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Sample records for left knee flexion

  1. Improved knee flexion following high-flexion total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionberger David R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of new techniques and materials in total knee arthroplasty (TKA continue to be a primary focus in orthopedic surgery. The primary aim of the present study is to evaluate post TKA total range of motion (ROM among a group of patients who received a gender specific high-flexion design modification implant compared to a control group of patients who received non-gender specific implants. Methods and results The control group was comprised of 39 TKAs that were recruited pre-operatively and received the non-gender specific implant while the study group consisted of 39 TKAs who received gender specific implants. The study group yielded an improvement in mean post-operative ROM of 21° at 12 months, whereas the mean improvement in ROM among the control group was 11°. Thus, the study group had a 10° increased ROM improvement (91% over the control group (p = 0.00060. In addition, 100% of the subjects with gender specific high-flexion implants achieved greater or equal ROM post-operatively compared to 82% for the control cohort. Lastly, women who exhibited greater pre-operative ROM and lower body mass index (BMI were found to benefit the most with the gender specific prosthesis. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that among subjects with a normal BMI, the gender specific high-flexion knee implant is associated with increased ROM as compared to the non-gender specific non-high-flexion implant designs.

  2. Flexion and anterior knee pain after high flexion posterior stabilized or cruciate retaining knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Groes, Sebastiaan; van der Ven, Paul; Kremers-van de Hei, Keetie; Koëter, Sander; Verdonschot, Nico

    2015-12-01

    Special high-flexion prosthetic designs show a small increase in postoperative flexion compared to standard designs and some papers show increased anterior knee pain with these prosthesis. A prospective double blind randomized controlled trial investigates the difference in flexion and anterior knee pain between standard and high-flexion total knee arthroplasty. In total 47 patients were randomly allocated to a standard cruciate retaining fixed bearing design (CR) in 23 patients and to a high-flexion posterior stabilized mobile bearing design (HF-PS) in 24 patients. The HF-PS did show a significantly higher passive postoperative flexion; 120.8° (SD 10.3°) vs. 112.0° (SD 9.5°) for the CR group (p = 0.004). The active postoperative flexion, VAS-pain score and Feller score did not show significant differences between both groups. Sub analysis with the HF-PS group showed a higher VAS-pain for the patients achieving ≥130° of flexion; 30.5 (SD 32.2) vs. 12.2 (SD 12.5) (p = 0.16). The present study showed a significant higher passive flexion in the high-flexion prosthesis compared to the standard prosthesis. However this difference disappeared when comparing active flexion. No difference in anterior knee pain was found between both groups.

  3. Effects of the abdominal drawing-in maneuver on muscle activity, pelvic motions, and knee flexion during active prone knee flexion in patients with lumbar extension rotation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyue-Nam; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Lee, Won-Hwee; Ha, Sung-Min; Kim, Su-Jung; Weon, Jong-Hyuck

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the effects of performing an abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) during active prone knee flexion on the hamstrings and erector spinae muscle activity, the amounts of pelvic motion and knee flexion, and onset of pelvic movements. Comparative, repeated-measures study. University research laboratory. Men patients (N=18) with lumbar extension rotation syndrome. Subjects performed prone knee flexion in 2 conditions. To measure muscle activity, surface electromyogram (EMG) of both erector spinae and the medial and lateral hamstrings was performed. Kinematic data on the pelvic motion and knee flexion were measured using a 3-dimensional motion analysis system. Repeated 1-way analysis of variance was used for the statistical analysis. Significantly decreased electromyographic activity in the right and left erector spinae and significantly increased electromyographic activity in the medial and lateral hamstrings activity were shown during prone knee flexion in ADIM condition using the pressure biofeedback unit. In addition, the amounts of anterior pelvic tilt, pelvic rotation, knee flexion, and perceived pain decreased significantly during prone knee flexion in the ADIM condition compared with the same maneuver in the non-ADIM condition. The onset of anterior pelvic tilt and pelvic rotation occurred significantly earlier in the non-ADIM condition, compared with the ADIM condition. ADIM effectively increased activation of knee flexors, decreased activation of back extensors, and reduced the pelvic motions and low back pain during prone knee flexion in patients with lumbar extension rotation syndrome. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [A man with a painful knee with restricted flexion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkering, L.J.; Zengerink, M.; Kampen, A. van

    2015-01-01

    A 39-year-old man presented with knee pain and limited knee flexion. MRI showed a mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (celery stalk sign). This rare condition can be treated with arthroscopic debridement with volume reduction of the anterior cruciate ligament. In severe cases,

  5. Can total knee arthroplasty (TKA) achieve its goal in knee flexion floor activity of Thai Buddhist monks?

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    Sresuriyasawad, Viriya

    2012-10-01

    To study knee's angulation required for Thai Buddhist monks whose activity based on floor sitting basis. And to identify an inter-observer reliability of knee flexion measurement based on radiologic reading. Descriptive analysis study comprised of measuring bilateral knee flexing angulation in 4 postures of floor activities; kneeling, monk's position in both right and left manner and sit cross-legged position, in 35 Thai Buddhist monks at Priest Hospital using plain radiograph image. The radiograph imaging for each patient was performed by one radiologist and two orthopedics. The measurement result was also analyzed for inter-observer reliability. Mean knee flexion angle in kneel, left monk's position, right monk's position and sit cross-legged postures were 163.21, 146.49, 148.89 and 138.38 degree, respectively. No statistical difference between knee flexion measurements among 3 investigators. Daily floor activity of Thai Buddhist monks need more flexion capacity than that can achieve by total knee arthroplasty instrument using nowadays.

  6. Clinical outcome of increased flexion gap after total knee arthroplasty. Can controlled gap imbalance improve knee flexion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismailidis, P; Kuster, M S; Jost, B; Giesinger, K; Behrend, H

    2017-06-01

    Increased range of motion (ROM) while maintaining joint stability is the goal of modern total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A biomechanical study has shown that small increases in flexion gap result in decreased tibiofemoral force beyond 90° flexion. The purpose of this paper was to investigate clinical implications of controlled increased flexion gap. Four hundred and four TKAs were allocated into one of two groups and analysed retrospectively. In the first group (n = 352), flexion gap exceeded extension gap by 2.5 mm, while in the second group (n = 52) flexion gap was equal to the extension gap. The procedures were performed from 2008 to 2012. The patients were reviewed 12 months postoperatively. Objective clinical results were assessed for ROM, mediolateral and sagittal stability. Patient-reported outcome measures were the WOMAC score and the Forgotten Joint Score (FJS-12). After categorizing postoperative flexion into three groups (poor < 90°, satisfactory 91°-119°, good ≥ 120°) significantly more patients in group 1 achieved satisfactory or good ROM (p = 0.006). Group 1 also showed a significantly higher mean FJS-12 (group 1: 73, group 2: 61, p = 0.02). The mean WOMAC score was 11 in the first and 14 in the second group (n.s.). Increase in flexion gap did not influence knee stability. The clinical relevance of this study is that a controlled flexion gap increase of 2.5 mm may have a positive effect on postoperative flexion and patient satisfaction after TKA. Neither knee stability in the coronal and sagittal planes nor complications were influenced by a controlled increase in flexion gap. III.

  7. Do patients care about higher flexion in total knee arthroplasty?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten G; Husted, Henrik; Otte, Kristian Stahl

    2013-01-01

    result in a better patient perceived outcome. METHODS: The study is a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial in which 36 patients (mean age: 67.2 yrs) undergoing one-stage bilateral TKA randomly received a standard cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA in one knee and a high-flex posterior-stabilized (PS......) TKA in the contra lateral knee. At follow-up ROM, satisfaction, pain, "feel" of the knee and the abilities in daily activities were assessed. RESULTS: At 1-year follow-up we found an expected significantly higher degree of knee flexion of 7[degree sign] in the high-flex knees (p = 0.001). The high......-flex TKA's showed a mean active flexion of 121[degree sign]. In both TKA's the median VAS pain score was 0, the median VAS satisfaction score was 9, and the median VAS score of the patient "feel" of the knee was 9 at 1-year follow-up. Further, there were no significant differences between the knees...

  8. Biomechanical analysis of posterior cruciate ligament retaining high-flexion total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, J.; van der Zanden, A.C.; De Waal Malefijt, M.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Background High-flexion knee replacements have been developed to accommodate a large range of flexion (>120°) after total knee arthroplasty. Both posterior cruciate ligament retaining and sacrificing high-flexion knee designs have been marketed. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the

  9. Improving Pre-Operative Flexion in Primary TKA: A Surgical Technique Emphasizing Knee Flexion with 5-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward McPherson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study prospectively reviews a consecutive series of 228 primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA procedures utilizing a technique to optimize knee flexion. The main features include: (1the use of a “patellar friendly” femoral component and reduced thickness patellar components, (2 patient individualized adjustment of the femoral component rotation set strictly to the anterior-posterior femoral axis, (3a rigorous flexion compartment debridement to remove non-essential posterior femoral bone with a Z-osteotome, and (4incorporation of a rapid recovery protocol with features to promote knee flexion. Results were categorized into three groups: low pre-op flexion (90 degrees and below, regular pre-op flexion (91-125 degrees, and high pre-op flexion (126 degrees and above. Average flexion in the low flexion group improved by 20 degrees at 6 weeks, 28 degrees at 3 months, 31 degrees at 1 year, and 30 degrees at 5 years. In the regular flexion group, average flexion improved by 2 degrees at 6 weeks, 10 degrees at 3 months, 12 degrees at 1 year, and 13 degrees at 5 years. Finally, in the high flexion group, average flexion decreased by 7 degrees at 6 weeks, regained preoperative levels at 3 months, and increased by 3 degrees at 1 year and 4 degrees at 5 years. In summary, a technique that emphasizes patellofemoral kinematics can consistently improve flexion in TKA in short and long-term follow-up.

  10. MR assessment of movement and morphologic change in the menisci during knee flexion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Y.; Uetani, M.; Fuchi, K.; Eguchi, H.; Hayashi, K.

    1999-01-01

    To examine movement and morphologic alteration in the menisci during knee flexion. Twenty healthy knees were imaged at 0 degrees, 45 degrees, and 90 degrees of passive non-weight-bearing flexion in the sagittal plane with MR. In each meniscus, posterior movement distance during knee flexion and the ratio of anteroposterior (a.p.) diameter at flexion to that at extension were calculated. Each meniscus moved posteriorly during knee flexion. Movement was greater in the anterior horn than in the posterior horn, and greater in the medial meniscus than in the lateral meniscus (p<0.05). The a.p. diameter of each meniscus was reduced at flexion (p<0.05). Knee flexion normally leads to posterior movement and shortening of the a.p. diameter of the menisci, which may be related to the positioning and curvature of femoral condyles at the femorotibial contact point at knee flexion

  11. MR assessment of movement and morphologic change in the menisci during knee flexion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Y.; Uetani, M.; Hayashi, K.; Fuchi, K.; Eguchi, H.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To examine movement and morphologic alteration in the menisci during knee flexion. Material and Methods: Twenty healthy knees were imaged at 0 , 45 , and 90 of passive non-weight-bearing flexion in the sagittal plane with MR. In each meniscus, posterior movement distance during knee flexion and the ratio of anteroposterior (a.p.) diameter at flexion to that at extension were calculated. Results: Each meniscus moved posteriorly during knee flexion. Movement was greater in the anterior horn than in the posterior horn, and greater in the medial meniscus than in the lateral meniscus (p<0.05). The a.p. diameter of each meniscus was reduced at flexion (p<0.05). Conclusion: Knee flexion normally leads to posterior movement and shortening of the a.p. diameter of the menisci, which may be related to the positioning and curvature of femoral condyles at the femorotibial contact point at knee flexion. (orig.)

  12. Modelling and Analysis on Biomechanical Dynamic Characteristics of Knee Flexion Movement under Squatting

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    Jianping Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The model of three-dimensional (3D geometric knee was built, which included femoral-tibial, patellofemoral articulations and the bone and soft tissues. Dynamic finite element (FE model of knee was developed to simulate both the kinematics and the internal stresses during knee flexion. The biomechanical experimental system of knee was built to simulate knee squatting using cadaver knees. The flexion motion and dynamic contact characteristics of knee were analyzed, and verified by comparing with the data from in vitro experiment. The results showed that the established dynamic FE models of knee are capable of predicting kinematics and the contact stresses during flexion, and could be an efficient tool for the analysis of total knee replacement (TKR and knee prosthesis design.

  13. Modelling knee flexion effects on joint power absorption and adduction moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Hanatsu; Tatsumi, Ichiroh; Sarashina, Eri; Sparrow, W A; Begg, Rezaul K

    2015-12-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is commonly associated with ageing and long-term walking. In this study the effects of flexing motions on knee kinetics during stance were simulated. Extended knees do not facilitate efficient loading. It was therefore, hypothesised that knee flexion would promote power absorption and negative work, while possibly reducing knee adduction moment. Three-dimensional (3D) position and ground reaction forces were collected from the right lower limb stance phase of one healthy young male subject. 3D position was sampled at 100 Hz using three Optotrak Certus (Northern Digital Inc.) motion analysis camera units, set up around an eight metre walkway. Force plates (AMTI) recorded ground reaction forces for inverse dynamics calculations. The Visual 3D (C-motion) 'Landmark' function was used to change knee joint positions to simulate three knee flexion angles during static standing. Effects of the flexion angles on joint kinetics during the stance phase were then modelled. The static modelling showed that each 2.7° increment in knee flexion angle produced 2.74°-2.76° increments in knee flexion during stance. Increased peak extension moment was 6.61 Nm per 2.7° of increased knee flexion. Knee flexion enhanced peak power absorption and negative work, while decreasing adduction moment. Excessive knee extension impairs quadriceps' power absorption and reduces eccentric muscle activity, potentially leading to knee osteoarthritis. A more flexed knee is accompanied by reduced adduction moment. Research is required to determine the optimum knee flexion to prevent further damage to knee-joint structures affected by osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Thigh-calf contact: Does it affect the loading of the knee in the high-flexion range?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, J.; Barink, M.; De Waal Malefijt, M.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Recently, high-flexion knee implants have been developed to provide for a large range of motion (ROM>120°) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Since knee forces typically increase with larger flexion angles, it is commonly assumed that high-flexion knee implants are subjected to larger loads than

  15. In vivo knee laxity in flexion and extension: a radiographic study in 30 older healthy subjects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesterbeek, P.J.C.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Wymenga, A.B.

    2008-01-01

    In order to determine how "tight" a total knee prosthesis should be implanted, it is important to know the amount of laxity in a healthy knee. The objective of this study was to determine knee laxity in extension and flexion in healthy, non-arthritic knees of subjects similar in age to patients

  16. Knee extension and flexion: MR delineation of normal and torn anterior cruciate ligaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji [Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the effect of joint position of semiflexed and extended knees in MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semiflexed position (average 45{degrees} of flexion) within the magnet bore. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained for both extended and flexed knee positions. Thirty-two knees with intact ACLs and 43 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL tears were evaluated. Two observers compared paired MR images of both extended and flexed positions and rated them by a relative three point scale. Anatomic correlation in MR images was obtained by a cadaveric knee with incremental flexion. The MR images of flexed knees were more useful than of extended knees in 53% of the case reviews of femoral attachments and 36% of reviews of midportions of normal ACLs. Compared with knee extensions, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 48% of reviews of disrupted sites and 52% of residual bundles of torn ACLs. Normal ACL appeared taut in the knee extension and lax in semiflexion. Compared with MR images of knees in extension, MR images of knees in flexion more clearly delineate the femoral side of the ligament with wider space under the intercondylar roof and with decreased volume-averaging artifacts, providing superior visualization of normal and torn ACLs. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Target of physiological gait: Realization of speed adaptive control for a prosthetic knee during swing flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wujing; Yu, Hongliu; Zhao, Weiliang; Li, Jin; Wei, Xiaodong

    2017-10-13

    Prosthetic knee is the most important component of lower limb prosthesis. Speed adaptive for prosthetic knee during swing flexion is the key method to realize physiological gait. This study aims to discuss the target of physiological gait, propose a speed adaptive control method during swing flexion and research the damping adjustment law of intelligent hydraulic prosthetic knee. According to the physiological gait trials of healthy people, the control target during swing flexion is defined. A new prosthetic knee with fuzzy logical control during swing flexion is designed to realize the damping adjustment automatically. The function simulation and evaluation system of intelligent knee prosthesis is provided. Speed adaptive control test of the intelligent prosthetic knee in different velocities are researched. The maximum swing flexion of the knee angle is set between sixty degree and seventy degree as the target of physiological gait. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate that the prosthetic knee with fuzzy logical control is able to realize physiological gait under different speeds. The faster the walking, the bigger the valve closure percentage of the hydraulic prosthetic knee. The proposed fuzzy logical control strategy and intelligent hydraulic prosthetic knee are effective for the amputee to achieve physiological gait.

  18. Hip flexion deformity improves without psoas-lengthening after surgical correction of fixed knee flexion deformity in spastic diplegia.

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    Rutz, Erich; Gaston, Mark S; Tirosh, Oren; Brunner, Reinald

    2012-01-01

    It is unclear if psoas lengthening surgery is required in the treatment of patients with cerebral palsy (CP) with hip flexion deformity and previous studies show equivocal results with regard to functional outcome. This study retrospectively assessed 12 patients with a diagnosis of spastic diplegia who underwent single event multilevel surgery in order to correct deformities in the sagittal plane distal to the hip. Both clinical and instrument gait analysis results were recorded preoperatively, at one year (short term) and at five years (mid term) postoperatively. Clinically measured hip and knee movement improved at both short and mid term follow up. Correlations of clinically measured maximum hip and knee extension were significant at all three time points. Angles at terminal stance/toe off for hip and knee from kinematic data also showed significant correlations at all three time points. Our study demonstrates that the hip flexion deformities encountered in these patients will improve spontaneously when the distal fixed knee flexion deformity is surgically corrected. Therefore correction at the knee allows the ground reaction force to assume a more normal position resulting in correction at the hip over time. This then removes the need for surgery at the hip level. This fact is especially important when applied to psoas lengthening as this procedure can cause significant reduction in propulsion power.

  19. Biomechanical Considerations in the Design of High-Flexion Total Knee Replacements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Kung Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Typically, joint arthroplasty is performed to relieve pain and improve functionality in a diseased or damaged joint. Total knee arthroplasty (TKA involves replacing the entire knee joint, both femoral and tibial surfaces, with anatomically shaped artificial components in the hope of regaining normal joint function and permitting a full range of knee flexion. In spite of the design of the prosthesis itself, the degree of flexion attainable following TKA depends on a variety of factors, such as the joint’s preoperative condition/flexion, muscle strength, and surgical technique. High-flexion knee prostheses have been developed to accommodate movements that require greater flexion than typically achievable with conventional TKA; such high flexion is especially prevalent in Asian cultures. Recently, computational techniques have been widely used for evaluating the functionality of knee prostheses and for improving biomechanical performance. To offer a better understanding of the development and evaluation techniques currently available, this paper aims to review some of the latest trends in the simulation of high-flexion knee prostheses.

  20. MR imaging of the knee extension and flexion. Diagnostic value for reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the value of extended and flexed knee positions in MR imaging of the surgically reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, knee joint was enabled to extend to a full-extension and bend vertically to a semi-flexion (average 45deg of flexion) within the confines of the magnet bore. Sets of 3-mm-thick oblique sagittal proton-weighted turbo spin echo MR images were obtained at both extended and flexed positions. Twenty-five knees with intact ACL grafts and three knees with arthroscopically proved graft tears were evaluated. Compared to the extended position, MR images of flexed knee provided better delineation of the intact and complicated ACL grafts with statistical significance. The intact graft appeared relaxed at the semi-flexion and taut at the extension. Overall lengths of the intact grafts were readily identified at the flexion. Stretched along the intercondylar roof, the grafts were poorly outlined at the extension. MR images with knee flexion delineated the disrupted site from the impingement more clearly than that with knee extension. (author).

  1. COMPARATIVE BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSES OF SQUAT JUMP WITHOUT AND WITH FLEXION IN KNEE JOINT

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    Saša Bubanj

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In sports hall of Faculty of sports and physical education in Niš, student demon- strated technique of squat jump – without and with flexion in knee joint. Elements of technique were recorded by using one digital video camera in sagital plane. By using comparative kinematics analyses, there were establish differences in values of kinema- tics parametres of different body segments. Bigger elevation of body centre of gravity was ascertain at bounce without flexion in knee joint.

  2. Influence of Hip Joint Position on Muscle Activity during Prone Hip Extension with Knee Flexion

    OpenAIRE

    Suehiro, Tadanobu; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Okamoto, Mitsuhisa; Ishida, Hiroshi; Kobara, Kenichi; Fujita, Daisuke; Osaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hisashi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the selective activation of the gluteus maximus during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise, with the hip joint in different positions. [Subjects] The subjects were 21 healthy, male volunteers. [Methods] Activities of the right gluteus maximus, right hamstrings, bilateral lumbar erector spinae, and bilateral lumbar multifidus were measured using surface electromyography during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise. Measurements were mad...

  3. Reduced knee flexion is a possible cause of increased loading rates in individuals with patellofemoral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Danilo de Oliveira; Briani, Ronaldo Valdir; Pazzinatto, Marcella Ferraz; Ferrari, Deisi; Aragão, Fernando Amâncio; Azevedo, Fábio Mícolis de

    2015-11-01

    Stair ascent is an activity that exacerbates symptoms of individuals with patellofemoral pain. The discomfort associated with this activity usually results in gait modification such as reduced knee flexion in an attempt to reduce pain. Although such compensatory strategy is a logical approach to decrease pain, it also reduces the normal active shock absorption increasing loading rates and may lead to deleterious and degenerative changes of the knee joint. Thus, the aims of this study were (i) to investigate whether there is reduced knee flexion in adults with PFP compared to healthy controls; and (ii) to analyze loading rates in these subjects, during stair climbing. Twenty-nine individuals with patellofemoral pain and twenty-five control individuals (18-30 years) participated in this study. Each subject underwent three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic analyses during stair climbing on two separate days. Between-groups analyses of variance were performed to identify differences in peak knee flexion and loading rates. Intraclass correlation coefficient was performed to verify the reliability of the variables. On both days, the patellofemoral pain group demonstrated significantly reduced peak knee flexion and increased loading rates. In addition, the two variables obtained high to very high reliability. Reduced knee flexion during stair climbing as a strategy to avoid anterior knee pain does not seem to be healthy for lower limb mechanical distributions. Repeated loading at higher loading rates may be damaging to lower limb joints. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of knee alignment with varus and valgus force through the range of flexion with non-invasive navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, F; Alho, R; Riches, P; Picard, F

    2017-08-01

    In image-free total knee arthroplasty (TKA) navigation, infra-red markers are attached to bony landmarks to provide kinematic data intra-operatively, with the aim of improving the precision of implant placement. In non-invasive navigation, infra-red markers are attached to the skin surface, with recent evidence suggesting that this can give repeatable measurements of lower limb mechanical alignment. The aim of our study was to evaluate the use of a non-invasive navigation system in the assessment of mechanical alignment with applied coronal force through the range of flexion. A previously validated non-invasive system (Physiopilot™) was tested on 23 volunteers with healthy knees. Two users performed two registrations of the software workflow on each participant's right and left knees. A force was manually applied to the end-point of varus and valgus knee laxity and the measured change in mechanical alignment was recorded. Force was applied with the knee positioned in increments of flexion from 0 to 90°. In keeping with previous studies, satisfactory values of coefficient of repeatability (CR) of 1.55 and 1.33 were found for intra-observer repeatability in measurement of supine mechanical femoro-tibial angle (MFTA) in extension, with a good inter-observer correlation of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) .72. However, when flexion was introduced, intra-observer and inter-observer reliability fell out with acceptable limits. Therefore, the trial did not support use of the Physiopilot™ system as a measure of MFTA when flexion is introduced. It was felt that learning-curve, soft tissue artefacts and lack of force standardisation equipment may have accounted for significant levels of error, with further studies required to address these issues.

  5. ARTHROMETRIC EVALUATION OF STABILIZING EFFECT OF KNEE FUNCTIONAL BRACING AT DIFFERENT FLEXION ANGLES

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    Saeedeh Seyed Mohseni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous in-vivo investigations on the stabilizing efficacy of knee bracing for ACL reconstructed patients have been often limited to 20-30 degrees of knee flexion. In this study, the effectiveness of a uniaxial hinged functional brace to improve the knee stability was assessed at 30, 60 and 90 degrees of knee flexion. Arthrometry tests were conducted on 15 healthy subjects before and following wearing the brace and the tibial displacements were measured at up to 150 N anterior forces. Results indicated that functional bracing has a significant stabilizing effect throughout the range of knee flexion examined (p < 0.05. The rate of effectiveness, however, was not consistent across the flexion range, e.g., 50% at 30 degrees and only 4% at 90 degrees. It was suggested that accurate sizing and fitting as well as attention to correct hinge placement relative to the femoral condyles can limit brace migration and improve its effectiveness in mid and deep knee flexion. With using adaptive limb fittings, through flexible pads, and a polycentric joint a more significant improvement of the overall brace performance and efficacy might be obtained

  6. Differences in the electromyographic activity of the hamstring muscles during maximal eccentric knee flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashihara, Ayako; Ono, Takashi; Kubota, Jun; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the knee joint angle and angular velocity on hamstring muscles' activation patterns during maximum eccentric knee flexion contractions. Ten healthy young males (23.4 +/- 1.3 years) performed eccentric knee flexion at constant velocities of 10, 60, 180, and 300 deg/s in random order. The eccentric knee flexion torque and the surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of the biceps femoris (BF), semitendinosus (ST), and semimembranosus (SM) muscles were measured. The results of torque during 10 deg/s were lower than the faster velocities. No significant change was found in eccentric torque output and the EMG amplitude with change in the faster test velocities, although those values showed a decreasing tendency as the knee approached extension. Furthermore, the EMG amplitude of the BF decreased significantly as the knee approached extension, although the EMG activity of the ST and SM remained constant. These results suggest that the neural inhibitory mechanism might be involved in decreasing in maximal voluntary force and hamstring muscles activation toward the knee extension during high-velocity eccentric movement and therefore subjects have difficulties to maintain high eccentric force level throughout the motion. Moreover, the possible mechanism reducing the BF muscle activation as the knee approaches extension was architectural differences in the hamstring muscles, which might reflect each muscle's function.

  7. Effects of hamstring stretching on passive muscle stiffness vary between hip flexion and knee extension maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, N; Hirata, K; Kanehisa, H

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the effects of hamstring stretching on the passive stiffness of each of the long head of the biceps femoris (BFl), semitendinosus (ST), and semimembranosus (SM) vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In 12 male subjects, before and after five sets of 90 s static stretching, passive lengthening measurements where knee or hip joint was passively rotated to the maximal range of motion (ROM) were performed. During the passive lengthening, shear modulus of each muscle was measured by ultrasound shear wave elastography. Both stretching maneuvers significantly increased maximal ROM and decreased passive torque at a given joint angle. Passive knee extension stretching maneuver significantly reduced shear modulus at a given knee joint angle in all of BFl, ST, and SM. In contrast, the stretching effect by passive hip flexion maneuver was significant only in ST and SM. The present findings indicate that the effects of hamstring stretching on individual passive muscles' stiffness vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In terms of reducing the muscle stiffness of BFl, stretching of the hamstring should be performed by passive knee extension rather than hip flexion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Influence of increasing knee flexion angle on knee-ankle varus stress during single-leg jump landing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam A. Ameer, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to identify the relationship between the peak knee flexion angle and knee-ankle varus stress in the landing phase of the single-leg jump during running. Methods: Fifteen male handball players from the first Saudi Arabian handball team were incorporated in this study. Each player performed a single-leg jump-land after running a fixed distance of 450 cm. The data were measured using a 3D motion analysis system. The maximum knee flexion angle, knee varus angle, centre of pressure pathway in the medio-lateral direction, and ankle varus moment were measured. Results: The Pearson Product Moment Correlation showed that a greater knee flexion angle was related to a greater lateral displacement of the centre of pressure (r = 0.794, P = 0.000, a greater ankle varus moment (r = 0.707, P = 0.003, and a greater knee varus angle (r = 0.753, P = 0.001. In addition, the greater ankle varus moment was related to the greater lateral displacement of the centre of pressure (r = 0.734, P = 0.002. Conclusions: These findings may help physical therapists and conditioning professionals to understand the impact of increasing knee flexion angle on the lower limb joints. Such findings may help to develop training protocols for enhancing the lateral body reaction during the landing phase of the single-leg jump, which may protect the knee and ankle joints from excessive varus stresses. Keywords: 3D motion analysis, Ankle kinetic, Centre of pressure pathway, Handball playing, Knee kinematic, Single-leg jump

  9. Return of motor evoked potentials after knee flexion in the setting of high-grade spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilan, Justin; Andras, Lindsay M; Krieger, Mark D; Skaggs, David L

    2017-03-01

    To present a case of loss of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) to the left foot in the supine position after a partial reduction and instrumented fusion from L4 to pelvis which was managed successfully without revision or removal of implants. We report a patient with high-grade spondylolisthesis who demonstrated loss of motor-evoked potentials after posterior spinal fusion and transfer to supine position. The patient's knees were flexed to 90° and signals were immediately restored. Systemic steroids were administered and circumferential fusion was delayed 21 days. Anterior-interbody cage was placed without complication. She was discharged on post-operative day 2. At 7 months, she is pain free and doing well with plans to return to gymnastics completely. Knee flexion can be instituted when encountering a neuromonitoring signal change following posterior spinal fusion for spondylolisthesis as a means to alleviate acute nerve stretch injury and may in some cases prevent the need to lessen the correction. IV.

  10. Bilateral Distal Femoral Flexion Deformity After Total Knee Arthroplasty in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Chan Chun-Ming

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune systemic disease with predominant peripheral polyarthritis, often leading to severe joint destruction. This is a case report of an 81-year-old woman with long-standing severe rheumatoid arthritis requiring multiple orthopaedic operations for joint destruction since 2000. These operated joints improved her functional mobility until recently, when she found that her knees were fixed at around 70° of flexion with limited motion. There was chronic progressive flexion deformity of bilateral distal femurs, which was an extremely rare complication of total knee arthroplasty.

  11. High early failure rate of the Columbus posterior stabilized high-flexion knee prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woon-Hwa; Jeong, Jae-Heon; Ha, Yong-Chan; Lee, Young-Kyun; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2012-05-01

    Most studies report high survivorship rates for TKAs, however, we observed higher than anticipated rates of dislocation and femoral component loosening after implanting a Columbus posterior stabilized prosthesis. We therefore determined (1) the incidence of dislocation and aseptic loosening that occurred after implantation of posterior stabilized high-flexion prostheses in TKAs, (2) the causative factors of dislocation and aseptic femoral component loosening when comparing two designs of prostheses, and (3) the mechanisms of dislocation. We retrospectively reviewed 319 patients who underwent 384 TKAs from May 2007 to July 2008. These patients had been assigned alternately to receive a Scorpio posterior stabilized knee prosthesis (Group I, 158 patients, 187 knees) or a Columbus posterior stabilized knee prosthesis (Group II, 161 patients, 197 knees). We followed the patients with clinical and radiographic evaluations for a minimum of 24 months (mean, 26 months; range, 24-38 months). Ten retrieved prostheses were examined visually. Ten dislocations (5.1%; 10 of 197 knees) and seven aseptic loosenings of femoral components (3.6%; seven of 197 knees) occurred in Group II at a mean of 10.9 months postoperatively. However, no dislocation or loosening occurred in patients in Group I. Most dislocations were associated with varus flexion or flexion rotation movements during normal daily activities. The cam jump distance at 90º flexion for the Columbus prosthesis was lower than for the Scorpio prosthesis. We observed a high rate of early failure during short-term followup after implantation of a Columbus posterior stabilized prosthesis. It appears that early failures of the Columbus design were related to a different cam-post design attributable to a low jump distance during knee flexion. We no longer recommend using this device. Level II, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  12. [Effect of anterior cruciate ligament rupture on hamstring: quadriceps ratio during isokinetic knee extension and flexion at 30 degrees of flexion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hong-shi; Jiang, Yan-fang; Yang, Jie; Yu, Yuan-yuan; Wang, Yi; Xu, Yan; Ao, Ying-fang

    2015-10-18

    To evaluate the change in hamstring (H):quadriceps (Q) ratio following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture during isokinetic knee extension and flexion at 30 degrees of flexion which is important for knee dynamic function. A study was performed in 25 male complete unilateral ACL ruptures. Isokinetic concentric and eccentric quadriceps and hamstring muscle tests in both the deficient knees and intact knees were performed at 60°/s, respectively. At 30 degrees of flexion, the average torque of quadriceps and hamstring, Qe:Qc ratios (ratios of eccentric quadriceps to concentric quadriceps muscle torque), He:Hc ratios (eccentric hamstring to concentric hamstring), Hc:Qc ratios (concentric hamstring to concentric quadriceps), He:Qc ratios (eccentric hamstring to concentric quadriceps), and Hc:Qe ratios (concentric hamstring to eccentric quadriceps) were calculated. Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used. At 30 degrees of knee flexion, a significant reduction (Pquadriceps was observed at concentric and eccentric 60°/s produced by the deficient-side compared with the intact side. In addition, Hc:Qc, He:Qc, and Qe:Qc significantly increased on the ACL-deficient side. The change in H :Q ratio in the mode of isokinetic 60°/s at 30 degrees of knee flexion might therefore be a new tool to objectively document muscle function in ACL-deficient knee.

  13. Quasi-stiffness of the knee joint in flexion and extension during the golf swing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical understanding of the knee joint during a golf swing is essential to improve performance and prevent injury. In this study, we quantified the flexion/extension angle and moment as the primary knee movement, and evaluated quasi-stiffness represented by moment-angle coupling in the knee joint. Eighteen skilled and 23 unskilled golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras and two force platforms were used to record a swing motion. The anatomical angle and moment were calculated from kinematic and kinetic models, and quasi-stiffness of the knee joint was determined as an instantaneous slope of moment-angle curves. The lead knee of the skilled group had decreased resistance duration compared with the unskilled group (P knee was lower than that of the trail knee in the skilled group (P knee of the skilled golfers had greater flexible excursion duration than the trail knee of the skilled golfers, and of both the lead and trail knees of the unskilled golfers. These results provide critical information for preventing knee injuries during a golf swing and developing rehabilitation strategies following surgery.

  14. Infrapatellar plica of the knee: Revisited with MR arthrographies undertaken in the knee flexion position mimicking operative arthroscopic posture

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    Lee, Young Han; Song, Ho-Taek; Kim, Sungjun [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Jae [Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Arthroscopic Surgery Unit, Yonsei University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jin-Suck, E-mail: jss@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To describe the appearance of the infrapatellar plica (IPP) on magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) taken in 70° knee flexion, corresponding to the arthroscopic posture. Materials and methods: Twenty-two patients (23 knee joints) who underwent MRA with 70° knee flexion were enrolled. All patients underwent MRA with 70° knee flexion to simulate operative arthroscopy. The images included fat-suppressed T1-weighted spin echo axial, sagittal, and coronal images. The visualization and morphology of the IPP were retrospectively assessed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Results: The IPP was demonstrated in 78.3% (n = 18/23) and was best visualized on the sagittal section through the intercondylar notch. The IPP manifested as a linear hypointense structure with variable thicknesses. The intercondylar component was delineated clearly, arising from the anterior intercondylar notch in parallel with the ACL and curving gently downward to attach to the infrapatellar fat pad. On the other hand, the Hoffa's fat pad component was not depicted clearly. The morphology of the IPP was either a separate type (60.9%) or a split type (17.4%). Conclusion: The IPPs can be visualized with a high rate of detection and various morphologic appearances must be appreciated under the review of a flexed knee MRA.

  15. Comparison of isokinetic knee flexion and extension between men ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate possible gender differences in more than one isokinetic variable: peak torque, angle of peak torque, work and agonist/antagonist (H/Q) ratios at two different isokinetic velocities in the knee joint. Participants were drawn from 85 university students: 50 males and 35 ...

  16. Effects of knee extension constraint training on knee flexion angle and peak impact ground-reaction force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Wu, Will; Yao, Wanxiang; Spang, Jeffrey T; Creighton, R Alexander; Garrett, William E; Yu, Bing

    2014-04-01

    Low compliance with training programs is likely to be one of the major reasons for inconsistency of the data regarding the effectiveness of current anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs. Training methods that reduce training time and cost could favorably influence the effectiveness of ACL injury prevention programs. A newly designed knee extension constraint training device may serve this purpose. (1) Knee extension constraint training for 4 weeks would significantly increase the knee flexion angle at the time of peak impact posterior ground-reaction force and decrease peak impact ground-reaction forces during landing of a stop-jump task and a side-cutting task, and (2) the training effects would be retained 4 weeks after completion of the training program. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-four recreational athletes were randomly assigned to group A or B. Participants in group A played sports without wearing a knee extension constraint device for 4 weeks and then played sports while wearing the device for 4 weeks, while participants in group B underwent a reversed protocol. Both groups were tested at the beginning of week 1 and at the ends of weeks 4 and 8 without wearing the device. Knee joint angles were obtained from 3-dimensional videographic data, while ground-reaction forces were measured simultaneously using force plates. Analyses of variance were performed to determine the training effects and the retention of training effects. Participants in group A significantly increased knee flexion angles and decreased ground-reaction forces at the end of week 8 (P ≤ .012). Participants in group B significantly increased knee flexion angles and decreased ground-reaction forces at the ends of weeks 4 and 8 (P ≤ .007). However, participants in group B decreased knee flexion angles and increased ground-reaction forces at the end of week 8 in comparison with the end of week 4 (P ≤ .009). Knee extension constraint training for 4 weeks

  17. A Textile-Based Wearable Sensing Device Designed for Monitoring the Flexion Angle of Elbow and Knee Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-Wei Shyr

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work a wearable gesture sensing device consisting of a textile strain sensor, using elastic conductive webbing, was designed for monitoring the flexion angle of elbow and knee movements. The elastic conductive webbing shows a linear response of resistance to the flexion angle. The wearable gesture sensing device was calibrated and then the flexion angle-resistance equation was established using an assembled gesture sensing apparatus with a variable resistor and a protractor. The proposed device successfully monitored the flexion angle during elbow and knee movements.

  18. Influence of Hip Joint Position on Muscle Activity during Prone Hip Extension with Knee Flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suehiro, Tadanobu; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Okamoto, Mitsuhisa; Ishida, Hiroshi; Kobara, Kenichi; Fujita, Daisuke; Osaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hisashi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the selective activation of the gluteus maximus during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise, with the hip joint in different positions. [Subjects] The subjects were 21 healthy, male volunteers. [Methods] Activities of the right gluteus maximus, right hamstrings, bilateral lumbar erector spinae, and bilateral lumbar multifidus were measured using surface electromyography during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise. Measurements were made with the hip joint in each of 3 positions: (1) a neutral hip joint position, (2) an abduction hip joint position, and (3) an abduction with external rotation hip joint position. [Results] Gluteus maximus activity was significantly higher when the hip was in the abduction with external rotation hip joint position than when it was in the neutral hip joint and abduction hip joint positions. Gluteus maximus activity was also significantly higher in the abduction hip joint position than in the neutral hip joint position. Hamstring activity was significantly lower when the hip was in the abduction with external rotation hip joint position than when it was in the neutral hip joint and abduction hip joint positions. [Conclusion] Abduction and external rotation of the hip during prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise selectively activates the gluteus maximus.

  19. Supracondylar femoral osteotomy and knee joint replacement during the same surgical procedure in a type A haemophiliac patient with knee flexion deformity and ankylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osma Rueda, Jose Luis; Oliveros Vargas, Alejandra; Sosa, Cristian David

    2017-03-01

    Haemophilia A is the cause of diverse musculoskeletal disorders such as ankylosis, arthritis and associated angular deformity. There are few reported cases in patients with haemophilia A in which simultaneous supracondylar femoral osteotomy and knee joint replacement has been performed to treat knee angular deformity and ankylosis. Here we present the case of an 18year old male patient, with an evolution of two years, who was unable to walk due to the presence of an untreated supracondylar fracture in the left femur and ipsilateral haemophilic arthropathy which led him to develop an ankylosis in flexion close to 70°. Supracondylar osteotomy of the femur and of the left knee joint was performed in the same surgical procedure. Bleeding control was achieved with a protocol of factor VIII supply. The patient was followed up for eight years, and recovered a 0 to 90° range of motion and regained his gait pattern. This case potentially provides a new alternative approach for haemophilia patients presenting with angular deformities and complex ankylosis. We suggest that mixed lesions of intra- and extra-articular deformity in haemophiliac patients can be corrected during the same surgical intervention. In addition, interdisciplinary management including haematology for operative and immediately postoperative control of intra-bleeding using factor VIII supply and control, combined with a controlled rehabilitation plan, can yield good functional outcomes in patients with haemophilic arthropathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Knee joint moments during high flexion movements: Timing of peak moments and the effect of safety footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Helen C; Tennant, Liana M; Kingston, David C; Acker, Stacey M

    2017-03-01

    (1) Characterize knee joint moments and peak knee flexion moment timing during kneeling transitions, with the intent of identifying high-risk postures. (2) Determine whether safety footwear worn by kneeling workers (construction workers, tile setters, masons, roofers) alters high flexion kneeling mechanics. Fifteen males performed high flexion kneeling transitions. Kinetics and kinematics were analyzed for differences in ascent and descent in the lead and trail legs. Mean±standard deviation peak external knee adduction and flexion moments during transitions ranged from 1.01±0.31 to 2.04±0.66% body weight times height (BW∗Ht) and from 3.33 to 12.6% BW∗Ht respectively. The lead leg experienced significantly higher adduction moments compared to the trail leg during descent, when work boots were worn (interaction, p=0.005). There was a main effect of leg (higher lead vs. trail) on the internal rotation moment in both descent (p=0.0119) and ascent (p=0.0129) phases. Peak external knee adduction moments during transitions did not exceed those exhibited during level walking, thus increased knee adduction moment magnitude is likely not a main factor in the development of knee OA in occupational kneelers. Additionally, work boots only significantly increased the adduction moment in the lead leg during descent. In cases where one knee is painful, diseased, or injured, the unaffected knee should be used as the lead leg during asymmetric bilateral kneeling. Peak flexion moments occurred at flexion angles above the maximum flexion angle exhibited during walking (approximately 60°), supporting the theory that the loading of atypical surfaces may aid disease development or progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Difference between right and left side in total knee and unicondylar knee replacement: An interesting observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasudevan Thirumal Selvan

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We report an observation made about the differences between right and left side in case of total knee and unicondylar knee replacement. It was found that unicondylar knee replacement was performed more commonly on the left side (66%, as compared to only 34% on right side, where as total knee replacement was more common on the right side (64% as compared to 36% on left side. The exact clinical utility of this difference is yet to be known.

  2. In-situ mechanical behavior and slackness of the anterior cruciate ligament at multiple knee flexion angles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rachmatt, H.H.; Janssen, D.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Diercks, R.L.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In this study the in-situ tensile behavior and slackness of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was evaluated at various knee flexion angles. In four cadaveric knees the ACL was released at the tibial insertion, after which it was re-connected to a tensiometer. After pre-tensioning (10 N) the ACL

  3. In-situ mechanical behavior and slackness of the anterior cruciate ligament at multiple knee flexion angles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rachmat, H.H.; Janssen, D.W.; Verkerke, G.J.; Diercks, R.L.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the in-situ tensile behavior and slackness of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was evaluated at various knee flexion angles. In four cadaveric knees the ACL was released at the tibial insertion, after which it was re-connected to a tensiometer. After pre-tensioning (10 N) the ACL

  4. In-situ mechanical behavior and slackness of the anterior cruciate ligament at multiple knee flexion angles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rachmat, Hendi; Janssen, D.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus; Diercks, Ronald; Verdonschot, N.

    In this study the in-situ tensile behavior and slackness of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was evaluated at various knee flexion angles. In four cadaveric knees the ACL was released at the tibial insertion, after which it was re-connected to a tensiometer. After pre-tensioning (10 N) the ACL

  5. Intra- and intertester reliability and criterion validity of the parallelogram and universal goniometers for measuring maximum active knee flexion and extension of patients with knee restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, L; Balmer, S; Tousignant, M; O'Sullivan, J P; Goudreault, C; Goudreault, M; Gringras, S

    2001-03-01

    To examine the intra- and intertester reliability of the universal goniometer (UG) and parallelogram goniometer (PG), and to assess the criterion validity of the same instruments on subjects with knee restrictions. Reliability and validation study. Radiology department at university hospital. Sixty subjects (34 men, 26 women; mean age, 52yr) with various knee restrictions. Sixteen goniometric measurements were collected per patient by 2 physical therapists. Subjects were evaluated in knee flexion and knee extension positions. To serve as a gold standard, radiographs were taken in both positions. Active knee flexion and knee extension on 2 goniometers, radiographs. Maximum active range of motion (AROM). The UG intratester reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients [ICCs]) was .997 in flexion and .972 to .985 in extension. The results were also high with the PG (ICC =.996,.953-.955) for flexion and extension, respectively. The intertester reliability was high for flexion (ICC =.977-.982) and for extension (ICC =.893-.926) when using the UG. For the PG, ICC results ranged from .959 to .970 for flexion and from .856 to .898 for extension. Criterion validity (r) varied from .975 to .987 for flexion and from .390 to .442 for extension with the UG, and from .976 to .985 for flexion and .423 to .514 for extension with the PG. Intra- and intertester reliability were high for both goniometers. The results for the criterion validity varied. Our study also revealed that it is preferable to use goniometry rather than visual estimations when measuring AROM. It is recommended that the same therapist take all the measurements when assessing AROM for UG and PG goniometric measurements on patients with knee restrictions.

  6. Modification of Knee Flexion Angle Has Patient-Specific Effects on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Risk Factors During Jump Landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, Julien; Clancy, Caitlin; Dowling, Ariel V; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries may be decreased through the use of intervention programs that focus on increasing the knee flexion angle during jump landing, which decreases strain on the ACL. To investigate whether intervention training designed to change the knee flexion angle during landing causes secondary changes in other known measures associated with the risk of ACL injuries and to examine the time points when these secondary measures change. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 39 healthy recreational athletes performed a volleyball block jump task in an instrumented gait laboratory. The participants first completed the jumps without any modification to their normal landing technique. They were then given oral instruction to land softly and to increase their knee flexion angle during landing. Lower body kinematics and kinetics were measured before and after the modification using an optoelectronic motion capture system. The knee flexion angle after the modification significantly increased from 11.2° to 15.2° at initial contact and from 67.8° to 100.7° at maximum flexion, and the time between initial contact and maximum flexion increased from 177.4 to 399.4 milliseconds. The flexion modification produced a substantial reduction in vertical ground-reaction force (243.1 to 187.8 %BW) with a concomitant reduction in the maximum flexion moment. Interestingly, the flexion modification only affected the abduction angle and abduction moment for the group of participants that landed in an initial adducted position before the modification and had no significant effect on the group that landed in an abducted position. Increasing the knee flexion angle during jump landing may be an effective intervention to improve knee biomechanical risk factors associated with an ACL injury. However, the fact that the flexion modification only influenced critical risk factors (the abduction angle and abduction moment) in participants who initially

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF BODY POSITION ON LOAD RANGE DURING ISOKINETIC KNEE EXTENSION/FLEXION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W. Findley

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Isokinetic range of motion (ROM has three distinct phases: rate of velocity development (RVD, load range (LR, and deceleration (DCC. The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in isokinetic knee extension/flexion LR exist between body positions. Ten subjects (4 males and 6 females, age 29.3 ± 5.4 yrs, ht 1.71 ± 0.10 m, wt 71.9 ± 12.9 kg volunteered to participate in the seated vs. prone investigation and nine different subjects (4 males and 5 females, age 29.5 ± 6.9 yrs, ht 1.72 ± 0.09 m, wt 69.0 ± 13.8 kg volunteered to participate in the seated vs. supine study. Each subject completed 3 maximal reciprocal concentric/concentric repetitions of dominant knee extension/flexion on a Biodex System 2 isokinetic dynamometer at 60, 120, 180, 240 and 360 deg·sec-1 in the supine or prone and seated positions. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed that only seated flexion at 360 deg·sec-1 (57.6 ± 1.7 degrees elicited significantly (p < 0.05 greater LR than prone (49.2 ± 2.8 degrees. No significant differences in LR extension or flexion existed at any velocity between the supine vs. seated positions. ANOVA also demonstrated differences between seated vs. prone torque, work and power at most velocities while there was no difference between seated vs. supine. LR is the only phase of an isokinetic repetition where quantifiable resistance is maintained and this data appears to support that it may not be position-dependent but position may alter traditional performance variables

  8. Comparison of High-Flexion Fixed-Bearing and High-Flexion Mobile-Bearing Total Knee Arthroplasties-A Prospective Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoo; Park, Jang-Won; Kim, Jun-Shik

    2018-01-01

    There is none, to our knowledge, about comparison of high-flexion fixed-bearing and high-flexion mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) in the same patients. The purpose of this study was to determine whether clinical results; radiographic and computed tomographic scan results; and the survival rate of a high-flexion mobile-bearing TKA is better than that of a high-flexion fixed-bearing TKA. The present study consisted of 92 patients (184 knees) who underwent same-day bilateral TKA. Of those, 17 were men and 75 were women. The mean age at the time of index arthroplasty was 61.5 ± 8.3 years (range 52-65 years). The mean body mass index was 26.2 ± 3.3 kg/m 2 (range 23-34 kg/m 2 ). The mean follow-up was 11.2 years (range 10-12 years). The Knee Society knee scores (93 vs 92 points; P = .531) and function scores (80 vs 80 points; P = 1.000), WOMAC scores (14 vs 15 points; P = .972), and UCLA activity scores (6 vs 6 points; P = 1.000) were not different between the 2 groups at 12 years follow-up. There were no differences in any radiographic and CT scan parameters between the 2 groups. Kaplan-Meier survivorship of the TKA component was 98% (95% confidence interval, 93-100) in the high-flexion fixed-bearing TKA group and 99% (95% confidence interval, 94-100) in the high-flexion mobile-bearing TKA group 12 years after the operation. We found no benefit to mobile-bearing TKA in terms of pain, function, radiographic and CT scan results, and survivorship. Longer-term follow-up is necessary to prove the benefit of the high-flexion mobile-bearing TKA over the high-flexion fixed-bearing TKA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of abduction and external rotation of the hip joint on muscle onset time during prone hip extension with knee flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suehiro, Tadanobu; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Ishida, Hiroshi; Kobara, Kenichi; Fujita, Daisuke; Osaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hisashi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of hip position on muscle onset time during prone hip extension with knee flexion. [Subjects] The study included 21 healthy male volunteers. [Methods] Muscle onset times of the right gluteus maximus, right hamstrings, bilateral lumbar erector spinae, and bilateral lumbar multifidus were measured using surface electromyography during right hip extension with knee flexion in the prone position. Measurements were made with the hip in 3 positions: (1) neutral, (2) abduction, and (3) abduction and external rotation. [Results] Gluteus maximus onset relative to the hamstrings was significantly earlier with hip abduction and with hip abduction and external rotation compared with that with the hip in the neutral position. Gluteus maximus onset relative to the hamstrings was significantly earlier with hip abduction and external rotation compared with that with hip abduction. The bilateral multifidus and left lumbar erector spinae onset times relative to the hamstrings were significantly earlier with hip abduction and external rotation compared with those with hip abduction and with the hip in the neutral position. [Conclusion] Abduction and external rotation of the hip during prone hip extension with knee flexion is effective for advancing the onset times of the gluteus maximus, bilateral multifidus, and contralateral lumbar erector spinae.

  10. Effect of a pelvic wedge and belt on the medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed a pelvic wedge and belt and investigated their effects on the selective activation of medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion. [Subjects and Methods] Nine adults were enrolled. The participants performed exercises without and with the pelvic wedge and belt, and the electromyographic activities of the medial and lateral hamstring muscles were recorded. [Results] The activity of the medial hamstring was increased significantly when using the pelvic wedge and belt, while the activity of the lateral hamstring did not differ significantly. [Conclusion] The pelvic wedge and belt provide a self-locked position during knee flexion in the prone position. Prone knee flexion in this position is an effective self-exercise for balanced strengthening of the medial hamstring.

  11. Contributions of knee swing initiation and ankle plantar flexion to the walking mechanics of amputees using a powered prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraham, Kimberly A; Fey, Nicholas P; Simon, Ann M; Hargrove, Levi J

    2014-01-01

    Recently developed powered prostheses are capable of producing near-physiological joint torque at the knee and/or ankle joints. Based on previous studies of biological joint impedance and the mechanics of able-bodied gait, an impedance-based controller has been developed for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis that integrates knee swing initiation and powered plantar flexion in late stance with increasing ankle stiffness throughout stance. In this study, five prosthesis configuration conditions were tested to investigate the individual contributions of each sub-strategy to the overall walking mechanics of four unilateral transfemoral amputees as they completed a clinical 10-m walk test using a powered knee and ankle prosthesis. The baseline condition featured constant ankle stiffness and no swing initiation or powered plantar flexion. The four remaining conditions featured knee swing initiation alone (SI) or in combination with powered plantar flexion (SI+PF), increasing ankle stiffness (SI+IK), or both (SI+PF+IK). Self-selected walking speed did not significantly change between conditions, although subjects tended to walk the slowest in the baseline condition compared to conditions with swing initiation. The addition of powered plantar flexion resulted in significantly higher ankle power generation in late stance irrespective of ankle stiffness. The inclusion of swing initiation resulted in a significantly more flexed knee at toe off and a significantly higher average extensor knee torque following toe off. Identifying individual contributions of intrinsic control strategies to prosthesis biomechanics could help inform the refinement of impedance-based prosthesis controllers and simplify future designs of prostheses and lower-limb assistive devices alike.

  12. Active, passive and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching are comparable in improving the knee flexion range in people with total knee replacement: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Tiffany P Y; Ng, Gabriel Y F

    2010-10-01

    To compare the immediate and medium-term effects of three stretching methods on the knee flexion range in people with a total knee replacement. Randomized clinical trial. Rehabilitation hospital. 117 patients were recruited and 100 (mean age: 68.43 ± 7.95 years) of them completed the study. Patients receiving total knee replacement due to knee osteoarthritis were randomly assigned into 3 groups of: active stretching (group 1, n =32), passive stretching (group 2, n =35) and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching (group 3, n =33). The immediate change in both active and passive knee flexion range after the first treatment session and the pattern of change in these ranges throughout the 2-week study period were compared among the three groups. All groups demonstrated significant improvement in knee ranges with time. The active range of group 1 improved by 19.9°, group 2 by 25.3° and group 3 by 22.5° throughout the 2-week period, whereas the improvements in the passive range were 18.8°, 24.5° and 22.7°, respectively. For between-group comparisons, no significant difference was found in both active (P = 0.647) and passive (P = 0.501) knee range immediately after stretching. For the changes at 2 weeks, there was also no significant difference among the groups in both active (P = 0.716) and passive (P = 0.959) knee ranges. This study revealed that all three modes of stretching were associated with an increase in the knee flexion range of patients after total knee replacement, with no statistically significant differences between the changes seen.

  13. Correlation of isokinetic and novel hand-held dynamometry measures of knee flexion and extension strength testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Rod; Jacobsen, Phillip; Prior, Simon; Skazalski, Christopher; Otten, Roald; Johnson, Amanda

    2012-09-01

    Describe inter-rater reliability of, and correlations between a novel method of isometric knee extension and flexion and eccentric knee flexion strength using hand-held dynamometry and isokinetic testing for flexion/extension in the knees of athletic participants. Document strength data normalized to the individual's limb muscle mass. Observational and reliability study. Inter-rater reliability for each of the hand-held dynamometry measures was established in both legs of 10 volunteers (6 male). During routine annual screening, 216 male professional football (soccer) players were examined using these same measures in addition to performing an isokinetic evaluation of knee flexion and extension strength. Intra-class correlation coefficients for inter-rater reliability, Pearson r correlations between hand-held dynamometry and isokinetic dynamometry were calculated. Peak torque, peak torque normalized to: body weight; lean body mass; and lean limb mass were documented. Excellent inter-rater reliability was demonstrated with intra-class correlation₂,₁ values of 0.90, 0.91, and 0.96, for the eccentric hamstrings, isometric hamstrings, and isometric quadriceps measures respectively. Medium to high correlations (r=0.322-0.617) which were all significant (pdynamometry and isokinetic measures. We present 3 novel and reliable methods of examining knee flexion and extension strength using hand-held dynamometry which require less skill and strength on the part of the examiner than previous measures. Correlations between these measures and isokinetic dynamometry are documented. The hand-held dynamometry examinations took less than 4 min per player to conduct and may be useful in clinical practice where isokinetic examination can be difficult to implement. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Two- to Four-Year Follow-up Results of Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a New High-Flexion Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Man Soo; Koh, In Jun; Jang, Sung Won; Jeon, Neung Han

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate minimum 2-year follow-up results of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) performed using a new high-flexion prosthesis design (LOSPA). Materials and Methods The 2- to 4-year results of 191 consecutive TKAs (177 patients) with the LOSPA posterior-stabilized prosthesis were evaluated. The patients were assessed clinically and radiographically using the Knee Society scoring system (KSS) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Results The mean range of motion (ROM) increased significantly from 117.4° (range, 75° to 140°) preoperatively to 126.7° (range, 80° to 144°) postoperatively (pknee required revision for deep infection. No knee had aseptic loosening or osteolysis. Radiolucent lines were noted in 15 knees (7.9%). Conclusions The new high-flexion total knee prosthesis resulted in no early aseptic loosening of the component and improved postoperative ROM comparable to other high-flexion TKA prostheses at 2- to 4-year follow-ups. PMID:26955612

  15. Are the Outcomes of Revision Knee Arthroplasty for Flexion Instability the Same as for Other Major Failure Mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajgopal, Ashok; Panjwani, Taufiq R; Rao, Arun; Dahiya, Vivek

    2017-10-01

    Aseptic loosening, infection, and flexion instability have emerged as the leading etiologies for revision after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Although studies have reported improved outcomes after revision TKA, the relative functional and clinical outcomes of patients revised for flexion instability and other failure etiologies have not been extensively reported. The aim of the study was to compare the functional and patient-reported outcomes of revision TKA for the common failure etiologies. We retrospectively reviewed records of 228 consecutive cases of revision TKA from 2008 to 2014. Revisions performed for aseptic loosening (n = 53), septic revisions (n = 48), and isolated flexion instability (n = 45) with a minimum of 18 months follow-up were included for analysis. Revision for all other etiologies (n = 82) were excluded. The Modified Knee Society Score (KSS), KSS Function, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index were recorded for all cases. A 7-point Likert scale was used to record patient's perception of outcomes after revision surgery and analyzed based on etiology. Although all groups showed improvement in outcome after revision TKA, the changes in Modified KSS and KSS-Function varied according to the etiology of failure of the primary procedure with the smallest improvement being reported by the flexion instability group. Patients undergoing revision for isolated flexion instability have less improvement in functional outcome as compared with other etiologies. We hypothesize this is due to a higher baseline preoperative knee function in the flexion instability group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Automatic string generation for estimating in vivo length changes of the medial patellofemoral ligament during knee flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Matthias; Diether, Salomon; Vlachopoulos, Lazaros; Fucentese, Sandro; Fürnstahl, Philipp

    2014-06-01

    Modeling ligaments as three-dimensional strings is a popular method for in vivo estimation of ligament length. The purpose of this study was to develop an algorithm for automated generation of non-penetrating strings between insertion points and to evaluate its feasibility for estimating length changes of the medial patellofemoral ligament during normal knee flexion. Three-dimensional knee models were generated from computed tomography (CT) scans of 10 healthy subjects. The knee joint under weight-bearing was acquired in four flexion positions (0°-120°). The path between insertion points was computed in each position to quantify string length and isometry. The average string length was maximal in 0° of flexion (64.5 ± 3.9 mm between femoral and proximal patellar point; 62.8 ± 4.0 mm between femoral and distal patellar point). It was minimal in 30° (60.0 ± 2.6 mm) for the proximal patellar string and in 120° (58.7 ± 4.3 mm) for the distal patellar string. The insertion points were considered to be isometric in 4 of the 10 subjects. The proposed algorithm appears to be feasible for estimating string lengths between insertion points in an automatic fashion. The length measurements based on CT images acquired under physiological loading conditions may give further insights into knee kinematics.

  17. Mobile bearing medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in patients whose lifestyles involve high degrees of knee flexion: A 10-14year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Won Sik; Lee, Kwang Won; Kim, Ha Yong; Kim, Kap Jung; Chun, Young Sub; Yang, Dae Suk

    2017-08-01

    Because Asian populations have different lifestyles, such as squatting and sitting on the floor, from those of Western populations, it is possible that the clinical results and survival rate of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) for Asian patients may be different. This study described outcomes of mobile bearing medial UKA for Korean patients. A total of the 164 knees treated with mobile bearing UKAs in 147 patients (14 males and 133 females) were reviewed. The mean follow-up period was 12.1years (range 10.1-14). The clinical outcomes, such as the Hospital for Special Surgery Knee score, the Oxford Knee Score and the Knee Society rating system, showed statistically significant improvement from pre-operative to final follow-up (Pbearing dislocation. The 95% confidence interval of survival rate at 12years was 84.1%, with revision for any reason as the end point. Minimally invasive mobile bearing UKA in Asian patients who required high degrees of knee flexion showed rapid recovery and good clinical outcome. However, they also showed relatively high rates of bearing dislocation and aseptic loosening. Therefore, mobile bearing UKA should only be performed in patients whose lifestyle involves high flexions after carefully considering these risks and benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Vicious Cycle of Multiple Invasive Treatments in a Hemophilic Inhibitor Positive Child with Resistant Knee Flexion Contracture, A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Reza Kachooei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled recurrent hemarthrosis can end to contracture, deformity, pain, joint destruction and gait disorders which are disabling. We are going to report a challenge, a unilateral knee flexion contracture in a child with severe hemophilia A and inhibitor who underwent different treatment options with unsatisfactory improvement of knee range of motion. Mismanaging postoperatively, patient and parents irresponsibility in managing self-care, lack of access and affordability to treatment and unavailability of proper treatment can be the reasons of recurrence in addition to the tough nature of a patient with inhibitor.

  19. Post-operative Hypertension following Correction of Flexion Deformity of the Knees in a Spastic Diplegic Child: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin Mohan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An adolescent boy with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy presented with crouch gait. He had bilateral severe flexion deformities of knees and hips. He was treated with single event multilevel surgery for the correction of deformities. Surgical procedures included bilateral adductor release, iliopsoas lengthening, bilateral femoral shortening and patella plication. Persistent hypertension was noted in the post-operative period. All causes of secondary hypertension were ruled out. Having persistent hypertension following the femoral shortening procedure is unusual. Antihypertensive medication controlled his blood pressure 15 months after surgery. Hypertension following correction of knee flexion deformity and limb lengthening is well known. Hypertension has not been described with the shortening osteotomy of the femur. Hypertension is a rare complication following the corrective surgery for the treatment of crouch gait. Blood pressure should be monitored during the post-operative period to detect such a rare complication.

  20. Effect of a pelvic wedge and belt on the medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed a pelvic wedge and belt and investigated their effects on the selective activation of medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion. [Subjects and Methods] Nine adults were enrolled. The participants performed exercises without and with the pelvic wedge and belt, and the electromyographic activities of the medial and lateral hamstring muscles were recorded. [Results] The activity of the medial hamstring was increased significantly when using the pelvi...

  1. Effect of abduction and external rotation of the hip joint on muscle onset time during prone hip extension with knee flexion

    OpenAIRE

    Suehiro, Tadanobu; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Ishida, Hiroshi; Kobara, Kenichi; Fujita, Daisuke; Osaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hisashi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of hip position on muscle onset time during prone hip extension with knee flexion. [Subjects] The study included 21 healthy male volunteers. [Methods] Muscle onset times of the right gluteus maximus, right hamstrings, bilateral lumbar erector spinae, and bilateral lumbar multifidus were measured using surface electromyography during right hip extension with knee flexion in the prone position. Measurements were made with the hip in 3 positions: (1) ...

  2. The Effects of Varying Ankle Foot Orthosis Stiffness on Gait in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy Who Walk with Excessive Knee Flexion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkum, Y.L.; Buizer, A.I.; van den Noort, J.C.; Becher, J.G.; Harlaar, J.; Brehm, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rigid Ankle-Foot Orthoses (AFOs) are commonly prescribed to counteract excessive knee flexion during the stance phase of gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). While rigid AFOs may normalize knee kinematics and kinetics effectively, it has the disadvantage of impeding push-off

  3. The Effects of Varying Ankle Foot Orthosis Stiffness on Gait in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy Who Walk with Excessive Knee Flexion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkum, Yvette L.; Buizer, Annemieke I.; van den Noort, Josien C.; Becher, Jules G.; Harlaar, Jaap; Brehm, Merel-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Rigid Ankle-Foot Orthoses (AFOs) are commonly prescribed to counteract excessive knee flexion during the stance phase of gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). While rigid AFOs may normalize knee kinematics and kinetics effectively, it has the disadvantage of impeding push-off power. A

  4. Topographic deformation patterns of knee cartilage after exercises with high knee flexion: an in vivo 3D MRI study using voxel-based analysis at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horng, Annie; Stockinger, M.; Notohamiprodjo, M. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Raya, J.G. [New York University Langone Medical Center, Center for Biomedical Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Pietschmann, M. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Munich (Germany); Hoehne-Hueckstaedt, U.; Glitsch, U.; Ellegast, R. [Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the German Social Accident Insurance (IFA), Sankt Augustin (Germany); Hering, K.G. [Miner' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Dortmund (Germany); Glaser, C. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); RZM Zentrum, Munich (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    To implement a novel voxel-based technique to identify statistically significant local cartilage deformation and analyze in-vivo topographic knee cartilage deformation patterns using a voxel-based thickness map approach for high-flexion postures. Sagittal 3T 3D-T1w-FLASH-WE-sequences of 10 healthy knees were acquired before and immediately after loading (kneeling/squatting/heel sitting/knee bends). After cartilage segmentation, 3D-reconstruction and 3D-registration, colour-coded deformation maps were generated by voxel-based subtraction of loaded from unloaded datasets to visualize cartilage thickness changes in all knee compartments. Compression areas were found bifocal at the peripheral medial/caudolateral patella, both posterior femoral condyles and both anterior/central tibiae. Local cartilage thickening were found adjacent to the compression areas. Significant local strain ranged from +13 to -15 %. Changes were most pronounced after squatting, least after knee bends. Shape and location of deformation areas varied slightly with the loading paradigm, but followed a similar pattern consistent between different individuals. Voxel-based deformation maps identify individual in-vivo load-specific and posture-associated strain distribution in the articular cartilage. The data facilitate understanding individual knee loading properties and contribute to improve biomechanical 3 models. They lay a base to investigate the relationship between cartilage degeneration patterns in common osteoarthritis and areas at risk of cartilage wear due to mechanical loading in work-related activities. (orig.)

  5. Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability of the fluid goniometer for measuring active knee flexion in painful knees; correlations do not mean agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remigio, Wilton; Tsai, Nancy; Layos, Leonivic; Chavez, Michelle

    2017-06-01

    [Purpose] The fluid goniometer is an instrument for measuring range of motion. Reliability of the fluid goniometer has not been established for subjects with painful knee joints. The purpose of this study was to determine the inter-rater and intra-rater reliability of the fluid goniometer in measuring active knee flexion of painful knees and to test its agreement with the gold standard ruler goniometer. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five individuals with either unilateral or bilateral painful knees participated in the study. Two raters each took three measurements with the same Baseline ® fluid goniometer on 35 knees. [Results] Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were 0.97 for both intra-rater and inter-rater measurements, denoting high relative reliability. The large standard error of measurement (SEM) value of 6.6 degrees, and the 95% limits of agreement, which revealed a potential difference of 18.4 degrees between raters of similar subjects, however, revealed poor absolute reliability. The smallest detectable difference (SDD) of 18 degrees was also large. [Conclusion] The results revealed excellent relative reliability, but a large amount of variability between the raters' measurements. The sensitivity of the fluid level of the goniometer to end range tremors of the lower leg flexed against gravity in the obligatory prone position may contribute significantly to the large variability in knee ROM values.

  6. Relation between peak knee flexion angle and knee ankle kinetics in single-leg jump landing from running: a pilot study on male handball players to prevent ACL injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameer, Mariam A; Muaidi, Qassim I

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between knee kinematics and knee-ankle kinetics during the landing phase of single leg jumping has been widely studied to identify proper strategies for preventing non-contact ACL injury. However, there is a lack of study on knee-ankle kinetics at peak knee flexion angle during jumping from running. Hence, the purpose of this study is to establish the relationship between peak knee flexion angle, knee extension moment, ankle plantar flexion moment and ground reaction force in handball players in order to protect ACL from excessive stress during single leg jumping. In addition, the study also clarifies the role of calf muscles in relieving part of ACL stresses with different knee flexion angles during landing. Fifteen active male elite handball players of Saudi Arabia have participated in this study (Age = 22.6 ± 3.5years, Height = 182 ± 3.7 cm, Weight = 87.5 ± 10.2 kg). The players performed three successful landings of single-leg jump following running a fixed distance of about 450cm. The data were collected using a 3D motion capture and analysis system (VICON). Pearson product moment correlation coefficients showed that greater peak knee flexion angle is related significantly to both lesser knee extension moment (r = -.623, P = .013) and vertical component of ground reaction force (VGRF) (r = -.688, P = .005) in landing phase. Moreover, increasing the peak knee flexion angle in landing phase tends to increase the ankle plantar flexion moment significantly (r = .832, P = .000). With an increase of the peak knee flexion angle during single leg jump landing from running, there would be less knee extension moment, low impact force and more plantar flexion moment. As such, the clinical implication of this study is that there may be a possible protective mechanism by increasing the knee flexion angle during landing phase, which tends to protect the ACL from vigorous strain and injuries.

  7. Kneeling and standing up from a chair as performance-based tests to evaluate knee function in the high-flexion range : A randomized controlled trial comparing a conventional and a high-flexion TKA design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Ven, Paul J.P.; van de Groes, Sebastiaan; Zelle, Jorrit; Koëter, Sander; Hannink, Gerjon; Verdonschot, Nico

    2017-01-01

    Background: We compared the functional outcome between conventional and high-flexion total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using kneeling and sit-to-stand tests at 1 year post-operative. In addition, the patient's daily functioning, pain and satisfaction were quantified using questionnaires. Methods: We

  8. Kneeling and standing up from a chair as performance-based tests to evaluate knee function in the high-flexion range: a randomized controlled trial comparing a conventional and a high-flexion TKA design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, P.J.P. van der; Groes, S.A. van de; Zelle, J.G.; Koeter, S.; Hannink, G.J.; Verdonschot, N.J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We compared the functional outcome between conventional and high-flexion total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using kneeling and sit-to-stand tests at 1 year post-operative. In addition, the patient's daily functioning, pain and satisfaction were quantified using questionnaires. METHODS: We

  9. Influence of knee flexion and atraumatic mobilisation of infrapatellar fat pad on incidence and severity of anterior knee pain after tibial nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Andrija; Korac, Zelimir; Bozic, Nenad-Bozo; Stedul, Ivan

    2013-09-01

    We evaluated the incidence and aetiology of anterior knee pain (AKP) in a series of patients that underwent intramedullary nailing for stabilisation of tibial fractures. During the preparation of the entry site no excision of the infrapatellar fat was allowed and electrical haemostasis was kept at the lowest level. Medullary canal was reamed and the nails inserted in position of knee flexion over 100 degrees. All fractures were fixed using medial paratendinous approach. Functional outcome was measured using Lysholm knee score. The knee range of movement and return to previous level of activity were also documented and analysed. Mean follow up was 38.9 months (range 12-84 months). In total 60 patients with 62 tibial shaft fractures were analysed. The mean age at the time of final follow up was 49.4 years (range 20-87). In 22 (35.5%) a newly developed and persisting pain in the anterior region of the operated knee was reported. According to VAP scale, the pain was mild (VAS 1-3) in 12 cases (19.4%) and moderate (VAS 4-6) in 10 (16.1%). In 16 cases (73%) the pain was noticed 6-12 months after injury and subjectively related to return to full range of working and recreational activities. The mean Lysholm knee score in the group without AKP was 90.8. In the AKP group with mild pain it was 88.4 and in the group with moderate AKP it was 79.9. Complete return to previous professional and recreational activities occurred in 49/60 patients (81.7%). Content with the treatment regarding expectations in recovery dynamics and return to desired level of activity was present in 98.3% of patients; one patient was unsatisfied with the treatment. Our results indicate that respecting the physiological motion of Hoffa pad and menisci during knee flexion, accompanied with atraumatic mobilisation of retrotendinous fat, reduces incidence and severity of anterior knee pain following intramedullary fixation of tibial shaft fractures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The risk of manipulation under anesthesia due to unsatisfactory knee flexion after fast-track total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wied, Christian; Thomsen, Morten G; Kallemose, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fast-track TKA has significantly shortened the time available for physiotherapists to optimize knee ROM before discharge. Safety aspects concerning knee stiffness and the need for manipulation in a fast-track setting need to be illuminated. The study aims were to analyze if fast-track...

  11. The flexion-extension axis of the knee and its relationship to the rotational orientation of the tibial plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, Charles M; Noble, Philip C; Ismaily, Sabir K; Stal, Drew; Incavo, Steve J

    2011-09-01

    We measured the optimal rotational alignment of the tibial component with respect to anatomic landmarks. Kinematic data were collected from functional maneuvers simulated in 20 cadaveric knees mounted in a joint simulator. The axis of knee motion was calculated for squatting and lunging activities over the interval of 30° to 90° of knee flexion. We then examined the accuracy and variability of 5 different anatomic axes in predicting the direction of knee motion. No one landmark guaranteed correct alignment of the tibial component and most predictors were highly variable (range, 6°-21°). The most accurate indicators were the medial third of the tibial tubercle (average error: squatting: 3.5° external rotation; lunging: 9.5°), and the medial-lateral axis of the resected tibial surface (6.7° and 1.1° internal rotation). The correct alignment of the tibial component can be best achieved by splitting the difference between these landmarks to eliminate placement of the component in excessive external and excessive internal rotation. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Focusing on Increasing Velocity during Heavy Resistance Knee Flexion Exercise Boosts Hamstring Muscle Activity in Chronic Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Vinstrup

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Muscle strength is markedly reduced in stroke patients, which has negative implications for functional capacity and work ability. Different types of feedback during strength training exercises may alter neuromuscular activity and functional gains. Objective. To compare levels of muscle activity during conditions of blindfolding and intended high contraction speed with a normal condition of high-intensity knee flexions. Methods. Eighteen patients performed unilateral machine knee flexions with a 10-repetition maximum load. Surface electromyography (EMG was recorded from the quadrics and hamstring muscles and normalized to maximal EMG (nEMG of the nonparetic limb. Results. For the paretic leg, the speed condition showed higher values of muscle activity compared with the normal and blindfolded conditions for both biceps femoris and semitendinosus. Likewise, the speed condition showed higher co-contraction values compared with the normal and blindfolded conditions for the vastus lateralis. No differences were observed between exercise conditions for the nonparetic leg. Conclusion. Chronic stroke patients are capable of performing heavy resistance training with intended high speed of contraction. Focusing on speed during the concentric phase elicited higher levels of muscle activity of the hamstrings compared to normal and blindfolded conditions, which may have implications for regaining fast muscle strength in stroke survivors.

  13. Ultrasound evaluation of fluid in knee recesses at varying degrees of flexion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandl, P; Brossard, M; Aegerter, P

    2012-01-01

    Various methods are utilized in daily practice to obtain optimal information on effusion in the knee. Our aim is to investigate which scanning position provides the best information about synovial fluid in the knee by using ultrasound and to evaluate the magnitude of difference for measuring syno...

  14. Influences of knee flexion angle and portal position on the location of femoral tunnel outlet in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with anteromedial portal technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Kanji; Okazaki, Ken; Tashiro, Yasutaka; Matsubara, Hirokazu; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the influences of knee flexion angle and portal position on the location of femoral tunnel outlet in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with the anteromedial (AM) portal technique. We recruited 6 volunteers with 12 normal knees. Each knee was flexed 120° or 135° and scanned with an open MRI. A 3D knee model was created. Virtual femoral tunnels were created on the footprint of the AM bundle and the posterolateral (PL) bundle of the ACL from three arthroscopic portals: the standard AM portal, the far medial and low portal, and the far medial and high (FMH) portal. The location of the femoral tunnel outlet was evaluated by comparing to the dissected cadaveric knee. Both increased flexion angle and lowering the drilling portal have a similar influence on the femoral tunnel outlet by moving them anterior and distally. Medialization of the portal moves them posteriorly and distally. PL tunnels created on the 120° knee model are more likely to be located under the lateral head of the gastrocnemius especially when they are drilled through the AM or FMH portals. If the femoral tunnel outlet is located under the soft tissue such as gastrocnemius attachment, suspension fixation devices may lapse into fixation failure by sitting on the soft tissue rather than the cortex bone surface. It is more desirable to drill in 135° knee flexion rather than 120°, and through a lower portal, to avoid creating the femoral tunnel outlet under soft tissues.

  15. Preoperative varus-valgus kinematic pattern throughout flexion persists more strongly after cruciate-retaining than after posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Kazunori; Oonishi, Yoshio; Kutsuna, Tatsuhiko; Watamori, Kunihiko; Iseki, Yasutake; Kiyomatsu, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Seiji; Miura, Hiromasa

    2016-08-01

    Restoration of normal knee kinematics is key to improving patient satisfaction and functional outcomes after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, the effect of preoperative varus-valgus kinematics due to knee osteoarthritis on the postoperative kinematics is unclear. The function of the knee ligament contributes to both knee stability and kinematics. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in varus-valgus kinematics before and after TKA using a navigation system, in addition to comparing the pre- and postoperative changes in kinematic patterns between cruciate-retaining (CR)- and posterior-stabilized (PS)-TKAs. Forty knees treated with TKA were evaluated (CR-TKA 20; PS-TKA 20). Manual mild passive knee flexion was applied while moving the leg from full extension to flexion. The varus-valgus angle was automatically measured by a navigation system at every 10° of the flexion angle, and the kinematics were evaluated. Kinematic patterns throughout flexion can be classified into five types. The pre- and postoperative kinematic patterns were similar in 60% of patients who underwent CR-TKA, whereas they were similar in only 25% of those who underwent PS-TKA. The mean change in the size of the varus-valgus angle throughout flexion did not differ between CR-TKA and PS-TKA. However, the distribution of changes in the size of the varus-valgus angle differed between CR-TKA and PS-TKA. We obtained the following results: 1) some patterns of varus-valgus kinematics are noted under unloading conditions despite recovery of neutral alignment in extension and 2) the preoperative varus-valgus kinematic pattern persisted more strongly after CR-TKA than after PS-TKA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. An individual approach for optimizing ankle-foot orthoses to improve mobility in children with spastic cerebral palsy walking with excessive knee flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkum, Yvette L; Harlaar, Jaap; Buizer, Annemieke I; van den Noort, Josien C; Becher, Jules G; Brehm, Merel-Anne

    2016-05-01

    Ankle-Foot Orthoses (AFOs) are commonly prescribed to promote gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The AFO prescription process is however largely dependent on clinical experience, resulting in confusing results regarding treatment efficacy. To maximize efficacy, the AFO's mechanical properties should be tuned to the patient's underlying impairments. This study aimed to investigate whether the efficacy of a ventral shell AFO (vAFO) to reduce knee flexion and walking energy cost could be improved by individually optimizing AFO stiffness in children with CP walking with excessive knee flexion. Secondarily, the effect of the optimized vAFO on daily walking activity was investigated. Fifteen children with spastic CP were prescribed with a hinged vAFO with adjustable stiffness. Effects of a rigid, stiff, and flexible setting on knee angle and the net energy cost (EC) [Jkg(-1)m(-1)] were assessed to individually select the optimal stiffness. After three months, net EC, daily walking activity [stridesmin(-1)] and knee angle [deg] while walking with the optimized vAFO were compared to walking with shoes-only. A near significant 9% (p=0.077) decrease in net EC (-0.5Jkg(-1)m(-1)) was found for walking with the optimized vAFO compared to shoes-only. Daily activity remained unchanged. Knee flexion in stance was reduced by 2.4° (p=0.006). These results show that children with CP who walk with excessive knee flexion show a small, but significant reduction of knee flexion in stance as a result of wearing individually optimized vAFOs. Data suggest that this also improves gait efficiency for which an individual approach to AFO prescription is emphasized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimising Ankle Foot Orthoses for children with Cerebral Palsy walking with excessive knee flexion to improve their mobility and participation; protocol of the AFO-CP study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkum, Y.L.; Harlaar, J.; Buizer, A.I.; van den Noort, J.C.; Becher, J.G.; Brehm, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ankle-Foot-Orthoses with a ventral shell, also known as Floor Reaction Orthoses (FROs), are often used to reduce gait-related problems in children with spastic cerebral palsy (SCP), walking with excessive knee flexion. However, current evidence for the effectiveness (e.g. in terms of

  18. Optimising Ankle Foot Orthoses for children with cerebral palsy walking with excessive knee flexion to improve their mobility and participation; protocol of the AFO-CP study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkum, Yvette L.; Harlaar, Jaap; Buizer, Annemieke I.; van den Noort, Josien C.; Becher, Jules G.; Brehm, Merel-Anne

    2013-01-01

    Ankle-Foot-Orthoses with a ventral shell, also known as Floor Reaction Orthoses (FROs), are often used to reduce gait-related problems in children with spastic cerebral palsy (SCP), walking with excessive knee flexion. However, current evidence for the effectiveness (e.g. in terms of walking energy

  19. The Columbus Knee System: 4-Year Results of a New Deep Flexion Design Compared to the NexGen Full Flex Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Goebel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Columbus knee system is designed as a standard knee implant to allow high flexion without additional bone resection. Between August, 2004 and March, 2010 we performed 109 total knee arthroplasties of the Columbus knee system in 101 consecutive patients suffering from primary arthrosis of the knee. Mean age was 72.4 years in women and 70.3 years in men. Mean followup was 47.3 months. The 4-year results of a group of patients who received the NexGen Full Flex implant operated by the same surgeon were used for comparison. Mean total knee score was Columbus: 175.6 and NexGen Flex: 183.4; =0.037. Mean operation time was 53 min for Columbus and 66 min for NexGen Flex; 0.05. Radiological assessment showed no signs of loosening for both groups. Therefore, the Columbus knee system can be recommended for flexion angles up to 140∘.

  20. Native Knee Laxities at 0°, 45°, and 90° of Flexion and Their Relationship to the Goal of the Gap-Balancing Alignment Method of Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Joshua D; Howell, Stephen M; Hull, Maury L

    2015-10-21

    Gap-balancing is an alignment method for total knee arthroplasty with the goal of creating uniform tension in the periarticular soft-tissue restraints and equal laxities throughout the arc of flexion. However, there is little evidence that achieving equal laxities prevents either overly tight or overly loose soft-tissue restraints after total knee arthroplasty. Accordingly, the purpose of the present study was to determine whether the laxities at 0°, 45°, and 90° of flexion are equal in the native knee. Seven different laxities were measured at 0°, 45°, and 90° of flexion in ten fresh-frozen native cadaveric knees (with intact menisci, cartilage, and ligaments) by applying loads of ±5 Nm in varus-valgus rotation, ±3 Nm in internal-external rotation, 100 N in distraction, and ±45 N in anterior-posterior translation with use of a six-degrees-of-freedom load application system. The mean laxities (and standard deviations) at 45° of flexion were 1.7° ± 0.6° greater in varus, 0.9° ± 0.4° greater in valgus, 10.2° ± 2.7° greater in internal rotation, 10.1° ± 2.0° greater in external rotation, 1.7 ± 1.0 mm greater in distraction translation, and 3.3 ± 1.5 mm greater in anterior translation than those at 0° of flexion. The mean laxities at 90° of flexion were 2.5° ± 0.8° greater in varus, 1.0° ± 0.5° greater in valgus, 10.0° ± 4.6° greater in internal rotation, 10.1° ± 4.5° greater in external rotation, 1.8 ± 0.7 mm greater in distraction, and 1.6 ± 1.2 mm greater in anterior translation than those at 0° of flexion. The mean anterior translation at 90° of flexion was 1.7 ± 0.9 mm less than that at 45° of flexion. Because five of the seven laxities were at least 1.7° or 1.6 mm greater at both 45° and 90° of flexion than those at 0° of flexion, the laxities of the native knee measured in this study are unequal at these flexion angles and therefore do not support the goal of gap-balancing in total knee arthroplasty. One possible

  1. The effect of active recovery, cold water immersion and passive recovery on subsequent knee extension and flexion strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Strejcová

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recovery is an important aspect of every physical activity. Many athletes train hard without giving their body time to recover which can lead to overreaching, burnout or poor performance. Currently cold-water immersion recovery and active recovery have emerged as some of the most popular interventions enabling faster recovery. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of three kinds of recovery (active recovery, cold water immersion, passive recovery on medium-term knee strength in the extension and flexion. METHODS: Fourteen athletes at the age of 26.6 ± 4.4 years performed, in a random cross-over design, 3 sessions with 3 repeated medium-term isokinetic tests. The effect of active recovery, passive rest and cold water immersion were assessed by 3 × 3 (time × recovery repeated-measure ANOVA, respectively. The dependent variables were – peak torque, total work and average power. RESULTS: We found significantly lower absolute differences between the first and third trial in knee extension for peak torque after the active recovery (↑ 0.9 N × m than after the cold water immersion (↓ 14.6 N × m or the passive recovery (↓ 13.9 N × m. The decrease of the average power was significantly lower differences after the active recovery (↓ 5 W than after the cold water immersion (↓ 23.7 W or passive recovery (↓ 25.9 W. The changes in total work were not significant. We did not found any changes in the isokinetic strength for the knee flexors after different kinds of recovery. Maximal heart rate (HRmax was significantly higher during the active recovery than during the cold water immersion and the passive recovery (173 ± 14, 166 ± 14 and 167 ± 14 rpm. We have found significant differences in the average heart rates (HRavg during active recovery, cold water immersion and passive recovery (124 ± 8, 97 ± 9 and 107 ± 12 rpm. CONCLUSION: We found the positive effect of the active recovery on the subsequent medium-term performance for

  2. The Effects of Varying Ankle Foot Orthosis Stiffness on Gait in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy Who Walk with Excessive Knee Flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkum, Yvette L; Buizer, Annemieke I; van den Noort, Josien C; Becher, Jules G; Harlaar, Jaap; Brehm, Merel-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Rigid Ankle-Foot Orthoses (AFOs) are commonly prescribed to counteract excessive knee flexion during the stance phase of gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). While rigid AFOs may normalize knee kinematics and kinetics effectively, it has the disadvantage of impeding push-off power. A spring-like AFO may enhance push-off power, which may come at the cost of reducing the knee flexion less effectively. Optimizing this trade-off between enhancing push-off power and normalizing knee flexion in stance is expected to maximize gait efficiency. This study investigated the effects of varying AFO stiffness on gait biomechanics and efficiency in children with CP who walk with excessive knee flexion in stance. Fifteen children with spastic CP (11 boys, 10±2 years) were prescribed with a ventral shell spring-hinged AFO (vAFO). The hinge was set into a rigid, or spring-like setting, using both a stiff and flexible performance. At baseline (i.e. shoes-only) and for each vAFO, a 3D-gait analysis and 6-minute walk test with breath-gas analysis were performed at comfortable speed. Lower limb joint kinematics and kinetics were calculated. From the 6-minute walk test, walking speed and the net energy cost were determined. A generalized estimation equation (pchildren with spastic CP, the vAFO stiffness that maximizes gait efficiency is primarily determined by its effect on knee kinematics and kinetics rather than by its effect on push-off power. Dutch Trial Register NTR3418.

  3. Effects of upright weight bearing and the knee flexion angle on patellofemoral indices using magnetic resonance imaging in patients with patellofemoral instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Christoph; Fleischer, Benjamin; Rase, Marten; Schumacher, Thees; Ettinger, Max; Ostermeier, Sven; Smith, Tomas

    2017-08-01

    This study analysed the effects of upright weight bearing and the knee flexion angle on patellofemoral indices, determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in patients with patellofemoral instability (PI). Healthy volunteers (control group, n = 9) and PI patients (PI group, n = 16) were scanned in an open-configuration MRI scanner during upright weight bearing and supine non-weight bearing positions at full extension (0° flexion) and at 15°, 30°, and 45° flexion. Patellofemoral indices included the Insall-Salvati Index, Caton-Deschamp Index, and Patellotrochlear Index (PTI) to determine patellar height and the patellar tilt angle (PTA), bisect offset (BO), and the tibial tubercle-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance to assess patellar rotation and translation with respect to the femur and alignment of the extensor mechanism. A significant interaction effect of weight bearing by flexion angle was observed for the PTI, PTA, and BO for subjects with PI. At full extension, post hoc pairwise comparisons revealed a significant effect of weight bearing on the indices, with increased patellar height and increased PTA and BO in the PI group. Except for the BO, no such changes were seen in the control group. Independent of weight bearing, flexing the knee caused the PTA, BO, and TT-TG distance to be significantly reduced. Upright weight bearing and the knee flexion angle affected patellofemoral MRI indices in PI patients, with significantly increased values at full extension. The observations of this study provide a caution to be considered by professionals when treating PI patients. These patients should be evaluated clinically and radiographically at full extension and various flexion angles in context with quadriceps engagement. Explorative case-control study, Level III.

  4. Increasing hip and knee flexion during a drop-jump task reduces tibiofemoral shear and compressive forces: implications for ACL injury prevention training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Liang-Ching; Ko, Yi-An; Hammond, Kyle E; Xerogeanes, John W; Warren, Gordon L; Powers, Christopher M

    2017-12-01

    Although most ACL injury prevention programmes encourage greater hip and knee flexion during landing, it remains unknown how this technique influences tibiofemoral joint forces. We examined whether a landing strategy utilising greater hip and knee flexion decreases tibiofemoral anterior shear and compression. Twelve healthy women (25.9 ± 3.5 years) performed a drop-jump task before and after a training session (10-15 min) that emphasised greater hip and knee flexion. Peak tibiofemoral anterior shear and compressive forces were calculated using an electromyography (EMG)-driven knee model that incorporated joint kinematics, EMG and participant-specific muscle volumes and patella tendon orientation measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Participants demonstrated a decrease in peak anterior tibial shear forces (11.1 ± 3.3 vs. 9.6 ± 2.7 N · kg -1 ; P = 0.008) and peak tibiofemoral compressive forces (68.4 ± 7.6 vs. 62.0 ± 5.5 N · kg -1 ; P = 0.015) post-training. The decreased peak anterior tibial shear was accompanied by a decrease in the quadriceps anterior shear force, while the decreased peak compressive force was accompanied by decreased ground reaction force and hamstring forces. Our data provide justification for injury prevention programmes that encourage greater hip and knee flexion during landing to reduce tibiofemoral joint loading.

  5. Radiography of the knee joint: A comparative study of the standing partial flexion PA projection and the standing fully extended AP projection using visual grading characteristics (VGC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrugia Wismayer, E.; Zarb, F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the diagnostic information in detection and assessment of knee pathology from knee radiographs using either the PA standing with partial flexion projection or AP fully extended standing projection. Method: A set of 32 knee radiographs was retrospectively compiled from 16 adult patients imaged using both projections over a 2-year period (PA: n = 16 and AP: n = 16). Repeat radiographs (n = 6) were added to the image set facilitating inter and intra observer reliability. Image evaluation was performed by 5 orthopaedic surgeons performing Absolute Visual Grading Analysis assessing image quality based on 6 anatomical image quality criteria specifically developed to evaluate and compare the two projections. The resulting image quality scores were analysed using Visual Grading Characteristics. Results: Image quality scores were higher for the PA projection but variation between the two projections was not significant (p > 0.05). The PA projection was significantly (p < 0.05) better in the visualization of 2 anatomical image quality criteria involving the joint space width and tibial spines. Conclusion: Both projections can be used for general evaluation of the knee joint, however the PA partial flexion projection is preferred for the investigation of specific knee pathology. Recommendations for minimizing variations in radiographic positioning technique are also highlighted. - Highlights: • AP/PA radiographic knee projections are comparable for most clinical indications. • PA knee projection is better in visualizing joint space/tibial spines. • PA projection is more standardized if used with a positioning frame. • Use of anatomical criteria facilitates evaluation of quality of knee radiographs.

  6. Side effects and potential risk factors of botulinum toxin type A intramuscular injections in knee flexion contractures of hemophiliacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; De la Corte-Rodriguez, Hortensia

    2017-07-01

    Knee flexion contracture (KFC) is a common complication of recurrent hemarthrosis in children and young adults with hemophilia. If the KFC is not prevented (by means of primary prophylaxis) and treated properly and early (be means of physical medicine and rehabilitation), it will become fixed. Areas covered: The aim of this article is to review the potential role of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) intramuscular injections for the treatment of KFC in people with hemophilia (PWH). Expert commentary: Although two recent reports have mentioned the benefits of intramuscular injections of BTX-A in PWH with KFC, the data are still scant and too preliminary. The use of intramuscular injections of BTX-A in PWH today should not be recommended until more case studies/small series (ideally well-designed clinical trials) fully demonstrate that this is safe and effective. The risks of intramuscular injections to a hemophilia patient cannot be underestimated (iatrogenic muscle hematomas and pseudotumors). This paper calls the attention of hemophilia treaters on the potential risks of this apparently interesting technique. The current use of BTX-A intramuscular injections in KFC of PWH could make no sense. Raising false expectations in these patients should be avoided.

  7. 3D skin length deformation of lower body during knee joint flexion for the practical application of functional sportswear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiyoung; Hong, Kyunghi

    2015-05-01

    With the advent of 3D technology in the design process, a tremendous amount of scanned data is available. However, it is difficult to trace the quantitative skin deformation of a designated location on the 3D body surface data during movement. Without identical landmarks or reflective markers, tracing the same reference points on the different body postures is not easy because of the complex shape change of the body. To find the least deformed location on the body, which is regarded as the optimal position of seams for the various lengths of functional compression pants, landmarks were directly marked on the skin of six subjects and scanned during knee joint flexion. Lines of non-extension (LoNE) and maximum stretch (LoMS) were searched for, both by tracing landmarks and newly drawn guidelines based on ratio division in various directions. Considering the waist as the anchoring position of the pants, holistic changes were quantified and visualized from the waistline in lengthwise and curvilinear deformation along the dermatomes of the lower body for various lengths of pants. Widthwise and unit area skin deformation data of the skin were also provided as guidelines for further use such as streamlined pants or design of other local wearing devices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Kinematically aligned total knee arthroplasty limits high tibial forces, differences in tibial forces between compartments, and abnormal tibial contact kinematics during passive flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Joshua D; Howell, Stephen M; Hull, Maury L

    2017-09-07

    Following total knee arthroplasty (TKA), high tibial forces, large differences in tibial forces between the medial and lateral compartments, and anterior translation of the contact locations of the femoral component on the tibial component during passive flexion indicate abnormal knee function. Because the goal of kinematically aligned TKA is to restore native knee function without soft tissue release, the objectives were to determine how well kinematically aligned TKA limits high tibial forces, differences in tibial forces between compartments, and anterior translation of the contact locations of the femoral component on the tibial component during passive flexion. Using cruciate retaining components, kinematically aligned TKA was performed on thirteen human cadaveric knee specimens with use of manual instruments without soft tissue release. The tibial forces and tibial contact locations were measured in both the medial and lateral compartments from 0° to 120° of passive flexion using a custom tibial force sensor. The average total tibial force (i.e. sum of medial + lateral) ranged from 5 to 116 N. The only significant average differences in tibial force between compartments occurred at 0° of flexion (29 N, p = 0.0008). The contact locations in both compartments translated posteriorly in all thirteen kinematically aligned TKAs by an average of 14 mm (p forces due to the soft tissue restraints were limited to 116 N, average differences in tibial forces between compartments were limited to 29 N, and a net posterior translation of the tibial contact locations was observed in all kinematically aligned TKAs during passive flexion from 0° to 120°, which are similar to what has been measured previously in native knees. While confirmation in vivo is warranted, these findings give surgeons who perform kinematically aligned TKA confidence that the alignment method and surgical technique limit high tibial forces, differences in tibial forces between

  9. The Effects of Varying Ankle Foot Orthosis Stiffness on Gait in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy Who Walk with Excessive Knee Flexion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette L Kerkum

    Full Text Available Rigid Ankle-Foot Orthoses (AFOs are commonly prescribed to counteract excessive knee flexion during the stance phase of gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP. While rigid AFOs may normalize knee kinematics and kinetics effectively, it has the disadvantage of impeding push-off power. A spring-like AFO may enhance push-off power, which may come at the cost of reducing the knee flexion less effectively. Optimizing this trade-off between enhancing push-off power and normalizing knee flexion in stance is expected to maximize gait efficiency. This study investigated the effects of varying AFO stiffness on gait biomechanics and efficiency in children with CP who walk with excessive knee flexion in stance. Fifteen children with spastic CP (11 boys, 10±2 years were prescribed with a ventral shell spring-hinged AFO (vAFO. The hinge was set into a rigid, or spring-like setting, using both a stiff and flexible performance. At baseline (i.e. shoes-only and for each vAFO, a 3D-gait analysis and 6-minute walk test with breath-gas analysis were performed at comfortable speed. Lower limb joint kinematics and kinetics were calculated. From the 6-minute walk test, walking speed and the net energy cost were determined. A generalized estimation equation (p<0.05 was used to analyze the effects of different conditions. Compared to shoes-only, all vAFOs improved the knee angle and net moment similarly. Ankle power generation and work were preserved only by the spring-like vAFOs. All vAFOs decreased the net energy cost compared to shoes-only, but no differences were found between vAFOs, showing that the effects of spring-like vAFOs to promote push-off power did not lead to greater reductions in walking energy cost. These findings suggest that, in this specific group of children with spastic CP, the vAFO stiffness that maximizes gait efficiency is primarily determined by its effect on knee kinematics and kinetics rather than by its effect on push-off power

  10. Comparison of reaction forces on the anterior cruciate and anterolateral ligaments during internal rotation and anterior drawer forces at different flexion angles of the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uğur, Levent

    2017-12-01

    Having a complicated anatomy, the knee joint has been further detailed and a new formation defined, the anterolateral ligament (ALL), in recent studies. While the importance of this ligament, which previously was associated with Segond fractures, was explained via clinical, radiologic and biomechanical studies, and basically, is thought to be a fixator structures for the tibia against internal rotation stress. Although in recent studies efficient surgical treatment was applied to patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) operation, some patients having a positive pivot test highlights the clinical importance of the ALL. The aim of this study is to evaluate reaction forces of different flexion angles on the tibia during internal rotation and anterior drawer tests on both the ALL and ACL, and to examine theimportance of this ligament in knee biomechanics by a finite element analysis method. In this study, normal anatomy knee joint was modelled using Computed Tomography images from lower extremity length in DICOM format. 0°, 15°,30°,45°,60°,75° and 90° angles of flexion were applied, respectively, to these models and reaction force vectors formed on both ligaments were examined separately and as total vector and size by applying internal rotation and anterior drawer forces on each model. Non-linear analysis was conducted using ANSYS (version 17) with the same limit conditions applied to all models. After all models were examined, in general when comparing reaction forces, those on the ACL were found to be higher. However, when vectoral directions were examined, forces on ALL increased with increased flexion ratio and internal rotation momentum. Beyond 30° flexion, the tensile force on the ALL is increased and compressive overload on the ACL occurs. The ALL plays an important role in stability, especially against internal rotation forces, and an increased knee joint flexion ratio increases the stability contribution ratio. In particular, at 30

  11. Activation of the gluteus maximus and hamstring muscles during prone hip extension with knee flexion in three hip abduction positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sun-Young; Jeon, Hye-Seon; Kwon, Ohyun; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Choi, Boram

    2013-08-01

    The direction of fiber alignment within a muscle is known to influence the effectiveness of muscle contraction. However, most of the commonly used clinical gluteus maximus (GM) exercises do not consider the direction of fiber alignment within the muscle. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of hip abduction position on the EMG (electromyography) amplitude and onset time of the GM and hamstrings (HAM) during prone hip extension with knee flexion (PHEKF) exercise. Surface EMG signals were recorded from the GM and HAM during PHEKF exercise in three hip abduction positions: 0°, 15°, and 30°. Thirty healthy subjects voluntarily participated in this study. The results show that GM EMG amplitude was greatest in the 30° hip abduction position, followed by 15° and then 0° hip abduction during PHEKF exercise. On the other hand, the HAM EMG amplitude at 0° hip abduction was significantly greater than at 15° and 30° hip abduction. Additionally, GM EMG onset firing was delayed relative to that of the HAM at 0° hip abduction. On the contrary, the GM EMG onset occurred earlier than the HAM in the 15° and 30° hip abduction positions. These findings indicate that performing PHEKF exercise in the 30° hip abduction position may be recommended as an effective way to facilitate the GM muscle activity and advance the firing time of the GM muscle in asymptomatic individuals. This finding provides preliminary evidence that GM EMG amplitude and onset time can be modified by the degree of hip abduction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Knee extension and flexion strength asymmetry in Human Immunodeficiency Virus positive subjects: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Vitor H F; Wiechmann, Susana L; Narciso, Argéria M S; Deminice, Rafael

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus positive subjects present impairment in muscle function, neural activation, balance, and gait. In other populations, all of these factors have been associated with muscle strength asymmetry. To investigate the existence of muscle strength asymmetry between dominant and non-dominant lower limbs and to determine the hamstrings-to-quadriceps strength ratio in Human Immunodeficiency Virus positive subjects. In this cross-sectional study, 48 subjects were included (22 men and 26 women; mean age 44.6 years), all of them under highly active antiretroviral therapy. They performed isokinetic strength efforts at speeds of 60°/s and 180°/s for knee extension and flexion in concentric-concentric mode. Peak torque was higher (pvs. 173, SD=55% body mass) and hamstrings (97, SD=36 vs. 90, SD=37% body mass) in dominant compared to non-dominant. Similarly, peak torque was higher at 180°/s (quadriceps 128, SD=44 vs. 112, SD=42; hamstrings 64, SD=24 vs. 57, SD=26% body mass) in dominant. Average power was also higher for all muscle groups and speeds, comparing dominant with non-dominant. The hamstrings-to-quadriceps ratio at 60°/s was 0.50 for dominant and 0.52 for non-dominant, and at 180°/s, it was 0.51 for both limbs, with no significant difference between them. The percentage of subjects with strength asymmetry ranged from 46 to 58%, depending upon muscle group and speed analyzed. Human Immunodeficiency Virus positive subjects present muscle strength asymmetry between lower limbs, assessed through isokinetic dynamometry. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Relief of knee flexion contracture and gait improvement following adaptive training for an assist device in a transtibial amputee: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sol-Bi; Ko, Chang-Yong; Son, Jinho; Kang, Sungjae; Ryu, Jeicheong; Mun, Museong

    2017-01-01

    Management of a knee contracture is important for regaining gait ability in transtibial amputees. However, there has been little study of prosthesis training for enhancing mobility and improving range of motion in cases of restricted knee extension. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of adaptive training for an assist device (ATAD) for a transtibial amputee with a knee flexion contracture (KFC). A male transtibial amputee with KFC performed 4 months of ATAD with a multidisciplinary team. During the ATAD, the passive range of motion (PROM) in the knee, amputee mobility predictor (AMP) assessment, center of pressure (COP) on a force plate-equipped treadmill, gait features determined by three-dimensional motion analysis, and Short-Form 36 Item Health Survey (SF-36) scores were evaluated. Following ATAD, PROM showed immediate improvement (135.6 ± 2.4° at baseline, 142.5 ± 1.7° at Step 1, 152.1 ± 1.8° at Step 2, 165.8 ± 1.9° at Step 3, and 166.0 ± 1.4° at Step 4); this was followed by an enhanced COP. Gradually, gait features also improved. Additionally, the AMP score (5 at baseline to 29 at Step 4) and K-level (K0 at baseline to K3 at Step 4) increased after ATAD. Along with these improvements, the SF-36 score also improved. ATAD could be beneficial for transtibial amputees by relieving knee contractures and improving gait.

  14. Contribution of regional 3D meniscus and cartilage morphometry by MRI to joint space width in fixed flexion knee radiography—A between-knee comparison in subjects with unilateral joint space narrowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloecker, K., E-mail: katja.bloecker@pmu.ac.at [Institute of Anatomy and Musculoskeletal Research, Paracelsus Medical University, Strubergasse 21, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Department of Traumatology and Sports Medicine, Paracelsus Medical University, Müllner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Wirth, W., E-mail: wolfgang.wirth@pmu.ac.at [Institute of Anatomy and Musculoskeletal Research, Paracelsus Medical University, Strubergasse 21, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Chondrometrics GmbH, Ulrichshöglerstrasse 23, 83404 Ainring (Germany); Hunter, D.J., E-mail: david.hunter@sydney.edu.au [Royal North Shore Hospital and Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, Pacific Highway, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); Duryea, J., E-mail: jduryea@bwh.harvard.edu [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA (United States); Guermazi, A., E-mail: Ali.Guermazi@bmc.org [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building 3rd Floor, Boston, MA (United States); Boston Imaging Core Lab (BICL), 601 Albany Street, Boston, MA (United States); Kwoh, C.K., E-mail: kwoh@pitt.edu [Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University of Pittsburgh and VA, Pittsburgh Healthcare System, 3500 Terrace Street, Biomedical Science Tower South 702, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Resch, H., E-mail: Herbert.resch@salk.at [Department of Traumatology and Sports Medicine, Paracelsus Medical University, Müllner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Eckstein, F. [Institute of Anatomy and Musculoskeletal Research, Paracelsus Medical University, Strubergasse 21, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Chondrometrics GmbH, Ulrichshöglerstrasse 23, 83404 Ainring (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Background: Radiographic joint space width (JSW) is considered the reference standard for demonstrating structural therapeutic benefits in knee osteoarthritis. Our objective was to determine the proportion by which 3D (regional) meniscus and cartilage measures explain between-knee differences of JSW in the fixed flexion radiographs. Methods: Segmentation of the medial meniscus and tibial and femoral cartilage was performed in double echo steady state (DESS) images. Quantitative measures of meniscus size and position, femorotibial cartilage thickness, and radiographic JSW (minimum, and fixed locations) were compared between both knees of 60 participants of the Osteoarthritis Initiative, with strictly unilateral medial joint space narrowing (JSN). Statistical analyses (between-knee, within-person comparison) were performed using regression analysis. Results: A strong relationship with side-differences in minimum and a central fixed location JSW was observed for percent tibial plateau coverage by the meniscus (r = .59 and .47; p < .01) and central femoral cartilage thickness (r = .69 and .75; p < .01); other meniscus and cartilage measures displayed lower coefficients. The correlation of central femoral cartilage thickness with JSW (but not that of meniscus measures) was greater (r = .78 and .85; p < .01) when excluding knees with non-optimal alignment between the tibia and X-ray beam. Conclusion: 3D measures of meniscus and cartilage provide significant, independent information in explaining side-differences in radiographic JSW in fixed flexion radiographs. Tibial coverage by the meniscus and central femoral cartilage explained two thirds of the variability in minimum and fixed location JSW. JSW provides a better representation of (central) femorotibial cartilage thickness, when optimal positioning of the fixed flexion radiographs is achieved.

  15. Contribution of regional 3D meniscus and cartilage morphometry by MRI to joint space width in fixed flexion knee radiography—A between-knee comparison in subjects with unilateral joint space narrowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloecker, K.; Wirth, W.; Hunter, D.J.; Duryea, J.; Guermazi, A.; Kwoh, C.K.; Resch, H.; Eckstein, F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Radiographic joint space width (JSW) is considered the reference standard for demonstrating structural therapeutic benefits in knee osteoarthritis. Our objective was to determine the proportion by which 3D (regional) meniscus and cartilage measures explain between-knee differences of JSW in the fixed flexion radiographs. Methods: Segmentation of the medial meniscus and tibial and femoral cartilage was performed in double echo steady state (DESS) images. Quantitative measures of meniscus size and position, femorotibial cartilage thickness, and radiographic JSW (minimum, and fixed locations) were compared between both knees of 60 participants of the Osteoarthritis Initiative, with strictly unilateral medial joint space narrowing (JSN). Statistical analyses (between-knee, within-person comparison) were performed using regression analysis. Results: A strong relationship with side-differences in minimum and a central fixed location JSW was observed for percent tibial plateau coverage by the meniscus (r = .59 and .47; p < .01) and central femoral cartilage thickness (r = .69 and .75; p < .01); other meniscus and cartilage measures displayed lower coefficients. The correlation of central femoral cartilage thickness with JSW (but not that of meniscus measures) was greater (r = .78 and .85; p < .01) when excluding knees with non-optimal alignment between the tibia and X-ray beam. Conclusion: 3D measures of meniscus and cartilage provide significant, independent information in explaining side-differences in radiographic JSW in fixed flexion radiographs. Tibial coverage by the meniscus and central femoral cartilage explained two thirds of the variability in minimum and fixed location JSW. JSW provides a better representation of (central) femorotibial cartilage thickness, when optimal positioning of the fixed flexion radiographs is achieved

  16. Medial sural perforator plus island flap: a modification of the medial sural perforator island flap for the reconstruction of postburn knee flexion contractures using burned calf skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Seog; Kim, Eui Sik; Hwang, Jae Ha; Lee, Sam Yong

    2012-06-01

    The medial sural perforator island flap may be suitable for the reconstruction of postburn knee flexion contractures. However, postburn knee flexion contractures are usually associated with burns of the calf, which is the donor site of the medial sural perforator flap. Thus, there are concerns regarding the safety of raising medial sural perforator flaps from burned calves. Between 2005 and 2010, 12 patients (11 males and 1 female) with postburn knee flexion contractures associated with second-degree burns of the calf (that healed by secondary intention) underwent reconstruction using a medial sural perforator island flap (based on the medial sural perforator) or medial sural perforator plus island flap (based on the medial sural perforator and other vessels that are pedicles of the sural flaps). All 12 flaps, which ranged in size from 7 to 15 cm in width and from 9 to 23 cm in length, survived completely. Of the 12 flaps, three were medial sural perforator island flaps and nine were medial sural perforator plus island flaps. Of the nine medial sural perforator plus island flaps, two included the lesser saphenous vein, five included the lesser saphenous vein and its accompanying artery, and two included the lesser saphenous vein, the distal sural nerve and their accompanying arteries. Healing of all donor sites was uncomplicated. All patients were completely satisfied with their results. Although this series is not large, the authors are convinced that some reliable medial sural perforators are usually present under second-degree burned calf skin that healed by secondary intention, and that the medial sural perforator island flap or the medial sural perforator plus island flap can be safely used even though the skin may not be as pliable as normal skin. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Knee extension and flexion muscle power after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon graft or hamstring tendons graft: a cross-sectional comparison 3 years post surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Harald P; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Thomeé, Roland; Roos, Ewa M

    2009-02-01

    Hamstring muscles play a major role in knee-joint stabilization after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Weakness of the knee extensors after ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon (PT) graft, and in the knee flexors after reconstruction with hamstring tendons (HT) graft has been observed up to 2 years post surgery, but not later. In these studies, isokinetic muscle torque was used. However, muscle power has been suggested to be a more sensitive and sport-specific measures of strength. The aim was to study quadriceps and hamstring muscle power in patients with ACL injury treated with surgical reconstruction with PT or HT grafts at a mean of 3 years after surgery. Twenty subjects with PT and 16 subjects with HT grafts (mean age at follow up 30 years, range 20-39, 25% women), who were all included in a prospective study and followed the same goal-based rehabilitation protocol for at least 4 months, were assessed with reliable, valid, and responsive tests of quadriceps and hamstring muscle power at 3 years (SD 0.9, range 2-5) after surgery. The mean difference between legs (injured minus uninjured), the hamstring to quadriceps (H:Q, hamstring divided by quadriceps) ratio, and the limb symmetry index (LSI, injured leg divided by uninjured and multiplied by 100) value, were used for comparisons between the groups (analysis of variance). The mean difference between the injured and uninjured legs was greater in the HT than in the PT group for knee flexion power (-21.3 vs. 7.7 W, p = 0.001). Patients with HT graft had lower H:Q ratio in the injured leg than the patients with PT graft (0.63 vs. 0.77, p = 0.012). They also had lower LSI for knee flexion power than those in the PT group (88 vs. 106%, p hamstring muscle power, and the lower hamstring to quadriceps ratio in the HT graft group than in the PT graft group 3 years (range 2-5) after ACL reconstruction, reflect imbalance of knee muscles after reconstruction with HT graft that may have a negative effect on

  18. The Effect of Malrotation of Tibial Component of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Tibial Insert during High Flexion Using a Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Osano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common errors of total knee arthroplasty procedure is a malrotation of tibial component. The stress on tibial insert is closely related to polyethylene failure. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of malrotation of tibial component for the stress on tibial insert during high flexion using a finite element analysis. We used Stryker NRG PS for analysis. Three different initial conditions of tibial component including normal, 15° internal malrotation, and 15° external malrotation were analyzed. The tibial insert made from ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene was assumed to be elastic-plastic while femoral and tibial metal components were assumed to be rigid. Four nonlinear springs attached to tibial component represented soft tissues around the knee. Vertical load was applied to femoral component which rotated from 0° to 135° while horizontal load along the anterior posterior axis was applied to tibial component during flexion. Maximum equivalent stresses on the surface were analyzed. Internal malrotation caused the highest stress which arose up to 160% of normal position. External malrotation also caused higher stress. Implanting prosthesis in correct position is important for reducing the risk of abnormal wear and failure.

  19. Optimising Ankle Foot Orthoses for children with Cerebral Palsy walking with excessive knee flexion to improve their mobility and participation; protocol of the AFO-CP study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerkum Yvette L

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle-Foot-Orthoses with a ventral shell, also known as Floor Reaction Orthoses (FROs, are often used to reduce gait-related problems in children with spastic cerebral palsy (SCP, walking with excessive knee flexion. However, current evidence for the effectiveness (e.g. in terms of walking energy cost of FROs is both limited and inconclusive. Much of this ambiguity may be due to a mismatch between the FRO ankle stiffness and the patient’s gait deviations. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of FROs optimised for ankle stiffness on the walking energy cost in children with SCP, compared to walking with shoes alone. In addition, effects on various secondary outcome measures will be evaluated in order to identify possible working mechanisms and potential predictors of FRO treatment success. Method/Design A pre-post experimental study design will include 32 children with SCP, walking with excessive knee flexion in midstance, recruited from our university hospital and affiliated rehabilitation centres. All participants will receive a newly designed FRO, allowing ankle stiffness to be varied into three configurations by means of a hinge. Gait biomechanics will be assessed for each FRO configuration. The FRO that results in the greatest reduction in knee flexion during the single stance phase will be selected as the subject’s optimal FRO. Subsequently, the effects of wearing this optimal FRO will be evaluated after 12–20 weeks. The primary study parameter will be walking energy cost, with the most important secondary outcomes being intensity of participation, daily activity, walking speed and gait biomechanics. Discussion The AFO-CP trial will be the first experimental study to evaluate the effect of individually optimised FROs on mobility and participation. The evaluation will include outcome measures at all levels of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, providing a unique

  20. Optimising Ankle Foot Orthoses for children with cerebral palsy walking with excessive knee flexion to improve their mobility and participation; protocol of the AFO-CP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkum, Yvette L; Harlaar, Jaap; Buizer, Annemieke I; van den Noort, Josien C; Becher, Jules G; Brehm, Merel-Anne

    2013-02-01

    Ankle-Foot-Orthoses with a ventral shell, also known as Floor Reaction Orthoses (FROs), are often used to reduce gait-related problems in children with spastic cerebral palsy (SCP), walking with excessive knee flexion. However, current evidence for the effectiveness (e.g. in terms of walking energy cost) of FROs is both limited and inconclusive. Much of this ambiguity may be due to a mismatch between the FRO ankle stiffness and the patient's gait deviations.The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of FROs optimised for ankle stiffness on the walking energy cost in children with SCP, compared to walking with shoes alone. In addition, effects on various secondary outcome measures will be evaluated in order to identify possible working mechanisms and potential predictors of FRO treatment success. A pre-post experimental study design will include 32 children with SCP, walking with excessive knee flexion in midstance, recruited from our university hospital and affiliated rehabilitation centres. All participants will receive a newly designed FRO, allowing ankle stiffness to be varied into three configurations by means of a hinge. Gait biomechanics will be assessed for each FRO configuration. The FRO that results in the greatest reduction in knee flexion during the single stance phase will be selected as the subject's optimal FRO. Subsequently, the effects of wearing this optimal FRO will be evaluated after 12-20 weeks. The primary study parameter will be walking energy cost, with the most important secondary outcomes being intensity of participation, daily activity, walking speed and gait biomechanics. The AFO-CP trial will be the first experimental study to evaluate the effect of individually optimised FROs on mobility and participation. The evaluation will include outcome measures at all levels of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, providing a unique set of data with which to assess relationships between outcome

  1. Fixed-flexion knee radiography using a new positioning device produced highly repeatable measurements of joint space width: ELSA-Brasil Musculoskeletal Study (ELSA-Brasil MSK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, Rosa Weiss; Costa-Silva, Luciana; Machado, Luciana A C; Reis, Rodrigo Citton Padilha Dos; Barreto, Sandhi Maria

    To describe the performance of a non-fluoroscopic fixed-flexion PA radiographic protocol with a new positioning device, developed for the assessment of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health Musculoskeletal Study (ELSA-Brasil MSK). A test-retest design including 19 adults (38 knee images) was conducted. Feasibility of the radiographic protocol was assessed by image quality parameters and presence of radioanatomic alignment according to intermargin distance (IMD) values. Repeatability was assessed for IMD and joint space width (JSW) measured at three different locations. Approximately 90% of knee images presented excellent quality. Frequencies of nearly perfect radioanatomic alignment (IMD ≤1mm) ranged from 29% to 50%, and satisfactory alignment was found in up to 71% and 76% of the images (IMD ≤1.5mm and ≤1.7mm, respectively). Repeatability analyses yielded the following results: IMD [SD of mean difference=1.08; coefficient of variation (%CV)=54.68%; intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (95%CI)=0.59 (0.34-0.77)]; JSW [SD of mean difference=0.34-0.61; %CV=4.48%-9.80%; ICC (95%CI)=0.74 (0.55-0.85)-0.94 (0.87-0.97)]. Adequately reproducible measurements of IMD and JSW were found in 68% and 87% of the images, respectively. Despite the difficulty in achieving consistent radioanatomic alignment between subsequent radiographs in terms of IMD, the protocol produced highly repeatable JSW measurements when these were taken at midpoint and 10mm from the medial extremity of the medial tibial plateau. Therefore, measurements of JSW at these locations can be considered adequate for the assessment of knee OA in ELSA-Brasil MSK. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  2. A Comparison of Musculo-Articular Stiffness and Maximal Isometric Plantar Flexion and Knee Extension Force in Dancers and Untrained Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Paige E; van Werkhoven, Herman; Dejournette, Denzel J; Gurchiek, Reed D; Mackall, John W; McBride, Jeffrey M

    2017-12-15

    Dance involves a high volume of aesthetic, stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) actions, which may cause unique adaptations to performance. The strength dancers possess to withstand such frequency of SSCs remains elusive. The extensive training that dancers experience from a young age, however, yields anatomical and strength development that may contrast with that of untrained individuals. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate differences in musculo-articular stiffness and maximal isometric plantar flexion and knee extension force between dancers and untrained individuals. A total of 16 females volunteered to participate in the study (N = 8 dancers; N = 8 untrained individuals). Dancers had a minimum of 10 years of dance experience and were currently training at the collegiate dance level three or more times per week. Untrained individuals had no dance background, nor were they currently involved in any form of regularized physical activity. All subjects completed a series of lower leg measurements and strength tests. This included a musculo-articular stiffness measurement using a free-oscillation technique, along with maximal isometric plantar flexion (MIP) and maximal isometric knee extension (MIKE) testing. The data indicate that dancers had a significantly greater rate of force development and peak force during MIP and rate of force development during MIKE in comparison to untrained individuals. Dancers also possessed significantly greater musculo-articular stiffness. Hence, the data provide some evidence that involvement in dance can result in greater muscle force generating capacity and musculo-articular stiffness due to the SSC mechanisms involved in dance movements.

  3. Three-Dimensional Evaluation of Similarity of Right and Left Knee Joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ki-Mo; Park, Jong-Hoon; Chang, Minho; Kim, Youngjun; Lee, Deukhee; Park, Sehyung; Wang, Joon Ho

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anatomical similarity of three-dimensional (3D) morphometric parameters between right and left knees. Ten fresh-frozen paired cadaveric knees were tested. Following dissection, footprint areas of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) were measured. Surface scanning was performed using a 3D scanner. Scanned data were reproduced and morphometric parameters were measured on specialized software. After making mirror models, we compared footprint center positions of the ACL and PCL of both sides and calculated the average deviation of 3D alignment between the right- and left-side models. No significant side-to-side differences were found in any morphometric parameters. Bony shapes displayed a side-to-side difference of 〈1 mm. Distal femoral and proximal tibial volumes did not present side-to-side differences, either; the average 3D deviations of alignment between the right and left sides were 0.8±0.4/1.1±0.6 mm (distal femur/proximal tibia). Center-to-center distances between the right and left ACL footprints were 2.6/2.7 mm (femur/tibia) for the anteromedial bundle and 2.4/2.8 mm for the posterolateral bundle. They were 1.9/1.5 mm for the anterolateral bundle and 2.2/1.8 mm for the posteromedial bundle of the PCL. There was a remarkable 3D morphometric similarity between right and left knees. Our results might support the concept of obtaining morphologic reference data from the uninvolved contralateral knee.

  4. Reliability of Concentric, Eccentric and Isometric Knee Extension and Flexion when using the REV9000 Isokinetic Dynamometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Carvalho Froufe Andrade, Alberto César Pereira; Caserotti, Paolo; de Carvalho, Carlos Manuel Pereira

    2013-01-01

    -to-moderate reliability was found in the isokinetic strength bilateral ratios while the Hamstring:Quadricep concentric ratio showed moderate reliability. The highest reliability (>0.90) was observed in the dynamic control ratio (Hamstring eccentric:Quadricep concentric) which consequently confirms that it is a more valid......The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of isokinetic and ISO knee extensor and flexor muscle strength when using the REV9000 (Technogym) isokinetic dynamometer. Moreover, the reliability of several strength imbalance indices and bilateral ratios were also examined. Twenty......-four physically active healthy subjects (age 23±3 years) underwent three testing sessions, two on the same day and a third, 7 days later. All sessions proceeded in the same order: five concentric contractions at 60ºs-1 followed by an isometric contraction (5 seconds) and five eccentric contractions (60ºs-1...

  5. Articulate torque and electromyographic activity of biceps femoris and semitendinosus muscles during isokinetic knee flexion movements in soccer athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Bodnariuc Fontes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to analyze the articulate torque (TO and the electromyographic activity (EMG of soccer athlete’s long head Biceps Femoris (BF and Semitendinosus (ST muscles during isokinetic knee fl exion movements (concentric-CON and eccentric-ECC actions at differing velocities, carried out in the ventral decubitus position. Fourteen soccer players aged 19 and 20 years old (71.2 ± 6.5 kg, 176.6 ± 6.4 cm were enrolled from the Associação Atlética Ponte Preta under- 20 team. They followed a protocol specifying 5 repetitions of fl exion (CON and ECC action of the knee at three velocities (60, 180 and 300º/s at random. The recovery interval between series adopted was 3 minutes. EMG Activity was recorded using surface electrodes and data were expressed in terms of root mean squares (RMS. Statistical analysis employed analysis of variance (Friedman test for repeated measures followed by the Wilcoxon test when necessary, with the level of signifi cance set at P ABSTRACT O objetivo do presente estudo foi analisar o torque articular (TO e a atividade eletromiográfi ca (EMG dos músculos Bíceps Femoral (BF cabeça longa e semitendíneo (ST durante movimentos isocinéticos de fl exão do joelho (ação concêntrica-CON e excêntrica-EXC, em diferentes velocidades de execução, na posição de decúbito ventral em atletas de futebol. Fizeram parte do estudo 14 atletas de futebol da equipe sub-20, da Associação Atlética Ponte Preta, com idade entre 19 e 20 anos (71,24 ± 6,53 kg, 176,59 ± 6,44 cm. Os atletas realizaram uma série de cinco repetições de fl exão (ação CON e EXC do joelho, em 3 velocidades (60, 180 e 300°/s, defi nidas anteriormente aleatoriamente. O intervalo de recuperação adotado entre as séries foi de 3 minutos. A atividade EMG foi coletada, utilizando-se eletrodos de superfície e os dados foram expressos em root mean square (RMS. Para análise estatística, foi empregada a análise de vari

  6. Use of embedded strain gages for the in-vitro study of proximal tibial cancellous bone deformation during knee flexion-extension movement: development, reproducibility and preliminary results of feasibility after frontal low femoral osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Sint Jan Serge

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper reports the development of an in-vitro technique allowing quantification of relative (not absolute deformations measured at the level of the cancellous bone of the tibial proximal epiphysis (CBTPE during knee flexion-extension. This method has been developed to allow a future study of the effects of low femoral osteotomies consequence on the CBTPE. Methods Six strain gages were encapsulated in an epoxy resin solution to form, after resin polymerisation, six measurement elements (ME. The latter were inserted into the CBTPE of six unembalmed specimens, just below the tibial plateau. Knee motion data were collected by three-dimensional (3D electrogoniometry during several cycles of knee flexion-extension. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility was estimated on one specimen for all MEs. Intra-specimen repeatability was calculated to determine specimen's variability and the error of measurement. A varum and valgum chirurgical procedure was realised on another specimen to observed CBTPE deformation after these kind of procedure. Results Average intra-observer variation of the deformation ranged from 8% to 9% (mean coefficient of variation, MCV respectively for extension and flexion movement. The coefficient of multiple correlations (CMC ranged from 0.93 to 0.96 for flexion and extension. No phase shift of maximum strain peaks was observed. Inter-observer MCV averaged 23% and 28% for flexion and extension. The CMC were 0.82 and 0.87 respectively for extension and flexion. For the intra-specimen repeatability, the average of mean RMS difference and the mean ICC were calculated only for flexion movement. The mean RMS variability ranged from 7 to 10% and the mean ICC was 0.98 (0.95 - 0.99. A Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated showing that RMS was independent of signal intensity. For the chirurgical procedure, valgum and varum deviation seems be in agree with the frontal misalignment theory. Conclusions

  7. Native rotational knee kinematics is restored after lateral UKA but not after medial UKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Keizo; Hamada, Daisuke; Takasago, Tomoya; Nitta, Akihiro; Goto, Tomohiro; Tonogai, Ichiro; Tsuruo, Yoshihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2018-03-26

    The aim of this study was to compare the intraoperative kinematics of medial and lateral unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) with those of the native knee using a navigation system. Six fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were included in the study. Medial UKA was performed in all right knees and lateral UKA was performed in all left knees. All UKA procedures were performed with a computerised navigation system. The tibial internal rotation angle and coronal alignment of the mechanical axis during passive knee flexion were assessed as rotational and varus/valgus kinematics before and after surgery using the navigation system. The rotation angles of the tibia in the early flexion phase of medial UKA were significantly larger than those of native knees (p = 0.008 at minimum knee flexion, p = 0.008 at 0° knee flexion). The rotational kinematics of lateral UKA was similar to those of the native knees throughout knee flexion. There were no significant differences in varus/valgus kinematics between native and UKA knees. The rotational kinematics of the native knee was not restored after medial UKA but was preserved after lateral UKA. There were no significant differences in the varus/valgus kinematics after either medial or lateral UKA when compared with those of the native knees. Thus, the geometry of the medial tibial articular surface is a determinant of the ability to restore the rotational kinematics of the native knee. Surgeons and implant designers should be aware that the anatomical medial articular geometry is an important factor in restoration of the native knee kinematics after knee arthroplasty.

  8. A Maximum Muscle Strength Prediction Formula Using Theoretical Grade 3 Muscle Strength Value in Daniels et al.’s Manual Muscle Test, in Consideration of Age: An Investigation of Hip and Knee Joint Flexion and Extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Usa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to develop a formula for predicting maximum muscle strength value for young, middle-aged, and elderly adults using theoretical Grade 3 muscle strength value (moment fair: Mf—the static muscular moment to support a limb segment against gravity—from the manual muscle test by Daniels et al. A total of 130 healthy Japanese individuals divided by age group performed isometric muscle contractions at maximum effort for various movements of hip joint flexion and extension and knee joint flexion and extension, and the accompanying resisting force was measured and maximum muscle strength value (moment max, Mm was calculated. Body weight and limb segment length (thigh and lower leg length were measured, and Mf was calculated using anthropometric measures and theoretical calculation. There was a linear correlation between Mf and Mm in each of the four movement types in all groups, excepting knee flexion in elderly. However, the formula for predicting maximum muscle strength was not sufficiently compatible in middle-aged and elderly adults, suggesting that the formula obtained in this study is applicable in young adults only.

  9. Shape model training for concurrent localization of the left and right knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppertshofen, Heike; Lorenz, Cristian; Schmidt, Sarah; Beyerlein, Peter; Salah, Zein; Rose, Georg; Schramm, Hauke

    2011-03-01

    An automatic algorithm for training of suitable models for the Generalized Hough Transform (GHT) is presented. The applied iterative approach learns the shape of the target object directly from training images and incorporates variability in pose and scale of the target object exhibited in the images. To make the model more robust and representative for the target object, an individual weight is estimated for each model point using a discriminative approach. These weights will be employed in the voting procedure of the GHT, increasing the impact of important points on the localization result. The proposed procedure is extended here with a new error measure and a revised point weight training to enable the generation of models representing several target objects. Common parts of the target objects will thereby obtain larger weights, while the model might also contain object specific model points, if necessary, to be representative for all targets. The method is applied here to the localization of knee joints in long-leg radiographs. A quantitative comparison of the new approach with the separate localization of right and left knee showed improved results concerning localization precision and performance.

  10. An Elderly Man with a Swollen Knee,Significant Ecchymosis, and Minimal Knee Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamodt, David; Serou, Michael; Neitschman, Harold

    2017-01-01

    A 72-year-old man presents with left knee pain and swelling over several days. The pain and swelling started after he felt a "pop" when bending to pick up an object off the floor. His past medical history is significant for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Physical exam revealed significant ecchymosis on the anterolateral aspect of the thigh. There was a minimal amount pain upon knee flexion.

  11. O comprimento dos túneis femorais varia com a flexão do joelho na reconstrução anatômica do ligamento cruzado anterior Femoral tunnels' length changes with knee flexion angle in anatomical anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Gali

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O propósito de nosso trabalho foi avaliar o efeito que o grau de flexão do joelho, durante a perfuração dos túneis femorais, pode causar no comprimento desses túneis, na reconstrução anatômica do ligamento cruzado anterior. MÉTODOS: Medimos o comprimento dos túneis femorais anteromedial e posterolateral do ligamento cruzado anterior, em 20 peças anatômicas de joelhos desemparelhadas, 10 direitas e 10 esquerdas, todas com a cartilagem e ligamentos cruzados íntegros. Os túneis foram perfurados com os joelhos flexionados a 90, 110 e 130 graus de flexão, através do portal anteromedial acessório, com uma broca de 2,5mm. Os estudos estatísticos foram realizadas pela análise de variância de Friedman e pelo teste de Mann-Whitney. RESULTADO: A média dos comprimentos dos túneis femorais anteromediais medidos com os joelhos flexionados a 90, 110 e 130 graus foram 33,7 ± 3,72mm, 37,4 ± 2,93mm e 38,8 ± 3,31mm, respectivamente. Para o comprimento dos túneis posterolaterais, os resultados obtidos a 90, 110 e 130 graus foram 32,1 ± 4,24mm, 37,3 ± 4,85mm e 38,4 ± 2,51mm, respectivamente. A análise de variância de Friedman mostrou diferença significativa entre os comprimentos dos túneis perfurados com 90 e 110 graus de flexão das peças, porém não mostrou diferença significativa entre os obtidos com flexão de 110e 130 graus (p OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to evaluate the effect that knee flexion angle while femoral tunnels are being drilled may have on the length of these tunnels, in anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. METHODS: We measured the lengths of anteromedial and posterolateral tunnels for the anterior cruciate ligament in 20 unpaired anatomical knee specimens (10 right and 10 left knees, all with the cartilage and cruciate ligaments intact. Tunnels were drilled with the knees flexed at 90º, 110º and 130º, through the accessory anteromedial portal, with a 2.5 mm

  12. Neglected surgically intervened bilateral congenital dislocation of knee in an adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaswant Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neglected bilateral congenital dislocation of knee is unusual. A 12 year old boy presented with inability to walk due to buckling of the knee. The symptoms were present since the child learnt walking. He preferred not to walk. Bilateral supracondylar femoral osteotomy was done at the age of 6 years. Patient had a fixed flexion deformity of both knees, 30° in the right (range of flexion from 30° to 45° and 45° fixed flexion deformity in left knee respectively (range of flexion from 45° to 65° when presented to us. The radiological examination revealed bilateral congenital dislocation of knee (CDK. No syndromic association was observed. He was planned for staged treatment. In stage I, the knee joints were distracted by Ilizarov ring fixators and this was followed by open reduction of both the knee joints in stage II. A bilateral supracondylar extension osteotomy was done 18 months after the previous surgery (stage III. The final followup visit at 4 years the patient presented with range of motion 5-100° and 5-80° on the right and left knee respectively with good functional outcome. The case is reported in view of lack of treatment guidelines for long standing neglected CDK in an adolescent child.

  13. Does the brake response time of the right leg change after left total knee arthroplasty? A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Carlos J; Barreiros, João; Cabri, Jan; Carita, Ana I; Friesecke, Christian; Loehr, Jochen F

    2008-08-01

    Patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty often ask when they can safely resume car driving. There is little evidence available on which physicians can rely when advising patients on this issue. In a prospective study we assessed the brake response time of 24 patients admitted to the clinic for left total knee arthroplasty preoperatively and then 10 days after surgery. On each measurement day the patients performed two tasks, a simple and a complex brake response time task in a car simulator. Ten days after left TKA the brake response time for the simple task had decreased by 3.6% (p=0.24), the reaction time by 3.1% (p=0.34) and the movement time by 6.6% (p=0.07). However, the performance improvement was not statistically significant. Task complexity increased brake response time at both time points. A 5.8% increase was significant (p=0.01) at 10 days after surgery. Based on our results, we suggest that patients who have undergone left total knee arthroplasty may resume car driving 10 days after surgery as long as they drive a car with automatic transmission.

  14. Knee extension and flexion muscle power after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon graft or hamstring tendons graft: a cross-sectional comparison 3 years post surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Harald; Silbernagel, Karin

    2008-01-01

    to 2 years post surgery, but not later. In these studies, isokinetic muscle torque was used. However, muscle power has been suggested to be a more sensitive and sport-specific measures of strength. The aim was to study quadriceps and hamstring muscle power in patients with ACL injury treated....... The lower hamstring muscle power, and the lower hamstring to quadriceps ratio in the HT graft group than in the PT graft group 3 years (range 2-5) after ACL reconstruction, reflect imbalance of knee muscles after reconstruction with HT graft that may have a negative effect on dynamic knee...

  15. Flexion Osteotomy in Genu Recurvatum Following Post-Polio Syndrome: Use of an Old Technique in a New Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazle Bagherifard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Post-polio syndrome (PPS can have devastating functional effects on the walking ability of patients decades after the acute disease. Genu recurvatum, as a consequence of PPS, is one such disability which can be treated through different measures. Case Presentation A 43-year-old woman with a history of supracondylar extension osteotomy of the left femur at the age of 22 was admitted to our hospital for a flexion contracture of the left knee due to poliomyelitis. She was able to walk without assistance for 20 years after the osteotomy until one year ago, when she started to experience progressive genu recurvatum. In the clinical and laboratory workup, she was diagnosed with PPS. Accordingly, we decided to perform supracondylar flexion osteotomy. Conclusions Supracondylar flexion osteotomy in patients with genu recurvatum, as a consequence of PPS, is a valuable treatment, which can relieve the patients' dependence on walking aids and improve their symptoms.

  16. Anterior knee pain caused by patellofemoral pain syndrome can be relieved by Botulinum toxin type A injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, John Tzu-Ning; Tang, Alice Chu-Wen; Lin, Shih-Cherng; Tang, Simon Fuk-Tan

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effects of Botulinum toxin type A (BTA) for anterior knee pain caused by patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Prospective case control study for intervention. A tertiary hospital rehabilitation center. Twelve bilateral PFPS patients with anterior knee pain were recruited. The worse pain knee was selected for injection, and the counterpart was left untreated. Injection of BTA to vastus lateralis (VL) muscle. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) was used to assess pain, stiffness, and functional status of the knee, and CYBEX isokinetic dynamometer to assess isokinetic muscle force before and after BTA application to VL. Remarkable improvement after receiving BTA injection was obtained not only in the questionnaire of WOMAC (pknee flexion torque (pknee extension torque was noted (p=0.682). BTA injection is a good alternative treatment to improve anterior knee pain, knee function and isokinetic flexion torque. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Reproducibility of a knee and hip proprioception test in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvin, Mina; Hoozemans, Marco J M; Burger, Bart J; Verschueren, Sabine M P; van Dieën, Jaap H; Pijnappels, Mirjam

    2015-04-01

    Proprioception can be assessed by measuring joint position sense (JPS). Most studies have focused on JPS of the knee joint while literature for other joints especially for hip JPS is scarce. Although some studies have evaluated proprioception of the knee joint, the reproducibility of methods has rarely been investigated. To estimate intrasession reliability and agreement of an active-active JPS test for hip flexion/abduction and knee flexion in healthy older adults. Nineteen healthy older adults participated in this study. The proprioception of the hip (flexion and abduction) and knee (flexion) were assessed in both legs using the "active-active" reproduction technique. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM), and limits of agreement (LOA) were estimated for relative angular error (RE), absolute angular error (AE), and variable angular error (VE). Reliability of our JPS test was substantial to almost perfect for the RE for both joints and legs (ICC values ranging from 0.75 to 0.93). We also found that the ICC values for AE were substantial for knee flexion and hip abduction of the left and right leg. The ICC results of VE showed poor reliability for hip and knee joints. SEM and LOA values for hip abduction were generally lower than for hip and knee flexion, indicating lower measurement error or more precise scores for the proprioception test of hip abduction. Proprioceptive acuity of the knee and hip joints in healthy older adults can be reliably assessed with an active-active procedure in a standing position with respect to relative and absolute error.

  18. Active knee joint flexibility and sports activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahn, Thomas; Foldspang, Anders; Vestergaard, E

    1999-01-01

    was significantly higher in women than in men and significantly positively associated with weekly hours of swimming and weekly hours of competitive gymnastics. Active knee flexion was significantly positively associated with participation in basketball, and significantly negatively associated with age and weekly......The aim of the study was to estimate active knee flexion and active knee extension in athletes and to investigate the potential association of each to different types of sports activity. Active knee extension and active knee flexion was measured in 339 athletes. Active knee extension...... hours of soccer, European team handball and swimming. The results point to sport-specific adaptation of active knee flexion and active knee extension. Udgivelsesdato: 1999-Apr...

  19. Medium-term evaluation of total knee arthroplasty without patellar replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Wanderley Vasconcelos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To mid-term evaluate patients who were submitted to total knee arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing. METHODS: It was realized a retrospective cross-sectional study of patients who were submitted to total knee arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing. In all patients clinical examination was done based on the protocol of the Knee Society Scoring System, which assessed pain, range of motion, stability, contraction, knee alignment and function, and radiological evaluation. RESULTS: A total of 36 patients were evaluated. Of these, 07 were operated only on left knee, 12 only on right knee and 17 were operated bilaterally, totaling 53 knees. Ages ranged from 26 to 84 years. Of the 53 knees evaluated, 33 (62.26% had no pain. The maximum flexion range of motion averaged 104.7°. No knee had difficulty in active extension. As to the alignment for anatomical axis twelve knees (22.64% showed deviation between 0° and 4° varus. Thirty-nine (75.49% knees showed pace without restriction and the femorotibial angle ranged between 3° varus and 13° valgus with an average of 5° valgus. The patellar index ranged from 0.2 to 1.1. CONCLUSION: Total knee arthroplasty whitout patellar resurfacing provides good results in mid-term evaluation.

  20. In vivo rotatory knee stability. Ligamentous and muscular contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, S C; Markolf, K L

    1982-02-01

    Active and passive components of torsional stability of the knee were measured with an instrumented clinical knee-testing apparatus. Torque-versus-rotation response curves were recorded in the non-weight-bearing condition with muscles relaxed for twenty normal subjects who were tested at 20 and 90 degrees of knee flexion with the hips flexed and extended. At applied torque levels as high as +/-10 newton-meters, tibial rotation averaged approximately one-half the foot rotation. The mean algebraic right-left rotation difference for the group was nearly zero; however, sizable standard deviations for this difference indicated considerable right-left variations between individuals in the test group. Maximum isometrically generated tibial torques were measured by asking the subjects to twist with an explosive effort against a locked torque-cell. No significant differences in generated torque were measured between preferred and non-preferred lower limbs, with only one minor exception. Subjects generally were able to generate greater internal torque than external torque. When the foot was locked in a position of internal or external rotation, an individual was able to generate increased tibial torque in the direction that would tend to return the foot to the neutral position. Flexion of the knee from 20 to 90 degrees increased externally generated torque, while internal torque was affected to a lesser degree. Flexion of the hip had little effect on generated torque. Six cadaver knees without menisci that were tested to failure in external rotation showed torque levels for ligament failure to be similar in magnitude to the maximum generated isometric torque that acts to protect the knee ligaments.

  1. Flexion in Abell 2744

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, J. P.; Goldberg, D. M.

    2018-05-01

    We present the first flexion-focused gravitational lensing analysis of the Hubble Frontier Field observations of Abell 2744 (z = 0.308). We apply a modified Analytic Image Model technique to measure source galaxy flexion and shear values at a final number density of 82 arcmin-2. By using flexion data alone, we are able to identify the primary mass structure aligned along the heart of the cluster in addition to two major substructure peaks, including an NE component that corresponds to previous lensing work and a new peak detection offset 1.43 arcmin from the cluster core towards the east. We generate two types of non-parametric reconstructions: flexion aperture mass maps, which identify central core, E, and NE substructure peaks with mass signal-to-noise contours peaking at 3.5σ, 2.7σ, and 2.3σ, respectively; and convergence maps derived directly from the smoothed flexion field. For the primary peak, we find a mass of (1.62 ± 0.12) × 1014 h-1 M⊙ within a 33 arcsec (105 h-1 kpc) aperture, a mass of (2.92 ± 0.26) × 1013 h-1 M⊙ within a 16 arcsec (50 h-1 kpc) aperture for the north-eastern substructure, and (8.81 ± 0.52) × 1013 h-1 M⊙ within a 25 arcsec (80 h-1 kpc) aperture for the novel eastern substructure.

  2. Alterations in walking knee joint stiffness in individuals with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Jonathan A; Gorman, Shannon; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Increased walking knee joint stiffness has been reported in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) as a compensatory strategy to improve knee joint stability. However, presence of episodic self-reported knee instability in a large subgroup of patients with knee OA may be a sign of inadequate walking knee joint stiffness. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in walking knee joint stiffness in patients with knee OA with and without self-reported instability and examine the relationship between walking knee joint stiffness with quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity, and varus knee malalignment. Overground biomechanical data at a self-selected gait velocity was collected for 35 individuals with knee OA without self-reported instability (stable group) and 17 individuals with knee OA and episodic self-reported instability (unstable group). Knee joint stiffness was calculated during the weight-acceptance phase of gait as the change in the external knee joint moment divided by the change in the knee flexion angle. The unstable group walked with lower knee joint stiffness (p=0.01), mainly due to smaller heel-contact knee flexion angles (pknee flexion excursions (pknee stable counterparts. No significant relationships were observed between walking knee joint stiffness and quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity or varus knee malalignment. Reduced walking knee joint stiffness appears to be associated with episodic knee instability and independent of quadriceps muscle weakness, knee joint laxity or varus malalignment. Further investigations of the temporal relationship between self-reported knee joint instability and walking knee joint stiffness are warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cross-talk correction method for knee kinematics in gait analysis using principal component analysis (PCA: a new proposal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Baudet

    Full Text Available In 3D gait analysis, the knee joint is usually described by the Eulerian way. It consists in breaking down the motion between the articulating bones of the knee into three rotations around three axes: flexion/extension, abduction/adduction and internal/external rotation. However, the definition of these axes is prone to error, such as the "cross-talk" effect, due to difficult positioning of anatomical landmarks. This paper proposes a correction method, principal component analysis (PCA, based on an objective kinematic criterion for standardization, in order to improve knee joint kinematic analysis.The method was applied to the 3D gait data of two different groups (twenty healthy subjects and four with knee osteoarthritis. Then, this method was evaluated with respect to three main criteria: (1 the deletion of knee joint angle cross-talk (2 the reduction of variance in the varus/valgus kinematic profile (3 the posture trial varus/valgus deformation matching the X-ray value for patients with knee osteoarthritis. The effect of the correction method was tested statistically on variabilities and cross-talk during gait.Cross-talk was lower (p<0.05 after correction (the correlation between the flexion-extension and varus-valgus kinematic profiles being annihilated. Additionally, the variance in the kinematic profile for knee varus/valgus and knee flexion/extension was found to be lower and higher (p<0.05, respectively, after correction for both the left and right side. Moreover, after correction, the posture trial varus/valgus angles were much closer to x-ray grading.The results show that the PCA correction applied to the knee joint eliminates the cross-talk effect, and does not alter the radiological varus/valgus deformation for patients with knee osteoarthritis. These findings suggest that the proposed correction method produces new rotational axes that better fit true knee motion.

  4. Cross-talk correction method for knee kinematics in gait analysis using principal component analysis (PCA): a new proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudet, Audrey; Morisset, Claire; d'Athis, Philippe; Maillefert, Jean-Francis; Casillas, Jean-Marie; Ornetti, Paul; Laroche, Davy

    2014-01-01

    In 3D gait analysis, the knee joint is usually described by the Eulerian way. It consists in breaking down the motion between the articulating bones of the knee into three rotations around three axes: flexion/extension, abduction/adduction and internal/external rotation. However, the definition of these axes is prone to error, such as the "cross-talk" effect, due to difficult positioning of anatomical landmarks. This paper proposes a correction method, principal component analysis (PCA), based on an objective kinematic criterion for standardization, in order to improve knee joint kinematic analysis. The method was applied to the 3D gait data of two different groups (twenty healthy subjects and four with knee osteoarthritis). Then, this method was evaluated with respect to three main criteria: (1) the deletion of knee joint angle cross-talk (2) the reduction of variance in the varus/valgus kinematic profile (3) the posture trial varus/valgus deformation matching the X-ray value for patients with knee osteoarthritis. The effect of the correction method was tested statistically on variabilities and cross-talk during gait. Cross-talk was lower (p<0.05) after correction (the correlation between the flexion-extension and varus-valgus kinematic profiles being annihilated). Additionally, the variance in the kinematic profile for knee varus/valgus and knee flexion/extension was found to be lower and higher (p<0.05), respectively, after correction for both the left and right side. Moreover, after correction, the posture trial varus/valgus angles were much closer to x-ray grading. The results show that the PCA correction applied to the knee joint eliminates the cross-talk effect, and does not alter the radiological varus/valgus deformation for patients with knee osteoarthritis. These findings suggest that the proposed correction method produces new rotational axes that better fit true knee motion.

  5. How Crouch Gait Can Dynamically Induce Stiff-Knee Gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Krogt, M.M.; Bregman, D.J.J.; Wisse, M.; Doorenbosch, C.A.M.; Harlaar, J.; Collins, S.H.

    Children with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). Stiff-knee gait is often accompanied by an overly flexed knee during stance (crouch gait). Studies on stiff-knee gait have mostly focused on

  6. How Crouch Gait Can Dynamically Induce Stiff-Knee Gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Krogt, M.M.; Bregman, D.J.J.; Wisse, M.; Doorenbosch, C.A.M.; Harlaar, J.

    2010-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). Stiff-knee gait is often accompanied by an overly flexed knee during stance (crouch gait). Studies on stiff-knee gait have mostly focused on

  7. Immediate effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on knee joint moments in women with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Masashi; Takagi, Yui; Goto, Yusuke; Otsuka, Naoki; Koyama, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Masashi; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Footwear modification can beneficially alter knee loading in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This study evaluated the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on reductions in external knee moments in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to examine the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology versus control shoes on the knee adduction and flexion moments in 17 women (mean age, 63.6 years) with radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis. The lateral and anterior trunk lean values, knee flexion and adduction angles, and ground reaction force were also evaluated. The influence of the original walking pattern on the changes in knee moments with Masai Barefoot Technology shoes was evaluated. The knee flexion moment in early stance was significantly reduced while walking with the Masai Barefoot Technology shoes (0.25±0.14Nm/kgm) as compared with walking with control shoes (0.30±0.19 Nm/kgm); whereas the knee adduction moment showed no changes. Masai Barefoot Technology shoes did not increase compensatory lateral and anterior trunk lean. The degree of knee flexion moment in the original walking pattern with control shoes was correlated directly with its reduction when wearing Masai Barefoot Technology shoes by multiple linear regression analysis (adjusted R2=0.44, PTechnology shoes reduced the knee flexion moment during walking without increasing the compensatory trunk lean and may therefore reduce external knee loading in women with knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Knee proprioception and strength and landing kinematics during a single-leg stop-jump task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Takashi; Sell, Timothy C; House, Anthony J; Abt, John P; Lephart, Scott M

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the sensorimotor system in maintaining a stable knee joint has been recognized. As individual entities, knee-joint proprioception, landing kinematics, and knee muscles play important roles in functional joint stability. Preventing knee injuries during dynamic tasks requires accurate proprioceptive information and adequate muscular strength. Few investigators have evaluated the relationship between knee proprioception and strength and landing kinematics. To examine the relationship between knee proprioception and strength and landing kinematics. Cross-sectional study. University research laboratory. Fifty physically active men (age = 26.4 ± 5.8 years, height = 176.5 ± 8.0 cm, mass = 79.8 ± 16.6 kg). Three tests were performed. Knee conscious proprioception was evaluated via threshold to detect passive motion (TTDPM). Knee strength was evaluated with a dynamometer. A 3-dimensional biomechanical analysis of a single-legged stop-jump task was used to calculate initial contact (IC) knee-flexion angle and knee-flexion excursion. The TTDPM toward knee flexion and extension, peak knee flexion and extension torque, and IC knee-flexion angle and knee flexion excursion. Linear correlation and stepwise multiple linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationships of both proprioception and strength against landing kinematics. The α level was set a priori at .05. Enhanced TTDPM and greater knee strength were positively correlated with greater IC knee-flexion angle (r range = 0.281-0.479, P range = .001-.048). The regression analysis revealed that 27.4% of the variance in IC knee-flexion angle could be accounted for by knee-flexion peak torque and TTDPM toward flexion (P = .001). The current research highlighted the relationship between knee proprioception and strength and landing kinematics. Individuals with enhanced proprioception and muscular strength had better control of IC knee-flexion angle during a dynamic task.

  9. Knee Muscular Control During Jump Landing in Multidirections

    OpenAIRE

    Sinsurin; Vachalathiti; Jalayondeja; Limroongreungrat

    2016-01-01

    Background Jump landing is a complex movement in sports. While competing and practicing, athletes frequently perform multi-planar jump landing. Anticipatory muscle activity could influence the amount of knee flexion and prepare the knee for dynamic weight bearing such as landing tasks. Objectives The aim of the present study was to examine knee muscle function and knee flexion excursion as athletes naturally performed multi-direct...

  10. Slightly flexed knee position within a standard knee coil: MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y. [Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan); Ikeda, K. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of positioning the knee slightly flexed within a standard MR knee coil in delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Within the confined space of a commercially available knee coil, knee could bend as much as 30 , average 17 of flexion. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained at both fully extended and slightly flexed positions. Twenty-two normal knees and 18 knees with ACL tears were examined and paired MR images were evaluated by two observers. Compared with knee extension, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 57 % of reviews of full length of the ACL and 53 % of the femoral attachment. In the extended position the anterior margin of the ligament was obscured due to partial averaging with the intercondylar roof. We recommend examining the knee in an achievable flexed position within the standard knee coil. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 6 refs.

  11. Alignment Analyses in the Varus Osteoarthritic Knee Using Computer Navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kelvin G; Sathappan, Sathappan S; Teo, Yee Hong; Low, Wilson C J

    2015-06-01

    Osteoarthritic (OA) knees with severe extension varus deformity seem to have correspondingly more severe flexion varus, especially beyond a certain tibiofemoral angle. Clinical measurement of flexion varus and fixed flexion deformity (FFD), which had been difficult to perform because of the spatial alignment of the knee in flexion, was recently made possible with computer navigation. We conducted a study to evaluate the relationship of extension and flexion varus in OA knees and to determine whether severity of FFD in the sagittal plane correlates with severity of coronal plane varus deformity. The study included 317 consecutive cases of computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty performed on OA knees with varus deformities. Three sets of values were extracted from the navigation data: varus angle at maximal knee extension, 90° knee flexion, and maximal knee extension. Correlation analyses were performed for extension and flexion varus, FFD, and coronal plane deformity. OA knees with extension varus of more than 10° had an incremental likelihood of more severe flexion varus. When the extension varus angle exceeded 20°, probability became almost certainty. There was no correlation between FFD and coronal plane varus deformity.

  12. In vivo metacarpophalanageal joint collateral ligament length changes during flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y C; Sheng, X M; Chen, J; Qian, Z W

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the in vivo length changes of the collateral ligaments of metacarpophalangeal joint during flexion. We obtained computed tomography scans of index, middle, ring and little fingers at 0°, 30°, 60° and 90° of joint flexion from six hands of six healthy adult volunteers. Three of them had their dominant right hand studied, and the other three had their non-dominant left hand studied. We measured and analysed the radial and ulnar collateral ligaments of each metacarpophalangeal joint from the reconstructed images. We found that the dorsal and middle portions of the both radial and ulnar collateral ligament lengthened progressively during digital flexion and reached the maximum at 90° flexion. The length of the volar portion increased from 0° to 30° flexion and then decreased from 30° to 60° flexion, reaching the minimum at 90°. In conclusion, three portions of collateral ligaments on both sides of the metacarpophalangeal joint have variable length changes during flexion, which act to stabilize the joint through its flexion arc.

  13. Spine lateral flexion strength development differences between exercises with pelvic stabilization and without pelvic stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straton, Alexandru; Gidu, Diana Victoria; Micu, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Poor lateral flexor muscle strength can be an important source of lumbar/thoracic back pain in women. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pelvic stabilization (PS) and no pelvic stabilization (NoPS) lateral flexion strength exercise training on the development of isolated right and left lateral flexion strength. Isometric torque of the isolated right and left lateral flexion muscles was measured at two positions (0° and 30° opposed angle range of motion) on 42 healthy women before and after 8 weeks of PS and NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise training. Subjects were assigned in three groups, the first (n=14) trained 3 times/week with PS lateral flexion strength exercise, the second (n=14) trained 3 times/week with NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise and the third (control, n=14) did not train. Post training isometric strength values describing PS and NoPS lateral flexion strength improved in greater extent for the PS lateral flexion strength exercise group and in lesser extent for the NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise group, in both angles (pstrength exercises; NoPS lateral flexion strength exercises can be an effective way of training for the spine lateral flexion muscles, if there is no access to PS lateral flexion strength training machines.

  14. Study of Wearable Knee Assistive Instruments for Walk Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Nakamura, Masahiro; Ito, Noritaka; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Horikuchi, Kenichi; Wakabayashi, Shojiro; Takahashi, Rei; Terada, Hidetsugu; Haro, Hirotaka

    A wearable Knee Assistive Instrument for the walk rehabilitation was newly developed. Especially, this system aimed at supporting the rehabilitation for the post-TKA (Total Knee Arthroplasty) which is a popular surgery for aging people. This system consisted of an assisting mechanism for the knee joint, a hip joint support system and a foot pressure sensor system. The driving system of this robot consisted of a CPU board which generated the walking pattern, a Li-ion battery, DC motors with motor drivers, contact sensors to detect the state of foot and potentiometers to detect the hip joint angle. The control method was proposed to reproduce complex motion of knee joint as much as possible, and to increase hip or knee flexion angle. Especially, this method used the timing that heel left from the floor. This method included that the lower limb was raised to prevent a subject's fall. Also, the prototype of knee assisting system was tested. It was confirmed that the assisting system is useful.

  15. Recovery of knee mobility after a static or mobile spacer in total knee infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunnekreef, J.J.; Hannink, G.; Mde, W. Malefijt

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the recovery of knee mobility after two-stage revision of an infected total knee arthroplasty using a static or mobile spacer. At 12 months follow-up, none of the patients had a recurrent infection of their new prosthesis. Knee flexion was lower in the static

  16. Snapping knee caused by the gracilis tendon: A case report with an anatomical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Seino

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a patient exhibiting the snapping phenomenon during flexion/extension motion caused by the gracilis tendon flipping over the posteromedial corner of the medial femoral condyle. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-year history of pain accompanied by snapping over the medial aspect of the left knee. Snapping was observed at the posteromedial corner of the medial femoral condyle at around 30° of flexion during active and passive flexion/extension. Imaging examination, including radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and computed tomography, revealed no abnormalities. Considering the persistent discomfort and disability associated with the snapping, surgery was indicated. During surgery, the gracilis tendon was observed to move over the posterior edge of the medial femoral condyle during flexion/extension of the knee. The gracilis tendon was transected and the proximal cut end was sutured to the neighboring semitendinosus tendon in a proximally retracted position. After the surgery, the snapping symptom was resolved. We hypothesized that the anteriorly deviated location of the gracilis tendon in relation to the medial femoral condyle was a causative factor for the snapping phenomenon in this patient. In order to investigate whether the gracilis tendon of this patient passes along the aberrant route, the location of the gracilis tendon in our patient population with knee injuries (26 patients was examined on axial MRI. In this study population, the gracilis tendon was located posterior to the medial femoral condyle in 21 of the 26 knees (81%, and at the posteromedial corner of the medial femoral condyle in 5 of the 26 knees (19%. However, passage of the gracilis tendon anterior to the posterior edge of the medial femoral condyle was not observed in any of the cases in this population. Based on this investigation, the aberrant route of the gracilis tendon was thought to be a primary factor for snapping observed in this

  17. The Impact of Bone Deformity on Osteoarthritic Varus Knee Correctability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcovigi, Andrea; Zambianchi, Francesco; Giorgini, Andrea; Digennaro, Vitantonio; Catani, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    Bone deformities in the varus osteoarthritic knee may influence soft-tissue balancing and therefore knee correctability. The hypothesis of the present study was that the grade of coronal plane knee deformity may influence directly knee correctability along the entire range of motion from 0° to 90°. Tibial and femoral epiphyseal bone deformities were also analyzed to determine which kind had the greater impact on knee correctability. A coronal plane deformity radiographic assessment and an intraoperative correctability assessment using computer-assisted surgery were performed on 118 varus osteoarthritic knees undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Knees were divided into groups taking into account the kind of bone deformity (tibial, femoral, and combined). A significant inverse correlation was found between coronal plane deformity and knee correctability at every 10 degrees of flexion. Correlation was strong at 0° and progressively got weaker at further flexion angles. According to literature, knees with a varus deformity >10° were rarely correctable in full extension, but often correctable in flexion, whereas knees with varus deformity >15° showed to be almost never correctable. Combined deformity group had a significantly lower rate of correctability along the entire range of motion. The severity of varus knee malalignment always influenced knee correctability with the knee in full extension, in further flexion (20°-60°), correctability was mildly affected. Isolated tibial epiphyseal deformity and combined epiphyseal deformity have the greatest impact on knee correctability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Anterior referencing of tibial slope in total knee arthroplasty considerably influences knee kinematics : a musculoskeletal simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marra, Marco Antonio; Strzelczak, Marta; Heesterbeek, Petra J.C.; van de Groes, Sebastiaan A.W.; Janssen, Dennis W.; Koopman, Bart F.J.M.; Wymenga, Ate B.; Verdonschot, Nico J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: In total knee arthroplasty (TKA), the posterior tibial slope is not always reconstructed correctly, and the knee ligaments may become too tight in flexion. To release a tight flexion gap, surgeons can increase the posterior tibial slope using two surgical resection techniques: the anterior

  19. A mini-invasive procedure for treating arthrofibrosis of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Xu

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: Mini-invasive quadricepsplasty-associated arthroscopic lysis and manipulation of the knee in flexion is simple and easy and should be considered as a legitimate treatment for arthrofibrosis of the knee.

  20. Knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  1. Spinal reflex excitability changes after lumbar spine passive flexion mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbulian, Ronald; Burke, Jeanmarie; Dishman, J Donald

    2002-10-01

    Flexion distraction has gained increased credibility as a therapeutic modality for treatment of low back pain. Although important work in the area has elucidated the intradiskal pressure profiles during flexion distraction, the accompanying neural responses have yet to be described. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess neural reflex responses to motion with 3 degrees of freedom applied to the lumbar spine and to evaluate H-reflex responses of the soleus. Subjects (n = 12) were measured for H-maximum reflexes determined from stimulus response recruitment curves measured in neutral prone position. The mean of 10 evoked H-waves (at H-maximum stimulus intensity) were measured in neutral position, flexion, left and right lateral flexion, and axial rotation of the trunk on an adjusting table. H-reflexes were expressed as a percentage of maximal M-wave for the criterion measure. Spinal range of motion was quantified by digitization. The data showed variation in some movement ranges, notwithstanding identical table positioning for all subjects. Mean H-reflex amplitude was decreased (15.2 +/- 5.8 mV to 13.8 +/- 5.8 mV), and the H/M ratio was also decreased in flexion compared with neutral (55.0% +/- 19.1% to 50.3% +/- 19.4%; P <.05). Trunk flexion is accompanied by inhibition of the motor neuron pool. Slight perturbations in numerous afferent receptors are known to significantly alter the H-reflex. The absence of measurable changes in lateral flexion and trunk rotation may indicate that both slow- and fast-adapting receptors could be involved in lumbar motion. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further dynamic motion studies of the flexion distraction neurophysiologic condition.

  2. [THE EFFECTS OF THE PILATES METHOD ON HAMSTRING EXTENSIBILITY, PELVIC TILT AND TRUNK FLEXION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero-Cristóbal, Raquel; López-Miñarro, Pedro A; Alacid Cárceles, Fernando; Esparza-Ros, Francisco

    2015-11-01

    Pilates includes a high volume of hamstring stretching and maximal trunk flexion with knees extended exercises. to perform a systematic review about Pilates practice effects and a detraining period on hamstring extensibility, pelvic tilt and trunk flexion in maximal trunk flexion with knees extended. it was analysed all the experimental or quasi-experimental designs written in English, Spanish or Portuguese and included in the following databases: Pubmed, Sports Discus, ISI Web of Knowledge, Dialnet and Research Gate. twenty-one papers were analysed. Most of them used a pre-test-post-test design with control group. The intervention programs applied were heterogeneous. Samples were composed mainly of women, both young and old. It was found that the Pilates practice, with different volume, significantly increased hamstring muscle extensibility and pelvic tilt in maximal trunk flexion. At least three training sessions peer week during six weeks were necessary in order to obtain a high trunk inclination. Studies which involved athletes showed contradictory results. By inducing a detraining period it was noticed a decrease in hamstring extensibility and trunk flexion from the second week. there is a moderate evidence that Pilates is an effective method to increase hamstring extensibility, pelvic tilt and the degree of trunk flexion in maximal flexion positions in sedentary and recreational active people and also to increase hamstring extensibility in athletes. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental knee pain reduces muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Mortensen, Sara Rosager; Aaboe, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Pain is the principal symptom in knee pathologies and reduced muscle strength is a common observation among knee patients. However, the relationship between knee joint pain and muscle strength remains to be clarified. This study aimed at investigating the changes in knee muscle strength following...... experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and if these changes were associated with the pain intensities. In a crossover study, 18 healthy subjects were tested on 2 different days. Using an isokinetic dynamometer, maximal muscle strength in knee extension and flexion was measured at angular velocities 0....... Knee pain reduced the muscle strength by 5 to 15% compared to the control conditions (P muscle strength was positively correlated to the pain intensity. Experimental knee pain significantly reduced knee extension...

  4. Knee joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total knee replacement; Knee arthroplasty; Knee replacement - total; Tricompartmental knee replacement; Subvastus knee replacement; Knee replacement - minimally invasive; Knee arthroplasty - minimally ...

  5. The Effect of Foot Progression Angle on Knee Joint Compression Force during Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldvinsson, Henrik Koblauch; Heilskov-Hansen, Thomas; Alkjær, Tine

    2013-01-01

    compression force increased during EFR and the lateral knee joint compartment compression force increased during IFR. The increases in joint loads may be a result of increased knee flexion angles. Further these data suggest that the frontal plane knee joint moment is not a valid surrogate measure for knee...

  6. Different Kinematics of Knees with Varus and Valgus Deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, C; Benditz, A; Koeck, F; Keshmiri, A; Grifka, J; Maderbacher, G

    2018-03-01

    Few data exist of kinematics of knees with varus and valgus deformities combined with osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to reveal different (1) tibiofemoral kinematics, (2) medial and lateral gaps, and (3) condylar liftoff of osteoarthritic knees with either varus or valgus deformity before and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). For this purpose, 40 patients for TKA were included in this study, 23 knees with varus deformity and 17 knees with valgus deformity. All patients underwent computer navigation, and kinematics was assessed before making any cuts or releases and after implantation. Osteoarthritic knees with valgus deformity showed a significant difference in tibia rotation relative to the femur with flexion before and after TKA, whereas knees with varus deformity did not. Knees with a valgus deformity showed femoral external rotation in extension and femoral internal rotation in flexion, whereas knees with a varus deformity revealed femoral internal rotation in extension and femoral external rotation in flexion. In both groups, gaps increased after TKA. Condylar liftoff was not observed in the varus deformity group after TKA. In the valgus deformity group, condylar liftoff was detected after TKA at knee flexion of 50 degrees and more. This study revealed significant differences in tibiofemoral kinematics between osteoarthritic knees with a varus or valgus deformity before and after TKA. Valgus deformities showed a paradoxic movement pattern. These in vivo intraoperative results need to be confirmed using fluoroscopic or radiographic three-dimensional matching before and after TKA. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Six degree-of-freedom knee joint kinematics in obese individuals with knee pain during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Sheng; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Felson, David T; Li, Guoan; Lewis, Cara L

    2017-01-01

    Knee joint pain is a common symptom in obese individuals and walking is often prescribed as part of management programs. Past studies in obese individuals have focused on standing alignment and kinematics in the sagittal and coronal planes. Investigation of 6 degree-of-freedom (6DOF) knee joint kinematics during standing and gait is important to thoroughly understand knee function in obese individuals with knee pain. This study aimed to investigate the 6DOF knee joint kinematics in standing and during gait in obese patients using a validated fluoroscopic imaging system. Ten individuals with obesity and knee pain were recruited. While standing, the knee was in 7.4±6.3°of hyperextension, 2.8±3.3° of abduction and 5.6±7.3° of external rotation. The femoral center was located 0.7±3.1mm anterior and 5.1±1.5mm medial to the tibial center. During treadmill gait, the sagittal plane motion, i.e., flexion/extension and anterior-posterior translation, showed a clear pattern. Specifically, obese individuals with knee pain maintained the knee in more flexion and more anterior tibial translation during most of the stance phase of the gait cycle and had a reduced total range of knee flexion when compared to a healthy non-obese group. In conclusion, obese individuals with knee pain used hyperextension knee posture while standing, but maintained the knee in more flexion during gait with reduced overall range of motion in the 6DOF analysis.

  8. Six degree-of-freedom knee joint kinematics in obese individuals with knee pain during gait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Sheng Li

    Full Text Available Knee joint pain is a common symptom in obese individuals and walking is often prescribed as part of management programs. Past studies in obese individuals have focused on standing alignment and kinematics in the sagittal and coronal planes. Investigation of 6 degree-of-freedom (6DOF knee joint kinematics during standing and gait is important to thoroughly understand knee function in obese individuals with knee pain. This study aimed to investigate the 6DOF knee joint kinematics in standing and during gait in obese patients using a validated fluoroscopic imaging system. Ten individuals with obesity and knee pain were recruited. While standing, the knee was in 7.4±6.3°of hyperextension, 2.8±3.3° of abduction and 5.6±7.3° of external rotation. The femoral center was located 0.7±3.1mm anterior and 5.1±1.5mm medial to the tibial center. During treadmill gait, the sagittal plane motion, i.e., flexion/extension and anterior-posterior translation, showed a clear pattern. Specifically, obese individuals with knee pain maintained the knee in more flexion and more anterior tibial translation during most of the stance phase of the gait cycle and had a reduced total range of knee flexion when compared to a healthy non-obese group. In conclusion, obese individuals with knee pain used hyperextension knee posture while standing, but maintained the knee in more flexion during gait with reduced overall range of motion in the 6DOF analysis.

  9. Predicting the Functional Roles of Knee Joint Muscles from Internal Joint Moments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flaxman, Teresa E; Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B

    2017-01-01

    to the activation of individual muscles. RESULTS: Rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae were classified as moment actuators for knee extension and hip flexion. Hamstrings were classified as moment actuators for hip extension and knee flexion. Gastrocnemius and hamstring muscles were classified as specific joint...

  10. Effect of referencing technique for the tibial slope in cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marra, Marco Antonio; Heesterbeek, Petra J.C.; van de Groes, Sebastiaan A.W.; Janssen, Dennis W.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Wymenga, A.B.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Tibial slope was shown to majorly affect the outcomes of Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA). More slope of the tibial component could help releasing a too tight flexion gap in cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA and is generally associated with a wider range of post-operative knee flexion. However,

  11. Knee Bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... frequent falls on the knee — such as wrestling, football and volleyball — can increase your risk of knee ... or repetitious bending of your knees increases the force on your knee joints. Achieve and maintain a ...

  12. Effects of tension of Kinesio taping application on maximum quadriceps torque and knee repositioning sense in recreationally males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Mohammadi

    2018-04-01

    Conclusion: According to the results, Kinesio taping could influence on repositioning sense of the knee joint at 60-degree knee flexion. Maximum concentric and eccentric extensor torques was also increased.

  13. Decreased extension gap and valgus alignment after implantation of total knee prosthesis in primary varus knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoda, Yukihide; Nakagawa, Shigeru; Sugama, Ryo; Ikawa, Tessyu; Noguchi, Takahiro; Hirakawa, Masashi; Matsui, Yoshio; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2016-11-01

    It was hypothesised that implantation of a total knee prosthesis may change the size and shape of the joint gap. To test this hypothesis, a tensor device was used which was specifically designed to reproduce the conditions before and after implantation, including attachment of the polyethylene insert trial. This study aimed to compare the joint gaps before and after implantation of a total knee prosthesis using this new tensor device. A total of 259 primary varus knees were included in this study. Knees were exposed using a medial parapatellar approach, and the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments were resected. After the trial reduction, the intraoperative joint gap kinematics was measured using the tensor device. Implantation of a total knee prosthesis decreased the size of the extension joint gap and made it valgus, but did not influence the size or shape of the flexion joint gap. The present findings suggest that the classical gap technique, which creates equal and rectangular extension and flexion joint gaps in the bone cutting surface, results in an imbalance between the extension and flexion joint gaps after implantation. To achieve equal and rectangular extension and flexion joint gaps after implantation, the prepared extension joint gap should be about 2 mm larger than the flexion joint gap and slightly varus before implantation in primary varus knees. Therapeutic study, Level II.

  14. [Effectiveness of traumatic dislocation of knee joint combined with multiple ligament injuries treated by stages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Liu, Chunlei; Yang, Lezhong; Dai, Zhu; Cao, Shengjun

    2011-02-01

    To observe the effectiveness of traumatic dislocation of the knee joint combined with multiple ligament injuries treated by stages. Between june 2005 and November 2008, 13 cases of traumatic dislocation of the knee joint combined with multiple ligament injuries were treated by stages, including 9 males and 4 females with an average age of 30.7 years (range, 18-54 years). The dislocations were left knee in 3 cases and right knee in 10 cases. The causes of injury were sports injury in 8 cases, traffic accident injury in 2 cases, falling from height injury in 2 cases, and sprain injury in 1 case. The average time from injury to hospitalization was 9 hours (range, 6 hours to 2 days). Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and medial collateral ligament (MCL) were involved in 8 cases; ACL, PCL, and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) in 3 cases; and ACL, PCL, MCL, and LCL in 2 cases. The valgus stress testing results of 10 knees were ++ to +++; the varus stress testing results of 5 knees were ++ to +++; all knees showed positive in the anterior or the posterior drawer test and ++ to +++ in Lachman test. The nerve, vessel, MCL, LCL, PCL, meniscus were repaired in the first operation. The functional exercise of knee joint was done after fixation for 3-4 weeks. During the second operation, the ACL was reconstructed under arthroscopy after the range of motion (ROM) of knee joint was good with anterior instability of knee within 4-6 months. All wounds healed by first intention after two operations; no complications of infection and compartment syndrome occurred. All cases were followed up 12-60 months with an average of 36 months. Joint effusion of knee occurred in 2 cases at 4 weeks after the first operation and was cured after removal of fluid. At 3 months after the second operation, the results of valgus stress testing and Lachman test were ++ in 1 case, respectively; the results of valgus stress testing, varus stress testing, and Lachman test

  15. Prosthetic knee design by simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollerbach, K; Hollister, A

    1999-07-30

    Although 150,000 total knee replacement surgeries are performed annually in North America, current designs of knee prostheses have mechanical problems that include a limited range of motion, abnormal gait patterns, patellofemoral joint dysfunction, implant loosening or subsidence, and excessive wear. These problems fall into three categories: failure to reproduce normal joint kinematics, which results in altered limb function; bone-implant interface failure; and material failure. Modern computer technology can be used to design, prototype, and test new total knee implants. The design team uses the full range of CAD-CAM to design and produce implant prototypes for mechanical and clinical testing. Closer approximation of natural knee kinematics and kinetics is essential for improved patient function and diminished implant loads. Current knee replacement designs are based on 19th Century theories that the knee moves about a variable axis of rotation. Recent research has shown, however, that knee motion occurs about two fixed, offset axes of rotation. These aces are not perpendicular to the long axes of the bones or to each other, and the axes do not intersect. Bearing surfaces of mechanisms that move about axes of rotation are surfaces of revolution of those axes which advanced CAD technology can produce. Solids with surfaces of revolution for the two axes of rotation for the knee have been made using an HP9000 workstation and Structural Ideas Master Series CAD software at ArthroMotion. The implant's CAD model should closely replicate movements of the normal knee. The knee model will have a range of flexion-extension (FE) from -5 to 120 degrees. Movements include varus, valgus, internal and external rotation, as well as flexion and extension. The patellofemoral joint is aligned perpendicular to the FE axis and replicates the natural joint more closely than those of existing prostheses. The bearing surfaces will be more congruent than current designs and should

  16. The effect of a knee ankle foot orthosis incorporating an active knee mechanism on gait of a person with poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arazpour, Mokhtar; Chitsazan, Ahmad; Bani, Monireh Ahmadi; Rouhi, Gholamreza; Ghomshe, Farhad Tabatabai; Hutchins, Stephen W

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this case study was to identify the effect of a powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis on the kinematics and temporospatial parameters of walking by a person with poliomyelitis when compared to a knee ankle foot orthosis. A knee ankle foot orthosis was initially manufactured by incorporating drop lock knee joints and custom molded ankle foot orthoses and fitted to a person with poliomyelitis. The orthosis was then adapted by adding electrically activated powered knee joints to provide knee extension torque during stance and also flexion torque in swing phase. Lower limb kinematic and kinetic data plus data for temporospatial parameters were acquired from three test walks using each orthosis. Walking speed, step length, and vertical and horizontal displacement of the pelvis decreased when walking with the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis compared to the knee ankle foot orthosis. When using the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis, the knee flexion achieved during swing and also the overall pattern of walking more closely matched that of normal human walking. The reduced walking speed may have caused the smaller compensatory motions detected when the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis was used. The new powered SCKAFO facilitated controlled knee flexion and extension during ambulation for a volunteer poliomyelitis person.

  17. Thompson′s quadricepsplasty for stiff knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundu Z

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Stiffness of the knee after trauma and/or surgery for femoral fractures is one of the most common complications and is difficult to treat. Stiffness in extension is more common and can be reduced by vigorous physiotherapy. If it does not improve then quadricepsplasty is indicated. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the results of Thompsons quadricepsplasty. Materials and Methods : 22 male patients (age range 20-45 years with posttraumatic knee stiffness following distal femoral fractures underwent Thompson′s quadricepsplasty where knee flexion range was less than 45°. The index injury in these patients was treated with plaster cast (n=5, plates (n=3, intramedullary nailing (n=3 and external fixator for open fractures (n=9. Thompson′s quadricepsplasty was performed in all the patients using anterior approach, with incision extending from upper thigh to tibial tubercle. Release of rectus femoris from underlying vastus intermedius and release of intraarticular adhesions were performed. After surgery the patients needed parentral analgesia for three days and then oral analgesics for three weeks. Active assisted knee mobilization exercises were started on the first post-operative day. Continous passive motion machine was used from the same day. Supervised physiotherapy was continued in hospital for six weeks followed by intensive knee flexion and extension exercise including cycling at home for atleast another six months. Results : Out of 22 patients, 20 had excellent to good results and two patients had poor results using criteria devised by Judet. One poor result was due to peroperative fracture of patella which was then internally fixed and hence the flexion of knee could not be started immediately. There was peroperative avulsion of tibial tuberosity in another patient who finally gained less than 50° knee flexion and hence a poor result. Conclusion : Thompsons quadricepsplasty followed by a strict and rigourous

  18. Effect of compression therapy on knee swelling and pain after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Stig; Jensen, Niels J F; Andersen, Ida

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty may impair postoperative mobilisation and training, and as medical elastic compression stockings are well tolerated and effective to prevent oedema, haematoma and postoperative pain after venous surgery, we wanted to study whether this effect...... could be transferred to total knee arthroplasty surgery reducing postoperative swelling and pain and thereby facilitating mobilisation and improving patient-reported knee function. METHODS: In a randomised controlled study, 88 patients were randomised to use either a medical elastic compression stocking...... or no stocking from the first postoperative day and the following 4 weeks after total knee arthroplasty. Outcome measures were knee, calf and ankle swelling, knee flexion, pain and patient-reported knee function. RESULTS: Seventy per cent of the swelling had occurred before application of the stocking the day...

  19. Acute aquatic treadmill exercise improves gait and pain in people with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Jaimie A; Bressel, Eadric; Tillman, Mark D

    2013-03-01

    To examine the acute effects of aquatic and land treadmill exercise on gait kinematics as well as the level of disease-specific and movement-related pain for individuals with osteoarthritis. Quasi-experimental crossover design. Biomechanics laboratory. Participants (N=14; age, 43-64y) diagnosed with osteoarthritis at the knee (n=12), osteoarthritis at the knee and ankle (n=1), or osteoarthritis at the knee and hip (n=1). Participants performed 3 exercise sessions separated by at least 24 hours in 1 week for each mode of exercise (aquatic treadmill and land treadmill). Gait kinematics and pain were measured before and after each intervention. The angular velocity gain score during stance for left knee extension was improved by 38% after aquatic treadmill exercise (P=.004). Similarly, during swing, the gain scores for angular velocity were also greater for left knee internal rotation and extension by 65% and 20%, respectively (P=.004, P=.008, respectively). During stance, the joint angle gain score for left hip flexion was 7.23% greater after land exercise (P=.007). During swing, the angular velocity gain score for right hip extension was significantly greater for aquatic exercise by 28% (P=.01). Only the joint angle gain score for left ankle abduction during stance was significantly higher after land exercise (4.72%, P=.003). No other joint angle gain scores for either stance or swing were significantly different for either condition (P=.06-.96). Perceived pain was 100% greater after land than aquatic treadmill exercise (P=.02). Step rate and step length were not different between conditions (P=.31-.92). An acute training period on an aquatic treadmill positively influenced joint angular velocity and arthritis-related joint pain. Acute aquatic treadmill exercise may be useful as a conservative treatment to improve angular speed of the lower-extremity joints and pain related to osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published

  20. Unilateral Congenital Knee and Hip Dislocation with Bilateral Clubfoot - A rare Packaging disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Mukesh; Sharma, Nishith

    2013-01-01

    Reduced intrauterine space gives rise to 'packaging disorder' which may involve joint dislocations or contractures. We present an unique case where mutiple joints were dislocated involving left congenital knee dislocation (CDK), bilateral congenital hip dislocation (CDH) and congenital talipes equino varus (CTEV)deformities. A preterm baby boy born to mother with diagnosed oligohydramios presented with left CDK bilateral DDH and CTEV. The knee dislocation was treated first with gradual streaching and weekly above knee cast. At 7th week good flexion was achieved at both knees and abduction splint for DDH (using double diaper) with ponseti cast for CTEV was done. At one year follow up all joints were reduced and maintained well with baby able to stand with support. Packaging disorders may present with multiple dislocations and deformities. Early intervention with serial casting and manipulation minimises disability and prevents ambulatory problems. In our case there was a good response to manipulation and serial casting. This differs from cases with inherent pathology like arthrogryposis where response to treatment is not so good.

  1. Unilateral Congenital Knee and Hip Dislocation with Bilateral Clubfoot – A rare Packaging disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Tiwari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction: Reduced intrauterine space gives rise to ‘packaging disorder’ which may involve joint dislocations or contractures. We present an unique case where mutiple joints were dislocated involving left congenital knee dislocation (CDK, bilateral congenital hip dislocation (CDH and congenital talipes equino varus (CTEVdeformities. Case Report: A preterm baby boy born to mother with diagnosed oligohydramios presented with left CDK bilateral DDH and CTEV. The knee dislocation was treated first with gradual streaching and weekly above knee cast. At 7th week good flexion was achieved at both knees and abduction splint for DDH (using double diaper with ponseti cast for CTEV was done. At one year follow up all joints were reduced and maintained well with baby able to stand with support. Conclusion: Packaging disorders may present with multiple dislocations and deformities. Early intervention with serial casting and manipulation minimises disability and prevents ambulatory problems. In our case there was a good response to manipulation and serial casting. This differs from cases with inherent pathology like arthrogryposis where response to treatment is not so good. Keywords: Congenital genu recurvatum, Develpmental dysplasia hip, CTEV, Clubfoot, serial manipulation, packaging disorders

  2. Intraoperative joint gaps and mediolateral balance affect postoperative knee kinematics in posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Toshifumi; Muneta, Takeshi; Sekiya, Ichiro; Banks, Scott A

    2015-12-01

    Adjusting joint gaps and establishing mediolateral (ML) soft tissue balance are considered essential interventions for better outcomes in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, the relationship between intraoperative laxity measurements and weightbearing knee kinematics has not been well explored. This study aimed to quantify the effect of intraoperative joint gaps and ML soft tissue balance on postoperative knee kinematics in posterior-stabilized (PS)-TKA. We investigated 44 knees in 34 patients who underwent primary PS-TKA by a single surgeon. The central joint gaps and ML tilting angles at 0°, 10°, 30°, 60°, 90°, 120° and 135° flexion were measured during surgery. At a minimum of two year follow-up, we analyzed in vivo kinematics of these knees and examined the influence of intraoperative measurements on postoperative kinematics. Gap difference of knee flexion at 135° minus 0° was correlated with the total posterior translation of lateral femoral condyle (r=0.336, p=0.042) and femoral external rotation (r=0.488, p=0.002) during squatting, anteroposterior position of lateral femoral condyle (r=-0.510, p=0.001) and maximum knee flexion (r=0.355, p=0.031) in kneeling. Similar correlations were observed between deep flexion gap differences with respect to the 90° reference and postoperative knee kinematics. Well-balanced knees showed less anterior translation of medial femoral condyle in mid- to deep flexion, consistent femoral external rotation, and the most neutral valgus/varus rotation compared with unbalanced knees. These findings indicate the importance of adequate intraoperative joint gaps in deep flexion and ML soft tissue balance throughout the range of motion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Post-traumatic knee stiffness: surgical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, N; Boisrenoult, P; Beaufils, P

    2015-02-01

    Post-traumatic knee stiffness and loss of range of motion is a common complication of injuries to the knee area. The causes of post-traumatic knee stiffness can be divided into flexion contractures, extension contractures, and combined contractures. Post-traumatic stiffness can be due to the presence of dense intra-articular adhesions and/or fibrotic transformation of peri-articular structures. Various open and arthroscopic surgical treatments are possible. A precise diagnosis and understanding of the pathology is mandatory prior to any surgical treatment. Failure is imminent if all pathologies are not addressed correctly. From a general point of view, a flexion contracture is due to posterior adhesions and/or anterior impingement. On the other hand, extension contractures are due to anterior adhesions and/or posterior impingement. This overview will describe the different modern surgical techniques for treating post-traumatic knee stiffness. Any bony impingements must be treated before soft tissue release is performed. Intra-articular stiff knees with a loss of flexion can be treated by an anterior arthroscopic arthrolysis. Extra-articular pathology causing a flexion contracture can be treated by open or endoscopic quadriceps release. Extension contractures can be treated by arthroscopic or open posterior arthrolysis. Postoperative care (analgesia, rehabilitation) is essential to maintaining the range of motion obtained intra-operatively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Intraarticular osteochondroma of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Machhindra Morey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteochondromas are usually extra articular and grow away from the joint towards the diaphysis. Intraarticular osteochondromas are very rare and often misdiagnosed. We report a case of 16-year-old boy who presented with pain and clicking sound in the right knee for last 6 months. On examination, click was felt at the terminal flexion of the knee. The lateral radiograph of the right knee showed a radio opaque shadow at the posterior aspect of the distal end of femur, which was further evaluated with an MRI. Arthroscopy showed a hard lesion arising from the roof of the intercondylar notch of femur. It was excised arthroscopically. Histopathology revealed it to be an osteochondroma. Thus, intraarticular osteochondroma of the knee can be considered as a rare cause of pain in young patients.

  5. Combining valgus knee brace and lateral foot wedges reduces external forces and moments in osteoarthritis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jafarnezhadgero, Amir Ali; Oliveira, Anderson S.; Mousavi, Seyed Hamed; Madadi-Shad, Morteza

    Osteoarthritis progression can be related to the external knee adduction and flexion moments during walking. Lateral foot wedges and knee braces have been used as treatment for osteoarthritis, but little is known about their influence on knee joint moments generated in the sagittal and frontal

  6. Calibration of EMG to force for knee muscles is applicable with submaximal voluntary contractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorenbosch, C.A.M.; Joosten, A.; Harlaar, J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the influence of using submaximal isokinetic contractions about the knee compared to maximal voluntary contractions as input to obtain the calibration of an EMG-force model for knee muscles is investigated. Methods: Isokinetic knee flexion and extension contractions were

  7. Relative torque contribution of vastus medialis muscle at different knee angles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.J.; Hoddenbach, J.G.; Huurnink, A.; de Haan, A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: We investigated the relative contribution of the vastus medialis (VM) muscle to total isometric knee extension torque at 10°, 30°, 60° and 90° knee flexion. In the past a more prominent role of the VM muscle at more extended knee angles has been put forward. However, different components of the

  8. Lower limbs kinematic assessment of the effect of a gym and hydrotherapy rehabilitation protocol after knee megaprosthesis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Lovecchio, N.; Sciumè, L.; Zago, M.; Panella, L.; Lopresti, M.; Sforza, C.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To quantitatively assess the effect of a personalized rehabilitation protocol after knee megaprosthesis. [Subject and Methods] The gait patterns of a 33-year-old male patient with knee synovial sarcoma were assessed by a computerized analysis before and after 40 rehabilitation sessions. [Results] The rehabilitation protocol improved the gait pattern. After rehabilitation, hip flexion was nearly symmetric, with normalized affected limb hip flexion, and improved ankle flexion. Ankle i...

  9. KNEE PROPRIOCEPTION FOLLOWING MENISCAL REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brytsko A. A.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is well known that meniscectomy leads to osteoarthritis of the knee and proprioception impairment. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess retrospectively the joint position sense after meniscal suture and partial medial meniscal resection and to estimate the patients’ satisfaction with knee function. Material and Methods. We evaluated the outcomes of 27 patients after meniscal repair and compared them to those of 24 patients after partial meniscal resection. We estimated the joint position sense at 30°, 45° and 60° of flexion using the Biodex system 4 Pro. All patients were assessed with the IKDC 2000 subjective knee score. Results. A statistically significant worsening in reproducing the injured joint position in comparison to the healthy limb in both groups was observed. These impairments were mostly expressed at 45° and 60° of knee flexion, and were worsening over time in the group of patients who had undergone medial meniscal resection. An average value by the IKDC 2000 scale after 24 months in the meniscorrhaphy group was 76.73 ± 11.17% and 68.93 ± 14.76% after partial medial meniscal resection. Сonclusion. The control over position of the knee is not impaired after meniscal repair. An overall satisfaction with joint function is higher in patients who undergo meniscal suture in comparison to the partial medial meniscal resection group.

  10. In Vivo Kinematic Comparison of a Bicruciate Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty and the Normal Knee Using Fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieco, Trevor F; Sharma, Adrija; Dessinger, Garett M; Cates, Harold E; Komistek, Richard D

    2018-02-01

    The bicruciate stabilized (BCS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) features asymmetrical bearing geometry and dual substitution for the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Previous TKA designs have not fully replicated normal knee motion, and they are characterized by lower magnitudes of overall rollback and axial rotation than the normal knee. In vivo kinematics were derived for 10 normal knees and 40-second generation BCS TKAs all implanted by a single surgeon. Mobile fluoroscopy and three-dimensional-to-two-dimensional registration was used to analyze anterior-posterior motion of the femoral condyles and femorotibial axial rotation during weight-bearing flexion. Statistical analysis was conducted at the 95% confidence level. From 0° to 30° of knee flexion, the BCS subjects exhibited similar patterns of femoral rollback and axial rotation compared to normal knee subjects. From 30° to 60° of knee flexion, BCS subjects experienced negligible anterior-posterior motions and axial rotation while normal knees continued to rollback and externally rotate. Between 60° and 90° the BCS resumed posterior motion and, after 90°, axial rotation increased in a normal-like fashion. Similarities in early flexion kinematics suggest that the anterior cam-post is supporting normal-like anterior-posterior motion in the BCS subjects. Likewise, lateral femoral rollback and external rotation of the femur in later flexion provides evidence for appropriate substitution of the PCL via the posterior cam-post. Being discrete in nature, the dual cam-post mechanism does not lend itself to adequate substitution of the cruciate ligaments in mid-flexion during which anterior cruciate ligament tension is decreasing and PCL tension is increasing in the normal knee. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Xin; Wen, Liang; Qu, Tie-Bing; Hou, Li-Li; Xiang, Dong; Bin, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Background: The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS) knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0–135° flexion. Results: Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee's kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, “rollback” compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. Conclusions: There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis. PMID:25591565

  12. Squat exercise to estimate knee megaprosthesis rehabilitation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovecchio, Nicola; Zago, Matteo; Sciumè, Luciana; Lopresti, Maurizio; Sforza, Chiarella

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated a specific rehabilitation protocol using a half squat after total knee reconstruction with distal femur megaprosthesis and tibial allograft-prosthesis composite. [Subject and Methods] Squat execution was recorded by a three-dimensional system before and after a specific rehabilitation program on a 28-year-old patient. Squat duration, body center of mass trajectory, and vertical range of motion were determined. Step width and joint angles and symmetry (hip flexion, extension, and rotation, knee flexion, and ankle dorsal and plantar flexion) were estimated. Knee and hip joint symmetry was computed using a bilateral cyclogram technique. [Results] After rehabilitation, the squat duration was longer (75%), step width was similar, and vertical displacement was higher. Hip flexion increased by over 20%, and ankle dorsiflexion diminished by 14%. The knee had the highest symmetry gain (4.1-3.4%). Angle-angle plot subtended areas decreased from 108° to 40°(2) (hip) and from 204° to 85°(2) (knee), showing improvement in movement symmetry. [Conclusion] We concluded that the squat is an effective multifactorial exercise to estimate rehabilitation outcomes after megaprosthesis, also considering that compressive and shear forces are minimal up to 60-70° of knee flexion.

  13. Lateral trunk lean and medializing the knee as gait strategies for knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbrands, T A; Pisters, M F; Theeven, P J R; Verschueren, S; Vanwanseele, B

    2017-01-01

    To determine (1) if Medial Thrust or Trunk Lean reduces the knee adduction moment (EKAM) the most during gait in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis, (2) if the best overall strategy is the most effective for each patient and (3) if these strategies affect ankle and hip kinetics. Thirty patients with symptomatic medial knee osteoarthritis underwent 3-dimensional gait analysis. Participants received verbal instructions on two gait strategies (Trunk Lean and Medial Thrust) in randomized order after comfortable walking was recorded. The peaks and impulse of the EKAM and strategy-specific kinematic and kinetic variables were calculated for all conditions. Early stance EKAM peak was significantly reduced during Medial Thrust (-29%). During Trunk Lean, early and late stance EKAM peak and EKAM impulse reduced significantly (38%, 21% and -25%, respectively). In 79% of the subjects, the Trunk Lean condition was significantly more effective in reducing EKAM peak than Medial Thrust. Peak ankle dorsi and plantar flexion, knee flexion and hip extension and adduction moments were not significantly increased. Medial Thrust and Trunk Lean reduced the EKAM during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Individual selection of the most effective gait modification strategy seems vital to optimally reduce dynamic knee loading during gait. No detrimental effects on external ankle and hip moments or knee flexion moments were found for these conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Palmar Flexion Creases Variants among Nigerians | Adetona ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Line formations of the palm (palmar flexion creases) as part of field of dermatoglyphics can be used for non-invasive investigations of congenital abnormalities. Numerous studies have found correlation between line patterns, diseases and psychological conditions. The pattern of palmar flexion creases had been studied in ...

  15. Association of bone scintigraphic abnormalities with knee malalignment and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, V B; McDaniel, G; Worrell, T W; Feng, S; Vail, T P; Varju, G; Coleman, R E

    2009-11-01

    The information content of knee bone scintigraphy was evaluated, including pattern, localisation and intensity of retention relative to radiographic features of knee osteoarthritis, knee alignment and knee symptoms. A total of 308 knees (159 subjects) with symptomatic and radiographic knee osteoarthritis of at least one knee was assessed by late-phase (99m)Technetium methylene disphosphonate bone scintigraph, fixed-flexion knee radiograph, full limb radiograph for knee alignment and for self-reported knee symptom severity. Generalised linear models were used to control for within-subject correlation of knee data. The compartmental localisation (medial vs lateral) and intensity of knee bone scan retention were associated with the pattern (varus vs valgus) (p<0.001) and severity (p<0.001) of knee malalignment and localisation and severity of radiographic osteoarthritis (p<0.001). Bone scan agent retention in the tibiofemoral, but not patellofemoral, compartment was associated with severity of knee symptoms (p<0.001) and persisted after adjusting for radiographic osteoarthritis (p<0.001). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study describing a relationship between knee malalignment, joint symptom severity and compartment-specific abnormalities by bone scintigraphy. This work demonstrates that bone scintigraphy is a sensitive and quantitative indicator of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Used selectively, bone scintigraphy is a dynamic imaging modality that holds great promise as a clinical trial screening tool and outcome measure.

  16. Forward lunge knee biomechanics before and after partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Nielsen, Jonas Høberg; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    partial meniscectomy (APM) on knee joint mechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in knee joint biomechanics during a forward lunge in patients with a suspected degenerative meniscal tear from before to three months after APM. METHODS: Twenty-two patients (35-55years old...... strenuous tasks following APM, patients used less knee flexion, a strategy that may limit excessive patellar loads during forward lunge in the recently operated leg....

  17. IN VIVO KINEMATICS OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT DEFICIENT KNEE DURING WIDE-BASED SQUAT USING A 2D/3D REGISTRATION TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Miyaji

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL deficiency increases the risk of early osteoarthritis (OA. Studies of ACL deficient knee kinematics would be important to reveal the disease process and therefore to find mechanisms which would potentially slow OA progression. The purpose of this study was to determine if in vivo kinematics of the anterior cruciate ligament deficient (ACLD knee during a wide-based squat activity differ from kinematics of the contralateral intact knee. Thirty-three patients with a unilateral ACLD knee consented to participate in this institutional review board approved study with the contralateral intact knee serving as the control. In vivo knee kinematics during the wide-based squat were analyzed using a 2D/3D registration technique utilizing CT-based bone models and lateral fluoroscopy. Comparisons were performed using values between 0 and 100° flexion both in flexion and extension phases of the squat activity. Both the ACLD and intact knees demonstrated increasing tibial internal rotation with knee flexion, and no difference was observed in tibial rotation between the groups. The tibia in the ACLD knee was more anterior than that of the contralateral knees at 0 and 5° flexion in both phases (p < 0.05. Tibiofemoral medial contact points of the ACLD knees were more posterior than that of the contralateral knees at 5, 10 and 15° of knee flexion in the extension phase of the squat activity (p < 0.05. Tibiofemoral lateral contact points of the ACLD knees were more posterior than that of the contralateral knees at 0° flexion in the both phases (p < 0.05. The kinematics of the ACLD and contralateral intact knees were similar during the wide-based squat except at the low flexion angles. Therefore, we conclude the wide-based squat may be recommended for the ACLD knee by avoiding terminal extension

  18. Clinical Outcomes in Men and Women following Total Knee Arthroplasty with a High-Flex Knee: No Clinical Effect of Gender

    OpenAIRE

    Nassif, Jeffrey M.; Pietrzak, William S.

    2015-01-01

    While it is generally recognized that anatomical differences exist between the male and female knee, the literature generally refutes the clinical need for gender-specific total knee prostheses. It has been found that standard, unisex knees perform as well, or better, in women than men. Recently, high-flex knees have become available that mechanically accommodate increased flexion yet no studies have directly compared the outcomes of these devices in men and women to see if gender-based dif...

  19. Quantitative and temporal differential recovery of articular and muscular limitations of knee joint contractures; results in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel, Guy; Laneuville, Odette; Coletta, Elizabeth; Goudreau, Louis; Uhthoff, Hans K

    2014-10-01

    Joint contractures alter the mechanical properties of articular and muscular structures. Reversibility of a contracture depends on the restoration of the elasticity of both structures. We determined the differential contribution of articular and muscular structures to knee flexion contractures during spontaneous recovery. Rats (250, divided into 24 groups) had one knee joint surgically fixed in flexion for six different durations, from 1 to 32 wk, creating joint contractures of various severities. After the fixation was removed, the animals were left to spontaneously recover for 1 to 48 wk. After the recovery periods, animals were killed and the knee extension was measured before and after division of the transarticular posterior muscles using a motorized arthrometer. No articular limitation had developed in contracture of recent onset (≤2 wk of fixation, P > 0.05); muscular limitations were responsible for the majority of the contracture (34 ± 8° and 38 ± 6°, respectively; both P contractures of recent onset (1 and 2 wk of fixation, respectively). Long-lasting contractures (≥4 wk of fixation) presented articular limitations, irreversible in all 12 durations of recovery compared with controls (all 12 P contractures of recent onset were primarily due to muscular structures, and they were reversible during spontaneous recovery. Long-lasting contractures were primarily due to articular structures and were irreversible. Comprehensive temporal and quantitative data on the differential reversibility of mechanically significant alterations in articular and muscular structures represent novel evidence on which to base clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Xin Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0-135° flexion. Results: Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee′s kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, "rollback" compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. Conclusions: There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis.

  1. Head flexion angle while using a smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sojeong; Kang, Hwayeong; Shin, Gwanseob

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive or prolonged head flexion posture while using a smartphone is known as one of risk factors for pain symptoms in the neck. To quantitatively assess the amount and range of head flexion of smartphone users, head forward flexion angle was measured from 18 participants when they were conducing three common smartphone tasks (text messaging, web browsing, video watching) while sitting and standing in a laboratory setting. It was found that participants maintained head flexion of 33-45° (50th percentile angle) from vertical when using the smartphone. The head flexion angle was significantly larger (p smartphone, could be a main contributing factor to the occurrence of neck pain of heavy smartphone users. Practitioner Summary: In this laboratory study, the severity of head flexion of smartphone users was quantitatively evaluated when conducting text messaging, web browsing and video watching while sitting and standing. Study results indicate that text messaging while sitting caused the largest head flexion than that of other task conditions.

  2. Fatigue effects on knee joint stability during two jump tasks in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Alexis; Olson, Sharon L; Etnyre, Bruce; Trudelle-Jackson, Elaine E; Bartlett, William; Venegas-Rios, Heidi L

    2010-04-01

    Dynamic knee joint stability may be affected by the onset of metabolic fatigue during sports participation that could increase the risk for knee injury. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of metabolic fatigue on knee muscle activation, peak knee joint angles, and peak knee internal moments in young women during 2 jumping tasks. Fifteen women (mean age: 24.6 +/- 2.6 years) participated in one nonfatigued session and one fatigued session. During both sessions, peak knee landing flexion and valgus joint angles, peak knee extension and varus/valgus internal moments, electromyographic (EMG) muscle activity of the quadriceps and hamstrings, and quadriceps/hamstring EMG cocontraction ratio were measured. The tasks consisted of a single-legged drop jump from a 40-cm box and a 20-cm, up-down, repeated hop task. The fatigued session included a Wingate anaerobic protocol followed by performance of the 2 tasks. Although participants exhibited greater knee injury-predisposing factors during the fatigued session, such as lesser knee flexion joint angles, greater knee valgus joint angles, and greater varus/valgus internal joint moments for both tasks, only knee flexion during the up-down task was statistically significant (p = 0.028). Metabolic fatigue may perhaps predispose young women to knee injuries by impairing dynamic knee joint stability. Training strength-endurance components and the ability to maintain control of body movements in either rested or fatigued situations might help reduce injuries in young women athletes.

  3. Maximum Velocities in Flexion and Extension Actions for Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessop David M.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Speed of movement is fundamental to the outcome of many human actions. A variety of techniques can be implemented in order to maximise movement speed depending on the goal of the movement, constraints, and the time available. Knowing maximum movement velocities is therefore useful for developing movement strategies but also as input into muscle models. The aim of this study was to determine maximum flexion and extension velocities about the major joints in upper and lower limbs. Seven university to international level male competitors performed flexion/extension at each of the major joints in the upper and lower limbs under three conditions: isolated; isolated with a countermovement; involvement of proximal segments. 500 Hz planar high speed video was used to calculate velocities. The highest angular velocities in the upper and lower limb were 50.0 rad·s-1 and 28.4 rad·s-1, at the wrist and knee, respectively. As was true for most joints, these were achieved with the involvement of proximal segments, however, ANOVA analysis showed few significant differences (p<0.05 between conditions. Different segment masses, structures and locations produced differing results, in the upper and lower limbs, highlighting the requirement of segment specific strategies for maximal movements.

  4. 3D intersegmental knee loading in below-knee amputees across steady-state walking speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, Nicholas P; Neptune, Richard R

    2012-05-01

    Unilateral below-knee amputees often develop comorbidities that include knee joint disorders (e.g., intact leg knee osteoarthritis), with the mechanisms leading to these comorbidities being poorly understood. Mechanical knee loading of non-amputees has been associated with joint disorders and shown to be influenced by walking speed. However, the relationships between amputee knee loading and speed have not been identified. This study examined three-dimensional mechanical knee loading of amputees across a wide range of steady-state walking speeds. Fourteen amputees and 10 non-amputee control subjects were analyzed at four overground walking speeds. At each speed, intersegmental joint moment and force impulses (i.e., time-integrals over the stance phase) were compared between the control, intact and residual knees using repeated-measures ANOVAs. There were no differences in joint force impulses between the intact and control knees. The intact knee abduction moment impulse was lower than the non-amputees at 0.6 and 0.9 m/s. The intact knee flexion moment impulses at 0.6, 1.2 and 1.5m/s and knee external rotation moment impulses at all speeds were greater than the residual knee. The residual knee extension moment and posterior force impulses were insensitive to speed increases, while these quantities increased in intact and control knees. These results suggest the intact knees of asymptomatic and relatively new amputees are not overloaded during walking compared to non-amputees. Increased knee loads may develop in response to prolonged prosthesis usage or joint disorder onset. Further study is needed to determine if the identified bilateral loading asymmetries across speeds lead to diminished knee joint health. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Leg position influences early blood loss and functional recovery following total knee arthroplasty: A randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Yong-Ming, Lv; Pei-jian, Ding; Jia, Li; Ying-ze, Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Hidden blood loss is a major factor influencing functional recovery and quality of life in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Special hip and knee flexion positions after have been reported to have promising results with respect to reducing perioperative blood loss. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of postoperative leg position on blood loss and functional recovery after total knee arthroplasty. We enrolled 46 consecutive patients with degenerative osteoarthritis of the knee in this prospective, randomized study. The patients were randomly allocated to a flexion or an extension group. In the flexion group, the affected leg was elevated by 60° at the hip, and the knee was flexed by 60°, while in the extension group, the affected knee was fully extended postoperatively. Blood loss, hemoglobin level, knee circumference and range of motion (ROM) were recorded to determine the influence of postoperative leg position on clinical outcomes. Although the transfusion rate was similar between the two groups (P > 0.05), other parameters related to blood loss (including calculated blood loss, hidden blood loss and postoperative knee circumference) were significantly lower in the flexion group than in the extension group (P group had gained a better ROM in the affected knee than had patients from the extension group (P = 0.04). At 6 months, however, the ROM of the affected knee was similar in both groups. The hospital stay was 1.9 days shorter in the flexion group than in the extension group. Wound infection rates were similar in both groups, and no proven case of deep vein thrombosis was observed in either group. Elevation of the hip by 60° with 60° knee flexion is an effective and simple method to reduce blood loss after primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty, and contributes to better recovery of the functional ROM in the early postoperative period. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  6. Are varus knees contracted? Reconciling the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Michael J; Vakili, Ali; Garg, Gautam; Roe, John; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Crawford, Ross

    2017-01-01

    There is direct literature conflict regarding coronal plane contracture or laxity in the end-stage varus osteoarthritic knee. Understanding the preoperative soft tissue status is important for optimizing the soft tissue envelope during total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The lower limb was manipulated using computer navigation, prior to surgical releases, to allow the limb weight-bearing axis to pass through the knee centre in maximum extension and 20° of flexion. Coronal plane laxity was measured in 78 varus (-7.7° ± 2.8°) knees as medial and lateral displacement from this point and compared to published values for healthy subjects. Medial contracture was present in 12.8% (10/78) of the knees. Of these 10 knees, 5 displayed abnormal lateral laxity. Knees with a contracture in maximum extension also displayed a significant decrease ( p varus deformity. Medial laxity did not significantly decrease when comparing varus deformity of 5-10° versus >10°. The majority of varus knees with deformity of up to 15° have neither a medial contracture nor abnormal lateral laxity when referenced to the individualized neutral axis of the knee. Surgical releases during TKA should be uncommon. Medial contracture when present is influenced by both posterior and medial structures. Lateral laxity is a more consistent feature of the varus knee. The patterns of contracture and laxity are variable with limited correlation to deformity.

  7. Patient Self-Assessed Passive Range of Motion of the Knee Cannot Replace Health Professional Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgbjerg, Jens; Madsen, Frank; Odgaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether patients can accurately self-assess their knee passive range of motion (PROM). A picture-based questionnaire for patient self-assessment of knee PROM was developed and posted to patients. The self-assessed PROM from 58 patients was compared...... (≥ 10-degree flexion contracture). Surgeon- and patient-assessed knee PROM showed a mean difference (95% limits of agreement) of -2.1 degrees (-42.5 to 38.3 degrees) for flexion and -8.1 degrees (-28.8 to 12.7 degrees) for extension. The sensitivity of patient self-assessed PROM in identifying knee...

  8. The effect of tibial slope on the biomechanics of cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty : A musculoskeletal simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marra, Marco Antonio; Strzelczak, Marta; Heesterbeek, Petra J.C.; van de Groes, Sebastiaan A.W.; Janssen, Dennis W.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Wymenga, A.B.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction/Aim: More posterior tibial slope (PTS) can prevent flexion gap tightness in cruciate-retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) and help achieving better knee function. However, the influence of PTS on knee function during activities of daily living (ADLs) is scarcely documented. The aim

  9. Novel knee joint mechanism of transfemoral prosthesis for stair ascent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Koh; Wada, Takahiro; Harada, Ryuchi; Tachiwana, Shinichi

    2013-06-01

    The stability of a transfemoral prosthesis when walking on flat ground has been established by recent advances in knee joint mechanisms and their control methods. It is, however, difficult for users of a transfemoral prosthesis to ascend stairs. This difficulty is mainly due to insufficient generation of extension moment around the knee joint of the prosthesis to lift the body to the next step on the staircase and prevent any unexpected flexion of the knee joint in the stance phase. Only a prosthesis with an actuator has facilitated stair ascent using a step-over-step gait (1 foot is placed per step). However, its use has issues associated with the durability, cost, maintenance, and usage environment. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to develop a novel knee joint mechanism for a prosthesis that generates an extension moment around the knee joint in the stance phase during stair ascent, without the use of any actuators. The proposed mechanism is based on the knowledge that the ground reaction force increases during the stance phase when the knee flexion occurs. Stair ascent experiments with the prosthesis showed that the proposed prosthesis can realize stair ascent without any undesirable knee flexion. In addition, the prosthesis is able to generate a positive knee joint moment power in the stance phase even without any power source.

  10. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty.

  11. Anterior knee pain after total knee arthroplasty: does it correlate with patellar blood flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Sandro; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios S; Hartel, Maximilian; Kohlhof, Hendrik; Roeder, Christoph; Eggli, Stefan

    2011-09-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) disturbs patellar blood flow, an unintended accompaniment to TKA that may be a cause of postoperative anterior knee pain. We examine whether disrupted patellar blood flow correlates with anterior knee pain following TKA. In 50 patients (21 men, 29 women) undergoing TKA, we compared patellar blood flow at flexions 0° to 30°, 60°, 90°, and 110° before and after medial parapatellar arthrotomy to pre- and postoperative anterior knee pain scores by means of a laser Doppler flowmeter (LDF) probe. Anterior knee pain was assessed using the pain intensity numeric rating scale (NRS) of 0-10 (0-no, 10-worst pain). Based on the NRS pain values, patients were divided into two main groups: group A (n = 34) with no pain or discomfort (NRS range 0-4) and group B (n = 16) with anterior knee pain (NRS range 5-10). Patients of group B demonstrated a significant decrease in blood flow before arthrotomy at flexions from 0° to 90°, and 110° and from 0° to 60°, 90°, and 110° after arthrotomy. For group A, a significant decrease in blood flow was detected at flexions from 0° to 90°, and 110° before and after arthrotomy. For both groups, medial arthrotomy did not have a statistically significant influence on patellar blood flow (margin of significance P anterior knee pain (mean NRS 7.1 ± 1.7). At 2-year follow-up, pain significantly decreased (NRS 3.1 ± 2.1) and only 4 of the 16 patients (25%) complained of moderate anterior pain (average NRS 5.7 ± 0.5), while 8 of 16 (50%) patients reported discomfort (mean NRS 3.5 ± 1.8) around the patella. Patients in group A also demonstrated a significant decrease in pain intensity (from NRS 1.5 ± 1.4 preoperatively to NRS 0.4 ± 1.5 at 2-year follow-up). Statistical analysis demonstrated no statistically significant correlation between pre-arthrotomy/post-arthrotomy patellar blood flow and the presence of preoperative and postoperative anterior knee pain. Only the degree of flexion had an influence on

  12. Evaluation of movements of lower limbs in non-professional ballet dancers: hip abduction and flexion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valenti Erica E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature indicated that the majority of professional ballet dancers present static and active dynamic range of motion difference between left and right lower limbs, however, no previous study focused this difference in non-professional ballet dancers. In this study we aimed to evaluate active movements of the hip in non-professional classical dancers. Methods We evaluated 10 non professional ballet dancers (16-23 years old. We measured the active range of motion and flexibility through Well Banks. We compared active range of motion between left and right sides (hip flexion and abduction and performed correlation between active movements and flexibility. Results There was a small difference between the right and left sides of the hip in relation to the movements of flexion and abduction, which suggest the dominant side of the subjects, however, there was no statistical significance. Bank of Wells test revealed statistical difference only between the 1st and the 3rd measurement. There was no correlation between the movements of the hip (abduction and flexion, right and left sides with the three test measurements of the bank of Wells. Conclusion There is no imbalance between the sides of the hip with respect to active abduction and flexion movements in non-professional ballet dancers.

  13. Evaluation of movements of lower limbs in non-professional ballet dancers: hip abduction and flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Erica E; Valenti, Vitor E; Ferreira, Celso; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M; Moura Filho, Oseas F; de Carvalho, Tatiana Dias; Tassi, Nadir; Petenusso, Marcio; Leone, Claudio; Fujiki, Edison N; Junior, Hugo Macedo; de Mello Monteiro, Carlos B; Moreno, Isadora L; Gonçalves, Ana Clara Cr; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2011-08-05

    The literature indicated that the majority of professional ballet dancers present static and active dynamic range of motion difference between left and right lower limbs, however, no previous study focused this difference in non-professional ballet dancers. In this study we aimed to evaluate active movements of the hip in non-professional classical dancers. We evaluated 10 non professional ballet dancers (16-23 years old). We measured the active range of motion and flexibility through Well Banks. We compared active range of motion between left and right sides (hip flexion and abduction) and performed correlation between active movements and flexibility. There was a small difference between the right and left sides of the hip in relation to the movements of flexion and abduction, which suggest the dominant side of the subjects, however, there was no statistical significance. Bank of Wells test revealed statistical difference only between the 1st and the 3rd measurement. There was no correlation between the movements of the hip (abduction and flexion, right and left sides) with the three test measurements of the bank of Wells. There is no imbalance between the sides of the hip with respect to active abduction and flexion movements in non-professional ballet dancers.

  14. [Knee disarticulation and through-knee amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, R

    2011-10-01

    A knee disarticulation or a through-knee stump is superior compared to a transfemoral stump. The thigh muscles are all preserved, and the muscle balance remains undisturbed. The range of motion of the hip joint is not limited. The bulbous shape of the stump allows full weight bearing at the stump end and can easily be fitted with a prosthesis. An amputee with a bilateral knee disarticulation is able to walk "barefoot". A more distal amputation level, e.g., an ultra-short transtibial amputation, is not possible. Important alternative to transfemoral amputations. Possible for any etiology except for Buerger-Winiwarter's disease. New indications are infected and loosened total knee replacements. Preservation of the knee joint is possible. Knee disarticulation is a very atraumatic procedure, compared to transfemoral amputations. Neither bones nor muscles have to be severed, just skin, ligaments, vessels, and nerves. Even the meniscal cartilages may be left in place to act as axial shock absorbers. The cartilage of the femur is not resected, but only bevelled in case of osteoarthritis. There are no tendon attachments or myoplastic procedures necessary. The patella remains in place and is held in position only by the retinacula. Skin closure must be performed without the slightest tension, and if possible not in the weight-bearing area. Transcondylar amputations across the femoral condyles only are indicated when there are not sufficient soft tissues for wound closure of a knee disarticulation. Alternatives as the techniques of Gritti, Klaes, and Eigler, the shortening of the femur and the Sauerbruch's rotation plasty [14] are presented and discussed. The risk of decubital ulcers is rather high. Correct bandaging of the stump is, therefore, particularly important. Prosthetic fitting is possible 3-6 weeks after surgery. The type of prosthesis depends on the amputee's activity level. The superior performance of amputees with knee disarticulations in sports prove the

  15. The influence of a powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis on walking in poliomyelitis subjects: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arazpour, Mokhtar; Moradi, Alireza; Samadian, Mohammad; Bahramizadeh, Mahmood; Joghtaei, Mahmoud; Ahmadi Bani, Monireh; Hutchins, Stephen W; Mardani, Mohammad A

    2016-06-01

    Traditionally, the anatomical knee joint is locked in extension when walking with a conventional knee-ankle-foot orthosis. A powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis was developed to provide restriction of knee flexion during stance phase and active flexion and extension of the knee during swing phase of gait. The purpose of this study was to determine differences of the powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis compared to a locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis in kinematic data and temporospatial parameters during ambulation. Quasi-experimental design. Subjects with poliomyelitis (n = 7) volunteered for this study and undertook gait analysis with both the powered and the conventional knee-ankle-foot orthoses. Three trials per orthosis were collected while each subject walked along a 6-m walkway using a calibrated six-camera three-dimensional video-based motion analysis system. Walking with the powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis resulted in a significant reduction in both walking speed and step length (both 18%), but a significant increase in stance phase percentage compared to walking with the conventional knee-ankle-foot orthosis. Cadence was not significantly different between the two test conditions (p = 0.751). There was significantly higher knee flexion during swing phase and increased hip hiking when using the powered orthosis. The new powered orthosis permitted improved knee joint kinematic for knee-ankle-foot orthosis users while providing knee support in stance and active knee motion in swing in the gait cycle. Therefore, the new powered orthosis provided more natural knee flexion during swing for orthosis users compared to the locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis. This orthosis has the potential to improve knee joint kinematics and gait pattern in poliomyelitis subjects during walking activities. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  16. Focal knee lesions in knee pairs of asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects with OA risk factors—Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chundru, Renu, E-mail: renu.chundru@ucsf.edu [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Baum, Thomas, E-mail: thbaum@gmx.de [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Nardo, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.nardo@ucsf.edu [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Nevitt, Michael C., E-mail: MNevitt@psg.ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Lynch, John, E-mail: JLynch@psg.ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); McCulloch, Charles E., E-mail: CMcCulloch@epi.ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Link, Thomas M., E-mail: tmlink@radiology.ucsf.edu [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Objective: To better understand the relationship between knee pain and bilateral knee lesions, we compared focal knee lesions in knee pairs of subjects with no, unilateral, and bilateral knee pain, and risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA), but no radiographic knee OA. Materials and methods: We examined both knees of 120 subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative database. We randomly selected 60 subjects aged 45–55 years with OA risk factors, no knee pain (WOMAC pain score = 0) and no radiographic OA (KL-score ≤1) in both knees. We also selected two comparison groups with OA risk factors and no radiographic OA in both knees, but with knee pain (WOMAC pain score ≥5): 30 subjects with right only knee pain and 30 subjects with bilateral knee pain. All subjects underwent 3T MRI of both knees and focal knee lesions were assessed. Results: Statistically significant associations between prevalence of focal lesions in the right and left knee with odds ratios up to 13.5 were found in all three subject groups. Focal knee lesions were generally not associated with pain in analyses comparing knee pairs of subjects with unilateral knee pain (p > 0.05). The prevalence and severity of focal knee lesions were not significantly different in knee pairs of subjects with no knee pain and those with bilateral knee pain (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Focal knee lesions in the right and left knee of subjects with OA risk factors were positively associated with each other independent of knee pain status, and were not statistically significant different between knees in subjects with unilateral knee pain.

  17. Jogging biomechanics after exercise in individuals with ACL-reconstructed knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenze, Christopher; Hertel, Jay; Weltman, Arthur; Diduch, David R; Saliba, Susan; Hart, Joseph M

    2014-06-01

    Return to recreational activity is a common goal for the clinician and patient after ACL reconstruction (ACLR) and structured rehabilitation. Decreased peak knee flexion angle and external knee flexion moment during walking and jogging have been indicated as significant contributors to cartilage degeneration over time after knee joint injury. The purpose of this investigation was to measure the effects of 30 min of exercise on knee joint kinetics and kinematics in participants with a history of ACLR. ACLR participants (n = 20, 9 females and 11 males) and healthy controls (n = 23, 11 females and 12 males) participated in an observational laboratory study. Gait analysis was performed on all subjects before and after a 30-min exercise protocol. Sagittal and frontal plane kinematics and kinetics were measured in the involved limb in the ACLR group and compared with healthy control participants across the gait cycle using 90% confidence intervals. Significant differences between groups were established as a consecutive 3% of the gait cycle in which 90% confidence interval did not overlap. Preexercise, ACLR participants were more hip flexed with higher magnitude external hip flexion moments and lower magnitude external knee flexion moments during the stance phase compared with healthy controls. ACLR participants experienced preexercise to postexercise declines in hip flexion angle and external hip flexion moment along with increases in external knee flexion moment when compared with healthy controls. Exercise-related adaptations in hip and knee biomechanics are different in individuals with a history ACLR when compared with healthy controls despite a return to recreational activity. The biomechanical response to fatiguing exercise observed in this investigation may provide insight into one potential source of elevated knee injury risk and reduced long-term knee joint health after ACLR.

  18. Radiological and clinical effect of prosthesis design in varus knees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isyar, Mehmet; Guler, Olcay; Cakmak, Selami; Kara, Adnan; Yalcin, Sercan; Mahirogullari, Mahir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study is to investigate the efficacy of the prosthesis design used in total knee arthroplasty in patients with varus malalignment. Methods After exclusion criteria we classified 90 patients underwent total knee arthroplasty according to prosthesis used into two groups: posterior cruciate ligament substituting and retaining. Mean follow up period was 25–98 months. We evaluated preoperative and postoperative radiological and as well as clinical parameters such as pain, knee function, flexion deformity. Results We found statistically significant difference in both groups in terms of deformity correction (p = 0.000). Conclusion Prosthesis design affects radiological outcomes in varus knees. PMID:26566321

  19. Immediate effect of valgus bracing on knee joint moments in meniscectomised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorning, Maria; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Roos, Ewa M

    2016-01-01

    knee brace on knee joint moments in patients following medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. DESIGN: Within-participant design. METHODS: Twenty-two patients (age 35-55 years) who had undergone medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy within the previous 8-15 months completed three......OBJECTIVES: Patients undergoing medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy are at increased risk of developing and/or progressing knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial compartment load being a potential contributor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of a valgus unloader......-dimensional analysis of gait, forward lunge and one-leg rise during two conditions: with and without a valgus unloader knee brace. Outcome measures included the peak and impulse of the knee adduction moment and the peak knee flexion moment. RESULTS: The peak knee flexion moment increased during brace condition...

  20. Adductor canal block for postoperative pain treatment after revision knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Pia; Koscielniak-Nielsen, Zbigniew J; Schrøder, Henrik M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Revision knee arthroplasty is assumed to be even more painful than primary knee arthroplasty and predominantly performed in chronic pain patients, which challenges postoperative pain treatment. We hypothesized that the adductor canal block, effective for pain relief after primary total...... knee arthroplasty, may reduce pain during knee flexion (primary endpoint: at 4 h) compared with placebo after revision total knee arthroplasty. Secondary endpoints were pain at rest, morphine consumption and morphine-related side effects. METHODS: We included patients scheduled for revision knee......01191593. RESULTS: We enrolled 36 patients, of which 30 were analyzed. Mean pain scores during knee flexion at 4 h (primary endpoint) were: 52±22 versus 71±25 mm (mean difference 19, 95% CI: 1 to 37, P = 0.04), ropivacaine and placebo group respectively. When calculated as area under the curve (1-8 h/7 h...

  1. Relationship between flexion contractures of the joints of the lower extremities and the sagittal profile of the spine in patients with cerebral palsy: a preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery V. Umnov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. The considerable incidence of kyphosis in patients with cerebral palsy (CP causes back pain and aggravates movement disorders. However, few studies have investigated the pathogenesis of this condition. Aim. To identify the relationship between patient motor abilities, the severity of flexion contractures of the knee and hip joints and spinal sagittal profile changes, and the impact on the latter by surgical correction of flexion contracture of the knee joint. Material and methods. The study cohort included 17 pediatric CP patients (11 boys and 6 girls with a mean age of 13.1 ± 1.3 (range, 10–16 years and level 2–4 spastic diplegia according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System. The relationship between radiological indicators of the spine sagittal profile and motor abilities of children, as well as the severity of flexion contractures at the hip and knee, and the degree of insufficiency of the active extension of the knee were investigated. Of these 17 patients, 12 underwent surgery to correct flexion contracture of the knee, which involved lengthening of leg flexors, to analyze the impact of contracture on the sagittal profile of the spine. The following radiological indicators were assessed: angle of thoracic kyphosis (CC, lordosis angle (UL of the lumbar spine, and sacral inclination angle (SS. The study included patients with a CC of at least 30°. Results. Results of an X-ray study showed that the severity of kyphosis was 50.7° ± 2.1°, lordosis was 30.3° ± 4.3°, and SS was 30.5° ± 3.3°. There was a significant association between kyphosis and flexion contracture of the knee joint, as well as between lordosis and insufficient active extension of the knee joint. After elimination of the flexion contracture of the knee, the degree of severity of the CC (thoracic kyphosis was unchanged, while UL (lordosis angle and SS (sacral inclination angle increased by approximately 10°. Conclusion. The severity of

  2. The effect of different types of insoles or shoe modifications on medial loading of the knee in persons with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Graham J.; Parkes, Matthew J.; Forsythe, Laura.; Felson, David T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many conservative treatments exist for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) which aims to reduce the external knee adduction moment (EKAM). The objective of this study was to determine the difference between different shoes and lateral wedge insoles on EKAM, knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI), external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort when walking in individuals with medial knee OA. Seventy individuals with medial knee OA underwent three‐dimensional walking gait analysis in five conditions (barefoot, control shoe, typical wedge, supported wedge, and mobility shoe) with pain and comfort recorded concurrently. The change in EKAM, KAAI, external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort were assessed using multiple linear regressions and pairwise comparisons. Compared with the control shoe, lateral wedge insoles and barefoot walking significantly reduced early stance EKAM and KAAI. The mobility shoe showed no effect. A significant reduction in latter stance EKAM was seen in the lateral wedge insoles compared to the other conditions, with only the barefoot condition reducing the external knee flexion moment. However, the mobility shoe showed significant immediate knee pain reduction and improved comfort scores. Different lateral wedge insoles show comparable reductions in medial knee loading and in our study, the mobility shoe did not affect medial loading. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1646–1654, 2015. PMID:25991385

  3. Data Collection and Analysis Using Wearable Sensors for Monitoring Knee Range of Motion after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yen Chiang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is the most common treatment for degenerative osteoarthritis of that articulation. However, either in rehabilitation clinics or in hospital wards, the knee range of motion (ROM can currently only be assessed using a goniometer. In order to provide continuous and objective measurements of knee ROM, we propose the use of wearable inertial sensors to record the knee ROM during the recovery progress. Digitalized and objective data can assist the surgeons to control the recovery status and flexibly adjust rehabilitation programs during the early acute inpatient stage. The more knee flexion ROM regained during the early inpatient period, the better the long-term knee recovery will be and the sooner early discharge can be achieved. The results of this work show that the proposed wearable sensor approach can provide an alternative for continuous monitoring and objective assessment of knee ROM recovery progress for TKA patients compared to the traditional goniometer measurements.

  4. In Vivo Kinematics of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficient Knee During Wide-Based Squat Using a 2D/3D Registration Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Takeshi; Gamada, Kazuyoshi; Kidera, Kenichi; Ikuta, Futoshi; Yoneta, Kei; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Osaki, Makoto; Yonekura, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency increases the risk of early osteoarthritis (OA). Studies of ACL deficient knee kinematics would be important to reveal the disease process and therefore to find mechanisms which would potentially slow OA progression. The purpose of this study was to determine if in vivo kinematics of the anterior cruciate ligament deficient (ACLD) knee during a wide-based squat activity differ from kinematics of the contralateral intact knee. Thirty-three patients with a unilateral ACLD knee consented to participate in this institutional review board approved study with the contralateral intact knee serving as the control. In vivo knee kinematics during the wide-based squat were analyzed using a 2D/3D registration technique utilizing CT-based bone models and lateral fluoroscopy. Comparisons were performed using values between 0 and 100° flexion both in flexion and extension phases of the squat activity. Both the ACLD and intact knees demonstrated increasing tibial internal rotation with knee flexion, and no difference was observed in tibial rotation between the groups. The tibia in the ACLD knee was more anterior than that of the contralateral knees at 0 and 5° flexion in both phases (p squat activity (p squat except at the low flexion angles. Therefore, we conclude the wide-based squat may be recommended for the ACLD knee by avoiding terminal extension.

  5. Rectus femoris distal tendon resection improves knee motion in patients with spastic diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presedo, Ana; Megrot, Fabrice; Ilharreborde, Brice; Mazda, Keyvan; Penneçot, Georges-François

    2012-05-01

    Children with spastic diplegia frequently show excessive knee extension (stiff-knee gait) throughout swing phase, which may interfere with foot clearance. Abnormal rectus femoris activity is commonly associated with a stiff-knee gait. Rectus femoris transfer has been recommended to enhance knee flexion during swing. However, recent studies suggest the transfer does not generate a knee flexor moment but diminishes knee extension moment in swing and MRI studies show the transferred tendons can be constrained by scarring to underlying muscles. Thus, it is possible knee flexion would be improved by distal rectus release rather than transfer since it would not be adherent to the underlying muscles. We therefore determined whether rectus femoris distal tendon resection improves knee ROM and kinematic characteristics of stiff-knee gait in patients with spastic diplegia. We studied 45 patients who underwent rectus femoris distal tendon resection as a part of multilevel surgery. Rectus femoris procedures were indicated based on kinematic characteristics of stiff-knee gait. All patients were walkers and had a mean age at surgery of 13 years (range, 6-22 years). We obtained gait analyses before surgery and at mean 2-year followup. We based postoperative assessment on clinical evaluation and gait analysis data. At followup, rectus femoris distal tendon resection was associated with improved knee ROM and timing of peak knee flexion in swing, and the absolute values of peak knee flexion became normal for those patients who showed abnormal preoperative values. Kinematic parameters of stiff-knee gait improved after rectus femoris distal tendon resection. Given the preliminary nature of our report, we intend to study the same patients to assess outcomes at a longer followup. Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  6. Proprioception in Above-the-Knee Amputees with Artificial Limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Latanioti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the lower limb proprioceptive sensation in patients with femoral amputation who received an artificial joint. Materials and Methods. 22 patients (18 men, 4 women, 24–65 years old (mean: 42, who had undergone above-the-knee joint amputation and underwent evaluation of proprioception using joint reposition in a predetermined angle of 15° knee flexion. The measurements were applied using a conventional goniometer to both amputated and healthy knees. The last ones were used as internal control. All patients performed an active knee flexion from hyperextension to 15° in a closed kinetic chain in order to evaluate proprioceptive sensation of the knee joint using the joint position sense (JPS method during specific controllable circumstances very close to normal gait. Results. JPS at 15° flexion for the amputated knee was calculated to be equal to 13.91 (SD = ±4.74, and for the healthy side it was equal to 14.15 (SD = ±2.61. No statistically significant differences were detected between the amputated and the healthy limb (. Conclusions. The proprioceptive information of the stumps did not appear to be affected significantly after thigh amputation and application of artificial prosthesis when JPS at 15° was evaluated. It seems that these patients compensate the loss of the knee sensory receptors via alternative mechanisms.

  7. Primary and coupled motions of the native knee in response to applied varus and valgus load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladnick, Brian P; Boorman-Padgett, James; Stone, Kyle; Kent, Robert N; Cross, Michael B; Mayman, David J; Pearle, Andrew D; Imhauser, Carl W

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of the complex kinematics of the native knee is a prerequisite for a successful reconstructive procedure. The aim of this study is to describe the primary and coupled motions of the native knee throughout the range of knee flexion, in response to applied varus and valgus loads. Twenty fresh-frozen cadaver knees were affixed to a six degree of freedom robotic arm with a universal force-moment sensor, and loaded with a 4Nm moment in varus and valgus at 0, 15, 30, 45, and 90° of knee flexion. The resulting tibiofemoral angulation, displacement, and rotation were recorded. For each parameter investigated, the knee joint demonstrated more laxity at higher flexion angles. Varus angulation increased progressively from zero (2.0° varus) to 90 (5.2° varus) degrees of knee flexion (pvarus than with valgus loading (pvarus load than with valgus load throughout the Range of Motion (ROM). Larger differences in laxity of more than 2 to 3°, or peak laxity specifically during the range of mid-flexion, were not found in our cadaver model and are not likely to represent normal coronal plane kinematics. Level V, biomechanical cadaveric study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of knee movement with low-field MR equipment. A normal volunteer study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yoko; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takeo; Aoki, Ikuo; Yamada, Takashi.

    1994-01-01

    This study was performed to make a normal standard by analyzing knee movement in detail. An open low-field unit was used for 23 healthy knee joints. With three-dimensional Fourier transformation (3DFT) gradient echo sequence, 50 sagittal slices of 4.5 mm in thickness were obtained at four flexion angles: 0, 30, 60, and 90 degrees (lateral position). Although the tension ratio of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL, PCL) increased during knee flexion, the change in the tension ratio was significantly different between the ACL and PCL. The femur-ACL angle and femur-PCL angle were parallel with the knee flexion angle, but the tibia-ACL angle and tibia-PCL angle changed complexly. The lateral and medial condyles rolled and slid during knee flexion, and the medial side moved more than the lateral side, consistent with rotation of the lower thigh. The difference in backward movement distance on the tibia between the two condyles was significantly larger in females than in males. This might explain the dominance of knee osteoarthritis in women. Although the lateral position is not completely physiological, we could show initial cinematic data of up to 90 degrees of knee flexion using open-type MRI, which is impossible with high- and middle-field machines. (author)

  9. Flexion-relaxation response to gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Michael; Solomonow, Moshe; Li, Li

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this report was to study the influence of the orientation of gravitational loading on the behavior of anterior and posterior trunk muscles during anterior trunk flexion-extension. Participants (N=13) performed five (5) cycles of trunk flexion-extension while standing with gravity parallel to the body axis and five (5) cycles while in the supine condition (e.g. sit-ups) with gravity perpendicular to the body axis. Surface electromyographic (EMG) patterns from lumbar paraspinal, rectus abdominis, external oblique, rectus femoris, semimembranosis, and biceps femoris muscles were analyzed during each condition. EMG signals were synchronized with lumbar flexion and trunk inclination angles. Flexion-extension from the standing position resulted in a myoelectric silent period of the lumbar posterior muscles (e.g. flexion-relaxation phenomena (FRP)) as well as the hamstring muscles through deep angles during which activity was observed in abdominal muscles. Flexion-extension during sit-ups, however, resulted in a myoelectric silent period of the abdominal muscles and the quadriceps through deep angles during which the lumbar posterior muscles were active. In this condition, the FRP was not observed in posterior muscles. The new findings demonstrate the profound impact of the orientation of the gravity vector on the FRP, the abdominal muscles reaction to gravitational loads during sit-ups and its relationships with lumbar antagonists and thigh musculature. The new findings suggest that gravitational moments requirements dominate the FRP through the prevailing kinematics, load sharing and reflex activation-inhibition of muscles in various conditions. Lumbar kinematics or fixed sensory motor programs by themselves, however, are not the major contributor to the FRP. The new findings improve our insights into spinal biomechanics as well as understanding and evaluating low back disorders.

  10. Can Diagnostic and Therapeutic Arthrocentesis Be Successfully Performed in the Flexed Knee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqub, Sabeen; Sibbitt, Wilmer L; Band, Philip A; Bennett, James F; Emil, N Suzanne; Fangtham, Monthida; Fields, Roderick A; Hayward, William A; Kettwich, Scarlett K; Roldan, Luis P; Bankhurst, Arthur D

    2018-02-07

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the extended or flexed knee positioning was superior for arthrocentesis and whether the flexed knee positioning could be improved by mechanical compression. Fifty-five clinically effusive knees underwent arthrocentesis in a quality improvement intervention: 20 consecutive knees in the extended knee position using the superolateral approach, followed by 35 consecutive knees in the flexed knee position with and without an external compression brace placed on the suprapatellar bursa. Arthrocentesis success and fluid yield in milliliters were measured. Fluid yield for the extended knee was greater (191% greater) than the flexed knee (extended knee, 16.9 ± 15.7 mL; flexed knee, 5.8 ± 6.3 mL; P < 0.007). Successful diagnostic arthrocentesis (≥2 mL) was 95% (19/20) in the extended knee and 77% (27/35) in the flexed knee (P = 0.08). After mechanical compression was applied to the suprapatellar bursa and patellofemoral joint of the flexed knee, fluid yields were essentially identical (extended knee, 16.9 ± 15.7 mL; flexed knee, 16.7 ± 11.3 mL; P = 0.73), as were successful diagnostic arthrocentesis (≥2 mL) (extended knee 95% vs. flexed knee 100%, P = 0.12). The extended knee superolateral approach is superior to the flexed knee for conventional arthrocentesis; however, the extended knee positioning and flexed knee positioning have identical arthrocentesis success when mechanical compression is applied to the superior knee. This new flexed knee technique for arthrocentesis is a useful alternative for patients who are in wheelchairs, have flexion contractures, cannot be supine, or cannot otherwise extend their knee.

  11. Home-Based versus Hospital-Based Rehabilitation Program after Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remedios López-Liria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare home-based rehabilitation with the standard hospital rehabilitation in terms of improving knee joint mobility and recovery of muscle strength and function in patients after a total knee replacement. Materials and Methods. A non-randomised controlled trial was conducted. Seventy-eight patients with a prosthetic knee were included in the study and allocated to either a home-based or hospital-based rehabilitation programme. Treatment included various exercises to restore strength and joint mobility and to improve patients’ functional capacity. The primary outcome of the trial was the treatment effectiveness measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC. Results. The groups did not significantly differ in the leg side (right/left or clinical characteristics (P>0.05. After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements (P<0.001 from the baseline values in the level of pain (visual analogue scale, the range of flexion-extension motion and muscle strength, disability (Barthel and WOMAC indices, balance, and walking. Conclusions. This study reveals that the rehabilitation treatments offered either at home or in hospital settings are equally effective.

  12. Do we need a gender-specific total knee replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Grove; Husted, H; Bencke, J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a gender-specific high-flexion posterior-stabilised (PS) total knee replacement (TKR) would offer advantages over a high-flex PS TKR regarding range of movement (ROM), 'feel' of the knee, pain and satisfaction, as well as during activity. A total.......66). Gait analysis showed no statistically significant differences between the two prosthetic designs in any kinematic, kinetic or temporospatial parameters. Both designs produced good clinical results with significant improvements in several gait parameters without evidence of any advantage in the gender...... of 24 female patients with bilateral osteoarthritis entered this prospective, blind randomised trial in which they received a high-flex PS TKR in one knee and a gender-specific high-flexion PS TKR in the other knee. At follow-up, patients were assessed clinically measuring ROM, and questioned about pain...

  13. The effect of a dynamic PCL brace on patellofemoral compartment pressures in PCL-and PCL/PLC-deficient knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Tyler; Keller, Thomas; Maldonado, Ruben; Metzger, Melodie; Mohr, Karen; Kvitne, Ronald

    2017-12-01

    The natural history of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) deficiency includes the development of arthrosis in the patellofemoral joint (PFJ). The purpose of this biomechanical study was to evaluate the hypothesis that dynamic bracing reduces PFJ pressures in PCL- and combined PCL/posterolateral corner (PLC)-deficient knees. Controlled Laboratory Study. Eight fresh frozen cadaveric knees with intact cruciate and collateral ligaments were included. PFJ pressures and force were measured using a pressure mapping system via a lateral arthrotomy at knee flexion angles of 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120° in intact, PCL-deficient, and PCL/PLC-deficient knees under a combined quadriceps/hamstrings load of 400 N/200 N. Testing was then repeated in PCL- and PCL/PLC-deficient knees after application of a dynamic PCL brace. Application of a dynamic PCL brace led to a reduction in peak PFJ pressures in PCL-deficient knees. In addition, the brace led to a significant reduction in peak pressures in PCL/PLC-deficient knees at 60°, 90°, and 120° of flexion. Application of the dynamic brace also led to a reduction in total PFJ force across all flexion angles for both PCL- and PCL/PLC-deficient knees. Dynamic bracing reduces PFJ pressures in PCL- and combined PCL/PLC-deficient knees, particularly at high degrees of knee flexion.

  14. Nordic Walking does not reduce the loading of the knee joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Henriksen, Michael; Larsen, P

    2008-01-01

    and the knee joint compressive forces were calculated. No differences in compression or shear forces between NW and NP were found. The peak knee flexion angles were larger during NW (-32.5+/-6.0 degrees) compared with NP (-28.2+/-4.2 degrees). The hip range of motion (ROM) was significantly increased during NW...

  15. The use of postoperative suction drainage in total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Mark

    2014-07-16

    The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials is to assess the effectiveness of no drainage when compared to drainage in total knee arthroplasty, in terms of recovery of knee flexion, reduction in swelling, length of hospital stay and haemoglobin levels following TKA.

  16. Examining Ankle-Joint Laxity Using 2 Knee Positions and With Simulated Muscle Guarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Shawn; Caccese, Jaclyn; Knight, Christopher A; Swanik, Charles Buz; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2016-02-01

    Several factors affect the reliability of the anterior drawer and talar tilt tests, including the individual clinician's experience and skill, ankle and knee positioning, and muscle guarding. To compare gastrocnemius activity during the measurement of ankle-complex motion at different knee positions, and secondarily, to compare ankle-complex motion during a simulated trial of muscle guarding. Cross-sectional study. Research laboratory. Thirty-three participants aged 20.2 ± 1.7 years were tested. The ankle was loaded under 2 test conditions (relaxed, simulated muscle guarding) at 2 knee positions (0°, 90° of flexion) while gastrocnemius electromyography (EMG) activity was recorded. Anterior displacement (mm), inversion-eversion motion (°), and peak EMG amplitude values of the gastrocnemius (μV). Anterior displacement did not differ between the positions of 0° and 90° of knee flexion (P = .193). Inversion-eversion motion was greater at 0° of knee flexion compared with 90° (P ankle laxity at the 2 most common knee positions for anterior drawer testing; however, talar tilt testing may be best performed with the knee in 0° of knee flexion. Finally, our outcomes from the simulated muscle-guarding condition suggest that clinicians should use caution and be aware of reduced perceived laxity when performing these clinical examination techniques immediately postinjury.

  17. Validation of a novel smartphone accelerometer-based knee goniometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockendon, Matthew; Gilbert, Robin E

    2012-09-01

    Loss of full knee extension following anterior cruciate ligament surgery has been shown to impair knee function. However, there can be significant difficulties in accurately and reproducibly measuring a fixed flexion of the knee. We studied the interobserver and the intraobserver reliabilities of a novel, smartphone accelerometer-based, knee goniometer and compared it with a long-armed conventional goniometer for the assessment of fixed flexion knee deformity. Five healthy male volunteers (age range 30 to 40 years) were studied. Measurements of knee flexion angle were made with a telescopic-armed goniometer (Lafayette Instrument, Lafayette, IN) and compared with measurements using the smartphone (iPhone 3GS, Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA) knee goniometer using a novel trigonometric technique based on tibial inclination. Bland-Altman analysis of validity and reliability including statistical analysis of correlation by Pearson's method was undertaken. The iPhone goniometer had an interobserver correlation (r) of 0.994 compared with 0.952 for the Lafayette. The intraobserver correlation was r = 0.982 for the iPhone (compared with 0.927). The datasets from the two instruments correlate closely (r = 0.947) are proportional and have mean difference of only -0.4 degrees (SD 3.86 degrees). The Lafayette goniometer had an intraobserver reliability +/- 9.6 degrees. The interobserver reliability was +/- 8.4 degrees. By comparison the iPhone had an interobserver reliability +/- 2.7 degrees and an intraobserver reliability +/- 4.6 degrees. We found the iPhone goniometer to be a reliable tool for the measurement of subtle knee flexion in the clinic setting.

  18. The Effect of Foot Progression Angle on Knee Joint Compression Force during Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldvinsson, Henrik Koblauch; Heilskov-Hansen, Thomas; Alkjær, Tine

    2013-01-01

    was to investigate the knee joint compressive forces during walking with internal, external and normal foot rotation and to determine if the frontal plane knee joint moment is an adequate surrogate for the compression forces in the medial and lateral knee joint compartments under such gait modifications. Ten healthy......It is unclear how rotations of the lower limb affect the knee joint compression forces during walking. Increases in the frontal plane knee moment have been reported when walking with internally rotated feet and a decrease when walking with externally rotated feet. The aim of this study...... compression force increased during EFR and the lateral knee joint compartment compression force increased during IFR. The increases in joint loads may be a result of increased knee flexion angles. Further these data suggest that the frontal plane knee joint moment is not a valid surrogate measure for knee...

  19. Effects of strength exercise on the knee and ankle proprioception of individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhangqi; Zhang, Yu; Lee, Seullee; Wang, Lin

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of 8-week strength exercise on knee and ankle proprioception of individuals with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Forty participants were randomly divided into control and strength exercise groups. Strength exercise group underwent squat training of three times a week for 8 weeks, while control group received an education programme. Threshold for detection of passive movement of knee and ankle joint was tested using an electrically driven movable frame. Between- and within-group differences were evaluated through repeated-measurement analysis of variance. After intervention, passive motion sense in knee flexion of participants in strength exercise group significantly improved (p = 0.033, 95% confidence interval of mean difference: 0.019-1.478) with significant difference between groups. No significant differences of passive motion senses were found in knee extension and ankle between strength exercise and control groups. Eight-week squat training significantly improves the motion sense of knee flexion in patients with KOA.

  20. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... days. Medications prescribed by your doctor should help control pain. During the hospital stay, you'll be encouraged to move your ... exercise your new knee. After you leave the hospital, you'll continue physical ... mobility and a better quality of life. And most knee replacements can be ...

  1. Knee arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through the other cuts. The surgeon will then fix or remove the problem in your knee. At the end of your surgery, the saline will be drained from your knee. The surgeon will close your cuts with sutures (stitches) and cover them with a dressing. Many surgeons ...

  2. Reliability of digital compass goniometer in knee joint range of motion measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaikwawongs, Nammond; Limpaphayom, Noppachart; Wilairatana, Vajara

    2009-04-01

    To compare the reliability of range of motion measurement in the knee joint using a digital compass goniometer combined with inclinometer with standard range of motion measurement from roentgenographic picture. Range of flexion and extension of the knee joint in volunteer participants was measured by the newly developed digital compass goniometer combined with inclinometer (DCG). The results were compared with range of knee joint motion obtained from standard roentgenographic picture by intraclass correlation coefficient. Range of motion of knee joint measured by DCG correlated very well with the data obtained from standard knee roentgenographic picture. The intraclass correlation coefficient equals 0.973. The digital compass goniometer was a reliable tool to measure knee joint range of motion in flexion and extension plane.

  3. Intraoperative assessment of midflexion laxity in total knee prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoda, Yukihide; Nakagawa, Shigeru; Sugama, Ryo; Ikawa, Tessyu; Noguchi, Takahiro; Hirakawa, Masashi; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2014-08-01

    Soft-tissue balancing of the knee is fundamental to the success of a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In posterior-stabilized TKA, there is no stabilizer of the anterior-posterior translation in the midflexion range in which the cam-post mechanism does not engage yet. Therefore, instability in the midflexion range is suspected to occur in posterior-stabilized TKA. The purpose of this study was to measure the joint gap throughout a full range of motion and to analyze the joint gap laxity in the midflexion range after implantation of a mobile-bearing posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis. Joint gap kinematics in 259 knees with varus osteoarthritis were measured during TKAs using a tensor device with the same shape of a total knee prosthesis of the same design was used. After the implantation of a mobile-bearing posterior-stabilized prosthesis and the reduction of the patellofemoral joint, the joint gap was measured at 0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, 120°, and 145° of flexion. The center size of the joint gap was tight in extension and deep flexion and loose at midflexion ranges, especially at 30° of flexion (pprosthesis. Our new tensor device, which can attach the polyethylene insert trial, will provide the important information about the joint gap kinematics after implantation of total knee prostheses. IV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Shape, shear and flexion: an analytic flexion formalism for realistic mass profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, P. D.; Fluke, C. J.

    2009-07-01

    Flexion is a non-linear gravitational lensing effect that arises from gradients in the convergence and shear across an image. We derive a formalism that describes non-linear gravitational lensing by a circularly symmetric lens in the thin-lens approximation. This provides us with relatively simple expressions for first- and second-flexion in terms of only the surface density and projected mass distribution of the lens. We give details of exact lens models, in particular providing flexion calculations for a Sérsic-law profile, which has become increasingly popular over recent years. We further provide a single resource for the analytic forms of convergence, shear, first- and second-flexion for the following mass distributions: a point mass, singular isothermal sphere (SIS); Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile; Sérsic-law profile. We quantitatively compare these mass distributions and show that the convergence and first-flexion are better indicators of the Sérsic shape parameter, while for the concentration of NFW profiles the shear and second-flexion terms are preferred. Research undertaken as part of the Commonwealth Cosmology Initiative (CCI:http://www.thecci.org), an international collaboration supported by the Australian Research Council. E-mail: plasky@astro.swin.edu.au (PDL); cfluke@astro.swin.edu.au (CJF)

  5. The effect of knee brace and knee sleeve on the proprioception of the knee in young non-professional healthy sportsmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoni, G; Herten, A; Kofler, P; Hasler, M; Nachbauer, W

    2013-12-01

    Proprioception has been defined as the capacity to feel the position of a joint in space as sensed by the central nervous system. Prophylactic knee braces are supposed to help in knee injury prevention not just with a mechanical support of the joint but also improving proprioception. The main aim of this study was to determine the effects of a knee brace and a knee sleeve on knee proprioception. The secondary aim was to determine if different starting angles of the knee and different movement directions influence knee proprioception. We tested a group of twenty healthy male sport students without knee injuries. They were tested with the brace, with the sleeve and without support. The threshold of detection of passive knee movement with a starting knee angle of 30° and 60°, both in flexion and extension was determined. We did not find any statistically significant change in the threshold of detection of passive knee movement wearing the brace or the sleeve compared to the unsupported condition (p=0.462, α=0.05). We found a significantly lower proprioceptive sensitivity starting at the more flexed knee angle (p=0.005, α=0.05) and moving in extension than in the other test situations (p=0.001, α=0.05). Movement direction and starting position appear to influence the threshold of detection of passive knee movement. The results of this study also suggest that knee supports do not influence either positively or negatively knee proprioception of uninjured active subjects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Goniometer crosstalk compensation for knee joint applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Sato, Tatiana; Hansson, Gert-Åke; Coury, Helenice Jane Cote Gil

    2010-01-01

    Electrogoniometers are prone to crosstalk errors related to endblocks rotation (general crosstalk) and to the characteristics of each sensor (individual crosstalk). The aim of this study was to assess the crosstalk errors due to endblock misalignments and to propose a procedure to compensate for these errors in knee applications. A precision jig was used to simulate pure ± 100° flexion/extension movements. A goniometer was mounted with various degrees of valgus/varus (± 20°) and rotation (± 30°) misalignments. For valgus/varus misalignments, although offset compensation eliminated the error in the valgus/varus recordings for 0° of flexion/extension and reduced it to a few degrees for small (± 30°) flexion/extension angles (root mean square error = 1.1°), the individual crosstalk caused pronounced errors for large (± 100°) angles (18.8°). Subsequent compensation for this crosstalk reduced these errors to 0.8° and 4.5°, respectively. For rotational misalignment, compensation for the general crosstalk by means of coordinate system rotation, in combination with compensation for the individual crosstalk, reduced the errors for small (± 30°) and large (± 100°) flexion/extension angles from 3.6° to 0.5° and from 15.5° to 2.4°, respectively. Crosstalk errors were efficiently compensated by the procedures applied, which might be useful in preprocessing of knee functional data, thereby substantially improving goniometer accuracy.

  7. Sagittal Plane Knee Biomechanics and Vertical Ground Reaction Forces Are Modified Following ACL Injury Prevention Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Padua, Darin A.; DiStefano, Lindsay J.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) occur because of excessive loading on the knee. ACL injury prevention programs can influence sagittal plane ACL loading factors and vertical ground reaction force (VGRF). Objective: To determine the influence of ACL injury prevention programs on sagittal plane knee biomechanics (anterior tibial shear force, knee flexion angle/moments) and VGRF. Data Sources: The PubMed database was searched for studies published between January 1988 an...

  8. Sagittal Plane Hip, Knee, and Ankle Biomechanics and the Risk of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, Mari; Pasanen, Kati; Krosshaug, Tron; Kannus, Pekka; Vasankari, Tommi; Kujala, Urho M; Bahr, Roald; Perttunen, Jarmo; Parkkari, Jari

    2017-12-01

    Stiff landings with less knee flexion and high vertical ground-reaction forces have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The literature on the association between other sagittal plane measures and the risk of ACL injuries with a prospective study design is lacking. To investigate the relationship between selected sagittal plane hip, knee, and ankle biomechanics and the risk of ACL injury in young female team-sport athletes. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 171 female basketball and floorball athletes (age range, 12-21 years) participated in a vertical drop jump test using 3-dimensional motion analysis. All new ACL injuries, as well as match and training exposure data, were recorded for 1 to 3 years. Biomechanical variables, including hip and ankle flexion at initial contact (IC), hip and ankle ranges of motion (ROMs), and peak external knee and hip flexion moments, were selected for analysis. Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs. The combined sensitivity and specificity of significant test variables were assessed using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. A total of 15 noncontact ACL injuries were recorded during follow-up (0.2 injuries/1000 player-hours). Of the variables investigated, landing with less hip flexion ROM (HR for each 10° increase in hip ROM, 0.61 [95% CI, 0.38-0.99]; P < .05) and a greater knee flexion moment (HR for each 10-N·m increase in knee moment, 1.21 [95% CI, 1.04-1.40]; P = .01) was significantly associated with an increased risk of ACL injury. Hip flexion at IC, ankle flexion at IC, ankle flexion ROM, and peak external hip flexion moment were not significantly associated with the risk of ACL injury. ROC curve analysis for significant variables showed an area under the curve of 0.6, indicating a poor combined sensitivity and specificity of the test. Landing with less hip flexion ROM and a greater peak

  9. Effect of real-time biofeedback on peak knee adduction moment in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis: Is direct feedback effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Rosie E; van den Noort, Josien C; van der Esch, Martin; Booij, Marjolein J; Harlaar, Jaap

    2017-07-13

    Gait modifications can reduce the knee adduction moment, a representation of knee loading. Reduced loading may help to slow progression of medial knee osteoarthritis. We aimed to investigate the response of patients with medial knee osteoarthritis to direct feedback on the knee adduction moment as a method for modifying the gait pattern, before and after training with specific gait modifications. Forty patients with medial knee osteoarthritis underwent 3D gait analysis on an instrumented-treadmill, while receiving real-time feedback on the peak knee adduction moment. Patients were trained with three different modifications; toe-in, wider steps and medial thrust gait. The response to real-time feedback on the knee adduction moment was measured before and after training. To evaluate the short term retention effect, we measured the changes without feedback. We also evaluated the effects on the knee flexion moment and at the hip and ankle joints. With direct feedback on the knee adduction moment, patients were initially unable to reduce the knee adduction moment. After training with specific modifications, peak knee adduction moment was reduced by 14% in response to direct feedback. Without feedback a 9% reduction in peak knee adduction moment was maintained. Hip moments were not increased with modified gait, but small increases in ankle adduction moment and knee flexion moment were observed. Real-time biofeedback directly on the knee adduction moment is a promising option for encouraging gait modifications to reduce knee loading, however only when combined with specific instructions on how to modify the gait. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of net knee moment-angle characteristics by instrumented hand-held dynamometry in children with spastic cerebral palsy and typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberfehlner, Helga; Maas, Huub; Harlaar, Jaap; Newsum, Irene E; Becher, Jules G; Buizer, Annemieke I; Jaspers, Richard T

    2015-08-15

    The limited range of motion during walking in children with spastic cerebral palsy (SCP) may be the result of altered mechanical characteristics of muscles and connective tissues around the knee joint. Measurement of static net knee moment-angle relation will provide insights into these alterations, for which instrumented hand-held dynamometry may be applied. The aims of this study were: (1) to test the measurement error of the estimated net knee moment-angle characteristics, (2) to determine the correlation between knee extension angle measurement at a standardized knee moment and popliteal angle from common physical examination and (3) to compare net knee moment-angle characteristics in SCP versus typically developing children. With the child lying in sideward position, the knee was extended by moving the lower leg by a hand-held force transducer on a low friction cart. Force data were collected for a range of knee angles. Data were excluded when activity (EMG) levels of knee extensor and flexor muscles exceeded the EMG level during rest by more than two standard deviations. The net knee flexion moments were calculated from recorded force data and measured moment arm. Reliability for knee angles corresponding with 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 Nm knee net flexion moments was assessed by standard error of measurements (SEM) and smallest detectable difference (SDD). For between day comparison, SEMs were about 5° and SDDs were below 14° for knee angles at 1-4 Nm net knee flexion moments. In SCP children, the knee angle measured at 4 Nm knee flexion moment was not related to the popliteal angle (r = 0.52). The slope at 4 Nm of the knee moment-angle curve in SCP children was significantly higher than that in typically developing children. The presented knee hand-held dynamometry allows assessment of net knee flexion moment-knee angle characteristics in typically developing and SCP children and can be used to identify clinically relevant changes as a result of treatment

  11. Influence of consciousness, muscle action and activity on medial condyle translation after Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegg, E C; Baré, J; Gill, H S; Pandit, H G; O'Connor, J J; Murray, D W; Price, A J

    2015-12-01

    Quantification of the in vivo position of the medial condyle throughout flexion is important for knee replacement design, and understanding knee pathology. The influence of consciousness, muscle action, and activity type on condyle translation was examined in patients who had undergone medial unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR) using lateral video fluoroscopy. The position of the centre of the femoral component relative to the tibial component was measured for nine patients under different conditions. The following activities were assessed; passive flexion and extension when anaesthetised, passive flexion and extension when conscious, and active flexion, extension and step-up. The position of the centre of the femoral component relative to the tibial component was highly patient dependent. The greatest average translation range (14.9 mm) was observed in anaesthetised patients, and the condyle was significantly more anterior near to extension. Furthermore, when conscious but being moved passively, the femoral condyle translated a greater range (8.9 mm) than when moving actively (5.2mm). When ascending stairs, the femoral condyle was more posterior at 20-30° of flexion than during flexion/extension. The similarity between these results and published data suggest that knee kinematics following mobile-bearing UKR is relatively normal. The results show that in the normal knee and after UKR, knee kinematics is variable and is influenced by the patient, consciousness, muscle action, and activity type. It is therefore essential that all these factors are considered during knee replacement design, if the aim is to achieve more normal knee kinematics. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mid term results of LCS knee: The Indian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh N Maniar

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: LCS implant has given good survival (93.2% at 12.3 years with low rates of spin-out and anterior knee pain and no incidence of osteolysis. Limited flexion post surgery (104° with only 12% managing to sit cross legged on the floor is a drawback.

  13. Pattern of Motion Restriction in Nigerian Patients with Knee Osteoar

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    SUMMARY. In the Western population, knee osteoarthritis (OA) has been shown to present a characteristic passive motion restriction pattern, called the capsular pattern (extension restriction to flexion restriction ratio ranging from. 0.03 to 0.50). The pattern of motion restriction of Nigerian patients with OA has not been ...

  14. Helical axes of skeletal knee joint motion during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bogert, A J; Reinschmidt, C; Lundberg, A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the changes in the axis of rotation of the knee that occur during the stance phase of running. Using intracortical pins, the three-dimensional skeletal kinematics of three subjects were measured during the stance phase of five running trials. The stance phase was divided into equal motion increments for which the position and orientation of the finite helical axes (FHA) were calculated relative to a tibial reference frame. Results were consistent within and between subjects. At the beginning of stance, the FHA was located at the midepicondylar point and during the flexion phase moved 20mm posteriorly and 10mm distally. At the time of peak flexion, the FHA shifted rapidly by about 10-20mm in proximal and posterior direction. The angle between the FHA and the tibial transverse plane increased gradually during flexion, to about 15 degrees of medial inclination, and then returned to zero at the start of the extension phase. These changes in position and orientation of FHA in the knee should be considered in analyses of muscle function during human movement, which require moment arms to be defined relative to a functional rotation axis. The finding that substantial changes in axis of rotation occurred independent of flexion angle suggests that musculoskeletal models must have more than one kinematic degree-of-freedom at the knee. The same applies to the design of knee prostheses, if the goal is to restore normal muscle function.

  15. MR imaging of the flexed knee: comparison to the extended knee in delineation of meniscal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y.; Endo, H.; Ikeda, K.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain MR images in the flexed-knee position and to compare the diagnostic value to the extended position in delineation of the menisci. With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semi-flexed position (average 45 of flexion) within a 1.5-T superconducting magnet. Sets of sagittal MR images were obtained for both the extended- and flexed-knee positions. Using the arthroscopic results as gold standards, 97 menisci were evaluated. Two observers interpreted each MR image of the extended and flexed positions independently without knowledge of the arthroscopic results. Flexed-knee MR images revealed 22 of the 27 arthroscopically proven torn menisci and 69 of the 70 intact menisci, for a sensitivity of 81.5 %, a specificity of 98.6 %, and an accuracy of 93.8 %. Extended-knee MR images indicated a sensitivity of 81.5 %, a specificity of 92.9 %, and an accuracy of 89.7 %. No statistically significant difference was found between the two positions. To enhance MR visualization of all the knee components, we recommend examining the knee in a flexed position within the magnet. (orig.)

  16. Sagittal Plane Knee Biomechanics and Vertical Ground Reaction Forces Are Modified Following ACL Injury Prevention Programs: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padua, Darin A; Distefano, Lindsay J

    2009-03-01

    Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) occur because of excessive loading on the knee. ACL injury prevention programs can influence sagittal plane ACL loading factors and vertical ground reaction force (VGRF). To determine the influence of ACL injury prevention programs on sagittal plane knee biomechanics (anterior tibial shear force, knee flexion angle/moments) and VGRF. The PubMed database was searched for studies published between January 1988 and June 2008. Reference lists of selected articles were also reviewed. Studies were included that evaluated healthy participants for knee flexion angle, sagittal plane knee kinetics, or VGRF after performing a multisession training program. Two individuals reviewed all articles and determined which articles met the selection criteria. Approximately 4% of the articles fulfilled the selection criteria. Data were extracted regarding each program's duration, frequency, exercise type, population, supervision, and testing procedures. Means and variability measures were recorded to calculate effect sizes. One reviewer extracted all data and assessed study quality using PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database). A second reviewer (blinded) verified all information. There is moderate evidence to indicate that knee flexion angle, external knee flexion moment, and VGRF can be successfully modified by an ACL injury prevention program. Programs utilizing multiple exercises (ie, integrated training) appear to produce the most improvement, in comparison to that of single-exercise programs. Knee flexion angle was improved following integrated training (combined balance and strength exercises or combined plyometric and strength exercises). Similarly, external knee flexion moment was improved following integrated training consisting of balance, plyometric, and strength exercises. VGRF was improved when incorporating supervision with instruction and feedback on proper technique. ACL injury prevention programs that are aimed at

  17. Peak activation of lower limb musculature during high flexion kneeling and transitional movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, David C; Tennant, Liana M; Chong, Helen C; Acker, Stacey M

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have measured lower limb muscle activation during high knee flexion or investigated the effects of occupational safety footwear. Therefore, our understanding of injury and disease mechanisms, such as knee osteoarthritis, is limited for these high-risk postures. Peak activation was assessed in eight bilateral lower limb muscles for twelve male participants, while shod or barefoot. Transitions between standing and kneeling had peak quadriceps and tibialis anterior (TA) activations above 50% MVC. Static kneeling and simulated tasks performed when kneeling had peak TA activity above 15% MVC but below 10% MVC for remaining muscles. In three cases, peak muscle activity was significantly higher (mean 8.9% MVC) when shod. However, net compressive knee joint forces may not be significantly increased when shod. EMG should be used as a modelling input when estimating joint contact forces for these postures, considering the activation levels in the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles during transitions. Practitioner Summary: Kneeling transitional movements are used in activities of daily living and work but are linked to increased knee osteoarthritis risk. We found peak EMG activity of some lower limb muscles to be over 70% MVC during transitions and minimal influence of wearing safety footwear.

  18. Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up stairs or hills. Treatment may involve surgery. Bursitis A bursa is a sac filled with fluid ... friction, it can develop into a condition called bursitis . Symptoms of bursitis in the knee include warmth, ...

  19. Knee disarticulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antun Muljačić

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we presented three patients withknee disarticulation performed according toBaumgartner. The Baumgartner tehnique and theapplication of knee disarticulation prosthesis appearedto be superior in comparisson with othermethods.

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament elasticity and force for flexion during the menstrual cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haneul; Petrofsky, Jerrold S.; Daher, Noha; Berk, Lee; Laymon, Michale; Khowailed, Iman Akef

    2013-01-01

    Background A high occurrence of knee injuries have been observed in women during the menstrual cycle (MC). As a result, numerous studies have been conducted regarding knee ligament elasticity during the MC. Some researchers believe that since estrogen receptor b exists in ligaments and tendons in the knee, estrogen may modulate towards a state of laxity. However, increased tissue temperature also observed during the MC can predispose ligament and tendon laxness. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess in women the relationship between Estradiol (E2) serum concentrations and tissue temperature during the MC and their combined effect on knee laxity. Material/Methods Ten non-athletic young healthy females, 18 to 30 years of age participated in the study. E2 serum concentrations, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) elasticity, and force to flex the knee (FFK), knee flexion-extension hysteresis (KFEH) were assessed both at ambient temperature (22°C) and after 38°C warming. Testing was performed multiple times during the participant’s MC, for one full MC. Results ACL elasticity was significantly higher (P<0.01) and FFK and KFEH were significantly lower (p<0.05) during ovulation when E2 levels were highest. ACL elasticity was still higher during ovulation after warming to 38°C. But, the effects of MC on FFK and KFEH were reduced by tissue warming. Conclusions ACL elasticity, FFK, and KFEH was affected not only by E2 but also tissue temperature. However, E2 had more impact on ACL elasticity while tissue temperature had more impact on FFK and KFEH at 38°C warming. PMID:24287619

  1. Changes in knee joint load indices from before to 12 months after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Creaby, M W

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) are at increased risk of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Meniscal damage and/or surgery may alter knee joint loading to increase OA risk. We investigated changes in knee joint loading following medial APM surgery, compared...... with the contra-lateral leg. METHODS: We estimated indices of knee joint loading (external peak knee adduction moment (KAM), KAM impulse and peak knee flexion moment (KFM)) normalized to body size (i.e., body mass (BM) and height (HT)) using 3D gait analysis in 23 patients (17 men, mean (SD) 46.2 (6.4) years, BMI...... 25.8 (3.4) kg/m(2)) without radiographic knee OA before and 12 months after medial APM. Static alignment was assessed by radiography and self-reported outcomes by Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). RESULTS: Peak KAM and KAM impulse increased in the APM leg compared to the contra...

  2. Are clinical photographs appropriate to determine the maximal range of motion of the knee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaegen, Filip; Ganseman, Yannick; Arnout, Nele; Vandenneucker, Hilde; Bellemans, Johan

    2010-12-01

    Goniometry is a commonly used method for the clinical assessment of range of motion (ROM) of the knee. A digital photograph of the knee in maximal flexion and extension could provide a more objective way to assess the ROM. The aim of our study was to investigate the reliability of the use of digital photographs as a method for measuring the ROM of the knee. Four observers examined 49 patients. Digital photographs of the knee in maximal flexion and extension were compared with standard clinical goniometric measurements in the same position. We observed higher intra-observer reliability for the digital method in flexion (p goniometry. The extension results were numerically lower when using goniometry compared to the digital method (p reliability for extension was lower compared to flexion. The intraobserver standard error of measurement (SEM) of the digital method was smaller than the goniometric SEM; the digital method thus appeared more reliable. Measuring maximal flexion and extension on digital photographs is more reliable for both extension and flexion compared to standard goniometric measurements.

  3. Evaluation of gait symmetry in poliomyelitis subjects: Comparison of a conventional knee-ankle-foot orthosis and a new powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arazpour, Mokhtar; Ahmadi, Fardin; Bahramizadeh, Mahmood; Samadian, Mohammad; Mousavi, Mohammad Ebrahim; Bani, Monireh Ahmadi; Hutchins, Stephen W

    2016-12-01

    Compared to able-bodied subjects, subjects with post-polio syndrome and poliomyelitis demonstrate a preference for weight-bearing on the non-paretic limb, causing gait asymmetry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gait symmetry of the poliomyelitis subjects when ambulating with either a drop-locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis or a newly developed powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis. Quasi experimental study. Seven subjects with poliomyelitis who routinely wore conventional knee-ankle-foot orthoses participated in this study and received training to enable them to ambulate with the powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis on level ground, prior to gait analysis. There were no significant differences in the gait symmetry index of step length (p = 0.085), stance time (p = 0.082), double-limb support time (p = 0.929), or speed of walking (p = 0.325) between the two test conditions. However, using the new powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis improved the symmetry index in step width (p = 0.037), swing time (p = 0.014), stance phase percentage (p = 0.008), and knee flexion during swing phase (p ⩽ 0.001) compared to wearing the drop-locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis. The use of a powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis for ambulation by poliomyelitis subjects affects gait symmetry in the base of support, swing time, stance phase percentage, and knee flexion during swing phase. A new powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis can improve gait symmetry for poliomyelitis subjects by influencing step width, swing time, stance time percentage, and knee flexion during swing phase when compared to ambulating with a drop-locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  4. The relationship between knee joint angle and knee flexor and extensor muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Misook; Han, Dongwook

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine a relationship between joint angle and muscular strength. In particular, this research investigated the differences in maximum muscular strength and average muscular strength at the knee-joint posture. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects comprised eight female students in their 20s attending S University in Busan. None of the subjects had functional disabilities or had experienced damage to the lower extremities in terms of measurement of muscular strength. A BIODEX system III model (Biodex medical system, USA) was used to measure joint angles and muscular strength. The axis of the dynamometer was consistent with the axis of motion, and measurements were made at 25° and 67° to examine differences in maximum muscular strength according to joint angle. [Results] The maximum muscular strength both knee-joint extension value, at 67° and flexion value, at 25° the value was larger. The average muscular strength both knee-joint extension value, at 67° and flexion value, at 25° the value was larger. [Conclusion] The results of this study reveal that muscular strength does not reach maximum at particular range angles, such as the knee-joint resting posture angle or the knee-joint middle range angle. Rather, a stretched muscle is stronger than a contracted muscle. Therefore, it is considered that it will be necessary to study the effects of the joint change ratio on muscular strength on the basis of the maximum stretched muscle.

  5. Parametric and cadaveric models of lumbar flexion instability and flexion restricting dynamic stabilization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Louis C; Alamin, Todd F; Voronov, Leonard I; Carandang, Gerard; Havey, Robert M; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2013-12-01

    Development of a dynamic stabilization system often involves costly and time-consuming design iterations, testing and computational modeling. The aims of this study were (1) develop a simple parametric model of lumbar flexion instability and use this model to identify the appropriate stiffness of a flexion restricting stabilization system (FRSS), and (2) in a cadaveric experiment, validate the predictive value of the parametric model. Literature was surveyed for typical parameters of intact and destabilized spines: stiffness in the high flexibility zone (HFZ) and high stiffness zone, and size of the HFZ. These values were used to construct a bilinear parametric model of flexion kinematics of intact and destabilized lumbar spines. FRSS implantation was modeled by iteratively superimposing constant flexion stiffnesses onto the parametric model. Five cadaveric lumbar spines were tested intact; after L4-L5 destabilization (nucleotomy, midline decompression); and after FRSS implantation. Specimens were loaded in flexion/extension (8 Nm/6 Nm) with 400 N follower load to characterize kinematics for comparison with the parametric model. To accomplish the goal of reducing ROM to intact levels and increasing stiffness to approximately 50 % greater than intact levels, flexion stiffness contributed by the FRSS was determined to be 0.5 Nm/deg using the parametric model. In biomechanical testing, the FRSS restored ROM of the destabilized segment from 146 ± 13 to 105 ± 21 % of intact, and stiffness in the HFZ from 41 ± 7 to 135 ± 38 % of intact. Testing demonstrated excellent predictive value of the parametric model, and that the FRSS attained the desired biomechanical performance developed with the model. A simple parametric model may allow efficient optimization of kinematic design parameters.

  6. Variability of ischiofemoral space dimensions with changes in hip flexion: an MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Adam C.; Howe, Benjamin M. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Hollman, John H.; Finnoff, Jonathan T. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2017-01-15

    The primary aim of this study was to determine if ischiofemoral space (IFS) dimensions vary with changes in hip flexion as a result of placing a bolster behind the knees during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A secondary aim was to determine if IFS dimensions vary between supine and prone hip neutral positions. The study employed a prospective design. Sports medicine center within a tertiary care institution. Five male and five female adult subjects (age mean = 29.2, range = 23-35; body mass index [BMI] mean = 23.5, range = 19.5-26.6) were recruited to participate in the study. An axial, T1-weighted MRI sequence of the pelvis was obtained of each subject in a supine position with their hips in neutral and flexed positions, and in a prone position with their hips in neutral position. Supine hip flexion was induced by placing a standard, 9-cm-diameter MRI knee bolster under the subject's knees. The order of image acquisition (supine hip neutral, supine hip flexed, prone hip neutral) was randomized. The IFS dimensions were then measured on a separate workstation. The investigator performing the IFS measurements was blinded to the subject position for each image. The main outcome measurements were the IFS dimensions acquired with MRI. The mean IFS dimensions in the prone position were 28.25 mm (SD 5.91 mm, standard error mean 1.32 mm). In the supine hip neutral position, the IFS dimensions were 25.1 (SD 5.6) mm. The mean difference between the two positions of 3.15 (3.6) mm was statistically significant (95 % CI of the difference = 1.4 to 4.8 mm, t{sub 19} = 3.911, p =.001). The mean IFS dimensions in the hip flexed position were 36.9 (SD 5.7) mm. The mean difference between the two supine positions of 11.8 (4.1) mm was statistically significant (95 % CI of the difference = 9.9 to 13.7 mm, t{sub 19} = 12.716, p <.001). Our findings demonstrate that the IFS measurements obtained with MRI are dependent upon patient positioning with respect to hip flexion and

  7. Does shoe heel design influence ground reaction forces and knee moments during maximum lunges in elite and intermediate badminton players?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing-Kai Lam

    Full Text Available Lunge is one frequently executed movement in badminton and involves a unique sagittal footstrike angle of more than 40 degrees at initial ground contact compared with other manoeuvres. This study examined if the shoe heel curvature design of a badminton shoe would influence shoe-ground kinematics, ground reaction forces, and knee moments during lunge.Eleven elite and fifteen intermediate players performed five left-forward maximum lunge trials with Rounded Heel Shoe (RHS, Flattened Heel Shoe (FHS, and Standard Heel Shoes (SHS. Shoe-ground kinematics, ground reaction forces, and knee moments were measured by using synchronized force platform and motion analysis system. A 2 (Group x 3 (Shoe ANOVA with repeated measures was performed to determine the effects of different shoes and different playing levels, as well as the interaction of two factors on all variables.Shoe effect indicated that players demonstrated lower maximum vertical loading rate in RHS than the other two shoes (P < 0.05. Group effect revealed that elite players exhibited larger footstrike angle, faster approaching speed, lower peak horizontal force and horizontal loading rates but higher vertical loading rates and larger peak knee flexion and extension moments (P < 0.05. Analysis of Interactions of Group x Shoe for maximum and mean vertical loading rates (P < 0.05 indicated that elite players exhibited lower left maximum and mean vertical loading rates in RHS compared to FHS (P < 0.01, while the intermediate group did not show any Shoe effect on vertical loading rates.These findings indicate that shoe heel curvature would play some role in altering ground reaction force impact during badminton lunge. The differences in impact loads and knee moments between elite and intermediate players may be useful in optimizing footwear design and training strategy to minimize the potential risks for impact related injuries in badminton.

  8. Effect of adductor-canal-blockade on established, severe post-operative pain after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, P; Grevstad, Ulrik; Henningsen, Maja

    2012-01-01

    In this proof-of-concept study, we investigated the effect of the predominantly sensory adductor-canal-blockade on established pain in the early post-operative period after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We hypothesised that the adductor-canal-blockade would reduce pain during flexion of the knee...

  9. Interpolation function for approximating knee joint behavior in human gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the importance of analyzing the kinematic data of the lower limb in gait movement, especially the angular variation of the knee joint, the paper propose an approximation function that can be used for processing the correlation among a multitude of knee cycles. The approximation of the raw knee data was done by Lagrange polynomial interpolation on a signal acquired using Zebris Gait Analysis System. The signal used in approximation belongs to a typical subject extracted from a lot of ten investigated subjects, but the function domain of definition belongs to the entire group. The study of the knee joint kinematics plays an important role in understanding the kinematics of the gait, this articulation having the largest range of motion in whole joints, in gait. The study does not propose to find an approximation function for the adduction-abduction movement of the knee, this being considered a residual movement comparing to the flexion-extension.

  10. Changes in knee shape and geometry resulting from total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari Shandiz, Mohsen; Boulos, Paul; Saevarsson, Stefan Karl; Ramm, Heiko; Fu, Chun Kit Jack; Miller, Stephen; Zachow, Stefan; Anglin, Carolyn

    2018-01-01

    Changes in knee shape and geometry resulting from total knee arthroplasty can affect patients in numerous important ways: pain, function, stability, range of motion, and kinematics. Quantitative data concerning these changes have not been previously available, to our knowledge, yet are essential to understand individual experiences of total knee arthroplasty and thereby improve outcomes for all patients. The limiting factor has been the challenge of accurately measuring these changes. Our study objective was to develop a conceptual framework and analysis method to investigate changes in knee shape and geometry, and prospectively apply it to a sample total knee arthroplasty population. Using clinically available computed tomography and radiography imaging systems, the three-dimensional knee shape and geometry of nine patients (eight varus and one valgus) were compared before and after total knee arthroplasty. All patients had largely good outcomes after their total knee arthroplasty. Knee shape changed both visually and numerically. On average, the distal condyles were slightly higher medially and lower laterally (range: +4.5 mm to -4.4 mm), the posterior condyles extended farther out medially but not laterally (range: +1.8 to -6.4 mm), patellofemoral distance increased throughout flexion by 1.8-3.5 mm, and patellar thickness alone increased by 2.9 mm (range: 0.7-5.2 mm). External femoral rotation differed preop and postop. Joint line distance, taking cartilage into account, changed by +0.7 to -1.5 mm on average throughout flexion. Important differences in shape and geometry were seen between pre-total knee arthroplasty and post-total knee arthroplasty knees. While this is qualitatively known, this is the first study to report it quantitatively, an important precursor to identifying the reasons for the poor outcome of some patients. Using the developed protocol and visualization techniques to compare patients with good versus poor clinical outcomes could

  11. Anterior referencing of tibial slope in total knee arthroplasty considerably influences knee kinematics: a musculoskeletal simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Marco A; Strzelczak, Marta; Heesterbeek, Petra J C; van de Groes, Sebastiaan A W; Janssen, Dennis W; Koopman, Bart F J M; Wymenga, Ate B; Verdonschot, Nico J J

    2017-05-12

    In total knee arthroplasty (TKA), the posterior tibial slope is not always reconstructed correctly, and the knee ligaments may become too tight in flexion. To release a tight flexion gap, surgeons can increase the posterior tibial slope using two surgical resection techniques: the anterior tibial cortex (ACR) or the centre of tibial plateau (CPR) referencing. It is not known how this choice affects the knee laxity and function during activities of daily living. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of tibial slope on knee laxity, kinematics and forces during a squatting activity using computer simulation techniques. We hypothesised that the effects depend on the referencing technique utilised. A validated musculoskeletal model of TKA was used. Knee laxity tests were simulated in flexion and extension. Then, a squat motion was simulated to calculate: movement of the tibiofemoral joint (TFJ) contact points and patello-femoral joint (PFJ) contact force. All analyses were repeated with more anterior (-3°), neutral (0°), and more posterior tibial slope (+3°, +6°, +9°), and with two referencing techniques (ACR, CPR). Knee laxities increased dramatically with more posterior slope with the ACR technique (up to 400%), both in flexion and in extension. The CPR technique, instead, had much smaller effects (up to 42% variations). During squatting, more slope with the ACR technique resulted in larger movements of the TFJ contact point. The PFJ contact force decreased considerably with more slope with the CPR technique (12% body weight reduction every 3° more posterior slope), thanks to the preservation of the patellar height and quadriceps-femur load sharing. ACR technique alters considerably the knee laxity, both in flexion and extensions, and surgeons should be cautious about its use. More slope with CPR technique induces more favourable TFJ kinematics and loading of the knee extensor apparatus and does not substantially alter knee laxity. Preferably, the

  12. Sharper angle, higher risk? The effect of cutting angle on knee mechanics in invasion sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Mervin J; Benjaminse, Anne; Lemmink, Koen A P M

    2017-10-03

    Cutting is an important skill in team-sports, but unfortunately is also related to non-contact ACL injuries. The purpose was to examine knee kinetics and kinematics at different cutting angles. 13 males and 16 females performed cuts at different angles (45°, 90°, 135° and 180°) at maximum speed. 3D kinematics and kinetics were collected. To determine differences across cutting angles (45°, 90°, 135° and 180°) and sex (female, male), a 4×2 repeated measures ANOVA was conducted followed by post hoc comparisons (Bonferroni) with alpha level set at α≤0.05a priori. At all cutting angles, males showed greater knee flexion angles than females (pknee flexion -42.53°±8.95°, females decreased their knee flexion angle from -40.6°±7.2° when cutting at 45° to -36.81°±9.10° when cutting at 90°, 135° and 180° (pKnee flexion moment decreased for both sexes when cutting towards sharper angles (pknee valgus moments than females. For both sexes, knee valgus moment increased towards the sharper cutting angles and then stabilized compared to the 45° cutting angle (pknee kinematics and kinetics. Sharper cutting angles place the knee more at risk. However, females and males handle this differently, which has implications for injury prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of Prophylactic Knee Bracing on Lower Limb Kinematics, Kinetics, and Energetics During Double-Leg Drop Landing at 2 Heights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Katie A; Begg, Rezaul K; Galea, Mary P; Lee, Peter V S

    2016-07-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries commonly occur during landing maneuvers. Prophylactic knee braces were introduced to reduce the risk of ACL injuries, but their effectiveness is debated. We hypothesized that bracing would improve biomechanical factors previously related to the risk of ACL injuries, such as increased hip and knee flexion angles at initial contact and at peak vertical ground-reaction force (GRF), increased ankle plantar flexion angles at initial contact, decreased peak GRFs, and decreased peak knee extension moment. We also hypothesized that bracing would increase the negative power and work of the hip joint and would decrease the negative power and work of the knee and ankle joints. Controlled laboratory study. Three-dimensional motion and force plate data were collected from 8 female and 7 male recreational athletes performing double-leg drop landings from 0.30 m and 0.60 m with and without a prophylactic knee brace. GRFs, joint angles, moments, power, and work were calculated for each athlete with and without a knee brace. Prophylactic knee bracing increased the hip flexion angle at peak GRF by 5.56° (P knee flexion angle at peak GRF by 4.75° (P = .001), and peak hip extension moment by 0.44 N·m/kg (P knee and ankle. No differences in peak GRFs and peak knee extension moment were observed with bracing. The application of a prophylactic knee brace resulted in improvements in important biomechanical factors associated with the risk of ACL injuries. Prophylactic knee braces may help reduce the risk of noncontact knee injuries in recreational and professional athletes while playing sports. Further studies should investigate different types of prophylactic knee braces in conjunction with existing training interventions so that the sports medicine community can better assess the effectiveness of prophylactic knee bracing. © 2016 The Author(s).

  14. Measurement of strength and loading variables on the knee during Alpine skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, S M; Hull, M L

    1989-01-01

    The study focusses on the prevention of knee injuries during snow skiing. In order to develop a technology of knee injury prevention, both the strength and loading on the knee during skiing activity must be known. This paper reports measurements of variables influencing both knee strength and loading of the joint. The strength variables measured included the degree of activity in six muscles crossing the knee, the knee flexion angle, and the axial load (i.e. weight bearing) transmitted to the knee. Transducers included surface electrodes to monitor electromyogram signals indicating the degree of muscle activity and a goniometer to measure both hip and knee flexion angles. The complete loading on the knee was derived from a dynamometer which measured the six load components at the boot-dynamometer interface. The transducer data were acquired and stored by a compact, battery powered digital data acquisition-controller system. Three male subjects of similar physical size (nominal was 1.8 m and 75 kg) and skiing ability (advanced intermediate to expert) were tested under similar conditions. Each subject skied a total of four slalom runs--one snowplow and three parallel. The total time of each test was 21 s. Example data plots from different types of runs are presented and discussed. Based on observations from the data, necessary performance features for ski bindings offering improved protection from knee ligamentous injuries are defined.

  15. EFFICACY OF KINESIO-TAPING VERSUS PHONOPHORESIS ON KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Gaid Sedhom

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common type of joint disease. Pain is the most common symptom of knee osteoarthritis. Also it characterized by sign, symptoms of inflammation, pain, stiffness and loss of mobility. This study was conducted to explore the efficacy of kinesio taping (KT versus Aescin, Diethylamine Salicylate gel phonophoresis (PH on pain level, range of motion (ROM, and proprioceptive accuracy on mild to moderate knee OA patients. Methods: Forty females with knee OA from Outpatient Clinic of Physical Therapy Faculty participated in the study with mean age (49±5.82 years. They were randomly assigned into 2 equal groups. Group I: received Aescin, Diethylamine Salicylate gel PH with pulsed ultrasound therapy and group II received KT. All patients received hot packs and selected exercise program for four weeks; three sessions per week. Visual analogue scale was used in assessment of pain level. Electronic digital goniometer was used in assessment of knee flexion ROM. Iso-kinetic daynamometer was used in assessment of knee proprioceptive accuracy. Results: There was a significant relieving of pain perception, increasing of knee flexion ROM and improving proprioceptive accuracy in knee joint post-study in both groups. But application of Aescin, Diethylamine Salicylate gel PH had significant relieve of knee pain than KT. Conclusion: Using of Aescin, Diethylamine Salicylate gel PH is more effective than KT application in reliving knee pain in knee osteoarthritic patients.

  16. Cartilage Thickening in Early Radiographic Human Knee Osteoarthritis –Within-Person, Between-Knee Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotofana, Sebastian; Buck, Robert; Wirth, Wolfgang; Roemer, Frank; Duryea, Jeff; Nevitt, Michael; Eckstein, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the presence of definite osteophytes (in absence of joint space narrowing [JSN]) by radiograph is associated with (subregional) increases in cartilage thickness, in a within-person, between-knee cross-sectional comparison of participants in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). Based on previous results, external medial (ecMF) and external lateral weight-bearing femoral (ecLF) subregions were selected as primary endpoints. Methods Both knees of 61 (of 4798) OAI participants displayed definite tibial or femoral marginal osteophytes and no JSN in one knee, and no signs of radiographic OA in the contra-lateral knee; this being confirmed by an expert central reader. In these participants, cartilage thickness was measured in 16 femorotibial subregions of each knee, based on sagittal DESSwe magnetic resonance images. Location-specific joint space width from fixed flexion radiographs was determined using dedicated software. Location-specific associations of osteophytes with cartilage thickness were evaluated using paired t-tests and mixed effect models. Results Of the 61 participants, 48% had only medial, 36% only lateral, and 16% bi-compartmental osteophytes. Osteophyte knees had significantly thicker cartilage than contra-lateral non-osteophyte knees in the ecMF (+71±223μm, equivalent to +5.5%, p=0.015) and ecLF (+64±195μm, +4.1%, p=0.013). No significant differences between knees were noted in other subregions, nor in joint space width. Cartilage thickness in ecMF and ecLF was significantly associated with tibial osteophytes in the same (medial or lateral) compartment (p=0.003). Conclusion Knees with early radiographic OA display thicker cartilage than (contra-lateral) knees without radiographic findings of OA, specifically in the external femoral subregions of compartments with marginal osteophytes. PMID:22556039

  17. Rehabilitation after ACL Injury: A Fluoroscopic Study on the Effects of Type of Exercise on the Knee Sagittal Plane Arthrokinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Norouzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A safe rehabilitation exercise for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries needs to be compatible with the normal knee arthrokinematics to avoid abnormal loading on the joint structures. The objective of this study was to measure the amount of the anterior tibial translation (ATT of the ACL-deficient knees during selective open and closed kinetic chain exercises. The intact and injured knees of fourteen male subjects with unilateral ACL injury were imaged using uniplanar fluoroscopy, while the subjects performed forward lunge and unloaded/loaded open kinetic knee extension exercises. The ATTs were measured from fluoroscopic images, as the distance between the tibial and femoral reference points, at seven knee flexion angles, from 0° to 90°. No significant differences were found between the ATTs of the ACL-deficient and intact knees at all flexion angles during forward lunge and unloaded open kinetic knee extension (. During loaded open kinetic knee extension, however, the ATTs of the ACL deficient knees were significantly larger than those of the intact knees at 0° (. It was suggested that the forward lunge, as a weight-bearing closed kinetic chain exercise, provides a safer approach for developing muscle strength and functional stability in rehabilitation program of ACL-deficient knees, in comparison with open kinetic knee extension exercise.

  18. Effect of adductor canal block on pain in patients with severe pain after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grevstad, Jens Ulrik; Mathiesen, Ole; Lind, T

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with varying degrees of pain. A considerable proportion (25-40%) of patients experience severe pain, despite a comprehensive multimodal analgesic regimen. We hypothesized that adductor canal block (ACB) would reduce pain in this patient...... category compared with placebo. METHODS: Fifty patients with severe pain, defined as having a visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score of >60 during active flexion of the knee on the first or the second postoperative day after TKA, were included in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. All......% of the patients had no effect during active flexion. At rest, however, only 8% had more than mild pain after ACB compared with 57% at inclusion. CONCLUSIONS: ACB reduced VAS with 32 mm, during active flexion of the knee, in patients with severe pain after TKA, but a large proportion (78%) still had at least...

  19. Swollen Knee (Water on the Knee)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to experience the types of knee injuries that cause swelling. Obesity. Excess weight puts added stress on the knee ... degeneration that can lead to a swollen knee. Obesity increases your risk of osteoarthritis, one of the more frequent causes of knee swelling. Complications Complications of a swollen ...

  20. Runner's Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you're used to only running a mile or so, don't try to go out and suddenly run 5 miles. Work up to it with a series of ... supporting structures. Surgery is only used as a last resort, though. Most cases of runner's knee get ...

  1. Laterality of radiographic osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Daigo; Ikeuchi, Kazuma; Kojima, Toshihisa; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Amano, Takafumi; Tsuboi, Masaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Hasegawa, Yukiharu

    2017-05-01

    There are few reports of the laterality in radiological knee osteoarthritis (ROA). This study aimed to evaluate laterality in terms of the minimum joint space width (mJSW) and osteophyte areas (OFs) in a cross-sectorial general population screen and elucidate the association between laterality and risk of osteoarthritis. We enrolled 330 participants (mean age 64.6 years) and examined the presence of ROA (Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≧ 2) laterality in terms of the mJSW and OF on the medial tibia using auto-measuring software. Moreover, we examined the association between laterality and leg dominance. The right and left medial mJSWs were 4.02 ± 0.98 mm and 4.05 ± 1.01 mm, respectively, showing no laterality; the laterals were also similar. The participants who had osteophytes ≥1 mm 2 in the right, left, and bilateral knees were 15, 37, and 57 respectively, with osteophytes being significantly more common in the left knee. The OF was significantly larger in the left knee. Conversely, the medial and lateral mJSWs and OF did not differ according to leg dominance. The prevalence of ROA was higher and the OF was more pronounced in the left knee. However, the mJSW showed no laterality. Additionally, the mJSW and OF showed no differences according to leg dominance.

  2. Criterion-related validity of knee joint-position-sense measurement using image capture and isokinetic dynamometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relph, Nicola; Herrington, Lee

    2015-01-13

    Clinicians require portable, valid, and cost-effective methods to monitor knee joint-position-sense (JPS) ability. To examine the criterion-related validity of image-capture JPS measures against an isokinetic-dynamometer (IKD) procedure. Random crossover design providing a comparison of knee JPS measures from image capture and IKD procedures. 10 healthy participants, 5 female, age 28.0 ± 13.29 y, mass 60.3 ± 9.02 kg, height 1.65 ± 0.07 m, and 5 male, 29.6 ± 10.74 y, mass 73.6 ± 5.86 kg, height 1.75 ± 0.07 m. The dependent variables were absolute error scores (AES) provided by 2 knee directions (flexion and extension). The independent variables were the method (image capture and IKD). There was no significant difference between clinical and IKD AES into knee-flexion data (P = .263, r = 0.55). There was a significant difference between clinical and IKD AES into knee-extension data (P = .016, r = .70). Analysis of photographic images to assess JPS measurements using knee flexion is valid against an IKD positioning method, but JPS measurements using knee extension may not be valid against IKD techniques. However, photo-analysis measurements provided a lower error score using knee-extension data and thus may provide an optimal environment to produce maximal knee JPS acuity. Therefore, clinicians do not need expensive equipment to collect representative JPS ability.

  3. The Nature of Age-Related Differences in Knee Function during Walking: Implication for the Development of Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Boyer

    Full Text Available Changes in knee kinematics have been identified in the early stages of osteoarthritis (OA. However, there is a paucity of information on the nature of kinematic change that occur with aging prior to the development of OA, This study applied a robust statistical method (Principal Component Analysis to test the hypothesis that coupling between primary (flexion and secondary (anterior-posterior translation, internal-external rotation joint motions in walking would differ for age groupings of healthy subjects.Seventy-four healthy participants divided into three groups with mean ages of 24 ± 2.3 years (younger, 48 ± 4.7years (middle-age and 64 ± 2.4 years (older were examined. Principal Component Analysis was used to characterize and statistically compare the patterns of knee joint movement and their relationships in walking.There were significant differences between the younger group and both the middle-age and older groups in the knee frontal plane angle and the coupling between knee flexion (PC1, p≤0.04 and the relative magnitudes of secondary plane motions in early and late stance (PC3, p<0.01. Two additional principal components (PC2, p = 0.03 and PC5, p<0.01 described differences in early stance knee flexion and relationship with secondary plane motion through-out stance for the older compared with middle-age group.It appears there are changes in knee kinematics that occur with aging. The kinematic differences were identified for middle-aged as well as older adults suggesting midlife changes in neuromuscular physiology or behavior may have important consequences. These kinematic measures offer the potential to identify early markers for the risk of developing knee OA with aging.

  4. Kinematics of gait using bionic and hydraulic knee joints in transfemoral amputees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Uchytil

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The development of new technologies has led to further improvements in prosthetic knee joints. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare angle parameters in knee and hip joints during the gait of transfemoral amputees and to determine the effect of the type of knee joint used on their symmetry. The study also compared pelvic movements in transfemoral amputees using different types of knee joints. Method: Eleven patients (5 female, 6 male, mean age 39.2 ± 10.1 years, height 171.8 ± 9.5 cm, mass 71.5 ± 11.0 kg with a transfemoral amputation (5 used bionic knee, 6 used hydraulic knee participated in this study. The control group consisted of 10 individuals with no locomotion-related problems (2 female, 8 male. Results: Movement was more symmetrical in the hip joint for all monitored parameters in patients with bionic knee joints. Flexion at heel contact and maximum flexion in the swing phase in the knee joint were more symmetrical in the group with hydraulic knee joints; for all other parameters the group with bionic knee joints achieved better symmetry. The kinematics of pelvic movement in the patients using hydraulic knee joints differed from the control group in all monitored parameters. The greatest difference with excellent effect size (ES = 7.96 was found in pelvic tilt. Pelvic tilt was higher when using hydraulic knee joints. Conclusion:  In comparison with the mechanically passive knee joint, gait with the bionic knee joint evinced gait symmetry.

  5. Knee Biomechanics During Jogging After Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michelle; Wrigley, Tim V; Metcalf, Ben R; Hinman, Rana S; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Dempsey, Alasdair R; Lloyd, David G; Bennell, Kim L

    2017-07-01

    Altered knee joint biomechanics is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis and has been reported in patients after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) while performing various activities. Longitudinally, understanding knee joint biomechanics during jogging may assist future studies to assess the implications of jogging on knee joint health in this population. To investigate knee joint biomechanics during jogging in patients 3 months after APM and a healthy control group at baseline and 2 years later at follow-up. Controlled laboratory study. Seventy-eight patients who underwent medial APM and 38 healthy controls underwent a 3-dimensional motion analysis during barefoot overground jogging at baseline. Sixty-four patients who underwent APM and 23 controls returned at follow-up. External peak moments (flexion and adduction) and the peak knee flexion angle during stance were evaluated for the APM leg, non-APM leg (nonoperated leg), and control leg. At baseline, the peak knee flexion angle was 1.4° lower in the APM leg compared with the non-APM leg ( P = .03). No differences were found between the moments in the APM leg compared with the control leg (all P > .05). However, the normalized peak knee adduction moment was 35% higher in the non-APM leg compared with the control leg ( P = .008). In the non-APM leg, the normalized peak knee adduction and flexion moments were higher compared with the APM leg by 16% and 10%, respectively, at baseline ( P ≤ .004). Despite the increase in the peak knee flexion moment in the APM leg compared with the non-APM leg ( P .05). Comparing the APM leg and control leg, no differences in knee joint biomechanics during jogging for the variables assessed were observed. Higher knee moments in the non-APM leg may have clinical implications for the noninvolved leg. Kinematic differences were small (~1.4°) and therefore of questionable clinical relevance. These results may facilitate future clinical research

  6. Isokinetic evaluation of knee muscles in soccer players: discriminant analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Fles Mazuquin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction:Muscle activity in soccer players can be measured by isokinetic dynamometer, which is a reliable tool for assessing human performance.Objectives:To perform isokinetic analyses and to determine which variables differentiate the under-17 (U17 soccer category from the professional (PRO.Methods:Thirty four players were assessed (n=17 for each category. The isokinetic variables used for the knee extension-flexion analysis were: peak torque (Nm, total work (J, average power (W, angle of peak torque (deg., agonist/ antagonist ratio (%, measured for three velocities (60°/s, 120°/s and 300°/s, with each series containing five repetitions. Three Wilks' Lambda discriminant analyses were performed, to identify which variables were more significant for the definition of each of the categories.Results:The discriminative variables at 60°/s in the PRO category were: extension peak torque, flexion total work, extension average power and agonist/antagonist ratio; and for the U17s were: extension total work, flexion peak torque and flexion average power. At 120°/s for the PRO category the discriminant variables were: flexion peak torque and extension average power; for the U17s they were: extension total work and flexion average power. Finally at 300°/s, the variables found in the PRO and U17 categories respectively were: extension average power and extension total work.Conclusion:Isokinetic variables for flexion and extension knee muscles were able to significantly discriminate between PRO and U17 soccer players.

  7. Magnetic resonance evaluation of the knee in children and adolescents with achondroplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akyol, Yakup; Averill, Lauren W.; Atanda, Alfred; Mackenzie, William G.; Kecskemethy, Heidi H.; Bober, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia. Although the radiographic features are well described, MRI features of the knee in achondroplasia have not been reported. To describe common MRI characteristics of the knee joint in symptomatic children and adolescents with achondroplasia. We retrospectively evaluated 10 knee MRI examinations in 8 children and young adults (age range 11-20 years, mean 16.3 years) with achondroplasia. We measured modified Insall-Salvati index, knee flexion angle, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-Blumensaat line angle, ACL-tibial angle, posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) angle, intercondylar notch width index, and intercondylar notch depth index. We compared our findings with an age- and gender-matched control group of 20 children (age range 15-18 years; mean 16 years) with normal knee MRIs. All 10 knees in the achondroplasia group had discoid lateral meniscus; 8 meniscal tears were identified. Patella baja was present in half of the study cases. Greater knee flexion and increased ACL-Blumensaat line and PCL angles were seen in all achondroplasia knees. ACL-tibial angle was similar in the study and in the control group. Children with achondroplasia had deeper A-shape femoral notches that extended more anteriorly than those seen in the control group. MRI findings were confirmed in all seven knees with arthroscopic correlation. Discoid lateral meniscus, often with tear, is a consistent feature in knee MRIs of symptomatic children and adolescents with achondroplasia. Other findings include patella baja, knee flexion, deep A-shape intercondylar notch, increased ACL-Blumensaat line angle and taut PCL. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance evaluation of the knee in children and adolescents with achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyol, Yakup; Averill, Lauren W; Atanda, Alfred; Kecskemethy, Heidi H; Bober, Michael B; Mackenzie, William G

    2015-06-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia. Although the radiographic features are well described, MRI features of the knee in achondroplasia have not been reported. To describe common MRI characteristics of the knee joint in symptomatic children and adolescents with achondroplasia. We retrospectively evaluated 10 knee MRI examinations in 8 children and young adults (age range 11-20 years, mean 16.3 years) with achondroplasia. We measured modified Insall-Salvati index, knee flexion angle, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-Blumensaat line angle, ACL-tibial angle, posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) angle, intercondylar notch width index, and intercondylar notch depth index. We compared our findings with an age- and gender-matched control group of 20 children (age range 15-18 years; mean 16 years) with normal knee MRIs. All 10 knees in the achondroplasia group had discoid lateral meniscus; 8 meniscal tears were identified. Patella baja was present in half of the study cases. Greater knee flexion and increased ACL-Blumensaat line and PCL angles were seen in all achondroplasia knees. ACL-tibial angle was similar in the study and in the control group. Children with achondroplasia had deeper A-shape femoral notches that extended more anteriorly than those seen in the control group. MRI findings were confirmed in all seven knees with arthroscopic correlation. Discoid lateral meniscus, often with tear, is a consistent feature in knee MRIs of symptomatic children and adolescents with achondroplasia. Other findings include patella baja, knee flexion, deep A-shape intercondylar notch, increased ACL-Blumensaat line angle and taut PCL.

  9. Magnetic resonance evaluation of the knee in children and adolescents with achondroplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akyol, Yakup; Averill, Lauren W. [Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Department of Medical Imaging, Wilmington, DE (United States); Atanda, Alfred; Mackenzie, William G. [Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Department of Orthopedics, Wilmington, DE (United States); Kecskemethy, Heidi H. [Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Department of Medical Imaging, Wilmington, DE (United States); Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Department of Biomedical Research, Wilmington, DE (United States); Bober, Michael B. [Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Wilmington, DE (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia. Although the radiographic features are well described, MRI features of the knee in achondroplasia have not been reported. To describe common MRI characteristics of the knee joint in symptomatic children and adolescents with achondroplasia. We retrospectively evaluated 10 knee MRI examinations in 8 children and young adults (age range 11-20 years, mean 16.3 years) with achondroplasia. We measured modified Insall-Salvati index, knee flexion angle, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-Blumensaat line angle, ACL-tibial angle, posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) angle, intercondylar notch width index, and intercondylar notch depth index. We compared our findings with an age- and gender-matched control group of 20 children (age range 15-18 years; mean 16 years) with normal knee MRIs. All 10 knees in the achondroplasia group had discoid lateral meniscus; 8 meniscal tears were identified. Patella baja was present in half of the study cases. Greater knee flexion and increased ACL-Blumensaat line and PCL angles were seen in all achondroplasia knees. ACL-tibial angle was similar in the study and in the control group. Children with achondroplasia had deeper A-shape femoral notches that extended more anteriorly than those seen in the control group. MRI findings were confirmed in all seven knees with arthroscopic correlation. Discoid lateral meniscus, often with tear, is a consistent feature in knee MRIs of symptomatic children and adolescents with achondroplasia. Other findings include patella baja, knee flexion, deep A-shape intercondylar notch, increased ACL-Blumensaat line angle and taut PCL. (orig.)

  10. Posteromedial knee friction syndrome: an entity with medial knee pain and edema between the femoral condyle, sartorius and gracilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeone, F.J.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Smith, Maximilian; Bredella, Miriam A.; Torriani, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Gill, Thomas J. [Boston Sports Medicine and Research Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-12-20

    To describe MRI features of an entity consisting of medial knee pain and edema between the posteromedial femoral condyle (PMFC), sartorius and/or gracilis tendons and determine whether reduced tendon-bone distances may account for these findings. We retrospectively identified MRI cases of edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons (25 subjects, 26 knees). Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently graded edema and measured the sartorius- and gracilis-PMFC distances and knee flexion angle. Age- and gender-matched subjects with normal knee MRIs (27 subjects, 27 knees) served as controls for measurements. Statistical analyses compared abnormal to control subjects. Sartorius-PMFC and gracilis-PMFC spaces were narrower in abnormal compared to control subjects (1.6 ± 1.0 vs. 2.1 ± 1.2 mm, P = 0.04; 2.3 ± 2.0 vs. 4.6 ± 3.0 mm, P = 0.002, respectively). The knee flexion angle was similar between groups (P > 0.05). In subjects with clinical information, medial knee pain was the main complaint in 58 % (15/26) of abnormal subjects, with 42 % (11/26) having clinical suspicion of medial meniscal tear. Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis was mild in 54 % (14/26), moderate in 35 % (9/26) and severe in 12 % (3/26), and it was most frequent deep to both the sartorius and gracilis (50 %, 13/26). Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons identified on knee MRI may be associated with medial knee pain and may represent a friction syndrome. (orig.)

  11. The incidence and pattern of supernumerary digital flexion creases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence and pattern of supernumerary digital flexion creases amongst the population of Ekpoma in Edo, Nigeria. ... This study on the incidence of supernumerary digital flexion crease was carried out among undergraduate students in the faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Ambrose Alli University, ...

  12. Changes in anteroposterior stability and proprioception after different types of knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wautier, Delphine; Thienpont, Emmanuel

    2017-06-01

    To compare different types of knee arthroplasty, in selected patients with a knee score above 80 points, for their post-operative changes in anteroposterior (AP) laxity and proprioception. Four groups of each ten patients were tested for AP translation after different types of arthroplasty with a KT-1000 device at 30°, 60° and 90° of flexion. Proprioception of the joint was evaluated by joint position sense with three different tests. Clinical outcome of stability and proprioceptive testing was analysed by comparing the results of three (KSS, KOOS and FJS-12) patient-reported outcome measurement scores (PROMS) for each of the different implant types. Anteroposterior laxity was observed at 30° and 90° of flexion for the two PS TKA designs included in this study, but not for the UKA or the medial pivot design. All knee designs, except UKA, had an increased laxity at 60° of flexion. Proprioceptive testing was inconclusive. PROMS were not able to identify differences in clinical outcome among different knee designs in these selected patients, despite observed differences in AP laxity. Increased AP laxity is a result of the surgical procedure in knee arthroplasty. UKA is the only design mimicking native laxity of the knee. A medial pivot design can obtain the same result as UKA at 30° and 90° of flexion, but not at the importantly cited 60° of flexion as tested under non-load-bearing conditions. The clinical relevance of this study is that despite of an important range of AP translations among the different knee designs, good-to-excellent patient-reported outcome was observed within the findings of this study. II.

  13. Effectiveness of Different Pain Control Methods in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis after Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Lain Ming

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with knee osteoarthritis has increased in tandem with population aging. Consequently, the number of knee arthroplasties has also risen. The postoperative pain is the biggest challenge faced by patients soon after knee arthroplasty; therefore, this study is among different methods for post-knee arthroplasty pain control. A prospective longitudinal research design was employed; 177 adult patients who proposed for primary knee arthroplasty were enrolled and recruited. The patients were divided into conventional Group 1 (n=120 and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA Group 2 (n=57 according to the treatment methods they received. All patients experience the highest pain level on the day of their surgery; women complained of higher pain levels than men did, while the PCA group had lower postoperative pain. Meanwhile, patients with general anesthesia experienced more pain than those with spinal anesthesia in postoperative period. Patients with a higher postoperative pain index have a smaller optimal knee flexion angle. The PCA group had lower postoperative pain; all patients experienced the highest pain level on the day of their surgery. The results of this study could serve as a reference for nurses where PCA ensures a better postoperative pain control and therefore facilitates recovery and improves the quality of nursing.

  14. Variability of TKR Knee Kinematics and Relationship with Gait Kinetics: Implications for Total Knee Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Ngai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several factors, including compressive load and knee kinematics, have been shown to influence wear. External knee moments (a surrogate for load have recently been correlated with the medial and lateral wear scar areas of an unconstrained, PCL retaining knee design. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether differences in kinetics during level walking are accompanied by specific differences in relative knee kinematics. Thirty TKR patients were gait tested using the point cluster technique to obtain 3D motions of the knee. External knee moments were calculated from ground reaction forces recorded with a multicomponent force plate. The subjects were separated into two distinct anteroposterior (AP motion categories: a low motion group and a high motion group. Similarly, the low and high motion groups for internal-external (IE rotation were also identified. For the IE motion, there was no significant difference between the transverse internal rotation moments between the two IE motion groups. However for the AP motion groups, a higher external peak flexion moment was found for the group displaying less AP motion. These observations suggest that subjects with higher joint moments execute smaller ranges of AP motion and thus are likely to incur less wear.

  15. Flexion Reflex Can Interrupt and Reset the Swimming Rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, Matthew S; Berkowitz, Ari

    2016-03-02

    The spinal cord can generate the hip flexor nerve activity underlying leg withdrawal (flexion reflex) and the rhythmic, alternating hip flexor and extensor activities underlying locomotion and scratching, even in the absence of brain inputs and movement-related sensory feedback. It has been hypothesized that a common set of spinal interneurons mediates flexion reflex and the flexion components of locomotion and scratching. Leg cutaneous stimuli that evoke flexion reflex can alter the timing of (i.e., reset) cat walking and turtle scratching rhythms; in addition, reflex responses to leg cutaneous stimuli can be modified during cat and human walking and turtle scratching. Both of these effects depend on the phase (flexion or extension) of the rhythm in which the stimuli occur. However, similar interactions between leg flexion reflex and swimming have not been reported. We show here that a tap to the foot interrupted and reset the rhythm of forward swimming in spinal, immobilized turtles if the tap occurred during the swim hip extensor phase. In addition, the hip flexor nerve response to an electrical foot stimulus was reduced or eliminated during the swim hip extensor phase. These two phase-dependent effects of flexion reflex on the swim rhythm and vice versa together demonstrate that the flexion reflex spinal circuit shares key components with or has strong interactions with the swimming spinal network, as has been shown previously for cat walking and turtle scratching. Therefore, leg flexion reflex circuits likely share key spinal interneurons with locomotion and scratching networks across limbed vertebrates generally. The spinal cord can generate leg withdrawal (flexion reflex), locomotion, and scratching in limbed vertebrates. It has been hypothesized that there is a common set of spinal cord neurons that produce hip flexion during flexion reflex, locomotion, and scratching based on evidence from studies of cat and human walking and turtle scratching. We show

  16. Fabella Syndrome as an Uncommon Cause of Posterolateral Knee Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriko Okano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fabella is a sesamoid bone that is located in the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle and has been identified on magnetic resonance imaging in 31% of Japanese people. In the present case, a 65-year-old woman experienced posterolateral knee pain, accompanied by a clicking “sound” during active knee flexion, after undergoing total knee arthroplasty for knee osteoarthritis. Eight months of conservative therapy failed to produce an improvement, with progressive osteoarthritic change of the fabella identified on plain radiography. Based on this evidence, a diagnosis of fabella syndrome was made and the patient underwent a fabellectomy. Fabellectomy provided immediate resolution of posterolateral knee pain and the clicking sound with knee flexion, with the patient remaining symptom-free 18 months after fabellectomy and with no limitations in knee function. Fabellectomy eliminated symptoms in all of five case reports that have been previously published and is regarded as an effective first choice for treating fabella syndrome after total knee arthroplasty.

  17. Estimating the Mechanical Behavior of the Knee Joint during Crouch Gait: Implications for Real-Time Motor Control of Robotic Knee Orthoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Diane L.; Bulea, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with cerebral palsy frequently exhibit crouch gait, a pathological walking pattern characterized by excessive knee flexion. Knowledge of the knee joint moment during crouch gait is necessary for the design and control of assistive devices used for treatment. Our goal was to 1) develop statistical models to estimate knee joint moment extrema and dynamic stiffness during crouch gait, and 2) use the models to estimate the instantaneous joint moment during weight-acceptance. We retrospectively computed knee moments from 10 children with crouch gait and used stepwise linear regression to develop statistical models describing the knee moment features. The models explained at least 90% of the response value variability: peak moment in early (99%) and late (90%) stance, and dynamic stiffness of weight-acceptance flexion (94%) and extension (98%). We estimated knee extensor moment profiles from the predicted dynamic stiffness and instantaneous knee angle. This approach captured the timing and shape of the computed moment (root-mean-squared error: 2.64 Nm); including the predicted early-stance peak moment as a correction factor improved model performance (root-mean-squared error: 1.37 Nm). Our strategy provides a practical, accurate method to estimate the knee moment during crouch gait, and could be used for real-time, adaptive control of robotic orthoses. PMID:27101612

  18. Knee pain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or softening of the patella cartilage as ... knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in the ligaments, osteoarthritis of the ...

  19. Preventing Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blog Skip breadcrumb navigation Preventing Knee Injuries Knee injuries in children and adolescent athletes may be the result of ... occur in childhood sports, but with any knee injury in a growing child there is a possibility of a fracture related ...

  20. Knee joint replacement - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Knee replacement - total - discharge; Tricompartmental knee replacement - discharge; Osteoarthritis - knee replacement discharge ... such as downhill skiing or contact sports like football and soccer. But, you should be able to ...

  1. Reliability of knee joint range of motion and circumference measurements after total knee arthroplasty: does tester experience matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Christensen, Malene; Christensen, Stine Sommer; Olsen, Marie; Bandholm, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Two of the most utilized outcome measures to assess knee joint range of motion (ROM) and intra-articular effusion are goniometry and circumference, respectively. Neither goniometry nor circumference of the knee joint have been examined for both intra-tester and inter-tester in patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to determine the intra-tester and inter-tester reliability of active and passive knee joint ROM and circumference in patients with TKA when administered by physiotherapists (testers) with different clinical experience. The design was an intra-tester, inter-tester and intra-day reliability study. Nineteen outpatients (10 females) having received a TKA were examined by an inexperienced and an experienced physiotherapist. Following a standardized protocol, active and passive knee joint ROM and circumference measurements were obtained using a universal goniometer and a tape measure, respectively. To establish reliability, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC(2,1)) and smallest real difference (SRD) were calculated. The knee joint ROM and circumference measurements were generally reliable (ICC > 0.8) within and between physiotherapists (except passive knee extension). Changes in knee joint ROM of more than 6.6 degrees and 10 degrees (except active knee flexion) and knee joint circumference of more than 1.0 cm and 1.63 cm represent a real clinical improvement (SRD) or deterioration for a single individual within and between physiotherapists, respectively. Generally, the experienced tester recorded larger knee joint ROM and lower circumference values than that of the inexperienced tester. In clinical practice, we suggest that repeated knee goniometric and circumferential measurements should be recorded by the same physiotherapist in individual patients with TKA. Tester experience appears not to influence the degree of reliability. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Assessment of knee laxity using a robotic testing device: a comparison to the manual clinical knee examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, T P; Stinton, S K; Siebold, R; Freedberg, H I; Jacobs, C A; Hutton, W C

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect knee laxity data using a robotic testing device. The data collected were then compared to the results obtained from manual clinical examination. Two human cadavers were studied. A medial collateral ligament (MCL) tear was simulated in the left knee of cadaver 1, and a posterolateral corner (PLC) injury was simulated in the right knee of cadaver 2. Contralateral knees were left intact. Five blinded examiners carried out manual clinical examination on the knees. Laxity grades and a diagnosis were recorded. Using a robotic knee device which can measure knee laxity in three planes of motion: anterior-posterior, internal-external tibia rotation, and varus-valgus, quantitative data were obtained to document tibial motion relative to the femur. One of the five examiners correctly diagnosed the MCL injury. Robotic testing showed a 1.7° larger valgus angle, 3° greater tibial internal rotation, and lower endpoint stiffness (11.1 vs. 24.6 Nm/°) in the MCL-injured knee during varus-valgus testing when compared to the intact knee and 4.9 mm greater medial tibial translation during rotational testing. Two of the five examiners correctly diagnosed the PLC injury, while the other examiners diagnosed an MCL tear. The PLC-injured knee demonstrated 4.1 mm more lateral tibial translation and 2.2 mm more posterior tibial translation during varus-valgus testing when compared to the intact knee. The robotic testing device was able to provide objective numerical data that reflected differences between the injured knees and the uninjured knees in both cadavers. The examiners that performed the manual clinical examination on the cadaver knees proved to be poor at diagnosing the injuries. Robotic testing could act as an adjunct to the manual clinical examination by supplying numbers that could improve diagnosis of knee injury. Level II.

  3. Effect of generalized joint hypermobility on knee function and muscle activation in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente Rona; Olesen, Annesofie T.; Pedersen, Mogens Theisen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We investigated muscle activation strategy and performance of knee extensor and flexor muscles in children and adults with generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) and compared them with controls. Methods: Muscle activation, torque steadiness, electromechanical delay, and muscle streng......: The results indicate that muscle activation strategy and quality of force control were significantly affected in adults with GJH during knee flexion, whereas only muscle activation strategy was affected in children with GJH. Muscle Nerve, 2013.......Introduction: We investigated muscle activation strategy and performance of knee extensor and flexor muscles in children and adults with generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) and compared them with controls. Methods: Muscle activation, torque steadiness, electromechanical delay, and muscle strength...... were evaluated in 39 children and 36 adults during isometric knee extension and flexion. Subjects performed isometric maximum contractions, submaximal contractions at 25% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and explosive contractions. Results: Agonist activation was reduced, and coactivation ratio...

  4. Single-Leg Hop Test Performance and Isokinetic Knee Strength After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueyoshi, Ted; Nakahata, Akihiro; Emoto, Gen; Yuasa, Tomoki

    2017-11-01

    Isokinetic strength and hop tests are commonly used to assess athletes' readiness to return to sport after knee surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate the results of single-leg hop and isokinetic knee strength testing in athletes who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) upon returning to sport participation as well as to study the correlation between these 2 test batteries. The secondary purpose was to compare the test results by graft type (patellar tendon or hamstring). It was hypothesized that there would be no statistically significant limb difference in either isokinetic knee strength or single-leg hop tests, that there would be a moderate to strong correlation between the 2 test batteries, and that there would be no significant difference between graft types. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Twenty-nine high school and collegiate athletes who underwent ACLR participated in this study. At the time of return to full sport participation, a series of hop tests and knee extension/flexion isokinetic strength measurements were conducted. The results were analyzed using analysis of variance and Pearson correlation ( r ). The timed 6-m hop test was the only hop test that showed a significant difference between the involved and uninvolved limbs (2.3 and 2.2 seconds, respectively; P = .02). A significant difference between limbs in knee strength was found for flexion peak torque/body weight at 180 deg/s ( P = .03), flexion total work/body weight at 180 deg/s ( P = .04), and flexion peak torque/body weight at 300 deg/s ( P = .03). The strongest correlation between the hop tests and knee strength was found between the total distance of the hop tests and flexion total work/body weight at 300 deg/s ( r = 0.69) and between the timed 6-m hop test and flexion peak torque/body weight at 300 deg/s ( r = -0.54). There was no statistically significant difference in hop test performance or isokinetic knee strength between graft types

  5. Femoropatellar gliding movement during active stretching of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brossmann, J.; Muhle, C.; Melchert, U.H.; Spielmann, R.P.; Schroeder, C.; Hassenpflug, J.

    1992-01-01

    By means of motion-triggered MRT it has been possible for the first time to demonstrate movements in the patello-femoral joint by means of MRT. Patello-femoral movement was studied during active extension of the knee between 30deg flexion and complete extension. The knees of 5 normal females and 7 normal males were studied together with 2 women with recurrent lateral patellar luxation. In normal women there was an average 16deg (10 to 18deg), in men an average of 12deg (10 to 14deg) of lateralisation of the patella during complete extension of the knee. In 1 patient there was 10deg medial displacement of the patella before extension. In 2 knees with recurrent lateral subluxation there was a 20 and 24deg displacement of the patella. (orig.) [de

  6. KNEE ISOKINETIC TORQUE IMBALANCE IN FEMALE FUTSAL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Mello Alves Rodrigues

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: The specificity of sports training can lead to muscle specialization with a possible change in the natural hamstring/quadriceps torque ratio (HQ ratio, constituting a risk factor for muscle injury at the joint angles in which muscle imbalance may impair dynamic stability. Objective: The aim was to evaluate the torque distribution of the hamstrings and quadriceps and the HQ ratio throughout the range of motion in order to identify possible muscle imbalances at the knee of female futsal athletes. Methods: Nineteen amateur female futsal athletes had their dominant limb HQ ratio evaluated in a series of five maximum repetitions of flexion/extension of the knee at 180°/second in the total joint range of motion (30° to 80°. The peak flexor and extensor torque and the HQ ratio (% were compared each 5° of knee motion using one-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test (p<0.05 to determine the joint angles that present muscular imbalance. Results: Quadriceps torque was higher than 50° to 60° of knee flexion, while hamstrings torque was higher than 55° to 65°. The HQ ratio presented lower values than 30° to 45° of knee flexion and four athletes presented values lower than 60%, which may represent a risk of injury. However, the HQ ratio calculated by the peak torque showed only one athlete with less than 60%. Conclusion: The HQ ratio analyzed throughout the knee range of motion allowed identifying muscle imbalance at specific joint angles in female futsal players.

  7. Wearable Vector Electrical Bioimpedance System to Assess Knee Joint Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersek, Sinan; Toreyin, Hakan; Teague, Caitlin N; Millard-Stafford, Mindy L; Jeong, Hyeon-Ki; Bavare, Miheer M; Wolkoff, Paul; Sawka, Michael N; Inan, Omer T

    2017-10-01

    We designed and validated a portable electrical bioimpedance (EBI) system to quantify knee joint health. Five separate experiments were performed to demonstrate the: 1) ability of the EBI system to assess knee injury and recovery; 2) interday variability of knee EBI measurements; 3) sensitivity of the system to small changes in interstitial fluid volume; 4) reducing the error of EBI measurements using acceleration signals; and 5) use of the system with dry electrodes integrated to a wearable knee wrap. 1) The absolute difference in resistance ( R) and reactance (X) from the left to the right knee was able to distinguish injured and healthy knees (p knee R was 2.5 Ω and for X was 1.2 Ω. 3) Local heating/cooling resulted in a significant decrease/increase in knee R (p knee R and X measured using the wet electrodes and the designed wearable knee wrap were highly correlated ( R 2 = 0.8 and 0.9, respectively). This study demonstrates the use of wearable EBI measurements in monitoring knee joint health. The proposed wearable system has the potential for assessing knee joint health outside the clinic/lab and help guide rehabilitation.

  8. OCCURRENCE OF EARLY KNEE ARTHROSIS FOLLOWING TOTAL MENISCECTOMIES IN YOUTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasa Milenkovic

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of early knee arthrosis following early total meniscectomy is a significant orthopedic, social and economical problem. Arthroscopic surgery shows the role and significance of the menisci for normal knee functioning. The outcome of 19 knee arthroscopies are presented; patients are of male sex, average age 39 (from 34 to 45. All patients underwent knee arthrotomy and total medial and lateral meniscectomy before the age of 25. All patients were active sportsmen. 12 arthroscopies of the right knee and 7 arthroscopies of the left one were done. In 13 patients, medial knee arthrosis following medial meniscectomy was found. One patient had lateral knee arthrosis and degeneration of the medial meniscus following lateral meniscectomy . The same patient had the total rupture of LCA. The remaining 5 patients had lateral knee arthrosis following lateral meniscectomy. One or more loose bodies of cartilaginous origin were found in 8 patients. All the operated patients had evident early signs of initial or progressive knee arthrosis confirmed or diagnosed arthroscopically. Knee arthroscopy in early arthroses following knee meniscectomies in youth can relieve the pain and slow down disease progression. A permanent solution to the problem is possible only with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

  9. Kinematic analysis of posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty during standing up from and sitting down on a chair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mine, Takatomo; Hoshi, Kenji; Gamada, Kazuyoshi; Ihara, Koichiro; Kawamura, Hiroyuki; Kuriyama, Ryutaro; Date, Ryo

    2016-11-17

    Total knee arthroplasty is effective to regain quality of life. Standing up from and sitting down on a chair and stair stepping motion are important in daily living. We previously reported in vivo kinematics of this implant during a stepping exercise. The purpose of this analysis was to assess in vivo knee motion during standing up from and sitting down on a chair and determine the motion pattern in patients with the unique knee prosthesis. A total of 15 patients implanted with Bi-Surface PS were assessed during standing up from and sitting down on a chair. The Bi-Surface PS knee is a posterior-cruciate substitute prosthesis with a unique ball-and-socket joint in the mid-posterior portion of the femoral and tibial components. Patients were examined during standing up from and sitting down on a chair using a two-dimensional to three-dimensional registration technique. During standing up from and sitting down on a chair from minimum to 30° knee flexion, anterior femoral translation was slight. From 30° knee flexion to maximum flexion, the kinematic pattern was a medial pivot and rollback. This study demonstrated that the knee motion kinematic patterns observed in this study were not similar to normal knee kinematics and derived from the unique design of the Bi-Surface PS.

  10. Case Reports: A Stener-like Lesion of the Medial Collateral Ligament of the Knee

    OpenAIRE

    Corten, Kristoff; Hoser, Christian; Fink, Christian; Bellemans, Johan

    2009-01-01

    When the superficial fibers of the medial collateral ligament of the knee are torn without tearing of the deep fibers, the anterior superficial fibers may displace over the pes anserinus tendons, so that healing back to the tibial insertion site may be jeopardized. As only the anterior superficial and not the posterior superficial or deep fibers are disrupted, the knee will not have increased valgus laxity in extension whereas there is not a firm end point in 30° flexion. The clinical finding...

  11. Protective Knee Braces and the Biomechanics of the Half-Squat Parachute Landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Zheng, Chao; Wu, Ji; Wang, Longfeng; Wei, Xiang; Wang, Lizheng

    2018-01-01

    Knee injuries are common among paratroopers and skydivers during landing maneuvers. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dropping height and the use of protective knee braces on parachute landing biomechanics. The study cohort consisted of 30 male elite paratroopers with formal parachute landing training and more than 2 yr of parachute jumping experience. Each participant was instructed to jump off a platform at two different heights (40 and 80 cm, respectively) and land on force plates in a half-squat posture. All participants tested three different knee brace conditions (no-brace, elastic brace, and semi-rigid brace) at each height. With an increase in dropping height, peak vertical ground reaction forces (GRF), peak flexion angle, peak flexion angular displacement, peak abduction angle, peak abduction angular displacement, peak extorsion angle, and peak extorsion angular displacement of the knee joint all increased. As compared without the use of a brace, use of an elastic or semi-rigid knee brace significantly reduced peak flexion angle, peak flexion angular displacement, peak abduction angular displacement, and peak extorsion angle, while there were no significant differences in peak vertical GRF or peak extorsion angular displacement. The semi-rigid brace provided the greatest restriction against peak abduction angle (3-6°). The elastic and semi-rigid knee braces both effectively restricted motion stability of the knee joint in the sagittal and coronal planes. The semi-rigid brace had a more marked effect, although the comfort of this device should be improved.Wu D, Zheng C, Wu J, Wang L, Wei X, Wang L. Protective knee braces and the biomechanics of the half-squat parachute landing. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2018; 89(1):26-31.

  12. Anterior knee pain in patients with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young; Lee, Sang Hyeong; Chung, Chin Youb; Park, Moon Seok; Lee, Kyoung Min; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, In Hyeok; Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon; Yoo, Won Joon; Lee, Seung Yeol

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for anterior knee pain in patients with cerebral palsy. This prospective study investigated the risk factors for anterior knee pain in 127 ambulatory patients with spastic cerebral palsy in terms of walking pain, resting pain, and provocative pain. Demographic data analysis and physical examination for measuring the knee flexion contracture and unilateral and bilateral popliteal angles were performed. Patellar height was measured on radiographs, and patella alta was identified. The risk factors for anterior knee pain were analyzed using multivariate analysis with a generalized estimating equation. Seventy-seven patients were found to have patella alta based on the radiographic measurements (60.6%). Overall, sixteen patients (12.6%) had either unilateral or bilateral anterior knee pain. Of these, 6 patients showed a visual analogue scale (VAS) ≤ 3, 9 patients showed 3 7. Age was found to be a significant risk factor for walking pain and resting pain with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.08 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 1.14) and 1.09 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.15), respectively. In the multivariate analysis, knee flexion contracture was a significant protective factor with an OR of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.85 to 0.98). Approximately 12.6% of ambulatory patients with spastic cerebral palsy were found to have anterior knee pain in our hospital-based cohort study. Age was found to be a significant risk factor for anterior knee pain while walking and resting.

  13. Importance of the different posterolateral knee static stabilizers: biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Campos Pace Lasmar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative importance of the different static stabilizers of the posterolateral corner of the knee in cadavers. METHODS: Tests were performed with the application of a varus and external rotation force to the knee in extension at 30 and 60 degrees of flexion using 10 cadaver knees. The forces were applied initially to an intact knee and then repeated after a selective sectioning of the ligaments into the following: section of the lateral collateral ligament; section of the lateral collateral ligament and the popliteofibular complex; and section of the lateral collateral ligament, the popliteofibular complex and the posterolateral capsule. The parameters studied were the angular deformity and stiffness when the knees were submitted to a 15 Newton-meter varus torque and a 6 Newton-meter external tibial torque. Statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA (Analysis of Variance and Tukey's tests. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Our findings showed that the lateral collateral ligament was important in varus stability at 0, 30 and 60 degrees. The popliteofibular complex was the most important structure for external rotation stability at all angles of flexion and was also important for varus stability at 30 and 60 degrees. The posterolateral capsule was important for varus stability at 0 and 30 degrees and for external rotation stability in extension. Level of evidence: Level IV (cadaver study.

  14. In vivo six-degree-of-freedom knee-joint kinematics in overground and treadmill walking following total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Shanyuanye; Gray, Hans A; Schache, Anthony G; Feller, Julian; de Steiger, Richard; Pandy, Marcus G

    2017-08-01

    No data are available to describe six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) knee-joint kinematics for one complete cycle of overground walking following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The aims of this study were firstly, to measure 6-DOF knee-joint kinematics and condylar motion for overground walking following TKA; and secondly, to determine whether such data differed between overground and treadmill gait when participants walked at the same speed during both tasks. A unique mobile biplane X-ray imaging system enabled accurate measurement of 6-DOF TKA knee kinematics during overground walking by simultaneously tracking and imaging the joint. The largest rotations occurred for flexion-extension and internal-external rotation whereas the largest translations were associated with joint distraction and anterior-posterior drawer. Strong associations were found between flexion-extension and adduction-abduction (R 2  = 0.92), joint distraction (R 2  = 1.00), and anterior-posterior translation (R 2  = 0.77), providing evidence of kinematic coupling in the TKA knee. Although the measured kinematic profiles for overground walking were grossly similar to those for treadmill walking, several statistically significant differences were observed between the two conditions with respect to temporo-spatial parameters, 6-DOF knee-joint kinematics, and condylar contact locations and sliding. Thus, caution is advised when making recommendations regarding knee implant performance based on treadmill-measured knee-joint kinematic data. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1634-1643, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Effect of rocker-soled shoes on parameters of knee joint load in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Elizabeth G; Kean, Crystal O; Wrigley, Tim V; Bennell, Kim L; Hinman, Rana S

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the immediate effects of rocker-soled shoes on parameters of the knee adduction moment (KAM) and pain in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed on 30 individuals (mean (SD): age, 61 (7) yr; 15 (50%) male) with radiographic and symptomatic knee OA under three walking conditions in a randomized order: i) wearing rocker-soled shoes (Skechers Shape-ups), ii) wearing non-rocker-soled shoes (ASICS walking shoes), and iii) barefoot. Peak KAM and KAM angular impulse were measured as primary indicators of knee load distribution. Secondary measures included the knee flexion moment (KFM) and knee pain during walking. Peak KAM was significantly lower when wearing the rocker-soled shoes compared with that when wearing the non-rocker-soled shoes (mean difference (95% confidence interval), -0.27 (-0.42 to -0.12) N·m/BW × Ht%; P shoe conditions (P = 0.13). Both peak KAM and KAM impulse were significantly higher during both shoe conditions compared with those during the barefoot condition (P shoes significantly reduced peak KAM when compared with non-rocker-soled shoes, without a concomitant change in KFM, and thus may potentially reduce medial knee joint loading. However, KAM parameters in the rocker-soled shoes remained significantly higher than those during barefoot walking. Wearing rocker-soled shoes did not have a significant immediate effect on walking pain. Further research is required to evaluate whether rocker-soled shoes can influence symptoms and progression of knee OA with prolonged wear.

  16. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee: a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    traumatic left knee pain and swelling. Radiography and histology were in keeping with Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis (PVNS). This case highlights the clinical presentation of this rare disorder and emphasizes its consideration as a differential ...

  17. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee: a case report | Sitati ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    traumatic left knee pain and swelling. Radiography and histology were in keeping with Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis (PVNS). This case highlights the clinical presentation of this rare disorder and emphasizes its consideration as a differential ...

  18. Interlimb reflexes following ipsilateral knee joint rotations are suppressed in an unstable walking environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Interlimb reflexes play an important role in human walking, such as when dynamic stability is threatened by external perturbations or changes in the walking surface. For example, we have previously shown that interlimb reflexes in the contralateral biceps femoris (cBF) following ipsilateral knee (iKnee...... on experiments investigating intra- and interlimb cutaneous reflexes and soleus H-reflexes (Llewellyn et al., 1990; Haridas et al., 2005; 2006; Krauss and Misiaszek, 2007), we hypothesized that the amplitude of interlimb reflexes following iKnee perturbations is altered when walking in an unstable environment....... To test this, interlimb reflexes were elicited in participants (n = 6) by either iKnee extension rotations during the late stance phase (50%) of the gait cycle or iKnee flexion rotations during the mid-swing phase (80%). The iKnee perturbations were applied while the participants walked normally...

  19. The knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, J.A.; Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Evaluation of infection is difficult on the basis of radiographs. A clinical history suggestive of infection, such as excessive prolonged pain, drainage, fever, or a postoperative hematoma, is helpful in assessment. Radiographs may reveal periosteal new bone formation in long-standing cases of infection. Aspiration of the knee may or may not be helpful. Differential Tc-99m and gallium bone scans may be a useful adjunct in difficult cases. The gallium scan should show increased uptake relative to the Tc-99m scan to be considered positive. Bone scanning is not a useful criterion by itself for assessment of loosening

  20. Experimental knee joint pain during strength training and muscle strength gain in healthy subjects: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, T J; Langberg, H; Hodges, P W; Bliddal, H; Henriksen, M

    2012-01-01

    Knee joint pain and reduced quadriceps strength are cardinal symptoms in many knee pathologies. In people with painful knee pathologies, quadriceps exercise reduces pain, improves physical function, and increases muscle strength. A general assumption is that pain compromises muscle function and thus may prevent effective rehabilitation. This study evaluated the effects of experimental knee joint pain during quadriceps strength training on muscle strength gain in healthy individuals. Twenty-seven healthy untrained volunteers participated in a randomized controlled trial of quadriceps strengthening (3 times per week for 8 weeks). Participants were randomized to perform resistance training either during pain induced by injections of painful hypertonic saline (pain group, n = 13) or during a nonpainful control condition with injection of isotonic saline (control group, n = 14) into the infrapatellar fat pad. The primary outcome measure was change in maximal isokinetic muscle strength in knee extension/flexion (60, 120, and 180 degrees/second). The group who exercised with pain had a significantly larger improvement in isokinetic muscle strength at all angular velocities of knee extension compared to the control group. In knee flexion there were improvements in isokinetic muscle strength in both groups with no between-group differences. Experimental knee joint pain improved the training-induced gain in muscle strength following 8 weeks of quadriceps training. It remains to be studied whether knee joint pain has a positive effect on strength gain in patients with knee pathology. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral forces during knee extension: simulations to strength training and rehabilitation exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Rico Bini

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Limited evidence has been shown on ways to optimize the mechanical design of machines in order to minimize knee loads. Objective: This study compared six computer simulated models of open kinetic knee extension exercises for patellofemoral pressure and tibiofemoral forces. Methods: A musculoskeletal model of the lower limb was developed using six different cam radius to change resistive forces. A default machine, a constant cam radius, a torque-angle model, a free-weight model and two optimized models were simulated. Optimized models reduced cam radius at target knee flexion angles to minimize knee forces. Cam radius, human force, tibiofemoral compressive and shear force, and patellofemoral pressure were compared for the six models using data from five knee flexion angles. Results: Large reductions in cam radius comparing the free-weight model to other models (73-180% were limited to the large human force for the constant cam model to other models (9-36%. Larger human force (13 -36% was estimated to perform knee extension using a constant cam radius compared other models without large effects in knee joint forces. Conclusion: Changes in cam design effected human without a potential impact in knee loads.

  2. The INDUS knee prosthesis - Prospective multicentric trial of a posteriorly stabilized high-flex design: 2 years follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sancheti Kantilal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The anatomical and morphological differences and high-flexion daily activities in the Asian population have since ever prompted for development of customized knee replacement systems. INDUS knee system has advantages both of high-flex designs and is developed by keeping the anatomical variations of the native population in mind. The purpose of this study is to analyze the 2-year follow-up results using the INDUS prosthesis. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and ninety-seven knees in 276 patients were prospectively analyzed. There were 65 men (72 knees and 211 (225 knees women with a mean age of 64.56 years. Two hundred and forty-five knees had primary osteoarthritis, 48 knees had rheumatoid arthritis, and four knees had post-traumatic arthritis. Clinical parameters, including the Knee Society scores (knee score and function score, range of motion, post-operative anterior knee pain, and complications were recorded. Pre- and post-operative serial radiographs were analyzed for limb alignment, component positioning, and evidence of loosening. Results: The patients were followed-up for an average of 2.59 years (range, 2-3.3 years. The mean knee score and the mean function score were significantly improved from a pre-operative value of 39.4 points and 46.7 points to a post-operative value of 87 points and 86 points, respectively (P value < 0.05. Two hundred and thirty four knees had no anterior knee pain while 63 knees had mild to moderate pain, but none of the patients requested any intervention for the same. Of the 276 patients (297 knees, 79 knees had flexion above 140°, 167 had a flexion range of 130-140°, 27 had a flexion range of 100-130°, and 24 knees had a flexion < 100°, with the mean range of movement being 132.9°. Improvements in the range of movement were retained over time and a total of 205 patients (224 knees, 75.7% could squat or sit cross-legged at the final follow-up. The mean tibiofemoral angle was 8.5°± 6.9º of

  3. The physiological cost index of walking with a powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis in subjects with poliomyelitis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arazpour, Mokhtar; Ahmadi Bani, Monireh; Samadian, Mohammad; Mousavi, Mohammad E; Hutchins, Stephen W; Bahramizadeh, Mahmood; Curran, Sarah; Mardani, Mohammad A

    2016-08-01

    A powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis was developed to provide restriction of knee flexion during stance phase and active flexion and extension of the knee during swing phase of gait. The purpose of this study was to determine its effect on the physiological cost index, walking speed and the distance walked in people with poliomyelitis compared to when walking with a knee-ankle-foot orthosis with drop lock knee joints. Quasi experimental study. Seven subjects with poliomyelitis volunteered for the study and undertook gait analysis with both types of knee-ankle-foot orthosis. Walking with the powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis significantly reduced walking speed (p = 0.015) and the distance walked (p = 0.004), and also, it did not improve physiological cost index values (p = 0.009) compared to walking with the locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis. Using a powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis did not significantly improve any of the primary outcome measures during walking for poliomyelitis subjects. This powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis design did not improve the physiological cost index of walking for people with poliomyelitis when compared to walking with a knee-ankle-foot orthosis with drop lock knee joints. This may have been due to the short training period used or the bulky design and additional weight of the powered orthosis. Further research is therefore warranted. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  4. High-intensity preoperative training improves physical and functional recovery in the early post-operative periods after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Casaña, Jose; Ezzatvar, Yasmin

    2017-01-01

    analogue scale (VAS), isometric knee flexion, isometric knee extension, isometric hip abduction, active knee range of motion and functional tasks (Timed Up and Go test and Stair ascent-descent test) were assessed at 8 weeks before surgery (T1), after 8 weeks of training (T2), 1 month after TKA (T3......) and finally 3 months after TKA (T4). The intervention group completed an 8-week training programme 3 days per week prior to surgery. RESULTS: Isometric knee flexion, isometric hip abduction, VAS, WOMAC, ROM extension and flexion and all the functional assessments were greater for the intervention group at T2...... the preoperative period reduces pain and improves lower limb muscle strength, ROM and functional task performance before surgery, resulting in a reduced length of stay at the hospital and a faster physical and functional recovery after TKA. The present training programme can be used by specialists to speed up...

  5. Construction-conditioned rollback in total knee replacement: fluoroscopic results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachowski, Martin Michael; Fiedler, Christoph; Walde, Tim Alexander; Balcarek, Peter; Schüttrumpf, Jan Philipp; Frosch, Stephan; Frosch, Karl-Heinz; Fanghänel, Jochen; Gezzi, Riccardo; Kubein-Meesenburg, Dietmar; Nägerl, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Firstly, the way of implementing approximatively the initial rollback of the natural tibiofemoral joint (TFJ) in a total knee replacement (AEQUOS G1 TKR) is discussed. By configuration of the curvatures of the medial and lateral articulating surfaces a cam gear mechanism with positive drive can be installed, which works under force closure of the femoral and tibial surfaces. Briefly the geometric design features in flexion/extension are described and construction-conditioned kinematical and functional properties that arise are discussed. Due to a positive drive of the cam gear under the force closure during the stance phase of gait the articulating surfaces predominantly roll. As a result of rolling, a sliding friction is avoided, thus the resistance to motion is reduced during the stance phase. Secondly, in vivo fluoroscopic measurements of the patella tendon angle during flexion/extension are presented. The patella tendon angle/ knee flexion angle characteristic and the kinematic profile in trend were similar to those observed in the native knee during gait (0°-60°).

  6. Are the Kinematics of the Knee Joint Altered during the Loading Response Phase of Gait in Individuals with Concurrent Knee Osteoarthritis and Complaints of Joint Instability? A Dynamic Stereo X-ray Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Tashman, Scott; Gil, Alexandra B.; Klatt, Brian A.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2011-01-01

    Background Joint instability has been suggested as a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis and a cause of significant functional declines in those with symptomatic disease. However, the relationship between altered knee joint mechanics and self-reports of instability in individuals with knee osteoarthritis remains unclear. Methods Fourteen subjects with knee osteoarthritis and complaints of joint instability and 12 control volunteers with no history of knee disease were recruited for this study. Dynamic stereo X-ray technology was used to assess the three-dimensional kinematics of the knee joint during the loading response phase of gait. Findings Individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and joint instability demonstrated significantly reduced flexion and internal/external rotation knee motion excursions during the loading response phase of gait (P knee joint at initial contact was significantly different (P knee osteoarthritis and joint instability. However, the anteroposterior and mediolateral tibiofemoral joint positions at initial contact and the corresponding total joint translations were similar between groups during the loading phase of gait. Interpretations The rotational patterns of tibiofemoral joint motion and joint alignments reported for individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and joint instability are consistent with those previously established for individuals with knee osteoarthritis. Furthermore, the findings of similar translatory tibiofemoral motion between groups suggest that self-reports of episodic joint instability in individuals with knee osteoarthritis may not necessarily be associated with adaptive alterations in joint arthrokinematics. PMID:22071429

  7. Micromechanics of the human vertebral body for forward flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haisheng; Nawathe, Shashank; Fields, Aaron J; Keaveny, Tony M

    2012-08-09

    To provide mechanistic insight into the etiology of osteoporotic wedge fractures, we investigated the spatial distribution of tissue at the highest risk of initial failure within the human vertebral body for both forward flexion and uniform compression loading conditions. Micro-CT-based linear elastic finite element analysis was used to virtually load 22 human T9 vertebral bodies in either 5° of forward flexion or uniform compression; we also ran analyses replacing the simulated compliant disc (E=8 MPa) with stiff polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA, E=2500 MPa). As expected, we found that, compared to uniform compression, forward flexion increased the overall endplate axial load on the anterior half of the vertebra and shifted the spatial distribution of high-risk tissue within the vertebra towards the anterior aspect of the vertebral body. However, despite that shift, the high-risk tissue remained primarily within the central regions of the trabecular bone and endplates, and forward flexion only slightly altered the ratio of cortical-to-trabecular load sharing at the mid-vertebral level (mean±SD for n=22: 41.3±7.4% compression; 44.1±8.2% forward flexion). When the compliant disc was replaced with PMMA, the anterior shift of high-risk tissue was much more severe. We conclude that, for a compliant disc, a moderate degree of forward flexion does not appreciably alter the spatial distribution of stress within the vertebral body. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Knee Joint Angle and Contraction Intensity on Hamstrings Coactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rui; Delahunt, Eamonn; Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Lowery, Madeleine M; DE Vito, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of knee joint angle and contraction intensity on the coactivation of the hamstring muscles (when acting as antagonists to the quadriceps) in young and older individuals of both sexes. A total of 25 young (24 ± 2.6 yr) and 26 older (70 ± 2.5 yr) healthy men and women participated. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the knee extensors and flexors was assessed at two knee joint angles (90° and 60°, 0° = full extension). At each angle, participants performed submaximal contractions of the knee extensors (20%, 50%, and 80% maximal voluntary isometric contraction), whereas surface EMG was simultaneously acquired from the vastus lateralis and biceps femoris muscles to assess the level (EMG root-mean-square) of agonist activation and antagonist coactivation. Subcutaneous adipose tissue in the areas corresponding to surface EMG electrode placements was measured via ultrasonography. The contractions performed at 90° knee flexion demonstrated higher levels of antagonist coactivation (all P < 0.01) and agonist activation (all P < 0.01) as a function of contraction intensity compared with the 60° knee flexion. Furthermore, after controlling for subcutaneous adipose tissue, older participants exhibited a higher level of antagonist coactivation at 60° knee flexion compared with young participants (P < 0.05). The results of the present study suggest that 1) the antagonist coactivation is dependent on knee joint angle and contraction intensity and 2) subcutaneous adipose tissue may affect the measured coactivation level likely because of a cross-talk effect. Antagonist coactivation may play a protective role in stabilizing the knee joint and maintaining constant motor output.

  9. Phaeohyphomycosis infection in the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sadigursky

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Phaeohyphomycosis is caused by cutaneous fungi and rarely affects large joints. This is a case report on phaeohyphomycosis in the left knee of an elderly individual without immunosuppression. It was accompanied by pain and swelling the anterior knee. The case was first suspected to be suprapatellar bursitis, and was treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, without remission of symptoms. Surgical treatment was performed, with resection of the suprapatellar bursa and anterior region of the quadriceps tendon. The material was sent for anatomopathological examination and culturing. The pathological examination showed phaeohyphomycosis. The treatment instituted consisted of itraconazole, 200 mg/day for six weeks, and complete remission of symptoms was achieved. The physical examination remained normal after one year of follow-up. This is the first published case of phaeohyphomycosis infection in the suprapatellar region of the knee. Although almost all the cases reported have been associated with immunosuppressed patients, this was an exception. It is important to suspect phaeohyphomycosis in cases of knee infection, in the area of the suprapatellar bursa, when the symptoms do not resolve after clinical treatment.

  10. Stability of knee ligament complex of Thiel-embalmed cadaver compared to in vivo knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völlner, Florian; Pilsl, Ulrike; Craiovan, Benjamin; Zeman, Florian; Schneider, Michael; Wörner, Michael; Grifka, Joachim; Weber, Markus

    2017-07-01

    The first biomechanical evaluation of new implants is usually carried out with cadavers. Fixation of Thiel-embalmed cadavers is supposed to preserve the histological structure, colour and consistency of the tissue and has a low risk of infection and toxicity. However, the biomechanical properties of Thiel-fixated tissue are still unknown. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of the Thiel-embalming method on the elastic properties of the ligament complex of the knee compared to in vivo knees during total knee arthroplasty. The results of biomechanical tensile tests with 10 Thiel-embalmed knees were compared with the findings of 10 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty with a standardised knee balancer at our department. We reconstructed the force-elongation curves of the medial and lateral ligament complex and calculated the stiffness in direct correlation with overall soft tissue stability in full extension and in 90° of flexion. All curves consisted of a non-linear part at the beginning and a linear part from about 80N onwards. In full extension, median stiffness in the cadavers was 26.6N/mm for the medial compartment and 31.6N/mm for the lateral compartment. The values for in vivo were 25.7N/mm for the medial compartment and 25.3N/mm for the lateral compartment (p=0.684 for the medial compartment and p=0.247 for the lateral compartment). In 90° of flexion, median stiffness in the cadaver group was 24.7N/mm for the medial compartment and 22.2N/mm for the lateral compartment. In vivo, median stiffness was 30.3N/mm for the medial compartment and 29.2N/mm for the lateral compartment (p=0.009 for the medial compartment and p=0.143 for the lateral compartment). Stiffness of the medial and lateral ligament complex in the knee was comparable between Thiel-embalmed cadavers and in vivo patients during total knee arthroplasty. Thiel fixation seems to preserve the soft tissue properties similar to those in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  11. Varus femoral and tibial coronal alignments result in different kinematics and kinetics after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mutsumi; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Nishitani, Kohei; Furu, Moritoshi; Ito, Hiromu; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2017-11-01

    Abnormal knee motion under various conditions has been described after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, differences in kinematics and kinetics of knees with varus femoral versus varus tibial alignment have not been evaluated. It was hypothesized that varus femoral and tibial alignments have the same impact on knee motion. A musculoskeletal computer simulation was used. Femoral and tibial alignment in the coronal plane was each varied from neutral to 5° of varus in 1° increments. Lift-off, defined as an intercomponent distance of >2 mm, and tibiofemoral contact forces were evaluated during gait up to 60° of knee flexion. Knee kinematics and contact stresses were also examined during squat, with up to 130° of knee flexion. During gait, lift-off occurred readily with more than 3° of varus tibial alignment and slight lateral joint laxity. In contrast, lift-off did not occur with varus femoral or tibial alignment of up to 5° during squat. Peak medial contact forces with varus femoral alignment were approximately twice those observed with varus tibial alignment. The lowest points of the femoral condyles moved internally with varus femoral alignment, contrary to the kinematics with neutral or varus tibial alignment. On the other hand, there was femoral medial sliding and edge loading against the tibia in mid-flexion with varus tibial alignment. Varus femoral alignment affects the non-physiological rotational movement of the tibiofemoral joint, whereas varus tibial alignment causes medial-lateral instability during mid-flexion. Varus femoral and tibial alignments might lead to post-TKA discomfort and unreliability.

  12. An examination of Cyriax's passive motion tests with patients having osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, K W; Petersen, C; Falconer, J

    1994-08-01

    We explored the construct validity and test-retest reliability of the passive motion component of the Cyriax soft tissue diagnosis system. We compared the hypothesized and actual patterns of restriction, end-feel, and pain/resistance sequence (P/RS) of 79 subjects with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee and examined associations among these indicators of dysfunction and related constructs of joint motion, pain intensity, and chronicity. Subjects had a mean age of 68.5 years (SD = 13.3, range = 28-95), knee stiffness for an average of 83.6 months (SD = 122.4, range = 1-612), knee pain averaging 5.6 cm (SD = 3.1, range = 0-10) on a 10-cm visual analogue scale, and at least a 10-degree limitation in passive range of motion (ROM) of the knee. Passive ROM (goniometry, n = 79), end-feel (n = 79), and P/RS during end-feel testing (n = 62) were assessed for extension and flexion on three occasions by one of four experienced physical therapists. Test-retest reliability was estimated for the 2-month period between the last two occasions. Consistent with hypotheses based on Cyriax's assertions about patients with OA, most subjects had capsular end-feels for extension; subjects with tissue approximation end-feels for flexion had more flexion ROM than did subjects with capsular end-feels, and the P/RS was significantly correlated with pain intensity (rho = .35, extension; rho = .30, flexion). Contrary to hypotheses based on Cyriax's assertions, most subjects had noncapsular patterns, tissue approximation end-feels for flexion, and what Cyriax called pain synchronous with resistance for both motions. Pain intensity did not differ depending on end-feel. The P/RS was not correlated with chronicity (rho = .03, extension; rho = .01, flexion). Reliability, as analyzed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC[3,1]) and Cohen's kappa coefficients, was acceptable (> or = .80) or nearly acceptable for ROM (ICC = .71-.86, extension; ICC = .95-.99, flexion) but not for end-feel (kappa

  13. Effect of stump flexion contracture with and without prosthetic alignment intervention towards postural stability among transtibial prosthesis users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, M. F.; Razak, N. A. Abd; Abu Osman, N. A.; Gholizadeh, H.

    2017-06-01

    Knee flexion contracture on a stump side is a phenomenon in which the stump cannot move in normal range of motion (ROM) or cannot be fully extended. This study has been carried out by using Biodex Stability System (BSS) in order to investigate the effect of stump flexion contracture towards the postural stability among the transtibial prosthesis users with the intervention of alignment accommodation. The BSS provides the reading of anterior-posterior stability index (APSI), medial-lateral stability index (MLSI), and overall stability index (OSI). Higher reading of the index indicates lesser stability. Each of the subjects had been tested in three different sessions that were Visit 1 (before contracture improvement), Visit 2 (after contracture improvement without alignment readjustment), and Visit 3 (after contracture improvement with alignment readjustment). The APSI reading was significantly higher during Visit 2 compared to Visit 1 and Visit 3. The OSI during Visit 2 was also found significantly higher compared to Visit 3. In Visit 2, the degree of contracture was significantly improved with 44.1% less than Visit 1. The stability index in anterior-posterior aspect (APSI) was proven to be lower as the prosthetic alignment was adjusted according to the ROM of knee. This finding explained that the alignment set up based on the adaptation with the stump’s ROM can contribute positively in maintaining postural stability.

  14. How to measure responses of the knee to lateral perturbations during gait? A proof-of-principle for quantification of knee instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Noort, Josien C; Sloot, Lizeth H; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Harlaar, Jaap

    2017-08-16

    Knee instability is a major problem in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury or knee osteoarthritis. A valid and clinically meaningful measure for functional knee instability is lacking. The concept of the gait sensitivity norm, the normalized perturbation response of a walking system to external perturbations, could be a sensible way to quantify knee instability. The aim of this study is to explore the feasibility of this concept for measurement of knee responses, using controlled external perturbations during walking in healthy subjects. Nine young healthy participants walked on a treadmill, while three dimensional kinematics were measured. Sudden lateral translations of the treadmill were applied at five different intensities during stance. Right knee kinematic responses and spatio-temporal parameters were tracked for the perturbed stride and following four cycles, to calculate perturbation response and gait sensitivity norm values (i.e. response/perturbation) in various ways. The perturbation response values in terms of knee flexion and abduction increased with perturbation intensity and decreased with an increased number of steps after perturbation. For flexion and ab/adduction during midswing, the gait sensitivity norm values were shown to be constant over perturbation intensities, demonstrating the potential of the gait sensitivity norm as a robust measure of knee responses to perturbations. These results show the feasibility of using the gait sensitivity norm concept for certain gait indicators based on kinematics of the knee, as a measure of responses during perturbed gait. The current findings in healthy subjects could serve as reference-data to quantify pathological knee instability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Diagnostic gait pattern of a patient with longstanding left femoral nerve palsy: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Neil G

    2010-12-01

    The gait pattern of a 35-year-old man with longstanding, left femoral nerve palsy was assessed using 3-dimensional kinematic and kinetic analysis. Stability of his left knee in stance was achieved by manipulating the external moments of the limb so that the ground reaction force passes in front of the knee joint. This compensatory mechanism of locking the knee in extension is reliant on the posterior capsular structures. The patient was managed conservatively and continued to walk without aids.

  16. Influence of body mass and lower limb length on knee flexion angle during walking in humans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hora, M.; Sládek, Vladimír; Soumar, L.; Stráníková, K.; Michálek, T.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, 3-4 (2012), s. 330-339 ISSN 0139-7893 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0589 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : size * posture * locomotion * biomechanics Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.494, year: 2012

  17. Quadriceps force during knee extension in different replacement scenarios with a modular partial prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calliess, Tilman; Schado, Ssuheib; Richter, Berna I; Becher, Christoph; Ezechieli, Marco; Ostermeier, Sven

    2014-02-01

    Previous biomechanical studies have shown that bi-cruciate retaining knee replacement does not significantly alter normal knee kinematics, however, there are no data on the influence of a combined medial and patellofemoral bi-compartimental arthroplasty. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different replacement scenarios with a modular partial knee replacement system on the amount of quadriceps force required to extend the knee during an isokinetic extension cycle. Ten human knee specimens were tested in a kinematic knee simulator under (1) physiologic condition and after subsequent implantation of (2) a medial unicondylar and (3) a trochlear replacement. An isokinetic extension cycle of the knee with a constant extension moment of 31 Nm was simulated. The resulting quadriceps extension force was measured from 120° to full knee extension. The quadriceps force curve described a typically sinusoidal characteristic before and after each replacement scenario. The isolated medial replacement resulted in a slightly, but significantly higher maximum quadriceps force (1510 N vs. 1585 N, P = 0.006) as well as the subsequent trochlear replacement showed an additional increase (1801 N, P = 0.008). However, for both replacements no significant difference to the untreated condition could be detected in mid-flexion (10-50°). When considering a bi-compartimental replacement an increase of required maximum quadriceps force needed to extend the knee has to keep in mind. However, the close to physiological movement in mid-flexion suggests that patients with a bi-crutiate retaining arthroplasty might have an advantage in knee stability compared to total knee arthroplasty. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Great Mimic Again? A Case of Tuberculosis Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teo SH

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB, once a disease confined to undeveloped or developing nations is currently in resurgence due to pandemic human immunodeficiency virus infection and immigration from endemic areas. TB is also known as the ‘great mimicker’. Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis affecting the knee is rare in all forms of TB (0.1-0.3%. Here, we report a case of isolated highly erosive TB knee in a previously fit Burmese migrant worker. He presented with after a history of fall into a drain. The patient also reported pain and swelling over his left knee for the previous three years. He had been treated for a bacterial infection of the knee in another hospital but defaulted due to financial constraints. Arthrotomy of the knee was performed including washout. Diagnosis of TB of the knee was made based on the synovial fluid and tissue culture. Treatment with anti- tuberculosis drugs was then initiated.

  19. Digital goniometric measurement of knee joint motion. Evaluation of usefulness for research settings and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleffken, Berry; van Breukelen, Gerard; Brink, Peter; van Mameren, Henk; Olde Damink, Steven

    2007-10-01

    An accurate and reproducible measurement method for joint motion is essential for classification of success or failure in therapeutic intervention. Digital goniometry is increasingly used as a method of classification for knee joint excursion. The reliability of goniometry however remains debatable. Aim of the study was to determine both intra- and inter-rater reproducibility in degrees, with an electronic digital inclinometer (EDI 320) for active and passive maximum flexion and active maximum extension of the knee joint and to determine the reproducibility of active and passive range of motion. A classical crossover design, with strict measurement protocol was used. Two raters measured 72 knee motions each, in 42 healthy subjects in four sessions. The smallest detectable difference (SDD) was calculated by using adjusted Bland and Altman plots for each knee excursion. No differences in joint excursions between the sexes were found. Passive maximum flexion showed larger excursions than active maximum flexion with additional higher levels of reproducibility. SDDs for inter-rater comparisons yielded: 0+/-3.9 degrees for active maximum extension, 0+/-7.4 degrees for active maximum flexion, 0+/-6.4 degrees for passive maximum flexion, 0+/-7.6 degrees for AROM and 0+/-5.4 degrees for PROM. Intra-rater SDDs showed increased reproducibility by 0.4-1.9 degrees. We conclude that interpretation of knee joint excursions in clinical settings is with these SDDs. Clinical and statistical differences in research settings within these SDDs are not a true difference but should be attributed to measurement error.

  20. Effects of a combined inversion and plantarflexion surface on knee and hip kinematics during landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Kevin A; Bhaskaran, Divya; Hummer, Cicily; Schefano, Antonio; Zhang, Songning

    2016-11-01

    Although landing in a plantarflexion and inversion position is a well-known characteristic of lateral ankle sprains, the associated kinematics of the knee and hip is largely unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the changes in knee and hip kinematics during landings on an altered landing surface of combined plantarflexion and inversion. Participants performed five drop landings from 30 cm onto a trapdoor platform in three different conditions: flat landing surface, 25° inversion, or a combined 25° plantarflexion and 25° inversion. Kinematic data were collected using a seven camera motion capture system. A 2 × 3 (leg × surface) repeated measures ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. The combined surface showed decreased knee and hip flexion range of motion (ROM) and increased knee abduction ROM (p knee abduction. A stiff landing pattern is frequently related to increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury. It may be beneficial for athletes at risk to train for alternate methods of increasing their sagittal plane motion of the knee and hip with active knee or trunk flexion.

  1. Designs and performance of three new microprocessor-controlled knee joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Julius; Schöllig, Christina; Bellmann, Malte; Kraft, Marc

    2018-02-09

    A crossover design study with a small group of subjects was used to evaluate the performance of three microprocessor-controlled exoprosthetic knee joints (MPKs): C-Leg 4, Plié 3 and Rheo Knee 3. Given that the mechanical designs and control algorithms of the joints determine the user outcome, the influence of these inherent differences on the functional characteristics was investigated in this study. The knee joints were evaluated during level-ground walking at different velocities in a motion analysis laboratory. Additionally, technical analyses using patents, technical documentations and X-ray computed tomography (CT) for each knee joint were performed. The technical analyses showed that only C-Leg 4 and Rheo Knee 3 allow microprocessor-controlled adaptation of the joint resistances for different gait velocities. Furthermore, Plié 3 is not able to provide stance extension damping. The biomechanical results showed that only if a knee joint adapts flexion and extension resistances by the microprocessor all known advantages of MPKs can become apparent. But not all users may benefit from the examined functions: e.g. a good accommodation to fast walking speeds or comfortable stance phase flexion. Hence, a detailed comparison of user demands and performance of the designated knee joint is mandatory to ensure a maximum in user outcome.

  2. Design, analysis and verification of a knee joint oncological prosthesis finite element model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zach, Lukáš; Kunčická, Lenka; Růžička, Pavel; Kocich, Radim

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to design a finite element model for a hinged PROSPON oncological knee endoprosthesis and to verify the model by comparison with ankle flexion angle using knee-bending experimental data obtained previously. Visible Human Project CT scans were used to create a general lower extremity bones model and to compose a 3D CAD knee joint model to which muscles and ligaments were added. Into the assembly the designed finite element PROSPON prosthesis model was integrated and an analysis focused on the PEEK-OPTIMA hinge pin bushing stress state was carried out. To confirm the stress state analysis results, contact pressure was investigated. The analysis was performed in the knee-bending position within 15.4-69.4° hip joint flexion range. The results showed that the maximum stress achieved during the analysis (46.6 MPa) did not exceed the yield strength of the material (90 MPa); the condition of plastic stability was therefore met. The stress state analysis results were confirmed by the distribution of contact pressure during knee-bending. The applicability of our designed finite element model for the real implant behaviour prediction was proven on the basis of good correlation of the analytical and experimental ankle flexion angle data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The influence of a change in the meniscus cross-sectional shape on the medio-lateral translation of the knee joint and meniscal extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daszkiewicz, Karol; Witkowski, Wojciech; Chróścielewski, Jacek; Ferenc, Tomasz; Baczkowski, Boguslaw

    2018-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of a change in the meniscus cross sectional shape on its position and on the biomechanics of a knee joint. Methods One main finite element model of a left knee joint was created on the basis of MRI images. The model consisted of bones, articular cartilages, menisci and ligaments. Eight variants of this model with an increased or decreased meniscus height were then prepared. Nonlinear static analyses with a fixed flexion/extension movement for a compressive load of 1000 N were performed. The additional analyses for those models with a constrained medio-lateral relative bone translation allowed for an evaluation of the influence of this translation on a meniscus external shift. Results It was observed that a decrease in the meniscus height caused a decrease in the contact area, together with a decrease in the contact force between the flattened meniscus and the cartilage. For the models with an increased meniscus height, a maximal value of force acting on the meniscus in a medio-lateral direction was obtained. The results have shown that the meniscus external shift was approximately proportional to the meniscus slope angle, but that relationship was modified by a medio-lateral relative bone translation. It was found that the translation of the femur relative to the tibia may be dependent on the geometry of the menisci. Conclusions The results have suggested that a change in the meniscus geometry in the cross sectional plane can considerably affect not only the meniscal external shift, but also the medio-lateral translation of the knee joint as well as the congruency of the knee joint. PMID:29447236

  4. Clinical Outcomes in Men and Women following Total Knee Arthroplasty with a High-Flex Knee: No Clinical Effect of Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Nassif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While it is generally recognized that anatomical differences exist between the male and female knee, the literature generally refutes the clinical need for gender-specific total knee prostheses. It has been found that standard, unisex knees perform as well, or better, in women than men. Recently, high-flex knees have become available that mechanically accommodate increased flexion yet no studies have directly compared the outcomes of these devices in men and women to see if gender-based differences exist. We retrospectively compared the performance of the high-flex Vanguard knee (Biomet, Warsaw, IN in 716 male and 1,069 female knees. Kaplan-Meier survivorship was 98.5% at 5.6–5.7 years for both genders. After 2 years, mean improvements in Knee Society Knee and Function scores for men and women (50.9 versus 46.3; 26.5 versus 23.1 and corresponding SF-12 Mental and Physical scores (0.2 versus 2.2; 13.7 versus 12.2 were similar with differences not clinically relevant. Postoperative motion gains as a function of preoperative motion level were virtually identical in men and women. This further confirms the suitability of unisex total knee prostheses for both men and women.

  5. The effects of 2 landing techniques on knee kinematics, kinetics, and performance during stop-jump and side-cutting tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Boyi; Garrett, William E; Gross, Michael T; Padua, Darin A; Queen, Robin M; Yu, Bing

    2015-02-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injuries (ACL) commonly occur during jump landing and cutting tasks. Attempts to land softly and land with greater knee flexion are associated with decreased ACL loading. However, their effects on performance are unclear. Attempts to land softly will decrease peak posterior ground-reaction force (PPGRF) and knee extension moment at PPGRF compared with a natural landing during stop-jump and side-cutting tasks. Attempts to land with greater knee flexion at initial ground contact will increase knee flexion at PPGRF compared with a natural landing during both tasks. In addition, both landing techniques will increase stance time and lower extremity mechanical work as well as decrease jump height and movement speed compared with a natural landing during both tasks. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 18 male and 18 female recreational athletes participated in the study. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data were collected during stop-jump and side-cutting tasks under 3 conditions: natural landing, soft landing, and landing with greater knee flexion at initial ground contact. Attempts to land softly decreased PPGRF and knee extension moment at PPGRF compared with a natural landing during stop-jump tasks. Attempts to land softly decreased PPGRF compared with a natural landing during side-cutting tasks. Attempts to land with greater knee flexion at initial ground contact increased knee flexion angle at PPGRF compared with a natural landing during both stop-jump and side-cutting tasks. Attempts to land softly and land with greater knee flexion at initial ground contact increased stance time and lower extremity mechanical work, as well as decreased jump height and movement speed during both stop-jump and side-cutting tasks. Although landing softly and landing with greater knee flexion at initial ground contact may reduce ACL loading during stop-jump and side-cutting tasks, the performance of these tasks decreased, as indicated by

  6. Effect of kinesio taping on the isokinetic muscle function in football athletes with a knee injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, SoonKwon; Shim, JeMyung; Kim, SungJoong; Namkoong, Seung; Roh, HyoLyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the difference in isokinetic muscle function in football athletes with a knee injury with and without kinesio taping. [Subjects] The subjects for this study were 10 football athletes (males) with a knee injury. [Methods] Measurements were performed by using Cybex dynamometer under uniform motion before and after the application of kinesio tape to the quadriceps and hamstring muscle. Maximal concentric knee extension and flexion at three angular velocities (60°/s, 120°/s, and 180°/s) were measured. [Results] A significant difference was found in peak torque and total work of the flexion at 120°/s and 180°/s, as well as in the average power of extension at 180°/s. [Conclusion] Though it is not the main therapy for muscle function in football athletes with injury, kinesio taping was an effective adjunct therapy.

  7. Knee Arthrodesis After Failure of Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfriedsen, Tinne B; Morville Schrøder, Henrik; Odgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Arthrodesis is considered a salvage procedure after failure of a knee arthroplasty. Data on the use of this procedure are limited. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence, causes, surgical techniques, and outcomes of arthrodesis after failed knee arthroplasty in a nati......BACKGROUND: Arthrodesis is considered a salvage procedure after failure of a knee arthroplasty. Data on the use of this procedure are limited. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence, causes, surgical techniques, and outcomes of arthrodesis after failed knee arthroplasty...

  8. Cartilage Degeneration and Alignment in Severe Varus Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Mukai, Shogo; Yabumoto, Hiromitsu; Tarumi, Eri; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between cartilage, ligament, and meniscus degeneration and radiographic alignment in severe varus knee osteoarthritis in order to understand the development of varus knee osteoarthritis. Fifty-three patients (71 knees) with primary varus knee osteoarthritis and who underwent total knee arthroplasty were selected for this study. There were 6 men and 47 women, with 40 right knees and 31 left knees studied; their mean age at operation was 73.5 years. The ligament, meniscus, degeneration of joint cartilage, and radiographic alignments were examined visually. The tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle was larger if the condition of the cartilage in the lateral femoral condyle was worse. The femorotibial angle and tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle were larger if the conditions of the lateral meniscus or the cartilage in the lateral tibial plateau were worse. Based on the results of this study, progression of varus knee osteoarthritis may occur in the following manner: medial knee osteoarthritis starts in the central portion of the medial tibial plateau, and accompanied by medial meniscal extrusion and anterior cruciate ligament rupture, cartilage degeneration expands from the anterior to the posterior in the medial tibial plateau. Bone attrition occurs in the medial tibial plateau, and the femoro-tibial angle and tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle increase. Therefore, the lateral intercondylar eminence injures the cartilage of the lateral femoral condyle in the longitudinal fissure type. Thereafter, the cartilage degeneration expands in the whole of the knee joints.

  9. Design and Characterization of a Novel Knee Articulation Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinski, M.; Gronowicz, A.; Handke, A.; Ceccarelli, M.

    2016-08-01

    The paper is focused on designing a novel controllable and adjustable mechanism for reproducing human knee joint's complex motion by taking into account the flexion/extension movement in the sagittal plane, in combination with roll and slide. Main requirements for a knee rehabilitation supporting device are specified by researching the knee's anatomy and already existing mechanisms. A three degree of freedom (3 DOF) system (four-bar like linkage with controlled variable lengths of rockers) is synthesised to perform the reference path of instantaneous centre of rotation (ICR). Finally, a preliminary design of the adaptive mechanism is elaborated and a numerical model is built in Adams. Numerical results are derived from simulations that are presented to evaluate the accuracy of the reproduced movement and the mechanism's capabilities.

  10. Anatomic ACL reconstruction produces greater graft length change during knee range-of-motion than transtibial technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowitz, James H

    2014-05-01

    Because distance between the knee ACL femoral and tibial footprint centrums changes during knee range-of-motion, surgeons must understand the effect of ACL socket position on graft length, in order to avoid graft rupture which may occur when tensioning and fixation is performed at the incorrect knee flexion angle. The purpose of this study is to evaluate change in intra-articular length of a reconstructed ACL during knee range-of-motion comparing anatomic versus transtibial techniques. After power analysis, seven matched pair cadaveric knees were tested. The ACL was debrided, and femoral and tibial footprint centrums for anatomic versus transtibial techniques were identified and marked. Asuture anchor was placed at the femoral centrum and a custom, cannulated suture-centring device at the tibial centrum, and excursion of the suture, representing length change of an ACL graft during knee range-of-motion, was measured in millimeters and recorded using a digital transducer. Mean increase in length as the knee was ranged 120°–0° (full extension) was 4.5 mm (±2.0 mm) for transtibial versus 6.7 mm (±0.9 mm) for anatomic ACL technique. A significant difference in length change occurs during knee range-of-motion both within groups and between the two groups. Change in length of the ACL intra-articular distance during knee range-of-motion is greater for anatomic socket position compared to transtibial position. Surgeons performing anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction may tension and fix grafts with the knee in full extension to minimize risk of graft stretch or rupture or knee capture during full extension. This technique may also result in knee anterior–posterior laxity in knee flexion.

  11. Association of internal rotation of the knee joint with recurrent subluxation of the lateral meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganuma, Jun; Ohkoshi, Tomohiro

    2011-08-01

    To compare the arc of rotation of the knee joint at 90° of flexion in control knee joints and those affected by recurrent subluxation of the lateral meniscus (RSLM), in determining whether rotatory instability of the knee joint is a risk factor for RSLM. Knee joints were diagnosed with RSLM when there was a history of mechanical locking episodes and when subluxation of the lateral meniscus with the peripheral margin of the posterior segment moving anteriorly beyond the lateral femoral condyle was recognized on arthroscopy. In this study 288 knee joints in 270 subjects were evaluated. The joints were classified into a control group (252 joints), an RSLM group (24 joints), and a contralateral RSLM group (12 joints). The arcs of external and internal rotation at 90° of flexion of the knee joint induced by 7 Nm of torque under non-weight-bearing conditions were measured with a Biodex System 3 (Biodex Medical Systems, Shirley, NY). There were no significant differences in mean values of external rotation among the 3 groups. The mean values of internal rotation of both the RSLM and contralateral RSLM groups were significantly larger than that of the control group, by about 15° (P < .0001). The mean value of internal rotation was slightly higher than that of external rotation in the RSLM and contralateral RSLM groups, although the mean value of internal rotation was smaller than that of external rotation by 10.1° in the control group. RSLM was found to be strongly related to bilateral increase in the arc of internal rotation at 90° of flexion of the knee joint, suggesting that internal rotatory instability of the flexed knee joint can be considered one of the risk factors for and diagnostic parameters of RSLM. Level III, diagnostic study of nonconsecutive patients. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Anterior knee pain: an update of physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Suzanne

    2014-10-01

    Anterior knee pain is one of the most common knee problems in physically active individuals. The reason for anterior knee pain has been suggested to be multifactorial with patella abnormalities or extensor mechanism disorder leading to patellar malalignment during flexion and extension of the knee joint. Some patients complain mostly of non-specific knee pain, while others report patellar instability problems. The patients present with a variety of symptoms and clinical findings, meaning that a thorough clinical examination is the key for optimal treatment. Weakness of the quadriceps muscle, especially during eccentric contractions, is usually present in the majority of anterior knee pain patients. However, irrespective of whether pain or instability is the major problem, hypotrophy and reduced activity of the vastus medialis are often found, which result in an imbalance between vastus medialis and vastus lateralis. This imbalance needs to be corrected before quadriceps exercises are started. The non-operative rehabilitation protocol should be divided into different phases based on the patient's progress. The goal of the first phase is to reduce pain and swelling, improve the balance between vastus medialis and vastus lateralis, restore normal gait, and decrease loading of the patello-femoral joint. The second phase should include improvement of postural control and coordination of the lower extremity, increase of quadriceps strength and when needed hip muscle strength, and restore good knee function. The patient should be encouraged to return to or to start with a suitable regular physical exercise. Therefore, the third phase should include functional exercises. Towards the end of the treatment, single-leg functional tests and functional knee scores should be used for evaluating clinical outcome. A non-operative treatment of patients with anterior knee pain should be tried for at least 3 months before considering other treatment options.

  13. Lower extremity rotational deformities and patellofemoral alignment parameters in patients with anterior knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkocak, Omer Faruk; Altan, Egemen; Altintas, Murat; Turkmen, Faik; Aydin, Bahattin Kerem; Bayar, Ahmet

    2016-09-01

    Anterior knee pain is a common musculoskeletal condition amongst young adult population. Lower extremity structural factors, such as increased femoral anteversion and lateral tibial torsion, may contribute to patellofemoral malalignment and anterior knee pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the lower extremity structural factors and related patellofemoral alignment parameters that play a role in the aetiology of anterior knee pain. This study involved three groups: patients with unilateral symptomatic knees (n = 35), asymptomatic contralateral knees in the same patients and a control group (n = 40). All subjects were physically examined, and Q-angles were measured. The lower extremities of all subjects were imaged by a very low-dose CT scan, and the symptomatic knees of patients were compared with their asymptomatic contralateral knees and with the healthy knees of controls regarding femoral anteversion, tibial torsion, sulcus angle, patellar tilt angle and lateral patellar displacement. Regarding the Q-angle, femoral anteversion and lateral tibial torsion, no significant differences were found between the symptomatic and asymptomatic knees, whereas significant differences were found between the symptomatic knees and controls. The symptomatic group demonstrated significantly greater sulcus angle only in 30° of knee flexion than did the controls. Patients with unilateral anterior knee pain may have similar morphology at their contralateral asymptomatic lower extremity, and different morphology compared with healthy controls. Lower extremity rotational deformities may increase the risk of anterior knee pain; however, these deformities alone are not sufficient to cause knee pain, and may be predisposing factor rather than a direct aetiology. Diagnostic study, Level III.

  14. Changes in uterine flexion caused by cesarean section: correlation between post-flexion and deficient cesarean section scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryo, Eiji; Sakurai, Rina; Kamata, Hideo; Seto, Michiharu; Morita, Masayoshi; Ayabe, Takuya

    2016-04-01

    To investigate changes in uterine flexion after cesarean delivery in comparison with vaginal delivery, and their relationship with the presence of deficient cesarean section scars. In 147 women who had a vaginal delivery and 101 women who had a cesarean delivery, transvaginal ultrasonographic photographs of the uterus were obtained at the first trimester of pregnancy and at 1 month postpartum, and they were reviewed to determine changes in uterine flexion. The presence of a deficient cesarean section scar was also reviewed in women with a cesarean section. Changes in uterine flexion were observed more frequently among the woman with a cesarean delivery than in those with a vaginal delivery. The incidence of post-flexed uterus during puerperium tended to increase depending on the number of cesarean sections the woman had undergone. In the women with a cesarean section, changes in uterine flexion were more frequently observed in the women with a deficient cesarean section scar than in those without one. Changes in uterine flexion after birth occurred more frequently in the women who had a cesarean delivery than in those who had a vaginal delivery, especially in the presence of a deficient cesarean section scar.

  15. Use of Knee Magnetic Resonance Imaging by Primary Care Physicians in Patients Aged 40 Years and Older

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petron, David J.; Greis, Patrick E.; Aoki, Stephen K.; Black, Stuart; Krete, Derek; Sohagia, Kinjal B.; Burks, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background: Criteria are needed for primary care providers such that they can evaluate age-related knee pain in a cost-effective manner. This study examined (1) in what percentage of patients are appropriate radiographic views of the knee ordered before magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for knee pain, (2) specialists’ retrospective evaluation for appropriate utilization of MRI in knee pain, and (3) in what manner would the MRIs have altered diagnosis and management of knee disorders. Hypothesis: Primary care providers underuse appropriate radiographs—especially, flexion weightbearing posteroanterior films—and overuse MRIs when evaluating older patients with knee pain. Study Design: Case control. Methods: The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 100 patients older than 40 years with knee MRIs. Patient encounters with primary care physicians were reviewed. Given available information, specialists then formulated a pre- and post-MRI diagnosis and treatment plan and indicated whether the MRI would have altered their treatment. Results: Only 12 of 100 MRIs would have been ordered by an orthopaedist given the documented data. No MRIs would have been ordered in the 19 patients aged 60 years or older. Among 44 radiographs ordered, only 7 were flexion weightbearing. The most common pre-MRI diagnoses made by primary care providers were joint pain (22%) and meniscus injury (24%); the most common post-MRI diagnoses were osteoarthritis (40%) and degenerative meniscus injury (23%). In contrast, the 2 most common pre- and post-MRI diagnoses by specialists were osteoarthritis (28% and 37%, respectively) and degenerative meniscus injury (23% and 24%, respectively). Also, referrals to specialists increased from 9% pre-MRI to 76% post-MRI. Conclusion: Primary care providers may be overusing knee MRIs and underusing flexion weightbearing posteroanterior radiographs in patients older than 40 years with knee pain. Clinical relevance: Primary care providers should strongly

  16. Flexion/extension cervical spine views in blunt cervical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Sadaf

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To examine the contribution of flexion and extension radiographs in the evaluation of ligamentous injury in awake adults with acute blunt cervical spine trauma, who show loss of cervical lordosis and neck pain. Methods: All patients who presented to our emer-gency department following blunt trauma were enrolled in this study, except those with schiwora, neurological defi-cits or fracture demonstrated on cross-table cervical spine X-rays, and those who were either obtunded or presented after cervical spine surgery. Adequacy of flexion and exten-sion views was checked by the neurosurgery and radiology team members. All these patients underwent cross-table cervical spine view followed by flexion/extension views based on the loss of lordosis on cross-table imaging and the presence of neck pain. Results: A total of 200 cases were reviewed, of whom 90 (45% underwent repeat X-rays because of either inadequate exposure or limited motion. None of the patients with loss of lordosis on cross-table view had positive flexion and extension views of cervical spine for instability. Conclusions: Our results show that in patients who underwent acute radiographic evaluation of blunt cervical spine trauma, flexion and extension views of the cervical spine are unlikely to yield positive results in the presence of axial neck pain and/or loss of cervical lordosis. We can also hypothesize that performing flexion and extension views will be more useful once the acute neck pain has settled. Key words: X-rays; Cervical vertebrae; Lordosis

  17. Femoral Component External Rotation Affects Knee Biomechanics: A Computational Model of Posterior-stabilized TKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Mohammad; Wright, Timothy M; Cross, Michael B; Mayman, David J; Pearle, Andrew D; Sculco, Peter K; Westrich, Geoffrey H; Imhauser, Carl W

    2018-01-01

    The correct amount of external rotation of the femoral component during TKA is controversial because the resulting changes in biomechanical knee function associated with varying degrees of femoral component rotation are not well understood. We addressed this question using a computational model, which allowed us to isolate the biomechanical impact of geometric factors including bony shapes, location of ligament insertions, and implant size across three different knees after posterior-stabilized (PS) TKA. Using a computational model of the tibiofemoral joint, we asked: (1) Does external rotation unload the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and what is the effect on lateral collateral ligament tension? (2) How does external rotation alter tibiofemoral contact loads and kinematics? (3) Does 3° external rotation relative to the posterior condylar axis align the component to the surgical transepicondylar axis (sTEA) and what anatomic factors of the femoral condyle explain variations in maximum MCL tension among knees? We incorporated a PS TKA into a previously developed computational knee model applied to three neutrally aligned, nonarthritic, male cadaveric knees. The computational knee model was previously shown to corroborate coupled motions and ligament loading patterns of the native knee through a range of flexion. Implant geometries were virtually installed using hip-to-ankle CT scans through measured resection and anterior referencing surgical techniques. Collateral ligament properties were standardized across each knee model by defining stiffness and slack lengths based on the healthy population. The femoral component was externally rotated from 0° to 9° relative to the posterior condylar axis in 3° increments. At each increment, the knee was flexed under 500 N compression from 0° to 90° simulating an intraoperative examination. The computational model predicted collateral ligament forces, compartmental contact forces, and tibiofemoral internal/external and

  18. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cartilage in the knee gradually wears away, causing pain and swelling. Injuries to ligaments and tendons also cause knee problems. A common injury is to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). You usually injure your ACL ...

  19. Knee braces - unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most people talk about the arthritis in their knees, they are referring to a type of arthritis ... is caused by wear and tear inside your knee joints. Cartilage, the firm, rubbery tissue that cushions ...

  20. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  1. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  2. What Are Knee Problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to stand on it. The medial and lateral collateral ligaments are usually injured by a blow to ... This can help your knee(s) without increasing the risk of injury or further damage. As a general ...

  3. Knee and Hip Joint Kinematics Predict Quadriceps and Hamstrings Neuromuscular Activation Patterns in Drop Jump Landings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Malfait

    Full Text Available The purpose was to assess if variation in sagittal plane landing kinematics is associated with variation in neuromuscular activation patterns of the quadriceps-hamstrings muscle groups during drop vertical jumps (DVJ.Fifty female athletes performed three DVJ. The relationship between peak knee and hip flexion angles and the amplitude of four EMG vectors was investigated with trajectory-level canonical correlation analyses over the entire time period of the landing phase. EMG vectors consisted of the {vastus medialis(VM,vastus lateralis(VL}, {vastus medialis(VM,hamstring medialis(HM}, {hamstring medialis(HM,hamstring lateralis(HL} and the {vastus lateralis(VL,hamstring lateralis(HL}. To estimate the contribution of each individual muscle, linear regressions were also conducted using one-dimensional statistical parametric mapping.The peak knee flexion angle was significantly positively associated with the amplitudes of the {VM,HM} and {HM,HL} during the preparatory and initial contact phase and with the {VL,HL} vector during the peak loading phase (p<0.05. Small peak knee flexion angles were significantly associated with higher HM amplitudes during the preparatory and initial contact phase (p<0.001. The amplitudes of the {VM,VL} and {VL,HL} were significantly positively associated with the peak hip flexion angle during the peak loading phase (p<0.05. Small peak hip flexion angles were significantly associated with higher VL amplitudes during the peak loading phase (p = 0.001. Higher external knee abduction and flexion moments were found in participants landing with less flexed knee and hip joints (p<0.001.This study demonstrated clear associations between neuromuscular activation patterns and landing kinematics in the sagittal plane during specific parts of the landing. These findings have indicated that an erect landing pattern, characterized by less hip and knee flexion, was significantly associated with an increased medial and posterior

  4. Joint gap measurement in total knee arthroplasty using a tensor device with the same articulating surface as the prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yoshio; Nakagawa, Shigeru; Minoda, Yukihide; Mizokawa, Shigekazu; Tokuhara, Yoshio; Kadoya, Yoshinori

    2014-05-01

    We developed a new tensor to measure the joint gap throughout knee flexion during total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This tensor has the same articular shape as that of the tibial liner, including the post structure and the curvature of femorotibial articular surface, to measure the gap intraoperatively under the same conditions as after TKA. The present study aimed to examine the precision of the new tensor for gap measurement after implantation. We performed TKA using the modified gap technique in four cadaveric knees and measured the gaps using the new tensor. The intra-observer and inter-observer error of the tensor was analyzed using 168 measurements of the gaps as determined at least twice by two surgeons. In addition, the gaps in rotating-platform posterior-stabilized TKA were measured at seven positions with the knee bending from extension to full flexion. The inter-observer and intra-observer errors were 0.8 and 0.3 mm, respectively, indicating precise and reproducible gap measurement. The gaps before implantation in reduced patellar position were 12.1 mm at extension and 12.5 mm at 90° flexion. The gaps after implantation were 9.1, 12.9, 13.1, 13.5, 13.8, 13.3, and 10.1 mm at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 90°, 120°, and full flexion, respectively. The new tensor provides precise and reproducible measurements. Although the joint gap before implantation was parallel and equal at extension and 90° flexion, the joint gap after implantation was variable throughout knee flexion. This feature of the gap should be considered during the operation.

  5. Linear and curvilinear relationship between knee range of motion and physical functioning in people with knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Hoogeboom

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Knee range of motion (KROM is associated with the ability to perform daily activities in people with knee OA. However, this association is weak, possibly through the use of linear analyses. Curvilinear associations appear much more relevant, as these allow the determination of relevant clinical thresholds in KROM. The goal of this study is to assess the curvilinear association between KROM and daily activities (self-reported and observed in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA. METHODS: Demographic, functional and KROM (flexion and extension data were collected from a convenience sample of people with knee OA awaiting total knee arthroplasty. Self-reported functioning was measured by use of the Knee Osteoarthritis Outcomes Scale and observed functioning with the timed up and go and six-minute walk test. The presence of curvilinear relationships between KROM and measures of functioning were tested by generalized additive modeling, piecewise regression modeling and receiver operated curves. RESULTS: Data from 110 participants (mean age ± standard deviation: 65 ± 9 and female: 54% with knee OA were evaluated. Statistical modeling did not reveal linear nor curvilinear associations between KROM and self-reported or observed measures of functioning; except for statistical significant associations between reduced knee flexion and major difficulties standing (p<=0.01. However, further modeling did not provide convincing evidence for relevant clinical associations and thresholds. CONCLUSIONS: No clinically relevant relationship between KROM and self-reported or observed measures of physical functioning could be established, indicating that the limitations in range of motion in the affected knee OA alone do not contribute to poorer functional performance.

  6. Loss of knee-extension strength is related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bente; Kristensen, Morten T; Bencke, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    To examine whether changes in knee-extension strength and functional performance are related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA).......To examine whether changes in knee-extension strength and functional performance are related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA)....

  7. Effects of technique variations on knee biomechanics during the squat and leg press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, R F; Fleisig, G S; Zheng, N; Lander, J E; Barrentine, S W; Andrews, J R; Bergemann, B W; Moorman, C T

    2001-09-01

    The specific aim of this project was to quantify knee forces and muscle activity while performing squat and leg press exercises with technique variations. Ten experienced male lifters performed the squat, a high foot placement leg press (LPH), and a low foot placement leg press (LPL) employing a wide stance (WS), narrow stance (NS), and two foot angle positions (feet straight and feet turned out 30 degrees ). No differences were found in muscle activity or knee forces between foot angle variations. The squat generated greater quadriceps and hamstrings activity than the LPH and LPL, the WS-LPH generated greater hamstrings activity than the NS-LPH, whereas the NS squat produced greater gastrocnemius activity than the WS squat. No ACL forces were produced for any exercise variation. Tibiofemoral (TF) compressive forces, PCL tensile forces, and patellofemoral (PF) compressive forces were generally greater in the squat than the LPH and LPL, and there were no differences in knee forces between the LPH and LPL. For all exercises, the WS generated greater PCL tensile forces than the NS, the NS produced greater TF and PF compressive forces than the WS during the LPH and LPL, whereas the WS generated greater TF and PF compressive forces than the NS during the squat. For all exercises, muscle activity and knee forces were generally greater in the knee extending phase than the knee flexing phase. The greater muscle activity and knee forces in the squat compared with the LPL and LPH implies the squat may be more effective in muscle development but should be used cautiously in those with PCL and PF disorders, especially at greater knee flexion angles. Because all forces increased with knee flexion, training within the functional 0-50 degrees range may be efficacious for those whose goal is to minimize knee forces. The lack of ACL forces implies that all exercises may be effective during ACL rehabilitation.

  8. Comparison of tibiofemoral joint space width measurements from standing CT and fixed flexion radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Neil A; Frick, Eric; Duryea, Jeffrey; Nevitt, Michael C; Niu, Jingbo; Torner, James C; Felson, David T; Anderson, Donald D

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this project was to determine the relationship between medial tibiofemoral joint space width measured on fixed-flexion radiographs and the three-dimensional joint space width distribution on low-dose, standing CT (SCT) imaging. At the 84-month visit of the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study, 20 participants were recruited. A commercial SCT scanner for the foot and ankle was modified to image knees while standing. Medial tibiofemoral joint space width was assessed on radiographs at fixed locations from 15% to 30% of compartment width using validated software and on SCT by mapping the distances between three-dimensional subchondral bone surfaces. Individual joint space width values from radiographs were compared with three-dimensional joint space width values from corresponding sagittal plane locations using paired t-tests and correlation coefficients. For the four medial-most tibiofemoral locations, radiographic joint space width values exceeded the minimal joint space width on SCT by a mean of 2.0 mm and were approximately equal to the 61st percentile value of the joint space width distribution at each respective sagittal-plane location. Correlation coefficients at these locations were 0.91-0.97 and the offsets between joint space width values from radiographs and SCT measurements were consistent. There were greater offsets and variability in the offsets between modalities closer to the tibial spine. Joint space width measurements on fixed-flexion radiographs are highly correlated with three-dimensional joint space width from SCT. In addition to avoiding bony overlap obscuring the joint, a limitation of radiographs, the current study supports a role for SCT in the evaluation of tibiofemoral OA. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1388-1395, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Henrik M.; Petersen, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a successful treatment of the osteoarthritic knee, which has increased dramatically over the last 30 years. The indication is a painful osteoarthritic knee with relevant radiographic findings and failure of conservative measures like painkillers and exercise...

  10. Knee kinematics and kinetics in former soccer players with a 16-year-old ACL injury – the effects of twelve weeks of knee-specific training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmström Eva

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Training of neuromuscular control has become increasingly important and plays a major role in rehabilitation of subjects with an injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL. Little is known, however, of the influence of this training on knee stiffness during loading. Increased knee stiffness occurs as a loading strategy of ACL-injured subjects and is associated with increased joint contact forces. Increased or altered joint loads contribute to the development of osteoarthritis. The aim of the study was to determine if knee stiffness, defined by changes in knee kinetics and kinematics of gait, step activity and cross-over hop could be reduced through a knee-specific 12-week training programme. Methods A 3-dimensional motion analysis system (VICON and a force plate (AMTI were used to calculate knee kinetics and kinematics before and after 12 weeks of knee-specific training in 12 males recruited from a cohort with ACL injury 16 years earlier. Twelve uninjured males matched for age, sex, BMI and activity level served as a reference group. Self-reported patient-relevant data were obtained by the KOOS questionnaire. Results There were no significant changes in knee stiffness during gait and step activity after training. For the cross-over hop, increased peak knee flexion during landing (from 44 to 48 degrees, p = 0.031 and increased internal knee extensor moment (1.28 to 1.55 Nm/kg, p = 0.017 were seen after training, indicating reduced knee stiffness. The KOOS sport and recreation score improved from 70 to 77 (p = 0.005 and was significantly correlated with the changes in knee flexion during landing for the cross-over hop (r = 0.6, p = 0.039. Conclusion Knee-specific training improved lower extremity kinetics and kinematics, indicating reduced knee stiffness during demanding hop activity. Self-reported sport and recreational function correlated positively with the biomechanical changes supporting a clinical importance of the

  11. Thigh Muscle Activity, Knee Motion, and Impact Force During Side-Step Pivoting in Agility-Trained Female Basketball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilderman, Danielle R; Ross, Scott E; Padua, Darin A

    2009-01-01

    Context: Improving neuromuscular control of hamstrings muscles might have implications for decreasing anterior cruciate ligament injuries in females. Objective: To examine the effects of a 6-week agility training program on quadriceps and hamstrings muscle activation, knee flexion angles, and peak vertical ground reaction force. Design: Prospective, randomized clinical research trial. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty female intramural basketball players with no history of knee injury (age  =  21.07 ± 2.82 years, height  =  171.27 ± 4.66 cm, mass  =  66.36 ± 7.41 kg). Intervention(s): Participants were assigned to an agility training group or a control group that did not participate in agility training. Participants in the agility training group trained 4 times per week for 6 weeks. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used surface electromyography to assess muscle activation for the rectus femoris, vastus medialis oblique, medial hamstrings, and lateral hamstrings for 50 milliseconds before initial ground contact and while the foot was in contact with the ground during a side-step pivot maneuver. Knee flexion angles (at initial ground contact, maximum knee flexion, knee flexion displacement) and peak vertical ground reaction force also were assessed during this maneuver. Results: Participants in the training group increased medial hamstrings activation during ground contact after the 6-week agility training program. Both groups decreased their vastus medialis oblique muscle activation during ground contact. Knee flexion angles and peak vertical ground reaction force did not change for either group. Conclusions: Agility training improved medial hamstrings activity in female intramural basketball players during a side-step pivot maneuver. Agility training that improves hamstrings activity might have implications for reducing anterior cruciate ligament sprain injury associated with side-step pivots. PMID

  12. The Surgeon's Role in Relative Success of PCL-Retaining and PCL-Substituting Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Merrill A; Davis, Kenneth E; Farris, Alex; Keating, E Michael; Faris, Philip M

    2014-07-01

    The orthopedic literature has not shown a universal and replicated difference, outside of flexion, in clinical results between posterior cruciate ligament retention and posterior cruciate ligament substitution in total knee arthroplasty. This study was performed to compare the restoration of flexion and knee function in a large series of cruciate-retaining and cruciate-substituting total knee arthroplasties (TKRs). In addition, we aimed to study how other variables, such as those unique to each surgeon, may have affected the results. The current study evaluated 8,607 total knee arthroplasties in 5,594 patients performed by six surgeons, each using one of four prosthesis designs (two posterior cruciate ligament retaining, two posterior cruciate ligament substituting). Knees were compared at the level of cruciate-retaining and cruciate-substituting knees, at the level of the four prostheses, and at the level of surgeon-implant combinations. Least squared means scores were obtained through multiple linear regression, analysis of variance, and the maximum likelihood method. At the level of posterior cruciate ligament treatment, posterior cruciate ligament substitution as a whole showed 3.2° greater flexion than posterior cruciate ligament retention. At the prosthesis level, cruciate-substituting models provided greater flexion and cruciate-retaining models provided higher function scores. In the surgeon-implant combinations, surgeons provided mixed results that often did not reflect findings from other levels; one surgeon's use of a posterior cruciate ligament retaining prosthesis achieved 14.7° greater flexion than the surgeon's use of a corresponding posterior cruciate ligament substituting design. Posterior cruciate ligament treatment is confounded by other variables, including the operating surgeon. The arthroplasty surgeon should choose a prosthesis based, not only on outside results, but also on personal experience and comfort.

  13. Thigh muscle activity, knee motion, and impact force during side-step pivoting in agility-trained female basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilderman, Danielle R; Ross, Scott E; Padua, Darin A

    2009-01-01

    Improving neuromuscular control of hamstrings muscles might have implications for decreasing anterior cruciate ligament injuries in females. To examine the effects of a 6-week agility training program on quadriceps and hamstrings muscle activation, knee flexion angles, and peak vertical ground reaction force. Prospective, randomized clinical research trial. Sports medicine research laboratory. Thirty female intramural basketball players with no history of knee injury (age = 21.07 +/- 2.82 years, height = 171.27 +/- 4.66 cm, mass = 66.36 +/- 7.41 kg). Participants were assigned to an agility training group or a control group that did not participate in agility training. Participants in the agility training group trained 4 times per week for 6 weeks. We used surface electromyography to assess muscle activation for the rectus femoris, vastus medialis oblique, medial hamstrings, and lateral hamstrings for 50 milliseconds before initial ground contact and while the foot was in contact with the ground during a side-step pivot maneuver. Knee flexion angles (at initial ground contact, maximum knee flexion, knee flexion displacement) and peak vertical ground reaction force also were assessed during this maneuver. Participants in the training group increased medial hamstrings activation during ground contact after the 6-week agility training program. Both groups decreased their vastus medialis oblique muscle activation during ground contact. Knee flexion angles and peak vertical ground reaction force did not change for either group. Agility training improved medial hamstrings activity in female intramural basketball players during a side-step pivot maneuver. Agility training that improves hamstrings activity might have implications for reducing anterior cruciate ligament sprain injury associated with side-step pivots.

  14. Does Residual Varus Alignment Cause Increasing Varus Laxity at a Minimum of Five Years After Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatayama, Kazuhisa; Terauchi, Masanori; Saito, Kenichi; Higuchi, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether varus-valgus laxity of cruciate-retaining (CR) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) changes between 1 year and >5 years after surgery based on postoperative limb alignment. One hundred twenty-one varus osteoarthritic knees that underwent CR TKA were included. The minimum follow-up was 5 years. Weight-bearing full-leg radiographs were obtained postoperatively and the hip-knee-ankle (HKA) angle was measured. Knees were grouped in varus (HKA angle ≤ -3°, 47 knees) and neutral groups (-3° Varus-valgus laxity at 15° of knee flexion was measured with stress radiographs after 1 year and at the last follow-up. No knees required revision surgery. The mean knee flexion angle (121.0° vs 117.1°) and Hospital for Special Surgery score (90.3 vs 90.4) at the last follow-up were not significantly different between the varus and neutral groups. In both groups, there was no significant change in varus or valgus laxity between 1 year and at the last follow-up. Postoperative residual varus limb alignment did not lead to increasing varus laxity after CR TKA in the mid-term. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Posterior cruciate-retaining versus posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis with severe varus deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünkar, Ethem Ayhan; Öztürkmen, Yusuf; Şükür, Erhan; Çarkçı, Engin; Mert, Murat

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the radiological and functional results of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) - retaining and posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasties in patients with severe varus gonarthrosis. Medical records of 112 knees of 96 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty for severe varus (≥15°) were reviewed. PCL-retaining and PCL-stabilizing groups consisted of 58 and 54 knees, respectively. Mean follow-up time was 56.6 months (range: 24-112 months). Knee Society (KS) clinical rating system was used in clinical evaluation. Range of motion, degree of flexion contracture, postoperative alignment, and complication rates were compared between the groups. Mean preoperative mechanical tibiofemoral angle was 20.1° in varus alignment, and was restored to 4.6° in valgus postoperatively. No statistically significant differences were found between PCL-stabilizing and PCL-retaining groups when KS knee scores, function scores, and flexion arc were evaluated. Two patients in PCL-retaining group underwent revision surgery due to aseptic loosening of tibial component. One patient in PCL-stabilizing group needed arthrotomy due to patellar clunk syndrome. There were no notable differences between the 2 groups and PCL-retaining design had outcomes as good as PCL-stabilizing total knee implant in osteoarthritic knees with severe varus deformity. Level III, Therapeutic study. Copyright © 2016 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Knee joint kinematics after dynamic intraligamentary stabilization: cadaveric study on a novel anterior cruciate ligament repair technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliemann, Benedikt; Lenschow, Simon; Domnick, Christoph; Herbort, Mirco; Häberli, Janosch; Schulze, Martin; Wähnert, Dirk; Raschke, Michael J; Kösters, Clemens

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic intraligamentary stabilization (DIS) has been introduced for the repair of acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears as an alternative to delayed reconstruction. The aim of the present study was to compare knee joint kinematics after DIS to those of the ACL-intact and ACL-deficient knee under simulated Lachman/KT-1000 and pivot-shift tests. We hypothesized that DIS provides knee joint kinematics equivalent to an intact ACL. With the use of a robotic knee simulator, knee kinematics were determined in simulated Lachman/KT-1000 and pivot-shift tests at 0°, 15°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion in eight cadaveric knees under the following conditions: (1) intact ACL, (2) ACL deficiency, (3) DIS with a preload of 60 N, and (4) DIS with a preload of 80 N. Statistical analyses were performed using two-factor repeated-measures analysis of variance. The significance level was set at a p value of knee (p knee joint kinematics to that of an intact knee in all degrees of flexion. DIS with a preload of 80 N restores knee joint kinematics comparable to that of an ACL-intact knee and is therefore capable of providing knee joint stability during ACL healing. DIS therefore provides a new technique for primary ACL repair with superior biomechanical properties in comparison with other techniques that have been described previously, although further clinical studies are required to determine its usefulness in clinical settings.

  17. Comparison of hyperpronation and supination‑flexion techniques in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Radial head subluxation, also known as 'pulled elbow', 'dislocated elbow' or 'nursemaid's elbow', is one of the most common upper extremity injuries in young children and a common reason to visit Emergency Department (ED). Aim: To compare supination of the wrist followed by flexion of the elbow (the traditional ...

  18. The effect of religious practice on the prevalence of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokkhanchitchai, Surachai; Tangarunsanti, Tanee; Jaovisidha, Suphaneewan; Nantiruj, Kanokrat; Janwityanujit, Suchela

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of religious practice on the prevalence, severity, and patterns of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a Thai elderly population with the same ethnicity and culture but different religions. A house-to-house survey was conducted in two subdistricts of Phranakhon Sri Ayutthaya province where inhabitants are a mixture of Buddhists and Muslims. One hundred fifty-three Buddhists and 150 Muslims aged >or= 50 years were evaluated demographically, physically, and radiographically. Those suffering knee pains were questioned about severity using the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores and examined for their range of knee motion. Radiographic knee OA (ROA) was defined as Kellgren-Lawrence radiographic grade >or=2 while symptomatic knee OA (SOA) was defined as knee symptoms of at least 1 month in a knee with ROA. Muslims had on average a higher number of daily religious practices than their Buddhist neighbors (p SOA, Buddhists showed a trend towards higher prevalence than Muslims (47.71 vs. 37.32, p = 0.068). No significant difference was found when the range of motion and WOMAC scores were compared between the two groups. Muslims had a lower prevalence of OA than their Buddhists counterparts with the same ethnicity but different religious practice. The Muslim way of praying since childhood, forcing the knees into deep flexion, may stretch the soft tissue surrounding the knee and decrease stiffness and contact pressure of the articular cartilage.

  19. Mobility function of a prosthetic knee joint with an automatic stance phase lock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrysek, Jan; Klejman, Susan; Torres-Moreno, Ricardo; Heim, Winfried; Steinnagel, Bryan; Glasford, Shane

    2011-06-01

    There is a need for a prosthetic knee joint design that is technologically and functionally appropriate for use in developing countries. To develop and clinically evaluate a new type of stance phase controlled prosthetic knee joint that provides stance phase stability without inhibiting swing phase flexion. A crossover repeated measures study design comparing the new knee joint to the participant's conventional low- or high-end prosthetic knee joint. The new knee joint was fitted to fourteen individuals aged 15 to 67 years with unilateral lower limb amputations. Walk tests were performed to measure walking speed. Energy expenditure was estimated using the physiological cost index (PCI). Walking speeds with the new knee joint were on average 0.14 m/s faster than conventional low-end knees (p < 0.0001), but 0.07 m/s slower than conventional high-end prosthetic knees (p = 0.008). The PCI was similar across all three knee joint technologies (p = 0.276). Mobility function with the new knee joint, in terms of walking speed, was more closely matched to high-end than low-end prosthetic knee joints. Therefore, given its relatively simple design, the new stance phase control mechanism may offer a functional and cost effective solution for active transfemoral amputees. This paper describes a new type of prosthetic knee joint mechanism that is intended to be cost-effective while providing high-level stance phase function to active individuals with a transfemoral amputation. Initial clinical testing suggests that the new knee joint may have some functional advantages over existing technologies in this category.

  20. Soreness-related changes in three-dimensional running biomechanics following eccentric knee extensor exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Max R; Peel, Shelby A; Schilling, Brian K; Melcher, Dan A; Bloomer, Richard J

    2017-06-01

    Runners often experience delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), especially of the knee extensors, following prolonged running. Sagittal knee joint biomechanics are altered in the presence of knee extensor DOMS but it is unclear how muscle soreness affects lower limb biomechanics in other planes of motion. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of knee extensor DOMS on three-dimensional (3D) lower limb biomechanics during running. Thirty-three healthy men (25.8 ± 6.8 years; 84.1 ± 9.2 kg; 1.77 ± 0.07 m) completed an isolated eccentric knee extensor damaging protocol to elicit DOMS. Biomechanics of over-ground running at a set speed of 3.35 m s -1 ±5% were measured before eccentric exercise (baseline) and, 24 h and 48 h following exercise in the presence of knee extensor DOMS. Knee flexion ROM was reduced at 48 h (P = 0.01; d = 0.26), and peak knee extensor moment was reduced at 24 h (P = 0.001; d = 0.49) and 48 h (P  0.05). Peak positive ankle and knee joint powers and, peak negative knee joint power were all reduced from baseline to 24 h and 48 h (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that knee extensor DOMS greatly influences sagittal knee joint angular kinetics and, reduces sagittal power production at the ankle joint. However, knee extensor DOMS does not affect frontal and transverse plane lower limb joint biomechanics during running.

  1. Estimation of quasi-stiffness of the human knee in the stance phase of walking.

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    Kamran Shamaei

    Full Text Available Biomechanical data characterizing the quasi-stiffness of lower-limb joints during human locomotion is limited. Understanding joint stiffness is critical for evaluating gait function and designing devices such as prostheses and orthoses intended to emulate biological properties of human legs. The knee joint moment-angle relationship is approximately linear in the flexion and extension stages of stance, exhibiting nearly constant stiffnesses, known as the quasi-stiffnesses of each stage. Using a generalized inverse dynamics analysis approach, we identify the key independent variables needed to predict knee quasi-stiffness during walking, including gait speed, knee excursion, and subject height and weight. Then, based on the identified key variables, we used experimental walking data for 136 conditions (speeds of 0.75-2.63 m/s across 14 subjects to obtain best fit linear regressions for a set of general models, which were further simplified for the optimal gait speed. We found R(2 > 86% for the most general models of knee quasi-stiffnesses for the flexion and extension stages of stance. With only subject height and weight, we could predict knee quasi-stiffness for preferred walking speed with average error of 9% with only one outlier. These results provide a useful framework and foundation for selecting subject-specific stiffness for prosthetic and exoskeletal devices designed to emulate biological knee function during walking.

  2. Ambulatory measurement of knee motion and physical activity: preliminary evaluation of a smart activity monitor

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    Malchau Henrik

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a paucity of devices available for continuous, long-term monitoring of human joint motion. Non-invasive, inexpensive devices capable of recording human activity and joint motion have many applications for medical research. Such a device could be used to quantify range of motion outside the gait laboratory. The purpose of this study was to test the accuracy of the modified Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA in measuring knee flexion angles, to detect different physical activities, and to quantify how often healthy subjects use deep knee flexion in the ambulatory setting. Methods We compared Biomotion Laboratory (BML "gold standard" data to simultaneous IDEEA measures of knee motion and gait, step up/down, and stair descent in 5 healthy subjects. In addition, we used a series of choreographed physical activities outside the BML to confirm the IDEEA's ability to accurately measure 7 commonly-performed physical activities. Subjects then continued data collection during ordinary activities outside the gait laboratory. Results Pooled correlations between the BML and IDEEA knee flexion angles were .97 +/- .03 for step up/down, .98 +/- .02 for stair descent, and .98 +/- .01 for gait. In the BML protocol, the IDEEA accurately identified gait, but was less accurate in identifying step up/down and stair descent. During sampling outside the BML, the IDEEA accurately detected walking, running, stair ascent, stair descent, standing, lying, and sitting. On average, subjects flexed their knees >120° for 0.17% of their data collection periods outside the BML. Conclusion The modified IDEEA system is a useful clinical tool for evaluating knee motion and multiple physical activities in the ambulatory setting. These five healthy subjects rarely flexed their knees >120°.

  3. Effects of changes in skiing posture on the kinetics of the knee joint.

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    Koyanagi, Maki; Shino, Konsei; Yoshimoto, Yoji; Inoue, Satoru; Sato, Mutsumi; Nakata, Ken

    2006-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of changes in the skiing posture on mechanical stress across the knee joint. The aim of the present study was to establish a safer form of skiing for the prevention of injury to the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee (ACL). Ten healthy volunteers were placed on a force plate on an artificial slope, and assumed forward and backward bending postures with a single leg by changing their centre of gravity. The knee flexion angles were limited to approximately 30 degrees by orthotics in each posture. Joint moments of the lower extremity were analyzed using a motion analysis system, and the muscle activities of the lower extremity were recorded by EMG and digitised to integrated EMG in each posture. In addition, extrusion of the lower leg by the boot was measured using a force sensor sheet inserted behind the calf. We found that the extension moment of the hip and ankle joints, and muscular activity of the hamstrings were increased in forward bending, whereas the extension moment of the knee and muscular activity of the quadriceps were decreased. Conversely, the muscular activity of the quadriceps, the flexion moment of the hip, extension moment of the knee joint, and pressure of the boot were increased in backward bending, whereas muscular activity of the hamstrings was decreased. The dependency on the hamstrings increased in forward bending in a skiing posture on a slope with slight knee flexion. Therefore, forward bending seemed to be an advantageous posture for the prevention of ACL injury. Conversely, in a backward bending skiing posture, the extension moment of the knee joint produced by muscle contraction of the quadriceps also increased imbalance in the hamstrings. The results of this study suggest that the internal force exerted by the quadriceps, in addition to the passive factor of extrusion of the lower leg by the boot, may contribute to non-contact ACL injury in a backward bending posture while skiing.

  4. Reliability, Concurrent Validity, and Minimal Detectable Change for iPhone Goniometer App in Assessing Knee Range of Motion.

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    Mehta, Saurabh P; Barker, Katherine; Bowman, Brett; Galloway, Heather; Oliashirazi, Nicole; Oliashirazi, Ali

    2017-07-01

    Much of the published works assessing the reliability of smartphone goniometer apps (SG) have poor generalizability since the reliability was assessed in healthy subjects. No research has established the values for standard error of measurement (SEM) or minimal detectable change (MDC) which have greater clinical utility to contextualize the range of motion (ROM) assessed using the SG. This research examined the test-retest reproducibility, concurrent validity, SEM, and MDC values for the iPhone goniometer app (i-Goni; June Software Inc., v.1.1, San Francisco, CA) in assessing knee ROM in patients with knee osteoarthritis or those after total knee replacement. A total of 60 participants underwent data collection which included the assessment of active knee ROM using the i-Goni and the universal goniometer (UG; EZ Read Jamar Goniometer, Patterson Medical, Warrenville, IL), knee muscle strength, and assessment of pain and lower extremity disability using quadruple numeric pain rating scale (Q-NPRS) and lower extremity functional scale (LEFS), respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to assess the reproducibility of the knee ROM assessed using the i-Goni and UG. Bland and Altman technique examined the agreement between these knee ROM. The SEM and MDC values were calculated for i-Goni assessed knee ROM to characterize the error in a single score and the index of true change, respectively. Pearson correlation coefficient examined concurrent relationships between the i-Goni and other measures. The ICC values for the knee flexion/extension ROM were superior for i-Goni (0.97/0.94) compared with the UG (0.95/0.87). The SEM values were smaller for i-Goni assessed knee flexion/extension (2.72/1.18 degrees) compared with UG assessed knee flexion/extension (3.41/1.62 degrees). Similarly, the MDC values were smaller for both these ROM for the i-Goni (6.3 and 2.72 degrees) suggesting smaller change required to infer true change in knee ROM. The i

  5. Adult Hip Flexion Contracture due to Neurological Disease: A New Treatment Protocol—Surgical Treatment of Neurological Hip Flexion Contracture

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    Alberto Nicodemo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital, traumatic, or extrinsic causes can lead people to paraplegia; some of these are potentially; reversible and others are not. Paraplegia can couse hip flexion contracture and, consequently, pressure sores, scoliosis, and hyperlordosis; lumbar and groin pain are strictly correlated. Scientific literature contains many studies about children hip flexion related to neurological diseases, mainly caused by cerebral palsy; only few papers focus on this complication in adults. In this study we report our experience on surgical treatment of adult hip flexion contracture due to neurological diseases; we have tried to outline an algorithm to choose the best treatment avoiding useless or too aggressive therapies. We present 5 cases of adult hips flexion due to neurological conditions treated following our algorithm. At 1-year-follow-up all patients had a good clinical outcome in terms of hip range of motion, pain and recovery of walking if possible. In conclusion we think that this algorithm could be a good guideline to treat these complex cases even if we need to treat more patients to confirm this theory. We believe also that postoperation physiotherapy it is useful in hip motility preservation, improvement of muscular function, and walking ability recovery when possible.

  6. Congenital fibrous hamartoma of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arioni, Cesare; Bellini, Carlo; Risso, Francesco Maria; Scopesi, Fabio; Serra, Giovanni; Oddone, Mauro; Toma, Paolo; Nozza, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    A full-term male infant presented at birth with a hard swelling of the left knee. The lemon-sized lesion was fixed to the underlying knee muscles, while the overlying skin was stretched and shiny; there was no bruit. Radiography, sonography and MRI suggested a soft-tissue tumour. After surgical excision, histology showed the presence of fibrous and mesenchymal tissue, with mature adipose tissue. Fibrous hamartoma of infancy was diagnosed. Among soft-tissue tumours, fibrous hamartoma of infancy is a rare and benign lesion, occurring in the first 2 years of life. The tumour mainly affects the trunk, axilla, and upper extremities. This infant had unique involvement of the knee. The treatment of choice is local excision. (orig.)

  7. Rotational profile alterations after anatomic posterolateral corner reconstructions in multiligament injured knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, Nicolas; Mouton, Caroline; Boisrenoult, Philippe; Theisen, Daniel; Beaufils, Philippe; Seil, Romain

    2014-09-01

    Injuries of the posterolateral corner (PLC) are rare and severe knee injuries, resulting in posterolateral rotatory instability and an increase in external rotation. Surgical reconstruction techniques reproducing the normal anatomy showed promising results. In vivo evaluations of static rotational knee laxity at 30° of knee flexion have not been reported so far. The purpose of this study was to evaluate static rotational knee laxity after anatomic PLC reconstructions. This is a retrospective clinical cohort study. Twenty patients with PLC reconstructions with an average follow-up time of 39 ± 22 months and no history of knee trauma or surgery of the contralateral knee were included in the study. They underwent a routine clinical examination and static rotational laxity measurements at 30° of knee flexion in the prone position. Side-to-side differences were recorded and compared to a group of matched controls. The postoperative IKDC score was graded A for 8 patients, B for 16, C for 6 and D for one patient. The primary goal of the surgical procedure which consists in reducing excessive external tibiofemoral rotation could be reached in 18 of the 20 patients (90%). Anatomic PLC reconstructions yielded a comparable rotational profile in operated and healthy knees in 7 patients (35%). Thirteen patients (65%) presented a significantly altered rotational profile in comparison with a healthy control group. Unexpected increases in internal rotation were found in 8 patients (40%). Anatomic PLC reconstructions reduced excessive external tibiofemoral rotation in a vast majority of patients. Static rotational laxity measurements allowed for a determination of the patients' individual rotational profile after PLC reconstructions. This profile was normalised in only one-third of the patients. The understanding of this finding needs further investigation as well as the clinical impact of rotational profile alterations on knee function. Diagnostic studies, Level III.

  8. Knee joint laxity in a native Canadian Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinitz, Daniel K; Harvey, Edward J; Berry, Gregory K; Reindl, Rudolf; Correa, José A

    2005-01-01

    Clinical observation of increased laxity has been noted in native Canadians. Comparative studies support the possible relationship between joint hypermobility and the development of osteoarthritis or other joint ailments. If joint laxity predisposes to osteoarthritis, there may be far-reaching consequences to the general Native population. A cohort of 52 Native Canadians (NC) and 52 non-Native Canadians (NNC) were evaluated for knee laxity. All patients had no prior history of knee injury or complaints of symptoms related to knee pathology at the time of the examination. Bilateral knee examination was performed. Objective laxity was measured using the KT-1000 tensiometer. Subjective findings were also recorded. Comparison for instability between the groups (NC and NNC) revealed that the NC group had significantly greater laxity on both right and left sides for all knee ligament grading (p Native Canadian population.

  9. Altered Knee and Ankle Kinematics During Squatting in Those With Limited Weight-Bearing–Lunge Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion

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    Dill, Karli E.; Begalle, Rebecca L.; Frank, Barnett S.; Zinder, Steven M.; Padua, Darin A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ankle-dorsiflexion (DF) range of motion (ROM) may influence movement variables that are known to affect anterior cruciate ligament loading, such as knee valgus and knee flexion. To our knowledge, researchers have not studied individuals with limited or normal ankle DF-ROM to investigate the relationship between those factors and the lower extremity movement patterns associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Objective: To determine, using 2 different measurement techniques, whether knee- and ankle-joint kinematics differ between participants with limited and normal ankle DF-ROM. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Forty physically active adults (20 with limited ankle DF-ROM, 20 with normal ankle DF-ROM). Main Outcome Measure(s): Ankle DF-ROM was assessed using 2 techniques: (1) nonweight-bearing ankle DF-ROM with the knee straight, and (2) weight-bearing lunge (WBL). Knee flexion, knee valgus-varus, knee internal-external rotation, and ankle DF displacements were assessed during the overhead-squat, single-legged squat, and jump-landing tasks. Separate 1-way analyses of variance were performed to determine whether differences in knee- and ankle-joint kinematics existed between the normal and limited groups for each assessment. Results: We observed no differences between the normal and limited groups when classifying groups based on nonweight-bearing passive-ankle DF-ROM. However, individuals with greater ankle DF-ROM during the WBL displayed greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement and peak knee flexion during the overhead-squat and single-legged squat tasks. In addition, those individuals also demonstrated greater knee-varus displacement during the single-legged squat. Conclusions: Greater ankle DF-ROM assessed during the WBL was associated with greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement during both squatting tasks as well as greater knee-varus displacement during

  10. Distal femoral flexion deformity from growth disturbance treated with a two-level osteotomy and internal lengthening nail

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    Austin T. Fragomen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salter Harris fractures of the distal femur can lead to growth disturbance with resulting leg length inequality and knee deformity. We have looked at a case series (3 of patients who presented with a distal femur flexion malunion and shortening treated with a distal femoral osteotomy and plating and a proximal femoral osteotomy with a magnetic internal lengthening nail. Does a two-level osteotomy and internal fixation approach provide a reliable result both radiographically and functionally? The average knee extension loss was 12°, LLD 47 mm, PDFA 65°, MAD 2 mm. The patients were treated with an acute, posterior, opening wedge osteotomy of the distal femur stabilized with a lateral plate and screws and grafted with cancellous chips and putty. A second osteotomy was made proximally in the femur percutaneously, and the internal lengthening nail was inserted. Lengthening was done at approximately 1 mm/day. The average extension gain was 12°; amount of lengthening at the proximal site was 40 mm, LLD was 3 mm. The average PDFA was 81°, and MAD 3 mm. There were no complications. Functional results were excellent. Bone healing index was 24 days/cm. The average distance from the distal osteotomy to the joint line was 57 mm. The technique of two-level femur osteotomy stabilized with a plate and lengthening nail yielded excellent results with acceptable correction of deformity, full knee extension, and improved function. There were no complications including implant failure, infection, need for blood transfusion, knee stiffness, nonunion, compartment syndrome, or malunion.

  11. Knee flexor strength recovery following hamstring tendon harvest for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review

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    Clare Ardern

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The hamstring tendons are an increasingly popular graft choice for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction due to preservation of quadriceps function and the absence of anterior knee pain post-operatively. Two commonly used hamstring grafts are a quadruple strand semitendinosus graft (4ST and a double strand semitendinosus-double strand gracilis graft (2ST-2G. It has been suggested that concurrent harvest of the semitendinsous and gracilis tendons may result in sub-optimal hamstring strength recovery as the gracilis may play a role in reinforcing the semitendinosus particularly in deep knee flexion angles. The objective of this systematic review was to synthesize the findings of available literature and determine whether semitendinosus and gracilis harvest lead to post-operative hamstring strength deficits when compared to semitendinosus harvest alone. Seven studies were identified which compared hamstring strength outcomes between the common hamstring graft types. The methodological quality of each paper was assessed, and where possible effect sizes were calculated to allow comparison of results across studies. No differences were reported between the groups in isokinetic hamstring strength. Deficits in hamstring strength were reported in the 2ST-2G groups when compared to the 4ST groups in isometric strength testing at knee flexion angles ≥70°, and in the standing knee flexion angle. Preliminary evidence exists to support the hypothesis that harvesting the semitendinosus tendon alone is preferable to harvesting in combination with the gracilis tendon for minimizing post-operative hamstring strength deficits at knee flexion angles greater than 70°. However, due to the paucity of research comparing strength outcomes between the common hamstring graft types, further investigation is warranted to fully elucidate the implications for graft harvest.

  12. UCI knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanski, P M; Waugh, T R; Orofino, C F; Anzel, S H

    1976-10-01

    Between March 9, 1972 and December 31, 1973, a total of 103 UCI knee replacements were performed. Follow-up data are available on 83 knees with an average follow-up of 33 months. Patient evaluation of the end results indicates that 78.3 per cent were better, 9.6 per cent unchanged, and 12.1 per cent worse. Patient evaluation of their own knee function averaged 55 per cent preoperatively and 79 per cent postoperatively. Patients were also evaluated on a 100 point Modified Larson Analysis Form. The average preoperative score was 46, and the average postoperative score was 70. There were six (5.8%) biological complications in the 103 knee replacement. Biological complications included infections, wound healing problems and unexplained pain. Mechanical complications were seen in 18 (17.4%) knees, and included knee instability, tibial component loosening or deformation, and patellar problems. Additional surgery was required in 18 (17.4%) knees. Failure of the procedure eventually requiring removal of the prosthesis and fusion or amputation occurred in 4 (3.9%) knees. The intermediate-term results of UCI knee replacement have been clinically satisfactory. We currently recommend consideration of this procedure for patients with disabling arthritis of the knee.

  13. Prosthesis alignment affects axial rotation motion after total knee replacement: a prospective in vivo study combining computed tomography and fluoroscopic evaluations

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    Harman Melinda K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical consequences of alignment errors in total knee replacement (TKR have led to the rigorous evaluation of surgical alignment techniques. Rotational alignment in the transverse plane has proven particularly problematic, with errors due to component malalignment relative to bone anatomic landmarks and an overall mismatch between the femoral and tibial components’ relative positions. Ranges of nominal rotational alignment are not well defined, especially for the tibial component and for relative rotational mismatch, and some studies advocate the use of mobile-bearing TKR to accommodate the resulting small rotation errors. However, the relationships between prosthesis rotational alignment and mobile-bearing polyethylene insert motion are poorly understood. This prospective, in vivo study evaluates whether component malalignment and mismatch affect axial rotation motions during passive knee flexion after TKR. Methods Eighty patients were implanted with mobile-bearing TKR. Rotational alignment of the femoral and tibial components was measured from postoperative CT scans. All TKR were categorized into nominal or outlier groups based on defined norms for surgical rotational alignment relative to bone anatomic landmarks and relative rotational mismatch between the femoral and tibial components. Axial rotation motion of the femoral, tibial and polyethylene bearing components was measured from fluoroscopic images acquired during passive knee flexion. Results Axial rotation motion was generally accomplished in two phases, dominated by polyethylene bearing rotation on the tibial component in early to mid-flexion and then femoral component rotation on the polyethylene articular surface in later flexion. Opposite rotations of the femur-bearing and bearing-baseplate articulations were evident at flexion greater than 80°. Knees with outlier alignment had lower magnitudes of axial rotation and distinct transitions from external to

  14. Bilateral assessment of knee muscle relationships in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislaine Regina Santos dos Santos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric performance of flexor and extensor muscles of the knee may be a risk factor for knee injuries, especially the anterior cruciate ligament. Additionally, asymmetries in power and work may have correlations with fatigue and performance during functional tasks. Among untrained individuals, such asymmetries may be of potential interest for training prescription. Here, we investigated the bilateral performance of knee flexors and extensors muscle groups of untrained individuals. We quantified the torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships, as well as work, power and asymmetry indexes in 20 untrained male (25 ± 4 years old; height 1.74 ± 0.05 m; body mass 76 ± 9 kg. No significant asymmetry was observed for torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships, work and power output for knee flexor and extensor muscle groups (p < .05. Our results suggest that untrained male present symmetry in the knee flexion and extension bilateral performance. Changes in this behavior due to physical training must be monitored.

  15. Shape-memory-alloy-based smart knee spacer for total knee arthroplasty: 3D CAD modelling and a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Arvind; Callejas, Miguel A; Acharyya, Amit; Acharyya, Swati Ghosh

    2018-03-22

    This study introduced a shape memory alloy (SMA)-based smart knee spacer for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Subsequently, a 3D CAD model of a smart tibial component of TKA was designed in Solidworks software, and verified using a finite element analysis in ANSYS Workbench. The two major properties of the SMA (NiTi), the pseudoelasticity (PE) and shape memory effect (SME), were exploited, modelled, and analysed for a TKA application. The effectiveness of the proposed model was verified in ANSYS Workbench through the finite element analysis (FEA) of the maximum deformation and equivalent (von Mises) stress distribution. The proposed model was also compared with a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based spacer for the upper portion of the tibial component for three subjects with body mass index (BMI) of 23.88, 31.09, and 38.39. The proposed SMA -based smart knee spacer contained 96.66978% less deformation with a standard deviation of 0.01738 than that of the corresponding PMMA based counterpart for the same load and flexion angle. Based on the maximum deformation analysis, the PMMA-based spacer had 30 times more permanent deformation than that of the proposed SMA-based spacer for the same load and flexion angle. The SME property of the lower portion of the tibial component for fixation of the spacer at its position was verified by an FEA in ANSYS. Wherein, a strain life-based fatigue analysis was performed and tested for the PE and SME built spacers through the FEA. Therefore, the SMA-based smart knee spacer eliminated the drawbacks of the PMMA-based spacer, including spacer fracture, loosening, dislocation, tilting or translation, and knee subluxation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. [Case-control study on the effect of meniscus shaping on knee function after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Li-Feng; Hu, Jin-Tao; Wang, Zheng; Chen, Xin

    2017-08-25

    To observe the effect of the meniscus shaping on the knee function and stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction(ACLR). A total of 64 ACLR patients were included from January 2013 to January 2015. The control group was the ACLR patients with intact meniscus, in which 24 males and 6 females. The mean age was(32.8±5.5) years old(ranged, 22 to 43 years old). The injury side was left on 17 cases and right on 13 cases. The mean follow-up time was(15.2±2.8) months(ranged, 12 to 19 months). The shaping group was the ACLR patients with meniscus shaping, in which 27 males and 7 females. The mean age was (33.1±4.2) years old (ranged, 23 to 42 years old). The injury side was on the left in 22 case and right in 12 cases. The mean follow-up time was (16.0±3.1) months (ranged, 12 to 20 months). The preoperative anterior tibia shift and knee joint function, as well as anterior tibia shift, knee joint function and active proprioception at last follow-up time were observed. The anterior tibia shift was measured by KT-1000. The knee joint function was assessed by Lysholm score and KOOS score. The errors of active proprioception were measured at 30°, 45° and 60° knee flexion. Postoperative anterior tibia shift of the affected side was (1.4±0.2) mm, which was lower than (2.2±0.4) mm in shaping group( P 0.05). In the KOOS score, the postoperative symptoms, pain, daily life, exercise capacity and life quality in control group were 90.7±5.5, 93.2±4.3, 96.8±2.2, 90.9±5.3, 91.8±4.5 respectively, which were higher than 72.7±6.0, 70.6±7.3, 72.5±7.4, 52.8±5.4, 36.2±6.5 preoperatively( P pain, daily life, exercise capacity and life quality in the shaping group were 88.9±5.8, 92.6±3.5, 96.5±2.1, 89.3±7.2, 90.6±4.1 respectively, which were higher than 71.9±5.1, 71.2±7.1, 71.3±6.2, 53.1±6.1, 35.6±4.7 preoperatively( P 0.05). No significant differences were observed in the postoperative active proprioception error of contralateral side between the

  17. Open Knee: Open Source Modeling & Simulation to Enable Scientific Discovery and Clinical Care in Knee Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Virtual representations of the knee joint can provide clinicians, scientists, and engineers the tools to explore mechanical function of the knee and its tissue structures in health and disease. Modeling and simulation approaches such as finite element analysis also provide the possibility to understand the influence of surgical procedures and implants on joint stresses and tissue deformations. A large number of knee joint models are described in the biomechanics literature. However, freely accessible, customizable, and easy-to-use models are scarce. Availability of such models can accelerate clinical translation of simulations, where labor intensive reproduction of model development steps can be avoided. The interested parties can immediately utilize readily available models for scientific discovery and for clinical care. Motivated by this gap, this study aims to describe an open source and freely available finite element representation of the tibiofemoral joint, namely Open Knee, which includes detailed anatomical representation of the joint's major tissue structures, their nonlinear mechanical properties and interactions. Three use cases illustrate customization potential of the model, its predictive capacity, and its scientific and clinical utility: prediction of joint movements during passive flexion, examining the role of meniscectomy on contact mechanics and joint movements, and understanding anterior cruciate ligament mechanics. A summary of scientific and clinically directed studies conducted by other investigators are also provided. The utilization of this open source model by groups other than its developers emphasizes the premise of model sharing as an accelerator of simulation-based medicine. Finally, the imminent need to develop next generation knee models are noted. These are anticipated to incorporate individualized anatomy and tissue properties supported by specimen-specific joint mechanics data for evaluation, all acquired in vitro from varying age

  18. Temporal gene expression profiling of the rat knee joint capsule during immobilization-induced joint contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kayleigh; Sun, Fangui; Trudel, Guy; Sebastiani, Paola; Laneuville, Odette

    2015-05-26

    Contractures of the knee joint cause disability and handicap. Recovering range of motion is recognized by arthritic patients as their preference for improved health outcome secondary only to pain management. Clinical and experimental studies provide evidence that the posterior knee capsule prevents the knee from achieving full extension. This study was undertaken to investigate the dynamic changes of the joint capsule transcriptome during the progression of knee joint contractures induced by immobilization. We performed a microarray analysis of genes expressed in the posterior knee joint capsule following induction of a flexion contracture by rigidly immobilizing the rat knee joint over a time-course of 16 weeks. Fold changes of expression values were measured and co-expressed genes were identified by clustering based on time-series analysis. Genes associated with immobilization were further analyzed to reveal pathways and biological significance and validated by immunohistochemistry on sagittal sections of knee joints. Changes in expression with a minimum of 1.5 fold changes were dominated by a decrease in expression for 7732 probe sets occurring at week 8 while the expression of 2251 probe sets increased. Clusters of genes with similar profiles of expression included a total of 162 genes displaying at least a 2 fold change compared to week 1. Functional analysis revealed ontology categories corresponding to triglyceride metabolism, extracellular matrix and muscle contraction. The altered expression of selected genes involved in the triglyceride biosynthesis pathway; AGPAT-9, and of the genes P4HB and HSP47, both involved in collagen synthesis, was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Gene expression in the knee joint capsule was sensitive to joint immobility and provided insights into molecular mechanisms relevant to the pathophysiology of knee flexion contractures. Capsule responses to immobilization was dynamic and characterized by modulation of at least three

  19. Radiologic findings of double contrast knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hye Ran; Ahn, Byeong Yeob; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, So Hyun; Suh, Chang Hae; Chung, Won Kyun

    1990-01-01

    The double contrast arthrography of the knee is a highly accurate diagnostic modality in wide rage of the clinical disorders of the knee. It allows radiological assessment of the menisci, the articular cartilages, the synovium and the ligaments. The double contrast knee arthrography was performed in 356 cases at Inha hospital for about 3 years from June 1986 to June 1989. Among them, 115 cases were abnormal, and were analyzed clinically and radiologically with the back ground of the operative finding. The results were as follows ; 1. Of the 115 cases, male were 77 and female 38. Male exceeds female in the ratio of 2 : 1. 2. The age group of 20 - 39 years was commonly involved (60%). 3. The right knee was more commonly involved than the left and the medial meniscus tear was more common (61%). The posterior horn of the meniscus was more frequently torn than the other parts of the meniscus (42%). 4. The incidence of the bucket-handle tear was the most frequent (33%). 5. The cases of the popliteal cyst were 16 (13.9%), and the combined meniscus tears were in 4 cases (25%). 6. The numbers of the discoid meniscus were 9 (7.8%), and all were present in the lateral meniscus, and combined tears were in 4 cases (44.4%). 7. The diagnostic accuracy of the double contrast knee arthrogram was 82.7% compared with operative finding. The false positive examination were 17.3%

  20. THE BIOMECHANICAL RESPONSE OF PERSONS WITH TRANSFEMORAL AMPUTATION TO VARIATIONS IN PROSTHETIC KNEE ALIGNMENT DURING LEVEL WALKING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler-McNicholas, Sara R.; Lipschutz, Robert D.; Gard, Steven A.

    2017-01-01

    Prosthetic alignment is an important factor in the overall fit and performance of a lower-limb prosthesis. However, the association between prosthetic alignment and control strategies used by persons with transfemoral amputation to coordinate the movement of a passive prosthetic knee is poorly understood. This study investigated the biomechanical response of persons with transfemoral amputation to systematic perturbations in knee joint alignment during a level walking task. Quantitative gait data were collected for three alignment conditions: bench alignment, 2 cm anterior knee translation (ANT), and 2 cm posterior knee translation (POST). In response to a destabilizing alignment perturbation (ANT), subjects significantly increased their early-stance hip extension moment, confirming that persons with transfemoral amputation rely on a hip extensor strategy to maintain knee joint stability. However, subjects also decreased the rate at which they loaded their prosthesis, decreased their step length, increased their trunk flexion, and maintained their limb in a more vertical posture at the time of opposite toe off. Collectively, these results suggest that persons with transfemoral amputation rely on a combination of strategies to coordinate stance-phase knee flexion. Further, no significant changes were observed in response to the POST condition, suggesting that a bias toward posterior alignment may have fewer implications in terms of stance-phase, knee-joint control. PMID:28355034

  1. Analytical shear and flexion of Einasto dark matter haloes

    OpenAIRE

    Retana-Montenegro, E.; Frutos-Alfaro, F.; Baes, M.

    2012-01-01

    N-body simulations predict that dark matter haloes are described by specific density profiles on both galactic- and cluster-sized scales. Weak gravitational lensing through the measurements of their first and second order properties, shear and flexion, is a powerful observational tool for investigating the true shape of these profiles. One of the three-parameter density profiles recently favoured in the description of dark matter haloes is the Einasto profile. We present exact expressions for...

  2. Load and speed effects on the cervical flexion relaxation phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Descarreaux Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP represents a well-studied neuromuscular response that occurs in the lumbar and cervical spine. However, the cervical spine FRP has not been investigated extensively, and the speed of movement and loading effects remains to be characterized. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the influence of load and speed on cervical FRP electromyographic (EMG and kinematic parameters and to assess the measurement of cervical FRP kinematic and EMG parameter repeatability. Methods Eighteen healthy adults (6 women and 12 men, aged 20 to 39 years, participated in this study. They undertook 2 sessions in which they had to perform a standardized cervical flexion/extension movement in 3 phases: complete cervical flexion; the static period in complete cervical flexion; and extension with return to the initial position. Two different rhythm conditions and 3 different loading conditions were applied to assess load and speed effects. Kinematic and EMG data were collected, and dependent variables included angles corresponding to the onset and cessation of myoelectric silence as well as the root mean square (RMS values of EMG signals. Repeatability was examined in the first session and between the 2 sessions. Results Statistical analyses revealed a significant load effect (P Conclusions The load increase evoked augmented FRP onset and cessation angles as well as heightened muscle activation. Such increments may reflect the need to enhance spinal stability under loading conditions. The kinematic and EMG parameters showed promising repeatability. Further studies are needed to assess kinematic and EMG differences between healthy subjects and patients with neck pain.

  3. Evaluation of hip flexion strength following lateral lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Po; Regev, Gilad J; Chan, Justin; Zhang, Bing; Taylor, William; Kim, Choll W; Garfin, Steven R

    2013-10-01

    Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is a minimally invasive procedure that is designed to achieve a solid interbody fusion while minimizing the damage to the surrounding soft tissue. Although short-term results have been promising, few data have been published to date regarding its risks and complication rate. The aim was to evaluate the extent of injury to the psoas muscle after the LIF procedure by measuring hip flexion strength. A prospective case series was used in the study. Hip flexion strength was measured using a handheld digital dynamometer while the patient was seated on a chair; the examiner held the device against the patient's attempt to flex the hip. Both sides were measured to compare the operated and nonoperated psoas muscles. Each side was measured three times and the average amount (in pounds) was recorded. Measurements were done before and after surgery on Day 2-3, at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and at 3 and 6 months. Thirty-three patients were recruited for this study. Mean preoperative hip flexion strength values were 20.7±3.47 lb and 21.3±4.31 lb for operated and nonoperated legs, respectively, with no significant difference (p=.85). With a mean of 11.2±2.24 lb postoperative measurements on Day 2, the operated side showed statistically significant reduction of strength (p=.0001). The nonoperated side was also weaker postoperatively, but not significantly (mean=19.12±1.74 lb; p=.097). From the first follow-up visit at 2 weeks, the values on the operated leg had returned to baseline values (20.6, p=.97) and were not significantly different from preoperative values on either side. Hip flexion was weakened immediately after the LIF procedure, which may be attributed to psoas muscle injury during the procedure. However, this damage was temporary, with almost complete return to baseline values by 2 weeks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The pediatric knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Robert C

    2013-03-01

    Knee pain is a common problem in children and adolescents, and MRI of the knee is the most commonly performed pediatric cross-sectional musculoskeletal imaging exam. The purpose of this pictorial review is to highlight differences between adult and pediatric knee imaging with an emphasis on normal developmental variants, injury and disease patterns unique to children and adolescents, and differences in response and presentation to conditions affecting both adults and children.

  5. Lumbopelvic flexibility modulates neuromuscular responses during trunk flexion-extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel; Artacho-Pérez, Carla; Biviá-Roig, Gemma

    2016-06-01

    Various stimuli such as the flexibility of lumbopelvic structures influence the neuromuscular responses of the trunk musculature, leading to different load sharing strategies and reflex muscle responses from the afferents of lumbopelvic mechanoreceptors. This link between flexibility and neuromuscular response has been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between lumbopelvic flexibility and neuromuscular responses of the erector spinae, hamstring and abdominal muscles during trunk flexion-extension. Lumbopelvic movement patterns were measured in 29 healthy women, who were separated into two groups according to their flexibility during trunk flexion-extension. The electromyographic responses of erector spinae, rectus abdominis and biceps femoris were also recorded. Subjects with greater lumbar flexibility had significantly less pelvic flexibility and vice versa. Subjects with greater pelvic flexibility had a higher rate of relaxation and lower levels of hamstring activation during maximal trunk flexion. The neuromuscular response patterns of the hamstrings seem partially modulated by pelvic flexibility. Not so with the lumbar erector spinae and lumbar flexibility, despite the assertions of some previous studies. The results of this study improve our knowledge of the relationships between trunk joint flexibility and neuromuscular responses, a relationship which may play a role in low back pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A case of synovial lipomatosis with chronic synovitis presenting as acute knee pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma HM, Anoosha K, Vijay Shankar S, Amita K

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Synovial lipomatosis is a rare, benign, intra-articular lipoma-like lesion characterized by villous proliferation of the synovium, most commonly affecting the knee joint. The usual presentation is long standing progressive swelling of the affected joint, with or without pain and restriction of movements. Histopathology is confirmatory. Case Report: We present the case of a 35- year old male patient with long standing history of swelling, short history of pain in the left knee joint. X-Ray and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the left knee showed the characteristic features of synovial lipomatosis with chronic synovitis. The patient underwent diagnostic arthroscopy with lavage of left knee joint. Histopathological study confirmed synovial lipomatosis with chronic synovitis. Conclusion: Synovial lipomatosis is a rare, benign, intra-articular lipoma-like lesion. Although rare, clinically it should be considered as an important differential in evaluating neoplastic and non- neoplastic conditions of the knee joint.

  7. Total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Henrik M.; Petersen, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a successful treatment of the osteoarthritic knee, which has increased dramatically over the last 30 years. The indication is a painful osteoarthritic knee with relevant radiographic findings and failure of conservative measures like painkillers and exercise...... surgeon seems to positively influence the rate of surgical complications and implant survival. The painful TKA knee should be thoroughly evaluated, but not revised except if a relevant indication can be established. The most frequent indications for revision are: aseptic loosening, instability, infection...

  8. Knee Bracing: What Works?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fitness, Exercise Basics, First Aid and Injury Prevention, Injury Rehabilitation, Prevention and Wellness, Sports SafetyTags: Knee Pain, Pain Management September 1, 2005 Copyright © American ...

  9. Kinematic effects of inertia and friction added by a robotic knee exoskeleton after prolonged walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirota, C; Tucker, M R; Lambercy, O; Gassert, R

    2017-07-01

    The capabilities of robotic gait assistive devices are ever increasing; however, their adoption outside of the lab is still limited. A critical barrier for the functionality of these devices are the still unknown mechanical properties of the human leg during dynamic conditions such as walking. We built a robotic knee exoskeleton to address this problem. Here, we present the effects of our device on the walking pattern of four subjects. We assessed the effects after a short period of acclimation as well as after a 1.5h walking protocol. We found that the knee exoskeleton decreased (towards extension) the peak hip extension and peak knee flexion of the leg with the exoskeleton, while minimally affecting the non-exoskeleton leg. Comparatively smaller changes occurred after prolonged walking. These results suggest that walking patterns attained after a few minutes of acclimation with a knee exoskeleton are stable for at least a couple of hours.

  10. Large Intra-Articular Anterior Cruciate Ligament Ganglion Cyst, Presenting with Inability to Flex the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake Sloane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 41-year-old female presented with a 3-month history of gradually worsening anterior knee pain, swelling and inability to flex the knee. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed a large intra-articular cystic swelling anterior to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL, extending into the Hoffa's infrapatellar fat pad. Following manipulation under anaesthesia and arthroscopic debridement of the cyst, the patient's symptoms were relieved with restoration of normal knee motion. ACL ganglion cysts are uncommon intra-articular pathological entities, which are usually asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally by MRI. This is the first reported case of an ACL cyst being so large as to cause a mechanical block to knee flexion.

  11. Ultrasonographic Findings in Hemiplegic Knees of Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Pin Yang

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and radiologic asymmetric arthritic differences between paralyzed and nonparalyzed limbs of stroke patients have been reported. Arthritic pathology aggravates motor dysfunction and compromises rehabilitation. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography plays an important role in showing soft tissue and the articular cartilage of the knee. Fifty-nine patients with either ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke-induced right or left hemiplegia were recruited to evaluate soft-tissue and intra-articular cartilage changes in hemiplegic knees of stroke patients using ultrasonography. An additional 15 subjects (30 knees without knee disease or a history of knee trauma or surgery were used as controls. There were significant differences in suprapatellar effusion and patellar tendinitis between hemiplegic and nonhemiplegic knees. Suprapatellar effusion and pes anserinus tendinitis were correlated with Brunnstrom stage. The length of time since stroke onset was not significantly correlated with positive ultrasonographic findings in hemiplegic knees. In conclusion, ultrasonography is useful for detecting periarticular soft-tissue changes and intra-articular lesions in hemiplegic knees of stroke patients.

  12. A functional electrical stimulation system improves knee control in crouch gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, Sam; Martikaro, Raz; Wientroub, Shlomo; Hemo, Yoram; Hayek, Shlomo

    2015-04-01

    Crouch gait is a major sagittal plane deviation in children diagnosed with cerebral palsy (CP). It is defined as a combination of excessive ankle dorsiflexion and knee and hip flexion throughout the stance phase. To the best of our knowledge, functional electrical stimulation (FES) has not been used to decrease the severity of crouch gait in CP subjects and assist in achieving lower limb extension. To evaluate the short- and long-term effects of FES to the quadriceps muscles in preventing crouch gait and achieving ankle plantar flexion, knee and hip extension at the stance phase. An 18-year-old boy diagnosed with CP diplegia [Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level II] was evaluated. The NESS L300(®) Plus neuroprosthesis system provided electrical stimulation of the quadriceps muscle. A three-dimensional gait analysis was performed using an eight-camera system measuring gait kinematics and spatiotemporal parameters while the subject walked shod only, with ground reaction ankle foot orthotics (GRAFOs) and using an FES device. Walking with the FES device showed an increase in the patient's knee extension at midstance and increased knee maximal extension at the stance phase. In addition, the patient was able to ascend and descend stairs with a "step-through" pattern immediately after adjusting the FES device. This report suggests that FES to the quadriceps muscles may affect knee extension at stance and decrease crouch gait, depending on the adequate passive range of motion of the hip, knee extension, and plantar flexion. Further studies are needed in order to validate these results.

  13. An investigation into the effects of a simulated effusion in healthy subjects on knee kinematics during jogging and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Garrett F; McLoughlin, Rod; McCarthy Persson, Ulrik; Caulfield, Brian M

    2008-10-01

    Knee joint effusion can lead to changes in the activation of surrounding musculature and result in delayed return to baseline daily and sporting activity following injury. However, the effects of an isolated knee joint effusion on control of movement during cyclical activities such as gait are poorly understood. Knee angular displacement and velocity was measured during treadmill jogging (8 km h(-1)) and running (12 km h(-1)) in 12 healthy subjects before and after a simulated knee joint effusion. Two separate pre-effusion recordings were taken to account for test-retest variability in gait measurement techniques. Subjects demonstrated a small yet significant decrease in peak knee flexion following heel strike at 8 km h(-1) as a result of the effusion (Pjogging and running. Our results suggest that it may be prudent to consider measurement variability in future studies of this nature.

  14. Prediction of muscle strength and postoperative function after knee flexor muscle resection for soft tissue sarcoma of the lower limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, A; Yoshimura, Y; Aoki, K; Okamoto, M; Kito, M; Suzuki, S; Takazawa, A; Ishida, T; Kato, H

    2017-11-01

    Oncological margins and prognosis are the most important factors for operative planning of soft tissue sarcomas, but prediction of postoperative function is also necessary. The purpose of this study was to predict the knee flexion strength and postoperative function after knee flexor muscle resection for soft tissue sarcoma of the lower limbs. Seventeen patients underwent knee flexor muscle resection for soft tissue sarcoma of the lower limbs between 1991 and 2015. The type of resected muscles was surveyed, knee flexion strength (ratio of affected to unaffected side) was evaluated using the Biodex System isokinetic dynamometer, and differences between the type of resected muscles were examined. The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score, Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS), European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), and Short Form 8 (SF-8) were used to assess postoperative function and examine correlations with flexion strength. The cutoff value for flexion strength to predict good postoperative results was calculated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and Fisher's exact test. Median flexion strength decreased in the resection of sartorius (97.8%), gracilis (95.4%), gastrocnemius (85.2%; interquartile range (IQR): 85.0-86.2), medial hamstrings (semimembranosus and semitendinosus, 76.2%; IQR: 73.3-78.0), lateral hamstrings (long and short head of biceps femoris, 66.1%; IQR: 65.9-70.4), and bilateral hamstrings (27.3%; IQR: 26.6-31.5). A significant difference was observed between lateral and bilateral hamstrings resection (P=0.049). Flexion strength was associated with lower functional scales (MSTS score, P=0.021; TESS, P=0.008; EQ-5D, P=0.034). Satisfactory function was obtained at a flexion strength cutoff value of 65.7%, and strength remained above the cutoff value up to unilateral hamstrings resection. Greater knee flexor muscles resection can result in functional deficits that are associated with decreased flexion strength. If

  15. [Changes in stress to the knee joint in skiing from a medical viewpoint with special reference to the modern ski shoe and the skiing technic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörterer, H

    1982-01-21

    The changed skiing-technique with more knee flexion (so called jet-position) has lead to rising pressures in the femoro-patellar joint. The danger of traumatic and arthritic diseases has increased as well. We suggest to avoid extreme anteflexed crural position in the ski-boots (more than 5 degrees). It should be possible to walk and stand in ski-boots without pressure on the knee-joint. This problem is most important in the growing locomotor system.

  16. Altered flexion-relaxation responses exist during asymmetric trunk flexion movements among persons with unilateral lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Brad D; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2014-02-01

    Repetitive exposures to altered gait and movement following lower-limb amputation (LLA) have been suggested to contribute to observed alterations in passive tissue properties and neuromuscular control in/surrounding the lumbar spine. These alterations, in turn, may affect the synergy between passive and active tissues during trunk movements. Eight males with unilateral LLA and eight non-amputation controls completed quasi-static trunk flexion-extension movements in seven distinct conditions of rotation in the transverse plane: 0° (sagittally-symmetric), ±15°, ±30°, and ±45° (sagittally-asymmetric). Electromyographic (EMG) activity of the bilateral lumbar erector spinae and lumbar kinematics were simultaneously recorded. Peak lumbar flexion and EMG-off angles were determined, along with the difference ("DIFF") between these two angles and the magnitude of peak normalized EMG activities. Persons with unilateral LLA exhibited altered and asymmetric synergies between active and passive trunk tissues during both sagittally-symmetric and -asymmetric trunk flexion movements. Specifically, decreased and asymmetric passive contributions to trunk movements were compensated with increases in the magnitude and duration of active trunk muscle responses. Such alterations in trunk passive and active neuromuscular responses may result from repetitive exposures to abnormal gait and movement subsequent to LLA, and may increase the risk for LBP in this population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Impairment-targeted exercises for older adults with knee pain: a proof-of-principle study (TargET-Knee-Pain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Laurence R J; Blagojevic-Bucknall, Milica; Stynes, Siobhán; D'Cruz, Deborah; Mullis, Ricky; Whittle, Rebecca; Peat, George; Foster, Nadine E

    2016-01-29

    Therapeutic exercise is an effective intervention for knee pain and osteoarthritis (OA) and should be individualised. In a preliminary, proof-of-principle study we sought to develop a home exercise programme targeted at specific physical impairments of weak quadriceps, reduced knee flexion range of motion (ROM) and poor balance, and evaluate whether receipt of this was associated with improvements in those impairments and in patient-reported outcomes among older adults with knee pain. This community-based study used a single group, before-after study design with 12-week follow-up. Participants were 58 adults aged over 56 years with knee pain and evidence of quadriceps weakness, loss of flexion ROM, or poor balance, recruited from an existing population-based, observational cohort. Participants received a 12-week home exercise programme, tailored to their physical impairments. The programme was led, monitored and progressed by a physiotherapist over six home visits, alternating with six telephone calls. Primary outcome measures were maximal isometric quadriceps strength, knee flexion ROM and timed single-leg standing balance, measured at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks by a research nurse blinded to the nature and content of participants' exercise programmes. Secondary outcome measures included the WOMAC. At 12 weeks, participants receiving strengthening exercises demonstrated a statistically significant change in quadriceps isometric strength compared to participants not receiving strengthening exercises: 3.9 KgF (95 % CI 0.1, 7.8). Changes in knee flexion ROM (2.1° (-2.3, 6.5)) and single-leg balance time (-2.4 s (-4.5, 6.7)) after stretching and balance retraining exercises respectively, were not found to be statistically significant. There were significant improvements in mean WOMAC Pain and Physical Function scores: -2.2 (-3.1, -1.2) and -5.1 (-7.8, -2.5). A 12-week impairment-targeted, home-based exercise programme for symptomatic knee OA appeared to be associated

  18. The Relationship between Fuctional Tests and Knee Muscles Isokinetic Parameters in Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Goharpey

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Patellofemoral pain syndrome is the most prevalent problem involving25 percent of all knee disorders. Such problems might be lead to functional disabilities. The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between functional tests and Isokinetic parameters of knee muscles and subjective assessment of knee function in patellofemoral pain syndrome and to compare between patient and control group. Materials & Methods: In this analytical and case – control research fifteen normal subjects and 15 patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome were selected with purposive sampling method in performing two main levels of this study: 1- Functional tests (bilateral squat and step down test which performed randomly with considering of repetitions per 30 seconds, within 3 minutes rest between them applied and followed by subjective assessment of knee function with Kujala questionnaire. 2- Isokinetic tests performed with Biodex dynamometer device, during 10 to 90 degree of knee flexion with two distinct speeds, 60 and 120 degree per second. Results: No relationship was found between functional tests and Isokinetic parameters in patient group, but we observed a low significant relationship between functional tests and subjective assessment in this group (r=0/47 for Squat test and 0/37 for Step down test. Moderate significant relationship was found between subjective assessment of knee function and functional Hamstring: Quadriceps ratio for knee flexion at 60 degree per second (r = - 0/58. All of the Isokinetic parameters of quadriceps muscle in patient group were lower than control group. Conclusion: As there were low correlation between Isokinetic strength measurement and functional tests and subjective assessment of knee function, it is not recommended using these methods of assessment interchangeable in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

  19. Can two-dimensional video analysis during single-leg drop vertical jumps help identify non-contact knee injury risk? A one-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingenen, Bart; Malfait, Bart; Nijs, Stefaan; Peers, Koen H E; Vereecken, Styn; Verschueren, Sabine M P; Staes, Filip F

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies showed that the amount of hip flexion and the combination of knee valgus and lateral trunk motion, measured with two-dimensional video analysis, were related to three-dimensional measured knee joint moments during single-leg drop vertical jumps, but it remains unclear whether these measurements can be used to identify non-contact knee injury risk. Fifty injury-free female athletes participated in the study. Two-dimensional video analysis was used to measure hip flexion, knee valgus and lateral trunk motion angles during single-leg drop vertical jumps. Time loss non-contact knee injuries were registered during a one-year follow-up. Independent t-tests and receiver operating characteristic analysis were used to analyze the predictive ability of the two-dimensional angles. Seven participants sustained a time loss non-contact knee injury. Hip flexion was not significantly different between groups (P>.05). The combination of knee valgus and lateral trunk motion was significantly smaller in the injured (P=.036) and non-injured legs (P=.009) of the future injured group compared with the respective matched leg of the non-injured group. The receiver operating characteristic analysis showed a significant discriminative accuracy between groups for the combination of knee valgus and lateral trunk motion of the uninjured leg of the future injured group with the matched leg of the non-injured group (area under curve=0.803; P=.012). The measurement of a combination of increased knee valgus and ipsilateral trunk motion during the single-leg drop vertical jump with two-dimensional video analysis can be used to help identify female athletes with increased non-contact knee injury risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. ARE LEFT HANDED SURGEONS LEFT OUT?

    OpenAIRE

    SriKamkshi Kothandaraman; Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2012-01-01

    Being a left-handed surgeon, more specifically a left-handed ENT surgeon, presents a unique pattern of difficulties.This article is an overview of left-handedness and a personal account of the specific difficulties a left-handed ENT surgeon faces.

  1. Joint angles of the ankle, knee, and hip and loading conditions during split squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Pascal; List, Renate; Zemp, Roland; Schellenberg, Florian; Taylor, William R; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify how step length and the front tibia angle influence joint angles and loading conditions during the split squat exercise. Eleven subjects performed split squats with an additional load of 25% body weight applied using a barbell. Each subject's movements were recorded using a motion capture system, and the ground reaction force was measured under each foot. The joint angles and loading conditions were calculated using a cluster-based kinematic approach and inverse dynamics modeling respectively. Increases in the tibia angle resulted in a smaller range of motion (ROM) of the front knee and a larger ROM of the rear knee and hip. The external flexion moment in the front knee/hip and the external extension moment in the rear hip decreased as the tibia angle increased. The flexion moment in the rear knee increased as the tibia angle increased. The load distribution between the legs changed squat execution was varied. Our results describing the changes in joint angles and the resulting differences in the moments of the knee and hip will allow coaches and therapists to adapt the split squat exercise to the individual motion and load demands of athletes.

  2. Adductor canal blockade for moderate to severe pain after arthroscopic knee surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espelund, M; Grevstad, U; Jaeger, P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The analgesic effect of the adductor canal block (ACB) after knee surgery has been evaluated in a number of trials. We hypothesized that the ACB would provide substantial pain relief to patients responding with moderate to severe pain after arthroscopic knee surgery. METHODS: Fifty...... subjects with moderate to severe pain after arthroscopic knee surgery were enrolled in this placebo-controlled, blinded trial. All subjects received two ACBs; an initial ACB with either 30 ml ropivacaine 7.5 mg/ml (n = 25) (R group) or saline (n = 25) (C group) and after 45 min a second ACB...... with the opposite study medication, according to randomization. Primary outcome was pain during 45 degrees active flexion of the knee at 45 min after the first block, assessed on a 0-100 mm visual analogue scale. Secondary outcome measures were: pain at rest and during flexion of the knee, worst pain experienced...

  3. Effects of Anterior Knee Displacement during Squatting on Patellofemoral Joint Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernozek, Thomas W; Gheidi, Naghmeh; Zellmer, Matthew; Hove, Jordan; Heinert, Becky L; Torry, Michael R

    2017-04-19

    Squatting is a common rehabilitation training exercise for Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Patellofemoral joint stress (PFJS) during squatting with more anterior knee displacement has not been systematically investigated. The aim was to compare PFJS during squatting using two techniques: Squat while keeping the knees before the toes (SBT) and squat while allowing the knees to go past the toes (SPT). University research laboratory. Twenty-five healthy females (Age: 22.69 ± 0.74 yrs.; Height: 169.39 ± 6.44 cm; Mass: 61.55 ± 9.74 kg) participated. Three dimensional kinematic and kinetic data were collected at 180 and 1800 Hz respectively. A musculoskeletal model was used to calculate muscle forces through static optimization. These muscle forces were used in a patellofemoral joint model to estimate PFJS. The magnitudes of PFJS, reaction force and quadriceps force were higher (P technique. Knee flexion, hip flexion, and ankle dorsiflexion angles were reduced when using the SBT technique. Findings provide some general support for minimizing forward knee translation during squats for patients that may have PFPS.

  4. Sagittal hip-knee coordination during a 45 degree cutting task

    OpenAIRE

    Stock, Holly; McLeod, Chris; ., Cassie Wilson; Van Emmerik, Richard E. A.; Preatoni, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    Background Hashemi et al. (2011) put forward a new theory of ACL injury mechanism, named the ‘hip extension knee flexion paradox’ that attempted to integrate itself with the most convincing findings in ACL research. This theory of mechanism stated that non-contact ACL injury would occur when the following four criteria are simultaneously met: 1) the tibial plateau has a posterior slope 2) the knee is near full extension upon application of a dynamic ground reaction force 3) activation of musc...

  5. Kinematic characteristics of anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees with concomitant meniscus deficiency during ascending stairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Huang, Wenhan; Ma, Limin; Lin, Zefeng; Huang, Huayang; Xia, Hong

    2017-02-01

    It is commonly believed that a torn ACL or a damaged meniscus may be associated with altered knee joint movements. The purpose of this study was to measure the tibiofemoral kinematics of ACL deficiency with concomitant meniscus deficiency. Unilateral knees of 28 ACL deficient participants were studied while ascending stairs. Among these patients, 6 had isolated ACL injuries (group I), 8 had combined ACL and medial meniscus injuries (group II), 8 had combined ACL and lateral meniscus injuries (group III) and 6 had combined ACL and medial-lateral meniscus injuries (group IV). Both knees were then scanned during a stair climb activity using single fluoroscopic image system. Knee kinematics were measured at 0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, 30° and 60° of flexion during ascending stairs. At 0°, 15° and 30° flexion of the knee, the tibia rotated externally by 13.9 ± 6.1°,13.8 ± 9.5° and 15.9 ± 9.8° in Group I. Group II and III exhibited decreased external rotation from 60° to full extension. Statistical differences were found in 0°, 15°and 30° of flexion for the 2 groups compared with Group I. In general, the tibia showed anterior translation with respect to the femur during ascending stairs. It was further determined that Group III had larger anterior translation compared with Group IV at 0° and 5° of flexion (-6.9 ± 1.7 mm vs. 6.2 ± 11.3 mm, P = 0.041; -9.0 ± 1.8 mm vs. 8.1 ± 13.4 mm, P = 0.044). During ascending stairs the ACL deficient knee with different deficiencies in the meniscus will show significantly different kinematics compared with that of uninjured contralateral knee. Considering the varying effect of meniscus injuries on knee joint kinematics, future studies should concentrate on specific treatment of patients with combined ACL and meniscus injuries to protect the joint from abnormal kinematics and subsequent postoperative degeneration.

  6. CURBSIDE CONSULTATION IN KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: 49 CLINICAL QUESTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig J. Della Vale

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A user- friendly reference for decision making in complicated cases of knee arthroplasty desingned in a question and answers format composed of articles containing current concepts and preferences of experts in total knee replacement surgery, enhanced by several images, diagrams and references and written in the form of a casual advice by Craig J. Della Vale, MD. and his collaborators. PURPOSE By this practical reference of knee arthroplasty, the editor and the contributors have aimed providing straightforward and brief answers, evidence-based advices, their preference and opinions containing current concepts for unanswered questions about complicated cases in total knee replacement surgery which are often controversial and not addressed clearly in traditional knee arthroplasty references. FEATURES There are 49 subjects each written by a different expert designed in 4 sections in a question and answers format including several images and diagrams and also essential references at the end of each article. In the first section preoperative questions is subjected including indications, unicompartmental osteoarthritis of the knee, patient with vascular problems, donating blood, bilateral arthroplasty, patellar resurfacing, range of motion, bearing surface, contraindications, teaching class for patients prior surgery. The second section is about intraoperative questions including skin incision, patella femoral maltracking, femoral component rotation, tibial component rotation, lateral release, femoral component sizing, flexion instability, varus deformity, and valgus deformity, tightness in extension, iatrogenic MCL injury, antibiotic-loaded cement, and perioperative pain. The third section subjects postoperative questions including wound drainage, preventing tromboembolic events, vascular complications, foot drop, manipulation under anesthesia, patella fractures, supracondylar femur fractures, acute extensor mechanism disruptions. In the fourth

  7. Déficit bilateral nos movimentos de flexão e extensão de perna e flexão do cotovelo Déficit bilateral en los movimientos de flexion y extension de la pierna y flexion del codo Bilateral deficit in leg flexion and extension and elbow flexion movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianne Pereira Giesbrecht Chaves

    2004-12-01

    and between the sum of these two results with that developed simultaneously by both legs and arms, respectively. Sixty individuals were submitted to leg flexion and extension and elbow flexion exercises at 1 RM. The results for left and right leg flexion and extension and left and right elbow flexion at ML were of 31.6 (± 7.9, 32.0 (± 8.0, 20.2 (± 9.2, 20.2 (± 9.8, 29.3 (± 13.9 and 29.8 (± 14.1 kg, respectively and seemed to be similar (p > 0.05 and strongly associated (r = 0.96, 0.96 and 0,98. When the sum of the unilateral values was compared with the bilateral values, the ML presented significant difference for the leg extension movements (p = 0.04 and elbow flexion (p = 0.03. The same behavior was not observed in the leg flexion movement (p = 0.75. This result may be explained due to the lower load increment two kilos and a half in this last movement in relation to the previous movements five kilos. Despite most subjects were right-handed, no unilateral differences were observed in ML, although not all subjects were trained. The sum of the unilateral results was higher in 9.8% and 4.0% for leg extension and elbow flexion movements, respectively, when compared with that previously obtained, showing a probable central limitation on the motor coordination of a complex movement performed at maximal speed and with high load. However, in the leg flexion movement, the sum of the unilateral results was lower that the sum of the bilateral results (-0.6%, indicating a possible learning of the movement and adaptation to training with weights from twelve weeks on.

  8. Validity and reliability of using photography for measuring knee range of motion: a methodological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Justine M; Ko, Victoria; Adie, Sam; Gaskin, Clive; Walker, Richard; Harris, Ian A; Mittal, Rajat

    2011-04-18

    The clinimetric properties of knee goniometry are essential to appreciate in light of its extensive use in the orthopaedic and rehabilitative communities. Intra-observer reliability is thought to be satisfactory, but the validity and inter-rater reliability of knee goniometry often demonstrate unacceptable levels of variation. This study tests the validity and reliability of measuring knee range of motion using goniometry and photographic records. Methodology study assessing the validity and reliability of one method ('Marker Method') which uses a skin marker over the greater trochanter and another method ('Line of Femur Method') which requires estimation of the line of femur. Radiology and orthopaedic departments of two teaching hospitals. 31 volunteers (13 arthritic and 18 healthy subjects). Knee range of motion was measured radiographically and photographically using a goniometer. Three assessors were assessed for reliability and validity. Agreement between methods and within raters was assessed using concordance correlation coefficient (CCCs). Agreement between raters was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs). 95% limits of agreement for the mean difference for all paired comparisons were computed. Validity (referenced to radiographs): Each method for all 3 raters yielded very high CCCs for flexion (0.975 to 0.988), and moderate to substantial CCCs for extension angles (0.478 to 0.678). The mean differences and 95% limits of agreement were narrower for flexion than they were for extension. Intra-rater reliability: For flexion and extension, very high CCCs were attained for all 3 raters for both methods with slightly greater CCCs seen for flexion (CCCs varied from 0.981 to 0.998). Inter-rater reliability: For both methods, very high ICCs (min to max: 0.891 to 0.995) were obtained for flexion and extension. Slightly higher coefficients were obtained for flexion compared to extension, and with the Marker compared to the Line of Femur Method

  9. Bilateral custom-fit total knee arthroplasty in a patient with poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, Nicolas; Chambat, Pierre; Murphy, Colin G; Fayard, Jean-Marie

    2014-09-01

    In limbs affected by poliomyelitis, total knee arthroplasty results in satisfactory pain relief. However, the risk of failure is high, especially if the preoperative quadriceps power is low. Therefore, treating osteoarthritis in the current patient represented a challenging procedure. A 66-year-old man presented with tricompartmental osteoarthritis of both knees, with valgus deformity of 14° on the left knee and 11° on the right knee. He walked with a bilateral knee recurvatum of 30° and a grade 1 quadriceps power. The authors treated both knees with cemented custom-fit hinged total knee arthroplasty with 30° of recurvatum in the tibial keel. Clinical scores showed good results 1 year postoperatively, especially on the subjective data of quality of life and function. At follow-up, radiographs showed good total knee arthroplasty positioning on the right side and a small mechanical loosening at the end of the tibial keel on the left side. Only 5 studies (Patterson and Insall; Moran; Giori and Lewallen; Jordan et al; and Tigani et al) have reported total knee arthroplasty results in patients with poliomyelitis. This study reports an original case of bilateral custom-fit hinged total knee arthroplasty in a patient with poliomyelitis. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of this type of procedure in the literature. The key point is the degree of recurvatum that is needed to allow walking, avoiding excessive constraints on the implants that can lead to early mechanical failure. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Knee arthroscopy - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... between the femur and the tibia in the knee joint. The anterior cruciate ligament, the posterior cruciate ligament, and the ... Several small punctures are made into the knee joint while the patient ... and pain-free (regional anesthesia or spinal anesthesia).

  11. Knee injuries in football

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Collateral ligament. Fortunately the majority of knee injuries are strains involving the ligaments. The medial collateral ligament (MCL), which resists valgus and internal rotation, is susceptible to contact and non-contact loads. The MCL is the most commonly injured ligament in the knee.13 In an audit of soccer injuries in ...

  12. Musculoskeletal MR: knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, A.; Glaser, C.; Reiser, M.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive, specific, and accurate noninvasive method for diagnosing internal derangement of the knee. During the past 15 years knowledge of pathologic conditions of the knee had evolved significantly. Beyond the basic principles of imaging knee injuries great impact was made on the understanding of indirect or collateral findings, even in rare diseases. In this article the spectrum of disorders of the knee are reviewed and an overview of the current literature is given. This includes considerations about how to achieve a high-standard MR imaging study of the knee, and principles of imaging anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal tears. A focus is put on distinct diseases including intra-articular and intraosseous ganglion cysts, iliotibial band friction syndrome, transient osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, osteochondritis dissecans, and imaging of the articular cartilage. (orig.)

  13. [Free functional gracilis muscle transplantation for reconstruction of active elbow flexion in posttraumatic brachial plexus lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Alfred; Hierner, Robert

    2009-06-01

    Reconstruction of powerful active elbow flexion. Reconstruction of missing muscle unit by neurovascular pedicled functional muscle transplantation. Treatment of last choice for --secondary reconstruction of active elbow flexion in case of complete lesion of the brachial plexus or musculocutaneous nerve (M0 muscle function = replacement indication), partial but incomplete lesion of the brachial plexus or musculocutaneous nerve (M1-(3) muscle function = augmentation indication); --replacement of the elbow flexor muscles in case of primary muscle loss (tumor, trauma). Concomitant lesions of the axillary artery. No adequate donor nerve. Relative: no sensibility at all at the forearm and hand. Free functional biarticular myocutaneous transplantation of gracilis muscle. A myocutaneous gracilis flap is raised at the thigh. At the upper arm the flap is fixed proximally to the coracoid process or the lateral clavicle. The distal insertion is sutured to the distal biceps tendon. Vascular anastomoses are carried out in end-to-side fashion with the brachial artery and vein. Nerval coaptation is done in end-to-end technique using the muculocutaneous nerve. Complete immobilization for 6 weeks. Dorsal upper arm splint until sufficient muscle power (M(4)). Progressive increase of active range of motion for another 6 weeks. Continuation of physiotherapy for 12-18 months. Postoperative standardized compression therapy, combined with scar therapy (silicone sheet). Functionally useful results can be expected in 60-75% of patients, especially if there is some residual function (M1 or M2) left ("augmentation indication"). Early free functional muscle transplantation shows best results in patients with direct muscle defect, because all vascular and neuronal structures are still available, and no secondary changes such as fibrosis or joint stiffness are present yet. There are inconsistent results for patients with neurologic insufficiency (i.e., total brachial plexus palsy) or mixed

  14. Does knee awareness differ between different knee arthroplasty prostheses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten G; Latifi, Roshan; Kallemose, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low knee awareness after Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) has become the ultimate goal in trying to achieve a natural feeling knee that meet patient expectations. To accommodate this manufacturers of TKAs have developed new prosthetic designs that potentially could give patients a more n...... a standard CR TKA, indicating that the use of this newer prosthetic design facilitate less knee awareness and better function after TKA.......BACKGROUND: Low knee awareness after Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) has become the ultimate goal in trying to achieve a natural feeling knee that meet patient expectations. To accommodate this manufacturers of TKAs have developed new prosthetic designs that potentially could give patients a more...

  15. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability of a method to measure ankle plantar-flexion range of motion in the hook-lying position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Guilherme S; Bayer, Gabriela S; M R da Costa, Letícia; de Noronha, Marcos

    2012-10-11

    Physical therapists often have to measure ankle range of motion (ROM) to decide on intervention and investigate improvements. The most common method of measurement is goniometry, but it has been questioned due to its unsatisfactory levels of reliability. To investigate the intraobserver and interobserver reliability of a new method of measuring plantar-flexion ROM. Prospective and descriptive. Laboratory. 20 healthy participants (12 women and 8 men). Ankle plantar flexion was measured by 3 observers (A, B, and C) with 3 methods (goniometry, measurement in hook-lying position [MHP], and static-image analysis [SIA]). Observer A was the most experienced therapist, and C, the least. MHP was performed with the participant in the supine position, knees flexed, and first and fifth metatarsals in contact with the treatment table. SIA was recorded and analyzed in the same position. Goniometry was performed with participant seated, lower legs unsupported, and axis positioned on the lateral malleolus. For the interobserver analysis, the ICC2,1 was high for the MHP (.88), high for SIA (.87), and moderate for goniometry (.57). For the intraobserver analysis, the ICC2,1 was high or very high for MHP (.91-.92), high for SIA (.79-.83), and low to moderate for goniometry (.18-.60). MHP is inexpensive, fast, and more reliable than goniometry for measuring plantar-flexion ROM.

  16. Correlation between the elbow flexion and the hand and wrist flexion after neurotization of the fascicles of the ulnar nerve to the motor branch to the biceps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Boso Escudero

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: Gain in elbow flexion in patients with brachial plexus injury is extremely important. The transfer of a fascicle from the ulnar nerve to the motor branch of the musculocutaneous nerve (Oberlin surgery is a treatment option. However, in some patients, gain in elbow flexion is associated with wrist and finger flexion. This study aimed to assess the frequency of this association and the functional behavior of the limb. METHODS: Case-control study of 18 patients who underwent the Oberlin surgery. Group 1 included patients without disassociation of range of elbow flexion and that of the fingers and wrist; Group 2 included patients in whom this disassociation was present. In the functional evaluation, the Sollerman and DASH tests were used. RESULTS: It was observed that 38.89% of the patients did not present disassociation of elbow flexion with flexion of the wrist and fingers. Despite the existence of a favorable difference in the group with disassociation of the movement, when the Sollerman protocol was applied to the comparison between both groups, this difference was not statistically significant. With the DASH test, however, there was a statistically significant difference in favor of the group of patients who managed to disassociate the movement. CONCLUSION: The association of elbow flexion with flexion of the wrist and fingers, in the group studied, was shown to be a frequent event, which influenced the functional result of the affected limb.

  17. Foot posture and function have only minor effects on knee function during barefoot walking in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldt, Andrew K; Levinger, Pazit; Murley, George S; Menz, Hylton B; Nester, Christopher J; Landorf, Karl B

    2015-06-01

    Foot posture has been postulated as a risk factor for overuse injuries of the knee, however the link between foot posture and knee joint function is unclear. The aims of this study were to: (i) compare knee adduction moment and knee joint rotations between normal, planus and cavus foot posture groups, and (ii) to determine the relationship between rearfoot and midfoot joint rotations and knee adduction moment magnitude. Rotation of the knee, rearfoot and midfoot was evaluated in 97 healthy adults that were classified as normal (n=37), cavus (n=30) or planus (n=30) for the Foot Posture Index, Arch Index and normalised navicular height. One way analyses of variance were used to compare tri-planar knee joint rotation, knee adduction moment peak variables and knee adduction angular impulse between foot posture groups. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to investigate the association between rearfoot and midfoot joint rotation during initial contact phase and the magnitude of 1st knee adduction moment peak. The planus group displayed significantly greater external rotation angle at heel contact compared to both normal and cavus groups. The planus groups also displayed greater extension at heel contact and sagittal plane flexion range of motion during propulsion and early swing compared to the cavus group. Otherwise, differences between groups were characterised by small effect sizes. There was no association between rearfoot or midfoot joint rotations and knee adduction moment. These findings suggest that in healthy individuals, foot posture and foot joint rotations do not substantially influence knee joint rotations and knee adduction moment while walking at a comfortable pace. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Strain on the human sciatic nerve in vivo during movement of the hip and knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, P; Lenehan, B; O'Rourke, S; McHugh, P; Kaar, K; McCabe, J P

    2003-04-01

    Injuries to the sciatic nerve are an occasional complication of surgery to the hip and acetabulum, and traction is frequently the causative mechanism. In vitro and animal experiments have shown that increased tensile strain on peripheral nerves, when applied for prolonged periods, impairs nerve function. We have used video-extensometry to measure strain on the human sciatic nerve during total hip replacement (THR). Ten consecutive patients with a mean age of 72 years undergoing primary THR by the posterior approach were recruited, and strains in the sciatic nerve were measured in different combinations of flexion and extension of the hip and knee, before dislocation of the hip. Significant increases (p = 0.02) in strain in the sciatic nerve were observed in flexion of the hip and extension of the knee. The mean increase was 26% (19% to 30%). In animal studies increases of this magnitude have been shown to impair electrophysiological function in peripheral nerves. Our results suggest that excessive flexion of the hip and extension of the knee should be avoided during THR.

  19. Analysis of the load on the knee joint and vertebral column with changes in squatting depth and weight load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Hagen; Wirth, Klaus; Klusemann, Markus

    2013-10-01

    It has been suggested that deep squats could cause an increased injury risk of the lumbar spine and the knee joints. Avoiding deep flexion has been recommended to minimize the magnitude of knee-joint forces. Unfortunately this suggestion has not taken the influence of the wrapping effect, functional adaptations and soft tissue contact between the back of thigh and calf into account. The aim of this literature review is to assess whether squats with less knee flexion (half/quarter squats) are safer on the musculoskeletal system than deep squats. A search of relevant scientific publications was conducted between March 2011 and January 2013 using PubMed. Over 164 articles were included in the review. There are no realistic estimations of knee-joint forces for knee-flexion angles beyond 50° in the deep squat. Based on biomechanical calculations and measurements of cadaver knee joints, the highest retropatellar compressive forces and stresses can be seen at 90°. With increasing flexion, the wrapping effect contributes to an enhanced load distribution and enhanced force transfer with lower retropatellar compressive forces. Additionally, with further flexion of the knee joint a cranial displacement of facet contact areas with continuous enlargement of the retropatellar articulating surface occurs. Both lead to lower retropatellar compressive stresses. Menisci and cartilage, ligaments and bones are susceptible to anabolic metabolic processes and functional structural adaptations in response to increased activity and mechanical influences. Concerns about degenerative changes of the tendofemoral complex and the apparent higher risk for chondromalacia, osteoarthritis, and osteochondritis in deep squats are unfounded. With the same load configuration as in the deep squat, half and quarter squat training with comparatively supra-maximal loads will favour degenerative changes in the knee joints and spinal joints in the long term. Provided that technique is learned accurately

  20. Posterior Tibial Slope Angle Correlates With Peak Sagittal and Frontal Plane Knee Joint Loading During Robotic Simulations of Athletic Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A.; Nesbitt, Rebecca J.; Shearn, Jason T.; Myer, Gregory D.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Tibial slope angle is a nonmodifiable risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the mechanical role of varying tibial slopes during athletic tasks has yet to be clinically quantified. Purpose To examine the influence of posterior tibial slope on knee joint loading during controlled, in vitro simulation of the knee joint articulations during athletic tasks. Study Design Descriptive laboratory study. Methods A 6 degree of freedom robotic manipulator positionally maneuvered cadaveric knee joints from 12 unique specimens with varying tibial slopes (range, −7.7° to 7.7°) through drop vertical jump and sidestep cutting tasks that were derived from 3-dimensional in vivo motion recordings. Internal knee joint torques and forces were recorded throughout simulation and were linearly correlated with tibial slope. Results The mean (6SD) posterior tibial slope angle was 2.2° ± 4.3° in the lateral compartment and 2.3° ± 3.3° in the medial compartment. For simulated drop vertical jumps, lateral compartment tibial slope angle expressed moderate, direct correlations with peak internally generated knee adduction (r = 0.60–0.65), flexion (r = 0.64–0.66), lateral (r = 0.57–0.69), and external rotation torques (r = 0.47–0.72) as well as inverse correlations with peak abduction (r = −0.42 to −0.61) and internal rotation torques (r = −0.39 to −0.79). Only frontal plane torques were correlated during sidestep cutting simulations. For simulated drop vertical jumps, medial compartment tibial slope angle expressed moderate, direct correlations with peak internally generated knee flexion torque (r = 0.64–0.69) and lateral knee force (r = 0.55–0.74) as well as inverse correlations with peak external torque (r = −0.34 to 20.67) and medial knee force (r = −0.58 to −0.59). These moderate correlations were also present during simulated sidestep cutting. Conclusion The investigation supported the theory that increased posterior

  1. Sex Differences in Proximal Control of the Knee Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Ford, Kevin R.; Quatman, Carmen E.; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Following the onset of maturation, female athletes have a significantly higher risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury compared with male athletes. While multiple sex differences in lower-extremity neuromuscular control and biomechanics have been identified as potential risk factors for ACL injury in females, the majority of these studies have focused specifically on the knee joint. However, increasing evidence in the literature indicates that lumbopelvic (core) control may have a large effect on knee-joint control and injury risk. This review examines the published evidence on the contributions of the trunk and hip to knee-joint control. Specifically, the sex differences in potential proximal controllers of the knee as risk factors for ACL injury are identified and discussed. Sex differences in trunk and hip biomechanics have been identified in all planes of motion (sagittal, coronal and transverse). Essentially, female athletes show greater lateral trunk displacement, altered trunk and hip flexion angles, greater ranges of trunk motion, and increased hip adduction and internal rotation during sport manoeuvres, compared with their male counterparts. These differences may increase the risk of ACL injury among female athletes. Prevention programmes targeted towards trunk and hip neuromuscular control may decrease the risk for ACL injuries. PMID:21688868

  2. A RARE CASE OF IPSILATERAL HIP AND KNEE DISLOCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available High velocity road traffic accidents leads to complicated lower limb injuries. Such injuries demand highly experienced surgeon and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Hip or knee dislocations are two different orthopaedic emergencies. Concomitant fracture dislocation of the hip and knee is rare and very few cases have been reported in the literature. A 45 year old man with history of fall from motorcycle came to the casualty. He had ipsilateral hip and knee dislocation. Immediately patient was shifted to operation theatre and closed reduction was performed under general anaesthesia. Reduction was confirmed under fluoroscopy and post-operative x-rays were taken. The functional results were excellent. After 2 months patient made an uncomplicated recovery and had satisfactory functional outcome with right hip having 110⁰ flexion and right knee flexes to 120⁰.There was no neurological deficit. The urgency, that the treating surgeon shows in managing these injuries, significantly affects the prognosis and outcome finally achieved by these patients (golden period in reducing the hip joint has been described to be 6 hours.

  3. Sex differences in proximal control of the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Ford, Kevin R; Quatman, Carmen E; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Hewett, Timothy E

    2011-07-01

    Following the onset of maturation, female athletes have a significantly higher risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury compared with male athletes. While multiple sex differences in lower-extremity neuromuscular control and biomechanics have been identified as potential risk factors for ACL injury in females, the majority of these studies have focused specifically on the knee joint. However, increasing evidence in the literature indicates that lumbo-pelvic (core) control may have a large effect on knee-joint control and injury risk. This review examines the published evidence on the contributions of the trunk and hip to knee-joint control. Specifically, the sex differences in potential proximal controllers of the knee as risk factors for ACL injury are identified and discussed. Sex differences in trunk and hip biomechanics have been identified in all planes of motion (sagittal, coronal and transverse). Essentially, female athletes show greater lateral trunk displacement, altered trunk and hip flexion angles, greater ranges of trunk motion, and increased hip adduction and internal rotation during sport manoeuvres, compared with their male counterparts. These differences may increase the risk of ACL injury among female athletes. Prevention programmes targeted towards trunk and hip neuromuscular control may decrease the risk for ACL injuries.

  4. Methods of X-ray examination of condylar knee replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrik, P.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed description is presented of the methodology of X-ray examination of patients with a condylar knee replacement. Preoperative examination includes standard anterio-posterior and lateral projections, axial projection of the patella in 30 deg flexion of the knee, examination of the mechanical axis of the extremity on a 90 x 30 format and the radioscopic assessment of the centre of the hip joint, essential for the correct centering of the knee implant. Immediately after surgery the position of the implant is checked in two standard projections. Another X-ray check is made after six weeks, before partial loading of the joint is permitted. A complete X-ray examination is made prior to the full loading of the knee joint. The methods are also discussed of the X-ray evaluation of complications such as aseptic loosening of the components, infection, instability, fractures. The general solution od these problems is described. The necessity is underlined of the deliberate and qualified indication of X-ray examinations. The basic prerequisites are listed for reducing the present considerable radiation burden of these patients in the course of the many X-ray examinations. (author). 7 figs., 3 tab., 6 refs

  5. [Correlations Between Joint Proprioception, Muscle Strength, and Functional Ability in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yoa; Yu, Yong; He, Cheng-qi

    2015-11-01

    To establish correlations between joint proprioception, muscle flexion and extension peak torque, and functional ability in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Fifty-six patients with symptomatic knee OA were recruited in this study. Both proprioceptive acuity and muscle strength were measured using the isomed-2000 isokinetic dynamometer. Proprioceptive acuity was evaluated by establishing the joint motion detection threshold (JMDT). Muscle strength was evaluated by Max torque (Nm) and Max torque/weight (Nm/ kg). Functional ability was assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index physical function (WOMAC-PF) questionnaire. Correlational analyses were performed between proprioception, muscle strength, and functional ability. A multiple stepwise regression model was established, with WOMAC-PF as dependent variable and patient age, body mass index (BMI), visual analogue scale (VAS)-score, mean grade for Kellgren-Lawrance of both knees, mean strength for quadriceps and hamstring muscles of both knees, and mean JMDT of both knees as independent variables. Poor proprioception (high JMDT) was negatively correlated with muscle strength (Pproprioception (high JMDT) and joint pain (WOMAC pain score), and between knee proprioception (high JMDT) and joint stiffness (WOMAC stiffness score). Poor proprioception (high JMDT) was correlated with limitation in functional ability (WOMAC physical function score r=0.659, Pproprioception is associated with poor muscle strength and limitation in functional ability. Patients with symptomatic OA of knees commonly endure with moderate to considerable dysfunction, which is associated with poor proprioception (high JMDT) and high VAS-scale score.

  6. [CLINICAL APPLICATION OF OXFORD MOBILE-BEARING BIPOLAR PROSTHESIS UNICOMPARTMENTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY FOR SINGLE COMPARTMENTAL KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shangzeng; Cheng, Shao; Wang, Yisheng

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) in the treatment of single compartmental knee osteoarthritis. Between June 2011 and July 2013, 22 cases of single compartmental knee osteoarthritis were treated by Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis UKA. Of 22 cases, 8 were male and 14 were female with an average age of 65 years (range, 45-80 years); the left knee was involved in 12 cases, and the right knee in 10 cases, with a mean disease duration of 32.5 months (range, 8-90 months). The mean weight was 55.2 kg (range, 50-65 kg), and the mean body mass index was 20.8 kg/m2 (range, 17-25 kg/m2). Osteoarthritis involved in the single knee medial compartment in all patients. Knee society score (KSS) and range of motion (ROM) were measured to evaluate the knee joint function. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients, and there was no complication of infection, bedsore, or deep venous thrombosis. Postoperative follow-up was 2-4 years (mean, 3.2 years). The X-ray films showed good position of prosthesis, no prosthesis dislocation, or periprosthetic infection during follow-up. Knee ROM, KSS function score, and KSS clinical score were significantly improved at 1 week after operation and at last follow-up when compared with preoperative ones (P 0.05). Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis UKA is an effective method to treat single compartmental knee osteoarthritis, with the advantages of less trauma, earlier rehabilitation exercise, near physiological state in joint function, and less risk of complications.

  7. Through Knee Amputation: Technique Modifications and Surgical Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank P Albino

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundKnee disarticulations (KD are most commonly employed following trauma or tumor resection but represent less than 2% of all lower extremity amputations performed in the United States annually. KDs provide enhanced proprioception, a long lever arm, preservation of adductor muscle insertion, decreased metabolic cost of ambulation, and an end weight-bearing stump. The role for KDs in the setting of arterial insufficiency or overwhelming infection is less clear. The purpose of this study is to describe technique modifications and report surgical outcomes following KDs at a high-volume Limb Salvage Center.MethodsA retrospective study of medical records for all patients who underwent a through-knee amputation performed by the senior author (C.E.A. between 2004 and 2012 was completed. Medical records were reviewed to collect demographic, operative, and postoperative information for each of the patients identified.ResultsBetween 2004 and 2012, 46 through-knee amputations for 41 patients were performed. The mean patient age was 68 and indications for surgery included infection (56%, arterial thrombosis (35%, and trauma (9%. Postoperative complications included superficial cellulitis (13%, soft tissue infection (4%, and flap ischemia (4% necessitating one case of surgical debridement (4% and four trans-femoral amputations (9%. 9 (22% patients went on to ambulate. Postoperative ambulation was greatest in the traumatic cohort and for patients less than 50 years of age, P<0.05. Alternatively, diabetes mellitus and infection reduced the likelihood of postoperative ambulation, P<0.01.ConclusionsKnee disarticulations are a safe and effective alternative to other lower extremity amputations when clinically feasible. For patient unlikely to ambulate, a through-knee amputation maximizes ease of transfers, promotes mobility by providing a counterbalance, and eliminates the potential for knee flexion contracture with subsequent skin breakdown.

  8. Entretien sur la psychanalyse: réflexions en marge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Martini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available L’auteur propose ici un commentaire sur les points les plus importants de son entretien de février 2003 avec Paul Ricœur consacré aux rapports entre herméneutique et psychanalyse. Bien que le philosophe se situe dans une réelle continuité par rapport à sa contribution de 1965, il enrichit toutefois sa réflexion philosophique sur la psychanalyse en proposant plusieurs innovations, en ce qui concerne plus particulièrement les thèmes du récit, du soi et de l’éthique. Dans les conclusions de son commentaire, l’auteur souligne l’importance des concepts d’“irreprésentable” et d’“intraduisible”: non seulement, en effet, ces concepts sont dans la ligne de nombreuses contributions de la psychanalyse contemporaine, mais la profondeur de la réflexion ricœurienne augmente en outre leur potentiel théorique et même clinique.

  9. Facilitating Cervical Flexion Using a Feldenkrais Method: Awareness through Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, S; Kegerreis, S

    1992-01-01

    Feldenkrais methods appear to be gaining popularity and utilization by physical therapists. The need for scientific justification of their usage is indicated. The purpose of this study was to quantify the results of a Feldenkrais method-Awareness Through Movement-involving a neck flexion task. The study examined 30 normal subjects to determine if a Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement sequence would result in an increase in neck flexion range of motion and if the subjects would indicate a significantly lower level of perceived effort posttest. Measurements of range of motion were taken using a gravity-based cervical range of motion goniometer. The subjects recorded their perceived efforts on a visual analogue scale. The range of motion data were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA. The visual analogue scale data were analyzed with a Mann-Whitney U test. The data supported both hypotheses. Based on these findings, further investigation of Feldenkrais methods in the treatment of patients appears warranted. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1992;16(1):25-29.

  10. Evaluating anterior knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Engene; Kraft, Michael C

    2014-07-01

    Musculoskeletal complaints account for about 20% to 30% of all primary care office visits; of these visits, discomfort in the knee, shoulder, and back are the most prevalent musculoskeletal symptoms. Having pain or dysfunction in the front part of the knee is a common presentation and reason for a patient to see a health care provider. There are a number of pathophysiological etiologies to anterior knee pain. This article describes some of the common and less common causes, and includes sections on diagnosis and treatment for each condition as well as key points. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An Unexpected Complication of Hip Arthroplasty: Knee Dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of patients with hip fracture have been seen with osteoporosis associated with osteoarthritis. Although knee dislocation is related to high-energy trauma, low-grade injuries can also lead to knee dislocation which is defined as “ultra-low velocity dislocation.” The case reported here is of an 82-year-old patient who presented with a left intertrochanteric hip fracture. Partial arthroplasty was planned because of osteoporosis. In the course of surgery, degenerative arthritic knee was dislocated during the hip reduction maneuver with the application of long traction. The neurovascular examination was intact, but the knee was grossly unstable and was dislocated even in a brace; thus a hinged knee prosthesis was applied nine days after surgery. The patient was mobilized with crutches after the knee prosthesis but exercise tolerance was diminished. In conclusion, it should be emphasized that overtraction must be avoided during the hip reduction maneuver in patients with advanced osteoarthritic knee.

  12. The effect of six weeks hamstring eccentric exercises on the postural control ability and knee joint proprioception in adolescent football players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azita Mohamadi

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Based on the results, hamstring eccentric exercises can improve the knee proprioception, postural control and hip flexion range of motion in the football players. Therefore, in order to improving the athletic performance and preventing the injuries occurrence, such exercises can be included in the training programs of these athletes.

  13. Clinical results of Hi-tech Knee II total knee arthroplasty in patients with rheumatoid athritis: 5- to 12-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamanaka Hajime

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a common form of treatment to relieve pain and improve function in cases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Good clinical outcomes have been reported with a variety of TKA prostheses. The cementless Hi-Tech Knee II cruciate-retaining (CR-type prosthesis, which has 6 fins at the anterior of the femoral component, posterior cruciate ligament (PCL retention, flat-on-flat surface component geometry, all-polyethylene patella, strong initial fixation by the center screw of the tibial base plate, 10 layers of titanium alloy fiber mesh, and direct compression molded ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE, is appropriate for TKA in the Japanese knee. The present study was performed to evaluate the clinical results of primary TKA in RA using the cementless Hi-Tech Knee II CR-type prosthesis. Materials and methods We performed 32 consecutive primary TKAs using cementless Hi-Tech Knee II CR-type prosthesis in 31 RA patients. The average follow-up period was 8 years 3 months. Clinical evaluations were performed according to the American Knee Society (KS system, knee score, function score, radiographic evaluation, and complications. Results The mean postoperative maximum flexion angle was 115.6°, and the KS knee score and function score improved to 88 and 70 after surgery, respectively. Complications, such as infection, occurred in 1 patient and revision surgery was performed. There were no cases of loosening in this cohort, and prosthesis survival rate was 96.9% at 12 years postoperatively. Conclusion These results suggest that TKA using the cementless Hi-Tech Knee II CR-type prosthesis is a very effective form of treatment in RA patients at 5 to 12 years postoperatively. Further long-term follow-up studies are required to determine the ultimate utility of this type of prosthesis.

  14. Knee Control and Jump-Landing Technique in Young Basketball and Floorball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, M; Pasanen, K; Kulmala, J-P; Kujala, U M; Krosshaug, T; Kannus, P; Perttunen, J; Vasankari, T; Parkkari, J

    2016-04-01

    Poor knee alignment is associated with increased loading of the joints, ligaments and tendons, and may increase the risk of injury. The study purpose was to compare differences in knee kinematics between basketball and floorball players during a vertical drop jump (VDJ) task. We wanted to investigate whether basketball players, whose sport includes frequent jump-landings, exhibited better knee control compared with floorball players, whose sport involves less jumping. Complete data was obtained from 173 basketball and 141 floorball players. Peak knee valgus and flexion angles during the VDJ were analyzed by 3D motion analysis.Larger knee valgus angles were observed among basketball players (- 3.2°, 95%CI -4.5 to - 2.0) compared with floorball players (- 0.9°, 95%CI -2.3 to 0.6) (P=0.022). Basketball players landed with a decreased peak knee flexion angle (83.1°, 95%CI 81.4 to 84.8) compared with floorball players (86.5°, 95%CI 84.6 to 88.4) (P=0.016). There were no significant differences in height, weight or BMI between basketball and floorball players. Female athletes exhibited significantly greater valgus angles than males. This study revealed that proper knee control during jump-landing does not seem to develop in young athletes simply by playing the sport, despite the fact that jump-landings occur frequently in practice and games. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Effect of static and dynamic muscle stretching as part of warm up procedures on knee joint proprioception and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Gregory S

    2017-10-01

    The importance of warm up procedures prior to athletic performance is well established. A common component of such procedures is muscle stretching. There is conflicting evidence regarding the effect of static stretching (SS) as part of warm up procedures on knee joint position sense (KJPS) and the effect of dynamic stretching (DS) on KJPS is currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of dynamic and static stretching as part warm up procedures on KJPS and knee extension and flexion strength. This study had a randomised cross-over design and ten healthy adults (20±1years) attended 3 visits during which baseline KJPS, at target angles of 20° and 45°, and knee extension and flexion strength tests were followed by 15min of cycling and either a rest period (CON), SS, or DS and repeat KJPS and strength tests. All participants performed all conditions, one condition per visit. There were warm up×stretching type interactions for KJPS at 20° (p=0.024) and 45° (p=0.018), and knee flexion (p=0.002) and extension (pwarm up procedures. However, the negative impact of SS on muscle strength limits the utility of SS before athletic performance. If stretching is to be performed as part of a warm up, DS should be favoured over SS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Concurrent measurement of isokinetic muscle strength of the trunk, knees, and ankles in patients with lumbar disc herniation with sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-Cheng; Kuo, Chu-Wen; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chang, Shin-Tsu; Ni, Shou-Min; Ho, Cheng-Wen

    2010-12-15

    A cross-sectional study comparing normal subjects and patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH) with sciatica. To simultaneously measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the trunk, knees, and ankles in both groups. Coordination between the trunk and lower extremity muscles is important for normal physical activity. Reduced trunk and knee muscle strength have been reported in patients with lower level LDH; however, ankle performance in these patients is still unknown. We recruited 43 normal subjects as controls and 33 patients with lower level LDH with sciatica. The isokinetic strength of the trunk, knees, and ankles was measured at 2 velocities in random order: 60°/s and 120°/s, and 60°/s and 180°/s for trunk and ankle strength and for knee strength, respectively. The isokinetic trunk strength was significantly lower in the LDH group irrespective of test modes or velocity. Despite unilateral sciatica or test modes and velocity, the unilateral knee strength was significantly lower in the LDH group than that in the control group. Knee extension torque was also found to be significantly lower in the limbs with sciatica than in those without sciatica at the testing velocity of 180°/s (80.25 ± 24.88 vs. 95.42 ± 26.29 Nm, P sciatica or test velocity, ankle plantar flexion torque revealed to be significantly lower in the LDH group than the control group; however, dorsiflexion torque was not different. Significant correlations were demonstrated among the total muscle strength of the trunk, knees, and ankles in both groups. Besides the lower trunk strength, concurrent lower unilateral knee and ankle plantar flexion but not dorsiflexion strength was demonstrated in the LDH subjects with unilateral sciatica, regardless of its location. As compared to the limbs without sciatica, an additional 14% reduction of knee extension torque at 180°/s was found in the limbs with sciatica in the LDH patients.

  17. Changes in hip muscles after above-knee amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaegers, S M; Arendzen, J H; de Jongh, H J

    1995-10-01

    To learn about the changes appearing in hip muscles after an above-knee amputation, 3-dimensional reconstructions of the hip and thigh region of 12 patients with above-knee amputations were made based on transverse magnetic resonance images. In all patients, the amputations were done at least 2 years before the study and were necessitated by trauma or osteosarcoma. The results show that, at higher amputation levels, the geometry of the once-biarticular muscles was changed. The cleaved muscles (40%-60%) and the intact muscles (0-30%) at the amputated side were atrophied. The amount of atrophy of the intact muscles at the amputated side was related to stump length. To avoid an abduction contracture in 8 patients with amputations, the iliotibial tract was not fixed. In 4 of these 8 patients, a flexion contracture was visible. If the tract was not fixed, the hip extension torque of the gluteus maximus, which inserts into the tract, decreased. As a result, the risk of appearance of a flexion contracture increased because the strongest hip flexor (iliopsoas muscle) was not involved in the amputation. Abduction contracture could be avoided only if the hip adductors were fixed accurately, especially at higher amputation levels.

  18. ACL-reconstructed and ACL-deficient individuals show differentiated trunk, hip, and knee kinematics during vertical hops more than 20 years post-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markström, Jonas L; Tengman, Eva; Häger, Charlotte K

    2018-02-01

    Little is known regarding movement strategies in the long term following injury of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and even less about comparisons of reconstructed and deficient knees in relation to healthy controls. The present purpose was to compare trunk, hip, and knee kinematics during a one-leg vertical hop (VH) ~20 years post-ACL injury between persons treated with surgery and physiotherapy (ACL R ), solely physiotherapy (ACL PT ), and controls (CTRL). Between-leg kinematic differences within groups were also investigated. Sixty-six persons who suffered unilateral ACL injury on average 23 ± 2 years ago (32 ACL R , 34 ACL PT ) and 33 controls performed the VH. Peak trunk, hip, and knee angles during Take-off and Landing phases recorded with a 3D motion capture system were analysed with multivariate statistics. Significant group effects during both Take-off and Landing were found, with ACL PT differing from CTRL in Take-off with a combination of less knee flexion and knee internal rotation, and from both ACL R and CTRL in Landing with less hip and knee flexion, knee internal rotation, and greater hip adduction. ACL R also presented different kinematics to ACL PT and CTRL in Take-off with a combination of greater trunk flexion, hip flexion, hip internal rotation, and less knee abduction, and in Landing with greater trunk flexion and hip internal rotation. Further, different kinematics and hop height were found between legs within groups in both Take-off and Landing for both ACL groups, but not for CTRL. Different kinematics for the injured leg for both ACL groups compared to CTRL and between treatment groups, as well as between legs within treatment groups, indicate long-term consequences of injury. Compensatory mechanisms for knee protection seem to prevail over time irrespective of initial treatment, possibly increasing the risk of re-injury and triggering the development of osteoarthritis. Detailed investigation of movement strategies during the VH

  19. Allograft Arthrodesis of the Knee in High-grade Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng-Le Huang

    2005-09-01

    Conclusion: Due to the high rate of complications in this study, we conclude that allograft arthrodesis should be left as a salvage or “back-up” reconstructive procedure after resection of osteosarcoma around the knee, unless there are special indications for this procedure. We found allograft fracture to be the most common complication.

  20. Partial knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... candidate for partial knee replacement and what the success rate is for your condition. Alternative Names Unicompartmental ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  1. Knee arthroscopy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pillows. Place the pillows under your foot or calf muscle. This helps control swelling in your knee. For ... time. You have swelling or pain in your calf muscle. Your foot or toes look darker than normal ...

  2. Anterior knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thighbone where the kneecap normally rests is too shallow. You have flat feet. Anterior knee pain is ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  3. [The bicompartmental knee joint prosthesis Journey Deuce: failure analysis and optimization strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M; Matziolis, G; Falk, R; Hommel, H

    2012-11-01

    The Journey Deuce bicompartmental knee system is intended for patients with medial and patellofemoral arthritis of the knee and is aimed at diversifying the treatment options for knee arthritis. The prosthesis consists of a combined femoral shield with a medial condylar resurfacing component and a fixed bearing unicondylar tibial knee prosthesis. The advantages of the Journey Deuce system compared to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are the bone sparing and cruciate retaining implantation. Outcome studies and investigation with respect to success and revision rates are rare. Thus the aim of this study was to investigate the early functional outcome as well as the revision and complication rates in patients with a Journey Deuce prosthesis within the first 2 years. In this study 43 patients (25 female/18 male, average age 62.4 ± 8 years and mean body mass index27.3 ± 4.5 kg/m(2)) underwent bicompartmental knee arthroplasty using the Journey Deuce prosthesis between March 2008 and March 2009. Inclusion criteria were clinically and radiographically confirmed patellofemoral arthritis, ligament stability and flexion > 90°. Exclusion criteria were extension deficits > 5°, axis deviation > 10° and patellofemoral malalignment. Patients were followed up for 6, 12 and 24 months postoperatively. Follow-up consisted of clinical and radiographical examination as well as a survey of the Knee Society score (KSS), a pain score (visual analog scale VAS, range 0-10) and a satisfaction score. Of the patients 35 (82%) patients reached the 2-year follow-up and of these 35 patients 26 (75%) had a good to very good satisfaction, a mean KSS of 93 (range 65-100) and a minimal pain score of 1.2 (range 0-4). After 12 months all patients had a knee flexion of more than 90° (mean 116°, range 95°-140°). Loosening was not detected but 8 (18%) patients had to undergo revision within the first year due to persistent knee pain and instability. Under clear indications and

  4. Dashboard (in the) knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M S; Qureshi, A A; Green, T P

    2015-03-01

    We present the case of a 19-year-old individual presenting to an orthopaedic outpatient clinic several months following a dashboard knee injury during a road traffic accident with intermittent mechanical symptoms. Despite unremarkable examination findings and normal magnetic resonance imaging, the patient was identified subsequently as having an intra-articular plastic foreign body consistent with a piece of dashboard on arthroscopic knee assessment, the retrieval of which resulted in a complete resolution of symptoms.

  5. Hyperphosphatemic Tumoral Calcinosis after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Mochizuki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis (TC that occurred after total knee arthroplasty. A 64-year-old Japanese man presented with painful swellings in both shoulders, the left elbow, and the right hip that developed after he underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA. The pathology of the patient’s bone at the time of TKA included a thick osteoid seam with calcareous deposition at the margin of the trabecular bone, which is not generally seen in osteoarthritis. Computed tomography scans of the swollen joints demonstrated leaflet and amorphous calcification masses around the joints. We diagnosed the patient with TC. The present case highlights that TC lesions are rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of subcutaneous soft and hard masses around the joint.

  6. Bilateral pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir H. Shah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a disorder resulting in a villous, nodular, or villonodular proliferation of the synovium, with pigmentation related to the presence of hemosiderin. These lesions are almost exclusively benign with rare reports of malignancy. Pigmented villonodular synovitis can occur in a variety of joints and at any age but most often occurs within the knee in the young adult. Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare disease entity, and bilateral synchronous or metachronous involvement of a joint is even more uncommon, with few reports previously described in the literature. We present a case of pigmented villonodular synovitis involving both the right and left knee in the same patient, with radiographic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, photograph and video intraoperative imaging, and pathologic correlation.

  7. Loading Patterns of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament in the Healthy Knee: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Renate; Oberhofer, Katja; Fucentese, Sandro F.; Snedeker, Jess G.; Taylor, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is the strongest ligament of the knee, serving as one of the major passive stabilizers of the tibio-femoral joint. However, despite a number of experimental and modelling approaches to understand the kinematics and kinetics of the ligament, the normal loading conditions of the PCL and its functional bundles are still controversially discussed. Objectives This study aimed to generate science-based evidence for understanding the functional loading of the PCL, including the anterolateral and posteromedial bundles, in the healthy knee joint through systematic review and statistical analysis of the literature. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Databases were searched for articles containing any numerical strain or force data on the healthy PCL and its functional bundles. Studied activities were as follows: passive flexion, flexion under 100N and 134N posterior tibial load, walking, stair ascent and descent, body-weight squatting and forward lunge. Method Statistical analysis was performed on the reported load data, which was weighted according to the number of knees tested to extract average strain and force trends of the PCL and identify deviations from the norms. Results From the 3577 articles retrieved by the initial electronic search, only 66 met all inclusion criteria. The results obtained by aggregating data reported in the eligible studies indicate that the loading patterns of the PCL vary with activity type, knee flexion angle, but importantly also the technique used for assessment. Moreover, different fibres of the PCL exhibit different strain patterns during knee flexion, with higher strain magnitudes reported in the anterolateral bundle. While during passive flexion the posteromedial bundle is either lax or very slightly elongated, it experiences higher strain levels during forward lunge and has a synergetic relationship with the anterolateral bundle. The strain

  8. Loading Patterns of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament in the Healthy Knee: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S H Hosseini Nasab

    Full Text Available The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL is the strongest ligament of the knee, serving as one of the major passive stabilizers of the tibio-femoral joint. However, despite a number of experimental and modelling approaches to understand the kinematics and kinetics of the ligament, the normal loading conditions of the PCL and its functional bundles are still controversially discussed.This study aimed to generate science-based evidence for understanding the functional loading of the PCL, including the anterolateral and posteromedial bundles, in the healthy knee joint through systematic review and statistical analysis of the literature.MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL.Databases were searched for articles containing any numerical strain or force data on the healthy PCL and its functional bundles. Studied activities were as follows: passive flexion, flexion under 100N and 134N posterior tibial load, walking, stair ascent and descent, body-weight squatting and forward lunge.Statistical analysis was performed on the reported load data, which was weighted according to the number of knees tested to extract average strain and force trends of the PCL and identify deviations from the norms.From the 3577 articles retrieved by the initial electronic search, only 66 met all inclusion criteria. The results obtained by aggregating data reported in the eligible studies indicate that the loading patterns of the PCL vary with activity type, knee flexion angle, but importantly also the technique used for assessment. Moreover, different fibres of the PCL exhibit different strain patterns during knee flexion, with higher strain magnitudes reported in the anterolateral bundle. While during passive flexion the posteromedial bundle is either lax or very slightly elongated, it experiences higher strain levels during forward lunge and has a synergetic relationship with the anterolateral bundle. The strain patterns obtained for virtual fibres that connect the origin and insertion of

  9. Isokinetic Identification of Knee Joint Torques before and after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Czaplicki

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the serial change of isokinetic muscle strength of the knees before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR in physically active males and to estimate the time of return to full physical fitness. Extension and flexion torques were measured for the injured and healthy limbs at two angular velocities approximately 1.5 months before the surgery and 3, 6, and 12 months after ACLR. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05 in peak knee extension and flexion torques, hamstring/quadriceps (H/Q strength ratios, uninvolved/involved limb peak torque ratios, and the normalized work of these muscles between the four stages of rehabilitation were identified. Significant differences between extension peak torques for the injured and healthy limbs were also detected at all stages. The obtained results showed that 12 months of rehabilitation were insufficient for the involved knee joint to recover its strength to the level of strength of the uninvolved knee joint. The results helped to evaluate the progress of the rehabilitation and to implement necessary modifications optimizing the rehabilitation training program. The results of the study may also be used as referential data for physically active males of similar age.

  10. Reduced Bearing Excursion After Mobile-Bearing Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty is Associated With Poor Functional Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahal, Naman; Gaba, Sahil; Malhotra, Rajesh; Kumar, Vijay; Pegg, Elise C; Pandit, Hemant

    2018-02-01

    A small proportion of patients with mobile unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) report poor functional outcomes in spite of optimal component alignment on postoperative radiographs. The purpose of this study is to assess whether there is a correlation between functional outcome and knee kinematics. From a cohort of consecutive cases of 150 Oxford medial UKA, patients with fair/poor functional outcome at 1-year postsurgery (Oxford Knee Score [OKS] bearing position with knee flexion angle. Mean OKS in the fair/poor group was 29.9 and the mean OKS in the good/excellent group was 41.1. The tibial slope, time taken to complete the exercises, and patellar tendon angle trend over the flexion range were similar in both the groups; however, bearing position and the extent of bearing excursion differed significantly. The total bearing excursion in the OKS bearing was positioned 1.7 mm more posterior on the tibia in the OKS bearing excursion and positioning, are associated with worse functional outcomes after mobile UKA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Taking care of your new knee joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee arthroplasty - precautions; Knee replacement - precautions ... After you have knee replacement surgery , you will need to be careful about how you move your knee, especially for the first few ...

  12. Multi-Axis Prosthetic Knee Resembles Alpine Skiing Movements of an Intact Leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demšar, Ivan; Duhovnik, Jože; Lešnik, Blaž; Supej, Matej

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the flexion angles of the ski boot, ankle and knee joints of an above-knee prosthesis and to compare them with an intact leg and a control group of skiers. One subject with an above-knee amputation of the right leg and eight healthy subjects simulated the movement of a skiing turn by performing two-leg squats in laboratory conditions. By adding additional loads in proportion to body weight (BW; +1/3 BW, +2/3 BW, +3/3 BW), various skiing regimes were simulated. Change of Flexion Angle (CoFA) and Range of Motion (RoM) in the ski boot, ankle and knee joints were calculated and compared. An average RoM in the skiing boot on the side of prosthesis (4.4 ± 1.1°) was significantly lower compared to an intact leg (5.9 ± 1.8°) and the control group (6.5 ± 2.3°). In the ankle joint, the average RoM was determined to be 13.2±2.9° in the prosthesis, 12.7 ± 2.8° in an intact leg and 14.8±3.6 in the control group. However, the RoM of the knee joint in the prosthesis (42.2 ± 4.2°) was significantly larger than that of the intact leg (34.7 ± 4.4°). The average RoM of the knee joint in the control group was 47.8 ± 5.4°. The influences of additional loads on the kinematics of the lower extremities were different on the side of the prosthesis and on the intact leg. In contrast, additional loads did not produce any significant differences in the control group. Although different CoFAs in the ski boot, ankle and knee joints were used, an above-knee prosthesis with a built-in multi-axis prosthetic knee enables comparable leg kinematics in simulated alpine skiing. Key pointsThe RoM in the ski boot on the side of the prosthetic leg was smaller than the RoM of the intact leg and the control group of healthy subjects.The RoM in the ankle joint of prosthetic leg was comparable to that of the intact leg and the control group of healthy subjects.The RoM in the prosthetic knee joint was greater than the RoM in the knee joint of the intact

  13. Multi-Axis Prosthetic Knee Resembles Alpine Skiing Movements of an Intact Leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demšar, Ivan; Duhovnik, Jože; Lešnik, Blaž; Supej, Matej

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the flexion angles of the ski boot, ankle and knee joints of an above-knee prosthesis and to compare them with an intact leg and a control group of skiers. One subject with an above-knee amputation of the right leg and eight healthy subjects simulated the movement of a skiing turn by performing two-leg squats in laboratory conditions. By adding additional loads in proportion to body weight (BW; +1/3 BW, +2/3 BW, +3/3 BW), various skiing regimes were simulated. Change of Flexion Angle (CoFA) and Range of Motion (RoM) in the ski boot, ankle and knee joints were calculated and compared. An average RoM in the skiing boot on the side of prosthesis (4.4 ± 1.1°) was significantly lower compared to an intact leg (5.9 ± 1.8°) and the control group (6.5 ± 2.3°). In the ankle joint, the average RoM was determined to be 13.2±2.9° in the prosthesis, 12.7 ± 2.8° in an intact leg and 14.8±3.6 in the control group. However, the RoM of the knee joint in the prosthesis (42.2 ± 4.2°) was significantly larger than that of the intact leg (34.7 ± 4.4°). The average RoM of the knee joint in the control group was 47.8 ± 5.4°. The influences of additional loads on the kinematics of the lower extremities were different on the side of the prosthesis and on the intact leg. In contrast, additional loads did not produce any significant differences in the control group. Although different CoFAs in the ski boot, ankle and knee joints were used, an above-knee prosthesis with a built-in multi-axis prosthetic knee enables comparable leg kinematics in simulated alpine skiing. Key points The RoM in the ski boot on the side of the prosthetic leg was smaller than the RoM of the intact leg and the control group of healthy subjects. The RoM in the ankle joint of prosthetic leg was comparable to that of the intact leg and the control group of healthy subjects. The RoM in the prosthetic knee joint was greater than the RoM in the knee joint of the

  14. Knee pain in competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeo, S A

    1999-04-01

    The high volume of training in competitive swimming results in cumulative overload injuries. Knee pain ranks second to shoulder pain as a common complaint in competitive swimmers. Most knee pain occurs on the medial side of the knee and, most commonly, in breaststroke swimmers; however, knee pain may accompany all strokes. This article reviews the incidence of knee pain, the biomechanic and anatomic factors predisposing to injury, specific injury patterns, injury diagnosis, and the treatment and prevention of injury to the knee in swimmers.

  15. Use of Knee Extension Device During Rehabilitation of a Patient with Type 3 Arthrofibrosis after ACL Reconstruction.