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Sample records for left abdominal pain

  1. Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to ease your pain. For instance, eat smaller meals if your pain is accompanied by indigestion. Avoid ... http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/abdominal-pain/basics/definition/SYM-20050728 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  2. Elderly patient with acute, left lower abdominal pain: perforated jejunal diverticulitis (2010:7b)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, Manuela; Certo, Manuela; Varzim, Pedro; Silva, Donzilia; Peixoto, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    An elderly patient with acute, left, lower abdominal pain is described, for whom the diagnosis of perforated jejunal diverticulitis was established by computed tomography (CT). The presence of a jejunal segmental inflammatory process, with or without abscess or perforation, in the setting of jejunal diverticulosis, is very suggestive of jejunal diverticulitis. (orig.)

  3. Elderly patient with acute, left lower abdominal pain: perforated jejunal diverticulitis (2010:7b)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franca, Manuela; Certo, Manuela; Varzim, Pedro [Centro Hospitalar do Porto, Radiology Department, Porto (Portugal); Silva, Donzilia [Centro Hospitalar do Porto, Surgery Department, Porto (Portugal); Peixoto, Carlos [Centro Hospitalar do Porto, Pathology Department, Porto (Portugal)

    2010-10-15

    An elderly patient with acute, left, lower abdominal pain is described, for whom the diagnosis of perforated jejunal diverticulitis was established by computed tomography (CT). The presence of a jejunal segmental inflammatory process, with or without abscess or perforation, in the setting of jejunal diverticulosis, is very suggestive of jejunal diverticulitis. (orig.)

  4. Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are at greater risk of having anxiety as young adults [2] . Abdominal pain or bellyaches in children What ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ...

  5. Abdominal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... citrus, high-fat foods, fried or greasy foods, tomato products, caffeine, alcohol, and carbonated beverages. Avoid aspirin, ... especially if bright red, maroon or dark, tarry black) Have chest, neck, or shoulder pain Have sudden, ...

  6. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have a clear idea about the cause of pain. Sometimes a diagnosis is made and treatment can be started. In ... tests. Treatment What treatments are available for abdominal pain? Once a diagnosis is made, treatment can proceed for that condition. ...

  7. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe ... kinds of pain: Generalized pain or pain over more than half ...

  8. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the family and child. If functional abdominal pain is strongly suspected as the likely diagnosis, testing should be limited to the most useful, ... the child resume a normal routine. Fortunately, the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain has a good outcome overall, with almost half ...

  9. Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-Term

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abdominal pain. Or find more information about abdominal pain that has lasted for more than 3 days. Our trusted Symptom Checker is written and reviewed by physicians and patient education professionals. Find a possible diagnosis by choosing a symptom and answering a few ...

  10. Adult Female with Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Frasure

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old female presented to the emergency department with diffuse abdominal pain, vaginal discharge, and a fever of 102°F. She described multiple recent male sexual partners, with inconsistent condom use. Her vital signs were unremarkable. Her physical exam was notable for moderate right lower quadrant tenderness to palpation. There was no cervical motion tenderness. The emergency physician performed a bedside abdominal ultrasound (Video, and subsequently ordered a computed tomography (Figure, which confirmed the diagnosis.

  11. Dehydration related abdominal pain (drap)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, S.I.; Aurangzeb; Khan, I.; Bhatti, A.M.; Khan, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To describe the frequency of dehydration as a medical cause of acute abdomen. Subjects and Methods: All the patients reporting with abdominal pain to the surgical outpatient department or the emergency department were reviewed in the study. The clinical findings in all these cases were studied along with the mode of their management and outcome. Results: Of all the patients presenting with abdominal pain, 3.3% (n=68) were suffering from dehydration related abdominal pain. They were predominantly males in a ratio of 8.7: 1, mostly in the 2nd and 3rd decades of their lives. All these cases were suffering from acute or chronic dehydration were provisionally diagnosed by general practitioners as 'acute abdomen' and referred for surgical consultation. Associated symptoms included vomiting in 42.6%, backache in 91.2%, headache in 95.6%, and pain in lower limbs in 97.1 % of the cases. 83.8% required indoor management with intravenous fluids. All the patients became asymptomatic with rehydration therapy. Conclusion: Dehydration is a possible cause of severe abdominal pain. There is a need to educate the general public about the benefits of adequate fluid intake. (author)

  12. Nontraumatic abdominal emergencies: acute abdominal pain: diagnostic strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marincek, B. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Common causes of acute abdominal pain include appendicitis, cholecystitis, bowel obstruction, urinary colic, perforated peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and nonspecific, nonsurgical abdominal pain. The topographic classification of acute abdominal pain (pain in one of the four abdominal quadrants, diffuse abdominal pain, flank or epigastric pain) facilitates the choice of the imaging technique. The initial radiological evaluation often consists of plain abdominal radiography, despite significant diagnostic limitations. The traditional indications for plain films - bowel obstruction, pneumoperitoneum, and the search of ureteral calculi - are questioned by helical computed tomography (CT). Although ultrasonography (US) is in many centers the modality of choice for imaging the gallbladder and the pelvis in children and women of reproductive age, CT is considered to be one of the most valued tools for triaging patients with acute abdominal pain. CT is particularly beneficial in patients with marked obesity, unclear US findings, bowel obstruction, and multiple lesions. The introduction of multidetector row CT (MDCT) has further enhanced the utility of CT in imaging patients with acute abdominal pain. (orig.)

  13. Nontraumatic abdominal emergencies: acute abdominal pain: diagnostic strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marincek, B.

    2002-01-01

    Common causes of acute abdominal pain include appendicitis, cholecystitis, bowel obstruction, urinary colic, perforated peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and nonspecific, nonsurgical abdominal pain. The topographic classification of acute abdominal pain (pain in one of the four abdominal quadrants, diffuse abdominal pain, flank or epigastric pain) facilitates the choice of the imaging technique. The initial radiological evaluation often consists of plain abdominal radiography, despite significant diagnostic limitations. The traditional indications for plain films - bowel obstruction, pneumoperitoneum, and the search of ureteral calculi - are questioned by helical computed tomography (CT). Although ultrasonography (US) is in many centers the modality of choice for imaging the gallbladder and the pelvis in children and women of reproductive age, CT is considered to be one of the most valued tools for triaging patients with acute abdominal pain. CT is particularly beneficial in patients with marked obesity, unclear US findings, bowel obstruction, and multiple lesions. The introduction of multidetector row CT (MDCT) has further enhanced the utility of CT in imaging patients with acute abdominal pain. (orig.)

  14. Abdominal Cocoon Syndrome: a Rare Cause for Recurrent Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fursevich, Dzmitry; Burt, Jeremy

    2017-07-01

    Abdominal cocoon syndrome, or sclerosing peritonitis, is a rare condition characterized by encasement of small bowel loops by a thick fibrous scar. It most commonly presents as nonspecific vague chronic abdominal pain and weight loss, and is difficult to recognize clinically until the patient develops symptoms of bowel obstruction. We present a case of abdominal cocoon syndrome in a 65-year-old female and describe its clinical, imaging, and pathologic features.

  15. Functional abdominal pain disorders in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajindrajith, Shaman; Zeevenhooven, Judith; Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Perera, Bonaventure Jayasiri Crispus; Benninga, Marc A.

    2018-01-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common problem in pediatric practice. The majority of cases fulfill the Rome IV criteria for functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPDs). At times, these disorders may lead to rather serious repercussions. Area covered: We have attempted to cover current knowledge on

  16. Lansoprazole for recurrent abdominal pain in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ade Saifan Surya

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Recurrent abdominal pain is common among adolescents. School absenteeism and lower quality of life are associated with severity of symptoms. Lansoprazole has been used to treat recurrent abdominal pain. Objective To investigate the effectiveness of lansoprazole as a treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in adolescents. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial from August 2009 to October 2009. Adolescents suffering recurrent abdominal pain were eligible for the study. Simple randomization was done to divide subjects into two groups. Groups received 30 mg of lansoprazole or placebo, once a day for 14 days. Before treatment, we performed laboratory and physical examinations. Pain frequency was measured in number of abdominal pain episodes per month. Duration was measured in minutes and pain intensity was measured by a pain rating scale. Drug efficacy was measured before, during and after intervention. Data was analyzed using Mann-Whitney U-test and t-test. Results One hundred sixteen recurrent abdominal pain patients were randomized into two groups of 58 patients. There were no statistically significant differences in pain frequency before and after treatment for either the lansoprazole group or the placebo group (P=0.083, 95%CI, -0.033 to 0.021 and P=0.096, 95%CI -0.376 to 0.031, respectively. In addition, there were no significant differences in frequency, duration, and degree of abdominal pain at baseline and after 1, 2 and 3 months of treatment between the two groups. Conclusion Lansoprazole was not more effective than the placebo for treatment of recurrent abdominal pain among adolescents.

  17. Support Vector Machine Diagnosis of Acute Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsdotter, Malin; Nalin, Kajsa; Hansson, Lars-Erik; Malmgren, Helge

    This study explores the feasibility of a decision-support system for patients seeking care for acute abdominal pain, and, specifically the diagnosis of acute diverticulitis. We used a linear support vector machine (SVM) to separate diverticulitis from all other reported cases of abdominal pain and from the important differential diagnosis non-specific abdominal pain (NSAP). On a database containing 3337 patients, the SVM obtained results comparable to those of the doctors in separating diverticulitis or NSAP from the remaining diseases. The distinction between diverticulitis and NSAP was, however, substantially improved by the SVM. For this patient group, the doctors achieved a sensitivity of 0.714 and a specificity of 0.963. When adjusted to the physicians' results, the SVM sensitivity/specificity was higher at 0.714/0.985 and 0.786/0.963 respectively. Age was found as the most important discriminative variable, closely followed by C-reactive protein level and lower left side pain.

  18. Laparoscopy In Unexplained Abdominal Pain: Surgeon's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Muhammad Tariq; Waqar, Shahzad Hussain; Zahid, Muhammad Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Unexplained abdominal pain is a common but difficult presenting feature faced by the clinicians. Such patients can undergo a number of investigations with failure to reach any diagnosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of laparoscopy in the diagnosis and management of patients with unexplained abdominal pain. This cross-sectional study was conducted at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences Islamabad from January 2009 to December 2013. This study included 91 patients of unexplained abdominal pain not diagnosed by routine clinical examination and investigations. These patients were subjected to diagnostic laparoscopy for evaluation of their conditions and to confirm the diagnosis. These patients presented 43% of patients undergoing investigations for abdominal pain. Patients diagnosed with gynaecological problems were excluded to see surgeon's perspective. The findings and the outcomes of the laparoscopy were recorded and data was analyzed. Unexplained abdominal pain is common in females than in males. The most common laparoscopic findings were abdominal tuberculosis followed by appendicitis. Ninety percent patients achieved pain relief after laparoscopic intervention. Laparoscopy is both beneficial and safe in majority of patients with unexplained abdominal pain. General surgeons should acquire training and experience in laparoscopic surgery to provide maximum benefit to these difficult patients.

  19. [Diagnostic imaging and acute abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-19

    Acute abdominal pain is a common clinical condition. Clinical signs and symptoms can be difficult to interpret, and diagnostic imaging may help to identify intra-abdominal disease. Conventional X-ray, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen vary in usability between common surgical causes of acute abdominal pain. Overall, conventional X-ray cannot confidently diagnose or rule out disease. US and CT are equally trustworthy for most diseases. US with subsequent CT may enhance diagnostic precision. Magnetic resonance seems promising for future use in acute abdominal imaging.

  20. Maintenance of pain in children with functional abdominal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    A significant proportion of children with functional abdominal pain develop chronic pain. Identifying clinical characteristics predicting pain persistence is important in targeting interventions. We examined whether child anxiety and/or pain-stooling relations were related to maintenance of abdomina...

  1. [Hereditary angioedema: strange cause of abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Lozano, Nereo Guillermo; Meza-Cardona, Javier; González-Fernández, Coty; Pineda-Figueroa, Laura; de Ariño-Suárez, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an episodic swelling disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance characterized by sudden attacks of peripheral swelling. Patients also commonly have episodic swelling of the wall of hollow viscera, including the bowel. We present a 33-year-old previously healthy male with a complaint of acute-onset intense abdominal pain localized in the epigastrium. Pain irradiated to the right lower quadrant and was associated with five episodes of vomiting. Computed tomography showed thickening of the duodenal wall with liquid in the subphrenic space. Complementary laboratory tests showed low C4 complement levels (5.5 mg/dl) and 30% complement C1 inhibitor activity. Hereditary angioedema is caused by a deficiency (type I) or dysfunction (type II) in complement C1 inhibitor. Abdominal associated with angioedema may manifest as severe acute-onset abdominal pain or as moderately severe chronic recurrent abdominal pain. Two medications are currently FDA-approved for the treatment of these patients.

  2. Diagnostic imaging of acute abdominal pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Sarah L; Knudson, Mark P

    2015-04-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common presentation in the outpatient setting and can represent conditions ranging from benign to life-threatening. If the patient history, physical examination, and laboratory testing do not identify an underlying cause of pain and if serious pathology remains a clinical concern, diagnostic imaging is indicated. The American College of Radiology has developed clinical guidelines, the Appropriateness Criteria, based on the location of abdominal pain to help physicians choose the most appropriate imaging study. Ultrasonography is the initial imaging test of choice for patients presenting with right upper quadrant pain. Computed tomography (CT) is recommended for evaluating right or left lower quadrant pain. Conventional radiography has limited diagnostic value in the assessment of most patients with abdominal pain. The widespread use of CT raises concerns about patient exposure to ionizing radiation. Strategies to reduce exposure are currently being studied, such as using ultrasonography as an initial study for suspected appendicitis before obtaining CT and using low-dose CT rather than standard-dose CT. Magnetic resonance imaging is another emerging technique for the evaluation of abdominal pain that avoids ionizing radiation.

  3. Diagnosis in acute abdominal pain and ongoing abdominal sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiewiet, J.J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common reason for presentation at the emergency department. To establish a timely and adequate diagnosis, doctors use the pattern of complaints and physical examination as the basis for the evaluation of a patient. In this thesis we conducted a study that showed that

  4. [Epiploic appendagitis: a rare cause of abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Marín, Andrés; Nofuentes-Riera, Carmen; Mella-Laborde, Mario; Pérez-López, Mercedes; Pérez-Bru, Susana; Rubio-Cerdido, José María

    2014-01-01

    Epiploic appendagitis is an atypical cause of abdominal pain whose knowledge could avoid diagnostic or treatment errors. Diagnosis has been performed with abdominal ultrasound or tomography with the only treatment being nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. To analyze patients diagnosed in our hospital. We performed a 4-year retrospective and descriptive study (March 2009-March 2013) of patients diagnosed with epiploic appendagitis in our hospital. Seventeen patients were included, 14 females and three males with a median age of 57 years. Symptom delay was 72 h. Abdominal pains were located in the left lower quadrant in 64.7% and right lower quadrant in 35.3% of patients. Blood test demonstrated leukocytes 6,300 (5,000-9,500), neutrophils 61.6% (57-65.8), and C reactive protein 1.5 (0.85-2.92). Diagnosis was confirmed with abdominal ultrasound or tomography in 88.2% and intraoperatively in 11.8%. Epiploic appendagitis was more frequent in women. Abdominal pain was located in the lower quadrant, more predominant in left than right. Blood tests were normal except for increased levels of C-reactive protein. Diagnosis was made mostly preoperatively due to imaging tests, avoiding unnecessary surgical intervention.

  5. Case report: Varicosity of the communicating vein between the left renal vein and the left ascending lumbar vein mimicking a renal artery aneurysm: Report of an unusual site of varicose veins and a novel hypothesis to explain its association with abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep G Jakhere

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A communicating vein between the left renal vein and the left ascending lumbar vein has only rarely been reported in the imaging literature. There are very few reports of varicosity of this communicating vein. Nonetheless, awareness about this communicating vein is of utmost importance for surgeons performing aortoiliac surgeries and nephrectomies as it may pose technical difficulties during surgery or cause life-threatening retroperitoneal hemorrhage. Varicosity of this venous channel may be mistaken for paraaortic lymphadenopathy, adrenal pseudo-mass, or renal artery aneurysm. We report a case of a patient with varicosity of this communicating vein, which mimicked a left renal artery aneurysm. A novel hypothesis is also proposed to explain the relationship with abdominal pain.

  6. Acute Abdominal Pain in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chih Chang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal pain is a common occurrence in the elderly patients and poses a difficult challenge for the emer-gency physician. Previous studies demonstrated that among the elderly patients presenting to the emergency department with abdominal pain, at least 50% were hospitalized and 30–40% eventually had surgery for the underlying condition. Reasons for the difficult diagnosis of acute abdomen in the elderly are multifactorial, and hence the diagnostic accuracy is lower and the mortality far higher in them than in the younger patients. High suspicion, widely differential diagnosis, and more aggressive use of imaging modalities are critical for these patients. In the geriatric population, biliary tract disease accounts for nearly 25% of cases of acute abdominal pain, followed by nonspecific pain, malignancy, bowel obstruction, complicated peptic ulcer disease, and incarcer-ated hernia. Acute appendicitis, pancreatitis, and diverticulitis are uncommon but important causes of acute abdomen in the elderly. Abdominal vascular diseases, including abdominal aortic aneurysm and mesenteric ischemia, are a rare but lethal condition in acute abdomen. Management of the elderly patients with acute abdomen should focus on keeping the vital signs, adequate hydration, and early administration of analgesics and antibiotics. Consultations with radiologists and surgeons are crucial in the management of difficult cases.

  7. Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Long-Term

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent discomfort. Start OverDiagnosisYour pain may be from GASTRITIS, an ULCER or HEARTBURN; all are irritations of ... sign of a more serious problem such as CANCER of the colon. Self CareSee your doctor. Start ...

  8. A Rare Cause of Postprandial Abdominal Pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Median arcuate ligament is a ligament under the diaphragm that wraps around the aorta. It passes superior to coeliac trunk and connects the right and left crura of diaphragm. If the ligament lies lower than T12, it can compress on the coeliac trunk and causes abdominal symptoms. Median arcuate ligament syndrome ...

  9. Abdominal epilepsy as an unusual cause ofabdominal pain: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Abdominal pain, in etiology sometimes difficult to be defined, is a frequent complaint in childhood. Abdominal epilepsy is a rare cause of abdominal pain. Objectives: In this article, we report on 5 year old girl patient with abdominal epilepsy. Methods: Some investigations (stool investigation, routine blood tests, ...

  10. Torsion of abdominal appendages presenting with acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jaberi, Tareq M.; Gharabeih, Kamal I.; Yaghan, Rami J.

    2000-01-01

    Diseases of abnormal appendages are rare causes of abdominal pain in all age groups. Nine patients with torsion and infraction of abdominal appendages were retrospectively reviewed. Four patients had torsion and infarction of the appendices epiploicae, four patients had torsion and infarction of the falciform ligament. The patient with falciform ligament disease represents the first reported case of primary torsion and infarction of the falciform ligament, and the patient with the transverse colon epiplocia represents the first reported case of vibration-induced appendix epiplocia torsion and infarction. The patient with the falciform ligament disease presented with a tender upper abdominal mass and the remaining patients were operated upon with the preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The presence of normal appendix with free serosanguinous fluid in the peritoneal cavity should raise the possibility of a disease and calls for further evaluation of the intra-abdominal organs. If the diagnosis is suspected preoperatively, CT scan and ultrasound may lead to a correct diagnosis and possibly conservative management. Laparoscopy is playing an increasing diagnostic and therapeutic role in such situations. (author)

  11. Abdominal epilepsy as an unusual cause of abdominal pain: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Introduction: Abdominal pain, in etiology sometimes difficult to be defined, is a frequent complaint in childhood. Abdominal epilepsy is a rare cause of abdominal pain. Objectives: In this article, we report on 5 year old girl patient with abdominal epilepsy. Methods: Some investigations (stool investigation, routine ...

  12. Acute abdominal pain: Advances in diagnosis and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gans, S.L.

    2015-01-01

    The term acute abdominal pain refers to non-traumatic abdominal pain of rapid onset with duration of less than five days. Acute abdominal pain can be divided in urgent and non-urgent conditions. Urgent causes require treatment within 24 hours to prevent serious complications whereas for non-urgent

  13. Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Darren; Callister, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP), commonly referred to as 'stitch', is an ailment well known in many sporting activities. It is especially prevalent in activities that involve repetitive torso movement with the torso in an extended position, such as running and horse riding. Approximately 70% of runners report experiencing the pain in the past year and in a single running event approximately one in five participants can be expected to suffer the condition. ETAP is a localized pain that is most common in the lateral aspects of the mid abdomen along the costal border, although it may occur in any region of the abdomen. It may also be related to shoulder tip pain, which is the referred site from tissue innervated by the phrenic nerve. ETAP tends to be sharp or stabbing when severe, and cramping, aching, or pulling when less intense. The condition is exacerbated by the postprandial state, with hypertonic beverages being particularly provocative. ETAP is most common in the young but is unrelated to sex or body type. Well trained athletes are not immune from the condition, although they may experience it less frequently. Several theories have been presented to explain the mechanism responsible for the pain, including ischemia of the diaphragm; stress on the supportive visceral ligaments that attach the abdominal organs to the diaphragm; gastrointestinal ischemia or distension; cramping of the abdominal musculature; ischemic pain resulting from compression of the celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament; aggravation of the spinal nerves; and irritation of the parietal peritoneum. Of these theories, irritation of the parietal peritoneum best explains the features of ETAP; however, further investigations are required. Strategies for managing the pain are largely anecdotal, especially given that its etiology remains to be fully elucidated. Commonly purported prevention strategies include avoiding large volumes of food and beverages for at least 2 hours

  14. [Pain originating from the abdominal wall: a forgotten diagnostic option].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero Fernández, Miguel; Moreira Vicente, Víctor; Riesco López, José María; Rodríguez Gandía, Miguel Angel; Garrido Gómez, Elena; Milicua Salamero, José María

    2007-04-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common clinical problem in primary care, and is usually referred to gastroenterologists or general surgeons. Although up to 20% of cases of idiopathic abdominal pain arise in structures of the abdominal wall, this is frequently overlooked as a possible cause. It includes pain arising from structures of the abdominal wall including skin, parietal peritoneum, cellular subcutaneous tissue, aponeuroses, abdominal muscles and somatosensorial innervation from lower dorsal roots. The diagnosis is based on anamnesis and physical examination. Carnett's sign is a simple maneuver that discriminates between parietal and visceral pain. Management with topical anesthesia is effective in a majority of patients and can help to confirm the diagnosis.

  15. Treatment of Abdominal Segmental Hernia, Constipation, and Pain Following Herpes Zoster with Paravertebral Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Saeyoung; Jeon, Younghoon

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) most commonly occurs in elderly patients and involves sensory neurons resulting in pain and sensory changes. Clinically significant motor deficits and visceral neuropathies are thought to be relatively rare. A 72-year-old man presented with abdominal segmental hernia, constipation, and pain following HZ in the left T9-10 dermatome. Sixteen days before presentation, he had developed a painful herpetic rash in the left upper abdominal quadrant. Approximately 10 days after the onset of the rash, constipation occurred and was managed with daily oral medication with bisacodyl 5 mg. In addition, 14 days after the onset of HZ, the patient noticed a protrusion of the left upper abdominal wall. Abdominal x-ray, ultrasound of the abdomen, and electrolyte analysis showed no abnormalities. General physical examination revealed a reducible bulge in his left upper quadrant and superficial abdominal reflexes were diminished in the affected region. Electromyographic testing revealed denervational changes limited to the left thoracic paraspinal muscles and supraumbilical muscles, corresponding to the affected dermatomes. He was prescribed with 500 mg of famciclovir 3 times a day for 7 days, and pregabalin 75 mg twice a day and acetaminophen 650 mg 3 times a day for 14 days. However, his pain was rated at an intensity of 5 on the numerical analogue scale from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain imaginable). A paravertebral block was performed at T9-10 with a mixture of 0.5% lidocaine 3 mL and triamcinolone 40 mg. One day after the procedure, the abdominal pain disappeared. In addition, 5 days after the intervention, the abdominal protrusion and constipation were resolved. He currently remains symptom free at a 6 month follow-up.

  16. Elderly Woman with Abdominal Pain: Bedside Ultrasound Diagnosis of Diverticulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason D. Heiner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 72-year-old otherwise healthy female presented to the emergency department with two weeks of worsening abdominal pain. She was afebrile with normal vital signs. Her physical examination was notable for moderate abdominal tenderness without rebound to the left and suprapubic regions of the abdomen. Laboratory studies were remarkable for a white blood cell count of 13,000/mm3. A focused bedside ultrasound over the patient’s region of maximal discomfort revealed a thickened bowel wall and several small contiguous hypoechoic projections surrounding a hyperechoic center, suggestive of diverticulitis (Figure. She was given metronidazole and ciprofloxacin and her diagnosis of uncomplicated colonic diverticulitis was confirmed by computed tomography (CT.

  17. The efficacy of adhesiolysis on chronic abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerner-Rasmussen, Jonas; Burcharth, Jakob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Abdominal adhesions are a frequent reason for chronic abdominal pain. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the evidence of performing laparoscopic adhesiolysis as a treatment for patients with chronic abdominal pain. METHODS: Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane...... Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for trials performing lysis of adhesions on patients suffering from chronic abdominal pain. Clinical studies on patients being treated for chronic abdominal pain with surgical adhesiolysis were included. The main outcome of the study...... chronic abdominal pain. A total of 22 trials were identified as case-series and included no control group. Three studies were identified as randomized controlled trials (RCT). A benefit of the intervention varied from 16 to 88 % in the non-randomized studies, with the majority reporting pain relief...

  18. A Syrian man with abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chughtai, Mary; Hoencamp, Rigo; Bronkhorst, Maarten

    2017-05-22

    A 32-year-old man presented with progressive abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting after swallowing a packet of dollar bills, his entire money savings, during his journey to Europe as a refugee. Subsequent imaging confirmed the presence of a foreign body in his stomach, which required surgical intervention to be removed. This is one of many cases that illustrate the hopeless circumstances people in the Middle-Eastern warzone are currently facing. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. [Abdominal pain in progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguier, J; Serratrice, J; Lachaud, A; Belenotti, P; Benyamine, A; Verschueren, A; Boucraut, J; Attarian, S; Weiller, P-J

    2015-04-01

    Stiff-person syndrome is rare neurological disease, associating trunk rigidity and painful muscular spasms. A clinical variant of stiff person syndrome is the progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), which includes neurological cognitive disturbances. We report a 73-year-old woman initially addressed for abdominal pain, anorexia and severe weight-loss, for whom diagnosis of PERM was made. Because of its various clinical presentations, sometimes without evidence for neurological disease, the diagnosis of PERM is delayed. The presence of antineuropile antibodies associated with muscular spasms at electromyogram are strong evidence for this diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Abdominal ultrasonography in the diagnostic work-up in children with recurrent abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Strandberg, C; Pærregaard, Anders

    1997-01-01

    We report on our experience with routine abdominal ultrasonography in 120 children (aged 3-15 years) with recurrent abdominal pain, in order to determine the diagnostic value of this investigation. Eight children (7%) revealed sonographic abnormalities: gallbladder stone (n = 2), splenomegaly (n...... = 1) and urogenital abnormalities (n = 5). The recurrent abdominal pain could be explained by these findings in only two (may be three) cases. CONCLUSION: The diagnostic value of abdominal ultrasonography in unselected children with recurrent abdominal pain is low. However, the direct visualization...... of the abdominal structures as being normal may be helpful to the parents and the child in their understanding and acceptance of the benign nature of recurrent abdominal pain....

  1. Abdominal binders may reduce pain and improve physical function after major abdominal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    with the use of abdominal binders. Reduction of pulmonary function during use of abdominal binders has not been revealed. CONCLUSION: Abdominal binders reduce post-operative psychological distress, but their effect on post-operative pain after laparotomy and seroma formation after ventral hernia repair remains......INTRODUCTION: Evidence for the effect of post-operative abdominal binders on post-operative pain, seroma formation, physical function, pulmonary function and increased intra-abdominal pressure among patients after surgery remains largely un-investigated. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted....... The PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for studies on the use of abdominal binders after abdominal surgery or abdominoplasty. All types of clinical studies were included. Two independent assessors evaluated the scientific quality of the studies. The primary outcomes were pain, seroma...

  2. Acute abdominal pain : considerations on diagnosis and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toorenvliet, Boudewijn Ronald

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis several aspects on the diagnosing and management of patients with acute abdominal pain are investigated. 1; The efficacy and safety of standard outpatient re-evaluation for patients not admitted to the hospital after emergency department evaluation for acute abdominal pain. 2; The use

  3. Acute Non-Traumatic Abdominal Pain in Childhood at Kenyatta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background The assessment and diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in childhood is clinically challenging. The epidemiologic correlates differ for different paediatric age groups and settings. Objectives To determine the clinical spectrum of acute abdominal pain in childhood at a referral Kenyan public hospital. Design

  4. Prognosis of chronic or recurrent abdominal pain in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, Marieke J.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.; Passchier, Ban; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    Background: Chronic abdominal pain (CAP) or recurrent abdominal pain is common in childhood and is rarely associated with organic disease. With modern diagnostic technology, new organic abnormalities are found in children with CAP. Thus far a causal relation between these abnormalities and CAP has

  5. Imperforate Hymen - a rare cause of acute abdominal pain and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Imperforate hymen is a rare condition that presents with amenorrhea, cyclical abdominal pains and urine retention among pubertal girls. A 14 year old girl with imperforate hymen underwent hymenotomy for hematocolpometra, having presented with abdominal pains and tenesmus. Key words: Imperforate hymen, ...

  6. An unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Cabe, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department with abdominal pain, diarrhoea, anorexia and haematemesis. The patient was previously diagnosed with latent tuberculosis (TB). On examination, his abdomen was diffusely tender, with localised guarding in the right iliac fossa. CT imaging of his abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a low volume of ascites, diffuse studding of the peritoneum, omental caking and several bulky low-density lymph nodes in the retroperitoneum. A laparoscopy was performed to obtain a peritoneal biopsy. Histology demonstrated fragments of peritoneum with necrotising granulomatous inflammatory infiltrate in keeping with an infectious process, favouring TB. He was commenced on rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethambutol and pyridoxine under the direct observed therapy by the infectious diseases team. In view of his extensive peritoneal involvement, he was empirically started on high-dose prednisolone for symptomatic control and to reduce complications related to peritoneal adhesions.

  7. [Intra-abdominal pressure as a surgery predictor in patients with acute abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Muñoz, Manuel Alejandro; Villarreal-Ríos, Enrique; Chimal-Torres, Mariano; Pozas-Medina, Josué Atila

    2016-01-01

    Intra-abdominal pressure is the pressure's state of balance within the abdominal cavity when a patient is at rest. This pressure may vary during mechanical ventilation or spontaneous breathing. The objective was to establish the intra-abdominal pressure as a surgery predictor in patients with acute abdominal pain. From April to December, 2013, it was carried out a nested case-control study on patients with acute abdominal pain in the emergency room of a second level hospital. Thirty-seven patients fit the inclusion criteria; they all underwent surgery with a previous measurement of the intra-abdominal pressure. Based on the results of the anatomopathological study, we divided the patients into two groups: those with evidence of acute abdominal inflammatory process (n=28) (case group), and patients without evidence of acute abdominal inflammatory process (n=9) (control group). In the case group, 100 % of patients shown high intra-abdominal pressure with a p=0.01 (OR=5 [95 % CI=2.578-9.699]. In the case group, the mean intra-abdominal pressure was 11.46, and in the control group 9.2 (p=0.183). Abdominal pain requiring surgical intervention is directly related to intra-abdominal pressure>5 mmHg.

  8. Abdominal pain in physical therapy practice: 3 patient cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeghero, Jason R; Denninger, Thomas R; Ross, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Resident's case problem. Abdominal pain is a common symptom, but not a common diagnosis, of patients referred to physical therapists for examination and intervention. For patients with primary symptoms of abdominal pain, a thorough evaluation must be performed to determine if symptoms are musculoskeletal in nature or of a nonmusculoskeletal origin that would warrant a referral to a different healthcare provider. This report describes the management of 3 adults with primary complaints of abdominal pain who were referred for physical therapy evaluation and treatment. Two of the patients had secondary symptoms of hip and/or low back pain and had previously undergone extensive medical testing for their chronic abdominal pain, without a definitive diagnosis having been determined. A physical therapy evaluation was conducted, and treatment, including manual physical therapy and exercise, was administered to address all relative impairments, once the physical therapist had determined that the patients' symptoms were of musculoskeletal origin. The third patient included in this series was referred to a physical therapist with a diagnosis of greater trochanteric versus iliopsoas bursitis. However, the patient had abdominal pain that was more acute in nature and a history and physical examination findings that were concerning for abdominal pain of nonmusculoskeletal origin. Both patients with abdominal pain of musculoskeletal origin showed marked improvement in pain and disability after 7 treatment sessions. The third patient was referred to her primary care physician, and ultrasound examination of the abdomen revealed several intrauterine masses that were consistent with uterine fibroids. Following uterine fibroid embolization, the patient was symptom free. Although not routinely managed by physical therapists, abdominal pain is a relatively common patient symptom that can have several causes, both musculoskeletal and nonmusculoskeletal. This paper emphasizes the importance

  9. Abdominal binders may reduce pain and improve physical function after major abdominal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence for the effect of post-operative abdominal binders on post-operative pain, seroma formation, physical function, pulmonary function and increased intra-abdominal pressure among patients after surgery remains largely un-investigated. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted....... The PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for studies on the use of abdominal binders after abdominal surgery or abdominoplasty. All types of clinical studies were included. Two independent assessors evaluated the scientific quality of the studies. The primary outcomes were pain, seroma...... to reduce seroma formation after laparoscopic ventral herniotomy and a non-significant reduction in pain. Physical function was improved, whereas evidence supports a beneficial effect on psychological distress after open abdominal surgery. Evidence also supports that intra-abdominal pressure increases...

  10. Plain abdominal radiography in acute abdominal pain; past, present, and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gans SL

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sarah L Gans,1 Jaap Stoker,2 Marja A Boermeester11Department of Surgery, 2Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The NetherlandsAbstract: Several studies have demonstrated that a diagnosis based solely on a patient’s medical history, physical examination, and laboratory tests is not reliable enough, despite the fact that these aspects are essential parts of the workup of a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain. Traditionally, imaging workup starts with abdominal radiography. However, numerous studies have demonstrated low sensitivity and accuracy for plain abdominal radiography in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain as well as various specific diseases such as perforated viscus, bowel obstruction, ingested foreign body, and ureteral stones. Computed tomography, and in particular computed tomography after negative ultrasonography, provides a better workup than plain abdominal radiography alone. The benefits of computed tomography lie in decision-making for management, planning of a surgical strategy, and possibly even avoidance of negative laparotomies. Based on abundant available evidence, major advances in diagnostic imaging, and changes in the management of certain diseases, we can conclude that there is no place for plain abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute abdominal pain presenting in the emergency department in current practice.Keywords: abdominal x-ray, acute abdomen, acute abdominal pain, emergency department, diagnostic imaging, abdominal radiography

  11. Pain following the repair of an abdominal hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mark Berner; Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Crawford, Michael Edward

    2010-01-01

    Pain and other types of discomfort are frequent symptoms following the repair of an abdominal hernia. After 1 year, the incidence of light to moderate pain following inguinal hernia repair is as high as 10% and 2% for severe disabling chronic pain. Postoperative chronic pain not only affects the ......, the paper provides an update on the diagnostic and treatment routines for postoperative pain.......Pain and other types of discomfort are frequent symptoms following the repair of an abdominal hernia. After 1 year, the incidence of light to moderate pain following inguinal hernia repair is as high as 10% and 2% for severe disabling chronic pain. Postoperative chronic pain not only affects...... the individual patient, but may also have a great impact on relatives and society, and may be a cause of concern for the responsible surgeon. This paper provides an overview of the anatomy, surgical procedures, and disposing factors (age, gender, ethnicity, genotype, previous hernia repair, pain prior to surgery...

  12. Laparoscopy in unexplained abdominal pain: surgeon's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, M.T.; Waqar, S.H.; Zahid, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Unexplained abdominal pain is a common but difficult presenting feature faced by the clinicians. Such patients can undergo a number of investigations with failure to reach any diagnosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of laparoscopy in the diagnosis and management of patients with unexplained abdominal pain. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences Islamabad from January 2009 to December 2013. This study included 91 patients of unexplained abdominal pain not diagnosed by routine clinical examination and investigations. These patients were subjected to diagnostic laparoscopy for evaluation of their conditions and to confirm the diagnosis. These patients presented 43% of patients undergoing investigations for abdominal pain. Patients diagnosed with gynaecological problems were excluded to see surgeon's perspective. The findings and the outcomes of the laparoscopy were recorded and data was analyzed. Results: Unexplained abdominal pain is common in females than in males. The most common laparoscopic findings were abdominal tuberculosis followed by appendicitis. Ninety percent patients achieved pain relief after laparoscopic intervention. Conclusion: Laparoscopy is both beneficial and safe in majority of patients with unexplained abdominal pain. General surgeons should acquire training and experience in laparoscopic surgery to provide maximum benefit to these difficult patients. (author)

  13. Abdominal pain in long-term spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Faaborg, Pia Møller; Krogh, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Objectives:To describe the prevalence and character of chronic abdominal pain in a group of patients with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI) and to assess predictors of abdominal pain.Study design:Postal survey.Setting:Members of the Danish Paraplegic Association.Methods:We mailed a questionnaire...... to 284 members of the Danish Paraplegic Association who met the inclusion criteria (member for at least 10 years). The questionnaire contained questions about cause and level of spinal injury, colorectal function and pain/discomfort.Results:Seventy percent returned the questionnaire (133 men and 70 women....../discomfort. There was no relation of abdominal pain to other types of pain.Conclusion:Chronic pain located in the abdomen is frequent in patients with long-term SCI. The delayed onset following SCI and the relation to constipation suggest that constipation plays an important role for this type of pain in the spinal cord injured....

  14. Abdominal pain – learning when not to intervene!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Tachamo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Epiploic appendagitis (EA is an uncommon cause of abdominal pain. It is a benign condition but may mimic other serious causes of acute abdomen such as appendicitis, diverticulitis, and gynecological emergency in severe cases. Knowledge of this condition in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain can save unnecessary hospital admission, antibiotics, and surgery. In this article, we present the case of a 43-year-old female who presented to our hospital with a 2-day history of right lower quadrant abdominal pain and diarrhea. She was diagnosed with EA with computed tomography of abdomen with contrast and was managed conservatively with good outcome.

  15. Acute lower abdominal pain caused by adnexal torsion in a ten-year-old girl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinthorsdottir, Kristin Julia; Hansen, Lars Folmer; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    A ten-year-old girl presented with four days of lower abdominal pain. A diagnostic laparoscopy on the suspicion of acute appendicitis revealed left-sided adnexal torsion. The cyanotic ovary was detorsed and recovered. At three-month follow-up there were no clinical or ultrasonic signs of pathology....... The clinical presentation of adnexal torsion is unspecific and mimics several differential diagnosis. Adnexal torsion is a rare condition, especially in pre-pubertal girls. However, it must still be kept in mind when evaluating girls regardless of age with lower abdominal pain....

  16. Psychological Profile of Children with Headache and Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The psychological profile of 70 patients (age range 4-18 years; mean 11 years with headache, 70 with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP, and 70 controls was compared using the Child Behaviour Checklist 4-18 (CBCL.

  17. Functional abdominal pain syndrome treated with Korean medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Gue Son

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year-old female patient with chronic and stubborn abdominal pain had been hospitalized five times in three Western hospitals, but no effects were observed. No abnormalities were found in blood tests, gastrointestinal endoscopy, sonogram, and computed tomography of the abdomen, except mild paralytic ileus. The patient decided to rely on Korean medicine as an inpatient. She was diagnosed with functional abdominal pain syndrome, and her symptom differentiation was the “Yang deficiency of spleen and kidney.” A herbal drug, Hwangikyeji-tang, along with moxibustion and acupuncture, was given to the patient. Abdominal pain and related symptoms were reduced radically within 16 days of treatment. This report shows a therapeutic potential of Korean medicine-based treatment for functional abdominal pain syndrome.

  18. Abdominal Pain in Adult Sickle Cell Disease Patients: A Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A prospective case series of 20 patients was done in which data was collected on demographic characteristics, hemoglobin electrophoresis patterns, a description of the abdominal pain including sites, severity, and type of pain, packed cell volume and the provisional and final diagnosis. Results: Haemoglobin S ...

  19. Pentazocine Pain Relief in Adult Patients With Acute Abdominal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    Results: Twenty patients in the PZ group and 9 patients in the control group had a VAS score drop. >12mm. ... investigate the safety of early administration of pentazocine in adult patients with acute abdominal pain. ... significant pain relief compared to a placebo, and whether pentazocine administration to patients with.

  20. Treatment of abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanuytsel, Tim; Tack, Jan F.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2014-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain in the context of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a challenging problem for primary care physicians, gastroenterologists and pain specialists. We review the evidence for the current and future non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment options targeting the central

  1. A typology of pain coping in pediatric patients with chronic abdominal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Lynn S.; Baber, Kari Freeman; Garber, Judy; Smith, Craig A.

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to identify clinically meaningful profiles of pain coping strategies used by youth with chronic abdominal pain (CAP). Participants (n = 699) were pediatric patients (ages 8–18 years) and their parents. Patients completed the Pain Response Inventory (PRI) and measures of somatic and depressive symptoms, disability, pain severity and pain efficacy, and perceived competence. Parents rated their children’s pain severity and coping efficacy. Hierarchical cluster analysis based on ...

  2. Managing a female patient with left low back pain and sacroiliac joint pain with therapeutic exercise: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Kyndall L

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to describe the management of a female patient with chronic left low back pain and sacroiliac joint pain (LBP/SIJP) using unique unilateral exercises developed by the Postural Restoration Institute (PRI) to address pelvic asymmetry and left hip capsule restriction, which is consistent with a Right Handed and Left Anterior Interior Chain pattern of postural asymmetry.Client Description: The client was 65-year-old woman with a 10-month history of constant left LBP/SIJP and leg pain. The patient was seen six times to correct pelvic position/posture and left hip posterior capsule restriction via (1) muscle activation (left hamstrings, adductor magnus, and anterior gluteus medius) and (2) left hip adduction to lengthen the left posterior capsule/ischiofemoral ligament. Stabilization exercises included bilateral hamstrings, gluteus maximus, adductors, and abdominals to maintain pelvic position/posture.Measures and Outcome: Left Ober's test (initially positive) was negative at discharge. Pain as measured on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (initially 1/10 at best and 8/10 at worst) was 0/10-0/10 at discharge. Oswestry Disability Index score (initially 20%) was 0% at discharge. The patient no longer had numbness in her left leg, and sexual intercourse had become pain free. INTERVENTIONs to restore and maintain the optimal position of pelvis and hip (femoral head in the acetabulum) may be beneficial for treating patients with chronic LBP/SIJP. The patient's pain was eliminated 13 days after she first performed three exercises to reposition the pelvis and restore left posterior hip capsule extensibility and internal rotation.

  3. Epidemiology, diagnosis and management of functional abdominal pain in children: A look beyond the belly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korterink, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic abdominal pain represents a common problem in children. In almost 90% of children presenting with chronic abdominal pain, no organic cause is found and a diagnosis of functional abdominal pain is made. Initially this condition was referred to as ‘recurrent abdominal pain’ by Apley and Naish

  4. Eighty-two year old female with long term abdominal pain, fever and skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz Nicolás, G; Zafar Iqbal-Mirza, S; Gonzáles Carhuancho, J A; Mollejo Villanueva, M

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of an old woman, consulting for fever, abdominal pain and constitutional symptoms one year of evolution. The differential diagnosis is between infectious, tumoral, or inflammatory disease, which may be located at the abdominal level, performing additional tests to rule out abdominal process. The existence of pain in the legs and level scan left thigh of a mass of hard consistency, makes us raise another diagnosis. Finally show on ultrasound soft tissue inflammatory changes regarding panniculitis. From this finding aetiologies of panniculitis are reviewed. Skin biopsy that shows the final diagnosis is made. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  5. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain in Childhood: Cardiac Angiosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvan Caglar Citak

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac angiosarcomas are extremely rare in childhood, they are rapidly progressive tumours that often present themselves as diagnostic dilemmas, resulting in delayed diagnosis. Also, extracardiac manifestations, including abdominal pain, are extremely rare in patients with intracardiac tumors. We herein present the case of a 15-year-old girl who presented with abdominal pain. Echocardiography and thoracic computed tomography showed right atrial mass. The patient underwent surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Eight months after treatment, abdominal recurrence was detected. The abdominal mass was resected, and radiotherapy and new chemotherapy protocol were given. The present case illustrates a rare case of primary cardiac angiosarcoma posing a diagnostic dilemma in an adolescent girl.

  6. Pain intensity and abdominal muscle activation during walking in patients with low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Kyue-Nam; Kwon, Oh-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Nonspecific low back pain (LBP) is a common musculoskeletal problem that is intensified during physical activity. Patients with LBP have been reported to change their abdominal muscle activity during walking; however, the effects of pain intensity, disability level, and fear-avoidance belief on this relationship have not been evaluated. Thus, we compared abdominal muscle activity in patients with LBP and asymptomatic controls, and assessed the impact of pain intensity, disability lev...

  7. Acute abdominal pain and constipation due to lead poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongolu, S; Sharp, P

    2013-01-01

    Although uncommon, lead poisoning should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases of unexplained acute abdominal pain in both adults and children. We present the case of a 35-year-old Asian male who presented with abdominal pain and constipation secondary to lead poisoning. Initially, the source of lead exposure was not apparent; this was later found to be due to ingestion of an Ayurvedic herbal medicine for the treatment of infertility. Lead poisoning due to the ingestion of Ayurvedic remedies is well described. We discuss the diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of lead poisoning. This case illustrates one of the rarer medical causes of acute abdominal pain and emphasizes the need to take a thorough history (including specific questioning regarding the use of over-the-counter and traditional/ herbal remedies) in cases of suspected poisoning or drug toxicity.

  8. [A young woman with acute abdominal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, R.; Dillen, J. van

    2013-01-01

    A 17-year-old woman was operated in a Tanzanian hospital because of a suspected ruptured ectopic pregnancy. During laparatomy an interstitial ectopic pregnancy with an intact gestational sac was found. The ectopic pregnancy had ruptured into the abdominal cavity.

  9. [A young woman with acute abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Rob; van Dillen, Jeroen

    2013-01-01

    A 17-year-old woman was operated in a Tanzanian hospital because of a suspected ruptured ectopic pregnancy. During laparatomy an interstitial ectopic pregnancy with an intact gestational sac was found. The ectopic pregnancy had ruptured into the abdominal cavity.

  10. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain: Primary Epiploic Appendagitis (PEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulbanu Erkan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary epiploic appendagitis (PEA is a rare disease caused by torsion or spontaneous thrombosis of the central vein that drains epiploic appendages (EA. Primary Epiploic Appendagitis (PEA is an ischemic infarction. Although PEA is a self-limiting disease and does not require surgical intervention in most cases, it may mimic diseases that require surgical intervention or aggressive medical therapy, such as appendicitis, diverticulitis, or cholecystitis. In order to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention, PEA should be kept in mind when patients present with acute abdominal pain. In this report, we present a PEA case admitted with abdominal pain.

  11. Cauda equina syndrome presenting as abdominal pain: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, Prasad

    2012-09-01

    Cauda equina syndrome (CES) is an uncommon entity. Symptoms include bowel and bladder dysfunction, saddle anesthesia, and varying degrees of lower limb motor and sensory disturbances. The consequences of delayed diagnosis can be devastating, resulting in bowel and bladder incontinence and lower limb paralysis. There is little in literature regarding abdominal pain as a significant feature of the initial presentation of CES. We present the case of a 32-year-old woman with CES who presented to the emergency department with gradually worsening lower abdominal pain.

  12. Treatment of chronic recurrent abdominal pain: laparoscopy or hypnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galili, Offer; Shaoul, Ron; Mogilner, Jorge

    2009-02-01

    Functional chronic recurrent abdominal pain (FCRAP) is long lasting, intermittent, or constant pain affecting 15-30% of children ages 4-18 and presents a diagnostic and treatment challenge to the physician. The predictive value of diagnostic tests is questionable, and studies of the treatment of chronic abdominal pain show inconclusive evidence regarding diet regimens as well as medical and surgical treatments. However, there is evidence that cognitive-behavioral therapy may be useful in improving pain and disability outcome. Increasing the understanding of the neural-pain pathways and research in cognitive modulation of pain led to the application of behavioral strategies in children with FCRAP with variable success. However, the use of hypnotherapy in children with recurrent abdominal pain is not common. During the last 3 years, we have implemented hypnosis as the preferred treatment for patients with FCRAP. In the current study, we aimed to summarize our experience with hypnosis for the treatment of FCRAP in children. Twenty patients who met the criteria for FCRAP were candidates for hypnosis. Hypnosis or imagery was offered to the families, of whom 3 refused. Seventeen patients underwent just one single session of hypnosis. A possible nonorganic etiology for the abdominal pain was revealed in all cases. In 14 adolescents, all clinical symptoms resolved. Hypnosis was not effective in 3 cases, in whom secondary gain was probably responsible for their symptoms. No side effects have been noted during and after the study. Follow-up was available for a period of 4-24 months. Although effective in the management of acute pain and distress in pediatric cancer patients, the use of hypnotherapy in children with FCRAP is not a common practice. The current study highly supports the use of hypnosis as a part of the biobehavioral approach for this dilemma.

  13. A primary care approach to functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Jennifer; Allen, Patricia Jackson

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the literature related to functional abdominal pain (FAP) in childhood, including the definition, etiology, contributing factors, clinical diagnosis, therapy and management, and associated long-term health effects. FAP is determined when no specific structural, infectious, inflammatory, or biochemical cause can be found in a child with chronic pain. The presence of abdominal pain as an isolated symptom is more suggestive of FAP, whereas multiple symptoms are more likely to be due to an organic or biochemical condition. While the exact cause of FAP is not completely understood, most researchers and clinicians agree that it is of multi-factorial etiology coupled with an altered brain-gut interaction. Children are highly susceptible to influences around them and can experience pain in response to normal childhood feelings and experiences. Psychological disorders such as anxiety and depression are common in both children with FAP and their parents. Children with FAP tend to have low levels of self-directedness, internalize their feelings and worries, and ruminate over issues they cannot control. The biopsychosocial model has proved to be a worthwhile framework for children with FAP, as it recognizes the interaction between social and environmental influences, psychological processes, and the state of the body. Interventions that focus on the child's cognitive processes associated with abdominal pain and the family's response to the pain have increased efficacy over standard education and reassurance. Providing children and families with techniques to use when experiencing pain decreases alterations in normal daily activities and improves long-term health outcomes.

  14. Managing acute abdominal pain in pediatric patients: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hijaz NM

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Nadia M Hijaz, Craig A Friesen Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Children’s Mercy Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, USA Abstract: Acute abdominal pain in pediatric patients has been a challenge for providers because of the nonspecific nature of symptoms and difficulty in the assessment and physical examination in children. Although most children with acute abdominal pain have self-limited benign conditions, pain may be a manifestation of an urgent surgical or medical condition where the biggest challenge is making a timely diagnosis so that appropriate treatment can be initiated without any diagnostic delays that increase morbidity. This is weighed against the need to decrease radiation exposure and avoid unnecessary operations. Across all age groups, there are numerous conditions that present with abdominal pain ranging from a very simple viral illness to a life-threatening surgical condition. It is proposed that the history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging studies should initially be directed at differentiating surgical versus nonsurgical conditions both categorized as urgent versus nonurgent. The features of the history including patient’s age, physical examination focused toward serious conditions, and appropriate tests are highlighted in the context of making these differentiations. Initial testing and management is also discussed with an emphasis on making use of surgeon and radiologist consultation and the need for adequate follow-up and reevaluation of the patient. Keywords: acute abdominal pain, surgical abdomen, ultrasound

  15. Role of laparoscopy in evaluation of abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masud, M.; Adil, M.; Gondal, Z.I.; Aquil, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of laparoscopy in ill-defined recurrent chronic abdominal pain. Study Design: Prospective study. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical department, Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from Jul 2011 to Dec 2013. Material and Methods: A total of 102 patients who presented to surgical department with chronic recurrent abdominal pain of unknown etiology and underwent diagnostic laparoscopy were included in our study. Patients with acute onset of abdominal pain, hemodynamically unstable, pregnant or those in which diagnosis can be made by radiological techniques were excluded from our study. Patient's demographic data, clinical findings and laparoscopic findings were recorded. Finally data was analyzed by using SPSS version 21. Results: Out of 110 patients 96 were female while remaining 14 were male. The age range of the patients was 20- 70 years with mean age of 50 +- 10 years. The most common site of pain was lower abdomen while mean duration of abdominal pain was 34 weeks. Laparoscopic findings include acute recurrent appendicitis in 32 (29.09%) patients, cholecystitis with biliary sludge in 14 (12.72%), pelvic inflammatory disease in 12 (10.90%), ovarian cyst in 11(10%), adhesions in 10(9.09%), intestinal tuberculosis in 8 (7.27%), mesenteric lymphadenitis in 7 (6.36%), lymphoma in 4 (3.63%), ectopic pregnancy in 3 (2.7%), CA gallbladder in 2 (1.81%), meckels diverticulum in 2 (1.81%), endometriosis in 2 (1.81%) and crohns disease in 1 (0.9%) patients. Mean operative time was 48 min while average hospital stay was 2-3 days. No major complications were noticed. Conclusion: Laparoscopy in our clinical setup has significant role in diagnosing cases of vague abdominal pain which cannot be diagnosed by routine investigations. (author)

  16. A rare cause of lomber pain: diopatic abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colak, F.; Saglam, M.; Sahin, M.; Bozlar, U.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysms are rare and life-threatening situations. Trauma and operative procedures are common causes of pseudoaneurysm. Abdominal pain is the most common symptom of them. They are usually detected incidentally. Objectives and tasks: We aim to present CTA findings of abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm causes gradually increasing lomber pain in 70-year-old female patient. Physical examination also made diagnosis easy because of pulsatile mass detected. Materials and methods: Lomber MRG and endoscopic procedures were normal. Then we performed CTA to find the cause for pulsatile mass. Results: Pseudoaneurysm with approximately 6 x 7.5 cm size was compressing duodenum and not showing extravasation at the infrarenal segment of abdominal aorta detected in CTA. Pseudoaneurysm was filling from aorta through a 2 cm neck. Conclusion: Primary cause for pseudoaneurysms is traumating injuries. Initial presentation may be abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding or pulsatile mass. To plan treatment and figure out pseudoaneurysm CTA is very fast and non-invasive technic

  17. An Elderly Female with Dyspnea and Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Van Heukelom

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of Present Illness: A 55-year-old female presented via transfer from a referring hospital with 48 hours of abdominal pain, vomiting and dyspnea. She was found to be in severe distress. Her temperature was 37.5° C (99.5° F, heart rate 130 beats per minute, respiratory rate 47 breaths per minute, blood pressure 80/48, and oxygen saturation of 95% on a non-rebreather mask. She had distended neck veins, diminished breath sounds on the left hemi-thorax, and a distended abdomen. A chest x-ray that had been obtained at the referring hospital was immediately reviewed. The decision was made to intubate the patient. Following intubation, a nasogastric tube was placed with marked improvement in her hemodynamics. An abdomen-pelvis CT was obtained which showed a para-esophageal hernia with the majority of the stomach located in the left hemi-thorax and evidence of a bowel obstruction. Significant findings: Radiography shows a dilated, gas-filled structure that fills nearly the entire left hemi-thorax. Lung markings are visible in the uppermost portion of the left hemi-thorax. There is mediastinal shift to the right. In the visualized portion of the abdomen, dilated loops of bowel are also visualized. This constellation of findings is consistent with a tension gastrothorax. Discussion: Tension gastrothorax is a rare complication of blunt trauma, diaphragmatic hernias, and certain surgical procedures.1,2 Clinically, a tension gastrothorax may mimic that of a tension pneumothorax, making it difficult to diagnose.3,4 Stabilizing treatment includes decompressing the stomach by means of a nasogastric (NG tube.2 Placement may be difficult due the intra-thoracic position of the stomach leading to kinking of the tube. The attempt to place an NG tube can lead to hyperventilation and air swallowing, which can aggravate gastric distention.4 Failure to decompress the stomach, however, may lead to patient decompensation and cardiac arrest.5 Definitive treatment

  18. [Gastrointestinal diseases and abdominal pain in combat veterans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal'tsev, A I; Torgashov, M N; Popova, O S

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the role of consequences of combat stress in the development of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) diseases. One hundred and sixty-one combat veterans aged 24 to 69 years were examined. All underwent a clinical and neurological examination using the McGill pain questionnaire (MPQ), Beck depression inventory, Kotenev trauma stress questionnaire, and visual analogue scale to determine pain intensity. Anxiety, impairments in memory and sleep, and depression were identified. The SF-36 questionnaire was used to estimate quality of life in the patients. Gastric secretory function was investigated; esophagogastroduodenoscopy, X-ray and ultrasound studies, clinical and biochemical blood tests, coprological examinations, fecal tests for dysbiosis, if indicated, occult blood were made. Combat stress and its consequences as posttraumatic stress disorder have been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of GIT diseases and in the development of chronic abdominal pain. GIT diseases in combat veterans are in larger measure a sequel of impaired processes of adjustment to combat stress. Chronic abdominal pains were heterogeneous. On the one hand, chronic GIT disease serves as a source of pain syndrome; on the other hand, the central nervous system is of importance in the development of chronic abdominal pain. In addition to therapy for GIT and hepatobiliary diseases, the treatment of GIT diseases in this category of patients involves psychotherapy and neuroprotection, aimed at reducing the consequences of combat stress in combat veterans.

  19. Inter-observer agreement for abdominal CT in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randen, Adrienne van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lameris, Wytze [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nio, C.Y.; Spijkerboer, Anje M.; Meier, Mark A.; Tutein Nolthenius, Charlotte; Smithuis, Frank; Stoker, Jaap [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bossuyt, Patrick M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boermeester, Marja A. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-15

    The level of inter-observer agreement of abdominal computed tomography (CT) in unselected patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the Emergency Department (ED) was evaluated. Two hundred consecutive patients with acute abdominal pain were prospectively included. Multi-slice CT was performed in all patients with intravenous contrast medium only. Three radiologists independently read all CT examinations. They recorded specific radiological features and a final diagnosis on a case record form. We calculated the proportion of agreement and kappa values, for overall, urgent and frequently occurring diagnoses. The mean age of the evaluated patients was 46 years (range 19-94), of which 54% were women. Overall agreement on diagnoses was good, with a median kappa of 0.66. Kappa values for specific urgent diagnoses were excellent, with median kappa values of 0.84, 0.90 and 0.81, for appendicitis, diverticulitis and bowel obstruction, respectively. Abdominal CT has good inter-observer agreement in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED, with excellent agreement for specific urgent diagnoses as diverticulitis and appendicitis. (orig.)

  20. Inter-observer agreement for abdominal CT in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randen, Adrienne van; Lameris, Wytze; Nio, C.Y.; Spijkerboer, Anje M.; Meier, Mark A.; Tutein Nolthenius, Charlotte; Smithuis, Frank; Stoker, Jaap; Bossuyt, Patrick M.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2009-01-01

    The level of inter-observer agreement of abdominal computed tomography (CT) in unselected patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the Emergency Department (ED) was evaluated. Two hundred consecutive patients with acute abdominal pain were prospectively included. Multi-slice CT was performed in all patients with intravenous contrast medium only. Three radiologists independently read all CT examinations. They recorded specific radiological features and a final diagnosis on a case record form. We calculated the proportion of agreement and kappa values, for overall, urgent and frequently occurring diagnoses. The mean age of the evaluated patients was 46 years (range 19-94), of which 54% were women. Overall agreement on diagnoses was good, with a median kappa of 0.66. Kappa values for specific urgent diagnoses were excellent, with median kappa values of 0.84, 0.90 and 0.81, for appendicitis, diverticulitis and bowel obstruction, respectively. Abdominal CT has good inter-observer agreement in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED, with excellent agreement for specific urgent diagnoses as diverticulitis and appendicitis. (orig.)

  1. Left Ventricular Myxoma Occluding the Suprarenal Abdominal Aorta in an Infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Takuya; Kasahara, Shingo; Ohtsuki, Shin-ichi; Kuroko, Yosuke; Kotani, Yasuhiro; Fujii, Yasuhiro; Yoshizumi, Ko; Arai, Sadahiko; Sano, Shunji

    2015-07-01

    Myxoma is the most common primary cardiac tumor in adults; however, it is extremely rare in infants. Acute occlusion of the abdominal aorta by a cardiac myxoma is also rare. We report the case of an infant with acute occlusion of the suprarenal abdominal aorta by a left ventricular myxoma. The patient underwent successful catheter embolectomy of the abdominal aorta and surgical resection of the cardiac myxoma. This is a very rare case report of the combination of infantile left ventricular myxoma and acute occlusion of the abdominal aorta. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prognostic factors for persistence of chronic abdominal pain in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, M.J.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.A.; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Y.; Passchier, J.; Berger, M.Y.

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to identify prognostic factors for the persistence of chronic abdominal pain (CAP) in children. Materials and Methods: For this systematic review, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO were searched up to June 2008 for prospective follow-up studies of pediatric CAP as

  3. ABDOMINAL PAIN IN ADULT SICKLE CELL DISEASE PATIENTS: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    had vasoocclusive crises and the reliability index between the provisional diagnosis and the final diagnosis was 67%. Conclusion: Abdominal pain in sickle cell disease may present in different ways and it is important to recognize that the possible diagnoses are numerous. Not all cases are due to vasoocclusive crises.

  4. Unexplained right upper quadrant abdominal pain? do not forget the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Right upper quadrant abdominal pain is a common reason for consulting a gastroenterologist. Commonly, it portends pathological processes occurring in the liver, gall bladder, or the gut however, unusual causes have been reported. We report cervical intervertebral disc prolapse causing right upper quadrant ...

  5. Surgical implications of abdominal pain in patients presenting to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the local aetiological spectrum of surgically relevant causes of abdominal pain. Design: A prospective descriptive study was carried out. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya during the month of October 2002. Subjects: Patients aged 13 years and older presenting to the casualty ...

  6. Recurrent abdominal pain and Helicobacter pylori infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, A; Ali, S; Hassan, M

    1999-05-01

    Recurrent chronic upper abdominal pain is a common problem in children and it has been associated with Helicobacter Pylori gastritis. We under took this study, to find out the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in children with recurrent chronic upper abdominal pain, in our set up. This was prospective study carried out at KRL Hospital, Islamabad. Forty three children with chronic recurrent upper abdominal pain (age 3 to 14 years), underwent diagnostic gastroscopy and antral biopsies with histopathology, over a period of one year. Another 42 children of the same age group were taken as control group. Fifteen patients, who tested positive for H. pylori were tested for IgG antibodies in whole blood and compared with 15 patients having negative histology for H. pylori. Thirty two (75%) children tested positive for H. pylori, in the test group, as compared to 17 (40%) histological positives in the control group (P = < 0.1). The patients who were tested for IgG antibodies showed that this test has 93% sensitivity, 60% specificity and a negative predictive value of 90% as compared to histological identification. Recurrent chronic upper abdominal pain in children, in our population has a significant association with Helicobacter pylori gastritis. Testing of IgG antibodies for H. pylori in whole blood can be used as initial, non invasive screening test for this organism.

  7. Diagnosis of Acute Abdominal Pain in Older Patients | Lyon | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute abdominal pain is a common presenting complaint in older patients. Presentation may differ from that of the younger patient and is often complicated by coexistent disease, delays in presentation, and physical and social barriers. The physical examination can be misleadingly benign, even with catastrophic conditions ...

  8. Nonpharmacologic Treatment of Functional Abdominal Pain Disorders: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Juliette M. T. M.; Korterink, Judith J.; Venmans, Leonie M. A. J.; Benninga, Marc A.; Tabbers, Merit M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Various nonpharmacologic treatments are available for pediatric abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs). Data on efficacy and safety are scarce. The goal of this study was to summarize the evidence regarding nonpharmacologic interventions for

  9. Plain abdominal radiography in acute abdominal pain; past, present, and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gans, Sarah L.; Stoker, Jaap; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that a diagnosis based solely on a patient's medical history, physical examination, and laboratory tests is not reliable enough, despite the fact that these aspects are essential parts of the workup of a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain. Traditionally,

  10. Testing a Model of Pain Appraisal and Coping in Children With Chronic Abdominal Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Lynn S.; Smith, Craig A.; Garber, Judy; Claar, Robyn Lewis

    2005-01-01

    This prospective study of children with recurrent abdominal pain (N = 133; ages 8–15 years) used path analysis to examine relations among dispositional pain beliefs and coping styles, cognitions and behavior related to a specific pain episode, and short- and long-term outcomes. Children believing they could not reduce or accept pain appraised their episode-specific coping ability as low and reported passive coping behavior. Dispositional passive coping had direct effects on both episode-speci...

  11. Recurrent abdominal pain: when an epileptic seizure should be suspected? Dor abdominal recorrente: quando suspeitar de crise epiléptica?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata C. Franzon

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent episodes of abdominal pain are common in childhood. Among the diagnostic possibilities are migraine and abdominal epilepsy (AE. AE is an infrequent syndrome with paroxystic episodes of abdominal pain, awareness disturbance, EEG abnormalities and positive results with the introduction of antiepileptic drugs. We present one 6 year-old girl who had short episodes of abdominal pain since the age of 4. The pain was followed by cry, fear and occasionally secondary generalization. MRI showed tumor in the left temporal region. As a differential diagnosis, we report a 10 year-old boy who had long episodes of abdominal pain accompanied by blurring of vision, vertigo, gait ataxia, dysarthria, acroparesthesias and vomiting. He received the diagnosis of basilar migraine. In our opinion, AE is part of a large group (partial epilepsies and does not require a special classification. Pediatric neurologists must be aware of these two entities that may cause abdominal pain.Episódios recorrentes de dor abdominal são freqüentes na infância e entre as causas neurológicas há migrânea e epilepsia abdominal (EA. EA é uma síndrome que consiste de episódios paroxísticos de dor abdominal associada à alteração de consciência, anormalidades eletrencefalográficas e boa resposta à terapia anticonvulsivante. Apresentamos uma menina de 6 anos que tinha desde os 4 anos episódios de curta duração de dor abdominal, seguidos por choro, medo e ocasional generalização secundária. A RM mostrou a presença de um tumor em região temporal esquerda. Como diagnóstico diferencial, apresentamos um menino de 10 anos que há 12 meses referia episódios de dor abdominal de longa duração acompanhados por turvação visual, vertigem, marcha atáxica, disartria, acroparestesia e vômito, recebendo posteriormente o diagnóstico de migrânia basilar. Em nossa opinião, EA faz parte de um grande grupo (epilepsias parciais e não requer uma classificação especial

  12. Abdominal and lower back pain in pediatric idiopathic stabbing headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Ohara, Tomoichiro; Hino-Fukuyo, Naomi; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Kure, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic stabbing headache (ISH) is a primary headache syndrome characterized by transient, sharp, stabbing pains located in the first division of the trigeminal nerve. Reports of pediatric ISH are rare, and extracephalic pain in pediatric ISH is extremely rare. Here we report the case of a 7-year-old male patient suffering from frequent, short, stabbing headache, which was occasionally associated with abdominal and lower back pain. Various investigations were normal. He was diagnosed with ISH, and valproic acid was administered to relieve his headache and accompanying symptoms. Our case demonstrates that abdominal and lower back pain may occur in pediatric ISH. This case may provide new evidence linking ISH and migraine by showing that extracephalic symptoms accompanying ISH are similar to those of migraine. We hypothesize that the mechanism underlying the headache and abdominal and lower back pain associated with ISH may be similar to that of a migraine headache. Accumulating additional cases by asking specific questions regarding the presence of the unusual symptoms presented in our case may help to establish a detailed clinical profile of these unfamiliar and peculiar symptoms in the pediatric ISH population.

  13. Annual Costs of Care for Pediatric Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Functional Abdominal Pain, and Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekman, Daniël R.; Rutten, Juliette M. T. M.; Vlieger, Arine M.; Benninga, Marc A.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.

    2015-01-01

    To estimate annual medical and nonmedical costs of care for children diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or functional abdominal pain (syndrome; FAP/FAPS). Baseline data from children with IBS or FAP/FAPS who were included in a multicenter trial (NTR2725) in The Netherlands were analyzed.

  14. Prognosis of abdominal pain in children in primary care : A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Spee, Leo A A; Benninga, Marc A; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Berger, Marjolein Y

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Abdominal pain is a common complaint in children. Because few data exist on its natural history, we wanted to investigate the prognosis of abdominal pain in children in general practice. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study of children (aged 4 to 17 years) complaining of abdominal pain,

  15. Value of abdominal CT in the emergency department for patients with abdominal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, Max P.; Siewert, Bettina; Bromberg, Rebecca; Raptopoulos, Vassilios [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Sands, Daniel Z. [Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Edlow, Jonathan [Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of our study is to demonstrate the value of CT in the emergency department (ED) for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. Between August 1998 and April 1999, 536 consecutive patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain were entered into our study. Using a computer order entry system, physicians were asked to identify: (a) their most likely diagnosis; (b) their level of certainty in their diagnosis; (c) if they thought CT would be normal or abnormal; (d) their treatment plan (prior to knowledge of the CT results); and (e) their role in deciding to order CT. This information was correlated with each patient's post-CT diagnosis and subsequent management. Pre- and post-CT diagnoses were concordant in 200 of 536 (37%) patients. The physicians' certainty in the accuracy of their pre-CT diagnosis was less than high in 88% of patients. Prior to CT, the management plan included hospital admission for 402 patients. Following CT, only 312 patients were actually admitted; thus, the net impact of performing CT was to obviate the need for hospital admission in 90 of 536 (17%) of patients with abdominal pain. Prior to CT, 67 of 536 (13%) of all patients would have undergone immediate surgery; however, following CT only 25 (5%) actually required immediate surgery. Among patients with the four most common pre-CT diagnoses (appendicitis, abscess, diverticulitis, and urinary tract stones) CT had the greatest impact on hospital admission and surgical management for patients with suspected appendicitis. For patients with suspected appendicitis, CT reduced the hospital admission rate in 28% (26 of 91) of patients and changed the surgical management in 40% (39 of 91) of patients. Our study demonstrates the advantage of performing abdominal CT in the ED for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  16. Value of abdominal CT in the emergency department for patients with abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, Max P.; Siewert, Bettina; Bromberg, Rebecca; Raptopoulos, Vassilios; Sands, Daniel Z.; Edlow, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to demonstrate the value of CT in the emergency department (ED) for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. Between August 1998 and April 1999, 536 consecutive patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain were entered into our study. Using a computer order entry system, physicians were asked to identify: (a) their most likely diagnosis; (b) their level of certainty in their diagnosis; (c) if they thought CT would be normal or abnormal; (d) their treatment plan (prior to knowledge of the CT results); and (e) their role in deciding to order CT. This information was correlated with each patient's post-CT diagnosis and subsequent management. Pre- and post-CT diagnoses were concordant in 200 of 536 (37%) patients. The physicians' certainty in the accuracy of their pre-CT diagnosis was less than high in 88% of patients. Prior to CT, the management plan included hospital admission for 402 patients. Following CT, only 312 patients were actually admitted; thus, the net impact of performing CT was to obviate the need for hospital admission in 90 of 536 (17%) of patients with abdominal pain. Prior to CT, 67 of 536 (13%) of all patients would have undergone immediate surgery; however, following CT only 25 (5%) actually required immediate surgery. Among patients with the four most common pre-CT diagnoses (appendicitis, abscess, diverticulitis, and urinary tract stones) CT had the greatest impact on hospital admission and surgical management for patients with suspected appendicitis. For patients with suspected appendicitis, CT reduced the hospital admission rate in 28% (26 of 91) of patients and changed the surgical management in 40% (39 of 91) of patients. Our study demonstrates the advantage of performing abdominal CT in the ED for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  17. Protozoa as a cause of recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsbers, Carolien F M; Schweizer, Joachim J; Büller, Hans A

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether protozoa can be identified as a cause of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), and whether protozoan infections can be recognized by a specific clinical presentation. For 2 years, all patients (ages 4-16 years) fulfilling the Apley criteria of RAP referred to secondary care were prospectively evaluated for protozoa (Giardia lamblia, Dientamoeba fragilis, Blastocystis hominis) and treated if positive. Re-examination followed at least 10 days after treatment. Disappearance of pain with eradication and a pain-free follow-up of at least 6 months were considered to be indicative of a causal relation with RAP. The predictive value of the characteristics of the pain for protozoan infections was calculated. Of 220 included patients (92 boys, mean age 8.8 years), 215 brought a stool sample; 73 (34%) carried parasites, 10 of whom had 2 parasites, 2 had 3 parasites. Sixty-five patients were treated. Twenty-five (11%) were pain-free after eradication (21 had D fragilis, 8 B hominis, 4 G lamblia), of whom 11 had another infection (2) or constipation (9) as second diagnosis for the pain. Five had recurrence of infection with D fragilis and were again pain-free with eradication. Patients with protozoa as cause of their pain did not show differences with respect to their presentation when compared with patients with an asymptomatic infection and patients without protozoa. Protozoa were found as the cause of pain in 6% to 11% of children with RAP. These patients did not show a characteristic presentation when compared with patients with other causes of abdominal pain.

  18. A typology of pain coping strategies in pediatric patients with chronic abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lynn S; Baber, Kari Freeman; Garber, Judy; Smith, Craig A

    2008-07-15

    This study aimed to identify clinically meaningful profiles of pain coping strategies used by youth with chronic abdominal pain (CAP). Participants (n=699) were pediatric patients (ages 8-18 years) and their parents. Patients completed the Pain Response Inventory (PRI) and measures of somatic and depressive symptoms, disability, pain severity and pain efficacy, and perceived competence. Parents rated their children's pain severity and coping efficacy. Hierarchical cluster analysis based on the 13 PRI subscales identified pain coping profiles in Sample 1 (n=311) that replicated in Sample 2 (n=388). Evidence was found of external validity and distinctiveness of the profiles. The findings support a typology of pain coping that reflects the quality of patients' pain mastery efforts and interpersonal relationships associated with pain coping. Results are discussed in relation to developmental processes, attachment styles, and treatment implications.

  19. Lactose and Fructose Intolerance in Turkish Children with Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuce, Ozlem; Kalayci, Ayhan Gazi; Comba, Atakan; Eren, Esra; Caltepe, Gonul

    2016-05-08

    To investigate the prevalence of lactose and fructose intolerance in children with chronic abdominal pain. Hydrogen breath tests were done to detect lactose and fructose malabsorption in 86 children with chronic abdominal pain (44 irritable bowel syndrome, 24 functional abdominal pain and 17 functional abdominal pain syndrome as per Rome III criteria) presenting to a Pediatric Gastroentreology department. 14 (16.3%) of patients were diagnosed with lactose intolerance and 11 (12.8%) with fructose intolerance. Lactose and fructose intolerance in children can lead to chronic abdominal pain and symptoms improve with dietary modifications.

  20. Abdominal pain in a 70-year-old Danish population. An epidemiological study of the prevalence and importance of abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kay, L; Jørgensen, Torben; Schultz-Larsen, K

    1992-01-01

    In order to assess the prevalence and importance of abdominal pain in the elderly, an epidemiological study of a 70-year-old Danish population was carried out. Seventy two percent of 1119 randomly selected persons answered a questionnaire concerning abdominal pain. One year prevalence of abdomina...... in a 70 year old population and influences the well-being of the subjects. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether subjects with abdominal pain have a poorer prognosis than subjects without.......In order to assess the prevalence and importance of abdominal pain in the elderly, an epidemiological study of a 70-year-old Danish population was carried out. Seventy two percent of 1119 randomly selected persons answered a questionnaire concerning abdominal pain. One year prevalence of abdominal...... to their well-being in terms of frequency, severity, or need of medicine (sex difference: chi 2 = 10.18, df = 2, p

  1. A Rare Cause of Acute Abdominal Pain: Primary Appendagitis Epiploica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarkan Ergun

    2014-03-01

    Primary appendagitis epiploica – one of the causes of acute abdominal pain – is a self-limited rare benign inflammatory condition involving the colonic epiploic appendages. Their therapy is conservative and clinically mimics other conditions requiring surgery such as acute diverticulitis or appendicitis. However, being a quite rare condition is the reason they are usually neglected by both the surgeon and the radiologist. However the computed tomography (CT findings are rather characteristic and pathognomonic. Thus, to consider CT as the diagnostic modality of choice is extremely important in order to diagnose the condition and to avoid unnecessary surgical interventions.             This is a paper reporting an acute abdominal pain case of primary appendicitis epiploica diagnosed using computed tomography. 

  2. Pentazocine pain relief in adult patients with acute abdominal ain: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Reported studies in the African population, on early pain relief in patients with acute abdominal pain are few. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of pentazocine (PZ) on pain relief, diagnostic accuracy and treatment decisions in patients with acute abdominal pain. Methods: This was a ...

  3. Medic - Abdominal Pain: A Decision Support Program for the Management of Acute Abdominal Pain. (User’s Manual)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-11

    Diagnosis Entry Page Your Gynecological Diagnosis APPENDICITIS NON-SPECIFIC ABDOMINAL PAIN PELVIC INFLAMMATORY DISEASE URINARY TRACT INFECTION OVARIAN...presence of diverticular disease does not preclude development of acute appendicitis concxitantly. The initial medical treatment is the same as for...for those patients whose symptoms are non-specific and resolve spontaneously without a diagnosis being made. Peptic ulcer disease (FUD) is included in

  4. Annual Costs of Care for Pediatric Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Functional Abdominal Pain, and Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekman, Daniël R; Rutten, Juliette M T M; Vlieger, Arine M; Benninga, Marc A; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W

    2015-11-01

    To estimate annual medical and nonmedical costs of care for children diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or functional abdominal pain (syndrome; FAP/FAPS). Baseline data from children with IBS or FAP/FAPS who were included in a multicenter trial (NTR2725) in The Netherlands were analyzed. Patients' parents completed a questionnaire concerning usage of healthcare resources, travel costs, out-of-pocket expenses, productivity loss of parents, and supportive measures at school. Use of abdominal pain related prescription medication was derived from case reports forms. Total annual costs per patient were calculated as the sum of direct and indirect medical and nonmedical costs. Costs of initial diagnostic investigations were not included. A total of 258 children, mean age 13.4 years (±5.5), were included, and 183 (70.9%) were female. Total annual costs per patient were estimated to be €2512.31. Inpatient and outpatient healthcare use were major cost drivers, accounting for 22.5% and 35.2% of total annual costs, respectively. Parental productivity loss accounted for 22.2% of total annual costs. No difference was found in total costs between children with IBS or FAP/FAPS. Pediatric abdominal pain related functional gastrointestinal disorders impose a large economic burden on patients' families and healthcare systems. More than one-half of total annual costs of IBS and FAP/FAPS consist of inpatient and outpatient healthcare use. Netherlands Trial Registry: NTR2725. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Cultural and migration aspects in functional abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, Caroline; Laederach, Kurt

    2011-08-01

    Compared to Europe's mean immigrant contingent of 7.3 to 8.6 % Switzerland holds the highest contingent of foreign population with 23.5 %. Therefore it is of utmost importance that physicians have a knowledge of the specific characteristics of immigrant patients. The influence of personality factors (experience, behavior) is not independent from the influence of culturally-related environmental factors (regional differences in diet, pollutants, meanings, etc.). In addition, different cultural groups rate their quality of life differently. Psychological reasons for recurrent abdominal pain are stress (life events), effects of self-medication (laxatives, cocaine) and sexual abuse but also rare infectious diseases are more common among immigrants (e.g. tuberculosis, histoplasmosis, etc.). Migration-specific characteristics are mainly to find in the semiotics of the symptoms: not every abdominal pain is real pain in the abdomen. Finally, it is crucial to make the distinction between organic, functional and psychological-related pain. This can, however, usually only be accomplished in the context of the entire situation of a patient and, depending on the situation, with the support of a colleague from the appropriate cultural group or an experienced interpreter. In this review we limit ourselves to the presentation of the working population of the migrants, because these represent the largest group of all migrants. The specific situation of asylum seekers will also be refrained to where appropriate.

  6. An isolated left subclavian artery supplied by a collateral artery from the abdominal aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming, Zhu; Qian, Wang

    2009-01-01

    An isolated left subclavian artery is a rare anomaly. We report a 9-month-old boy with an isolated left subclavian artery associated with tetralogy of Fallot and the right aortic arch. MRI and angiography show that the blood supply through the left subclavian artery was maintained by a large tortuous collateral artery from the abdominal aorta. This type of collateral artery structure is unique. (orig.)

  7. An isolated left subclavian artery supplied by a collateral artery from the abdominal aorta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Zhu; Qian, Wang [Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Children' s Medical Center, Shanghai (China)

    2009-08-15

    An isolated left subclavian artery is a rare anomaly. We report a 9-month-old boy with an isolated left subclavian artery associated with tetralogy of Fallot and the right aortic arch. MRI and angiography show that the blood supply through the left subclavian artery was maintained by a large tortuous collateral artery from the abdominal aorta. This type of collateral artery structure is unique. (orig.)

  8. Fructose intolerance/malabsorption and recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Mauricio A; Lustig, Daniel; Pflugeisen, Bethann M; Amoroso, Paul J; Sherif, Dalia; Saeed, Rasha; Shamdeen, Shaza; Tuider, Judith; Abdullah, Bisher

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to ascertain whether pediatric patients with chronic abdominal pain had concurrent fructose intolerance as determined by a standardized dose breath hydrogen test (BHT), and whether symptoms would improve with a low-fructose diet. The fructose BHT test was administered to patients evaluated in clinic with unexplained chronic abdominal pain alone or associated with constipation, gas or bloating, and/or diarrhea. The patients were given a standard dose of 1 g/kg fructose to maximum of 25 g. Hydrogen and methane were measured at 8 time points. The test was presumed positive if breath hydrogen exceeded 20 ppm above baseline. If positive, patients were given a dietitian-prescribed low-fructose diet. A total of 222 patients were part of the study. Ages ranged from 2 to 19 years with a mean of 10.5. BHT for fructose was performed in all of the patients and it was positive for fructose intolerance in 121 of 222 patients (54.5%). A total of 101 of 222 (45.5%) patients had negative BHT for fructose intolerance. All BHT-positive patients had a nutrition consult with a registered dietitian and were placed on a low-fructose diet. Using a standard pain scale for children, 93 of 121 patients (76.9%) reported resolution of symptoms on a low-fructose diet (P fructose reported resolution of symptoms without a low-fructose diet (P = 0.37). Fructose intolerance/malabsorption is common in children with recurrent/functional abdominal pain and a low-fructose diet is an effective treatment.

  9. An unusual cause of acute abdominal pain in dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Tariq; Latif, Hina; Shabbir, Bilquis

    2014-07-01

    Dengue fever is an acute febrile viral disease caused by the bite of Aedes aegypti mosquito. It is a major health problem especially in tropical and subtropical areas including South East Asia and Pakistan. In the past few years, dengue fever has been endemic in Northern Punjab. Physicians managing dengue fever come across varied and uncommon complications of dengue fever. We report a case of dengue fever that developed severe right upper quadrant abdominal pain and induration after extreme retching and vomiting for 2 days. A rectus sheath hematoma was confirmed on noncontrast computed tomography (CT). Rectus sheath hematoma as a complication of dengue fever has rarely been reported before and never from this part of the world. Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon and often clinically misdiagnosed cause of abdominal pain. It is the result of bleeding into the rectus sheath from damage to the superior or inferior epigastric artery or their branches or from a direct tear of the rectus muscle. It can mimic almost any abdominal condition (See Fig.) (See Table).

  10. Heterotopic gastric mucosa associated with abdominal abscess formation, hypotension, and acute abdominal pain in a puppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobleman, Bridget N; Sinnott, Virginia B

    2014-01-01

    To describe the presence of heterotopic gastric mucosa forming an abscess associated with acute abdominal pain and shock in a puppy. A 7-month-old male intact Shih-Tzu was presented to the emergency service for evaluation of a 12-hour history of vomiting and lethargy progressing to weakness. On presentation, the puppy was obtunded and hypotensive. Radiographs revealed an ill-defined mid-ventral abdominal mass. Ultrasound revealed an echogenic, fluid-filled mass associated with the jejunum. The puppy had an exploratory celiotomy and a 2 × 4 cm oval fluid-filled soft tissue mass was found to be intimately associated, but not communicating with, a section of the mid-jejunum. The mass and associated jejunum were removed via enterectomy. Histopathology of the resected mass revealed heterotopic gastric mucosa; bacterial culture of the fluid contained in the mass revealed heavy growth of Escherichia coli. The puppy recovered from surgery, was discharged from the hospital, and has had no further complications from this episode. Heterotopic gastric mucosa is commonly found incidentally on necropsy. When it has been associated with acute gastrointestinal signs, mechanical intestinal obstruction with or without perforation was noted. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of heterotopic gastric mucosa leading to abscess formation and acute abdominal pain in the dog. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  11. Perioperative dexmedetomidine for acute pain after abdominal surgery in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen Lundorf, Luise; Korvenius Nedergaard, Helene; Møller, Ann Merete

    2016-02-18

    Acute postoperative pain is still an issue in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Postoperative pain and side effects of analgesic treatment, in particular those of opioids, need to be minimized. Opioid-sparing analgesics, possibly including dexmedetomidine, seem a promising avenue by which to improve postoperative outcomes. Our primary aim was to determine the analgesic efficacy and opioid-sparing effect of perioperative dexmedetomidine for acute pain after abdominal surgery in adults.Secondary aims were to establish effects of dexmedetomidine on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), gastrointestinal function and mobilization, together with the side effect profile of dexmedetomidine. We searched the following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI), Web of Science and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and reference lists of articles to May 2014. We searched the Science Citation Index, ClinicalTrials.gov and Current Controlled Trials, and we contacted pharmaceutical companies to identify unpublished and ongoing studies. We applied no language restrictions. We reran the search in May 2015 and found nine studies of interest. We will deal with the studies of interest when we update the review. We included randomized, controlled trials of perioperative dexmedetomidine versus placebo or other drug during abdominal surgery in adults. Trials included one of the following outcomes: amount of 'rescue' opioid, postoperative pain, time to 'rescue' analgesia, participants requiring 'rescue' analgesia, postoperative sedation, PONV, time to first passage of flatus and stool or time to first out-of-bed mobilization. Two review authors independently screened the titles and abstracts for eligibility. We retrieved full trial reports if necessary, and we extracted relevant data from the included studies using a data collection form and assessed risk of bias. We

  12. Relationship Between Abdominal Symptoms and Fructose Ingestion in Children with Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Veronika; Hammer, Katharina; Memaran, Nima; Huber, Wolf-Dietrich; Hammer, Karin; Hammer, Johann

    2018-05-01

    Limited valid data are available regarding the association of fructose-induced symptoms, fructose malabsorption, and clinical symptoms. To develop a questionnaire for valid symptom assessment before and during a carbohydrate breath test and to correlate symptoms with fructose breath test results in children/adolescents with functional abdominal pain. A Likert-type questionnaire assessing symptoms considered relevant for hydrogen breath test in children was developed and underwent initial validation. Fructose malabsorption was determined by increased breath hydrogen in 82 pediatric patients with functional abdominal pain disorders; fructose-induced symptoms were quantified by symptom score ≥2 and relevant symptom increase over baseline. The results were correlated with clinical symptoms. The time course of symptoms during the breath test was assessed. The questionnaire exhibited good psychometric properties in a standardized assessment of the severity of carbohydrate-related symptoms. A total of 40 % (n = 33) had malabsorption; symptoms were induced in 38 % (n = 31), but only 46 % (n = 15) with malabsorption were symptomatic. There was no significant correlation between fructose malabsorption and fructose-induced symptoms. Clinical symptoms correlated with symptoms evoked during the breath test (p < 0.001, r 2  = 0.21) but not with malabsorption (NS). Malabsorbers did not differ from non-malabsorbers in terms of symptoms during breath test. Symptomatic patients had significantly higher pain and flatulence scores over the 9-h observation period (p < 0.01) than did nonsymptomatic patients; the meteorism score was higher after 90 min. Fructose-induced symptoms but not fructose malabsorption are related to increased abdominal symptoms and have distinct timing patterns.

  13. Abdominal Pain: A Comparison between Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction and Chronic Idiopathic Constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Møller Faaborg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Most spinal-cord-injured patients have constipation. One-third develop chronic abdominal pain 10 years or more after injury. Nevertheless, very little is known about the nature of abdominal pain after spinal cord injury (SCI. It may be neuropathic or caused by constipation. Aim. To compare characteristics of abdominal pain in SCI with able-bodied with chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC. Subjects and Methods. 21 SCI and 15 CIC patients were referred for treatment of bowel symptoms. Constipation-related symptoms were assessed with the Cleveland Constipation Scoring System and the International Spinal Cord Injury Basic Bowel Function Data Set. Characteristics of abdominal pain were described using the Brief Danish Pain Questionnaire. Total gastrointestinal transit times (GITT were measured by radiopaque markers. Results. Seventeen (81% SCI and 14 (93% CIC patients reported abdominal pain or discomfort within the last month (. Pain was considered more intense by CIC than by SCI patients (. Only minor differences were found in patient’s qualitative description of abdominal pain or in the location of pain. In neither SCI nor CIC was pain associated with GITT. Conclusion. Most characteristics of abdominal pain among SCI patients resemble those of CIC. This indicates that constipation is a major cause of pain after SCI.

  14. Diagnostic profiles of acute abdominal pain with multinomial logistic regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohmann, Christian

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Application of multinomial logistic regression for diagnostic support of acute abdominal pain, a diagnostic problem with many differential diagnoses. Methods: The analysis is based on a prospective data base with 2280 patients with acute abdominal pain, characterized by 87 variables from history and clinical examination and 12 differential diagnoses. Associations between single variables from history and clinical examination and the final diagnoses were investigated with multinomial logistic regression. Results: Exemplarily, the results are presented for the variable rigidity. A statistical significant association was observed for generalized rigidity and the diagnoses appendicitis, bowel obstruction, pancreatitis, perforated ulcer, multiple and other diagnoses and for localized rigidity and appendicitis, diverticulitis, biliary disease and perforated ulcer. Diagnostic profiles were generated by summarizing the statistical significant associations. As an example the diagnostic profile of acute appendicitis is presented. Conclusions: Compared to alternative approaches (e.g. independent Bayes, loglinear model there are advantages for multinomial logistic regression to support complex differential diagnostic problems, provided potential traps are avoided (e.g. α-error, interpretation of odds ratio.

  15. Chronic appendicitis in a patient with 15 years abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    bizhan Khorasani

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Khorasani B1, Gholizadeh Pasha A2 1. Assistant professor, Department of surgery, Faculty of medicine, Tehran University of rehabilitation 2. Assistant professor, Department of surgery, Faculty of medicine, Babol University of medical sciences Abstract Background: Acute appendicitis is a completely known disease but for many physicians chronic appendicitis is unknown and some of them don believe in it. Although the number of people suffer from chronic appendicitis is much fewer than those who suffer from acute appendicitis, we shouldn ignore it. Clinical symptoms for these patients are chronic, longtime and recurrent abdominal pain, which is usually in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen. In the Para clinical examinations there isn any considerable pathological problem (in urine, stool, and sonography of the abdomen and pelvis. By recognizing appendicitis and appendectomy, the symptoms will be vanished and the patients will recover. Case presentation: The case was a 57-year-old man who has complained from chronic abdominal pain in the RLQ area since 15years ago. No pathological problem had been found in all diagnostic process. Conclusion: The problem was diagnosed as the chronic appendicitis and he underwent the appendectomy by laparoscopic procedure and was completely recovered.

  16. Testing a model of pain appraisal and coping in children with chronic abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lynn S; Smith, Craig A; Garber, Judy; Claar, Robyn Lewis

    2005-07-01

    This prospective study of children with recurrent abdominal pain (N=133; ages 8--15 years) used path analysis to examine relations among dispositional pain beliefs and coping styles, cognitions and behavior related to a specific pain episode, and short- and long-term outcomes. Children believing they could not reduce or accept pain appraised their episode-specific coping ability as low and reported passive coping behavior. Dispositional passive coping had direct effects on both episode-specific passive coping and long-term symptoms and disability. Accommodative coping (acceptance and self-encouragement) was associated with reduced episode-specific distress, which itself predicted reduced depressive symptoms 3 months later. Results suggest that coping-skill interventions for children with chronic pain should target reductions in passive coping and consider the potential benefits of accommodative coping strategies.

  17. Unusual cause of abdominal pain in the second trimester in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 26-year-old primigravida, at 22 weeks gestation by dates, was admitted to our institution after having presented with a two-day history of abdominal pain and vaginal spotting. An abdominal ultrasound revealed an abdominal pregnancy with fetal demise at 20 weeks and an empty uterus. Intra-operatively, the placenta was ...

  18. Delayed abdominal muscle onsets and self-report measures of pain and disability in chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Paul; Murphy, Bernadette

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was the measure the onset time of the transverse abdominis (TA) muscle during rapid unilateral shoulder movements in individuals with chronic low back pain (LBP), and to evaluate the relationship between latency times and self-report measures of pain and disability. Descriptive cross-sectional study. University laboratory. Eighty individuals with chronic LBP of a non-specific origin (males n=44, females n=36). Responses of the right and left surface TA/internal obliques were measured using surface electromyography (EMG) during rapid unilateral shoulder flexion, abduction, and extension. Pain intensity was measured using a visual analog scale (VAS), and disability with the Oswestry disability index (ODI). Seventy-five percent of individuals were identified as lacking feedforward activation. A significant sidexdirection main effect was identified, with the ipsilateral latency more delayed in flexion and abduction (F(2316)=58.2, plower ODI scores (23.2+/-6.9% vs 31.0+/-9.2%, mean difference 7.8%, 95% CI 3.9 to 11.6%, pmuscle onsets during rapid limb movement were significantly associated with self-rated pain scores. Seventy-five percent of individuals with chronic non-specific LBP exhibited delayed activation. No evidence has been provided in this study to support, or refute the use of specific localized deep abdominal contractions for exercise rehabilitation programs. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A rare diagnosis of abdominal pain presentation in the emergency department: Idiopathic omental bleeding: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yen-Hung; Liu, Kuan-Ting; Wen, Chun-Kai

    2017-12-01

    Idiopathic omental bleeding is a rare cause of acute abdomen, with only a few reported cases. It usually presents with abdominal pain and may be life-threatening. As it rarely occurs, it may not be considered initially during patient presentation. A 35-year-old male came to our emergency department with abdominal pain present for around 5 to 6 hours. The patient complained of left upper quadrant abdominal pain after eating breakfast. The only associated symptom was 3 episodes of vomiting up food. Physical examination revealed mild left upper quadrant abdominal tenderness without muscle guarding or rebounding pain. Blood examination showed leukocytosis with neutrophil predominance and C reactive protein elevation. The pain was persistent and relief was not obtained by medication. Computed tomography showed a large lobular-contour homogenous slightly hyperdense lesion without enhancement along the greater curvature of the stomach in the lesser sac. A surgeon was consulted and laparotomy was suggested. Hematoma was found at Morrison pouch, subsplenic fossa, and lesser sac under operation. Laparotomy and ligation for hemostasis. The patient was discharged with stable condition after 7 days of hospitalization. This diagnosis should be considered in patients presenting with epigastric pain and vomiting after eating while in the emergency department because this disease might be life-threatening. This case highlights 2 important learning points. First, idiopathic omental bleeding could occur after eating in patients without underlying disease or trauma history, and this disease should be taken into consideration when acute abdomen occurs. Second, emergent laparotomy is indicated if the cause of acute abdomen is not clear. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Secret Underlying Unexplained Abdominal Pain, Neurological Symptoms and Intermittent Hypertension: Acute Intermittent Porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komac Andac

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old female patient with abdominal pain, vomiting and constipation was admitted to the hospital with the possible diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis. Due to increased abdominal pain and constipation the patient underwent a surgery with the diagnosis of ileus. However, no pathological findings were found in the abdominal organs apart from serous fluid in the abdominal cavity. The patient became hypertensive, tachycardic and had an episode of seizures postoperatively. Neurological manifestations with unexplained abdominal pain indicated a diagnosis of acute intermittent porphyria (AIP. Acute intermittent porphyria diagnosis is based on elevated urinary δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA and porphobilinogen (PBG levels as well as hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS IVS13-2 A>G heterozygous mutation. Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF gene mutations were not confirmed. Porphyria should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with recurrent abdominal pain, neurological symptoms and lack of FMF gene polymorphism.

  1. Retropsoas hernia as a cause of chronic abdominal pain: CT diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, J.E.; Strauch, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    Congenital retropsoas small bowel herniation is reported as the cause of long-standing recurrent abdominal pain in a teenage girl. Knowledge of this entity is important for differential diagnosis of abdominal pain, mass, or retroperitoneal gas and fluid, and for avoiding complications of percutaneous renal interventions. (orig.)

  2. Retropsoas hernia as a cause of chronic abdominal pain: CT diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.E. [Div. of Pediatric Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Strauch, E.D. [Division of Pediatric Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Congenital retropsoas small bowel herniation is reported as the cause of long-standing recurrent abdominal pain in a teenage girl. Knowledge of this entity is important for differential diagnosis of abdominal pain, mass, or retroperitoneal gas and fluid, and for avoiding complications of percutaneous renal interventions. (orig.) With 2 figs., 6 refs.

  3. The course of mental health problems in children presenting with abdominal pain in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, Marieke J.; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Yvone; Passchier, Jan; Koes, Bart W.; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Leuwen, Y.L.V.

    Objective. To investigate the course of mental health problems in children presenting to general practice with abdominal pain and to evaluate the extent to which abdominal pain characteristics during follow-up predict the presence of mental health problems at 12 months' follow-up. Design. A

  4. The course of mental health problems in children presenting with abdominal pain in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, J.; Gieteling, M.J.; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Y.; Koes, B.W.; Berger, M.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the course of mental health problems in children presenting to general practice with abdominal pain and to evaluate the extent to which abdominal pain characteristics during follow-up predict the presence of mental health problems at 12 months' follow-up. Design. A

  5. A giant adrenal lipoma presenting in a woman with chronic mild postprandial abdominal pain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Drygiannakis, Ioannis; Tzortzinis, Anastasios; Papanas, Nikolaos; Fiska, Aliki

    2011-04-05

    Adrenal lipomas are rare, small, benign, non-functioning tumors, which must be histopathologically differentiated from other tumors such as myelolipomas or liposarcomas. They are usually identified incidentally during autopsy, imaging, or laparotomy. Occasionally, they may present acutely due to complications such as abdominal pain from retroperitoneal bleeding, or systemic symptoms of infection. We report a giant adrenal lipoma (to the best of our knowledge, the second largest in the literature) clinically presenting with chronic mild postprandial pain. A 54-year-old Caucasian woman presented several times over a period of 10 years to various emergency departments complaining of long-term mild postprandial abdominal pain. Although clinical examinations were unrevealing, an abdominal computed tomography scan performed at her most recent presentation led to the identification of a large lipoma of the left adrenal gland, which occupied most of the retroperitoneal space. Myelolipoma was ruled out due to the absence of megakaryocytes, immature leukocytes, or erythrocytes. Liposarcoma was ruled out due to the absence of lipoblasts. The size of the lipoma (16 × 14 × 7 cm) is, to the best of our knowledge, the second largest reported to date. After surgical resection, our patient was relieved of her symptoms and remains healthy six years postoperatively. Physicians should be aware that differential diagnosis of mild chronic abdominal pain in patients presenting in emergency rooms may include large adrenal lipomas. When initial diagnostic investigation is not revealing, out-patient specialist evaluation should be planned to enable appropriate further investigations.

  6. MR imaging evaluation of abdominal pain during pregnancy: appendicitis and other nonobstetric causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalluto, Lucy B; Woodfield, Courtney A; DeBenedectis, Carolynn M; Lazarus, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of the cause of abdominal pain in a pregnant patient is particularly difficult because of multiple confounding factors related to normal pregnancy. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is useful in evaluation of abdominal pain during pregnancy, as it offers the benefit of cross-sectional imaging without ionizing radiation or evidence of harmful effects to the fetus. MR imaging is often performed specifically for diagnosis of possible appendicitis, which is the most common illness necessitating emergency surgery in pregnant patients. However, it is important to look for pathologic processes outside the appendix that may be an alternative source of abdominal pain. Numerous entities other than appendicitis can cause abdominal pain during pregnancy, including processes of gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, genitourinary, vascular, and gynecologic origin. MR imaging is useful in diagnosing the cause of abdominal pain in a pregnant patient because of its ability to safely demonstrate a wide range of pathologic conditions in the abdomen and pelvis beyond appendicitis. © RSNA, 2012.

  7. Negative correlation of cortical thickness with the severity and duration of abdominal pain in Asian women with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Chian Sem; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Shiao, Chen-Yu; Hsu, Chien-Yeh; Cheng, Chiao-Wen; Yang, Kuo-Ching; Chiu, Hung-Wen; Hsu, Jung-Lung

    2017-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) manifests as chronic abdominal pain. One pathophysiological theory states that the brain-gut axis is responsible for pain control in the intestine. Although several studies have discussed the structural changes in the brain of IBS patients, most of these studies have been conducted in Western populations. Different cultures and sexes experience different pain sensations and have different pain responses. Accordingly, we aimed to identify the specific changes in the cortical thickness of Asian women with IBS and to compare these data to those of non-Asian women with IBS. Thirty Asian female IBS patients (IBS group) and 39 healthy individuals (control group) were included in this study. Brain structural magnetic resonance imaging was performed. We used FreeSurfer to analyze the differences in the cortical thickness and their correlations with patient characteristics. The left cuneus, left rostral middle frontal cortex, left supramarginal cortex, right caudal anterior cingulate cortex, and bilateral insula exhibited cortical thinning in the IBS group compared with those in the controls. Furthermore, the brain cortical thickness correlated negatively the severity as well as duration of abdominal pain. Some of our findings differ from those of Western studies. In our study, all of the significant brain regions in the IBS group exhibited cortical thinning compared with those in the controls. The differences in cortical thickness between the IBS patients and controls may provide useful information to facilitate regulating abdominal pain in IBS patients. These findings offer insights into the association of different cultures and sexes with differences in cortical thinning in patients with IBS.

  8. Varicella Zoster Infection: A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain Mimicking Acute Abdomen

    OpenAIRE

    Olmez, Deniz; Boz, Alper; Erkan, Nazif

    2009-01-01

    Varicella zoster is an acute viral infection that results from reactivation of a latent varicella zoster virus. It usually occurs in adult population and immune compromised patients. It rarely occurs in healthy children. Here we present a 14 years old male with varicella zoster that had abdominal pain mimicking acute abdomen to alert others who are consulted for the differentiation of acute abdomen and others who may be consulted for pain management. Keywords Varicella zoster; Abdominal pain

  9. Child pain catastrophizing mediates the relationship between parent responses to pain and disability in youth with functional abdominal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Natoshia Raishevich; Lynch-Jordan, Anne; Barnett, Kimberly; Peugh, James; Sil, Soumitri; Goldschneider, Kenneth; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Functional abdominal pain (FAP) in youth is associated with substantial impairment in functioning and prior research has shown that overprotective parent responses can heighten impairment. Little is known about how a range of parental behaviors in response to their child’s pain (overprotection, minimizing and/or encouragement) interact with child coping characteristics (e.g., catastrophizing) to influence functioning in youth with FAP. In this study, it was hypothesized that the relationship between parenting factors and child disability would be mediated by children’s level of maladaptive coping (i.e., pain catastrophizing). Methods Seventy-five patients with FAP presenting to a pediatric pain clinic and their caregivers participated. Youth completed measures of pain intensity (Numeric Rating Scale), pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale), and disability (Functional Disability Inventory). Caregivers completed measures of parent pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale), and parent responses to child pain behaviors (Adult Responses to Child Symptoms: protection, minimizing, and encouragement/monitoring subscales). Results Increased functional disability was significantly related to higher child pain intensity, increased child and parent pain catastrophizing, and higher levels of encouragement/monitoring and protection. Parent minimization was not related to disability. Child pain catastrophizing fully mediated the relationship between parent encouragement/monitoring and disability and partially mediated the relationship between parent protectiveness and disability. Conclusions The impact of parenting behaviors in response to FAP on child disability is determined in part by the child’s coping style. Findings highlight a more nuanced understanding of the parent-child interaction in determining pain-related disability levels, which should be taken into consideration in assessing and treating youth with FAP. PMID:25121521

  10. Child pain catastrophizing mediates the relation between parent responses to pain and disability in youth with functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Natoshia R; Lynch-Jordan, Anne; Barnett, Kimberly; Peugh, James; Sil, Soumitri; Goldschneider, Kenneth; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita

    2014-12-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) in youth is associated with substantial impairment in functioning, and prior research has shown that overprotective parent responses can heighten impairment. Little is known about how a range of parental behaviors (overprotection, minimizing, and/or encouragement) in response to their child's pain interact with child coping characteristics (eg, catastrophizing) to influence functioning in youth with FAP. In this study, it was hypothesized that the relation between parenting factors and child disability would be mediated by children's levels of maladaptive coping (ie, pain catastrophizing). Seventy-five patients with FAP presenting to a pediatric pain clinic and their caregivers participated in the study. Youth completed measures of pain intensity (Numeric Rating Scale), pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale), and disability (Functional Disability Inventory). Caregivers completed measures of parent pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale), and parent responses to child pain behaviors (Adult Responses to Child Symptoms: Protection, Minimizing, and Encouragement/Monitoring subscales). Increased functional disability was significantly related to higher child pain intensity, increased child and parent pain catastrophizing, and higher levels of encouragement/monitoring and protection. Parent minimization was not related to disability. Child pain catastrophizing fully mediated the relation between parent encouragement/monitoring and disability and partially mediated the relation between parent protectiveness and disability. The impact of parenting behaviors in response to FAP on child disability is determined, in part, by the child's coping style. Findings highlight a more nuanced understanding of the parent-child interaction in determining pain-related disability levels, which should be taken into consideration in assessing and treating youth with FAP.

  11. Chronic Abdominal Pain and Symptoms 5 Years After Gastric Bypass for Morbid Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høgestøl, Ingvild K; Chahal-Kummen, Monica; Eribe, Inger; Brunborg, Cathrine; Stubhaug, Audun; Hewitt, Stephen; Kristinsson, Jon; Mala, Tom

    2017-06-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is widely performed as treatment of morbid obesity. Long-term weight loss, effects on co-morbidities, and quality of life after RYGB have been well addressed. Other long-term outcomes are less elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, symptom characteristics, and possible predictors of chronic abdominal pain and gastrointestinal symptoms during consultations 5 years after RYGB. A 5-year follow-up study of patients operated with RYGB 2008-2009 was performed. The patients completed questionnaires regarding chronic abdominal pain, the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS), the ROME III questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Pain Catastrophing Scale (PCS), the Brief Pain Inventory, and SF-36. Uni- and multivariable logistic regression analyses of characteristics associated with chronic abdominal pain were performed. A total of 165/234 (71%) patients met to the follow-up, 160 of these accepted study inclusion. The mean follow-up was 64 (SD 4.2) months. The mean age was 42.5 (SD 8.7) years and 59% were females. The mean total weight loss was 23.9% (SD 11.2). Chronic abdominal pain was reported by 33.8%. Female gender, average strength of bodily pain, and the PCS sum score were associated with chronic abdominal pain. Symptoms of indigestion and irritable bowel syndrome were reported by 48.8% and 29.1%, respectively. Chronic abdominal pain was associated with reduced health related quality of life. A substantial proportion of patients experienced chronic abdominal pain and symptoms 5 years after RYGB. Abdominal pain should be addressed at follow-up consultations after RYGB.

  12. Does low-dose CCK-8 injection produce abdominal pain in 'truly normal' individuals?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsay, S.; Webb, B.; Hille, N.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The development of abdominal pain following cholecystokinin (CCK) injection is not specific for biliary disease. Patients can develop abdominal pain with CCK during hepatobiliary studies and have normal gallbladder function. Does this non-biliary pain indicate pathology? High doses of CCK induce pain in functional bowel syndromes, but may also produce pain in normals. Pain is less common at lower CCK doses, and hence may be more significant. This study aimed to determine the rate at which the low dose of CCK used in hepatobiliary scans causes abdominal pain and other side-effects in 'truly normal' individuals. Some preliminary results of CCK-induced pain in gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) patients are also discussed. Six 'truly normal' subjects were studied. 'Truly normal' was defined as: no current history of abdominal pain; no biliary or gallbladder disease; no significant GIT pathology; not currently on medication designed to be pharmacologically active in the GIT. Each patient was given an intravenous dose of 0.01 μg-kg -1 of CCK8 over 3 min, and side-effects were recorded for 30 min. No subject had abdominal pain. Two developed nausea, 1 moderate and 1 mild. An identical dose of CCK was given to 2 patients with endoscopically proven GOR. Anti-reflux medication had been ceased for 12 h. After CCK, 1 patient developed typical 'reflux' pain and 1 was asymptomatic. In conclusion, none of our 'truly normal' patients had abdominal pain with low-dose CCK. This suggests that patients developing pain following injection of this dose of CCK are indeed abnormal. The literature infers these patients may have irritable bowel syndrome; however, this hypothesis is complicated by our preliminary results indicating that CCK can reproduce pain in some patients with GOR

  13. A randomized, controlled trial of routine early abdominal computed tomography in patients presenting with non-specific acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sala, E.; Watson, C.J.E.; Beadsmoore, C.; Groot-Wassink, T.; Fanshawe, T.R.; Smith, J.C.; Bradley, A.; Palmer, C.R.; Shaw, A.; Dixon, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To compare the effect of an initial early computed tomography (CT) examination versus standard practice (SP) on the length of hospital stay, diagnostic accuracy, and mortality of adults presenting with acute abdominal pain. Materials and methods: Two hundred and five adults presenting with acute abdominal pain were randomized to undergo an early CT examination or current SP, which comprised supine abdominal and erect chest radiography. One hundred and ninety-eight patients (99 in each arm) were included in the analysis. The primary endpoint was the duration of inpatient stay; secondary endpoints were diagnostic certainty and mortality. Results: There was no significant difference in the length of hospital stay between the two arms (p = 0.20). At randomization 36% (35 of 96) of CT patients and 49% (48 of 98) of SP patients were correctly diagnosed; 24 h after randomization the correct diagnosis had been established in 84% of CT patients and 73% of SP patients. This refinement in diagnostic certainty was significantly better in the CT group (p < 0.001). There was no difference in mortality between the two trial arms (p = 0.31). Conclusion: Early abdominal CT in patients with acute abdominal pain improves diagnostic certainty, but does not reduce the length of hospital stay and 6 month mortality

  14. Latrodectus mactans (black widow spider) envenomation: an unusual cause for abdominal pain in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzone, J M; Wells, S L

    1994-05-01

    The differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in pregnancy is extensive. An important consideration in endemic areas is a bite by a black widow spider. A 30-year-old woman at 30 weeks' gestation presented with acute abdominal pain following an insect bite. We based the diagnosis on classic symptomatology in an area endemic for Latrodectus mactans. Treatment consisted of supportive therapy and observation. Symptoms resolved over 48 hours and did not recur. The patient delivered a healthy child at 40 weeks' gestation. In endemic areas, black widow spider envenomation should be part of the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in pregnancy.

  15. [A man presenting with fever and abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeberg, Kathrine Aglen; Selbekk, Bodil Hammerstad

    2010-09-23

    A 34-year-old man with no previous medical history was referred to our surgical department with abdominal pain and fever. Over the next days he developed a cluster of symptoms, which finally led us in the right diagnostical direction. On admission he had clinical findings and biochemistry supportive of cholecystitis. However, he also had a non-symptomatic rash on his chest. Intravenous antibiotic treatment was instigated. Radiological findings did not show intraabdominal pathology, except for mesenterial lymphadenopathy. After three days on antibiotics the patient still had fever. The biochemical work-up revealed persistent cholestasis, lymphopenia and increasing infectious stigmata. A more extensive laboratory work-up was performed, including bacterial, viral, and immunological tests. During the next few days the patient developed palmar erythema, polymorphic exanthema, conjunctival bleeding and a strawberry tongue. The patient gradually improved, but developed skin desquamation, thrombocytosis and reactive arthralgia. This is consistent with the clinical picture of Kawasaki disease. As all supplemental tests were negative, we could therefore conclude (based on clinical, radiological and biochemical results) that this was a rare case of adult Kawasaki disease. A review of literature describing adult Kawasaki disease is also presented.

  16. Cost and consultation patterns of abdominal pain in Uruguayan children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saps, Miguel; Bolioli, Pablo; Espana, Magali; Marshall, Beth M; Di Lorenzo, Carlo

    2008-02-01

    Children with abdominal pain (AP) have worse quality of life and poorer social functioning and school attendance than their healthy peers. This is the first investigation of consultation patterns and costs of AP in South American children. All data were collected from Unidad Coronaria Movil in Montevideo, Uruguay. Diagnoses of all house calls during a 4-year period (January 2002 through December 2005) were analyzed. Variances in consultation patterns based on sex and age were investigated. Supply and personnel costs were analyzed and prorated to obtain an accurate estimate of the cost per house call and outpatient visit. A total of 125,945 in-home visits and 1588 outpatient consultations were analyzed. Consultation rates for AP peaked among patients 7 to 9 years of age. Female subjects 9 to 14 years of age consulted significantly more frequently for AP than male subjects in the same age group. The average AP consultation accounted for approximately 3.8% of the per capita health care spending in Uruguay in 2005. AP is a global health problem that is present across ethnicities, nationalities, and geographic locations and is associated with significant health care expenditure.

  17. A rare case of right lower quadrant abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Mark; Kim, Brian; Khoury, Rami; Narkiewicz, Larry

    2017-04-01

    Isolated fallopian tube torsion without involvement of the ovary is a rare condition most frequently presenting during reproductive years. Imaging, vitals, physical exam, and laboratory findings all fail to help establish a definitive diagnosis. The majority of the diagnoses are made on the operating table. Physical exam most often reveals unilateral and localized abdominal pain, often with nausea and vomiting, but few other reliably common findings. Diagnosis becomes even more challenging due to the fact that isolated tubal torsion occurs often in pregnancy and preferentially on the right, further complicating the clinical picture. We describe a case of isolated tubal torsion, unique in that localized necrosis and inflammation from the torsion triggered a secondary appendicitis. The patient required surgical intervention, and an appendectomy and salpingectomy emergently. Given its elusive and rare nature, awareness and early intervention is required by the emergency physician to recognize tubal torsion, as operative intervention is crucial, and can lead to preservation of fertility and improved fetal survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bowel perforation by crumpled paper in a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhshaeekia, Alireza; Hosseini, Seyed M.V; Razmi, Tannaz; Shamsaeefar, Alireza

    2009-01-01

    Many of the abdominal foreign bodies are due to accidental ingestion. Our objective in this case report is to emphasize the importance of the enquiry about the foreign body in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain. According to our knowledge, this is the first report of bowel perforation caused by paper ingestion. A 14-year-old boy with abdominal pain underwent exploratory laparotomy and was found to have abdominal pus and ileal perforation. A crumpled paper was found at the site of perforation. Postoperative enquiry revealed that the patient had ingested 10 crumpled papers. We highlight that recording the history is an important aspect in the management of patients with acute abdominal pain and that foreign bodies should be included in its differential diagnosis. (author)

  19. The Impact of Upper Abdominal Pain During Pregnancy Following a Gastric Bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Liselotte; Lauenborg, Jeannet; Svare, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to describe the risk of internal herniation (IH) and the obstetric outcome in pregnant women with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and episodes of upper abdominal pain.  Methods: The cohort included 133 women with RYGB: 94 with 113 pregnancies, from.......  Conclusions: Upper abdominal pain during pregnancy is frequent among women with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, is often due to IH and is associated with adverse pregnancy outcome......., pregestational and gestational abdominal surgery and pregnancy outcome. The risk of upper abdominal pain was estimated in the local cohort. Surgical intervention, IH and obstetric outcome according to pain were evaluated for 139 pregnancies with delivery of a singleton after 24 weeks of gestation (birth cohort...

  20. The association of mast cells and serotonin in children with chronic abdominal pain of unknown etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Ravi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal pain of unknown origin affects up to 20% of school-aged children. Evaluation of children is symptom-based without clear guidelines to investigate molecular mechanisms of abdominal pain. Aberrant molecular mechanisms may increase intestinal permeability leading to interactions between the immune and nervous systems, subclinical inflammation, and visceral pain. This study evaluated the association between interleukin-6 (IL-6, mast cell infiltrates, and serotonin (5-HT levels in gastrointestinal (GI biopsies, with perceived abdominal pain in a pediatric cohort. Methods Clinical data and biopsy samples from pediatric patients (n = 48 with chronic abdominal pain, with and without inflammation were included. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded GI biopsies were sectioned and immunohistochemistry performed for IL-6 and 5-HT; mast cells were identified with toluidine blue stain. Histological findings were compared to self-reported abdominal pain between groups. Results There was significantly greater IL-6 immunoreactivity in biopsies with confirmed histologic inflammation (p = 0.004. There was a greater number of mast cells per HPF in non-inflammatory biopsies (3.5 ± 2.9 compared to the inflammatory biopsies (2.6 ± 1.8 p = 0.049. The non-inflammatory biopsy group was significantly less likely to respond to standard treatment as evidenced by higher pain reports (p = .018. Mast cells (p = .022 and 5-HT (p = .02 were significantly related to abdominal pain scores. Conclusions A potential association between self-reported abdominal pain, number of mast cells, and 5-HT levels, which may contribute to perceived GI pain in pediatric patients may exist.

  1. Abdominal pregnancy with placenta inserted in the spleen left in situ causing subphrenic abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Radoje B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal pregnancy appears once in 3000 pregnancies. It usually terminates with abortion and urgent surgery. Thanks to ultrasonography and computed tomography the diagnosis is possible before surgery. Most frequently the diagnosis has been established during emergency laparotomy. Gynaecologists are not in agreement wheather removal of placenta is mandatory or not, as it may include removal of parts or entire organs or may be followed with serious bleeding difficult to control. We present a 21-year old woman in whom during an urgent laparotomy performed for abdominal pregnancy placenta inserted in the spleen was left in situ. Postoperatively the patient developed subphrenic abscess which could not be solved without reoperation during which both the placenta and the spleen were removed. Ten years after surgery she is symptom-free.

  2. Abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion as clinical presentation of acute intermittent porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Feijóo, M L; Bermúdez Sanjurjo, J R; González Vázquez, L; Rey Martínez, M; de la Fuente Aguado, J

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare condition characterized by abdominal pain and a wide range of nonspecific symptoms. We report the case of a woman with abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as clinical presentation of AIP. The diagnosis was achieved through the etiologic study of the SIADH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  3. Functional abdominal pain in childhood: Background studies and recent research trends

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, Rona L; van Tilburg, Miranda AL

    2012-01-01

    The present review summarizes many of the major research trends investigated in the past five years regarding pediatric functional abdominal pain, and also summarizes the primary related findings from the authors’ research program. Specific areas discussed based on work within the authors’ group include familial illness patterns, genetics, traits, and mechanisms or processes related to abdominal pain. Topics covered from research published in the past five years include prevalence and cost, l...

  4. Exposure to environmental microbiota explains persistent abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome after a major flood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, NurFadhilah; Hamid, Nurhazwani; Ma, Zheng Feei; Lawenko, Rona Marie; Wan Mohammad, Wan Mohd Zahiruddin; Collins, Deirdre A; Liong, Min Tze; Odamaki, Toshitaka; Xiao, Jinzhong; Lee, Yeong Yeh

    2017-01-01

    After an environmental disaster, the affected community is at increased risk for persistent abdominal pain but mechanisms are unclear. Therefore, our study aimed to determine association between abdominal pain and poor water, sanitation and hygiene (WaSH) practices, and if small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and/or gut dysbiosis explain IBS, impaired quality of life (QOL), anxiety and/or depression after a major flood. New onset abdominal pain, IBS based on the Rome III criteria, WaSH practices, QOL, anxiety and/or depression, SIBO (hydrogen breath testing) and stools for metagenomic sequencing were assessed in flood victims. Of 211 participants, 37.9% ( n  = 80) had abdominal pain and 17% ( n  = 36) with IBS subtyped diarrhea and/or mixed type ( n  = 27 or 12.8%) being the most common. Poor WaSH practices and impaired quality of life during flood were significantly associated with IBS. Using linear discriminant analysis effect size method, gut dysbiosis was observed in those with anxiety (Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria, effect size 4.8), abdominal pain (Fusobacteria , Staphylococcus, Megamonas and Plesiomonas , effect size 4.0) and IBS ( Plesiomonas and Trabulsiella , effect size 3.0). Disturbed gut microbiota because of environmentally-derived organisms may explain persistent abdominal pain and IBS after a major environmental disaster in the presence of poor WaSH practices.

  5. Pain intensity and abdominal muscle activation during walking in patients with low back pain: The STROBE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Kyue-Nam; Kwon, Oh-Yun

    2017-10-01

    Nonspecific low back pain (LBP) is a common musculoskeletal problem that is intensified during physical activity. Patients with LBP have been reported to change their abdominal muscle activity during walking; however, the effects of pain intensity, disability level, and fear-avoidance belief on this relationship have not been evaluated. Thus, we compared abdominal muscle activity in patients with LBP and asymptomatic controls, and assessed the impact of pain intensity, disability level, and fear-avoidance belief.Thirty patients with LBP divided into groups reporting low (LLBP) and high-pain intensity low back pain (HLBP), and 15 participants without LBP were recruited. LBP patients' self-reported pain intensity, disability, and fear-avoidance belief were recorded. To examine abdominal muscle activity (rectus abdominis [RA], internal [IO], and external oblique [EO] muscles) during walking, all subjects walked at a self-selected speed. Abdominal muscle activity (RA, IO, and EO) was compared among groups (LLBP, HLBP, and controls) in different phases of walking (double support vs swing). Relationships between abdominal muscle activity and clinical measures (pain intensity, disability, fear-avoidance belief) were analyzed using partial correlation analysis.Right IO muscle activity during walking was significantly decreased in LLBP and HLBP compared with controls in certain walking phase. Partial correlation coefficients showed significant correlations between fear-avoidance belief and right EO activity (r = .377, P  .05).This study demonstrated decreased IO muscle activity during certain walking phases in LLBP and HLBP compared with asymptomatic participants. Although altered IO muscle activity during walking was observed in patients with LBP, no changes were found with other abdominal muscles (EO, RA). Thus, these results provide useful information about abdominal muscle activity during walking in patients with LBP.

  6. The prevalence and related symptomatology of Helicobacter pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Andersen, L P; Pærregaard, Anders

    1998-01-01

    in 46/66 by culture and histology. The presence of H. pylori was significantly associated with active or inactive chronic gastritis. The presence of H. pylori was associated with both parents being born in a country with a high prevalence and a low social class. Helicobacter pylori-positive children had......The aim of the study was to assess and compare the IgG seroprevalence of H. pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain with healthy children and to investigate the related symptoms. IgG antibodies against low-molecular weight H. pylori antigens were assessed in 438 children with recurrent...... of the abdominal pain, presence of pyrosis, nocturnal pain, relation of pain to meals and bowel irregularities. The seroprevalence was 21% (95% CI: 17-25%) in the children with recurrent abdominal pain and 10% (95% CI: 5-18%) in the healthy controls (p = 0.30). In seropositive children with RAP H. pylori was found...

  7. Efficacy of abdominal acupuncture for neck pain: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Lai Fun; Lin, Zhi Xiu; Leung, Albert Wing Nang; Chen, Liyi; Zhang, Hongwei; Ng, Bacon Fung Leung; Ziea, Eric Tat Chi; Guo, Yuanqi

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to provide evidence regarding the clinical efficacy of abdominal acupuncture for neck pain. This randomized, patient and assessor-blind, sham-controlled trial was conducted at a Chinese medicine center in Hong Kong between November 2014 and March 2016. A total of 154 eligible participants (age range, 18-65 years) with neck pain were randomly assigned to receive abdominal (n = 77) or non-penetrating sham abdominal (sham group; n = 77) acupuncture. Each participant was administered treatment over six sessions by Registered Chinese Medicine Practitioners, in accordance with a standardized protocol. The primary outcome was mean improvement in neck pain disability scores evaluated by the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). Secondary outcomes included intensity of neck pain and health-related quality-of-life measures. The outcomes were assessed at baseline and at 2 and 6 weeks from baseline. Patients in the abdominal acupuncture group received additional follow-up evaluation at 14 weeks from baseline. Outcomes were evaluated by intention-to-treat analysis. All participants provided informed consent for treatment and follow-up evaluation. Patients who received abdominal acupuncture exhibited greater improvement in NPQ scores than those who received sham treatment at both 2 and 6 weeks from baseline (intergroup mean differences, -5.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], -9.48 to -2.03; P = 0.008 and -8.65; 95% CI, -12.13 to -5.16; P acupuncture group was even more significant at 14 weeks from baseline. Patients in the abdominal acupuncture group also exhibited significantly greater improvements in intensity of neck pain and a few quality-of-life measures than those in the sham abdominal acupuncture group, without any serious adverse events. These findings suggest that abdominal acupuncture is an effective alternative treatment for neck pain. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-14004932.

  8. The adult cystic fibrosis patient with abdominal pain: what the radiologist needs to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liong, S.Y.; Awad, D. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Jones, A.M. [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Sukumar, S.A., E-mail: Sathi.Sukumar@uhsm.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    As the life expectancy of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients continues to increase, abdominal manifestations of CF are increasingly being encountered by clinicians and radiologists. Imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of adult CF patients with abdominal pain as a cause is often not discernable clinically. Accurate diagnosis is crucial in these patients as some causes may be managed conservatively, whilst others may require surgical intervention. In this review, we describe clinical presentation, imaging findings, and management of adult CF patients presenting with abdominal pain.

  9. A giant adrenal lipoma presenting in a woman with chronic mild postprandial abdominal pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzortzinis Anastasios

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Adrenal lipomas are rare, small, benign, non-functioning tumors, which must be histopathologically differentiated from other tumors such as myelolipomas or liposarcomas. They are usually identified incidentally during autopsy, imaging, or laparotomy. Occasionally, they may present acutely due to complications such as abdominal pain from retroperitoneal bleeding, or systemic symptoms of infection. We report a giant adrenal lipoma (to the best of our knowledge, the second largest in the literature clinically presenting with chronic mild postprandial pain. Case presentation A 54-year-old Caucasian woman presented several times over a period of 10 years to various emergency departments complaining of long-term mild postprandial abdominal pain. Although clinical examinations were unrevealing, an abdominal computed tomography scan performed at her most recent presentation led to the identification of a large lipoma of the left adrenal gland, which occupied most of the retroperitoneal space. Myelolipoma was ruled out due to the absence of megakaryocytes, immature leukocytes, or erythrocytes. Liposarcoma was ruled out due to the absence of lipoblasts. The size of the lipoma (16 × 14 × 7 cm is, to the best of our knowledge, the second largest reported to date. After surgical resection, our patient was relieved of her symptoms and remains healthy six years postoperatively. Conclusion Physicians should be aware that differential diagnosis of mild chronic abdominal pain in patients presenting in emergency rooms may include large adrenal lipomas. When initial diagnostic investigation is not revealing, out-patient specialist evaluation should be planned to enable appropriate further investigations.

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection, serum pepsinogens, and pediatric abdominal pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Eias; Naamna, Medhat; Mawassy, Kadri; Beer-Davidson, Gany; Muhsen, Khitam

    2017-08-01

    The significance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in pediatric abdominal pain remains poorly recognized. We examined associations of H. pylori infection and serum pepsinogens (PGs), as non-invasive markers of gastritis, with pediatric abdominal pain. A case-control study was conducted among 99 children aged 5-17 years admitted to one hospital for abdominal pain (cases) without an apparent organic reason. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, sera were tested and compared with 179 controls for anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies and PGI and PGII levels. Multivariable analysis was performed to adjust for potential confounders. H. pylori IgG sero-positivity was 34.3 and 36.3% in cases and controls, respectively, P = 0.7. H. pylori-infected children had higher median PGI and PGII levels and a lower PGI/PGII ratio than uninfected children. Cases infected with H. pylori had a higher median PGII level (P pylori. The percentage of cases with PGII ≥7.5 μg/L, as indication for antral inflammation, was higher than in controls: 58.6 versus 44.7%, P = 0.027. Children with PGII levels ≥7.5 μg/L had increased risk for abdominal pain: adjusted prevalence ratio 1.73 [95% confidence intervals 1.02, 2.93], P = 0.039. Children with increased serum PGII levels, as an indication of gastritis, are more likely to have abdominal pain. Serum PGs can be a useful non-invasive marker for gastritis, in evaluating children with severe abdominal pain with no apparent organic reason. What is Known: • The significance of Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatric abdominal pain remains debated. • Serum pepsinogens (PGs), non-invasive markers of gastric inflammation, were rarely utilized in assessing the association between H. pylori in pediatric abdominal pain of unknown origin. What is New: • High serum PGII level, as an indication of gastritis, rather than H. pylori infection itself, was associated with increased risk for abdominal pain.

  11. Autonomic nervous system function in patients with functional abdominal pain. An experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L S; Christiansen, P; Raundahl, U

    1993-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain--that is, pain without demonstrable organic abnormalities--has often been associated with psychologic stress. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether sympathetic nervous system response to laboratory stress and basal parasympathetic neural activity were...

  12. Fructose malabsorption in children with recurrent abdominal pain: positive effects of dietary treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermeyer, P; Baur, M; Pilic, D; Schmidt-Choudhury, A; Zilbauer, M; Wirth, S

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of a fructose-restricted diet in otherwise healthy children with abdominal pain and pathologic fructose hydrogen breath test. 75 children (aging 3-14 years) with recurrent abdominal pain without gastrointestinal disease and fructose malabsorption followed a fructose restricted diet for 4 weeks. A median decline of weekly pain frequency from 4 (mean 3.64+1.6) before diet to 1 (mean 1.46+1.4; pfructose restriction was documented. The intensity of pain decreased from median 6 (mean 5.83+2.0) before intervention to median 3 (mean 3.4+2.5; pfructose restriction represents a useful approach to address recurrent abdominal symptoms in children with fructose malabsorption. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Autonomic nervous system function in patients with functional abdominal pain. An experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L S; Christiansen, P; Raundahl, U

    1993-01-01

    disturbed in 22 patients with functional abdominal pain (functional group) as compared with 14 healthy controls (healthy group) and 26 patients with organic abdominal pain (organic group) due to duodenal ulcer (DU), gallstones, or urinary tract calculi. Plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and serum......Functional abdominal pain--that is, pain without demonstrable organic abnormalities--has often been associated with psychologic stress. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether sympathetic nervous system response to laboratory stress and basal parasympathetic neural activity were...... and serum cortisol did not increase at all in any of the groups. As a measure of parasympathetic neural activity, independent of sympathetic neural activity, the beat-to-beat variation of the heart rate was calculated. The functional patients had a significantly higher beat-to-beat variation expressed...

  14. Evaluation of guided imagery as treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in children: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro Daniel E; Weydert Joy A; Acra Sari A; Monheim Cynthia J; Chambers Andrea S; Ball Thomas M

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Because of the paucity of effective evidence-based therapies for children with recurrent abdominal pain, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of guided imagery, a well-studied self-regulation technique. Methods 22 children, aged 5 – 18 years, were randomized to learn either breathing exercises alone or guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation. Both groups had 4-weekly sessions with a therapist. Children reported the numbers of days with pain, the pain intensity, an...

  15. Unusual cause of acute abdominal pain in a postmenopausal woman: adnexal torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Biler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adnexal torsion is an infrequent but significant cause of acute lower abdominal pain in women. While adnexal torsion is generally considered in premenopausal women presenting with acute abdominal pain and a pelvic mass, it is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain during postmenopausal period. The diagnosis of adnexal torsion is often challenging due to nonspesific clinical, laboratory and physical examination findings. Causes of adnexal torsion is also different in premenopausal and postmenopausal women. While a simple functional cyst is often the cause of torsion in premenopausal women, it is more rarely the cause in postmenopausal women. Adnexal torsion is a surgical emergency. The surgery of adnexal torsion is performed either via conventional exploratory laparotomy or laparoscopic surgery. Adnexal torsion in postmenopausal women should be considered not only in the setting of sudden onset pain, but also in long-term abdominal discomfort. In this article, we presented a case with adnexal torsion that rarely cause acute abdominal pain in postmenopausal women. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(1.000: 167-170

  16. Abdominal pain symptoms are associated with anxiety and depression in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gontard, Alexander; Moritz, Anne-Michaela; Thome-Granz, Sigrid; Equit, Monika

    2015-11-01

    Abdominal pain symptoms and incontinence are common in childhood. The aim of this study was to analyse abdominal pain symptoms and their associations with incontinence and symptoms of anxiety and depression in young children. We examined 1130 children during the school entry check-up (mean age 6.2 years) and 951 participated in the study. Parents completed a questionnaire contained 11 items regarding Rome-III functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) and incontinence and 14 items from the anxious/depressed scale of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Of the 951 children (55.6% boys) we recruited, 30.1% had experienced abdominal pain symptoms in the past two months and 14% had complained of them at least once a week. In addition, 2.6% had irritable bowel syndrome, 11.3% had childhood functional abdominal pain, 2.4% were affected by faecal incontinence, 2.1% were affected by daytime urinary incontinence, and 5.5% were affected by nocturnal enuresis. One in ten (10.6%) had symptoms of anxiety and depression, and these were significantly higher in the children with FGIDs, particularly if they were also incontinent. Nearly a third of the children (30.1%) had abdominal pain symptoms, and FGIDs were associated with significantly higher symptoms of anxiety and depression, especially if children were also incontinent. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Ultrasound Assessment of Abdominal Muscle Thickness in Women With and Without Low Back Pain During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Carol Ann; Nash, Jennifer; Triano, John J; Barrett, Jon

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this preliminary study was to determine the differences in abdominal musculature thickness, within 1 month of delivery, in women who experienced back pain during pregnancy compared with those who did not. B-mode ultrasound imaging was used to measure abdominal muscle thickness on 76 postpartum participants who participated in a larger study; 47 women experienced back pain during pregnancy, and 29 did not. Participant data were stratified by group, and primary comparisons were based on these grouping across the abdominal muscles, including rectus abdominis (upper and lower fibers), external oblique, internal oblique, and transversus abdominis. Means and standard deviations were also used to set parameters for future studies. In the present study, there was no difference in any abdominal muscle thickness between groups. Women with low back pain were significantly shorter (165.19 ± 6.64 cm) than women who did not have from back pain during pregnancy (169.38 ± 7.58 cm). All other demographics, such as age, weight, and date tested postpartum, were not significantly different between groups. The results of this study showed no variation in abdominal muscle thickness in women who had back pain during pregnancy and those who did not. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Role of diagnostic laproscopy in evaluation and treatment of chronic abdominal pain in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talat, N.; Afzal, M.; Ahmad, S.; Rasool, N.; Wasti, A.R.; Saleem, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic abdominal Pain in children is a very common cause of hospital admission. Many of them are discharged without a diagnosis even after battery of investigations. Laparoscopy plays a significant role in diagnosis and management of many causes of acute and chronic abdominal pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of laparoscopy as an efficient diagnostic and management tool in children with chronic abdominal pain. Methods: A descriptive, prospective case series was collected in the department of Paediatric surgery Mayo Hospital Lahore, over the period of 5 years between Jan 2007- Dec 2013. The data of consecutive 50 patients, who were admitted in the department with the diagnosis of chronic abdominal pain, was recorded. All patients who had 2-3 admissions in hospital for last 2 months and failed to establish a definitive diagnosis after clinical examination and base line investigations underwent laparoscopy. The details of associated symptoms, finding of laparoscopy, laparoscopic procedures done, definitive diagnosis, histopathology, complications and relief of symptoms were collected and analysed and results were evaluated using SPSS17. Results: Out of 50 patients studies, 27/50 (54 percentage) were male, 23/50 (46 percentage) were female. Age ranged from 2-12 years, with the mean age of 7.24 year. Tuberculosis abdomen, adhesions, mesenteric lymphadenitis, appendicitis and cholecystitis were the final diagnosis. Five abdomens were found normal on laparoscopy. Complete pain relief was achieved in 30/50 (60 percentage), reduced intensity of pain was gained in 12/50 (24 percentage) cases while 16 percentage (8/50) still complained of pain. Conclusions: Laparoscopy is an efficient diagnostic and treatment tool in children with chronic unexplained abdominal pain. It avoids serial examinations; prolong admission, battery of investigations and unnecessary surgeries. (author)

  19. ROLE OF DIAGNOSTIC LAPAROSCOPY IN EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF CHRONIC ABDOMINAL PAIN IN CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talat, Nabila; Afzal, Muhammad; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Rasool, Naima; Wasti, Arsalan Raza; Saleem, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Chronic abdominal Pain in children is a very common cause of hospital admission. Many of them are discharged without a diagnosis even after battery of investigations. Laparoscopy plays a significant role in diagnosis and management of many causes of acute and chronic abdominal pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of laparoscopy as an efficient diagnostic and management tool in children with chronic abdominal pain. A descriptive, prospective case series was collected in the department of Paediatric surgery Mayo's Hospital Lahore, over the period of 5 years between Jan 2007-Dec 2013. The data of consecutive 50 patients, who were admitted in the department with the diagnosis of chronic abdominal pain, was recorded. All patients who had 2-3 admissions in hospital for last 2 months and failed to establish a definitive diagnosis after clinical examination and base line investigations underwent laparoscopy. The details of associated symptoms, finding of laparoscopy, laparoscopic procedures done, definitive diagnosis, histopathology, complications and relief of symptoms were collected and analysed and results were evaluated using SPSS-17. Out of 50 patients studies, 27/50 (54%) were male, 23/50 (46%) were female. Age ranged from 2-12 years, with the mean age of 7.24 year. Tuberculosis abdomen, adhesions, mesenteric lymphadenitis, appendicitis and cholecystitis were the final diagnosis. Five abdomens were found normal on laparoscopy. Complete pain relief was achieved in 30/50 (60%), reduced intensity of pain was gained in 12/50 (24%) cases while 16% (8/50) still complained of pain. Laparoscopy is an efficient diagnostic and treatment tool in children with chronic unexplained abdominal pain. It avoids serial examinations; prolong admission, battery of investigations and unnecessary surgeries.

  20. Evaluation and management of acute abdominal pain in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macaluso CR

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Christopher R Macaluso, Robert M McNamaraDepartment of Emergency Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Evaluation of the emergency department patient with acute abdominal pain is sometimes difficult. Various factors can obscure the presentation, delaying or preventing the correct diagnosis, with subsequent adverse patient outcomes. Clinicians must consider multiple diagnoses, especially those life-threatening conditions that require timely intervention to limit morbidity and mortality. This article will review general information on abdominal pain and discuss the clinical approach by review of the history and the physical examination. Additionally, this article will discuss the approach to unstable patients with abdominal pain.Keywords: acute abdomen, emergency medicine, peritonitis

  1. Prospective Evaluation of the Clinical Features of Choledocholithiasis: Focus on Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, C Mel; Kim, Hwasoon

    2016-05-01

    Although abdominal pain is a cardinal feature of choledocholithiasis, there has been little formal study of the features of pain in this condition. The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the clinical, laboratory, and radiological features of common bile duct stones, focusing on the characteristics of abdominal pain. All of the patients evaluated for choledocholithiasis at the time of endoscopic cholangiopancreatography during a 3.5-year period were prospectively interviewed and evaluated. Specific features of abdominal pain were recorded, including pertinent radiographic and laboratory data and endoscopic cholangiopancreatography findings. During the 42-month study period, 61 patients (mean age 55.3 years; 42.6% men) were identified; 31 patients (50.8%) had undergone cholecystectomy. Of the 52 patients who reported pain, abdominal pain was most commonly described as constant (100%), located in the epigastrium alone (65%) or both the epigastrium and the right upper quadrant (25%), occurring at night (44.3%), and radiating to the back (59.6%) with the number of distinct pain episodes before diagnosis ranging from 1 to 20. The median duration of pain was 3 hours and ranged from 20 minutes to 2 days. Associated symptoms of nausea (69.2%) and vomiting (30.7%) were common. No differences in pain characteristics were detected between those with or without a prior cholecystectomy. Liver tests were abnormal in all patients, with serum transaminase values being most elevated. In our study, choledocholithiasis had a characteristic pattern of constant epigastric pain radiating to the back that was associated with nausea. A prior episode was common. The most common laboratory abnormality was transaminase elevation, and the most common imaging finding was common bile duct dilatation.

  2. Widespread pressure pain hypersensitivity and ultrasound imaging evaluation of abdominal area after colon cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Jiménez, Antonio; Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Molina-Barea, Rocio; Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Galiano-Castillo, Noelia; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the presence of widespread pressure pain sensitivity in cancer patients following partial colorectal resection in the abdominal and lower back area and to describe the presence of abnormalities in abdominal and lower back muscle morphology. Twenty colon cancer survivors (eight females, mean age 56.60 ± 7.76 years) and 20 matched healthy controls (10 females, mean age 54.22 ± 8.12 years) participated. Abdominal and lower back pain was assessed after undergoing surgery using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Brief Pain Inventory (BPI). Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were bilaterally assessed over the supraumbilical, infraumbilical, and lower back areas and the second metacarpal. Ultrasound imaging was used to measure the depth of the abdominal muscles, the width of the midline abdominal fascia and the width of the lumbar multifidus. Ten months after finishing oncological treatments, patients who underwent partial colorectal resection reported significantly higher pain levels in the low-back area (P = 0.003) but not in the abdominal area (P = 0.426) compared with the matched controls. After surgery, the colon patients reported significantly higher BPI-intensity (P ultrasound imaging of the depth of the internal oblique muscle (F = 4.887, P = 0.035) but not in the other ultrasound imaging measurements. Ten months after oncology treatment, colon cancer survivors show widespread pressure pain muscle hyperalgesia and reduced depths of dominant-side internal oblique muscles compared with matched controls. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Evaluation of guided imagery as treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in children: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapiro Daniel E

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of the paucity of effective evidence-based therapies for children with recurrent abdominal pain, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of guided imagery, a well-studied self-regulation technique. Methods 22 children, aged 5 – 18 years, were randomized to learn either breathing exercises alone or guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation. Both groups had 4-weekly sessions with a therapist. Children reported the numbers of days with pain, the pain intensity, and missed activities due to abdominal pain using a daily pain diary collected at baseline and during the intervention. Monthly phone calls to the children reported the number of days with pain and the number of days of missed activities experienced during the month of and month following the intervention. Children with ≤ 4 days of pain/month and no missed activities due to pain were defined as being healed. Depression, anxiety, and somatization were measured in both children and parents at baseline. Results At baseline the children who received guided imagery had more days of pain during the preceding month (23 vs. 14 days, P = 0.04. There were no differences in the intensity of painful episodes or any baseline psychological factors between the two groups. Children who learned guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation had significantly greater decrease in the number of days with pain than those learning breathing exercises alone after one (67% vs. 21%, P = 0.05, and two (82% vs. 45%, P Conclusion The therapeutic efficacy of guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation found in this study is consistent with our present understanding of the pathophysiology of recurrent abdominal pain in children. Although unfamiliar to many pediatricians, guided imagery is a simple, noninvasive therapy with potential benefit for treating children with RAP.

  4. Home-Based Hypnotherapy Self-exercises vs Individual Hypnotherapy With a Therapist for Treatment of Pediatric Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Functional Abdominal Pain, or Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Juliette M. T. M.; Vlieger, Arine M.; Frankenhuis, Carla; George, Elvira K.; Groeneweg, Michael; Norbruis, Obbe F.; Tjon A ten, Walther; van Wering, Herbert M.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Merkus, Maruschka P.; Benninga, Marc A.

    2017-01-01

    Individual gut-directed hypnotherapy (HT) is effective in pediatric irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional abdominal pain or functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAP[S]). It is, however, unavailable to many children. To compare the effectiveness of HT by means of home-based self-exercises

  5. Right Lower Quadrant Abdominal Pain in a Patient with Prior Ventriculoperitoneal Shunting: Consider the Tip!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Charalampoudis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunting is the treatment of choice for nonobstructive hydrocephalus. In patients with such a device, right lower quadrant abdominal pain can puzzle the surgeon, posing a differential diagnostic problem among appendicitis, nonsurgical colicky pain, and primary shunt catheter tip infection. Treatment is different in either case. Presentation of Case. We hereby present a case of a young woman with prior ventriculoperitoneal shunt positioning who presented to our department with right lower quadrant abdominal pain. The patient underwent a 24-hour observation including a neurosurgery consult in order to exclude acute appendicitis and VP shunt tip infection. Twenty four hours later, the patient’s symptomatology improved, and she was discharged with the diagnosis of atypical colicky abdominal pain seeking a gastroenterologist consult. Discussion. This case supports that when a patient with prior VP shunting presents with right lower quadrant abdominal pain, differential diagnosis can be tricky for the surgeon. Conclusion. Apart from acute appendicitis, primary or secondary VP catheter tip infection must be considered because the latter can be disastrous.

  6. Managing a Female Patient with Left Low Back Pain and Sacroiliac Joint Pain with Therapeutic Exercise: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, Kyndall L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this case study is to describe the management of a female patient with chronic left low back pain and sacroiliac joint pain (LBP/SIJP) using unique unilateral exercises developed by the Postural Restoration Institute (PRI) to address pelvic asymmetry and left hip capsule restriction, which is consistent with a Right Handed and Left Anterior Interior Chain pattern of postural asymmetry.

  7. Association of left renal vein variations and pelvic varices in abdominal MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, Zafer [Baskent University, Adana Teaching and Medical Research Center, Department of Radiology, Adana (Turkey); Baskent Universitesi Adana Hastanesi, Adana (Turkey); Ulusan, Serife; Oguzkurt, Levent [Baskent University, Adana Teaching and Medical Research Center, Department of Radiology, Adana (Turkey)

    2007-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine whether left renal vein (LRV) variation is associated with pelvic varices and left ovarian vein (LOV) reflux. Routine abdominal multidetector-row computed tomography scans of 324 women without symptoms of pelvic congestion syndrome were analyzed. Presence and type of LRV variants (circumaortic [CLRV] or retroaortic [RLRV]) were recorded. Diameters of the LRV, ovarian veins (OVs), and parauterine veins were measured and a specific LRV diameter ratio was calculated for each patient. Presence and severity of pelvic varices and LOV reflux were noted. Pelvic varices were detected in 59 (18%) of the total of 324 women, in 7 (37%) of the 19 women with RLRVs, in 7 (29%) of the 24 women with CLRVs, and in 45 (16%) of the 281 women with normal LRVs. The frequency of pelvic varices in the women with LRV variation was significantly higher than that in the group with normal LRV anatomy (33 vs. 16%; p=0.009). The frequency of pelvic varices in the women with RLRVs was also significantly higher than that in the group with normal LRV anatomy (p=0.02). LRV diameter ratio was correlated with presence of pelvic varices and presence of LOV reflux (p=0.0001 for both). This study revealed an association between pelvic varices and LRV variations in a population of predominantly multiparous women. (orig.)

  8. Pathology Image of the Month: Abdominal Pain and Peripheral Eosinophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasson, Reggie; Alquist, Caroline Raasch; Farris, K Barton; McGoey, Robin

    2015-01-01

    A 69 year-old man presented to his primary care physician with abdominal discomfort. Medical history was notable for diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with recent (one week prior) steroid use and hypertension. Surgical history was significant for a remote sigmoid hemicolectomy for diverticulitis with a synthetic mesh abdominal repair. He was admitted to the hospital for suspected gastroparesis. An upper GI series showed a distended stomach with delayed gastric motility. He underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and a duodenal biopsy was taken. He remained afebrile but had an elevated white blood cell count of 19.1 x 103/mcL (4.5 - 11.0 x 103/mcL) with 28.8 percent eosinophils on differential. Microscopic images of the duodenal biopsy are shown below.

  9. Preoperative pain measures ineffective in outpatient abdominal surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robert; Wright, Julia; Perry, Kyler; Wright, Daniel

    2018-05-01

    The multimodality addition of preoperative gabapentin, acetaminophen, and celecoxib (GAC) and postoperative TENS has been recommended to diminish narcotics. We predict that GAC-TENS implementation will reduce recovery room time, improve pain control, reduce narcotic refills, and demonstrate usefulness of TENS treatment. A prospective study compared a control group of patients not utilizing the GAC-TENS protocol during 2015 to patients using the GAC-TENS protocol during 2016. There was less recovery room time in the control group compared to the protocol group. Postoperative day one pain control was similar between the groups. Less refills were noted. TENS unit satisfaction level was rated "very helpful" by 63% of patients. The results call into question the efficacy of the American Pain Society recommendations as they increase time in recovery room but do not decrease the quantity of narcotics used in the recovery room, nor do they improve pain satisfaction responses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Lithotripsy of Pancreatic Stones in a Patient with Cystic Fibrosis: Successful Treatment of Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Weiss

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic pancreatic sphincteroromy and removal of pancreatic stones has been helpful in selected cases of patients with chronic pancreatitis. This article reports the case of an 18-year-old native Indian woman with cystic fibrosis who was experiencing pain related to pancreatitis, complicated by pancreatic duct stricture and lithiasis. Subsequent dilation of the pancreatic stricture and lithotripsy of the pancreatic ductal stones successfully eliminated the abdominal pain

  11. Lithotripsy of Pancreatic Stones in a Patient with Cystic Fibrosis: Successful Treatment of Abdominal Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, AA; Greig, JM; Fache, S

    1992-01-01

    Endoscopic pancreatic sphincteroromy and removal of pancreatic stones has been helpful in selected cases of patients with chronic pancreatitis. This article reports the case of an 18-year-old native Indian woman with cystic fibrosis who was experiencing pain related to pancreatitis, complicated by pancreatic duct stricture and lithiasis. Subsequent dilation of the pancreatic stricture and lithotripsy of the pancreatic ductal stones successfully eliminated the abdominal pain

  12. Anaesthetic injection versus ischemic compression for the pain relief of abdominal wall trigger points in women with chronic pelvic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Mary L L S; Braz, Carolina A; Rosa-e-Silva, Julio C; Candido-dos-Reis, Francisco J; Nogueira, Antonio A; Poli-Neto, Omero B

    2015-12-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is a common condition among women, and 10 to 30 % of causes originate from the abdominal wall, and are associated with trigger points. Although little is known about their pathophysiology, variable methods have been practiced clinically. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of local anaesthetic injections versus ischemic compression via physical therapy for pain relief of abdominal wall trigger points in women with chronic pelvic pain. We conducted a parallel group randomized trial including 30 women with chronic pelvic pain with abdominal wall trigger points. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two intervention groups. One group received an injection of 2 mL 0.5 % lidocaine without a vasoconstrictor into a trigger point. In the other group, ischemic compression via physical therapy was administered at the trigger points three times, with each session lasting for 60 s, and a rest period of 30 s between applications. Both treatments were administered during one weekly session for four weeks. Our primary outcomes were satisfactory clinical response rates and percentages of pain relief. Our secondary outcomes are pain threshold and tolerance at the trigger points. All subjects were evaluated at baseline and 1, 4, and 12 weeks after the interventions. The study was conducted at a tertiary hospital that was associated with a university providing assistance predominantly to working class women who were treated by the public health system. Clinical response rates and pain relief were significantly better at 1, 4, and 12 weeks for those receiving local anaesthetic injections than ischemic compression via physical therapy. The pain relief of women treated with local anaesthetic injections progressively improved at 1, 4, and 12 weeks after intervention. In contrast, women treated with ischemic compression did not show considerable changes in pain relief after intervention. In the local anaesthetic injection group, pain threshold

  13. Evaluation of guided imagery as treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in children: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weydert, Joy A; Shapiro, Daniel E; Acra, Sari A; Monheim, Cynthia J; Chambers, Andrea S; Ball, Thomas M

    2006-11-08

    Because of the paucity of effective evidence-based therapies for children with recurrent abdominal pain, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of guided imagery, a well-studied self-regulation technique. 22 children, aged 5-18 years, were randomized to learn either breathing exercises alone or guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation. Both groups had 4-weekly sessions with a therapist. Children reported the numbers of days with pain, the pain intensity, and missed activities due to abdominal pain using a daily pain diary collected at baseline and during the intervention. Monthly phone calls to the children reported the number of days with pain and the number of days of missed activities experienced during the month of and month following the intervention. Children with Depression, anxiety, and somatization were measured in both children and parents at baseline. At baseline the children who received guided imagery had more days of pain during the preceding month (23 vs. 14 days, P = 0.04). There were no differences in the intensity of painful episodes or any baseline psychological factors between the two groups. Children who learned guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation had significantly greater decrease in the number of days with pain than those learning breathing exercises alone after one (67% vs. 21%, P = 0.05), and two (82% vs. 45%, P children who had learned guided imagery met the threshold of children who learned only the breathing exercises. The therapeutic efficacy of guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation found in this study is consistent with our present understanding of the pathophysiology of recurrent abdominal pain in children. Although unfamiliar to many pediatricians, guided imagery is a simple, noninvasive therapy with potential benefit for treating children with RAP.

  14. Is non-operative approach applicable for penetrating injuries of the left thoraco-abdominal region?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Kones

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Currently, diagnostic laparoscopy (DL is recommended for the left thoraco-abdominal region penetrating injuries (LTARP. However, organ and diaphragmatic injury may not be detected in all of these patients. Our aim is to focus on this LTARP patient group without any operative findings and to highlight the evaluation of diagnostic tools in the high-tech era for a possible selected conservative treatment. Material and methods: The patients who were admitted to ED due to LTARP, and who underwent routine DL were evaluated retrospectively in terms of demographic, clinical, radiological, and operative findings of the patients. Results: The current study included 79 patients with LTARP. In 44 of 79 patients, abdominal injury was not detected. In 30 patients an isolated diaphragmatic injury was revealed and in 4 patients a visceral injury was accompanying to diaphragmatic injury. Surgical findings revealed that the diaphragm was the organ most likely to sustain injury. In patients with more than one positive diagnostic findings need for surgery rate was 61.5%, however; in patients with one positive diagnostic finding (n = 53, positive surgical finding rate was only 35.8%, (p = 0.03. Regarding the combined use of all diagnostic tools in these patients; such as physical examination, plain chest X-ray, and computed tomography, when this method was used for pre-operative diagnosis, sensitivity was measured as 82.7%, specificity 84.1%, PPV 77.4% and NPV 88.1%. Conclusion: Although DL is reliable for diagnosis of diaphragmatic and visceral injury in patients with LTARP. However, individual decision making for laparoscopic intervention is needed to prevent morbidity of an unnecessary operation under emergent setting due to high rates of negative intraabdominal findings. Keywords: Wounds penetrating, Physical examination, Diagnostic imaging, Treatment outcome

  15. Ultrasound tissue Doppler imaging reveals no delay in abdominal muscle feed-forward activity during rapid arm movements in patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubler, Deborah; Mannion, Anne F; Schenk, Peter; Gorelick, Mark; Helbling, Daniel; Gerber, Hans; Toma, Valeriu; Sprott, Haiko

    2010-07-15

    Cross-sectional study. Comparison of the timing of onset of lateral abdominal muscle activity during rapid arm movements in patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain (cLBP) and back-pain-free controls. Rapid movements of the arm are normally associated with prior activation of trunk-stabilizing muscles in readiness for the impending postural perturbation. Using invasive intramuscular electromyography techniques, studies have shown that this feed-forward function is delayed in some patients with low back pain (LBP). Ultrasound tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) provides an ultrasound method for quantifying muscle activation in a noninvasive manner, allowing investigation of larger groups of patients and controls. Ninety-six individuals participated (48 patients with cLBP and 48 matched LBP-free controls). During rapid shoulder flexion, abduction, and extension, surface electromyographic signals from the deltoid and motion-mode TDI images from the contralateral lateral abdominal muscles were recorded simultaneously. The onset of muscle activity was given by changes in the tissue velocity of the abdominal muscles, as measured with TDI. Pain and disability in the patients were assessed using standardized questionnaires. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance. In both groups, feed-forward activity of the lateral abdominal muscles was recorded during arm movements in all directions. The main effect of "group membership" revealed no significant difference between the groups for the earliest onset of abdominal muscle activity (P = 0.398). However, a significant "group x body side" interaction (P = 0.015) was observed, and this was the result of earlier onsets in the cLBP group than controls for the abdominal muscles on the right (but not left) body side. No relationship was found between the time of onset of the earliest abdominal muscle activity and pain intensity, pain frequency, pain medication usage, or Roland Morris disability scores. Patients

  16. The effect of a preoperative single-dose methylprednisolone on postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabakke, Anna J M; Holst, Lars B; Jørgensen, Jørgen C

    2014-01-01

    -blinded placebo-controlled trial women scheduled for elective abdominal hysterectomy (n=59) were randomized to preoperatively receive either 125 mg methylprednisolone or saline intravenously. Primary outcome was postoperative pain measured on a 0.0-10.0 visual analog scale and assessed at rest and during...

  17. Constipation and Nonspecific Abdominal Pain in Teenage Girls Referred for Emergency Surgical Consultation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buddingh, K. Tim; Wieselmann, Eva; Heineman, Erik; Broens, Paul M. A.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the discharge diagnoses of children receiving surgical consultation for acute abdominal pain according to age and sex. Methods: Retrospective chart review. Results: Nine hundred forty-one children were included. Appendicitis was confirmed in 31% of

  18. Current radiological strategies for the assessment of right lower quadrant abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pumersha Naidoo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Right lower quadrant abdominal pain is a common clinical entity. Imaging and the radiologistplay an integral role in achieving a diagnosis, so guiding prompt management of patients.This review discusses the spectrum of pathology and imaging findings, and highlights and contrasts the preferred imaging modalities in different subsets of patients.

  19. Chronic abdominal pain in long-term spinal cord injury: a follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steffen D; Faaborg, Pia Møller; Christensen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    -reported constipation. The median intensity (numeric rating scale) was 6.0 (range 3-10) and it was often associated with autonomic symptoms. Nine (8%) of the 115 individuals who responded in both 2006 and 2015 had developed new abdominal pain or discomfort, 30 (26%) no longer reported it, and 28 (24%) reported...

  20. Clinical and laboratory findings in 220 children with recurrent abdominal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, C. F. M.; Benninga, M. A.; Büller, H. A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the clinical and laboratory findings in children with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP). Methods: Consecutive patients with RAP (Apley criteria), age 4-16 years, referred to a secondary medical centre were evaluated by a standardized history, physical examination and laboratory

  1. The Import of Abdominal Pain in Adults with Sickle Cell Disorder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    crisis in sickle cell patients with abdominal pain and their clinical correlates if any. METHODS: Clinical records of adults with SCD (Hb SS and Hb SC) attending the Haematology Outpatients' Clinic of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Southwest Nigerian, over a ten-year period, were reviewed.

  2. Hypnotherapy for children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieger, Arine M.; Menko-Frankenhuis, Carla; Wolfkamp, Simone C. S.; Tromp, Ellen; Benninga, Marc A.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are highly prevalent in childhood. A substantial proportion of patients continues to experience long-lasting symptoms. Gut-directed hypnotherapy (HT) has been shown to be highly effective in the treatment of adult

  3. Functional abdominal pain disorders in children: therapeutic strategies focusing on hypnotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, J.M.T.M.

    2015-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain disorders are common pediatric disorders, which can significantly impact the child and his/her family. Treatment of these children is hampered, because of the incomplete understanding of underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. This thesis focusses on the clinical and

  4. Biliary scintigraphy in children with sickle cell anemia and acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Alonzo, W.A. Jr.; Heyman, S.

    1985-01-01

    The patterns of radionuclide hepatobiliary scans in nine children with sickle cell disease and acute right upper quadrant abdominal pain were reviewed. The most common pattern observed was delayed gall bladder visualization, consistent with chronic cholecystitis. The value of hepatobiliary imaging in distinguishing acute cholecystitis from crisis is presented. (orig.)

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Norrman, Eva; Geijer, Mats; Jansson, Kjell; Geijer, Håkan

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. • Low-dose CT has a higher diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • A systematic review shows that CT has better diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • Radiography has no place in the workup of acute non-traumatic abdominal pain.

  6. Spinal cord stimulation for intractable chronic upper abdominal pain: a case report of the first patient in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahrouqi, Haitham; Munro, Zea; Acland, Richard H; MacFarlane, Martin R

    2012-12-14

    We present the first patient in New Zealand to undergo Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) for intractable upper abdominal pain. The patient was a 53-year-old man with a 20-year history of debilitating upper abdominal pain associated with chronic pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic divisum. Prior to the SCS, he was prescribed 680 mg of morphine sulphate equi-analgesia a day. Despite the intense analgesia, he still suffered monthly attacks of upper abdominal pain requiring hospitalisation. Nine months after implanting a Spinal Cord Stimulator, the monthly attacks ceased, his background pain was effectively controlled and the need for opioids decreased to 510 mg of morphine sulphate equi-analgesia a day.

  7. Primary segmental omental infarction as a rare cause of acute abdominal pain in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.F. Tepeneu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Primary omental infarction (POI has a low incidence worldwide, with most cases occurring in adults. This condition is rarely considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in childhood. Material and methods: We present 2 cases of omental infarction in an obese 8-year-old boy and a 5-year-old boy who presented with acute abdominal pain in the right abdomen. Both patients were initially treated with intravenous fluids and analgesics with no improvement. Abdominal ultrasound of the first patient showed free intraperitoneal fluid, meteorism and distended bowel loops. The appendix was not visualized. With a presumptive clinical diagnosis of appendicitis the child underwent laparotomy.On entering the peritoneal cavity an omental infarction was seen and a portion of the omentum was resected. Appendectomy was performed.The second patient presented with acute abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant, which started 2 days before. There was a history of possible abdominal trauma about 3 weeks earlier. The patient had repeated ultrasound examinations and a CT scan of the abdomen which showed a omental infarction. He underwent laparoscopy and resection of the omental infarction, as well as incidental appendectomy. Results: The postoperative period was uneventful. The first patient was discharged on day 3, the second patient on day 4 after surgery. Histology showed a normal vermiform appendix and an omental infarction in both cases. Conclusion and discussion: Since the omental infarction as etiology of acute abdominal pain is uncommon in children, we emphasize the importance of accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment of omental infarction. Keywords: Primary segmental omental infarction (POI, Appendicitis, Childhood

  8. Effects of Different Types of Contraction in Abdominal Bracing on the Asymmetry of Left and Right Abdominal Muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sung-Hyun; Song, Min-Young; Park, Hyeon-Ji; Park, Ji-Hyun; Bae, Hyun-Young; Lim, Da-Som

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effective strength levels of abdominal muscle contraction using the bracing contraction method. [Subjects] The experiment was conducted with 31 healthy male (M=15) and female (F=16) adults attending D University in Busan; all participants had less than obesity level BMI (BMI

  9. Quadratus lumborum block in chronic pain after abdominal hernia repair: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Rita; Segura, Elena; Loureiro, Maria do Céu; Assunção, José Pedro

    The quadratus lumborum blockade was described by R. Blanco in its two approaches (I and II). The local anesthetic deposition in this location can provide blockade to T6-L1 dermatomes. We performed this fascia blockade guided by ultrasound for treating a chronic neuropathic pain in the abdominal wall. Male patient, 61 years old, 83kg, with a history of thrombocytopenia due to alcoholic cirrhosis, among others; had chronic pain in the abdominal wall after multiple abdominal hernia repairs in the last year and a half, with poor response to treatment with neuromodulators and opioids. On clinical examination, he revealed a neuropathic pain, with prevalence of allodynia to touch, covering the entire anterior abdominal wall, from T7 to T12 dermatomes. We opted for a quadratus lumborum block type II, guided by ultrasound, with administration of 0.2% ropivacaine (25mL) and depot (vial) methylprednisolone (20mg) on each side. The procedure gave immediate relief of symptoms and, after six months, the patient still had a significant reduction in allodynia without compromising the quality of life. We consider that performing the quadratus lumborum block type II was an important analgesic option in the treatment of a patient with chronic pain after abdominal hernia repair, emphasizing the effects of local anesthetic spread to the thoracic paravertebral space. The technique has proven to be safe and well tolerated. The publication of more clinical cases reporting the effectiveness of this blockade for chronic pain is desirable. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. [Quadratus lumborum block in chronic pain after abdominal hernia repair: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Rita; Segura, Elena; Loureiro, Maria do Céu; Assunção, José Pedro

    The quadratus lumborum blockade was described by R. Blanco in its two approaches (I and II). The local anesthetic deposition in this location can provide blockade to T6-L1 dermatomes. We performed this fascia blockade guided by ultrasound for treating a chronic neuropathic pain in the abdominal wall. Male patient; 61 years old; 83kg; with a history of thrombocytopenia due to alcoholic cirrhosis, among others; had chronic pain in the abdominal wall after multiple abdominal hernia repairs in the last year and a half, with poor response to treatment with neuromodulators and opioids. On clinical examination, he revealed a neuropathic pain, with prevalence of allodynia to touch, covering the entire anterior abdominal wall, from T7 to T12 dermatomes. We opted for a quadratus lumborum block type II, guided by ultrasound, with administration of 0.2% ropivacaine (25mL) and depot (vial) methylprednisolone (20mg) on each side. The procedure gave immediate relief of symptoms and, after six months, the patient still had a significant reduction in allodynia without compromising the quality of life. We consider that performing the quadratus lumborum block type II was an important analgesic option in the treatment of a patient with chronic pain after abdominal hernia repair, emphasizing the effects of local anesthetic spread to the thoracic paravertebral space. The technique has proven to be safe and well tolerated. The publication of more clinical cases reporting the effectiveness of this blockade for chronic pain is desirable. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Post-operative management of pain following major abdominal and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the common methods of analgesia and their effectiveness in postoperative patients and to assess the occurrence of common post-operative complications related to pain. Design: A prospective descriptive study. Settings: Three general surgical wards and one cardiothoracic ward at the Kenyatta National ...

  12. Extra scrotal spermatocele causing lower abdominal pain: a first case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollard, Denis J; Fobia, John B

    2011-03-01

    Lower quadrant abdominal pain is a common complaint evaluated in emergency departments (EDs). The number of differential diagnoses is lowered when the pain in a male patient is associated with a palpable tender mass. These diagnoses include inguinal hernia, inflamed inguinal lymph node, rectus sheath hematoma, cryptorchidism, mass derived from the spermatic cord, and polyorchidism. We report a case of extra scrotal spermatocele causing lower quadrant abdominal pain that was misdiagnosed as an inguinal hernia on several ED visits. Lower quadrant mass and pain caused by a spermatocele are unusual conditions. Upon the patient's third (ED) visit, the painful mass remained located in his right lower quadrant. The lower quadrant mass was movable on palpation and with pressure could be delivered into the superior aspect of the scrotum. The patient had an abdominal and pelvic computed tomography scan and lower quadrant ultrasound. The imaging studies revealed the mass to be a cystic structure. Surgical excision confirmed that the mass was a spermatocele. Differential diagnoses, diagnostic approaches, and treatment are discussed.

  13. ANTISPASMODIC MEDICATION WITH DIRECTIVE EFFECT IN CHILDREN WITH ABDOMINAL PAIN AT THE STAGE OF DIAGNOSTIC SEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.A. Kozlova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Additional examination is needed for the purpose of detection of its etiology in some patients with abdominal pain, and it takes several days to prove a diagnosis. In most cases this pain is a result of muscle spasm in gastrointestinal tract. The administration of antispasmodic medication with directive effect, particularly, of hyoscine butylbromide (Buscopan, is well-grounded. Hyoscine butylbromide is M-cholinergic antagonist, it does not penetrates blood-brain barrier, does not induce common for cholinergic antagonists vascular reactions and decrease of blood pressure. This drug is used in pediatric practice for a long time, it can be used in patients 6 years old anв older, and it has good safety profile. Key words: abdominal pain, hyoscine butylbromide.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(1:168-170

  14. Primary Cardiac Burkitt Lymphoma Presenting with Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Tzachanis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 44-year-old woman with primary Burkitt lymphoma of the heart who presented with abdominal bloating and epigastric discomfort secondary to tamponade physiology caused by a large pericardial effusion. The pericardial fluid contained a large number of highly atypical lymphocytes with moderate basophilic cytoplasm, rare punched-out vacuoles, a vesicular nuclear chromatin, large nucleolus, and marginated chromatin that by FISH were positive for the 8;14 translocation. She had no other sites of disease. She was treated with four alternating cycles of modified CODOX-M and IVAC in combination with rituximab and remains in remission more than 5 years since diagnosis.

  15. Persistent abdominal pain after exercise: an unexpected diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugrul Ormeci

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Painful conditions of the musculoskeletal system are encountered quite frequently and are generally benign. However, clinicians should be careful to exclude rare malignant disorders and soft tissue sarcomas such as rhabdomyosarcoma, which have no specific symptoms or findings. This paper presents a case that was initially consistent with a hematoma but was then diagnosed as a rhabdomyosarcoma upon clinical examination and ultrasonography at follow-up shortly after.

  16. Acute jejunogastric intussusception: a rare cause of abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, K B; Gordon, R S; Victory, C

    1992-05-01

    We report the case of a 61-year-old man with a history of a Bilroth II procedure who presented to the emergency department after 12 hours of severe epigastric pain and one episode of coffee-ground emesis. Computed tomography and esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed intussuscepted jejunum through a gastrojejunostomy that required emergency operative reduction. This case illustrates the rare complication of acute jejunogastric intussusception more than 20 years after a Bilroth II procedure.

  17. Relative abdominal adiposity is associated with chronic low back pain: a preliminary explorative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristy Brooks

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although previous research suggests a relationship between chronic low back pain (cLBP and adiposity, this relationship is poorly understood. No research has explored the relationship between abdominal-specific subcutaneous and visceral adiposity with pain and disability in cLBP individuals. The aim of this study therefore was to examine the relationship of regional and total body adiposity to pain and disability in cLBP individuals. Methods A preliminary explorative study design of seventy (n = 70 adult men and women with cLBP was employed. Anthropometric and adiposity measures were collected, including body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, total body adiposity and specific ultrasound-based abdominal adiposity measurements. Self-reported pain and disability were measured using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI questionnaires respectively. Relationships between anthropometric and adiposity measures with pain and disability were assessed using correlation and regression analyses. Results Significant correlations between abdominal to lumbar adiposity ratio (A-L variables and the waist-to-hip ratio with self-reported pain were observed. A-L variables were found to predict pain, with 9.1–30.5 % of the variance in pain across the three analysis models explained by these variables. No relationships between anthropometric or adiposity variables to self-reported disability were identified. Conclusions The findings of this study indicated that regional distribution of adiposity via the A-L is associated with cLBP, providing a rationale for future research on adiposity and cLBP.

  18. Reduced incidence of chronic postsurgical pain after epidural analgesia for abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouman, Esther A; Theunissen, Maurice; Bons, Sabrina A; van Mook, Walther N; Gramke, Hans-F; van Kleef, Maarten; Marcus, Marco A

    2014-02-01

    Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) is a common complication of surgery with high impact on quality of life. Peripheral and central sensitization caused by enhanced and prolonged afferent nociceptive input are considered important mechanisms for the development of CPSP. This case-control study investigated whether epidural analgesia is associated with a reduced incidence of CPSP after open abdominal surgery. Six months after surgery, Short-Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) pain scores, possible predictors of chronic pain, and quality of life were assessed. Patients treated with epidural analgesia in combination with general anesthesia (epidural group, N = 51) were compared to patients undergoing matched surgical procedures receiving general anesthesia alone (GA-group, N = 50). Multivariate analysis was performed by logistic regression analysis. Twenty-six (25.7%) patients experienced chronic pain, 9 in the epidural group (17.6%), 17 in the GA-group (34%), crude odds ratio (OR) 0.42 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16 to 1.05). After adjustment for the most prominent predictors of CPSP, such as age, sex, pre-operative pain, and acute postoperative pain, the OR for chronic pain in the epidural group was 0.19 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.76). Patients with CPSP reported a significantly lower quality of life compared to patients without CPSP (SF-36 total score median (IQR) 39.2 (27.2 to 56.7) vs. 84.3 (69.9 to 92.5, P abdominal surgery. Postoperative epidural analgesia is associated with a reduced incidence of CPSP after abdominal surgery. © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  19. Clinical Scoring for Diagnosis of Acute Lower Abdominal Pain in Female of Reproductive Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kijja Jearwattanakanok

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obstetrics and gynecological conditions (OB-GYNc are difficult to be differentiated from appendicitis in young adult females presenting with acute lower abdominal pain. Timely and correct diagnosis is clinically challenging. Method. A retrospective data analysis was performed on 542 female patients who were admitted to a tertiary care hospital with a chief complaint of acute lower abdominal pain. Diagnostic indicators of appendicitis and OB-GYNc were identified by stepwise multivariable polytomous logistic regression. Diagnostic performances of the scores were tested. Result. The developed clinical score is comprised of (1 guarding or rebound tenderness, (2 pregnancy, (3 sites of abdominal tenderness, (4 leukocytosis, (5 peripheral neutrophils ≥75%, and (6 presence of diarrhea. For diagnosis of appendicitis, the area under the ROC curve was 0.8696, and the sensitivity and specificity were 89.25% and 70.00%. For OB-GYNc, the corresponding values were 0.8450, 66.67%, and 94.85%, respectively. Conclusion. The clinical scoring system can differentiate the diagnosis of acute lower abdominal pain in young adult females. Time spent for diagnosis at the emergency room may be shortened, and the patients would be admitted to the appropriate departments in less time.

  20. Chronic abdominal pain, appendiceal mucinous neoplasm, and concurrent intestinal endometriosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurogochi Takanori

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Although both appendiceal tumor and intestinal endometriosis have been reported as rare causes of abdominal pain, the coexistence of appendiceal mucinous neoplasm and ileal endometriosis has not previously been reported. Case presentation A 41-year-old Japanese woman presented with a positive fecal occult blood test and a 3-year history of menstruation-related lower abdominal pain. A colonoscopy demonstrated extrinsic compression of the cecum, suggesting a mass arising from the appendix or adjacent structures. Abdominal imaging showed a 6-cm cystic mass with intraluminal thick fluids originating from the appendix. At ileocecal resection for an appendiceal tumor, a 2-cm mass in the terminal ileum was incidentally found, which was included in the surgical specimen. Microscopic examination confirmed a diagnosis of a mucinous neoplasm of the appendix with endometriosis of the terminal ileum. Conclusions To avoid urgent surgery for subsequent serious events associated with disease progression, appendiceal tumor and intestinal endometriosis should be ruled out in patients with chronic abdominal pain.

  1. Jejunal Choristoma: A Very Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Olajide

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Choristoma is development of a normal tissue in an aberrant location. This report describes jejunal salivary choristoma (JSC causing recurring episodes of abdominal discomfort in a 5-year-old girl. Exploratory laporatomy revealed a pale yellow subserosal jejunal lesion. Wedge resection of the lesion and repair of the bowel were performed. The child did well postoperatively and has since that time been free of pain at follow-up. Histopathological examination of the resected lesion revealed salivary gland choriostoma. Literature review (PUBMED search engine revealed no previous report of this rare clinicopathologic entity. We conclude that choriostoma should be considered a possible differential when evaluating abdominal complaint in children.

  2. An adult male with abdominal pain and skin rash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Patel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Henoch-Schönlein purpura is generally a disease of children and uncommon in adults, especially after the age of 40. It is characterized by leukocytoclastic vasculitis skin rash, arthralgia, and gastrointestinal symptoms. In adults, glomerulonephritis may occur and the long-term prognosis is poor. We present the case of a 65-year-old man with complaints of abdomen pain and skin rash who subsequently developed renal failure. He was diagnosed with adult onset Henoch-Schönlein purpura and survived after treatment with glucocorticoids and hemodialysis.

  3. Differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain – acute intermittent porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mislav Klobučić

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of heme biosynthesis in liver due to deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase enzyme. Clinically, AIP is dominatedby a colicky type pain, which does not subside after taking usual analgesics. Additional frequent symptoms are vomiting, hypertension, peripheral neuropathy, seizures, depression, delirium and coma. This paper reported a case of a twenty-fi- ve-year-old female patient, who had undergone a period of six days between the first presentationto the medical department and the diagnosis confirmation. It has accentuated possible mistakes in symptomatic therapy administration as well as dangers of a delayed diagnosis.

  4. The neurolytic celiac plexus block using CT guidance through anterior abdominal approach to control the cancer pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jie; Yang Ning; Liu Wei; Jin Zhengyu; Zhao Yupei; Cai Lixing

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect and safety of neurolytic celiac plexus block (Ncb) using CT guidance through anterior abdominal approach. Methods: The clinical data of 24 patients who were given NCPB because of the suffering of upper abdominal and back pain caused by pancreatic carcinoma and other cancer in advanced stage were retrospectively analyzed. The therapeutic effect was evaluated with complete pain relief and partial pain relief. Results: The effective rate and complete pain relief rate in short period ( 3 months) were 71.4% and 14.3% respectively. No severe complications occurred. Conclusion: NCPB guided by CT through anterior abdominal approach is an effective, safe and simple method to control the upper abdominal and back pain caused by cancer

  5. Abdominal musculature abnormalities as a cause of groin pain in athletes. Inguinal hernias and pubalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D C; Meyers, W C; Moylan, J A; Lohnes, J; Bassett, F H; Garrett, W E

    1991-01-01

    There has been increasing interest within the European sports medicine community regarding the etiology and treatment of groin pain in the athlete. Groin pain is most commonly caused by musculotendinous strains of the adductors and other muscles crossing the hip joint, but may also be related to abdominal wall abnormalities. Cases may be termed "pubalgia" if physical examination does not reveal inguinal hernia and there is an absence of other etiology for groin pain. We present nine cases of patients who underwent herniorrhaphies for groin pain. Two patients had groin pain without evidence of a hernia preoperatively (pubalgia). In the remaining seven patients we determined the presence of a hernia by physical examination. At operation, eight patients were found to have inguinal hernias. One patient had no hernia but had partial avulsion of the internal oblique fibers from their insertion at the public tubercle. The average interval from operation to return to full activity was 11 weeks. All patients returned to full activity within 3 months of surgery. One patient had persistent symptoms of mild incisional tenderness, but otherwise there were no recurrences, complications, or persistence of symptoms. Abnormalities of the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernias and microscopic tears or avulsions of the internal oblique muscle, can be an overlooked source of groin pain in the athlete. Operative treatment of this condition with herniorrhaphy can return the athlete to his sport within 3 months.

  6. [Appendicitis versus non-specific acute abdominal pain: Paediatric Appendicitis Score evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada Arias, Marcos; Salgado Barreira, Angel; Montero Sánchez, Margarita; Fernández Eire, Pilar; García Saavedra, Silvia; Gómez Veiras, Javier; Fernández Lorenzo, José Ramón

    2018-01-01

    Non-specific acute abdominal pain is the most common process requiring differential diagnosis with appendicitis in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to assess the Paediatric Appendicitis Score in differentiating between these two entities. All patients admitted due to suspicion of appendicitis were prospectively evaluated in our hospital over a two-year period. Cases of non-specific acute abdominal pain and appendicitis were enrolled in the study. Several variables were collected, including Score variables and C-reactive protein levels. Descriptive, univariate and multivariate analyses and diagnostic accuracy studies (ROC curves) were performed. A total of 275 patients were studied, in which there were 143 cases of non-specific acute abdominal pain and 132 cases of appendicitis. Temperature and right iliac fossa tenderness on palpation were the variables without statistically significant differences, and with no discrimination power between groups. Pain on coughing, hopping, and/or percussion tenderness in the right lower quadrant was the variable with greater association with appendicitis. The Score correctly stratified the patients into risk groups. Substitution of temperature for C-reactive protein in the Score increased diagnostic accuracy, although with no statistically significant differences. The Paediatric Appendicitis Score helps in differential diagnosis between appendicitis and non-specific acute abdominal pain. It would be advisable to replace the temperature in the Score, since it has no discrimination power between these groups. C-reactive protein at a cut-off value of 25.5mg/L value could be used instead. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Lead intoxication due to ayurvedic medications as a cause of abdominal pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Varun; Midha, Vandana; Mahajan, Ramit; Narang, Vikram; Wander, Praneet; Sood, Ridhi; Sood, Ajit

    2017-02-01

    Though a majority of cases of lead intoxication come from occupational exposures, traditional and folk remedies have also been reported to contain toxic amounts of lead. We present a large series of patients with lead poisoning due to intake of Ayurvedic medicines, all of whom presented with unexplained abdominal pain. This was a retrospective, observational case series from a tertiary care center in India. The charts of patients who underwent blood lead level (BLL) testing as a part of workup for unexplained abdominal pain between 2005 and 2013 were reviewed. The patients with lead intoxication (BLLs >25 μg/dl) were identified and demographics, history, possible risk factors, clinical presentation and investigations were reviewed. Treatment details, duration, time to symptomatic recovery, laboratory follow-up and adverse events during therapy were recorded. BLLs were tested in 786 patients with unexplained abdominal pain and high levels were identified in 75 (9.5%) patients, of which a majority (73 patients, 9.3%) had history of Ayurvedic medication intake and only two had occupational exposure. Five randomly chosen Ayurvedic medications were analyzed and lead levels were impermissibly high (14-34,950 ppm) in all of them. Besides pain in abdomen, other presenting complaints were constipation, hypertension, neurological symptoms and acute kidney injury. Anemia and abnormal liver biochemical tests were observed in all the 73 patients. Discontinuing the Ayurvedic medicines and chelation with d-penicillamine led to improvement in symptoms and reduction in BLLs in all patients within 3-4 months. The patients presenting with severe recurrent abdominal pain, anemia and history of use of Ayurvedic medicines should be evaluated for lead toxicity. Early diagnosis in such cases can prevent unnecessary investigations and interventions, and permits early commencement of the treatment.

  8. Intra-operative remifentanil might influence pain levels in the immediate postoperative period after major abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, EG; Duedahl, Tina H; Rømsing, Janne

    2005-01-01

    Remifentanil, a widely used analgesic agent in anaesthesia, has a rapid onset and short duration of action. In clinical settings, this requires an appropriate pain strategy to prevent unacceptable pain in the post-operative period. The aim of this study was to investigate whether remifentanil had...... any impact on post-operative pain and opioid consumption after major abdominal surgery....

  9. Intra-operative remifentanil might influence pain levels in the immediate post-operative period after major abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, E G; Duedahl, T H; Rømsing, J

    2005-01-01

    Remifentanil, a widely used analgesic agent in anaesthesia, has a rapid onset and short duration of action. In clinical settings, this requires an appropriate pain strategy to prevent unacceptable pain in the post-operative period. The aim of this study was to investigate whether remifentanil had...... any impact on post-operative pain and opioid consumption after major abdominal surgery....

  10. Presumptive intraperitoneal envenomation resulting in hemoperitoneum and acute abdominal pain in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istvan, Stephanie A; Walker, Julie M; Hansen, Bernard D; Hanel, Rita M; Marks, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    To describe the clinical features, diagnostic findings, treatment, and outcome of a dog with acute abdominal pain and hemoperitoneum secondary to a presumptive intraperitoneal (IP) snakebite. A 10-month-old castrated male mixed-breed dog was evaluated for suspected snake envenomation. The dog presented recumbent and tachycardic with signs of severe abdominal pain. Two cutaneous puncture wounds and hemoperitoneum were discovered during evaluation. Ultrasonographic examination revealed communication of the wounds with the peritoneal cavity. The dog was treated with supportive care, parenteral analgesia, packed red blood cell and fresh frozen plasma transfusions, crotalid antivenom, and placement of an IP catheter to provide local analgesia. The dog recovered fully and was discharged 5 days after initial presentation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of IP envenomation accompanied by hemorrhage treated with continuous IP analgesia in the veterinary literature. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  11. Perioperative use of etoricoxib reduces pain and opioid side-effects after total abdominal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viscusi, Eugene R; Frenkl, Tara L; Hartrick, Craig T

    2012-01-01

    - to 10-point NRS) as well as Average Total Daily Dose of Morphine over Days 1 to 3. Clinical trial registration: This trial is registered on www.clinicaltrials.gpv (NCT00788710) Results: The Least Squares (LS) means (95% CI) for the primary endpoint were 3.26 (2.96, 3.55); 2.46 (2.16, 2.76); and 2.40 (2......-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, we evaluated postoperative pain following total abdominal hysterectomy over 5 days in patients receiving placebo or etoricoxib administered 90 min prior to surgery and continuing postoperatively. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either placebo (n...... as primary endpoints. Conclusion: In patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy, etoricoxib 90 and 120 mg dosed preoperatively and then continued postoperatively significantly reduces both resting and movement-related pain, as well as reduced opioid (morphine) consumption that led to more rapid bowel...

  12. COMPARISON OF EFFECTS OF ABDOMINAL STRETCHING EXERCISE AND COLD COMPRESS THERAPY ON MENSTRUAL PAIN INTENSITY IN TEENAGE GIRLS

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    Desta Ayu Cahya Rosyida

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain during menstruation is not uncommon, especially in young women, which has an impact on their life activities. Objective: To examine the effect of abdominal stretching exercise and cold compress therapy on decreasing intensity of menstrual pain in teenage girls at SMK Bakti Indonesia Medika. Design: A Quasy Experimental Study with two group comparison pretest-postest design. There were 46 respondents selected in this study by consecutive sampling that consisted of 23 samples in the abdominal stretching exercise group and 23 samples in the cold compress group. The menstrual pain was measured using VAS (visual analog scale. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney, Chi-Square, and Wilcoxon test. Results: Findings showed that the mean of menstrual pain before intervention in the abdominal stretching exercise was 7.04 and in the cold compress therapy was 6.74 with p-value 0.211 (<0.05, which indicated that there was no mean difference of pain between both groups. However, after intervention, the menstrual pain was reduced from 7.04 to 1.91 (5.09 difference in the abdominal stretching exercise group; and from 6.74 to 5.52 (1.22 difference in the cold compress group with p-value 0.000 (<0.05, which indicated that there was statistically significant difference of menstrual pain before and after intervention, both abdominal stretching exercise and cold compress therapy. Conclusion: There were statistically significant effects of abdominal stretching exercise and cold compress therapy on menstrual pain in teenage girls. The abdominal stretching exercise is more effective than cold compress therapy in reducing menstrual pain intensity. Thus, it is suggested that abdominal stretching exercise can be an alternative choice of management of dysmenorrhea in teenage girls, and can be a part of subject in the education as non-pharmacological medicine.

  13. Tetrahydrocannabinol Does Not Reduce Pain in Patients With Chronic Abdominal Pain in a Phase 2 Placebo-controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Marjan; van Rijckevorsel, Dagmar C M; Vissers, Kris C P; Wilder-Smith, Oliver H G; van Goor, Harry

    2017-07-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the most abundant cannabinoid from the plant Cannabis sativa. There is only equivocal evidence that THC has analgesic effects. We performed a phase 2 controlled trial to evaluate the analgesic efficacy, pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of an oral tablet containing purified THC in patients with chronic abdominal pain. Sixty-five patients with chronic abdominal pain for 3 months or more (numeric rating scale scores of 3 or more) after surgery or because of chronic pancreatitis were randomly assigned to groups given the THC tablet or identical matching placebos for 50-52 days. Subjects in the THC group were given the tablet first in a step-up phase (3 mg 3 times daily for 5 days and then 5 mg 3 times daily for 5 days), followed by a stable dose phase (8 mg 3 times daily until days 50-52). Preceding and during the entire study period, patients were asked to continue taking their medications (including analgesics) according to prescription. Patients reported any additional pain medications in a diary. Efficacy and safety assessments were conducted preceding medication intake (day 1), after 15 days, and at 50-52 days. Plasma samples were collected on study days 1, 15, and 50-52; mean plasma concentration curves of THC and 11-OH-THC were plotted. The primary end point was pain relief, which was measured by a visual analogue scale (VAS) of the mean pain (VAS mean scores) on the basis of information from patient diaries. Secondary end points included pain and quality of life (determined from patient questionnaires), pharmacokinetics, and safety. At days 50-52, VAS mean scores did not differ significantly between the THC and placebo groups (F 1,46  = 0.016; P = .901). Between the start and end of the study, VAS mean scores decreased by 1.6 points (40%) in the THC group compared with 1.9 points (37%) in the placebo group. No differences were observed in secondary outcomes. Oral THC was generally well-absorbed. Seven patients

  14. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm masquerading as isolated hip pain: an unusual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Wadhawan, Himanshu; Welch, Pedro; El-Salamani, Murad

    2008-05-01

    The rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a catastrophic event. Misdiagnosis by first-contact emergency physicians remains a serious concern. Varied and frequently nonspecific presentations lead to erroneous diagnostic impressions and cause significant delays in definitive intervention. We report the case of a 73-year-old man with a ruptured AAA presenting with isolated acute right hip pain without any classical features such as truncal pain or hypotension. Despite major advances in imaging and definitive treatment, a heightened awareness among emergency physicians remains the only effective means of improving detection and thereby survival.

  15. Towards remote assessment and screening of acute abdominal pain using only a smartphone with native accelerometers

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, David R.; Weiss, Alexander; Rollins, Margo R.; Lam, Wilbur A.

    2017-01-01

    Smartphone-based telehealth holds the promise of shifting healthcare from the clinic to the home, but the inability for clinicians to conduct remote palpation, or touching, a key component of the physical exam, remains a major limitation. This is exemplified in the assessment of acute abdominal pain, in which a physician’s palpation determines if a patient’s pain is life-threatening requiring emergency intervention/surgery or due to some less-urgent cause. In a step towards virtual physical e...

  16. ENDOMETRIOSIS OF APPENDIX IN WOMEN PRESENTING WITH RIGHT LOWER ABDOMINAL PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Bai Prabhu T, Velayudam DA, Jayalakshmi M

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a well known gynaecological condition associated with infertility and chronic pelvic pain. Review of literature shows that endometriosis can affect any tissue in the body, including the appendix. Here we report a case of pelvic endometriosis involving the vermiform appendix in a 45 years old multiparous woman. When women of the reproductive age present with recurrent lower abdominal pain on the right side, endometriosis of the appendix should also be considered. At the time of surgery appendix should be inspected and removed; especially in the presence of pelvic endometriosis.

  17. An epidemiological survey of recurrent abdominal pain in a rural Malay school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boey, C C; Yap, S B

    1999-06-01

    To study the prevalence of complaints of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) among school children aged 11-12 years in a rural setting in Malaysia. Questionnaires were distributed to all parents and teachers of children aged 11-12 years who attended a small rural school in which all the children were Malays. Complaints of RAP were defined as at least three such complaints occurring over a period of at least 3 months. One hundred and sixty questionnaires were distributed, of which 148 were returned, giving a response rate of 92.5%. Sixty-one children (41.2%) had RAP. Approximately 45.2% of girls and 35.9% of boys reported having RAP. Compared with children without RAP, there was a significantly larger number of children with RAP (85.2%) who had at least one stress factor (P = 0.0109). There were no significant associations between RAP and total family income (P = 0.0573), a history of abdominal pain in at least one parent (P = 0.1686), a history of abdominal pain in at least one sibling (P = 0.0617), academic performance (P = 0.9967) or the degree of sports participation (P = 0.8469). There was an increased incidence of other systemic complaints in children with RAP when compared with children without RAP. Recurrent abdominal pain was found to be common among 11- to 12-year-old children in a rural Malay school. There was a significant association found between RAP and the presence of stressful events, as well as with the presence of other systemic complaints.

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Geijer, Haakan [Oerebro University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Norrman, Eva [Oerebro University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Geijer, Mats [Lund University and Skaane University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Jansson, Kjell [Oerebro University, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden)

    2016-06-15

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  19. Occult constipation: faecal retention as a cause of recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsbers, Carolien F M; Kneepkens, C M Frank; Vergouwe, Yvonne; Büller, Hans A

    2014-06-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in children is generally believed to be functional. In practice, many children with RAP become pain-free with laxative therapy. The aims of the study were to establish the role of (occult) constipation in RAP and to investigate whether patients diagnosed with (occult) constipation could be identified by history and physical examination. During 2 years, all patients (age 4-16 years, secondary referral) fulfilling Apley criteria of RAP were included. After exclusion of gastrointestinal infections and food intolerance, laxatives were advised when pain persisted. (Occult) constipation was defined as 'abdominal pain disappearing with laxative treatment and not reappearing within a 6 month follow up period'; 'occult constipation' was diagnosed in patients who did not fulfil the Rome criteria of constipation. Two hundred children (87 M; median age 8.8 years) were evaluated. (Occult) constipation was found in 92 patients (46 %). Of these, 18 had considerable relief of pain when treated for a somatic cause but experienced complete relief only after laxative measures; they were considered to have two diagnoses. Using multivariate analysis, a simple model was developed with cystitis in past history, early satiety and flatulence as predictors for (occult) constipation. The risk of (occult) constipation ranged from 18/58 if no predictor was present to 4/4 if all three were present. Laxatives played a pivotal role in the recovery of patients with RAP. We developed a simple model to identify patients at risk of having (occult) constipation.

  20. Prevalence of abnormal lactose breath hydrogen tests in children with functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neha; Basu, Srikanta; Singh, Preeti; Kumar, Ruchika; Sharma, Lokesh; Kumar, Praveen

    2017-05-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of abnormal lactose breath hydrogen test in children with non-organic chronic abdominal pain. Children with chronic abdominal pain were examined and investigated for organic causes. All children without a known organic cause underwent lactose and glucose breath hydrogen test. After a standard dose of 2 g/kg of lactose to a maximum of 50 g, hydrogen in breath was measured at 15 min intervals for 3 h. A rise of 20 ppm above baseline was considered suggestive of lactose malabsorption. Of 108 children screened, organic causes were found in 46 children. Sixty-two patients without any organic cause underwent hydrogen breath test. Lactose hydrogen breath test (HBT) was positive in 36 of 62 (58%), while 11 (17%) had positive HBT with glucose suggestive of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Twenty out of 34 (59%) improved on lactose free diet while 8 out of 11 (72%) children of SIBO improved on antibiotics. Lactose malabsorption was seen in 58% of children with non-organic chronic abdominal pain.

  1. Acute abdominal and pelvic pain in pregnancy: MR imaging as a valuable adjunct to ultrasound?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masselli, Gabriele; Brunelli, Roberto; Casciani, Emanuele; Polettini, Elisabetta; Bertini, Luca; Laghi, Francesca; Anceschi, Maurizio; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of pregnant women with acute abdominal and pelvic pain after sonographically (US) indeterminate findings. Forty pregnant patients with acute abdominal and/or pelvic pain, in whom ultrasound was indeterminate, were included in this study. Multiplanar MR images of the abdomen and pelvis were obtained and independently reviewed by two radiologists with discrepancies were resolved by consensus. Correlation of prospective clinical MR interpretations with surgical and obstetric records and clinical follow-up showed correct identification of disease entities in all 40/40 patients. The following disease processes were correctly identified using MRI in 21/40 patients: appendicitis (n = 5), ileal volvulus (n = 1), common bile duct lithiasis (n = 2), pubic chondrosarcoma (n = 1), uterine dehiscence (n = 1), placental hematoma (n = 3), iliac venous thrombosis (n = 2), ulcerative colitis (n = 1), acute pancreatitis (n = 1), hydronephrosis (n = 1), ovarian dermoid (n = 1), and ovarian torsion (n = 2). 19 of the 40 patients had normal findings on MR examinations and unremarkable follow-up. Interobserver agreement for lesion detection was excellent (0.95 k). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an accurate investigation in detecting the cause of acute abdominal and pelvic pain during pregnancy and should be considered after US indeterminate findings.

  2. Towards remote assessment and screening of acute abdominal pain using only a smartphone with native accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, David R; Weiss, Alexander; Rollins, Margo R; Lam, Wilbur A

    2017-10-06

    Smartphone-based telehealth holds the promise of shifting healthcare from the clinic to the home, but the inability for clinicians to conduct remote palpation, or touching, a key component of the physical exam, remains a major limitation. This is exemplified in the assessment of acute abdominal pain, in which a physician's palpation determines if a patient's pain is life-threatening requiring emergency intervention/surgery or due to some less-urgent cause. In a step towards virtual physical examinations, we developed and report for the first time a "touch-capable" mHealth technology that enables a patient's own hands to serve as remote surrogates for the physician's in the screening of acute abdominal pain. Leveraging only a smartphone with its native accelerometers, our system guides a patient through an exact probing motion that precisely matches the palpation motion set by the physician. An integrated feedback algorithm, with 95% sensitivity and specificity, enabled 81% of tested patients to match a physician abdominal palpation curve with <20% error after 6 attempts. Overall, this work addresses a key issue in telehealth that will vastly improve its capabilities and adoption worldwide.

  3. Soap Suds Enemas Are Efficacious and Safe for Treating Fecal Impaction in Children With Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumpitazi, Corrie E; Henkel, Erin B; Valdez, Karina L; Chumpitazi, Bruno P

    2016-07-01

    Constipation is a common cause of pediatric abdominal pain and emergency department (ED) presentation. Despite the high prevalence, there is a dearth of clinical information and wide practice variation in childhood constipation management in the ED. The objective of the study was to assess the efficacy and safety of soap suds enema (SSE) in the therapy for fecal impaction in children with abdominal pain within the pediatric ED setting. The primary outcome was stool output following SSE. Secondary outcomes were adverse events, admissions, and return visits within 72 hours. The present study is a retrospective cross-sectional study performed in the ED at a quaternary care children's hospital of patients seen during a 12-month period who received an SSE for fecal impaction. Five hundred twelve patients (53% girls, median age 7.8 years, range: 8 months-23 years) received SSE therapy during a 1-year period. Successful therapy (bowel movement) following SSE occurred in 419 (82%). Adverse events included abdominal pain in 24 (5%) and nausea/vomiting in 18 (4%). No SSE-related serious adverse events were identified. Following SSE, 405 (79%) were subsequently discharged, of which 15 (3.7%) returned to the ED for re-evaluation within 72 hours. SSE is an efficacious and safe therapeutic option for the acute treatment of childhood fecal impaction in the ED setting.

  4. Effect of head and limb orientation on trunk muscle activation during abdominal hollowing in chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfrey, Kevin; Gibbons, Sean G T; Drinkwater, Eric J; Behm, David G

    2014-02-22

    Individuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP) have altered activations patterns of the anterior trunk musculature when performing the abdominal hollowing manœuvre (attempt to pull umbilicus inward and upward towards the spine). There is a subgroup of individuals with CLBP who have high neurocognitive and sensory motor deficits with associated primitive reflexes (PR). The objective of the study was to determine if orienting the head and extremities to positions, which mimic PR patterns would alter anterior trunk musculature activation during the hollowing manoeuvre. This study compared surface electromyography (EMG) of bilateral rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), and internal obliques (IO) of 11 individuals with CLBP and evident PR to 9 healthy controls during the hollowing manoeuvre in seven positions of the upper quarter. Using magnitude based inferences it was likely (>75%) that controls had a higher ratio of left IO:RA activation with supine (cervical neutral), asymmetrical tonic neck reflex (ATNR) left and right, right cervical rotation and cervical extension positions. A higher ratio of right IO:RA was detected in the cervical neutral and ATNR left position for the control group. The CLBP group were more likely to show higher activation of the left RA in the cervical neutral, ATNR left and right, right cervical rotation and cervical flexion positions as well as in the cervical neutral and cervical flexion position for the right RA. Individuals with CLBP and PR manifested altered activation patterns during the hollowing maneuver compared to healthy controls and that altering cervical and upper extremity position can diminish the group differences. Altered cervical and limb positions can change the activation levels of the IO and EO in both groups.

  5. Parent attention versus distraction: Impact on symptom complaints by children with and without chronic functional abdominal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Lynn S.; Williams, Sara E.; Smith, Craig A.; Garber, Judy; Van Slyke, Deborah A.; Lipani, Tricia A.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of parent attention and distraction on symptom complaints by children with and without chronic functional abdominal pain. The water load symptom provocation task was used to induce visceral discomfort in pediatric patients with abdominal pain (N = 104) and well children (N = 119), ages 8–16 years. Parents were randomly assigned and trained to interact with their children according to one of three conditions: Attention, Distraction, or No In...

  6. A randomized controlled trial to compare pregabalin with gabapentin for postoperative pain in abdominal hysterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Ghai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pregabalin is a potent ligand for alpha-2-delta subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels in the central nervous system, which exhibits potent anticonvulsant, analgesic and anxiolytic activity. The pharmacological activity of pregabalin is similar to that of gabapentin and shows possible advantages. Although it shows analgesic efficacy against neuropathic pain, very limited evidence supports its postoperative analgesic efficacy. We investigated its analgesic efficacy in patients experiencing acute pain after abdominal hysterectomy and compared it with gabapentin and placebo. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 90 women undergoing abdominal hysterectomy who were anaesthetized in a standardized fashion. Patients received 300 mg pregabalin, 900 mg gabapentin or placebo, 1-2 hours prior to surgery. Postoperative analgesia was administered at visual analogue scale (VAS ≥3. The primary outcome was analgesic consumption over 24 hours and patients were followed for pain scores, time to rescue analgesia and side effects as secondary outcomes. Results: The diclofenac consumption was statistically significant between pregabalin and control groups, and gabapentin and control groups; however, pregabalin and gabapentin groups were comparable. Moreover, the consumption of tramadol was statistically significant among all the groups. Patients in pregabalin and gabapentin groups had lower pain scores in the initial hour of recovery. However, pain scores were subsequently similar in all the groups. Time to first request for analgesia was longer in pregabalin group followed by gabapentin and control groups. Conclusion: A single dose of 300 mg pregabalin given 1-2 hours prior to surgery is superior to 900 mg gabapentin and placebo after abdominal hysterectomy. Both the drugs are better than placebo.

  7. Pain pressure threshold algometry of the abdominal wall in healthy women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L.L.S. Montenegro

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the inter- and intra-examiner reliability of pain pressure threshold algometry at various points of the abdominal wall of healthy women. Twenty-one healthy women in menacme with a mean age of 28 ± 5.4 years (range: 19-39 years were included. All volunteers had regular menstrual cycles (27-33 days and were right-handed and, to the best of our knowledge, none were taking medications at the time of testing. Women with a diagnosis of depression, anxiety or other mood disturbances were excluded. Women with previous abdominal surgery, any pain condition or any evidence of inflammation, hypertension, smoking, alcoholism, or inflammatory disease were also excluded. Pain perception thresholds were assessed with a pressure algometer with digital traction and compression and a measuring capacity for 5 kg. All points were localized by palpation and marked with a felt-tipped pen and each individual was evaluated over a period of 2 days in two consecutive sessions, each session consisting of a set of 14 point measurements repeated twice by two examiners in random sequence. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean pain threshold obtained by the two examiners on 2 diferent days (examiner A: P = 1.00; examiner B: P = 0.75; Wilcoxon matched pairs test. There was excellent/good agreement between examiners for all days and all points. Our results have established baseline values to which future researchers will be able to refer. They show that pressure algometry is a reliable measure for pain perception in the abdominal wall of healthy women.

  8. Pain pressure threshold algometry of the abdominal wall in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, M L L S; Braz, C A; Mateus-Vasconcelos, E L; Rosa-e-Silva, J C; Candido-dos-Reis, F J; Nogueira, A A; Poli-Neto, O B

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the inter- and intra-examiner reliability of pain pressure threshold algometry at various points of the abdominal wall of healthy women. Twenty-one healthy women in menacme with a mean age of 28 ± 5.4 years (range: 19-39 years) were included. All volunteers had regular menstrual cycles (27-33 days) and were right-handed and, to the best of our knowledge, none were taking medications at the time of testing. Women with a diagnosis of depression, anxiety or other mood disturbances were excluded. Women with previous abdominal surgery, any pain condition or any evidence of inflammation, hypertension, smoking, alcoholism, or inflammatory disease were also excluded. Pain perception thresholds were assessed with a pressure algometer with digital traction and compression and a measuring capacity for 5 kg. All points were localized by palpation and marked with a felt-tipped pen and each individual was evaluated over a period of 2 days in two consecutive sessions, each session consisting of a set of 14 point measurements repeated twice by two examiners in random sequence. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean pain threshold obtained by the two examiners on 2 different days (examiner A: P = 1.00; examiner B: P = 0.75; Wilcoxon matched pairs test). There was excellent/good agreement between examiners for all days and all points. Our results have established baseline values to which future researchers will be able to refer. They show that pressure algometry is a reliable measure for pain perception in the abdominal wall of healthy women.

  9. Quantifying the usefulness of CT in evaluating seniors with abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Lawrence M.; Klippel, Allen P.; Bavolek, Rebecca A.; Ross, Laura M.; Scherer, Tara M.; Banet, Gerald A.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: (1) Determine if older patients with abdominal pain who receive emergency department (ED) abdominal CT have changes in diagnosis and/or disposition more often than similar patients without CT; (2) compare physician confidence in diagnosis and disposition for patients with versus without CT; (3) document factors that most influence physician's decision to order abdominal CT in this population. Methods: ED patients 60 years of age or older, with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain were enrolled over a 6-week period. Physicians documented a preliminary and final ED diagnosis and disposition, along with pre- and post-evaluation confidence levels. Decision to order CT, along with clinical information most influencing that decision, was noted. Physician confidence levels and percent change in diagnosis and disposition were compared for patients with versus without CT. Results: One hundred and twenty-six patients comprised study sample. Abdominal CT rate was 59% (95%CI, 50-67%). CT was associated with an increased change in diagnosis (46%; 95%CI, 4-58% versus 29%; 95%CI, 16-42%), but no change in disposition between patients with versus without CT. Preliminary diagnostic confidence was lower for EPs who ordered a CT than for those who did not (p < 0.001). Patient history most influenced ordering CT, whereas prior lab/imaging results most influenced not ordering CT. Conclusion: Patients with CT had a change in diagnosis more often than those without. Preliminary diagnostic confidence was lower in CT group. Percent change in disposition did not differ between groups. Physicians most often ordered CT based on history and did not order CT when other diagnostic evaluation supported a specific diagnosis

  10. Estudo prospectivo de pacientes pediátricos com dor abdominal crônica Prospective study of infants with chronic abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Kores Dorsa

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Classificar a dor abdominal crônica em crianças e adolescentes por meio dos critérios de Roma II e definir o desfecho diagnóstico em três anos de seguimento. MÉTODOS: Durante um ano, 71 pacientes com dor abdominal crônica foram atendidos como casos novos num ambulatório terciário de gastroenterologia pediátrica. Causas orgânicas foram excluídas por bases clínicas e laboratoriais, e relatos clínicos foram avaliados especificamente quanto à possibilidade de preencherem os Critérios de Roma II para dor abdominal em crianças. Para estabelecer o diagnóstico definitivo, os pacientes foram seguidos por três anos, em média. RESULTADOS: A alocação dos 71 pacientes segundo Roma II foi: doença orgânica (n=12, remissão dos sintomas após a primeira consulta (n=7, ou preencheram os critérios para dor funcional (n=52. Dos 12 pacientes de doença orgânica, nove foram diagnosticados como intolerantes à lactose, mas foram re-alocados para doença funcional no seguimento, visto que a dieta de isenção não aliviou a queixa. Dos 52 pacientes com doença funcional (idade mediana=9,3 anos, 50% meninos, nove, que inicialmente preencheram o critério para dor abdominal funcional, foram re-alocados no diagnóstico de constipação funcional e 43 mantiveram o diagnóstico funcional: 24 com dispepsia funcional, 18 com dor abdominal funcional e um com síndrome do intestino irritável. CONCLUSÕES: Dentre os casos de dor abdominal crônica, a dor do tipo funcional foi mais comum que as causas orgânicas e, dentre os seus subgrupos, a dispepsia funcional foi mais freqüente. O seguimento em longo prazo permitiu estabelecer o diagnóstico definitivo da origem da dor abdominal nessas crianças.OBJECTIVE: To classify chronic abdominal pain in children and adolescents, according to Rome II criteria and to define diagnosis outcome in a three-year follow-up period. METHODS: During one year, 71 consecutive new patients with abdominal pain

  11. The prevalence of recurrent abdominal pain in 11- to 16-year-old Malaysian schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boey, C; Yap, S; Goh, K L

    2000-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) among Malaysian school children aged from 11 to 16 years. A preliminary cross-sectional survey in which three urban schools and three rural schools were selected randomly. Two classes were selected randomly from each year. A questionnaire was given to each child asking him or her about whether they had experienced abdominal pain occurring at least three times over a period of at least 3 months, interfering with normal daily activity. 1 Interfering with normal daily activity was defined as missing school and/or having to stop doing a routine daily activity on account of the pain. Girls whose pains were related to periods were excluded. After the forms had been completed, each child was again interviewed to ensure that Apley's criteria1 was fulfilled in cases of RAP. The overall prevalence of RAP among 1549 schoolchildren (764 boys; 785 girls) was 10.2% (95% confidence interval (CI), 8.8-11.8). There appeared to be a higher prevalence in rural schoolchildren (P = 0.008; odds ratio (OR) 1.58), in those with a lower family income (P family size. : In spite of differences in time and culture, the overall prevalence of 10.2% found in this study is similar to that determined by Apley.1 There are significant differences in the prevalence of RAP between children from rural and urban schools, among children with different family incomes and among children whose parents have different educational backgrounds.

  12. Changes in abdominal muscle thickness measured by ultrasound are not associated with recovery in athletes with longstanding groin pain associated with resisted hip adduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, J A C G; Mens, J M A; Backx, Frank J G; Stam, Henk J

    2009-10-01

    Longitudinal single-cohort study. Athletes with longstanding groin pain associated with resisted hip adduction have been shown to have abnormal activation of the transversus abdominis (TA). Therefore, exercises targeting the TA to help stabilize the lumbopelvic area are generally used in the rehabilitation of these athletes. To investigate if (1) changes in abdominal muscle resting thickness and changes in relative thickness during lower extremity tasks after 14 weeks of intervention are related to changes in clinical status and (2) the changes in abdominal muscle resting/relative thickness are significant postintervention. In 21 athletes with longstanding groin pain associated with resisted hip adduction, ultrasound imaging of the abdominal musculature on the right side was performed at rest, during the active straight-leg raise (left and right), and during bilateral isometric hip adduction. Athletes then followed a 14-week rehabilitation protocol. Clinical outcome measured by self-reported sports restriction and change in abdominal muscle resting and relative thickness during lower extremity tasks were evaluated. There was an overall significant decrease in self-reported sports restriction after intervention for this group of athletes. Apart from a significant negative correlation for changes in TA resting thickness, no significant association between changes in abdominal muscle thickness and change in self-reported sports restriction were found. Postintervention, TA resting thickness was significantly increased but relative thickness during the lower extremity tasks was found not to be statistically different for all muscles, except for a decreased relative thickness of obliquus externus abdominus (OE) during the active straight-leg raise for the left lower extremity. There was no association between changes in abdominal muscle resting thickness and relative thickness during lower extremity tasks, and change in self-reported sports restriction after a period of

  13. Acceptance-based interoceptive exposure for young children with functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Nancy; Mauro, Christian; Craske, Michelle; Wagner, H Ryan; Datta, Nandini; Hopkins, Hannah; Caldwell, Kristen; Kiridly, Adam; Marsan, Samuel; Maslow, Gary; Mayer, Emeran; Egger, Helen

    2017-10-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is a common childhood somatic complaint that contributes to impairment in daily functioning (e.g., school absences) and increases risk for chronic pain and psychiatric illness. Cognitive behavioral treatments for FAP target primarily older children (9 + years) and employ strategies to reduce a focus on pain. The experience of pain may be an opportunity to teach viscerally hypersensitive children to interpret the function of a variety of bodily signals (including those of hunger, emotions) thereby reducing fear of bodily sensations and facilitating emotion awareness and self-regulation. We designed and tested an interoceptive exposure treatment for younger children (5-9 years) with FAP. Assessments included diagnostic interviews, 14 days of daily pain monitoring, and questionnaires. Treatment involved 10 weekly appointments. Using cartoon characters to represent bodily sensations (e.g., Gassy Gus), children were trained to be "FBI agents" - Feeling and Body Investigators - who investigated sensations through exercises that provoked somatic experience. 24 parent-child dyads are reported. Pain (experience, distress, and interference) and negative affect demonstrated clinically meaningful and statistically significant change with effect sizes ranging from 0.48 to 71 for pain and from 0.38 to 0.61 for pain distress, total pain: X 2 (1, n = 24) = 13.14, p < 0.0003. An intervention that helps children adopt a curious stance and focus on somatic symptoms reduces pain and may help lessen somatic fear generally. NCT02075437. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Case of Chronic Abdominal Neuropathic Pain and Burning after Female Genital Cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky Hadid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Female genital cutting is prevalent in the Middle Eastern and African countries. This ritual entails not only immediate complications such as infection, pain, and haemorrhage, but also chronic ones including dysmenorrhea and dyspareunia. However, there is limited data on neuropathic pain secondary to female genital mutilation when searching the literature. Case. This case discusses a 38-year-old female with a history of infibulation who presented with a chronic burning abdominal and anterior vulvar pain including the related investigations and treatment. Discussion. This case brings to light the additional delayed complication of this ritual: sensory neuropathy. Our goal is to educate health professionals to be aware of these complications and to appropriately investigate and treat them in order to find a solution to relieve the patients’ symptoms.

  15. A rare cause of acute abdominal pain: Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ramazan; Ozdemir, Ayse Zehra; Ozturk, Bahadir; Bilgici, Meltem Ceyhan; Tosun, Migraci

    2014-01-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a rare müllerian duct anomaly with uterus didelphys, unilateral obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. Patients with this syndrome generally present after menarche with pelvic pain and mass and, rarely, primary infertility in later years. Strong suspicion and knowledge of this syndrome are mandatory for an accurate diagnosis. A 14-year-old female patient presented with acute retention of urine and abdominopelvic pain. Her condition was diagnosed with the use ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging as a case of HWW syndrome. She was treated with vaginal hemiseptal resection. The HWW syndrome should be considered among the differential diagnoses in girls with renal anomalies presenting with pelvic mass, symptoms of acute abdominal pain, and acute urinary retention.

  16. "Candy cane syndrome:" an underappreciated cause of abdominal pain and nausea after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryaie, Amir H; Fayezizadeh, Mojtaba; Wen, Yuxiang; Alshehri, Mohammed; Abbas, Mujjahid; Khaitan, Leena

    2017-09-01

    "Candy cane" syndrome (a blind afferent Roux limb at the gastrojejunostomy) has been implicated as a cause of abdominal pain, nausea, and emesis after Roux-n-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) but remains poorly described. To report that "candy cane" syndrome is real and can be treated effectively with revisional bariatric surgery SETTING: All patients underwent "candy cane" resection at University Hospitals of Cleveland. All patients who underwent resection of the "candy cane" between January 2011 and July 2015 were included. All had preoperative workup to identify "candy cane" syndrome. Demographic data; pre-, peri-, and postoperative symptoms; data regarding hospitalization; and postoperative weight loss were assessed through retrospective chart review. Data were analyzed using Student's t test and χ 2 analysis where appropriate. Nineteen patients had resection of the "candy cane" (94% female, mean age 50±11 yr), within 3 to 11 years after initial RYGB. Primary presenting symptoms were epigastric abdominal pain (68%) and nausea/vomiting (32%), particularly with fibrous foods and meats. On upper gastrointestinal study and endoscopy, the afferent blind limb was the most direct outlet from the gastrojejunostomy. Only patients with these preoperative findings were deemed to have "candy cane" syndrome. Eighteen (94%) cases were completed laparoscopically. Length of the "candy cane" ranged from 3 to 22 cm. Median length of stay was 1 day. After resection, 18 (94%) patients had complete resolution of their symptoms (PCandy cane" syndrome is a real phenomenon that can be managed safely with excellent outcomes with resection of the blind afferent limb. A thorough diagnostic workup is paramount to proper identification of this syndrome. Surgeons should minimize the size of the blind afferent loop left at the time of initial RYGB. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An Incidentally Found Inflamed Uterine Myoma Causing Low Abdominal Pain, Using Tc-99m-Tektrotyd Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography-CT Hybrid Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Zandieh, Shahin; Sch?tz, Matthias; Bernt, Reinhard; Zwerina, Jochen; Haller, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old woman presented with a history of right hemicolectomy due to an ileocecal neuroendocrine tumor and left breast metastasis. Owing to a slightly elevated chromogranin A-level and lower abdominal pain, single photon emission computed tomography-computer tomography (SPECT-CT) was performed. There were no signs of recurrence on the SPECT-CT scan, but the patient was incidentally found to have an inflamed intramural myoma. We believe that the slightly elevated ch...

  18. An 88-Year-Old Man with Sudden Onset Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Manouchehrifar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An 88-year-old man presented to the emergency department with sudden onset of abdominal pain since 6 hours before. He was a known case of chronic renal failure that underwent hemodialysis three times a week. He also suffered from hypertension and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The patients’ on-arrival vital signs were as follows: systolic blood pressure: 100/60 mmHg, pulse rate: 88/minute, respiratory rate: 25/minute, oral temperature: 36◦C, oxygen saturation 93% in room air.  He had severely ill appearance on admission. Distended abdomen was considerable but had normal bowel sound and clearly, pain was disproportionate to physical examination. His electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm and venous blood gas analysis revealed the following: pH=6.96, PaCO2=49 mmHg, HCO3=11 mEq/L, Base excess= -20.  The bedside ultrasonography showed echogenic particles in hepatic parenchyma and same findings that were passing through the portal vein. Chest and abdominal X-rays were reported as normal. The patient underwent abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT scan with oral contrast.What is your diagnosis?

  19. Novel Therapeutic Approaches to the Treatment of Chronic Abdominal Visceral Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca Patrizi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic abdominal visceral pain (CAVP has a significant clinical impact and represents one of the most frequent and debilitating disorders in the general population. It also leads to a significant economic burden due to workdays lost, reduced productivity, and long-term use of medications with their associated side effects. Despite the availability of several therapeutic options, the management of patients with CAVP is often inadequate, resulting in frustration for both patients and physicians. This may in part be explained by the lack of understanding of the mechanisms underlying chronic pain; in contrast with acute pain in which the pathophysiology is relatively well known and has several satisfactory therapeutic options. Recently, the development of tools for brain investigation, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, has provided new insights on the pathophysiology of chronic pain. These new data have shown that plastic changes in the central and peripheral nervous system might play an important role in the maintenance of chronic pain. Therefore, approaches aimed at the modulation of the nervous system, rather than the ones interfering with the inflammatory pathways, may be more effective for chronic pain treatment. We propose that noninvasive central nervous system stimulation, with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, might be a novel therapeutic option for CAVP. This paper will present an overview of the pathophysiology and the available therapies for CAVP, focusing on the recent advances in the treatment of this pathology.

  20. Marfan's syndrome presenting with abdominal aortic aneurysm: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present the case of a 16-year old student with Marfan's syndrome and abdominal aortic aneurysm who presented with a diagnostic conundrum. He presented with a three months history of progressive painful left upper abdominal mass and back pain. It became severe in the last two weeks before presentation and was ...

  1. Emergency assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain using low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Becker, Minerva; Becker, Christoph D; Halfon Poletti, Alice; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Zaidi, Habib; Perneger, Thomas; Platon, Alexandra

    2017-08-01

    To determine if radiation dose delivered by contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for acute abdominal pain can be reduced to the dose administered in abdominal radiography (<2.5 mSv) using low-dose CT (LDCT) with iterative reconstruction algorithms. One hundred and fifty-one consecutive patients requiring CECT for acute abdominal pain were included, and their body mass index (BMI) was calculated. CECT was immediately followed by LDCT. LDCT series was processed using 1) 40% iterative reconstruction algorithm blended with filtered back projection (LDCT-IR-FBP) and 2) model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm (LDCT-MBIR). LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR images were reviewed independently by two board-certified radiologists (Raters 1 and 2). Abdominal pathology was revealed on CECT in 120 (79%) patients. In those with BMI <30, accuracies for correct diagnosis by Rater 1 with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR, when compared to CECT, were 95.4% (104/109) and 99% (108/109), respectively, and 92.7% (101/109) and 100% (109/109) for Rater 2. In patients with BMI ≥30, accuracies with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR were 88.1% (37/42) and 90.5% (38/42) for Rater 1 and 78.6% (33/42) and 92.9% (39/42) for Rater 2. The radiation dose delivered by CT to non-obese patients with acute abdominal pain can be safely reduced to levels close to standard radiography using LDCT-MBIR. • LDCT-MBIR (<2.5 mSv) can be used to assess acute abdominal pain. • LDCT-MBIR (<2.5 mSv) cannot safely assess acute abdominal pain in obese patients. • LDCT-IR-FBP (<2.5 mSv) cannot safely assess patients with acute abdominal pain.

  2. 10-Year-Old Female with Acute Abdominal Pain with Pancreatic Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles K. Powers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A previously healthy 10-year-old female presented to a local emergency department following three days of nausea and vomiting diagnosed with a solid pseudopapillary tumor. Solid pseudopapillary neoplasms are a rare form of pancreatic cystic neoplasm that typically presents in young females in their 20–30s and are very rare in children. These neoplasms often present as an asymptomatic tumor found on incidental imaging. When symptomatic they most commonly present with abdominal pain and can also cause a palpable abdominal mass, weight loss, gastrointestinal obstruction, and nausea and vomiting. Timely diagnosis of this rare neoplasm is very important because complete resection of the tumor is the definitive treatment and leads to an excellent long-term survival.

  3. Lactose and fructose malabsorption in children with recurrent abdominal pain: results of double-blinded testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsbers, C F M; Kneepkens, C M F; Büller, H A

    2012-09-01

    To investigate malabsorption of lactose and fructose as causes of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP). In 220 children (128 girls, mean age 8,8 [4.1-16.0] years) with RAP, hydrogen breath tests (H(2) BT; abnormal if ΔH(2) > 30 ppm) were performed with lactose and fructose. Disappearance of RAP with elimination, recurrence with provocation and disappearance with re-elimination, followed by a 6-month pain-free follow-up, were considered indicative of a causal relation with RAP. For definite proof, a double-blinded placebo-controlled (DBPC) provocation was performed. Malabsorption of lactose was found in 57 of 210, of fructose in 79 of 121 patients. Pain disappeared upon elimination in 24/38 patients with lactose malabsorption, and in 32/49 with fructose malabsorption. Open provocation with lactose and fructose was positive in 7/23 and 13/31 patients. DBPC provocation in 6/7 and 8/13 patients was negative in all. However, several children continued to report abdominal symptoms upon intake of milk or fructose. Lactose intolerance nor fructose intolerance could be established as causes of RAP, according to preset criteria including elimination, open provocation and DBPC provocation. However, in clinical practice, persistent feeling of intolerance in some patients should be taken seriously and could warrant extended elimination with repeated challenges. © 2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2012 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  4. Laparoscopy for the management of acute lower abdominal pain in women of childbearing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitán, Hernando G; Reveiz, Ludovic; Farquhar, Cindy; Elias, Vanessa M

    2014-05-22

    This is an updated version of the original review, published in Issue 1, 2011, of The Cochrane Library. Acute lower abdominal pain is common, and making a diagnosis is particularly challenging in premenopausal women, as ovulation and menstruation symptoms overlap with symptoms of appendicitis, early pregnancy complications and pelvic infection. A management strategy involving early laparoscopy could potentially provide a more accurate diagnosis, earlier treatment and reduced risk of complications. To evaluate the effectiveness and harms of laparoscopy for the management of acute lower abdominal pain in women of childbearing age. The Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group (MDSG) Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, LILACS and CINAHL were searched (October 2013). The International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) was also searched. No new studies were included in this updated version. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that included women of childbearing age who presented with acute lower abdominal pain, non-specific lower abdominal pain or suspected appendicitis were included. Trials were included if they evaluated laparoscopy with open appendicectomy, or laparoscopy with a wait and see strategy. Study selection was carried out by two review authors independently. Data from studies that met the inclusion criteria were independently extracted by two review authors and the risk of bias assessed. We used standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. A summary of findings table was prepared using GRADE criteria. A total of 12 studies including 1020 participants were incorporated into the review. These studies had low to moderate risk of bias, mainly because allocation concealment or methods of sequence generation were not adequately reported. In addition, it was not clear whether follow-up was similar for the treatment groups

  5. Diagnostic errors related to acute abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medford-Davis, Laura; Park, Elizabeth; Shlamovitz, Gil; Suliburk, James; Meyer, Ashley N D; Singh, Hardeep

    2016-04-01

    Diagnostic errors in the emergency department (ED) are harmful and costly. We reviewed a selected high-risk cohort of patients presenting to the ED with abdominal pain to evaluate for possible diagnostic errors and associated process breakdowns. We conducted a retrospective chart review of ED patients >18 years at an urban academic hospital. A computerised 'trigger' algorithm identified patients possibly at high risk for diagnostic errors to facilitate selective record reviews. The trigger determined patients to be at high risk because they: (1) presented to the ED with abdominal pain, and were discharged home and (2) had a return ED visit within 10 days that led to a hospitalisation. Diagnostic errors were defined as missed opportunities to make a correct or timely diagnosis based on the evidence available during the first ED visit, regardless of patient harm, and included errors that involved both ED and non-ED providers. Errors were determined by two independent record reviewers followed by team consensus in cases of disagreement. Diagnostic errors occurred in 35 of 100 high-risk cases. Over two-thirds had breakdowns involving the patient-provider encounter (most commonly history-taking or ordering additional tests) and/or follow-up and tracking of diagnostic information (most commonly follow-up of abnormal test results). The most frequently missed diagnoses were gallbladder pathology (n=10) and urinary infections (n=5). Diagnostic process breakdowns in ED patients with abdominal pain most commonly involved history-taking, ordering insufficient tests in the patient-provider encounter and problems with follow-up of abnormal test results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of surgeons and trainees in assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Diagnostic accuracy in the assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain in the emergency ward is not adequate. It has been argued that this is because the investigations are carried out predominantly by a trainee. Resource utilization could be lowered if surgeons had a higher initial diagnostic accuracy. Patients with acute abdominal pain were included in a prospective cohort study. A surgical trainee and a surgeon made independent assessments in the emergency department, recording the clinical diagnosis and proposed diagnostic investigations. A reference standard diagnosis was established by an expert panel, and the proportion of correct diagnoses was calculated. Diagnostic accuracy was expressed in terms of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. Interobserver agreement for the diagnosis and elements of history-taking and physical examination were expressed by means of Cohen's κ. Certainty of diagnosis was recorded using a visual analogue scale. A trainee and a surgeon independently assessed 126 patients. Trainees made a correct diagnosis in 44·4 per cent of patients and surgeons in 42·9 per cent (P = 0·839). Surgeons, however, recorded a higher level of diagnostic certainty. Diagnostic accuracy was comparable in distinguishing urgent from non-urgent diagnoses, and for the most common diseases. Interobserver agreement for the clinical diagnosis varied from fair to moderate (κ = 0·28-0·57). The diagnostic accuracy of the initial clinical assessment is not improved when a surgeon rather than a surgical trainee assesses a patient with abdominal pain in the emergency department. © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Integrative treatment approaches: family satisfaction with a multidisciplinary paediatric Abdominal Pain Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Verrill Schurman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess patient and family satisfaction with evaluation received through a multidisciplinary paediatric Abdominal Pain Clinic (APC staffed by a paediatric gastroenterologist and a paediatric psychologist as compared to a traditional gastroenterology clinic (GI staffed by a paediatric gastroenterologist only. Methods: Two hundred and ninety-eight families (145 APC, 153 GI with a child or adolescent aged 8-17 years seen for initial evaluation of a chronic abdominal pain completed an anonymous survey to assess understanding of the treatment recommendations made, intent to follow through with various treatment recommendations, and the overall level of satisfaction with the evaluation service provided. Family perceptions of strengths and challenges of the APC evaluation process also were explored. Results: APC families reported being prescribed adjunctive mental health and other therapies at significantly higher rates than GI families, while the rates of medication were comparable. APC families also reported significantly greater receptivity to beginning the treatments prescribed and higher levels of overall satisfaction with the evaluation process. The contribution of integrated medical and psychological perspectives frequently was identified as a strength of the APC evaluation process. Challenges identified for the APC evaluation were few and focused on issues related to paperwork and scheduling issues. Conclusions: Integrative care approaches to the evaluation of paediatric abdominal pain appear well accepted by families, yielding high levels of satisfaction, and enhance receptivity to treatment recommendations. Integrative care starting at the time of first evaluation may be particularly well-tailored to enhance outcomes, reduce health care utilization, and yield financial savings within this population.

  8. The diagnostic role of US in patients with right lower quadrant abdominal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sheen Woo; Lee, Jeong Kyong; Baek, Seung Yon; Kang, Byung Chul; Lee, Sun Wha [Ewha Womans Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    To determine the frequency with which ultrasonography (US) provides a correct diagnosis and suggests appropriate guidance for the treatment of patients with right lower quadrant abdominal pain. During an 11-month period, US was consecutively performed in 84 patients who were presented with right lower quadrant abdominal pain. In the 76 [M:F = 16:60, age range 14-87 (mean, 41) years] who formed the study population, final diagnoses were made surgically or clinically. For US, a 5-7-MHz convex-array, 4-MHz vector-array, and/or 7-MHz linear-array transducer was used, according to the patient's body habitus. To determine how often our US reports had provided a correct diagnosis and suggested appropriate guidance for surgical or medical treatment, and to calculate their diagnostic value, the reports were retrospectively compared with final diagnoses. US diagnoses were acute appendicitis in 40 patients (53%), diseases other than this in 25 patients (33%), and no abnormality in 11 (14%). In 38 of the 40 patients (95%), the diagnosis of acute appendicitis was surgically confirmed as correct, and for other diseases, diagnoses based on the findings of US proved to be correct in 21 of 25 patients (84%). Overall, diagnoses was correct in 67 (88%). As regards appropriate guidance for treatment, 46 (61%) and 30 (39%) patients were diagnosed by US to have surgical and medical diseases, respectively. In 44 of the 46 (96%), it was confirmed guidance was appropriate, and for the 30 with medical disease, this was so in all but one case (97%). Overall, the treatment plan was appropriate in 72 patients (95%). Our study revealed that US was able to provide a correct diagnosis in 88% of patients with right lower quadrant abdominal pain, and in 95% of these, the treatment plan suggested was appropriate. US is, therefore, a valuable screening tool in the diagnosis and therapeutic guidance of such patients.

  9. Soft Tissue Mobilization to Resolve Chronic Pain and Dysfunction Associated With Postoperative Abdominal and Pelvic Adhesions: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yui Y; Smith, Ryan W; Koppenhaver, Shane

    2015-12-01

    Case report. Common complications from abdominal and pelvic surgery include adhesions and chronic pain. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis is sometimes used to reduce adhesions and related pain. Physical therapy interventions, such as soft tissue mobilization (STM), may be used for this condition; however, evidence to support its effectiveness is lacking. A 28-year-old woman with a history of 5 abdominal/pelvic surgeries presented with right-sided lower abdominal and anterior hip pain, which had been present since she had undergone a laparoscopic appendectomy with a right ovarian cystectomy surgery 1 year earlier. As an active-duty member in the US Navy, due to pain and weakness, she was unable to perform required curl-ups for her fitness test. Though she had been previously treated both surgically with laparoscopic adhesiolysis and nonsurgically with physical therapy consisting of stretching and strengthening exercises, her pain and function did not improve. She was again evaluated and treated with physical therapy and, based on the examination findings, STM was used to address her pain and dysfunction, which were thought to be related to intra-abdominal adhesions. Following 5 sessions of physical therapy over a 3-week period that included STM and therapeutic exercises, followed by 5 additional sessions over a 4-week period that focused on therapeutic exercises, the patient reported substantially decreased pain, improved function, and a full return to previous level of activity, including unrestricted physical training in a military setting. The outcomes for this patient suggest that STM may be effective as a conservative treatment option for pain and dysfunction related to intra-abdominal adhesions from abdominal/pelvic surgery. Studies with a higher level of evidence, including potential comparison between STM and traditional laparoscopic adhesiolysis, are needed to further determine benefits of nonsurgical care for this condition.

  10. Kaempferol, a dietary flavonoid, ameliorates acute inflammatory and nociceptive symptoms in gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shi Hyoung; Park, Jae Gwang; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yang, Sungjae; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Jun Ho; Ha, Van Thai; Kim, Han Gyung; Yi, Young-Su; Kim, Ji Hye; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Sung, Nak Yoon; Lee, Mi-nam; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-07-01

    Kaempferol (KF) is the most abundant polyphenol in tea, fruits, vegetables, and beans. However, little is known about its in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy and mechanisms of action. To study these, several acute mouse inflammatory and nociceptive models, including gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain were employed. Kaempferol was shown to attenuate the expansion of inflammatory lesions seen in ethanol (EtOH)/HCl- and aspirin-induced gastritis, LPS/caerulein (CA) triggered pancreatitis, and acetic acid-induced writhing. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Water Load Test in Childhood Functional Abdominal Pain: No Relation to Food Intake and Nutritional Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Roberto Koity Fujihara; Soares, Ana Cristina Fontenele; Speridião, Patricia da Graça Leite; de Morais, Mauro Batista

    2015-09-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluates the relations between the water load test in childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders with food intake and nutritional status. Patients with functional dyspepsia required a lower maximum water intake to produce fullness (n = 11, median = 380 mL) than patients with irritable bowel syndrome (n = 10, median = 695 mL) or functional abdominal pain (n = 10, median = 670 mL) (P 560 mL (n = 14) in the water load test, there was no relation between the maximum drinking capacity and food intake, body mass index, or height.

  12. 73-year-old woman with abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman presented with a six-day history of abdominal pain that had started in the epigastrium, but recently had become more intense in the right lower quadrant. Peptic ulcer had been diagnosed three years prior to presentation and had been managed medically. On physical examination, epigastric tenderness as well as guarding and rebound tenderness in the right lower quandrant were present. Mild leukocytosis was reported. Computed tomography demonstrated a 5-cm retrocecal mass with low attenuation (fluid content) surrounded by an irregularly thickened uncalcified wall. Multiple areas of tissue debris were seen extending into the mass, but no true separation was present

  13. PARASITIC INFECTION IN A YOUNG MAN PRESENTING WITH NON-SPECIFIC ABDOMINAL PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FARNAZA A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old man presented with a two-week history of central colicky abdominal pain associated with loose stools. Further history revealed that he had been exposed to contaminated waters. Stool investigation by direct wet stool smears revealed the presence of Entamoeba histolytica and Blastocystis hominis cysts. A diagnosis of amoebiasis secondary to E. histolytica and concurrent B. hominis infestation was made. We would like to emphasise the importance of clinical history including recent travel to endemic areas. Any suspicion of parasitic infection should prompt the clinician to investigate. Early diagnosisand management would prevent serious complications associated with E. Histolytica infection.

  14. Therapeutic Response for Functional Abdominal Pain in Children with Occult Constipation: Laxatives versus Prokinetic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Eun Kyo; Jang, Homin; Jeong, Su Jin

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between functional abdominal pain (FAP) and occult constipation (OC) in children who did not meet the Rome III criteria for constipation has rarely been reported. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of OC in patients with FAP and to compare the effectiveness of prokinetic drugs and laxatives for FAP and OC. Pediatric outpatients (n = 212; aged 4-15 years) who satisfied the Rome III criteria for childhood FAP were divided into 2 groups based on Leech scores: group 1 children with FAP. Laxatives can be more effective than prokinetic drugs for relieving symptoms of FAP in children with a Leech score ≥ 8 and suspected OC.

  15. Individual and additive effects of mothers' and fathers' chronic pain on health outcomes in young adults with a childhood history of functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Amanda L; Bruehl, Stephen; Smith, Craig A; Walker, Lynn S

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate effects of mothers' and fathers' chronic pain on health outcomes in adult sons and daughters with a childhood history of functional abdominal pain (FAP). Adults (n = 319; Mean age = 22.09 years) with a childhood history of FAP reported parental history of chronic pain and their own current health (chronic pain, somatic symptoms, disability, use of medication and health care, illness-related job loss). Positive histories of maternal and paternal chronic pain were each associated with poorer health in sons and daughters, regardless of child or parent gender. Having 2 parents with chronic pain was associated with significantly poorer health than having 1 or neither parent with chronic pain. Chronic pain in both mothers and fathers is associated with poor health and elevated health service use in young adults with a childhood history of FAP. Having both parents with chronic pain increases risk for adverse outcomes.

  16. The effect of abdominal drawing-in exercise and myofascial release on pain, flexibility, and balance of elderly females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seong Hun; Sim, Yong Hyeon; Kim, Myung Hoon; Bang, Ju Hee; Son, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Jae Woong; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] This study is designed to compare the effects of abdominal drawing-in exercise and myofascial release on pain, flexibility, and balance of elderly females. [Subjects and Methods] Forty elderly females aged 65 or older who had complained of low back pain for three months or longer were selected as the subjects. They were randomly and equally assigned to either an abdominal drawing-in group or a myofascial release group. The subjects conducted exercise three times per week, 40 minutes each time, for eight weeks. As evaluation tools, visual analogue scale for pain, remodified schober test for flexibility, and upright posture with eye opening on hard platform, upright posture with eye closing on hard platform, upright posture with eye opening on soft platform, upright posture with eye closing on soft platform using tetrax for balance were used. [Results] The abdominal drawing-in exercise group saw significant difference in pain and balance after the exercise compared to before the exercise. The myofascial release group saw significant difference in pain and flexibility after exercise compared to before the exercise. [Conclusion] The above study showed that abdominal drawing-in exercise affected elderly females regarding pain and balance and myofascial release influenced their pain and flexibility.

  17. Autonomic nervous system function in patients with functional abdominal pain. An experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L S; Christiansen, P; Raundahl, U

    1993-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain--that is, pain without demonstrable organic abnormalities--has often been associated with psychologic stress. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether sympathetic nervous system response to laboratory stress and basal parasympathetic neural activity were...... cortisol measurements were included, to assess the pituitary-adrenocortical axis. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and plasma adrenaline increased significantly in all groups in response to a stress test (mental arithmetic). Plasma noradrenaline increased in the DU patients only, and plasma ACTH...... response as indicated by a lesser stress-induced increment in heart rate, was seen in both patient groups (functional, 13 +/- 2 beats/min; organic, 10 +/- 2 beats/min) as compared with the healthy group (19 +/- 2 beats/min; P = 0.003).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  18. Abdominal implantation of testicles in the management of intractable testicular pain in Fournier gangrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cyrus C; Shahrour, Khaled; Collier, Ronald D; Welch, Marlene; Chang, Shiliang; Williams, Mallory

    2013-01-01

    Fournier gangrene (FG) is a necrotizing soft tissue infection involving the superficial and fascial planes of the perineum. In many cases of FG, debridement of the scrotum is necessary, leaving definitive management of the exposed testicles a significant surgical challenge. Frequent incidental trauma to the testicles can cause severe pain, especially in laborers. Practical surgical solutions are few and not well detailed. Various options exist, including creating a neoscrotum with adjacent thigh tissue, split-thickness skin grafts (STSGs), or even creating a subcutaneous thigh pocket. We describe a case of abdominal implantation of bilateral testicles for persistent testicular pain in a case where STSGs did not provide adequate protection, adjacent thigh skin was not available for creation of a neoscrotum, and significant cord contracture occurred. We detail the advantages and disadvantages of the commonly described techniques, including this approach, and how in select individuals this may be a suitable alternative.

  19. CHOLECYSTITIS AS A CAUSE OF ABDOMINAL PAIN IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE VIRAL HEPATITIS A AND B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miodrag Radunović

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute cholecystitis is an inflammation of the gallbladder wall, usually caused by gallstones in the cystic duct, which causes attacks of severe pain. At least 95% of the population with acute inflammation of the gallbladder have gallstones. Acute viral hepatitis is the liver inflammation accompanied by nausea, faintness, vomiting, pain below the right rib arch, jaundice. The presence of acute cholecystitis intensifies the existing symptoms. The aim of the paper was to show the incidence of the gallbladder inflammation in patients with acute hepatitis A or B. This retrospective-prospective study involved 110 patients treated for viral hepatitis A or B and had severe abdominal pain during hospitalization. The selected sample involved more male examinees - 63 (62% compared to female ones - 47 (38%. The most frequent age of examinees was 30-50 years, 82 (83%, and cholecystitis during hepatitis was also most common in the age group 30-50 years, 28 (73% patients. Cholecystitis was more common in patients with acute hepatitis B - 21 (55% examinees than in patients with acute hepatitis A - 17 (45% examinees. Ultrasound examination, performed in 24 (63% examinees showed gallstones in inflamed gallbladder, while 14 (37% examinees had the inflammation of the gallbladder without gallstones. The most common cause of severe abdominal pain in patients with acute liver infection caused by HAV and HBV infection was the gallbladder, 38 (34.5% patients. Cholecystitis was more common in patients with acute hepatitis B, 21 (55% examinees, than in those with an acute hepatitis A, 17 (45% examinees.

  20. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain in a Patient with Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana C. Branco

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Walled-off necrosis (WON is a potentially lethal late complication of acute pancreatitis (AP and occurs in less than 10% of AP cases. It can be located in or outside the pancreas. When infected, the mortality rate increases and can reach 100% if the collection is not drained. Its treatment is complex and includes, at the beginning, intravenous antibiotics, which permit sepsis control and a delay in the therapeutic intervention, like drainage. Nowadays, a minimally invasive approach is advised. Depending on the location of the collection, computed tomography (CT-guided drainage or endoscopic necrosectomy are the primary options, then complemented by surgical necrosectomy if needed. Infected WON of the abdominal wall has been rarely described in the literature and there is no report of any infection with Citrobacter freundii. Case: We present the case of a 61-year-old man with necrotizing AP complicated by WON of the left abdominal wall, infected with Citrobacter freundii that was successfully treated with CT-guided percutaneous drainage and intravenous antibiotics. Conclusion: Infected WON accounts for considerable mortality and its location in the abdominal wall is rare; it can be treated with antibiotics and CT-guided drainage with no need for further intervention.

  1. Lead Toxicity: A Probable Cause of Abdominal Pain in Drug Abusers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Froutan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lead toxicity is caused by ingestion, inhalation, or contact with particles or vapors containing lead. It can present with nonspecific signs and symptoms such as abdominal pain, constipation, irritability, difficulty concentrating, and anemia. In this study, we have tried to find a relationship between lead poisoning and drug abuse.Methods: In a cross sectional study, drug addicts presenting with abdominal pain referring to GI center ofImam Khomeini hospital in 2008 were observed. Patients having occupational contact with lead were excluded from the study. Required data included age, sex, clinical findings, Para clinic results and blood lead level. Results were analyzed through SPSS-15 software.Results: 42 patients (all male with average age of 46.9 ± 10.1 years were included in the study. Averageblood lead level was 51.17±27.96µg/dl. 22 patients (52.6% had lead toxicity. A significant relation was found between lead toxicity and mode of opium drug use; however relation between lead toxicity and duration of addiction was not significant. Similarly, a meaningful relation was found between lead toxicity and abnormal liver function test, urine tests, ECG, presence of basophilic stippling and hyperuricemia.Conclusion: There seems to be a significant relation between opium drug abuse and lead toxicity. Further studies with more cases and ethnicities are needed.

  2. Appraisal and coping with daily stressors by pediatric patients with chronic abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lynn S; Smith, Craig A; Garber, Judy; Claar, Robyn Lewis

    2007-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that pain patients differ from well children in their appraisal and coping with daily stressors and to test a model of the relation of stress appraisal and coping to symptoms and disability. Pediatric patients with chronic abdominal pain (n = 143) and well children (n = 104) completed a 5-day diary study regarding their appraisal and coping with daily stressors. Somatic symptoms, depressive symptoms, and functional disability were assessed 2 months later. Compared to well children, pain patients were less confident of their ability either to change or to adapt to stress and were less likely to use accommodative coping strategies. Different patterns of stress appraisal were associated with active, passive, and accommodative coping. Both appraisals and coping were significantly related to symptoms and disability. The relation between stress and symptoms in pediatric pain patients may be explained in part by their appraisal and coping with stressors. The relation between appraisal and coping was consistent with Lazarus, R. S., & Folkman, S. (1984). Stress, Appraisal, and Coping. New York: Springer.

  3. [Evaluation of diagnostic scales for appendicitis in patients with lower abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria, Alvaro; Domínguez, Luis Carlos; Bermúdez, Charles; Serna, Adriana

    2007-09-01

    Diagnosis of apendicitis is difficult; however several clinical scales have been developed that attempt to improve diagnostic accuracy. The operational characteristics of Alvarado and Fenyö scales were defined in patients with abdominal pain suggestive of appendicitis and were compare with clinical and pathological diagnoses. A prospective trial assessed the diagnostic tests. Sign, symptoms, and laboratory tests were included in scales selected. Surgeon decision was maintained independent from the results of the scales. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value and positive and negative likelihood ratio for each scale was compared with the surgeon evaluation. The sample included 374 patients with approximately equal sexes. Of these 269 patients underwent surgery. Howeve, 16.9% of the male and 31.4% of female patients did not have appendicitis. For men, a diagnosis made by the surgeon had better sensitivity than scales (86.2% vs. 73% for Alvarado and 67.2% for Fenyö) without significant differences in specificity. For women, surgeon and Alvarado scale diagnoses were similar, and better than Fenyö scale (77.1% vs. 79.5% for Alvarado and 47% for Fenyö), but specificity was higher for Fenyö scale (92.9% vs. 71.4% for Alvarado and 75.9% for surgeon). Accuracy in diagnosis of appendicitis increases with a higher Alvarado score. For men with abdominal pain on right lower quadrant, surgeon diagnosis is more accurate than scales. For women, Fenyö scale offers a better sensitivity. Alvarado score can facilitate decision-making in patients with these abdominal symptoms.

  4. Changes in lateral abdominal muscle thickness during an abdominal drawing-in maneuver in individuals with and without low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beazell, James R; Grindstaff, Terry L; Hart, Joseph M; Magrum, Eric M; Cullaty, Martha; Shen, Francis H

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare lateral abdominal muscle thickness changes in individuals with and without low back pain (LBP) during an abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) using ultrasound imaging. Twenty individuals (13 females and 7 males, average age 40.1 ± 13.4) with stabilization classification LBP and 19 controls (10 females and 9 males, average age 30.3 ± 8.7) participated in this study. Bilateral measurements were made using ultrasound imaging to determine changes in thickness of the transversus abdominus (TrA) and external and internal oblique (EO+IO) muscles during an ADIM. There were no significant differences in relaxed muscle thickness values or contraction ratios for the TrA or EO+IO between groups or side. Individuals with stabilization classification LBP demonstrated no difference in lateral abdominal muscle thickness during an ADIM when compared with controls without LBP when using a pressure biofeedback device to monitor stability.

  5. Transversus abdominal plane (TAP) block for postoperative pain management: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, Jan; Wickerts, Liselott; Forsberg, Sune; Ledin, Gustaf

    2015-01-01

    Transversus abdominal plane (TAP) block has a long history and there is currently extensive clinical experience around TAP blocks. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the present evidence on the effects of TAP block and to provide suggestions for further studies. There are several approaches to performing abdominal wall blocks, with the rapid implementation of ultrasound-guided technique facilitating a major difference in TAP block performance. During surgery, an abdominal wall block may also be applied by the surgeon from inside the abdominal cavity. Today, there are more than 11 meta-analyses providing a compiled evidence base around the effects of TAP block. These analyses include different procedures, different techniques of TAP block administration and, importantly, they compare the TAP block with a variety of alternative analgesic regimes. The effects of TAP block during laparoscopic cholecystectomy seem to be equivalent to local infiltration analgesia and also seem to be beneficial during laparoscopic colon resection. The effects of TAP are more pronounced when it is provided prior to surgery and these effects are local anaesthesia dose-dependent. TAP block seems an interesting alternative in patients with, for example, severe obesity where epidural or spinal anaesthesia/analgesia is technically difficult and/or poses a risk. There is an obvious need for further high-quality studies comparing TAP block prior to surgery with local infiltration analgesia, single-shot spinal analgesia, and epidural analgesia. These studies should be procedure-specific and the effects should be evaluated, both regarding short-term pain and analgesic requirement and also including the effects on postoperative nausea and vomiting, recovery of bowel function, ambulation, discharge, and protracted recovery outcomes (assessed by e.g., postoperative quality of recovery scale).

  6. P-18: Comparison of Lateral Abdominal Muscle Thickness in Young Male Soccer Players With and Without Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Tavana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the lateral abdominal muscle thickness and other possible functional risk factors in young soccer players with and without low back pain (LBP.METHOD: In total, 30 young soccer players between 16 and 20 years old, with and without LBP, from the premier league participated in this study. The thicknesses of external oblique, internal oblique and transversus abdominis on both sides were measured via ultrasound imaging. In addition, hamstring flexibility, active lumbar forward flexion, and isometric muscle endurance of trunk extensors were measured and were compared regarding the history of LBP.RESULTS: Mean ± SD age of the subjects was 17.4 ± 1.1 years. There was no statistically significant difference regarding age, BMI, weekly training hours and age of starting to compete between groups. Subjects with sports-life, last year and last month history ofLBP had a statistically significant lower external oblique muscle thickness in both right and left side, and both dominant and non-dominant feet (p<0.05. Subjects with sportslife history of LBP had lower internal oblique muscle thickness in both side and both feet (p<0.05. Moreover, those with a sports-life history of LBP had a significantly higher degree of hamstring muscle tightness than non-LBP group on the dominant foot (p <0.05.CONCLUSION: In this sample group of young soccer players, abdominal muscles seem to have an important role in the stability of the spine and prevention of LBP. Further longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate the role of these muscles as a risk factor for soccer players.

  7. Chronic Abdominal Pain In Children: a Technical Report of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Colletti, Richard B; Lehmann, Horald P; Boyle, John T; Gerson, William T; Hyams, Jeffrey S; Squires, Robert H; Walker, Lynn S; Kanda, Pamela T

    2005-03-01

    Chronic abdominal pain, defined as long-lasting intermittent or constant abdominal pain, is a common pediatric problem encountered by primary care physicians, medical subspecialists and surgical specialists. Chronic abdominal pain in children is usually functional-that is, without objective evidence of an underlying organic disorder. The Subcommittee on Chronic Abdominal Pain of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition has prepared this report based on a comprehensive, systematic review and rating of the medical literature. This report accompanies a clinical report based on the literature review and expert opinion. The subcommittee examined the diagnostic and therapeutic value of a medical and psychologic history, diagnostic tests, and pharmacological and behavioral therapy. The presence of alarm symptoms or signs (such as weight loss, gastrointestinal bleeding, persistent fever, chronic severe diarrhea and significant vomiting) is associated with a higher prevalence of organic disease. There was insufficient evidence to state that the nature of the abdominal pain or the presence of associated symptoms (such as anorexia, nausea, headache and joint pain) can discriminate between functional and organic disorders. Although children with chronic abdominal pain and their parents are more often anxious or depressed, the presence of anxiety, depression, behavior problems or recent negative life events does not distinguish between functional and organic abdominal pain. Most children who are brought to the primary care physician's office for chronic abdominal pain are unlikely to require diagnostic testing. Pediatric studies of therapeutic interventions were examined and found to be limited or inconclusive.

  8. [A 35-year-old woman with fever, dyspnea, and pain in the left thigh].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, A; Navajas, F; De Iorio, F; Amicarelli, M; Spoto, S; De Galasso, L; Vespaciani Gentilucci, U; Scarlata, S; Zardi, E; Di Cuonzo, G

    2001-01-01

    A thirty-five years old woman during her twelfth pregnancy presented fever and pain at the left thigh. After cesarean delivery dyspnea added to the first two symptoms and pulmonary embolism was suspected. A clinical history revaluation suggested a diagnosis of infectious endocarditis and femoural osteomielitis due to a septic embolus.

  9. Association between changes in electromyographic signal amplitude and abdominal muscle thickness in individuals with and without lumbopelvic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Jackie L; McLean, Linda; Hodder, Joanne; Warner, Martin B; Stokes, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    Validation study. To investigate the association between changes in electromyographic (EMG) signal amplitude and sonographic measures of muscle thickness of 4 abdominal muscles, during 2 clinical tests, in adults with and without lumbopelvic pain. There is a trend in rehabilitation to use ultrasound imaging (USI) to determine the extent of abdominal muscle contraction. However, the literature investigating the relationship between abdominal muscle thickness change and level of activation is inconclusive and has not included clinically relevant tasks. Simultaneous recording from fine-wire EMG and USI was performed for 4 abdominal muscles, in 7 adults with lumbopelvic pain (mean ± SD age, 29.7 ± 12.0 years) and 7 adults without lumbopelvic pain (32.0 ± 10.6 years), during an active straight leg raise (ASLR) test and an abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM). Cross-correlation functions and linear regression analyses were used to describe the relationship between the 2 measures. Analyses of variance were used to compare individuals with and without lumbopelvic pain, with an alpha set at .05. Across all muscles, peak cross-correlation values were low (ASLR, r = 0.28 ± 0.09; ADIM, r = 0.35 ± 0.11), and there was large variability in associated time lags (ASLR, τ = 0.69 ± 2.56 seconds; ADIM, τ = 0.53 ± 3.75 seconds). Regression analyses did not detect a systematic pattern of association between EMG signal amplitude and USI measurements, and analyses of variance revealed no differences between cohorts. These results suggest a weak relationship between EMG amplitude and abdominal muscle thickness change measured with USI during the ADIM and ASLR, and raise questions about thickness change derived from USI as a measure of muscular activity for the abdominal musculature.

  10. Antinociceptive fatty acid patterns differ in children with psychosomatic recurrent abdominal pain and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfven, Gösta; Strandvik, Birgitta

    2016-06-01

    Stress is considered to trigger psychosomatic recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), but the mechanism behind the pain is unclear. Because the essential fatty acids, omega-6 and omega-3, are involved in pain, by regulating lipid mediators, we analysed the fatty acid patterns in children with RAP compared to healthy children. This was a cross-sectional study of plasma phospholipid fatty acids in 22 consecutively included children with RAP, aged six to 16 years, at an outpatient clinic specialising in RAP. The controls were 100 healthy children previously reported on and analysed in the same laboratory. The children with psychosomatic RAP showed higher mean concentrations of saturated fatty acids than the controls (49.0 mol% versus 47.4 mol%) but lower mean levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (38.6 mol% versus 39.9 mol%). Omega-3 fatty acids were lower in children with psychosomatic RAP, resulting in higher ratios of linoleic to alpha-linolenic acids (p psychosomatic RAP. Further studies, including lipid mediators and oxidative products, are necessary to confirm an association. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Acupuncture Therapy by Verbal Pain Scale in Patients with Abdominal Pain of Familial Mediterranean Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becel, Sinan; Sezgin, Yılmaz; Akçay, Fatih

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy based on Verbal Pain Scale (VPS) scores in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients admitted to the emergency department with attacks of abdominal pain. This observational study was conducted in Erzurum Regional Training and Research Hospital between August 2014 and December 2014. Twenty patients admitted to the emergency department with FMF attacks were included in the study. Acupuncture therapy was applied to three points including LI4 (Hegu), ST25 (Tianshu), and Ren12 (Zhongwan). The VPS test was applied to the patients before and after the treatment. Average VPS scores were found to be 8.45±0.75 before the treatment and 2.10±0.85 after the treatment. The difference of the VPS scores before and after treatment was statistically significant (p=0.001). To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy in the treatment of FMF attacks. Our results suggest that acupuncture therapy can be used as an effective treatment method in patients with FMF attacks. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. The Utility of Diagnostic Laparoscopy in Post-Bariatric Surgery Patients with Chronic Abdominal Pain of Unknown Etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsulaimy, Mohammad; Punchai, Suriya; Ali, Fouzeyah A; Kroh, Matthew; Schauer, Philip R; Brethauer, Stacy A; Aminian, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Chronic abdominal pain after bariatric surgery is associated with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The aim of this study was to evaluate the yield of laparoscopy as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool in post-bariatric surgery patients with chronic abdominal pain who had negative imaging and endoscopic studies. A retrospective analysis was performed on post-bariatric surgery patients who underwent laparoscopy for diagnosis and treatment of chronic abdominal pain at a single academic center. Only patients with both negative preoperative CT scan and upper endoscopy were included. Total of 35 post-bariatric surgery patients met the inclusion criteria, and all had history of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Twenty out of 35 patients (57%) had positive findings on diagnostic laparoscopy including presence of adhesions (n = 12), chronic cholecystitis (n = 4), mesenteric defect (n = 2), internal hernia (n = 1), and necrotic omentum (n = 1). Two patients developed post-operative complications including a pelvic abscess and an abdominal wall abscess. Overall, 15 patients (43%) had symptomatic improvement after laparoscopy; 14 of these patients had positive laparoscopic findings requiring intervention (70% of the patients with positive laparoscopy). Conversely, 20 (57%) patients required long-term medical treatment for management of chronic abdominal pain. Diagnostic laparoscopy, which is a safe procedure, can detect pathological findings in more than half of post-bariatric surgery patients with chronic abdominal pain of unknown etiology. About 40% of patients who undergo diagnostic laparoscopy and 70% of patients with positive findings on laparoscopy experience significant symptom improvement. Patients should be informed that diagnostic laparoscopy is associated with no symptom improvement in about half of cases.

  13. Impact of abdominal obesity and ambulatory blood pressure in the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy in never treated hypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodilla, Enrique; Costa, José A; Martín, Joaquin; González, Carmen; Pascual, Jose M; Redon, Josep

    2014-03-20

    The principal objective was to assess the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in hypertensive, never treated patients, depending on adjustment for body surface or height. Secondary objectives were to determine geometric alterations of the left ventricle and to analyze the interdependence of hypertension and obesity to induce LVH. Cross-sectional study that included 750 patients (387 men) aged 47 (13, SD) years who underwent ambulatory blood pressure (ABPM) monitoring and echocardiography. The prevalence of LVH was 40.4% (303 patients), adjusted for body surface area (BSA, LVHBSA), and 61.7% (463 patients), adjusted for height(2.7) (LVHheight(2.7)). In a multivariate logistic analysis, systolic BP24h, gender and presence of elevated microalbuminuria were associated with both LVHBSA and LVHheight(2.7). Increased waist circumference was the strongest independent predictor of LVHheight(2.7), but was not associated with LVHBSA. We found a significant interaction between abdominal obesity and systolic BP24h in LVHheight(2.7). Concentric remodelling seems to be the most prevalent alteration of left ventricular geometry in early stages of hypertension (37.5%). The impact of obesity as predictor of LVH in never treated hypertensives is present only when left ventricular mass (LVM) is indexed to height(2.7). Obesity interacts with systolic BP24h in an additive but not merely synergistic manner. Systolic BP24h is the strongest determinant of LVH when indexed for BSA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Appendicitis by Enterobius vermicularis presenting with recurrent abdominal pain and eosinophilia A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risio, Domenico; Rendine, Anna; Napolitano, Luca; Schiavone, Cosima

    2016-02-29

    Enterobius vermicularis (EV) is the most common parasitic infection in developed countries. Enterobius vermicularis infestation of the appendix can cause symptoms of appendiceal pain, independent of microscopic evidence of acute inflammation. The diagnosis of a parasitic infestation is generally achieved only after the pathologic examination of the resected appendices. We present a case of a 23 year old female with enterobiasis of appendix presented with clinical features of acute appendicitis. The appendix was surgically removed and the specimen was pathologically. We highlight that the symptoms of appendicitis can be due to Enterobius vermicularis infestation also without any histological evidence of acute inflammation. High index of suspicion and including parasitic origin in differential diagnosis of abdominal disturbances might hopefully Appencitis, Elminth, Enterobius vermicularis (EV).

  15. Acute Abdominal Pain Secondary to Retroperitoneal Bleeding From a Giant Adrenal Lipoma With Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyaz M. Singaporewalla

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal lipomas are rare, non-functioning benign tumours, which are primarily detected during autopsy or imaging, as asymptomatic incidentalomas. Occasionally, they can present with abdominal pain due to their large size. Imaging studies help to determine the origin, volume, composition of the lesion and presence of bleeding. Histopathology, however, is necessary to differentiate an adrenal lipoma from other fatty tumours such as myelolipoma, angiomyolipomas, teratomas and liposarcomas. We report a case of spontaneous bleeding from a giant adrenal lipoma that presented as an acute abdomen, and was initially mistaken on imaging for the more common myelolipoma. The literature is reviewed to discuss the clinical, pathological and radiological features, and the optimum therapeutic management.

  16. Consumerism in healthcare can be detrimental to child health: lessons from children with functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, K J; Glaser, D; Milla, P J

    2005-04-01

    To determine prognostic indicators in children with severe functional abdominal pain (FAP) and to test the hypothesis that "healthcare consumerism" in these families might be deleterious to the child. Retrospective analysis of a cohort of 23 children aged 12 months after onset. Poor outcome was associated with refusal to engage with psychological services, involvement of more than three consultants, lodging of a manipulative complaint with hospital management by the child's family, and lack of development of insight into psychosocial influences on symptoms. Three of four adverse prognostic indicators reflected healthcare consumerism by the families. Actions of families who lack insight into their child's illness may perpetuate FAP in childhood. A culture of parental consumerism in healthcare, however well intentioned, needs to be accompanied by robust systems to protect the interests of the child.

  17. Biliary Stones: An atypical cause of abdominal pain in Paediatric age group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, A.; Khan, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To identify Paediatric patients with biliary stone disease presenting to a tertiary care hospital in order to determine the etiology, presentation and management. Methods: Retrospective study of all cases of ultrasonographically proven biliary stones under the age of 15 years from January 1988 to December 2008. Data included their risk factors, complications, management and outcome. Results: Total 32 patients were identified with biliary stones, treated in the hospital. Mean age at presentation was 8.25 +- 3.33 years. Sixteen patients underwent cholecystectomy. Conclusion: Paediatric cholelithiasis is an atypical and under-diagnosed cause of abdominal pain in childhood. True prevalence of the disease may be higher than reported. Appropriate surgical intervention is required in patients with symptomatic and complicated biliary lithiasis. (author)

  18. Somatoform abdominal pain in surgery: is SD worthy of surgical attention? Case reports and literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abd Elwahab, Sami Medani

    2012-08-01

    Somatoform disorders (SD) or medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) are a group of disorders that represent a group of symptoms that cannot be explained by an organic or physical pathology. These disorders are widely prevalent, and, if unrecognised, SD may lead medical professionals to embark on tests or procedures which may inflict unnecessary iatrogenic complications. Despite the high prevalence, they are only poorly included in medical training curricula, at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. In this article, we review the literature and present two cases. The first one presented with a recurrent acute abdomen had an unnecessary CT abdomen. The second case had laparoscopy for acute right-sided abdominal pain which turned out to be normal, and was readmitted again after a short period with acute urine retention which resolved spontaneously following discussion with the patient and family. Both cases were referred for psychiatric assessment and their family doctors were informed.

  19. [Tuberculosis of the pancreas: an unsuspected cause of abdominal pain and fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Moreno, Roberto Manuel; Hernández-Ramírez, Daniel Alejandro; Madrazo-Navarro, Mario; Salazar-Lozano, Carlos Rafael; García-Álvarez, Karla Gisela; Espinoza-Álvarez, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis is frequently the form of presentation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection even in patients who have not developed acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Nevertheless, pancreatic affection is uncommon. Tuberculosis of the pancreas (TBP) is a clinical rarity and mimics pancreatic carcinoma both clinically and radiologically. We present the case of a 42-year-old man with a 5-day evolution of moderate abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant and fever and vomiting without diarrhea. The patient had no history of abdominal surgery. CT scan revealed a heterogeneously enhancing, multicystic structure in the pancreatic head. Due to suspicion of malignancy, a pancreatoduodenectomy was performed with pathological result of pancreatic tuberculosis. The patient was discharged on the 10th postoperative day without surgical complications. He died 10 months later of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. By that time he had a positive serum HIV antibodies test. TBP diagnosis can be missed or significantly delayed because it is often not suspected prior to laparotomy unless there is evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis. TBP should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a mass in the head of the pancreas. The response to early antituberculosis treatment is very effective.

  20. Role of CT in the Diagnosis of Nonspecific Abdominal Pain: A Multicenter Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Jonathan D; Reisner, Andrew T; Binder, William D; Zaheer, Atif; Gunn, Martin L; Linnau, Ken F; Miller, Chad M; Tramontano, Angela C; Herring, Maurice S; Dowling, Emily C; Halpern, Elkan F; Donelan, Karen; Gazelle, G Scott; Pandharipande, Pari V

    2017-03-01

    The objective of our study was to determine whether specific patient and physician factors-known before CT-are associated with a diagnosis of nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP) after CT in the emergency department (ED). We analyzed data originally collected in a prospective multicenter study. In the parent study, we identified ED patients referred to CT for evaluation of abdominal pain. We surveyed their physicians before and after CT to identify changes in leading diagnoses, diagnostic confidence, and admission decisions. In the current study, we conducted a multiple regression analysis to identify whether the following were associated with a post-CT diagnosis of NSAP: patient age; patient sex; physicians' years of experience; physicians' pre-CT diagnostic confidence; and physicians' pre-CT admission decision if CT had not been available. We analyzed patients with and those without a pre-CT diagnosis of NSAP separately. For the sensitivity analysis, we excluded patients with different physicians before and after CT. In total, 544 patients were included: 10% (52/544) with a pre-CT diagnosis of NSAP and 90% (492/544) with a pre-CT diagnosis other than NSAP. The leading diagnoses changed after CT in a large proportion of patients with a pre-CT diagnosis of NSAP (38%, 20/52). In regression analysis, we found that physicians' pre-CT diagnostic confidence was inversely associated with a post-CT diagnosis of NSAP in patients with a pre-CT diagnosis other than NSAP (p = 0.0001). No other associations were significant in both primary and sensitivity analyses. With the exception of physicians' pre-CT diagnostic confidence, the factors evaluated were not associated with a post-CT diagnosis of NSAP.

  1. Psyllium fiber reduces abdominal pain in children with irritable bowel syndrome in a randomized, double-blind trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    We sought to determine the efficacy of psyllium fiber treatment on abdominal pain and stool patterns in children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We evaluated effects on breath hydrogen and methane production, gut permeability, and microbiome composition. We also investigated whether psychologic...

  2. Experiences of patients with acute abdominal pain in the ED or acute surgical ward --a qualitative comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Helen; Qvist, Niels; Backer Mogensen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    with the patients took place after surgical assessment. In all, patients experienced long waiting times. The study shows a need to define the roles of the professionals in units receiving patients with acute abdominal pain in order to fulfil the medical as well as the experienced needs of the acute patient....

  3. Glucose hydrogen breath test for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korterink, Judith J.; Benninga, Marc A.; van Wering, Herbert M.; Deckers-Kocken, Judith M.

    2015-01-01

    A potential link between small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGID) has been suggested by symptom similarities and by the reported prevalence of SIBO in children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional AP. The

  4. Gut-directed hypnotherapy for functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome in children: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Juliette M. T. M.; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Vlieger, Arine M.; Benninga, Marc A.

    2013-01-01

    Gut directed hypnotherapy (HT) is shown to be effective in adult functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. We performed a systematic review to assess efficacy of HT in paediatric FAP/IBS patients. We searched Medline, Embase, PsychINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing

  5. Filariasis presenting as acute abdominal pain: The role of imaging and image-guided intervention in diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha N. Metha, MD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Filariasis is an endemic infection seen in tropical and subtropical regions of the world that presents with lymphatic dysfunction in the form of lymphocoele, hydrocoele, chyluria, or groin lymphadenovarix. We report a case of filariasis with the unusual presentation of acute abdominal pain in which radiographic imaging modalities played a crucial role in diagnosis.

  6. Filariasis presenting as acute abdominal pain: The role of imaging and image-guided intervention in diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metha, Natasha N; Dalavi, Vashali S; Mehta, Nikit P

    2015-01-01

    Filariasis is an endemic infection seen in tropical and subtropical regions of the world that presents with lymphatic dysfunction in the form of lymphocoele, hydrocoele, chyluria, or groin lymphadenovarix. We report a case of filariasis with the unusual presentation of acute abdominal pain in which radiographic imaging modalities played a crucial role in diagnosis.

  7. Filariasis presenting as acute abdominal pain: The role of imaging and image-guided intervention in diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Metha, Natasha N.; Dalavi, Vashali S.; Mehta, Nikit P.

    2016-01-01

    Filariasis is an endemic infection seen in tropical and subtropical regions of the world that presents with lymphatic dysfunction in the form of lymphocoele, hydrocoele, chyluria, or groin lymphadenovarix. We report a case of filariasis with the unusual presentation of acute abdominal pain in which radiographic imaging modalities played a crucial role in diagnosis.

  8. No Change in Rectal Sensitivity After Gut-Directed Hypnotherapy in Children With Functional Abdominal Pain or Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieger, A. M.; van den Berg, M. M.; Menko-Frankenhuis, C.; Bongers, M. E. J.; Tromp, E.; Benninga, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Gut-directed hypnotherapy (HT) has recently been shown to be highly effective in treating children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This study was conducted to determine the extent to which this treatment success is because of an improvement in

  9. Epidemiological and pathophysiological aspects of abdominal pain predominant functional gastrointestinal disorders in children and adolescents: a Sri Lankan perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devanarayana, N.M.

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pain-predominant functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs) are a worldwide pediatric problem with uncertain pathology. Main objectives of this thesis were to assess epidemiology, risk factors and underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of AP-FGIDs. A systematic review and

  10. Lumbar and abdominal muscle activity during walking in subjects with chronic low back pain: Support of the ''guarding'' hypothesis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hulst, M.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé; Rietman, Johan Swanik; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    It has been hypothesized that changes in trunk muscle activity in chronic low back pain (CLBP) reflect an underlying “guarding��? mechanism, which will manifest itself as increased superficial abdominal – and lumbar muscle activity. During a functional task like walking, it may be further provoked

  11. Gut-directed hypnotherapy in children with irritable bowel syndrome or functional abdominal pain (syndrome): A randomized controlled trial on self exercises at home using CD versus individual therapy by qualified therapists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.T.M. Rutten (Juliette); A.M. Vlieger (Arine M.); C. Frankenhuis (Carla); E.K. George (Elvira K.); M. Groeneweg (Michael); O.F. Norbruis (Obbe); W.E. Tjon A ten; H. Van Wering (Herbert); M.G.W. Dijkgraaf (Marcel); M.P. Merkus; M.A. Benninga (Marc)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional abdominal pain (syndrome) (FAP(S)) are common pediatric disorders, characterized by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain. Treatment is challenging, especially in children with persisting symptoms. Gut-directed hypnotherapy (HT)

  12. Decision making in patients with acute abdominal pain at a university and at a rural hospital: does the value of abdominal sonography differ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinkel Hans

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction and objectives Abdominal sonography is regarded as a quick and effective diagnostic tool for acute abdominal pain in emergency medicine. However, final diagnosis is usually based on a combination of various clinical examinations and radiography. The role of sonography in the decision making process at a hospital with advanced imaging capabilities versus a hospital with limited imaging capabilities but more experienced clinicians is unclear. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the relative importance of sonography and its influence on the clinical management of acute abdominal pain, at two Swiss hospitals, a university hospital (UH and a rural hospital (RH. Methods 161 patients were prospectively examined clinically. Blood tests and sonography were performed in all patients. Patients younger than 18 years and patients with trauma were excluded. In both hospitals, the diagnosis before and after ultrasonography was registered in a protocol. Certainty of the diagnosis was expressed on a scale from 0% to 100%. The decision processes used to manage patients before and after they underwent sonography were compared. The diagnosis at discharge was compared to the diagnosis 2 – 6 weeks thereafter. Results Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of sonography were high: 94%, 88% and 91%, respectively. At the UH, management after sonography changed in only 14% of cases, compared to 27% at the RH. Additional tests were more frequently added at the UH (30% than at the RH (18%, but had no influence on the decision making process-whether to operate or not. At the UH, the diagnosis was missed in one (1% patient, but in three (5% patients at the RH. No significant difference was found between the two hospitals in frequency of management changes due to sonography or in the correctness of the diagnosis. Conclusion Knowing that sonography has high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in the diagnosis of acute abdominal pain, one would

  13. The effects of abdominal draw-in maneuver and core exercise on abdominal muscle thickness and Oswestry disability index in subjects with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Doo; Yu, Seong-Hun

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to effects of abdominal draw-in maneuver and core exercise with 4 weeks using the musculoskeletal ultrasonography on muscle thickness and disability in subjects with low back pain. Twenty patients with nonspecific back pain (abdominal draw-in maneuver group: n= 10, core exercise group: n= 10) were recruited in the study. Both group received exercise intervention 3 times a week for 4weeks. The test were based on muscle thickness (transversus abdominis; Tra, internal oblique; IO and external oblique; EO), disability (Oswestry disability index; ODI) measured immediately before and after intervention. The data was measured by SPSS program 12.0 version and analyzed by Paired t-test and Independent t-test. The following results were obtained. The thickness of IO, EO for both group significantly improved except for muscle thickness of Tra. The ODI were significant difference for both groups. As the results of this study, we suggest that it may be effective method to apply to increase for the thickness of Tra, EO using abdominal draw-in maneuver and thickness of IO using core exercise.

  14. Fifteen Minutes of Left Prefrontal Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Acutely Increases Thermal Pain Thresholds in Healthy Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Borckardt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS of the motor cortex appears to alter pain perception in healthy adults and in patients with chronic neuropathic pain. There is, however, emerging brain imaging evidence that the left prefrontal cortex is involved in pain inhibition in humans.

  15. Recurrent abdominal pain in school children: effect of obesity and diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaty, Hoda M; Abudayyeh, Suhaib; Fraley, Ken; Graham, David Y; Gilger, Mark A; Hollier, David R

    2007-04-01

    To study the epidemiology and some of the risk factors of childhood recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in school age children. We used a questionnaire concerning socioeconomic parameters, intensity, frequency, duration, nature of RAP and anthropometric measures. We used several criteria to identify RAP and the Wong-Baker FACES scale for pain intensity and calculated the gender/age-specific body mass index (BMI) Z-score using NCHS standards. Obesity was defined as a BMI>or=95th percentile for age and gender. A total of 925 children mean age of 9.5 years completed and returned the questionnaires. The prevalence of RAP was 24%; 22% among boys versus 26% among girls (p=0.28) and reached its peak among children aged 7-9 (29%) years. Children with BMI>or=95% percentile reported more RAP compared to those not obese (33.3% vs. 22.5%) (OR=1.8, p=0.01). There was an inverse correlation between fruit consumption and RAP prevalence with 20% among children reporting more than three serving of fruit per week compared to 40% of those who did not consume any fruits (por=95th percentile and low consumption of fruits are significant risk factors for RAP. There is a significant association between RAP and obesity and both conditions are prevalent among children in this population. Understanding more about the co-morbidity between RAP and obesity could have important implications on RAP management and treatment.

  16. The study of controlling intractable upper abdominal pain caused by cancer through neurolytic celiac plexus block guided by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Hengwu; Tian Jianming; Wang Peijun; Chen Aihua; Zuo Changjing; Xiao Yi; Wang Minjie; Fan Yuelan

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) and to analyze the factors related to the degree of pain relief. Methods: Forty-two patients who had intractable upper abdominal pain or accompanying referred back pain from cancer of pancreas, liver, stomach, colon and bile duct received bilateral alcohol neurolytic celiac plexus blocks under CT guidance. The results of pain relief were classified into 0-III grade. The spread of neurolytic solution (with contrast material) was observed through 3D reconstruction. Results: During the 3 months follow-up, the total effective rates of pain relief in 2 weeks, 1 month, 2 months and 3 months were 92.86%, 88.10%, 85.00% and 80.56% respectively. Satisfactory pain relief results were obtained when the neurolytic solution encircled the aorta adequately from two sides. There were no severe complications in any case. Conclusion: NCPB guided by CT proves to be an effective and safe means of controlling intractable upper abdominal cancer pain and should be popularized

  17. An unusual cause of chronic abdominal pain after laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass: Case report of a penetrating fish bone causing adhesions at the biliary-digestive junction resulting in partial obstruction and chronic symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Ochieng

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This case highlights the possibility of a missed fish bone perforation causing chronic postprandial abdominal pain and discomfort in a patient with a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass anatomy. Foreign body perforation is a rare cause of abdominal pain after gastric bypass that should be considered when evaluating chronic abdominal pain symptoms after LRYGP.

  18. Complicated jejunal diverticulosis - a rare but important diagnosis to consider in abdominal pain: a report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, B M; Winker, J; Wagner, M; Jung, A; Strebel, H; Born, P

    2016-06-01

    Jejunal diverticulosis, a form of acquired false diverticula, is considered to be a rare clinical entity, which is mostly asymptomatic. But, in case of complications, jejunal diverticulosis can present as acute abdominal distress. Due to its rarity in clinical manifestation, jejunal diverticulosis may lead to a diagnostic and therapeutic delay. We report on 3 interdisciplinary cases of complicated jejunal diverticulosis by diverticulitis, diverticular bleeding, and perforation. We want to highlight the fact that complicated jejunal diverticulosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases of unclear abdominal pain. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of regional abdominal muscle function in elite AFL players with and without low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hides, Julie; Hughes, Brita; Stanton, Warren

    2011-06-01

    Changes in the motor control of trunk muscles have been identified in people with low back pain (LBP) including elite football players. Previous research has found functional differences in the anatomical regions of abdominal muscles; however, this has not been examined in football players with LBP. The aim of this study was to investigate if the ability to draw-in the abdominal wall is altered among football players with LBP, and to determine if there are functional differences between the middle and lower abdominal regions in participants with and without LBP. Forty-three elite Australian Football League players were imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as they drew in their abdominal walls, and the trunk cross-sectional area (CSA) was measured in relaxed and contracted states. At the lower region, participants with LBP (1.1%) reduced their trunk CSA to a lesser extent than those without LBP (3.2%) (P = 0.018). The results also showed that the draw-in of the abdominal wall was smaller in Region 1 (8.8%) compared to Region 2 (16.0%) and Region 3 (19.7%) (P < 0.001). This study provides evidence of regional differences in motor control and altered control of the lower region in participants with LBP. This may direct physiotherapists, especially those treating athletes, to focus on the lower abdominal region in those with LBP. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An incidentally found inflamed uterine myoma Causing low abdominal pain, using TC-99m-tektrotyd single photon emission computed tomography-CT hybrid imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zandieh, Shahin; Schuetz, Matthias; Bernt, Reinhard; Zwerina, Jochen; Haller, Joerg [Hanusch-Hospital, Teaching Hospital of Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Australia)

    2013-10-15

    We report the case of a 50-year-old woman presented with a history of right hemicolectomy due to an ileocecal neuroendocrine tumor and left breast metastasis. Owing to a slightly elevated chromogranin A-level and lower abdominal pain, single photon emission computed tomography-computer tomography (SPECT-CT) was performed. There were no signs of recurrence on the SPECT-CT scan, but the patient was incidentally found to have an inflamed intramural myoma. We believe that the slightly elevated chromogranin A-level was caused by the hypertension that the patient presented. In the clinical context, this is a report of an inflamed uterine myoma seen as a false positive result detected by TC-99m-Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-Octreotide (Tektrotyd) SPECT-CT hybrid imaging.

  1. An incidentally found inflamed uterine myoma causing low abdominal pain, using Tc-99m-tektrotyd single photon emission computed tomography-CT hybrid imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandieh, Shahin; Schütz, Matthias; Bernt, Reinhard; Zwerina, Jochen; Haller, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old woman presented with a history of right hemicolectomy due to an ileocecal neuroendocrine tumor and left breast metastasis. Owing to a slightly elevated chromogranin A-level and lower abdominal pain, single photon emission computed tomography-computer tomography (SPECT-CT) was performed. There were no signs of recurrence on the SPECT-CT scan, but the patient was incidentally found to have an inflamed intramural myoma. We believe that the slightly elevated chromogranin A-level was caused by the hypertension that the patient presented. In the clinical context, this is a report of an inflamed uterine myoma seen as a false positive result detected by TC-99m-Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-Octreotide (Tektrotyd) SPECT-CT hybrid imaging.

  2. Ingested Foreign Body Migration to the Liver: An Unusual Cause of Persistent Abdominal Pain in a 54-Year-Old Female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Lucerna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal pain is a common presentation in emergency medicine. We describe the case of a 54-year-old female who presented to the emergency department due to worsening abdominal pain. She had a history of right upper quadrant (RUQ abdominal pain that had been ongoing for several months. The pain had been thought by the primary care team to be related to gastritis and she had been prescribed a proton pump inhibitor (PPI. Her abdominal pain increased in the three days prior to her presentation to the emergency department (ED. The computed tomography (CT scan of the abdomen showed a foreign body (FB in the liver which was successfully removed surgically. Pathology results showed that the FB was consistent with a small bone fragment. Ingestions of FB are common but seldom result in complications. When complications do arise, perforation of a hollow viscous is typically seen. Rarely, transmigration of the FB can occur.

  3. Lycopene, Lutein and Zeaxanthin May Reduce Faecal Blood, Mucus and Pus but not Abdominal Pain in Individuals with Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głąbska, Dominika; Guzek, Dominika; Zakrzewska, Paulina; Włodarek, Dariusz; Lech, Gustaw

    2016-09-30

    The main symptom of ulcerative colitis is diarrhoea, which is often accompanied by painful tenesmus and faecal blood and mucus. It sometimes co-occurs with abdominal pain, fever, feeling of fatigue, loss of appetite and weight loss. Some dietary factors have been indicated as important in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. The aim of the study was to analyse the association between retinoid intake (total vitamin A, retinol, β-carotene, α-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin) and ulcerative colitis symptoms (abdominal pain, faecal blood, faecal mucus, faecal pus) in individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission. Assessment of diet was based on self-reported data from each patient's dietary records taken over a period of three typical, random days (2 weekdays and 1 day of the weekend). A total of 56 individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission (19 males and 37 females) were recruited for the study. One in every four individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission was characterised as having inadequate vitamin A intake. Higher lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin intakes in individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission were associated with lower faecal blood, mucus and pus but not with lower incidence of abdominal pain. Higher carotene intake in individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission may contribute to higher incidence of faecal mucus. Optimising intake of specific retinoids may enhance disease control in individuals with ulcerative colitis. Prospective studies, including patient reported and objective outcomes, are required to confirm this.

  4. Lycopene, Lutein and Zeaxanthin May Reduce Faecal Blood, Mucus and Pus but not Abdominal Pain in Individuals with Ulcerative Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głąbska, Dominika; Guzek, Dominika; Zakrzewska, Paulina; Włodarek, Dariusz; Lech, Gustaw

    2016-01-01

    Background: The main symptom of ulcerative colitis is diarrhoea, which is often accompanied by painful tenesmus and faecal blood and mucus. It sometimes co-occurs with abdominal pain, fever, feeling of fatigue, loss of appetite and weight loss. Some dietary factors have been indicated as important in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. The aim of the study was to analyse the association between retinoid intake (total vitamin A, retinol, β-carotene, α-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin) and ulcerative colitis symptoms (abdominal pain, faecal blood, faecal mucus, faecal pus) in individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission. Methods: Assessment of diet was based on self-reported data from each patient’s dietary records taken over a period of three typical, random days (2 weekdays and 1 day of the weekend). Results: A total of 56 individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission (19 males and 37 females) were recruited for the study. One in every four individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission was characterised as having inadequate vitamin A intake. Higher lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin intakes in individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission were associated with lower faecal blood, mucus and pus but not with lower incidence of abdominal pain. Higher carotene intake in individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission may contribute to higher incidence of faecal mucus. Conclusions: Optimising intake of specific retinoids may enhance disease control in individuals with ulcerative colitis. Prospective studies, including patient reported and objective outcomes, are required to confirm this. PMID:27706028

  5. Discriminative Accuracy of Novel and Traditional Biomarkers in Children with Suspected Appendicitis Adjusted for Duration of Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharbanda, Anupam B.; Cosme, Yohaimi; Liu, Khin; Spitalnik, Steven L.; Dayan, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To assess the accuracy of novel and traditional biomarkers in patients with suspected appendicitis as a function of duration of symptoms. Methods This was a prospective cohort study, conducted in a tertiary care emergency department (ED). The authors enrolled children 3 to 18 years old with acute abdominal pain of less than 96 hours, and measured serum levels of Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-8 (IL-8), C - reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell count (WBC), and absolute neutrophil count (ANC). Final diagnosis was determined by histopathology or telephone follow-up. Trends in biomarker levels were examined based on duration of abdominal pain. The accuracy of biomarkers was assessed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Optimal cut-points and test performance characteristics were calculated for each biomarker. Results Of 280 patients enrolled, the median age was 11.3 years (IQR 8.6 to 14.8), 57% were male, and 33% had appendicitis. Median IL-6, median CRP, mean WBC, and mean ANC differed significantly (p appendicitis and those without appendicitis; median IL-8 levels did not differ between groups. In non-perforated appendicitis, median IL-6, WBC, and ANC levels were maximal at less than 24 hrs of pain, while CRP peaked between 24 and 48 hours. In perforated appendicitis, median IL-8 levels were highest by 24 hours, WBC and IL-6 by 24 to 48 hours, and CRP after 48 hours of pain. The WBC appeared to be the most useful marker to predict appendicitis in those with fewer than 24 or more than 48 hours of pain, while CRP was the most useful in those with 24 to 48 hours of pain. Conclusions In this population, the serum levels and accuracy of novel and traditional biomarkers varies in relation to duration of abdominal pain. IL-6 shows promise as a novel biomarker to identify children with appendicitis. PMID:21676053

  6. Reliability and validity of lumbar and abdominal trunk muscle endurance tests in office workers with nonspecific subacute low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pozo-Cruz, Borja; Mocholi, Miguel H; del Pozo-Cruz, Jesus; Parraca, Jose A; Adsuar, Jose C; Gusi, Narcis

    2014-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of trunk endurance tests, the reliability and validity of these tests in office workers with subacute nonspecific low back pain are unknown. This cross-sectional study involved 190 subjects: 30 men and 42 women without low back pain and 47 men and 71 women with low back pain. All subjects underwent timed prone and supine isometric lumbar and abdominal trunk endurance tests that were performed until subjective fatigue occurred. All subjects also completed the Roland Morris and Oswestry self-reported disability questionnaires. A test-retest study (7 days) was conducted with 31 participants with low back pain from the study. For the abdominal trunk endurance test, males and females with low back pain had mean (SD) values of 62.06 (36.87) and 46.06 (29.28) seconds, respectively, both significantly lower than the asymptomatic workers. For the lumbar test, males and females with low back pain had mean (SD) values of 79.57 (30.66) and 75.49 (28.97) seconds, respectively, again, both significantly lower than the asymptomatic workers. The intraclass correlation coefficients of both tests exceeded 0.90 and the Kappa indices were excellent for both men and women. Receiver-operating curve analyses revealed areas under the curve very close to or exceeding 0.70 for both men and women for both tests. The lumbar and abdominal trunk muscle endurance tests appeared to be reliable and valid measures in office workers with subacute low back pain.

  7. The utility of ultrasonography in the the diagnostics and monitoring of treatment of acute abdominal pain in children with neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaleska-Dorobisz, U.; Jankowski, B.; Maciaszek, A.; Moron, K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the results of the diagnostic imaging modalities, especially ultrasonography (US) in children during the oncological therapy with the acute abdominal symptoms. Acute abdominal symptoms in children with neoplasms causing a very difficult clinical and diagnostic problems and can occur in any stage of disease. The high-resolution ultrasound has a very important role in diagnosis in all patients with acute abdominal pain and with neoplasms. The authors consider that the US should be the first imaging method in the differential diagnosis of the abdominal changes in children with neutropenia and oncological disease. Proper diagnosis should be established only with clinical information. We analyzed 249 ultrasounds examinations of the abdominal cavity in 144 girls and 105 boys aged from 1 to 18 years (mean age 10, 3 years). The more important indication for the US exam in 133 cases was acute abdominal symptoms. We took exams during pre- and postoperative chemotherapy, radiotherapy and after the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. All the patients were under routine hematological control. Based on the clinical symptoms and the laboratory tests we analysed two groups of children with oncological disease and acute abdomen: I group - 111 children with neutropenia, II group - 22 children without neutropenia. In the patients who underwent operation procedure the final diagnosis was established on histopathology. In the other cases diagnosis was based on clinical, laboratory and radiological exams, especially ultrasonography. We analyzed clinical picture of disease, the results of therapy and the US changes in examined patients using statistic parameters as: sensitivity, specificity and efficiency. In the group of 133 children with acute abdominal symptoms the most (92- 69,1%) patients suffer from ALL (acute lymphoblastic leukaemia) and 16(12%) - from AML (acute lymphoblastic leukaemia), Ewing sarcoma-3(2,2%), osteosarcoma - 3(2,2%), NHL

  8. Appendiceal endometriosis as a rare cause of abdominal pain: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Denadai

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent inflammatory disease, common in young women, characterized by the presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity. This ectopic endometrial tissue is most commonly found in the ovaries, peritoneum, uterosacral ligaments and rectovaginal cul-de-sac, with extremely rare involvement of the appendix. The main symptom is chronic abdominal pain, and the diagnosis is often made later, after the result of the histopathological examination. This study reports a 34-year-old patient complaining of chronic pelvic pain refractory to medical treatment, having undergone diagnostic laparotomy. During the surgery, we observed the presence of endometrioma fixed to the uterine wall, and the appendix was enlarged, but without evidence of inflammation. Endometrioma resection and appendectomy were performed, with good postoperative recovery. The anatomopathological exam showed endometriosis in the cecal appendix.Endometriose é uma doença inflamatória estrogênio-dependente frequente em mulheres jovens, caracterizada pela presença de tecido endometrial fora da cavidade uterina. Esse tecido ectópico de endométrio é mais comumente encontrado nos ovários, peritônio, ligamentos uterossacros e fundo de saco retovaginal, sendo o acometimento do apêndice cecal extremamente raro. O quadro clínico predominante é o de dor abdominal crônica, sendo muitas vezes o diagnóstico feito posteriormente, após o resultado do anatomopatológico. Relatamos o caso de uma paciente de 34 anos com queixa de dor pélvica crônica, refratária ao tratamento clínico, tendo sido submetida à laparotomia exploradora diagnóstica. Durante o ato cirúrgico, observamos a presença de endometrioma fixo à parede uterina, bem como apêndice cecal aumentado de volume, porém sem evidência de sinais flogísticos. Procedeu-se à ressecção do endometrioma e apendicectomia, com boa evolução pós-operatória. O resultado do exame

  9. The Placebo Response in Pediatric Abdominal Pain-Related Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekman, Daniël R; Zeevenhooven, Judith; van Etten-Jamaludin, Faridi S; Douwes Dekker, Iuke; Benninga, Marc A; Tabbers, Merit M; Vlieger, Arine M

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the magnitude and determinants of the placebo response in studies with pediatric abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched for systematic reviews and randomized placebo-controlled trials concerning children 4-18 years of age with an abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder. The primary outcome was the pooled proportion of subjects assigned to placebo with improvement as defined by the authors. The effect of trial characteristics on the magnitude of the placebo response was investigated using univariate meta-regression analysis. Twenty-one trials were identified. The pooled proportion of subjects with improvement was 41% (95% CI, 34%-49%; 17 studies) and with no pain was 17% (95% CI, 8%-32%; 7 studies). The pooled standardized mean difference on the Faces Pain Scales compared with baseline was -0.73 (95% CI, -1.04 to -0.42; 8 studies). There was significant heterogeneity across studies with respect to both outcomes. Lower dosing frequency (P = .04), positive study (P = .03), longer duration of treatment (P placebo dropout (P placebo. Several trial characteristics are correlated significantly with the proportion of patients with no pain on placebo and with the magnitude of the placebo response on Faces Pain Scales. These data could be valuable for the design of future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prognostic value of CT-derived left atrial and left ventricular measures in patients with acute chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takx, Richard A.P. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Groningen/University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging − North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Nance, John W. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Bamberg, Fabian [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Abro, Joseph A. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Carr, Christine M. [Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Litwin, Sheldon E. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • LV mass and LA diameter are independent prognostic factor for composite MACE. • LV mass and LA diameter were not significant prognostic factors for MACE in African Americans. • Assessment of LV mass by CT may have a role in the management of patients. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine which left atrial (LA) and left ventricular (LV) parameters are associated with future major adverse cardiac event (MACE) and whether these measurements have independent prognostic value beyond risk factors and computed tomography (CT)-derived coronary artery disease measures. Materials and methods: This retrospective analysis was performed under an IRB waiver and in HIPAA compliance. Subjects underwent coronary CT angiography (CCTA) using a dual-source CT system for acute chest pain evaluation. LV mass, LV ejection fraction (EF), LV end-systolic volume (ESV) and LV end-diastolic volume (EDV), LA ESV and LA diameter, septal wall thickness and cardiac chamber diameters were measured. MACE was defined as cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or late revascularization. The association between cardiac CT measures and the occurrence of MACE was quantified using Cox proportional hazard analysis. Results: 225 subjects (age, 56.2 ± 11.2; 140 males) were analyzed, of whom 42 (18.7%) experienced a MACE during a median follow-up of 13 months. LA diameter (HR:1.07, 95%CI:1.01–1.13 per mm) and LV mass (HR:1.05, 95%CI:1.00–1.10 per g) remained significant prognostic factor of MACE after controlling for Framingham risk score. LA diameter and LV mass were also found to have prognostic value independent of each other. The other morphologic and functional cardiac measures were no significant prognostic factors for MACE. Conclusion: CT-derived LA diameter and LV mass are associated with future MACE in patients undergoing evaluation for chest pain, and portend independent prognostic value beyond traditional risk factors, coronary calcium score, and

  11. Emergency assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain using low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Becker, Minerva; Becker, Christoph D.; Zaidi, Habib; Platon, Alexandra [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Halfon Poletti, Alice; Rutschmann, Olivier T. [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Community, Primary Care and Emergency Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Perneger, Thomas [University Hospital of Geneva, Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-08-15

    To determine if radiation dose delivered by contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for acute abdominal pain can be reduced to the dose administered in abdominal radiography (<2.5 mSv) using low-dose CT (LDCT) with iterative reconstruction algorithms. One hundred and fifty-one consecutive patients requiring CECT for acute abdominal pain were included, and their body mass index (BMI) was calculated. CECT was immediately followed by LDCT. LDCT series was processed using 1) 40% iterative reconstruction algorithm blended with filtered back projection (LDCT-IR-FBP) and 2) model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm (LDCT-MBIR). LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR images were reviewed independently by two board-certified radiologists (Raters 1 and 2). Abdominal pathology was revealed on CECT in 120 (79%) patients. In those with BMI <30, accuracies for correct diagnosis by Rater 1 with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR, when compared to CECT, were 95.4% (104/109) and 99% (108/109), respectively, and 92.7% (101/109) and 100% (109/109) for Rater 2. In patients with BMI ≥30, accuracies with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR were 88.1% (37/42) and 90.5% (38/42) for Rater 1 and 78.6% (33/42) and 92.9% (39/42) for Rater 2. The radiation dose delivered by CT to non-obese patients with acute abdominal pain can be safely reduced to levels close to standard radiography using LDCT-MBIR. (orig.)

  12. A rare cause of acute abdominal pain in children: Isolated tubal torsion; a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Dere Gunal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Isolated tubal torsion -a rare cause of acute abdomen in children-is usually difficult to diagnose because of non-specific findings. Surgical salphingectomy is required in delayed diagnosis in most cases. Three sexual inactive adolescents diagnosed in isolated tubal torsion (ITT were discussed for its diagnostic features and surgical management. Laboratory tests and radiological studies including ultrasonography (US, color doppler ultrasound were performed in all patients after evaluation for acute lower abdominal pain in emergency department and they underwent surgical intervention with laparotomy (n:2 and laparoscopy (n:1. One of the patients in this study had salpingectomy. Detorsion of the fallopian tube and cyst excision were performed in the remaining two patients who also had paratubal cysts. There was no recurrence in these patients during the follow-up for 3 and 2 years. The isolated tubal torsion should be kept in mind and early surgical management is essential in order to preserve fallopian tube because of its importance in fertility. Keywords: Fallopian tube, Torsion, Paratubal cyst, Adolescent, Acute abdomen

  13. Coexistence of Helicobacter pylori and Intestinal Parasitosis in Children with Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökşen, Bülent; Appak, Yeliz Çağan; Girginkardeşler, Nogay; Ecemiş, Talat; Kasırga, Erhun

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of coinfection with Helicobacter pylori and intestinal parasitosis in children with chronic abdominal pain (CAP) and to investigate the common risk factors in the development of both infections. Ninety patients with CAP were enrolled in this study. Blood samples of each case were screened for human preformed IgG (HpIgG) antibodies, and stool samples were tested for HpSA and also examined for intestinal parasites by direct wet-mount, formalin-ethyl-acetate concentration, and Trichrome staining procedures. Cellophane tape test was used for Enterobius vermicularis. Children tested positive for HpIgG and/or HpSA were accepted as H. pylori positive. The risk factors were compared with a questionnaire. The incidence of Giardia intestinalis was 14.8% in the H. pylori-positive group and was found to be statistically higher than that in the H. pylori-negative group (1.6%). The positivity rates of H. pylori were found to be statistically higher in children attending school and using drinking water from taps. The incidences of parasitosis were significantly higher in children with a low maternal education level and with a history of parasitosis treatment in the family. The most common etiologies of CAP in children are H. pylori infection and intestinal parasitosis. İmprovement of hygienic conditions would be beneficial in preventing both infections.

  14. Frequency of helicobacter pylori (hp) infection in children with recurrent abdominal pain (rap)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmud, S.; Ali, S.

    2015-01-01

    To study the frequency of Helicobacter Pylori (HP) infection among children with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) Study Design: Cross-sectional comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Military Hospital (MH), Rawalpindi from December 2011 to February 2012. Patients and Methods: One hundred children of either gender aged 2 to 12 years presenting with RAP were tested for HP at Paediatric OPD MH, Rawalpindi who consented to participate in the study. Those children who tested positive for Helicobacter Pylori Stool Antigen Test (HPSAT) were labeled as those having Hp infection. The stool assay was performed using the HpSAT kit and the socio-demographic and clinical profiles of children were associated. Results: Out of 100 children included in the study HpSAT was positive in 38% children. Frequency of Hp infection was significantly associated with source of drinking water (p = 0.014), socioeconomic status (p = 0.001) and positive family history of yspepsia (p= 0.023). While age and gender have no significant association with HP infection. Conclusion: Hp infection is very common in children presenting with RAP in our Paediatric OPD. Children with family history of dyspepsia, from low socioeconomic class and those drinking filtered water are at greater risk for HP infection. It is recommended that children from other populations in our country should also be tested in their medical health facilities in order to have a wider analysis of this problem in our setup. (author)

  15. CT and MR imaging in patients with localized acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prassopoulos, P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Acute abdominal pain (AAP) is one of the most common causes for admissions to emergency departments. Clinical presentation, physical and laboratory examinations are often inconclusive and, therefore, imaging evaluation is required. Ultrasonography is efficient in the evaluation of gallbladder and gynecologic conditions and it is considered the first-line examination in many centres. Plain radiography and barium studies are often falsely normal or non-specific, especially in the most common conditions related with rightsided AAP and their use has significantly decreased. CT is a rapid and accurate imaging modality in the diagnosis of common (appendicitis, acute cholecystitis, biliary obstruction, duodenal ulcer perforation) or uncommon (mesenteric adenitis, liver abscess, cholangitis etc) conditions associated with right-sided AAP. CT may demonstrate a number of either specific or sensitive imaging findings for the confident diagnosis of diseases manifested with AAP. Moreover, CT has the advantage to suggest alternative diagnoses, if the suspected clinical diagnosis is unconfirmed. Different examination protocols and different strategies for the application of oral-rectal-intravenous contrast agents have been proposed to balance diagnostic accuracy to time effectiveness and radiation dose. MRI is suggested for AAP related to biliary abnormalities or to gynecologic diseases and it may be used as a complementary examination in pregnant patients. Imaging evaluation is an indispensable part in the diagnostic work up of most patients with AAP. CT has gained widespread acceptance, as offering more accurate and confident diagnosis and its use has changed management of the patients in 28-60% of the cases

  16. A case of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation identified by investigating the cause of upper abdominal pain associated with acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kohei; Monden, Kazuteru; Ueki, Toru; Tatsukawa, Masashi; Sadamori, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Kousaku; Takakura, Norihisa

    2016-07-01

    A man in his 60s with epigastric pain was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis and subsequently recovered following conservative treatment. However, because of repeated upper abdominal pain and the formation of a pancreatic pseudocyst, he was transferred to our institution for evaluation. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) scanning confirmed abnormal vessels in the tail of the pancreas and early venous return to the splenic vein in the early arterial phase. Abdominal angiography revealed a racemose vascular network in the tail of the pancreas, confirming the presence of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in this region. This AVM was thought to be the cause of the acute pancreatitis, so a distal pancreatectomy was performed. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and there has been no recurrence at the 7-month postoperative follow-up. Surgical resection has a low recurrence rate and good outcome;thus, if a pancreatic AVM appears difficult to treat with conservative medical therapy, surgical resection appears to be the definitive treatment.

  17. Pain perception during esophageal warming due to radiofrequency catheter ablation in the left atrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, Marco; Ficili, Sabina; Dottori, Serena; Elian, Mohamed Abdelkader; Pasceri, Vincenzo; Venditti, Franco; Russo, Maurizio; Lavalle, Carlo; Pandozi, Angela; Pandozi, Claudio; Santini, Massimo

    2010-03-01

    We investigated the relationship among esophageal warming, pain perception, and the site of radiofrequency (RF) delivery in the left atrium (LA) during the course of catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation. Such a procedure in awake patients is often linked to the development of visceral pain and esophageal warming. As a consequence, potentially dangerous complications have been described. Twenty patients undergoing RF ablation in the LA were studied. An esophageal probe (EP) capable of measuring endoesophageal temperature (ET) was positioned before starting the procedure. The relative position of the EP and the tip of the ablator were evaluated through fluoroscopy imaging before starting each RF delivery, during which the highest value of the temperature was collected. After RF withdrawal, the patients were asked to define the intensity of the experienced pain by using a score index ranging from 0 (no pain) to 4 (pain requiring immediate RF interruption). The mean ET value during ablation was 39.59 +/- 4.71 degrees C. The EP proximity to the ablator's tip showed a high correlation with the development of the highest ET values (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient r = 0.49, confidence interval (CI) 0.55-0.41). Moreover, the highest values of pain intensity were reported when the RF was delivered to the atrial zones close to the EP projection (r = 0.50, CI 0.55-0.42) and when the highest ET levels were reached (r = 0.38, CI 0.30-0.45). Pain perception in LA ablation is significantly related to esophageal warming and is higher when the RF is delivered near the esophagus. It seems advisable to perform ET monitoring in sedated patients to avoid short- and long-term jeopardizing of the esophageal wall.

  18. The value of pancreatic stone protein in predicting acute appendicitis in patients presenting at the emergency department with abdominal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Tschuor, Christoph; Raptis, Dimitri Aristotle; Limani, Përparim; Bächler, Thomas; Oberkofler, Christian Eugen; Breitenstein, Stefan; Graf, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Pancreatic Stone Protein (PSP) is a protein naturally produced mainly in the pancreas and the gut. There is evidence from experimental and clinical trials that blood PSP levels rise in the presence of inflammation or infection. However, it is not known whether PSP is superior to other established blood tests (e.g. White Blood Count, Neutrophils or C - reactive protein) in predicting appendicitis in patients presenting with abdominal pain and a clinical suspicion of appendi...

  19. Effect of head and limb orientation on trunk muscle activation during abdominal hollowing in chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Parfrey, Kevin; Gibbons, Sean GT; Drinkwater, Eric J; Behm, David G

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP) have altered activations patterns of the anterior trunk musculature when performing the abdominal hollowing manœuvre (attempt to pull umbilicus inward and upward towards the spine). There is a subgroup of individuals with CLBP who have high neurocognitive and sensory motor deficits with associated primitive reflexes (PR). The objective of the study was to determine if orienting the head and extremities to positions, which mimic PR patte...

  20. A preliminary study of treating intractable abdominal pain caused by cancer through neurolytic celiac plexus block guided by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jun; Nian Dingfang; Cao Qingxuan; Li Wenhua; Huang Xianglong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of neurolytic cliac plexus block (NCPB), and to analyze the factors related to the degree of pain relief. Methods: Eight cases of the abdominal cancer with intractable pain from 7 days to 20 days, were treated by NCPB. During NCPB,10 ml or 15 ml, dehydrated alcohol was injected bilaterally for the former and unilateral for the latter. The results of pain relief were classified into four score-grade. The spread of alcohol was observed through CT scanning. Results: During the follow-up of 1W, 1M, 2M, 3M, 4M, 5M, 6M, the cases of pain relief ( ≥2 cases) were 7,7, 6, 5, 4, 3 and 3 cases respectively. With CT scanning, 7 cases showed the satisfactory spread of alcohol except 1 case which was not properly distributed. No severe complication occurred. Conclusions: NCPB guided by CT is an effective and safe method for treating intractable abdominal cancer pain

  1. A comparison of the accuracy of ultrasound and computed tomography in common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randen, Adrienne van; Stoker, Jaap; Lameris, Wytze; Boermeester, Marja A.; Es, H.W. van; Heesewijk, Hans P.M. van; Ramshorst, Bert van; Hove, Wim ten; Bouma, Willem H.; Leeuwen, Maarten S. van; Keulen, Esteban M. van; Bossuyt, Patrick M.

    2011-01-01

    Head-to-head comparison of ultrasound and CT accuracy in common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain. Consecutive patients with abdominal pain for >2 h and <5 days referred for imaging underwent both US and CT by different radiologists/radiological residents. An expert panel assigned a final diagnosis. Ultrasound and CT sensitivity and predictive values were calculated for frequent final diagnoses. Effect of patient characteristics and observer experience on ultrasound sensitivity was studied. Frequent final diagnoses in the 1,021 patients (mean age 47; 55% female) were appendicitis (284; 28%), diverticulitis (118; 12%) and cholecystitis (52; 5%). The sensitivity of CT in detecting appendicitis and diverticulitis was significantly higher than that of ultrasound: 94% versus 76% (p < 0.01) and 81% versus 61% (p = 0.048), respectively. For cholecystitis, the sensitivity of both was 73% (p = 1.00). Positive predictive values did not differ significantly between ultrasound and CT for these conditions. Ultrasound sensitivity in detecting appendicitis and diverticulitis was not significantly negatively affected by patient characteristics or reader experience. CT misses fewer cases than ultrasound, but both ultrasound and CT can reliably detect common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain. Ultrasound sensitivity was largely not influenced by patient characteristics and reader experience. (orig.)

  2. A comparison of the accuracy of ultrasound and computed tomography in common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randen, Adrienne van; Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (suite G1-227), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lameris, Wytze; Boermeester, Marja A. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Es, H.W. van; Heesewijk, Hans P.M. van [St Antonius Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Ramshorst, Bert van [St Antonius Hospital, Department of Surgery, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Hove, Wim ten [Gelre Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Bouma, Willem H. [Gelre Hospitals, Department of Surgery, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Leeuwen, Maarten S. van [University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Keulen, Esteban M. van [Tergooi Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Hilversum (Netherlands); Bossuyt, Patrick M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Bioinformatics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-07-15

    Head-to-head comparison of ultrasound and CT accuracy in common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain. Consecutive patients with abdominal pain for >2 h and <5 days referred for imaging underwent both US and CT by different radiologists/radiological residents. An expert panel assigned a final diagnosis. Ultrasound and CT sensitivity and predictive values were calculated for frequent final diagnoses. Effect of patient characteristics and observer experience on ultrasound sensitivity was studied. Frequent final diagnoses in the 1,021 patients (mean age 47; 55% female) were appendicitis (284; 28%), diverticulitis (118; 12%) and cholecystitis (52; 5%). The sensitivity of CT in detecting appendicitis and diverticulitis was significantly higher than that of ultrasound: 94% versus 76% (p < 0.01) and 81% versus 61% (p = 0.048), respectively. For cholecystitis, the sensitivity of both was 73% (p = 1.00). Positive predictive values did not differ significantly between ultrasound and CT for these conditions. Ultrasound sensitivity in detecting appendicitis and diverticulitis was not significantly negatively affected by patient characteristics or reader experience. CT misses fewer cases than ultrasound, but both ultrasound and CT can reliably detect common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain. Ultrasound sensitivity was largely not influenced by patient characteristics and reader experience. (orig.)

  3. Undiagnosed pancreatic exocrine insufficiency and chronic pancreatitis in functional GI disorder patients with diarrhea or abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Nicholas J; Holtmann, Gerald; Nguyen, Quoc Nam; Gibson, Peter; Bampton, Peter; Veysey, Martin; Wong, James; Philcox, Stephen; Koloski, Natasha; Bunby, Lisa; Jones, Michael

    2017-11-01

    A previous UK study showed that 6.1% of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) had evidence of severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI), but these findings need replication. We aimed to identify the prevalence of PEI based on fecal elastase stool testing in consecutive outpatients presenting with chronic unexplained abdominal pain and/or diarrhea and/or IBS-D. Patients aged over 40 years presenting to hospital outpatient clinics from six sites within Australia with unexplained abdominal pain and/or diarrhea for at least 3 months and/or IBS-D were studied. Patients completed validated questionnaires and donated a stool sample in which elastase concentration was measured by ELISA. A concentration of chronic pancreatitis. One in 50 patients with IBS-D or otherwise unexplained abdominal pain or diarrhea have an abnormal fecal elastase, but unexpected pancreatic insufficiency was detected in only a minority of these. This study failed to confirm the high prevalence of PEI among patients with unexplained GI symptoms previously reported. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Effect of flurbiprofen axetil pretreatment on the pain degree as well as stress hormone and mediator secretion after abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of flurbiprofen axetil pretreatment on the pain degree as well as stress hormone and mediator secretion after abdominal surgery. Methods: Patients undergoing abdominal surgery in our hospital between May 2015 and March 2017 were selected and randomly divided into two groups, intervention group received flurbiprofen axetil pretreatment combined with routine intravenous anesthesia, and the control group only accepted conventional intravenous anesthesia. The levels of pain neurotransmitters and cytokines, stress hormones and mediators in serum were detected before operation as well as 12 h and 24 h after operation. Results: 12 h and 24 h after operation, serum NPY, SP, Glu, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6, IL- 10, ACTH, Cor, Ins, NE and E levels of both groups of patients were significantly higher than those before operation while SOD, GHS-Px and HO-1 levels were significantly lower than those before operation, and serum NPY, SP, Glu, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, ACTH, Cor, Ins, NE and E levels of intervention group 12 h and 24 h after operation were significantly lower than those of control group while SOD, GHS-Px and HO-1 levels were significantly higher than those of control group. Conclusion: Flurbiprofen axetil pretreatment can reduce the pain degree and stress response after abdominal surgery.

  5. Diagnóstico pouco frequente de dor abdominal em unidade de emergência infantil Unusual diagnosis of abdominal pain in pediatric emergency unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suelen Bianca S. Martins

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relatar um caso de doença péptica na infância em escolar, com queixa inicial de dor abdominal aguda e palidez. DESCRIÇÃO DO CASO: Escolar de nove anos procurou pronto-socorro infantil com queixa de dor abdominal súbita e palidez. Não apresentava outros sintomas ou sinais ao exame físico além de mucosas descoradas e hemograma com nível baixo de hemoglobina. Durante a observação intra-hospitalar, apresentou episódio de melena. Foi realizada endoscopia digestiva alta, sendo observadas gastrite erosiva de antro e úlcera duodenal, com Helicobacter pylori positivo. O paciente foi tratado com esquema tríplice (inibidor de bomba de prótons e dois antimicrobianos por uma semana e, posteriormente, acompanhado ambulatorialmente. COMENTÁRIOS: O caso em questão descreve uma doença rara em unidade de emergência pediátrica. O paciente referia dor abdominal e observou-se palidez confirmada por baixo nível de hemoglobina, que se manteve nos exames subsequentes durante a observação no pronto-socorro infantil, dificultando o diagnóstico de sangramento ativo. Porém, a presença de melena na evolução facilitou e propiciou a condução do caso para se chegar à hipótese de sangramento digestivo alto. Realizada endoscopia digestiva alta, que confirmou o diagnóstico de gastrite erosiva de antro e úlcera duodenal H. pylori positiva, sendo, então, necessário tratamento específico, inclusive para erradicação da bactéria.OBJECTIVE: To report a case of peptic disease in a school child whose first symptoms were acute abdominal pain and paleness. CASE DESCRIPTION: A nine-year-old school child presented to a pediatric emergency unit with acute abdominal pain and sudden pallor. There were no other symptoms or signs on physical examination, except for discolored mucous and a low hemoglobin level. During hospital observation he presented one episode of melena. The esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed erosive antrum gastritis and

  6. Comparison of Abdominal Muscles Thickness Changes Different Postures beween Non-Specific Chronic Low Back Pain Patients and Healthy Males by Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Rasouli

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion: Abdominal muscles respond to postural changes and these muscles are automatically targeted by decreasing the seated stability. In non–specific chronic low back pain patients, activity of Transvers Abdominis was decreased and activity of Rectus Abdominis was increased.

  7. Diagnostic yield and clinical impact of wireless capsule endoscopy in patients with chronic abdominal pain with or without diarrhea: a Greek multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsinelos, Panagiotis; Fasoulas, Kostas; Beltsis, Athanasios; Chatzimavroudis, Grigoris; Paroutoglou, George; Maris, Theofanis; Mimidis, Kostas; Koufokotsios, Alexandros; Terzoudis, Sotiris; Atmatzidis, Stefanos; Kaltsa, Agoritsa; Kapetanos, Dimitris; Kamperis, Eustathios; Zavos, Christos; Kountouras, Jannis; Belou, Aristea

    2011-10-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy has become the gold standard for the examination of small bowel. However, its role in the evaluation of patients suffering from chronic abdominal pain is not yet clearly defined. We conducted an open-label prospective multi-center study to evaluate the yield and clinical outcome of capsule endoscopy in patients with chronic abdominal pain with/without diarrhea. Seventy-two patients with chronic (>3months) abdominal pain with/without diarrhea in whom the underlying pathology could not be diagnosed by conventional modalities, underwent capsule endoscopy in either of the 6 participating centers. Patients were then followed up for clinical outcomes. The overall diagnostic yield of capsule endoscopy was 44.4%. More specifically, its diagnostic yield was 21.4% in patients with abdominal pain and negative inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate), 66.7% in patients with abdominal pain and positive inflammatory markers, 0% in patients with abdominal pain, diarrhea and negative inflammatory markers, and 90.1% in patients with abdominal pain, diarrhea and positive inflammatory markers. Both univariate and multivariate regression analyses showed that abnormal C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were significant factors related with positive capsule endoscopy findings. Chronic abdominal pain with/without diarrhea should be accompanied by elevated inflammatory markers to be regarded as a valid indication for capsule endoscopy. The yield of capsule endoscopy in such patients is reasonably high and clinical outcomes of patients treated with capsule endoscopy findings as a guide are significant. Copyright © 2011 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Concordance Between Mothers’ and Children’s Reports of Somatic and Emotional Symptoms in Patients with Recurrent Abdominal Pain or Emotional Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Garber, Judy; Van Slyke, Deborah A.; Walker, Lynn S.

    1998-01-01

    Mother-child concordance regarding children’s somatic and emotional symptoms was assessed in children with recurrent abdominal pain (n = 88), emotional disorders (n = 51), and well children (n = 56). Children between 6 and 18 years of age and their mothers completed questionnaires assessing the children’s somatic symptoms, functional disability, and depression. Mothers of children with recurrent abdominal pain reported more child somatic and depressive symptoms than did their children, and mo...

  9. The prevalence of recurrent abdominal pain and some relative factors among children beginning primary school in Bushehr port

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Pouladfar

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP is a common problem in children and adolescence. The functional abdominal pain is the most common cause of RAP. The conceptual models of RAP are multivariate and acknowledge the contributions of a variety of biological, psychological, and social factors. Among the 6-7 year-old population of Bushehr port, 485 (50.1% male, 49.9%female children starting primary school were randomly selected. Questionnaires were completed by direct interview during the National Program of Health Surveillance of Schoolchildren in 2000. According to Apley's criteria, 49 children had RAP (9.1% male and 11.2% female. Abdominal pain pattern such as frequency, duration, location, radiation, associated symptoms was relatively similar to other investigations. The signs of environmental reinforcement of pain behavior such as specific attention and medication at time of pain were commonly observed (32.6% and 71.4%, respectively. Prolonged duration of involvement (73.5%, more than one year and frequent referral to physician (30.6%, at least three referral were detected. Some psychosocial stress such as father unemployment and history of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS in parents were significantly more frequent in RAP group (p values= 0.038 and 0.01, respectively. History of RAP in siblings and appendectomy, peptic disease and migraine were mildly more frequent in RAP group. Separation of one of the parents, change of address, parent education and mother employment, sibling number and order and weight and height had not significant differences between two groups. Among 22 patients, giardia cyst was detected in the stool of 4 patients (18.2 %. In conclusion, RAP is a common problem in Bushehr port and its pattern was relatively similar to other regions. The father unemployment and the history of IBS in parents, two psychosocial stresses, were associated with RAP.

  10. The effect of core stability and general exercise on abdominal muscle thickness in non-specific chronic low back pain using ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi, MohammadBagher; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Jamshidi, Aliashraf; Zarabi, Vida; Pourahmadi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-05-01

    There is a controversy regarding whether core stability exercise (CSE) is more effective than general exercise (GE) for chronic LBP. To compare different exercises regarding their effect on improving back strength and stability, performance of abdominal muscles is a useful index. Ultrasound imaging for measuring muscle thickness could be used to assess muscle performance. The aim of this study was to compare CSE and GE in chronic LBP using ultrasound imaging for measurement of thickness of the deep stabilizing and main global trunk muscles in non-specific chronic LBP. Each program included 16 training sessions three times a week. Using ultrasound imaging, four transabdominal muscle thickness were measured before and after the intervention. Disability and pain were measured as secondary outcomes. After the intervention on participants (n = 43), a significant increase in muscle thickness (hypertrophy) was seen only in right and left rectus abdominis in the GE group, but significant difference to the CSE group was only on the right side. Disability and pain reduced within the groups without a significant difference in the change between them. The present results provided evidence that only GE increased right and left rectus muscle thickness. The only significant difference between CSE and GE groups was the right rectus thickness. As rectus is a global muscle, the effect of GE on strength improvement (one side stronger than the other) may have a negative effect on motor control of lumbopelvic muscles and possibly increase the risk of back pain occurring or becoming worse, though this was not observed in the present study.

  11. Changes in recruitment of the abdominal muscles in people with low back pain: ultrasound measurement of muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Paulo H; Ferreira, Manuela L; Hodges, Paul W

    2004-11-15

    Ultrasound and electromyographic (EMG) measures of trunk muscle activity were compared between low back pain (LBP) and control subjects in a cross-sectional study. To compare the recruitment of the abdominal muscles (measured as a change in thickness with ultrasound imaging) between people with and without low back pain and to compare these measurements with EMG recordings made with intramuscular electrodes. Although ultrasonography has been advocated as a noninvasive measure of abdominal muscle activity, it is not known whether it can provide a valid measure of changes in motor control of the abdominal muscles in LBP. Ten subjects with recurrent LBP and 10 matched controls were tested during isometric low load tasks with their limbs suspended. Changes in thickness from resting baseline values were obtained for transversus abdominis (TrA), obliquus internus (OI), and obliquus externus (OE) using ultrasonography. Fine wire EMG was measured concurrently. Study participants with LBP had a significantly smaller increase in TrA thickness with isometric leg tasks compared with controls. No difference was found between groups for OI or OE. Similar results were found for EMG. People with LBP had less TrA EMG activity with leg tasks, and there was no difference between groups for EMG activity for OI or OE. This study reinforces evidence for changes in automatic control of TrA in people with LBP. Furthermore, the data establish a new test of recruitment of the abdominal muscles in people with LBP. This test presents a feasible noninvasive test of automatic recruitment of the abdominal muscles.

  12. Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and a placebo both significantly reduced symptoms in children with functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragkoudaki, M; Chouliaras, G; Orel, R; Horvath, A; Szajewska, H; Papadopoulou, A

    2017-11-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri is a Gram-positive bacterium that naturally inhabits the human intestinal tract. This study assessed how effectively the probiotic L. reuteri DSM 17938 managed childhood functional abdominal pain (FAP). We recruited 54 children with a mean age 9.1 ± 3.8 years, who were diagnosed with FAP in the outpatient clinics of three university hospitals in Greece, Slovenia and Poland, according to the Rome III criteria, from January 2013 to December 2015. They were randomly assigned to receive either 2 × 10 8 colony-forming units of L. reuteri (n = 27) or a placebo (n = 27) for four weeks. Both L. reuteri and the placebo significantly reduced the frequency and intensity of abdominal pain episodes at four and eight weeks compared to baseline (all p L. reuteri decreased the use of pain relieving drugs at four weeks and the number of child school and adult work absences at four and eight weeks, unlike the placebo, which achieved nonsignificant results. However, the difference between the groups did not reach significance. No side effects were recorded. Both L. reuteri and the placebo were effective in alleviating pain in children with FAP, but only L. reuteri improved the child's and family's normal activities. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Spontaneous splenic rupture and Anisakis appendicitis presenting as abdominal pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle Joaquín

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Anisakidosis, human infection with nematodes of the family Anisakidae, is caused most commonly by Anisakis simplex. Acquired by the consumption of raw or undercooked marine fish or squid, anisakidosis occurs where such dietary customs are practiced, including Japan, the coastal regions of Europe and the United States. Rupture of the spleen is a relatively common complication of trauma and many systemic disorders affecting the reticuloendothelial system, including infections and neoplasias. A rare subtype of rupture occurring spontaneously and arising from a normal spleen has been recognized as a distinct clinicopathologic entity. Herein we discuss the case of a woman who presented to our institution with appendicitis secondary to Anisakis and spontaneous spleen rupture. Case presentation We report the case of a 53-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with hemorrhagic shock and abdominal pain and was subsequently found to have spontaneous spleen rupture and appendicitis secondary to Anisakis simplex. She underwent open surgical resection of the splenic rupture and the appendicitis without any significant postoperative complications. Histopathologic examination revealed appendicitis secondary to Anisakis simplex and splenic rupture of undetermined etiology. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first of a woman with the diagnosis of spontaneous spleen rupture and appendicitis secondary to Anisakis simplex. Digestive anisakiasis may present as an acute abdomen. Emergency physicians should know and consider this diagnosis in patients with ileitis or colitis, especially if an antecedent of raw or undercooked fish ingestion is present. Spontaneous rupture of the spleen is an extremely rare event. Increased awareness of this condition will enhance early diagnosis and effective treatment. Further research is required to identify the possible risk factors associated with spontaneous rupture of the spleen.

  14. Pregabalin and dexamethasone in combination with paracetamol for postoperative pain control after abdominal hysterectomy. A randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M L; Dierking, G; Lech, K

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multimodal analgesia may be important for optimal postoperative pain treatment and facilitation of early mobilization and recovery. We investigated the analgesic effect of pregabalin and dexamethasone in combination with paracetamol after abdominal hysterectomy. METHODS: One hundred...... and sixteen patients were randomly assigned to either group A (paracetamol+placebo x 2), group B (paracetamol+pregabalin+placebo) or group C (paracetamol+pregabalin+dexamethasone). According to randomization and preoperatively, patients received paracetamol 1000 mg, pregabalin 300 mg, dexamethasone 8 mg...... or placebo. General anaesthesia was performed. Postoperative pain treatment was paracetamol 1000 mg x 4 and patient-controlled intravenous morphine, 2.5 mg bolus. Nausea was treated with ondansetron. Morphine consumption, pain score (visual analogue scale) at rest and during mobilization, nausea, sedation...

  15. [Efficiency of bupivacaine and association with dexmedetomidine in transversus abdominis plane block ultrasound guided in postoperative pain of abdominal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Recep; Patmano, Gülçin; Biçer, Cihangir; Emek, Ertan; Çoruh, Aliye Esmaoğlu

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine added to bupivacaine used in tranversus abdominis plane (TAP) block on postoperative pain and patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Patients submitted to lower abdominal surgery were enrolled in the study. After anesthesia induction, ultrasound guided TAP block was performed. TAP block was obtained with 21mL 0.9% saline in Group C (n=31), 20mL 0.5% bupivacaine+1mL saline in Group B (n=31), and 20mL 0.5% bupivacaine+1mL dexmedetomidine (100μg) in Group BD (n=31). Visual analog scale scores were lower in Group BD compared to Group C, at all time points (p0.05). The addition of dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine on TAP block decreased postoperative pain scores and morphine consumption; it also increased patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Dexmedetomidine did not have any effect on nausea and vomiting score and antiemetic requirement. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Efficiency of bupivacaine and association with dexmedetomidine in transversus abdominis plane block ultrasound guided in postoperative pain of abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Aksu

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives We aimed to evaluate the effect of bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine added to bupivacaine used in tranversus abdominis plane (TAP block on postoperative pain and patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Methods Patients submitted to lower abdominal surgery were enrolled in the study. After anesthesia induction, ultrasound guided TAP block was performed. TAP block was obtained with 21 mL 0.9% saline in Group C (n = 31, 20 mL 0.5% bupivacaine + 1 mL saline in Group B (n = 31, and 20 mL 0.5% bupivacaine + 1 mL dexmedetomidine (100 µg in Group BD (n = 31. Results Visual analog scale scores were lower in Group BD compared to Group C, at all time points (p 0.05. Conclusions The addition of dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine on TAP block decreased postoperative pain scores and morphine consumption; it also increased patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Dexmedetomidine did not have any effect on nausea and vomiting score and antiemetic requirement.

  17. Midgut malrotation presenting with left-sided acute appendicitis and CT inversion sign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çağlar, Emrah; Arıbaş, Bilgin; Tiken, Ramazan; Keskin, Suat

    2014-01-01

    In patients presenting with abdominal pain, appendicitis is the most common surgical disorder. Appendicitis causing pain in the left lower quadrant is extremely rare and can occur with congenital abnormalities that include true left-sided appendix or as an atypical presentation of right-sided long appendix, which projects into the left lower quadrant. We report a case of a 69-year-old man showing midgut malrotation with acute appendicitis presenting as left lower quadrant abdominal pain. PMID:24682135

  18. Chronic abdominal pain after ventral hernia due to mesh migration and erosion into the sigmoid colon from a distant site: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millas, S G; Mesar, T; Patel, R J

    2015-10-01

    Hernia repair is one of the most commonly performed procedures in general surgery. Use of mesh has been shown to decrease the overall recurrence rate. Mesh implantation, however, carries its own risks and complications. We report a case of a 41-year-old female who presented with nonspecific, chronic lower abdominal pain after ventral hernia repair with mesh implantation. The chronic pain was found to be the consequence of mesh migration and erosion into the sigmoid colon from a previous supraumbilical hernia repair. Hernia repair, use of mesh, and chronic abdominal pain are discussed.

  19. Diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced MR for acute appendicitis and alternative causes of abdominal pain in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koning, Jeffrey L. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Rady Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Unenhanced MRI has emerged as a useful tool for diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis. The use of contrast-enhanced MRI for diagnosing pediatric appendicitis has not been documented. The purpose of this study is to examine the diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced MRI for acute appendicitis and alternative entities in the pediatric population presenting with acute abdominal pain. A retrospective review was conducted of 364 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing contrast-enhanced MRI for the evaluation of possible appendicitis at a single institution between November 2012 and September 2013. There were 132 cases of pathologically confirmed appendicitis out of 364 pediatric patients (36.3%) included in the study. Overall sensitivity and specificity were 96.2% (95% CI [91.4-98.4%]) and 95.7% (95% CI [92.3-97.6%]), respectively. Positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 92.7% (95% CI [86.6-96.3%]) and 97.8% (95% CI [94.7-99.1%]), respectively. The appendix was visualized in 243 cases (66.8%). Imaging confirmed alternative diagnoses in 75 patients, including most commonly colitis, enteritis or terminal ileitis (n = 25, 6.9%), adnexal cysts (n = 25, 6.9%) and mesenteric adenitis (n = 7, 1.9%). Contrast-enhanced MRI is capable of accurately diagnosing acute appendicitis while detecting many alternative entities of abdominal pain, and it allows good visualization of the appendix. Further evaluation is needed to determine whether contrast-enhanced MRI provides an advantage over non-enhanced MRI for imaging evaluation of acute abdominal pain in the pediatric population. (orig.)

  20. Effectiveness of Massage Therapy and Abdominal Hypopressive Gymnastics in Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bellido-Fernández

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are a great number of interventions in physiotherapy, but with little evidence of their effectiveness in chronic low back pain. Therefore, this study assesses effectiveness of Massage Therapy and Abdominal Hypopressive Gymnastics and the combination of both to decrease pain and lumbar disability while increasing joint mobility and quality of life in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Methods. A randomized, single-blinded, controlled, clinical trial with sample (n=27 was comprised of patients between 20 and 65 years, diagnosed with pain of mechanical origin characterized by having a duration of at least 12 weeks and no serious complications. Each group received 8 interventions of 30 minutes. Results. Friedman ANOVA test obtained statistically significant differences of Oswestry, NRS, and Schober variables (p<0.05 in the three measurements (pretest, posttest 1, and posttest 2, in each individual group. ANOVA Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison between groups, and Oswestry Disability values were significantly higher (p=0.024 in the group receiving both treatments. Conclusion. Both individual groups reduce pain levels, improve disability, and increase the flexibility of the lumbar spine. The combination therapy provides greater benefits in terms of lumbar disability. This study is registered on March 8, 2016, with NCT02721914.

  1. Acute Renal Infarction Presenting with Acute Abdominal Pain Secondary to Newly Discovered Atrial Fibrillation: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif Ali Eltawansy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an 85-year-old female with known history of recurrent diverticulitis presented with abdominal pain. It was believed that the patient again needed to be treated for another diverticulitis and was started on the routine treatment. The initial CT scan of abdomen showed renal infarcts bilaterally that were confirmed by a CT with and without intravenous contrast secondary to unknown cause. An ECG found accidentally that the patient was in atrial fibrillation, which was the attributed factor to the renal infarctions. Subsequently, the patient was started on the appropriate anticoagulation and discharged.

  2. Use of Physician-in-Triage Model in the Management of Abdominal Pain in an Emergency Department Observation Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, John R; Katzer, Robert; Lotfipour, Shahram; Chakravarthy, Bharath; Shastry, Siri; Andrusaitis, Jessica; Anderson, Craig L; Barton, Erik D

    2017-02-01

    Given the nationwide increase in emergency department (ED) visits it is of paramount importance for hospitals to find efficient ways to manage patient flow. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a significant difference in success rates, length of stay (LOS), and other demographic factors in two cohorts of patients admitted directly to an ED observation unit (EDOU) under an abdominal pain protocol by a physician in triage (bypassing the main ED) versus those admitted via the traditional pathway (evaluated and treated in the main ED prior to EDOU admission). This was a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted to a protocol-driven EDOU with a diagnosis of abdominal pain in a single university hospital center ED. We obtained compiled data for all patients admitted to the EDOU with a diagnosis of abdominal pain that met EDOU protocol admission criteria. We divided data for each cohort into age, gender, payer status, and LOS. The data were then analyzed to assess any significant differences between the cohorts. A total of 327 patients were eligible for this study (85 triage group, 242 main ED group). The total success rate was 90.8% (n=297) and failure rate was 9.2% (n=30). We observed no significant differences in success rates between those dispositioned to the EDOU by triage physicians (90.6%) and those via the traditional route (90.5 % p) = 0.98. However, we found a significant difference between the two groups regarding total LOS with significantly shorter main ED times and EDOU times among patients sent to the EDOU by the physician-in-triage group (ptriage or via the traditional route. However, there were statistically significant shorter LOSs in patients admitted to the EDOU by triage physicians. The data from this study support the implementation of a physician-in-triage model in combination with the EDOU in improving efficiency in the treatment of abdominal pain. This knowledge may spur action to cut healthcare costs and improve

  3. Correlation among academic performance, recurrent abdominal pain and other factors in Year-6 urban primary-school children in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boey, C C M; Omar, A; Arul Phillips, J

    2003-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the extent to which recurrent abdominal pain and other factors were associated with academic achievement among Year-6 (12 years of age) schoolchildren. The present study was a cross-sectional survey conducted from September to November 2001. Schoolchildren were recruited from primary schools that were selected randomly from a list of all primary schools in Petaling Jaya, Malaysia, using random sampling numbers. Information concerning recurrent abdominal pain, socio-economic status, life events, demographic and other details was obtained using a combination of questionnaires and interviews. Academic achievement was assessed using a score based on the Malaysian Primary School Achievement Examination. An overall score at or above the mean was taken to indicate high academic achievement while a score below the mean indicated poor academic achievement. A total of 1971 children were studied (958 boys and 1013 girls: 1047 Malays, 513 Chinese and 411 Indians). Of these children, 456 (23.1%) fulfilled the criteria for recurrent abdominal pain. Using the method of binary logistic regression analysis, the following factors were found to be independently associated with poor academic performance: a low socio-economic status (odds ratio (OR) 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.25-1.35); male sex (OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.26-2.05); the death of a close relative (OR 2.22; 95% CI 1.73-2.85); the divorce or separation of parents (OR 3.05; 95% CI 1.73-5.40); the commencement of work by the mother (OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.02-1.76); hospitalization of the child in the 12 months prior to the study (OR 1.83; 95% CI 1.12-3.01); lack of health-care consultation (OR 1.80; 95% CI 1.36-2.36); missing breakfast (OR 1.47; 95% CI 1.07-2.02); and lack of kindergarten education (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.04-1.75). Many factors, such as socio-economic status and recent life events, were associated with poor academic performance. Recurrent abdominal pain did not correlate

  4. Endometriosis in a Man as a Rare Source of Abdominal Pain: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Rei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis occurs when a tissue resembling endometrial glands and stroma grows in ectopic sites, commonly causing infertility and pain. This condition is most often seen in women of reproductive age, involving pelvic sites such as the ovaries, broad ligaments, uterosacral ligaments, and posterior cul-de-sac. Very rarely, endometriosis has also been found in the lower genitourinary tract of men. A 40-year-old man presented to his primary care physician with abdominal pain. Further imaging discovered a midline mass. Surgical removal of the mass and histological investigations led to the diagnosis of endometriosis. There are multiple theories on the etiology of both female and male endometriosis. The prevailing risk factor proposed in previous cases of male endometriosis is prolonged exposure to estrogen therapy. Should endometriosis become symptomatic, cessation of estrogen therapy and careful surgical intervention may successfully relieve the associated symptoms.

  5. Associations between low back pain, urinary incontinence, and abdominal muscle recruitment as assessed via ultrasonography in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Vânia F; Amorim, Juleimar S C; Pereira, Aline M; Ferreira, Paulo H; Pereira, Leani S M

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) and urinary incontinence (UI) are highly prevalent among elderly individuals. In young adults, changes in trunk muscle recruitment, as assessed via ultrasound imaging, may be associated with lumbar spine stability. To assess the associations between LBP, UI, and the pattern of transversus abdominis (TrA), internal (IO), and external oblique (EO) muscle recruitment in the elderly as evaluated by ultrasound imaging. Fifty-four elderly individuals (mean age: 72±5.2 years) who complained of LBP and/or UI as assessed by the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form, and ultrasound imaging were included in the study. The statistical analysis comprised a multiple linear regression model, and a p-value ultrasound imaging-based studies to measure abdominal muscle recruitment in the elderly.

  6. Comparison of the Effects of pH-Dependent Peppermint Oil and Synbiotic Lactol (Bacillus coagulans + Fructooligosaccharides) on Childhood Functional Abdominal Pain: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgarshirazi, Masoumeh; Shariat, Mamak; Dalili, Hosein

    2015-04-01

    Still there is no consensus on the best treatment for abdominal pain-related functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (FGIDs). The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a synbiotic Lactol (Bacillus coagulans + fructooligosaccharide (FOS)), peppermint oil (Colpermin) and placebo (folic acid) on abdominal pain-related FGIDs except for abdominal migraine. This placebo-controlled study was conducted on 120 children aged 4 - 13 years to compare the efficacy of pH-dependent peppermint oil (Colpermin) versus synbiotic Lactol (Bacillus coagulans + fructooligosaccharids (FOS)) in decreasing duration, severity and frequency of functional abdominal pain. The patients were randomly allocated into three equal groups (n = 40 in each group) and each group received Colpermin or Lactol or placebo. Eighty-eight out of 120 enrolled patients completed a one-month protocol and analyses were performed on 88 patients' data. Analyses showed that improvement in pain duration, frequency and severity in the Colpermin group was better than the placebo group (P = 0.0001, P = 0.0001 and P = 0.001, respectively). Moreover, pain duration and frequency were decreased in the Lactol group more than the placebo (P = 0.012 and P = 0.0001, respectively), but changes in pain severity were not significant (P = 0.373). Colpermin was superior to Lactol in decreasing pain duration and severity (P = 0.040 and P = 0.013, respectively). No known side effects or intolerance were seen with Colpermin or Lactol. The pH-dependent peppermint oil capsule and Lactol tablet (Bacillus coagulans+ FOS) as synbiotics seem to be superior to placebo in decreasing the severity, duration and frequency of pain in abdominal pain-related functional GI disorders.

  7. [Spasmodic left waist pain in a six years old child--cat scratch disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkai, Galia; Gutman, Gabriel; Sherr-Lurie, Nir; Hoffmann, Chen; Schpirer, Zvi

    2012-08-01

    Cat scratch disease is caused by Bartonella henselae, a bacterium transmitted to humans from cats through a scratch or by fleas. In 90% of cases, the clinical presentation is that of classical cat scratch disease where an adjacent lymph node is infected. Atypical manifestations include prolonged fever, liver and spleen abscesses, infective endocarditis, central nervous system involvement etc. We present a 6 years old girl who suffered from L2 vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess, initially presenting as colic left waist pain, with no back pain or high fevers. During the process of diagnosis, she recovered without surgical intervention or antibiotic treatment. A review of the literature indicates that among the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations of cat scratch disease, skeletal involvement is rare. However, in cases of osteomyelitis, vertebrae are a common site as well as formation of a contiguous phlegmon. Although no studies have investigated the efficacy of different treatment regimens, all patients presented were treated with antimicrobial combinations and recovery rates were high. In view of the patient presented here, it is questioned whether the high recovery rates are a result of efficient antibiotic treatment or due to a benign natural course of the disease.

  8. The Effect of Aromatherapy Abdominal Massage on Alleviating Menstrual Pain in Nursing Students: A Prospective Randomized Cross-Over Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyseer M. F. Marzouk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysmenorrhea is a common cause of sickness absenteeism from both classes and work. This study investigated the effect of aromatherapy massage on a group of nursing students who are suffering of primary dysmenorrhea. A randomized blind clinical trial of crossover design was used. In the first treatment phase, group 1 ( received aromatherapy abdominal massage once daily for seven days prior to menstruation using the essential oils (cinnamon, clove, rose, and lavender in a base of almond oil. Group 2 ( received the same intervention but with placebo oil (almond oil. In the second treatment phase, the two groups switched to alternate regimen. Level and duration of pain and the amount of menstrual bleeding were evaluated at the baseline and after each treatment phase. During both treatment phases, the level and duration of menstrual pain and the amount of menstrual bleeding were significantly lower in the aromatherapy group than in the placebo group. These results suggests that aromatherapy is effective in alleviating menstrual pain, its duration and excessive menstrual bleeding. Aromatherapy can be provided as a nonpharmacological pain relief measure and as a part of nursing care given to girls suffering of dysmenorrhea, or excessive menstrual bleeding.

  9. The Effect of Aromatherapy Abdominal Massage on Alleviating Menstrual Pain in Nursing Students: A Prospective Randomized Cross-Over Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzouk, Tyseer M. F.; El-Nemer, Amina M. R.; Baraka, Hany N.

    2013-01-01

    Dysmenorrhea is a common cause of sickness absenteeism from both classes and work. This study investigated the effect of aromatherapy massage on a group of nursing students who are suffering of primary dysmenorrhea. A randomized blind clinical trial of crossover design was used. In the first treatment phase, group 1 (n = 48) received aromatherapy abdominal massage once daily for seven days prior to menstruation using the essential oils (cinnamon, clove, rose, and lavender in a base of almond oil). Group 2 (n = 47) received the same intervention but with placebo oil (almond oil). In the second treatment phase, the two groups switched to alternate regimen. Level and duration of pain and the amount of menstrual bleeding were evaluated at the baseline and after each treatment phase. During both treatment phases, the level and duration of menstrual pain and the amount of menstrual bleeding were significantly lower in the aromatherapy group than in the placebo group. These results suggests that aromatherapy is effective in alleviating menstrual pain, its duration and excessive menstrual bleeding. Aromatherapy can be provided as a nonpharmacological pain relief measure and as a part of nursing care given to girls suffering of dysmenorrhea, or excessive menstrual bleeding. PMID:23662151

  10. Novel presentation of a cricket ball-related intra-abdominal injury: genitofemoral nerve referred pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipoff, Adam C; Rowcroft, Alistair; Weber, Dieter G

    2015-08-30

    Serious intra-abdominal injuries are very uncommon in cricket; traumatic cricket injuries are traditionally musculoskeletal, soft tissue or maxillofacial in origin. The cause of such cricket injuries can be broadly divided into collision type injuries (a result of direct contact with the ball or bat, another player, the ground or boundary) or overuse injuries (due to running, throwing, batting, bowling, repetitive movements and overexertion). This case report describes a rare cause of small bowel perforation and suspected genitofemoral nerve injury secondary to the direct impact of a cricket ball, and includes a brief review of blunt abdominal injuries resulting in isolated small bowel perforations. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  11. Effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation-based abdominal muscle strengthening training on pulmonary function, pain, and functional disability index in chronic low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom-Ryong; Lee, Hye-Jin

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of abdominal muscle strengthening training (AMST) using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on pulmonary function, pain, and functional disability index in chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients. Thirty CLBP patients were randomly assigned to the traditional physical therapy (control) group (n=15) and PNF-AMST group (n=15). Forced expiratory volume at 1 second (FEV 1 ) was measured to measure changes in pulmonary function. To measure the degree of pain, a visual analog scale (VAS) was used. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was used to assess the disability level due to low back pain. A paired t -test was performed to compare differences within the groups before and after intervention. An independent t -test was performed to compare differences between the test and control groups. The level of significance was set at α=0.05. Within-group changes in FEV 1 were significantly different in the experimental group ( P disability index inpatients with CLBP. We expect it to be useful as one of the programs for CLBP patients in the future.

  12. The use of ultrasound imaging of the abdominal drawing-in maneuver in subjects with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyhen, Deydre S; Miltenberger, Chad E; Deiters, Henry M; Del Toro, Yadira M; Pulliam, Jennifer N; Childs, John D; Boyles, Robert E; Flynn, Timothy W

    2005-06-01

    Randomized controlled trial among patients with low back pain (LBP). (1) Determine the reliability of real-time ultrasound imaging for assessing activation of the lateral abdominal muscles; (2) characterize the extent to which the abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) results in preferential activation of the transverse abdominis (TrA); and (3) determine if ultrasound biofeedback improves short-term performance of the ADIM in patients with LBP. Ultrasound imaging is reportedly useful for measuring and training patients to preferentially activate the TrA muscle. However, research to support these claims is limited. Thirty patients with LBP referred for lumbar stabilization training were randomized to receive either traditional training (n = 15) or traditional training with biofeedback (n = 15). Ultrasound imaging was used to measure changes in thickness of the lateral abdominal muscles. Differences in preferential changes in muscle thickness of the TrA between groups and across time were assessed using analysis of variance. Intrarater reliability measuring lateral abdominal muscle thickness exceeded 0.93. On average, patients in both groups demonstrated a 2-fold increase in the thickness of the TrA during the ADIM. Performance of the ADIM did not differ between the groups. These data provide construct validity for the notion that the ADIM results in preferential activation of the TrA in patients with LBP. Although, the addition of biofeedback did not enhance the ability to perform the ADIM at a short-term follow-up, our data suggest a possible ceiling effect or an insufficient training stimulus. Further research is necessary to determine if there is a subgroup of patients with LBP who may benefit from biofeedback.

  13. Changes in multifidus and abdominal muscle size in response to microgravity: possible implications for low back pain research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hides, J A; Lambrecht, G; Stanton, W R; Damann, V

    2016-05-01

    In microgravity, muscle atrophy occurs in the intrinsic muscles of the spine, with changes also observed in the abdominal muscles. Exercises are undertaken on the International Space Station and on Earth following space flight to remediate these effects. Similar effects have been seen on Earth in prolonged bed rest studies and in people with low back pain (LBP). The aim of this case report was to examine the effects of microgravity, exercise in microgravity and post-flight rehabilitation on the size of the multifidus and antero-lateral abdominal muscles. Ultrasound imaging was used to assess size of the multifidus, transversus abdominis and internal oblique muscles at four time points: pre-flight and after daily rehabilitation on day one (R + 1), day 8 (R + 8) and day 14 (R + 14) after return to Earth (following 6 months in microgravity). Exercises in microgravity maintained multifidus size at L2-L4, however, after spaceflight, size of the multifidus muscle at L5 was reduced, size of the internal oblique muscle was increased and size of transversus abdominis was reduced. Rehabilitation post-space flight resulted in hypertrophy of the multifidus muscle to pre-mission size at the L5 vertebral level and restoration of antero-lateral abdominal muscle size. Exercise in space can prevent loss of spinal intrinsic muscle size. For the multifidus muscles, effectiveness varied at different levels of the spine. Post-mission rehabilitation targeting specific motor control restored muscle balance between the antero-lateral abdominal and multifidus muscles, similar to results from intervention trials for people with LBP. A limitation of the current investigation is that only one astronaut was studied, however, the microgravity model could be valuable as predictable effects on trunk muscles can be induced and interventions evaluated. Level of Evidence Case series.

  14. Ultrasound measurement of abdominal muscles during clinical isometric endurance tests in women with and without low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ShahAli, Shabnam; Arab, Amir Massoud; Ebrahimi, Esmaeil; ShahAli, Shiva; Rahmani, Nahid; Negahban, Hossein; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Bahmani, Andia

    2018-02-26

    The present study investigated group differences between the thickness changes of the transverse abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO), and external oblique (EO) muscles, during performance of the isometric supine chest raise and the supine double leg-straight leg raise tests in women with and without low back pain (LBP). Twenty women with LBP and 20 women without LBP participated in this case-control study. The thickness of the right TrA, IO, and EO muscles was measured using B-mode ultrasound (US) at rest, immediately at the beginning of performing the tests and when participants in both groups self-reported fatigue. The percentage of change in thickness of the abdominal muscles from rest to the initiation and fatigue stages of both tests was measured. The results indicate a statistically significant difference in the pattern of changes in deep (TrA) and superficial (EO) abdominal muscles thickness at the fatigue stage of the supine double straight-leg raise (SDSLR) test between groups (P abdominal muscles thicknesses change at rest or during stages of the clinical isometric endurance tests (P > 0.05). An altered activation pattern in the deep (TrA) and superficial (EO) muscles of LBP participants during fatigue stage of the SDSLR test as compared to controls indicates motor control dysfunction in the LBP group. Comparison of the activity of TrA and EO muscles during fatigue stage of SDSLR test can be used to assess alterations in motor control of abdominal muscles.

  15. [Simultaneous endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and coronary artery bypass grafting in a patient with abdominal aortic aneurysm and left main trunk lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Yoshihisa; Mitsuoka, Hiroshi; Masuda, Mikio; Shintani, Tsunehiro; Higashi, Shigeki

    2010-10-01

    To patients with severe coronary artery disease (CAD) and expanding large abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), simultaneous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and AAA repair has been recommended. A 68-year-old woman had a CAD and an AAA 71 mm in diameter which was enlarging. Coronary angiography showed severe stenoses in the left main trunk (LMT), the left anterior descending artery and the circumflex artery. On-pump beating CABG and AAA repair with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) were performed simultaneously, because intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP) might be needed due to severe stenoses of LMT. Just after EAVR, on-pump beating CABG was performed. The patient was discharged 15 days after the operation. It was suggested that a simultaneous operation of CABG and EVAR might be safe and effective for high risk patients with CAD and AAA.

  16. Autonomic nervous system function in young children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have been reported to have alterations in autonomic nervous system function as measured by vagal activity via heart rate variability. Whether the same is true for children is unknown. We compared young children 7 to 10 years of age with functional abdominal...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic or scrotal pain in children. Preparation will depend on the type ... help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, abscesses or an ...

  18. Exercise left ventricular performance in patients with chest pain, ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiograms, and angiographically normal coronary arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.J.; Sands, M.J.; Davies, R.A.; Wackers, F.J.; Alexander, J.; Lachman, A.S.; Williams, B.W.; Zaret, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Left ventricular performance was evaluated using first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography in 31 patients with chest pain, an ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiogram, and angiographically normal coronary arteries at rest and during maximal upright bicycle exercise. 201 Tl imaging was done in all patients after treadmill exercise and in selected patients after ergonovine provocation. Resting left ventricular performance was normal in all patients. An abnormal ejection fraction response to exercise was detected in 12 of 31 patients. Regional dysfunction was present during exercise in four patients, all of whom also had abnormal global responses. Three of these 12 patients and two additional patients had exercise-induced 201 Tl perfusion defects. In all nine patients who underwent ergonovine testing, there was no suggestion of coronary arterial spasm. Thus, left ventricular dysfunction during exercise, in the presence of normal resting performance, was found in a substantial number of patients with chest pain, an ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiogram, and normal coronary arteries

  19. Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Andrusaitis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 69-year-old male with poorly controlled hypertension presented with 1 hour of severe low back pain that radiated to his abdomen. The patient was tachycardic and had an initial blood pressure of 70/40. He had a rigid and severely tender abdomen. The patient’s history of hypertension, abnormal vital signs, severity and location of his pain were suspicious for a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Therefore, a computed tomography angiogram (CTA was ordered. Significant findings: CTA demonstrated a ruptured 7.4 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm with a large left retroperitoneal hematoma. Discussion: True abdominal aortic aneurysm is defined as at least a 3cm dilatation of all three layers of the arterial wall of the abdominal aorta.1 An estimated 15,000 people die per year in the US of this condition.2 Risk factors for AAA include males older than 65, tobacco use, and hypertension.1,3,4 There are also congenital, mechanical, traumatic, inflammatory, and infectious causes of AAA.3 Rupture is often the first manifestation of the disease. The classic triad of abdominal pain, pulsatile mass, and hypotension is seen in only 50% of ruptured AAAs.5 Pain (abdominal, groin, or back is the most common symptom. The most common misdiagnoses of ruptured AAAs are renal colic, diverticulitis, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage.6 Bedside ultrasonography is the fastest way to detect this condition and is nearly 100% sensitive.1 One study showed that bedside ultrasounds performed by emergency physicians had a sensitivity of .94 [95% CI = .86-1.0] and specificity of 1 [95% CI = .98-1.0] for detecting AAAs.7 CTA has excellent sensitivity (approximately 100% and yields the added benefit of facilitating surgical planning and management.1 Without surgical treatment, a ruptured AAA is almost uniformly fatal, and 50% of those who undergo surgery do not survive.1 Early resuscitation and coordination with vascular surgery should be

  20. Gut-directed hypnotherapy in children with irritable bowel syndrome or functional abdominal pain (syndrome): a randomized controlled trial on self exercises at home using CD versus individual therapy by qualified therapists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Juliette M. T. M.; Vlieger, Arine M.; Frankenhuis, Carla; George, Elvira K.; Groeneweg, Michael; Norbruis, Obbe F.; Tjon A ten, Walther; van Wering, Herbert; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Merkus, Maruschka P.; Benninga, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional abdominal pain (syndrome) (FAP(S)) are common pediatric disorders, characterized by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain. Treatment is challenging, especially in children with persisting symptoms. Gut-directed hypnotherapy (HT) performed by a therapist

  1. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain and Mass in an 18-Year-Old Patient: A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Hassan; Kamal, Muhammad Umar; Vootla, Vamshidhar; ElZaeedi, Mohamed; Niazi, Masooma; Gilchrist, Brian; Ihimoyan, Ariyo; Dev, Anil; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2018-02-01

    We present a case of an 18-year-old male who presented with complains of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting for 2 years. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed a 3 mm nodule on the lesser curvature of the stomach and prominent gastric folds. Biopsy of the nodule revealed a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor (NET) in lamina prop with focal extension into muscularis mucosa consistent with a gastric carcinoid. Tumor cells stained with neuron-specific enolase (NSE), chromogranin and synaptophysin only. The prominent gastric fold biopsy revealed gastric fundic mucosa with mucosal edema and focal mild chronic inflammation. Serum gastrin level was found to be 2,083 pg/mL. Abdomen CT and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) revealed a mass near the pancreatic neck. These findings were consistent with a functional gastrin producing well-differentiated grade 1 neuroendocrine neoplasm (gastrinoma). The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy with resection of the mass and resulting in normalization of gastrin levels.

  2. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain and Mass in an 18-Year-Old Patient: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Hassan; Kamal, Muhammad Umar; Vootla, Vamshidhar; ElZaeedi, Mohamed; Niazi, Masooma; Gilchrist, Brian; Ihimoyan, Ariyo; Dev, Anil; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2018-01-01

    We present a case of an 18-year-old male who presented with complains of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting for 2 years. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed a 3 mm nodule on the lesser curvature of the stomach and prominent gastric folds. Biopsy of the nodule revealed a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor (NET) in lamina prop with focal extension into muscularis mucosa consistent with a gastric carcinoid. Tumor cells stained with neuron-specific enolase (NSE), chromogranin and synaptophysin only. The prominent gastric fold biopsy revealed gastric fundic mucosa with mucosal edema and focal mild chronic inflammation. Serum gastrin level was found to be 2,083 pg/mL. Abdomen CT and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) revealed a mass near the pancreatic neck. These findings were consistent with a functional gastrin producing well-differentiated grade 1 neuroendocrine neoplasm (gastrinoma). The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy with resection of the mass and resulting in normalization of gastrin levels. PMID:29511413

  3. Conservative management of a 31 year old male with left sided low back and leg pain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Emily R

    2012-09-01

    This case study reported the conservative management of a patient presenting with left sided low back and leg pain diagnosed as a left sided L5-S1 disc prolapse/herniation. A 31-year-old male recreational worker presented with left sided low back and leg pain for the previous 3-4 months that was exacerbated by prolonged sitting. The plan of management included interferential current, soft tissue trigger point and myofascial therapy, lateral recumbent manual low velocity, low amplitude traction mobilizations and pelvic blocking as necessary. Home care included heat, icing, neural mobilizations, repeated extension exercises, stretching, core muscle strengthening, as well as the avoidance of prolonged sitting and using a low back support in his work chair. The patient responded well after the first visit and his leg and back pain were almost completely resolved by the third visit. Conservative chiropractic care appears to reduce pain and improve mobility in this case of a L5-S1 disc herniation. Active rehabilitative treatment strategies are recommended before surgical referral.

  4. A levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system embedded in the omentum in a woman with abdominal pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Kevin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The Mirena intrauterine system has been licensed as a contraceptive in the United Kingdom since May 1995. The use of an intrauterine system as a primary method of contraception among women has been slowly increasing over the last few years and they now account for about 3% of contraceptive use in England. The Mirena intrauterine system now also has a license for the management of idiopathic menorrhagia. Women may be informed that the rate of uterine perforation associated with intrauterine contraceptive use is low (0-2.3 per 1000 insertions. The rate of perforation reported with the Mirena intrauterine system in a large observational cohort study was 0.9 per 1000 insertions. Case presentation In this case report, the diagnosis of an intraperitoneal Mirena intrauterine system was noted nearly four years after its insertion, despite the patient having had a vaginal hysterectomy and admissions to hospital in the interim with complaints of abdominal pain. Conclusion This case report demonstrates clearly that whenever there is a question of a intrauterine system having fallen out following an ultrasound scan report showing an empty uterus, clinicians should also perform an abdominal X-ray.

  5. Evaluation of pelvic floor muscles activity with and without abdominal maneuvers in subjects with and without low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Fatemeh; Arab, Amir Massoud; Assadi, Hamed; Karimi, Noureddin; Shanbehzadeh, Sanaz

    2016-04-27

    There was controversy in finding of studies related pelvic floor muscle (PFM) rehabilitation of subjects with low back pain (LBP), while this issue is very important for treatment of subjects with LBP. The purpose of this study was to evaluate PFM contraction in three conditions of alone and with abdominal hollowing (AH) or abdominal bracing (AB) maneuvers in subjects with and without chronic LBP. Subjects were divided into two groups: subjects with LBP (N = 25) and without LBP (N = 27). PFM contraction alone and during contraction with AH or AB maneuvers was measured. The amount of bladder base movement was measured as an indicator of PFM activity. There were no differences in PFM activity between subjects with and without chronic LBP, when PFM contracted alone (P = 0.60), contracted with AH (P= 0.12) and AB maneuver (P = 0.54). Our data revealed that contraction of the PFM alone produce greater displacement of the bladder base than contraction of the PFM with AH (P = 0.005) or AB maneuver (P = 0.001) in both groups. However, no significant difference was found between contraction of the PFM with AH and AB maneuver in individuals with LBP (P = 0.31). It seems that PFM contraction alone is more effective than PFM contraction with AH or AB maneuvers in lifting the pelvic floor in subjects with and without LBP.

  6. Ultrasound imaging in children with acute abdominal pain - can it help to decrease the rate of negative appendectomies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedzielski, J.; Miodek, M.; Kucharski, P.; Sokal, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of high-resolution ultrasound (US) with graded compression in the diagnosis of pediatric appendicitis.Material/Methods: The medical records of 664 consecutive children with acute abdominal pain treated between 2007 and 2009 were reviewed retrospectively and analyzed; 408 children (61.4 %) underwent appendectomy and 256 patients were treated conservatively (38.6 %). High-resolution US was performed in 570 out of 664 patients (85.8 %). The US data were verified by intraoperative findings or by clinical follow-up. Results: Out of 664 children, 408 underwent appendectomy and 256 were treated conservatively. US was performed in 570 out of 664 children (85.8 %); in 327/408 children (80.1 %) with AA and in 243/256 children (94.9 %) with negative diagnosis. The sensitivity and specificity for US was 66.6% and 77.4%, respectively. If histopathological diagnosis of catarrhal appendicitis was considered a negative (unnecessary) appendectomy, the sensitivity was 68.6 % (p=0.87), and specificity was 67 % (p=0.29). Positive and negative predictive values of US were 79.9 % and 63.1 %, respectively. After recalculating results, positive predictive value decreased to 59.8% (p=0.036) and negative predictive value increased to 74.8 % (p=0.2). The rate of false negative results was 13.1 % (75/572) and the rate of false positives was 19.2 % (110/572). The negative appendectomy rate was 27.4 % (112/408). Conclusions: High-resolution ultrasonography provides an accurate and specific test for acute appendicitis and is recommended by the authors as an examination of choice in children with acute abdominal pain. (authors)

  7. Associations between low back pain, urinary incontinence, and abdominal muscle recruitment as assessed via ultrasonography in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia F. Figueiredo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low back pain (LBP and urinary incontinence (UI are highly prevalent among elderly individuals. In young adults, changes in trunk muscle recruitment, as assessed via ultrasound imaging, may be associated with lumbar spine stability. Objective: To assess the associations between LBP, UI, and the pattern of transversus abdominis (TrA, internal (IO, and external oblique (EO muscle recruitment in the elderly as evaluated by ultrasound imaging. Method: Fifty-four elderly individuals (mean age: 72±5.2 years who complained of LBP and/or UI as assessed by the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form, and ultrasound imaging were included in the study. The statistical analysis comprised a multiple linear regression model, and a p-value <0.05 was considered significant. Results: The regression models for the TrA, IO, and EO muscle thickness levels explained 2.0% (R2=0.02; F=0.47; p=0.628, 10.6% (R2=0.106; F=3.03; p=0.057, and 10.1% (R2=0.101; F=2.70; p=0.077 of the variability, respectively. None of the regression models developed for the abdominal muscles exhibited statistical significance. A significant and negative association (p=0.018; β=-0.0343 was observed only between UI and IO recruitment. Conclusion: These results suggest that age-related factors may have interfered with the findings of the study, thus emphasizing the need to perform ultrasound imaging-based studies to measure abdominal muscle recruitment in the elderly.

  8. Delayed Bleeding and Pelvic Haematoma after Low-Energy Osteoporotic Pubic Rami Fracture in a Warfarin Patient: An Unusual Cause of Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sandri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute abdominal pain may be the presenting symptom in a wide range of diseases in the elderly. Acute abdominal pain related to a delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma after a low-energy pubic rami fracture is rare and can have important consequences; to the best of our knowledge, only one case has been previously described. Case Report. We present an unusual case of an 83-year-old woman taking warfarin for atrial fibrillation, admitted to the Emergency Department (ED with acute abdominal pain and progressive anemia related to a delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma 72 hours after a low-energy osteoporotic pubic rami fracture. Warfarin was withheld, anticoagulation was reversed by using fresh frozen plasma and vitamin K, and concentrated red blood cells were given. Haemoglobin level gradually returned to normal with a progressive resorption of the haematoma. Conclusion. Delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma after osteoporotic pubic rami fracture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in the elderly. This case indicates the need for hospital admission, careful haemodynamic monitoring, and early identification of bleeding in patients with “benign” osteoporotic pubic rami fracture, especially those receiving anticoagulants, to provide an adequate management and prevent severe complications.

  9. Long-Term Follow-Up of Gut-Directed Hypnotherapy vs. Standard Care in Children With Functional Abdominal Pain or Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieger, Arine M.; Rutten, Juliette M. T. M.; Govers, Anita M. A. P.; Frankenhuis, Carla; Benninga, Marc A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We previously showed that gut-directed hypnotherapy (HT) is highly effective in the treatment of children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Aim of this follow-up study was to investigate the long-term effects of HT vs. standard medical treatment

  10. Discriminative Validity of the Behavior Assessment System for Children-Parent Rating Scales in Children with Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Matched Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Paul M.; Schoff, Kristin M.; Glutting, Joseph J.; Abelkop, A. Shayne

    2003-01-01

    Examined discriminative validity of the Parent Rating Scale (PRS) of the Behavior Assessment System for Children (BASC; Reynolds & Kamphaus, 1992, Circle Pines, MN: American Guidance Services). Two groups were compared: a cohort with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) (n = 49) and children from the BASC-PRS standardization sample (n = 49) matched…

  11. Delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma after low-energy osteoporotic pubic rami fracture in a warfarin patient: an unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Andrea; Regis, Dario; Bizzotto, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Acute abdominal pain may be the presenting symptom in a wide range of diseases in the elderly. Acute abdominal pain related to a delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma after a low-energy pubic rami fracture is rare and can have important consequences; to the best of our knowledge, only one case has been previously described. Case Report. We present an unusual case of an 83-year-old woman taking warfarin for atrial fibrillation, admitted to the Emergency Department (ED) with acute abdominal pain and progressive anemia related to a delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma 72 hours after a low-energy osteoporotic pubic rami fracture. Warfarin was withheld, anticoagulation was reversed by using fresh frozen plasma and vitamin K, and concentrated red blood cells were given. Haemoglobin level gradually returned to normal with a progressive resorption of the haematoma. Conclusion. Delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma after osteoporotic pubic rami fracture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in the elderly. This case indicates the need for hospital admission, careful haemodynamic monitoring, and early identification of bleeding in patients with "benign" osteoporotic pubic rami fracture, especially those receiving anticoagulants, to provide an adequate management and prevent severe complications.

  12. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... often used to determine the cause of unexplained pain. CT scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. ... help diagnose the cause of abdominal or pelvic pain and diseases of the internal organs, small bowel ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... organs and is often used to determine the cause of unexplained pain. CT scanning is fast, painless, ... procedure is typically used to help diagnose the cause of abdominal or pelvic pain and diseases of ...

  14. Postsurgical pain outcome of vertical and transverse abdominal incision: Design of a randomized controlled equivalence trial [ISRCTN60734227

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motsch Johann

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are two ways to open the abdominal cavity in elective general surgery: vertically or transversely. Various clinical studies and a meta-analysis have postulated that the transverse approach is superior to other approaches as regards complications. However, in a recent survey it was shown that 90 % of all abdominal incisions in visceral surgery are still vertical incisions. This discrepancy between existing recommendations of clinical trials and clinical practice could be explained by the lack of acceptance of these results due to a number of deficits in the study design and analysis, subsequent low internal validity, and therefore limited external generalisability. The objective of this study is to address the issue from the patient's perspective. Methods This is an intraoperatively randomized controlled observer and patient-blinded two-group parallel equivalence trial. The study setting is the Department of General-, Visceral-, Trauma Surgery and Outpatient Clinic of the University of Heidelberg, Medical School. A total of 172 patients of both genders, aged over 18 years who are scheduled for an elective abdominal operation and are eligible for either a transverse or vertical incision. To show equivalence of the two approaches or the superiority of one of them from the perspective of the patient, a primary endpoint is defined: the pain experienced by the patient (VAS 0–100 on day two after surgery and the amount of analgesic required (piritramide [mg/h]. A confidence interval approach will be used for analysis. A global α-Level of 0.05 and a power of 0.8 is guaranteed, resulting in a size of 86 patients for each group. Secondary endpoints are: time interval to open and close the abdomen, early-onset complications (frequency of burst abdomen, postoperative pulmonary complications, and wound infection and late complications (frequency of incisional hernias. Different outcome variables will be ranked by patients and

  15. Preliminary evidence for increased parasympathetic activity during social inclusion and exclusion in adolescents with functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulewitsch, Marco Daniel; Jusyte, Aiste; Mazurak, Nazar; Weimer, Katja; Schönenberg, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Peer victimization (e.g. social exclusion) has been shown to be associated with physical health problems such as functional somatic complaints and especially symptoms of pain. To date, no study has investigated the mechanisms underlying this association in clinical pediatric samples. The aim of this study was to evaluate the parasympathetic activity during a social exclusion experience in adolescents with functional abdominal pain (FAP). Twenty adolecents with FAP and 21 matched healthy participants were compared regarding parameters of parasympathetic activation before, during, and after participating in the Cyberball-game, a well-established paradigm to induce social exclusion. Adolescents with FAP showed an increase in parasympathetic activation during both consecutive phases of the Cyberball game (inclusion as well as exclusion condition) whereas the healthy control group remained stable. There were no differences in subjective experience of in- and exclusion between the groups. The parasympathetic activation pattern may indicate altered processing of social stimuli in adolescents with FAP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of bromopride on the healing of left colonic anastomoses in rats with induced abdominal sepsis Efeitos da bromoprida na cicatrização de anastomoses no cólon esquerdo de ratos sob sepse abdominal induzida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Marques e Silva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of bromopride on the healing of left colonic anastomoses in rats with induced abdominal sepsis. METHODS: Forty rats were divided into two groups to receive either bromopride (experimental group- E or saline (control group- C. Each group was divided into subgroups of ten animals each to be euthanized on third (E3 and C3 or seventh day (E7 and C7 after surgery. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. The rats underwent segmental left colon resection and end-to-end anastomosis. Adhesion formation, tensile strength and hydroxyproline concentration were assessed. Histomorphometry of collagen and histopathological analysis were also performed. RESULTS: On postoperative third day, anastomoses in bromopride-treated animals showed lower tensile strength (p=0.02 and greater reduction in hydroxyproline concentration (p=0.04 than in control animals. There was no statistical difference in these parameters on seventh day, and the remaining parameters were similar across subgroups. Collagen content was also similar across subgroups. CONCLUSION: In the presence of abdominal sepsis, the administration of bromopride was associated with decreased tensile strength and hydroxyproline concentration in left colonic anastomoses in rats three days after surgery.OBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos da bromoprida sobre a cicatrização de anastomoses de cólon esquerdo de ratos na presença de sepse abdominal. MÉTODOS: Quarenta ratos distribuídos em grupos contendo 20 animais para administração de bromoprida ou salina. Cada grupo foi dividido em subgrupos contendo dez animais, para eutanásia no terceiro ou no sétimo dia de pós-operatório. A indução da sepse foi realizada pelo método de ligadura e punção do ceco. Foi realizada ressecção de um segmento do cólon esquerdo e anastomose término-terminal. À re-laparotomia, foi avaliada a quantidade total de aderências e removido um segmento colônico contendo a anastomose

  17. Acute abdominal pain presenting as a rare appendiceal duplication: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Ali

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Appendiceal duplication is a rare anomaly that can manifest as right lower quadrant pain. There are several variations described for this condition. We recommend aggressive operative management should this anatomical variation present in the presence of acute appendicitis. Case presentation We report the case of a 15-year-old African American girl who presented to our hospital with right lower quadrant pain and was subsequently found to have appendiceal duplication. Conclusion There are two categorical systems that have described and stratified appendiceal duplication. Both classification systems have been outlined and referenced in this case report. A computed tomography scan has been included to provide a visual aid to help identify true vermiform appendiceal duplication. The presence of this anatomical abnormality is not a reason for surgical intervention; however, should this be found in the setting of acute appendicitis, aggressive resection of both appendices is mandatory.

  18. A Decision Support System for the Management of Acute Abdominal Pain (User’s Manual)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-10

    which exist for each diagnostic category. Each treatment protocol contains a discussion of the disease , a differential diagnosis , ABDX User’s Manual... disease of the left colon will precede the acute episode. The pre-existence of diverticular disease does not preclude development of acute...Keep in mind that there are many causes for melena and one should not assume the diagnosis of peptic ulcer disease unless the symptom complex

  19. Exposure-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Children with Abdominal Pain: A Pilot Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lalouni

    Full Text Available Children with pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (P-FGIDs have an increased risk for school absenteeism, depression, anxiety and low quality of life. Exposure-based cognitive behavior therapy (CBT has shown large treatment effects in adults with irritable bowel syndrome, but has not been tested for children 8-12 years with P-FGIDs.The aim of this trial was to test the feasibility, acceptability and potential efficacy of a newly developed exposure-based CBT for children with P-FGIDs.The children (n = 20 with a P-FGID, were referred by their treating physicians. The participants received 10 weekly sessions of exposure-based CBT and were assessed at pre-treatment, post-treatment and 6-month follow-up.Children improved significantly on the primary outcome measure pain intensity at post (Cohen's d = 0.40, p = 0.049 and at 6-month follow-up (Cohen's d = 0.85, p = 0.004. Improvements were also seen in pain frequency, gastrointestinal symptoms, quality of life, depression, anxiety, school absenteeism and somatic symptoms. Improvements were maintained or further increased at 6-month follow-up. The children engaged in the exposures and were satisfied with the treatment.Exposure-based CBT for children with P-FGIDs is feasible, acceptable and potentially efficacious.

  20. Post-operative pain relief using local infiltration analgesia during open abdominal hysterectomy: a randomized, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, J M; Oras, J; Karlsson, O I; Olausson, K G; Thörn, S-E; Gupta, A

    2017-05-01

    Post-operative pain is common and often severe after open abdominal hysterectomy, and analgesic consumption high. This study assessed the efficacy of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) injected systematically into different tissues during surgery compared with saline on post-operative pain and analgesia. Fifty-nine patients were randomized to Group LIA (n = 29) consisting of 156 ml of a mixture of 0.2% ropivacaine + 30 mg ketorolac + 0.5 mg (5 ml) adrenaline, where the drugs were injected systematically in the operating site, around the proximal vagina, the ligaments, in the fascia and subcutaneously, or to saline and intravenous ketorolac, Group C (Control, n = 28), in a double-blind study. Post-operative pain, analgesic consumption, side-effects, and home discharge were analysed. Median dose of rescue morphine given 0-24 h after surgery was significantly lower in group LIA (18 mg, IQR 5-25 mg) compared with group C (27 mg, IQR 15-43 mg, P = 0.028). Median time to first analgesic injection was significantly longer in group LIA (40 min, IQR 20-60 min) compared with group C (20 min, IQR 12-30 min, P = 0.009). NRS score was lower in the group LIA compared with group C in the direct post-operative period (0-2 h). No differences were found in post-operative side-effects or home discharge between the groups. Systematically injected local infiltration analgesia for pain management was superior to saline in the primary endpoint, resulting in significantly lower rescue morphine requirements during 0-24 h, longer time to first analgesic request and lower early post-operative pain intensity. © 2017 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Body Fat, Abdominal Fat, and Body Fat Distribution Is Related to Left Atrial Diameter in Young Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Magnus; Thorsson, Ola; Karlsson, Magnus K

    2012-01-01

    such as lean body mass, blood pressure, gender, age, and Tanner stage revealed that TBF, AFM, and AFM/TBF were all independently related to LA diameter. Differences in the different body fat measurements explained 6-9% of the variance in LA size. These results demonstrated that both total body fat, AFM......In adults, the size of the left atria (LA) has important prognostic information. In obese adults, adolescents and children enlargement of LA have been observed. This has not been investigated on a population-based level in young children. We therefore assessed if total body fat mass (TBF...

  2. [Paravertebral and intra-abdominal abscess due to oxygen-ozone therapy for lower back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, P; García, A; Peláez, R

    2014-01-01

    Complications secondary to oxygen-ozone therapy are rare, but they have been described in medical literature. There are only two cases of infectious complications after oxygen-ozone therapy. Our aim is to describe a rare case of purulent complication that was secondary to oxygen-ozone therapy for the treatment of lower back pain. We report the clinical improvement with conservative treatment for a local complication after percutaneous oxygen-ozone treatment. According to the clinical improvement of our patient, conservative treatment should be considered before any aggressive surgery. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of traditional bridging or suspension-exercise bridging on lateral abdominal thickness in individuals with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Rebecca J; Grindstaff, Terry L; Croy, Theodore; Ingersoll, Christopher D; Saliba, Susan A

    2012-05-01

    Individuals with low back pain (LBP) are thought to benefit from interventions that improve motor control of the lumbopelvic region. It is unknown if therapeutic exercise can acutely facilitate activation of lateral abdominal musculature. To investigate the ability of 2 types of bridging-exercise progressions to facilitate lateral abdominal muscles during an abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) in individuals with LBP. Randomized control trial. University research laboratory. 51 adults (mean ± SD age 23.1 ± 6.0 y, height 173.6 ± 10.5 cm, mass 74.7 ± 14.5 kg, and 64.7% female) with LBP. All participants met 3 of 4 criteria for stabilization-classification LBP or at least 6 best-fit criteria for stabilization classification. Participants were randomly assigned to either traditional-bridge progression or suspension-exercise-bridge progression, each with 4 levels of progressive difficulty. They performed 5 repetitions at each level and were progressed based on specific criteria. Muscle thickness of the external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and transversus abdominis (TrA) was measured during an ADIM using ultrasound imaging preintervention and postintervention. A contraction ratio (contracted thickness:resting thickness) of the EO, IO, and TrA was used to quantify changes in muscle thickness. There was not a significant increase in EO (F1,47 = 0.44, P = .51) or IO (F1,47 = .30, P = .59) contraction ratios after the exercise progression. There was a significant (F1,47 = 4.05, P = .05) group-by-time interaction wherein the traditional-bridge progression (pre = 1.55 ± 0.22; post = 1.65 ± 0.21) resulted in greater (P = .03) TrA contraction ratio after exercise than the suspension-exercise-bridge progression (pre = 1.61 ± 0.31; post = 1.58 ± 0.28). A single exercise progression did not acutely improve muscle thickness of the EO and IO. The magnitude of change in TrA muscle thickness after the traditional-bridging progression was less than the minimal

  4. Gastric bare area and left adrenal gland involvement on abdominal computed tomography and their prognostic value in acute pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zaiyi [Guangdong Provincial People' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Sichuan University, Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Yan, Zhihan [Wenzhou Medical College, Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Min, Pengqiu [Sichuan University, Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Liang, Changhong [Guangdong Provincial People' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Wang, Ying [Sun Yatsen University, Department of Medical Ultrasonics, First Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China)

    2008-08-15

    To demonstrate the CT manifestations of gastric bare area involvement (GBAI) and left adrenal gland involvement (LAGI) in acute pancreatitis (AP) and evaluate their prognostic value. From January 2003 to December 2006, CT examinations of 116 patients with AP were retrospectively reviewed. There were 34 (29.3%) patients with GBAI showing haziness and streaky density or fluid collection in the gastric bare area, and 18 (15.5%) with LAGI showing deformity and hypoattenuation of left adrenal gland. The mean duration of hospital stay in patients with GBAI and LAGI was longer than that of patients without (P<0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of GBAI for predicting complications were 43.3% (0.31, 0.55) and 89.8% (0.81, 0.98), respectively; and 83.3% (0.36, 1.00) and 73.6% (0.65, 0.82) for predicting mortality. A patient with GBAI was 6.7 (2.4, 19.1) and 14.0 (1.6, 124.6) times more likely to have complications and die than was a patient without. The sensitivity and specificity of LAGI for predicting complications were 23.9% (0.14, 0.34) and 95.9% (0.86, 0.99), respectively, and 66.7% (0.22, 0.96) and 87.3% (0.81, 0.94) for predicting mortality. A patient with LAGI was 7.4 (1.6, 33.8) and 13.7 (2.3, 81.9) times more likely to have complications and die than was a patient without. Our results showed that GBAI and LAGI were characteristic CT findings in AP and could serve as useful prognostic indicators for this disease. (orig.)

  5. Aggressive malignant abdominal mesothelioma: Clinical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hassan, Ahmad M.; Al-Saigh, Abdulrehman A.

    2004-01-01

    A 32-year-old Filipino female, working as an x-ray technician, presented to the Emergency Room (ER) with acute abdominal pain for one day. The pain was mainly on the left side and left hypochondrium. She had recurring abdominal pain before but not significant to worry her. She also complained of abdominal distension, which she noticed one week ago. Abdominal examination revealed fullness in the left hypochondrium with marked tenderness but negative rebound. Abdominal ultrasound (US) showed a huge mass mainly in the left hypochondrium. The origin of the mass cannot be identified by US. A computerized tomography scan showed a mass in the left side of the abdomen crossing the midline with a necrotic centre. The hospital course of the patient runs smoothly, and she was discharged after 7-days and referred to an Oncology Center. Abdominal mesothelioma is a neoplasm arising from the mesothelial surface lining the abdominal cavity. It is less frequent than that of the pleura. It is a rapidly growing and fatal malignancy with a median survival of less than 1-year. The relation between pleural malignant mesothelioma and asbestos is well recognized since it was described in 19602 but implication of asbestos exposure in the etiology of the peritoneal type is less obvious. This patient history is giving no obvious exposure to asbestos but as she is working in the Radiology Department as an x-ray technician she is well exposed to x-ray, but the effect of radioactivity on induction of mesothelioma is still disputed.4 There are several reports linking malignant mesothelioma to radioactivity due to radiation therapy.The fibrous mesothelioma (sarcomatous), as in this case, which is difficult to diagnose microscopically, looks like a fibroma, unless helped by tissue culture. The treatment options of malignant mesothelioma include surgery, intraperitoneal chemotherapy and whole abdominal radiation or multimodality therapy, which were suggested that might prolong the survival in

  6. Usefulness of computed tomography in patients with right inferior abdominal quadrant pain: acute appendicitis and its alternative diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossini, Sebastian A.; Haberman, Diego; Gonzalez Villaveiran, Ruben F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To review the tomography findings of the acute appendicitis, their complications and alternative diagnosis. To value the use of helicoidal computed tomography (HCT) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and in the study of patients with right inferior abdominal quadrant (RIQ) pain and acute abdomen, for diagnosis and eventual complications, in order to decide treatment. Materials and method: For five months, the populations included in this retrospectively study were all patients delivered for presenting with RIQ pain for a HCT exam. These exams were made with oral and intravenous contrasts, when there were not contraindications. The HCT results were correlated with clinical follow up, surgery and histopathologic exams. Results: Over a total of 100 patients studied, 53 presented tomographic diagnosis of appendicitis, 22 of which presented perforation signs; 27 showed an alternative diagnosis (ovaries follicles, ureteral litiasis, tiphlitis, diverticulitis, colitis, salpingitis), 18 patients did not present tomographic findings to support the clinical symptoms and 2 presented indeterminated results. These data represented a sensibility of 100%, specificity of 95,7%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 96,2% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% for the tomography diagnosis of acute appendicitis and a sensibility of 100%, specificity of 81,8%, PPV of 95,1% and NPV of 100% for the tomography diagnosis of the different etiology in patient with right inferior acute abdomen. Conclusion: HCT is extremely useful in the study of patients with acute abdomen with origin in the RIQ, not only to make a diagnosis, but also to evaluate the complications, so as to decide proper treatment. (authors) [es

  7. Diagnostic performance of a biomarker panel as a negative predictor for acute appendicitis in adult ED patients with abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckins, David S; Copeland, Karen; Self, Wesley; Vance, Cheryl; Hendry, Phyllis; Borg, Keith; Gogain, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    Evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the APPY1TM biomarker panel, previously described for use in pediatric patients, for identifying adult ED patients with abdominal pain who are at low risk of acute appendicitis. This study prospectively enrolled subjects >18years of age presenting to seven U.S. emergency departments with pain suggesting possible acute appendicitis. The APPY1 panel was performed on blood samples drawn from each patient at the time of initial evaluation and results were correlated with the final diagnosis either positive or negative for acute appendicitis. 431 patients were enrolled with 422 completing all aspects of the study. The APPY1 biomarker panel exhibited a sensitivity of 97.5% (95% CI, 91.3-99.3%), a negative predictive value of 98.4% (95% CI, 94.4-99.6%), a negative likelihood ratio of 0.07 (95% CI, 0.02-0.27), with a specificity of 36.5% (95% CI, 31.6-41.8%) for acute appendicitis. The panel correctly identified 125 of 342 (36.6%) patients who did not have appendicitis with 2 (2.5%) false negatives. The CT utilization rate in this population was 72.7% (307/422). Of 307 CT scans, 232 were done for patients who did not have appendicitis and 79 (34%) of these patients were correctly identified as negative with "low risk" biomarker panel results, representing 26% (79/307) of all CT scans performed. This biomarker panel exhibited high sensitivity and negative predictive value for acute appendicitis in this prospective adult cohort, thereby potentially reducing the dependence on CT for the evaluation of possible acute appendicitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Delayed ethylene glycol poisoning presenting with abdominal pain and multiple cranial and peripheral neuropathies: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sran Hersharan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Ethylene glycol poisoning may pose diagnostic difficulties if the history of ingestion is not volunteered, or if the presentation is delayed. This is because the biochemical features of high anion-gap metabolic acidosis and an osmolar gap resolve within 24 to 72 hours as the ethylene glycol is metabolized to toxic metabolites. This case illustrates the less well-known clinical features of delayed ethylene glycol poisoning, including multiple cranial and peripheral neuropathies, and the clinical findings which may point towards this diagnosis in the absence of a history of ingestion. Case presentation A 53-year-old Afro-Caribbean man presented with vomiting, abdominal pain and oliguria, and was found to have acute renal failure requiring emergency hemofiltration, and raised inflammatory markers. Computed tomography imaging of the abdomen revealed the appearance of bilateral pyelonephritis, however he failed to improve with broad-spectrum antibiotics, and subsequently developed multiple cranial neuropathies and increasing obtundation, necessitating intubation and ventilation. Computed tomography of the brain showed no focal lesions, and a lumbar puncture revealed a raised cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure and cyto-albuminological dissociation. Nerve conduction studies revealed a sensorimotor radiculoneuropathy mimicking a Guillain-Barre type lesion with an atypical distribution. It was only about two weeks after presentation that the history of ethylene glycol ingestion one week before presentation was confirmed. He had a slow recovery on the intensive care unit, requiring renal replacement therapy for eight weeks, and complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, neuropathic pain and a slow neurological recovery requiring prolonged rehabilitation. Conclusions Although neuropathy as a result of ethylene glycol poisoning has been described in a few case reports, all of these were in the context of a known history of

  9. Home-Based Hypnotherapy Self-exercises vs Individual Hypnotherapy With a Therapist for Treatment of Pediatric Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Functional Abdominal Pain, or Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Juliette M T M; Vlieger, Arine M; Frankenhuis, Carla; George, Elvira K; Groeneweg, Michael; Norbruis, Obbe F; Tjon A Ten, Walther; van Wering, Herbert M; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; Merkus, Maruschka P; Benninga, Marc A

    2017-05-01

    Individual gut-directed hypnotherapy (HT) is effective in pediatric irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional abdominal pain or functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAP[S]). It is, however, unavailable to many children. To compare the effectiveness of HT by means of home-based self-exercises using a CD with that of individual HT (iHT) performed by qualified therapists. This noninferiority randomized clinical trial with a follow-up of 1 year after the end of treatment was conducted from July 15, 2011, through June 24, 2013, at 9 secondary and tertiary care centers throughout the Netherlands. A total of 303 children were eligible to participate. Of those, 260 children (aged 8-18 years) with IBS or FAP(S) were included in this study. Children were randomized (1:1 ratio) to home-based HT with a CD (CD group) or iHT performed by qualified therapists (iHT group). No children withdrew from the study because of adverse effects. The CD group was instructed to perform exercises 5 times per week or more for 3 months. The iHT group consisted of 6 sessions during 3 months. Primary outcomes were treatment success directly after treatment and after 1-year follow-up. Treatment success was defined as a 50% or greater reduction in pain frequency and intensity scores. The noninferiority limit was set at 50% treatment success in the CD group, with a maximum of 25% difference in treatment success with the iHT group after 1-year follow-up. Modified intention-to-treat analyses were performed. A total of 132 children were assigned to the CD group and 128 to the iHT group; 250 children were analyzed (126 in the CD group and 124 in the iHT group) (mean [SD] age, 13.4 [2.9] years in the CD group and 13.3 [2.8] years in the iHT group; 94 female [74.6%] in the CD group and 85 [68.5%] in the iHT group). Directly after treatment, 46 children (36.8%) in the CD group and 62 (50.1%) in the iHT group were successfully treated. After 1-year follow-up, the 62.1% treatment success in the CD group

  10. Effect of core stability exercises on feed-forward activation of deep abdominal muscles in chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseljen, Ottar; Unsgaard-Tøndel, Monica; Westad, Christian; Mork, Paul Jarle

    2012-06-01

    A randomized controlled trial. To investigate feed-forward activation or timing of abdominal muscle activation in response to rapid shoulder flexion after 8 weeks with core stability exercises, sling exercises, or general exercises in chronic nonspecific low back pain (LBP) patients. Delayed onset in abdominal muscles has been associated with LBP. Low load exercises to volitionally activate the transversus abdominis were introduced to restore trunk muscle activation deficits. More forceful co-contraction exercises have been advocated by others. This study explored whether abdominal muscle onset changed after low-load core stability exercises, high-load sling exercises, or general exercises. Subjects (N = 109) with chronic nonspecific LBP of at least 3 months' duration were randomly assigned to 8 weekly treatments with low-load core stability exercises, high-load stabilizing exercises in slings, or general exercises in groups. Primary outcome was onset recorded bilaterally by m-mode ultrasound imaging in the deep abdominal muscles in response to rapid shoulder flexion. No or small changes were found in onset after treatment. Baseline adjusted between group differences showed a 15 ms (95% confidence interval [CI], 1-28; P = 0.03) and a 19 ms (95% CI, 5-33; P core stability and general exercises, respectively, but on 1 side only. There was no association between changes in pain and onset over the intervention period (R ≤ 0.02). Abdominal muscle onset was largely unaffected by 8 weeks of exercises in chronic LBP patients. There was no association between change in onset and LBP. Large individual variations in activation pattern of the deep abdominal muscles may justify exploration of differential effects in subgroups of LBP.

  11. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome: A Case Report of Cyclic Severe Hyperemesis and Abdominal Pain with Long-Term Cannabis Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes-Laufer, Julia; Del Puppo, Lola; Inan, Ihsan; Troillet, François-Xavier; Kherad, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome (CHS) is a rare condition that includes cyclic severe vomiting in subjects who have been consuming large doses of cannabis for several years. One of the major diagnostic criteria is the alleviation of symptoms by hot showers. The syndrome was first described in 2004 and is so far neither completely understood nor well known. The latter leads to continued morbidity in concerned subjects and unnecessary expenses for futile investigations. Standard treatments of vomiting as 5-HT3 or D2-receptor antagonists have been shown to be ineffective in alleviating the symptoms. The only long-term satisfying treatment option is the complete abstinence from cannabis consumption. Case Summary. In this case report we describe a 26-year-old male Caucasian long-term cannabis consumer who repeatedly presented in our emergency room with cyclic severe nausea and vomiting ceased by hot showers and resistant to all other treatments. The final diagnosis was not established until his third visit to the ER. Conclusion. CHS is an important differential diagnosis in patients who present with cyclic vomiting and abdominal pain with a history of long-term cannabis use. Recognition of this syndrome is important in order to avoid unnecessary clinical testing and to help the patients break the cycle of drug use.

  12. The value of pancreatic stone protein in predicting acute appendicitis in patients presenting at the emergency department with abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tschuor Christoph

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic Stone Protein (PSP is a protein naturally produced mainly in the pancreas and the gut. There is evidence from experimental and clinical trials that blood PSP levels rise in the presence of inflammation or infection. However, it is not known whether PSP is superior to other established blood tests (e.g. White Blood Count, Neutrophils or C - reactive protein in predicting appendicitis in patients presenting with abdominal pain and a clinical suspicion of appendicitis at the emergency room. Methods/design The PSP Appendix Trial is a prospective, multi-center, cohort study to assess the value of PSP in the diagnostic workup of acute appendicitis. 245 patients will be prospectively recruited. Interim analysis will be performed once 123 patients are recruited. The primary endpoint of the study concerns the diagnostic accuracy of PSP in predicting acute appendicitis and therefore the evidence of appendicitis on the histopathological specimen after appendectomy. Discussion The PSP Appendix Trial is a prospective, multi-center, cohort study to assess the value of PSP in the diagnostic workup of acute appendicitis. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01610193; Institution Ethical Board Approval ID: KEKZH- Nr. 2011–0501

  13. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome: A Case Report of Cyclic Severe Hyperemesis and Abdominal Pain with Long-Term Cannabis Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Hermes-Laufer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome (CHS is a rare condition that includes cyclic severe vomiting in subjects who have been consuming large doses of cannabis for several years. One of the major diagnostic criteria is the alleviation of symptoms by hot showers. The syndrome was first described in 2004 and is so far neither completely understood nor well known. The latter leads to continued morbidity in concerned subjects and unnecessary expenses for futile investigations. Standard treatments of vomiting as 5-HT3 or D2-receptor antagonists have been shown to be ineffective in alleviating the symptoms. The only long-term satisfying treatment option is the complete abstinence from cannabis consumption. Case Summary. In this case report we describe a 26-year-old male Caucasian long-term cannabis consumer who repeatedly presented in our emergency room with cyclic severe nausea and vomiting ceased by hot showers and resistant to all other treatments. The final diagnosis was not established until his third visit to the ER. Conclusion. CHS is an important differential diagnosis in patients who present with cyclic vomiting and abdominal pain with a history of long-term cannabis use. Recognition of this syndrome is important in order to avoid unnecessary clinical testing and to help the patients break the cycle of drug use.

  14. Beyond abuse: the association among parenting style, abdominal pain, and somatization in IBS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Jeffrey M; Gudleski, Gregory D; Blanchard, Edward B

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed the relative strength of the association between abuse, negative parenting style, and somatization in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. Drawing from preclinical stress physiology and abuse research identifying the family social climate as a frequently stronger and independent determinant of long-term health effects than abuse-specific variables, we predicted that negative parenting behaviors would more strongly correlate with somatization than abuse. Subjects were 81 consecutively evaluated patients, who at baseline underwent psychological testing, measuring perceived parental style, abuse history, somatization, and pain. Although abuse correlated with maternal and paternal rejection, abuse was not associated with somatization. Higher levels of rejection and/or hostility among fathers (not mothers) were more strongly correlated with somatization than was abuse. Further, paternal parenting behaviors were more predictive of somatization than abuse, age, and gender. The lack of an association between abuse and somatization is discussed in light of limitations of biopsychosocial IBS models, whose strong focus on "pathological stressors" (e.g., abuse, trauma) as risk factors may overlook the importance of "less extreme" parenting variables in influencing somatic complaints. The relationship between parenting and somatization is discussed in the context of broader behavioral science research linking disruptions in the quality of parenting to dramatic and long-term changes in patterns of stress reactivity and brain abnormalities seen in IBS patients.

  15. The Influence of Dual Pressure Biofeedback Units on Pelvic Rotation and Abdominal Muscle Activity during the Active Straight Leg Raise in Women with Chronic Lower Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Noh, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Gyoung-Mo; Ha, Sung-Min; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to assess the influence of applying dual pressure biofeedback units (DPBUs) on the angle of pelvic rotation and abdominal muscle activity during the active straight leg raise (ASLR). [Subjects] Seventeen patients with low-back pain (LBP) participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects were asked to perform an active straight leg raise (ASLR) without a PBU, with a single PBU, and with DPBUs. The angles of pelvic rotation were measured using a three-dimensi...

  16. Recurrent abdominal pain among a sample of Egyptian children in relation to family and school related problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Mageid, F Y; Abou-El Fetouh, A M; Abou-Hatab, Maha F

    2002-01-01

    Recurrent Abdominal pain (RAP) is a common feature of growing children especially above the age of five. It may be experienced for either organic or non-organic (psychogenic) reasons. The main objective of the present study is to investigate the possible relation between the occurrence of RAP and some family and school related problems. It is a descriptive cross sectional study designed to assess children aged 7-12 years, of both sexes, attending El-Salam health insurance clinic (Eastern Cairo) for their RAP. Seven hundred children (400 boys and 300 girls) suffering from RAP were investigated. They were subjected to routine investigations (urine and stool analysis, complete blood picture, x-ray abdomen) to exclude the possible organic cause for their RAP. A specially designed questionnaire for the purpose of the present study was applied after testing its validity (it was judged by 10 professors of Psychology, Psychiatry and community medicine before its use). It was applied individually on each child (or his/her caregiver). Data were collected from each subject as regard: His/her personal history, socio-demographic characteristics, characters of RAP (its type, severity, onset, duration, frequency, site and its relation to other symptoms), some organic and psychological symptoms and history of family troubles and school related problems. Data were collected, tabulated and analyzed using Chi- square test to compare children of organic and non-organic RAP. Results revealed that RAP was mostly non-organic in origin (65.7%). It was commonly associated with family troubles (59.7%) and school related problems (40.3%). Children with non-organic RAP expressed many psychological symptoms especially; tantrums (41.1%), phobias related to school (17.4%) as well as continuous crying (13%) and appetite loss (14%). There was significant female predominance (p = 0.0000) in expressing RAP in direct relation to family troubles and school related problems compared to boys. Non

  17. Syringomyelia and Arnold-Chiari malformation associated with neck pain and left arm radiculopathy treated with spinal manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieppo Francio, Vinicius

    2014-11-09

    An 18-year-old female patient presented with left dominant neck pain after a motor vehicle collision. Her cervical spine MRI revealed syringomyelia with associated Type I Arnold-Chiari malformation. Some researchers have reported that these might be considered contraindications to spinal manipulation. Nevertheless, her benign and functional clinical examination suggested otherwise and she underwent four manipulative treatments in 2 weeks. By the end of the treatment plan and after 1-month follow-up, she was asymptomatic, no adverse effects were noted and her outcome assessment score decreased from 56% to 0%. This case illustrates that spinal manipulation may be a useful adjunctive treatment procedure for spinal pain, even in the presence of syringomyelia and Chiari malformation, which may not necessarily be a contraindication to spinal manipulation, when performed by a skilled and well-trained physician. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Comparison of diagnostic performance between single- and multiphasic contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic computed tomography in patients admitted to the emergency department with abdominal pain: potential radiation dose reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Shin Hye; You, Je Sung; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Mi Kyong [Yonsei University, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate feasibility of radiation dose reduction by optimal phase selection of computed tomography (CT) in patients who visited the emergency department (ED) for abdominal pain. We included 253 patients who visited the ED for abdominal pain. They underwent multiphasic CT including precontrast, late arterial phase (LAP), and hepatic venous phase (HVP). Three image sets (HVP, precontrast + HVP, and precontrast + LAP + HVP) were reviewed. Two reviewers determined the most appropriate diagnosis with five-point confidence scale. Diagnostic performances were compared among image sets by weighted-least-squares method or DeLong's method. Linear mixed model was used to assess changes of diagnostic confidence and radiation dose. There was no difference in diagnostic performance among three image sets, although diagnostic confidence level was significantly improved after review of triphasic images compared with both HVP images only or HVP with precontrast images (confidence scale, 4.64 ± 0.05, 4.66 ± 0.05, and 4.76 ± 0.04 in the order of the sets; overall P = 0.0008). Similar trends were observed in the subgroup analysis for diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease and cholecystitis. There is no difference between HVP-CT alone and multiphasic CT for the diagnosis of causes of abdominal pain in patients admitted to the ED without prior chronic disease or neoplasia. (orig.)

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging can also: help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, abscesses or ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Except for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging can also: help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, ...

  1. Comparative Characteristics of the Results of Evacuation to Healthcare Facilities and Treatment Outcomes of Children Who Applied for First Aid With Acute Abdominal Pains. The Case of an Emergency Medical Setting of an Average Municipal Entity

    OpenAIRE

    Ekaterina А. Romanova; Leyla S. Namazova-Baranova; Elena Yu. Dyakonova; Aleksey Yu. Romanov; Kazbek S. Mezhidov; Zharadat I. Dohshukaeva

    2017-01-01

    Background. Despite the active development of diagnostic capabilities, the problems of diagnosis at the pre-hospital stage with abdominal pain remain unresolved. Objective. Our aim was to analyze the results of evacuation to healthcare facilities as well as treatment outcomes (conservative and surgical) of hospitalized children who applied for first aid with acute abdominal pain, in order to identify possible shortcomings in the existing diagnostic algorithm and its optimization. Methods. The...

  2. Abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raissaki, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: There are numerous conditions that affect mainly or exclusively the pediatric population. These constitute true emergencies, related to patient's health. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of abdominal non-traumatic emergencies may result in rapid deterioration, peritonitis, sepsis, even death or in severe complications with subsequent morbidity. Abdominal emergencies in children mostly present with pain, tenderness, occasionally coupled by vomiting, fever, abdominal distension, and failure to pass meconium or stools. Diarrhea, blood per rectum, abnormal laboratory tests and lethargy may also be manifestations of acute abdominal conditions. Abdominal emergencies have a different aetiology, depending on age and whether the pain is acute or chronic. Symptoms have to be matched with age and gender. Newborns up to 1 months of age may have congenital diseases: atresia, low obstruction including Hirschsprung's disease, meconium ileus. Meconium plug is one of the commonest cause of low obstruction in newborns that may also develop necrotizing enterocolitis, incarcerated inguinal hernia and mid-gut volvulus. Past the immediate postnatal period, any duodenal obstruction should be considered midgut volvulus until proven otherwise and patients should undergo ultrasonography and/or properly performed upper GI contrast study that records the exact position of the deduno-jejunal junction. Infants 6 months-2 years carry the risk of intussusception, mid-gut volvulus, perforation, acute pyelonephritis. Preschool and school-aged children 2-12 years carry the risk of appendicitis, genito-urinary abnormalities including torsion, urachal abnormalities, haemolytic uremic syndrome and Henoch-Schonlein purpura. Children above 12 years suffer from the same conditions as in adults. Most conditions may affect any age despite age predilection. Abdominal solid organ ultrasonography (US) coupled with gastrointestinal ultrasonography is the principle imaging modality in radiosensitive

  3. A Large Left Ventricle Myxoma: Presenting with Epigastric Pain and Weight Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmaz Fakhari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac myxomas are the most common benign tumors found in the heart. They usually appear in the left atrium. Those originating from the left ventricle (LV are rare. Although clinical presentation may vary, dyspnea and embolism are the most commonly reported symptoms. In the present case study, a 27-year-old woman with a large myxoma originating from the left ventricular free wall is studied. She had atypical complaints, mainly epigastric discomfort, nausea, vomiting, and anorexia. She was hospitalized for acute abdomen, but subsequent investigations revealed a large myxoma that fully filled the LV and severely compromised the flow of the aortic and mitral valves. After successful emergency tumor resection, all symptoms disappeared. The uncommon presentation caused by these tumors is discussed in this study.

  4. Estudo prospectivo de pacientes pediátricos com dor abdominal crônica Prospective study of infants with chronic abdominal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana Kores Dorsa; Gabriel Hessel; Magno Cardoso V. Neto; Elizete Aparecida L. C. Pinto

    2007-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Classificar a dor abdominal crônica em crianças e adolescentes por meio dos critérios de Roma II e definir o desfecho diagnóstico em três anos de seguimento. MÉTODOS: Durante um ano, 71 pacientes com dor abdominal crônica foram atendidos como casos novos num ambulatório terciário de gastroenterologia pediátrica. Causas orgânicas foram excluídas por bases clínicas e laboratoriais, e relatos clínicos foram avaliados especificamente quanto à possibilidade de preencherem os Critérios de...

  5. Dexketoprofen/tramadol 25 mg/75 mg: randomised double-blind trial in moderate-to-severe acute pain after abdominal hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R A; McQuay, H J; Tomaszewski, J; Raba, G; Tutunaru, D; Lietuviete, N; Galad, J; Hagymasy, L; Melka, D; Kotarski, J; Rechberger, T; Fülesdi, B; Nizzardo, A; Guerrero-Bayón, C; Cuadripani, S; Pizà-Vallespir, B; Bertolotti, M

    2016-01-22

    Dexketoprofen trometamol plus tramadol hydrochloride is a new oral combination of two analgesics, which have different mechanisms of action for the treatment of moderate to severe acute pain. Randomised, double-blind, parallel, placebo and active-controlled, single and multiple-dose study to evaluate the analgesic efficacy and safety of dexketoprofen/tramadol 25 mg/75 mg in comparison with the single agents (dexketoprofen 25 mg and tramadol 100 mg) in moderate to severe acute pain after abdominal hysterectomy. Patients received seven consecutive doses of study drug within a 3-day period, each dose separated by an 8-hour interval. A placebo arm was included during the single-dose phase to validate the pain model. Efficacy assessments included pain intensity, pain relief, patient global evaluation and use of rescue medication. The primary endpoint was the mean sum of pain intensity differences over the first 8 h (SPID8). The efficacy analysis included 606 patients, with a mean age of 48 years (range 25-73). The study results confirmed the superiority of the combination over the single agents in terms of the primary endpoint (p dexketoprofen/tramadol 25 mg/75 mg over the single components in the management of moderate to severe acute pain, as confirmed by the single-dose efficacy, repeated-dose sustained effect and good safety profile observed. EU Clinical Trials Register (EudraCT number 2012-004545-32, registered 04 October 2012); Clinicaltrials.gov ( NCT01904149, registered 17 July 2013).

  6. Ultrasound measurement of deep and superficial abdominal muscles thickness during standing postural tasks in participants with and without chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Fatemeh; Arab, Amir Massoud; Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Salavati, Mahyar

    2016-06-01

    Activity of deep abdominal muscles increases the lumbar stability. Majority of previous studies indicated abdominal muscle activity dysfunction during static activity in patients with low back pain (LBP). However, the number of studies that evaluated deep abdominal muscle activity in dynamic standing activities in patients is limited, while this assessment provides better understanding of pain behavior during these activities. Investigation of superficial and deep abdominal muscles activity in participants with chronic LBP as compared to healthy individuals during standing tasks. Case control study. Ultrasound imaging was used to measure the thickness of transverse abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO) and external oblique (EO) muscles in female participants with (N = 45) and without chronic LBP (CLBP) (N = 45) during tests. The Biodex Balance System was used to provide standing tasks. The thickness of each muscle in a standing task was normalized to actual thickness at rest in the supine lying position to estimate its activity. The results indicate increases in thickness of all muscles in both groups during dynamic as compared to static standing tasks (P  0.5). Lower percentages of thickness change for TrA muscle and higher for EO muscle were found in the patients as compared to healthy individuals during all tests (P  1.28). Higher activity of superficial than deep abdominal muscles in patients as compared to healthy individuals during standing tasks indicates motor control dysfunction in patients with CLBP. Standing tasks can discriminate the individuals with and without LBP and can be progressively used in training. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Intravenous acetaminophen is superior to ketamine for postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy: results of a prospective, randomized, double-blind, multicenter clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiz HR

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hamid Reza Faiz,1 Poupak Rahimzadeh,1 Ognjen Visnjevac,2 Behzad Behzadi,1 Mohammad Reza Ghodraty,1 Nader D Nader2 1Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2VA Western NY Healthcare System, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA Background: In recent years, intravenously (IV administered acetaminophen has become one of the most common perioperative analgesics. Despite its now-routine use, IV acetaminophen's analgesic comparative efficacy has never been compared with that of ketamine, a decades-old analgesic familiar to obstetricians, gynecologists, and anesthesiologists alike. This double-blind clinical trial aimed to evaluate the analgesic effects of ketamine and IV acetaminophen on postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy. Methods: Eighty women aged 25–70 years old and meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria were randomly allocated into two groups of 40 to receive either IV acetaminophen or ketamine intraoperatively. Postoperatively, each patient had patient-controlled analgesia. Pain and sedation (Ramsay Sedation Scale were documented based on the visual analog scale in the recovery room and at 4 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after the surgery. Hemodynamic changes, adverse medication effects, and the need for breakthrough meperidine were also recorded for both groups. Data were analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results: Visual analog scale scores were significantly lower in the IV acetaminophen group at each time point (P<0.05, and this group required significantly fewer doses of breakthrough analgesics compared with the ketamine group (P=0.039. The two groups had no significant differences in terms of adverse effects. Conclusion: Compared with ketamine, IV acetaminophen significantly improved postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy. Keywords: intravenous acetaminophen, abdominal hysterectomy, ketamine, analgesia, postoperative pain

  8. Left Colon Diverticulitis Presenting as Perforated Lumbar Abscess: A Case Report and Review of the Current Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Paramythiotis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverticular perforation is a common complication of diverticulitis and can lead to the creation of abscesses. The presence of such abscesses on the abdominal wall is rare and can lead to misdiagnosis. We present the case of a patient with abdominal pain and the formation of a large left lumbar abscess due to perforation of a diverticulum of the left colon and our surgical treatment of choice with favorable results.

  9. Evaluation of reduced-dose CT for acute non-traumatic abdominal pain: evaluation of diagnostic accuracy in comparison to standard-dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Ahmed E; Bongers, Malte Niklas; Zinsser, Dominik; Schabel, Christoph; Wichmann, Julian L; Arshid, Rami; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bamberg, Fabian

    2018-01-01

    Background Patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain often undergo abdominal computed tomography (CT). However, abdominal CT is associated with high radiation exposure. Purpose To evaluate diagnostic performance of a reduced-dose 100 kVp CT protocol with advanced modeled iterative reconstruction as compared to a linearly blended 120 kVp protocol for assessment of acute, non-traumatic abdominal pain. Material and Methods Two radiologists assessed 100 kVp and linearly blended 120 kVp series of 112 consecutive patients with acute non-traumatic pain (onset diagnostic confidence. Both 100 kVp and linearly blended 120 kVp series were quantitatively evaluated regarding radiation dose and image noise. Comparative statistics and diagnostic accuracy was calculated using receiver operating curve (ROC) statistics, with final clinical diagnosis/clinical follow-up as reference standard. Results Image quality was high for both series without detectable significant differences ( P = 0.157). Image noise and artifacts were rated low for both series but significantly higher for 100 kVp ( P ≤ 0.021). Diagnostic accuracy was high for both series (120 kVp: area under the curve [AUC] = 0.950, sensitivity = 0.958, specificity = 0.941; 100 kVp: AUC ≥ 0.910, sensitivity ≥ 0.937, specificity = 0.882; P ≥ 0.516) with almost perfect inter-rater agreement (Kappa = 0.939). Diagnostic confidence was high for both dose levels without significant differences (100 kVp 5, range 4-5; 120 kVp 5, range 3-5; P = 0.134). The 100 kVp series yielded 26.1% lower radiation dose compared with the 120 kVp series (5.72 ± 2.23 mSv versus 7.75 ± 3.02 mSv, P diagnostic accuracy for the assessment of acute non-traumatic abdominal pain.

  10. Oral contrast for CT in patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal and pelvic pain: what should be its current role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielar, Ania Z; Patlas, Michael N; Katz, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    Positive oral contrast agents, including barium suspensions and water-soluble iodinated solutions, have traditionally been used in conjunction with the CT evaluation of patients with abdominal and pelvic pain. Due to continued advancements in CT technology, and due to increasing obesity and correspondingly a general increase in the intra-abdominal and intra-pelvic fat separating bowel loops in North American patients and in patients in other parts of the world over the past few decades, the ability of radiologists to accurately evaluate the cause of acute symptoms has substantially improved. Recent research and evolving imaging society guidelines/systematic reviews increasingly support performing CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis without the need for positive oral contrast in these types of adult patient populations, in most clinical situations. Increased patient throughput, patient preference, patient safety, and most importantly, retention of high diagnostic accuracy, are reasons for this recent change in practice to routinely omit the use of enteric contrast agents for the majority of patients presenting with acute abdominal and pelvic pain whom are undergoing emergency CT.

  11. Transversus Abdominis Plane Blocks with Single-Dose Liposomal Bupivacaine in Conjunction with a Nonnarcotic Pain Regimen Help Reduce Length of Stay following Abdominally Based Microsurgical Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonka, Eric M; Lamelas, Andreas M; Kim, Julie N; Molina, Bianca; Molina, Nathan; Okwali, Michelle; Samson, William; Sultan, Mark R; Dayan, Joseph H; Smith, Mark L

    2017-08-01

    Side effects associated with use of postoperative narcotics for pain control can delay recovery after abdominally based microsurgical breast reconstruction. The authors evaluated a nonnarcotic pain control regimen in conjunction with bilateral transversus abdominis plane blocks on facilitating early hospital discharge. A retrospective analysis was performed of consecutive patients who underwent breast reconstruction using abdominally based free flaps, with or without being included in a nonnarcotic protocol using intraoperative transversus abdominis plane blockade. During this period, the use of locoregional analgesia evolved from none (control), to continuous bupivacaine infusion transversus abdominis plane and catheters, to single-dose transversus abdominis plane blockade with liposomal bupivacaine solution. Demographic factors, length of stay, inpatient opioid consumption, and complications were reported for all three groups. One hundred twenty-eight consecutive patients (182 flaps) were identified. Forty patients (62 flaps) were in the infusion-liposomal bupivacaine group, 48 (66 flaps) were in the single-dose blockade-catheter group, and 40 (54 flaps) were in the control group. The infusion-liposomal bupivacaine patients had a significantly shorter hospital stay compared with the single-dose blockade-catheter group (2.65 ± 0.66 versus 3.52 ± 0.92 days; p bupivacaine help facilitate early hospital discharge after abdominally based microsurgical breast reconstruction. A trend toward consistent discharge by postoperative day 2 was seen. This could result in significant cost savings for health care systems. Therapeutic, III.

  12. Abdominal epilepsy in a Nigerian child S

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdominal epilepsy is an exceptionally rare cause of abdominal pain that is more likely to occur in children than in adults. We report on a child with episodic paroxysmal abdominal pain, accompanied by flatulence, neck pain, tiredness and bilateral weakness of the lower limbs. The findings on physical examination were ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be asked to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras ... can diagnose many causes of abdominal pain or injury from trauma with very high accuracy, enabling faster ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... experienced radiologist can diagnose many causes of abdominal pain or injury from trauma with very high accuracy, enabling faster treatment and often eliminating the need for additional, more ...

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the technologist verifies that the images are of high enough quality for accurate interpretation. The CT examination ... abdominal pain or injury from trauma with very high accuracy, enabling faster treatment and often eliminating the ...

  16. Dor abdominal aguda como manifestação de violência física em lactente: alerta aos pediatras Dolor abdominal agudo como manifestación de violencia física en lactante: alerta a los pediatras Acute abdominal pain as a manifestation of physical violence in an infant: alert to pediatricians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Gomes de Souza

    2012-12-01

    Pediatría y de los pediatras en general para el acercamiento a la violencia contra el niño, para que estén más preparados para accionar la línea de cuidados en situaciones de violencia.OBJECTIVE: To alert pediatricians and pediatric residents on the possibility of child abuse by reporting a clinical case. CASE DESCRIPTION: An 18 month-old infant was brought to the Emergency Department due to abdominal pain and vomiting for 48 hours. Abdominal examination revealed two holes and a small hardened mass. An abdominal X-ray showed three metallic objects. Two sewing needles and one nail without a head were removed from the abdominal cavity by laparotomy. COMMENTS: Diagnosis was performed in the second medical care, probably because the intentional injury had not been considered in the first visit. Physical violence is a differential diagnosis to be considered in the presence of abdominal pain in children. It is worth noting the importance of improving pediatric resident training, and also of pediatricians in general, in relation to the approach of child abuse, enabling them to use adequate care in cases of violence.

  17. Interrater and intrarater reliability of transverse abdominal and lumbar multifidus muscle thickness in subjects with and without low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Olivera; Djordjevic, Aleksandar; Konstantinovic, Ljubica

    2014-12-01

    Two-group, repeated-measures reliability study. To determine interrater and intrarater reliability of ultrasound measurements of transverse abdominal (TrA) and lumbar multifidus (LM) muscle thickness, during rest and contraction, in subjects with low back pain (LBP) and healthy subjects over 3 consecutive days, performed by an experienced and a novice rater. Previous reliability studies of TrA or LM thickness did not simultaneously account for muscle state, rater experience, and multiday assessment in large subject samples. The 2 raters measured TrA and LM thickness on 3 consecutive days in 42 healthy subjects and 56 subjects with LBP, during rest and contraction, and calculated the percent thickness change from rest to contraction. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC(2,k)) and 95% minimal detectable change in thickness were derived for a single measure (day 1) and an average measure (days 1-3). The interrater ICC(2,1) values for single-measure thickness (LBP group, 0.71-0.87; healthy group, 0.94-1.00) were similar to those for average-measure thickness (LBP group, 0.73-0.84; healthy group, 0.93-1.00). Both interrater ICC(2,1) and ICC(2,3) were lower for the relative thickness change (0.61-0.96). Intrarater ICC(2,1) values across 3 consecutive days were high for both raters across the 2 groups (LBP group, 0.95-1.00; healthy group, 0.93-1.00), albeit lower for the relative thickness change (0.79-0.99). The 95% minimal detectable changes were < 0.3 mm for the TrA and < 2 mm for the LM (but, in most cases, less than 10% of average thickness). Both experienced and trained novice raters provided reliable measurements of TrA and LM thickness in participants with LBP and healthy participants, during rest and contraction. One-time measurements were similar to averaged measurements. Small absolute errors were observed. Public trial registry: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613001077752.

  18. Video Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Chronic Abdominal Pain with or without Associated Symptoms: A Retrospective Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Egnatios

    Full Text Available Chronic abdominal pain (CAP is a common indication for gastroenterology referrals. More insidious causes of CAP isolated to the small bowel, such as malignancies and Crohn's disease, are rising in incidence and causing more gastroenterologists to evaluate their patients with video capsule endoscopy (VCE. However, the role of VCE in patients with CAP is still unclear.We assessed the efficacy of VCE in patients with CAP and whether it led to findings that contributed to disease management and meaningful interventions.This retrospective study evaluated 607 capsule endoscopy studies at an open referral endoscopy unit. Ninety of the studies were for CAP. These studies were compared to those performed for other indications to compare diagnostic yield. In addition, we investigated whether VCE led to an intervention that improved clinical outcomes.Overall, the number of abnormal findings in CAP patients was significantly lower than VCE performed for other indications (24.4% vs 39.0%, respectively p = 0.009. When patients with CAP presented with other pertinent clinical findings (e.g. nausea, weight loss, anemia, history of in inflammatory bowel disease, etc., the likelihood of an abnormal finding increased to a level that was not different from those who received VCE for other indications (27.1%, p = 0.10. The findings from VCE lead to changed management and improved outcomes in 16.2% of CAP patients with associated symptoms. However, the subgroup that benefited the most were those who had a prior history of Crohn's disease. Patients with CAP who did not have any associated symptoms continued to have a significantly lower abnormal finding rate compared to those who received VCE for other indications (19.4%, p = 0.03 and VCE rarely led to a change in management that would improve outcomes (5.6%.VCE for CAP has a lower rate of abnormal findings than other indications. However, VCE is a useful diagnostic tool that can help provide a possible etiology of

  19. Video Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Chronic Abdominal Pain with or without Associated Symptoms: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egnatios, Jeremy; Kaushal, Khushboo; Kalmaz, Denise; Zarrinpar, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Chronic abdominal pain (CAP) is a common indication for gastroenterology referrals. More insidious causes of CAP isolated to the small bowel, such as malignancies and Crohn's disease, are rising in incidence and causing more gastroenterologists to evaluate their patients with video capsule endoscopy (VCE). However, the role of VCE in patients with CAP is still unclear. We assessed the efficacy of VCE in patients with CAP and whether it led to findings that contributed to disease management and meaningful interventions. This retrospective study evaluated 607 capsule endoscopy studies at an open referral endoscopy unit. Ninety of the studies were for CAP. These studies were compared to those performed for other indications to compare diagnostic yield. In addition, we investigated whether VCE led to an intervention that improved clinical outcomes. Overall, the number of abnormal findings in CAP patients was significantly lower than VCE performed for other indications (24.4% vs 39.0%, respectively p = 0.009). When patients with CAP presented with other pertinent clinical findings (e.g. nausea, weight loss, anemia, history of in inflammatory bowel disease, etc.), the likelihood of an abnormal finding increased to a level that was not different from those who received VCE for other indications (27.1%, p = 0.10). The findings from VCE lead to changed management and improved outcomes in 16.2% of CAP patients with associated symptoms. However, the subgroup that benefited the most were those who had a prior history of Crohn's disease. Patients with CAP who did not have any associated symptoms continued to have a significantly lower abnormal finding rate compared to those who received VCE for other indications (19.4%, p = 0.03) and VCE rarely led to a change in management that would improve outcomes (5.6%). VCE for CAP has a lower rate of abnormal findings than other indications. However, VCE is a useful diagnostic tool that can help provide a possible etiology of CAP in

  20. A comparison of abdominal muscle thickness changes after a lifting task in subjects with and without chronic low-back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed Hoseinpoor, Tahere; Kahrizi, Sedighe; Mobini, Bahram; Naji, Mohsen

    2015-03-01

    Using ultrasound imaging, the abdominal muscles' response to the back extensor muscle fatigue was assessed in subjects with chronic low-back pain (CLBP). Lumbar muscle fatigue is a common occurrence among workers. Alteration in motor coordination is one consequence of muscular fatigue. According to previous studies, CLBP subjects use their back and abdominal muscles in different ways, but questions remain about abdominal muscle responses to back muscle fatigue in CLBP patients. Thirteen CLBP patients and 15 healthy subjects participated in this study. The thickness of abdominal muscles-including transverse abdominis (TrA), internal oblique abdominis (IO), and external oblique abdominis (EO) muscles-was measured in standing position with and without axial loads before and after a lifting fatigue task. The results reveal a significant difference for the main effects of group on percentage of change in TrA thickness (F = 8.9, p = .004). Percentage of change in thickness of TrA was 10% greater in the CLBP group. Although IO thickness displayed greater percentage of change in the CLBP group, the difference between groups was not significant. Abdominal muscle behavior changes with back-muscle fatigue in both healthy and CLBP subjects, but responses were more exaggerated in CLBP patients. Ultrasound imaging technique can provide critical information about the effect of fatigue on spinal muscle activation and consequently about the stability of the spine. As a more applicable and easy technique, ergonomists can use ultrasound imaging in musculoskeletal system assessment in worker populations in future studies. © 2014, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  1. Irritable bowel syndrome symptoms among German students: prevalence, characteristics, and associations to somatic complaints, sleep, quality of life, and childhood abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulewitsch, Marco D; Enck, Paul; Hautzinger, Martin; Schlarb, Angelika A

    2011-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder in the general population, and is linked to considerable impairments in daily functioning. Little is known about the prevalence of IBS symptoms among students. This study examined the prevalence and characteristics of IBS, sex differences, associations to other somatic complaints and sleep, quality of life (QoL), and childhood abdominal pain in a German university student population. Using an Internet-based questionnaire, we assessed IBS criteria (according to Rome III), health complaints, health-related QoL (12-item short-form), healthcare-seeking behavior, absenteeism from classes, and subjective attributions in a sample of 2399 university students (mean age: 24.16 years; 1701 female and 696 male students). The prevalence of IBS-like symptoms was 18.1% with a significant difference between male (15.2%) and female (21.0%) students. Logistic regression models showed that being long-term student doubles the risk for having IBS [adjusted Odds ratio (OR)=2.16], as did the presence of other health problems: recurrent backaches (adjusted OR=2.15), troubles falling asleep (adjusted OR=1.52), and recurrent abdominal pain during childhood (adjusted OR=2.01). The IBS group had significant impairment on 12-item short-form physical and mental dimensions compared with asymptomatic students. Approximately 60% of participants fulfilling IBS criteria never consulted a physician. Male students attributed their symptoms significantly more to nutrition than female students did, who attributed their symptoms significantly more often to stress and anxiety. IBS is a common syndrome among German university students and goes along with impaired health-related QoL. According to our data, students reporting recurrent abdominal pain in childhood are especially at risk for IBS.

  2. Distinct Microbiome-Neuroimmune Signatures Correlate With Functional Abdominal Pain in Children With Autism Spectrum DisorderSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Ann Luna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Emerging data on the gut microbiome in autism spectrum disorder (ASD suggest that altered host–microbe interactions may contribute to disease symptoms. Although gut microbial communities in children with ASD are reported to differ from individuals with neurotypical development, it is not known whether these bacteria induce pathogenic neuroimmune signals. Methods: Because commensal clostridia interactions with the intestinal mucosa can regulate disease-associated cytokine and serotonergic pathways in animal models, we evaluated whether microbiome-neuroimmune profiles (from rectal biopsy specimens and blood differed in ASD children with functional gastrointestinal disorders (ASD-FGID, n = 14 compared with neurotypical (NT children with FGID (NT-FGID, n = 15 and without abdominal pain (NT, n = 6. Microbial 16S ribosomal DNA community signatures, cytokines, and serotonergic metabolites were quantified and correlated with gastrointestinal symptoms. Results: A significant increase in several mucosa-associated Clostridiales was observed in ASD-FGID, whereas marked decreases in Dorea and Blautia, as well as Sutterella, were evident. Stratification by abdominal pain showed multiple organisms in ASD-FGID that correlated significantly with cytokines (interleukin [IL]6, IL1, IL17A, and interferon-γ. Group comparisons showed that IL6 and tryptophan release by mucosal biopsy specimens was highest in ASD children with abdominal pain, whereas serotonergic metabolites generally were increased in children with FGIDs. Furthermore, proinflammatory cytokines correlated significantly with several Clostridiales previously reported to associate with ASD, as did tryptophan and serotonin. Conclusions: Our findings identify distinctive mucosal microbial signatures in ASD children with FGID that correlate with cytokine and tryptophan homeostasis. Future studies are needed to establish whether these disease-associated Clostridiales

  3. Whether preventive low dose magnesium sulphate infusion has an influence on postoperative pain perception and the level of serum beta-endorphin throughout the total abdominal hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryalchi, K; Abedinzade, M; Khanaki, K; Mansour Ghanaie, M; Mohammad Zadeh, F

    Due to the known role of preventive low dose magnesium sulphate on postoperative pain management, in this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study, we tried to investigate the possible relationship between low dose intra-operative magnesium sulphate infusion, postoperative analgesia and the level of serum beta-endorphin during total abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia. Forty women undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy were randomly allocated into 2 groups (20 in each arm). Fifteen minutes before induction of anaesthesia, the case group received a continuous intravenous infusion of magnesium sulphate (15mg/kg/h) and placebo control group received the same volume of isotonic saline. Pain scores were assessed at 0, 6, 12, and 24h after operations using Verbal Numeric Rating Scale. Pethidine consumption was recorded precisely. Serum level of beta-endorphin just 15min before the induction and at the end of the operations was determined by ELISA technique. At 6 and 12h after the operations, Verbal Numeric Rating Scale in the case group was significantly lower than that of placebo control group (P=.0001). Over 24h after the operations, pethidine consumption was significantly lower in the case group compared with control group (P=.0001). In the case group, serum level of beta-endorphin was significantly decreased at the end of the operations compared with before the induction (P=.04). We illustrated that preventive low dose intra-operative magnesium sulphate infusion reduces postoperative pain, has opioid sparing effect and declines serum beta-endorphin concentration during total abdominal hysterectomy. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. An investigation of the reproducibility of ultrasound measures of abdominal muscle activation in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Chris G.; Latimer, Jane; Hodges, Paul W.; Shirley, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) measures are used by clinicians and researchers to evaluate improvements in activity of the abdominal muscles in patients with low back pain. Studies evaluating the reproducibility of these US measures provide some information; however, little is known about the reproducibility of these US measures over time in patients with low back pain. The objectives of this study were to estimate the reproducibility of ultrasound measurements of automatic activation of the lateral abdominal wall muscles using a leg force task in patients with chronic low back pain. Thirty-five participants from an existing randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled trial participated in the study. A reproducibility analysis was undertaken from all patients using data collected at baseline and after treatment. The reproducibility of measurements of thickness, muscle activation (thickness changes) and muscle improvement/deterioration after intervention (differences in thickness changes from single images made before and after treatment) was analysed. The reproducibility of static images (thickness) was excellent (ICC2,1 = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.96–0.97, standard error of the measurement (SEM) = 0.04 cm, smallest detectable change (SDC) = 0.11 cm), the reproducibility of thickness changes was moderate (ICC2,1 = 0.72, 95% CI 0.65–0.76, SEM = 15%, SDC 41%), while the reproducibility of differences in thickness changes from single images with statistical adjustment for duplicate measures was poor (ICC2,1 = 0.44, 95% CI 0.33–0.58, SEM = 21%, SDC = 66.5%). Improvements in the testing protocol must be performed in order to enhance reproducibility of US as an outcome measure for abdominal muscle activation. PMID:19415347

  5. Comparison of diagnostic performance between single- and multiphasic contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic computed tomography in patients admitted to the emergency department with abdominal pain: potential radiation dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Shin Hye; You, Je Sung; Song, Mi Kyong; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate feasibility of radiation dose reduction by optimal phase selection of computed tomography (CT) in patients who visited the emergency department (ED) for abdominal pain. We included 253 patients who visited the ED for abdominal pain. They underwent multiphasic CT including precontrast, late arterial phase (LAP), and hepatic venous phase (HVP). Three image sets (HVP, precontrast + HVP, and precontrast + LAP + HVP) were reviewed. Two reviewers determined the most appropriate diagnosis with five-point confidence scale. Diagnostic performances were compared among image sets by weighted-least-squares method or DeLong's method. Linear mixed model was used to assess changes of diagnostic confidence and radiation dose. There was no difference in diagnostic performance among three image sets, although diagnostic confidence level was significantly improved after review of triphasic images compared with both HVP images only or HVP with precontrast images (confidence scale, 4.64 ± 0.05, 4.66 ± 0.05, and 4.76 ± 0.04 in the order of the sets; overall P = 0.0008). Similar trends were observed in the subgroup analysis for diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease and cholecystitis. There is no difference between HVP-CT alone and multiphasic CT for the diagnosis of causes of abdominal pain in patients admitted to the ED without prior chronic disease or neoplasia. • There was no difference in diagnostic performance of HVP CT and multiphasic CT. • The diagnostic confidence level was improved after review of the LAP images. • HVP CT can achieve diagnostic performance similar to that of multiphasic CT, while minimizing radiation.

  6. An investigation of the reproducibility of ultrasound measures of abdominal muscle activation in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; Maher, Chris G; Latimer, Jane; Hodges, Paul W; Shirley, Debra

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasound (US) measures are used by clinicians and researchers to evaluate improvements in activity of the abdominal muscles in patients with low back pain. Studies evaluating the reproducibility of these US measures provide some information; however, little is known about the reproducibility of these US measures over time in patients with low back pain. The objectives of this study were to estimate the reproducibility of ultrasound measurements of automatic activation of the lateral abdominal wall muscles using a leg force task in patients with chronic low back pain. Thirty-five participants from an existing randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled trial participated in the study. A reproducibility analysis was undertaken from all patients using data collected at baseline and after treatment. The reproducibility of measurements of thickness, muscle activation (thickness changes) and muscle improvement/deterioration after intervention (differences in thickness changes from single images made before and after treatment) was analysed. The reproducibility of static images (thickness) was excellent (ICC(2,1) = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.96-0.97, standard error of the measurement (SEM) = 0.04 cm, smallest detectable change (SDC) = 0.11 cm), the reproducibility of thickness changes was moderate (ICC(2,1) = 0.72, 95% CI 0.65-0.76, SEM = 15%, SDC 41%), while the reproducibility of differences in thickness changes from single images with statistical adjustment for duplicate measures was poor (ICC(2,1) = 0.44, 95% CI 0.33-0.58, SEM = 21%, SDC = 66.5%). Improvements in the testing protocol must be performed in order to enhance reproducibility of US as an outcome measure for abdominal muscle activation.

  7. Abdominal muscle feedforward activation in patients with chronic low back pain is largely unaffected by 8 weeks of core stability training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Garry T

    2012-01-01

    Does timing of abdominal muscle activation in response to rapid shoulder flexion change after 8 weeks with low-load core stability exercises (CSE), high-load sling exercises (SE), or general exercises (GE) in chronic nonspecific low back pain (LBP) patients? A randomised, controlled trial with concealed allocation. Patients were recruited from general practitioners, physiotherapists, or by advertising at a regional hospital in Norway. Men and women, aged 18-60 years, with chronic nonspecific LBP for 3 months or more, and pain score of 2 or more on a 0-10 numeric rating scale were included. Key exclusion criteria included radiating pain below the knee or neurological signs from nerve root compression, and former back surgery. Randomisation of 109 participants allocated 36 to CSE, 36 to SE, and 37 to GE. Patients in the three groups attended treatment once a week for 8 weeks, supervised by a physiotherapist. All were encouraged to stay active and received an information booklet with general information on LBP. The CSE were individualised according to protocols focusing on isolated activation of transversus abdominis during an abdominal drawing-in manoeuver in supine hook-lying position with ultrasound feedback. Written instructions to carry out the drawing-in exercise (10 × 10 seconds 2-3 times per day) at home were also provided. The SE maintained the lumbar spine stable in neutral position throughout a range of leg/arm positions and movements, using elastic bands attached to the pelvis to help the patient maintain a neutral spine position. The SE was performed for 40 minutes in a physiotherapy clinic. The GE group received generalised trunk strengthening and stretching exercises supervised by a physiotherapist at a fitness centre. Primary outcome was change in onset of the deep abdominal muscles in response to rapid shoulder flexion. 102 participants completed the study. No or small changes were found in onset after treatment. Baseline adjusted between

  8. Response of the muscles in the pelvic floor and the lower lateral abdominal wall during the Active Straight Leg Raise in women with and without pelvic girdle pain: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjödahl, Jenny; Gutke, Annelie; Ghaffari, Ghazaleh; Strömberg, Tomas; Öberg, Birgitta

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between activation of the stabilizing muscles of the lumbopelvic region during the Active Straight Leg Raise test and pelvic girdle pain remains unknown. Therefore, the aim was to examine automatic contractions in relation to pre-activation in the muscles of the pelvic floor and the lower lateral abdominal wall during leg lifts, performed as the Active Straight Leg Raise test, in women with and without persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain. Sixteen women with pelvic girdle pain and eleven pain-free women performed contralateral and ipsilateral leg lifts, while surface electromyographic activity was recorded from the pelvic floor and unilaterally from the lower lateral abdominal wall. As participants performed leg lifts onset time was calculated as the time from increased muscle activity to leg lift initiation. No significant differences were observed between the groups during the contralateral leg lift. During the subsequent ipsilateral leg lift, pre-activation in the pelvic floor muscles was observed in 36% of women with pelvic girdle pain and in 91% of pain-free women (P=0.01). Compared to pain-free women, women with pelvic girdle pain also showed significantly later onset time in both the pelvic floor muscles (P=0.01) and the muscles of the lower lateral abdominal wall (Pactivation patterns influence women's ability to stabilize the pelvis during leg lifts. This could be linked to provocation of pain during repeated movements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative Characteristics of the Results of Evacuation to Healthcare Facilities and Treatment Outcomes of Children Who Applied for First Aid With Acute Abdominal Pains. The Case of an Emergency Medical Setting of an Average Municipal Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina А. Romanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite the active development of diagnostic capabilities, the problems of diagnosis at the pre-hospital stage with abdominal pain remain unresolved. Objective. Our aim was to analyze the results of evacuation to healthcare facilities as well as treatment outcomes (conservative and surgical of hospitalized children who applied for first aid with acute abdominal pain, in order to identify possible shortcomings in the existing diagnostic algorithm and its optimization. Methods. The results of treatment outcomes for children with acute abdominal pain at the pre-hospital stage and evacuation to healthcare facilities by visiting teams for the period 2014–2015. are presented by the example of the State Institution «Engels Emergency Medical Setting». Results. Difficulties in routing children to the necessary healthcare facilities (surgical or somatic are due to the complexities of differential diagnosis of the disease in children with acute abdominal pain at the pre-hospital stage. Conclusion. The main task of the primary care and emergency physician at the pre-hospital stage, whose decision determines the direction of the diagnostic search, timeliness and adequacy of the subsequent treatment measures, is to give a correct assessment of abdominal pain syndrome. 

  10. Inter-Rater Reliability of Historical Data Collected by Non-Medical Research Assistants and Physicians in Patients with Acute Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mills, Angela M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In many academic emergency departments (ED, physicians are asked to record clinical data for research that may be time consuming and distracting from patient care. We hypothesized that non-medical research assistants (RAs could obtain historical information from patients with acute abdominal pain as accurately as physicians.METHODS: Prospective comparative study conducted in an academic ED of 29 RAs to 32 resident physicians (RPs to assess inter-rater reliability in obtaining historical information in abdominal pain patients. Historical features were independently recorded on standardized data forms by a RA and RP blinded to each others' answers. Discrepancies were resolved by a third person (RA who asked the patient to state the correct answer on a third questionnaire, constituting the "criterion standard." Inter-rater reliability was assessed using kappa statistics (kappa and percent crude agreement (CrA.RESULTS: Sixty-five patients were enrolled (mean age 43. Of 43 historical variables assessed, the median agreement was moderate (kappa 0.59 [Interquartile range 0.37-0.69]; CrA 85.9% and varied across data categories: initial pain location (kappa 0.61 [0.59-0.73]; CrA 87.7%, current pain location (kappa 0.60 [0.47-0.67]; CrA 82.8%, past medical history (kappa 0.60 [0.48-0.74]; CrA 93.8%, associated symptoms (kappa 0.38 [0.37-0.74]; CrA 87.7%, and aggravating/alleviating factors (kappa 0.09 [-0.01-0.21]; CrA 61.5%. When there was disagreement between the RP and the RA, the RA more often agreed with the criterion standard (64% [55-71%] than the RP (36% [29-45%].CONCLUSION: Non-medical research assistants who focus on clinical research are often more accurate than physicians, who may be distracted by patient care responsibilities, at obtaining historical information from ED patients with abdominal pain.

  11. The efficacy of paracetamol versus tenoxicam on postoperative pain and morphine consumption after abdominal hysterectomy: a placebo-controlled, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunusen, I; Karaman, S; Acar, A; Sargin, A; Firat, V

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the analgesic efficacy and side-effects of paracetamol and tenoxicam in comparison with placebo in patients with postoperative pain after elective abdominal hysterectomy. A total of 120 patients were randomly divided into three groups to receive either paracetamol 1 g, tenoxicam 20 mg or placebo intravenously at the end of surgery, and then morphine was administered by a patient-controlled analgesia device postoperatively. Tenoxicam was associated with lower pain scores at the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 24th hour postoperatively. Total morphine consumption was 44.8 +/- 17.4 mg, 64.6 +/- 19.6 mg, 69.2 +/- 22.1 (tenoxicam, paracetamol and placebo group, respectively) and there was a significant difference in the tenoxicam group compared with the other two groups (p < 0.05). Side-effects except for nausea were similar. A single dose of 20 mg tenoxicam provided effective analgesia and reduced total morphine consumption in comparison with paracetamol and placebo after abdominal hysterectomy.

  12. Diagnostic value of CT compared to ultrasound in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain in children younger than 10 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanovsky, Natalia; Dola, Tamar; Hiller, Nurith

    2016-02-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of ultrasound compared to CT in evaluating acute abdominal pain of different causes in children 10 years of age and under, hospital records and imaging files of 4052 patients under age of 10 who had imaging for abdominal pain were reviewed. One-hundred-thirty-two patients (3 %), (74 males/58 females) who underwent ultrasound and CT within 24 h were divided by age: group I, ages 0-48 months (25 patients); group II, 49-84 months (53 patients); and group III, 85-120 months (54 patients). Diagnoses at ultrasound, CT, and discharge were compared. Cases of a change in diagnosis following CT and impact of the changed diagnosis on patient management were assessed. Non-diagnostic ultrasound or a diagnostic conundrum was present in a small percentage (3 %) of our patients. In the group of patients imaged with two modalities, CT changed the diagnosis in 73/132 patients (55.3 %). Patient management changed in 63/132 patients (47.7 %). CT changed the diagnosis in 46/64 patients with surgical conditions (71.8 %, p diagnostic or equivocal US in a small percentage of patients is probably sufficient to justify the additional radiation burden.

  13. Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 for the Management of Functional Abdominal Pain in Childhood: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizman, Zvi; Abu-Abed, Jaber; Binsztok, Mauricio

    2016-07-01

    To determine whether administration of Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 is beneficial in functional abdominal pain (FAP) of childhood. A total of 101 children, aged 6-15 years, who fulfilled the Rome III criteria for FAP were enrolled in a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, and were randomly assigned to receive either L reuteri DSM 17938 or placebo for 4 weeks, with further follow-up of additional 4 weeks. Response to therapy was based on a self-reported daily questionnaire monitoring frequency and intensity of abdominal pain, using the faces scoring system by Hicks. L reuteri (n = 47) was significantly superior to placebo (n = 46) in relieving frequency (1.9 ± 0.8 vs 3.6 ± 1.7 episodes/wk, P L reuteri. L reuteri DSM 17938, compared with placebo, significantly reduced the frequency and intensity of FAP in children. ClicalTrials.gov: NCT01180556. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Influence of Dual Pressure Biofeedback Units on Pelvic Rotation and Abdominal Muscle Activity during the Active Straight Leg Raise in Women with Chronic Lower Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Gyoung-Mo; Ha, Sung-Min; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to assess the influence of applying dual pressure biofeedback units (DPBUs) on the angle of pelvic rotation and abdominal muscle activity during the active straight leg raise (ASLR). [Subjects] Seventeen patients with low-back pain (LBP) participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects were asked to perform an active straight leg raise (ASLR) without a PBU, with a single PBU, and with DPBUs. The angles of pelvic rotation were measured using a three-dimensional motion-analysis system, and the muscle activity of the bilateral internal oblique abdominis (IO), external oblique abdominis (EO), and rectus abdominis (RA) was recorded using surface electromyography (EMG). One-way repeated-measures ANOVA was performed to determine the rotation angles and muscle activity under the three conditions. [Results] The EMG activity of the ipsilateral IO, contralateral EO, and bilateral RA was greater and pelvic rotation was lower with the DPBUs than with no PBU or a single PBU. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that applying DPBUs during ASLR is effective in decreasing unwanted pelvic rotation and increasing abdominal muscle activity in women with chronic low back pain.

  15. Non-specific abdominal pain remains as the most common reason for acute abdomen: 26-year retrospective audit in one emergency unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerström, Anne; Paajanen, Paavo; Saarelainen, Heidi; Ahonen-Siirtola, Mirella; Ukkonen, Mika; Miettinen, Pekka; Paajanen, Hannu

    2017-10-01

    Distribution of diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain (AAP) may change because of population aging, increased obesity, advanced diagnostic imaging and changes in nutritional habits. Our aim was to evaluate the diagnoses causing AAP during a 26-year period. This was a retrospective cross-sectional cohort study in one emergency department (ED) covering population about 250,000. All patients admitted to the ED in 1986, 2003 and 2012 were evaluated from hospital electronic database. Demographic data, utilization of diagnostic tests, surgical treatment and discharge diagnosis were analyzed. Statistical data of population aging, obesity and alcohol consumption during 1980-2012 were obtained from national registers. The AAP patients represented 10-20% of our total ED census. The most common causes of AAP were nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP, 31-37%), acute appendicitis (11-23%), biliary disease (9-11%), bowel obstruction (5-7%), acute pancreatitis (4-8%) and acute diverticulitis (1-7%). The percentage of NSAP remained highest throughout the study period. Decrease in the number of acute appendicitis (from 23 to 11%; p audit.

  16. Spontaneous Expulsion of a Biliary Stent via the abdominal wall: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a rare complication of a biliary stent inserted via endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) for benign biliary disease in a 60 years-old female presented with abdominal pain and a tender left iliac fossa (LIF) mass. She had change of the colour of the skin over the hypogastric region. Crepitus was ...

  17. Music reduces pain and increases resting state fMRI BOLD signal amplitude in the left angular gyrus in fibromyalgia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo A. Garza-Villarreal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Music reduces pain in fibromyalgia (FM, a chronic pain disease, but the functional neural correlates of music-induced analgesia are still largely unknown. We recruited FM patients (n = 22 who listened to their preferred relaxing music and an auditory control (pink noise for 5 minutes without external noise from fMRI image acquisition. Resting state fMRI was then acquired before and after the music and control conditions. A significant increase in the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations of the BOLD signal was evident in the left angular gyrus after listening to music, which in turn, correlated to the analgesia reports. The post-hoc seed-based functional connectivity analysis of the left angular gyrus showed found higher connectivity after listening to music with right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the left caudate, and decreased connectivity with right anterior cingulate cortex, right supplementary motor area, precuneus and right precentral gyrus. Pain intensity analgesia was correlated (r = .61 to the connectivity of the left angular gyrus with the right precentral gyrus. Our results show that music-induced analgesia in FM is related to top-down regulation of the pain modulatory network by the default-mode network.

  18. Combined transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass with right gastroepiploic artery and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürer, Onur; Haberal, Ismail; Ozsoy, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Male, 74 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) Symptoms: Palpable abdominal mass Medication: - Clinical Procedure: Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair Specialty: Surgery. Rare disease. Coronary artery disease is common in elderly patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Here we report a case of the combination of surgical repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm and off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery. A 74-year-old man who presented at our clinic with chest pain was diagnosed with an abdominal aortic aneurysm. His medical history included right coronary artery stenting. Physical examination revealed a pulsatile abdominal mass on the left side and palpable peripheral pulses. Computed tomography scans showed an infrarenal abdominal aneurysm with a 61-mm enlargement. Coronary angiography revealed 80% stenosis in the stent within the right coronary artery and 20% stenosis in the left main coronary artery. The patient underwent elective coronary artery bypass grafting and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimal invasive coronary artery bypass grafting with right gastroepiploic artery were performed simultaneously in a single surgery. We report this case to emphasize the safety and effectiveness of transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery with abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. This combined approach shortens hospital stay and decreases cost.

  19. Tuberculosis abdominal Abdominal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    T. Rubio; M. T. Gaztelu; A. Calvo; M. Repiso; H. Sarasíbar; F. Jiménez Bermejo; A. Martínez Echeverría

    2005-01-01

    La tuberculosis abdominal cursa con un cuadro inespecífico, con difícil diagnóstico diferencial respecto a otras entidades de similar semiología. Presentamos el caso de un varón que ingresa por presentar dolor abdominal, pérdida progresiva y notoria de peso corporal y fiebre de dos meses de evolución. El cultivo de la biopsia de colon mostró presencia de bacilo de Koch.Abdominal tuberculosis develops according to a non-specific clinical picture, with a difficult differential diagnosis with re...

  20. Validity of tests performed to diagnose acute abdominal pain in patients admitted at an emergency department Validez de las pruebas diagnósticas realizadas a pacientes con dolor abdominal agudo en un servicio de urgencias hospitalario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Navarro Fernández

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the real importance of anamnesis, physical examination, and various tests in the assessment of acute abdominal pain. Methods: a retrospective observational study with patients complaining of abdominal pain at the Emergency Department, Altiplano Health Area (Murcia was performed. In our study we considered the following variables: socio-demographic data, history of previous surgery, symptoms, place and type of pain. Imaging tests were labeled as positive, negative, or inconclusive for assumed diagnoses, which were retrospectively assessed by an external radiologist who was unaware of the patient's final diagnosis. Results: our study includes 292 patients with a mean age of 45.49 years; 56.8% of these patients were women. Regarding the frequency of the different acute abdomen diagnoses, appendicitis was the main cause (approx. 25%, followed by cholecystitis (10%. We found a significant diagnostic correlation between pain location in the right hypochondrium (RHC and a diagnosis with cholecystitis. This location was also significant for acute appendicitis (up to 74%. Regarding clinical signs, we only observed a significant correlation between fever and viscera perforation, and between Murphy's sign and cholecystitis. Sensitivity and specificity found in relation to the psoas sign were similar to those seen in other series, 16 and 95% respectively, and slightly lower than the Blumberg or rebound sign, which we found to be around 50 and 23%, respectively. Conclusions: a anamnesis and physical examination offer limited accuracy when assessing acute abdomen; b ultrasound scans offer a low diagnostic agreement index for appendicitis; and c laparoscopy may prove useful for diagnosis, and is also a possible treatment for acute abdominal pain despite its low diagnostic efficiency.Objetivo: determinar la importancia real que en sí tienen la anamnesis, la exploración física y las diferentes pruebas complementarias en la valoraci

  1. Excision of a large abdominal wall lipoma improved bowel passage in a Proteus syndrome patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yoshifumi; Kusuda, Shinichi; Nagata, Naoki; Yamaguchi, Koji

    2009-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is an extremely rare congenital disorder that produces multifocal overgrowth of tissue. This report presents a surgical case of a large lipoma in the abdominal wall of a patient with Proteus syndrome. She was diagnosed with Proteus syndrome based on certain diagnostic criteria. The neoplasm increased in size gradually, producing hemihypertrophy of her left lower extremity and trunk, and spread to her retroperitoneum and her left abdominal wall. She experienced gradually progressive constipation, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen demonstrated a large mass in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of the left lower abdominal wall which measured 12 cm × 8 cm x 6 cm in diameter and encased the left colon. This mass in the abdominal wall was excised. The weight of the excised mass was 1550 g. The histopathological diagnosis of this mass was lipoma. After surgery, the encasement of the left colon was improved, and the patient was able to move her bowels twice per day. The excision of the large lipoma in the abdominal wall contributed to the improved bowel passage in this patient with Proteus syndrome. PMID:19598310

  2. Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia - Worsening Pain in Opioid-Dependent Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    presented to the emergency department (ED) with severe pain in his left leg and perineum. The patient had a history of bilateral above- the-knee amputations...μg to 75 μg/h and started buprenorphine 2 mg sublingual 4 times daily. He reported nausea and chills but denied fever, abdominal pain, dysuria, or...other symptoms. His medical history was significant for posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, chronic pain, phantom limb pain, insomnia, and depression

  3. STUDY OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL ENDOSCOPY FINDINGS AND PRESENCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION AMONG ADULT PATIENTS OF UPPER ABDOMINAL PAIN AND DYSPEPSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Singh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Dyspepsia is a common presenting complaint of various upper gastrointestinal disorders. The symptoms of causes of dyspepsia often overlap and this makes aetiological diagnosis difficult. Endoscopy is the ideal procedure for identifying organic diseases of the foregut and rapid urease test with endoscopy is a gold standard method for diagnosing the h.pylori infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with various upper gastrointestinal pathologies. MATERIALS AND METHODS This hospital-based case-controlled study was carried out in a tertiary hospital, Dr. Bhim Rao Ambedkar Hospital, which is attached to Pt. J.N.M. Medical College, Raipur, and which provides open access service to endoscopy. Eighty two consecutive adult outpatients and admitted patients under Department of Surgery and Medicine with upper abdominal pain and dyspepsia were screened for eligibility and underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy using forward-viewing endoscopes from March 2015 to September 2016. Patients with dyspepsia who are over 18 years of age should undergoendoscopy (EGD for initial work up and divided in case having endoscopic findings and control having normal findings, then apply rapid urease test to all of these patients. RESULTS The most commonly identified endoscopic findings were gastritis (36%, Peptic Ulcer Disease (PUD (13.3%, oesophagitis (11%, duodenitis (7.3%. Gastric cancer was identified in 4.9% of patients and all of them were aged 18 years and above (p>0.05. H. pylori infection was detected in 51% (n=42 of patients. Gastritis andoesophagitis were statistically significantly associated with H. pylori (p0.05. Gastritis, GERD and PUD are the leading causes of dyspepsia. H. pylori infection is present in significant proportion of dyspeptic patients. CONCLUSION In present study, we are concluded that all upper abdominal pain is not due to acid peptic disease, but most of upper abdominal pain is due to acid peptic disease with H

  4. Hiperalgesia visceral e dor abdominal crônica: abordagem diagnóstica e terapêutica Hiperalgesia visceral y dolor abdominal crónico: abordaje diagnóstica y terapéutica Visceral hyperalgesia and chronic abdominal pain: diagnostic and therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durval Campos Kraychete

    2003-12-01

    esclarecer la fisiopatología del dolor visceral y establecer metas diagnósticas y terapéuticas, para portadores de esta morbididad, fundamentada en criterios específicos. CONTENIDO: El dolor abdominal crónico inespecífico o funcional representa una interacción compleja entre disturbio de motilidad, hipersensibilidad visceral y respuestas neuroendócrina y psicosocial inadecuadas. Mecanismos periféricos y centrales de nocicepción parecen estar envueltos en la hiperalgesia visceral. El abordaje diagnóstico requiere una evaluación minuciosa de la historia y examen clínico, llevando en consideración los criterios de Roma II. Fundamentado en los mecanismos fisiopatológicos conocidos, o supuestos, nuevas drogas vienen siendo pesquisadas, y algunas utilizadas más recientemente, como los agonistas de los receptores 5-HT4 y bloqueadores de los canales de sodio, para el control del dolor abdominal. CONCLUSIONES: Los mecanismos fisiopatológicos del dolor abdominal crónico, aún no están esclarecidos. El abordaje terapéutico y diagnóstico requiere el conocimiento de tales mecanismos, así como de los criterios de Roma II. Por otro lado, una buena relación médico-paciente y la actuación de grupo intermultidiciplinar parecem fundamentais para mejorar la respuesta al tratamiento instituido y la calidad de vida del paciente.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Chronic abdominal pain is one of the most frequent reasons for medical consultation. There is, however, no well-established protocol for its diagnostic approach and, most of the times, investigation becomes an expensive and invasive medical practice. This review aimed at explaining visceral pain pathophysiology and establishing diagnostic and therapeutic goals for these patients, based on specific criteria. CONTENTS: Chronic nonspecific or functional abdominal pain is a complex interaction among impaired motility, visceral hypersensitivity and inadequate neuroendocrine and psychosocial responses. Peripheral and central

  5. Abdominal tap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peritoneal tap; Paracentesis; Ascites - abdominal tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap ... You then receive a local numbing medicine. The tap needle is inserted 1 to 2 inches (2. ...

  6. Recurring Lower Abdominal Pain and Fever as Initial Presentation of Adult Onset Still’s Disease in the Absence of Arthralgia and Other System Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuajela Sreh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A 34 year-old Afro-Caribbean female presented with recurring episodes of fever and lower abdominal pain over a period of two months not improving despite courses of antibiotics for possible recurrent urinary tract infections. On admission to hospital, patient was treated for a possible pyelonephritis or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID. Extensive investigations into possible source of infection were carried out. However, all of the repeated microbiological cultures were normal. Patient was investigated further for other possible causes including connective tissue disease, haematological disorders, or neoplasm, all of which were normal. Diagnosis of adult onset Still’s disease (AOSD was confirmed by a rheumatologist based on Yamaguchi’s diagnostic criteria for AOSD alongside significantly raised serum ferritin. Patient was treated with steroids to which she showed remarkable clinical improvement alongside marked reduction in her serum ferritin levels.

  7. Vascular thrombosis as a cause of abdominal pain in a patient with neuroendocrine carcinoma of pancreas: Findings on 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naswa, Niraj; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Malhotra, Arun

    2012-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of pancreas are relatively rare neoplasms and are classified as either functioning or non-functioning tumors. A 55-year-old female diagnosed with a large, well-differentiated, non-functional neuroendocrine carcinoma of pancreas, presented with abdominal pain of increasing severity. A contrast-enhanced examination of the abdomen was performed to reveal a large, diffuse, enhancing pancreatic mass with multiple filling defects within the mesenteric vasculature. We present findings on 68 Ga-labeled [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid]-1-NaI 3 -Octreotide, positron emission tomography-computed tomography ( 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT) and the importance of somatostatin receptor-based PET imaging in such patients

  8. Refractory Abdominal Pain in a Patient with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Be Wary of Acquired Angioedema due to C1 Esterase Inhibitor Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullateef Abdulkareem

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1INH-AAE is a rare and potentially fatal syndrome of bradykinin-mediated angioedema characterized by episodes of angioedema without urticaria. It typically manifests with nonpitting edema of the skin and edema in the gastrointestinal (GI tract mucosa or upper airway. Edema of the upper airway and tongue may lead to life-threatening asphyxiation. C1INH-AAE is typically under-diagnosed because of its rarity and its propensity to mimic more common abdominal conditions and allergic reactions. In this article, we present the case of a 62-year-old male with a history of recently diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL who presented to our hospital with recurrent abdominal pain, initially suspected to have Clostridium difficile colitis and diverticulitis. He received a final diagnosis of acquired angioedema due to C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency due to concomitant symptoms of lip swelling, cutaneous nonpitting edema of his lower extremities, and complement level deficiencies. He received acute treatment with C1 esterase replacement and icatibant and was maintained on C1 esterase infusions. He also underwent chemotherapy for his underlying CLL and did not experience further recurrence of his angioedema.

  9. Music reduces pain and increases resting state fMRI BOLD signal amplitude in the left angular gyrus in fibromyalgia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A; Jiang, Zhiguo; Vuust, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Music reduces pain in fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic pain disease, but the functional neural correlates of music-induced analgesia (MIA) are still largely unknown. We recruited FM patients (n = 22) who listened to their preferred relaxing music and an auditory control (pink noise) for 5 min without...... external noise from fMRI image acquisition. Resting state fMRI was then acquired before and after the music and control conditions. A significant increase in the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations of the BOLD signal was evident in the left angular gyrus (lAnG) after listening to music, which in turn......, correlated to the analgesia reports. The post-hoc seed-based functional connectivity analysis of the lAnG showed found higher connectivity after listening to music with right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (rdlPFC), the left caudate (lCau), and decreased connectivity with right anterior cingulate cortex (r...

  10. Preoperative gabapentin alone or in combination with dexamethasone on postoperative pain relief after abdominal hysterectomies. A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Badawy

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Gabapentin alone reduced the intraoperative and postoperative opioid requirement as well as postoperative pain and PONV which was significant in comparison with the placebo effect in the control. Obviously these effects were more prominent and highly significant when dexamethasone was added to gabapentin.

  11. Effect of feedback techniques for lower back pain on gluteus maximus and oblique abdominal muscle activity and angle of pelvic rotation during the clam exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eun-Kyung; Park, Kyue-Nam; Jung, Do-Young

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine the effect of feedback tools on activities of the gluteus maximus (Gmax) and oblique abdominal muscles and the angle of pelvic rotation during clam exercise (CE). Comparative study using repeated measures. University laboratory. Sixteen subjects with lower back pain. Each subject performed the CE without feedback, the CE using a pressure biofeedback unit (CE-PBU), and the CE with palpation and visual feedback (CE-PVF). Electromyographic (EMG) activity and the angles of pelvic rotation were measured using surface EMG and a three-dimensional motion-analysis system, respectively. One-way repeated-measures ANOVA followed by the Bonferroni post hoc test were used to compare the EMG activity in each muscle as well as the angle of pelvic rotation during the CE, CE-PBU, and CE-PVF. The results of post-hoc testing showed a significantly reduced angle of pelvic rotation and significantly more Gmax EMG activity during the CE-PVF compared with during the CE and CE-PBU. These findings suggest that palpation and visual feedback is effective for activating the Gmax and controlling pelvic rotation during the CE in subjects with lower back pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Music reduces pain and increases resting state fMRI BOLD signal amplitude in the left angular gyrus in fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A; Jiang, Zhiguo; Vuust, Peter; Alcauter, Sarael; Vase, Lene; Pasaye, Erick H; Cavazos-Rodriguez, Roberto; Brattico, Elvira; Jensen, Troels S; Barrios, Fernando A

    2015-01-01

    Music reduces pain in fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic pain disease, but the functional neural correlates of music-induced analgesia (MIA) are still largely unknown. We recruited FM patients (n = 22) who listened to their preferred relaxing music and an auditory control (pink noise) for 5 min without external noise from fMRI image acquisition. Resting state fMRI was then acquired before and after the music and control conditions. A significant increase in the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations of the BOLD signal was evident in the left angular gyrus (lAnG) after listening to music, which in turn, correlated to the analgesia reports. The post-hoc seed-based functional connectivity analysis of the lAnG showed found higher connectivity after listening to music with right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (rdlPFC), the left caudate (lCau), and decreased connectivity with right anterior cingulate cortex (rACC), right supplementary motor area (rSMA), precuneus and right precentral gyrus (rPreG). Pain intensity (PI) analgesia was correlated (r = 0.61) to the connectivity of the lAnG with the rPreG. Our results show that MIA in FM is related to top-down regulation of the pain modulatory network by the default mode network (DMN).

  13. [Abdominal pregnancy, institutional experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Bolaños Ancona, R; Simón Pereyra, L; Juárez García, L; García-Benitez, C Q

    1998-07-01

    Abdominal pregnancy is a rare entity, which has been classified as primary or secondary by Studiford criteria. A retrospective study, between January 1989 and December 1994, realized at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, found 35,080 pregnancies, from which 149 happened to be ectopic, and 6 of them were abdominal. All patients belonged to a low income society class, age between 24 and 35 years, and average of gestations in 2.6. Gestational age varied from 15 weeks to 32.2 weeks having only one delivery at term with satisfactory postnatal evolution. One patient had a recurrent abdominal pregnancy, with genital Tb as a conditional factor. Time of hospitalization varied from 4 to 5 days, and no further patient complications were reported. Fetal loss was estimated in 83.4%. Abdominal pregnancy is often the sequence of a tubarian ectopic pregnancy an when present, it has a very high maternal mortality reported in world literature, not found in this study. The stated frequency of abdominal pregnancy is from 1 of each 3372, up to 1 in every 10,200 deliveries, reporting in the study 1 abdominal pregnancy in 5846 deliveries. The study had two characteristic entities one, the recurrence and two, the delivery at term of one newborn. Abdominal pregnancy accounts for 4% of all ectopic pregnancies. Clinical findings in abdominal pregnancies are pain, transvaginal bleeding and amenorrea, being the cardinal signs of ectopic pregnancy.

  14. Associations between low back pain, urinary incontinence, and abdominal muscle recruitment as assessed via ultrasonography in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, Vânia F.; Amorim, Juleimar S. C.; Pereira, Aline M.; Ferreira, Paulo H.; Pereira, Leani S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) and urinary incontinence (UI) are highly prevalent among elderly individuals. In young adults, changes in trunk muscle recruitment, as assessed via ultrasound imaging, may be associated with lumbar spine stability. Objective: To assess the associations between LBP, UI, and the pattern of transversus abdominis (TrA), internal (IO), and external oblique (EO) muscle recruitment in the elderly as evaluated by ultrasound imaging. Method: Fifty-four elderly individua...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or ... help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, abscesses or an ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging can also: help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. A clear water-based gel ...

  17. Painful ophthalmoplegia of the left eye in a 19-year-old female, with an emphasis in Tolosa-Hunt syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Juan A; Arias, Cristhian R; Sanchez, Diego; Pesci, Luis M; Lopez, Brenda S; Lopez, Ruben; Castro, Elvira

    2009-09-17

    Painful ophthalmoplegia refers to periorbital or hemicraneal pain plus ipsilateral ocular motor nerve palsies with or without oculo-sympathetic paralysis, sensory loss in the distribution of V1 and V2 can co-occur. There are many etiologies of painful ophthalmoplegia. Tolosa-Hunt syndrome is a steroid-responsive painful ophthalmoplegia secondary to idiopatic granulomatous inflammation of the cavernous sinus or orbital apex. THS is a diagnosis of exclusion and treatment should be with high dose steroid. We describe the case of a 19-year-old female that was admitted to our hospital for painful ophthalmoplegia of the left eye. After the diagnostic work-up, we concluded that the patient had a benign form of Tolosa-Hunt syndrome. We initiated treatment with steroids and 72 hours later saw a response. In conclusion, steroid treatment is the cornerstone in the management of THS. Even though there is no standardized dose specified in the literature, this type of treatment with steroids at a dose of 1 mg/kg/day tapered slowly over 3 to 4 months has been well received.

  18. Obesity-Associated Abdominal Elephantiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Kohli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal elephantiasis is a rare entity. Abdominal elephantiasis is an uncommon, but deformative and progressive cutaneous disease caused by chronic lymphedema and recurrent streptococcal or Staphylococcus infections of the abdominal wall. We present 3 cases of patients with morbid obesity who presented to our hospital with abdominal wall swelling, thickening, erythema, and pain. The abdominal wall and legs were edematous, with cobblestone-like, thickened, hyperpigmented, and fissured plaques on the abdomen. Two patients had localised areas of skin erythema, tenderness, and increased warmth. There was purulent drainage from the abdominal wall in one patient. They were managed with antibiotics with some initial improvement. Meticulous skin care and local keratolytic treatment for the lesions were initiated with limited success due to their late presentation. All three patients refused surgical therapy. Conclusion. Early diagnosis is important for the treatment of abdominal elephantiasis and prevention of complications.

  19. Mast cell gastritis: Children complaining of chronic abdominal pain with histologically normal gastric mucosal biopsies except for increase in mast cells, proposing a new entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourpak Zahra

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cells reside within the connective tissue of a variety of tissues and all vascularized organs. Since 1996, few studies have been performed on mast cell density in gastrointestinal biopsies, mainly in adult age group. We recently studied mast cell density in pediatric age group on rather larger number of cases in a referral children hospital. Mast cell density was 12.6 ± 0.87 in 0.25 mm2 (range: 0-81 in our study. Since we frequently encounter cases with rather normal gastric biopsies with no H.pylori, which mainly complain of chronic abdominal pain, we gathered those cases with mast cell density more than 30/0.25 mm2. from 895 gastric biopsies and wanted to study their clinical and endoscopic findings and propose a new entity. Methods Between April 2005 and May 2008, 895 children (2, were chosen and a questionnaire was filled for each patient including clinical, endoscopic and pathologic findings. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS, version 13 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. Results Over a 3 year period of study, of 895 selected children, 86 patients fulfilled the entrance criteria. The major complaint of patients was recurrent abdominal pain. The mean mast cell density was 45.59 ± 13.81 in 0.25 mm2 (range: 30-93. Among our cases, about 67.4% (n = 58 had 30 to 49, 23.3% (n = 20 had 50 to 69, 8.1% (n = 7 had 70 to 89 and 1.2% (n = 1 had 93 mast cells/0.25 mm2 in their specimens Discussion In 29% of our cases, neither endoscopic nor pathologic change was detected and only increase in mast cell number was reported and in others endoscopic and histopathological findings were negligible except increase in mast cells. In updated Sydney system (classification and grading of gastritis, no term is introduced which is in concordance with this group but we think that increased density of mast cells in these cases should not be overlooked and it may contribute to clinical manifestations in some way. We hope that

  20. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to help diagnose the cause of abdominal or pelvic pain and diseases of the internal organs, small bowel and colon, such as: infections such as appendicitis , pyelonephritis or infected fluid collections, also known as abscesses. inflammatory bowel disease such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's ...

  1. Relationship of Helicobacter pylori infection to the nutritional status of children with chronic diarrohea and abdominal pain from three different environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega V, M.I.; Valencia J, M.E.; Soleto C, N.; Triana Tejas, A.; Robles, A.E.; Morales F, G.G.

    2000-01-01

    A population study of the infection with Hp in children affected by chronic diarrhoea is proposed with the use of the 13 C- Urea Breath Test. A sample of children with repeated episodes of diarrhoea and recurrent abdominal pain will be selected from three populations. One of the samples will be selected from the population that attends the Children's Hospital in the Northwest part of Mexico. The second sample will be selected from families of agricultural migrant workers that came to the Northwest part of Mexico from south Mexico, looking to work in the cash crops fields. The third sample will be constituted by children living in the south of Mexico, mainly in the state of Oaxaca from where most of the agricultural migrant workers came. This comparative study will allow to see if the different environments from which each sample represents, has an effect in the prevalence of H. pylori. In addition, it will be looking at the association of the gastrointestinal infection with stunting, different dietary patterns and socio-economic status. The results of this study will contribute to the preventive effort of health promotion campaigns for the population living in different regions of Mexico, as well as for those high risk populations continuously moving from one place to another. (author)

  2. Ultrasonic Thickness of Lateral Abdominal Wall Muscles in Response to Pelvic Floor Muscle Contraction in women with stress incontinency with and without Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Dehghan-Manshadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Urinary Incontinence (UI as a common lower urinary tract dysfunction , results from Pelvic Floor Muscle's (PFM underactivity.Because of co-activation of PFM and the Lateral Abdominal Wall Muscles (LAWM, this study was aimed to investigate the changes in the ultrasonic thickness of the LAWM in response to PFM contraction in stress urinary incontinent (SUIwomen with and without Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP. Materials & Methods: A total of 28 women, 10 healthy, 18 SUI with and without CLBP (9 in each group participated in this quasi-experimental study. After collecting demographic information and assessment of PFM function, changes in ultrasonic thickness of right LAWM were measured in response to PFM contraction. One way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and Pearson’s correlation tests were performed to analyze the data. Values of P0.05. There was a significant increase in thickness of the Traversus Abdominis Muscle (TrA during PFM contraction in control group comparing experimental groups (P=0.03. Women in control group showed significantly higher PFM strength and more intravaginal pressure (P=0.001. Conclusion: Changes in ultrasonic thickness of the TrA during PFM contraction revealed disturbance of co-activation of the LAWM and the PFM in women with and without SUI CLBP.

  3. Leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sing, T.M.Y.; Young, N.; O'Rourke, I.C.; Tomlinson, P.

    1994-01-01

    A case of leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is reported, with a brief review of the literature. A 58 year old female presented with shoulder and abdominal pain associated with diarrhea, vomiting and fever with leucocytosis. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed pooling of contrast in the retroperitoneum anterior to a non-dilated abdominal aorta. There was considerable retroperitoneal blood accumulating in a mass-like lesion in the right lower abdomen and pelvis obstructing the right renal collecting system. Laparotomy revealed a 4 cm diameter saccular aneurysm of the abdominal aorta, with a 1 cm diameter neck. Culture of the thrombus grew Streptococcus pyogens. 11 refs., 2 figs

  4. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Appendicular endometriosis as a cause of chronic abdominal pain alone in the right iliac fossa: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Pandolfi Basso

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a disease characterized by the presence of ectopic endometrial glands and stroma. Although its etiology is undefined, it is suggested to be a result of coelomic metaplasia, retrograde menstruation, to provide a genetic component, or to be one that occurs due to blood or lymphatic spread. The involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is common. However, appendicular endometriosis is a rare condition. It is usually asymptomatic. Recurrent pain in the right iliac fossa is an unusual clinical manifestation. There are no non-invasive complementary tests to confirm the diagnosis. Laparoscopy is the main option for research, due to its diagnostic and therapeutic features. A histopathological examination is necessary for the diagnosis. Although surgical and drug therapies have special indications, the combination therapy showed lower symptom recurrence. This study reports a case of appendicular endometriosis that was diagnosed and treated in the service of Coloproctology of the Base Hospital at Faculdade de Medicina of São Jose do Rio Preto. There is also a literature review about this situation.Endometriose é uma doença caracterizada pela presença de estroma e glândulas endometriais ectópicas. Apesar de sua etiologia não definida, sugere-se que seja decorrente de metaplasia celômica, menstruação retrógada, apresente componente genético, ou ocorra devido à disseminação linfática ou sanguínea. O acometimento do trato gastrointestinal é comum; no entanto, a endometriose apendicular é condição rara e se apresenta com maior frequência de forma assintomática. Dor recorrente em fossa ilíaca direita é uma manifestação clínica incomum. Não há exames complementares não invasivos que confirmem o diagnóstico. A laparoscopia é a principal opção durante a investigação, por sua característica diagnóstica e terapêutica. O diagnóstico pode ser feito apenas após um exame histopatológico. Embora as terapias

  6. A Large Intra-Abdominal Hiatal Hernia as a Rare Cause of Dyspnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Sahin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant hiatal hernias, generally seen at advanced ages, can rarely cause cardiac symptoms such as dyspnea and chest pain. Here, we aimed to present a case with a large hiatal hernia that largely protruded to intrathoracic cavity and caused dyspnea, particularly at postprandial period, by compressing the left atrium and right pulmonary vein. We considered presenting this case as large hiatal hernia is a rare, intra-abdominal cause of dyspnea.

  7. The predictive value of childhood recurrent abdominal pain for adult emotional disorders, and the influence of negative cognitive style. Findings from a cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Stein

    Full Text Available Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP in childhood is common, with no explanatory pathology identified in the majority of cases. Previous studies have consistently demonstrated an association between childhood RAP and later emotional distress disorders. The aim of this study was to replicate this finding through the analysis of a large dataset, and explore how a negative style of thinking could potentially influence this relationship.The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC is a population cohort of children born in the Avon area of the UK, between 1991-1992. Data on childhood RAP was collected via maternal reports at 3, 4, 7 and 9 years. Mood, anxiety and cognitive style were measured at age 18. We controlled for various confounding factors, including maternal anxiety and the child's pre-existing psychopathology. Logistic regression models were used to examine associations, and moderation effects of cognitive style were analysed using likelihood ratios.Experiencing RAP at any one time-point is associated with an increased odds of depression and/or anxiety disorder at 18 (OR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.09-1.83. We found a dose-response relationship and each additional marker of RAP was associated with a 26% (CI: 7% to 47% increase in risk of having a mood and/or anxiety disorder. Individuals who attribute adversity to global, stable or personal factors were at amplified risk.Childhood RAP predicts depression and anxiety disorders at 18 and should be targeted for early intervention. Individuals with a negative cognitive style may be particularly vulnerable, suggesting that cognitive interpretations of physical symptoms could play an important role in long-term health outcomes.

  8. The predictive value of childhood recurrent abdominal pain for adult emotional disorders, and the influence of negative cognitive style. Findings from a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Kate; Pearson, Rebecca M; Stein, Alan; Fazel, Mina

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in childhood is common, with no explanatory pathology identified in the majority of cases. Previous studies have consistently demonstrated an association between childhood RAP and later emotional distress disorders. The aim of this study was to replicate this finding through the analysis of a large dataset, and explore how a negative style of thinking could potentially influence this relationship. The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) is a population cohort of children born in the Avon area of the UK, between 1991-1992. Data on childhood RAP was collected via maternal reports at 3, 4, 7 and 9 years. Mood, anxiety and cognitive style were measured at age 18. We controlled for various confounding factors, including maternal anxiety and the child's pre-existing psychopathology. Logistic regression models were used to examine associations, and moderation effects of cognitive style were analysed using likelihood ratios. Experiencing RAP at any one time-point is associated with an increased odds of depression and/or anxiety disorder at 18 (OR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.09-1.83). We found a dose-response relationship and each additional marker of RAP was associated with a 26% (CI: 7% to 47%) increase in risk of having a mood and/or anxiety disorder. Individuals who attribute adversity to global, stable or personal factors were at amplified risk. Childhood RAP predicts depression and anxiety disorders at 18 and should be targeted for early intervention. Individuals with a negative cognitive style may be particularly vulnerable, suggesting that cognitive interpretations of physical symptoms could play an important role in long-term health outcomes.

  9. Preemptive Epidural Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Relief Revisited: Comparison of Combination of Buprenorphine and Neostigmine with Combination of Buprenorphine and Ketamine in Lower Abdominal Surgeries, A Double-blind Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sanjay; Singh, Raj Bahadur

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative pain relief provides subjective comfort to patient in addition to blunting of autonomic and somatic reflex responses to pain, subsequently enhancing restoration of function by allowing the patient to breathe, cough, and move easily. The aim is to evaluate and compare the effects of neostigmine + buprenorphine and ketamine + buprenorphine for preemptive epidural analgesia for postoperative pain relief in patients undergoing abdominal surgeries under general anesthesia (GA). A double-blind randomized trial. A total of 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status Classes I and II patients undergoing abdominal surgeries under GA were taken up for the study. They were randomly allocated into two groups, Group A and Group B of thirty patients each. Preemptive epidural analgesia for postoperative pain relief was provided by a combination of neostigmine 1 μg/kg + buprenorphine 2 μg/kg in Group A patients and ketamine 1 mg/kg + buprenorphine 2 μg/kg in Group B patients after induction of GA but before surgical incision. Postoperatively, vital parameters, pain score, requirement of top up doses, and side effects in the two groups were observed and recorded at 2, 4, 6, 10, 18, and 22 h. Mean values within each of the Group A and Group B were compared using one-way analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA). Mean values between Group A and Group B were compared using double analysis of variance (two-way ANOVA). Group A patients had a significant analgesia (visual analog scale [VAS] pain scores reduced significantly from 54.6 ± 6.3 at 2 h to 8.1 ± 8.9 at 22 h postoperatively). Group B patients had significant analgesia too (VAS pain scores reduced significantly from 36 ± 12.5 at 2 h to 5.3 ± 10.9 at 22 h postoperatively). There was however no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the degree of postoperative analgesia on comparison of VAS scores, effect on vital parameters, and incidence of side effects. Either of the two

  10. Effect of the Abdominal Hollowing and Bracing Maneuvers on Activity Pattern of the Lumbopelvic Muscles During Prone Hip Extension in Subjects With or Without Chronic Low Back Pain: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlaee, Amir H; Ghamkhar, Leila; Arab, Amir M

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of abdominal hollowing (AH) and abdominal bracing (AB) maneuvers on the activity pattern of lumbopelvic muscles during prone hip extension (PHE) in participants with or without nonspecific chronic low back pain (CLBP). Twenty women with or without CLBP participated in this cross-sectional observational study. The electromyographic activity (amplitude and onset time) of the contralateral erector spinae (CES), ipsilateral erector spinae (IES), gluteus maximus, and biceps femoris muscles was measured during PHE with and without abdominal maneuvers. A 3-way mixed model analysis of variance and post hoc tests were used for statistical analysis. Between-group comparisons showed that the CES onset delay during PHE alone was greater (P = .03) and the activity level of IES, CES, and biceps femoris in all maneuvers (P muscles. In participants with CLBP, IES muscle AMP was lower during PHE + AH compared with PHE + AB and PHE alone. With regard to onset delay, the results also showed no significant difference between maneuvers within either of the 2 groups (P > .05). Performance of the AH maneuver decreased the erector spinae muscle AMP in both groups, and neither maneuver altered the onset delay of any of the muscles in either group. The low back pain group showed higher levels of activity in all muscles (not statistically significant in gluteus maximus during all maneuvers). The groups were similar according to the onset delay of any of the muscles during either maneuver. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Posttraumatic abdominal aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahmann, M.; Richter, G.M.; Kauffmann, G.W.; Schuhmacher, H.; Allenberg, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    Dissections due to deceleration trauma are rarely limited to the infradiaphragmal aorta (only 2-3%) and are usually lethal. Here we report the unusual course of an abdominal aortic dissection with aneurysmatic enlargement of the false lumen. Based on diagnostic imaging, a therapeutic stent application was planed in order to close the entry and to prevent rupture. During the intervention sondation of the false lumen revealed that the left renal artery had a reentry. Due to the complexity of the entry - reentry situation of the left renal artery the intervention was not possible, and the patient had to undergo vascular surgery. (orig.) [de

  12. Gastric pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intermittent pain and. Not generalised or localised to other abdominal or chest regions and. Not relieved by defecation or passage of flatus and. Not fulfilling the ... retrosternal component. • The pain is commonly induced or relieved by the ingestion of a meal, but may occur during fasting. • Postprandial distress syndrome.

  13. Abdominal Wall Abscess due to Acute Perforated Sigmoid Diverticulitis: A Case Report with MDCT and US Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafailidis Vasileios

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Perforation of the inflamed diverticula is a common diverticulitis complication. It usually leads to the formation of a local abscess. In some rare cases, the inflammatory process may spread towards extra-abdominal sites like the anterior or posterior abdominal wall or the thigh and form an abscess in these sites. We present the case of a 73-year-old man with a history of pain at the lower left quadrant of the abdomen for 20 days and a visible mass in this site. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed this mass to be an abscess of the abdominal wall which had been formed by the spread of ruptured sigmoid diverticulitis by continuity of tissue through the lower left abdominal wall. Local drainage of the abscess was performed and the patient was discharged after alleviation of symptoms and an uneventful course. We also discuss causes of abdominal wall abscesses along with the possible pathways by which an intra-abdominal abscess could spread outside the abdominal cavity.

  14. Inverted Takotsubo-Like Left Ventricular Dysfunction with Pulmonary Oedema Developed after Caesarean Delivery Complicated by Massive Haemorrhage in a Severe Preeclamptic Parturient with a Prolonged Painful Labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyejin Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverted takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC, a variant of stress-induced cardiomyopathy, features transient myocardial dysfunction characterized by a hyperdynamic left ventricular apex and akinesia of the base. Herein, we describe a 38-year-old primigravida with severe preeclampsia who had active labour for 4 h followed by an emergency caesarean delivery. She developed postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine atony complicated by pulmonary oedema, which was managed with large-volume infusion and hysterectomy. Her haemodynamic instability was associated with cardiac biomarkers indicative of diffuse myocardial injury and echocardiographic findings of an “inverted” TTC. The patient was almost fully recovered one month later. Our case shows that a reversible inverted TTC may result from a prolonged painful labour. TTC should be listed in the differential diagnosis of the patient presenting with pulmonary oedema of unknown origin, especially in patients with severe preeclampsia.

  15. Abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordany, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    Abdominal injury is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Ten percent of trauma-related deaths are due to abdominal injury. Thousands of children are involved in auto accidents annually; many suffer severe internal injury. Child abuse is a second less frequent but equally serious cause of internal abdominal injury. The descriptions of McCort and Eisenstein and their associates in the 1960s first brought to attention the frequency and severity of visceral injury as important manifestations of the child abuse syndrome. Blunt abdominal trauma often causes multiple injuries; in the past, many children have been subjected to exploratory surgery to evaluate the extent of possible hidden injury. Since the advent of noninvasive radiologic imaging techniques including radionuclide scans and ultrasound and, especially, computed tomography (CT), the radiologist has been better able to assess (accurately) the extent of abdominal injury and thus allow conservative therapy in many cases. Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs following gunshot wounds, stabbing, and other similar injury. This is fortunately, a relatively uncommon occurrence in most pediatric centers and will not be discussed specifically here, although many principles of blunt trauma diagnosis are valid for evaluation of penetrating abdominal trauma. If there is any question that a wound has extended intraperitonelly, a sinogram with water-soluble contrast material allows quick, accurate diagnosis. The presence of large amounts of free intraperitoneal gas suggests penetrating injury to the colon or other gas-containing viscus and is generally considered an indication for surgery

  16. Inflamed vermiform appendix within the sac of incarcerated left inguinal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turanlı, Sevim; Yüksel, Murat Ulvi; Pirhan, Yavuz; Çetin, Abdullah

    2011-09-01

    A 54-year-old male complained of a continuous pain together with an irreducible swelling of the left inguinal region 8 hours prior to admission to the surgical emergency department. His physical examination revealed a very painful, erythematous, irreducible swelling in the left inguinal region without abdominal peritoneal irritation. Routine blood tests disclosed mild leukocytosis. Abdominal plain X-ray film was not specific, and ultrasonography revealed a 10 cm in length inactive, edematous intestinal section within the inguinal hernia. With the diagnosis of strangulated inguinal hernia, he underwent surgical exploration through a transverse inguinal incision. By opening the hernia sac, 6-8 cc inflammatory fluid drained out, and an inflamed vermiform appendix adhered to the inner surface of the sac was seen. Appendicectomy and primary hernia repair were performed at the same time through the inguinal incision. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the histological examination of the specimen revealed an inflamed appendix.

  17. Abdominal Trauma: Never Underestimate It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakash N. Bodhit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We present a case of a sports injury. The initial presentation and clinical examination belied serious intra-abdominal injuries. Case Presentation. A 16-year-old male patient came to emergency department after a sports-related blunt abdominal injury. Though on clinical examination the injury did not seem to be serious, FAST revealed an obscured splenorenal window. The CT scan revealed a large left renal laceration and a splenic laceration that were managed with Cook coil embolization. Patient remained tachycardic though and had to undergo splenectomy, left nephrectomy, and a repair of left diaphragmatic rent. Patient had no complication and had normal renal function at 6-month followup. Conclusion. The case report indicates that management of blunt intra-abdominal injury is complicated and there is a role for minimally invasive procedures in management of certain patients. A great deal of caution is required in monitoring these patients, and surgical intervention is inevitable in deteriorating patients.

  18. Abdominal exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diverticulitis ) Inflammation of the pancreas ( acute or chronic pancreatitis ) Liver abscess Pockets of infection (retroperitoneal abscess, abdominal abscess , pelvic abscess) Pregnancy outside of the uterus ( ectopic pregnancy ) Scar tissue ...

  19. ABDOMINAL TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The most common cause of abdominal trauma is blunt trauma, gunshot wounds and stab wounds are rare. Most commonly injured organs in abdominal cavity are the spleen and the liver.Conclusions. Early diagnosis is very important and include precise phisical examination and all available diagnostic methods. The final decission about the method of treatmet depends on patients clinical condition, surgeon’s experience and other local conditions.

  20. Dor abdominal recorrente: quando suspeitar de crise epiléptica?

    OpenAIRE

    Franzon, Renata C.; Lopes, Camila F.; Schmutzler, Kátia M.R.; Morais, Maria Isabel R.; Guerreiro, Marilisa M.

    2002-01-01

    Recurrent episodes of abdominal pain are common in childhood. Among the diagnostic possibilities are migraine and abdominal epilepsy (AE). AE is an infrequent syndrome with paroxystic episodes of abdominal pain, awareness disturbance, EEG abnormalities and positive results with the introduction of antiepileptic drugs. We present one 6 year-old girl who had short episodes of abdominal pain since the age of 4. The pain was followed by cry, fear and occasionally secondary generalization. MRI sho...

  1. Pain

    OpenAIRE

    H.W. Snyman

    1980-01-01

    The medical profession has always been under pressure to supply public explanations of the diseases with which it deals. On the other hand, it is an old characteristic of the profession to devise comprehensive and unifying theories on all sorts of medical problems. Both these statements apply to pain - one of the most important and clinically striking phenomena and expressions of man since his origin in the mists of time.

  2. Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.W. Snyman

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available The medical profession has always been under pressure to supply public explanations of the diseases with which it deals. On the other hand, it is an old characteristic of the profession to devise comprehensive and unifying theories on all sorts of medical problems. Both these statements apply to pain - one of the most important and clinically striking phenomena and expressions of man since his origin in the mists of time.

  3. [Renal angiomyolipoma rupture as a cause of lumbar pain: report of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Melissa; Calleja, Félix; Hola, José; Daviú, Antonio; Jara, Danilo; Vallejos, Humberto

    2008-08-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma is a benign tumor formed by smooth muscle, adipose tissue and blood vessels. It is commonly found incidentally and its clinical manifestations are pain and abdominal mass or spontaneous tumor rupture with retroperitoneal bleeding. The clinical presentation of a hemorrhagic shock secondary to a retroperitoneal hematoma is uncommon. We report a 40 year-old male who presented to the emergency room with lumbar pain and deterioration of hemodynamic parameters. The CT scan showed a left renal injury associated to an expansive retroperitoneal process. The abdominal exploration, vascular control of the renal pedicle and nephrectomy allowed a successful outcome.

  4. Adult abdominal hernias.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Kevin P

    2014-06-01

    Educational Objectives and Key Points. 1. Given that abdominal hernias are a frequent imaging finding, radiologists not only are required to interpret the appearances of abdominal hernias but also should be comfortable with identifying associated complications and postrepair findings. 2. CT is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of a known adult abdominal hernia in both elective and acute circumstances because of rapid acquisition, capability of multiplanar reconstruction, good spatial resolution, and anatomic depiction with excellent sensitivity for most complications. 3. Ultrasound is useful for adult groin assessment and is the imaging modality of choice for pediatric abdominal wall hernia assessment, whereas MRI is beneficial when there is reasonable concern that a patient\\'s symptoms could be attributable to a hernia or a musculoskeletal source. 4. Fluoroscopic herniography is a sensitive radiologic investigation for patients with groin pain in whom a hernia is suspected but in whom a hernia cannot be identified at physical examination. 5. The diagnosis of an internal hernia not only is a challenging clinical diagnosis but also can be difficult to diagnose with imaging: Closed-loop small-bowel obstruction and abnormally located bowel loops relative to normally located small bowel or colon should prompt assessment for an internal hernia.

  5. Medical image of the week: massive abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larson M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. An 88 year-old presented to the emergency department with left flank and lower back pain as well as lower abdominal fullness. The fullness had started 2 days prior, but the left flank pain acutely started in the early morning before presenting. He had a history of unmedicated hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and mild vertigo. His review of systems was positive for chills and difficulty urinating but no hematuria. He was a non-smoker, and had undergone orthopedic surgeries but had otherwise avoided emergent hospitalizations. On exam, vitals were unremarkable; there was no flank nor costovertebral angle tenderness; however, a midline pulsatile mass was present. An initial non-contrast CT abdomen/pelvis revealed a massive abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA, Figure 1. Follow-up CT angiogram of the AAA can be seen in Figure 2. Upon further questioning, he had undergone a research study some 30 years earlier involving ultrasound to screen for AAA and was told he ...

  6. Report of a Case of Primary Abdominal Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Beigi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic pregnancy (EP is a potentially life-threatening condition in which the embryo implants outside the uterine endometrial cavity. Abdominal pregnancy is an atypical site wherein the product of conception lies totally outside the reproductive tract. Primary abdominal pregnancy is a very rare condition with a high mortality rate. Diagnosis is often late or misdiagnosed. The aim of introducing this case report is to present a new case of early primary abdominal pregnancy. Despite regular menstrual bleeding and contraception with IUD (intrauterine device, this pregnancy occurred in a 24-year old woman. Emergency laparotomy was performed because of abdominal pain, unstable condition and positive urine pregnancy test. It revealed more than 1500 ml of blood in the abdominal cavity. The uterus, both fallopian tubes and ovaries were completely intact. A 3X4 cm mass lateral to the left utersacral ligament was observed and resected. Since IUD strings could not be identified, endometrial currettage was performed and then the IUD was removed. Histological report of the mass and tissue of uterine cavity was placental villi and secretory endometrium, respectively, which according to Studdifords criteria is a new case of early primary abdominal pregnancy. To reduce maternal mortality and morbidity, early recognition of ectopic pregnancy is critical. According to review of the literature and the case report, a high index of suspicion is vital for the early diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy because the signs and symptoms of EP overlap with many surgical and gynecologic conditions. With early diagnosis of EP, we can suggest many therapeutic options and also retain fertility (if desired by patient, while minimizing disease and treatment-related morbidity.

  7. Abdominal Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy.

  8. Childhood abdominal cystic lymphangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konen, Osnat; Rathaus, Valeria; Shapiro, Myra [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Meir General Hospital, Sapir Medical Centre, Kfar Saba (Israel); Dlugy, Elena [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Schneider Medical Centre, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Freud, Enrique [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Sapir Medical Centre, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Kessler, Ada [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sourasky Medical Centre, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Horev, Gadi [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Schneider Medical Centre, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2002-02-01

    Background: Abdominal lymphangioma is a rare benign congenital malformation of the mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal lymphatics. Clinical presentation is variable and may be misleading; therefore, complex imaging studies are necessary in the evaluation of this condition. US and CT have a major role in the correct preoperative diagnosis and provide important information regarding location, size, adjacent organ involvement, and expected complications. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and imaging findings of seven children with proven abdominal cystic lymphangioma. Materials and methods: Clinical and imaging files of seven children with pathologically proven abdominal lymphangioma, from three university hospitals, were retrospectively evaluated. Patient's ages ranged from 1 day to 6 years (mean, 2.2 years). Symptoms and signs included evidence of inflammation, abnormal prenatal US findings, chronic abdominal pain, haemorrhage following trauma, clinical signs of intestinal obstruction, and abdominal distension with lower extremities lymphoedema. Plain films of five patients, US of six patients and CT of five patients were reviewed. Sequential imaging examinations were available in two cases. Results: Abdominal plain films showed displacement of bowel loops by a soft tissue mass in five of six patients, two of them with dilatation of small bowel loops. US revealed an abdominal multiloculated septated cystic mass in five of six cases and a single pelvic cyst in one which changed in appearance over 2 months. Ascites was present in three cases. CT demonstrated a septated cystic mass of variable sizes in all available five cases. Sequential US and CT examinations in two patients showed progressive enlargement of the masses, increase of fluid echogenicity, and thickening of walls or septa in both cases, with multiplication of septa in one case. At surgery, mesenteric lymphangioma was found in five patients and retroperitoneal lymphangioma in the other two

  9. Gut-directed hypnotherapy in children with irritable bowel syndrome or functional abdominal pain (syndrome): a randomized controlled trial on self exercises at home using CD versus individual therapy by qualified therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Juliette M T M; Vlieger, Arine M; Frankenhuis, Carla; George, Elvira K; Groeneweg, Michael; Norbruis, Obbe F; Tjon a Ten, Walther; Van Wering, Herbert; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; Merkus, Maruschka P; Benninga, Marc A

    2014-06-04

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional abdominal pain (syndrome) (FAP(S)) are common pediatric disorders, characterized by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain. Treatment is challenging, especially in children with persisting symptoms. Gut-directed hypnotherapy (HT) performed by a therapist has been shown to be effective in these children, but is still unavailable to many children due to costs, a lack of qualified child-hypnotherapists and because it requires a significant investment of time by child and parent(s). Home-based hypnotherapy by means of exercises on CD has been shown effective as well, and has potential benefits, such as lower costs and less time investment. The aim of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to compare cost-effectiveness of individual HT performed by a qualified therapist with HT by means of CD recorded self-exercises at home in children with IBS or FAP(S). 260 children, aged 8-18 years with IBS or FAP(S) according to Rome III criteria are included in this currently conducted RCT with a follow-up period of one year. Children are randomized to either 6 sessions of individual HT given by a qualified therapist over a 3-month period or HT through self-exercises at home with CD for 3 months.The primary outcome is the proportion of patients in which treatment is successful at the end of treatment and after one year follow-up. Treatment success is defined as at least 50% reduction in both abdominal pain frequency and intensity scores. Secondary outcomes include adequate relief, cost-effectiveness and effects of both therapies on depression and anxiety scores, somatization scores, QoL, pain beliefs and coping strategies. If the effectiveness of home-based HT with CD is comparable to, or only slightly lower, than HT by a therapist, this treatment may become an attractive form of therapy in children with IBS or FAP(S), because of its low costs and direct availability. Dutch Trial Register number NTR2725 (date of registration: 1 February

  10. Don't Forget the Abdominal Wall: Imaging Spectrum of Abdominal Wall Injuries after Nonpenetrating Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalon, Shanna A; Askari, Reza; Gates, Jonathan D; Patel, Ketan; Sodickson, Aaron D; Khurana, Bharti

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal wall injuries occur in nearly one of 10 patients coming to the emergency department after nonpenetrating trauma. Injuries range from minor, such as abdominal wall contusion, to severe, such as abdominal wall rupture with evisceration of abdominal contents. Examples of specific injuries that can be detected at cross-sectional imaging include abdominal muscle strain, tear, or hematoma, including rectus sheath hematoma (RSH); traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH); and Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) (closed degloving injury). These injuries are often overlooked clinically because of (a) a lack of findings at physical examination or (b) distraction by more-severe associated injuries. However, these injuries are important to detect because they are highly associated with potentially grave visceral and vascular injuries, such as aortic injury, and because their detection can lead to the diagnosis of these more clinically important grave traumatic injuries. Failure to make a timely diagnosis can result in delayed complications, such as bowel hernia with potential for obstruction or strangulation, or misdiagnosis of an abdominal wall neoplasm. Groin injuries, such as athletic pubalgia, and inferior costochondral injuries should also be considered in patients with abdominal pain after nonpenetrating trauma, because these conditions may manifest with referred abdominal pain and are often included within the field of view at cross-sectional abdominal imaging. Radiologists must recognize and report acute abdominal wall injuries and their associated intra-abdominal pathologic conditions to allow appropriate and timely treatment. © RSNA, 2017.

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic or scrotal pain in young children. It is also valuable for evaluating the brain, spinal cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  12. Endometrioma de parede abdominal Abdominal wall endometrioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italo Accetta

    2011-03-01

    : Retrospective analysis of patients operated for abdominal wall endometrioma with emphasis on data relating to age, symptoms, previous cesarean, relation of symptoms with the menstrual cycle, physical examinations and additional surgical treatment, postoperative course and histopathological results of specimens. RESULTS: Forteen patients were operated during the study period, aged between 28 and 40 years. The presence of local mass and pain that worsened during menstruation were the main complaints. Ultrasound and CT examinations were important to precisely localize the disease. Surgical excision was a wide excision of the tumor and affected tissues. The patient progressed satisfactorily and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of abdominal wall endometrioma in all cases. CONCLUSION: Exists a clear relationship between cesarean operation and abdominal wall endometrioma; ultrasound studies and CT scans help to plan the surgical resection allowing resection of tumor and all affected adjacent tissues.

  13. Intra-abdominal tuberculous peritonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, G.; Ahlhelm, F.; Altmeyer, K.; Kramann, B. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Homburg (Germany); Hennes, P. [Dept. of Pediatrics, University Hospital, Homburg (Germany); Pueschel, W. [Dept. of Pathology, University Hospital, Homburg (Germany); Karadiakos, N. [Dept. of Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital, Homburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    We report the case of a 15-year-old boy suffering from progressive dyspnea on exertion and painful abdominal protrusion. Final diagnosis of intra-abdominal tuberculosis (TB), including lymphadenopathy and abdominal abscess formation, was made following elective laparotomy. This type of disease is a rare manifestation of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. The imaging findings in unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI and laparoscopic images are presented. Differential diagnosis of abdominal abscess formation and other fungal or bacteriological infections, as well as the imaging findings of this type of lesion, are discussed. This case demonstrates that atypical manifestation of TB may remain unrecognized; thus, awareness of this kind of manifestation of tuberculosis may prevent patients from being subjected to inappropriate therapies. (orig.)

  14. Surgical treatment of adhesion-related chronic abdominal and pelvic pain after gynaecological and general surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukel, B.A. van den; Ree, R. van; Leuven, S. van; Bakkum, E.A.; Strik, C.; Goor, H. van; Broek, R.P.G ten

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is a frequent post-operative complication, affecting ~20-40% of patients who have undergone surgery of the female genital or alimentary tract. Chronic pain is an important risk factor for diminished quality of life after surgery. Adhesions are frequently associated with

  15. Abdominal Aortic Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Christie; Swaminathan, Anand

    2017-11-01

    This article discusses abdominal aortic emergencies. There is a common thread of risk factors and causes of these diseases, including age, male gender, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and connective tissue disorders. The most common presenting symptom of these disorders is pain, usually in the chest, flank, abdomen, or back. Computed tomography scan is the gold standard for diagnosis of pathologic conditions of the aorta in the hemodynamically stable patient. Treatment consists of a combination of blood pressure and heart rate control and, in many cases, emergent surgical intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Divergent functions of the left and right central amygdala in visceral nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Katelyn E; McQuaid, Neal A; Cox, Abigail C; Behun, Marissa N; Trouten, Allison M; Kolber, Benedict J

    2017-04-01

    The left and right central amygdalae (CeA) are limbic regions involved in somatic and visceral pain processing. These 2 nuclei are asymmetrically involved in somatic pain modulation; pain-like responses on both sides of the body are preferentially driven by the right CeA, and in a reciprocal fashion, nociceptive somatic stimuli on both sides of the body predominantly alter molecular and physiological activities in the right CeA. Unknown, however, is whether this lateralization also exists in visceral pain processing and furthermore what function the left CeA has in modulating nociceptive information. Using urinary bladder distension (UBD) and excitatory optogenetics, a pronociceptive function of the right CeA was demonstrated in mice. Channelrhodopsin-2-mediated activation of the right CeA increased visceromotor responses (VMRs), while activation of the left CeA had no effect. Similarly, UBD-evoked VMRs increased after unilateral infusion of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide in the right CeA. To determine intrinsic left CeA involvement in bladder pain modulation, this region was optogenetically silenced during noxious UBD. Halorhodopsin (NpHR)-mediated inhibition of the left CeA increased VMRs, suggesting an ongoing antinociceptive function for this region. Finally, divergent left and right CeA functions were evaluated during abdominal mechanosensory testing. In naive animals, channelrhodopsin-2-mediated activation of the right CeA induced mechanical allodynia, and after cyclophosphamide-induced bladder sensitization, activation of the left CeA reversed referred bladder pain-like behaviors. Overall, these data provide evidence for functional brain lateralization in the absence of peripheral anatomical asymmetries.

  17. Ultrasound Measurement of Abdominal Muscle Thickness With and Without Transducer Fixation During Standing Postural Tasks in Participants With and Without Chronic Low Back Pain: Intrasession and Intersession Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Fatemeh; Arab, Amir Massoud; Salavati, Mahyar; Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Hajihasani, Abdolhamid

    2016-12-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging can be used for the measurement of trunk muscle activity. The displacements of US transducer, especially during more dynamic situations, however, may disturb the measurement results. To control this variable, some studies have used transducer fixator (TF), but no study evaluated the effect of using TF on US reliability in dynamic situations. The present study discriminated this issue. To investigate the intrasession and intersession reliability of lateral abdominal muscle thickness measurement in dynamic standing postural tasks by using US with and without TF in participants with and without chronic low back pain (CLBP). An intersession and intrasession reliability study. Biomechanics laboratory, Neuromuscular Rehabilitation Research Center, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran. Twenty-three patients with CLBP and 23 healthy matched individuals. Abdominal muscle thickness of all the subjects was evaluated with use of US imaging with the patient in the supine position and double-leg stance at different levels of platform stability of BBS (static, levels 6 and 3), with and without using TF. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), standard errors of measurement, minimal metrically detectable changes, and coefficients of variation were calculated to determine intersession and intrasession reliability of muscle activity measure. Lateral abdominal muscle thickness. The intersession ICCs in the conditions with TF ranged from 0.93 to 0.98 and 0.97 to 0.99 in CLBP and healthy individuals, respectively. The intersession ICCs in the conditions without TF ranged from 0.67 to 0.79 and 0.7 to 0.86 in CLBP and healthy groups, respectively. In addition, smaller standard errors of measurement and minimal metrically detectable change values were observed with US measurement in both the groups when TF was used. US imaging appears to have acceptable reliability for the assessment of abdominal muscle thickness during dynamic standing tasks in

  18. Poststroke Pain – but Multiple Pain Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinjamuri Chari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old man presented with acute left hemiplegia due to a right frontotemporal hemorrhagic stroke and left-sided pain. While the initial presentation suggested central poststroke pain, subsequent investigations also implicated heterotopic ossification of the left hip and amplification of previous low back pain by the new central pain. While heterotopic ossification has been commonly associated with brain injury, spinal cord injury or osseous injury, it is only rarely associated with stroke. Poststroke pain may be multifactorial, and discovering the pain mechanisms has important implications for treatment.

  19. Left-sided appendicitis: review of 95 published cases and a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Sami; Ulku, Abdullah; Senol, Ayhan; Tas, Mahmut; Yagmur, Yusuf

    2010-11-28

    To give an overview of the literature on left-sided acute appendicitis (LSAA) associated with situs inversus totalis (SIT) and midgut malrotation (MM). We present a new case of LSAA with SIT and a literature review of studies published in the English language on LSAA, accessed via PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Ninety-five published cases of LSAA were evaluated and a 25-year-old female, who presented to our clinic with left lower abdominal pain caused by LSAA, is reported. In the reviewed literature, fifty-seven patients were male and 38 were female with an age range of 8 to 82 years and a median age of 29.1 ± 15.9 years. Sixty-six patients had SIT, 23 had MM, three had cecal malrotation, and two had a previously unnoted congenital abnormality. Fifty-nine patients had presented to the hospital with left lower, 14 with right lower and seven with bilateral lower quadrant pain, and seven subjects complained of left upper quadrant pain. The diagnosis was established preoperatively in 49 patients, intraoperatively in 19, and during the postoperative period in five; 14 patients were aware of having this anomaly. The data of eight patients were not unavailable. Eleven patients underwent laparoscopic appendectomy, which was combined with cholecystectomy in two cases. Histopathological examination of the appendix specimens revealed adenocarcinoma in only two of 95 patients. The diagnosis of left lower quadrant pain is based on well-established clinical symptoms, physical examination and physician's experience.

  20. Left-sided appendicitis in a patient with congenital gastrointestinal malrotation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welte Frank J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While appendicitis is the most common abdominal disease requiring surgical intervention seen in the emergency room setting, intestinal malrotation is relatively uncommon. When patients with asymptomatic undiagnosed gastrointestinal malrotation clinically present with abdominal pain, accurate diagnosis and definitive therapy may be delayed, possibly increasing the risk of morbidity and mortality. We present a case where CT was crucial diagnostically and helpful for pre-surgical planning in a patient presenting with an acute abdomen superimposed on complete congenital gastrointestinal malrotation. Case presentation A 46-year-old previously healthy male with four days of primarily left-sided abdominal pain, low-grade fevers, nausea and anorexia presented to the Emergency Department. His medical history was significant for poorly controlled diabetes and dyslipidemia. His white blood count at that time was elevated. Initial abdominal plain films suggested small bowel obstruction. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was performed with oral and IV contrast to exclude diverticulitis, revealing acute appendicitis superimposed on congenital intestinal malrotation. Following consultation with the surgical team for surgical planning, the patient went on to laparoscopic appendectomy and did well postoperatively. Conclusion Atypical presentations of acute abdominal conditions superimposed on asymptomatic gastrointestinal malrotation can result in delays in delivery of definitive therapy and potentially increase morbidity and mortality if not diagnosed in a timely manner. Appropriate imaging can be helpful in hastening diagnosis and guiding intervention.