and simvastatin medications. in acute diabetic foot ulcers, wound area and OPG levels had positive correlation with wound healing, whereas simvastatin medications had negative correlation with wound healing.

  11. Transcutaneous oxygen pressure measurement in diabetic foot ulcers: mean values and cut-point for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuan; Weng, Huan; Chen, Lihong; Yang, Haiyun; Luo, Guangming; Mai, Lifang; Jin, Guoshu; Yan, Li

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate mean values and cut-point of transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO2) measurement in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. Prospective, descriptive study. Sixty-one patients with diabetes mellitus and foot ulcers comprised the sample. The research setting was Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital of SunYat-sen University, Guangzhou, China. Participants underwent transcutaneous oxygen (TcPO2) measurement at the dorsum of foot. Patients were classified into 3 groups according to clinical outcomes: (1) ulcers healed with intact skin group, (2) ulcer improved, and (3) ulcer failed to improve. TcPO2 was assessed and cut-points for predicting diabetic foot ulcer healing were calculated. Thirty-six patients healed with intact skin, 8 experienced improvement, and 17 showed no improvement. Mean TcPO2 levels were significantly higher (Pfoot ulcers. In contrast, all patients with TcPO2≥ 40 mmHg achieved wound closure. Measurement of TcPO2 in the supine position revealed a cut-point value of 25 mmHg as the best threshold for predicting diabetic foot ulcer healing; the area under the curve using this cut-point was 0.838 (95% confidence interval = 0.700-0.976). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for TxPO2 were 88.6%, 82.4%, 90.7%, and 72.2%, respectively. TcPO2≥ 40 mmHg was associated with diabetic foot ulcer healing, but a TcPO2≤ 10 mmHg was associated with failure of wound healing. We found that a cut-point of 25 mmHg was most predictive of diabetic foot ulcer healing.

  12. [Compression therapy: Choosing the right option for leg ulcers in 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senet, P; Monfort, J-B; Debure, C

    2016-09-01

    Compression therapy is a mandatory treatment of leg ulcers whether the goal is cure (stage C6 in the international classification for chronic venous disease) or prevention of recurrence (stage C5). Different indications for compression therapy were proposed by the French Superior Health Authority (HAS) in 2010, but new studies have modified attitudes since that time. Considering the very large number of options available, the many co-morbid conditions observed in these patients, as well as patient age and available assistance, it is important to adapt to the variable clinical and social situations encountered. One must keep in mind that a well-controlled treatment should improve trophic disorders and patient comfort. A poorly-adapted treatment with little or even deleterious effect will be abandoned by the patient. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Clinical audit of leg ulceration prevalence in a community area: a case study of good practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindley, Jenny

    2014-09-01

    This article presents the findings of an audit on venous leg ulceration prevalence in a community area as a framework for discussing the concept and importance of audit as a tool to inform practice and as a means to benchmark care against national or international standards. It is hoped that the discussed audit will practically demonstrate how such procedures can be implemented in practice for those who have not yet undertaken it, as well as highlighting the unexpected extra benefits of this type of qualitative data collection that can often unexpectedly inform practice and influence change. Audit can be used to measure, monitor and disseminate evidence-based practice across community localities, facilitating the identification of learning needs and the instigation of clinical change, thereby prioritising patient needs by ensuring safety through the benchmarking of clinical practice.

  14. Complementary and alternative medicine for older adults with venous leg ulcer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobón, Jeniffer

    2010-11-01

    Chronic pain management is an important, and often under-addressed, component in the care of older adults with venous leg ulcers (VLUs). Clinicians caring for older adults with VLUs must consider and address both the physiological and psychosocial aspects of chronic pain. Traditional pharmacological approaches to pain management are only part of the solution. One strategy is to adopt a more holistic approach to chronic pain management that includes complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of CAM research that focuses on the pain management of older adults with VLUs. Despite these limitations, pain management that includes discussion of relevant CAM modalities must be a priority for clinicians caring for older adults living with VLUs.

  15. Comparison of characteristics and healing course of diabetic foot ulcers by etiological classification: neuropathic, ischemic, and neuro-ischemic type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotsu, Rie Roselyne; Pham, Ngoc Minh; Oe, Makoto; Nagase, Takeshi; Sanada, Hiromi; Hara, Hisao; Fukuda, Shoji; Fujitani, Junko; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Tamaki, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    To identify differences in the characteristics of patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) according to their etiological classification and to compare their healing time. Over a 4.5-year period, 73 patients with DFUs were recruited. DFUs were etiologically classified as being of neuropathic, ischemic, or neuro-ischemic origin. Descriptive analyses were performed to characterize study subjects, foot-related factors, and healing outcome and time. Duration of healing was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Healing time among the three types was compared using the log rank test. The number of patients manifesting neuropathic, ischemic, and neuro-ischemic ulcers was 30, 20, and 14, respectively. Differences were identified for age, diabetes duration, body mass index, hypertension, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Patients with neuro-ischemic ulcers had better ankle-brachial index, skin perfusion pressure (SPP), and transcutaneous oxygen pressure values compared to those with ischemic ulcers. The average time in which 50% of patients had healed wounds was 70, 113, and 233 days for neuropathic, neuro-ischemic, and ischemic ulcers, respectively. Main factors associated with healing were age and SPP values. Based on the etiological ulcer type, DFU healing course and several patient factors differed. Failure to consider the differences in DFU etiology may have led to heterogeneity of results in previous studies on DFUs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A predictive model for pressure ulcer outcome: the Wound Healing Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Susan D; Barrett, Ryan S; Fife, Caroline E; Thomson, Brett

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this learning activity is to provide information regarding the creation of a risk-stratification system to predict the likelihood of the healing of body and heel pressure ulcers (PrUs). This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to:1. Explain the need for a PrU risk stratification tool.2. Describe the purpose and methodology of the study.3. Delineate the results of the study and development of the Wound Healing Index. : To create a validated system to predict the healing likelihood of patients with body and heel pressure ulcers (PrUs), incorporating only patient- and wound-specific variables. The US Wound Registry data were examined retrospectively and assigned a clear outcome (healed, amputated, and so on). Significant variables were identified with bivariate analyses. Multivariable logistic regression models were created based on significant factors (P wound clinics in 24 states : A total of 7973 body PrUs and 2350 heel PrUs were eligible for analysis. Not applicable : Healed PrU MAIN RESULTS:: Because of missing data elements, the logistic regression development model included 6640 body PrUs, of which 4300 healed (64.8%), and the 10% validation sample included 709 PrUs, of which 477 healed (67.3%). For heel PrUs, the logistic regression development model included 1909 heel PrUs, of which 1240 healed (65.0%), and the 10% validation sample included 203 PrUs, of which 133 healed (65.5%). Variables significantly predicting healing were PrU size, PrU age, number of concurrent wounds of any etiology, PrU Stage III or IV, evidence of bioburden/infection, patient age, being nonambulatory, having renal transplant, paralysis, malnutrition, and/or patient hospitalization for any reason. Body and heel PrU Wound Healing Indices are comprehensive, user-friendly, and validated predictive models for

  17. Effects of topical Kiwifruit on healing of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Mohajeri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kiwifruit (Actindia Deliciosa is demonstrated to have antibacterial and pro-angiogenic effects. It also contains proteolytic enzymes (actinidin and ascorbic acid. In this study, the effects of Kiwifruit on neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer healing in clinical settings were evaluated. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial of 37 patients (17 in experimental and 20 in control groups with neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer were studied in Isfahan-Iran. Patients of the control group received just the standard treatments. In the experimental group, in addition to the standard treatments, ulcers were dressed with pure extract of kiwifruit twice daily for 21 days. The ulcers were examined and evaluated based on macroscopic, microscopic and microbiological status. Pre- and post-interventions, biopsies were taken from the ulcers to perform microbiological and histological studies. Results: Mean reduction in surface area of foot ulcer in the experimental group was significantly higher than the control group (168.11 ± 22.31 vs. 88.80 ± 12.04 mm 2 respectively, P < 0.0001. The amount of collagen and granulation tissues was significantly higher in the experimental groups than the control group (P value < 0.0001. Significantly higher levels of angiogenesis and vascularization were found in the kiwifruit treated patients (P value < 0.0001. No significant antibacterial effect was observed for kiwifruit. Conclusion: Natural compounds in the kiwifruit including protein-dissolving enzymes (Actinidin improved different aspects of the wound healing process. Based on these benefits and safety aspects, we conclude that using kiwifruit is a simple, applicable and effective way for treatment of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer.

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, an ideal cell source for regenerative therapy with no ethical issues, play an important role in diabetic foot ulcer (DFU. Growing evidence has demonstrated that MSCs transplantation can accelerate wound closure, ameliorate clinical parameters, and avoid amputation. In this review, we clarify the mechanism of preclinical studies, as well as safety and efficacy of clinical trials in the treatment of DFU. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs, compared with MSCs derived from other tissues, may be a suitable cell type that can provide easy, effective, and cost-efficient transplantation to treat DFU and protect patients from amputation.

  19. Non-healing foot ulcers in diabetic patients: general and local interfering conditions and management options with advanced wound dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccioli, Luigi; Izzo, Valentina; Meloni, Marco; Vainieri, Erika; Ruotolo, Valeria; Giurato, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Medical knowledge about wound management has improved as recent studies have investigated the healing process and its biochemical background. Despite this, foot ulcers remain an important clinical problem, often resulting in costly, prolonged treatment. A non-healing ulcer is also a strong risk factor for major amputation. Many factors can interfere with wound healing, including the patient's general health status (i.e., nutritional condition indicated by albumin levels) or drugs such as steroids that can interfere with normal healing. Diabetic complications (i.e., renal insufficiency) may delay healing and account for higher amputation rates observed in diabetic patients under dialysis treatment. Wound environment (e.g., presence of neuropathy, ischaemia, and infection) may significantly influence healing by interfering with the physiological healing cascade and adding local release of factors that may worsen the wound. The timely and well-orchestrated release of factors regulating the healing process, observed in acute wounds, is impaired in non-healing wounds that are blocked in a chronic inflammatory phase without progressing to healing. This chronic phase is characterised by elevated protease activity (EPA) of metalloproteinases (MMPs) and serine proteases (e.g., human neutrophil elastase) that interfere with collagen synthesis, as well as growth factor release and action. EPA (mainly MMP 9, MMP-8 and elastase) and inflammatory factors present in the wound bed (such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNFa) account for the catabolic state of non-healing ulcers. The availability of wound dressings that modulate EPA has added new therapeutic options for treating non-healing ulcers. The literature confirms advantages obtained by reducing protease activity in the wound bed, with better outcomes achieved by using these dressings compared with traditional ones. New technologies also allow a physician to know the status of the wound bed environment, particularly EPA, in a clinical

  20. Leucocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) as a regenerative medicine strategy for the treatment of refractory leg ulcers: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Nelson R; Ubilla, Matias; Zamora, Yelka; Del Rio, Verónica; Dohan Ehrenfest, David M; Quirynen, Marc

    2017-07-20

    Chronic wounds (VLU: venous leg ulcer, DFU: diabetic foot ulcer, PU: pressure ulcer, or complex wounds) affect a significant proportion of the population. Despite appropriate standard wound care, such ulcers unfortunately may remain open for months or even years. The use of leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) to cure skin ulcers is a simple and inexpensive method, widely used in some countries but unknown or neglected in most others. This auto-controlled prospective cohort study explored and quantified accurately for the first time the adjunctive benefits of topical applications of L-PRF in the management of such refractory ulcers in a diverse group of patients. Forty-four consecutive patients with VLUs (n = 28, 32 wounds: 17 ≤ 10 cm 2 and 15 > 10 cm 2 ), DPUs (n = 9, 10 wounds), PUs (n = 5), or complex wounds (n = 2), all refractory to standard treatment for ≥3 months, received a weekly application of L-PRF membranes. L-PRF was prepared following the original L-PRF method developed more than 15 years ago (400g, 12 minutes) using the Intra-Spin L-PRF centrifuge/system and the XPression box kit (Intra-Lock, Boca Raton, FL, USA; the only CE/FDA cleared system for the preparation of L-PRF). Changes in wound area were recorded longitudinally via digital planimetry. Adverse events and pain levels were also registered. All wounds showed significant improvements after the L-PRF therapy. All VLUs ≤ 10 cm 2 , all DFUs, as well as the two complex wounds showed full closure within a 3-month period. All wounds of patients with VLUs > 10 cm 2 who continued therapy (10 wounds) could be closed, whereas in the five patients who discontinued therapy improvement of wound size was observed. Two out of the five PUs were closed, with improvement in the remaining three patients who again interrupted therapy (surface evolution from 7.35 ± 4.31 cm 2 to 5.78 ± 3.81 cm 2 ). No adverse events were observed. A topical application of L-PRF on

  1. Effect of omeprazole and cimetidine on healing of chronic gastric ulcers and gastric acid secretion in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1988-01-01

    The effect of omeprazole and cimetidine on healing of chronic gastric ulcers and gastric acid secretion was investigated in rats. The effect of three doses of omeprazole given orally once daily for 25 days was investigated. In controls median ulcer healing was 19.6% after 25 days. Omeprazole...... increased median ulcer healing from 36% at 145 mumole/kg/day to 80% at 580 mumole/kg/day. Basal and pentagastrin stimulated gastric acid secretion decreased dose-dependently by nearly 90% at a dose of 580 mumole/kg/day 22-24 hr after the last dose of omeprazole. Cimetidine given twice daily, in a dose...... that initially inhibits gastric acid secretion by 95%, reduced acid secretion by only 50% 11 hr after the last dose. Median ulcer healing after treatment with cimetidine for 25 days was 41%. This study demonstrates that omeprazole has a more long-acting inhibitory effect on gastric acid secretion compared...

  2. The personality pattern of duodenal ulcer patients in relation to spontaneous ulcer healing and relapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, P; von der Lieth, L; Matzen, Peter

    1989-01-01

    stressful life events before entrance to the study (P less than 0.05) and, like the neurotic patients, they had lower ego-strength to cope with such events (P less than 0.05). The results indicate that personality assessments make it possible to distinguish between subgroups of duodenal ulcer patients......One hundred consecutive out-patients with duodenal ulceration from a hospital and a gastroenterological clinic were tested with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). This was carried out in order to investigate whether neuroticism or other personality disorders were...... characteristics of duodenal ulcer patients, and whether the presence of such possible personality disorders might influence the prognosis of the disease. Neuroticism occurred in 53% of the patients, but only in 5% of controls (P less than 0.0001). Overall, personality disorders were present in 69% of the patients...

  3. Oral administration of synthetic human urogastrone promotes healing of chronic duodenal ulcers in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    1986-01-01

    The effect of oral administration of synthetic human epidermal growth factor/urogastrone (EGF/URO) on healing of chronic duodenal ulcers induced by cysteamine in rats was investigated and compared with that of cimetidine, a H2-receptor antagonist. After 25 and 50 days of treatment, synthetic human...... EGF/URO significantly increased healing of chronic duodenal ulcers to the same extent as cimetidine. Combined treatment with synthetic human EGF/URO and cimetidine for 25 days was more effective than synthetic human EGF/URO given alone, whereas combined treatment for 50 days was significantly more...... human EGF/URO is a potent inhibitor of gastric acid secretion when administered intravenously, but had no effect on acid secretion when given intraduodenally, which suggests that the effect of synthetic human EGF/URO is a direct action on the duodenal mucosa. In conclusion, this study showed that oral...

  4. Analysis of traumatic ulcer healing time under the treatment of the Mauli banana (Musa acuminata 25% stem extract gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Puspitasari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Traumatic ulcer is one of oral disorders that often occur. The prevalence is quite high, between 3-24% of population. Therapy of traumatic ulcer is symptomatic. People usually use Aloe vera extract gel. Previous research showed that the Aloe vera gel is equivalent with ethanol extract of 25% Mauli banana (Musa acuminata stem in accelerating wound healing based on the number of macrophages and neovascular. The objective of the study is to find out the time difference of traumatic ulcer healing using 25% Musa acuminata stem extract gel compared to a gel containing Aloe vera extract. Methods: The research was post test design. Subjects were patients of Oral Medicine Installation in Gusti Hasan Aman Dental Hospital Banjarmasin with diagnosis of traumatic ulcer using completely random sampling method. Eight patients as samples were determined by the formula of Lemeshow. Results: there was no significant difference with p=0,724 (p>0,05 between healing time using Aloe vera gel and 25% Musa acuminata stem extract. Conclusion: At the concentration of 25% Musa acuminata stem extract gel concentration has the same healing time with Aloe vera gel, therefore can be recommended as a topical use for traumatic ulcer healing. Keywords: Musa acuminata stem, Healing time, Traumatic ulcer

  5. Wound healing: total contact cast vs. custom-made temporary footwear for patients with diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weg, F.B.; van der Windt, D.A.W.M.; Vahl, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of irremovable total-contact casts (TCC) and custom-made temporary footwear (CTF) to heal neuropathic foot ulcerations in individuals with diabetes. In this prospective clinical trial, 43 patients with plantar ulcer Grade 1 or 2 (Wagner

  6. [When to ask for a skin biopsy in a patient with leg ulcer? Retrospective study of 143 consecutive biopsies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansal, A; Khayat, K; Duchatelle, V; Tella, E; Gautier, V; Sfeir, D; Attal, R; Lazareth, I; Priollet, P

    2018-02-01

    A vascular cause is found in around 85% of leg ulcer patients, but non-vascular causes are also observed. Their diagnosis is based on a set of clinical arguments and skin biopsy with histological analysis. The aim of this study was to analyze the results of these biopsies and to find common criteria for ulcers whose skin biopsies had led to the diagnosis of a non-vascular ulcer. A retrospective study was carried out on the analysis of 143 skin biopsies of leg ulcers. The reasons for the biopsy were mainly atypical clinical signs and/or the lack of improvement in care after 6 months, as advocated by the French health authorities. The skin biopsies led to a diagnosis of non-vascular ulcer in 4.9% of cases (7/143), including skin cancer (n=5, 3.5%), cutaneous leishmaniasis (n=1, 0.7%) and Pyoderma gangrenosum (n=1, 0.7%). The univariate statistical analysis revealed that an elevated rim and abnormal excessive granulation tissue were significantly more frequently found in these ulcers. All patients with a positive skin biopsy had associated vascular involvement. This study found a 5% rate of non-vascular causes of ulcers, mainly skin cancer. Elevated rims and abnormal excessive granulation tissue were the unusual features most commonly found in these ulcers. All patients whose skin biopsy revealed a non-vascular cause had associated vascular involvement. This information confirms the need to perform a skin biopsy, even in the presence of a vascular disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of intravenous Semelil (ANGIPARSTM on diabetic foot ulcers healing: A multicenter clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larijani B

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Some diabetic foot ulcers, which are notoriously difficult to cure, are one of the most common health problems in diabetic patients .There are several surgical and medical options which already have been introduced for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers, so some patient will require amputation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous Semelil (ANGIPARSTM, a naive herbal extract to accelerate healing of diabetic foot ulcers. A multi-centric randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate intravenous Semelil for healing of diabetic foot ulcers. Sixteen diabetic patients were treated with intravenous Semelil, and nine other patients were treated with placebo as control group. Both groups were otherwise treated by wound debridement and irrigation with normal saline solution, systemic antibiotic therapy and daily wound dressing. Before and after intervention, the foot ulcer surface area was measured, by digital photography, mapping and planimetry. After 4 weeks, the mean foot ulcer surface area decreased from 479.93±379.75 mm2 to 198.93±143.75 mm2 in the intervention group (p = 0.000 and from 766.22±960.50 mm2 to 689.11±846.74 mm2 in the control group (p = 0.076. Average wound closure in the treatment group was significantly greater than placebo group (64% vs. 25%, p= 0.015. This herbal extract by intravenous rout in combination with conventional therapy is more effective than conventional therapy by itself probably without side effect. However, further studies are required in the future to confirm these results in larger population.

  8. Wound healing effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors: An emerging concept in management of diabetic foot ulcer-A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboo, Apoorva; Rathnayake, Ayeshmanthe; Vangaveti, Venkat N; Malabu, Usman H

    2016-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have a well-known effect on glycaemic control in patients with diabetes but little is known on their wound healing role in this group of population. This paper reviews the effects of DPP-4 inhibitors on wound healing of diabetic foot ulcers. Published data on effects and mechanism of DDP-4 inhibitors on wound healing were derived from Medline, PubMed and Google Scholar search of English language literature from 1994 to 2014 using the key words such as "DPP-4 inhibitors", "endothelial healing" "diabetes" and "chronic ulcers". DPP-4 inhibitors show a potential benefit in processes of wound healing in diabetic chronic foot ulcers. The enzyme inhibitors promote recruitment of endothelial progenitor cells and allow the final scaffolding of wounds. Furthermore DPP-4 inhibitors augment angiogenesis and have widespread effects on optimising the immune response to persistent hypoxia in chronic diabetes wounds. DPP-4 inhibitors show promise in the local wound healing of diabetic foot ulcers in addition to its already established glycaemic control. In the light of high rate of amputations due to non-healing ulcers with profound psychological and economical liability, more investigations on the usefulness of DPP-4 inhibitors in the high risk diabetes population are needed. Copyright © 2015 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Topical oxygen therapy results in complete wound healing in diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Janelle; Lu, Suzanne; McLaren, Ann-Marie; Perry, Julie A; Cross, Karen M

    2016-11-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are a significant problem in an aging population. Fifteen percent of diabetics develop a DFU over their lifetime, which can lead to potential amputation. The 5-year survival rate after amputation is 31%, which is greater than the lifetime risk of mortality from cancer. Topical oxygen is a promising technique for the adjunctive therapy of chronic wounds including DFUs, but few controlled studies exist to support its clinical adoption. The aim of this study was to compare a portable topical oxygen delivery system in patients with nonhealing DFUs to standard best practice. Twenty patients were randomized into a topical oxygen group (n = 10), and a nonplacebo control group with regular dressings and standard care (n = 10), and attended the diabetic foot clinic once weekly for 8 weeks. Ulcer surface area over time was analyzed using standardized digital imaging software. DFUs were present without healing for a mean duration of 76 weeks prior to the study. They found a significant difference in healing rate between patients receiving topical oxygen and those receiving standard care. Topical oxygen, therefore, represents a potentially exciting new technology to shorten healing time in patients with nonhealing DFUs. More prospective randomized and powered studies are needed to determine the benefits of topical oxygen, but our current results are very promising. © 2016 by the Wound Healing Society.

  10. The Canadian Bandaging Trial: Evidence-informed leg ulcer care and the effectiveness of two compression technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Margaret B; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G; Hopman, Wilma M; Graham, Ian D; Carley, Meg E; Nelson, E Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Objective: To determine the relative effectiveness of evidence-informed practice using two high compression systems: four-layer (4LB) and short-stretch bandaging (SSB) in community care of venous leg ulcers. Design and Setting: Pragmatic, multi-centre, parallel-group, open-label, randomized controlled trial conducted in 10 centres. Cognitively intact adults (≥18 years) referred for community care (home or clinic) with a venous ulceration measuring ≥0.7cm and present for ≥1...

  11. Role of endothelial progenitor cells and inflammatory cytokines in healing of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tecilazich

    Full Text Available To evaluate changes in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs and cytokines in patients with diabetic foot ulceration (DFU in association with wound healing.We studied healthy subjects, diabetic patients not at risk of DFU, at risk of DFU and with active DFU. We prospectively followed the DFU patients over a 12-week period. We also investigated similar changes in diabetic rabbit and mouse models of wound healing.All EPC phenotypes except the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR(+CD133(+ were reduced in the at risk and the DFU groups compared to the controls. There were no major EPC differences between the control and not at risk group, and between the at risk and DFU groups. Serum stromal-cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and stem cell factor (SCF were increased in DFU patients. DFU patients who healed their ulcers had lower CD34(+KDR(+ count at visits 3 and 4, serum c-reactive protein (CRP and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF at visit 1, interleukin-1 (IL-1 at visits 1 and 4. EPCs tended to be higher in both diabetic animal models when compared to their non-diabetic counterparts both before and ten days after wounding.Uncomplicated diabetes does not affect EPCs. EPCs are reduced in patients at risk or with DFU while complete wound healing is associated with CD34(+KDR(+ reduction, suggesting possible increased homing. Low baseline CRP, IL-1α and GM-CSF serum levels were associated with complete wound healing and may potentially serve as prognostic markers of DFU healing. No animal model alone is representative of the human condition, indicating the need for multiple experimental models.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of becaplermin gel on wound healing of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Adrienne M; Waycaster, Curtis R; Motley, Travis A

    2015-01-01

    We sought to determine the long-term cost effectiveness (payer's perspective) of becaplermin gel plus good wound care (BGWC) vs. good wound care (GWC) alone in terms of wound healing and risk of amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). Outcomes data were derived from a propensity score-matched cohort from the Curative Health Services database between 1998 and 2004, which was followed for 20 weeks. A four-state Markov model was used to predict costs and outcomes of wound healing and risk of amputation for BGWC vs. GWC alone over 1 year in patients with DFU. The primary outcome was closed-wound weeks. Transition probabilities for healing and amputation were derived from the aforementioned propensity score-matched cohorts. Ulcer recurrence was estimated from the medical literature. Utilization for becaplermin was calculated using the dosing algorithm in the product labeling. Of 24,898 eligible patients, 9.6% received BGWC. Based on the model, patients treated with BGWC had substantially more closed-wound weeks compared with GWC (16.1 vs. 12.5 weeks, respectively). More patients receiving BGWC had healed wounds at 1 year compared with those receiving GWC (48.1% vs. 38.3%). Risk of amputation was lower in the BGWC cohort (6.8% vs. 9.8%). Expected annual direct costs for DFU were $21,920 for BGWC and $24,640 for GWC. BGWC was economically dominant over GWC, providing better outcomes at a lower cost in patients with DFU. Compared with GWC alone, BGWC is more effective in healing wounds and lowering amputation risk, thereby decreasing long-term costs for DFU. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  13. A case of cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma of the legs appearing as chronic venous ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Carlesimo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We report here a case of a woman with a cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma of the legs. She had a plaque lesion, superficially ulcerated and necrotized with tumorous borders situated on the posterior side of the right leg and two red or bluish-red nodular lesions. A skin biopsy from both nodular and plaque lesion showed a diffuse infiltrate of atypical large B cells CD20+ and CD79a+, spanning epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous tissue. A therapeutic approach containing anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab was suggested.

  14. The causes of skin damage and leg ulceration in chronic venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip Coleridge

    2006-09-01

    Chronic venous disease with skin changes of the leg is a common condition affecting up to 1 in 20 people in westernized countries. The causes of this problem are not fully understood, although research in recent years has revealed a number of important mechanisms that contribute to the disease process. Patients with chronic venous disease suffer persistently raised pressures in their deep and superficial veins in the lower limb. Leucocytes become "trapped" in the circulation of the leg during periods of venous hyper-tension produced by sitting or standing. Studies of the plasma levels of neutrophil granule enzymes shows that these are increased during periods of venous hypertension, suggesting that this causes activation of the neutrophils. Investigation of the leucocyte surface ligands CD11b and CD62L shows that the more activated neutrophils and monocytes are sequestered during venous hypertension. Measurement of plasma levels of the soluble parts of the endothelial adhesion molecules VCAM, ICAM, and ELAM show that these are all elevated in patients with chronic venous disease compared to controls. Following 30 minutes of venous hypertension produced by standing, these levels are further increased. These data suggest that venous hypertension causes neutrophil and monocyte activation, which in turn causes injury to the endothelium. Chronic injury to the endothelium leads to a chronic inflammatory condition of the skin that we know clinically as lipodermatosclerosis. This is mediated by perivascular inflammatory cells, principally macrophages, in the skin microcirculation. These stimulate fibroblasts in the skin leading to tissue remodeling and laying down of fibrous tissue. Vascular endothelial growth factor stimulates proliferation of capillaries within the skin. Skin in this state has the potential to ulcerate in response to minor injury.

  15. Association of Hemoglobin A1c and Wound Healing in Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesseha, Betiel K; Abularrage, Christopher J; Hines, Kathryn F; Sherman, Ronald; Frost, Priscilla; Langan, Susan; Canner, Joseph; Likes, Kendall C; Hosseini, Sayed M; Jack, Gwendolyne; Hicks, Caitlin W; Yalamanchi, Swaytha; Mathioudakis, Nestoras

    2018-04-16

    This study evaluated the association between hemoglobin A 1c (A1C) and wound outcomes in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). We conducted a retrospective analysis of an ongoing prospective, clinic-based study of patients with DFUs treated at an academic institution during a 4.7-year period. Data from 270 participants and 584 wounds were included in the analysis. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess the incidence of wound healing at any follow-up time in relation to categories of baseline A1C and the incidence of long-term (≥90 days) wound healing in relation to tertiles of nadir A1C change and mean A1C change from baseline, adjusted for potential confounders. Baseline A1C was not associated with wound healing in univariate or fully adjusted models. Compared with a nadir A1C change from baseline of -0.29 to 0.0 (tertile 2), a nadir A1C change of 0.09 to 2.4 (tertile 3) was positively associated with long-term wound healing in the subset of participants with baseline A1C healing was seen with the mean A1C change from baseline in this group. Neither nadir A1C change nor mean A1C change were associated with long-term wound healing in participants with baseline A1C ≥7.5%. There does not appear to be a clinically meaningful association between baseline or prospective A1C and wound healing in patients with DFUs. The paradoxical finding of accelerated wound healing and increase in A1C in participants with better baseline glycemic control requires confirmation in further studies. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  16. The molecular biology in wound healing & non-healing wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Chun

    2017-08-01

    The development of molecular biology and other new biotechnologies helps us to recognize the wound healing and non-healing wound of skin in the past 30 years. This review mainly focuses on the molecular biology of many cytokines (including growth factors) and other molecular factors such as extracellular matrix (ECM) on wound healing. The molecular biology in cell movement such as epidermal cells in wound healing was also discussed. Moreover many common chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers, leg ulcers, diabetic foot wounds, venous stasis ulcers, etc. usually deteriorate into non-healing wounds. Therefore the molecular biology such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and other molecular factors in diabetes non-healing wounds were also reviewed. Copyright © 2017 Daping Hospital and the Research Institute of Surgery of the Third Military Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The terminal complement complex is generated in chronic leg ulcers in the absence of protectin (CD59)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, E; Thomsen, H K; Danielsen, L

    1999-01-01

    Loss of membrane complement regulators accompanied by complement activation is suggested to be involved in the pathophysiological processes leading to tissue damage in myocardial ischaemia. In the present study we have investigated whether the same phenomenon may occur in ischaemic and/or venous...... results suggest that loss of CD59 may enhance deposition of TCC and that complement-dependent inflammation may be an important factor in the tissue-damaging processes seen in chronic leg ulcers....

  18. Role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-dependent macrophages in gastric ulcer healing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Y; Nakase, Y; Isomoto, Y; Matsuda, N; Amagase, K; Kato, S; Takeuchi, K

    2011-08-01

    We examined the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-dependent macrophages in the healing of gastric ulcers in mice. Male M-CSF-deficient (op/op) and M-CSF-expressing heterozygote (+/?) mice were used. Gastric ulcers were induced by thermal cauterization under ether anesthesia, and healing was observed for 14 days after ulceration. The numbers of macrophages and microvessels in the gastric mucosa were determined immunohistochemically with anti-CD68 and anti-CD31 antibodies, respectively. Expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA was determined via real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the mucosal content of prostaglandin (PG) E(2) was determined via enzyme immunoassay on day 10 after ulceration. The healing of gastric ulcers was significantly delayed in op/op mice compared with +/? mice. Further, significantly fewer macrophages were observed in the normal gastric mucosa of op/op mice than in +/? mice. Ulcer induction caused a marked accumulation of macrophages around the ulcer base in +/? mice, but this response was attenuated in op/op mice. The mucosal PGE(2) content as well as the expression of COX-2, VEGF, and TNF-α mRNA were all upregulated in the ulcerated area of +/? mice but significantly suppressed in op/op mice. The degree of vascularization in the ulcerated area was significantly lower in op/op mice than in +/? mice. Taken together, these results suggest that M-CSF-dependent macrophages play an important role in the healing of gastric ulcers, and that this action may be associated with angiogenesis promoted by upregulation of COX-2/PGE(2) production.

  19. The psychosocial impact of leg ulcers in patients with sickle cell disease: I don't want them to know my little secret.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkeiruka I Umeh

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD impacts millions of individuals worldwide and more than 100,000 people in the United States. Leg ulcers are the most common cutaneous manifestation of SCD. The health status of individuals living with chronic leg ulcers is not only influenced by clinical manifestations such as pain duration and intensity, but also by psychosocial factors. Garnering insights into the psychosocial impact can provide a more holistic view of their influence on quality of life.Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants living with active SCD-associated leg ulcers or with a history of ulcers. Subjects were recruited from an ongoing study (INSIGHTS, Clin Trial.Gov NCT02156102 and consented to this qualitative phase of the study. Five areas were explored: leg ulcer pain, physical function, social-isolation, social relationships and religious support. Data was collected from 20 individuals during these interviews and a thematic analysis was performed and reported.Twenty participants with a mean age of 42.4 (SD ± 11.1years were included in the study. Major themes identified included:1 pain (acute and chronic; 2 compromised physical function as demonstrated by decreased ability to walk, run, and play sports; 3 social isolation from activities either by others or self-induced as a means of avoiding certain emotions, such as embarrassment; 4 social relationships (family support and social network; 5 support and comfort through their religion or spirituality.SCD patients with leg ulcers expressed that they experience social isolation, intense and frequent ulcer pain, and difficulty in physical function. SCD-associated leg ulcers have been studied from a clinical approach, but the psychosocial factors investigated in this study informs how quality of life is impacted by the leg ulcers.

  20. Impact of compression therapy using Unna's boot on the self-esteem of patients with venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salome, G M; de Brito, M J A; Ferreira, L M

    2014-09-01

    To assess self-esteem in patients with venous leg ulcers treated with Unna's boot. • A descriptive, analytic, clinical study was conducted from June 2010 to May 2011 in an outpatient wound care clinic in São Paulo, Brazil. Patients of both sexes, aged ≥18 years, who had had a venous leg ulcer for more than one year and a Doppler ankle brachial index ranging from 0.8-1.0 were consecutively selected for inclusion. Patients were treated with wound dressings and Unna's boot. Self-esteem was assessed using the Brazilian version of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE) at inclusion (baseline) and after 4, 8, and 12 months of compression therapy using Unna's boot. The scale is reverse-scored; thus lower scores indicate higher levels of self-esteem. • The patients showed a slight but significant improvement in self-esteem after 4 months of treatment (mean RSE score=17.12) compared with baseline (mean RSE score=24.90). However, a marked and significant improvement in self-esteem was observed after 8 months (mean RSE score=7.40) and 12 months (mean RSE score=2.10) of compression therapy using Unna's boot. • Patients with venous leg ulcers treated with Unna's boot for 12 months showed a significant improvement in self-esteem • All authors declare that no competing financial interests exist. There was no external funding for this study.

  1. Use of hydrocapillary dressing in the management of highly exuding ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norkus, A.; Dargis, V.; Thomsen, J.K.

    2005-01-01

    was conducted on 97 patients with an ankle brachial pressure index > or = 0.8 and a highly exuding leg ulcer. Ulcer duration was at least four weeks.Treatment continued until healing or for a maximum of 12 months. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference in healing time or wound area reduction...

  2. Skin graft secured by VAC (vacuum-assisted closure) therapy in chronic leg ulcers: A controlled randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, A; Labeille, B; Perrot, J-L; Vercherin, P; Cambazard, F

    2016-01-01

    Leg ulcers are a common condition. There have been very few studies of combined therapy involving VAC (vacuum-assisted closure) and skin graft. We performed a randomized controlled trial of VAC therapy vs. hydrocolloid dressings over 5 days following autologous grafting on chronic leg ulcers. The primary objective was to assess the difference in success (defined as a reduction in wound area of at least 50% at 1 month) between the two dressing methods. Forty-six patients with ulcers present for over one month were included. Following a 7-day hospitalization period, follow-up was performed for 3 months on an outpatient basis. Our study does not demonstrate a statistically significant difference, with a 45.8% success rate in the VAC group vs. 40.9% in the conventional dressing group (P=0.73). In the venous ulcer group, the success rate was 57.9% for VAC vs. 40% for conventional dressings (P=0.3). The difference in favor of VAC in this group was not statistically significant, most likely due to an insufficient number of patients studied. Our study does not demonstrate superiority of VAC associated with skin graft over conventional dressings. We observed more complications with VAC (40%) than with conventional dressings (23%) (P=0.06). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Traditional Japanese Formula Kigikenchuto Accelerates Healing of Pressure-Loading Skin Ulcer in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Kimura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effect of kigikenchuto (KKT, a traditional Japanese formula, in a modified rat pressure-loading skin ulcer model. Rats were divided into three groups, KKT extract orally administered (250 or 500 mg/kg/day for 35 days and control. KKT shortened the duration until healing. Immunohistochemically, KKT increased CD-31-positive vessels in early phase and increased α-smooth muscle actin-(α-SMA- positive fibroblastic cells in early phase and decreased them in late phase of wound healing. By Western blotting, KKT showed the potential to decrease inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1, IL-1β, and TNF-α in early phase, decrease vascular endothelial growth factor in early phase and increase it in late phase, and modulate the expression of extracellular protein matrix (α-SMA, TGF-β1, bFGF, collagen III, and collagen I. These results suggested the possibility that KKT accelerates pressure ulcer healing through decreases of inflammatory cytokines, increase of angiogenesis, and induction of extracellular matrix remodeling.

  4. Decreased hematocrit-to-viscosity ratio and increased lactate dehydrogenase level in patients with sickle cell anemia and recurrent leg ulcers.

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    Philippe Connes

    Full Text Available Leg ulcer is a disabling complication in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA but the exact pathophysiological mechanisms are unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the hematological and hemorheological alterations associated with recurrent leg ulcers. Sixty-two SCA patients who never experienced leg ulcers (ULC- and 13 SCA patients with a positive history of recurrent leg ulcers (ULC+--with no leg ulcers at the time of the study--were recruited. All patients were in steady state condition. Blood was sampled to perform hematological, biochemical (hemolytic markers and hemorheological analyses (blood viscosity, red blood cell deformability and aggregation properties. The hematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR, which reflects the red blood cell oxygen transport efficiency, was calculated for each subject. Patients from the ULC+ group were older than patients from the ULC- group. Anemia (red blood cell count, hematocrit and hemoglobin levels was more pronounced in the ULC+ group. Lactate dehydrogenase level was higher in the ULC+ group than in the ULC- group. Neither blood viscosity, nor RBC aggregation properties differed between the two groups. HVR was lower and RBC deformability tended to be reduced in the ULC+ group. Our study confirmed increased hemolytic rate and anemia in SCA patients with leg ulcers recurrence. Furthermore, our data suggest that although systemic blood viscosity is not a major factor involved in the pathophysiology of this complication, decreased red blood cell oxygen transport efficiency (i.e., low hematocrit/viscosity ratio may play a role.

  5. Chemical structure of bismuth compounds determines their gastric ulcer healing efficacy and anti-Helicobacter pylori activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandha, G S; LeBlanc, R; Van Zanten, S J; Sitland, T D; Agocs, L; Burford, N; Best, L; Mahoney, D; Hoffman, P; Leddin, D J

    1998-12-01

    The recognition of the role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease has led to renewed interest in bismuth pharmacology since bismuth compounds have both anti-Helicobacter pylori and ulcer healing properties. The precise chemical structure of current bismuth compounds is not known. This has hindered the development of new and potentially more efficacious formulations. We have created two new compounds, 2-chloro-1,3-dithia-2-bismolane (CDTB) and 1,2-[bis(1,3-dithia-2-bismolane)thio]ethane (BTBT), with known structure. In a rat model of gastric ulceration, BTBT was comparable to, and CDTB was significantly less effective than colloidal bismuth subcitrate in healing cryoprobe-induced ulcers. However, both BTBT and CDTB inhibited H. pylori growth in vitro at concentrations <1/10 that of colloidal bismuth subcitrate. The effects on ulcer healing are not mediated by suppression of acid secretion, pepsin inhibition, or prostaglandin production. Since all treated animals received the same amount of elemental bismuth, it appears that the efficacy of bismuth compounds varies with compound structure and is not simply dependent on the delivery of bismuth ion. Because the structure of the novel compounds is known, our understanding of the relationship of bismuth compound structure and to biologic activity will increase. In the future it may be possible to design other novel bismuth compounds with more potent anti-H. pylori and ulcer healing effects.

  6. An Automatic Assessment System of Diabetic Foot Ulcers Based on Wound Area Determination, Color Segmentation, and Healing Score Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Pedersen, Peder C; Strong, Diane M; Tulu, Bengisu; Agu, Emmanuel; Ignotz, Ron; He, Qian

    2015-08-07

    For individuals with type 2 diabetes, foot ulcers represent a significant health issue. The aim of this study is to design and evaluate a wound assessment system to help wound clinics assess patients with foot ulcers in a way that complements their current visual examination and manual measurements of their foot ulcers. The physical components of the system consist of an image capture box, a smartphone for wound image capture and a laptop for analyzing the wound image. The wound image assessment algorithms calculate the overall wound area, color segmented wound areas, and a healing score, to provide a quantitative assessment of the wound healing status both for a single wound image and comparisons of subsequent images to an initial wound image. The system was evaluated by assessing foot ulcers for 12 patients in the Wound Clinic at University of Massachusetts Medical School. As performance measures, the Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) value for the wound area determination algorithm tested on 32 foot ulcer images was .68. The clinical validity of our healing score algorithm relative to the experienced clinicians was measured by Krippendorff's alpha coefficient (KAC) and ranged from .42 to .81. Our system provides a promising real-time method for wound assessment based on image analysis. Clinical comparisons indicate that the optimized mean-shift-based algorithm is well suited for wound area determination. Clinical evaluation of our healing score algorithm shows its potential to provide clinicians with a quantitative method for evaluating wound healing status. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  7. Gallic Acid Enriched Fraction of Phyllanthus emblica Potentiates Indomethacin-Induced Gastric Ulcer Healing via e-NOS-Dependent Pathway

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    Ananya Chatterjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The healing activity of gallic acid enriched ethanolic extract (GAE of Phyllanthus emblica fruits (amla against the indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration in mice was investigated. The activity was correlated with the ability of GAE to alter the cyclooxygenase- (COX- dependent healing pathways. Histology of the stomach tissues revealed maximum ulceration on the 3rd day after indomethacin (18 mg/kg, single dose administration that was associated with significant increase in inflammatory factors, namely, mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO activity and inducible nitric oxide synthase (i-NOS expression. Proangiogenic parameters such as the levels of prostaglandin (PG E2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, von Willebrand Factor VIII, and endothelial NOS (e-NOS were downregulated by indomethacin. Treatment with GAE (5 mg/kg/day and omeprazole (3 mg/kg/day for 3 days led to effective healing of the acute ulceration, while GAE could reverse the indomethacin-induced proinflammatory changes of the designated biochemical parameters. The ulcer healing activity of GAE was, however, compromised by coadministration of the nonspecific NOS inhibitor, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, but not the i-NOS-specific inhibitor, L-N6-(1-iminoethyl lysine hydrochloride (L-NIL. Taken together, these results suggested that the GAE treatment accelerates ulcer healing by inducing PGE2 synthesis and augmenting e-NOS/i-NOS ratio.

  8. Topically Applied Connective Tissue Growth Factor/CCN2 Improves Diabetic Preclinical Cutaneous Wound Healing: Potential Role for CTGF in Human Diabetic Foot Ulcer Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Henshaw, F. R.; Boughton, P.; Lo, L.; McLennan, S. V.; Twigg, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis. Topical application of CTGF/CCN2 to rodent diabetic and control wounds was examined. In parallel research, correlation of CTGF wound fluid levels with healing rate in human diabetic foot ulcers was undertaken. Methods. Full thickness cutaneous wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic control rats were treated topically with 1??g?rhCTGF or vehicle alone, on 2 consecutive days. Wound healing rate was observed on day 14 and wound sites were examined for breaking strength and granulati...

  9. Complete Healing of the Diabetic Ulcerative Osteomyelitis with Atherectomy and Flexible Stent

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    Veysel Temizkan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that causes arterial and neurological disorders. Extremities threatening a diabetic foot ulcer might occur in the long term, especially in irregular glycemia levels. A multidisciplinary approach including infection treatment, pressure relief in the wound and arterial revascularization is important for limb salvage and to prevent such life-threatening complications as septicemia. Compared to the surgery, endovascular procedures can be performed with low complication rates in diabetic foot ulcers complicated with infection. Atherectomy is an alternative to the classical percutaneous angioplasty techniques, especially in totally occluded lesions. We are reporting complete healing of osteomyelitis associated with critical limb ischemia, resistant to classical treatment with debridement, antibacterial therapy and hyperbaric oxygen therapy, by atherectomy following long-segment flexible stent implantation. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2014; 3(3.000: 193-196

  10. Factors influencing the implementation of a lifestyle counseling program in patients with venous leg ulcers: a multiple case study

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    van de Glind Irene M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementation of lifestyle interventions in patient care is a major challenge. Understanding factors that influence implementation is a first step in programs to enhance uptake of these interventions. A lifestyle-counseling intervention, Lively Legs, delivered by trained nurses, can effectively improve the lifestyle in patients with venous leg ulcers. The aim of this study was to identify factors that hindered or facilitated implementation of this intervention in outpatient dermatology clinics and in home care. Methods A mixed-methods multiple case study in five purposefully selected healthcare settings in the Netherlands was conducted. Measurements to identify influencing factors before and after implementation of Lively Legs included interviews, focus groups, questionnaires, and nurses’ registration. Analyses focused on qualitative data as the main data source. All data were compared across multiple cases to draw conclusions from the study as a whole. Results A total of 53 patients enrolled in the Lively Legs program, which was delivered by 12 trained nurses. Barriers for implementation were mainly organizational. It was difficult to effectively organize reaching and recruiting patients for the program, especially in home care. Main barriers were a lack of a standardized healthcare delivery process, insufficient nursing time, and a lack of motivated nurses to deliver the program. Facilitating factors were nurse-driven coordination of care and a standardized care process to tie Lively Legs into, as this resulted in better patient recruitment and better program implementation. Conclusions This study identified a range of factors influencing the implementation of a lifestyle-counseling program, mainly related to the organization of healthcare. Using a case study method proved valuable in obtaining insight into influencing factors for implementation. This study also shed light on a more general issue, which is that leg ulcer

  11. Effects of Aloe vera and sucralfate on gastric microcirculatory changes, cytokine levels and gastric ulcer healing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eamlamnam, Kallaya; Patumraj, Suthiluk; Visedopas, Naruemon; Thong-Ngam, Duangporn

    2006-04-07

    To compare the effects of Aloe vera and sucralfate on gastric microcirculatory changes, cytokine levels and gastric ulcer healing. Male Spraque-Dawley rats (n=48) were divided into four groups. Group1 served as control group, group 2 as gastric ulcer group without treatment, groups 3 and 4 as gastric ulcer treatment groups with sucralfate and Aloe vera. The rats from each group were divided into 2 subgroups for study of leukocyte adherence, TNF-alpha and IL-10 levels and gastric ulcer healing on days 1 and 8 after induction of gastric ulcer by 20% acetic acid. On day 1 after induction of gastric ulcer, the leukocyte adherence in postcapillary venule was significantly (P<0.05) increased in the ulcer groups when compared to the control group. The level of TNF-alpha was elevated and the level of IL-10 was reduced. In the ulcer groups treated with sucralfate and Aloe vera, leukocyte adherence was reduced in postcapillary venule. The level of IL-10 was elevated, but the level of TNF-alpha had no significant difference. On day 8, the leukocyte adherence in postcapillary venule and the level of TNF-alpha were still increased and the level of IL-10 was reduced in the ulcer group without treatment. The ulcer treated with sucralfate and Aloe vera had lower leukocyte adherence in postcapillary venule and TNF-alpha level. The level of IL-10 was still elevated compared to the ulcer group without treatment. Furthermore, histopathological examination of stomach on days 1 and 8 after induction of gastric ulcer showed that gastric tissue was damaged with inflammation. In the ulcer groups treated with sucralfate and Aloe vera on days 1 and 8, gastric inflammation was reduced, epithelial cell proliferation was enhanced and gastric glands became elongated. The ulcer sizes were also reduced compared to the ulcer group without treatment. Administration of 20% acetic acid can induce gastric inflammation, increase leukocyte adherence in postcapillary venule and TNF-alpha level and reduce

  12. Effects of Aloe vera and sucralfate on gastric microcirculatory changes, cytokine levels and gastric ulcer healing in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kallaya Eamlamnam; Suthiluk Patumraj; Naruemon Visedopas; Duangporn Thong-Ngam

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To compare the effects of Aloe vera and sucralfate on gastric microcirculatory changes, cytokine levels and gastric ulcer healing.METHODS: Male Spraque-Dawley rats (n=48) were divided into four groups. Group1 served as control group,group 2 as gastric ulcer group without treatment, groups 3 and 4 as gastric ulcer treatment groups with sucralfate and Aloe vera. The rats from each group were divided into 2 subgroups for study of leukocyte adherence, TNF-α and IL-10 levels and gastric ulcer healing on days 1 and 8 after induction of gastric ulcer by 20% acetic acid. RESULTS: On day 1 after induction of gastric ulcer, the leukocyte adherence in postcapillary venule was significantly (P< 0.05) increased in the ulcer groups when compared to the control group. The level of TNF-αwas elevated and the level of IL-10 was reduced. In the ulcer groups treated with sucralfate and Aloe vera,leukocyte adherence was reduced in postcapillary venule.The level of IL-10 was elevated, but the level of TNF-αhad no significant difference. On day 8, the leukocyte adherence in postcapillary venule and the level of TNF-αwere still increased and the level of IL-10 was reduced in the ulcer group without treatment. The ulcer treated with sucralfate and Aloe vera had lower leukocyte adherence in postcapillary venule and TNF-α level. The level of IL-10 was still elevated compared to the ulcer group without treatment. Furthermore, histopathological examination of stomach on days 1 and 8 after induction of gastric ulcer showed that gastric tissue was damaged with inflammation. In the ulcer groups treated with sucralfate and Aloe vera on days 1 and 8, gastric inflammation was reduced, epithelial cell proliferation was enhanced and gastric glands became elongated. The ulcer sizes were also reduced compared to the ulcer group without treatment.CONCLUSION: Administration of 20% acetic acid can induce gastric inflammation, increase leukocyte adherence in postcapillary venule and TNF-α level

  13. Effect of FRG-8813, a new-type histamine H(2)-receptor antagonist, on the recurrence of gastric ulcer after healing by drug treatment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajioka, H; Miyake, H; Matsuura, N

    2000-08-01

    We investigated the recurrence of ulcers in rats after treatment with FRG-8813, (+/-)-2-(furfurylsulfinyl)-N-[4- [4-(piperidinomethyl)-2-pyridyl] oxy-(Z)-2-butenyl] acetamide, a novel histamine H(2)-receptor antagonist. Chronic gastric ulcers were induced by serosa-searing with a hot metal bar, and the ulcer healing and recurrence after treatment with FRG-8813 or famotidine were evaluated by endoscopy for 160 days. At the dose of 30 mg/kg p. o., once daily, the treatment with FRG-8813 or famotidine for 60 days, which was stopped earlier if the ulcer had healed, accelerated the ulcer healing significantly. A subsequent follow-up study on the healed rats showed that the cumulative recurrence rate of rats healed by FRG-8813 was lower than that of naturally healed rats or rats healed by famotidine. In many cases of rats healed by FRG-8813, the regenerated mucosa was normal in contrast with the control of famotidine-healed animals. The mucosal regeneration index of the gastric ulcer after 10 days' administration of FRG-8813 was significantly higher than that obtained with famotidine. After cessation of the treatment with famotidine for 7 days, rebound hyperacidity was induced; but such rebound did not occur with FRG-8813. Considering the low recurrence rate of ulcers after FRG-8813 treatment, we suggest that FRG-8813 treatment may provide additional benefits in peptic ulcer therapy. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Wound-Healing Peptides for Treatment of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Other Infected Skin Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gomes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available As the incidence of diabetes continues to increase in the western world, the prevalence of chronic wounds related to this condition continues to be a major focus of wound care research. Additionally, over 50% of chronic wounds exhibit signs and symptoms that are consistent with localized bacterial biofilms underlying severe infections that contribute to tissue destruction, delayed wound-healing and other serious complications. Most current biomedical approaches for advanced wound care aim at providing antimicrobial protection to the open wound together with a matrix scaffold (often collagen-based to boost reestablishment of the skin tissue. Therefore, the present review is focused on the efforts that have been made over the past years to find peptides possessing wound-healing properties, towards the development of new and effective wound care treatments for diabetic foot ulcers and other skin and soft tissue infections.

  15. Wound-Healing Peptides for Treatment of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Other Infected Skin Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Ana; Teixeira, Cátia; Ferraz, Ricardo; Prudêncio, Cristina; Gomes, Paula

    2017-10-18

    As the incidence of diabetes continues to increase in the western world, the prevalence of chronic wounds related to this condition continues to be a major focus of wound care research. Additionally, over 50% of chronic wounds exhibit signs and symptoms that are consistent with localized bacterial biofilms underlying severe infections that contribute to tissue destruction, delayed wound-healing and other serious complications. Most current biomedical approaches for advanced wound care aim at providing antimicrobial protection to the open wound together with a matrix scaffold (often collagen-based) to boost reestablishment of the skin tissue. Therefore, the present review is focused on the efforts that have been made over the past years to find peptides possessing wound-healing properties, towards the development of new and effective wound care treatments for diabetic foot ulcers and other skin and soft tissue infections.

  16. Effectiveness of combined laser-puncture and conventional wound care to accelerate diabetic foot ulcer healing

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    Adiningsih Srilestari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Impaired wound healing is a common complication of diabetes. It has complex pathophysiologic mechanisms and often necessitates amputation. Our study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of combined laser-puncture and conventional wound care in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.Methods: This was a double-blind controlled randomized clinical trial on 36 patients, conducted at the Metabolic Endocrine Outpatient Clinic, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, between May and August 2015. Stimulation by laser-puncture (the treatment group or sham stimulation (the control group were performed on top of the standard wound care. Laser-puncture or sham were done on several acupuncture points i.e. LI4 Hegu, ST36 Zusanli, SP6 Sanyinjiao and KI3 Taixi bilaterally, combined with irradiation on the ulcers itself twice a week for four weeks. The mean reduction in ulcer sizes (week 2–1, week 3–1, week 4–1 were measured every week and compared between the two groups and analyzed by Mann-Whitney test.Results: The initial median ulcer size were 4.75 (0.10–9.94 cm2 and 2.33 (0.90–9.88 cm2 in laser-puncture and sham groups, respectively (p=0.027. The median reduction of ulcer size at week 2–1 was -1.079 (-3.25 to -0.09 vs -0.36 (-0.81 to -1.47 cm2, (p=0.000; at week 3–1 was -1.70 (-3.15 to -0.01 vs -0.36 (-0.80 to -0.28 cm2, (p=0.000; and at week 4–1 was -1.22 (-2.72 to 0.00 vs -0.38 (-0.74 to -0.57 cm2, (p=0.012.Conclusion: Combined laser-puncture and conventional wound care treatment are effective in accelerating the healing of diabetic foot ulcer.

  17. Deregulation of epidermal stem cell niche contributes to pathogenesis of non-healing venous ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusbaum, Aron G.; Vukelic, Sasa; Krzyzanowska, Agata; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis is maintained by epidermal stem cells (ESC) that reside in distinct niches and contribute to homeostasis and wound closure. Keratinocytes at the non-healing edges of venous ulcers (VUs) are healing-incompetent, hyper-proliferative and non-migratory suggesting deregulation of ESCs. To date genes which regulate ESC niches have been studied in mice only. Utilizing microarray analysis of VU non-healing edges, we identified changes in expression of genes harboring regulation of ESCs and their fate. In a prospective clinical study of ten VUs, we confirmed suppression of the bone morphogenetic protein receptor and GATA binding protein3 as well as inhibitors of DNA-binding proteins 2 and 4. We also found decreased levels of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3, nuclear presence of ß-catenin and overexpression of its transcriptional target, c-myc indicating activation of the Wnt pathway. Additionally, we found down-regulation of leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains protein 1, a gene important for maintaining ESCs in a quiescent state, and absence of keratin 15, a marker of the basal stem cell compartment suggesting local depletion of ESCs. Our study shows that loss of genes important for regulation of ESCs and their fate along with activation of ß-catenin and c-myc in the VU may contribute to ESC deprivation and a hyper-proliferative, non-migratory, healing incapable wound edge. PMID:24635172

  18. Atypical Diabetic Foot Ulcer Keratinocyte Protein Signaling Correlates with Impaired Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, Glenn D.; Ramos, Corrine; Hoke, Nicholas N.; Crossland, Mary C.; Shawler, Lisa G.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and wound infections often resulting in lower extremity amputations. The protein signaling architecture of the mechanisms responsible for impaired DFU healing has not been characterized. In this preliminary clinical study, the intracellular levels of proteins involved in signal transduction networks relevant to wound healing were non-biasedly measured using reverse-phase protein arrays (RPPA) in keratinocytes isolated from DFU wound biopsies. RPPA allows for the simultaneous documentation and assessment of the signaling pathways active in each DFU. Thus, RPPA provides for the accurate mapping of wound healing pathways associated with apoptosis, proliferation, senescence, survival, and angiogenesis. From the study data, we have identified potential diagnostic, or predictive, biomarkers for DFU wound healing derived from the ratios of quantified signaling protein expressions within interconnected pathways. These biomarkers may allow physicians to personalize therapeutic strategies for DFU management on an individual basis based upon the signaling architecture present in each wound. Additionally, we have identified altered, interconnected signaling pathways within DFU keratinocytes that may help guide the development of therapeutics to modulate these dysregulated pathways, many of which parallel the therapeutic targets which are the hallmarks of molecular therapies for treating cancer. PMID:27840833

  19. Atypical Diabetic Foot Ulcer Keratinocyte Protein Signaling Correlates with Impaired Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, Glenn D; Ramos, Corrine; Hoke, Nicholas N; Crossland, Mary C; Shawler, Lisa G; Boykin, Joseph V

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and wound infections often resulting in lower extremity amputations. The protein signaling architecture of the mechanisms responsible for impaired DFU healing has not been characterized. In this preliminary clinical study, the intracellular levels of proteins involved in signal transduction networks relevant to wound healing were non-biasedly measured using reverse-phase protein arrays (RPPA) in keratinocytes isolated from DFU wound biopsies. RPPA allows for the simultaneous documentation and assessment of the signaling pathways active in each DFU. Thus, RPPA provides for the accurate mapping of wound healing pathways associated with apoptosis, proliferation, senescence, survival, and angiogenesis. From the study data, we have identified potential diagnostic, or predictive, biomarkers for DFU wound healing derived from the ratios of quantified signaling protein expressions within interconnected pathways. These biomarkers may allow physicians to personalize therapeutic strategies for DFU management on an individual basis based upon the signaling architecture present in each wound. Additionally, we have identified altered, interconnected signaling pathways within DFU keratinocytes that may help guide the development of therapeutics to modulate these dysregulated pathways, many of which parallel the therapeutic targets which are the hallmarks of molecular therapies for treating cancer.

  20. Effects of insulin on the skin: possible healing benefits for diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuelli, T; Burgeiro, A; Carvalho, E

    2016-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers affect 15-20 % of all diabetic patients and remain an important challenge since the available therapies have limited efficacy and some of the novel therapeutic approaches, which include growth factors and stem cells, are highly expensive and their safety remains to be evaluated. Despite its low cost and safety, the interest for topical insulin as a healing agent has increased only in the last 20 years. The molecular mechanisms of insulin signaling and its metabolic effects have been well studied in its classical target tissues. However, little is known about the specific effects of insulin in healthy or even diabetic skin. In addition, the mechanisms involved in the effects of insulin on wound healing have been virtually unknown until about 10 years ago. This paper will review the most recent advances in the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the beneficial effects of insulin on skin wound healing in diabetes. Emerging evidence that links dysfunction of key cellular organelles, namely the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria, to changes in the autophagy response, as well as the impaired wound healing in diabetic patients will also be discussed along with the putative mechanisms whereby insulin could regulate/modulate these alterations.

  1. The use of low output laser therapy to accelerate healing of diabetic foot ulcers: a randomized prospective controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, S. V. L. G.; Subapriya, S.; Yeoh, C. N.; Soosai, S.; Shalini, V.; Harwant, S.

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of low output laser therapy as an adjuvant treatment in grade 1 diabetic foot ulcers. Methods: Sixteen patients were randomly divided equally into two groups. Group A had daily dressing only, while group B had low output laser therapy instituted five days a week in addition to daily dressing. Serial measurement of the ulcer was done weekly using digital photography and analyzed. Results: The rate of healing in group A was 10.42 mm2/week, and in group B was 66.14mm2/week. The difference in the rate of healing was statistically significant, pdiabetic ulcer healing by six times in a six week period.

  2. Relationship between maceration and wound healing on diabetic foot ulcers in Indonesia: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryanto, Haryanto; Arisandi, Defa; Suriadi, Suriadi; Imran, Imran; Ogai, Kazuhiro; Sanada, Hiromi; Okuwa, Mayumi; Sugama, Junko

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between maceration and wound healing. A prospective longitudinal design was used in this study. The wound condition determined the type of dressings used and the dressing change frequency. A total of 62 participants with diabetic foot ulcers (70 wounds) were divided into two groups: non-macerated (n = 52) and macerated wounds (n = 18). Each group was evaluated weekly using the Bates-Jensen Wound Assessment Tool, with follow-ups until week 4. The Mann-Whitney U test showed that the changes in the wound area in week 1 were faster in the non-macerated group than the macerated group (P = 0·02). The Pearson correlation analysis showed a moderate correlation between maceration and wound healing from enrolment until week 4 (P = 0·002). After week 4, the Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the non-macerated wounds healed significantly faster than the macerated wounds (log-rank test = 19·378, P = 0·000). The Cox regression analysis confirmed that maceration was a significant and independent predictor of wound healing in this study (adjusted hazard ratio, 0·324; 95% CI, 0·131-0·799; P = 0·014). The results of this study demonstrated that there is a relationship between maceration and wound healing. Changes in the wound area can help predict the healing of wounds with maceration in clinical settings. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The Healing Effect of Low-Temperature Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma in Pressure Ulcer: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuangsuwanich, Apirag; Assadamongkol, Tananchai; Boonyawan, Dheerawan

    2016-12-01

    Pressure ulcers are difficult to treat. Recent reports of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma (LTAPP) indicated its safe and effectiveness in chronic wound care management. It has been shown both in vitro and vivo studies that LTAPP not only helps facilitate wound healing but also has antimicrobial efficacy due to its composition of ion and electron, free radicals, and ultraviolet ray. We studied the beneficial effect of LTAPP specifically on pressure ulcers. In a prospective randomized study, 50 patients with pressure ulcers were divided into 2 groups: Control group received standard wound care and the study group was treated with LTAPP once every week for 8 consecutive weeks in addition to standard wound care. We found that the group treated with LTAPP had significantly better PUSH (Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing) scores and exudate amount after 1 week of treatment. There was also a reduction in bacterial load after 1 treatment regardless of the species of bacteria identified.

  4. Topically applied connective tissue growth factor/CCN2 improves diabetic preclinical cutaneous wound healing: potential role for CTGF in human diabetic foot ulcer healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshaw, F R; Boughton, P; Lo, L; McLennan, S V; Twigg, S M

    2015-01-01

    Topical application of CTGF/CCN2 to rodent diabetic and control wounds was examined. In parallel research, correlation of CTGF wound fluid levels with healing rate in human diabetic foot ulcers was undertaken. Full thickness cutaneous wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic control rats were treated topically with 1 μg rhCTGF or vehicle alone, on 2 consecutive days. Wound healing rate was observed on day 14 and wound sites were examined for breaking strength and granulation tissue. In the human study across 32 subjects, serial CTGF regulation was analyzed longitudinally in postdebridement diabetic wound fluid. CTGF treated diabetic wounds had an accelerated closure rate compared with vehicle treated diabetic wounds. Healed skin withstood more strain before breaking in CTGF treated rat wounds. Granulation tissue from CTGF treatment in diabetic wounds showed collagen IV accumulation compared with nondiabetic animals. Wound α-smooth muscle actin was increased in CTGF treated diabetic wounds compared with untreated diabetic wounds, as was macrophage infiltration. Endogenous wound fluid CTGF protein rate of increase in human diabetic foot ulcers correlated positively with foot ulcer healing rate (r = 0.406; P diabetic foot ulcers.

  5. Fototerapia (LEDs 660/890nm no tratamento de úlceras de perna em pacientes diabéticos: estudo de caso Phototherapy (LEDs 660/890nm in the treatment of leg ulcers in diabetic patients: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Garbin Minatel

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a fototerapia na cicatrização de úlceras de perna (UP mistas em dois pacientes diabéticos (tipo 2, hipertensos. O aparelho apresentava sonda 1 (S1 (1 LED de 660nm, 5mW aplicado em 3 UP e sonda 2 (S2 (32 LEDs de 890nm e 4 LEDs de 660nm, 500mW em 6 UP. Após antissepsia,úlceras foram tratadas com sondas a 3J/cm2, 30seg, 2x/semana seguido pelo curativo diário com sulfadiazina de prata a 1% por 12 semanas. Pela análise com software Image J®, as UP com S2 tiveram índices de cicatrização médios de 0,6; 0,7 e 0,9 enquanto S1 foi de 0,2; 0,4 e 0,6 no 30º, 60º e 90º dias, respectivamente. A fototerapia acelerou a cicatrização das úlceras de perna em pacientes diabéticos.This study evaluated the use of phototherapy in the healing of mixed leg ulcers in two diabetic patients (type 2 with arterial hypertension. The device had probe 1 (one 660nm LED, 5mW applied in 3 ulcers and probe 2 (32 890nm LEDs associated with 4 660nm LEDs, 500mW in 6 ulcers. After asepsis, ulcers were treated with probes to 3 J/cm2, 30sec per point, twice a week, followed by topical daily dressing with 1% silver sulphadiazine during 12 weeks. The following analyses of ulcers with software Image J showed that probe 2 presented mean healing rates of 0.6; 0.7 and 0.9, whereas probe 1 had 0.2;0.4 and 0.6 at 30, 60 and 90 days, espectively. Phototherapy accelerated wound healing of leg ulcers in diabetic patients.

  6. Offloading the diabetic foot: toward healing wounds and extending ulcer-free days in remission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boghossian JA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Jano A Boghossian,1 John D Miller,2 David G Armstrong1 1Department of Surgery, Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 2Department of Podiatric Surgery and Medicine, DVA Maryland Healthcare System, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Management of the diabetic foot is multifaceted and requires constant monitoring from patients and health care providers. The alarmingly high rate of recurrence of ulcerations in diabetic foot requires a change in our approach to care and to the vernacular in the medical literature. With its high rates of morbidity and recurrence, care of the complex diabetic foot may be aptly comparable to many forms of cancer. Therefore, our efforts should be not only in rapid healing of open wounds but also in maximizing ulcer-free days for the patient in diabetic foot remission. One facet of the multidisciplinary approach in managing wounds is achieved by reducing peak plantar pressures by offloading the foot with various conservative and surgical techniques aimed at reducing areas of stress caused by ambulation and improper shoe gear. Evidence supports the use of total contact casts as the gold standard for offloading open wounds; however, other methods have gained popularity as well. Novel approaches in surgical techniques and advances in wearable technology appear to show promise in measuring and modulating dangerous pressure and inflammation to extend remission and improve quality of life for these most complex patients. Keywords: diabetic foot, ulcer, remission, amputation, offloading, wearables 

  7. Comparing negative pressure wound treatment with honey dressing in healing of foot ulcers in diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, U.; Maqsood, R.; Shabbir, H.

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the effectiveness of vacuum assisted treatment with that of honey dressing in duration of healing of foot ulcers in diabetics. Study Design: Randomized control study. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital Multan and Nishtar Hospital Multan, from Aug 2016 till Feb 2017. Patients and Methods: A total of 95 patients with ages between 30-60 years of both sexes, who presented with diabetic ulcers of foot involving subcutaneous tissue and skin. Patients were divided randomly into two groups; Group V and H. Group V was subjected to Vacuum Pack closure (negative pressure wound treatment) and group H was treated with honey dressing, follow up was done till the appearance of healthy tissue after initial debridement, suitable for STSG (Split Thickness Skin Graft) or primary closure. Results: Healthy tissue appeared much faster in Vacuum assisted treatment, then with honey dressing with mean of 18.2 days for V.A.C and 28.8 days for honey dressing. Conclusion: Vacuum assisted closure was more effective in the treatment of foot ulcers in diabetics. It promotes healthy granulation tissue in the wound bed at a faster rate in comparison to honey dressing. (author)

  8. [Modern approach to treatment of trophic ulcers of legs with perifocal varicose eczema, associated with mycotic infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetukhin, A M; Askerov, N G; Batkaev, E A; Makhulaeva, A M; Malinina, V N

    2008-01-01

    During 2005-2007 128 patients at the age from 21 to 80 years with extensive trophic ulcers of legs were treated in the contaminated surgery department of A.V. Vishnevsky Surgery Institute and Korolenko Hospital. In 87 patients (69.9%) varicosity was the cause of venous insufficiency, in 41 patients--post-thrombotic disease. 23 patients (17.97%) had double-sided throphic ulcers. In 50 patients (39.1%) ulcer area exceeded 40 cm2. In microscopical analysis fungi were discovered in 87 patients (89.06%). In the remaining 15 patients diagnosis was verified culturally. System etiotropic antimycotic antibacterial treatment including hyposensitizative, anti-inflammatory, antihistamine drugs was carried out. 34 patients (26.57%) received broad spectrum antibiotic from terbinafine group (Terbizil) in dosage 250 mg once a day during 3 moths with concurrent use of topical antimycotics. 34 patients (26.56%) recieved pulse therapy with broad spectrum antibiotic Rumicoz 400 mg a day during 7 days in combination with topical antimycotics. Nizoral 400 mg a day during 30 days was prescribed to 26 patients (20.3%). 34 patients (26.56%) were treated only with topical antimycotics. After preoperative preparation and reduction of inflammatory process 64 patients had underwent excision of trophic ulcers whereupon the therapy was continued. In these patients regress of varicose eczema manifestation was achieved on the 10th day. In patients who hadn't received surgical cure regress of varicose eczema was signed on the 23-25th day after onset of treatment. Question of plastic closing of throphic ulcers and wounds after their excision was solved particularly. 14 patients needed recurring surgical management becose inflammatory process was continued. Comprehensive approach to therapy taking into account mycotic semination appears to be appropriate and effective. Proactive surgical tactics (excision of throphic ulcer) allows to quicken preoperative preparation for correction of venous blood

  9. A prospective case series evaluating the safety and efficacy of the Klox BioPhotonic System in venous leg ulcers

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    Nikolis A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Andreas Nikolis,1 Doria Grimard,2 Yves Pesant,3 Giovanni Scapagnini,4 Denis Vézina5 1Division of Plastic Surgery, Victoria Park Research Centre, Montreal, 2Q&T Research Chicoutimi, Chicoutimi, 3St-Jerome Medical Research Inc., St-Jerome, Quebec, Canada; 4Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy; 5Klox Technologies, Laval, Quebec, Canada Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of the BioPhotonic System developed by Klox Technologies in a case series of ten patients with venous leg ulcers.Patients and methods: Ten patients with chronic venous leg ulcers, having failed on at least one previous therapy, were enrolled into this case series.Results: Nine patients were evaluable for efficacy. A response (defined as decrease in wound surface area was observed in seven patients (77.8%. Of these, four patients (44.4% achieved wound closure on average 4 months (127.5 days following the beginning of the treatment. Two patients did not respond to the investigational treatment. Quality of life improved over time throughout the study. Compliance was excellent, with 93.2% of visits completed as per protocol. Safety was unremarkable, with only four treatment-emergent-related adverse events, for which no specific intervention was required.Conclusion: The BioPhotonic System was shown to be safe and extremely well tolerated. It also demonstrated potential in terms of wound closure, wound surface area decrease, and wound bed preparation. Keywords: biophotonics, light, photobiomodulation, venous leg ulcers

  10. Granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor mouthwashes heal oral ulcers during head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovirosa, Angeles; Ferre, Jorge; Biete, Albert

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor GM-CSF mouthwashes in the epithelization of radiation-induced oral mucosal ulceration, control of pain, and weight loss. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients received curative radiotherapy for head and neck carcinoma. All had oropharyngeal and/or oral mucosa irradiation, with a median dose of 72 Gy (range 50-74), with conventional fractionation. A total of 300 μg of GM-CSF in 250 cc of water for 1 h of mouthwashing was prescribed. The procedure started once oral ulceration in the irradiation field was detected. Patients, examined twice a week, were evaluated for oral ulceration, pain, and weight loss. Blood tests were taken weekly during GM-CSF administration. A comparison was carried out with 12 retrospective case-matched controls. Results: In the GM-CSF group, mucosa ulcerations healed in 9 of 12 (75%) of the patients during the course of the radiotherapy. Fifty percent of the patients said they felt less pain during the GM-CSF treatment; 30% needed morphine. The mean and median weight loss as a percentage of baseline weight in addition to the actual weight were 4.2% and 3%, respectively (variation ranged between a gain of 1% and a loss of 13%). No GM-CSF-related side effects were found. In the case control group, in the 12 cases, oral ulcerations increased during radiotherapy and two patients needed intubation intake and hospital admission, as opposed to the GM-CSF group. The mean and median percentage of weight loss were 5.8% and 5%, respectively. Sixty percent of patients needed morphine, as opposed to 30% in the GM-CSF group. Conclusions: Granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor was effective in curing mucosal ulcerations during the course of radiotherapy. This is the first time we have seen a drug with this capacity. Although the GM-CSF seems to be effective in the control of pain, oral intake, and weight loss, we need further studies with a greater number

  11. Objective evaluation for venous leg ulcer-related nociceptive pain using thermography

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    Goto T

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Taichi Goto,1 Ayumi Naito,1,2 Nao Tamai,1 Gojiro Nakagami,1 Makoto Mo,3 Hiromi Sanada1 1Department of Gerontological Nursing/Wound Care Management, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan; 2Fujisawa City Hospital, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan; 3Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Yokohama Minami Kyosai Hospital, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan Purpose: We aimed to identify distinguishing characteristics in thermographic images of venous leg ulcer (VLU, for objective evaluation of VLU-related nociceptive pain. Patients and methods: Secondary analysis was performed, using existing data obtained from April to November 2010, for patients with VLU. Thermographic images of wounds and their surrounding area were classified according to the periwound temperature pattern as "normal temperature" or "high temperature". These results were compared with the self-reported pain intensity assessed by the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire. Cohen's kappa coefficients were used to evaluate the interrater reliability for temperature assessment, and Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare pain intensities between the two groups. Results: Among 39 thermographic examinations in eight patients, 22 were classified into the high-temperature group and 17 into the normal-temperature group. Kappa coefficients for the temperature classification were 0.90 between the wound, ostomy, and continence nurse and a wound care specialist, and 0.90 between the wound, ostomy, and continence nurse and a graduate student. The pain rating index (Z=−2.981, P=0.003, sensory pain (Z=−3.083, P=0.002, affective pain (Z=−2.764, P=0.006, and present pain intensity (Z=−2.639, P=0.006 ratings were significantly higher in the high-temperature group than in the normal-temperature group, but the visual analog scale (Z=−0.632, P=0.527 was not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion: Thermographic pattern may reflect VLU

  12. Duodenal ulcer healing on 2 g of sucralfate daily at bedtime compared to 1 g four times daily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Flemming; Ebbehøj, N; Fallingborg, J

    1990-01-01

    Seventy-seven patients with endoscopically verified duodenal ulcers were randomized to treatment with either 2 g sucralfate daily at bedtime or 1 g sucralfate q.d.s. in a controlled double-blind comparative study. After a 4-week treatment period, the healing rate was 68% for the former and 69...

  13. Successful Endoscopic Management of Non-Healing Perforated Duodenal Ulcer with Polyglycolic Acid Sheet and Fibrin Glue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishiro, Tsuyoshi; Shibagaki, Kotaro; Matsuda, Kayo; Fukuyama, Chika; Okada, Mayumi; Mikami, Hironobu; Izumi, Daisuke; Yamashita, Noritsugu; Okimoto, Eiko; Fukuda, Naoki; Aimi, Masahito; Fukuba, Nobuhiko; Oshima, Naoki; Takanashi, Toshihiro; Matsubara, Takeshi; Ishimura, Norihisa; Ishihara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, treatment techniques in which polyglycolic acid sheets are applied to various situations with fibrin glue have exhibited great clinical potential, and previous studies have reported safety and efficacy. We describe closure of a non-healing perforated duodenal ulcer with the use of a polyglycolic acid sheet and fibrin glue in an elderly patient who was not a candidate for surgery.

  14. Increased ratio of serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 against TIMP-1 predicts poor wound healing in diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhihong; Guo, Shuqin; Yao, Fang; Zhang, Yunliang; Li, Tingting

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about serum concentrations of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 in diabetic patients with foot ulcers. This study demonstrates their relationship with wound healing. Ninety-four patients with diabetic foot ulcers were recruited in the study. Serum MMP-9, MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were measured at the first clinic visit and the end of 4-week treatment and followed up till 12 weeks. According to the decreasing rate of ulcer healing area at the fourth week, we divided those cases into good and poor healers. Through analyses, we explore the possible relationship among those factors and degree of wound healing. The median level of serum MMP-9 in good healers was lower than poor healers at first visit (124.2 μg/L vs 374.6 μg/L, phealing than MMP-9 alone before therapy and after 4 week treatment (r = -0.6475 vs -0.3251, r = -0.7096 vs -0.1231, respectively). Receiver Operator Curve (ROC) showed that the cutoff for MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio at healing and might provide a novel target for the future therapy in diabetic foot ulcers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a medical device in various forms containing Triticum vulgare for the treatment of venous leg ulcers – a randomized pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanelli M

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Marco Romanelli,1 Michela Macchia,1 Salvatore Panduri,1 Battistino Paggi,1 Giorgio Saponati,2 Valentina Dini1 1Wound Healing Research Unit, Dermatology Division, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, 2ISPharm srl, Lucca, Italy Abstract: This study was carried out to assess the efficacy and tolerability of the topical application of an aqueous extract of Triticum vulgare (TV in different vehicles (cream, impregnated gauzes, foam, hydrogel, and dressing gel for the treatment of venous lower leg ulcers. Fifty patients were randomized to receive one of the five investigational vehicles. Treatment was performed up to complete healing or to a maximum of 29 days. The wound size reduction from baseline was the primary efficacy variable, which was measured by means of a noninvasive laser scanner instrument for wound assessment. In all groups, apart from the foam group, a similar trend toward the reduction of the surface area was observed. The cream showed the greatest effect on the mean reduction of the lesion size. At last visit, six ulcers were healed: two in the cream group, three in the gauze group, and one in the dressing gel group. In the patients treated with the cream, the gauzes, the hydrogel, and the dressing gel, the reduction of lesion size was 40%–50%; the reduction was smaller in the foam group. No impact in terms of age on the healing process was found. The Total Symptoms Score decreased in all groups during the study; a greater efficacy in terms of signs/symptoms was observed in the patients treated with the gauzes. In the dressing gel group, one patient had an infection of the wound after 3 weeks of treatment and 2 of colonization, leading to a systemic antibiotic treatment. The events were judged as nonrelated to the device used. On the basis of the results, it could be argued that the medical device may be useful in the treatment of chronic venous ulcers. Keywords: venous leg ulcers, Triticum vulgare

  16. The healing effects of Teucrium polium in the repair of indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrabani, Davood; Fattahi, Mohammad R; Saberi-Firouzi, Mehdi; Rezaee, Aminallah; Azarpira, Negar; Amini, Masoud; Tanideh, Nader; Panjehshahin, Mohammad R

    2009-01-01

    To determine the healing effect of Teucrium polium (T. polium) in indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats. In the fall of 2007, 250 Sprague-Dawley rats provided by the Shiraz University Laboratory Animal Center were divided into 4 equal groups including control (70 rats), and 3 experimental groups (60 rats each), and each group received different doses of T. polium. Ten rats were used to study the induction of gastric ulcer by indomethacin (25 mg/kg/stat). After 24 hours, their stomachs were evaluated for any mucosal ulcer. The T. polium extract was administered orally, 24 hours after indomethacin administration. In the experimental group, 10 animals were sacrificed after 24, 48, and 72 hours, after administration of T. polium, and at one, 2, and 4 weeks, and in the control group identically after the administration of distilled water. In rats treated with indomethacin, multiple ulcers were evident. After 4 weeks of treatment with T. polium, more re-epithelialization, proliferation, mucosal hyperplasia, migration of the gastric epithelial cells, and decrease in inflammatory cells were observed. The T. polium reduced the ulcer indices by >50% after one week, >80% after 2 weeks, and >90% after 4 weeks. The healing effect of T. polium may be due to antioxidant activity along with the ability to modulate the mucin secretion, prostaglandin synthesis, and epidermal growth factor receptor expression. These results along with the non-toxicity properties of T. polium suggests it as a promising anti-ulcer compound. (author)

  17. Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 Inhibition May Facilitate Healing of Chronic Foot Ulcers in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

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    Raffaele Marfella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of chronic diabetic ulcers is complex and still incompletely understood, both micro- and macroangiopathy strongly contribute to the development and delayed healing of diabetic wounds, through an impaired tissue feeding and response to ischemia. With adequate treatment, some ulcers may last only weeks; however, many ulcers are difficult to treat and may last months, in certain cases years; 19–35% of ulcers are reported as nonhealing. As no efficient therapy is available, it is a high priority to develop new strategies for treatment of this devastating complication. Because experimental and pathological studies suggest that incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 may improves VEGF generation and promote the upregulation of HIF-1α through a reduction of oxidative stress, the study evaluated the effect of the augmentation of GLP-1, by inhibitors of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4, such as vildagliptin, on angiogenesis process and wound healing in diabetic chronic ulcers. Although elucidation of the pathophysiologic importance of these aspects awaits further confirmations, the present study evidences an additional aspect of how DPP-4 inhibition might contribute to improved ulcer outcome.

  18. Preliminary investigation of topical nitroglycerin formulations containing natural wound healing agent in diabetes-induced foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotkar, Mukesh S; Avachat, Amelia M; Bhosale, Sagar S; Oswal, Yogesh M

    2015-04-01

    Nitroglycerin (NTG) is an organic nitrate rapidly denitrated by enzymes to release free radical nitric oxide and shows improved wound healing and tissue protection from oxidative damage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether topical application of NTG in the form of gel/ointment along with a natural wound healing agent, aloe vera, would bring about wound healing by using diabetes-induced foot ulcer model and rat excision wound model. All these formulations were evaluated for pH, viscosity, drug content and ex vivo diffusion studies using rat skin. Based on ex vivo permeation studies, the formulation consisting of carbopol 974p as a gelling agent and aloe vera was found to be suitable. The in vivo study used streptozotocin-induced diabetic foot ulcer and rat excision wound models to analyse wound healing activity. The wound size in animals of all treated groups was significantly reduced compared with that of the diabetic control and marketed treated animals. This study showed that the gel formed with carbopol 974p (1%) and aloe vera promotes significant wound healing and closure in diabetic rats compared with the commercial product and provides a promising product to be used in diabetes-induced foot ulcer. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Effect of oral nutritional supplementation on wound healing in diabetic foot ulcers: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, D G; Hanft, J R; Driver, V R; Smith, A P S; Lazaro-Martinez, J L; Reyzelman, A M; Furst, G J; Vayser, D J; Cervantes, H L; Snyder, R J; Moore, M F; May, P E; Nelson, J L; Baggs, G E; Voss, A C

    2014-09-01

    Among people with diabetes, 10-25% will experience a foot ulcer. Research has shown that supplementation with arginine, glutamine and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate may improve wound repair. This study tested whether such supplementation would improve healing of foot ulcers in persons with diabetes. Along with standard of care, 270 subjects received, in a double-blinded fashion, (twice per day) either arginine, glutamine and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate or a control drink for 16 weeks. The proportion of subjects with total wound closure and time to complete healing was assessed. In a post-hoc analysis, the interaction of serum albumin or limb perfusion, as measured by ankle-brachial index, and supplementation on healing was investigated. Overall, there were no group differences in wound closure or time to wound healing at week 16. However, in subjects with an albumin level of ≤ 40 g/l and/or an ankle-brachial index of healed at week 16 compared with control subjects (P = 0.03 and 0.008, respectively). Those with low albumin or decreased limb perfusion in the supplementation group were 1.70 (95% CI 1.04-2.79) and 1.66 (95% CI 1.15-2.38) times more likely to heal. While no differences in healing were identified with supplementation in non-ischaemic patients or those with normal albumin, addition of arginine, glutamine and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate as an adjunct to standard of care may improve healing of diabetic foot ulcers in patients with risk of poor limb perfusion and/or low albumin levels. Further investigation involving arginine, glutamine and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate in these high-risk subgroups might prove clinically valuable. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  20. Case report 379: 'Ulcer osteoma' associated with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiggins, T.; Bohrer, S.P.

    1986-01-01

    In summary, a 32-year-old black man with homozygous sickle cell anemia has been presented. The patient developed bilateral ulcers of the leg which never completely healed. In one leg he demonstrated a focal, fusiform, periosteal reaction which probably in time would become incorporated into the cortex, resulting in the formation of an ulcer osteoma of the tibia associated with sickle cell disease. The ulcer osteoma has the same radiological appearance as the ulcer osteoma in individuals in Africa without sickle cell disease. (orig./SHA)

  1. Analysis of patient knowledge on interdisciplinary care and self-care in venous leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Michalik

    2017-08-01

    It is therefore reasonable to say that the treatment of ulcers should be comprehensive and organized, consistent with the principles of modern medicine, and should be based on procedures and standards.

  2. Pirfenidone Accelerates Wound Healing in Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Randomized, Double-Blind Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz E. Gasca-Lozano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diabetic foot ulcers are one disabling complication of diabetes mellitus. Pirfenidone (PFD is a potent modulator of extracellular matrix. Modified diallyl disulfide oxide (M-DDO is an antimicrobial and antiseptic agent. Aim. To evaluate efficacy of topical PFD + M-DDO in a randomized, double-blind trial versus ketanserin in the treatment of noninfected chronic DFU. Methods. Patients received PFD + M-DDO or ketanserin for 6 months. Relative ulcer volume (RUV was measured every month; biopsies were taken at baseline and months 1 and 2 for histopathology and gene expression analysis for COL-1α, COL-4, KGF, VEGF, ACTA2 (α-SMA, elastin, fibronectin, TGF-β1, TGF-β3, HIF-1α, and HIF-1β. Results. Reduction of median RUV in the PFD + M-DDO group was 62%, 89.8%, and 99.7% at months 1–3 and 100% from months 4 to 6. Ketanserin reduced RUV in 38.4%, 56%, 60.8%, 94%, 94.8%, and 100% from the first to the sixth month, respectively. Healing score improved 4.5 points with PFD + M-DDO and 1.5 points with ketanserin compared to basal value. Histology analysis revealed few inflammatory cells and organized/ordered collagen fiber bundles in PFD + M-DDO. Expression of most genes was increased with PFD + M-DDO; 43.8% of ulcers were resolved using PFD + M-DDO and 23.5% with ketanserin. Conclusion. PFD + M-DDO was more effective than ketanserin in RUV reduction.

  3. Successful Use of Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy for Leg Ulcers Caused by Occluding Vasculopathy and Inflammatory Vascular Diseases - A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Zutt, Markus; Haas, Ellen; Krüger, Ullrich; Distler, Meike; Neumann, Christine

    2007-01-01

    Background: Leg ulcers caused by vasculitis, small vessel occlusion or other rare conditions often prove to be very difficult to treat. Despite polypragmatic, systemic and localized therapy, many of these wounds are progressive and characterized by severe pain. Methods and Results: We here portray the cases of 5 patients with ulcers resistant to systemic therapy for the underlying disease, who were treated successfully using vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) for wound mana...

  4. Venous Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  5. The effect of flexor tenotomy on healing and prevention of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers on the distal end of the toe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Netten Jaap J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flexor tenotomy is a minimally invasive surgical alternative for the treatment of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers on the distal end of the toe. The influence of infection on healing and time to heal after flexor tenotomy is unknown. Flexor tenotomy can also be used as a prophylactic treatment. The effectiveness as a prophylactic treatment has not been described before. Methods A retrospective study was performed with the inclusion of all consecutive flexor tenotomies from one hospital between January 2005 and December 2011. Results From 38 ulcers, 35 healed (92%, with a mean time to heal of 22 ± 26 days. The longest duration for healing was found for infected ulcers that were penetrating to bone (35 days; p = .042. Cases of prophylactic flexor tenotomies (n=9 did not result in any ulcer or other complications during follow-up. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that flexor tenotomy may be beneficial for neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers on the distal end of the toe, with a high healing percentage and a short mean time to heal. Infected ulcers that penetrated to bone took a significantly longer time to heal. Prospective research, to confirm the results of this retrospective study, should be performed.

  6. Success rate of split-thickness skin grafting of chronic venous leg ulcers depends on the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a retrospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgsberg, Trine; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Thomsen, Jens Schiersing

    2011-01-01

    that once chronic venous leg ulcers were colonized (weeks or months preoperatively) by P. aeruginosa, the success rate of skin grafting deteriorated despite aggressive treatment. To investigate this, a retrospective study was performed on the clinical outcome of 82 consecutive patients with chronic venous...... regression analysis was carried out leaving P. aeruginosa as the only predictor left in the model (p¿=¿0.001). This study supports our hypothesis that P. aeruginosa in chronic venous leg ulcers, despite treatment, has considerable impact on partial take or rejection of split-thickness skin grafts....

  7. Cost-effectiveness of a disease-specific oral nutritional support for pressure ulcer healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereda, Emanuele; Klersy, Catherine; Andreola, Manuela; Pisati, Roberto; Schols, Jos M G A; Caccialanza, Riccardo; D'Andrea, Federico

    2017-02-01

    The Oligo Element Sore Trial has shown that supplementation with a disease-specific nutritional formula enriched with arginine, zinc, and antioxidants improves pressure ulcer (PU) healing in malnourished patients compared to an isocaloric-isonitrogenous support. However, the use of such a nutritional formula needs to be supported also by a cost-effectiveness evaluation. This economic evaluation - from a local healthcare system perspective - was conducted alongside a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial following a piggy-back approach. The primary efficacy endpoint was the percentage of change in PU area at 8 weeks. The cost analysis focused on: the difference in direct medical costs of local PU care between groups and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of nutritional therapy related to significant study endpoints (percentage of change in PU area and ≥40% reduction in PU area at 8 weeks). Although the experimental formula was more expensive (mean difference: 39.4 Euros; P costs of local PU care (difference, -74.3 Euros; P = 0.013). Therefore, given its efficacy it proved to be a cost-effective intervention. The robustness of these results was confirmed by the sensitivity analyses. The use of a disease-specific oral nutritional formula not only results in better healing of PUs, but also reduces the costs of local PU care from a local healthcare system perspective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  8. Gastric Ulcers in Middle-Aged Rats: The Healing Effect of Essential Oil from Citrus aurantium L. (Rutaceae

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    C. M. Polo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The elderly population has experienced increased life expectancy as well as the increased incidence of gastric ulcers. The peels of fruits from Citrus aurantium L., popularly known in Brazil as orange bitter, are commonly used asatea form for the treatment of gastrointestinal tract disorders, such as ulcer and gastritis. We evaluated the healing effects of essential oil from the peels of Citrus aurantium fruits (OEC on gastric ulcers in middle-aged rats. We examined the effects of a 14-day chronic OEC treatment on gastric mucosa in middle-aged male Wistar rats that were given acetic-acid-induced gastric lesions by morphometric and immunohistological analyses. Oral OEC treatment significantly reduced the lesion area (76% within the gastric mucosa and significantly increased (P<.05 the height of regenerated mucosa (59% when compared to the negative control group. Immunohistochemical analysis of the molecular markers such as COX-2, HSP-70, VEGF, and PCNA in the gastric mucosa confirmed that OEC treatment induced healing effects by increasing the number of new blood vessels and by augmenting gastric mucus in the mucosa glands. These results suggest that the oil from Citrus aurantium effectively heals gastric ulcers in middle-aged animals; however, safe use of OEC demands special care and precautions.

  9. Débridement and Autologous Lipotransfer for Chronic Ulceration of the Diabetic Foot and Lower Limb Improves Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasch, Tilman; Hoehne, Julius; Huynh, Tuan; De Baerdemaeker, Randy; Grandel, Siegfried; Herold, Christian

    2015-12-01

    The application of autologous lipotransfer (fat grafting, lipofilling) in reconstructive surgery is steadily becoming more popular as evidence of the regenerative and reparative effects of fat becomes better known. The authors investigated the use of autologous lipotransfer for treatment of chronic diabetic and other foot and lower limb ulcers. Twenty-six patients with nonhealing wounds were treated with surgical débridement and autologous lipotransfer (using the débridement and autologous lipotransfer method). The mean age of the wounds before intervention was 16.7 months. Wound size after débridement averaged 5.1 ± 2.6 cm2. On average, 7.1 ± 3.3 cc of lipoaspirate was transferred into the wound area. Twenty-two of 25 wounds (88 percent) healed completely within a mean of 68.0 ± 33.0 days. A reduction of wound size by 50 percent was achieved after an average of 4 weeks. In one patient with an ulcer within particularly scarred tissues on the lower limb, a repeated session of lipotransfer led to complete wound healing after another 4 weeks. The authors describe a simple and useful technique to improve wound healing in diabetic feet and chronic lower limb ulcers with a background of peripheral vascular disease, where other interventional options to achieve wound healing have failed.

  10. Culture-based Screening of Aerobic Microbiome in Diabetic Foot Subjects and Developing Non-Healing Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Noor

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried on diabetic foot patients to deduce clinical attributes, the occurrence of the range of aerobic microbial flora and to assess their comparative in vitro susceptibility to the customarily used antimicrobials. We also studied the potential risk factors involved in the development of non-healing ulcers. A total of 87 organisms were isolated from 70 specimens, including Escherichia coli (19.5% among the Gram-negative and Staphylococcus aureus (18.4% among the Gram-positive as the predominant aerobes explored. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli were predominant isolates of non-healing ulcers. The antimicrobial sensitivity pattern revealed that vancomycin (100% and amikacin (90.4% exhibited highest sensitivity to Gram-positive cocci, while all strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were sensitive towards imipenem (100%. The prevalent uncontrolled glycemic status, altered lipid spectra, the existence of neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease, suggested predisposition towards the development of non-healing lesions. The study has underlined the need for continuous surveillance of bacteria and their antimicrobial sensitivity blueprints to provide the basis for empirical therapy and to minimize the risk of complications. Further, stringent clinical evaluation and medical history will help in revealing the risk of developing non-healing status in diabetic foot ulcers.

  11. Evaluation of wound healing in diabetic foot ulcer using platelet-rich plasma gel: A single-arm clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Molavi, Behnam; Mohammadi, Saeed; Nikbakht, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Ashraf Malek; Mostafaei, Shayan; Norooznezhad, Amir Hossein; Ghorbani Abdegah, Ali; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) gel for treatment of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) during the first 4 weeks of the treatment. In this longitudinal and single-arm trial, 100 patients were randomly selected after meeting certain inclusion and exclusion criteria; of these 100 patients, 70 (70%) were enrolled in the trial. After the primary care actions such as wound debridement, the area of each wound was calculated and recorded. The PRP therapy (2mL/cm 2 of ulcers) was performed weekly until the healing time for each patient. We used one sample T-test for healing wounds and Bootstrap resampling approach for reporting confidence interval with 1000 Bootstrap samples. The p-valuehealing time was 8.7, 8 weeks (SD: 3.93) except for 2 mentioned cases. According to one sample T-test, wound area (cm 2 ), on average, significantly decreased to 51.9% (CI: 46.7-57.1) through the first four weeks of therapy. Furthermore, significant correlation (0.22) was not found between area of ulcers and healing duration (p-value>0.5). According to the results, PRP could be considered as a candidate treatment for non-healing DFUs as it may prevent future complications such as amputation or death in this pathological phenomenon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Measurement of the healing ability of ischemic ulcers in the lower limbs in chronic arterial obstructive disease using 201Tl-Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motoyasu, Shuzo

    1987-01-01

    Evaluation of the healing ability of ischemic ulcers by a method involving measurement of the ulcer index (U. I.) and mean ulcer index of toes (mU. I.) using 201 Tl-Cl before and after the treatment of chronic arterial obstructive disease accompanied by ischemic ulcer was studied. The lesions consisted of 56 ulcers in 41 limbs. Reactive hyperemia following avascularization stress was used for measurement, and U. I. was determined according to the method of Siegel et al. For cases with toe ulcers, the mU. I. was measured from plantar scintigrams, twice under stress and upon redistribution after 3 hours' rest. The following results were obtained. 1) The healing ability of the cases with a U. I. value of more than 1.4 was good, but even among cases with a pretreatment U. I. of 0.9 - 1.4, ulcer healing was also good in cases in which the U. I. was maintained above 1.4 as a result of various treatments. 2) Significant increases in U. I. were observed in the arterial reconstruction group after treatment, compared to the conservative treatment group and the lumbar sympathectomy group. 3) The healing ability was good in cases with an mU. I. of more than 1.2 at stress except for 2 ASO cases complicated by diabetes. 4) Although it was difficult to prognosticate the healing ability of cases with an mU. I. of less than 1.2 before treatment, healing ability could be evaluated after treatment on the basis of the appearance of significant increase in blood flow on stress in the ulcerated toes. 5) A stress index seemed to reflect the ischemic conditions in ulcerated toes in relation to stress. 6) U. I. and mU. I. measured using 201 Tl-Cl were significantly correlated with the degree of inflammatory and reactive hyperemia in the floor of ulcers and in the ulcerated toes. (J.P.N.)

  13. Wound healing: total contact cast vs. custom-made temporary footwear for patients with diabetic foot ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Weg, F B; Van Der Windt, D A W M; Vahl, A C

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of irremovable total-contact casts (TCC) and custom-made temporary footwear (CTF) to heal neuropathic foot ulcerations in individuals with diabetes. In this prospective clinical trial, 43 patients with plantar ulcer Grade 1 or 2 (Wagner scale) were randomized to one of two off-loading modalities: TCC or CTF. Outcomes assessed were wound surface area reduction (cm2) and time to wound healing (days) at 2, 4, 8 and 16 weeks. To evaluate safety, possible side effects were recorded at each follow-up visit. The results showed no significant difference in wound surface area reduction (adjusted for baseline wound surface) at 2, 4, 8 or 16 weeks (adjusted mean difference 0.10 cm2; 95% CI -0.92-0.72 at 16 weeks). At 16 weeks, 12 patients had a completely healed ulcer, 6 per group. The median time to healing was shorter for the patients using a cast (52 vs. 90 days, p = 0.26). Five patients with TCC and two with CTF developed device-related complications. It was concluded that: (i) the rate of wound healing is not significantly different for patients treated with CTF or TCC. The difference in wound surface area was small and not significant at any time during follow-up; and (ii) the difference in healing time (38 days) may have attained statistical significance if the numbers in these sub-groups (2 x 6) had been higher. Since there appears to be little difference in effectiveness between both off-loading modalities, further investigation into the benefits of CTF is warranted.

  14. [Information needs of people suffering from venous leg ulcer. Expertise of people concerned as a basis of patient-centered information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Astrid

    2011-06-01

    Patient-centred information is orientated on the needs. The main objective of such information is coping with every-day life and learning to live with the chronic disease. Regarding the current knowledge, such information does not exist in German speaking countries for people suffering from venous leg ulceration. In order to generate the subject matter of such information, a literature search and a secondary analysis of 27 transcripts of interviews, given by people living with chronic leg ulceration, were conducted. Both analyses show the complex impact of leg ulceration on every-day live. The dimensions competences in every-day live, knowledge, techniques and skills and the meaning of family were generated. The secondary analysis points out that family members are an important part of the supporting system and are concerned by effects of chronic disease as well. After long-lasting disease-experience people consider themselves as experts. They obtain special competences in dealing with their disease and judge their experience-based knowledge higher than the knowledge of healthcare professionals. The participants describe individual concepts about their disease. Medical knowledge constitutes just one source of knowledge among others. People know about alternative medicine and use it. They feel that the healthcare professionals do not take them seriously in most cases. Patient-centred information can be a guide to people suffering from venous leg ulceration and their family members, but also a support for healthcare professionals to reflect their professional behaviour and understanding.

  15. Pain-relieving properties of topically applied morphine on arterial leg ulcers: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, M.M.; Horst, J.C. van der; Valk, P.G.M. van der; Kuks, P.F.M.; Zylicz, Z.; Sorge, A.A. van

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether topical morphine is pharmacologically effective in relieving pain from ulcers caused by arterial insufficiency and identify whether this effect is centrally or peripherally mediated. METHOD: The analgesic effect of a topically applied hydrogel containing 0.5% of morphine

  16. District nurses' experiences of caring for leg ulcers in accordance with clinical guidelines: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerin, Annica; Hylander, Ingrid; Törnkvist, Lena

    2017-12-01

    This qualitative study used the grounded theory method to investigate district nurses' experiences of caring for leg ulcers in accordance with clinical guidelines at seven primary health care centres in Stockholm, Sweden. Group interviews were conducted with 30 nurses. The results describe how district nurses strive to stay on track in order to follow clinical guidelines and remain motivated despite prolonged wound treatment and feelings of hopelessness. Three main obstacles to following the guidelines were found. District nurses used compensating strategies so the obstacles would not lead to negative consequences. If the compensating strategies were insufficient, perceived prolonged wound treatment and feelings of hopelessness could result. District nurses then used motivating strategies to overcome these feelings of hopelessness. Sometimes, despite the motivating strategies, treatment in accordance with guidelines could not be achieved. With some patients, district nurses had to compromise and follow the guidelines as far as possible.

  17. Olive oil-induced reduction of oxidative damage and inflammation promotes wound healing of pressure ulcers in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato-Trancoso, Aline; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Romana-Souza, Bruna

    2016-07-01

    The overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and exacerbated inflammatory response are the main events that impair healing of pressure ulcers. Therefore, olive oil may be a good alternative to improve the healing of these chronic lesions due to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. This study investigated the effect of olive oil administration on wound healing of pressure ulcers in mice. Male Swiss mice were daily treated with olive oil or water until euthanasia. One day after the beginning of treatment, two cycles of ischemia-reperfusion by external application of two magnetic plates were performed in skin to induced pressure ulcer formation. The olive oil administration accelerated ROS and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and reduced oxidative damage in proteins and lipids when compared to water group. The inflammatory cell infiltration, gene tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression and protein neutrophil elastase expression were reduced by olive oil administration when compared to water group. The re-epithelialization and blood vessel number were higher in the olive oil group than in the water group. The olive oil administration accelerated protein expression of TNF-α, active transforming growth factor-β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor-A when compared to water group. The collagen deposition, myofibroblastic differentiation and wound contraction were accelerated by olive oil administration when compared to water group. Olive oil administration improves cutaneous wound healing of pressure ulcers in mice through the acceleration of the ROS and NO synthesis, which reduces oxidative damage and inflammation and promotes dermal reconstruction and wound closure. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effect of Foot Exercises on Wound Healing in Type 2 Diabetic Patients With a Foot Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraydin, Şahizer; Avşar, Gülçin

    2017-12-19

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of foot exercises on wound healing in type 2 diabetic patients with a diabetic foot ulcer. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Sixty-five patients from an outpatient clinic with grade 1 or 2 ulcers (Wagner classification) who met study criteria agreed to participate; 60 patients completed the study and were included in the final analysis. Subjects were followed up between February 2014 and June 2015. Subjects were recruited by the researchers in the clinics where they received treatment. Subjects were randomly allocated to either the control or intervention group. Data were collected using investigator-developed forms: patient information form and the diabetic foot exercises log. Patients in the intervention group received standard wound care and performed daily foot exercises for 12 weeks; the control group received standard wound care but no exercises. The ulcers of the patients in both the intervention and control groups were examined and measured at the 4th, 8th, and 12th weeks. The groups were compared in terms of the ulcer size and depth. To analyze and compare the data, frequency distribution, mean (standard deviation), variance analysis, and the independent samples t test and the χ test were used. The mean ulcer areas were 12.63 (14.43), 6.91 (5.44), 4.30 (3.70), and 3.29 (3.80) cm (P diabetic foot ulcer sizes in the study intervention group in the 4th and 12th weeks compared to beginning baseline (P ≤ .05). However, only the 12th week was different from the beginning in the control group (P = .000). The mean depths of the ulcers were 0.56 (0.85), 0.42 (0.68), 0.36 (0.50), and 0.28 (0.38) cm in the study intervention group (P foot exercises should be included in the treatment plan when managing patients with diabetic foot ulcers.

  19. Combined application of alginate dressing and human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor promotes healing in refractory chronic skin ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guobao; Sun, Tangqing; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Qiuhe; Zhang, Keyan; Tian, Qingfen; Huo, Ran

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical therapeutic effect of the combined application of alginate and recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) on the healing of refractory chronic skin ulcers. A single center, three arm, randomized study was performed at Jinan Central Hospital (Jinan, Shandong, China). A total of 60 patients with refractory chronic skin ulcers, which persisted for >1 month, were enrolled and randomly assigned into one of the following three groups: alginate dressing/rhGM-CSF group (group A), rhGM-CSF only group (group B) and conventional (vaseline dressing) group (group C). The wound area rate was measured, granulation and color were observed and pain was evaluated. The data were summarized and statistical analysis was performed. The results demonstrated that group A exhibited a significantly faster wound healing rate and lower pain score compared with the other groups (PCSF for the treatment of refractory chronic skin ulcers demonstrated significant advantages. It promoted the growth of granulation tissue, accelerated re-epithelialization and also effectively reduced wound pain, and thus improved the quality of life for the patient. This suggests that the combined application of alginate and rhGM-CSF may be an effective therapeutic strategy for the clinical treatment of refractory chronic skin ulcers.

  20. STUDY ON COMPARISON OF THE EFFECT OF TOPICAL INSULIN WITH NORMAL SALINE DRESSING IN HEALING OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinnam Venkata Reddy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Numerous topical medication and gels are promoted for ulcer care and healing. Relatively, few have proved to be more efficacious than saline wet-to-dry dressings. The present study was aimed to compare the effect of topical insulin and normal saline dressing in healing of diabetic foot ulcers. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present two-year hospital-based randomised-controlled trial was conducted in the Department of General Surgery, Rangaraya Medical College, Kakinada, from April 2015 to March 2017. A total of 60 patients with diabetic foot ulcers were studied. Based on the envelop method, patients were divided into two groups of 30 patients each that is group A (topical insulin and group B (normal saline. RESULTS In this males (66.67% in group A and 83.33% in group B outnumbered females in both the groups with male-to-female ratio of 2:1 in group A and 4:1 in group B. The mean age in group A was 52.00 ± 11.00 years, and in group B, it was 57.00 ± 9.80 years (p=1.000. Among patients with group A, significant reduction of mean ulcer area was observed (307.23 ± 169.87 mm2 with higher mean percentage reduction (35.19 ± 19.00 percent, whereas in group B, the mean percentage reduction was significantly less (18.82 ± 4.06 percent with less reduction of mean final ulcer area (149.90 ± 64.45 mm2 (p<0.001. CONCLUSION Overall, topical insulin dressing provided favourable outcome in patients with diabetic foot ulcer by significant reduction in wound area when compared to normal saline dressing and it had positive role in reducing the wound infection if present.

  1. Effectiveness of an Internet-based learning program on venous leg ulcer nursing care in home health care--study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylönen, Minna; Viljamaa, Jaakko; Isoaho, Hannu; Junttila, Kristiina; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Suhonen, Riitta

    2015-10-01

    To describe the study protocol for a study of the effectiveness of an internet-based learning program on venous leg ulcer nursing care (eVLU) in home health care. The prevalence of venous leg ulcers is increasing as population age. The majority of these patients are treated in a municipal home healthcare setting. However, studies show nurses' lack of knowledge of ulcer nursing care. Quasi-experimental study with pre- and postmeasurements and non-equivalent intervention and comparison groups. During the study, nurses taking care of patients with a chronic leg ulcer in home health care in one Finnish municipality will use the eVLU. Nurses working in home health care in another Finnish municipality will not use it providing standard care. Nurses will complete three questionnaires during the study and they will also be observed three times at patients' homes. Nurses' perceived and theoretical knowledge is the primary outcome of the study. Funding for this study was received from the Finnish Foundation for Nursing Education in 2014. Data from this study will provide information about the effectiveness of an internet-based educational program. After completing the program nurses will be accustomed to using internet-based resources that can aid them in the nursing care of patients with a VLU. Nurses will also have better knowledge of VLU nursing care. This study is registered with the International Clinical Trials Registry, identifier NCT02224300. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Marjolin's Ulcers: A Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    remains a feature of this pathology even in recent times. Prognosis ... marjolin's ulcers such as chronic leg ulcers and poorly managed burns ... the distribution of the disease. ..... Squamous cell carcinoma complicating chronic venous leg.

  3. Improved wound healing in pressure-induced decubitus ulcer with controlled release of basic fibroblast growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Wei; Wang Hailun; Jin Faguang; Yu Chunyan; Chu Dongling; Wang Lin; Lu Xian

    2008-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the efficacy of the wound dressing containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-loaded microspheres on promoting healing in pressure-induced decubitus ulcer. In this study, the pressure-induced ulcer in swine was used as a model to demonstrate the hypothesis that controlled release of bFGF has the potential to provide optimal healing milieu for chronic wounds in the repair process. Average size of the microspheres was 14.36 ± 3.56 μm and the network gelatin sponges were characterized with an average pore size of 80-160 μm. Both the in vitro release efficiency and the protein bioactivity revealed that bFGF was released from the microspheres in a controlled manner and it was biologically active as assessed by its ability to induce the proliferation of fibroblasts. Pressure-induced ulcer was created at 500 g/cm 2 pressure loaded on swine dorsal skin 12 h daily for 2 consecutive days. After removal of the pressure load, the gelatin sponge containing bFGF gelatin microspheres or bFGF in solution was implanted into the wound. Swine were sacrificed at 7, 14, and 21 days after implantation, and a full-thickness biopsy was taken and stained for histological analysis. It was observed that controlled release of bFGF provided an accelerated recovery in the wound areas. Histological investigations showed that the dressings were biocompatible and had capability of proliferating fibroblasts and inducing neovascularisation. The present study implied the clinical potential of gelatin sponge with bFGF microspheres to promote the healing in pressure-induced decubitus ulcer

  4. Improved wound healing in pressure-induced decubitus ulcer with controlled release of basic fibroblast growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Wei [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Wang Hailun [Department of Dermatology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Jin Faguang [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China)], E-mail: nidewenzhang@163.com; Yu Chunyan [Department of Dermatology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Chu Dongling [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Wang Lin [Department of Internal Medicine, 316 Hospital of PLA, Beijing 100093 (China); Lu Xian [93942 Unit Hospital of PLA, Xianyang 710012 (China)

    2008-07-14

    The purpose was to evaluate the efficacy of the wound dressing containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-loaded microspheres on promoting healing in pressure-induced decubitus ulcer. In this study, the pressure-induced ulcer in swine was used as a model to demonstrate the hypothesis that controlled release of bFGF has the potential to provide optimal healing milieu for chronic wounds in the repair process. Average size of the microspheres was 14.36 {+-} 3.56 {mu}m and the network gelatin sponges were characterized with an average pore size of 80-160 {mu}m. Both the in vitro release efficiency and the protein bioactivity revealed that bFGF was released from the microspheres in a controlled manner and it was biologically active as assessed by its ability to induce the proliferation of fibroblasts. Pressure-induced ulcer was created at 500 g/cm{sup 2} pressure loaded on swine dorsal skin 12 h daily for 2 consecutive days. After removal of the pressure load, the gelatin sponge containing bFGF gelatin microspheres or bFGF in solution was implanted into the wound. Swine were sacrificed at 7, 14, and 21 days after implantation, and a full-thickness biopsy was taken and stained for histological analysis. It was observed that controlled release of bFGF provided an accelerated recovery in the wound areas. Histological investigations showed that the dressings were biocompatible and had capability of proliferating fibroblasts and inducing neovascularisation. The present study implied the clinical potential of gelatin sponge with bFGF microspheres to promote the healing in pressure-induced decubitus ulcer.

  5. Health-Related Quality of Life Predicts Major Amputation and Death, but Not Healing, in People With Diabetes Presenting With Foot Ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersma, V.; Thorsen, H.; Holstein, P.E.

    2014-01-01

    healing, major amputation and death.Research design and methodsWe followed 1088 patients with new diabetic foot ulcers presenting for treatment at one of the 14 centers in 10 European countries participating in the Eurodiale study, prospectively until healing (76.9%), major amputation (4.6%) or death (6...... for major amputation (Mobility, Self-Care, Usual Activities) and death (Self-care, Usual Activities, Pain/Discomfort).ConclusionsLow HRQoL appears to be predictive for major amputation and death, but high HRQoL does not increase healing. Future studies into the influence of HRQoL on ulcer outcome...

  6. Comparative healing property of kombucha tea and black tea against indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration in mice: possible mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Debashish; Hassarajani, Sham A; Maity, Biswanath; Narayan, Geetha; Bandyopadhyay, Sandip K; Chattopadhyay, Subrata

    2010-12-01

    The healing activity of black tea (BT) and BT fermented with Candida parapsilosis and kombucha culture, designated as CT and KT respectively against the indomethacin-induced stomach ulceration has been studied in a mouse model. The KT sample (KT4) produced by fermenting BT for four days, showed the best DPPH radical scavenging capacity and phenolics contents. Hence the ulcer-healing activity of KT4 was compared with those of CT4 and BT. All the tea extracts (15 mg kg(-1)) could effectively heal the gastric ulceration as revealed from the histopathological and biochemical studies, with relative efficacy as KT4 > CT4 ∼ BT. The healing capacities of the tea extracts could be attributed to their antioxidant activity as well as the ability to protect the mucin content of the gastric tissues. In addition, the ability of KT4 to reduce gastric acid secretion might also contribute to its ulcer-healing activity. The tea preparation KT4 (15 mg kg(-1)) was as effective as the positive control, omeprazole (3 mg kg(-1)) in ulcer healing.

  7. The Proteolytic Fraction from Latex of Vasconcellea cundinamarcensis (P1G10) Enhances Wound Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Double-Blind Randomized Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonaco, Luís A B; Gomes, Flavia L; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo; Lopes, Miriam T P; Salas, Carlos E

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the role of the proteolytic fraction from Vasconcellea cundinamarcensis, designated as P1G10, on the healing of chronic foot ulcers in neuropathic patients with diabetes 2. Fifty patients were enrolled in a prospective, randomized, double-blind trial, to verify the efficacy and safety of a topical dressing formulated with 0.1% P1G10, intended for wound healing, versus a hydrogel (control) protocol. Upon completion of the intervention, the outcome evaluated the number of patients attaining full epithelization (100%), or at least 80% healing. Statistical analysis compared the data on each group for the significance of the differences. Collection of data was finished in week 16, and the results were analyzed by intention to treat. The results showed that, in the control group, 5 patients attained 100% ulcer healing, 3 patients ≥ 80% healing and 11 experienced ulcer changes ≤ 80%, and the remainder showed no changes or their wounds became worse. Meanwhile, in the P1G10 group, 11 patients experienced full healing, 4 had healing ≥ 80% and 5 had ulcer changes ≤ lower than 80%, and the remainder showed no changes or their wounds became worse. The healing incidence for the first endpoint (100% healing) showed that the P1G10 group was 2.95-fold more efficacious than the control group (CI 95%) and 2.52-fold (CI, 95%) higher than its control for the second endpoint (80% healing). These data support the hypothesis that topical application of the proteolytic fraction identified as P1G10 significantly enhances foot ulcer healing compared to hydrogel treatment.

  8. Economic benefit of a polyacrylate-based hydrogel compared to an amorphous hydrogel in wound bed preparation of venous leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaspar D

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Kaspar,1 Jörg Linder,1 Petra Zöllner,1 Ulrich Simon,2 Hans Smola1,31Medical Competence Centre, Paul Hartmann AG, Heidenheim, Germany; 2Scientific Computing Centre, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany; 3Department of Dermatology, University of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyObjective: To assess the cost-effectiveness of a polyacrylate (PA-based hydrogel compared to an amorphous hydrogel in wound bed preparation for venous leg ulcers.Method: A cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken alongside a multicenter, randomized controlled trial performed in France. A total of 75 patients with venous leg ulcers extensively covered with fibrin and necrotic tissue were randomized to a PA-containing hydrogel or an amorphous hydrogel. Wounds were treated for 14 days and costs were estimated from the German payer's perspective. Medical costs included study treatment, wound treatment supply, and labor time. The clinical benefit was expressed as the number of patients with wounds >50% covered with granulation tissue within 14 days. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER was expressed as the additional cost spent with >50% granulation tissue per day per patient within 14 days of leg ulcer care.Results: Because of individual pricing of wound dressings in hospitals, cost data were derived from the outpatient sector. A total of 33 patients were treated using the PA-based hydrogel and 37 patients using the amorphous hydrogel. The estimated total direct costs per patient and per 14 days of therapy were €306 for both treatment groups. However, with the PA-based hydrogel, 2.5 additional days with wounds covered >50% with granulation tissues were gained within 14 days of leg ulcer care compared to the comparator. The ICER was €0 per additional day spent with >50% granulation tissue.Conclusion: Although there were a greater number of dressing changes in the PA-based hydrogel treatment, the total treatment cost for 14 days of leg ulcer care was the same for both

  9. Wound healing in animal models: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Jaffary

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing and reduction of its recovery time is one of the most important issues in medicine. Wound is defined as disruption of anatomy and function of normal skin. This injury could be the result of physical elements such as  surgical incision, hit or pressure cut of the skin and gunshot wound. Chemical or caustic burn is another category of wound causes that can be induced by acid or base contact irritation. Healing is a process of cellular and extracellular matrix interactions that occur in the damaged tissue. Wound healing consists of several stages including hemostasis, inflammatory phase, proliferative phase and new tissue formation which reconstructs by new collagen formation. Wounds are divided into acute and chronic types based on their healing time. Acute wounds have sudden onset and in normal individuals usually have healing process of less than 4 weeks without any residual side effects. In contrast, chronic wounds have gradual onset. Their inflammatory phase is prolonged and the healing process is stopped due to some background factors like diabetes, ischemia or local pressure. If the healing process lasts more than 4 weeks it will be classified as chronic wound. Despite major advances in the treatment of wounds, still finding effective modalities for healing wounds in the shortest possible time with the fewest side effects is a current challenge. In this review different phases of wound healing and clinical types of wound such as venous leg ulcer, diabetic foot ulcer and pressure ulcer are discussed. Also acute wound models (i.e burn wounds or incisional wound and chronic wound models (such as venous leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcer, pressure ulcers or bedsore in laboratory animals are presented. This summary can be considered as a preliminary step to facilitate designing of more targeted and applied research in this area.

  10. Genetic parameters of wound healing in patients with neuropatic diabetic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina L. Zaitseva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tissue repair processes are impaired in diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs. Previous research has shown that glycaemic control, cytokines and growth factors play an important role in wound healing. Emerging evidence also suggests that genes play a role via their regulation of cell proliferation, collagen synthesis and granulation tissue formation. Aim. To evaluate collagen genes expression in different stages of wound healing in patients with DFUs. Materials and methods. Prospective study included four patients with neuropathic DFUs after surgical debridement. Tissue samples were taken for morphological and genetic tests on days 0, 10 and 15 of local treatment to evaluate expression of collagen genes (i.e. COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1 and to perform morphological tests. Results. The present study confirmed that the size of wounds decreased by 8.8 ± 7% after 10 days of local treatment and by 18.3 ± 8% after 15 days of local treatment. According to histological examination of wound biopsies at day 10, all patients showed a tendency for lower levels of inflammatory infiltrate, increased number of fibroblast-like cells, presence of maturing granulation tissue and emergence of connective tissue fibres. After 15 days, we detected inflammatory infiltration in the wounds, despite the formation of mature granulation tissue. According to results of genetic analysis on day 10 of local wound treatment, we found a tendency for increased expression of collagen genes relative to the baseline: COL1A1 increased by 3.2 ± 1.3 times, COL1A2 by 2.0 ± 1.0 times and COL3A1 by 1.25 ± 1.1 times. On day 15 of local treatment, in contrast, we found a tendency for decreased expression of COL1A1, COL1A2 and COL3A1 relative to the baseline (1.7 ± 0.6, 2.5 ± 2 and 20.0 ± 3 times, respectively. Conclusions. The expression of collagen genes (COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1 is more pronounced in proliferation phase and is subsequently reduced towards the end. These data were

  11. A controlled, randomized, comparative study of a radiant heat bandage on the healing of stage 3-4 pressure ulcers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David R; Diebold, Marilyn R; Eggemeyer, Linda M

    2005-01-01

    Pressure ulcers, like other chronic wounds, fail to proceed through an orderly and timely process to produce anatomical or functional integrity. Treatment of pressure ulcers is directed to improving host factors and providing an optimum wound environment. In addition to providing a moist wound environment, it has been theorized that preventing hypothermia in a wound and maintaining a normothermic state might improve wound healing. Forty-one subjects with a stage 3 or stage 4 truncal pressure ulcer >1.0 cm(2) were recruited from outpatient clinics, long-term care nursing homes, and a rehabilitation center. The experimental group was randomized to a radiant-heat dressing device and the control group was randomized to a hydrocolloid dressing, with or without a calcium alginate filler. Subjects were followed until healed or for 12 weeks. Eight subjects (57%) in the experimental group had complete healing of their pressure ulcer compared with 7 subjects (44%) with complete healing in the control group (P = .46). Although a 13% difference in healing rate between the two arms of the study was found, this difference was not statistically significant. At almost all points along the healing curve, the proportion not healed was higher in the control arm.

  12. Novel Surgical Treatment for Refractory Heel Ulcers in Werner’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Oe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Werner’s syndrome frequently develop chronic leg ulcers that heal poorly. We present a patient who suffered from this rare syndrome and developed typical heel ulcers. Treatment of the ulcer is challenging, as flap options are limited over the lower third of the leg and skin grafting is not easy as there is a lack of healthy granulations. We successfully treated the ulcer with osteomyelitis by drilling the bone and applying an ultrathin split thickness skin graft with the thigh skin as the donor site.

  13. Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage is not associated with wound healing in diabetic foot ulcer patients treated in a multidisciplinary setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Canner, Joseph K; Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Sherman, Ronald L; Hines, Kathryn; Lippincott, Christopher; Black, James H; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2018-04-01

    Socioeconomic deprivation is associated with poor glycemic control and higher hospital admission rates in patients with diabetes. We sought to quantify the effects of neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation on wound healing among a cohort of patients with diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) treated in a multidisciplinary setting. Socioeconomic disadvantage was calculated for all patients using the area deprivation index (ADI) stratified by quartile (from ADI-0: least through ADI-3: most). Predictors of wound healing were assessed using Cox proportional hazards models accounting for patient demographics, wound characteristics, and ADI category. Six hundred twenty-one wounds were evaluated, including 59% ADI-0, 7% ADI-1, 12% ADI-2, and 22% ADI-3. After accounting for patient demographics and wound characteristics, the likelihood of wound healing was similar between groups (ADI-3 versus ADI-0: hazards ratio [HR] 1.03 [95% confidence interval 0.76-1.41]). Independent predictors of poor wound healing included peripheral arterial disease (HR 0.75), worse wound stage (stage 4: HR 0.48), larger wound area (HR 0.99), and partially dependent functional status (HR 0.45) (all, P healing was largely dependent on wound characteristics and vascular status rather than patient demographics or neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage. Use of a multidisciplinary approach to the management of DFU may overcome the negative effects of socioeconomic disadvantage frequently described in the diabetic population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Roles of pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors as well as matrix metalloproteinases in healing of NSAID-induced small intestinal ulcers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyenge, Melinda; Amagase, Kikuko; Kunimi, Shino; Matsuoka, Rie; Takeuchi, Koji

    2013-10-06

    We examined changes in the expression of a pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and an anti-angiogenic factor, endostatin, as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 in the rat small intestine after administration of indomethacin and investigated the roles of these factors in the healing of indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulcers. Male SD rats were given indomethacin (10mg/kg) p.o. and euthanized at various time points (3-24h and 2-7days) after the administration. To impair the healing of these lesions, low-dose of indomethacin (2mg/kg) was given p.o. once daily for 6days starting 1day after ulceration. Levels of VEGF, endostatin, MMP-2 and MMP-9 were determined by Western blotting. The expression of both VEGF and endostatin was upregulated after the ulceration. Repeated administration of low-dose indomethacin impaired the ulcer healing with a decrease of VEGF expression and a further increase of endostatin expression, resulting in a marked decrease in the ratio of VEGF/endostatin expression. The levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were both significantly increased after the ulceration, but these responses were suppressed by the repeated indomethacin treatment. The healing of these ulcers was significantly delayed by the repeated administration of MMP inhibitors such as ARP-101 and SB-3CT. The results confirm the importance of the balance between pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic activities in the healing of indomethacin-induced small intestinal damage and further suggest that the increased expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 is another important factor for ulcer healing in the small intestine. © 2013.

  15. Iliac Vein Interrogation Augments Venous Ulcer Healing in Patients Who Have Failed Standard Compression Therapy along with Pathological Venous Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Albeir Y; Broce, Mike; Yacoub, Michael; AbuRahma, Ali F

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of venous ulcers is demanding for patients, as well as clinicians, and the investigation of underlying venous hypertension is the cornerstone of therapy. We propose that occult iliac vein stenosis should be ruled out by iliac vein interrogation (IVI) in patients with advanced venous stasis. We conducted a systematic retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of patients who presented with CEAP (clinical, etiological, anatomical, and pathophysiological) 6 venous disease. All patients had great saphenous vein ablation, compressive treatment, wound care (including Unna boot compression), and perforator closure using ablation therapy. Iliac vein stenosis was defined as ≥50% stenosis in cross-sectional surface area on intravascular ultrasound. Primary outcomes include time of venous ulcer healing and/or measurable change in the Venous Clinical Severity Score. Twenty-two patients with CEAP 6 venous disease met the inclusion criteria (active ulcers >1.5 cm in diameter). The average age and body mass index were 62.2 ± 9.2 years and 41.7 ± 16.7, respectively. The majority were female (72.7%) with common comorbidities, such as hyperlipidemia (54.5%), hypertension (36.4%), and diabetes mellitus (27.3%). Twenty-nine ulcers with an average diameter of 3.4 ± 1.9 cm and a depth of 2.2 ± 0.5 mm were treated. The majority of the ulcers occurred on the left limb (n = 17, 58.6%). Average perforator venous reflux was 3.6 ± 0.8 sec, while common femoral reflux was 1.8 ± 1.6. The majority (n = 19, 64.5%) of the perforator veins were located at the base of the ulcer, while the remainder (n = 10, 34.5%) were within 2 cm from the base. Of the 13 patients who underwent IVI, 8 patients (61.5%) had stenosis >50% that was corrected with iliac vein angioplasty and stenting (IVAS). There was a strong trend toward shorter healing time in the IVI group (7.9 ± 9.5 weeks) than for patients in the no iliac vein interrogation (NIVI) group (20.2 ± 15

  16. Calcificación distrófica en úlceras de la extremidad inferior Dystrophic calcification in leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Chaverri Fierro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available La calcificación patológica entendida como depósito anormal de sales de calcio en los tejidos, es un proceso frecuente que ocurre en diversas situaciones patológicas bien conocidas como la hipercalcemia, la insuficiencia renal, el hiperparatiroidismo o en la patología valvular cardíaca. Sin embargo, este fenómeno, es todavía un gran desconocido en el campo de las heridas crónicas a juzgar por la escasa literatura existente al respecto. En este artículo se analiza en detalle este proceso y mostramos nuestra experiencia al respecto en el manejo de esta situación poco frecuente en el paciente con úlceras en la extremidad inferior.The pathological calcification known as an abnormal deposit of calcium salts into the tissues is a frequent process that we can find in several well known pathological situations as hypercalcaemia, renal insufficiency, hyperthyroidism or heart valve disease. However, this phenomenon is still a great unknown in the chronic wounds attending to the few existing literature. In this article we analyze this process in detail and we show our experience in this so infrequent situation in patients with chronic leg ulcers.

  17. The LeucoPatch® system in the management of hard-to-heal diabetic foot ulcers: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Game, Frances; Jeffcoate, William; Tarnow, Lise; Day, Florence; Fitzsimmons, Deborah; Jacobsen, Judith

    2017-10-10

    Diabetic foot ulcers are a common and severe complication of diabetes mellitus. Standard treatment includes debridement, offloading, management of infection and revascularisation where appropriate, although healing times may be long. The LeucoPatch® device is used to generate an autologous platelet-rich fibrin and leucocyte wound dressing produced from the patient's own venous blood by centrifugation, but without the addition of any reagents. The final product comprises a thin, circular patch composed predominantly of fibrin together with living platelets and leucocytes. Promising results have been obtained in non-controlled studies this system, but this now needs to be tested in a randomised controlled trial (RCT). If confirmed, the LeucoPatch® may become an important new tool in the armamentarium in the management of diabetic foot ulcers which are hard-to-heal. People with diabetes and hard-to-heal ulcers of the foot will receive either pre-specified good standard care or good standard care supplemented by the application of the LeucoPatch® device. The primary outcome will be the percentage of ulcers healed within 20 weeks. Healing will be defined as complete epithelialisation without discharge that is maintained for 4 weeks and is confirmed by an observer blind to randomisation group. Ulcers of the foot are a major source of morbidity to patients with diabetes and costs to health care economies. The study population is designed to be as inclusive as possible with the aim of maximising the external validity of any findings. The primary outcome measure is healing within 20 weeks of randomisation and the trial also includes a number of secondary outcome measures. Among these are rate of change in ulcer area as a predictor of the likelihood of eventual healing, minor and major amputation of the target limb, the incidence of infection and quality of life. International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, ISRCTN27665670 . Registered on 5 July 2013.

  18. Autologous circulating angiogenic cells treated with osteopontin and delivered via a collagen scaffold enhance wound healing in the alloxan-induced diabetic rabbit ear ulcer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loughlin, Aonghus; Kulkarni, Mangesh; Vaughan, Erin E; Creane, Michael; Liew, Aaron; Dockery, Peter; Pandit, Abhay; O'Brien, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is the leading cause of amputation in people with diabetes mellitus. Peripheral vascular disease is present in the majority of patients with diabetic foot ulcers. Despite standard treatments there exists a high amputation rate. Circulating angiogenic cells previously known as early endothelial progenitor cells are derived from peripheral blood and support angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, providing a potential topical treatment for non-healing diabetic foot ulcers. A scaffold fabricated from Type 1 collagen facilitates topical cell delivery to a diabetic wound. Osteopontin is a matricellular protein involved in wound healing and increases the angiogenic potential of circulating angiogenic cells. A collagen scaffold seeded with circulating angiogenic cells was developed. Subsequently the effect of autologous circulating angiogenic cells that were seeded in a collagen scaffold and topically delivered to a hyperglycemic cutaneous wound was assessed. The alloxan-induced diabetic rabbit ear ulcer model was used to determine healing in response to the following treatments: collagen seeded with autologous circulating angiogenic cells exposed to osteopontin, collagen seeded with autologous circulating angiogenic cells, collagen alone and untreated wound. Stereology was used to assess angiogenesis in wounds. The cells exposed to osteopontin and seeded on collagen increased percentage wound closure as compared to other groups. Increased angiogenesis was observed with the treatment of collagen and collagen seeded with circulating angiogenic cells. These results demonstrate that topical treatment of full thickness cutaneous ulcers with autologous circulating angiogenic cells increases wound healing. Cells exposed to the matricellular protein osteopontin result in superior wound healing. The wound healing benefit is associated with a more efficient vascular network. This topical therapy provides a potential novel therapy for the treatment of non-healing

  19. Recruitment strategy effectiveness for a cryotherapy intervention for a venous leg ulcer prevention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelechi, Teresa J; Watts, Ashlee; Wiseman, Jan

    2010-01-01

    To describe the strategies and costs associated with recruiting African American and white adults into a randomized controlled pilot trial. "Cryotherapy for Venous Disorders: A Pilot Study" is a randomized controlled trial designed to determine the effects of a cool gel wrap and leg elevation intervention versus a leg elevation alone intervention on skin temperature, skin microcirculation, quality of life, and pain in adults with stages 4 and 5 chronic venous disorders. We sought to recruit 60 participants (21 African Americans, 37 whites, and 2 Hispanic or Latino) to complete the study. These enrollment targets reflect the demographic distribution of the community in which the study was conducted (33% African American, 66% white, and 2% Latino). Proactive and reactive recruitment strategies were implemented to recruit subjects. Seventy-three individuals (9 African American men, 29 African American women, 11 white men, 22 white women, 1 Asian woman, and 1 Hispanic woman) were screened, and of those, 67 were randomized (9 African American men, 25 African American women, 9 white men, 22 white women, 1 Asian woman, and 1 Hispanic women). Fifty-eight completed the study, yielding an overall 11% attrition rate. An additional 8 subjects canceled or did not show up for a first appointment. Reactive recruitment strategies were most successful for recruiting men, women, African American, and white participants. The 3 most successful reactive strategies were referrals from providers/clinics (34%), flyers posted in the hospital elevators (22%), and targeted mailings from a business (16%). Of the healthcare provider referrals (19), wound care nurses referred 12 completed participants. The amount budgeted for advertisement was $5,000 (2% of the total grant award). The amount spent on recruitment including labor was $5,978, which averaged $103 per participant who completed the study (N = 58). Reactive strategies per participant completer proved more cost-efficient than proactive

  20. Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the stomach and intestines. In certain circumstances stress can help cause ulcers. But this usually only happens when illness involving severe emotional or physical stress is involved — such as when someone too sick ...

  1. Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These include both regular and decaffeinated coffee, tea, chocolate, meat extracts, alcohol, black pepper, chili powder, mustard ... Disease, peptic ulcers, proton pump inhibitor, sucralfate, triple therapy January 1, 1996 Copyright © American Academy of Family ...

  2. Evaluating the effect of the new incentive system for high-risk pressure ulcer patients on wound healing and cost-effectiveness: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanada, Hiromi; Nakagami, Gojiro; Mizokami, Yuko; Minami, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Aya; Oe, Makoto; Kaitani, Toshiko; Iizaka, Shinji

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of new incentive system for pressure ulcer management, which focused on skilled nurse staffing in terms of rate of healing and medical costs. A prospective cohort study included two types of groups: 39 institutions, which introduced the new incentive system, and 20 non-introduced groups (control). Sixty-seven patients suffering from severe pressure ulcers in the introduced group and 38 patients in the non-introduced group were included. Wound healing and medical costs were monitored weekly for three weeks by their skilled nurses in charge. Healing status and related medical costs. The introduced group showed significantly higher rate of healing compared with the control group at each weekly assessment. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the introduction of the new incentive system was independently associated with the faster healing rate (beta=3.44, Pcost of treating severe pressure ulcers by 1.776 billion yen per year. The new incentive system for the management of pressure ulcers, which focused on staffing with skilled nurses can improve healing rate with reduced medical cost. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pressure mapping and performance of the compression bandage/garment for venous leg ulcer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S; Mukhopadhyay, A; Sikka, M; Nagla, K S

    2008-08-01

    A study has been conducted on the commercially available compression bandages as regards their performance with time. Pressure mapping of these bandages has been done using a fabricated pressure-measuring device on a mannequin leg to see the effect on pressure due to creep, fabric friction and angle of bandaging. The results show that the creep behavior, frictional behavior and the angle of bandaging have a significant effect on the pressure profile generated by the bandages during application. The regression analysis shows that the surface friction restricts the slippage in a multilayer system. Also the diameters of the limb and the amount of stretch given to the bandage during application have definite impact on the bandage pressure. In case of compression garments, washing improves the pressure generated but not to the extent of the pressure of a virgin garment. Comparing the two compression materials i.e. bandage and garment, it is found that the presence of higher percentage of elastomeric material and a highly close construction in case of garment provides better holding power and a more homogeneous pressure distribution.

  4. Scientific production on the applicability of phenytoin in wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Firmino

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Phenytoin is an anticonvulsant that has been used in wound healing. The objectives of this study were to describe how the scientific production presents the use ofphenytoinas a healing agent and to discuss its applicability in wounds. A literature review and hierarchy analysis of evidence-based practices was performed. Eighteen articles were analyzed that tested the intervention in wounds such as leprosy ulcers, leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, trophic ulcers, war wounds, burns, preparation of recipient graft area, radiodermatitis and post-extraction of melanocytic nevi. Systemic use ofphenytoinin the treatment of fistulas and the hypothesis of topical use in the treatment of vitiligo were found. In conclusion, topical use ofphenytoinis scientifically evidenced. However robust research is needed that supports a protocol for the use ofphenytoinas another option of a healing agent in clinical practice.

  5. Off-loading the diabetic foot for ulcer prevention and healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavanagh, Peter R.; Bus, Sicco A.

    2010-01-01

    Retrospective and prospective studies have shown that elevated plantar pressure is a causative factor in the development of many plantar ulcers in diabetic patients and that ulceration is often a precursor of lower-extremity amputation. Herein, we review the evidence that relieving areas of elevated

  6. Off-loading the diabetic foot for ulcer prevention and healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavanagh, Peter R.; Bus, Sicco A.

    2011-01-01

    Retrospective and prospective studies have shown that elevated plantar pressure is a causative factor in the development of many plantar ulcers in diabetic patients and that ulceration is often a precursor of lower-extremity amputation. Herein, we review the evidence that relieving areas of elevated

  7. The Role of Pressure Offloading on Diabetic Foot Ulcer Healing and Prevention of Recurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.

    2016-01-01

    An increased plantar pressure is a causative factor in the development of plantar foot ulcers in people with diabetes mellitus, and ulcers are a precursor of lower extremity amputation. In this article, the evidence is reviewed that relieving areas of increased plantar pressure (ie, offloading) can

  8. Off-loading the diabetic foot for ulcer prevention and healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavanagh, Peter R.; Bus, Sicco A.

    2010-01-01

    Retrospective and prospective studies have shown that elevated plantar pressure is a causative factor in the development of many plantar ulcers in diabetic patients and that ulceration is often a precursor of lower extremity amputation. In this article, we review the evidence that relieving areas of

  9. Wound healing outcomes in a diabetic foot ulcer outpatient clinic at an acute care hospital: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, S H; McLaren, A-M

    2017-10-01

    Patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) have an increased risk of lower extremity amputation. A retrospective chart review of patients with DFUs attending the Foot Treatment and Assessment chiropodist-led outpatient clinic at an inner-city academic hospital was conducted to determine wound healing outcomes and characteristics contributing to outcomes. We reviewed the complete clinical history of 279 patients with 332 DFUs spanning over a five-year period. The mean age of patients was 61.5±12.5 years and most patients (83.5%) had one DFU. The majority of wounds (82.5%) were in the forefoot. Overall, 267/332 (80.5%) wounds healed. A greater proportion of wounds healed in the forefoot (82.5%) and midfoot (87.1%) than hindfoot (51.9%; phealing. Our findings are the first to demonstrate the benefits of chiropodists leading an acute care outpatient clinic in the management of DFUs in Canada and delivers wound healing outcomes equivalent to or exceeding those previously published.

  10. Location-dependent depth and undermining formation of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshiko; Isogai, Zenzo; Mizokami, Fumihiro; Furuta, Katsunori; Nemoto, Tetsuya; Kanoh, Hiroyuki; Yoneda, Masahiko

    2013-08-01

    We examined the location-specific properties of pressure ulcers, focusing on depth and undermining formation, which are often unfavorable factors for ulcer healing. We conducted a retrospective observational study of 2 independent databases on pressure ulcers. Databases from a 200-bed hospital (database A) and a 300-bed hospital (database B) were collected during different time periods. Relationships between ulcer location, ulcer depth, and undermining formation were analyzed. All pressure ulcers were accurately diagnosed and classified according to their locations. A total of 282 pressure ulcers in 189 patients from database A and 232 pressure ulcers in 154 patients from database B were analyzed. It was found that pressure ulcers primarily developed over the sacrum. Ratio of stages III and IV pressure ulcers was high in pressure ulcers of the foot, ankle, and crus on the lower leg. Among the deep pressure ulcers, undermining formation was frequently observed on the greater trochanter, ilium, and sacrum. In contrast, pressure ulcers of the foot, ankle, and crus did not exhibit undermining formation. Our results revealed marked differences in pressure ulcer properties depending on their location. Factors affecting depth and undermining of pressure ulcers appear to be related to anatomical and physical properties of the bone and subcutaneous tissue. Copyright © 2013 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Topical application of the bee hive protectant propolis is well tolerated and improves human diabetic foot ulcer healing in a prospective feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshaw, Frances R; Bolton, Thyra; Nube, Vanessa; Hood, Anita; Veldhoen, Danielle; Pfrunder, Louise; McKew, Genevieve L; Macleod, Colin; McLennan, Susan V; Twigg, Stephen M

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a naturally occurring anti-inflammatory bee derived protectant resin. We have previously reported that topically applied propolis reduces inflammation and improves cutaneous ulcer healing in diabetic rodents. The aim of this study was to determine if propolis shows efficacy in a pilot study of human diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) healing and if it is well tolerated. Serial consenting subjects (n=24) with DFU ≥4 weeks' duration had topical propolis applied at each clinic review for 6 weeks. Post-debridement wound fluid was analyzed for viable bacterial count and pro-inflammatory MMP-9 activity. Ulcer healing data were compared with a matched control cohort of n=84 with comparable DFU treated recently at the same center. Ulcer area was reduced by a mean 41% in the propolis group compared with 16% in the control group at week 1 (P<0.001), and by 63 vs. 44% at week 3, respectively (P<0.05). In addition, 10 vs. 2% (P<0.001), then 19 vs. 12% (P<0.05) of propolis treated vs. control ulcers had fully healed by weeks 3 and 7, respectively. Post-debridement wound fluid active MMP-9 was significantly reduced, by 18.1 vs. 2.8% week 3 from baseline in propolis treated ulcers vs. controls (P<0.001), as were bacterial counts (P<0.001). No adverse effects from propolis were reported. Topical propolis is a well-tolerated therapy for wound healing and this pilot in human DFU indicates for the first time that it may enhance wound closure in this setting when applied weekly. A multi-site randomized controlled of topical propolis now appears to be warranted in diabetic foot ulcers. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Effectiveness of a micronized purified flavonoid fraction (MPFF) in the healing process of lower limb ulcers. An open multicentre study, controlled and randomized].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinski, W; Chodynicka, B; Roszkiewicz, J; Bogdanowski, T; Lecewicz-Torun, B; Kaszuba, A; Bowszyc, J; Nowak, A; Wnorowski, J; Wasik, F; Glinska-Ferenz, M; Blaszczyk, M; Strzyga, P; Pachocki, R

    2001-04-01

    To determine the increase in healing rate of venous ulcer in patients receiving a micronised purified flavonoid fraction (MPFF) as supplementation to standard local care. A randomised, open, controlled, multicentre study. Departments of Dermatology and University Outpatients Clinics. One hundred and forty patients with chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers. PATIENTS received standard compressive therapy plus external treatment alone or 2 tablets of MPFF daily in addition to the above treatment for 24 weeks. Healing of ulcers and their reduction in size after 24 weeks of treatment. The percentage of patients whose ulcers healed completely was found to be markedly higher in those receiving MPFF in addition to standard external and compressive treatment than in those treated with conventional therapy alone (46.5% vs 27.5%; p<0.05. OR=2.3, 95% CI 1.1-4.6). Ulcers with diameters <3 cm were cured in 71% of patients in the MPFF group and in 50% of patients in the control group, whereas ulcers between 3 and 6 cm in diameter were cured in 60% and 32% of patients (p<0.05), respectively. The mean reduction in ulcer size was also found to be greater in patients treated with MPFF (80%) than in the control group (65%) (p<0.05). The cost-effectiveness ratio (cost per healed ulcer) in the MPFF group was 1026.2 compared with 1871.8 in the control group. These results indicate that MPFF significantly improves the cure rate in patients with chronic venous insufficiency.

  13. Footwear and offloading interventions to prevent and heal foot ulcers and reduce plantar pressure in patients with diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, S A; van Deursen, R W; Armstrong, D G; Lewis, J E A; Caravaggi, C F; Cavanagh, P R

    2016-01-01

    Footwear and offloading techniques are commonly used in clinical practice for preventing and healing of foot ulcers in persons with diabetes. The goal of this systematic review is to assess the medical scientific literature on this topic to better inform clinical practice about effective treatment. We searched the medical scientific literature indexed in PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane database for original research studies published since 1 May 2006 related to four groups of interventions: (1) casting; (2) footwear; (3) surgical offloading; and (4) other offloading interventions. Primary outcomes were ulcer prevention, ulcer healing, and pressure reduction. We reviewed both controlled and non-controlled studies. Controlled studies were assessed for methodological quality, and extracted key data was presented in evidence and risk of bias tables. Uncontrolled studies were assessed and summarized on a narrative basis. Outcomes are presented and discussed in conjunction with data from our previous systematic review covering the literature from before 1 May 2006. We included two systematic reviews and meta-analyses, 32 randomized controlled trials, 15 other controlled studies, and another 127 non-controlled studies. Several randomized controlled trials with low risk of bias show the efficacy of therapeutic footwear that demonstrates to relief plantar pressure and is worn by the patient, in the prevention of plantar foot ulcer recurrence. Two meta-analyses show non-removable offloading to be more effective than removable offloading for healing plantar neuropathic forefoot ulcers. Due to the limited number of controlled studies, clear evidence on the efficacy of surgical offloading and felted foam is not yet available. Interestingly, surgical offloading seems more effective in preventing than in healing ulcers. A number of controlled and uncontrolled studies show that plantar pressure can be reduced by several conservative and surgical approaches. Sufficient

  14. Performance of prognostic markers in the prediction of wound healing or amputation among patients with foot ulcers in diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownrigg, J R W; Hinchliffe, R J; Apelqvist, J; Boyko, E J; Fitridge, R; Mills, J L; Reekers, J; Shearman, C P; Zierler, R E; Schaper, N C

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of wound healing and major amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulceration is clinically important to stratify risk and target interventions for limb salvage. No consensus exists as to which measure of peripheral artery disease (PAD) can best predict outcomes. To evaluate the prognostic utility of index PAD measures for the prediction of healing and/or major amputation among patients with active diabetic foot ulceration, two reviewers independently screened potential studies for inclusion. Two further reviewers independently extracted study data and performed an assessment of methodological quality using the Quality in Prognostic Studies instrument. Of 9476 citations reviewed, 11 studies reporting on 9 markers of PAD met the inclusion criteria. Annualized healing rates varied from 18% to 61%; corresponding major amputation rates varied from 3% to 19%. Among 10 studies, skin perfusion pressure ≥ 40 mmHg, toe pressure ≥ 30 mmHg (and ≥ 45 mmHg) and transcutaneous pressure of oxygen (TcPO2 ) ≥ 25 mmHg were associated with at least a 25% higher chance of healing. Four studies evaluated PAD measures for predicting major amputation. Ankle pressure diabetic foot ulceration, the measurement of skin perfusion pressures, toe pressures and TcPO2 appear to be more useful in predicting ulcer healing than ankle pressures or the ABI. Conversely, an ankle pressure of < 50 mmHg or an ABI < 0.5 is associated with a significant increase in the incidence of major amputation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Topical application of amelogenin extracellular matrix protein in non-healing venous ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Burçin Abud; Kemal Karaarslan; Işıl Kılınç Karaarslan; Süreyya Talay; Soysal Turhan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Design: Treatment of chronic venous ulcers of the lower extremity is still an important difficulty. The principal treatment of these ulcers includes compression therapy, local wound care and surgery. Unresponsiveness to these standard treatments is a frequent situation with negative effects on life quality and reductions in personal productivity. Therefore, there is a need for new applications to increase the effectiveness of treatment in treatment-resistant cases. In the prese...

  16. S100A8/A9 is an important host defence mediator in neuropathic foot ulcers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Holstein, Per; Christophersen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wounds and in particular diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are a growing clinical challenge, but the underlying molecular pathophysiological mechanisms are unclear. Recently, we reported reduced levels of the immunomodulating and antimicrobial S100A8/A9 in non-healing venous leg ulcers (VLUs...

  17. Evaluation of the internal and external responsiveness of the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) tool for assessing acute and chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Edmond P H; Chin, Weng Yee; Wan, Eric Y F; Lam, Cindy L K

    2016-05-01

    To examine the internal and external responsiveness of the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) tool for assessing the healing progress in acute and chronic wounds. It is important to establish the responsiveness of instruments used in conducting wound care assessments to ensure that they are able to capture changes in wound healing accurately over time. Prospective longitudinal observational study. The key study instrument was the PUSH tool. Internal responsiveness was assessed using paired t-testing and effect size statistics. External responsiveness was assessed using multiple linear regression. All new patients with at least one eligible acute or chronic wound, enrolled in the Nurse and Allied Health Clinic-Wound Care programme between 1 December 2012 - 31 March 2013 were included for analysis (N = 541). Overall, the PUSH tool was able to detect statistically significant changes in wound healing between baseline and discharge. The effect size statistics were large. The internal responsiveness of the PUSH tool was confirmed in patients with a variety of different wound types including venous ulcers, pressure ulcers, neuropathic ulcers, burns and scalds, skin tears, surgical wounds and traumatic wounds. After controlling for age, gender and wound type, subjects in the 'wound improved but not healed' group had a smaller change in PUSH scores than those in the 'wound healed' group. Subjects in the 'wound static or worsened' group had the smallest change in PUSH scores. The external responsiveness was confirmed. The internal and external responsiveness of the PUSH tool confirmed that it can be used to track the healing progress of both acute and chronic wounds. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. High mucosal healing rates in 5-ASA-treated ulcerative colitis patients: results of a meta-analysis of clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romkens, T.E.H.; Kampschreur, M.T.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Oijen, M.G.H. van; de Jong, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, mucosal healing (MH) is regarded as an important treatment goal in ulcerative colitis (UC). 5-Aminosalicylates (5-ASA) are the standard treatment in mild-to-moderate UC, but the effect on MH is less known. The aim of this study was to systematically review the medical

  19. Performance of prognostic markers in the prediction of wound healing or amputation among patients with foot ulcers in diabetes: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brownrigg, J. R. W.; Hinchliffe, R. J.; Apelqvist, J.; Boyko, E. J.; Fitridge, R.; Mills, J. L.; Reekers, J.; Shearman, C. P.; Zierler, R. E.; Schaper, N. C.

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of wound healing and major amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulceration is clinically important to stratify risk and target interventions for limb salvage. No consensus exists as to which measure of peripheral artery disease (PAD) can best predict outcomes. To evaluate the

  20. Successful use of vacuum-assisted closure therapy for leg ulcers caused by occluding vasculopathy and inflammatory vascular diseases--a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutt, Markus; Haas, Ellen; Kruger, Ullrich; Distler, Meike; Neumann, Christine

    2007-01-01

    Leg ulcers caused by vasculitis, small vessel occlusion or other rare conditions often prove to be very difficult to treat. Despite polypragmatic, systemic and localized therapy, many of these wounds are progressive and characterized by severe pain. We here portray the cases of 5 patients with ulcers resistant to systemic therapy for the underlying disease, who were treated successfully using vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) for wound management. We present the advantages and disadvantages of this method, as well as illustrating the essential and known therapeutic principles. Our experience shows VAC to be an excellent and effective alternative in the treatment of therapy-resistant chronic wounds caused by vasculopathy (small vessel occlusion or vasculitis). We did not observe any pathergy or proinflammatory effects caused by VAC. 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

  1. Systematic review of economic evaluations of human cell-derived wound care products for the treatment of venous leg and diabetic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langer Astrid

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue engineering is an emerging field. Novel bioengineered skin substitutes and genetically derived growth factors offer innovative approaches to reduce the burden of diabetic foot and venous leg ulcers for both patients and health care systems. However, they frequently are very costly. Based on a systematic review of the literature, this study assesses the cost-effectiveness of these growth factors and tissue-engineered artificial skin for treating chronic wounds. Methods On the basis of an extensive explorative search, an appropriate algorithm for a systematic database search was developed. The following databases were searched: BIOSIS Previews, CRD databases, Cochrane Library, EconLit, Embase, Medline, and Web of Science. Only completed and published trial- or model-based studies which contained a full economic evaluation of growth factors and bioengineered skin substitutes for the treatment of chronic wounds were included. Two reviewers independently undertook the assessment of study quality. The relevant studies were assessed by a modified version of the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria (CHEC list and a published checklist for evaluating model-based economic evaluations. Results Eleven health economic evaluations were included. Three biotechnology products were identified for which topical growth factors or bioengineered skin substitutes for the treatment of chronic leg ulceration were economically assessed: (1 Apligraf®, a bilayered living human skin equivalent indicated for the treatment of diabetic foot and venous leg ulcers (five studies; (2 Dermagraft®, a human fibroblast-derived dermal substitute, which is indicated only for use in the treatment of full-thickness diabetic foot ulcers (one study; (3 REGRANEX® Gel, a human platelet-derived growth factor for the treatment of deep neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers (five studies. The studies considered in this review were of varying and partly low

  2. Macro- and microperfusion during application of a new compression system, designed for patients with leg ulcer and concomitant peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jünger, Michael; Haase, Hermann; Schwenke, Linda; Bichel, Jens; Schuren, Jan; Ladwig, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    To investigate macro- and microperfusion during 14 days of treatment with a new 2-layer compression system (3M™ Coban™ 2 Lite), designed for patients with leg ulcer and concomitant peripheral arterial occlusive disease. A single-centre, open-label, prospective pilot study was performed with 15 subjects suffering from peripheral arterial occlusive disease with an ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) of 0.5-0.8, who volunteered to have their 'study leg' bandaged with the new system. Coincident leg ulcer or chronic venous disease was not mandatory. All subjects received the new compression system, which stayed in place from 1 up to 4 days according to scheduled study visits. The system was reapplied by study personnel at each clinical visit (days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10 and 14). The study participation stopped after 14 days. At each clinical visit safety assessments were performed: measurement of acral pulsation to capture macroperfusion; laser Doppler fluxmetry to capture microperfusion; clinical signs of pressure related skin damage, hypoxia-related pain and sub-bandage pressure measurement. In addition, the leg volume was measured and a comfort questionnaire was completed. An average sub-bandage pressure in standing position of approximately 30 mmHg was measured at the B1 location immediately after bandage application. Laser Doppler fluxmetry demonstrated positive effects on microcirculation regarding vasomotion and respiratory reflux. No change of the cardiac signal appeared. For acrale pulsations a high intraindividual variability was found with no clear interference to the bandage application. No pressure-related skin damage or hypoxia-related pain was detected. After application of the new compression system in subjects with moderate PAOD, laser Doppler fluxmetry indicated significant improvements of the microcirculation. High variability and lack of correlation to clinical symptoms was found for the acral pulsation. The new compression system revealed a high

  3. The impact of glycaemic variability on wound healing in the diabetic foot - A retrospective study of new ulcers presenting to a specialist multidisciplinary foot clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhatariya, Ketan K; Li Ping Wah-Pun Sin, Edwin; Cheng, Joyce Oi Suet; Li, Francesca Yan Nok; Yue, Anson Wei Yue; Gooday, Catherine; Nunney, Ian

    2018-01-01

    Glycaemic variability - the visit-to-visit variation in HbA1c - plays a possible role in the development of micro and macrovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Whether HbA1c variability is a factor determining wound healing in diabetic foot ulcers remains unknown. We aimed to determine whether HbA1c variability is associated with foot ulcer healing time. A retrospective analysis of patients presenting to our specialist multidisciplinary foot clinic between July 2013 and March 2015, with at least three HbA1c measurements within five years of presentation and more than two follow-up reviews. HbA1c variation was measured by magnitude of standard deviation. 629 new referrals were seen between July 2013 and March 2015. Of these, 172 patients had their number of days to healing recorded and sufficient numbers of HbA1c values to determine variability. The overall geometric mean days to heal was 91.1 days (SD 80.8-102.7). In the low HbA1c variability group the geometric mean days to heal was 78.0 days (60.2-101.2) vs 126.9 days (102.0-158.0) in the high Hb1Ac variability group (p = .032). Those with low HbA1c (healed faster than those with high HbA1c and high variability (73.5 days [59.5-90.8] vs 111.0 days [92.0-134.0], p = .007). Additionally, our results show that time to healing is more dependent on the mean HbA1c than the variability in HbA1c (p = .007). Our data suggest that there was a significant association between HbA1c variability and healing time in diabetic foot ulcers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Impact of Endoscopic Inflammation and Mucosal Healing on Health-related Quality of Life in Ulcerative Colitis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theede, Klaus; Kiszka-Kanowitz, Marianne; Nordgaard-Lassen, Inge

    2015-01-01

    , mucosal healing and HRQoL. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, patients with either active or inactive ulcerative colitis underwent sigmoidoscopy. Clinical disease activity was assessed by the Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index [SCCAI], endoscopic inflammation by the Mayo Endoscopic Subscore [MES......], and HRQoL by the Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire [SIBDQ] and Short Health Scale [SHS]. RESULTS: A total of 110 patients, 71% with active disease, had a median SCCAI score of 3 and a median MES score of 1. Patients in clinical remission had a mean SIBDQ of 60 and SHS of 6. HRQoL decreased...... significantly with increasing clinical (SIBDQ [χ(2) = 61.8, p SHS [χ(2) = 63.4, p SHS [χ(2) = 40.3, p

  5. Suppression of LRRC19 promotes cutaneous wound healing in pressure ulcers in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Wang, Zhijing; Wang, Xirui

    2018-02-20

    The ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) induced skin lesion has been identified as primary cause of pressure ulcer. Better understanding of the mechanism is required for new therapy development. Leucine rich repeat containing protein 19 (LRRC19) is a recently discovered transmembrane protein containing leucine-rich repeats and plays a role in immune response. To investigate the role of LRRC19 in pressure ulcers, mouse ulcer model was established with two cycles of I/R. The expression of LRRC19 was assessed during injury. siRNA mediated LRRC19 downregulation was applied to investigate the disease severity, immune cell infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokines production. The primary skin fibroblasts were stimulated with IL-1β to dissect the molecular mechanism. LRRC19 was readily induced in I/R induced lesion site in a pattern mimicking the disease progress as measured by wound area. Knockdown of LRRC19 by siRNA significantly alleviated the disease severity and attenuated immune cell infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokines production. In primary skin fibroblast model, siRNA knockdown of LRRC19 suppressed IL-1β mediated NFκB activation and its downstream cytokines production. LRRC19 was a novel factor for I/R-induced tissue damage by promoting NFκB dependent pro-inflammatory response. Our results supported that LRRC19 could be a potential therapeutic target for pressure ulcers.

  6. Aloe vera Leaf Anti Inflamation’s Activity Speeds Up the Healing Proccess of Oral Mucosa Ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agoeng Tjahajani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous work showed that 25% of inner layer Aloe vera leaf extract was effective as anti-inflammatory on the oral mucous of Wistar rats. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the lowest concentration of whole leaf Aloe vera extract that could accelerate healing process of ulceration on rats. Methods: Sixty inbreeding Spraque Dawley rats was exposed to solution of Hydrogen Peroxide 10% during three days to induced inflammation on the labial mucous inferior of rats. During the next three days, on the same area of control group were topically applied solution of Natrium Chloride 0.9%; while in the treatment group were topically applied 6.25%; 12.5%; 25% of whole leaf of Aloe vera extract for 3x5 minutes with 90 minutes intervals. On the fourth day, five rats in each group were sacrificed; and the same treatment was done on others groups. On the sixth day, five rats of each group were sacrificed; and the same treatment was done on the rest group up to seven days. On the eighth days, the rest groups were sacrificed. Microscopic slides were done. Results: Microscopic slides were analyzed under light microscope and scored. Statistical analysis with Mann-Whitney test showed significant differences between control and treatment group (p<0.05. Conclusion: Application of 6.25% whole leaf Aloe vera extract was the lowest and the most effective concentration in accelerating the healing process of oral mucous ulceration on rats.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v18i1.56

  7. Randomised controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of wrap therapy for wound healing acceleration in patients with NPUAP stage II and III pressure ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuhara, Akihiro; Oonishi, Sandai; Takeuchi, Kensuke; Suzuki, Masatsune; Akiyama, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Kazuyo; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate if ‘wrap therapy’ using food wraps, which is widely used in Japanese clinical sites, is not inferior when compared to guideline adhesion treatments. Design Multicentre, prospective, randomised, open, blinded endpoint clinical trial. Setting 15 hospitals in Japan. Patients 66 older patients with new National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel stage II or III pressure ulcers. Interventions Of these 66 patients, 31 were divided into the conventional treatment guidelines group and 35 into the wrap therapy group. Main outcome measures The primary end point was the period until the pressure ulcers were cured. The secondary end point was a comparison of the speed of change in the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing score. Results 64 of the 66 patients were analysed. The estimated mean period until healing was 57.5 days (95% CI 45.2 to 69.8) in the control group as opposed to 59.8 days (95% CI 49.7 to 69.9) in the wrap therapy group. By the extent of pressure ulcer infiltration, the mean period until healing was 16.0 days (95% CI 8.1 to 23.9) in the control group as opposed to 18.8 days (95% CI 10.3 to 27.2) in the wrap therapy group with National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel stage II ulcers, and 71.8 days (95% CI 61.4 to 82.3) as opposed to 63.2 days (95% CI 53.0 to 73.4), respectively, with stage III ulcers. There is no statistical significance in difference in Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing scores. Conclusions It might be possible to consider wrap therapy as an alternative choice in primary care settings as a simple and inexpensive dressing care. Clinical Trial registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000002658. Summary protocol is available on https://upload.umin.ac.jp/cgi-bin/ctr/ctr.cgi?function=brows&action=brows&type=detail&recptno=R000003235&admin=0&language=J PMID:22223842

  8. Use of Collagen Extracellular Matrix Dressing for the Treatment of a Recurrent Venous Ulcer in a 52-Year-Old Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    This case study describes treatment for a 52-year-old man with a recurrent venous leg ulcer using a collagen dressing with extracellular matrix. The patient was admitted to the wound care service for a 3-week-old recurrent venous ulcer. Treatment included application of a collagen dressing with extracellular matrix twice weekly or as needed by the patient; application of a secondary dressing (4 × 4 gauze); and coverage with an expandable netting or gauze using a conforming stretch gauze bandage and latex-free dressing retention tape. The initial venous leg ulcer in this patient required 10 weeks to achieve closure. Ninety-eight percent resolution of the recurrent ulcer had occurred within 4 weeks of treatment, with complete closure at 7 weeks. The average healing time for recurrent venous ulcers is reported in the literature to be longer than initial venous ulcers. In the case provided, collagen ECM dressings promoted complete wound healing in 49 days.

  9. Predictive validity of granulation tissue color measured by digital image analysis for deep pressure ulcer healing: a multicenter prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizaka, Shinji; Kaitani, Toshiko; Sugama, Junko; Nakagami, Gojiro; Naito, Ayumi; Koyanagi, Hiroe; Konya, Chizuko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    This multicenter prospective cohort study examined the predictive validity of granulation tissue color evaluated by digital image analysis for deep pressure ulcer healing. Ninety-one patients with deep pressure ulcers were followed for 3 weeks. From a wound photograph taken at baseline, an image representing the granulation red index (GRI) was processed in which a redder color represented higher values. We calculated the average GRI over granulation tissue and the proportion of pixels exceeding the threshold intensity of 80 for the granulation tissue surface (%GRI80) and wound surface (%wound red index 80). In the receiver operating characteristics curve analysis, most GRI parameters had adequate discriminative values for both improvement of the DESIGN-R total score and wound closure. Ulcers were categorized by the obtained cutoff points of the average GRI (≤80, >80), %GRI80 (≤55, >55-80, >80%), and %wound red index 80 (≤25, >25-50, >50%). In the linear mixed model, higher classes for all GRI parameters showed significantly greater relative improvement in overall wound severity during the 3 weeks after adjustment for patient characteristics and wound locations. Assessment of granulation tissue color by digital image analysis will be useful as an objective monitoring tool for granulation tissue quality or surrogate outcomes of pressure ulcer healing. © 2012 by the Wound Healing Society.

  10. The Healing Effect of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Hypericum Perforatum on Acetic Acid-Induced Ulcerative Colitis in Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Tanideh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Anti-inflammatory effect of Hypericum have long been considered. Ulcerative Colitis (UC is a form of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD. In this study, the effects of Hypericum perforatum on histopathological changes and tissue malondialdehyde (MDA level of colonic tissue in rats with induced UC were evaluated. Materials & Methods: 70 rats were divided into seven equal groups. Colitis was induced by acetic acid.. Groups I and II received 1 mL of 600 and 300 mg/kg H. perforatum extract orally per day respectively; groups III and IV received 1 mL of 20% and 10% intra-colonic gel form of H. perforatum extract daily respectively; group V, as positive control, received 1 mL of intra-colonic Asacol; group VI received 1 mL of normal saline as negative control; group VII received just intra-colonic gel base. All the animals were evaluated for histological changes and tissue MDA level of colon seven days after the treatment. Results: H. perforatum extract in the two forms of trans-rectal and oral administration could result in a more healing effect on acetic acid-induced damaged colonic tissue with a reduction in the MDA activity. In trans-rectal administration, the 20% gel had a better healing response than the 10% gel. In oral administration, the 600 mg/kg dosage had a better healing response than the 300 mg/kg. Conclusions: Therefor, H. perforatum can be considered as a treatment of choice for UC especially in trans-rectal gel form.

  11. Low level laser therapy (GaAlInP 660 nm) in healing of a chronic venous ulcer: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botaro, C A; Faria, L A; Oliveira, R G; Bruno, R X; Rocha, C A Q C; Paiva-Oliveira, E L

    2015-01-01

    The venous ulcer represents approximately 70% to 90% of inferior member ulcers, and the most common etiological factor is venous insufficiency, triggered by venous hypertension. Currently in Brazil there are several types of lasers used in physiotherapy, which benefit biological potential, emitting low power radiation, with anti-inflammatory, analgesic, healing and circulatory effects. This study aimed at the analysis of low level laser therapy effects (LLLT) on the process of tissue repair in chronic venous ulcers. We conducted a case study of a patient with a venous ulcer in the lateral region of the right inferior member. The patient underwent LLLT, which used a GaAlInP diode laser, with a wavelength of 660 nm and energy density of 4 J cm −2 applied punctually at the edges of the wound, with an average distance of 1 cm between the points with a pen-laser perpendicular wrapped in paper and a plastic wrap, keeping contact with the tissue. After four months of therapy and a total of 21 sessions, an improvement was noticeable in the gross appearance of the wound, but after a month and a half without therapy, the dimensions of the wound increased in length and width. Analyzing the results of this case study allows us to conclude that the LLLT GaAlInP (660 nm) with an energy density of 4 J cm −2 , was not successful in the healing of venous ulcers. (paper)

  12. Low level laser therapy (GaAlInP 660 nm) in healing of a chronic venous ulcer: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botaro, C. A.; Faria, L. A.; Oliveira, R. G.; Bruno, R. X.; Rocha, C. A. Q. C.; Paiva-Oliveira, E. L.

    2015-07-01

    The venous ulcer represents approximately 70% to 90% of inferior member ulcers, and the most common etiological factor is venous insufficiency, triggered by venous hypertension. Currently in Brazil there are several types of lasers used in physiotherapy, which benefit biological potential, emitting low power radiation, with anti-inflammatory, analgesic, healing and circulatory effects. This study aimed at the analysis of low level laser therapy effects (LLLT) on the process of tissue repair in chronic venous ulcers. We conducted a case study of a patient with a venous ulcer in the lateral region of the right inferior member. The patient underwent LLLT, which used a GaAlInP diode laser, with a wavelength of 660 nm and energy density of 4 J cm-2 applied punctually at the edges of the wound, with an average distance of 1 cm between the points with a pen-laser perpendicular wrapped in paper and a plastic wrap, keeping contact with the tissue. After four months of therapy and a total of 21 sessions, an improvement was noticeable in the gross appearance of the wound, but after a month and a half without therapy, the dimensions of the wound increased in length and width. Analyzing the results of this case study allows us to conclude that the LLLT GaAlInP (660 nm) with an energy density of 4 J cm-2, was not successful in the healing of venous ulcers.

  13. The efficacy and safety of Dermagraft in improving the healing of chronic diabetic foot ulcers: results of a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, William A; Hanft, Jason; Norwood, Paul; Pollak, Richard

    2003-06-01

    To determine if a human fibroblast-derived dermal substitute could promote the healing of diabetic foot ulcers. A randomized, controlled, multicenter study was undertaken at 35 centers throughout the U.S. and enrolled 314 patients to evaluate complete wound closure by 12 weeks. Patients were randomized to either the Dermagraft treatment group or control (conventional therapy). Except for the application of Dermagraft, treatment of study ulcers was identical for patients in both groups. All patients received pressure-reducing footwear and were allowed to be ambulatory during the study. The results demonstrated that patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers of >6 weeks duration experienced a significant clinical benefit when treated with Dermagraft versus patients treated with conventional therapy alone. With regard to complete wound closure by week 12, 30.0% (39 of 130) of Dermagraft patients healed compared with 18.3% (21 of 115) of control patients (P = 0.023). The overall incidence of adverse events was similar for both the Dermagraft and control groups, but the Dermagraft group experienced significantly fewer ulcer-related adverse events. The data from this study show that Dermagraft is a safe and effective treatment for chronic diabetic foot ulcers.

  14. A cost and clinical effectiveness analysis among moist wound healing dressings versus traditional methods in home care patients with pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souliotis, Kyriakos; Kalemikerakis, Ioannis; Saridi, Maria; Papageorgiou, Manto; Kalokerinou, Athena

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was a cost and clinical effectiveness analysis between moist wound healing dressings and gauze in a homecare set up for the treatment of stage III and IV pressure ulcers up to complete healing. In addition, we assessed the overall economic burden on the Healthcare System. Treatment method for each patient was chosen randomly by using sealed opaque envelopes. The authors monitored the healing progress and recorded treatment costs without interfering with the treatment process. The healing progress was estimated by using surface measurement transparent films. To estimate treatment costs, the authors took into account labor costs, cost of dressings, as well the cost of other materials such as cleansing gauzes, normal saline, syringes, examination gloves, antiseptics and adhesive tape. The patient group under treatment with moist wound healing dressings consisted of 27 men and 20 women aged 75.1 ± 8,6 and had an average ulcer surface of 43.5 ± 30.70 cm(2) ; the patient group under treatment with gauze comprised 25 men and 23 women aged 77.02 ± 8.02 and had an average ulcer surface 41.52 ± 29.41 cm(2) (p = 0.25, 95% CI, Student's t test). The average healing time for the moist wound healing dressings group' was 85.56 ± 52.09 days, while 121.4 ± 52.21 days for the "gauze group" (p = 0.0001, 95% CI, Student's t test). The dressing change frequency per patient was reduced in the "moist wound healing dressings group," 49.5 ± 29.61, compared with a dressing change frequency per patient of 222.6 ± 101.86 for the "gauze group" (p = 0.0001, 95% CI, Student's t test). The use of moist wound healing dressings had a lower total treatment cost of 1,351 € per patient compared with, the use of gauzes (3,888 €). © 2016 by the Wound Healing Society.

  15. Lower extremity arterial and venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieggreen, Mary

    2005-06-01

    The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in the general population is high, but the awareness of primary care providers of the disease process is low. The disease is not recognized by primary care providers. Early recognition and treatment of venous diseases that progress to postphlebotic syndrome, such as after a deep vein thrombosis, will prevent venous ulcers that add considerable expense to the health care system. Vascular assessment, including routine ABI measurement of patients who are in risk categories for vascular disease will identify those patients so that prevention programs can be put into place early. Major contributions to the understanding and management of leg ulcers and wound healing have been made in the last decade. However, there is still confusion as to the exact mechanism behind ulcer development and the best method to manage, cure,and prevent these ulcers has yet to be found.

  16. Avaliação da analgesia de opioide tópico em úlcera de perna de paciente falcêmico Evaluation of the topical application of opioid analgesia for a leg ulcer of a sickle cell disease patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre F. Neves

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A doença falciforme é caracterizada por apresentar várias alterações clinicas e fisiopatológicas nos pacientes que por ela são acometidos. Uma dessas alterações é presença de úlceras de perna dolorosas e de difícil cicatrização, sendo necessário o apoio de equipe multiprofissional no seu manejo e tratamento. Com o objetivo de reduzir a dor associada a úlcera de perna, o paciente falcêmico faz uso de opioides parenterais e enterais que normalmente estão associados a efeitos colaterais indesejados. Com o objetivo de reduzir o uso desses opioides sistêmicos, avaliamos um gel de morfina, de fácil manipulação e baixo custo, que foi utilizado antes e após o processo de troca de curativo das úlceras de perna dos pacientes falcêmicos atendidos em nossa instituição. Baseados na escala analógica da dor foi avaliado o efeito analgésico do gel em 28 pacientes. Todos apresentavam dor grau 7 ou 8 antes da aplicação do gel. Vinte e quatro pacientes (85,7% apresentaram total ausência de dor por um período de 24 horas, não sendo necessário o uso de analgésicos sistêmicos. Em três pacientes (10,7% a ausência de dor durou um periodo de 12horas. Somente um paciente (3,6% não relatou analgesia apos o uso do gel. Os resultados demonstraram que o gel é altamente eficaz no controle da dor das úlceras de perna de pacientes falcêmicos.Sickle cell disease is characterized by several clinical and pathophysiological changes including painful leg ulcers. These are difficult to heal and require the support of a multidisciplinary team in their management. The treatment of pain in these patients usually involves the use of opioids. In order to reduce the use of systemic opioids, we evaluated an easy-to-use low-cost morphine gel (0.12% that was applied before and after changing leg ulcer dressings of sickle cell patients treated in Hemorio hospital. Based on the Analogue Pain Scale (APS we evaluated the analgesic effect of the gel with

  17. The effect of a nurse-directed intervention to reduce pain and improve behavioral and physical outcomes in patients with critically colonized/infected chronic leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelechi, Teresa J; Mueller, Martina; Spencer, Cam; Rinard, Bobbie; Loftis, Greg

    2014-01-01

    We compared a WOC nurse-directed, patient-centered intervention called MECALF (motivational enhancement and conditioning activity for leg function) compared to conditioning activities for lower leg function (CALF) alone. Outcomes were study feasibility, pain, motivation, self-efficacy, physical activity, leg strength, and range of motion. Comparative study. The sample was drawn from 2 wound centers in the Southeastern United States. Twenty-one patients (n = 12 MECALF site A and n = 9 CALF site B) with painful lower legs and critically colonized/infected wounds participated in the study. All patients received usual wound care per center protocol. The MECALF intervention was delivered by WOC nurses for 6 weeks at site A and a handout of CALF depicting the conditioning activities was provided by site staff (not WOC nurses) to patients at site B. We assessed study feasibility with postsurvey questionnaires given to WOC nurses (training usefulness, ease of use of ME with patients) and subjects (able to perform activities, use logs). Pre- and postintervention outcome data were collected by study staff using pain, motivation, and self-efficacy scales, functional measures of physical activity, and physical measures of strength and range of motion. The study was found to be somewhat feasible by the WOC nurses and patients. WOC nurses had time management problems using MECALF during usual patient care. Patients reported that they were able to perform CALF. Overall pain was statistically significantly reduced (P = .046) in both groups of patients with painful critically colonized/infected leg ulcers measured at week 8, 2 weeks after the study period. The CALF group experienced a slightly greater reduction in pain intensity than did the MECALF group. No statistically significant differences between the groups were observed in behavioral outcomes for motivation (P = .641) and self-efficacy (P = .643), or for physical outcomes including overall ankle strength (P = .609) and

  18. The Effect of Foot Exercises on Wound Healing in Type 2 Diabetic Patients With a Foot Ulcer: A Randomized Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraydin, Şahizer; Avşar, Gülçin

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of foot exercises on wound healing in type 2 diabetic patients with a diabetic foot ulcer. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Sixty-five patients from an outpatient clinic with grade 1 or 2 ulcers (Wagner classification) who met study criteria agreed to participate; 60 patients completed the study and were included in the final analysis. Subjects were followed up between February 2014 and June 2015. Subjects were recruited by the researchers in the clinics where they received treatment. Subjects were randomly allocated to either the control or intervention group. Data were collected using investigator-developed forms: patient information form and the diabetic foot exercises log. Patients in the intervention group received standard wound care and performed daily foot exercises for 12 weeks; the control group received standard wound care but no exercises. The ulcers of the patients in both the intervention and control groups were examined and measured at the 4th, 8th, and 12th weeks. The groups were compared in terms of the ulcer size and depth. To analyze and compare the data, frequency distribution, mean (standard deviation), variance analysis, and the independent samples t test and the χ test were used. The mean ulcer areas were 12.63 (14.43), 6.91 (5.44), 4.30 (3.70), and 3.29 (3.80) cm (P diabetic foot ulcer sizes in the study intervention group in the 4th and 12th weeks compared to beginning baseline (P ≤ .05). However, only the 12th week was different from the beginning in the control group (P = .000). The mean depths of the ulcers were 0.56 (0.85), 0.42 (0.68), 0.36 (0.50), and 0.28 (0.38) cm in the study intervention group (P foot exercises should be included in the treatment plan when managing patients with diabetic foot ulcers.

  19. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and force-plate analysis of gait in dogs with healed femora after leg-lengthening plate fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, P.; Markel, M.D.; Bogdanske, J.J.; Johnson, K.A.

    1995-01-01

    Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to measure bone mineral density of four regions in healed femora of nine dogs after fracture fixation with a leg-lengthening plate. Six to 85 months (mean, 46 months) after surgery, the bone mineral density of healed femora was not significantly different from the contralateral uninjured femora (P > .05; power = 0.8 at delta = 15%). Radiolucencies around the proximal screws, apparently associated with screw loosening, were seen on radiographic views of the healed femora of three dogs. In one of these dogs, one screw in the proximal metaphysis had broken. Force-plate analysis of gait was also performed on dogs at the time of bone mineral density measurement. Peak vertical force was decreased in the pelvic limb with the healed fracture compared with the contralateral unoperated limb (P < 0.05). Clinically apparent lameness in three dogs did not appear to be associated with altered bone mineral density and may have been caused by hip osteoarthritis, a nondisplaced hairline diaphyseal fracture, and screw loosening in conjunction with extensive post-traumatic soft tissue injury

  20. Gaseous Mediators Nitric Oxide and Hydrogen Sulfide in the Mechanism of Gastrointestinal Integrity, Protection and Ulcer Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Magierowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO and hydrogen sulfide (H2S are known as biological messengers; they play an important role in human organism and contribute to many physiological and pathophysiological processes. NO is produced from l-arginine by constitutive NO synthase (NOS and inducible NOS enzymatic pathways. This gaseous mediator inhibits platelet aggregation, leukocyte adhesion and contributes to the vessel homeostasis. NO is known as a vasodilatory molecule involved in control of the gastric blood flow (GBF and the maintenance of gastric mucosal barrier integrity in either healthy gastric mucosa or that damaged by strong irritants. Biosynthesis of H2S in mammals depends upon two enzymes cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase. This gaseous mediator, similarly to NO and carbon monoxide, is involved in neuromodulation, vascular contractility and anti-inflammatory activities. For decades, H2S has been known to inhibit cytochrome c oxidase and reduce cell energy production. Nowadays it is generally considered to act through vascular smooth muscle ATP-dependent K+ channels, interacting with intracellular transcription factors and promote sulfhydration of protein cysteine moieties within the cell, but the mechanism of potential gastroprotective and ulcer healing properties of H2S has not been fully explained. The aim of this review is to compare current results of the studies concerning the role of H2S and NO in gastric mucosa protection and outline areas that may pose new opportunities for further development of novel therapeutic targets.

  1. The Wound Healing Effects of Herbal Cream Containing Oliveria Decumbens and Pelargonium Graveolens Essential Oils in Diabetic Foot Ulcer Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboubi, Mohaddese; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Khamechian, Tahereh; Tamtaji, Omid Reza; Mokhtari, Rasoul; Talaei, Sayyed Alireza

    2018-01-01

    The number of diabetic patients in adult population is increasing. All this population are at risk of developing diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) that are associated with unwanted ailments and high mortality. In spite of current therapies for DFUs, further therapies are needed to help the patients. The efficacy of herbal cream containing Pelargonium graveolens and Oliveria decombens essential oils was evaluated topically for treatment of DFUs in rat animal model in comparison with two other herbal formulas containing each essential oil alone, placebo (the basic formula without active ingredients) and normal saline as control groups. After anesthesia of diabetic rats (n=75) induced by streptozotocin (STZ), diabetic wounds were visible on the hind dorsal surface of the foot . The treatments were initiated on Day 1 and repeated 3 times a day for thirteen consecutive days. On day 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13, the wound sizes were determined and assessed histologically. Three herbal formulations reduced the size of wounds in rats with DFUs, while the cream containing combined herbals of O. decumbens and P. graveolens essential oils had the highest tissue repair in DFU rat models. Due to better wound healing effects of combined herbal cream containing O. decumbens and P. graveolens essential oils, it can be recommended in treatment of DFUs.

  2. Predictive value of intracutaneous xenon clearance for healing of amputation and cutaneous ulcer sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, E.B.; Thomas, S.; Cline, J.; Kempczinski, R.; Gottesman, L.

    1983-01-01

    A previously reported technique for the assessment of skin blood flow in the lower extremities of patients with ischemic lesions was evaluated using intracutaneous xenon clearance. The radioisotope was injected above and below both the ankle and the knee and flow was measured using a gamma camera with a low-energy collimator, 88-keV photopeak, and a 20% window. Healing was more frequent when skin blood flow was equal to or greater than 2.4 ml/min/100 g (38/39 patients) than when flow was less than 2.4 ml/min/100 g (4/7 patients). The authors conclude that this technique can be used to help determine the appropriate site for amputation in lower limb ischemic lesions

  3. [Effect of heijiang pill on radiation skin ulcer in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Yang, Yang; Xu, Yong-Mei

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between single dosage of 60Co radiation and the degree of radiation-induced skin ulcers, and to evaluate the curative effect of Heijiang Pill (HJP) on skin ulcer induced by various dosages of radiation in rats. Sixty-six Wistar female rats were randomly divided into three groups, the blank control group (n = 6) and the two radiation groups, each 30 rats, with their right hind leg exposed respectively to 60 Gy and 40 Gy of 60 Co radiation. The time of emergence and degree of skin ulcer were recorded. Then rats in the two radiation groups were subdivided into the HJP group, the Ethacridine group and the model group, 10 in each group, they received corresponding treatment after ulceration, and the incidence, pathology, cure rate and cure time of skin ulcer were observed in the 90 days of observation. The incidence of skin ulcer was higher and occurred earlier in rats radiated with 60 Gy than that with 40 Gy (P ulcer healing rate in rats treated with HJP was higher than that treated with Ethacridine (P cure time in the HJP group was shorter (P ulcers. HJP can effectively cure radiation skin ulcer, and the effect is especially significant on the ulcer induced by low dose radiation.

  4. The prevalence of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Jill; Hale, Claire; Helliwell, Philip; Hill, Jackie; Nelson, E Andrea

    2008-02-15

    To establish the prevalence of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in secondary care. A postal survey of all patients with RA (n = 1,130) under the care of rheumatologists in Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK was performed. The prevalence data were validated through clinical examination, case-note review, and contact with health professionals. The false-negative rate was investigated in a subsample of patients (n = 70) who denied any history of ulceration. The postal survey achieved a 78% response rate. Following validation, the point prevalence of foot ulceration was 3.39% and the overall prevalence was 9.73%. The false-positive rate was initially high at 21.21%, but use of diagrammatic questionnaire data to exclude leg ulceration reduced the rate to 10.76%. The false-negative rate was 11.76%. The most common sites for ulceration were the dorsal aspect of hammer toes, the metatarsal heads, and the metatarsophalangeal joint in patients with hallux abducto valgus, with 33% of patients reporting multiple sites of ulceration. Patients with open-foot and healed-foot ulceration had significantly longer RA disease duration, reported significantly greater use of special footwear, and had a higher prevalence of foot surgery than ulcer-free patients. Foot ulceration affects a significant proportion of patients with RA. Further work is needed to establish risk factors for foot ulceration in RA and to target foot health provision more effectively.

  5. Effects of new biomimetic regenerating agents on corneal wound healing in an experimental model of post-surgical corneal ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, I; Íñigo-Portugués, A; Carreño, N; Riestra, A C; Merayo-Lloves, J M

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of the topical application of cacicol regenerating agent (RGTA) in an experimental model of corneal ulcer after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in mice. Mice were subjected to PRK surgery with a 2.0mm ablation zone on the central cornea and 45mm of depth on a VISX Star S2 excimer laser. Corneas were treated topically with cacicol drops 1hour and 48hours after injury. Control groups received balanced salt solution (BSS) in the same dosage. Clinical and histopathological events were evaluated at 1, 2, 3 and 7 days after surgery. Sections obtained through the central region of the corneas were used to analyze the histopathological events of injured and healed corneas. αSMA (myofibroblast transformation), E cadherin (assembly of epithelial cells) and neuronal class III β-tubulin (innervation) were performed. Corneas treated topically with cacicol for 7 days showed a greater degree of transparency compared to controls. cacicol treated corneas showed improved epithelial cytoarchitecture. Analysis of αSMA profiles in the stroma showed that cacicol reduced or delayed the presence of myofibroblasts in the stroma compared to BSS (P<0.001). Finally, a putative neuroregenerative effect of cacicol was found in corneas subjected to an experimental PRK lesion. In some cases some interindividual variability could be observed due to the design of the experimental model. This is a limitation to consider, despite the statistical significance of the data. In a model of laser induced surgical lesions in the cornea, topical application of an RGTA (i.e. cacicol) could be involved in avoiding myofibroblast scarring formation and promoting nerve regeneration. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Pressure ulcer prevention and healing using alternating pressure mattress at home: the PARESTRY project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaume, S; Marty, M

    2015-08-01

    Specialised pressure-relieving supports reduce or relieve the interface pressure between the skin and the support surface. The comparative effectiveness of dynamic support surfaces is debated. The aim of this study is to examine the impact of using an alternating pressure air mattress (APAM) on pressure ulcer (PU) incidence in patients receiving home-based care. A second aim was to determine the level of patient/family satisfaction with comfort and gain the views of the care team that used the APAM. The PARESTRY study was a prospective observational study conducted in patients with a high risk of PUs (Braden score prevention groups consisted of patients with no PU at baseline who were in bed for at least 20 hours a day. Patients at baseline with a category 3 or 4 PU or a category 1 or 2 PU in association with poor general health or end-of-life status were included in the secondary prevention group. All patients were laid on an APAM. The primary end point was the % of patients with a worsening skin condition in the pressure area (heel, sacrum, ischium) at day 90 or at the end of the study. The primary analysis was done on the full analysis set (patients included with at least a second assessment), using the last observation carried forward technique to handle missing data, at day 90. A 95% confidence interval was calculated. Analysis was performed on 92 patients (30 in primary prevention and 62 in secondary prevention). The average time spent in bed was 22.7 (SD 2.7) hours a day and 22.6 (SD 2.2) hours in the primary and secondary prevention groups, respectively. At baseline, in the secondary group, 77% of patients had a sacral PU, 63% a heel PU, 8% an ischial tuberosity PU and 45% a PU in another area, a number of patients having multiple PUs. In the primary prevention group, 63% (19/30) of patients dropped out of the study (5 were hospitalised, 9 died, 5 other causes). In the secondary prevention group, 61% (38/62) dropped out (7 were hospitalised, 23 died, 8

  7. The effectiveness of hydrocolloid dressings versus other dressings in the healing of pressure ulcers in adults and older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciele Soares Pott

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the effectiveness of hydrocolloids in the healing of pressure ulcers in adult and older adult patients.METHOD: systematic review with meta-analysis, based on the recommendations of the Cochrane Handbook. The search was undertaken in the databases: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS, Cochrane Database, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science and the Scientific Electronic Library Online.RESULTS: 646 primary studies were identified, 69 were evaluated and nine were selected, referring to the use of the hydrocolloid dressing in healing; of these, four studies allowed meta-analysis. There was no statistically significant difference between the hydrocolloid group and the foams group (p value=0.84; Odds Ratio 1.06, CI 95% 0.61-1.86. A slight superiority of the polyurethane dressings was observed in relation to the hydrocolloid dressings.CONCLUSION: the evidence is not sufficient to affirm whether the efficacy of hydrocolloid dressings is superior to that of other dressings. It is suggested that clinical randomized trials be undertaken so as to ascertain the efficacy of this intervention in the healing of pressure ulcers, in relation to other treatments.

  8. Healing effects of Musa sapientum var. paradisiaca in diabetic rats with co-occurring gastric ulcer: cytokines and growth factor by PCR amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mohan; Gautam, Manish Kumar; Singh, Amit; Goel, Raj Kumar

    2013-11-05

    The present study evaluates the effects of extract of Musa sapientum fruit (MSE) on ulcer index, blood glucose level and gastric mucosal cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1β and growth factor, TGF-α (affected in diabetes and chronic ulcer) in acetic acid (AA)-induced gastric ulcer (GU) in diabetic (DR) rat. MSE (100 mg/kg, oral), omeprazole (OMZ, 2.0 mg/kg, oral), insulin (INS, 4 U/kg, sc) or pentoxyphylline (PTX, 10 mg/kg, oral) were given once daily for 10 days in 14 days post-streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneal)-induced diabetic rats while, the normal/diabetic rats received CMC for the same period after induction of GU with AA. Ulcer index was calculated based upon the product of length and width (mm2/rat) of ulcers while, TNF-α, IL-1β and TGF-α were estimated in the gastric mucosal homogenate from the intact/ulcer region. Phytochemical screening and HPTLC analysis of MSE was done following standard procedures. An increase in ulcer index, TNF-α and IL-1β were observed in normal (NR)-AA rat compared to NR-normal saline rat, which were further increased in DR-AA rat while, treatments of DR-AA rat with MSE, OMZ, INS and PTX reversed them, more so with MSE and PTX. Significant increase in TGF-α was found in NR-AA rat which did not increase further in DR-AA rat. MSE and PTX tended to increase while, OMZ and INS showed little or no effect on TGF-α in AA-DR rat. Phytochemical screening of MSE showed the presence of saponins, flavonoids, glycosides, steroids and alkaloids and HPTLC analysis indicated the presence of eight active compounds. MSE showed antidiabetic and better ulcer healing effects compared with OMZ (antiulcer) or INS (antidiabetic) in diabetic rat and could be more effective in diabetes with concurrent gastric ulcer.

  9. The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification independently predicts wound healing in diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Canner, Joseph K; Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Sherman, Ronald; Malas, Mahmoud B; Black, James H; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2018-04-02

    Previous studies have reported correlation between the Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system and wound healing time on unadjusted analyses. However, in the only multivariable analysis to date, WIfI stage was not predictive of wound healing. Our aim was to examine the association between WIfI classification and wound healing after risk adjustment in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated in a multidisciplinary setting. All patients presenting to our multidisciplinary DFU clinic from June 2012 to July 2017 were enrolled in a prospective database. A Cox proportional hazards model accounting for patients' sociodemographics, comorbidities, medication profiles, and wound characteristics was used to assess the association between WIfI classification and likelihood of wound healing at 1 year. There were 310 DFU patients enrolled (mean age, 59.0 ± 0.7 years; 60.3% male; 60.0% black) with 709 wounds, including 32.4% WIfI stage 1, 19.9% stage 2, 25.2% stage 3, and 22.4% stage 4. Mean wound healing time increased with increasing WIfI stage (stage 1, 96.9 ± 8.3 days; stage 4, 195.1 ± 10.6 days; P healing at 1 year was 94.1% ± 2.0% for stage 1 wounds vs 67.4% ± 4.4% for stage 4 (P healing (stage 4 vs stage 1: hazard ratio, [HR] 0.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.59). Peripheral artery disease (HR, 0.73), increasing wound area (HR, 0.99 per square centimeter), and longer time from wound onset to first assessment (HR, 0.97 per month) also decreased the likelihood of wound healing, whereas use of clopidogrel was protective (HR, 1.39; all, P ≤ .04). The top three predictors of poor wound healing were WIfI stage 4 (z score, -5.40), increasing wound area (z score, -3.14), and WIfI stage 3 (z score, -3.11), respectively. Among patients with DFU, the WIfI classification system predicts wound healing at 1 year in both crude and risk-adjusted analyses. This is the first study to validate the WIfI score as an independent

  10. Marjolin’s ulcer in chronic wounds – review of available literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Bazaliński

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Marjolin’s ulcer is a rare, aggressive skin cancer developing in scar tissue, chronic ulcers and areas affected by inflammations. Its incidence is estimated to range from 1% to 2% of all burn scars. It most frequently takes the form of squamous cell carcinoma which sometimes is diagnosed during examination of lesions developing in scars and hard-to-heal chronic wounds (pressure sores, leg ulcers. Therapeutic management of Marjolin’s ulcer requires well-designed treatment plan to ensure optimal medical care and good quality of life for the patient. The high risk of metastases and damage to the structure of vitally important organs determines the need for early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention with supplementary therapy. The purpose of the study was to examine etiopathogenesis of Marjolin’s ulcer and principles of its treatment. The authors focused on the aspect of malignant degeneration in chronic wounds (leg ulcers, pressure sores as a very rare, aggressive form of Marjolin’s ulcer. A review of the available literature on the issue of Marjolin ulcers was conducted using the key words; Marjolin ulcers, pressure sore, chronic wound. Malignant degeneration in chronic wounds is a very rare aggressive form of Marjolin ulcer. Increased oncological alertness should be displayed by nursing and medical personnel taking care of patients with chronic wounds.

  11. Hot topics in venous ulcer treatment: an international survey

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Ricci; Francesco Serino; Leo Moro; Fausto Passariello

    2013-01-01

    Compression is the most effective treatment to promote skin ulcer healing, although there are as many different methods of performing a leg compression as the number of phlebologists, each one having personal tricks, solutions, habits. Conversely, though dressings may be done in different ways, none is considered the standard solution. We asked few (18) questions to physicians involved in this field, in Italy and abroad, looking for some common feature. The analysis of 100 replies indicated t...

  12. Metformin Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Reduced Proliferation, Wound Healing Impairment In Vivo and Is Associated to Clinical Outcomes in Diabetic Foot Ulcer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Gonzalez, Fatima; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto R; Fernandez-Ruiz, Julio C; Nava-Ramirez, Hilda S; Hernandez-Correa, Adriana C; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio E

    2016-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies in diabetic patients have demonstrated a protective effect of metformin to the development of several types of cancer. The underlying mechanisms of such phenomenon is related to the effect of metformin on cell proliferation among which, mTOR, AMPK and other targets have been identified. However, little is known about the role that metformin treatment have on other cell types such as keratinocytes and whether exposure to metformin of these cells might have serious repercussions in wound healing delay and in the development of complications in diabetic patients with foot ulcers or in their exacerbation. HaCaT Cells were exposed to various concentrations of metformin and cell viability was evaluated by a Resazurin assay; Proliferation was also evaluated with a colony formation assay and with CFSE dilution assay by flow cytometry. Cell cycle was also evaluated by flow cytometry by PI staining. An animal model of wound healing was used to evaluate the effect of metformin in wound closure. Also, an analysis of patients receiving metformin treatment was performed to determine the effect of metformin treatment on the outcome and wound area. Statistical analysis was performed on SPSS v. 18 and GraphPad software v.5. Metformin treatment significantly reduces cell proliferation; colony formation and alterations of the cell cycle are observed also in the metformin treated cells, particularly in the S phase. There is a significant increase in the area of the wound of the metformin treated animals at different time points (Pdiabetic foot ulcers at the time of hospitalization. A protective effect of metformin was observed for amputation, probably associated with the anti inflammatory effects reported of metformin. Metformin treatment reduces cell proliferation and reduces wound healing in an animal model and affects clinical outcomes in diabetic foot ulcer patients. Chronic use of this drug should be further investigated to provide evidence of

  13. The effects of golden sea cucumber extract (Stichopus hermanii on the number of lymphocytes during the healing process of traumatic ulcer on wistar rat’s oral mucous

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Arundina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indonesia is a country with the world’s biggest potential and producer of sea cucumbers. Golden sea cucumber contains glicosaminoglycans, such as heparan sulphate and chondroitin sulphate, which could have a positive implication on wound healing process. This acceleration of wound healing process could be observed through the increasing of lymphocytes on ulcus traumaticus. Purpose: This study aims to analyze the effects of golden sea cucumber extract on the number of lymphocytes during the healing process of traumatic ulcer on Wistar rat’s oral mucous. Method: Golden sea cucumber extrat was made with freeze-dried method, and then gel was prepared using PEG 400 and PEG 4000 solvent. Twenty male rats with mucosal ulcus made were divided into a control group and three treatment groups with 20%, 40% and 80% golden sea cucumber extracts. All samples were euthanized on day 4 and then a preparation for histopathological examination was made to examine the number of lymphocytes. Result: The biggest number of lymphocytes was found in the treatment group with 40% golden sea cucumber extract, while the lowest one was found in the control group. The results of one way Anova test then showed a significant difference between the control group and the treatment groups. And, the results of Tukey HSD showed a significant difference between the control group and the treatment group with 40% golden sea cucumber extract. Conclusion: It can be concluded that 40% golden sea cucumber (Stichopus hermanii extract can increase the number of lymphocytes during the healing process of traumatic ulcer on Wistar rat’s oral mucous.

  14. A novel, non-invasive diagnostic clinical procedure for the determination of an oxygenation status of chronic lower leg ulcers using peri-ulceral transcutaneous oxygen partial pressure measurements: results of its application in chronic venous insufficiency (CVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnikol, Wolfgang K R; Pötzschke, Harald

    2012-01-01

    The basis for the new procedure is the simultaneous transcutaneous measurement of the peri-ulceral oxygen partial pressure (tcPO(2)), using a minimum of 4 electrodes which are placed as close to the wound margin as possible, additionally, as a challenge the patient inhales pure oxygen for approximately 15 minutes. In order to evaluate the measurement data and to characterise the wounds, two new oxygen parameters were defined: (1) the oxygen characteristic (K-PO(2)), and (2) the oxygen inhomogeneity (I-PO(2)) of a chronic wound. The first of these is the arithmetic mean of the two lowest tcPO(2) measurement values, and the second is the variation coefficient of the four measurement values. Using the K-PO(2) parameter, a grading of wound hypoxia can be obtained. To begin with, the physiologically regulated (and still compensated) hypoxia with K-PO(2) values of between 35 and 40 mmHg is distinguished from the pathological decompensated hypoxia with K-PO(2) values of between 0 and 35 mmHg; the first of these still stimulates self-healing (within the limits of the oxygen balance). The decompensated hypoxia can be (arbitrarily) divided into "simple" hypoxia (Grade I), intense hypoxia (Grade II) and extreme hypoxia (Grade III), with the possibility of intermediate grades (I/II and II/III).Measurements were carried out using the new procedure on the skin of the right inner ankle of 21 healthy volunteers of various ages, and in 17 CVI (chronic venous insufficiency) wounds. Sixteen of the 17 CVI wounds (i.e., 94%) were found to be pathologically hypoxic, a state which was not found in any of the healthy volunteers. The oxygen inhomogeneity (I-PO(2)) of the individual chronic wounds increased exponentially as a function of the hypoxia grading (K-PO(2)), with a 10-fold increase with extreme hypoxia in contrast to a constant value of approximately 14% in the healthy volunteers. This pronounced oxygen inhomogeneity explains inhomogeneous wound healing, resulting in the so

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate impaired wound healing through enhancing keratinocyte functions in diabetic foot ulcerations on the plantar skin of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Jiro; Kamiya, Hideki; Himeno, Tatsuhito; Shibata, Taiga; Kondo, Masaki; Okawa, Tetsuji; Fujiya, Atsushi; Fukami, Ayako; Uenishi, Eita; Seino, Yusuke; Tsunekawa, Shin; Hamada, Yoji; Naruse, Keiko; Oiso, Yutaka; Nakamura, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    Although the initial healing stage involves a re-epithelialization in humans, diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) has been investigated using rodent models with wounds on the thigh skin, in which a wound contraction is initiated. In this study, we established a rodent model of DFU on the plantar skin and evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) in this model. The wounds made on the hind paws or thighs of streptozotocin induced diabetic or control rats were treated with BM-MSCs. Expression levels of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (pFAK), matrix metaroprotease (MMP)-2, EGF, and IGF-1, were evaluated in human keratinocytes, which were cultured in conditioned media of BM-MSCs (MSC-CM) with high glucose levels. Re-epithelialization initiated the healing process on the plantar, but not on the thigh, skin. The therapy utilizing BM-MSCs ameliorated the delayed healing in diabetic rats. In the keratinocytes cultured with MSC-CM, the decreased pFAK levels in the high glucose condition were restored, and the MMP2, EGF, and IGF-1 levels increased. Our study established a novel rat DFU model. The impaired healing process in diabetic rats was ameliorated by transplantation of BM-MSCs. This amelioration might be accounted for by the modification of keratinocyte functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Frequency and prognostic role of mucosal healing in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis after one-year of biological therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Klaudia; Lakatos, Péter László; Szűcs, Mónika; Pallagi-Kunstár, Éva; Bálint, Anita; Nagy, Ferenc; Szepes, Zoltán; Vass, Noémi; Kiss, Lajos S; Wittmann, Tibor; Molnár, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the endoscopic activity before and after a one-year period of biological therapy and to evaluate the frequency of relapses and need for retreatment after stopping the biologicals in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: The data from 41 patients with CD and 22 patients with UC were assessed. Twenty-four CD patients received infliximab, and 17 received adalimumab. The endoscopic severity of CD was quantified with the simplified endoscopic activity score for Crohn’s disease in CD and with the Mayo endoscopic subscore in UC. RESULTS: Mucosal healing was achieved in 23 CD and 7 UC patients. Biological therapy had to be restarted in 78% of patients achieving complete mucosal healing with CD and in 100% of patients with UC. Neither clinical remission nor mucosal healing was associated with the time to restarting the biological therapy in either CD or UC. CONCLUSION: Mucosal healing did not predict sustained clinical remission in patients in whom the biological therapies had been stopped. PMID:24659890

  17. Complete mucosal healing of distal lesions induced by twice-daily budesonide 2-mg foam promoted clinical remission of mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis with distal active inflammation: double-blind, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganuma, Makoto; Aoyama, Nobuo; Tada, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Kiyonori; Hirai, Fumihito; Watanabe, Kenji; Watanabe, Mamoru; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2018-04-01

    Budesonide foam is used for the topical treatment of distal ulcerative colitis. This phase III study was performed to confirm mucosal healing and other therapeutic effects of twice-daily budesonide 2-mg foam in patients with mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis including left-sided colitis and pancolitis. This was a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. A total of 126 patients with mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis with active inflammation in the distal colon were randomized to two groups receiving twice-daily budesonide 2 mg/25 ml foam or placebo foam. The primary endpoint was the percentage of complete mucosal healing of distal lesions (endoscopic subscore of 0) at week 6. Some patients continued the treatment through week 12. Drug efficacy and safety were evaluated. The percentages of both complete mucosal healing of distal lesions and clinical remission were significantly improved in the budesonide as compared with the placebo group (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.0035). Subgroup analysis showed similar efficacy of budesonide foam for complete mucosal healing of distal lesions and clinical remission regardless of disease type. The clinical remission percentage tended to be higher in patients achieving complete mucosal healing of distal lesions than in other patients. There were no safety concerns with budesonide foam. This study confirmed for the first time complete mucosal healing with twice-daily budesonide 2-mg foam in mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis with distal active inflammation. The results also indicated that complete mucosal healing of distal lesions by budesonide foam promotes clinical remission of ulcerative colitis. Clinical trial registration no.: Japic CTI-142704.

  18. Uso de terapias alternativas en la cicatrización de úlceras de etiología venosa: La cromoterapia Colour therapy in venous ulcers healing: chromoteraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Alexandre Lozano

    2012-12-01

    clinically shown to attain an ulcer healing rate of 80% after twelve weeks' treatment. It is the most effective currently existing treatment. Several studies have shown colour therapy to aid wound healing. Among other effects, it stimulates the blood supply to the wound bed and encourages oxygenation, at the same time inhibiting the growth of anaerobic bacteria. On the strength of the above, we propose the use of colour therapy in treating venous ulcers, as additional treatment to standard therapy, when standard therapy is ineffective or when a patient cannot tolerate multilayer bandaging due to pain.

  19. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 induces LL-37 and HBD-2 production in keratinocytes from diabetic foot ulcers promoting wound healing: an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Curiel, Irma; Trujillo, Valentin; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; Rincon, Kublai; Rivas-Calderon, Bruno; deHaro-Acosta, Jeny; Marin-Luevano, Paulina; Lozano-Lopez, Daniel; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) are one of the most common diabetes-related cause of hospitalization and often lead to severe infections and poor healing. It has been recently reported that patients with DFU have lower levels of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) at the lesion area, which contributes with the impairment of wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25 (OH)2 D3) and L-isoleucine induced HBD-2 and LL-37 in primary cultures from DFU. We developed primary cell cultures from skin biopsies from 15 patients with DFU and 15 from healthy donors. Cultures were treated with 1,25 (OH)2D3 or L-isoleucine for 18 h. Keratinocytes phenotype was identified by western blot and flow cytometry. Real time qPCR for DEFB4, CAMP and VDR gene expression was performed as well as an ELISA to measure HBD-2 and LL-37 in supernatant. Antimicrobial activity, in vitro, wound healing and proliferation assays were performed with conditioned supernatant. The results show that primary culture from DFU treated with 1,25(OH)2D3, increased DEFB4 and CAMP gene expression and increased the production of HBD-2 and LL-37 in the culture supernatant. These supernatants had antimicrobial activity over E. coli and induced remarkable keratinocyte migration. In conclusion the 1,25(OH)2D3 restored the production of AMPs in primary cell from DFU which were capable to improve the in vitro wound healing assays, suggesting their potential therapeutic use on the treatment of DFU.

  20. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 induces LL-37 and HBD-2 production in keratinocytes from diabetic foot ulcers promoting wound healing: an in vitro model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Gonzalez-Curiel

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU are one of the most common diabetes-related cause of hospitalization and often lead to severe infections and poor healing. It has been recently reported that patients with DFU have lower levels of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs at the lesion area, which contributes with the impairment of wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25 (OH2 D3 and L-isoleucine induced HBD-2 and LL-37 in primary cultures from DFU. We developed primary cell cultures from skin biopsies from 15 patients with DFU and 15 from healthy donors. Cultures were treated with 1,25 (OH2D3 or L-isoleucine for 18 h. Keratinocytes phenotype was identified by western blot and flow cytometry. Real time qPCR for DEFB4, CAMP and VDR gene expression was performed as well as an ELISA to measure HBD-2 and LL-37 in supernatant. Antimicrobial activity, in vitro, wound healing and proliferation assays were performed with conditioned supernatant. The results show that primary culture from DFU treated with 1,25(OH2D3, increased DEFB4 and CAMP gene expression and increased the production of HBD-2 and LL-37 in the culture supernatant. These supernatants had antimicrobial activity over E. coli and induced remarkable keratinocyte migration. In conclusion the 1,25(OH2D3 restored the production of AMPs in primary cell from DFU which were capable to improve the in vitro wound healing assays, suggesting their potential therapeutic use on the treatment of DFU.

  1. The effects of vitamin D supplementation on wound healing and metabolic status in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaghi, Reza; Pourbagheri, Hamideh; Momen-Heravi, Mansooreh; Bahmani, Fereshteh; Shadi, Jafar; Soleimani, Zahra; Asemi, Zatollah

    2017-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of vitamin D supplementation on wound healing and metabolic status in patients with diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed among 60 patients with grade 3 DFU according to "Wagner-Meggitt's" criteria. Participants were randomly divided into two groups (each 30 participants) and received either 50,000IU vitamin D supplements every 2weeks for 12weeks (group A) or placebo (group B). Fasting blood samples were taken at study baseline and after 12-week intervention to determine related markers. After 12weeks of intervention, compared with the placebo, vitamin D supplementation resulted in a significant reduction in ulcer length (-2.1±1.1 vs. -1.1±1.1cm, P=0.001), width (-2.0±1.2 vs. -1.1±1.0cm, P=0.02) and depth (-1.0±0.5 vs. -0.5±0.5cm, Phealing due to its effect on improved glycemic control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Topic Simvastatin for the Treatment of Chronic Vascular Cutaneous Ulcers: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposio, Edoardo; Libondi, Guido; Bertozzi, Nicolò; Grignaffini, Eugenio; Grieco, Michele P

    2015-12-01

    Recent research suggests that statins might be useful in the process of wound healing, playing a positive immune-modulatory role, improving microvascular function and reducing oxidative stress. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy of topic application of Simvastatin-based cream in the treatment of chronic vascular cutaneous ulcers, comparing this type of treatment to a collagen-based dressing, proven to be effective for ulcer treatment. A total of 20 ulcers were studied in 2 Groups of randomly-chosen patients for a period of one month. In the first Group a 0.5% Simvastatin-based cream was topically administered, while the second Group (control) was treated with an absorbable type I bovine collagen-based medication. Each week, wound healing progress was observed in both Groups, and the ulcers photographed. Wound healing rate was calculated by considering the absolute change in area and by the formula "healing ratio (%) = [(Area 0 - Area t4 )/Area 0 ] × 100," both sets of data being related to the days comprised in the study in order to calculate healing rate per day. Statistical analysis was performed by Student t test. Study endpoint equaling the time-course changes of ulcer areas. At the end of the study, when considering absolute change in area, the experimental Group appeared to heal better and faster than the control Group although differences between the Groups were not statistically significant. Conversely, rates of wound healing in the experimental and control Groups were 46.88% and 64% respectively, revealing statistically significant differences. ( P topic application of a simvastatin-based cream proved to be well- tolerated but not effective in the management of vascular leg ulcers in a 4 week-period.

  3. BURULI ULCER THE (1)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a 22 years old female patient from Southern Ethiopia with ulcerative form of Buruli ulcer on the left leg. The case suffered for more ... general, there is no difference in the infection rate among males and ... 'Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University.

  4. Increased growth factors play a role in wound healing promoted by noninvasive oxygen-ozone therapy in diabetic patients with foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Guan, Meiping; Xie, Cuihua; Luo, Xiangrong; Zhang, Qian; Xue, Yaoming

    2014-01-01

    Management of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is a great challenge for clinicians. Although the oxygen-ozone treatment improves the diabetic outcome, there are few clinical trials to verify the efficacy and illuminate the underlying mechanisms of oxygen-ozone treatment on DFUs. In the present study, a total of 50 type 2 diabetic patients complicated with DFUs, Wagner stage 2~4, were randomized into control group treated by standard therapy only and ozone group treated by standard therapy plus oxygen-ozone treatment. The therapeutic effects were graded into 4 levels from grade 0 (no change) to grade 3 (wound healing). The wound sizes were measured at baseline and day 20, respectively. Tissue biopsies were performed at baseline and day 11. The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) proteins in the pathologic specimens were determined by immunohistochemical examinations. The effective rate of ozone group was significantly higher than that of control group (92% versus 64%, P healing of DFUs via potential induction of VEGF, TGF-β, and PDGF at early stage of the treatment. (Clinical trial registry number is ChiCTR-TRC-14004415).

  5. Venous ulcers -- self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery to improve blood flow through your veins. Prevention If you are at risk for venous ulcers, take the steps listed above under Wound Care. ... weight if you are overweight. Manage your blood pressure and cholesterol levels. ... Venous leg ulcers - self-care; Venous insufficiency ulcers - self-care; Stasis ...

  6. Clinical validity of the estimated energy requirement and the average protein requirement for nutritional status change and wound healing in older patients with pressure ulcers: A multicenter prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizaka, Shinji; Kaitani, Toshiko; Nakagami, Gojiro; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-11-01

    Adequate nutritional intake is essential for pressure ulcer healing. Recently, the estimated energy requirement (30 kcal/kg) and the average protein requirement (0.95 g/kg) necessary to maintain metabolic balance have been reported. The purpose was to evaluate the clinical validity of these requirements in older hospitalized patients with pressure ulcers by assessing nutritional status and wound healing. This multicenter prospective study carried out as a secondary analysis of a clinical trial included 194 patients with pressure ulcers aged ≥65 years from 29 institutions. Nutritional status including anthropometry and biochemical tests, and wound status by a structured severity tool, were evaluated over 3 weeks. Energy and protein intake were determined from medical records on a typical day and dichotomized by meeting the estimated average requirement. Longitudinal data were analyzed with a multivariate mixed-effects model. Meeting the energy requirement was associated with changes in weight (P clinically validated for prevention of nutritional decline and of impaired healing of deep pressure ulcers. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  7. Evaluation of treatment with carboxymethylcellulose on chronic venous ulcers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januário, Virginia; de Ávila, Dione Augusto; Penetra, Maria Alice; Sampaio, Ana Luisa Bittencourt; Noronha Neta, Maria Isabel; Cassia, Flavia de Freire; Carneiro, Sueli

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among the chronic leg ulcers, venous ulcers are the most common and constitute a major burden to public health. Despite all technology available, some patients do not respond to established treatments. In our study, carboxymethylcellulose was tested in the treatment of refractory chronic venous ulcers. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of carboxymethylcellulose 20% on the healing of chronic venous ulcers refractory to conventional treatments. METHODS: This is an analytical, pre-experimental study. Thirty patients were included with refractory venous ulcers, and applied dressings with carboxymethylcellulose 20% for 20 weeks. The analysis was based on measurement of the area of ulcers, performed at the first visit and after the end of the treatment. RESULTS: There was a reduction of 3.9 cm2 of lesion area (p=0.0001), corresponding to 38.8% (p=0.0001). There was no interruption of treatment and no increase in lesion area in any patient. CONCLUSIONS: Carboxymethylcellulose 20% represents a low cost and effective therapeutic alternative for the treatment of refractory chronic venous ulcers. However, controlled studies are necessary to prove its efficacy. PMID:26982773

  8. Level of Fecal Calprotectin Correlates With Endoscopic and Histologic Inflammation and Identifies Patients With Mucosal Healing in Ulcerative Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theede, Klaus; Holck, Susanne; Ibsen, Per

    2015-01-01

    values of 0.71 and 0.65, respectively; negative predictive values were 0.90 and 0.93, respectively. A cutoff level of 171 mg/kg identified patients with histologic evidence of mucosal healing, with positive predictive value of 0.75 and negative predictive value of 0.90. Levels of FC increased...

  9. The Difference Between the Healing and the Nonhealing Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Review of the Role of the Microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Danielle; Saeed, Mujahid; Narendran, Parth; Tiwari, Alok

    2017-09-01

    Diabetic foot disease carries a high morbidity and is a leading cause of lower limb amputation. This may in part be due to the effect diabetes mellitus (DM) has on the microcirculation including in the skin. We conducted a review of studies that have examined the relationship between microcirculatory function and wound healing in patients with DM. A search of the Medline, Embase, and Web of Science databases was performed coupled with a review of references for the period 1946 to March 2015. Nineteen studies of diverse methodology and cohort selection were identified. Poor function of the microcirculation was related to poor outcome. Transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO 2 ) was the most commonly used method to measure the microcirculation and thresholds for poor outcome proposed ranged from 10 mmHg to diabetic and nondiabetic patients. While it is not possible to draw firm conclusions from the evidence currently available there are clear areas that warrant research. Good microcirculation unsurprisingly appears to associate with better wound healing. The influence of DM is not clear, and neither is the degree of improvement required to achieve healing. Studies that examine a clearly defined cohort both with and without DM are urgently required. Accurate quantitative assessment of microcirculation will aid prediction of wound healing identifying those at greatest risk of amputation.

  10. Calidad de vida y cicatrización en pacientes con úlceras de etiología venosa: Validación del Charing Cross Venous Ulcer Questionnaire, versión española (CCVUQ-e y del Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing, versión española (PUSH-e. Resultados preliminares Quality of life healing in patints with venous ulcers of etiology: Validation of Charing Cross Venous Ulcer Questionnaire, Spanish version (CCVUQ-e and the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing, Spanish version (PUSH-e. Preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Virgina González-Consuegra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: en España no se dispone de instrumentos de medida específicos de calidad de vida relacionada con la salud (CVRS y de medida de la evolución hacia la cicatrización en pacientes con heridas crónicas, que hayan sido validados mediante la investigación. Disponer de estas herramientas ayudaría a la toma de decisiones y a aumentar la calidad de los cuidados con este tipo de pacientes. Así, los objetivos de este estudio son: a validar y establecer las propiedades psicométricas, en español, del Cuestionario Charing Cross Venous Ulcer Questionnaire (CCVUQ-e para medir CVRS en pacientes con úlceras venosas (UV y validar y establecer las propiedades clínico-métricas, en español, de la escala Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH-e en los mismos pacientes y b establecer cuál es la CVRS de los pacientes con UV de la muestra estudiada. Material y método: estudio prospectivo de validación de instrumentos, de medidas repetidas. Se estima una muestra de 105 pacientes seleccionados según el estándar internacional para validación de cuestionarios. Procedimiento: durante un periodo de seis semanas, los pacientes son estudiados cada dos semanas, recogiéndose variables relacionadas con la demografía, situación de la patología, úlceras, datos de la CVRS mediante el cuestionario CCVUQ-e y SF-12 V2, datos del tratamiento recibido y datos de cicatrización mediante la Escala PUSH-e. Análisis: cálculo de los indicadores psicométricos y clínicométricos para medir la validez, fiabilidad y sensibilidad al cambio de los instrumentos de medida. Estadística descriptiva de las variables estudiadas. Comparaciones entre las variables de resultado y las explicativas. Resultados: se presentan los resultados preliminares del estudio con datos de 27 pacientes con UV. La muestra recoge todas las características típicas de los pacientes con UV. Preliminarmente, el CCUVQ-e presenta buena consistencia interna (alfa de Cronbach > 0,80. La

  11. Comment on "Topically Applied Connective Tissue Growth Factor/CCN2 Improves Diabetic Preclinical Cutaneous Wound Healing: Potential Role for CTGF in Human Diabetic Foot Ulcer Healing".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongling; Cao, Cong; Huang, Ai; Man, Yi

    2015-01-01

    A recent paper in this journal, presented a novel method by topical application of growth factors in stimulating diabetic cutaneous wound healing that caught our attention. We believe that the experimental method in the article is efficient and creative, but it also has some controversies and shortcomings to be discussed. We noted that the authors used "Tegaderm" as a semiocclusive dressing film and stated that it exerted a "splinting effect" on the wound margins and controlled contraction. Indeed, the "Tegaderm" itself can serve as a dressing film to isolate the wound bed with outside environments while the "splinting effect" is mainly achieved by adding silicone splints around the wound. Considering the unique properties of silicone splints and "Tegaderm," our experimental group propose an alternative method named "combined-suturing" technique that is not only suturing the silicone splints but also securing the "Tegaderm" around the wound. The specific reasons and operative procedures are explained in detail in this letter.

  12. The Study of Influence of Different Methods of Local Treatment on Wound Healing in Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitseva, E L; Tokmakova, A Y; Shestakova, M V; Galstyan, G R; Doronina, L P

    To evaluate the influence of different methods of local treatment on tissue repair in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. We evaluated such clinical characteristics as wound size and local perfusion after using negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), local collagen, and standard care in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. We observed 63 patients with neuropathic and neuroischemic forms of diabetic foot (without critical ischemia) after surgical debridement. After that 21 patients received NPWT, 21 local collagen treatment and 21 ― standard care. After using NPWT wound area and depth decreased in 19,8% and 42,8% (p<0.05), in group of collagen dressings in 26,4 and 30,4% (p<0.05). In control group those parameters were 17,0 и 16.6% respectively (p<0.05). There was found the significant increase of local perfusion according to oxygen monitoring in group of NPWT (p<0.05). The received data showed that the intensity of lower limb tissue repair processes increases more significant after using NPWT and collagen dressings in comparison to standard care which is found according to wound size and tissue perfusion alterations.

  13. Analgesic efficacy of equimolar 50% nitrous oxide/oxygen gas premix (Kalinox®) as compared with a 5% eutectic mixture of lidocaine/prilocaine (EMLA®) in chronic leg ulcer debridement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traber, Juerg; Held, Ulrike; Signer, Maria; Huebner, Tobias; Arndt, Stefan; Neff, Thomas A

    2017-08-01

    Chronic foot and leg ulcers are a common health problem worldwide. A mainstay of chronic ulcer therapy is sharp mechanical wound debridement requiring potent analgesia. In this prospective, controlled, single-centre, crossover design study, patients were assigned to either the administration of topical analgesia with 5% lidocaine/prilocaine cream or the inhalation of an analgesic 50% N 2 O/O 2 gas premix. Primary outcome parameter was level of pain at maximum wound depth during debridement as measured by a visual analogue scale. Secondary outcomes included level of pain after debridement, overall duration of treatment session, duration and completeness of debridement, and the patient's subjective perception of analgesic quality during debridement. Pain level increased from 0·60/0·94 (first/second debridement; baseline) to 1·76/2·50 (debridement) with 5% lidocaine/prilocaine and from 1·00/1·35 (baseline) to 3·95/3·29 (debridement) with 50% N 2 O/O 2 gas premix. Patient satisfaction was 90·48%/94·44% (first/second debridement) with topical 5% lidocaine/prilocaine analgesia and 90·48%/76·47% with the inhalation of 50% N 2 O/O 2 gas premix. Debridement was completed in a significantly higher percentage of 85·71%/88·89% (first/second debridement) with 5% lidocaine/prilocaine than with 50% N 2 O/O 2 gas premix (42·86%/58·82%) (odds ratio 6·7; P = 0·001). This study provides sound evidence that analgesia with topically administered 5% lidocaine/prilocaine cream is superior to the use of inhaled 50% N 2 O/O 2 gas premix in chronic leg ulcer debridement. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Pyoderma gangrenosum: A commonly overlooked ulcerative condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Zunsheng Tay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pyoderma ga ngrenosum (PG is a rare, inflammatory, destructive neutrophilic dermatosis, which mimics other ulcerative conditions. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study based on patients diagnosed with PG over a 3-year period (2010-2013, we evaluated demographics, anatomical sites, number of lesions, subtypes, histopathology, associated conditions, treatment regimens, healing time, and recurrence. Results: Of our five patients, there were three males and two females, age ranging between 19 and 58 years (mean age 38 years. Four had single lesions localized to the lower limbs while one had multiple lesions (more than five over bilateral hands and legs. Ulcerative subtype was observed in all the patients. One exhibited pathergy. Skin biopsies were done in four patients, revealing dense neutrophilic infiltrates in three cases and leukocytoclastic vasculitis in one. Associated systemic diseases were observed in all patients, four having inflammatory bowel disease and one having both systemic lupus erythematosus and anti-phospholipid syndrome. The patients were all treated with systemic corticosteroids either alone or in combination with immunosuppressants (e.g., azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and wound dressing. Split-thickness skin graft was done in one patient. Complete healing was achieved in all patients, ranging from one to 3 months after diagnosis. No recurrence was reported. Conclusions: Systemic corticosteroids, either alone or in combination with steroid-sparing agents are the mainstay of treatment. Should family physicians encounter a rapidly progressing ulcer that has poor response to usual wound management, timely referral to dermatology should be made.

  15. Cost analysis of negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation for wound bed preparation preceding split-thickness skin grafts for massive (>100 cm(2)) chronic venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C Kevin; Alcantara, Sean; Goss, Selena; Lantis, John C

    2015-04-01

    Massive (≥100 cm(2)) venous leg ulcers (VLUs) demonstrate very low closure rates with standard compression therapy and are costly to manage. Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT), followed by a split-thickness skin graft (STSG), can be a cost-effective alternative to this standard care. We performed a cost analysis of these two treatments. A retrospective review was performed of 10 ulcers treated with surgical debridement, 7 days of inpatient NPWT with topical antiseptic instillation (NPWTi), and STSG, with 4 additional days of inpatient NPWT bolster over the graft. Independent medical cost estimators were used to compare the cost of this treatment protocol with standard outpatient compression therapy. The average length of time ulcers were present before patients entered the study was 38 months (range, 3-120 months). Eight of 10 patients had complete VLU closure by 6 months after NPWTi with STSG. The 6-month costs of the proposed treatment protocol and standard twice-weekly compression therapy were estimated to be $27,000 and $28,000, respectively. NPWTi with STSG treatment is more effective for closure of massive VLUs at 6 months than that reported for standard compression therapy. Further, the cost of the proposed treatment protocol is comparable with standard compression therapy. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Publicly Reported Wound Healing Rates: The Fantasy and the Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, Caroline E.; Eckert, Kristen A.; Carter, Marissa J.

    2018-01-01

    Significance: We compare real-world data from the U.S. Wound Registry (USWR) with randomized controlled trials and publicly reported wound outcomes and develop criteria for honest reporting of wound outcomes, a requirement of the new Quality Payment Program (QPP). Recent Advances: Because no method has existed by which wounds could be stratified according to their likelihood of healing among real-world patients, practitioners have reported fantastically high healing rates. The USWR has developed several risk-stratified wound healing quality measures for diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and venous leg ulcers (VLUs) as part of its Qualified Clinical Data Registry (QCDR). This allows practitioners to report DFU and VLU healing rates in comparison to the likelihood of whether the wound would have healed. Critical Issues: Under the new QPP, practitioners must report at least one practice-relevant outcome measure, and it must be risk adjusted so that clinicians caring for the sickest patients do not appear to have worse outcomes than their peers. The Wound Healing Index is a validated risk-stratification method that can predict whether a DFU or VLU will heal, leveling the playing field for outcome reporting and removing the need to artificially inflate healing rates. Wound care practitioners can report the USWR DFU and VLU risk-stratified outcome measure to satisfy the quality reporting requirements of the QPP. Future Directions: Per the requirements of the QPP, the USWR will begin publicly reporting of risk-stratified healing rates once quality measure data have met the reporting standards of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Some basic rules for data censoring are proposed for public reporting of healing rates, and others are needed, which should be decided by consensus among the wound care community. PMID:29644145

  17. Comparison of low-strength compression stockings with bandages for the treatment of recalcitrant venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizzio, Eugenio; Amsler, Felix; Lun, Bertrand; Blättler, Werner

    2010-02-01

    To compare the proportion and rate of healing, pain, and quality of life of low-strength medical compression stockings (MCS) with traditional bandages applied for the treatment of recalcitrant venous leg ulcers. A single-center, randomized, open-label study was performed with consecutive patients. Sigvaris prototype MCS providing 15 mm Hg-25 mm Hg at the ankle were compared with multi-layer short-stretch bandages. In both groups, pads were placed above incompetent perforating veins in the ulcer area. The initial static pressure between the dressing-covered ulcer and the pad was 29 mm Hg and 49 mm Hg with MCS and bandages, respectively. Dynamic pressure measurements showed no difference. Compression was maintained day and night and changed every week. The primary endpoint was healing within 90 days. Secondary endpoints were healing within 180 days, time to healing, pain (weekly Likert scales), and monthly quality of life (ChronIc Venous Insufficiency Quality of Life [CIVIQ] questionnaire). Of 74 patients screened, 60 fulfilled the selection criteria and 55 completed the study; 28 in the MCS and 27 in the bandage group. Ulcers were recurrent (48%), long lasting (mean, 27 months), and large (mean, 13 cm2). All but one patient had deep venous reflux and/or incompetent perforating veins in addition to trunk varices. Characteristics of patients and ulcers were evenly distributed (exception: more edema in the MCS group; P = .019). Healing within 90 days was observed in 36% with MCS and in 48% with bandages (P = .350). Healing within 180 days was documented in 50% with MCS and in 67% with bandages (P = .210). Time to healing was identical. Pain scored 44 and 46 initially (on a scale in which 100 referred to maximum and 0 to no pain) and decreased within the first week to 20 and 28 in the MCS and bandage groups, respectively (P ulcers only. Our study illustrates the difficulty of bringing large and long-standing venous ulcers to heal. The effect of compression with MCS was

  18. The beneficial effects of probiotic administration on wound healing and metabolic status in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Sima; Bayani, Masomeh; Bahmani, Fereshteh; Tajabadi-Ebrahimi, Maryam; Bayani, Mohammad Ali; Jafari, Parvaneh; Asemi, Zatollah

    2018-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of probiotic supplementation on wound healing and metabolic status in subjects with diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted among 60 subjects (aged 40-85 years old) with grade 3 diabetic foot ulcer. Individuals were randomly divided into 2 groups (30 subjects each group) to receive either probiotic or placebo daily for 12 weeks. After the 12-week intervention, compared with the placebo, probiotic supplementation led to significant reductions in ulcer length (-1.3 ± 0.9 vs. -0.8 ± 0.7 cm, P = .01), width (-1.1 ± 0.7 vs. -0.7 ± 0.7 cm, P = .02), and depth (-0.5 ± 0.3 vs. -0.3 ± 0.3 cm, P = .02). Furthermore, significant reductions in fasting plasma glucose (-29.6 ± 30.3 vs. -5.8 ± 39.8 mg/dL, P = .01), serum insulin concentrations (-4.3 ± 7.9 vs. +0.4 ± 8.5 μIU/mL, P = .03), and haemoglobin A1c (-0.6 ± 0.5 vs. -0.2 ± 0.4%, P = .003) and a significant rise in the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (+0.01 ± 0.01 vs. -0.01 ± 0.02, P = .003) were seen following supplementation of probiotic compared with the placebo. Additionally, compared with the placebo, probiotic supplementation resulted in significant decreases in serum total cholesterol (-4.8 ± 16.1 vs. +7.0 ± 27.1 mg/dL, P = .04), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (-9.0 ± 14.7 vs. -1.7 ± 8.6 mg/L, P = .02), plasma malondialdehyde (-0.8 ± 0.8 vs. -0.2 ± 0.8 μmol/L, P = .001), and significant increases in plasma nitric oxide (+6.2 ± 8.2 vs. +0.8 ± 8.0 μmol/L, P = .01) and total antioxidant capacity concentrations (+179.3 ± 97.2 vs. -85.1 ± 203.4 mmol/L, P diabetic foot ulcer had beneficial effects on ulcer size, glycaemic control, total cholesterol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, plasma nitric oxide, total antioxidant capacity, and malondialdehyde levels. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley

  19. Ulcer due to chronic venous disease: a sociodemographic study in northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Edson Marques; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti; de Melo, Valdinaldo Aragão; Aragão, José Aderval; de Oliveira, Luiz Augusto Bitencurt

    2013-07-01

    Venous ulcers account for 70% of chronic leg ulcers and affect about 2-7% of the population, causing much socioeconomic impact and reducing patients' quality of life. In this study we aimed to describe the clinical features of venous ulcers and sociodemographic characteristics of patients with ulcers due to chronic venous disease (CVD). This cross-sectional, observational study was conducted at the Vascular Surgery Service, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, in northeastern Brazil. The study included a consecutive series of 154 patients with active venous ulcers (CEAP C6) in the lower limb due to CVD. Sociodemographic characteristics (age, gender, race, monthly income, education, occupation, and caregiver) and clinical data (affected limb, ulcer site, etiopathogenesis, recurrence, and time elapsed since the first episode of ulcer) were collected. A possible correlation of time elapsed since the first episode of ulcer and number of recurrences with primary or secondary etiology was analyzed by Mann-Whitney U-test. Of the 154 patients analyzed, 79% were female, 94% were ethnically black or brown, 90% had a monthly income less than or equal to minimum wage, 47% were illiterate, 35% had not completed elementary school, 50% had informal jobs, 19.5% were retired, and 18.2% received sick pay from the social security system. The mean age was 53.7 years. Both limbs were affected similarly, and venous ulcers were located predominantly on the medial aspect of the leg (84%). The median time elapsed since the first episode of ulcer was 36 months, being significantly higher in patients with venous ulcers of secondary etiology (P < 0.0003). The prevalence of recurrence was also significantly higher in patients with venous ulcers of secondary etiology (P < 0.001). According to CEAP classification, 65% of ulcers were primary (Ep), 94.1% demonstrated reflux involving the superficial system (As), 92% had incompetent perforators (Ap), 35% demonstrated reflux involving the deep system

  20. Effect of low-level laser therapy on the healing process of donor site in patients with grade 3 burn ulcer after skin graft surgery (a randomized clinical trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghardoost, Reza; Momeni, Mahnoush; Kazemikhoo, Nooshafarin; Mokmeli, Soheila; Dahmardehei, Mostafa; Ansari, Fereshteh; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Sabr Joo, Parisa; Mey Abadi, Sara; Naderi Gharagheshlagh, Soheila; Sassani, Saeed

    2018-04-01

    Skin graft is a standard therapeutic technique in patients with deep ulcers, but managing donor site after grafting is very important. Although several modern dressings are available to enhance the comfort of donor site, using techniques that accelerate wound healing may enhance patient satisfaction. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used in several medical fields, including healing of diabetic, surgical, and pressure ulcers, but there is not any report of using this method for healing of donor site in burn patients. The protocols and informed consent were reviewed according to Medical Ethics Board of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (IR.SBMU.REC.1394.363) and Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (IRCT2016020226069N2). Eighteen donor sites in 11 patients with grade 3 burn ulcer were selected. Donor areas were divided into 2 parts, for laser irradiation and control randomly. Laser area was irradiated by a red, 655-nm laser light, 150 mW, 2 J/cm 2 , on days 0 (immediately after surgery), 3, 5, and 7. Dressing and other therapeutic care for both sites were the same. The patients and the person who analyzed the results were blinded. The size of donor site reduced in both groups during the 7-day study period (P < 0.01) and this reduction was significantly greater in the laser group (P = 0.01). In the present study, for the first time, we evaluate the effects of LLLT on the healing process of donor site in burn patients. The results showed that local irradiation of red laser accelerates wound healing process significantly.

  1. Topical treatment of chronic venous ulcers with sucralfate: a placebo controlled randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumino, Giovanni; Masuelli, Laura; Bei, Roberto; Simonelli, Lucilla; Santoro, Alberto; Francipane, Silvana

    2008-07-01

    Venous leg ulcers are an important medical issue due to their high incidence in the elderly and the lack of a standard curative approach. Apart from surgical therapy, different medical treatments to effect ulcer wound repair and regeneration are currently being investigated. Sucralfate is a cytoprotective agent employed to prevent or treat several gastrointestinal diseases such as gastroesophageal reflux, gastritis, peptic ulcer, stress ulcer and dyspepsia. In this study we evaluated the efficacy, safety and tolerability of topical sucralfate (SUC-LIS 95) on the healing of chronic venous leg ulcers in 50 patients by a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study. Our results indicated that the daily application of SUC-LIS 95 to non-infected post-phlebitis/vascular ulcers, for a median period of 42.0 days, led to complete healing in 95.6% of patients, against only 10.9% of cases with a matched placebo. A significant improvement was obtained in the SUC-LIS 95-treated patient group with regard to local tissue inflammation as well as pain and burning, and consequently, in ulcer size and the evolution of granulation tissue. Our findings were corroborated for selected patients by the morphological analysis of biopsies obtained before and after treatment. Using ultrastructural analysis we demonstrated that the topical use of SUC-LIS 95 was able to affect neoangiogenesis, increase wound contraction, promote re-epithelialization of the wound area and diminish the inflammatory reaction. Overall, our results indicated that patients with chronic venous ulcers show improvement after the use of topical sucralfate.

  2. Ethanolic extract of roots from Arctium lappa L. accelerates the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric ulcer in rats: Involvement of the antioxidant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Luisa Mota; Allemand, Alexandra; Mendes, Daniel Augusto G B; Dos Santos, Ana Cristina; André, Eunice; de Souza, Lauro Mera; Cipriani, Thales Ricardo; Dartora, Nessana; Marques, Maria Consuelo Andrade; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko; Werner, Maria Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the curative efficacy of the ethanolic extract (EET) of roots from Arctium lappa (bardana) in healing of chronic gastric ulcers induced by 80% acetic acid in rats and additionally studies the possible mechanisms underlying this action. Oral administration of EET (1, 3, 10 and 30mg/kg) reduced the gastric lesion area in 29.2%, 41.4%, 59.3% and 38.5%, respectively, and at 10mg/kg promoted significant regeneration of the gastric mucosa, which was confirmed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry. EET (10mg/kg) treatment did not increase the gastric mucus content but restored the superoxide dismutase activity, prevented the reduction of glutathione levels, reduced lipid hydroperoxides levels, inhibited the myeloperoxidase activity and reduced the microvascular permeability. In addition, EET reduced the free radical generation and increased scavenging of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals in vitro. Furthermore, intraduodenal EET (10 and 30mg/kg) decreased volume and acidity of gastric secretion. Total phenolic compounds were high in EET (Folin-Ciocalteau assay) and the analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed that the main compounds present in EET were a serie of hydroxycinnamoylquinic acid isomers. In conclusion, these data reveal that EET promotes regeneration of damaged gastric mucosa, probably through its antisecretory and antioxidative mechanisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Gastroprotective and ulcer healing effects of hydroethanolic extract of leaves of Caryocar coriaceum: Mechanisms involved in the gastroprotective activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lacerda Neto, Luis Jardelino; Ramos, Andreza Guedes Barbosa; Santos Sales, Valterlucio; de Souza, Severino Denicio Gonçalves; Dos Santos, Antonia Thassya Lucas; de Oliveira, Larissa Rolim; Kerntopf, Marta Regina; de Albuquerque, Thais Rodrigues; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo Jose; Wanderley, Almir Gonçalves; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar

    2017-01-05

    This work aimed to determine the chemical fingerprint of hydroethanolic extract of leaves of Caryocar coriaceum (HELCC) and the gastroprotective activity. The chemical fingerprint of HELCC was analyzed by HPLC-DAD, to quantify total phenols and flavonoids were carried out by Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and aluminum chloride assay, while in vitro antioxidant activity was evaluated by the DPPH method. The methods used to determine pharmacological activity were: gastroprotective screening test in classical models of induced acute and chronic gastric lesions and physical barrier test. Further assays were performed to demonstrate the involvement of NO, prostaglandins, ATP-dependent potassium channels, TRPV, noradrenergic α2 receptors, histamines, and opioids. The DPPH method demonstrated the antioxidant activity of the extract, in vitro, explained by the presence of polyphenols and flavonoids. Oral administration of the extract, previously dissolved in deionized water, at a dose of 100 mg/kg decreased the lesions induced by indomethacin, acidified ethanol, ethanol and acetic acid by 75.0, 72.8, 69.4 and 86.2% respectively. It was demonstrated that opioid receptors, α 2 -adrenergic receptors and primary afferent neurons sensitive to capsaicin were involved in the mechanism of gastric protection, in addition to the contribution of NO and prostaglandins. The results show that extract is a promising candidate for the treatment of gastric ulcers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnesium Supplementation and the Effects on Wound Healing and Metabolic Status in Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcer: a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaghi, Reza; Pidar, Farangis; Momen-Heravi, Mansooreh; Bahmani, Fereshteh; Akbari, Hossein; Asemi, Zatollah

    2018-02-01

    Hypomagnesemia is associated with the development of neuropathy and abnormal platelet activity, both of which are risk factors for diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of magnesium administration on wound healing and metabolic status in subjects with DFU. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed among 70 subjects with grade 3 DFU. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups (35 subjects each group) to receive either 250 mg magnesium oxide supplements or placebo daily for 12 weeks. Pre- and post-intervention wound depth and appearance were scored in accordance with the "Wagner-Meggitt's" wound assessment tool. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after the 12-week intervention to assess related markers. After the 12-week treatment, compared with the placebo, magnesium supplementation resulted in a significant increase in serum magnesium (+0.3 ± 0.3 vs. -0.1 ± 0.2 mg/dL, P < 0.001) and significant reductions in ulcer length (-1.8 ± 2.0 vs. -0.9 ± 1.1 cm, P = 0.01), width (-1.6 ± 2.0 vs. -0.8 ± 0.9 cm, P = 0.02), and depth (-0.8 ± 0.8 vs. -0.3 ± 0.5 cm, P = 0.003). In addition, significant reductions in fasting plasma glucose (-45.4 ± 82.6 vs. -10.6 ± 53.7 mg/dL, P = 0.04), serum insulin values (-2.4 ± 5.6 vs. +1.5 ± 9.6 μIU/mL, P = 0.04), and HbA1c (-0.7 ± 1.5 vs. -0.1 ± 0.4%, P = 0.03) and a significant rise in the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (+0.01 ± 0.01 vs. -0.004 ± 0.02, P = 0.01) were seen following supplementation of magnesium compared with the placebo. Additionally, compared with the placebo, taking magnesium resulted in significant decrease in serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (-19.6 ± 32.5 vs. -4.8 ± 11.2 mg/L, P = 0.01) and significant increase in plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC) concentrations (+6.4 ± 65.2 vs. -129.9 ± 208.3 mmol/L, P < 0

  5. The effects of antidepressants on gastric ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Latif Güneş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In their daily practice, psychiatrists often experience gastriccomplaints in patients beside psychiatric disorders.Peptic ulcer is one of the diseases, which accompanyto psychiatric disorders including mainly depression. Itis shown that antidepressants can inflame the bleedingsincluding gastrointestinal (GI bleedings, while they havepositive effect on ulcer healing. In this review, studies,which conducted about the positive or negative effects ofantidepressant drugs on ulcer treatment were examined.Accordingly; it was found that opipramol, amitriptyline,imipramine that of tricyclic antidepressants was found tobe helpful in healing of the ulcer. It was stated that SelectiveSerotonin Reuptake Inhibitors generally inflamedulcers, exceptionally fluvoxamine and fluoxetine reducedulcer; moclobemide that of monoamine-oxidase inhibitorand tianeptine and mirtazapine that of atypical antidepressantshad positive effect in ulcer healing. To be carefulin choosing the appropriate antidepressant in psychiatricpatients with gastric ulcer is important in the prognosisof both ulcer and depression.Key words: peptic ulcer; depression; antidepressant drugs

  6. Providing cost-effective treatment of hard-to-heal wounds in the community through use of NPWT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Jane

    2015-06-01

    The treatment of non-healing wounds accounts for a high proportion of wound care costs. Advanced technology treatments, such as negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), could be cost-effective if they result in faster healing. The objective of this study is to assess the effect on healing and the cost-effectiveness of a single-use NPWT (i.e PICO by Smith & Nephew) when used on hard-to-heal wounds in a community setting. This was a cohort case study in which wounds were treated with NWPT for 2 weeks. Wounds were assessed every 2-4 weeks to a healed state. The weekly cost of treatment prior to intervention, that is, the products used and nurse time, were compared with treatment costs associated with NWPT and after a return to standard treatment. The study included 9 patients with leg ulcers or pressure ulcers that had been slow healing or non-healing for at least 6 weeks. While treated with NPWT, the average weekly reduction in wound size was 21%. The wound size achieved with NPWT was reached on average 10 weeks earlier than predicted. The increased healing rate continued after PICO stopped and 5 wounds healed on average 8 weeks later. Frequency of dressing changes fell from 4 times weekly at baseline to 2 times a week with NPWT and to 1.8 after NPWT stopped. Weekly cost of treatment with NPWT was, on average, 1.6 times higher than the baseline, but fell to 3 times less when NPWT stopped owing to the reduction in dressing changes. The amount of change in healing rate was considerably higher than the increase in costs associated with NPWT. NWPT is a cost-effective treatment for hard-to-heal wounds. Wounds decreased in size and healed more quickly under NWPT treatment than under standard treatment. Additional NPWT costs can be quickly offset by faster healing and a shortened treatment period.

  7. Treatment of a Refractory Skin Ulcer Using Punch Graft and Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Carducci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic ulceration of the lower legs is a relatively common condition amongst adults: one that causes pain and social distress and results in considerable healthcare and personal costs. The technique of punch grafting offers an alternative approach to the treatment of ulcers of the lower limbs. Objective. Combining platelet-rich plasma and skin graft enhances the efficacy of treating chronic diabetic wounds by enhancing healing rate and decreasing recurrence rate. Platelet-rich plasma could, by stimulating dermal regeneration, increase the take rate after skin grafting or speed up reepithelialization. Methods and Materials. The ulcer was prepared by removing fibrin with a curette and the edges of the ulcer were freshened. The platelet-rich plasma has been infiltrated on the bottom and edges of the ulcer. The punch grafts were placed in 5 mm holes arranged. The ulcer was medicated with hydrogel and a pressure dressing was removed after 8 days. Results. After a few days the patient did not report more pain. Granulation tissue appeared quickly between implants. Most of the grafts were viable in 2-3 weeks. The grafts gradually came together to close the ulcer and were completed in four months.

  8. Gastroduodenal ulceration in foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becht, J L; Byars, T D

    1986-07-01

    Gastroduodenal ulceration is becoming recognised as an important disease in foals during the first few months of life. Aetiopathogenesis is presumed to be similar to peptic disease in humans associated with back diffusion of hydrogen ions into the mucosa. Many factors have been incriminated as predisposing foals to ulceration but few have been proven. To date, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents has been the only documented cause of gastroduodenal ulceration in foals. The clustering of affected foals on certain farms suggests an infectious aetiology but attempts to identify a causative organism have been unsuccessful. Four clinical syndromes defined for foals with gastroduodenal ulceration include: silent ulcers, which occur most often in the non-glandular stomach along the margo plicatus and are identified as incidental findings at necropsy; active ulcers which are often manifested by abdominal pain, excessive salivation and bruxism; perforating ulcers which usually result in a severe, diffuse peritonitis; and pyloric or duodenal obstruction from a healing ulcer. General approaches to therapy of a foal with active ulceration consist of reduction of gastric acidity and enhancement of mucosal protection. Antacids and type 2 histamine receptor antagonists are used most often to neutralise or decrease acid secretion, respectively. Sucralfate, a locally active sulphated sucrose preparation, is commonly used as a cytoprotective agent. The efficacy and safety of many products used have not been evaluated adequately in foals. Perforating ulcers are usually associated with death or humane destruction of the foal because of fulminating peritonitis. Surgical intervention and bypass procedures are indicated in foals that develop pyloric or duodenal obstructions from healing ulcers.

  9. Synergistic action of protease-modulating matrix and autologous growth factors in healing of diabetic foot ulcers. A prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakagia, Despoina D; Kazakos, Konstantinos J; Xarchas, Konstantinos C; Karanikas, Michael; Georgiadis, George S; Tripsiannis, Gregory; Manolas, Constantinos

    2007-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that addition of a protease-modulating matrix enhances the efficacy of autologous growth factors in diabetic ulcers. Fifty-one patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers were managed as outpatients at the Democritus University Hospital of Alexandroupolis and followed up for 8 weeks. All target ulcers were > or = 2.5 cm in any one dimension and had been previously treated only with moist gauze. Patients were randomly allocated in three groups of 17 patients each: Group A was treated only with the oxidized regenerated cellulose/collagen biomaterial (Promogran, Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, NJ), Group B was treated only with autologous growth factors delivered by Gravitational Platelet Separation System (GPS, Biomet), and Group C was managed by a combination of both. All ulcers were digitally photographed at initiation of the study and then at change of dressings once weekly. Computerized planimetry (Texas Health Science Center ImageTool, Version 3.0) was used to assess ulcer dimensions that were analyzed for homogeneity and significance using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences, Version 13.0. Post hoc analysis revealed that there was significantly greater reduction of all three dimensions of the ulcers in Group C compared to Groups A and B (all P<.001). Although reduction of ulcer dimensions was greater in Group A than in Group B, these differences did not reach statistical significance. It is concluded that protease-modulating dressings act synergistically with autologous growth factors and enhance their efficacy in diabetic foot ulcers.

  10. Current guidelines for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori in peptic ulcer disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rauws, E. A.; van der Hulst, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    Pharmacological suppression of gastric acid secretion has traditionally been the most rational approach to healing ulcers successfully. However, ulcers initially healed using antisecretory therapy have a tendency to relapse after treatment is withdrawn. This tendency is altered definitively by

  11. Stability of the cathelicidin peptide LL-37 in a non-healing wound environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönberg, Alvar; Zettergren, Louise; Ågren, Sven Per Magnus

    2011-01-01

    The endogenous cathelicidin peptide LL-37 is strongly expressed at the wound edge early in the process of acute wound healing, but only weakly expressed in chronic wounds. Excessive proteolysis may limit the therapeutic usefulness of exogenous LL-37, especially in ulcers colonized with Pseudomonas...... aeruginosa that produce elastase, which degrades LL-37. This study investigated the stability of synthetic LL-37 against two types of proteinases in the presence or absence of wound fluid samples (diluted to 10-20%) from nine non-healing venous leg ulcers. Incubation of LL-37 (10 µg/ml) at 37°C for 6 h...... resulted in complete degradation by the serine proteinase trypsin (≥ 10 ng/ml), while no degradation was observed with matrix metalloproteinase-9. LL-37 susceptibility to trypsin was diminished considerably in the presence of wound fluid, and there was no apparent cleavage of exogenous LL-37 incubated...

  12. Peptic Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people of any age — even kids — can develop ulcers. About Peptic Ulcers An ulcer is a sore, which means it's ... that most people can be cured. Causes of Peptic Ulcers in Kids Although stress and certain foods may ...

  13. Avaliação das limitações de úlcera venosa em membros inferiores Evaluation of limitations of venous ulcers in legs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Regina Lopes

    2013-03-01

    of tibiotarsus' articulation, is an instrument used to its valuation. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the osteomuscular limitations and changes in life quality in bearers of venous ulcers in lower members. METHODS: Ten patients with ulcers classified as CEAP (Clinic, Etiologic, Anatomic and Fisiopatologic 6 were studied. They answered the SF-36 questionnaire and visual analogue pain and performed goniometry, muscular strength and electromyography. RESULTS: The average age of the group studied was 67.4 (±11.7, being 70% of the cases female. There wasn't correlation statistically significant between pain, range of motion (ROM muscular strength, electromyography (EMG and the injury size. However, there was found correlation between the psychological profile of SF36 and the domain of motor activities, as well the psychological profile with social activities and the perception of itself. In studied muscles electromyographyc evaluation, was found significance too. CONCLUSION: The presence of venous ulcers in lower members can generate limitations and changes in the life quality of these people. The psychosocial aspect showed up preponderant over the motor aspect, increasing the restrictions in day life activities.

  14. Reducing wound pain in venous leg ulcers with Biatain Ibu: A randomized, controlled double-blind clinical investigation on the performance and safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, F.; Jorgensen, B.; Karlsmark, T.

    2008-01-01

    Six out of 10 patients with chronic wounds suffer from persistent wound pain. A multinational and multicenter randomized double-blind clinical investigation of 122 patients compared two moist wound healing dressings: a nonadhesive foam dressing with ibuprofen (62 patients randomized to Biatain Ibu...... Nonadhesive Coloplast A/S) and a nonadhesive foam without ibuprofen (60 patients to Biatain Non-Adhesive-comparator). Patients were recruited from September 2005 to April 2006. The ibuprofen foam was considered successful if the pain relief on a five-point Verbal Rating Scale was higher than the comparator...... higher in the ibuprofen-foam group, as compared with the comparator on day 1-5, with a quick onset of action (p ibuprofen foam during day 1-5 with 40% from baseline, compared with 30% with the comparator (p

  15. Total contact cast for neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, R.; Yaqoob, M.Y.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the outcome of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers treated with Total Contact Cast (TCC) in terms of percentage of ulcers healed and time to heal. The study included diabetic patients with non-ischemic neuropathic foot ulcers of upto grade 2 of Wagner's classification. Ulcers were debrided off necrotic tissues and Total Contact Cast (TCC) was applied. TCC was renewed every 2 weeks till healing. Cases were labeled as cast failure when there was no reduction in wound size in 4 consecutive weeks or worsening to a higher grade. Main outcome measures were the percentage of ulcers healed and time to heal in the cast. Thirty four (87.17%) patients were males and 5(12.82%) were females. The mean age was 62 +- 13.05 years. All patients had NIDDM. Out of the 52 ulcers, 41(78.84%) healed with TCC in an average 2 casts duration (mean 32 days). There were 11(21.15%) cast failure. Majority (63.63%) of cast failure ulcers were located on pressure bearing area of heel. Most (90%) of the ulcers on forefoot and midsole region healed with TCC (p<0.001). Longer ulcer duration (mean 57.45 +- 29.64 days) significantly reduced ulcer healing (p<0.001). Total contact cast was an effective treatment modality for neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers of Wagner's grade 2, located on forefoot and midsole region. (author)

  16. Short-term stress, but not mucosal healing nor depression was predictive for the risk of relapse in patients with ulcerative colitis: a prospective 12-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhorst, Jost; Hofstetter, Anna; Wolfe, Fred; Häuser, Winfried

    2013-10-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory bowel disease. Psychological factors such as depression and stress are under debate to contribute to the risk of relapse. The impact of mucosal healing to reduce the risk of relapse had not been studied prospectively. The aim of this study was to identify whether depression and stress increase and mucosal healing reduces the risk of clinical relapse in patients with UC in clinical remission. Patients in clinical remission were followed prospectively for 1 year, or less if they relapsed. Endoscopy and histology score and long-term perceived stress (Perceived Stress Questionnaire) were measured at baseline. Mucosal healing was defined by a Mayo Endoscopy score of 0-1. Depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and acute perceived stress (Cohen Perceived Stress Scale) were measured at baseline and after 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. A time-dependent multivariate Cox regression model determined the predictors of time to relapse. Seventy-five patients were included into final analysis, of which 28 (37.3%) relapsed. Short-term stress at the last visit before relapse (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.10) and male gender (HR = 2.38, 95% CI = 1.01-5.61), but not baseline mucosal healing (HR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.35-2.11), baseline long-term stress (HR = 0.20, 95% CI = 0.01-3.31), and depression at the last visit before relapse (HR = 1.08, 95% CI = 0.95-1.22) were predictive for a relapse. Short-term stress but not depression nor mucosal healing was predictive for the risk of relapse in patients with UC in clinical remission. Larger multicentre studies are necessary to confirm our findings.

  17. A Prospective, Postmarket, Compassionate Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Acellular Fish-skin Graft Which Contains Omega-3 Fatty Acids for the Closure of Hard-to-heal Lower Extremity Chronic Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun K; Polanco, Thais O; Lantis, John C

    2016-04-01

    A novel piscine acellular fish-skin graft product has 510k clearance on the US market. This product (Omega3, Kerecis, Isafjordur, Iceland) is to be used similarly to extracellular matrices (ECMs) on the market (eg, bovine and porcine) except that it contains fats, including omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids that have been associated with anti-inflammatory properties in many studies. While many current ECMs are effective on open wounds, studies have largely excluded application to hard-to-heal ulcers. To test this product in a real-world environment, the authors chose to look specifically at hard-to-heal ulcers based on previously defined wound and patient factors. The primary objective was to assess the percentage of wound closure area from baseline after 5 weekly fish-skin graft applications in 18 patients with at least 1 "hard-to-heal" criteria. Patients underwent application of the fish skin for 5 sequential weeks, followed by 3 weeks of standard of care. Wound area, skin assessments, and pain were assessed weekly. A 40% decrease in wound surface area (P skin graft and secondary dressing (P < 0.05). Complete closure was seen in 3 of 18 patients by the end of the study phase. This fish-skin product appears to provide promise as an effective wound closing adjunctive ECM. This is true when used in this compassionate setting, where many other products fail. This study lacks a control arm and an aggressive application schedule, but the investigators believe it represents real-world practice.

  18. Helicobacter pylori : the causative agent of peptic ulcer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review examines Helicobacter pylori as an organism and as the causative agent of peptic ulcers. The review also examined the classification of ulcers, ... Elimination of Helicobacter pylori by treatment with antibiotics in peptic ulcer patients resulted in the healing of the ulcer. Prevention of Helicobacter pylori infections is ...

  19. Expression of the SOCS family in human chronic wound tissues: Potential implications for SOCS in chronic wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yi; Sanders, Andrew J.; Ruge, Fiona; Morris, Ceri-Ann; Harding, Keith G.; Jiang, Wen G.

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines play important roles in the wound healing process through various signalling pathways. The JAK-STAT pathway is utilised by most cytokines for signal transduction and is regulated by a variety of molecules, including suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins. SOCS are associated with inflammatory diseases and have an impact on cytokines, growth factors and key cell types involved in the wound-healing process. SOCS, a negative regulator of cytokine signalling, may hold the potential to regulate cytokine-induced signalling in the chronic wound-healing process. Wound edge tissues were collected from chronic venous leg ulcer patients and classified as non-healing and healing wounds. The expression pattern of seven SOCSs members, at the transcript and protein level, were examined in these tissues using qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Significantly higher levels of SOCS3 (P=0.0284) and SOCS4 (P=0.0376) in non-healing chronic wounds compared to the healing/healed chronic wounds were observed at the transcript level. Relocalisation of SOCS3 protein in the non-healing wound environment was evident in the investigated chronic biopsies. Thus, the results show that the expression of SOCS transcript indicated that SOCS members may act as a prognostic biomarker of chronic wounds. PMID:27635428

  20. The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system predicts wound healing but not major amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcers treated in a multidisciplinary setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Hicks, Caitlin W; Canner, Joseph K; Sherman, Ronald L; Hines, Kathryn F; Lum, Ying W; Perler, Bruce A; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2017-06-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) threatened limb classification has been shown to correlate well with risk of major amputation and time to wound healing in heterogeneous diabetic and nondiabetic populations. Major amputation continues to plague the most severe stage 4 WIfI patients, with 1-year amputation rates of 20% to 64%. Our aim was to determine the association between WIfI stage and wound healing and major amputation among patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated in a multidisciplinary setting. All patients presenting to our multidisciplinary DFU clinic from July 2012 to December 2015 were enrolled in a prospective database. Wound healing and major amputation were compared for patients stratified by WIfI classification. There were 217 DFU patients with 439 wounds (mean age, 58.3 ± 0.8 years; 58% male, 63% black) enrolled, including 28% WIfI stage 1, 11% stage 2, 33% stage 3, and 28% stage 4. Peripheral arterial disease and dialysis were more common in patients with advanced (stage 3 or 4) wounds (P ≤ .05). Demographics of the patients, socioeconomic status, and comorbidities were otherwise similar between groups. There was a significant increase in the number of active wounds per limb at presentation with increasing WIfI stage (stage 1, 1.1 ± 0.1; stage 4, 1.4 ± 0.1; P = .03). Mean wound area (stage 1, 2.6 ± 0.6 cm 2 ; stage 4, 15.3 ± 2.8 cm 2 ) and depth (stage 1, 0.2 ± 0.0 cm; stage 4, 0.8 ± 0.1 cm) also increased progressively with increasing wound stage (P healing (P healing time was 190 ± 17 days, and risk of major amputation at 1 year was 5.7% ± 3.2%. Among patients with DFU, the WIfI classification system correlated well with wound healing but was not associated with risk of major amputation at 1 year. Although further prospective research is warranted, our results suggest that use of a multidisciplinary approach for DFUs may augment healing time and reduce amputation

  1. Effects of a pulsatile electrostatic field on ischemic injury to the diabetic foot: evaluation of refractory ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liani, Mario; Trabassi, Ernesto; Cusaro, Claudio; Zoppis, Elisabetta; Maduli, Elisabetta; Pezzato, Roberto; Piccoli, Paola; Maraschin, Maddalena; Bau, Piero; Cortese, Pietro; Cogo, Albero; Salvati, Filippo; Liani, Rossella

    2014-10-01

    The macro- and microcirculation disease, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), induces ischemic wounds of the lower limbs. We have tried to reduce the aggregation of red blood cells and to improve the O2 supply to the tissues and speed the healing of ulcers in T2DM patients. We enrolled 25 obese subjects without glucose intolerance (group A; BMI greater than 30 kg/m2), 20 obese adults intolerant to glucose (group B) and two subgroups, groups C and D, with T2DM and with leg ulcers. The groups A, B and C were treated with PESF. Body weight, O2 extraction, the capillary pulse, blood pressure and the surface of the ulcers were monitored. The technique PESF shows to have positive effects on the metabolism, on the reduction of body weight in the groups A and B, increasing extraction of O2 in group C and increase the speed of healing of wounds in group C compared to group D. In group A, there was a significant reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The technique PESF has affected the metabolic processes and the speed of wound healing ulcer in patients with T2DM. Copyright © 2013 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Recurring pressure ulcers: identifying the definitions. A National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel white paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Cindy; Hettrick, Heather; Holden-Mount, Sarah; Grigsby, Rebekah; Rhodovi, Julie; Moore, Lyn; Ghaznavi, Amir M; Siddiqui, Aamir

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is a lack of consensus regarding the accepted terminology pertaining to the pressure ulcer healing progression and recidivism. This lack of uniformity can negatively impact initiation of treatment pathways, completion of appropriate interventions, clinical documentation, medical coding, patient education, discharge planning and healthcare revenue through out the healthcare system. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a standard nomenclature as it pertains to pressure ulcer healing progression and any recidivism that may occur. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel has formulated a framework of terms regarding pressure ulcer progression. We also developed a clearer nomenclature for lack of progress and recidivism of pressure ulcers. This document should serve as a starting point for the discussion of the pressure ulcer care, research, and terminology. © 2014 by the Wound Healing Society.

  3. Growth factors for treating diabetic foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Gluud, Christian; Nicola, Susana

    2015-01-01

    following treatment for diabetic foot ulcers (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.14 to 2.94; P value 0.56, low quality of evidence)Although 11 trials reported time to complete healing of the foot ulcers in people with diabetes , meta-analysis was not possible for this outcome due to the unique comparisons within each trial...... (minimum of one toe), complete healing of the foot ulcer, and time to complete healing of the diabetic foot ulcer as the primary outcomes. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Independently, we selected randomised clinical trials, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data in duplicate. We estimated risk ratios......BACKGROUND: Foot ulcers are a major complication of diabetes mellitus, often leading to amputation. Growth factors derived from blood platelets, endothelium, or macrophages could potentially be an important treatment for these wounds but they may also confer risks. OBJECTIVES: To assess...

  4. Hot topics in venous ulcer treatment: an international survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Ricci

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Compression is the most effective treatment to promote skin ulcer healing, although there are as many different methods of performing a leg compression as the number of phlebologists, each one having personal tricks, solutions, habits. Conversely, though dressings may be done in different ways, none is considered the standard solution. We asked few (18 questions to physicians involved in this field, in Italy and abroad, looking for some common feature. The analysis of 100 replies indicated the average treatment: compression made by multilayer bandage when edema is present, knee long stocking when edema is removed, mostly based on patient’s agreement. Escharectomy should be done when ulcer bed is covered by necrotic tissue. Advanced wound care is used, with dressing changed several times a week. For highly exuding ulcers, a specific dressing is used or frequent changing is performed. The treatment in early stage of disease is done by the physician while subsequently the dressings may be performed by the patient himself, nurses or doctors. Usually no medical treatments are associated. The cost of a single dressing is often lower than 10 Euro, without any reimbursement. The compression devices aren’t reimbursed as well. The expected compression pressure is 30/40 mm Hg. Daytime compression is not reduced at night-time. The patient is always invited to walk. The same compression is used if the ABPI is <1. However the survey shows that several variations in the cookbook may occur, sometimes even contradictory.

  5. The management of pelvic pressure ulcers by myocutaneous flaps ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pressure ulcers or ischaemic necrosis of tissues over bony eminences due to pressure, heal very slowly. Vascularised tissues such as myocutaneous flaps are necessary to cover the ulcer and accelerate healing. This study was done to share our experience with methods of myocutaneous flaps in the treatment of pressure ...

  6. [Having trouble with pressure ulcers care?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Masako; Noda, Yasuhiro; Nohara, Yoko; Fujii, Keiko; Sato, Noriko; Renda, Akiyoshi; Yuasa, Takashi; Muramatsu, Shuichi; Furuta, Katsunori

    2004-12-01

    Since 1997, we, the community pharmacists, have established this society, Aichi Prefecture Society for the Study of Pressure Ulcers Care, in order to furnish drug information about pressure ulcers care. Moist atmosphere is required for the healing of pressure ulcers. The moist environment that could be regulated depends on the physicochemical property of ointment bases. Therefore, ointment should reasonably be chosen to adjust the moisture. Since 2000, we have been committed to providing pharmacists, who work on home care, with a booklet to instruct how to choose ointments for pressure ulcers treatment. In 2002, when the Aichi pharmaceutical association held a training conference held at various hospitals using the booklet as a teaching material, hospital pharmacists cooperated by making a field study trip to observe pressure ulcers treatments. Nowadays researchers at pharmaceutical colleges have also cooperated in studying the efficacy and economical effect of the method of blending different ointments to improve the healing process of pressure ulcers.

  7. Leg pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the blood Medicines (such as diuretics and statins) Muscle fatigue or strain from overuse, too much exercise, or holding a muscle in the same position for a long time An injury can also cause leg pain from: A torn or overstretched muscle ( strain ) Hairline ...

  8. Broken Leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the leg, which can result in a fracture. Stress fractures outside of sport situations are more common in people who have: ... shoes. Choose the appropriate shoe for your favorite sports or activities. And ... can prevent stress fractures. Rotate running with swimming or biking. If ...

  9. Marjolin's Ulcers in South Eastern Nigeria - A 15 Year Review at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    and Department of** Pathology, National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria. ABSTRACT ... chronic ulcer while 33(47%) originated from previous scars ... current trends in the pattern of this disease. ..... Venous and non-venous leg ulcers:.

  10. Trophic ulcers in the carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abelardo Q.-C. Araújo

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available A patient with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS and trophic ulcers is described. Despite the healing of the ulcers after surgery for CTS, the severe sensory deficit and the electrophysiological tests have not shown any significant improvement. We think these findings argue against the hypothesis of the sensory deficit being responsible for the trophic ulcers. We favor a major role for the sympathetic disturbances as the main cause for those lesions.

  11. Gastric emptying abnormal in duodenal ulcer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, S.; Heading, R.C.; Taylor, T.V.; Forrest, J.A.; Tothill, P.

    1986-07-01

    To investigate the possibility that an abnormality of gastric emptying exists in duodenal ulcer and to determine if such an abnormality persists after ulcer healing, scintigraphic gastric emptying measurements were undertaken in 16 duodenal ulcer patients before, during, and after therapy with cimetidine; in 12 patients with pernicious anemia, and in 12 control subjects. No difference was detected in the rate or pattern of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients before and after ulcer healing with cimetidine compared with controls, but emptying of the solid component of the test meal was more rapid during treatment with the drug. Comparison of emptying patterns obtained in duodenal ulcer subjects during and after cimetidine treatment with those obtained in pernicious anemia patients and controls revealed a similar relationship that was characterized by a tendency for reduction in the normal differentiation between the emptying of solid and liquid from the stomach. The similarity in emptying patterns in these groups of subjects suggests that gastric emptying of solids may be influenced by changes in the volume of gastric secretion. The failure to detect an abnormality of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer subjects before and after ulcer healing calls into question the widespread belief that abnormally rapid gastric emptying is a feature with pathogenetic significance in duodenal ulcer disease.

  12. Gastric emptying abnormal in duodenal ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, S.; Heading, R.C.; Taylor, T.V.; Forrest, J.A.; Tothill, P.

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the possibility that an abnormality of gastric emptying exists in duodenal ulcer and to determine if such an abnormality persists after ulcer healing, scintigraphic gastric emptying measurements were undertaken in 16 duodenal ulcer patients before, during, and after therapy with cimetidine; in 12 patients with pernicious anemia, and in 12 control subjects. No difference was detected in the rate or pattern of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients before and after ulcer healing with cimetidine compared with controls, but emptying of the solid component of the test meal was more rapid during treatment with the drug. Comparison of emptying patterns obtained in duodenal ulcer subjects during and after cimetidine treatment with those obtained in pernicious anemia patients and controls revealed a similar relationship that was characterized by a tendency for reduction in the normal differentiation between the emptying of solid and liquid from the stomach. The similarity in emptying patterns in these groups of subjects suggests that gastric emptying of solids may be influenced by changes in the volume of gastric secretion. The failure to detect an abnormality of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer subjects before and after ulcer healing calls into question the widespread belief that abnormally rapid gastric emptying is a feature with pathogenetic significance in duodenal ulcer disease

  13. Longitudinal study of influence of Helicobacter pylori on current risk of duodenal ulcer relapse. The Hvidovre Ulcer Project Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M R; Franzmann, M B; Holst, C

    1992-01-01

    acid output, time of healing of the preceding ulcer, treatment of the present ulcer (cimetidine, antacids, or no treatment), or type and degree of gastritis. Thus, although H. pylori is prevalent in patients with duodenal ulcer disease, the present study indicates that H. pylori does not have...

  14. Longitudinal study of influence of Helicobacter pylori on current risk of duodenal ulcer relapse. The Hvidovre Ulcer Project Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M R; Franzmann, M B; Holst, C

    1992-01-01

    acid output, time of healing of the preceding ulcer, treatment of the present ulcer (cimetidine, antacids, or no treatment), or type and degree of gastritis. Thus, although H. pylori is prevalent in patients with duodenal ulcer disease, the present study indicates that H. pylori does not have.......052-0.133), 0.123 (0.096-0.157), and 0.069 (0.041-0.116), respectively. No significant differences in incidence rates across H. pylori scores were observed when taking into account the observation period after healing of the first ulcer, number of ulcer recurrence (1st, 2nd, 3rd), sex, age, smoking habits, peak...

  15. Peptic Ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A peptic ulcer is a sore in the lining of your stomach or your duodenum, the first part of your ... Comes and goes for several days or weeks Peptic ulcers happen when the acids that help you digest ...

  16. Stomach ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... erode the stomach wall. A major cause of stomach ulcers is the bacteria called Helicobacter pylori . Treatment regimens for ulcers caused this bacterium usually include medications to suppress the stomach acid as well as antibiotics to eradicate the ...

  17. Ugh! Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... believed that ulcers were caused by stress and spicy foods. Then, in 1982, two doctors (Barry Marshall and ... not develop ulcers. Doctors still aren't sure why, but they think that part ... of pain relievers , like aspirin or ibuprofen, can cause ulcers in some ...

  18. Monitoring wound healing by multiphoton tomography/endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Bückle, Rainer; Kaatz, Martin; Hipler, Christina; Zens, Katharina; Schneider, Stefan W.; Huck, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Certified clinical multiphoton tomographs are employed to perform rapid label-free high-resolution in vivo histology. Novel tomographs include a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechano-optical arm for autofluorescence and SHG imaging as well as rigid two-photon GRIN microendoscope. Mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen can be imaged with submicron resolution in human skin. The system was employed to study the healing of chronic wounds (venous leg ulcer) and acute wounds (curettage of actinic or seborrheic keratosis) on a subcellular level. Furthermore, a flexible sterile foil as interface between wound and focusing optic was tested.

  19. Ulcerative colitis masked by giant urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroselli, C; Plocco, M; Pratticò, F; Bruno, C; Antonaglia, C; Rota, F; Curreli, I; Caroselli, A; Bruno, G

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of giant urticaria and ulcerative colitis is very infrequent. A 23 year-old female reported the initial eruption of short-lived cutaneous itchy weals on her arms. Then lesions ran together and became confluent, extending to her legs, followed by undefined abdominal pain and a slight increase of body temperature. Exams showed hystologically confirmed ulcerative colitis, with perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positivity. Ulcerative colitis therapy led not only to the remission of the colitic symptoms, but also to the prompt recovery of skin manifestations. Urticaria was the epiphenomenon of ulcerative colitis.

  20. Studies of a new multi-layer compression bandage for the treatment of venous ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriven, J M; Bello, M; Taylor, L E; Wood, A J; London, N J

    2000-03-01

    This study aimed to develop an alternative graduated compression bandage for the treatment of venous leg ulcers. Alternative bandage components were identified and assessed for optimal performance as a graduated multi-layer compression bandage. Subsequently the physical characteristics and clinical efficacy of the optimal bandage combination was prospectively examined. Ten healthy limbs were used to develop the optimal combination and 20 limbs with venous ulceration to compare the physical properties of the two bandage types. Subsequently 42 consecutive ulcerated limbs were prospectively treated to examine the efficacy of the new bandage combination. The new combination produced graduated median (range) sub-bandage pressures (mmHg) as follows: ankle 59 (42-100), calf 36 (27-67) and knee 35 (16-67). Over a seven-day period this combination maintained a comparable level of compression with the Charing Cross system, and achieved an overall healing rate at one year of 88%. The described combination should be brought to the attention of healthcare professionals treating venous ulcers as a possible alternative to other forms of multi-layer graduated compression bandages pending prospective, randomised clinical trials.

  1. Ultrasonic Stimulation of Mouse Skin Reverses the Healing Delays in Diabetes and Aging by Activation of Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, James A; Williamson, Rosalind C; Bally, Blandine; Cowell, Christopher A M; Brooks, Rebecca; Stephens, Phil; Harrison, Andrew J; Bass, Mark D

    2015-11-01

    Chronic skin-healing defects are one of the leading challenges to lifelong well-being, affecting 2-5% of populations. Chronic wound formation is linked to age and diabetes and frequently leads to major limb amputation. Here we identify a strategy to reverse fibroblast senescence and improve healing rates. In healthy skin, fibronectin activates Rac1 in fibroblasts, causing migration into the wound bed, and driving wound contraction. We discover that mechanical stimulation of the skin with ultrasound can overturn healing defects by activating a calcium/CamKinaseII/Tiam1/Rac1 pathway that substitutes for fibronectin-dependent signaling and promotes fibroblast migration. Treatment of diabetic and aged mice recruits fibroblasts to the wound bed and reduces healing times by 30%, restoring healing rates to those observed in young, healthy animals. Ultrasound treatment is equally effective in rescuing the healing defects of animals lacking fibronectin receptors, and can be blocked by pharmacological inhibition of the CamKinaseII pathway. Finally, we discover that the migration defects of fibroblasts from human venous leg ulcer patients can be reversed by ultrasound, demonstrating that the approach is applicable to human chronic samples. By demonstrating that this alternative Rac1 pathway can substitute for that normally operating in the skin, we identify future opportunities for management of chronic wounds.

  2. Usefulness of Transcriptional Blood Biomarkers as a Non-invasive Surrogate Marker of Mucosal Healing and Endoscopic Response in Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planell, Núria; Masamunt, M Carme; Leal, Raquel Franco; Rodríguez, Lorena; Esteller, Miriam; Lozano, Juan J; Ramírez, Anna; Ayrizono, Maria de Lourdes Setsuko; Coy, Claudio Saddy Rodrigues; Alfaro, Ignacio; Ordás, Ingrid; Visvanathan, Sudha; Ricart, Elena; Guardiola, Jordi; Panés, Julián; Salas, Azucena

    2017-10-27

    Ulcerative colitis [UC] is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon. Colonoscopy remains the gold standard for evaluating disease activity, as clinical symptoms are not sufficiently accurate. The aim of this study is to identify new accurate non-invasive biomarkers based on whole-blood transcriptomics that can predict mucosal lesions and response to treatment in UC patients. Whole-blood samples were collected for a total of 152 UC patients at endoscopy. Blood RNA from 25 UC individuals and 20 controls was analysed using microarrays. Genes that correlated with endoscopic activity were validated using real-time polymerase chain reaction in an independent group of 111 UC patients, and a prediction model for mucosal lesions was evaluated. Responsiveness to treatment was assessed in a longitudinal cohort of 16 UC patients who started anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] therapy and were followed up for 14 weeks. Microarray analysis identified 122 genes significantly altered in the blood of endoscopically active UC patients. A significant correlation with the degree of endoscopic activity was observed in several genes, including HP, CD177, GPR84, and S100A12. Using HP as a predictor of endoscopic disease activity, an accuracy of 67.3% was observed, compared with 52.4%, 45.2%, and 30.3% for C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and platelet count, respectively. Finally, at 14 weeks of treatment, response to anti-TNF therapy induced alterations in blood HP, CD177, GPR84, and S100A12 transcripts that correlated with changes in endoscopic activity. Transcriptional changes in UC patients are sensitive to endoscopic improvement and appear to be an effective tool to monitor patients over time. © European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) 2017.

  3. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiography of pressure ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstroem, P.S.; Ekberg, O.; Lasson, A.

    1988-01-01

    In patients with longstanding and/or deep pressure ulcers radiology is usually consulted. Survey radiography and sinography in 14 patients with pressure ulcers (6 over the tuber ischii and 8 over the femoral trochanter) were evaluated. Osteomyelitic involvement of adjacent bone was revealed in 9 patients on survey radiography. However, it was usually impossible to assess whether or not bony involvement represents healed or active osteomyelitis. Sinography did not contribute to the assessment of whether or not adjacent cortical bone was involved. However, when a fistulation to an adjacent joint was revealed this contributed substantially to the preoperative planning of resection. We therefore recommend that survey radiography and sinography should be included in the evaluation of these patients but that the results from such examinations are critically evaluated. Joint involvement should be taken seriously as progression of septic arthritis usually occurs rapidly. (orig.)

  5. Actovegin administration in patients with ulcerated gout tophuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Eliseev

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study actovegin efficacy in the treatment of chronic skin ulcers due to ulceration of tophuses in pts with chronic tophaceous gout. Materials and methods. 6 pts with chronic tophaceous gout aged 52 to 77 years with disease duration from 6 to 20 years with longstanding persisting skin ulcers due to tophuses ulceration were included. In addition to allopuri- nol, steroid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs they were treated with actovegin 20% intravenously and local applications of 2% actovegin gel. Clinical examination was performed before and after the course of therapy- Results. Two from six pts showed healing of single chronic ulcers to the end of the treatment course. In the remaining pts ulcer count and size decrease was achieved. Conclusion. Actovegin administration in combined therapy of chronic skin ulcers in pts with chronic tophaceous gout promoted healing of the defects in all cases.

  6. Reconstruction of radionecrotic ulcer using a myocutaneous flap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Okano, Shinji; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Mori, Tamotsu; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Shigeki, Sadayuki

    1990-01-01

    Problems in the surgical treatment of radionecrotic ulcers, using a myocutaneous flap, have been reviewed in 21 patients. These problems included poor wound healing, radiation damage to important nerves and vessels there by making dissection difficult, malignant changes, infections, continuing necrosis of the tissue, and bleeding during surgery and secondary hemorrhaging. The use of a myocutaneous flap has many advantages when compared with conventional flaps and free skin grafts in the reconstruction of radionecrotic ulcers. Flap survival was good, but an incomplete excision of the ulcer delayed primary wound healing. Therefore, complete excision of the radionecrotic ulcer is imperative. (author)

  7. Treatment of venous ulcers with fibrin sealant derived from snake venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAN Gatti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous ulcers of the lower limbs complicated by infection or chronicity represent a serious public health problem. The elevated number of those afflicted burdens the health services, interferes in quality of life and causes absenteeism. Although there are 2,500 items on the market, ranging from the simplest dressing up to the most complex types of dressing, treatment remains a challenge. Among the substances used, fibrin sealant is the one that promotes diminution of bacterial colonization and of edema, controls hemorrhaging, alters the pain threshold by protecting the nerve endings, hydrates the wound bed and forms granulation tissue that favors healing. Its disadvantages include higher cost and utilization of human fibrinogen that can transmit infectious diseases. The Center for the Study of Venoms and Venomous Animals (CEVAP at São Paulo State University (UNESP developed a new sealant made up of fibrinogen extracted from large animals and from an enzyme obtained from snake venom. The present study, developed in the Health Education Clinic (CEPS of Sacred Heart University (USC aimed to evaluate the effect of the new sealant on the healing process of venous ulcers in 24 adult patients, seven of whom were male and 17 female. Two study groups were formed as follows: Group 1 (G1 - control group of 11 patients treated with essential fatty acid (EFA and Unna's boot, and Group 2 (G2 - 13 patients treated with essential fatty acid (EFA, fibrin sealant and Unna's boot. The follow-up lasted eight weeks and the sealant was applied at only the first and fourth weeks. The results showed that Group 2 presented worse lesion conditions as to healing, but, when comparing the two groups, it was noteworthy that the the sealant was effective in healing venous ulcers. There is evidence that the new sealant is recommended for leg ulcers with the following advantages: ease of application, preparation of the wound bed, diminution of pain and a higher number of

  8. Fibreglass Total Contact Casting, Removable Cast Walkers, and Irremovable Cast Walkers to Treat Diabetic Neuropathic Foot Ulcers: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Vania; Tu, Hong Anh; Wells, David; Weir, Mark; Holubowich, Corinne; Walter, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Background Diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers are a risk factor for lower leg amputation. Many experts recommend offloading with fibreglass total contact casting, removable cast walkers, and irremovable cast walkers as a way to treat these ulcers. Methods We completed a health technology assessment, which included an evaluation of clinical benefits and harms, value for money, and patient preferences for offloading devices. We performed a systematic literature search on August 17, 2016, to identify randomized controlled trials that compared fibreglass total contact casting, removable cast walkers, and irremovable cast walkers with other treatments (offloading or non-offloading) in patients with diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers. We developed a decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of fibreglass total contact casting, removable cast walkers, and irremovable cast walkers, and we conducted a 5-year budget impact analysis. Finally, we interviewed people with diabetes who had lived experience with foot ulcers, asking them about the different offloading devices and the factors that influenced their treatment choices. Results We identified 13 randomized controlled trials. The evidence suggests that total contact casting, removable cast walkers, and irremovable cast walkers are beneficial in the treatment of neuropathic, noninfected foot ulcers in patients with diabetes but without severe peripheral arterial disease. Compared to removable cast walkers, ulcer healing was improved with total contact casting (moderate quality evidence; risk difference 0.17 [95% confidence interval 0.00–0.33]) and irremovable cast walkers (low quality evidence; risk difference 0.21 [95% confidence interval 0.01–0.40]). We found no difference in ulcer healing between total contact casting and irremovable cast walkers (low quality evidence; risk difference 0.02 [95% confidence interval −0.11–0.14]). The economic analysis showed that total contact casting and irremovable

  9. Pressure Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Monfre, Jill M.

    2016-01-01

    Unrelieved pressure or friction of the skin, particularly over bony prominences, can lead to pressure ulcers, which affect up to one third of people in hospitals or community care, and one fifth of nursing home residents. Pressure ulcers are more likely in people with reduced mobility and poor skin condition, such as older people or those with vascular disease.

  10. Mini-Invasive floating metatarsal osteotomy for resistant or recurrent neuropathic plantar metatarsal head ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Tamir, Eran; Finestone, Aharon S.; Avisar, Erez; Agar, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with peripheral neuropathy and pressure under a relatively plantar deviated metatarsal head frequently develop plantar foot ulcers. When conservative management with orthotics and shoes does not cure the ulcer, surgical metatarsal osteotomy may be indicated to relieve the pressure and enable the ulcer to heal. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of a mini-invasive floating metatarsal osteotomy in treating recalcitrant ulcers or recurrent ulcers plantar to the ...

  11. Predicting complex acute wound healing in patients from a wound expertise centre registry: a prognostic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubbink, Dirk T; Lindeboom, Robert; Eskes, Anne M; Brull, Huub; Legemate, Dink A; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-10-01

    It is important for caregivers and patients to know which wounds are at risk of prolonged wound healing to enable timely communication and treatment. Available prognostic models predict wound healing in chronic ulcers, but not in acute wounds, that is, originating after trauma or surgery. We developed a model to detect which factors can predict (prolonged) healing of complex acute wounds in patients treated in a large wound expertise centre (WEC). Using Cox and linear regression analyses, we determined which patient- and wound-related characteristics best predict time to complete wound healing and derived a prediction formula to estimate how long this may take. We selected 563 patients with acute wounds, documented in the WEC registry between 2007 and 2012. Wounds had existed for a median of 19 days (range 6-46 days). The majority of these were located on the leg (52%). Five significant independent predictors of prolonged wound healing were identified: wound location on the trunk [hazard ratio (HR) 0·565, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·405-0·788; P = 0·001], wound infection (HR 0·728, 95% CI 0·534-0·991; P = 0·044), wound size (HR 0·993, 95% CI 0·988-0·997; P = 0·001), wound duration (HR 0·998, 95% CI 0·996-0·999; P = 0·005) and patient's age (HR 1·009, 95% CI 1·001-1·018; P = 0·020), but not diabetes. Awareness of the five factors predicting the healing of complex acute wounds, particularly wound infection and location on the trunk, may help caregivers to predict wound healing time and to detect, refer and focus on patients who need additional attention. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Management of ulcers in lymphoedematous limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu M Karnasula

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoedema is a progressive condition that can have a marked physical and psychological impact on affected patients and significantly reduce the quality of life. The ulcers on chronic lymphoedema patient, which often also makes it impossible for them to work. If left untreated, tends to progress or worsen. Ulcers in lymphoedema patients, therefore, represent not only a medical but also a psychological problem. The treatment is often regarded as being worse than it actually is. In our study of more than 25 years shows around 10% cases are due to chronic lymphodema. Ulcers of chronic lymphoedema are classified into four stages according to their presentation. Their management depends upon their stage of presentation. Patients with chronic lymphoedema and ulceration require a different approach to treatment. The specific issues associated with managing the patient with lymphoedematous ulceration include, limb shape distortion i.e., elephantiasis, care of the skin creases and folds, and swelling of the toes and fore foot. Stage I ulcers will heal with conservative treatment without any surgical intervention. Stage II ulcers needs debridement of the wound and split-thickness skin grafting. The most difficult to treat are the stage III and IV ulcers, due to associated skin changes and reduced vascularity. These cases need debulking along with excision of the ulcer. In order to prevent recurrence of the ulcer in all the four stages needs prolonged follow-up and limb care.

  13. [Drug-induced oral ulcerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madinier, I; Berry, N; Chichmanian, R M

    2000-06-01

    Different side effects of drugs have been described in the oral cavity, including oral ulcerations. Direct contact between drugs and oral mucosa may induce chemical burn or local hypersensitivity. Less frequently, these drug-induced oral ulcerations are part of a complex reaction with cutaneous or systemic manifestations. Sometimes, one or more oral ulcerations appear as the main side-effect of a drug, or exceptionally as solitary lesions. Solitary oral ulcerations usually appear after few weeks of treatment. In most of cases, these lesions resist to conventional treatments, with a rapid healing following the suppression of the responsible drug. This diagnosis is usually difficult, particularly with patients receiving multiple drug therapy. Besides, special attention must be paid to new drugs. Oral ulcerations following symptoms of burning mouth, metallic taste, dysgueusia or agueusia are strongly suggestive of a pharmacological origin. Most of the molecules able to induce solitary oral ulcerations are commonly prescribed in a) rheumatology: NSAI (diclofenac, flurbiprofen, indomethacin, naproxen), long-term rheumatoid arthritis therapy (azathioprine, methotrexate, penicillamine, gold compounds, tiopronin); b) cardiology: angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (captopril, enalapril), angiotensin 2-receptor antagonist (losartan), anti-angorous (nicorandil), c) psychiatry: antidepressants (fluoxetine, lithium), d) AIDS therapy (foscarnet, zalcitabine).

  14. Cancer complicating chronic ulcerative and scarifying mucocutaneous disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Skin affected by a burn cancer is scarred, ulcerated, and often appears as erythema ab igne clinically in adjacent skin. The latent period in burn scar malignancy is much longer for SCC than BCC. Malignant melanoma and various sarcomas are reported to arise in burn scars, too. The other extreme on the temperature scale can less often result in enough permanent acral damage that poor wound healing may eventually result in cancer, usually SCC. About 1% of patients with chronic osteomyelitis develop cancer, usually SCC in sinus tracts. As with tumors arising in burn scars and chronic leg ulcers of varied etiology, black patients are disproportionately overrepresented in osteomyelitic malignancy. In nearly all of the patients with radiation-induced skin cancer, concomitant radiodermatitis is present. As with burn scar and osteomyelitic cancer, x-ray related cancer has a long latent period. Similar to burn scar cancer, SCC predominates in osteomyelitis and occurs on the extremities. BCC, when it arises, is more common on the face and neck in burn- and radiation-induced tumors. Multiple tumors are frequent as is recurrence in x-ray malignancy. Mortality is high: one out of three to four patients with burn scar, osteomyelitic, and radiation cancer die of dermatosis-related malignancy. Recently, radioactivity-contaminated gold rings have been implicated in causing SCC. Carcinoma tends to occur in irradiated benign dermatoses whereas sarcomas tend to complicate irradiated malignancies. Stasis ulceration and anogenital fistulae may rarely lead to cancer, SCC in the former and adenocarcinoma in the latter. SCC can rarely develop in four related conditions (acne conglobata, dissecting perifolliculitis of the scalp, hidradenitis suppurativa, and pilonidal sinus) after a lengthy latent period; prognosis is poor with a high metastatic rate. 147 references

  15. Management of radiation ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shack, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    Despite more efficient and safer technics of radiation therapy, the problem of radiation-induced injury to the skin and soft tissue persists. The problem of adequate coverage of these painful, ischemic, and fibrotic ulcers remains challenging. Split-thickness skin grafts are seldom sufficient coverage, as the graft almost always has areas that do not take. Although these areas may eventually heal by epithelialization, the result is never ideal. Most often flap coverage is required, but elevation of local flaps is jeopardized because the tissue surrounding the ulcer crater frequently has been sufficiently compromised to cause loss of at least part of the flap. In the past, this necessitated use of pedicled flaps, tubed and transposed from a distance. With the development of axial-pattern musculocutaneous and muscle flaps, as well as microvascular free flaps, the difficulty in dealing with these ulcers has been decreased. Surgeons can now recommend earlier use of adequate debridement, many times of the entire irradiated area, and immediate coverage with a well vascularized axial-pattern musculocutaneous flap or revascularized free flap

  16. Ulcerative Proctitis

    OpenAIRE

    Whitlow, Charles B.

    2004-01-01

    Ulcerative proctitis is an idiopathic mucosal inflammatory disease involving only the rectum and is therefore an anatomically limited form of ulcerative colitis. Diagnosis is made based on clinical presentation, endoscopic appearance, and histopathology. Additionally, other etiologies of proctitis are excluded. The course of the disease is variable ranging from complete resolution to easily maintained remission to frequent relapses or refractory disease. Extension of inflammatory changes invo...

  17. Absorption of pentacaine from ulcerous rat stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomcikova, O.; Babulova, A.; Durisova, M.; Trnovec, T.; Benes, L.

    1985-01-01

    Pentacaine is a local anaesthetic which exhibited positive effects on healing of model ulcers in the rat stomach. The in situ disappearance of pentacaine from the ulcerous and intact rat stomach was studied. Gastric ulcers were produced by oral administration of phenylbutazone (200 mg/kg) 3.5 h before absorption experiment. Pentacaine exhibited a biexponential decrease from the lumen of the stomach, the rate of which was essentially the same in both groups. The total amount of pentacaine absorbed was small because of extremly low absorption rate. (author)

  18. Heel ulcers - Pressure ulcers or symptoms of peripheral arterial disease? An exploratory matched case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twilley, Heidi; Jones, Sarahjane

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between pressure ulcers of the heel and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and determine the feasibility of conducting a statistically powered matched case control study. Evidence indicates a relationship between chronic leg ulcers and vascular disease. The relationship between pressure ulcers of the heel and vascular disease is less well established. A matched case control study. Data were collected between March 2014 and January 2015. 15 patients identified as having a grade 2, 3 or 4 pressure ulcer of the heel were compared with 15 matched controls without pressure ulcers of the heel. The primary clinical outcome measure was the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI), where an ABPI 1.3 was considered clinically indicative of PAD. The primary feasibility outcome measure was the rate of recruitment. Eighty seven patients were reported as having foot and heel ulcers; 36 of whom were identified as having pressure ulcers of the heel, 15 (42%) of whom were recruited to the study. Patients presenting with pressure ulcers of the heel were significantly more likely to simultaneously have previously undiagnosed PAD compared with age, gender and ethnicity matched controls without pressure ulcers of the heel (odds ratio: 11, 95% confidence interval 1.99-60.57). The formation of pressure ulcers of the heel could, in some patients, be related to the presence of PAD rather than a consequence of poor quality care. Healthcare professionals should assess the patient to exclude or confirm PAD. Copyright © 2016 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A shift in priority in diabetic foot care and research: 75% of foot ulcers are preventable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.; van Netten, Jaap J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration poses a heavy burden on the patient and the healthcare system, but prevention thereof receives little attention. For every euro spent on ulcer prevention, ten are spent on ulcer healing, and for every randomized controlled trial conducted on prevention, ten are conducted on

  20. Evaluation of the wound healing potential of Protea madiensis Oliv ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ijeoma

    2012-11-08

    Nov 8, 2012 ... In medical practice, the treat- ment of full ... wounds, burns and ulcers by indigenous West Africans ... wound healing activity, no scientific study has been car- ..... that the leaf extract of P. madiensis accelerated fibroblast.

  1. Potential of Jatropha multifida sap against traumatic ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri A. Gani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic ulcer is a lesion in oral mucosa as a result of physical and mechanical trauma, as well as changes in salivary pH. Jatropha multifida sap can act as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and re-epithelialization, and can also trigger the healing process of ulcers. Purpose: Research was aimed to determine the potential of Jatropha multifida sap against traumatic ulcer base on clinical and histopathological healing process. Method: This research was conducted laboratory experimental model, with rats (Rattus norvegicus as the subject as well as Jatropha multifida sap for ulcer healing. Those subjects were divided into four groups: two treatment groups administrated with pellet and Jatropha multifida sap, one group as the positive control group administrated with 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide, and one group as the negative control group administrated with 0.9% NaCl. Ulcer manipulation was used 30% H2O2, and evaluation of ulcer healing was used clinical and histopathological approach. Result: Clinically, the healing process of ulcers in the treatment group with Jatropha multifida sap was faster than that in the positive control group with 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide, indicated with the reduction of the ulcer size until the missing of the ulcers started from the third day to the seventh one (p≤0.05. Histopathologically inflammatory cells (lymphocytes, and plasma cells declined started from the third day, and the formation of collagen and re-epithelialization then occurred. On the seventh day, the epithelial cells thickened, and the inflammatory cells infiltrated. Statistically, those groups were significant (p≤0.05. Conclusion: Jatropha multifida sap has a significant potential to cure traumatic ulcers on oral mucosa clinically and histopathologically.

  2. Nutritional care in peptic ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    VOMERO, Nathália Dalcin; COLPO, Elisângela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a lesion of the mucosal lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract characterized by an imbalance between aggressive and protective factors of the mucosa, having H. pylori as the main etiologic factor. Dietotherapy is important in the prevention and treatment of this disease. Aim To update nutritional therapy in adults' peptic ulcer. Methods Exploratory review without restrictions with primary sources indexed in Scielo, PubMed, Medline, ISI, and Scopus databases. Results Dietotherapy, as well as caloric distribution, should be adjusted to the patient's needs aiming to normalize the nutritional status and promote healing. Recommended nutrients can be different in the acute phase and in the recovery phase, and there is a greater need of protein and some micronutrients, such as vitamin A, zinc, selenium, and vitamin C in the recovery phase. In addition, some studies have shown that vitamin C has a beneficial effect in eradication of H. pylori. Fibers and probiotics also play a important role in the treatment of peptic ulcer, because they reduce the side effects of antibiotics and help reduce treatment time. Conclusion A balanced diet is vital in the treatment of peptic ulcer, once food can prevent, treat or even alleviate the symptoms involving this pathology. However, there are few papers that innovate dietotherapy; so additional studies addressing more specifically the dietotherapy for treatment of peptic ulcer are necessary. PMID:25626944

  3. Adenosine Receptors and Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce N. Cronstein

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that application of topical adenosine A2A receptor agonists promotes more rapid wound closure and clinical studies are currently underway to determine the utility of topical A2A adenosine receptor agonists in the therapy of diabetic foot ulcers. The effects of adenosine A2A receptors on the cells and tissues of healing wounds have only recently been explored. We review here the known effects of adenosine A2A receptor occupancy on the cells involved in wound healing.

  4. Leg Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are important for motion and standing. Playing sports, running, falling, or having an accident can damage your legs. Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint dislocations, and fractures. ...

  5. Non-contact ulcer area calculation system for neuropathic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Parth; Mahajan, Siddaram; Nageswaran, Sharmila; Paul, Sathish Kumar; Ebenzer, Mannam

    2017-08-11

    Around 125,785 new cases in year 2013-14 of leprosy were detected in India as per WHO report on leprosy in September 2015 which accounts to approximately 62% of the total new cases. Anaesthetic foot caused by leprosy leads to uneven loading of foot leading to ulcer in approximately 20% of the cases. Much efforts have gone in identifying newer techniques to efficiently monitor the progress of ulcer healing. Current techniques followed in measuring the size of ulcers, have not been found to be so accurate but are still is followed by clinicians across the globe. Quantification of prognosis of the condition would be required to understand the efficacy of current treatment methods and plan for further treatment. This study aims at developing a non contact technique to precisely measure the size of ulcer in patients affected by leprosy. Using MATLAB software, GUI was designed to process the acquired ulcer image by segmenting and calculating the pixel area of the image. The image was further converted to a standard measurement using a reference object. The developed technique was tested on 16 ulcer images acquired from 10 leprosy patients with plantar ulcers. Statistical analysis was done using MedCalc analysis software to find the reliability of the system. The analysis showed a very high correlation coefficient (r=0.9882) between the ulcer area measurements done using traditional technique and the newly developed technique, The reliability of the newly developed technique was significant with a significance level of 99.9%. The designed non-contact ulcer area calculating system using MATLAB is found to be a reliable system in calculating the size of ulcers. The technique would help clinicians have a reliable tool to monitor the progress of ulcer healing and help modify the treatment protocol if needed. Copyright © 2017 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Topical phenytoin for treating pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiang Yong; Li, Hong Ling; Su, He; Cai, Hui; Guo, Tian Kang; Liu, Ruifeng; Jiang, Lei; Shen, Yan Fei

    2017-02-22

    Pressure ulcers are common in clinical practice and pose a significant health problem worldwide. Apart from causing suffering to patients, they also result in longer hospital stays and increase the cost of health care. A variety of methods are used for treating pressure ulcers, including pressure relief, patient repositioning, biophysical strategies, nutritional supplementation, debridement, topical negative pressure, and local treatments including dressings, ointments and creams such as bacitracin, silver sulphadiazine, neomycin, and phenytoin. Phenytoin is a drug more commonly used in the treatment of epilepsy, but may play an important role in accelerating ulcer healing. To assess the effects of topical phenytoin on the rate of healing of pressure ulcers of any grade, in any care setting. In September 2016, we searched the following electronic databases to identify relevant randomized clinical trials: the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; the Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid Embase; and EBSCO CINAHL Plus. We handsearched conference proceedings from the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Wound Management Association and the Tissue Viability Society for all available years. We searched the references of the retrieved trials to identify further relevant trials. We also searched clinical trials registries to identify ongoing and unpublished studies. There were no restrictions with respect to language, date of publication or study setting. We included all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) addressing the effects (both benefits and harms) of topical phenytoin on the healing of pressure ulcers of any grade compared with placebo or alternative treatments or no therapy, irrespective of blinding, language, and publication status. Two review authors independently selected studies, extracted information on participants, interventions, methods and results and assessed risk of bias using

  7. Ulcerative chickenpox in an immunocompetent child

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most common complications were skin/soft-tissue infections (33 ... vitamin A. The ulcers healed slowly and the patient was discharged from hospital after ... e alth. Fatema Thawer / Esmail, MD. S Jessop, MB ChB, FFDerm (SA). Division of ...

  8. A systematic review of the efficacy and limitations of venous intervention in stasis ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montminy, Myriam L; Jayaraj, Arjun; Raju, Seshadri

    2018-05-01

    Surgical techniques to address various components of chronic venous disease are rapidly evolving. Their efficacy and generally good results in treating superficial venous reflux (SVR) have been documented and compared in patients presenting with pain and swelling. A growing amount of literature is now available suggesting their efficacy in patients with venous leg ulcer (VLU). This review attempts to summarize the efficacy and limitations of commonly used venous interventions in the treatment of SVR and incompetent perforator veins (IPVs) in patients with VLU. A systematic review of the published literature was performed. Two different searches were conducted in MEDLINE, Embase, and EBSCOhost to identify studies that examined the efficacy of SVR ablation and IPV ablation on healing rate and recurrence rate of VLU. In the whole review, 1940 articles were screened. Of those, 45 were included in the SVR ablation review and 4 in the IPV ablation review. Data were too heterogeneous to perform an adequate meta-analysis. The quality of evidence assessed by the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation for the two outcomes varied from very low to moderate. Ulcer healing rate and recurrence rate were between 70% and 100% and 0% and 49% in the SVR ablation review and between 59% and 93% and 4% and 33% in the IPV ablation review, respectively. To explain those variable results, limitations such as inadequate diagnostic techniques, saphenous size, concomitant calf pump dysfunction, and associated deep venous reflux are discussed. Currently available minimally invasive techniques correct most venous pathologic processes in chronic venous disease with a good sustainable healing rate. There are still specific diagnostic and efficacy limitations that mandate proper match of individual patients with the planned approach. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mouth ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gingivostomatitis Herpes simplex ( fever blister ) Leukoplakia Oral cancer Oral lichen planus Oral thrush A skin sore caused by histoplasmosis may ... mouth Images Oral thrush Canker sore (aphthous ulcer) Lichen planus on the oral mucosa Mouth sores References Daniels TE, Jordan RC. ...

  10. Epithelial Regeneration After Gastric Ulceration Causes Prolonged Cell-Type AlterationsSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eitaro Aihara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: The peptic ulcer heals through a complex process, although the ulcer relapse often occurs several years later after healing. Our hypothesis is that even after visual evidence of healing of gastric ulceration, the regenerated epithelium is aberrant for an extended interval, increasing susceptibility of the regenerated epithelium to damage and further diseases. Methods: Gastric ulcers were induced in mice by serosal topical application of acetic acid. Results: Gastric ulcers induced by acetic acid visually healed within 30 days. However, regenerated epithelial architecture was poor. The gene profile of regenerated tissue was abnormal, indicating increased stem/progenitor cells, deficient differentiated gastric cell types, and deranged cell homeostasis. Despite up-regulation of PDX1 in the regenerated epithelium, no mature antral cell type was observed. Four months after healing, the regenerated epithelium lacks parietal cells, trefoil factor 2 (TFF2 and (sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9 remain up-regulated deep in the gastric gland, and the Na/H exchanger 2 (a TFF2 effector in gastric healing remains down-regulated. Gastric ulcer healing was strongly delayed in TFF2 knockout mice, and re-epithelialization was accompanied with mucous metaplasia. After Helicobacter pylori inoculum 30 days after ulceration, we observed that the gastric ulcer selectively relapses at the same site where it originally was induced. Follow-up evaluation at 8 months showed that the relapsed ulcer was not healed in H pylori–infected tissues. Conclusions: These findings show that this macroscopically regenerated epithelium has prolonged abnormal cell distribution and is differentially susceptible to subsequent damage by H pylori. Keywords: Gastric Ulcer Healing, Metaplasia, H pylori, SOX9, TFF2, NHE2

  11. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Foot, leg, and ankle swelling is common when the person also: Is overweight Has a blood clot in the leg Is older Has ...

  12. Off-loading of hindfoot and midfoot neuropathic ulcers using a fiberglass cast with a metal stirrup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Eran; Daniels, Timothy R; Finestone, Aharon; Nof, Matityahu

    2007-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of a method of off-loading large neuropathic ulcers of the hindfoot and midfoot. The device used is composed of a fiberglass cast with a metal stirrup and a window around the ulcer. A retrospective study of 14 diabetic and nondiabetic patients was performed. All had chronic plantar hindfoot or midfoot neuropathic ulcers that failed to heal with conventional treatment methods. A fiberglass total contact cast with a metal stirrup was applied. A window was made over the ulcer to allow daily ulcer care. The average duration of ulcer before application of the metal stirrup was 26 + 13.2 (range 7 to 52) months. The ulcer completely healed in 12 of the 14 patients treated. The mean time for healing was 10.8 weeks for midfoot ulcers and 12.3 weeks for heel ulcers. Complications developed in four patients: three developed superficial wounds and one developed a full-thickness wound. In three of these four patients, local wound care was initiated, and the stirrup cast was continued to complete healing of the primary ulcer. A fiberglass cast with a metal stirrup is an effective off-loading device for midfoot and hindfoot ulcers. It is not removable and does not depend on patient compliance. The window around the ulcer allows for daily wound care, drainage of the ulcer and the use of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) treatment. The complication rate is comparable to that of total contact casting.

  13. Temperature- and pH-sensitive wearable materials for monitoring foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvo P

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pietro Salvo,1,2 Nicola Calisi,1 Bernardo Melai,1 Valentina Dini,3 Clara Paoletti,1 Tommaso Lomonaco,1 Andrea Pucci,1 Fabio Di Francesco,1 Alberto Piaggesi,4 Marco Romanelli3 1Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, University of Pisa, 2Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Council of Research, 3Wound Healing Research Unit, Department of Dermatology, University of Pisa, 4Diabetic Foot Section, Department of Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: Foot ulcers account for 15% of comorbidities associated with diabetes. Presently, no device allows the status of foot ulcers to be continuously monitored when patients are not hospitalized. In this study, we describe a temperature and a pH sensor capable of monitoring diabetic foot and venous leg ulcers developed in the frame of the seventh framework program European Union project SWAN-iCare (smart wearable and autonomous negative pressure device for wound monitoring and therapy. Temperature is measured by exploiting the variations in the electrical resistance of a nanocomposite consisting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and poly(styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene-b-styrene. The pH sensor used a graphene oxide (GO layer that changes its electrical potential when pH changes. The temperature sensor has a sensitivity of ~85 Ω/°C in the range 25°C–50°C and a high repeatability (maximum standard deviation of 0.1% over seven repeated measurements. For a GO concentration of 4 mg/mL, the pH sensor has a sensitivity of ~42 mV/pH and high linearity (R2=0.99. Keywords: diabetic foot ulcer, wearable sensors, wound temperature, wound pH

  14. Acyclovir in the prevention of duodenal ulcer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune, S J; Linde, J; Bonnevie, O

    1990-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that reactivation of a latent herpes simplex virus infection may be a cause of recurrent duodenal ulceration. Patients with recently healed duodenal ulcer were entered into a double blind, randomised study of maintenance treatment with the antiviral drug acyclovir...... (400 mg bid) versus placebo, to determine if suppression of herpes virus infection would influence the natural history of the ulcer disease. One hundred and fifteen patients entered the trial and 76 patients completed it according to the protocol. Endoscopy was performed when ulcer symptoms recurred...

  15. Primary squamous cell carcinoma with mucormycosis in a diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Palash Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Nirmal Kumar; Mookerjee, Sekhar Kumar; Chaudhuri, Bhaskarnarayan

    2013-02-01

    The diabetic foot ulcer is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus leading to prolonged hospital stay. Non-healing foot ulcers in diabetes may be due to peripheral neuropathy and/or vasculopathy. Non-healing occurs following a trivial trauma due to loss of local immunity and increased infection by bacteria and fungus. Candida and mucormycosis are common fungal infection in diabetic foot ulcer. Squamous cell carcinoma in any non-healing ulcer is a common occurrence. But squamous cell carcinoma in non-healing diabetic foot ulcer is rarely reported. Here, mucormycosis in a diabetic foot ulcer which turned into squamous cell carcinoma is reported in a 62-year-old male with poor glycaemic control for last 21 years who presented with a non-healing ulcer of 8 months' duration over dorsum of left forefoot. Microbiological examination revealed presence of mucormycosis infection and histopathology of ulcer showed infiltrating well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The clinicians and pathologists should be aware of these combinations because only eradication of mucormycosis may not cure the ulcer, rather presence of squamous cell carcinoma may be ignored that may be an immediate threat to the patient's life.

  16. Oropharynx Ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Sylwanowicz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 31-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED with worsening constant left sided throat pain over the past four months. The patient reports that he was brushing his teeth when his dog jumped onto his back causing his toothbrush to puncture the back of his throat, resulting in immediate bleeding and discomfort. The bleeding subsided and the patient did not seek medical care. The pain radiated to his left ear and the back of the neck. He also noted a change in his voice. The day before presenting to the ED the patient noted subjective fevers, hemoptysis and drooling, which led him to seek medical care. Significant findings: The photograph demonstrates an area of ulcerative tissue at the left palatine tonsil without surrounding erythema or purulent drainage. The computed tomography (CT scan shows a large ulceration of the left soft palate and palatine tonsil (red arrow. There is no evidence of skull base osteomyelitis. There is suppurative lymphadenopathy with partial left jugular vein compression due to mass effect (yellow highlight. There is mild nasopharyngeal airway narrowing with architectural distortion (blue arrow, but no other evidence of airway obstruction. Discussion: The oral cavity is prone to trauma leading to the formation of superficial ulcerations. There are many causes of mechanical trauma, most commonly accidental biting. Chemical, electrical and thermal insults are also possibilities. Poor fitting dental devices and fractured or malformed teeth can also be etiologies.1 Traumatic ulcerations are most common in children given bruxism and thumb sucking. However, a broad differential must be considered including malignant and premalignant lesions, infections of the oral mucosa, aphthous ulcerations and autoimmune diseases.2, 3 Chronic ulcerations are associated with superimposed infection, but there has not been established an association of malignant transformation of the oral mucosa after

  17. Effect of systemic insulin treatment on diabetic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatankhah, Nasibeh; Jahangiri, Younes; Landry, Gregory J; Moneta, Gregory L; Azarbal, Amir F

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates if different diabetic treatment regimens affect diabetic foot ulcer healing. From January 2013 to December 2014, 107 diabetic foot ulcers in 85 patients were followed until wound healing, amputation or development of a nonhealing ulcer at the last follow-up visit. Demographic data, diabetic treatment regimens, presence of peripheral vascular disease, wound characteristics, and outcome were collected. Nonhealing wound was defined as major or minor amputation or those who did not have complete healing until the last observation. Median age was 60.0 years (range: 31.1-90.1 years) and 58 cases (68.2%) were males. Twenty-four cases reached a complete healing (healing rate: 22.4%). The median follow-up period in subjects with classified as having chronic wounds was 6.0 months (range: 0.7-21.8 months). Insulin treatment was a part of diabetes management in 52 (61.2%) cases. Insulin therapy significantly increased the wound healing rate (30.3% [20/66 ulcers] vs. 9.8% [4/41 ulcers]) (p = 0.013). In multivariate random-effect logistic regression model, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, type of diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, peripheral arterial disease, oral hypoglycemic use, wound infection, involved side, presence of Charcot's deformity, gangrene, osteomyelitis on x-ray, and serum hemoglobin A1C levels, insulin treatment was associated with a higher chance of complete healing (beta ± SE: 15.2 ± 6.1, p = 0.013). Systemic insulin treatment can improve wound healing in diabetic ulcers after adjusting for multiple confounding covariates. © 2017 by the Wound Healing Society.

  18. TOPICAL ESTROGEN IN WOUND HEALING: A DOUBLE BLIND RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL ON YOUNG HEALTHY PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A ASILIAN

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acceleration of wounf healing is intrested because of decreasing the risk of wound complication and infections as well as reducing the cost of treatment. In animal models, it has been proved that estrogen can accelerate wound healing. It has been also suggested that topical estrogen can eliminate effect of aging on wound healing and can increase the speed of wound healing in old people. Methods: We selected 16 young healthy people who developed symmetrical and ulcers (regarding size and depths after dermabrasion, shave and electrocoagulouzon and CO2 laser. Primary lesions of patients were benign and noninfective. Identical and symmetrical lesions of each patient were randomly divided into two groups (A and B. Topical estrogen with concentration of 0.625 mg/g in the base of silver sulfadiazine cream was applied to A ulcers and silver sulfadiazine cream alone was applied on B ulcers. Ulcers were dressed by Telfa gauzes. The A ulcers of each patients were compared to counterpart B ulcers in regard of redness, size, depth, general appearance of ulcers and wound healing duration at three days intervals by a physician. Results: Average time of healing was 10.8 days and 8.5 days for B (n=29 and A (n=29 ulcers, respectively (P < 0.001. In 78 percent of cases, the A ulcers were judged better than B ulcers by physician (P < 0.01. Discussion: It seems that estrogen not only accelerate healing of acute ulcers but also it is efficient in young healthy people who don"t have any hormonal or wound healing problems.

  19. Avaliação da eficácia da pomada de própolis em portadores de feridas crônicas Evaluación de la eficacia de la pomada de própolis en portadores de heridas crónicas The effect of propolis cream in healing chronic ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinaldo José dos Santos

    2007-06-01

    ón de todas las lesiones fue de 13,1 semanas. Considerando un seguimiento de 20 semanas el 74,1% de las úlceras lograron la cicatrización antes de ese período. En cuanto a la etiología, las úlceras venosas cicatrizaron en 35% (7 de los pacientes, contraponiéndose a las úlceras de presión cuya cicatrización sucedió en apenas el 10,0% (2 de los pacientes. CONCLUSIÓN: Se concluye, que la utilización de pomada de própolis, de fácil acceso y bajo costo, fue sido eficiente en la cicatrización de heridas.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of propolis cream in healing chronic. METHODS: This descriptive study used a sample of 20 subjects from a Basic Unit of Health of Maringá City, Paraná, Brazil, who had chronic wounds. Wound healing was measured through progress notes of wound length, width, and depth. Data were analyzed with Pearson's correlation to determine the degree and strength of the relationship between propolis cream treatment and wound healing. RESULTS: The progress notes of 22 chronic ulcers showed that the probability of wound healing was 18.7 weeks. Regarding the study period of 13,1 weeks, the majority of ulcers (74.1% of ulcers healed completely. Regarding wound etiology, vascular ulcers (35% healed in 7 patients. And, pressure ulcers (10% healed in patients. CONCLUSION: The use of propolis cream, which is widely accessible and inexpensive, was effective in healing chronic wounds.

  20. Stasis dermatitis and ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ulcers; Ulcers - venous; Venous ulcer; Venous insufficiency - stasis dermatitis; Vein - stasis dermatitis ... veins. Some people with venous insufficiency develop stasis dermatitis. Blood pools in the veins of the lower ...

  1. Gastric ulcer treatment: cure of Helicobacter pylori infection without subsequent acid-suppressive therapy: is it effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zanten, Sander Veldhuyzen; van der Knoop, Bloeme

    2008-06-01

    Whether it is a requirement to continue with anti-secretory therapy following anti-Helicobacter therapy in H. pylori positive gastric ulcers is an important question. As gastric ulcers tend to heal more slowly than duodenal ulcers, may be asymptomatic or only causing mild symptoms and success at curing H. pylori with current fist line therapies is 80% at best, clinicians will likely err on the side of caution and continue acid suppressive therapy to ensure healing of gastric ulcers. This is certainly recommended when dealing with bleeding ulcers.

  2. [Evaluation of pressure ulcers area using the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Camila Letícia Dias dos; Cavalcante, Janaína Mortosa; Rocha Júnior, Edvar Ferreira da; Neves, Rinaldo Souza; Santana, Levy Aniceto; Guadagnin, Renato da Veiga; Brasil, Lourdes Mattos

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is a lesion that affects skin layers in some regions of the body and its healing can be followed up using image processing. The analysis of pressure ulcer area is relevant to evaluate its evolution and response to therapeutic procedures. Such areas can be evaluated through contour marking with the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®. In this study 35 volunteers computed areas from two grade III pressure ulcers using these instruments. It was possible to conclude that results are clinically equivalent and so can be considered to follow up healing evolution from pressure ulcers.

  3. [Pathophysiological aspects of wound healing in normal and diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimova, N V; Lyundup, A V; Lubimov, R O; Melnichenko, G A; Nikolenko, V N

    2014-01-01

    The main cause of long-term healing of ulcers in patients with diabetic foot is considered to be direct mechanical damage when walking due to reduced sensitivity to due to neuropathy, hyperglycemia, infection and peripheral artery disease. These factors determine the standard approaches to the treatment of diabeticfoot, which include: offloading, glycemic control, debridement of ulcers, antibiotic therapy and revascularization. Recently, however, disturbances in the healing process of the skin in diabetes recognized an additional factor affecting the timing of healing patients with diabetic foot. Improved understanding and correction of cellular, molecular and biochemical abnormalities in chronic wound in combination with standard of care for affords new ground for solving the problem of ulcer healing in diabetes.

  4. Wound Healing and Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Wound Healing and Care KidsHealth / For Teens / Wound Healing and ... open to heal through natural scar formation. The Healing Process Before healing begins, the body gears up ...

  5. Anti-ulcer Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explains the procedure of ethanol-induced ulcer to check the protective effect of drugs over induced ulcer in rats. Ulcer is defined as the erosion in the lining of the stomach or duodenum and is caused by the disruptions of the gastric mucosal defence and repair systems. Ulceration of stomach is called gastric ulcer and that of duodenum is called duodenal ulcer and together peptic ulcer. In clinical practice, peptic ulcer is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders, which commonly occurs in developed countries.

  6. Selective plantar fascia release for nonhealing diabetic plantar ulcerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J Young; Hwang, Seungkeun; Lee, Yoonjung

    2012-07-18

    Achilles tendon lengthening can decrease plantar pressures, leading to resolution of forefoot ulceration in patients with diabetes mellitus. However, this procedure has been reported to have a complication rate of 10% to 30% and can require a long period of postoperative immobilization. We have developed a new technique, selective plantar fascia release, as an alternative to Achilles tendon lengthening for managing these forefoot ulcers. We evaluated sixty patients with diabetes for a mean of 23.5 months after selective plantar fascia release for the treatment of nonhealing diabetic neuropathic ulcers in the forefoot. Preoperative and postoperative dorsiflexion range of motion of the affected metatarsophalangeal joint and wound-healing data were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the procedure and to determine the relationship between plantar fascia release and ulcer healing. Complications were recorded. Thirty-six (56%) of the ulcers healed within six weeks, including twenty-nine (60%) of the plantar toe ulcers and seve