WorldWideScience

Sample records for leed pilot checklist

  1. The Leeds Evaluation of Efficacy of Detoxification Study (LEEDS prisons project pilot study: protocol for a randomised controlled trial comparing dihydrocodeine and buprenorphine for opiate detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalton Richard

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the United Kingdom (UK, there is an extensive market for the class 'A' drug heroin. Many heroin users spend time in prison. People addicted to heroin often require prescribed medication when attempting to cease their drug use. The most commonly used detoxification agents in UK prisons are buprenorphine, dihydrocodeine and methadone. However, national guidelines do not state a detoxification drug of choice. Indeed, there is a paucity of research evaluating the most effective treatment for opiate detoxification in prisons. This study seeks to address the paucity by evaluating routinely used interventions amongst drug using prisoners within UK prisons. Methods/Design The Leeds Evaluation of Efficacy of Detoxification Study (LEEDS Prisons Pilot Study will use randomised controlled trial methodology to compare the open use of buprenorphine and dihydrocodeine for opiate detoxification, given in the context of routine care, within HMP Leeds. Prisoners who are eligible and give informed consent will be entered into the trial. The primary outcome measure will be abstinence status at five days post detoxification, as determined by a urine test. Secondary outcomes during the detoxification and then at one, three and six months post detoxification will be recorded.

  2. Psychometric properties of the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefin Sveen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: To date there is a lack of studies assessing the psychometric properties of the recently revised PTSD Checklist (PCL, the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the psychometric properties of the PCL-5 in parents of children with burns. Methods: The participating parents (N=62, mean age=38 completed self-report questionnaires, 0.8–5.6 years after their child's burn. Measures were the PCL-5, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R, the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS, and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS. Burn severity of the child and sociodemographic variables was obtained. Results: The parents’ average PCL-5 scores were low to moderate. The internal consistency of the PCL-5 was satisfactory, with Cronbach's alpha ranging from 0.56 to 0.77 and mean inter-item correlations ranging from 0.22 to 0.73 for the four PCL-5 subscales and the PCL-5 total. The PCL-5 subscales were moderately to highly correlated with the corresponding IES-R subscales as well as MADRS and PSS (p<0.05, whereas associations with sociodemographics and burn severity were low to moderate. Conclusions: This study provides preliminary support for the use of PCL-5. The results indicate satisfactory psychometric properties of the PCL-5 as measured with internal consistency, test–retest reliability, and aspects of convergent validity.

  3. Interval follow up of a 4-day pilot program to implement the WHO surgical safety checklist at a Congolese hospital

    OpenAIRE

    White, Michelle C.; Peterschmidt, Jennifer; Callahan, James; Fitzgerald, J. Edward; Close, Kristin L.

    2017-01-01

    Background The World Health Organisation Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) improves surgical outcomes and the research question is no longer ?does the SSC work?? but, ?how to make the SSC work?? Evidence for implementation strategies in low-income countries is sparse and existing strategies are heavily based on long-term external support. Short but effective implementation programs are required if widespread scale up is to be achieved. We designed and delivered a four-day pilot SSC training cou...

  4. Leeds under a cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Before 26 April 1986 few people in the west had heard of Chernobyl. Then Chernobyl experienced the world's worst nuclear power station accident. In the wake of the disaster radioactivity fell on Britain and much of Europe. There was confusion and rumour on the television, in the papers and amongst ordinary people. What would the effect of the Chernobyl accident be? Was it safe to go out of doors? Was it safe to eat fresh vegetables? What was a safe level of radiation? What was a becquerel, a milliSievert or any of the other scientific terms with which we were bombarded by scientists and other experts? This booklet sets out to help answer these questions by looking at a hypothetical disaster at the nuclear power station at Heysham, near Morecambe in Lancashire. Using this scenario it shows what the worst consequences of a nuclear accident might be for the citizens of Leeds. It also explains in a straightforward way the meaning of many technical terms which will help you to understand the advice and comments of experts and to make your own judgement of what they say. (author)

  5. Checklist to improve informed consent process in pediatric surgery: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdouse, Mohammed; Wajchendler, Amy; Koyle, Martin; Fecteau, Annie

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a checklist to standardize surgical informed consent process. A checklist was created following a literature search. Consent processes were observed from general surgery (GS) and urology (US) in the pre- and post-intervention phases. Competent patients/guardians were asked to complete a satisfaction questionnaire. All trainees and staff surgeons were interviewed on the checklist's utility. 73 observations (GS=39, US=34) and 66 observations (GS=30, US=36) were made in the pre- and post-intervention phase, respectively. Our checklist increased the frequency with which surgeons explained alternative treatments (pre-intervention 23.3% vs. post-intervention 81.8%), the role of trainees (15.1% vs. 72.7%), and the potential outcomes of not pursuing surgery (60.3% vs. 87.9%). The patient/guardian average satisfaction score increased between phases within GS (mean[standard deviation] 3.55[0.58] vs. 3.85[0.24]); p=0.002), but not within US (3.53[0.61] vs. 3.52[0.54]); p=0.705) or the overall sample (3.54[0.59] vs. 3.67[0.46]); p=0.329). Interestingly, there was no significant improvement in patient/guardian average anxiety levels in GS (X 2 =0.069, p=0.793), US (X 2 =0, p=1) or the overall sample (X 2 =0.143, p=0.706) following the intervention. Our checklist aids in standardizing the informed consent process. However, it did not significantly change satisfaction or anxiety levels of patients and guardians. Prognosis study. Level III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Promoting Health and Safety in San Francisco's Chinatown Restaurants: Findings and Lessons Learned from a Pilot Observational Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaydos, Megan; Bhatia, Rajiv; Morales, Alvaro; Lee, Pam Tau; Liu, Shaw San; Chang, Charlotte; Salvatore, Alicia L.; Krause, Niklas; Minkler, Meredith

    2011-01-01

    Noncompliance with labor and occupational health and safety laws contributes to economic and health inequities. Environmental health agencies are well positioned to monitor workplace conditions in many industries and support enhanced enforcement by responsible regulatory agencies. In collaboration with university and community partners, the San Francisco Department of Public Health used an observational checklist to assess preventable occupational injury hazards and compliance with employee notification requirements in 106 restaurants in San Francisco's Chinatown. Sixty-five percent of restaurants had not posted required minimum wage, paid sick leave, or workers' compensation notifications; 82% of restaurants lacked fully stocked first-aid kits; 52% lacked antislip mats; 37% lacked adequate ventilation; and 28% lacked adequate lighting. Supported by a larger community-based participatory research process, this pilot project helped to spur additional innovative health department collaborations to promote healthier workplaces. PMID:21836739

  7. Energy Efficiency: Comparison between GREENSHIP and LEED

    OpenAIRE

    Baharuddin; Rahim, Ramli

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares the energy efficiency in the two green building rating tools i.e. GREENSHIP and LEED. The study has been carried out by comparing the energy performance standard and the energy calculation method of both rating tools. GREENSHIP uses the OTTV (overall thermal transfer value) to measure the efficiency of energy use of the building design, while LEED uses ASHRAE standard for baseline building. The result shows that the energy standard uses in LEED rating tool is more stringen...

  8. The Survey Checklist (Manifesto).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlbach, Hunter; Artino, Anthony R

    2018-03-01

    Checklists can mitigate a multitude of high-cost mistakes in fields ranging from surgery to aviation. As part of a standard protocol, checklists may provide many benefits, including improved equity and communication among team members and more efficient integration of different processes during complex tasks. Mostly, though, checklists serve as easy, efficient means to remind professionals of what they already know but can easily forget. By improving processes, checklists can reduce procedural errors, miscommunications, and even deaths. Although the stakes of writing a survey are rarely as high as they are for performing surgery or piloting a plane, checklists can improve the quality of surveys in medical education. In this Perspective, the authors propose a survey checklist to serve the same core function as surgical checklists-to reduce error. That is, a survey checklist can help medical education practitioners and researchers gather more accurate responses. Designers can use the checklist in the appendix to guide item creation processes or to help evaluate the quality of existing surveys. The checklist focuses on formulating items, crafting response options, and formatting/organizing the whole survey.

  9. A multinational study to pilot the modified Hypomania Checklist (mHCL) in the assessment of mixed depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinbas, Kursat; Ozerdem, Aysegul; Prieto, Miguel L; Fuentes, Manuel E; Yalin, Nefize; Ersoy, Zeliha; Aydemir, Omer; Quiroz, Danilo; Oztekin, Signem; Geske, Jennifer R; Feeder, Scott E; Angst, Jules; Frye, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Mixed depression is a common, dimensional phenomenon that is increasingly recognized in unipolar and bipolar disorders. We piloted a modified version of the Hypomania Checklist (mHCL-32) to assess the prevalence and clinical correlates of concurrent manic (hypo) symptoms in depressed patients. The mHCL-32, Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-24) were utilized in the assessment of unipolar (UP=61) and bipolar (BP=44) patients with an index major depressive episode confirmed by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID). Differential mHLC-32 item endorsement was compared between UP and BP. Correlation analyses assessed the association of symptom dimensions measured by mHCL-32, YMRS and HAMD-24. There was no significant difference between mood groups in the mean mHCL-32 and YMRS scores. Individual mHLC-32 items of increased libido, quarrels, and caffeine intake were endorsed more in BP vs. UP patients. The mHCL-32 active-elevated subscale score was positively correlated with the YMRS in BP patients and negatively correlated with HAMD-24 in UP patients. Conversely, the mHCL-32 irritable-risk taking subscale score was positively correlated with HAMD-24 in BP and with YMRS in UP patients. Small sample size and cross-sectional design. Modifying the HCL to screen for (hypo) manic symptoms in major depression may have utility in identifying mixed symptoms in both bipolar vs. unipolar depression. Further research is encouraged to quantify mixed symptoms with standardized assessments. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Emergency Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Week National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day Emergency Checklist If someone may have been poisoned, call the ... visit to the emergency room. Below is a checklist to help you in the event of a ...

  11. Assessment of pragmatic language impairment in children referred to psychiatric services: a pilot study of the Children's Communication Checklist in a Norwegian sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helland, Wenche Andersen; Heimann, Mikael

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present pilot study was to explore whether pragmatic language impairments are more prevalent among children referred to child psychiatric services (n=21) than among a comparison group of typically developing children (n=29) in the age range 8-10 years. A second and minor aim was also to assess the usability of a Norwegian translation of the Children's Communication Checklist (CCC). Communication disorders defined as a pragmatic score equal to or below 140 on the CCC were identified in a majority (0.57) of the children in the clinical group; the corresponding proportion for the typically developing comparison group was only 0.10. Thus, the Norwegian version of the CCC distinguishes between children with symptoms of pragmatic language impairments and those with no symptoms, as does the English version.

  12. LEED Credit Review System and Optimization Model for Pursuing LEED Certification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Ouk Choi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating sustainability in construction can result in desirable building attributes and project life cycle. The Leadership in Engineering and Environmental Design (LEED® Rating System helps project teams make the right green building decisions for their projects through a process. However, in current practice, project teams do not have a systematic procedure or tool for choosing the LEED credits appropriate for a particular project. The researchers have developed a tool, which support the LEED integrative process during a charrette, and developed an optimization model that can be utilized to assist project teams determine which credits to pursue for LEED certification, taking into account potential benefits associated with any LEED credit. The tool enables owners to incorporate sustainability in construction by helping the project teams make the right green building decisions for their projects through an integrated procedure.

  13. Safety Checklists

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this checklist is to provide commanders, directors, safety officers, and supervisors with a ready safety reference that encompasses most functions and tasks common to operations within...

  14. Back to basics: implementing the surgical checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruce, Lisa

    2014-11-01

    Surgery is complex and technically demanding for all team members. Surgical checklists have been implemented with different degrees of success in the perioperative setting. There is a wealth of evidence that they are effective at preventing patient safety events and helping team members master the complexities of modern health care. Implementation is key to successful use of the surgical checklist in all invasive procedural settings. Key strategies for successful checklist implementation include establishing a multidisciplinary team to implement the checklist, involving surgeon leaders, pilot testing the checklist, incorporating feedback from team members to improve the process, recognizing and addressing barriers to implementation, and offering coaching and continuous feedback to team members who use the checklist. Using these strategies will give the perioperative nurse, department leaders, and surgeons the tools to implement a successful checklist. Copyright © 2014 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Electronic Checklists on Multi-Purpose Displays: A Better Way For Fighter Pilots to Manage Information and Situational Awareness during Periods of High Workload

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Doherty, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    ...% of aviation mishaps. But, apply a bit more aggressive critical analysis into the type of human errors occurring highlight the fact that task saturation, lack of situational awareness, and checklist errors are the leading factors...

  16. Cost analysis of LEED certified United States navy buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Kirar, Carl V.

    2011-01-01

    CIVINS (Civilian Institutions) Thesis document A study was completed at UW-Madison in 2010 that reviewed the energy consumption of US Navy buildings which earned Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). The research compared LEED certified buildings to a commercial counterpart within the US Navy inventory against Executive Order (EO) 13423. The EO mandated that all federal agencies meet a 30 percent reduction of...

  17. Reliability of contemporary data-acquisition techniques for LEED analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noonan, J.R.; Davis, H.L.

    1980-10-01

    It is becoming clear that one of the principal limitations in LEED structure analysis is the quality of the experimental I-V profiles. This limitation is discussed, and data acquisition procedures described, which for simple systems, seem to enhance the quality of agreement between the results of theoretical model calculations and experimental LEED spectra. By employing such procedures to obtain data from Cu(100), excellent agreement between computed and measured profiles has been achieved. 7 figures

  18. Walkable new urban LEED_Neighborhood-Development (LEED-ND) community design and children's physical activity: selection, environmental, or catalyst effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Interest is growing in physical activity-friendly community designs, but few tests exist of communities explicitly designed to be walkable. We test whether students living in a new urbanist community that is also a pilot LEED_ND (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design-Neighborhood Development) community have greater accelerometer-measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) across particular time periods compared to students from other communities. We test various time/place periods to see if the data best conform to one of three explanations for MVPA. Environmental effects suggest that MVPA occurs when individuals are exposed to activity-friendly settings; selection effects suggest that walkable community residents prefer MVPA, which leads to both their choice of a walkable community and their high levels of MVPA; catalyst effects occur when walking to school creates more MVPA, beyond the school commute, on schooldays but not weekends. Methods Fifth graders (n = 187) were sampled from two schools representing three communities: (1) a walkable community, Daybreak, designed with new urbanist and LEED-ND pilot design standards; (2) a mixed community (where students lived in a less walkable community but attended the walkable school so that part of the route to school was walkable), and (3) a less walkable community. Selection threats were addressed through controlling for parental preferences for their child to walk to school as well as comparing in-school MVPA for the walkable and mixed groups. Results Minutes of MVPA were tested with 3 × 2 (Community by Gender) analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs). Community walkability related to more MVPA during the half hour before and after school and, among boys only, more MVPA after school. Boys were more active than girls, except during the half hour after school. Students from the mixed and walkable communities--who attended the same school--had similar in-school MVPA levels, and community groups

  19. Do LEED-certified buildings save energy? Yes, but...

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newsham, Guy R.; Mancini, Sandra; Birt, Benjamin J. [National Research Council Canada - Institute for Research in Construction, Ottawa (Canada)

    2009-08-15

    We conducted a re-analysis of data supplied by the New Buildings Institute and the US Green Buildings Council on measured energy use data from 100 LEED-certified commercial and institutional buildings. These data were compared to the energy use of the general US commercial building stock. We also examined energy use by LEED certification level, and by energy-related credits achieved in the certification process. On average, LEED buildings used 18-39% less energy per floor area than their conventional counterparts. However, 28-35% of LEED buildings used more energy than their conventional counterparts. Further, the measured energy performance of LEED buildings had little correlation with certification level of the building, or the number of energy credits achieved by the building at design time. Therefore, at a societal level, green buildings can contribute substantial energy savings, but further work needs to be done to define green building rating schemes to ensure more consistent success at the individual building level. Note, these findings should be considered as preliminary, and the analyses should be repeated when longer data histories from a larger sample of green buildings are available. (author)

  20. Designing healthy communities: A walkability analysis of LEED-ND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana A. Zuniga-Teran

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Prevailing city design in many countries has created sedentary societies that depend on automobile use. Consequently, architects, urban designers, and land planners have developed new urban design theories, which have been incorporated into the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for Neighborhood Development (LEED-ND certification system. The LEED-ND includes design elements that improve human well-being by facilitating walking and biking, a concept known as walkability. Despite these positive developments, relevant research findings from other fields of study have not been fully integrated into the LEED-ND. According to Zuniga-Teran (2015, relevant walkability research findings from multiple disciplines were organized into a walkability framework (WF that organizes design elements related to physical activity into nine categories, namely, connectivity, land use, density, traffic safety, surveillance, parking, experience, greenspace, and community. In this study, we analyze walkability in the LEED-ND through the lens of the nine WF categories. Through quantitative and qualitative analyses, we identify gaps and strengths in the LEED-ND and propose potential enhancements to this certification system that reflects what is known about enhancing walkability more comprehensively through neighborhood design analysis. This work seeks to facilitate the translation of research into practice, which can ultimately lead to more active and healthier societies.

  1. Automated fenestration allocation as complying with LEED rating system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazem Mohamed Talaat El Daly

    2014-12-01

    The allocation of windows, through the help of certain well known heuristic algorithms and simulation programs, could be reached automatically to compromise with the LEED rating system by achieving the required daylight amounts with a minimum solar radiation inside a particular building. This research shows a design method based on simulation techniques with the help of heuristic algorithms through a parametric design that automatically allocate windows to comply with LEED. At the end of the research, a small project is discussed for evaluating the design process.

  2. Cost Analysis of Leed Certified United States Navy Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    employee productivity, investors seeking more socially conscious investments, and reputational issues that have been forcing the real estate sector...conscious investments, and reputational issues that have been forcing the real estate sector towards more efficient building techniques. LEED has...2011. 12. Macdonald, N., Cheng, D. Basic Finance for Marketers (Marketing and agribusiness texts - 1). Food and Agriculuture Organization of the

  3. Performance or marketing benefits? The case of LEED certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matisoff, Daniel C; Noonan, Douglas S; Mazzolini, Anna M

    2014-01-01

    Green building adoption is driven by both performance-based benefits and marketing based benefits. Performance based benefits are those that improve performance or lower operating costs of the building or of building users. Marketing benefits stem from the consumer response to green certification. This study illustrates the relative importance of the marketing based benefits that accrue to Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) buildings due to green signaling mechanisms, specifically related to the certification itself are identified. Of course, all participants in the LEED certification scheme seek marketing benefits. But even among LEED participants, the interest in green signaling is pronounced. The green signaling mechanism that occurs at the certification thresholds shifts building patterns from just below to just above the threshold level, and motivates builders to cluster buildings just above each threshold. Results are consistent across subsamples, though nonprofit organizations appear to build greener buildings and engage in more green signaling than for-profit entities. Using nonparametric regression discontinuity, signaling across different building types is observed. Marketing benefits due to LEED certification drives organizations to build "greener" buildings by upgrading buildings at the thresholds to reach certification levels.

  4. Critical review of LEED system for rating sustainability of architecture of commercial interiors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Sanja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The LEED rating system for sustainability of architecture has gained large marketing potential in USA and became one of main ways American builders are attacking ecological challenges. In this paper the LEED rating system for commercial interiors is critically reviewed, pointing out its positive - focus on integrated design process - and negative impacts - low thresholds for highest ratings and tendency to gain LEED rating with projects that hardly pass the thresholds, largely neglecting the principles of energy efficiency. Based on a few prominent LEED platinum examples, the beginnings of a LEED style of designing interiors in historical landmark buildings are pointed out as well.

  5. Achieving LEED credit for ergonomics: Laying the foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mallory

    2014-01-01

    Despite guidance from the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) on the requirements for earning a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) ergonomics credit in the Innovation in Design and Innovation in Operations category, few projects have received the credit. The University of California, Berkeley ergonomics program, Ergonomics@Work, has aligned the ergonomics strategy to those of the USGBC and LEED to achieve the ergonomics credit in several new buildings. This article describes the steps needed to obtain the credit and highlights the opportunities it creates to partner with the project team to promote ergonomics. As a profession it is up to ergonomists to create the road map that incorporates ergonomics into the green building design.

  6. Rumpel-Leede Phenomenon in a Hypertensive Lady on Amlodipine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2014-01-01

    We are describing a 60-year-old hypertensive lady who developed Rumpel-Leede phenomenon following the use of a tourniquet to obtain a blood sample. History revealed that she was on amlodipine therapy and that spontaneous sun-exposure related purpura was often seen since amlodipine was prescribed. Examinations and investigations provided normal results. She refused consent for a skin biopsy. Symptoms resolved after its substitution with enalapril and dihydrochlorothiazide, without any further recurrence. PMID:24959504

  7. A value-for-money solution in Leeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, M. [United Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    1998-05-01

    A contract energy services scheme is described which supplies all the electric power, heating and chilling needs of the United Leeds Hospital and the University of Leeds campus. In order to meet current needs, a major expansion of capacity and reconfiguration of an existing GSC built as a joint venture between Leeds General Infirmary and the University in the 1970s was required. The estimated capital investment for the project was Pound 6.5 M. The decision to develop the project as an energy services scheme was taken in view of the technical complexity requiring project management and engineering skills not available either in the Hospital or the University. It has been successfully implemented and is meeting expectations in terms both of delivery of service and savings. The Hospital and University have avoided the need to obtain and invest capital themselves, the combination of more energy efficient equipment and better use of existing capacity have reduced revenue costs and management time has been reduced. Over the lifetime of the 20-year contract, savings of Pound 700,000 per annum on average are expected. (UK)

  8. Update Checklist Energiebesparende Maatregelen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildschut, J.

    2014-01-01

    De laatste versie van de Checklist Energiebesparende Maatregelen is inmiddels vijf jaar oud. Door PPO Bloembollen en DLV Plant is deze nu geactualiseerd. De bedoeling van de checklist is dat bloembollenbedrijven zelf een zogenoemde shortlist kunnen maken van voor hen interessante mogelijkheden.

  9. Citrate anticoagulation in the ICU: the Leeds experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumper, Charlotte

    2016-09-08

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is widely used in the management of critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. It requires effective anticoagulation of the extracorporeal blood circuit. Although heparin is the most commonly prescribed anticoagulant, there are issues associated with heparin, and there has been increasing interest in regional citrate anticoagulation as an alternative. In 2013, The Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust switched from heparin to citrate anticoagulant for CRRT in intensive care units (ICUs) across the Trust. This article examines the reasons for the switch, the implementation of citrate and the impact of this quality-improvement project in terms of patient outcome data and feedback from the ICU nursing team.

  10. Evaluation of Digital Checklists for Command and Control Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    advances allow innovative solutions to checklists in numerous contexts. For example, in the aviation industry , numerous military and civil pilots are...2011). Systematic review of safety checklists for use by medical care teams in acute hospital settings- limited evidence of effectiveness. BMC...Implications for decision making. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting (Vol. 36, No. 1, pp. 7-11). SAGE

  11. A Study on the LEED Energy Simulation Process Using BIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Soo Ryu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the domestic and international environmentally friendly certification system, energy-related credit occupies a high ratio in the total distribution of certification score Leadership in the Energy and Environmental Design (LEED system is a certification system developed by the US Green Building Council (USGBC in order to assess the environmental friendliness of buildings. The energy-related credit is approximately 30% of the total and also the energy simulation ratio specifically is the highest among the single credits as it is 20%. In this research, the energy simulation process using Building Information Modeling (BIM based on the energy simulation case performed at the A-Tower, LEED certification was proposed. It places an emphasis on the verification process which was short in the previous research. The architectural geometry modeled through the BIM tool is converted to the gbXML, and in this process the geometry is verified through the interference check functions, the gbXML Viewer and the FZKViewer. The energy simulation is performed after the verification procedure. The geometry verification process in the A-Tower project is presented throughout this paper. In conclusion, an improved process is proposed for the productivity and reliability of energy simulation.

  12. Distributed System Design Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brendan; Driscoll, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a design checklist targeted to fault-tolerant distributed electronic systems. Many of the questions and discussions in this checklist may be generally applicable to the development of any safety-critical system. However, the primary focus of this report covers the issues relating to distributed electronic system design. The questions that comprise this design checklist were created with the intent to stimulate system designers' thought processes in a way that hopefully helps them to establish a broader perspective from which they can assess the system's dependability and fault-tolerance mechanisms. While best effort was expended to make this checklist as comprehensive as possible, it is not (and cannot be) complete. Instead, we expect that this list of questions and the associated rationale for the questions will continue to evolve as lessons are learned and further knowledge is established. In this regard, it is our intent to post the questions of this checklist on a suitable public web-forum, such as the NASA DASHLink AFCS repository. From there, we hope that it can be updated, extended, and maintained after our initial research has been completed.

  13. Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields in the Cookridge area of Leeds

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, K; Judd, P M; Lowe, A J; Shaw, J

    2002-01-01

    On the 8 and 9 May 2002 representatives of the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) performed a radiofrequency electromagnetic field survey in the Cookridge area of Leeds in order to assess exposure to radio signals from transmitters mounted on a water tower/a lattice tower and a radio station tower. Guidelines on limiting exposure to radio signals have been published by NRPB and the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). These guidelines are designed to prevent established adverse effects on human health. During this survey, the total exposures due to all radio signals from 30 MHz to 18000 MHz (18 GHz) were measured. This frequency range was chosen as it includes mobile phone base station transmissions, which are at around 900 and 1800 MHz and super high frequency (SHF) transmissions from most of the large microwave dish antennas mounted on the towers. In addition, other major sources of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields in the environment such as broadcast radio...

  14. Checklists for external validity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrvig, Anne-Kirstine; Kidholm, Kristian; Gerke, Oke

    2014-01-01

    to an implementation setting. In this paper, currently available checklists on external validity are identified, assessed and used as a basis for proposing a new improved instrument. METHOD: A systematic literature review was carried out in Pubmed, Embase and Cinahl on English-language papers without time restrictions...

  15. Asthma Home Environment Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    This checklist guides home care visitors in identifying environmental asthma triggers most commonly found in homes. It includes sections on the building, home interior and room interior and provides low-cost action steps for remediation. EPA 402-F-03-030.

  16. College Preparation Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Student Aid, US Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Why go to college? A higher education introduces students to new people and new experiences, and usually leads to a higher salary and lower chance of unemployment. This checklist will tell you how to get ready for college--and how the government will help you pay for it.

  17. College Party Intervention Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Off-campus parties are a major source of underage and excessive drinking among college students and cause alcohol-related problems for students and residents. This checklist is a brief, evidence-based guide for campus-based prevention professionals. It is designed to give the basic information needed to develop, implement, and evaluate an…

  18. More than a Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidus, Gabrielle; Sadder, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Your students are sitting at their desks, using a checklist to revise their writing. You see that some are consistently checking off the same areas they always do as "needing improvement" and that others are simply marking off a skill as "mastered," scarcely glancing at the piece of writing in front of them. The authors suggest…

  19. Checklist for clinical readiness published

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists from NCI, together with collaborators from outside academic centers, have developed a checklist of criteria to evaluate the readiness of complex molecular tests that will guide decisions made during clinical trials. The checklist focuses on tes

  20. Universidad de Leeds - Gran Bretaña

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamberlin, -

    1977-11-01

    Full Text Available Located 1,500 m from the center of the city, the Leeds University complex actively participates in city life. Designed in the 60's and built later on, this architectonic complex is outstanding because it offers an «ideal» city, perfectly integrated in the «real» city and conditioned to its own needs, to a great extent. In the beginning, this challenge of converting this university complex with a capacity for 10,000 students, in an architectonically attractive urban center met with difficulties referring to traffic and parking problems corresponding to a city as large as the one projected; this obstacle was overcome by adequate organization of underground and overhead traffic arteries which reserved large garden areas exclusively for pedestrians, freeing them from the traffic congestion and offering the pleasant and relaxed atmosphere required. The large «campus» ¡s sub-divided into different garden areas, connected one to the other and In the center of each one we have a varied and complementary architecture, which breaks with the conventional monolithic style.Situado a 1.500 m del centro de la ciudad, el conjunto universitario de Leeds participa activamente de la misma. Concebido en la década de los 60, y construido posteriormente, este complejo arquitectónico se destaca por encerrar una propuesta de ciudad «ideal», perfectamente integrada en la ciudad «real» y sujeta en buena medida a sus mismas necesidades. La alternativa de convertir a este conjunto universitario, con capacidad para 10.000 estudiantes, en un núcleo urbano arquitectónicamente atractivo, tropezó inicialmente con los condicionamientos surgidos del tráfico, circulación y estacionamiento de vehículos, correspondientes a la magnitud de la ciudad proyectada; impedimento que fue resuelto de forma adecuada mediante la organización de una red subterránea y superficial de circulación vehicular, que reserva grandes espacios verdes para la circulaci

  1. Study of the local structure of binary surfaces by electron diffraction (XPS, LEED)

    OpenAIRE

    Gereová, Katarína

    2006-01-01

    Study of local structure of binary surface with usage of ultra-thin film of cerium deposited on a Pd (111) single-crystal surface is presented. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction (XPS, XPD), angle resolved UV photoemission spectroscopy (ARUPS) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) was used for our investigations. LEED and X-ray excited photoemission intensities results represent a surface-geometrical structure. As well, mapping of ultra-violet photoelectron intensities as a...

  2. Surgical checklists: the human factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Connor, Paul

    2013-05-14

    BACKGROUND: Surgical checklists has been shown to improve patient safety and teamwork in the operating theatre. However, despite the known benefits of the use of checklists in surgery, in some cases the practical implementation has been found to be less than universal. A questionnaire methodology was used to quantitatively evaluate the attitudes of theatre staff towards a modified version of the World Health Organisation (WHO) surgical checklist with relation to: beliefs about levels of compliance and support, impact on patient safety and teamwork, and barriers to the use of the checklist. METHODS: Using the theory of planned behaviour as a framework, 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted with theatre personnel regarding their attitudes towards, and levels of compliance with, a checklist. Based upon the interviews, a 27-item questionnaire was developed and distribute to all theatre personnel in an Irish hospital. RESULTS: Responses were obtained from 107 theatre staff (42.6% response rate). Particularly for nurses, the overall attitudes towards the effect of the checklist on safety and teamworking were positive. However, there was a lack of rigour with which the checklist was being applied. Nurses were significantly more sensitive to the barriers to the use of the checklist than anaesthetists or surgeons. Moreover, anaesthetists were not as positively disposed to the surgical checklist as surgeons and nurse. This finding was attributed to the tendency for the checklist to be completed during a period of high workload for the anaesthetists, resulting in a lack of engagement with the process. CONCLUSION: In order to improve the rigour with which the surgical checklist is applied, there is a need for: the involvement of all members of the theatre team in the checklist process, demonstrated support for the checklist from senior personnel, on-going education and training, and barriers to the implementation of the checklist to be addressed.

  3. Guidance for Modifying the Definition of Diseases: A Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doust, Jenny; Vandvik, Per O; Qaseem, Amir; Mustafa, Reem A; Horvath, Andrea R; Frances, Allen; Al-Ansary, Lubna; Bossuyt, Patrick; Ward, Robyn L; Kopp, Ina; Gollogly, Laragh; Schunemann, Holger; Glasziou, Paul

    2017-07-01

    No guidelines exist currently for guideline panels and others considering changes to disease definitions. Panels frequently widen disease definitions, increasing the proportion of the population labeled as unwell and potentially causing harm to patients. We set out to develop a checklist of issues, with guidance, for panels to consider prior to modifying a disease definition. We assembled a multidisciplinary, multicontinent working group of 13 members, including members from the Guidelines International Network, Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation working group, and the World Health Organisation. We used a 5-step process to develop the checklist: (1) a literature review of issues, (2) a draft outline document, (3) a Delphi process of feedback on the list of issues, (4) a 1-day face-to-face meeting, and (5) further refinement of the checklist. The literature review identified 12 potential issues. From these, the group developed an 8-item checklist that consisted of definition changes, number of people affected, trigger, prognostic ability, disease definition precision and accuracy, potential benefits, potential harms, and the balance between potential harms and benefits. The checklist is accompanied by an explanation of each item and the types of evidence to assess each one. We used a panel's recent consideration of a proposed change in the definition of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) to illustrate use of the checklist. We propose that the checklist be piloted and validated by groups developing new guidelines. We anticipate that the use of the checklist will be a first step to guidance and better documentation of definition changes prior to introducing modified disease definitions.

  4. Coordinated Specialty Care Fact Sheet and Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Checklist Share Coordinated Specialty Care Fact Sheet and Checklist Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... webpage: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/raise . CSC Checklist If you are interested in a CSC program, ...

  5. Checklist of Serengeti Ecosystem Grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Emma Victoria; Elia Ntandu, John; Ficinski, Paweł; Vorontsova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We present the first taxonomic checklist of the Poaceae species of the Serengeti, Tanzania. A review of the literature and herbarium specimens recorded 200 species of grasses, in line with similar studies in other parts of East Africa. The checklist is supported by a total of 939 herbarium collections. Full georeferenced collection data is made available alongside a summary checklist in pdf format. More than a quarter of the species are known from a single collection highlighting the need for further research, especially concerning the rare species and their distribution.

  6. Checklist of Serengeti Ecosystem Grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficinski, Paweł; Vorontsova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We present the first taxonomic checklist of the Poaceae species of the Serengeti, Tanzania. A review of the literature and herbarium specimens recorded 200 species of grasses, in line with similar studies in other parts of East Africa. The checklist is supported by a total of 939 herbarium collections. Full georeferenced collection data is made available alongside a summary checklist in pdf format. More than a quarter of the species are known from a single collection highlighting the need for further research, especially concerning the rare species and their distribution. PMID:27226761

  7. Regional Variations of Credits Obtained by LEED 2009 Certified Green Buildings—A Country Level Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED is one of the most widely recognized green building rating systems. With more than 20% of the projects certified in non-United States (US countries, LEED’s global impact has been increasing and it is critically important for developers and regulatory authorities to understand LEED’s performance at the country level to facilitate global implementation. This study therefore aims to investigate the credit achievement pattern of LEED 2009, which is one of the well-developed versions of LEED, by using 4021 certified projects in the US, China, Turkey, and Brazil. The results show that significant differences can be identified on most rating categories, including sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, indoor environmental quality, and innovation in design. Using a post hoc analysis, country-specific credit allocation patterns are also identified to help developers to understand existing country-specific green building practices. In addition, it is also found that there is unbalanced achievement of regional priority credits. The study offers a useful reference and benchmark for international developers and contractors to understand the regional variations of LEED 2009 and for regulatory authorities, such as the U.S. Green Building Council, to improve the rating system, especially on designing regional priority credits.

  8. Integrating Building Information Modeling and Green Building Certification: The BIM-LEED Application Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Building information modeling (BIM) and green building are currently two major trends in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry. This research recognizes the market demand for better solutions to achieve green building certification such as LEED in the United States. It proposes a new strategy based on the integration of BIM…

  9. Green Infrastructure Checklists and Renderings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materials and checklists for Denver, CO to review development project plans for green infrastructure components, best practices for inspecting and maintaining installed green infrastructure. Also includes renderings of streetscape projects.

  10. A checklist for photovoltaic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    To aid the reproducibility of published results for photovoltaic devices, from now on we will ask authors of relevant manuscripts to complete a checklist of key technical information that must be reported.

  11. Peruvian lessons to inform Bradford pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinitt, Ian; Noakes, Catherine

    2008-05-01

    Ian Hinitt, deputy director of estates, Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and Department of Built Environment, University of Central Lancashire, and Dr Catherine Noakes, AMIMechE, Pathogen Control Engineering Research Group, University of Leeds School of Civil Engineering, discuss whether infection control can be improved by applying physical barriers and mixed mode ventilation, with particular reference to a proposed pilot project at Bradford Royal Infirmary.

  12. LEED (Trademark) for Homes - Pilot Study: Evaluation for Use in Army Family Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    Exchange Cafeteria, Fast Food/Snack Bar (Cyber Cafe , Food Court, Burger King, Popeyes, etc.), Post (Installation) Dining Facilities School Dependent...Water-efficient showerhead with H2Okinetic technology from Delta • WeatherTRAK smart irrigation controls from HydroPoint Data Sys- tems, Inc...worship (protestant, catholic, Jewish), restaurant (food court, Burger King, combined club), other neighborhood-serving retail (cyber cafe , military

  13. Health and Safety Checklist for Early Care and Education Programs to Assess Key National Health and Safety Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkon, Abbey; Rose, Roberta; Wolff, Mimi; Kotch, Jonathan B; Aronson, Susan S

    2016-01-01

    The project aims were to (1) develop an observational Health and Safety Checklist to assess health and safety practices and conditions in early care and education (ECE) programs using Stepping Stones To Caring For Our Children, 3rd Edition national standards, (2) pilot test the Checklist, completed by nurse child care health consultants, to assess feasibility, ease of completion, objectivity, validity, and reliability, and (3) revise the Checklist based on the qualitative and quantitative results of the pilot study. The observable national health and safety standards were identified and then rated by health, safety, and child care experts using a Delphi technique to validate the standards as essential to prevent harm and promote health. Then, child care health consultants recruited ECE centers and pilot tested the 124-item Checklist. The pilot study was conducted in Arizona, California and North Carolina. The psychometric properties of the Checklist were assessed. The 37 participating ECE centers had 2627 children from ethnically-diverse backgrounds and primarily low-income families. The child care health consultants found the Checklist easy to complete, objective, and useful for planning health and safety interventions. The Checklist had content and face validity, inter-rater reliability, internal consistency, and concurrent validity. Based on the child care health consultant feedback and psychometric properties of the Checklist, the Checklist was revised and re-written at an 8th grade literacy level. The Health and Safety Checklist provides a standardized instrument of observable, selected national standards to assess the quality of health and safety in ECE centers.

  14. Evaluation of a countrywide implementation of the world health organisation surgical safety checklist in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michelle C; Baxter, Linden S; Close, Kristin L; Ravelojaona, Vaonandianina A; Rakotoarison, Hasiniaina N; Bruno, Emily; Herbert, Alison; Andean, Vanessa; Callahan, James; Andriamanjato, Hery H; Shrime, Mark G

    2018-01-01

    The 2009 World Health Organisation (WHO) surgical safety checklist significantly reduces surgical mortality and morbidity (up to 47%). Yet in 2016, only 25% of East African anesthetists regularly use the checklist. Nationwide implementation of the checklist is reported in high-income countries, but in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) reports of successful implementations are sparse, limited to single institutions and require intensive support. Since checklist use leads to the biggest improvements in outcomes in LMICs, methods of wide-scale implementation are needed. We hypothesized that, using a three-day course, successful wide-scale implementation of the checklist could be achieved, as measured by at least 50% compliance with six basic safety processes at three to four months. We also aimed to determine predictors for checklist utilization. Using a blended educational implementation strategy based on prior pilot studies we designed a three-day dynamic educational course to facilitate widespread implementation of the WHO checklist. The course utilized lectures, film, small group breakouts, participant feedback and simulation to teach the knowledge, skills and behavior changes needed to implement the checklist. In collaboration with the Ministry of Health and local hospital leadership, the course was delivered to 427 multi-disciplinary staff at 21 hospitals located in 19 of 22 regions of Madagascar between September 2015 and March 2016. We evaluated implementation at three to four months using questionnaires (with a 5-point Likert scale) and focus groups. Multivariate linear regression was used to test predictors of checklist utilization. At three to four months, 65% of respondents reported always using the checklist, with another 13% using it in part. Participant's years in practice, hospital size, or surgical volume did not predict checklist use. Checklist use was associated with counting instruments (pcourse for checklist implementation resulted in 78

  15. Chemical reactivity and structural determination of metal and gaseous adsorbates on Cu{100} using TPD and LEED

    OpenAIRE

    Younis Ahmed, Hamid M.

    2003-01-01

    The structures formed by adsorbing thin-film platinum, formic acid and oxygen on Cu{ 100} single crystal are investigated by quantitative low-energy electrondiffraction (LEED) and Temperature Programmed Reaction Spectroscopy (TPRS) Symmetrized Automated Tensor LEED (SATLEED) calculations are used to determine the structure of the formed surface alloys and overlayers. TPRS was used to probe the surface reactivity of the systems studied while surface composition was obtained using Auger Electro...

  16. Developing and testing a checklist to enhance quality in clinical ethics consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicker, Lauren Sydney; Rose, Susannah L; Eves, Margo M; Flamm, Anne Lederman; Sanghani, Ruchi; Smith, Martin L

    2014-01-01

    Checklists have been used to improve quality in many industries, including healthcare. The use of checklists, however, has not been extensively evaluated in clinical ethics consultation. This article seeks to fill this gap by exploring the efficacy of using a checklist in ethics consultation, as tested by an empirical investigation of the use of the checklist at a large academic medical system (Cleveland Clinic). The specific aims of this project are as follows: (1) to improve the quality of ethics consultations by providing reminders to ethics consultants about process steps that are important for most patient-centered ethics consultations, (2) to create consistency in the ethics consultation process across the medical system, and (3) to establish an effective educational tool for trainers and trainees in clinical ethics consultation. The checklist was developed after a thorough literature review and an iterative process of revising and testing by a group of experienced ethics consultants. To pilot test the checklist, it was distributed to 46 ethics consultants. After a six-month pilot period in which ethics professionals used the checklist during their clinical activities, a survey was distributed to all of those who used the checklist. The 10-item survey examined consultants' perceptions regarding the three aims listed above. Of the 25 survey respondents, 11 self-reported as experts in ethics consultation, nine perceived themselves to have mid-level expertise, and five self-reported as novices. The majority (68 percent) of all respondents, regardless of expertise, believed that the checklist could be a "helpful" or "very helpful" tool in the consultation process generally. Novices were more likely than experts to believe that the checklist would be useful in conducting consultations. The limitations of this study include: reduced generalizability given that this project was conducted at one medical system, utilized a small sample size, and used self

  17. An institutional approach: education for sustainable development at the University of Leeds

    OpenAIRE

    Purvis, M; Young, CW; Marsh, C; Clarke, J

    2013-01-01

    Central to the strategic vision of the University of Leeds is the reaffirmation of the University’s commitment to provide an exceptional student experience centred on inspirational learning and teaching, grounded in world-class research. A key component of this vision is a major curriculum enhancement project. This chapter outlines the intent of this project, which reinforces existing provision that challenges undergraduate students to broaden their academic horizons and develop their capacit...

  18. Assessment of Energy Credits in LEED-Certified Buildings Based on Certification Levels and Project Ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Pelin Gurgun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Compared to other categories, the Energy and Atmosphere category contributes the most to the maximum obtainable points in the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED certification system. The objective of the study was to identify the extent to which project teams take advantage of the credits in the Energy and Atmosphere category of LEED. This study analyzes the performance of practitioners in achieving points in the Energy and Atmosphere credits of LEED-New Construction (NC 2009 for 1500 buildings that received LEED certification in the US. For a better understanding of the credit patterns, the differences in the performance of practitioners are investigated relative to certification levels and project ownership. Achievement in credits is calculated in terms of percent of maximum points (PMP, since the maximum achievable points differ for each credit. Practitioners’ achievements in the credits were ranked as follows: (1 enhanced commissioning, (2 optimized energy performance, (3 enhanced refrigerant management, (4 green power, (5 measurement and verification, and (6 on-site renewable energy. The largest achievement differences were observed in the on-site renewable energy credit. Concerning building ownership, investors were found to optimize mostly energy efficiency and on-site renewable energy, but to mostly skip enhanced refrigerant management. Performance in the measurement and verification credit was similar for all owner types, whereas investors performed differently from corporations, and government agencies in the enhanced commissioning credit. Practitioners who recognize these priorities and differences are expected to be better positioned to make sustainability-related decisions in building design and construction.

  19. LEED structural analysis of GaAs(001)-c(4X4) surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romanyuk, Olexandr; Jiříček, Petr; Cukr, Miroslav; Bartoš, Igor

    566-568, - (2004), s. 89-93 ISSN 0039-6028 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : electron-solid interactions * low energy electron diffraction(LEED) * molecular beam epitaxy(MBE) * surface relaxation and reconstruction * gallium arsenide * low index single crystal scattering * diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2004

  20. The association between the geography of fast food outlets and childhood obesity rates in Leeds, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Lorna K; Edwards, Kimberley L

    2010-11-01

    To analyse the association between childhood overweight and obesity and the density and proximity of fast food outlets in relation to the child's residential postcode. This was an observational study using individual level height/weight data and geographic information systems methodology. Leeds in West Yorkshire, UK. This area consists of 476 lower super-output areas. Children aged 3-14 years who lived within the Leeds metropolitan boundaries (n=33,594). The number of fast food outlets per area and the distance to the nearest fast food outlet from the child's home address. The weight status of the child: overweight, obese or neither. 27.1% of the children were overweight or obese with 12.6% classified as obese. There is a significant positive correlation (pfast food outlets and higher deprivation. A higher density of fast food outlets was significantly associated (p=0.02) with the child being obese (or overweight/obese) in the generalised estimating equation model which also included sex, age and deprivation. No significant association between distance to the nearest fast food outlet and overweight or obese status was found. There is a positive relationship between the density of fast food outlets per area and the obesity status of children in Leeds. There is also a significant association between fast food outlet density and areas of higher deprivation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Indoor environmental quality differences between office types in LEED-certified buildings in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young S. [School of Planning, Design, and Construction, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States); Guerin, Denise A. [College of Design, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, MN 55108 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    The study compared IAQ, thermal quality, and lighting quality between 5 different office types in LEED-certified buildings in relation to employees' environmental satisfaction and their job performance. This was to provide workplaces where workers in each specific office environment could be provided with appropriate office settings regarding these IEQ criteria when organizations comply with LEED standards. The five types of office included private enclosed, private shared, open-plan with high cubicle over 5', open-plan with low cubicle lower than 5', and open-plan with no partitions (bullpen) offices. The study found IAQ enhanced workers' job performance in enclosed private offices more than both high cubicles and low cubicles. All four office types had higher satisfaction with the amount of light and visual comfort of light as well as more enhancement with job performance due to lighting quality than high cubicles. There was no difference in thermal quality between the five office types. IAQ and lighting quality were not different between enclosed private, enclosed shared, and bullpen office types, either. The study findings suggest a careful workplace design considering the height of partitions in LEED-certified buildings to improve employee's environmental satisfaction and job performance. (author)

  2. Investigation of reordered (001) Au surfaces by positive ion channeling spectroscopy, LEED and AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleton, B.R.; Noggle, T.S.; Miller, J.W.; Schow, O.E. III; Zehner, D.M.; Jenkins, L.H.; Barrett, J.H.

    1974-01-01

    As a consequence of the channeling phenomenon of positive ions in single crystals, the yield of ions Rutherford scattered from an oriented single crystal surface is dependent on the density of surface atoms exposed to the incident ion beam. Thus, the positive ion channeling spectroscopy (PICS) technique should provide a useful tool for studying reordered surfaces. This possibility was explored by examining the surfaces of epitaxially grown thin Au single crystals with the combined techniques of LEED-AES and PICS. The LEED and AES investigations showed that when the (001) surface was sputter cleaned in ultra-high vacuum, the normal (1 x 1) symmetry of the (001) surfaces reordered into a structure which gave a complex (5 x 20) LEED pattern. The yield and energy distributions of 1 MeV He ions scattered from the Au surfaces were used to determine the number of effective monolayers contributing to the normal and reordered surfaces. These combined measurements were used to characterize the nature of the reordered surface. The general applicability of the PICS technique for investigations of surface and near surface regions is discussed

  3. Evaluation of LEED for Neighbourhood Development and Envision Rating Frameworks for Their Implementation in Poorer Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Diaz-Sarachaga

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The unstoppable world population growth is increasing the concentration of people in urban settlements and the number of megacities, especially in developing countries where urbanization exacerbates social and economic inequalities. Green rating systems have been launched during the last decades to facilitate the assessment of sustainable development in terms of building and infrastructure, including the evaluation of sustainable urban development through the study of communities. This article assesses two of the most renowned sustainable rating systems through the prism of economy, environment and society and the international actions undertaken toward the promotion of sustainable development worldwide, in order to determine their effectiveness to assess urban development in poorer nations. Hence, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for Neighbourhood Development (LEED ND and Envision, both from the United States, were chosen as representatives of building and infrastructure fields, respectively, so that the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs and the New Urban Agenda (Habitat III were the benchmarks selected to define the sustainability aspects required to evaluate their potential application in less developed countries. The absence of metrics in the New Urban Agenda led to relate its commitments to the SDGs, which revealed that the prerequisites and credits included in LEED ND and Envision mainly focused on managerial and environmental aspects and disregarded the economic and social dimensions. Consequently, the premises under which LEED ND and Envision were developed must be updated and complemented with the two latest guidelines recently adopted by the United Nations in the field of urban and sustainable development.

  4. Trouble Shooting Checklist-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Brad A.

    The Trouble Shooting Checklist-B (TSC-B) is a predictive instrument to aid the educational change agent in defining variables within institutions or organizations which are concerned with adopting a psychological assessment battery with some form of personal counseling orientation in deciding whether or not an institution is suited for a…

  5. Earthquake Preparedness Checklist for Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    A brochure provides a checklist highlighting the important questions and activities that should be addressed and undertaken as part of a school safety and preparedness program for earthquakes. It reminds administrators and other interested parties on what not to forget in preparing schools for earthquakes, such as staff knowledge needs, evacuation…

  6. Special Consolidated Checklists for Toxicity Characteristics Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    This checklist consolidates the changes to the Federal code addressed by the Toxicity Characteristic (TC) Rule [55 FR 11798; March 29, 1990; Revision Checklist 74] and subsequent revisions which have occurred through December 31, 2002.

  7. Applying epidemiological principles to ergonomics: a checklist for incorporating sound design and interpretation of studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heacock, H; Koehoorn, M; Tan, J

    1997-06-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to provide a checklist of scientific requirements necessary for the design of sound ergonomics studies. Ergonomics researchers will be able to use the checklist when designing a study and preparing it for publication. Practitioners can use the checklist to critically appraise study results, thereby having greater confidence when applying ergonomic recommendations to the workplace. A secondary purpose of the paper is to pilot the checklist on a sample of papers in the ergonomics literature and to assess its reliability. While there are checklists to assess the epidemiological rigour of studies, none have been adapted to address methodological issues in ergonomics. Two epidemiologists independently searched five ergonomics journals (Applied Ergonomics, Ergonomics, Human Factors, International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction and Journal of Human Ergology) for research studies on VDT use and visual function published between 1990 and 1995. Twenty-one articles were reviewed. Each paper was scored according to the checklist. Overall, the reviewers found that the articles did not consistently fulfill some of the checklist criteria. An insufficient sample size was the most serious omission. Inter-rater reliability of the checklist was excellent for 11 of 14 items on the checklist (Kappa > 0.74), good for two items (Kappa between 0.40 and 0.74) and poor for one item. As ergonomics is gaining acceptance as an integral part of occupational health and safety, individuals in this field must be cognizant of the fact that study results are being applied directly to workplace procedures and design. It is incumbent upon ergonomists to base their work on a solid research foundation. The checklist can be used as a tool to improve study designs and so ultimately has implications for improving the fit between the worker and the work environment.

  8. Adjective checklist to assess the big five personality factors in the Argentine population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Rubén D; Sánchez, Roberto; Díaz-Lázaro, Carlos M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an adjective checklist to assess the Big Five personality factors in the Argentine population. The new instrument was administered to pilot (n= 112), validation (n= 372), and replication (n= 309) samples. The final version of the checklist included 67 adjectives encompassing its 5 dimensions. Factor analysis results were consistent with the Five-factor model. Internal consistency of scales was very good and convergent correlations with the Big Five Inventory (BFI; John, Donahue, & Kentle, 1991) were substantial. Face validity, as evaluated by 2 independent raters, was good. Preliminary evidence of validity for the checklist is presented. Finally, the Adjective Checklist for Personality Assessment and BFI are compared, taking into consideration their psychometric properties in our cultural context. Study limitations and future research are discussed.

  9. Developing an English Language Textbook Evaluation Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukundan, Jayakaran; Hajimohammadi, Reza; Nimehchisalem, Vahid

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the considerations that were taken into account in the development of a tentative English language textbook evaluation checklist. A brief review of the related literature precedes the crucial issues that should be considered in developing checklists. In the light of the previous evaluation checklists the developers created a…

  10. Evaluation of a countrywide implementation of the world health organisation surgical safety checklist in Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michelle C.; Baxter, Linden S.; Close, Kristin L.; Ravelojaona, Vaonandianina A.; Rakotoarison, Hasiniaina N.; Bruno, Emily; Herbert, Alison; Andean, Vanessa; Callahan, James; Andriamanjato, Hery H.; Shrime, Mark G.

    2018-01-01

    Background The 2009 World Health Organisation (WHO) surgical safety checklist significantly reduces surgical mortality and morbidity (up to 47%). Yet in 2016, only 25% of East African anesthetists regularly use the checklist. Nationwide implementation of the checklist is reported in high-income countries, but in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) reports of successful implementations are sparse, limited to single institutions and require intensive support. Since checklist use leads to the biggest improvements in outcomes in LMICs, methods of wide-scale implementation are needed. We hypothesized that, using a three-day course, successful wide-scale implementation of the checklist could be achieved, as measured by at least 50% compliance with six basic safety processes at three to four months. We also aimed to determine predictors for checklist utilization. Materials and methods Using a blended educational implementation strategy based on prior pilot studies we designed a three-day dynamic educational course to facilitate widespread implementation of the WHO checklist. The course utilized lectures, film, small group breakouts, participant feedback and simulation to teach the knowledge, skills and behavior changes needed to implement the checklist. In collaboration with the Ministry of Health and local hospital leadership, the course was delivered to 427 multi-disciplinary staff at 21 hospitals located in 19 of 22 regions of Madagascar between September 2015 and March 2016. We evaluated implementation at three to four months using questionnaires (with a 5-point Likert scale) and focus groups. Multivariate linear regression was used to test predictors of checklist utilization. Results At three to four months, 65% of respondents reported always using the checklist, with another 13% using it in part. Participant’s years in practice, hospital size, or surgical volume did not predict checklist use. Checklist use was associated with counting instruments (pchecklist

  11. The development of CHAMP: a checklist for the appraisal of moderators and predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph van Hoorn

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Personalized healthcare relies on the identification of factors explaining why individuals respond differently to the same intervention. Analyses identifying such factors, so called predictors and moderators, have their own set of assumptions and limitations which, when violated, can result in misleading claims, and incorrect actions. The aim of this study was to develop a checklist for critically appraising the results of predictor and moderator analyses by combining recommendations from published guidelines and experts in the field. Methods Candidate criteria for the checklist were retrieved through systematic searches of the literature. These criteria were evaluated for appropriateness using a Delphi procedure. Two Delphi rounds yielded a pilot checklist, which was tested on a set of papers included in a systematic review on reinforced home-based palliative care. The results of the pilot informed a third Delphi round, which served to finalize the checklist. Results Forty-nine appraisal criteria were identified in the literature. Feedback was obtained from fourteen experts from (biostatistics, epidemiology and other associated fields elicited via three Delphi rounds. Additional feedback from other researchers was collected in a pilot test. The final version of our checklist included seventeen criteria, covering the design (e.g. a priori plausibility, analysis (e.g. use of interaction tests and results (e.g. complete reporting of moderator and predictor analysis, together with the transferability of the results (e.g. clinical importance. There are criteria both for individual papers and for bodies of evidence. Conclusions The proposed checklist can be used for critical appraisal of reported moderator and predictor effects, as assessed in randomized or non-randomized studies using individual participant or aggregate data. This checklist is accompanied by a user’s guide to facilitate implementation. Its future use across a

  12. The development of CHAMP: a checklist for the appraisal of moderators and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoorn, Ralph; Tummers, Marcia; Booth, Andrew; Gerhardus, Ansgar; Rehfuess, Eva; Hind, Daniel; Bossuyt, Patrick M; Welch, Vivian; Debray, Thomas P A; Underwood, Martin; Cuijpers, Pim; Kraemer, Helena; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Kievit, Wietkse

    2017-12-21

    Personalized healthcare relies on the identification of factors explaining why individuals respond differently to the same intervention. Analyses identifying such factors, so called predictors and moderators, have their own set of assumptions and limitations which, when violated, can result in misleading claims, and incorrect actions. The aim of this study was to develop a checklist for critically appraising the results of predictor and moderator analyses by combining recommendations from published guidelines and experts in the field. Candidate criteria for the checklist were retrieved through systematic searches of the literature. These criteria were evaluated for appropriateness using a Delphi procedure. Two Delphi rounds yielded a pilot checklist, which was tested on a set of papers included in a systematic review on reinforced home-based palliative care. The results of the pilot informed a third Delphi round, which served to finalize the checklist. Forty-nine appraisal criteria were identified in the literature. Feedback was obtained from fourteen experts from (bio)statistics, epidemiology and other associated fields elicited via three Delphi rounds. Additional feedback from other researchers was collected in a pilot test. The final version of our checklist included seventeen criteria, covering the design (e.g. a priori plausibility), analysis (e.g. use of interaction tests) and results (e.g. complete reporting) of moderator and predictor analysis, together with the transferability of the results (e.g. clinical importance). There are criteria both for individual papers and for bodies of evidence. The proposed checklist can be used for critical appraisal of reported moderator and predictor effects, as assessed in randomized or non-randomized studies using individual participant or aggregate data. This checklist is accompanied by a user's guide to facilitate implementation. Its future use across a wide variety of research domains and study types will provide

  13. The Leeds Evaluation of Efficacy of Detoxification Study (LEEDS project: An open-label pragmatic randomised control trial comparing the efficacy of differing therapeutic agents for primary care detoxification from either street heroin or methadone [ISRCTN07752728

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheard Laura

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heroin is a synthetic opioid with an extensive illicit market leading to large numbers of people becoming addicted. Heroin users often present to community treatment services requesting detoxification and in the UK various agents are used to control symptoms of withdrawal. Dissatisfaction with methadone detoxification 8 has lead to the use of clonidine, lofexidine, buprenorphine and dihydrocodeine; however, there remains limited evaluative research. In Leeds, a city of 700,000 people in the North of England, dihydrocodeine is the detoxification agent of choice. Sublingual buprenorphine, however, is being introduced. The comparative value of these two drugs for helping people successfully and comfortably withdraw from heroin has never been compared in a randomised trial. Additionally, there is a paucity of research evaluating interventions among drug users in the primary care setting. This study seeks to address this by randomising drug users presenting in primary care to receive either dihydrocodeine or buprenorphine. Methods/design The Leeds Evaluation of Efficacy of Detoxification Study (LEEDS project is a pragmatic randomised trial which will compare the open use of buprenorphine with dihydrocodeine for illicit opiate detoxification, in the UK primary care setting. The LEEDS project will involve consenting adults and will be run in specialist general practice surgeries throughout Leeds. The primary outcome will be the results of a urine opiate screening at the end of the detoxification regimen. Adverse effects and limited data to three and six months will be acquired.

  14. Mining Association Rules Between Credits in the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC) Green Building Assessment System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas, Benjamin J

    2008-01-01

    .... Taking this vision into account, the individual credits that comprise LEED are designed to reward design teams for employing sustainable design strategies that reduce the total environmental impact...

  15. Grief and culture: a checklist

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, Tony

    2010-01-01

    All groups have a culture. This article is intended to help the bereavement practitioner better understand the support needs of clients from other cultures. It sets out and explains a simple checklist of questions designed to explore cultural practices and attitudes to grief and bereavement. The questions cover the obligations mourners feel towards the dead and towards society; who should be mourned; what should be done with the dead; what should be done with emotions; the inclusion or exclus...

  16. A study of the effects of computer animation on college students’ learning of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design - LEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh Nilforooshan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents ongoing research aimed at investigating the efficacy of computer animations in improving college students’ learning of building sustainability concepts and practices. The use of animations in educational contexts is not new, however scientific evidence that supports their effectiveness as educational materials is still limited. This paper reports an experiment that explored the impact of an educational digital animation, called “LEED-ERS”, on college students’ learning of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED rating system. Specifically, the animation focused on the LEED category of Sustainable Site. Results of a study with 68 students show that viewing the animation led to an increase in subjects’ declarative knowledge by 15%. Compared to traditional learning methods (e.g. reading assignments with static images, viewing the animation led to significantly higher declarative knowledge gains.

  17. LEED crystallography studies of the structure of clean and adsorbate-covered Ir, Pt and Rh crystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koestner, R.J.

    1982-08-01

    There have only been a few Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) intensity analyses carried out to determine the structure of molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces; most surface crystallography studies concentrated on the structure of clean unreconstructed or atomic adsorbate-covered transition metal faces. The few molecular adsorption systems already investigated by dynamical LEED are CO on Ni(100), Cu(100) and Pd(100) as well as C 2 H 2 and C 2 H 4 adsorbed on Pt(111). The emphasis of this thesis research has been to extend the applicability of LEED crystallography to the more complicated unit cells found in molecular overlayers on transition metals or in there constructed surfaces of clean transition metals

  18. LEED crystallography studies of the structure of clean and adsorbate-covered Ir, Pt and Rh crystal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koestner, R.J.

    1982-08-01

    There have only been a few Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) intensity analyses carried out to determine the structure of molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces; most surface crystallography studies concentrated on the structure of clean unreconstructed or atomic adsorbate-covered transition metal faces. The few molecular adsorption systems already investigated by dynamical LEED are CO on Ni(100), Cu(100) and Pd(100) as well as C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ and C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ adsorbed on Pt(111). The emphasis of this thesis research has been to extend the applicability of LEED crystallography to the more complicated unit cells found in molecular overlayers on transition metals or in there constructed surfaces of clean transition metals.

  19. Academic Reading Strategies used by Leeds Metropolitan University Graduates: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Sohail

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Academic reading is different from other forms of reading because it is complex and discipline-specific. It involves a measured, challenging, and multifaceted process in which students are dynamically engaged with a range of reading strategies. Academic reading improvement is possible, provided students work on it and there are no short cuts or remedies which will cure the reading problems. Reading improvement is hard work and a difficult task, but it is rewarding as well. This study examined the selection and use of academic reading strategies used by the undergraduate and postgraduate students studying at Leeds Metropolitan University, Headingley Campus, Leeds. A quantitative data study was carried out to investigate three aspects of academic reading strategies: (a efficiency, (b interacting with texts, and (c critical reading strategies. The results of this survey suggest that the participants on balance have proficient reading skills, but a significant number of participants have ineffective reading strategies and bad reading habits. Recommendations and suggestions have been put forward to improve academic reading strategies and for further research.

  20. Lisbon Emoji and Emoticon Database (LEED): Norms for emoji and emoticons in seven evaluative dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, David; Prada, Marília; Gaspar, Rui; Garrido, Margarida V; Lopes, Diniz

    2018-02-01

    The use of emoticons and emoji is increasingly popular across a variety of new platforms of online communication. They have also become popular as stimulus materials in scientific research. However, the assumption that emoji/emoticon users' interpretations always correspond to the developers'/researchers' intended meanings might be misleading. This article presents subjective norms of emoji and emoticons provided by everyday users. The Lisbon Emoji and Emoticon Database (LEED) comprises 238 stimuli: 85 emoticons and 153 emoji (collected from iOS, Android, Facebook, and Emojipedia). The sample included 505 Portuguese participants recruited online. Each participant evaluated a random subset of 20 stimuli for seven dimensions: aesthetic appeal, familiarity, visual complexity, concreteness, valence, arousal, and meaningfulness. Participants were additionally asked to attribute a meaning to each stimulus. The norms obtained include quantitative descriptive results (means, standard deviations, and confidence intervals) and a meaning analysis for each stimulus. We also examined the correlations between the dimensions and tested for differences between emoticons and emoji, as well as between the two major operating systems-Android and iOS. The LEED constitutes a readily available normative database (available at www.osf.io/nua4x ) with potential applications to different research domains.

  1. Characterization of Si(112) and In/Si(112) studied by SPA-LEED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoecker, Jan; Speckmann, Moritz; Schmidt, Thomas; Falta, Jens [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    High index surfaces are of strong interest in todays research because of the possibility to grow low dimensional structures. It has for instance already been shown that the adsorption of Ga can induce the formation of 1D metal chains on Si(112) (cf. Snijders et al., PRB 72, 2005). In this work we investigated the clean Si(112) surface and the adsorption of In on Si(112) to establish an analogy to Ga/Si(112) using spot profile analyzing low energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED). By means of reciprocal space mapping we determined the bare Si(112) surface to be decomposed into alternating (5512) and (111) facets in [1 anti 10] direction with (2 x 1) and (7 x 7) reconstruction, respectively (cf. Baski et al., Surf. Sci. 392, 1997). With SPA-LEED we were able to observe the decreasing intensity of the facet spots in-situ while depositing In on Si(112) and thus reveal the smoothening of the surface due to the deposition of In. At saturation coverage we found a (3.x1) reconstruction, where x is dependent on the deposition temperature and changes from x=7 at 400 C to x=5 at 500 C. This leads us to the assumption that the reconstruction is not incommensurate but a mixture of (3 x 1) and (4 x 1) building blocks, which is very similar to the super structure of Ga on Si(112).

  2. The use of the Leeds test tools in evaluating image intensifiers fitted to fluoroscopic x-ray machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnell, S.A.; Hamilton, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    A set of specialised phantoms for the non-invasive testing of the image intensifiers and associated television equipment fitted to fluoroscopic x-ray machines has been developed in the Medical Physics Department of the University of Leeds. The Radiation Control Section of the South Australian Health Commission has acquired a set of the Leeds Test Tools to use in its program of inspecting and testing diagnotic x-ray equipment. The tools and their use are described, and some preliminary results for South Australia are given

  3. The antibiotic checklist: an observational study of the discrepancy between reported and actually performed checklist items

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Daalen, Frederike V.; Hulscher, Marlies E. J. L.; Minderhoud, Cas; Prins, Jan M.; Geerlings, Suzanne E.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Checklists are increasingly used to measure quality of care. Recently we implemented an antibiotic checklist in nine Dutch hospitals and showed that use of the checklist resulted in more appropriate antibiotic use. While more appropriate antibiotic use was associated with a reduction in

  4. The two-glass-building in Ratingen. LEED platin for the Coca-Cola headquarter; Das Zwei-Scheiben-Haus in Ratingen. LEED-Platin fuer die Coca-Cola-Zentrale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerres, Eberhard

    2011-07-01

    In order to receive the eco-labeled LEED platinum category, a good planning is essential. In the construction of a new administration building in Ratingen (Federal Republic of Germany), many details have been considered up to the use of ecologically unquestionable building materials. Thus, these details were very purposeful.

  5. CO{sub 2} neutral living and working. LEED project Dockside Green in Canada; CO{sub 2}-neutral leben, wohnen und arbeiten. LEED-Projekt Dockside Green in Kanada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paetz, Christian

    2012-07-01

    In the western Canadian city of Victoria a new residential quarter and commercial quarter is uprisen on the area of a closed down harbour. The ambiguous goal: Every 26 buildings of this project shall achieve the LEED certification of the highest level: platinum.

  6. Extending the range of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) surface structure determination: Co-adsorbed molecules, incommensurate overlayers and alloy surface order studied by new video and electron counting LEED techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogletree, D.F.

    1986-11-01

    LEED multiple scattering theory is briefly summarized, and aspects of electron scattering with particular significance to experimental measurements such as electron beam coherence, instrument response and phonon scattering are analyzed. Diffuse LEED experiments are discussed. New techniques that enhance the power of LEED are described, including a real-time video image digitizer applied to LEED intensity measurements, along with computer programs to generate I-V curves. The first electron counting LEED detector using a ''wedge and strip'' position sensitive anode and digital electronics is described. This instrument uses picoampere incident beam currents, and its sensitivity is limited only by statistics and counting times. Structural results on new classes of surface systems are presented. The structure of the c(4 x 2) phase of carbon monoxide adsorbed on Pt(111) has been determined, showing that carbon monoxide molecules adsorb in both top and bridge sites, 1.85 +- 0.10 A and 1.55 +- 0.10 A above the metal surface, respectively. The structure of an incommensurate graphite overlayer on Pt(111) is analyzed. The graphite layer is 3.70 +- 0.05 A above the metal surface, with intercalated carbon atoms located 1.25 +- 0.10 A above hollow sites supporting it. The (2..sqrt..3 x 4)-rectangular phase of benzene and carbon monoxide coadsorbed on Pt(111) is analyzed. Benzene molecules adsorb in bridge sites parallel to and 2.10 +- 0.10 A above the surface. The carbon ring is expanded, with an average C-C bond length of 1.72 +- 0.15 A. The carbon monoxide molecules also adsorb in bridge sites. The structure of the (..sqrt..3 x ..sqrt..3) reconstruction on the (111) face of the ..cap alpha..-CuAl alloy has been determined.

  7. 30 CFR 7.311 - Approval checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval checklist. 7.311 Section 7.311 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Electric Motor Assemblies § 7.311 Approval checklist...

  8. 30 CFR 7.71 - Approval checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval checklist. 7.71 Section 7.71 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF... checklist. Each blasting unit bearing an MSHA approval marking shall be accompanied by a description of what...

  9. 30 CFR 7.51 - Approval checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval checklist. 7.51 Section 7.51 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.51 Approval checklist. Each...

  10. Home Healthcare Medical Devices: A Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    R Please use this checklist to use and maintain your medical device safely and effectively in your home. As a homecare medical device user, you ... home monitoring devices. Home Healthcare Medical Devices: A Checklist For additional government sources and information visit: CDRH ...

  11. College Preparation Checklist, 2003-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Federal Student Aid (ED), Washington, DC.

    This leaflet contains a checklist of actions students should take to prepare for college. The checklist begins with the pre high school years, by advising selection of challenging courses and outlining ways to save for college. Ninth graders are again advised to select challenging courses and to begin to think about possible careers. It is…

  12. Proposal of a "Checklist" for endodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Flores-García, Víctor; Perea-Pérez, Bernardo; Labajo-González, Elena; Santiago-Sáez, Andrés; Cisneros-Cabello, Rafael

    2014-04-01

    On the basis of the "Surgical Checklist" proposed by the WHO, we propose a new Checklist model adapted to the procedures of endodontic treatment. The proposed document contains 21 items which are broken down into two groups: those which must be verified before beginning the treatment, and those which must be verified after completing it, but before the patient leaves the dentist's office. The Checklist is an easy-to-use tool that requires little time but provides, order, logic and systematization by taking into account certain basic concepts to increase patient safety. We believe that the result is a Checklist that is easy to complete and which ensure the fulfillment of the key points on patient safety in the field of endodontics. Key words:Checklist, endodontics, patient safety, adverse event.

  13. On the contraction of the W(001)-(1x1) surface using LEED intensity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, M.N.; Russell, G.J.

    1979-01-01

    Three recent independent attempts at reducing the W(001)-(1x1) surface structure by LEED beam intensity analysis have yielded contractions of the topmost layer spacing of 6+-6%, 11+-2%, 4.4+-3% normal to the surface plane. The authors investigate possible reasons for the discrepancies by comparing published experimental and theoretical profiles of these workers as well as their own. Their main conclusions are that the direct comparison of experimental data of different investigators shows deviations which are comparable to the changes in the calculated profiles for various surface contractions. Also the deviations between calculated intensity profiles using different (but still realistic) assumed scattering potentials are comparable to the changes in the calculated profiles for various surface contractions. (Auth.)

  14. Uno strumento per la creazione di valore nella realizzazione di edifici sostenibili: la certificazione LEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rick Fedrizzi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Il presente lavoro ha l’obiettivo di delineare gli aspetti chiave della sostenibilità in ambito edilizio focalizzando l’attenzione sul sistema di certificazione LEED® quale strumento “universale” di supporto per la realizzazione, gestione e valutazione di edifici sostenibili. Nella prima parte del lavoro si descrive la rapida diffusione della certificazione LEED nel recente passato quale diretta conseguenza della capacità di questo strumento di rating di adattarsi sia alle specifiche tipologie di edifici, sia alle diversità climatiche e morfologiche dei siti. Nella seconda parte si procede invece a presentare ed analizzare gli aspetti economico-finanziari degli edifici sostenibili con riferimento sia alle metodologie valutative applicabili, sia ai dati della letteratura. Partendo dalle esperienze internazionali in tema di sostenibilità, si procede successivamente a descrivere la situazione italiana, evidenziando la percezione del mercato e le opportunità di sviluppo future.

  15. The UPD of copper on Pt(100): a first quantitative structure determination by LEED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberdam, D.; Gauthier, Y.; Durand, R.; Faure, R.

    1994-04-01

    The adsorption of copper on platinum, obtained by electrochemical underpotential deposition (UPD), is a complex phenomenon. As observed by cyclic voltammetry, the underpotential is not limited to a narrow, well defined range of electrochemical potentials, but is spread out on a wide range of potentials. On the Pt(100) surface, a lack of reversibility of adsorption and desorption occurs, and a gradual change in the voltammogram shape takes place under potential cycling. In this paper, we describe a first "ex situ" low energy electron diffraction (LEED) structure investigation of that system, for a copper coverage of about {2}/{3} of a monolayer. The main result is that copper clusters in 2D islands with p(1 × 1) structure and a density of one Cu per Pt atom.

  16. “THE LEEDS IDEA”: AN HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF THE SPONDARTHRITIS CONCEPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M.H. Moll

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY In the 1960s, Professor Verna Wright became increasingly interested in possible relationships between certain seronegative “variants of rheumatoid arthritis”, as they were then generally known. At the Rheumatism Research Unit, a department within the division of medicine at Leeds University, he gathered around him a succession of research workers, whom he inspired to study aspects of these relationships. The focus was on family studies, as it was thought that genetic factors could be important. The striking association previously noted between sacroiliitis or full-blown ankylosing spondylitis and several of these disorders to be studied - e.g., psoriatic arthritis, ulcerative colitis, and the arthritis associated with Crohn’s disease - was to be central for each of these studies. As a provisional collective name for these possibly related conditions, the term “Spondarthritides” was chosen. These were the days before HLA B27, and so the research tools were simply clinical, radiological (for sacroiliitis and serological (for rheumatoid factor. The research programme confirmed not only links between the primary disorders with ankylosing spondylitis, but also links between the disorders themselves. Over subsequent years, the spondarthritis concept (dubbed by some “The Leeds Idea” has gained further strength from HLA studies internationally. And membership of the group of conditions fulfilling spondarthritis criteria has grown substantially. It is hoped that this now consolidated framework of spondylitis-related entities will pave the way for further research, with exciting prospects of gene-based prevention and/or cure through the increasing sophistication of molecular biology. Key words: Seronegative spondarthritides, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spndylitis

  17. Effects of checklist interface on non-verbal crew communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Leon D.

    1994-01-01

    The investigation looked at the effects of the spatial layout and functionality of cockpit displays and controls on crew communication. Specifically, the study focused on the intra-cockpit crew interaction, and subsequent task performance, of airline pilots flying different configurations of a new electronic checklist, designed and tested in a high-fidelity simulator at NASA Ames Research Center. The first part of this proposal establishes the theoretical background for the assumptions underlying the research, suggesting that in the context of the interaction between a multi-operator crew and a machine, the design and configuration of the interface will affect interactions between individual operators and the machine, and subsequently, the interaction between operators. In view of the latest trends in cockpit interface design and flight-deck technology, in particular, the centralization of displays and controls, the introduction identifies certain problems associated with these modern designs and suggests specific design issues to which the expected results could be applied. A detailed research program and methodology is outlined and the results are described and discussed. Overall, differences in cockpit design were shown to impact the activity within the cockpit, including interactions between pilots and aircraft and the cooperative interactions between pilots.

  18. Assessment of a Worksite Health Promotion Readiness Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghri, Pouran D; Kotejoshyer, Rajashree; Cherniack, Martin; Reeves, David; Punnett, Laura

    2010-09-01

    To assess the utility of a Worksite Health Promotion Readiness Checklist (WRCL) designed to evaluate the worksite's readiness for implementing health promotion and health protection programs. The WRCL was pilot tested in worksites with (WHPy) and without (WHPn) health promotion programs. The two parts of WRCL scores (observational and administrative) for WHPy and WHPn sites were compared within and between the worksites to establish WRCL utility and sensitivity. Observational WRCL (completed by two observers per site) demonstrated high interrater reliability (P Administrative WRCL (completed by three administrators per site) showed some discrepant responses between administrators. Overall, both sections of WRCL produced higher scores for WHPy sites. WRCL could be a valid and reliable instrument to measure readiness of a worksite toward health promotion and health protection programs.

  19. Checklist for Reviewing EPA Quality Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    This checklist will be used to review the Quality Management Plans (QMPs) that are submitted to the Quality Staff of the Office of Environmental Information (OEI) for Agency review under EPA Order 5360.1 A2.

  20. A Checklist of Legal Considerations for Museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Stephen E.

    1980-01-01

    A checklist for museum compliance with federal, state, and local laws covers administrative organization, general endowment and restricted funds, trustees, staffing and employment practices, volunteers, acquisition and disposition, exhibition programs, visitors and membership, auxiliary activities, building, and miscellaneous regulations. (MSE)

  1. REMARK checklist elaborated to improve tumor prognostician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experts have elaborated on a previously published checklist of 20 items -- including descriptions of design, methods, and analysis -- that researchers should address when publishing studies of prognostic markers. These markers are indicators that enable d

  2. Catalogue of Life: 2013 Annual Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolson, David T.; Roskov, Yuri; Kunze, Thomas; Paglinawan, Luvie; Orrell, Thomas; Culham, Alistair; Bailly, Nicolas; Kirk, Paul; Bourgoin, Thierry; Baillargeon, Guy; Hernandez, Franciso; De Wever, Aaike

    2013-01-01

    The most comprehensive and authoritative global index of species currently available, it consists of a single integrated species checklist and taxonomic hierarchy. It is available (1) as a DVD and booklet; and (2) on the Web. The contact for the booklet and DVD is Thomas Orrell at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington,DC. The URL for the online version is http://www.catalogueoflife.org/annual-checklist/2013/info/ac

  3. A survey of job satisfaction, sources of stress and psychological symptoms among general practitioners in Leeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, K; House, A; Dowell, A

    1998-03-01

    The past seven years have seen rapid changes in general practice in the United Kingdom (UK), commencing with the 1990 contract. During the same period, concern about the health and morale of general practitioners (GPs) has increased and a recruitment crisis has developed. To determine levels of psychological symptoms, job satisfaction, and subjective ill health in GPs and their relationship to practice characteristics, and to compare levels of job satisfaction since the introduction of the 1990 GP contract with those found before 1990. Postal questionnaire survey of all GP principals on the Leeds Health Authority list. The main outcome measures included quantitative measures of practice characteristics, job satisfaction, mental health (General Health Questionnaire), and general physical health. Qualitative statements about work conditions, job satisfaction, and mental health were collected. A total of 285/406 GPs (70%) returned the questionnaires. One hundred and forty-eight (52%) scored 3 or more on the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), which indicates a high level of psychological symptoms. One hundred and sixty GPs (56%) felt that work had affected their recent physical health. Significant associations were found between GHQ-12 scores, total job satisfaction scores, and GPs' perceptions that work had affected their physical health. Problems with physical and mental health were associated with several aspects of workload, including list size, number of sessions worked per week, amount of time spent on call, and use of deputizing services. In the qualitative part of the survey, GPs reported overwork and excessive hours, paperwork and administration, recent National Health Service (NHS) changes, and the 1990 GP contract as the most stressful aspects of their work. Fifty-two per cent of GPs in Leeds who responded showed high levels of psychological symptoms. Job satisfaction was lower than in a national survey conducted in 1987, and GPs expressed the least

  4. Mining Association Rules Between Credits in the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC) Green Building Assessment System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas, Benjamin J

    2008-01-01

    The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Building Assessment System is a performance-based tool for determining the environmental impact of a facility from the whole-building perspective...

  5. Structural and electronic analysis of Hf on Si(1 1 1) surface studied by XPS, LEED and XPD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carazzolle, M.F. [Experimentelle Physik 1, Universitaet Dortmund, Otto-Hahn-Str. 4, D44221 Dortmund (Germany); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, C.P. 6165, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: mcarazzo@ifi.unicamp.br; Schuermann, M.; Fluechter, C.R.; Weier, D. [Experimentelle Physik 1, Universitaet Dortmund, Otto-Hahn-Str. 4, D44221 Dortmund (Germany); Berges, U. [Experimentelle Physik 1, Universitaet Dortmund, Otto-Hahn-Str. 4, D44221 Dortmund (Germany); DELTA, Universitaet Dortmund, Maria-Goeppert-Mayer-Str. 2, D44227 Dortmund (Germany); Siervo, A. de [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, C.P. 6192, 13084-971 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Landers, R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, C.P. 6165, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, C.P. 6192, 13084-971 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Kleiman, G.G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, C.P. 6165, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Westphal, C. [Experimentelle Physik 1, Universitaet Dortmund, Otto-Hahn-Str. 4, D44221 Dortmund (Germany); DELTA, Universitaet Dortmund, Maria-Goeppert-Mayer-Str. 2, D44227 Dortmund (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    In this work, we present a systematic electronic and structural study of the Hf-silicide formation upon annealing on Si(1 1 1) surface. The electronic structure and surface composition were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). To determine the atomic structure of the surface alloy we used low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and angle-resolved photoelectron diffraction (XPD). It was possible to verify that, after 600 deg. C annealing, there is alloy formation and after 700 deg. C the Hf diffusion process is predominant. Using LEED and XPD measurements we detected the ordered island formation simultaneously with alloy formation.

  6. Analysis of non-spherical grid geometry for distortion-free LEED apparatus with micro channel plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Tatsuo; Ohsaki, Akihiko; Sakurai, Makoto; Honda, Tohru; Tuzi, Yutaka

    1985-01-01

    A design of non-spherical grid structure for the distortion-free LEED apparalus with a micro channel plate (MCP) is described. The grid structure is assumed as an interface of two electrostatic potentials. The potential interface refracts the diffracted electrons and the LEED patterns can be projected on the MCP just like those observed on a spherical fluorescent screen. The shape of the potential interface is described by a differential equation and numerically calculated for several conditions. The most appropriate geometry is determined by the easiness of the mechanical construction. The effect of energy distribution of diffracted electrons is numerically estimated and the deviation is proved to be negligibly small for most applications. (author)

  7. PLEASE: The Python Low-energy Electron Analysis SuitE – Enabling Rapid Analysis of LEEM and LEED Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Grady

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available PLEASE, the Python Low-energy Electron Analysis SuitE, provides an open source and cross-platform graphical user interface (GUI for rapid analysis and visualization of low energy electron microscopy (LEEM data sets. LEEM and the associated technique, selected area micro-spot low energy electron diffraction (μ-LEED, are powerful tools for analysis of the surface structure for many novel materials. Specifically, these tools are uniquely suited for the characterization of two-dimensional materials. PLEASE offers a user-friendly point-and-click method for extracting intensity-voltage curves from LEEM and LEED data sets. Analysis of these curves provides insight into the atomic structure of the target material surface with unparalleled resolution.

  8. Implementation of the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEEDS (trademark) as the Army’s Green Building Rating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Child Development Center Installation: Fort McPherson Project Manager: Morris, Timothy C. Project Status: Approved District SSD POC: Milton, Judith F...Number: 053321 Project Description: Recruiting Brigade Operations B Installation: Fort Gillem Project Manager: Morris, Timothy C Project Status...Martinez, Stephen B. Project Status: oved District SSD POC: Raney , Jeff P. SPiRiT (Actual): 61 (Gold) LEED (Estimated): 31 (Silver) LEED

  9. Translating research into practice in Leeds and Bradford (TRiPLaB: a protocol for a programme of research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibby John

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR has funded nine Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRCs. Each CLAHRC is a partnership between higher education institutions (HEIs and the NHS in nine UK regional health economies. The CLAHRC for Leeds, York, and Bradford comprises two 'research themes' and three 'implementation themes.' One of these implementation themes is Translating Research into Practice in Leeds and Bradford (TRiPLaB. TRiPLaB aims to develop, implement, and evaluate methods for inducing and sustaining the uptake of research knowledge into practice in order to improve the quality of health services for the people of Leeds and Bradford. Methods TRiPLaB is built around a three-stage, sequential, approach using separate, longitudinal case studies conducted with collaborating NHS organisations, TRiPLaB will select robust innovations to implement, conduct a theory-informed exploration of the local context using a variety of data collection and analytic methods, and synthesise the information collected to identify the key factors influencing the uptake and adoption of targeted innovations. This synthesis will inform the development of tailored, multifaceted, interventions designed to increase the translation of research findings into practice. Mixed research methods, including time series analysis, quasi-experimental comparison, and qualitative process evaluation, will be used to evaluate the impact of the implementation strategies deployed. Conclusion TRiPLaB is a theory-informed, systematic, mixed methods approach to developing and evaluating tailored implementation strategies aimed at increasing the translation of research-based findings into practice in one UK health economy. Through active collaboration with its local NHS, TRiPLaB aims to improve the quality of health services for the people of Leeds and Bradford and to contribute to research knowledge regarding the

  10. LEED, Its Efficacy and Fallacy in a Regional Context—An Urban Heat Island Case in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ho Shin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of energy in the building sector has increased rapidly over the past two decades. Accordingly, various building assessment methods have developed in green building practices. However, the questions still remain in regard to how positively green buildings affect regional surroundings. This study investigates the possible relationship between LEED-certified buildings and urban heat island effect. Using GIS with spatial regression, the study found that constructing an LEED building in a 30-m boundary could possibly lower the temperature of the surrounding environment by 0.35 °C. Also, having a higher certification level, such as Gold or Platinum, increased the lowering effect by 0.48 °C, while a lower certification level, such as Certified or Silver, had a lowering effect of 0.26 °C. Although LEED has gained a substantial amount of interest and skepticism at the same time, the study results could be a potential sign that the Sustainable Sites Credits or energy-efficient materials play a positive role in lowering the temperature.

  11. Life-cycle thinking and the LEED rating system: global perspective on building energy use and environmental impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghamdi, Sami G; Bilec, Melissa M

    2015-04-07

    This research investigates the relationship between energy use, geographic location, life cycle environmental impacts, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). The researchers studied worldwide variations in building energy use and associated life cycle impacts in relation to the LEED rating systems. A Building Information Modeling (BIM) of a reference 43,000 ft(2) office building was developed and situated in 400 locations worldwide while making relevant changes to the energy model to meet reference codes, such as ASHRAE 90.1. Then life cycle environmental and human health impacts from the buildings' energy consumption were calculated. The results revealed considerable variations between sites in the U.S. and international locations (ranging from 394 ton CO2 equiv to 911 ton CO2 equiv, respectively). The variations indicate that location specific results, when paired with life cycle assessment, can be an effective means to achieve a better understanding of possible adverse environmental impacts as a result of building energy consumption in the context of green building rating systems. Looking at these factors in combination and using a systems approach may allow rating systems like LEED to continue to drive market transformation toward sustainable development, while taking into consideration both energy sources and building efficiency.

  12. Promoting Independent Language Learning Cross- Campus at the University of Leeds through a Self- Access Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Schneider

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Language Centre at the University of Leeds concentrates on the full range of language training and preparation courses, both for pre-sessional and for current university students. These courses relate both to the learning of English and of foreign languages. The Self-Access Area constitutes the Language Centre’s resource library for language learning materials and supports learners on Language Centre and other modern language courses, as well as independent language learners from across the university. Catering for approximately 11,000 users, the Self-Access Area opens, on average, for 46 hours per week, with evening and Saturday opening times during term time and exam weeks. Among the services that the Self-Access Area provides are a wide range of language learning resources in print and various audiovisual formats, induction tours, an up-to-date online library catalogue and a social media presence. As part of the Language Centre, the Self- Access Area team is connected with staff and students across the university. The service also offers a range of opportunities which encourage human interaction both amongst language learners and between learners and specialists. It also acts as a flexible social and study space. The main initiatives or valuable ‘accessories’ for language learning to be discussed in this brief overview are: Language learning advising; Language exchange; and Conversation sessions

  13. Titanium dioxide surfaces and interfaces studied using ESDIAD, LEED and STM

    CERN Document Server

    Cocks, I D

    1998-01-01

    resolved into two contributions: H atoms bonded at the oxide substrate, and the rupture of the C-H bonds of the acetate. It is proposed that acetates are bridge bonded with five-fold coordinated Ti sup 4 sup + ions, with their molecular plane perpendicular to the surface. Decomposition of acetate at room temperature occurs under electron beam radiation, desorbing CH sub 2 CO and CH sub 3 /CH sub 4. Adsorption of benzoic acid at the TiO sub 2 (110) surface is dissociative, forming benzoate and surface hydroxyls. Adsorbed benzoate is bonded with the five-fold coordinated Ti sup 4 sup + cations, forming a pseudo (2x1) overlayer at a saturation coverage of 0.5 ML. Attractive interactions between benzoate aromatic rings leads to the formation of dimerised benzoate rows along the [001] direction. TiO sub 2 surfaces have been studied by electron stimulated desorption ion angular distribution (ESDIAD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The TiO sub 2 (100) surface was stu...

  14. The effect of a performance-based intra-procedural checklist on a simulated emergency laparoscopic task in novice surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Boghdady, Michael; Tang, Benjie; Alijani, Afshin

    2017-05-01

    Surgical checklists are in use as means to reduce errors. Checklists are infrequently applied during emergency situations in surgery. We aimed to study the effect of a simple self-administered performance-based checklist on the laparoscopic task when applied during an emergency-simulated scenario. The aviation checklist for unexpected situations is commonly used for simulated training of pilots to handle emergency during flights. This checklist was adopted for use as a standardised-performance-based checklist during emergency surgical tasks. Thirty consented laparoscopic novices were exposed unexpectedly to a bleeding vessel in a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator as an emergency scenario. The task consisted of using laparoscopic clips to achieve haemostasis. Subjects were randomly allocated into two equal groups; those using the checklist that was applied once every 20 s (checklist group) and those without (control group). The checklist group performed significantly better in 5 out of 7 technical factors when compared to the control group: right instrument path length (m), median (IQR) 1.44 [1.22] versus 2.06 [1.70] (p = 0.029), right instrument angular path (degree) 312.10 (269.44 versus 541.80 [455.16] (p = 0.014), left instrument path length (m) 1.20 [0.60] versus 2.08 [2.02] (p = 0.004), and left instrument angular path (degree) 277.62 [132.11] versus 385.88 [428.42] (p = 0.017). The checklist group committed significantly fewer number of errors in the application of haemostatic clips, 3 versus 28 (p = 0.006). Although statistically not significant, total blood loss (lit) decreased in the checklist group from 0.83 [1.23] to 0.78 [0.28] (p = 0.724) and total time (sec) from 186.51 [145.69] to 125.14 [101.46] (p = 0.165). The performance-based intra-procedural checklist significantly enhanced the surgical task performance of novices in an emergency-simulated scenario.

  15. Checklist of earthworms (Oligochaeta: Lumbricidae) from Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmitz, Ricarda; Römbke, Jörg; Jänsch, Stephan; Krück, Stefanie; Beylich, Anneke; Graefe, Ulfert

    2014-09-23

    A checklist of the German earthworm fauna (Oligochaeta: Lumbricidae) is presented, including published data, data from reports, diploma- and PhD- theses as well as unpublished data from museum collections, research institutions and private persons. Overall, 16,000 datasets were analyzed to produce the first German checklist of Lumbricidae. The checklist comprises 46 earthworm species from 15 genera and provides ecological information, zoogeographical distribution type and information on the species distribution in Germany. Only one species, Lumbricus badensis Michaelsen, 1907, is endemic to Germany, whereas 41% are peregrine. As there are 14 species occurring exclusively in the southern or eastern part of Germany, the species numbers in German regions increase from north to south.

  16. Development of a brachytherapy audit checklist tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisciandaro, Joann; Hadley, Scott; Jolly, Shruti; Lee, Choonik; Roberson, Peter; Roberts, Donald; Ritter, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    To develop a brachytherapy audit checklist that could be used to prepare for Nuclear Regulatory Commission or agreement state inspections, to aid in readiness for a practice accreditation visit, or to be used as an annual internal audit tool. Six board-certified medical physicists and one radiation oncologist conducted a thorough review of brachytherapy-related literature and practice guidelines published by professional organizations and federal regulations. The team members worked at two facilities that are part of a large, academic health care center. Checklist items were given a score based on their judged importance. Four clinical sites performed an audit of their program using the checklist. The sites were asked to score each item based on a defined severity scale for their noncompliance, and final audit scores were tallied by summing the products of importance score and severity score for each item. The final audit checklist, which is available online, contains 83 items. The audit scores from the beta sites ranged from 17 to 71 (out of 690) and identified a total of 7-16 noncompliance items. The total time to conduct the audit ranged from 1.5 to 5 hours. A comprehensive audit checklist was developed which can be implemented by any facility that wishes to perform a program audit in support of their own brachytherapy program. The checklist is designed to allow users to identify areas of noncompliance and to prioritize how these items are addressed to minimize deviations from nationally-recognized standards. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Allbutt of Leeds and Duchenne de Boulogne: Newly discovered insights on Duchenne by a British neuropsychiatrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, E H; Broussolle, E

    2018-02-01

    It is well-established that Guillaume-Benjamin-Amand Duchenne de Boulogne (1806-1875), and Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) were the founding fathers of Parisian and French neurology during the second half of the 19th century, although much more is known about Charcot than about his "master" Duchenne. In Britain, Thomas Clifford Allbutt (1836-1925) was Leeds' most distinguished physician of the 19th century, eventually becoming Regius Professor of Physic at Cambridge. Allbutt's 1860-1861 year of postgraduate study in Paris and his friendship with Duchenne profoundly influenced his own contributions to nervous system and mental diseases, partly in collaboration with his colleague James Crichton-Browne (1840-1938) at the nearby West Riding Lunatic Asylum in Wakefield, Yorkshire. The present report briefly recalls the careers of Duchenne and Allbutt, and also presents a unique account by Allbutt of Duchenne in action at the height of his powers, investigating and defining the previously uncharted field of neuromuscular diseases with the aid of his localized electrization techniques. This account is discussed in relation to: Duchenne's personality and pioneering neurological achievements; the origins of French neurology; and the development of Anglo-French neurological relationships during the 19th century. Interestingly, both Duchenne and Crichton-Browne separately made important and much-appreciated contributions to the third major book by Charles Darwin (1809-1882), The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals, published in 1872. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Carbon Footprint of Housing in the Leeds City Region - A Best Practice Scenario Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, John; Dawkins, Elena (Stockholm Environment Inst. (Sweden))|(Univ. of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom))

    2008-06-15

    The Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) was commissioned by the Environment Agency to carry out a carbon footprint analysis of the housing sector, using the Leeds City Region (LCR) as an example. The aim was to determine our ability to meet the 80 per cent by 2050 challenge of energy efficiency in the housing sector. The study relates specifically to LCR but its findings will help any planning and development teams make the right decisions and gain the resources necessary to meet carbon budgets at regional and local levels. With a growing population and an additional 263,000 housing units to be built within LCR by 2026, the housing sector would need to reduce its expected total carbon dioxide emissions by 38 million tonnes between 2010 and 2026 to be on track for 80 per cent savings in 2050. The report outlines the most detailed analysis to date of the required measures to deliver a growth-based regional housing strategy, alongside reducing carbon emissions. If the city region's new and existing housing is to attain the levels of energy efficiency necessary to deliver these carbon savings, big changes will be required in the way we build, maintain and run our homes over the next 20 years. There are pockets of good practice already in the region and the study shows that by combining innovative measures on construction standards, improvements to existing housing, low and zero carbon technologies and changing behaviour of householders, LCR can achieve the necessary savings to meet its carbon budget

  19. Strategic energy planning within local authorities in the UK: A study of the city of Leeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bale, Catherine S.E.; Foxon, Timothy J.; Hannon, Matthew J.; Gale, William F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the development of a strategic energy body in a local authority in the UK and looks at the perceived need for, and possible roles of, such a body. Historically, energy provision and management has not usually been a strategic priority for UK local authorities. Yet energy considerations are implicit in key local authority responsibilities such as transport, waste management, planning, and the provision of housing services. In addition, recent UK central government policies support the move to localism and provide incentives for low-carbon energy generation. A study was undertaken to assess the potential (including both the perceived benefits and actual capacity to deliver) for Leeds City Council to develop a strategic body to execute delivery of city-level energy decision-making. We examine the perceived benefits to a range of main stakeholders, using data drawn from interviews with managers responsible for low-carbon and renewable energy projects across the city. Through participant observation we explore the capacity of a local authority to deliver a strategic energy body, and we briefly examine the possible forms of delivery. We conclude with recommendations for national policy that would enable the development of strategic energy bodies across local governments in the UK. - Highlights: ► Strategic energy planning is currently not a priority for UK local authorities. ► We present an empirical study of strategic energy planning in local authorities. ► Results from stakeholder interviews suggest support for a strategic energy body. ► We identify the capacity barriers to implementing a strategic energy body. ► We make recommendations for ways forward and support needed from national policy.

  20. The Leeds food preference questionnaire after mild sleep restriction - A small feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaars, Cathalijn H C; Zant, Janneke C; Aussems, Audrey; Faatz, Vivian; Snackers, Daphne; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2016-02-01

    Besides the increased sedentary lifestyle and increased caloric intake, changes in dietary composition may play an important role in the increased prevalence of obesity. Because inadequate sleep could be a risk factor in the aetiology of obesity, reliable methods for assessing food intake and food choice after sleep restriction are needed. We translated the Leeds food preference questionnaire (LFPQ), addressing preferences for sweet/savoury tastes and low-fat/high-fat foods, into Dutch, and tested it in 15 mildly sleep-restricted psychology students. The participants completed the LFPQ in our laboratory on two separate occasions, with approximately one week in between. Sleep on the preceding night was not controlled, but mild sleep-restriction was confirmed by a short sleep latency test (sSLT) or a short maintenance of wakefulness test (sMWT). Each participant completed the sSLT and sMWT once, just before the LFPQ, in a cross-over design randomised for the first test. Differences were present in preferences for food items from different categories (sweet/savoury and low-fat/high-fat; pchoice frequencies for various food categories were comparable on both occasions (p=0.27). The choice frequencies for individual items were also comparable on both occasions (p=0.27). The LFPQ is easily implemented under mild sleep-restricted conditions, and translation is straightforward. Future studies using the LFPQ after sleep restriction could elucidate if restricting sleep or longer periods affects food choice, which could underlie increases in obesity risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Proposal of a "Checklist" for endodontic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz-Flores García, Victor; Perea Pérez, Bernardo; Labajo González, María Elena; Santiago Sáez, Andrés; Cisneros Cabello, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: On the basis of the “Surgical Checklist” proposed by the WHO, we propose a new Checklist model adapted to the procedures of endodontic treatment. Study Design: The proposed document contains 21 items which are broken down into two groups: those which must be verified before beginning the treatment, and those which must be verified after completing it, but before the patient leaves the dentist’s office. Results: The Checklist is an easy-to-use tool that requires little time but pro...

  2. Assessing and Developing the Application of LEED Green Building Rating System as a Sustainable Project Management and Market Tool in the Italian Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa S. E. Ismaee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the recent introduction of the LEED system to the Italian context in order to assess its role to promote sustainable building process in the Italian context, pointing out its potentials on one hand as well as their gaps and limitations on the other hand, and suggests means for its future development. The study discusses the application of LEED as a ‘Sustainable Project management tool’ to guide sustainable building performance. This requires investigating the following: its structure, tools, assessment criteria along with its benchmarks and references. It also discusses the application of LEED as a ‘Sustainable building Certification and market tool’. This investigates the role and value of the LEED certification in the Italian Green market. The research method is comprised of three parts. The first part is a comparative analysis of LEED categories against Italian national initiatives for sustainability. The comparison showed that most LEED categories are already mandated by national norms and directives but they may differ in their stringency creating some areas of precedence of LEED system or drawbacks. This streamlines the adaptation process of LEED system to the Italian context. The second part investigates LEED projects’ market analysis. The result showed that the shift towards a sustainable building process is occurring slowly and on a vertical scale focusing on some building sectors rather than others. Its market diffusion in the Italian context faces challenges regarding the insufficient availability of green materials and products satisfying its requirements, as well as high soft cost of sustainability tests and expertise required. The Third part presents a practical review-citing the methodology and results of a survey conducted by the researchers in mid-2012. It is composed of a web-based questionnaire and interviews among a sample of LEED professionals in Italy. The result shows that LEED systems needs

  3. A Checklist to Evaluate Mapping Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Robert; Young, James

    1991-01-01

    Presents a checklist for evaluating commercially available mapping software. Analyzes software features by general categories including range of map types, availability and flexibility of data files, and program evaluation. Discusses ease of operation, the manual, tutorial, screens and help, error handling, design flexibility, hard copy output,…

  4. Three Mile Island: a preliminary checklist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drazan, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    This checklist aims to be as complete as possible for articles found in the periodical literature and for separately published monographs. It excludes newspaper accounts and state and federal documents. The bibliography contains 17 monographs arranged by author, followed by 149 authored journal articles and 119 unauthored articles arranged alphabetically by title

  5. Pocket Checklists of Indonesian timber trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prawira, Soewanda A.; Tantra, I.G.M.; Whitmore, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    Indonesia as yet does not have a comprehensive account of the forest trees which reach timber size (35 cm dbh = 14 inch or 105 cm gbh = 42 inch). A project has been started in August 1983 by the Botany Section of the Forest Research Institute in Bogor, Indonesia, to prepare pocket checklists of the

  6. Special Consolidated Checklists for Organic Air Emission Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    This checklist consolidates changes made to the Federal code by the December 6, 1994 final rule regarding Subpart CC standards [(59 FR 62896); Revision Checklist 154] and subsequent revisions which have occurred through December 31, 2002.

  7. Screening Checklist for Contraindications to Vaccines for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screening Checklist for Contraindications to Vaccines for Adults patient name date of birth / / month day year For patients: The ... 17) Information for Healthcare Professionals about the Screening Checklist for Contraindications to Vaccines for Adults Are you ...

  8. Criteria Checklist is Helpful in Magazine Writing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grow, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    Describes a 10-category criteria checklist that identifies skills journalism students have to improve and that emphasizes stylistic details in the context of the larger elements of magazine writing. Includes a copy of the checklist. (FL)

  9. Sample Federal Facility Land Use Control ROD Checklist and Suggested Language (LUC Checklist)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The LUC Checklist provides direction on describing and documenting land use controls (LUCs) in federal facility actrions under CERCLA in Records of Decision (RODs), remedial designs (RDs), and remedial action work plans (RAWPs).

  10. The use of Leeds Test Objects in the assessment of the performance of radiological imaging systems: an introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowen, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    Over the preceding decade the Leeds Radiological Imaging Group have developed a range of test objects with which to assess the performance of radiological imaging systems. The types of imaging equipment which can be assessed include X-ray image intensifier television systems, small-format 100mm/105mm fluorography systems and radiographic screen-film combinations. We have recently extended our interest to the evaluation of digital radiological imaging equipment including digital subtraction fluorography and digital (greyscale) radiographic imaging systems. These test objects were initially developed for the purpose of evaluating imaging performance under laboratory conditions but they have also proved useful under field (clinical) conditions. (author)

  11. Osteolisis tibial secundaria a un implante ligamentoso de Leeds-Keio: Presentación de un caso

    OpenAIRE

    Zafra, M.A.; Ballester, J.; Román, Manuel; Carpintero Benítez, Pedro

    2002-01-01

    Hasta hace algunos años, el ligamento artificial de Leeds-Keio, se usó en muchos casos para la reconstrucción de lesiones del ligamento cruzado anterior. Hoy día no se usa para este tipo de lesiones debido a los pobres resultados que se observaron a medio y largo plazo. No obstante, su uso está indicado en otras lesiones, como son la reconstrucción del aparato extensor de la rodilla, y en inestabilidades del hombro y de la columna vertebral. Presentamos un caso de osteolisis masiva del platil...

  12. Implementation of Pre-Operative Checklist: An Effort to Reduce ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Implementation of Pre-Operative Checklist: An Effort to Reduce Delays in. Surgery and ... insight to develop a pre-operative checklist to ensure that patients were prepared for surgery and to minimize disruptions ... documentation audit was conducted in May 2014, showing 59% compliance in completing the checklist. Since.

  13. Intranet Effectiveness: A Public Relations Paper-and-Pencil Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgolo-Poore, Marie E.; Pitt, Leyland F.; Ewing, Michael T.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process directed at developing a simple paper-and-pencil checklist to assess Intranet effectiveness. Discusses the checklist purification procedure, and attempts to establish reliability and validity for the list. Concludes by identifying managerial applications of the checklist, recognizing the limitations of the approach, and…

  14. Special Consolidated Checklists for Land Disposal Restrictions (unchanged since 1992)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This checklist consolidates LDR rules from the first rule promulgated on November 7, 1986 through June 30, 1992, including the Third Third Scheduled wastes (i.e., from Revision Checklist 34 through Revision Checklist 106, 57 FR 28628, June 26, 1992).

  15. Single-layer ZnS supported on Au(111): A combined XPS, LEED, STM and DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xingyi; Sorescu, Dan C.; Lee, Junseok

    2017-04-01

    Single-layer of ZnS, consisting of one atomic layer of ZnS(111) plane, has been grown on Au(111) and characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). While the LEED measurement indicates a coincidence structure of ZnS-(3×3)/Au(111)-(4×4), high resolution STM images reveal hexagonal unit cells of 6.7×6.7 Å2 and 11.6×11.6 Å2, corresponding to √3 and 3 times the unit cell of the ideal zincblende ZnS-(1×1), respectively, depending on the tunneling conditions. Calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) indicate a significantly reconstructed non-planar structure of ZnS single-layer on Au(111) with 2/3 of the S anions being located nearly in the plane of the Zn cations and the rest 1/3 of the S anions protruding above the Zn plane. The calculated STM image shows similar characteristics to those of the experimental STM image. Additionally, the DFT calculations reveal the different bonding nature of the S anions in ZnS single-layer supported on Au(111).

  16. ADOÇÃO DA CERTIFICAÇÃO LEED EM MEIOS DE HOSPEDAGEM: ESVERDEANDO A HOTELARIA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna de Lima Medeiros

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The research intended to analyze the adoption process of the green certification “Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design” (LEED from the hotel sector establishments that has already adopted it. For its concretization it was proceeded a bibliographical research, secondary fact-gathering in journals, institutional sites and documentaries, and primary fact-gathering by means of semi structured interviews carried out with responsible people of the certified hotels and of the responsible entity of the certification in Brazil (Green Building Council Brazil. There were 21 interviewee, being 02 of the GBC Brazil and 19 of means of lodging (31% of the certified. For data analysis, it was utilized content analysis technique with the aid of ATLAS.ti software. The results permitted to identify the chronology of the processes of certification and the profile of the hotel categories that adopt the LEED program. Beyond that, the interviews enabled the discussion of the initial motivations for seeking the certification, as well the advantages and the obstacles perceived regarding its adoption.

  17. Energy efficiency benchmarks and the performance of LEED rated buildings for Information Technology facilities in Bangalore, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabapathy, Ashwin; Ragavan, Santhosh K.V.; Vijendra, Mahima; Nataraja, Anjana G. [Enzen Global Solutions Pvt Ltd, 90, Hosur Road, Madiwala, Bangalore 560 068 (India)

    2010-11-15

    This paper provides a summary of an energy benchmarking study that uses performance data of a sample of Information Technology facilities in Bangalore. Information provided by the sample of occupiers was used to develop an Energy Performance Index (EPI) and an Annual Average hourly Energy Performance Index (AAhEPI), which takes into account the variations in operation hours and days for these facilities. The EPI and AAhEPI were modelled to identify the factors that influence energy efficiency. Employment density, size of facility, operating hours per week, type of chiller and age of facility were found to be significant factors in regression models with EPI and AAhEPI as dependent variables. Employment density, size of facility and operating hours per week were standardised and used in a separate regression analysis. Parameter estimates from this regression were used to normalize the EPI and AAhEPI for variance in the independent variables. Three benchmark ranges - the bottom third, middle third and top third - were developed for the two normalised indices. The normalised EPI and AAhEPI of LEED rated building, which were also part of the sample, indicate that, on average, LEED rated buildings outperform the other buildings. (author)

  18. Study on application of safety checklist in preventive maintenance activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Jin; Chen Song; Liu Jingquan

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes the principles and the characteristics of safety checklist as a risk evaluation method. Examples of application of safety checklists to preventive maintenance activities such as criteria comparison and checkup items in place in nuclear power plants are illustrated in details with issues appeared in the checklist establishment. Checklist has a good application in the RCM analysis or in the actual preventive maintenance program for Chashma Nuclear Power Plant indicated by concrete instances. In the light of safety checklist which is used to sustain preventive maintenance as a simple and applicable risk analysis approach, we can get deep knowledge of risks of nuclear power plant to perfect preventive maintenance activities. (authors)

  19. Reducing the V2O3(0001) surface through electron bombardment – a quantitative structure determination with I/V-LEED

    OpenAIRE

    Feiten, F.; Kuhlenbeck, H.; Freund, H.

    2016-01-01

    The (0001) surface of vanadium sesquioxide, V2O3, is terminated by vanadyl groups under standard ultra high vacuum preparation conditions. Reduction with electrons results in a chemically highly active surface with a well-defined LEED pattern indicating a high degree of order. In this work we report the first quantitative structure determination of a reduced V2O3(0001) surface. We identify two distinct surface phases by STM, one well ordered and one less well ordered. I/V-LEED shows the order...

  20. A Self-assessment Checklist for Undergraduate Students’ Argumentative Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Nimehchisalem

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available With a growing emphasis on students’ ability to assess their own written works in teaching English as a Second Language (ESL writing courses, self-assessment checklists are today regarded as useful tools. These checklists can help learners diagnose their own weaknesses and improve their writing performance. This necessitates development of checklists that guide the learners in assessing their own writing. In this study, a self-assessment checklist was developed for undergraduate students in an ESL context to help them with their argumentative essays. This paper presents the related literature and theories, based on which the checklist was developed. The checklist is described and its potential theoretical and practical implications in ESL writing classes are discussed. Further research is necessary to refine the checklist through focus group studies with lecturers and students.

  1. Aesthetic Plastic Surgery Checklist: A Safety Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucupira, Eduardo; Matta, Renato; Zuker, Patrícia; Matta, Jorge; Arbeláez, Juan Pablo; Uebel, Carlos O

    2016-10-01

    About one in ten patients experiences iatrogenic events, and more than half of these occur in the perioperative environment. The objective of this study was to develop a complete and functional checklist for aesthetic plastic surgery and test it in patients who would undergo elective plastic surgeries. Patient data were collected from a general hospital and the particular clinic between October 2013 and October 2015, through history, physical examination, diagnosis, laboratory tests, pre-, during, and postoperatively, and complications. An expanded safety checklist was developed and optimized for aesthetic plastic surgery based on the model presented by the WHO in 2009 with reference to the information related to the prevention of more frequent complications in this specialty. The tool was applied to 486 patients, of whom 430 (88 %) were women and 56 (12 %) were men. The most frequently performed procedure was liposuction with 30 % of cases, and the most widely used type of anesthesia (39 %) was local anesthesia + sedation. The greater adherence of professionals to the checklist was the group of residents (98 %). The observed complications were seromas (7 %), other complications unrelated to the wound (3 %), and hematoma (0.2 %) in only one patient who underwent facelift. The use of the checklist in addition to allowing data collection and the identification of potential risks promoted favorable changes in the attitudes of some professionals and generated interest in patient safety and teamwork. This journal requires that the authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  2. A Checklist to Improve Patient Safety in Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koetser, Inge C. J.; Vries, Eefje N. de; Delden, Otto M. van; Smorenburg, Susanne M.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Lienden, Krijn P. van

    2013-01-01

    To develop a specific RADiological Patient Safety System (RADPASS) checklist for interventional radiology and to assess the effect of this checklist on health care processes of radiological interventions. On the basis of available literature and expert opinion, a prototype checklist was developed. The checklist was adapted on the basis of observation of daily practice in a tertiary referral centre and evaluation by users. To assess the effect of RADPASS, in a series of radiological interventions, all deviations from optimal care were registered before and after implementation of the checklist. In addition, the checklist and its use were evaluated by interviewing all users. The RADPASS checklist has two parts: A (Planning and Preparation) and B (Procedure). The latter part comprises checks just before starting a procedure (B1) and checks concerning the postprocedural care immediately after completion of the procedure (B2). Two cohorts of, respectively, 94 and 101 radiological interventions were observed; the mean percentage of deviations of the optimal process per intervention decreased from 24 % before implementation to 5 % after implementation (p < 0.001). Postponements and cancellations of interventions decreased from 10 % before implementation to 0 % after implementation. Most users agreed that the checklist was user-friendly and increased patient safety awareness and efficiency. The first validated patient safety checklist for interventional radiology was developed. The use of the RADPASS checklist reduced deviations from the optimal process by three quarters and was associated with less procedure postponements.

  3. Surface structure and electronic states of epitaxial β-FeSi.sub.2./sub.(100)/Si(001) thin films: Combined quantitative LEED, ab initio DFT, and STM study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romanyuk, Olexandr; Hattori, K.; Someta, M.; Daimon, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 15 (2014), "155305-1"-"155305-9" ISSN 1098-0121 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101201; Murata Science Foundation(JP) Project n. 00295 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : iron silicide * LEED I-V * DFT * STM * surface reconstruction * surface states Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  4. Effects of Contract Delivery Method on the LEED(trademark) Score of U.S. Navy Military Construction Projects (Fiscal Years 2004-2006) (CD-ROM)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carpenter, Deanna S

    2005-01-01

    ...: 1 CD-ROM; 4 3/4 in.; 484 KB. ABSTRACT: This research study focused on determining the effects that the two major contract delivery methods had on the LEED score of projects over the design and construction time horizon...

  5. Energy Provisions of the ICC-700, LEED for Homes, and ENERGY STAR Mapped to the 2009 IECC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, Michelle L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sullivan, Robin S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kora, Angela R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Makela, Eric J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Makela, Erin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2011-05-01

    This document provides the results of a comparison of building energy efficient elements of the ICC-700 National Green Building Standard, LEED for Homes, and ENERGY STAR versions 2, 2.5, and 3.0 to the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (2009 IECC). This comparison will provide a tool for states and local municipalities as they consider adoption of these programs. The comparison is presented in a series of appendices. The first appendix provides a summary chart that visually represents the comprehensive comparison of the programs to the 2009 IECC topic areas. Next there are a series of individual tables (one appendix for each program) that include the specific program mapping to the 2009 IECC elements with comments that briefly discuss how well the elements mapped. Finally, a comprehensive table is included that shows all five of the programs mapped to the 2009 IECC elements to allow a detailed comparison.

  6. Challenging Racist Violence and Racist Hostility in 'Post-Racial' Times: Research and Action in Leeds, UK, 2006–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Law

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing understanding of, information about and official commitment to challenge these patterns, racist hostility and violence continue to have an enduring presence in urban and rural life in the UK. This indicates the paradoxical nature of this racial crisis and challenges for antiracism as a political project. This paper charts how these issues play out at the local level through an examination of a five year process from problem identification through to research, response, action and aftermath from 2006 to 2012 in the city of Leeds, UK, with a focus on two predominantly white working class social housing estates in the city. We explore how embedded tensions and antagonisms can begin to be challenged, while examining how the contemporary climate of austerity and cuts in services, together with prevailing post-racial thinking, make the likelihood of such concerted action in the UK increasingly remote.

  7. Life Cycle Assessment and Optimization-Based Decision Analysis of Construction Waste Recycling for a LEED-Certified University Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kucukvar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current waste management literature lacks a comprehensive LCA of the recycling of construction materials that considers both process and supply chain-related impacts as a whole. Furthermore, an optimization-based decision support framework has not been also addressed in any work, which provides a quantifiable understanding about the potential savings and implications associated with recycling of construction materials from a life cycle perspective. The aim of this research is to present a multi-criteria optimization model, which is developed to propose economically-sound and environmentally-benign construction waste management strategies for a LEED-certified university building. First, an economic input-output-based hybrid life cycle assessment model is built to quantify the total environmental impacts of various waste management options: recycling, conventional landfilling and incineration. After quantifying the net environmental pressures associated with these waste treatment alternatives, a compromise programming model is utilized to determine the optimal recycling strategy considering environmental and economic impacts, simultaneously. The analysis results show that recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals significantly contributed to reductions in the total carbon footprint of waste management. On the other hand, recycling of asphalt and concrete increased the overall carbon footprint due to high fuel consumption and emissions during the crushing process. Based on the multi-criteria optimization results, 100% recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals, cardboard, plastic and glass is suggested to maximize the environmental and economic savings, simultaneously. We believe that the results of this research will facilitate better decision making in treating construction and debris waste for LEED-certified green buildings by combining the results of environmental LCA with multi-objective optimization modeling.

  8. A checklist for evaluating the methodological quality of validation studies on self-report instruments for physical activity and sedentary behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagströmer, Maria; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Kwak, Lydia; Bowles, Heather R

    2012-01-01

    The quality of methodological papers assessing physical activity instruments depends upon the rigor of a study's design. We present a checklist to assess key criteria for instrument validation studies. A Medline/PubMed search was performed to identify guidelines for evaluating the methodological quality of instrument validation studies. Based upon the literature, a pilot version of a checklist was developed consisting of 21 items with 3 subscales: 1) quality of the reported data (9 items: assess whether the reported information is sufficient to make an unbiased assessment of the findings); 2) external validity of the results (3 items: assess the extent to which the findings are generalizable); 3) internal validity of the study (9 items: assess the rigor of the study design). The checklist was tested for interrater reliability and feasibility with 6 raters. Raters viewed the checklist as helpful for reviewing studies. They suggested minor wording changes for 8 items to clarify intent. One item was divided into 2 items for a total of 22 items. Checklists may be useful to assess the quality of studies designed to validate physical activity instruments. Future research should test checklist internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and criterion validity.

  9. Checklist of the spiders (Araneae) of Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonstein, Sergei; Marusik, Yuri M

    2013-01-01

    This checklist records 631 spider species and subspecies belonging to 49 families in Israel. Species distributions are given in both generalised (by main geographic areas of the country) and detailed (by localities) form. Twenty-seven records are considered as doubtful and another ten are based on misidentifications. A historical survey is provided. Each record is presented in its original combination. The list is dominated by members of the families Gnaphosidae and Salticidae (20.0% and 17.1% of total species, respectively). The level of regional endemism exceeds 37.0%.

  10. Checklists for quality assurance and audit in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, E.D.; Harding, L.K.; McKillop, J.H. (Britsh Nuclear Medicine Society, London (UK))

    1989-08-01

    A series of checklists are given which aim to provide some guidance to staff in determining whether their working procedures in nuclear medicine are likely to produce a good service and avoid mistakes. The checklists relate to the special equipment used in nuclear medicine departments, radiopharmaceuticals, nuclear medicine staff, services to medical and other hospital staff and finally the service to patients. The checklists are relevant to an average nuclear medicine department performing less than 2000 imaging studies per year. (U.K.).

  11. THE COMMUNICATION DEALL DEVELOPMENTAL CHECKLIST - INTER RATER RELIABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Pratibha Karanth

    2011-01-01

    A checklist is ideal when assessing young children who are ‘difficult to test’. The Communication DEALL Developmental Checklist (CDDC) was developed by Karanth (1), to assess developmental skills of children up to the age of 6 years, along eight developmental domains, with norms based on an Indian population. Since all checklists depend on rater reliability, the aim of the current study was to establish inter rater reliability of the CDDC. Two senior Speech Language Pathologists used a 4-poin...

  12. Patient Safety in Interventional Radiology: A CIRSE IR Checklist.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) is an invasive speciality with the potential for complications as with other invasive specialities. The World Health Organization (WHO) produced a surgical safety checklist to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with surgery. The Cardiovascular and Interventional Society of Europe (CIRSE) set up a task force to produce a checklist for IR. Use of the checklist will, we hope, reduce the incidence of complications after IR procedures. It has been modified from the WHO surgical safety checklist and the RAD PASS from Holland.

  13. Person-centered endoscopy safety checklist: Development, implementation, and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Hanna; Schmidt, Peter T; Creutzfeldt, Johan; Bergenmar, Mia

    2017-12-28

    To describe the development and implementation of a person-centered endoscopy safety checklist and to evaluate the effects of a "checklist intervention". The checklist, based on previously published safety checklists, was developed and locally adapted, taking patient safety aspects into consideration and using a person-centered approach. This novel checklist was introduced to the staff of an endoscopy unit at a Stockholm University Hospital during half-day seminars and team training sessions. Structured observations of the endoscopy team's performance were conducted before and after the introduction of the checklist. In addition, questionnaires focusing on patient participation, collaboration climate, and patient safety issues were collected from patients and staff. A person-centered safety checklist was developed and introduced by a multi-professional group in the endoscopy unit. A statistically significant increase in accurate patient identity verification by the physicians was noted (from 0% at baseline to 87% after 10 mo, P importance of patient participation were rated more highly after the introduction of the checklist, but this did not result in statistical significance ( P = 0.07/ P = 0.08). The patients rated almost all items as very high both before and after the introduction of the checklist; hence, no statistical difference was noted. The intervention led to increased patient identity verification by physicians - a patient safety improvement. Clear evidence of enhanced person-centeredness or team work was not found.

  14. Checklist of accessibility in Web informational environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Gomes dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research deals with the process of search, navigation and retrieval of information by the person with blindness in web environment, focusing on knowledge of the areas of information recovery and architecture, to understanding the strategies used by these people to access the information on the web. It aims to propose the construction of an accessibility verification instrument, checklist, to be used to analyze the behavior of people with blindness in search actions, navigation and recovery sites and pages. It a research exploratory and descriptive of qualitative nature, with the research methodology, case study - the research to establish a specific study with the simulation of search, navigation and information retrieval using speech synthesis system, NonVisual Desktop Access, in assistive technologies laboratory, to substantiate the construction of the checklist for accessibility verification. It is considered the reliability of performed research and its importance for the evaluation of accessibility in web environment to improve the access of information for people with limited reading in order to be used on websites and pages accessibility check analysis.

  15. Integration of Multiple Non-Normal Checklist Procedures into a Single Checklist Procedure for Transport Aircraft: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foernsler, Lynda J.

    1996-01-01

    Checklists are used by the flight crew to properly configure an aircraft for safe flight and to ensure a high level of safety throughout the duration of the flight. In addition, the checklist provides a sequential framework to meet cockpit operational requirements, and it fosters cross-checking of the flight deck configuration among crew members. This study examined the feasibility of integrating multiple checklists for non-normal procedures into a single procedure for a typical transport aircraft. For the purposes of this report, a typical transport aircraft is one that represents a midpoint between early generation aircraft (B-727/737-200 and DC-10) and modern glass cockpit aircraft (B747-400/777 and MD-11). In this report, potential conflicts among non-normal checklist items during multiple failure situations for a transport aircraft are identified and analyzed. The non-normal checklist procedure that would take precedence for each of the identified multiple failure flight conditions is also identified. The rationale behind this research is that potential conflicts among checklist items might exist when integrating multiple checklists for non-normal procedures into a single checklist. As a rule, multiple failures occurring in today's highly automated and redundant system transport aircraft are extremely improbable. In addition, as shown in this analysis, conflicts among checklist items in a multiple failure flight condition are exceedingly unlikely. The possibility of a multiple failure flight condition occurring with a conflict among checklist items is so remote that integration of the non-normal checklists into a single checklist appears to be a plausible option.

  16. Can a structured checklist prevent problems with laparoscopic equipment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdaasdonk, E.G.G.; Stassen, L.P.S.; Hoffmann, W.F.; Van der Elst, M.; Dankelman, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background A high incidence of problems with the technical equipment is known to occur during routine laparoscopic procedures. Use of a structured checklist of preparatory measures could help to prevent these problems. This study aimed to determine the extent to which a checklist reduced the number

  17. Development and Use of Checklists for Assessment of Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... than the conventional method. The development of checklists requires hard team work and frequent updating and use to develop experience. We propose using checklists as alternative tools of assessment with many advantages over the conventional method, and to prepare the examination culture to adopt the OSCE ...

  18. A Self-Assessment Checklist for Undergraduate Students' Argumentative Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimehchisalem, Vahid; Chye, David Yoong Soon; Jaswant Singh, Sheena Kaur A/P; Zainuddin, Siti Zaidah; Norouzi, Sara; Khalid, Sheren

    2014-01-01

    With a growing emphasis on students' ability to assess their own written works in teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) writing courses, self-assessment checklists are today regarded as useful tools. These checklists can help learners diagnose their own weaknesses and improve their writing performance. This necessitates development of…

  19. CHECKLIST OF DIATOMS FROM THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES

    Science.gov (United States)

    An updated diatom (Bacillariophyta) checklist for the Great Lakes has been completed (J. Great Lakes Res. 1999) and supplants the preliminary checklist (J. Great Lakes Res. 1978). The present list is effectively a 20-year update. The updated list is based upon: 1) the 1978 checkl...

  20. Online Course Quality Assurance: Development of a Quality Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGahan, Steven J.; Jackson, Christina M.; Premer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The University of Nebraska at Kearney's Online Course Checklist is the main instrument for assessing the quality of online courses at UNK. A number of issues were faced when developing and deploying this quality assurance checklist at a small four-year university. The process including development, implementation, and revision is discussed along…

  1. Developing a Checklist: Consensus Via a Modified Delphi Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Shanna R; Culp, William C; Villamaria, Frank J; Ball, Timothy R

    2016-08-01

    To create a universal checklist of key preparatory steps to aid anesthesiologists in patient separation from cardiopulmonary bypass. Multistep, iterative survey with statistically guided refinement of survey items using a modified Delphi technique. Internet-based surveys. Ninety active members of the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists volunteered to participate, including geographically distributed private practice and academic physicians. A series of checklist items was created and distributed to 90 anesthesiologists, who assessed each item's importance in preparing for patient separation from cardiopulmonary bypass and added, deleted, or modified any items as they saw fit. Items meeting a threshold of greater than 90% group acceptance were carried forward to a second survey. These items then were evaluated using a 5-point Likert scale to grade relative importance and then compared with the group's responses, creating a third survey with refined checklist items. The results then were used to generate a final survey based on each item achieving certain predefined statistical criteria, which then were scored again by the participants, generating a final checklist via statistically guided consensus. An initial checklist containing 28 possible items was proposed to the participants. After the iterative process was completed, a final checklist of 10 items deemed essential to prepare for bypass separation was created. A checklist to aid in bypass separation was created with key steps derived from a statistically driven Delphi process. This technique of iterative consensus building may be useful in developing additional safety checklists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 192 - Checklist for Commanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Checklist for Commanders A Appendix A to Part 192 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EQUAL OPPORTUNITY IN OFF-BASE HOUSING Pt. 192, App. A Appendix A to Part 192—Checklist for...

  3. Surgical Checklist Implementation Project: The Impact of Variable WHO Checklist Compliance on Risk-adjusted Clinical Outcomes After National Implementation: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Erik K; Sevdalis, Nick; Rout, Shantanu; Caris, Jochem; Russ, Stephanie; Mansell, Jenny; Davies, Rachel; Skapinakis, Petros; Vincent, Charles; Athanasiou, Thanos; Moorthy, Krishna; Darzi, Ara

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate impact of WHO checklist compliance on risk-adjusted clinical outcomes, including the influence of checklist components (Sign-in, Time-out, Sign-out) on outcomes. There remain unanswered questions surrounding surgical checklists as a quality and safety tool, such as the impact in cases of differing complexity and the extent of checklist implementation. Data were collected from surgical admissions (6714 patients) from March 2010 to June 2011 at 5 academic and community hospitals. The primary endpoint was any complication, including mortality, occurring before hospital discharge. Checklist usage was recorded as checklist completed in full/partly. Multilevel modeling was performed to investigate the association between complications/mortality and checklist completion. Significant variability in checklist usage was found: although at least 1 of the 3 components was completed in 96.7% of cases, the entire checklist was only completed in 62.1% of cases. Checklist completion did not affect mortality reduction, but significantly lowered risk of postoperative complication (16.9% vs. 11.2%), and was largely noticed when all 3 components of the checklist had been completed (odds ratio = 0.57, 95% confidence interval: 0.37-0.87, P checklist was implemented. Checklist implementation was associated with reduced case-mix-adjusted complications after surgery and was most significant when all 3 components of the checklist were completed. Full, as opposed to partial, checklist completion provides a health policy opportunity to improve checklist impact on surgical safety and quality of care.

  4. Checklist for the crop weeds of Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Egea, Juana; Mereles, Fátima; Peña-Chocarro, María Del Carmen; Céspedes, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Paraguay, a country whose economy is based mainly on agriculture and livestock for export, has experienced a major expansion in mechanized crops during the last few decades. Despite being heavily dependent on agriculture, Paraguay has very limited research on crop weeds, in spite of these having a high economic impact on production. This work aims to update and enhance the knowledgebase on the most common weeds affecting productive fields throughout the different ecoregions of Paraguay. We present here the first checklist of crop weeds for the country, which includes a total of 256 taxa (189 species, 10 subspecies, 54 varieties and 3 forms), with the most species-rich families being Poaceae and Asteraceae followed by Malvaceae, Amaranthaceae, Fabaceae and Solanaceae. The list includes three new records for the country. Synonyms, distribution details within Paraguay, habit and a voucher specimen are provided for each taxon.

  5. Araneae Sloveniae: a national spider species checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostanjšek, Rok; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The research of the spider fauna of Slovenia dates back to the very beginning of binomial nomenclature, and has gone through more and less prolific phases with authors concentrating on taxonomy, faunistics, ecology and zoogeographic reviews. Although the body of published works is remarkable for a small nation, the faunistic data has remained too scattered for a thorough understanding of regional biotic diversity, for comparative and ecological research, and for informed conservation purposes. A national checklist is long overdue. Here, a critical review of all published records in any language is provided. The species list currently comprises 738 species, is published online at http://www.bioportal.si/katalog/araneae.php under the title Araneae Sloveniae, and will be updated in due course. This tool will fill the void in cataloguing regional spider faunas and will facilitate further araneological research in central and southern Europe. PMID:25632258

  6. Araneae Sloveniae: a national spider species checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Kostanjšek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The research of the spider fauna of Slovenia dates back to the very beginning of binomial nomenclature, and has gone through more and less prolific phases with authors concentrating on taxonomy, faunistics, ecology and zoogeographic reviews. Although the body of published works is remarkable for a small nation, the faunistic data has remained too scattered for a thorough understanding of regional biotic diversity, for comparative and ecological research, and for informed conservation purposes. A national checklist is long overdue. Here, a critical review of all published records in any language is provided. The species list currently comprises 738 species, is published online at http://www.bioportal.si/katalog/araneae.php under the title Araneae Sloveniae, and will be updated in due course. This tool will fill the void in cataloguing regional spider faunas and will facilitate further araneological research in central and southern Europe.

  7. A checklist of fishes of Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bijukumar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A checklist of the fishes of Kerala State is presented, along with their scientific and common names (English and Malayalam, endemism, IUCN Red List status, listing under different Schedules of the Indian Wildlife (Protection Act and in the Appendices of Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES. Nine Hundred and five species of fishes are recorded from the inland and marine waters of Kerala comprising of 41 orders and 172 families. Close to 30% of the freshwater fish species found in Kerala are endemic to the State. Only 8% of the total fishes of Kerala are listed as threatened in the IUCN Red List, of which the majority are freshwater species. Several hundred fish species occurring in the marine waters of Kerala have not yet been assessed for their conservation status by IUCN.  

  8. Human Factors Checklist: Think Human Factors - Focus on the People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Darcy; Stelges, Katrine; Barth, Timothy; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena; Dischinger, Charles; Kanki, Barbara; Kramer, Ian

    2016-01-01

    A quick-look Human Factors (HF) Checklist condenses industry and NASA Agency standards consisting of thousands of requirements into 14 main categories. With support from contractor HF and Safety Practitioners, NASA developed a means to share key HF messages with Design, Engineering, Safety, Project Management, and others. It is often difficult to complete timely assessments due to the large volume of HF information. The HF Checklist evolved over time into a simple way to consider the most important concepts. A wide audience can apply the checklist early in design or through planning phases, even before hardware or processes are finalized or implemented. The checklist is a good place to start to supplement formal HF evaluation. The HF Checklist was based on many Space Shuttle processing experiences and lessons learned. It is now being applied to ground processing of new space vehicles and adjusted for new facilities and systems.

  9. Point prevalence of surgical checklist use in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jammer, I; Ahmad, T; Aldecoa, C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of use of the World Health Organization surgical checklist is unknown. The clinical effectiveness of this intervention in improving postoperative outcomes is debated. METHODS: We undertook a retrospective analysis of data describing surgical checklist use from a 7 day...... models were constructed to explore the relationship between surgical checklist use and hospital mortality. Findings are presented as crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: A total of 45 591 patients from 426 hospitals were included in the analysis. A surgical...... checklist was used in 67.5% patients, with marked variation across countries (0-99.6% of patients). Surgical checklist exposure was associated with lower crude hospital mortality (OR 0.84, CI 0.75-0.94; P=0.002). This effect remained after adjustment for baseline risk factors in a multivariate model...

  10. The Effect of an Electronic Checklist on Critical Care Provider Workload, Errors, and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Harrison, Andrew M; O'Horo, John C; Berrios, Ronaldo A Sevilla; Pickering, Brian W; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2016-03-01

    The strategy used to improve effective checklist use in intensive care unit (ICU) setting is essential for checklist success. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that an electronic checklist could reduce ICU provider workload, errors, and time to checklist completion, as compared to a paper checklist. This was a simulation-based study conducted at an academic tertiary hospital. All participants completed checklists for 6 ICU patients: 3 using an electronic checklist and 3 using an identical paper checklist. In both scenarios, participants had full access to the existing electronic medical record system. The outcomes measured were workload (defined using the National Aeronautics and Space Association task load index [NASA-TLX]), the number of checklist errors, and time to checklist completion. Two independent clinician reviewers, blinded to participant results, served as the reference standard for checklist error calculation. Twenty-one ICU providers participated in this study. This resulted in the generation of 63 simulated electronic checklists and 63 simulated paper checklists. The median NASA-TLX score was 39 for the electronic checklist and 50 for the paper checklist (P = .005). The median number of checklist errors for the electronic checklist was 5, while the median number of checklist errors for the paper checklist was 8 (P = .003). The time to checklist completion was not significantly different between the 2 checklist formats (P = .76). The electronic checklist significantly reduced provider workload and errors without any measurable difference in the amount of time required for checklist completion. This demonstrates that electronic checklists are feasible and desirable in the ICU setting. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Evaluation plan and recommendations - ‘Can’t Wait to be Healthy’: A briefing paper on evaluation for Leeds Childhood Obesity Prevention and Weight Management Strategy.

    OpenAIRE

    South, J; Kime, NH

    2008-01-01

    The rise in childhood obesity is a major public health challenge and a national priority for health action. Obesity is associated with many illnesses and is directly related to increased mortality and lower life expectancy. The Children’s Plan recognises child obesity as one of the most serious challenges for children and links it to a number of poor outcomes, physical, social and psychological (Department for Children, Schools and Families 2007). ‘Can’t wait to be healthy’- Leeds Childhood O...

  12. LEED AND THE DESIGN/BUILD EXPERIENCE: A SHELTER FOR HOMELESS FAMILIES RETURNING TO POST-KATRINA NEW ORLEANS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Verderber

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hurricane Katrina displaced nearly one million citizens from the New Orleans metro region in 2005. Five years after the catastrophe, in August of 2010, more than 150,000 citizens remained scattered across the United States. Katrina was the largest Diaspora in the nation’s history. The number of homes damaged or destroyed by Katrina’s devastation numbered more than 125,000. An award-winning case study is presented of a unique partnership forged between academia, a local social service agency, professional architectural and engineering firms, and a national humanitarian aid organization whose mission is to provide affordable housing for homeless persons in transition. This collaboration resulted in a sustainable design/build project that originated in a research-based university design studio. The facility is a 38-bed family shelter for homeless mothers and their children seeking to rebuild their lives in post-Katrina New Orleans. The site for this 4,400 facility did not flood when the city’s federally built levee system failed in 2005. This case study is presented from its inception, to programming and design, construction, occupancy, and the postoccupancy assessment of the completed building. This facility is the first LEED certified (Silver building in New Orleans. Project limitations, lessons learned, and recommendations for future initiatives of this type are discussed, particularly in the context of any inner urban community coping with the aftermath of an urban disaster.

  13. From Provider to Enabler of Care? Reconfiguring Local Authority Support for Older People and Carers in Leeds, 2008 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeandle, Sue

    2016-03-14

    This article explores developments in the support available to older people and carers (i.e., caregivers) in the city of Leeds, United Kingdom, and examines provision changes during a period characterized by unprecedented resource constraint and new developments in national-local governance. Using documentary evidence, official statistics, and findings from recent studies led by the author, the effects of these changes on service planning and delivery and the approach taken by local actors to mitigate their impact are highlighted. The statistical data show a marked decline in some types of services for older people during a 5-year period during which the city council took steps to mobilize citizens and develop new services and system improvements. The analysis focuses on theories of social quality as a framework for analysis of the complex picture of change related to service provision. It concludes that although citizen involvement and consultations exerted a positive influence in delivering support to some older people and carers, research over a longer timescale is needed to show if these changes are adequate to protect older people and carers from the effects of ongoing budgetary constraints.

  14. Bandgap opening in graphene templates on Ru(0001) from subsurface hydrogen effects studied by STM, LEED, and DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Maxwell; Diaconescu, Bogdan; Valovcin, Darren; Hagelberg, Frank; Pohl, Karsten

    2013-03-01

    Graphene has aroused tremendous interest due to its remarkable electronic and mechanical properties. Graphene's optical properties, conductance, and the fact that it can be transferred to many substrates make it an ideal candidate for use in nanoelectronic devices and organic photoelectric devices. The lack of a bandgap, however, causes a serious challenge for implementing graphene as a material for electrical switches and therefore creative ways of inducing this bandgap are needed. We will present a STM/LEED/DFT study of the single layer graphene on Ru(0001) system in the presence of hydrogen. Structural studies show arrays of moiré superlattices with sizes ranging from 0.9 to 3.0 nm in the presence of hydrogen on the compact surface of ruthenium. First principle calculations help explain the appearance of these arrays of graphene reconstructions driven by the H presence at the Ru(0001) interface, and furthermore, predict the appearance of a bandgap with values correlated with the moiré superstructure sizes in the presence of hydrogen. Control over moiré superstructure size can aid in future work using graphene as a nanotemplate for self assembled growth of nanoelectronic devices an organic photovoltaics. This work was supported by the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (NSF NSEC-425826) and NSF DMR-1006863

  15. Survey of the knowledge, perception, and attitude of medical students at the University of Leeds toward organ donation and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, K K; Hakeem, A R; Dave, R; Lewington, A; Sanfey, H; Ahmad, N

    2015-03-01

    The shortage of organ donors is the key rate-limiting factor for organ transplantation in the United Kingdom. Many strategies have been proposed to increase donation; one strategy aims to improve awareness of organ donation and transplantation (ODT) among medical students. This survey seeks to investigate the knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes of the medical students in the United Kingdom toward ODT and the curriculum content. A 32-item online questionnaire was distributed to 957 medical students at the University of Leeds (October to December 2012). There were 216 (22.6%) respondents. Students were aware of kidney, heart, and liver transplantation (91.6%, 88.8%, and 86.5%). Awareness of small intestine (36.7%) and islet of Langerhans (33.0%) transplantation was poor. Students understood the term "brain stem death" (82.3%); however, they lacked understanding of criteria used for brain stem death testing (75.8%). Their perceptions and attitudes were favorable toward ODT; 43.3% of the students were unhappy with their current knowledge, and 87.6% of the students agree that ODT teaching should be included in the curriculum. Students have a basic understanding of ODT but lack detailed knowledge. They accept its importance and desire further teaching to supplement their current knowledge to be able to understand the issues related to ODT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Soft tissue reinforcement with a Leeds-Keio artificial ligament in revision surgery for dislocated total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aota, Shigeo; Kikuchi, Shin-Ichi; Ohashi, Hironori; Kitano, Naoko; Hakozaki, Michiyuki; Konno, Shin-Ichi

    2017-10-16

    Since dislocation after total hip arthroplasty (THA) greatly diminishes patient's quality of life, the THA frequently needs revision. However, it is common for the dislocation not to heal even after reconstruction, but rather to become intractable. The 17 patients with dislocated THA, mean age of 71 years (range 51-87 years), who underwent a revision THA together with soft tissue reinforcement with a Leeds-Keio (LK) ligament were enrolled. The purposes of reinforcement with LK ligament were to restrict the internal rotation of the hip joint, and to encourage the formation of fibrous tissue in the posterior acetabular wall to stabilise the femoral head. We determined the success rate of surgical treatment for dislocation, the Harris Hip Score (HHS), a factor of recurrent dislocation. There was no recurrent dislocation in 82% of the cases (14 joints) during the mean postoperative follow-up period of 63.5 months (15-96 months). The HHS was 82 ± 18 points preoperatively and 82 ± 14 points postoperatively. Recurrent dislocation after this surgical procedure occurred in 2 hips with breakage of the LK ligaments, and intracapsular dislocation in 1 hip with loosening of the LK ligament. Although the risk of recurrent dislocation still exists with this procedure, when performed to provide reinforcement with an LK ligament for dislocated THA it may be useful in intractable cases with soft tissue defects around the hip joint.

  17. WHO Surgical Checklist and Its Practical Application in Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shady Abdel-Rehim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The WHO surgical checklist was introduced to most UK surgical units following the WHO “Safe Surgery Saves Lives” initiative. The aim of this audit was to review patient's safety in the delivery of surgical care and to evaluate the practical application of the new WHO surgical checklist. We conducted a retrospective audit of patients who received operative treatment under general anaesthesia at our Plastic Surgery Department, involving a total number of 90 patients. The WHO form was compared to its former equivalents. Complications or incidents occurring during or after surgery were recorded. Using the department's previous surgical checklist, “Time out” was only performed in only 30% of cases. One patient arrived at theatre reception without a completed consent form, and two clinical incidents were reported without patients suffering harm. Following introduction of current WHO surgical checklist, “Time out” was recorded in 80% of cases. In all cases, the new WHO surgical checklist was used and no incidents were reported. The WHO surgical checklist provides a structured frame work that standardizes the delivery of care across hospitals and specialized units; however, it will take some time and practice for teams to learn to use the checklist effectively and reliably.

  18. An Autopsy Checklist: A Monitor of Safety and Risk Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkrum, Michael James; Kent, Jessica

    2016-09-01

    Any autopsy has safety and risk management issues, which can arise in the preautopsy, autopsy, and postautopsy phases. The London Health Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Autopsy Checklist was developed to address these issues. The current study assessed 1 measure of autopsy safety: the effectiveness of the checklist in documenting pathologists' communication of the actual or potential risk of blood-borne infections to support staff. Autopsy checklists for cases done in 2012 and 2013 were reviewed. The frequency of communication, as recorded in checklists, by pathologists to staff of previously diagnosed blood-borne infections (hepatitis B/C and human immunodeficiency virus) or the risk of infection based on lifestyle (eg, intravenous drug abuse) was tabulated. These data were compared with medical histories of the deceased and circumstances of their deaths described in the final autopsy reports. Information about blood-borne infections was recorded less frequently in the checklists compared with the final reports. Of 4 known human immunodeficiency virus cases, there was no checklist documentation in 3. All 11 hand injuries were documented. None of these cases had known infectious risks. The Autopsy Checklist is a standardized means of documenting safety and risk issues arising during the autopsy process, but its effectiveness relies on accurate completion.

  19. Human factors engineering checklists for application in the SAR process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overlin, T.K.; Romero, H.A.; Ryan, T.G.

    1995-03-01

    This technical report was produced to assist the preparers and reviewers of the human factors portions of the SAR in completing their assigned tasks regarding analysis and/or review of completed analyses. The checklists, which are the main body of the report, and the subsequent tables, were developed to assist analysts in generating the needed analysis data to complete the human engineering analysis for the SAR. The technical report provides a series of 19 human factors engineering (HFE) checklists which support the safety analyses of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) reactor and nonreactor facilities and activities. The results generated using these checklists and in the preparation of the concluding analyses provide the technical basis for preparing the human factors chapter, and subsequent inputs to other chapters, required by DOE as a part of the safety analysis reports (SARs). This document is divided into four main sections. The first part explains the origin of the checklists, the sources utilized, and other information pertaining to the purpose and scope of the report. The second part, subdivided into 19 sections, is the checklists themselves. The third section is the glossary which defines terms that could either be unfamiliar or have specific meanings within the context of these checklists. The final section is the subject index in which the glossary terms are referenced back to the specific checklist and page the term is encountered

  20. Human factors engineering checklists for application in the SAR process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overlin, T.K.; Romero, H.A.; Ryan, T.G.

    1995-03-01

    This technical report was produced to assist the preparers and reviewers of the human factors portions of the SAR in completing their assigned tasks regarding analysis and/or review of completed analyses. The checklists, which are the main body of the report, and the subsequent tables, were developed to assist analysts in generating the needed analysis data to complete the human engineering analysis for the SAR. The technical report provides a series of 19 human factors engineering (HFE) checklists which support the safety analyses of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) reactor and nonreactor facilities and activities. The results generated using these checklists and in the preparation of the concluding analyses provide the technical basis for preparing the human factors chapter, and subsequent inputs to other chapters, required by DOE as a part of the safety analysis reports (SARs). This document is divided into four main sections. The first part explains the origin of the checklists, the sources utilized, and other information pertaining to the purpose and scope of the report. The second part, subdivided into 19 sections, is the checklists themselves. The third section is the glossary which defines terms that could either be unfamiliar or have specific meanings within the context of these checklists. The final section is the subject index in which the glossary terms are referenced back to the specific checklist and page the term is encountered.

  1. Participatory design of a preliminary safety checklist for general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, Paul; Ferguson, Julie; MacLeod, Marion; Kennedy, Susan; de Wet, Carl; McNab, Duncan; Kelly, Moya; McKay, John; Atkinson, Sarah

    2015-05-01

    The use of checklists to minimise errors is well established in high reliability, safety-critical industries. In health care there is growing interest in checklists to standardise checking processes and ensure task completion, and so provide further systemic defences against error and patient harm. However, in UK general practice there is limited experience of safety checklist use. To identify workplace hazards that impact on safety, health and wellbeing, and performance, and codesign a standardised checklist process. Application of mixed methods to identify system hazards in Scottish general practices and develop a safety checklist based on human factors design principles. A multiprofessional 'expert' group (n = 7) and experienced front-line GPs, nurses, and practice managers (n = 18) identified system hazards and developed and validated a preliminary checklist using a combination of literature review, documentation review, consensus building workshops using a mini-Delphi process, and completion of content validity index exercise. A prototype safety checklist was developed and validated consisting of six safety domains (for example, medicines management), 22 sub-categories (for example, emergency drug supplies) and 78 related items (for example, stock balancing, secure drug storage, and cold chain temperature recording). Hazards in the general practice work system were prioritised that can potentially impact on the safety, health and wellbeing of patients, GP team members, and practice performance, and a necessary safety checklist prototype was designed. However, checklist efficacy in improving safety processes and outcomes is dependent on user commitment, and support from leaders and promotional champions. Although further usability development and testing is necessary, the concept should be of interest in the UK and internationally. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  2. Checklists in Neurosurgery to Decrease Preventable Medical Errors: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enchev, Yavor

    2015-01-01

    Neurosurgery represents a zero tolerance environment for medical errors, especially preventable ones like all types of wrong site surgery, complications due to the incorrect positioning of patients for neurosurgical interventions and complications due to failure of the devices required for the specific procedure. Following the excellent and encouraging results of the safety checklists in intensive care medicine and in other surgical areas, the checklist was naturally introduced in neurosurgery. To date, the reported world experience with neurosurgical checklists is limited to 15 series with fewer than 20,000 cases in various neurosurgical areas. The purpose of this review was to study the reported neurosurgical checklists according to the following parameters: year of publication; country of origin; area of neurosurgery; type of neurosurgical procedure-elective or emergency; person in charge of the checklist completion; participants involved in completion; whether they prevented incorrect site surgery; whether they prevented complications due to incorrect positioning of the patients for neurosurgical interventions; whether they prevented complications due to failure of the devices required for the specific procedure; their specific aims; educational preparation and training; the time needed for checklist completion; study duration and phases; number of cases included; barriers to implementation; efforts to implementation; team appreciation; and safety outcomes. Based on this analysis, it could be concluded that neurosurgical checklists represent an efficient, reliable, cost-effective and time-saving tool for increasing patient safety and elevating the neurosurgeons’ self-confidence. Every neurosurgical department must develop its own neurosurgical checklist or adopt and modify an existing one according to its specific features and needs in an attempt to establish or develop its safety culture. The world, continental, regional and national neurosurgical societies

  3. CONSORT 2010 statement: extension to randomised pilot and feasibility trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Sandra M; Chan, Claire L; Campbell, Michael J; Bond, Christine M; Hopewell, Sally; Thabane, Lehana; Lancaster, Gillian A

    2016-01-01

    The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement is a guideline designed to improve the transparency and quality of the reporting of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). In this article we present an extension to that statement for randomised pilot and feasibility trials conducted in advance of a future definitive RCT. The checklist applies to any randomised study in which a future definitive RCT, or part of it, is conducted on a smaller scale, regardless of its design (eg, cluster, factorial, crossover) or the terms used by authors to describe the study (eg, pilot, feasibility, trial, study). The extension does not directly apply to internal pilot studies built into the design of a main trial, non-randomised pilot and feasibility studies, or phase II studies, but these studies all have some similarities to randomised pilot and feasibility studies and so many of the principles might also apply. The development of the extension was motivated by the growing number of studies described as feasibility or pilot studies and by research that has identified weaknesses in their reporting and conduct. We followed recommended good practice to develop the extension, including carrying out a Delphi survey, holding a consensus meeting and research team meetings, and piloting the checklist. The aims and objectives of pilot and feasibility randomised studies differ from those of other randomised trials. Consequently, although much of the information to be reported in these trials is similar to those in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing effectiveness and efficacy, there are some key differences in the type of information and in the appropriate interpretation of standard CONSORT reporting items. We have retained some of the original CONSORT statement items, but most have been adapted, some removed, and new items added. The new items cover how participants were identified and consent obtained; if applicable, the prespecified criteria used to judge

  4. The Afghan symptom checklist: a culturally grounded approach to mental health assessment in a conflict zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kenneth E; Omidian, Patricia; Quraishy, Abdul Samad; Quraishy, Naseema; Nasiry, Mohammed Nader; Nasiry, Seema; Karyar, Nazar Mohammed; Yaqubi, Abdul Aziz

    2006-10-01

    This article describes a methodology for developing culturally grounded assessment measures in conflict and postconflict situations. A mixed-method design was used in Kabul, Afghanistan, to identify local indicators of distress and develop the 22-item Afghan Symptom Checklist (ASCL). The ASCL contains several indigenous items and items familiar to Western mental health professionals. The ASCL was pilot tested and subsequently administered to 324 adults in 8 districts of Kabul. It demonstrated excellent reliability (alpha=.93) and good construct validity, correlating strongly with a measure of exposure to war-related violence and loss (r=.70). Results of the survey indicate moderate levels of distress among Afghan men and markedly higher levels of distress and impaired functioning among women (and widows in particular). (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved

  5. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    be difficult to plan and conduct. It is sometimes assumed that pilot implementations are less complicated and risky than ordinary implementations. Pilot implementations are, however, neither prototyping nor small-scale versions of full-scale implementations; they are fundamentally different and have their own...

  6. First supplement to the lichen checklist of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teuvo Ahti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Details are given of errors and additions to the recently published checklist of lichens reported from South Africa (Fryday 2015. The overall number of taxa reported from South Africa is increased by one, to 1751.

  7. Consolidated Checklist for C4 40 CFR 263

    Science.gov (United States)

    No final rules affecting 40 CFR Part 263 were promulgated between June 30, 2002 and December 31, 2002, therefore, this Consolidated Checklist corresponds to 40 CFR Part 263 as published on July 1, 2002.

  8. Consolidated Checklist for C3 40 CFR 262

    Science.gov (United States)

    No final rules affecting 40 CFR Part 262 were promulgated between June 30, 2002 and December 31, 2002, therefore, this Consolidated Checklist corresponds to 40 CFR Part 262 as published on July 1, 2002.

  9. Can the Children's Communication Checklist differentiate within the autistic spectrum?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verte, S; Geurts, H.M.; Roeyers, H.; Rosseel, Y.; Oosterlaan, J.; Sergeant, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The study explored whether children with high functioning autism (HFA), Asperger syndrome (AS), and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) can be differentiated on the Children's Communication Checklist (CCC). The study also investigated whether empirically derived

  10. Patient Safety in Interventional Radiology: A CIRSE IR Checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, M. J.; Fanelli, F.; Haage, P.; Hausegger, K.; van Lienden, K. P.

    2012-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) is an invasive speciality with the potential for complications as with other invasive specialities. The World Health Organization (WHO) produced a surgical safety checklist to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with surgery. The Cardiovascular and

  11. Rotary mode core sampling approved checklist: 241-TX-113

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, K.D.

    1998-01-01

    The safety assessment for rotary mode core sampling was developed using certain bounding assumptions, however, those assumptions were not verified for each of the existing or potential flammable gas tanks. Therefore, a Flammable Gas/Rotary Mode Core Sampling Approved Checklist has been completed for tank 241-TX-113 prior to sampling operations. This transmittal documents the dispositions of the checklist items from the safety assessment

  12. A Checklist based Framework for Software Security Risk Management

    OpenAIRE

    Sumithra A; Dr.E.Ramraj

    2011-01-01

    As security of software systems is becoming more and more important in the current era of ecommerce and e-governance, traditional approaches for software development should be supplanted with a formal approach to security in the software life cycle. Both a software security checklist and assessment tools should be incorporated into this life cycle process. This paper focuses on the development of a Security Checklist for the software life cycle. It includes the critical areas of requiremen...

  13. Debriefing: the forgotten phase of the surgical safety checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz-Kurycki, Marisa A; Anderson, Kathryn T; Abraham, Jocelyn E; Masada, Kendall M; Wang, Jiasen; Kawaguchi, Akemi L; Lally, Kevin P; Tsao, KuoJen

    2017-06-01

    The debriefing phase of the surgical safety checklist (SSC) provides the operative team an opportunity to share pertinent intraoperative information and communicate postoperative plans. Prior quality improvement initiatives at our institution focused on the preincision phase of the SSC; however, the debriefing phase has not been evaluated. We aimed to assess adherence to the debrief checklist at our institution and identify areas for improvement. An observational study was conducted from 2014 to 2016 with a convenience sample of pediatric surgery cases at an academic children's hospital over 8-wk periods annually to evaluate the debriefing checklist across 14 subspecialties. Intraoperative team members' adherence to eight prespecified checkpoints was assessed. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's chi square, Kruskal-Wallis rank test, and Cohen's kappa for interrater reliability were used (P checklist was conducted in 90.6%, 90.3%, and 94.9% of observed cases each year respectively with the median number of checklist items completed relatively unchanged (8, 7, and 7, range 0-8). However, the checklist was only fully completed in 55%, 48%, and 50% of cases over the study period (P = 0.001) with no debriefing at all in approximately 9% of cases in 2014 and 2015 versus 5% in 2016 (P 0.65. Despite slight increases annually in overall compliance to the debriefing checklist, only half of all checklists were completed in full. Future efforts to augment adherence are needed and will include interventions targeting the debriefing phase and increasing operating room efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Swedish Nurse Anesthetists' Experiences of the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnberg, Linda; Nilsson, Ulrica

    2015-12-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) surgical safety checklist aims to increase communication, build teamwork, and standardize routines in clinical practice in an effort to reduce complications and improve patient safety. The checklist has been implemented in surgical departments both nationally and internationally. The purpose of this study was to describe the registered nurse anesthetists' (RNA) experience with the use of the WHO surgical safety checklist. This was a cross-sectional study with a descriptive mixed methods design, involving nurse anesthetists from two different hospitals in Sweden. Data were collected using a study-specific questionnaire. Forty-seven RNAs answered the questionnaire. There was a statistically significant lower compliance to "Sign-in" compared with the other two parts, "Timeout" and "Sign-out." The RNAs expressed that the checklist was very important for anesthetic and perioperative care. They also expressed that by confirming their own area of expertise, they achieved an increased sense of being a team member. Thirty-four percent believed that the surgeon was responsible for the checklist, yet this was not the reality in clinical practice. Although 23% reported that they initiated use of the checklist, only one RNA believed that it was the responsibility of the RNA. Forty-three percent had received training about the checklist and its use. The WHO surgical checklist facilitates the nurse anesthetist's anesthetic and perioperative care. It allows the nurse anesthetist to better identify each patient's specific concerns and have an increased sense of being a team member. Copyright © 2015 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Heuristic Evaluation on Mobile Interfaces: A New Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez Gómez, Rosa; Cascado Caballero, Daniel; Sevillano, José-Luis

    2014-01-01

    The rapid evolution and adoption of mobile devices raise new usability challenges, given their limitations (in screen size, battery life, etc.) as well as the specific requirements of this new interaction. Traditional evaluation techniques need to be adapted in order for these requirements to be met. Heuristic evaluation (HE), an Inspection Method based on evaluation conducted by experts over a real system or prototype, is based on checklists which are desktop-centred and do not adequately detect mobile-specific usability issues. In this paper, we propose a compilation of heuristic evaluation checklists taken from the existing bibliography but readapted to new mobile interfaces. Selecting and rearranging these heuristic guidelines offer a tool which works well not just for evaluation but also as a best-practices checklist. The result is a comprehensive checklist which is experimentally evaluated as a design tool. This experimental evaluation involved two software engineers without any specific knowledge about usability, a group of ten users who compared the usability of a first prototype designed without our heuristics, and a second one after applying the proposed checklist. The results of this experiment show the usefulness of the proposed checklist for avoiding usability gaps even with nontrained developers. PMID:25295300

  16. Heuristic Evaluation on Mobile Interfaces: A New Checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Yáñez Gómez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid evolution and adoption of mobile devices raise new usability challenges, given their limitations (in screen size, battery life, etc. as well as the specific requirements of this new interaction. Traditional evaluation techniques need to be adapted in order for these requirements to be met. Heuristic evaluation (HE, an Inspection Method based on evaluation conducted by experts over a real system or prototype, is based on checklists which are desktop-centred and do not adequately detect mobile-specific usability issues. In this paper, we propose a compilation of heuristic evaluation checklists taken from the existing bibliography but readapted to new mobile interfaces. Selecting and rearranging these heuristic guidelines offer a tool which works well not just for evaluation but also as a best-practices checklist. The result is a comprehensive checklist which is experimentally evaluated as a design tool. This experimental evaluation involved two software engineers without any specific knowledge about usability, a group of ten users who compared the usability of a first prototype designed without our heuristics, and a second one after applying the proposed checklist. The results of this experiment show the usefulness of the proposed checklist for avoiding usability gaps even with nontrained developers.

  17. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 505 - Management Control Evaluation Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Management Control Evaluation Checklist G...—Management Control Evaluation Checklist (a) Function. The function covered by this checklist is DA Privacy Act Program. (b) Purpose. The purpose of this checklist is to assist Denial Authorities and Activity...

  18. 46 CFR Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart E... - Complaint Form and Information Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Complaint Form and Information Checklist No. Exhibit No... Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart E of Part 502—Complaint Form and Information Checklist Before the Federal... of documents). Checklist of Specific Information The following checklist sets forth items of...

  19. Fragile X checklists: A meta-analysis and development of a simplified universal clinical checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubala, Toni Kasole; Lumaka, Aimé; Kanteng, Gray; Mutesa, Léon; Mukuku, Olivier; Wembonyama, Stanislas; Hagerman, Randi; Luboya, Oscar Numbi; Lukusa Tshilobo, Prosper

    2018-04-06

    Clinical checklists available have been developed to assess the risk of a positive Fragile X syndrome but they include relatively small sample sizes. Therefore, we carried out a meta-analysis that included statistical pooling of study results to obtain accurate figures on the prevalence of clinical predictors of Fragile X syndrome among patients with intellectual disability, thereby helping health professionals to improve their referrals for Fragile X testing. All published studies consisting of cytogenetic and/or molecular screening for fragile X syndrome among patients with intellectual disability, were eligible for the meta-analysis. All patients enrolled in clinical checklists trials of Fragile X syndrome were eligible for this review, with no exclusion based on ethnicity or age. Odds ratio values, with 95% confidence intervals as well as Cronbach coefficient alpha, was reported to assess the frequency of clinical characteristics in subjects with intellectual disability with and without the fragile X mutation to determine the most discriminating. The following features were strongly associated with Fragile X syndrome: skin soft and velvety on the palms with redundancy of skin on the dorsum of hand [OR: 16.85 (95% CI 10.4-27.3; α:0.97)], large testes [OR: 7.14 (95% CI 5.53-9.22; α: 0.80)], large and prominent ears [OR: 18.62 (95% CI 14.38-24.1; α: 0.98)], pale blue eyes [OR: 8.97 (95% CI 4.75-16.97; α: 0.83)], family history of intellectual disability [OR: 3.43 (95% CI 2.76-4.27; α: 0.81)] as well as autistic-like behavior [OR: 3.08 (95% CI 2.48-3.83; α: 0.77)], Flat feet [OR: 11.53 (95% CI 6.79-19.56; α:0.91)], plantar crease [OR: 3.74 (95% CI 2.67-5.24; α: 0.70)]. We noted a weaker positive association between transverse palmar crease [OR: 2.68 (95% CI 1.70-4.18; α: 0.51)], elongated face [OR: 3.69 (95% CI 2.84-4.81; α: 0.63)]; hyperextensible metacarpo-phalangeal joints [OR: 2.68 (95% CI 2.15-3.34; α: 0.57)] and the Fragile X syndrome. This study

  20. Handover checklist: testing a standardization process in an Italian hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferorelli D

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Davide Ferorelli,1 Teresa Giandola,2 Mariangela Laterza,2 Biagio Solarino,2 Angela Pezzolla,3 Fiorenza Zotti,2 Alessandro Dell’Erba1 1Interdisciplinary Department of Medicine, 2Section of Legal Medicine, 3Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, University of Bari, Bari, Italy Objectives: This study aimed to standardize and rationalize the handover, a critical and essential moment in common health care practices, through the realization of an efficient and standardized checklist, which could be used daily to ensure complete, thorough and effective handover. The principal purpose of the implementation of the handover is to reduce errors due to superficial and insufficient communication.Methods: The “operative group” defined the phases to the realization of the delineated aims: at first, the direct observation and the consequent realization of a handover checklist model and then, the experimental phases (trials. The handover checklist model was used for a month and it was daily and duly completed by the doctors who took part in the trial. To prove the success of the study, three questionnaires were distributed on different occasions.Results: Analyzing the answers to the questionnaires, the importance of the handover has come to light and that for the most part, the doctors consider it an essential and irreplaceable moment in daily health care work. Moreover, it became obvious that the use of the handover checklist guaranteed a considerable improvement in the traditional handover in terms of security, completeness, care continuity and clarity. The handover checklist was completely appreciated by the majority of the participant doctors who agree with the definitive introduction of it in their unit.Conclusions: Our study indicated the consistency of the handover checklist as an instrument to implement the handover and, indirectly, to improve the quality of the care. Keywords: clinical risk management, handover checklist, health care

  1. Designing and Determining Psychometric Properties of the Elder Neglect Checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majideh Heravi-Karimooi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to design and determine the psychometric properties of a checklist for assessing domestic elder neglect. Methods & Materials: This study was conducted in four phases. In the first phase, the meaning of domestic elder neglect explored using the qualitative method of phenomenology. In the second phase, a checklist was created, based on the results obtained in the first phase, in conjunction with the inductions from the expert panel. In the third and fourth phases, the psychometric properties including face validity, content validity, construct validity, convergent validity, internal consistency, and Inter- rater reliability were measured. 110 elderly people participated in the this study. Results: The initial 26 item checklist designed using the results of first and second phases of study, reduced to 11 items and 2 factors including the health and care needs neglect, and neglect in providing healthy environment in the process of determining the face and content validity. Acceptable convergent validity was identified in the elder neglect checklist and care neglect scale of the domestic elder abuse questionnaire (r=0.862. The results of known groups' comparisons showed that this checklist could successfully discriminate between subgroups of elderly people in the index of re-hospitalization. The internal consistency (Kuder-Richardson Formula 20 was 0.824. Inter- rater reliability of the checklist was 0.850. Conclusion: The elder neglect checklist with 11 items appears to be a promising tool, providing reliable and valid data helping to detect neglect among elders in different settings such as clinical settings, homes and research environments by health care providers and researchers.

  2. Developing a checklist for collecting information from overseas hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Juri; Kobayashi, Yuichi; Kajiki, Shigeyuki; Uehara, Masamichi; Sasaki, Norio; Odagami, Kiminori; Hiraoka, Kou; Nakanishi, Shigemoto; Igarashi, Yu; Mori, Koji

    2017-05-31

    Expatriate workers and their families may encounter difficulties and uncertainties when visiting local hospitals. These problems include differences in the medical system, higher healthcare costs, and language problems. Occupational health staff in companies need to know about the healthcare system, including emergency transportation arrangements, to reduce anxiety in workers and families attending hospitals. This study was designed to create a checklist to allow occupational health staff to collect information from overseas hospitals efficiently and effectively. We used documentary searches and the knowledge and experience of researchers to identify the support requirements of expatriate workers and drafted a checklist for information collection from overseas hospitals. The validity of the checklist was assessed in two stages. First, we interviewed health specialists caring for expatriate workers and their families and then tested the draft in international hospitals. We revised the draft based on our findings and again tested the new version in different overseas hospitals, enabling us to create a final version of the checklist. Our checklist contains 12 major categories: reception, administration, inpatient wards, available tests, outpatient clinics, emergency services, pediatrics, gynecology, dentistry, general health check-ups, vaccination services, and precautions against infection. These categories cover a total of 51 subcategories, each of which is further divided into a total of 131 smaller categories. Occupational health staff can use this checklist to gather information in order to provide comprehensive and effective support for expatriate workers attending hospitals. We recommend that the staff gather all possible information from hospital websites before visiting and use the visiting time to gather information available only on site. In order to gather as much information as accurately as possible, the staff are recommended to visit the facilities

  3. Pilot Implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manikas, Maria Ie

    This PhD dissertation engages in the study of pilot (system) implementation. In the field of information systems, pilot implementations are commissioned as a way to learn from real use of a pilot system with real data, by real users during an information systems development (ISD) project and before...... the final system is implemented. Among others, their use is argued to investigate the fit between the technical design and the organisational use. But what is a pilot implementation really? In this dissertation, I set out to address this conceptual question. I initially investigate this question....... The analysis is conducted by means of a theoretical framework that centres on the concept infrastructure. With infrastructure I understand the relation between organised practice and the information systems supporting this practice. Thus, infrastructure is not a thing but a relational and situated concept...

  4. Development of a checklist in risk management in thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardal-Refoyo, José Luis; Cuello-Azcárate, Jesús Javier; Santiago-Peña, Luis Francisco

    2014-11-01

    Communication failures may result in inadequate treatment and patient harm, and are among the most common causes of sentinel events. Checklists are part of cycles to improve quality of the care process, promote communication between professionals involved in the different stages, help detect failures and risks, and increase patient safety. The lack of checklists at each stage was identified as a factor contributing to communication failures. To design checklists at different stages of the thyroidectomy care process to improve the communication between the professionals involved. Multidisciplinary working team consisting of specialists in otolaryngology, anesthesiology, and endocrinology. The process of thyroidectomy was divided into three stages (preoperative -A-, operative -B- and postoperative -C-). Potential safety incidents and failures at each stage and their contributing factors (causes) were identified by literature review and brainstorming. Checklists for each checkpoint were designed by consensus of the working group. The items correspond to factors contributing to the occurrence of incidents in the perioperative stage of thyroidectomy related to patients, technological equipment, environment, management, and organization. Lists of items should be checked by the appropriate specialist in each stage. Checklists in thyroid surgery are tools that allow for testing at different checkpoints data related to factors contributing to the occurrence of failures at each stage of the care process. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Accessibility in Public Buildings: Efficiency of Checklist Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Jonas E; Skehan, Terry

    2016-01-01

    In Sweden, governmental agencies and bodies are required to implement a higher level of accessibility in their buildings than that stipulated by the National Building and Planning Act (PBL). The Swedish Agency for Participation (MFD, Myndigheten för delaktighet) develops holistic guidelines in order to conceptualize this higher level of accessibility. In conjunction to these guidelines, various checklist protocols have been produced. The present study focuses on the efficiency of such checklist protocols. The study revolved around the use of a checklist protocol in assessments of two buildings in Stockholm: the new head office for the National Authority for Social Insurances (ASI) and the School of Architecture at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). The study included three groups: Group 1 and Group 2 consisted of 50 real estate managers employed by the ASI, while Group 3 consisted of three participants in a course at the KTH. The results were similar in all of the groups. The use of the checklist protocol generated queries, which related mainly to two factors: (1) the accompanying factsheet consisted of textual explanations with no drawings, photographs or illustrations and (2) the order of the questions in the checklist protocol was difficult to correlate with the two buildings' spatial logic of accessing, egressing and making use of the built space.

  6. [Implementation strategy of the HAS French surgical check-list in a university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunat, C; Flatin, V; Viale, J-P

    2011-06-01

    The check-list (CL) "Safety in Operating Room" has been introduced in our teaching hospital since 2009, associated to a "Quality and Prevention of Risks" program. This introduction was carried out over two distinct phases. The first one was a pilot start including five OR, allowing us to draw firm recommendations on the best way to perform the introduction, followed by a generalization to the other operating room (OR). The recommendations were the followings: a pilot committee including all the professionals should be constituted before the onset of introduction, a dedicated communication should focus on the actual concerns and benefits, and finally, the person questioning other care givers and filling the form should be clearly identified and supported in the OR. Meanwhile a guide on the utilization of the CL in each surgical speciality was written, and a dedicated manager was in charge of the whole procedure. This experience raised several remarks. This implementation of the CL proved to be a cause of self-interrogation on our medical practices, and the opportunity to improve communication among the professionals of the OR. Indeed, the 10 items of the OR should be thought as the last check before the no-return point, which should be shared by anyone in the OR. If these conditions were fulfilled, the CL could be viewed as an actual improvement of safety in the OR. Otherwise, CL is just a supplementary form. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Cockroaches (Blattaria) of Ecuador-checklist and history of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidlička, Lubomír

    2013-01-09

    Cockroaches are an understudied group and the total number of described taxa increases every year. The last checklist of Ecuador species was published in 1926. The main aim of this study was to complete a new checklist of cockroach species recorded in Ecuador supplemented with a research history of cockroaches (Blattaria) on the territory of continental Ecuador. In addition, the checklist contains comments on Ecuadorian faunistic records, including the Galápagos Islands. A total of 114 species (105 in continental Ecuador and 18 in Galápagos Islands) belonging to 6 families and 44 genera are listed. Forty species (38.1 %) occur solely in continental Ecuador and five (27.8 %) are endemic on Galápagos Islands. The results indicate that further research on the cockroach fauna of Ecuador as well as determination of museum collections from this territory is needed.

  8. Safe pediatric surgery: development and validation of preoperative interventions checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paula de Oliveira Pires

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: this study was aimed at developing and validating a checklist of preoperative pediatric interventions related to the safety of surgical patients. METHOD: methodological study concerning the construction and validation of an instrument with safe preoperative care indicators. The checklist was subject to validation through the Delphi technique, establishing a consensus level of 80%. RESULTS: five professional specialists in the area conducted the validation and a consensus on the content and the construct was reached after two applications of the Delphi technique. CONCLUSION: the "Safe Pediatric Surgery Checklist", simulating the preoperative trajectory of children, is an instrument capable of contributing to the preparation and promotion of safe surgery, as it identifies the presence or absence of measures required to promote patient safety.

  9. Pilot interaction with automated airborne decision making systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, John M.; Wan, C. Yoon; Vasandani, Vijay

    1987-01-01

    The current research is focused on detection of human error and protection from its consequences. A program for monitoring pilot error by comparing pilot actions to a script was described. It dealt primarily with routine errors (slips) that occurred during checklist activity. The model to which operator actions were compared was a script. Current research is an extension along these two dimensions. The ORS fault detection aid uses a sophisticated device model rather than a script. The newer initiative, the model-based and constraint-based warning system, uses an even more sophisticated device model and is to prevent all types of error, not just slips or bad decision.

  10. Using checklists and algorithms to improve qualitative exposure judgment accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Susan F; Stenzel, Mark; Drolet, Daniel; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    2016-01-01

    Most exposure assessments are conducted without the aid of robust personal exposure data and are based instead on qualitative inputs such as education and experience, training, documentation on the process chemicals, tasks and equipment, and other information. Qualitative assessments determine whether there is any follow-up, and influence the type that occurs, such as quantitative sampling, worker training, and implementing exposure and risk management measures. Accurate qualitative exposure judgments ensure appropriate follow-up that in turn ensures appropriate exposure management. Studies suggest that qualitative judgment accuracy is low. A qualitative exposure assessment Checklist tool was developed to guide the application of a set of heuristics to aid decision making. Practicing hygienists (n = 39) and novice industrial hygienists (n = 8) were recruited for a study evaluating the influence of the Checklist on exposure judgment accuracy. Participants generated 85 pre-training judgments and 195 Checklist-guided judgments. Pre-training judgment accuracy was low (33%) and not statistically significantly different from random chance. A tendency for IHs to underestimate the true exposure was observed. Exposure judgment accuracy improved significantly (p aided by the Checklist. Qualitative judgments guided by the Checklist tool were categorically accurate or over-estimated the true exposure by one category 70% of the time. The overall magnitude of exposure judgment precision also improved following training. Fleiss' κ, evaluating inter-rater agreement between novice assessors was fair to moderate (κ = 0.39). Cohen's weighted and unweighted κ were good to excellent for novice (0.77 and 0.80) and practicing IHs (0.73 and 0.89), respectively. Checklist judgment accuracy was similar to quantitative exposure judgment accuracy observed in studies of similar design using personal exposure measurements, suggesting that the tool could be useful in developing informed

  11. Validity of the Kihon Checklist for assessing frailty status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Shosuke; Senda, Kazuyoshi; Hong, Young-Jae; Miura, Hisayuki; Endo, Hidetoshi; Sakurai, Takashi; Kondo, Izumi; Toba, Kenji

    2016-06-01

    The Kihon Checklist is extensively used in Japan to identify elderly persons who are at risk of requiring support/care. We aimed to determine whether or not the Kihon Checklist can estimate frailty status defined by the Cardiovascular Health Study criteria. This cross-sectional study evaluated the Kihon Checklist and activities of daily living based on self-records maintained with the assistance of nurses in a convenience sample of 164 elderly outpatients who lived without care or support. Body composition was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Physical functions, nutritional status, cognitive function and depressive mood were assessed using standardized evaluations. Frailty status was evaluated using the Cardiovascular Health Study frailty criteria. The total Kihon Checklist score closely correlated with validated assessments of physical functions, nutritional state, cognitive function, depressive mood and the number of frailty phenotypes defined by the Cardiovascular Health Study criteria (ρ = 0.655, P < 0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curves for the evaluation of frailty status was 0.81 for prefrailty and 0.92 for frailty. The sensitivity and the specificity were 70.3% and 78.3% for prefrailty, and 89.5% and 80.7% for frailty at total Kihon Checklist scores of 3/4 and 7/8, respectively. The Kihon Checklist is a useful tool for frailty screening. Analyzing the results of this self-reporting questionnaire, together with other more high-tech screening modalities, will cost-effectively improve the quality of life for many elderly individuals in a timely manner. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2015; ●●: ●●-●●. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  12. Reducing the V2O3(0001) surface through electron bombardment--a quantitative structure determination with I/V-LEED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiten, Felix E; Kuhlenbeck, Helmut; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-28

    The (0001) surface of vanadium sesquioxide, V2O3, is terminated by vanadyl groups under standard ultra high vacuum preparation conditions. Reduction with electrons results in a chemically highly active surface with a well-defined LEED pattern indicating a high degree of order. In this work we report the first quantitative structure determination of a reduced V2O3(0001) surface. We identify two distinct surface phases by STM, one well ordered and one less well ordered. I/V-LEED shows the ordered phase to be terminated by a single vanadium atom per surface unit cell on a quasi-hexagonal oxygen layer with three atoms per two-dimensional unit cell. Furthermore we compare the method of surface reduction via electron bombardment with the deposition of V onto a vanadyl terminated film. The latter procedure was previously proposed to result in a structure with three surface vanadium atoms in the 2D unit cell and we confirm this with simulated STM images.

  13. Establishing daily quality control (QC) in screen-film mammography using leeds tor (max) phantom at the breast imaging unit of USTH-Benavides Cancer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acaba, K. J. C.; Cinco, L. D.; Melchor, J. N.

    2016-03-01

    Daily QC tests performed on screen film mammography (SFM) equipment are essential to ensure that both SFM unit and film processor are working in a consistent manner. The Breast Imaging Unit of USTH-Benavides Cancer Institute has been conducting QC following the test protocols in the IAEA Human Health Series No.2 manual. However, the availability of Leeds breast phantom (CRP E13039) in the facility made the task easier. Instead of carrying out separate tests on AEC constancy and light sensitometry, only one exposure of the phantom is done to accomplish the two tests. It was observed that measurements made on mAs output and optical densities (ODs) using the Leeds TOR (MAX) phantom are comparable with that obtained from the usual conduct of tests, taking into account the attenuation characteristic of the phantom. Image quality parameters such as low contrast and high contrast details were also evaluated from the phantom image. The authors recognize the usefulness of the phantom in determining technical factors that will help improve detection of smallest pathological details on breast images. The phantom is also convenient for daily QC monitoring and economical since less number of films is expended.

  14. Realities of and perspectives for languages in the globalised world: Can language teaching survive the inadequacies of policies implemented today at Leeds Beckett University?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadia Gamir

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Various newspaper articles report that British ministers, university representatives, exam chiefs and business bodies agree that foreign languages skills in primary, secondary and tertiary UK education are in crisis. Lower funding and policy changes have caused language skills deficiencies felt gravely in the business sectors. Funding and support initiatives pledged by policy makers appear to be election-driven, barely outliving newly elected governments. Others blame secondary school language curriculum for failing to inspire students to take up a language when they reach 13 or 14. Others still argue that severe A-level examinations marking deters students from taking up a foreign language at 6th form level, producing fewer prospective language learners for university departments. Community languages are also undervalued as small-entry languages could soon be axed from GCSE and A-level examinations. In a world increasingly interconnected, it is essential the importance of language learning be reinstated in all our educational institutions. This paper reviews two decades of the conditions of language provision in the UK in general, with an emphasis on Leeds Beckett University. It also attempts to answer two questions emerging form the author’s personal teaching experience and reflections: What are the realities and challenges language teaching faces at Leeds Beckett University? And, how may we support language learners in fulfilling their ambition to acquire the required skills to communicate effectively in this globalised world?

  15. [Implementation of "never events" checklists in a radiotherapy information system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusadin, G; Bour, M S; Deutsch, E; Kouchit, N; Corbin, S; Lefkopoulos, D

    2017-10-01

    In order to reduce the incidence of major accidents during external radiotherapy treatment, "never events" checklists have been incorporated into the "record and verify" system. This article details this process. Prospects for improvement are also proposed, including a peer-to-peer audit on the use of checklists and the availability of the radiotherapy information system manufacturer to collaborate in this process to secure the patients' journey. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Checklist of the echinoderm fauna of the Adriatic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despalatović, Marija; Cvitković, Ivan; Žuljević, Ante

    2017-11-22

    This paper presents a checklist of echinoderm species in the Adriatic Sea. The checklist is based on the review of the available literature data, with temporal coverage from the end of the 18th century to the present day, including the most recent investigations of benthic communities. A total of 108 species have been recorded: 2 species from class Crinoidea, 23 species from class Asteroidea, 22 species from class Ophiuroidea, 22 species from class Echinoidea and 39 species from class Holothuroidea. Non-indigenous echinoderm species have not been observed.

  17. Kommenteret checkliste over Danmarks bier - Del 2: Andrenidae (Hymenoptera, Apoidea)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calabuig, Isabel; Madsen, Henning Bang

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents Part 2 of a checklist for the taxa of bees occurring in Den- mark, dealing with the family Andrenidae, and covering 61 species. The re- maining four families (Halictidae, Melittidae, Megachilidae and Apidae) will be dealt with in future papers. The following 13 species......, 1887, Andrena nycthemera Imhoff, 1868, Andrena semilaevis Pérez, 1903, Andrena similis Smith, 1849, An- drena simillima Smith, 1851 and Andrena subopaca Nylander, 1848. Andrena nana (Kirby, 1802) is excluded from the Danish checklist. Species that have the po- tential to occur in Denmark are discussed...

  18. Kommenteret checkliste over Danmarks bier – Del 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning Bang; Calabuig, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents Part 3 of a checklist for the taxa of bees occurring in Denmark, dealing with the families Melittidae and Megachilidae, and covering 53 species. The remaining two families (Halictidae and Apidae) will be dealt with in future papers. The following two species are hereby recorded...... as belonging to the Danish bee fauna: Melitta tricincta Kirby, 1802 and Hoplosmia spinulosa (Kirby, 1802). Megachile pyrenaea Pérez, 1890 and Osmia bicolor (Schrank, 1781) are excluded from the Danish checklist. Species that have the potential to occur in Denmark are discussed briefly....

  19. Development and Initial Psychometric Evaluation of the Sport Interference Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Brad; Silver, N. Clayton; Dickens, Yani; Covassin, Tracey; Lancer, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    The Sport Interference Checklist (SIC) was developed in 141 athletes to assist in the concurrent assessment of cognitive and behavioral problems experienced by athletes in both training (Problems in Sports Training Scale, PSTS) and competition (Problems in Sports Competition Scale, PSCS). An additional scale (Desire for Sport Psychology Scale,…

  20. Commentary: The Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charman, Tony; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Baird, Gillian; Cox, Antony; Wheelwright, Sally; Swettenham, John; Drew, Auriol

    2001-01-01

    This article comments on results of a study (EC 629 869) on the reliability of the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT), a early detection screening test. It discusses concerns relating to clinic vs. population samples, data analysis, use of a parent questionnaire only to identify autism, and the age of screening. (Contains…

  1. A preliminary checklist of the ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A preliminary species checklist of the ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of. Kakamega Forest, Western Kenya, is presented. The species list is based on specimens sampled from 1999 until 2009, which are deposited in the ant collection of the Zoological Research Museum Koenig, Bonn, Germany, and the Natural History ...

  2. Abstract: Implementation of Pre-Operative Checklist: An Effort to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Description: Multidisciplinary stakeholders from the departments of anesthesia, surgery and nursing provided valuable insight to develop a pre-operative checklist to ensure that patients were prepared for surgery and to minimize disruptions to patient flow. Both the World Health Organization surgical safety guidelines and ...

  3. Bird checklist, Guánica Biosphere Reserve, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne J. Arendt; John Faaborg; Miguel Canals; Jerry Bauer

    2015-01-01

    This research note compiles 43 years of research and monitoring data to produce the first comprehensive checklist of the dry forest avian community found within the Guánica Biosphere Reserve. We provide an overview of the reserve along with sighting locales, a list of 185 birds with their resident status and abundance, and a list of the available bird habitats....

  4. Stability of the pregnancy obsessive compulsive personality disorder symptoms checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Broekhoven, K.E.M.; Karreman, A.; Hartman, E.E.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2018-01-01

    Because stability over time is central to the definition of personality disorder, aim of the current study was to determine the stability of the Pregnancy Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD) Symptoms Checklist (N = 199 women). Strong positive correlations between assessments at 32 weeks

  5. Annotated checklist of fungi in Cyprus Island. 1. Larger Basidiomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Torrejón

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An annotated checklist of wild fungi living in Cyprus Island has been compiled broughting together all the information collected from the different works dealing with fungi in this area throughout the three centuries of mycology in Cyprus. This part contains 363 taxa of macroscopic Basidiomycota.

  6. Checklist of vertebrate animals of the Cascade Head Experimental Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Maser; Jerry F. Franklin

    1974-01-01

    Three months, April and August 1971 and August 1972, were spent studying the vertebrate fauna of Cascade Head Experimental Forest. The resulting annotated checklist includes 9 amphibians, 2 reptiles, 35 birds, and 40 mammals. A standardized animal habitat classification is presented in an effort to correlate the vertebrates in some meaningful way to their environment...

  7. The Good School: A Quality Check-List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Peter

    2004-01-01

    In response to the parents' question concerning the good school for their child, Cowley offers a four-point checklist of the key characteristics that any good school--whether an inner city school serving disadvantaged children or a well-endowed university-prep school--will process. To illustrate each of these characteristics of a good school, the…

  8. Preliminary checklist of amphibians and reptiles from Baramita, Guyana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R.P.; MacCulloch, R.D.

    2012-01-01

    We provide an initial checklist of the herpetofauna of Baramita, a lowland rainforest site in the Northwest Region of Guyana. Twenty-five amphibian and 28 reptile species were collected during two separate dry-season visits. New country records for two species of snakes are documented, contributing to the knowledge on the incompletely known herpetofauna of Guyana.

  9. Checklist of the oribatid mites of the Netherlands (Acari: Oribatida)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siepel, H.; Zaitsev, A.; Berg, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    More than fifty years ago Van der Hammen published the last checklist of oribatid mites (or moss mites) for the Netherlands. Since then the species number has almost doubled to 318 species, of which 100 are presented here for the first time. Brief data on occurrence and nomenclature are provided for

  10. Checklist of the Oribatid Mites of the Netherlands (Acari: Oribatida)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siepel, H.; Zaitsev, A.; Berg, M.

    2009-01-01

    More than fifty years ago Van der Hammen published the last checklist of oribatid mites (or moss mites) for the Netherlands. Since then the species number has almost doubled to 318 species, of which 100 are presented here for the first time. Brief data on occurence and nomenclature are provided for

  11. School District (K-12) Pandemic Influenza Planning Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Local educational agencies (LEAs) play an integral role in protecting the health and safety of their district's staff, students and their families. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have developed this checklist to assist LEAs in developing and/or improving plans to prepare…

  12. THE COMMUNICATION DEALL DEVELOPMENTAL CHECKLIST - INTER RATER RELIABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratibha Karanth

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A checklist is ideal when assessing young children who are ‘difficult to test’. The Communication DEALL Developmental Checklist (CDDC was developed by Karanth (1, to assess developmental skills of children up to the age of 6 years, along eight developmental domains, with norms based on an Indian population. Since all checklists depend on rater reliability, the aim of the current study was to establish inter rater reliability of the CDDC. Two senior Speech Language Pathologists used a 4-point rating scale, to assess 40 children with developmental disabilities (across the ages of 0-6 years on the CDDC checklist. Each rater independently made two ratings during the assessment; the first as reported by the parent (PR1 and PR2, and the second based on the clinician’s own observation (CR1 and CR2. The correlation between CR1 and CR2, as well as PR1 and PR2 for each rater separately, was found to be high, suggesting that the CDDC provides a reliable baseline for the developmental skills of children up to 6 years.DOI 10.5463/DCID.v22i1.9

  13. Can the Children's Communication Checklist Differentiate Autism Spectrum Subtypes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verte, Sylvie; Geurts, Hilde M.; Roeyers, Herbert; Rosseel, Yves; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Sergeant, Joseph A.

    2006-01-01

    The study explored whether children with high functioning autism (HFA), Asperger syndrome (AS), and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) can be differentiated on the Children's Communication Checklist (CCC). The study also investigated whether empirically derived autistic subgroups can be identified with a cluster…

  14. Checklist of Library Building Design Considerations. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannwald, William W.

    This checklist serves as a guide during various stages of a library design process to help ensure that all needed spaces and functions are included, to help enable the evaluation of existing library spaces as part of a library's needs assessment process, and to help provide data and support to the library in presentations that might be made to…

  15. Checklist of the family Syrphidae (Diptera of Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti Haarto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A checklist of the Syrphidae (Diptera recorded from Finland. Three species of Syrphidae, Platycheirus modestus Ide, 1926, Cheilosia barovskii (Stackelberg, 1930 and Mallota tricolor Loew, 1871, are published as new to the Finnish fauna. P. modestus is also new to the Palaearctic.

  16. Chicanos: A Checklist of Current Materials, September 1972-December 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Raquel Quiroz, Comp.; And Others

    Beginning in 1972 and now appearing approximately twice a year, this serial publication lists Chicano-related materials acquired by the Coleccion Tloque Nahuague within the Library of the University of California at Santa Barbara. This compilation of issues consists of a complete collection of the checklist for the 10-year period September 1972…

  17. Rapid Benefit Indicator (RBI) Checklist Tool - Quick Start Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Rapid Benefits Indicators (RBI) approach consists of five steps and is outlined in Assessing the Benefits of Wetland Restoration – A Rapid Benefits Indicators Approach for Decision Makers. This checklist tool is intended to be used to record information as you answer the ques...

  18. Annotated checklist of Solanum L. (Solanaceae) for Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genus Solanum is among the most species-rich genera both of the Peruvian flora and of the tropical Andes in general. The present revised checklist treats 276 species of Solanum L., of which 253 are native, while 23 are introduced and/or cultivated. A total of 74 Solanum species (29% of native sp...

  19. Home Intervention: Validating the Item Order of a Developmental Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, A. T.; Jansen, G. G.; van der Meulen, B. F.; Oenema-Mostert, C. E.; Ruijssenaars, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    To adapt home intervention processes to the needs of a child, a correct overview of skills that the child masters is necessary. The Portage Program, a home intervention program for families with children from 0 to 6 years of age with special educational needs, uses a checklist to assess the developmental skills that the child masters (S. M. Bluma,…

  20. Rasch Analysis of the Routines-Based Interview Implementation Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boavida, Tânia; Akers, Kate; McWilliam, R. A.; Jung, Lee Ann

    2015-01-01

    The Routines-­Based Interview (RBI) is useful for developing functional outcomes/goals, for establishing strong relationships with families, and for assessing the family's true needs. In this study, the authors investigated the psychometric properties of the RBI Implementation Checklist, conducted by 120 early intervention professionals,…

  1. An updated checklist of the dragonflies (Odonata) of the Kakamega ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comprehensive checklist of dragonflies occurring in the Kakamega Forest, Kenya is given and shortly discussed. A total of 72 dragonfly species, representing 42 % of Kenya's dragonfly fauna, has been recorded from the forest. Three of these are based on literature records only. The habitat preference and affiliation with ...

  2. New Danish standardization of the Child Behaviour Checklist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jon Røikjær; Nielsen, Peter Fraas; Bilenberg, Niels

    2012-01-01

    In child mental health services, the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) and related materials are internationally renowned psychometric questionnaires for assessment of children aged 6-16 years. The CBCL consists of three versions for different informants: the CBCL for parents, the Teacher's Report...

  3. Annoted checklist of the freshwater fishes of Kenya (excluding the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A checklist of the freshwater fishes of Kenya is presented. Pending more accurate information on their status, the lacustrine Lake Victoria haplochromines have been omitted from the list. Currently 206 species belonging to 38 families are known from Kenyan fresh waters. With at least 50 species, Cyprinidae are by far the ...

  4. Effectiveness of a structured checklist of risk factors in identifying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with increased risk of mortality and morbidity for pregnant women and newborns. Identifying pregnant women with risk factors for GDM based on the clinical suspicion is a popular approach. However, the effectiveness of the use of a structured checklist of risk ...

  5. A checklist of South African theses and dissertations on Shakespeare

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This checklist is in two parts. The first lists South African Shakespearean theses and dissertations, as well as some work on Shakespeare completed abroad by South Africans recently or currently active in the country. A few items in which Shakespeare is an important subordinate focus are included. The second list is ...

  6. Checklist of the family Simuliidae (Diptera of Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Ilmonen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A checklist of the family Simuliidae (Diptera is provided for Finland and recognizes 56 species. One new record has been added (Simulium latipes and one name sunken in synonymy (Simulium carpathicum. Furthermore, Simulium tsheburovae is treated as a doubtful record.

  7. Checklist of the Iranian Ground Beetles (Coleoptera; Carabidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadbakhsh, Saeed; Nozari, Jamasb

    2015-09-30

    An up-to-date checklist of the ground beetles of Iran is presented. Altogether 955 species and subspecies in 155 genera belonging to 26 subfamilies of Carabidae are reported; 25 taxa are recorded for Iran for the fist time. New localities are listed and some previous distributional records are discussed.

  8. Checklist and Decision Support in Nutritional Care for Burned Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    checklist for the provision of nutritional care which would be supported by decision support technology akin to what we had done previously with...order to encourage Annual Report, Grant W81XWH-12-2-0074 17 eating a regular diet . At this point, only days when the patient received ≥ 90% of

  9. Reconsidering the Checklist in Teaching Internet Source Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostenson, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The growing importance of the Internet in our society requires that university graduates be skilled in critical evaluation of the messages and sources present in the online world. Traditional efforts to teach these skills have relied on specific, checklist-like tools; recently, these approaches have rightly come under criticism for being…

  10. Checklist of the birds of the Nylsvley nature reserve

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tarboton, WR

    1977-09-01

    Full Text Available A provisional avifaunal checklist based on observations made during the period September 1974 to July 1976 is presented. Of 325 species recorded, 197 are classified as resident, 64 as migrant, 14 as sporadic, 13 as vagrant while 37 are of uncertain...

  11. A SUGGESTED CHECKLIST FOR ASSESSING A SCIENCE PROGRAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    SUGGESTIONS AND A CHECKLIST FOR THE EVALUATION OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOL SCIENCE PROGRAMS ARE CONTAINED IN THIS UNITED STATES OFFICE OF EDUCATION BULLETIN. AN INTRODUCTORY SECTION DEALS WITH THE IMPORTANCE OF (1) BROAD FACULTY PARTICIPATION, AND (2) UP-TO-DATE CONTENT AND METHODS IN PROGRAM EVALUATION. EXPLANATIONS FOR THE CONSTRUCTION…

  12. An updated checklist of Echinoderms from Indian waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Vijay Kumar Deepak; Krishnan, Pandian; Sreeraj, Chemmencheri Ramakrishnan; Chamundeeswari, Kanagaraj; Parthiban, Chermapandi; Sekar, Veeramuthu; Patro, Shesdev; Saravanan, Raju; Abhilash, Kottarathil Rajendran; Ramachandran, Purvaja; Ramesh, Ramachandran

    2017-11-27

    Species checklists enlist the species available within the defined geographical region and thus serve as essential input for developing conservation and management strategies. The fields of conservation biology and ecology confront the challenge of inflated biodiversity, attributed to non-recognition of taxonomic inconsistencies such as synonyms, alternate representation, emendations etc. Critical review of the checklists and distributional records of Phylum Echinodermata from Indian waters and subsequent validation of species names with World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) database, revealed that the current literature included 236 incorrect entries comprising of 162 synonyms, 15 emendations, 5 nomina dubia, 1 nomen nudum, 40 species under alternate representation, 9 species with author misnomer, 1 subspecies and 1 unaccepted. The 226 species found to be mixed with valid names and a revised checklist was prepared. The revised and updated checklist holds 741 species of echinoderms comprising of 182 asteroids (24.56%), 70 crinoids (9.45%), 138 echinoids (18.62%), 179 holothuroids (24.16%) and 172 ophiuroids (23.21%), placed under 28 orders and 107 families. This paper discusses the cause for taxonomic inflation and argues that such taxonomic inconsistencies alter our interpretations of a species including its inaccurate distribution and, could possibly impede the country's conservation and management efforts.

  13. Snakes of Sulawesi: checklist, key and additional Biogeographical remarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, in den H.A.J.

    1985-01-01

    A checklist with concise synonymy and a key to the snakes of Sulawesi is presented, comprising 63 species in 38 genera; 3 subspecies and 15 species, of which one constitutes a monotypic genus, are considered endemic. There is a strong Indo-Malayan relationship. Sea-snakes and Candoia carinata

  14. An annotated checklist of Malachiidae (Coleoptera: Cleroidea) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirutenko, Vladyslav; Ghahari, Hassan

    2016-09-09

    A checklist of Iranian Malachiidae (Coleoptera) is given in this paper. Eighty two species from 22 genera (subfamily Malachiinae) are listed in the fauna of Iran. Of these species, 31 are endemic to Iran, and one Anthocomus pupillatus Abeille de Perrin, 1890 is a new record for this country.

  15. Coleoptera of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: an annotated checklist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stafford, M.P.; Barr, W.F.; Johnson, J.B.

    1986-04-30

    An insect survey was conducted on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory during the summers of 1981-1983. This site is on the Snake River Plains in southeastern Idaho. Presented here is an annotated checklist of the Coleoptera collected. Successful collecting methods, dates of adult occurrence, and relative abundance are given for each species. Relevant biological information is also presented for some species.

  16. Transformative, Mixed Methods Checklist for Psychological Research with Mexican Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Genevieve

    2013-01-01

    This is a description of the creation of a research methods tool, the "Transformative, Mixed Methods Checklist for Psychological Research With Mexican Americans." For conducting literature reviews of and planning mixed methods studies with Mexican Americans, it contains evaluative criteria calling for transformative mixed methods, perspectives…

  17. Pilot Greenhouse

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This pilot greenhouse was built in collaboration with the "Association des Maraichers" of Geneva in the frame of the study for making use of the heat rejected as warm water by CERN accelerators and experiments. Among other improvements, more automated and precise regulation systems for heating and ventilation were developed. See also 8305598X.

  18. Homework for Parents -- Your Child's Back-To-School Health Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advancements Homework for Parents — Your Child's Back-To-School Health Checklist Resources Home Safety Checklist ACEP Coloring Book Download the Coloring Book » Emergency Care For You American College of Emergency Phycisians Copyright © American College of Emergency ...

  19. Poison-Proof Your Home: One Room at a Time Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... One Room at a Time Pesticide Poison Prevention Checklist You’ve heard it before, ”Better to be ... for pets; and • Weed killers. The following home checklist provides a list of activities and action steps ...

  20. Helpful Entry Level Skills Checklist--Revised Manual [and] Helpful Entry Level Skill Checklist--Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Development Centers of the Bluegrass, Lexington, KY.

    The Helpful Entry Level Skills Checklist was designed to assist preschool teachers in selecting functional skills that children (including children with disabilities) may need to make a successful transition into the public schools. These skills, for the most part, deal with attending, compliance, ability to follow directions, turn taking, ability…

  1. The economic evaluation of an antibiotic checklist as antimicrobial stewardship intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Daalen, Frederike V.; Opmeer, Brent C.; Prins, Jan M.; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Hulscher, Marlies E. J. L.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: An antibiotic checklist was introduced in nine Dutch hospitals to improve appropriate antibiotic use. We estimated the cost-effectiveness of checklist use. Methods: We compared 853 patients treated with an antibiotic before checklist introduction (usual care group) with 1207 patients

  2. Screening for Psychiatric Symptoms: PAS-ADD Checklist Norms for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. L.; Hatton, C.; Dixon, L.; Douglas, C.

    2004-01-01

    The Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adults with Developmental Disabilities Checklist (PAS-ADD Checklist) is a screening instrument designed to help carers recognize likely mental health problems in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). To date there are no published PAS-ADD Checklist data on a large nonpsychiatric population of adults…

  3. Consolidated Checklist for C8 Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 268

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Consolidated Checklist corresponds to the 40 CFR Part 268, published on July 1, 2002, and as amended by the following final rules: 67 FR 48393, July 24, 2002 (Revision Checklist 200); and 67 FR 62618, October 7, 2002 (Revision Checklist 201).

  4. Requirements for the design and implementation of checklists for surgical processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdaasdonk, E.G.G.; Stassen, L.P.S.; Widhiasmara, P.P.; Dankelman, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background- The use of checklists is a promising strategy for improving patient safety in all types of surgical processes inside and outside the operating room. This article aims to provide requirements and implementation of checklists for surgical processes. Methods- The literature on checklist use

  5. Checklist usage decreases critical task omissions when training residents to separate from simulated cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrik, Edward W; Ho, Dennis; Elahi, Maqsood; Ball, Timothy R; Hofkamp, Michael P; Wehbe-Janek, Hania; Culp, William C; Villamaria, Frank J

    2014-12-01

    Separation from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) requires multiple preparatory steps, during which mistakes, omissions, and human errors may occur. Checklists have been used extensively in aviation to improve performance of complex, multistep tasks. The aim of this study was to (1) develop a checklist using a modified Delphi process to identify essential steps necessary to prepare for separation from CPB, and (2) compare the frequency of completed items with and without the use of a checklist in simulation. It was hypothesized that the use of a checklist would reduce the number of omissions. High-fidelity simulation study. University-affiliated tertiary care facility. Seven cardiac anesthesiologists created a checklist using a modified Delphi process. Ten residents participated in 4 scenarios separating from CPB in simulation. Each scenario was performed first without a checklist and then again with a checklist. An observer graded participants' performance. A pre-separation checklist containing 9 tasks was created using the Delphi process. Without using this checklist, 4 tasks were completed in at least 75% of scenarios, and 8 tasks were completed at least 75% of the time when using the checklist. There was a significant improvement in completion of 5 of the 9 items (pchecklist of steps in preparing to separate from CPB. Using this checklist during simulation resulted in increased frequency of completing designated tasks in comparison to relying on memory alone. Checklists may reduce omission errors during complex periods of anesthesiologists' perioperative workflow. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An Experimental Evaluation of a Unified Checklist for Designing and Reporting Empirical Research in Software Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Condori-Fernandez, Nelly; Wieringa, Roelf J.; Daneva, Maia; Mutschler, B.B.; Pastor, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on an experimental evaluation of a unified checklist for case study and experimental research. The checklist aims at exhibiting the underlying, shared, structure of observational and experimental research, and is based on several published checklist in software engineering and

  7. The (001) 3C SiC surface termination and band structure after common wet chemical etching procedures, stated by XPS, LEED, and HREELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengeler, Sven; Kaiser, Bernhard; Ferro, Gabriel; Chaussende, Didier; Jaegermann, Wolfram

    2018-01-01

    The (001) surface of cubic silicon carbide (3C SiC) after cleaning, Ar sputtering and three different wet chemical etching procedures was thoroughly investigated via (angle resolved) XPS, HREELS, and LEED. While Ar sputtering was found to be unsuitable for surface preparation, all three employed wet chemical etching procedures (piranha/NH4F, piranha/HF, and RCA) provide a clean surface. HF as oxide removal agent tends to result in fluorine traces on the sample surface, despite thorough rinsing. All procedures yield a 1 × 1 Si-OH/C-H terminated surface. However, the XPS spectra reveal some differences in the resulting surface states. NH4F for oxide removal produces a flat band situation, whereas the other two procedures result in a slight downward (HF) or upward (RCA) band bending. Because the band bending is small, it can be concluded that the number of unsaturated surface defects is low.

  8. Structural and electronic changes in the growth of mercury overlayers on Cu(001) - A helium beam scattering, LEED and ARPES study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidali, G.; Li, W.; Dowben, P. A.; Karimi, M.; Hutchings, C. W.; Lin, J.; Moses, C.; Ila, D.; Dalins, I.

    1990-01-01

    We used ABS, LEED and angle-resolved photo-electron spectroscopy (ARPES) to study bilayer films of Hg on Cu(001). In the surface temperature range of 180 to 330 K, the first Hg layer forms two ordered phases, a c(2x2) (with coverage-0.5 of Cu(001)) and a high density (partially commensurate) c(4x4) (coverage-0.62). ARPES data show that there is little or no dispersion of the 5d band of Hg. ABS data show that this layer is not flat, with in-registry Hg atoms lying about 0.15 below the not-in-registry Hg atoms. From ABS we find that the second layer forms a completely registered c(4x4) phase. From ARPES we obtain that the second layer has an electronic structure, particularly the 5d levels, characteristic of bulk mercury. Preliminary results of calculations of the structure of the bilayer are given.

  9. Chronic pain and the development of a symptom checklist: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kendall, S; Holm, N R; Højsted, J

    2013-01-01

    There is currently no instrument to systematically assess the range of symptoms/problems and their bothersomeness in patients with chronic non-cancer pain (CNPN). Systematic assessment and prioritizing may target treatments and improve outcomes....

  10. Checking the lists: A systematic review of electronic checklist use in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Heidi S; Drews, Frank A

    2017-07-01

    We conducted a literature search to examine the effects and experiences surrounding the transition from paper to electronic checklists in healthcare settings. We explore the types of electronic checklists being used in health care, how and where they were evaluated and seek to identify the successes and failures of using electronic checklists in healthcare, including use of checklists to ensure completeness of documentation in the electronic medical record. Formalized checklist use as a memory and decision aid in aviation has resulted in significant increases in safety in that domain. Checklists have also been successfully introduced to reduce errors in some areas of healthcare; however, in some contexts checklists failed to provide some of the expected benefits. Adapting and integrating checklists electronically into the healthcare workflow provides opportunities and challenges that need to be better understood to make checklist adoption a success in health care. We conducted a literature search of the English language literature in MEDLINE using PubMed for peer-reviewed literature of implementation and use of electronic or computerized checklists related to clinical or healthcare use. We reviewed the studies and included in this review those papers that discussed in depth the development process and that conducted controlled studies to assess the effectiveness of checklists and the evaluation of their acceptance in the clinical context. The literature search using the keywords electronic checklist OR computerized checklist returned a total of 23 peer-reviewed papers. Out of these 15 were included in the review, with 8 excluded because they did not evaluate checklist use for patient care. More rigorous application of known principles and methods from Human Computer Interaction research and the behavioral sciences can provide a clearer, more comprehensive understanding of the conditions that affect the development and use of checklists. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Validity and Reliability of the Farsi Version of the Individual Strength Questionnaire Checklist in the Iranian Working Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Hosseinzadeh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Significant attention is paid towards Work-related fatigue for its adverse health effects. The Checklist for Individual Strength (CIS is an instrument for measuring fatigue. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of the Persian version of an Iranian working population in the checklist individual strength. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, in order to determine the linguistic validity, the CIS was translated into Persian. The Farsi version was translated into English by another professional translator. Farsi to English translation of the original English version was sent to the author for comparison. After comparison and verification by the author, the final version of the P-CIS was prepared in a pilot study to assess the strength of understanding. In order to evaluate the reliability and validity of the P-CIS, 200 people working in a cosmetics factory along with office employees at Yasuj health centers were studied. To assess reliability and internal consistency of the questionnaire, Cronbach's alpha coefficient was used. Using the Spearman correlation coefficient, convergent validity was examined. Validity was assessed through factor analysis. Results: The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of reliability of the total questionnaire, mental fatigue, reducing activity, reducing of the concentration, and reduction of motivation were 0.86, 0.83, 0.72, 0.59, and 0.37 respectively. Spearman correlation coefficients were obtained for the validity range of 0.43-0.88. Based on the weight factor obtained in the aspect of mental fatigue and reduced activity of the P-CIS showed acceptable validity Conclusion: The P-CIS had satisfactory linguistic validity and psychometric properties for measuring fatigue in the Iranian working population. Key words: Fatigue, Checklist Individual Strength (CIS, Validity, Reliability

  12. [Safe use of medications among elderly people: a checklist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscanoa, Teodoro J

    2013-04-01

    Elderly people are particularly vulnerable to adverse drug reactions (ADR) due to polypathology and polypharmacy and the changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of medications induced by aging. It is very important to evaluate the safety aspects and appropriate use of medications in this population. For this purpose, a checklist is proposed consisting of a list of medications (including herbal medicine), detecting and treating geriatric syndromes induced by medications, overprescription, unprescription and underprescription; measuring and treating drug adhesion, measuring parameters for geriatric posology, preventing adverse reactions due to inadequate drug recalls, evaluating aging people's capacity to take their medications and using the minimum datasheet regarding the medication prescribed to the patient. This checklist is developed based on validated instruments. It is a proposal which application in the outpatient and inpatient context is possible and feasible.

  13. An updated checklist of aquatic plants of Myanmar and Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The flora of Tropical Asia is among the richest in the world, yet the actual diversity is estimated to be much higher than previously reported. Myanmar and Thailand are adjacent countries that together occupy more than the half the area of continental Tropical Asia. This geographic area is diverse ecologically, ranging from cool-temperate to tropical climates, and includes from coast, rainforests and high mountain elevations. An updated checklist of aquatic plants, which includes 78 species in 44 genera from 24 families, are presented based on floristic works. This number includes seven species, that have never been listed in the previous floras and checklists. The species (excluding non-indigenous taxa were categorized by five geographic groups with the exception of to reflect the rich diversity of the countries' floras.

  14. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program environmental compliance assessment checklists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, M.B.; Sigmon, C.F.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the Environmental Compliance Assessment Program is to assess the compliance of Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites with applicable environmental regulations and Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. The mission is to identify, assess, and decontaminate sites utilized during the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s to process and store uranium and thorium ores in support of the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission. To conduct the FUSRAP environmental compliance assessment, checklists were developed that outline audit procedures to determine the compliance status of the site. The checklists are divided in four groups to correspond to these regulatory areas: Hazardous Waste Management, PCB Management, Air Emissions, and Water Discharges

  15. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program environmental compliance assessment checklists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, M.B.; Sigmon, C.F.

    1989-09-29

    The purpose of the Environmental Compliance Assessment Program is to assess the compliance of Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites with applicable environmental regulations and Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. The mission is to identify, assess, and decontaminate sites utilized during the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s to process and store uranium and thorium ores in support of the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission. To conduct the FUSRAP environmental compliance assessment, checklists were developed that outline audit procedures to determine the compliance status of the site. The checklists are divided in four groups to correspond to these regulatory areas: Hazardous Waste Management, PCB Management, Air Emissions, and Water Discharges.

  16. Audit of an automated checklist for quality control of radiotherapy treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breen, Stephen L.; Zhang Beibei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effect of adding an automated checklist to the treatment planning process for head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods: Plans produced within our treatment planning system were evaluated at the planners' discretion with an automated checklist of more than twenty planning parameters. Plans were rated as accepted or rejected for treatment, during regular review by radiation oncologists and physicists as part of our quality control program. The rates of errors and their types were characterised prior to the implementation of the checklist and with the checklist. Results: Without the checklist, 5.9% of plans were rejected; the use of the checklist reduced the rejection rate to 3.1%. The checklist was used for 64.7% of plans. Pareto analysis of the causes of rejection showed that the checklist reduced the number of causes of rejections from twelve to seven. Conclusions: The use of an automated checklist has reduced the need for reworking of treatment plans. With the use of the checklist, most rejections were due to errors in prescription or inadequate dose distributions. Use of the checklist by planners must be increased to maximise improvements in planning efficiency.

  17. Implementation of checklists in health care; learning from high-reliability organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lossius Hans

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Checklists are common in some medical fields, including surgery, intensive care and emergency medicine. They can be an effective tool to improve care processes and reduce mortality and morbidity. Despite the seemingly rapid acceptance and dissemination of the checklist, there are few studies describing the actual process of developing and implementing such tools in health care. The aim of this study is to explore the experiences from checklist development and implementation in a group of non-medical, high reliability organisations (HROs. Method A qualitative study based on key informant interviews and field visits followed by a Delphi approach. Eight informants, each with 10-30 years of checklist experience, were recruited from six different HROs. Results The interviews generated 84 assertions and recommendations for checklist implementation. To achieve checklist acceptance and compliance, there must be a predefined need for which a checklist is considered a well suited solution. The end-users ("sharp-end" are the key stakeholders throughout the development and implementation process. Proximity and ownership must be assured through a thorough and wise process. All informants underlined the importance of short, self-developed, and operationally-suited checklists. Simulation is a valuable and widely used method for training, revision, and validation. Conclusion Checklists have been a cornerstone of safety management in HROs for nearly a century, and are becoming increasingly popular in medicine. Acceptance and compliance are crucial for checklist implementation in health care. Experiences from HROs may provide valuable input to checklist implementation in healthcare.

  18. Safe Surgery Checklist, Patient Safety, Teamwork, and Responsibility—Coequal Demands? A Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willassen, Elin Thove; Jacobsen, Inger Lise Smith; Tveiten, Sidsel

    2018-01-01

    The use of World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) Safe Surgery checklist is an established practice worldwide and contributes toward ensuring patient safety and collaborative teamwork. The aim of this study was to elucidate operating room nurses’ and operating room nursing students’ experiences and opinions about execution of and compliance with checklists. We chose a qualitative design with semistructured focus group discussions. Qualitative content analysis was conducted. Two main themes were identified; the Safe Surgery checklists have varied influence on teamwork and patient safety, and taking responsibility for executing the checks on the Safe Surgery checklist entails practical and ethical challenges. The experiences and opinions of operating room nurses and their students revealed differences of practices and attitudes toward checklist compliance and the intentions of checklist procedures. These differences are related to cultural and professional distances between team members and their understanding of the Safe Surgery checklists as a tool for patient safety. PMID:29623287

  19. The effect of a simple intraprocedural checklist on the task performance of laparoscopic novices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Boghdady, Michael; Tang, Benjie; Tait, Iain; Alijani, Afshin

    2017-08-01

    Surgical checklists are used for error reduction. Checklists are infrequently applied during procedures and have been limited to lists of procedural steps as aid memoires. We aimed to study the effect of a self-administered checklist on the laparoscopic task performance of novices during a standardized task. Twenty novices were randomized into 2 equal groups, those receiving paper feedback (control group) and those receiving paper feedback and the checklist (checklist group). Subjects performed laparoscopic double knots, repeated over 5 separate stages. Human reliability assessment technique was used for error analysis. 2,341 errors were detected during the 5 stages. During the first stage, the errors were not significantly different between the 2 groups. The checklist group committed significantly fewer errors as compared with the control group during all the later 4 stages (P checklist significantly improved the laparoscopic task performance and the learning curve of laparoscopic novices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Financial Conflicts of Interest Checklist 2010 for clinical research studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, Paula A; Hoey, John; Chan, An-Wen; Ferris, Lorraine E; Lexchin, Joel; Kalkar, Sunila R; Sekeres, Melanie; Wu, Wei; Van Laethem, Marleen; Gruneir, Andrea; Maskalyk, James; Streiner, David L; Gold, Jennifer; Taback, Nathan; Moher, David

    2010-01-01

    A conflict of interest is defined as "a set of conditions in which professional judgment concerning a primary interest (such as a patient's welfare or the validity of research) tends to be unduly influenced by a secondary interest (such as financial gain)" [Thompson DF. Understanding financial conflicts of interest. N Engl J Med 1993;329(8):573-576]. Because financial conflict of interest (fCOI) can occur at different stages of a study, and because it can be difficult for investigators to detect their own bias, particularly retrospectively, we sought to provide funders, journal editors and other stakeholders with a standardized tool that initiates detailed reporting of different aspects of fCOI when the study begins and continues that reporting throughout the study process to publication. We developed a checklist using a 3-phase process of pre-meeting item generation, a stakeholder meeting and post-meeting consolidation. External experts (n = 18), research team members (n = 12) and research staff members (n = 4) rated or reviewed items for some or all of the 7 major iterations. The resulting Financial Conflicts of Interest Checklist 2010 consists of 4 sections covering administrative, study, personal financial, and authorship information, which are divided into 6 modules and contain a total of 15 items and their related sub-items; it also includes a glossary of terms. The modules are designed to be completed by all investigators at different points over the course of the study, and updated information can be appended to the checklist when it is submitted to stakeholder groups for review. We invite comments and suggestions for improvement at http://www.openmedicine.ca/fcoichecklist and ask stakeholder groups to endorse the use of the checklist.

  1. Polychaetes of Greece: an updated and annotated checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simboura, Nomiki; Katsiaras, Nikolaos; Chatzigeorgiou, Giorgos; Arvanitidis, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background The last annotated checklist of marine polychaetes in Greece was published in 2001. Since then, global taxonomic progress, combined with many new species records for Greece, required a thorough review of the taxonomic, nomenclatural and biogeographic status of the national species list. This checklist revises the status of all extant polychaete species reported from the Greek Exclusive Economic Zone since 1832. The work was undertaken as part of the efforts on compiling a national species inventory (Greek Taxon Information System initiative) in the framework of the LifeWatchGreece Research Infrastructure. New information This checklist comprises an updated and annotated inventory of polychaete species in Greek waters, compiled from literature reports, online databases, museum collections and unpublished datasets. The list provides information on 836 species-level taxa from Greece, of which 142 are considered questionable. An additional 84 species reported in the past are currently considered absent from Greece; reasons for the exclusion of each species are given. Fourteen species are reported here for the first time from Greek waters. At least 52 species in the present list constitute in fact a complex of cryptic or pseudo-cryptic species. Forty-seven species are considered non-native to the area. In addition to the species-level taxa reported in this checklist, eleven genera have been recorded from Greece with no representatives identified to species level. One replacement name is introduced. For each species, a comprehensive bibliographic list of occurrence records in Greece and the synonyms used in these publications are provided as supplementary material. Where necessary, the taxonomic, nomenclatural or biogeographic status is discussed. Finally, the findings are discussed in the wider context of Mediterranean polychaete biogeography, taxonomic practice and worldwide research progress. PMID:29362552

  2. Children’s Communication Checklist - 2: a validation study

    OpenAIRE

    Norbury, Courtenay Frazier; Bishop, Dorothy V.M.

    2010-01-01

    The Children’s Communication Checklist (Bishop, 1998) was revised (CCC-2 – Bishop, 2003) to provide a general screen for communication disorder and pragmatic/social-interaction deficits. Families of 77 children attending full-time special education for specific language impairment, pragmatic language impairments or autistic spectrum disorders completed the questionnaire. Data were also available from 23 typically developing children. The CCC-2 distinguished children with communication impairm...

  3. A New Electronic Approach for the Surgical Safety Checklist

    OpenAIRE

    Estima, Vanessa das Neves

    2014-01-01

    To improve surgical safety, and to reduce the mortality and surgical complications incidence, the World Health Organization (WHO) developed the Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC). The SSC is a support of information that aids health professionals to reduce the number of complications, induction of anaesthesia, period before skin incision and period before leaving the operating room (OR). The SSC was tested in several countries of the world and their results shown that after introduction...

  4. An Annotated Checklist of the Mammals of Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Cowan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An annotated checklist of the mammals of Kuwait is presented, based on the literature, personal communications, a Kuwait website and a blog and the author’s observations. Twenty five species occur, a further four are uncommon or rare visitors, six used to occur whilst another two are of doubtful provenance. This list should assist those planning desert rehabilitation, animal reintroduction and protected area projects in Kuwait.

  5. A checklist of Ropalidiini wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Polistinae in Indochina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Phong Huy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a basis for intensive study of the taxonomy and biogeography of Ropalidiini wasps in Indochina (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Polistinae, a checklist of Ropalidiini wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae is presented. A total of 57 Ropalidiini species and subspecies belonging to three genera from Indochina are listed, together with information of the type material deposited in the Natural History Collection, Ibaraki University, Japan (IUNH and the Institute of Ecology and Biological Resources (IEBR. References of their distribution in Indochina are also provided.

  6. An annotated checklist of the orchids of Nepal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rokaya, Maan Bahadur; Raskoti, B. B.; Timsina, Binu; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 5 (2013), s. 511-550 ISSN 0107-055X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/09/0549 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:67179843 Keywords : orchids * checklist * Nepal Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; EH - Ecology, Behaviour (UEK-B) Impact factor: 0.844, year: 2013

  7. Checklists Change Communication About Key Elements of Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    mechanical ventilation bun- dles, and lead to decreased infection rates.4Y7 They have also been applied to the use of indwelling Foley catheters and...resulted in decreased duration of use as well as related urinary tract infections .8 In addition to improving patient care, checklists have been shown to...the field of obstetrics during cesarean deliv- eries.15 Studies of medical error and handoffs suggest that CLINICAL RESEARCH J Trauma Acute Care Surg

  8. Accessibility in Public Buildings: : Efficiency of Checklist Protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Jonas E; Skehan, Terry

    2016-01-01

    In Sweden, governmental agencies and bodies are required to implement a higher level of accessibility in their buildings than that stipulated by the National Building and Planning Act (PBL). The Swedish Agency for Participation (MFD, Myndigheten för delaktighet) develops holistic guidelines in order to conceptualize this higher level of accessibility. In conjunction to these guidelines, various checklist protocols have been produced. The present study focuses on the efficiency of such checkli...

  9. An updated checklist of mosquito species (Diptera: Culicidae from Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tantely Michaël Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An updated checklist of 235 mosquito species from Madagascar is presented. The number of species has increased considerably compared to previous checklists, particularly the last published in 2003 (178 species. This annotated checklist provides concise information on endemism, taxonomic position, developmental stages, larval habitats, distribution, behavior, and vector-borne diseases potentially transmitted. The 235 species belong to 14 genera: Aedeomyia (3 species, Aedes (35 species, Anopheles (26 species, Coquillettidia (3 species, Culex (at least 50 species, Eretmapodites (4 species, Ficalbia (2 species, Hodgesia (at least one species, Lutzia (one species, Mansonia (2 species, Mimomyia (22 species, Orthopodomyia (8 species, Toxorhynchites (6 species, and Uranotaenia (73 species. Due to non-deciphered species complexes, several species remain undescribed. The main remarkable characteristic of Malagasy mosquito fauna is the high biodiversity with 138 endemic species (59%. Presence and abundance of species, and their association, in a given location could be a bio-indicator of environmental particularities such as urban, rural, forested, deforested, and mountainous habitats. Finally, taking into account that Malagasy culicidian fauna includes 64 species (27% with a known medical or veterinary interest in the world, knowledge of their biology and host preference summarized in this paper improves understanding of their involvement in pathogen transmission in Madagascar.

  10. An updated checklist of mosquito species (Diptera: Culicidae) from Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantely, Michaël Luciano; Le Goff, Gilbert; Boyer, Sébastien; Fontenille, Didier

    2016-01-01

    An updated checklist of 235 mosquito species from Madagascar is presented. The number of species has increased considerably compared to previous checklists, particularly the last published in 2003 (178 species). This annotated checklist provides concise information on endemism, taxonomic position, developmental stages, larval habitats, distribution, behavior, and vector-borne diseases potentially transmitted. The 235 species belong to 14 genera: Aedeomyia (3 species), Aedes (35 species), Anopheles (26 species), Coquillettidia (3 species), Culex (at least 50 species), Eretmapodites (4 species), Ficalbia (2 species), Hodgesia (at least one species), Lutzia (one species), Mansonia (2 species), Mimomyia (22 species), Orthopodomyia (8 species), Toxorhynchites (6 species), and Uranotaenia (73 species). Due to non-deciphered species complexes, several species remain undescribed. The main remarkable characteristic of Malagasy mosquito fauna is the high biodiversity with 138 endemic species (59%). Presence and abundance of species, and their association, in a given location could be a bio-indicator of environmental particularities such as urban, rural, forested, deforested, and mountainous habitats. Finally, taking into account that Malagasy culicidian fauna includes 64 species (27%) with a known medical or veterinary interest in the world, knowledge of their biology and host preference summarized in this paper improves understanding of their involvement in pathogen transmission in Madagascar. PMID:27101839

  11. An updated checklist of mosquito species (Diptera: Culicidae) from Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantely, Michaël Luciano; Le Goff, Gilbert; Boyer, Sébastien; Fontenille, Didier

    2016-01-01

    An updated checklist of 235 mosquito species from Madagascar is presented. The number of species has increased considerably compared to previous checklists, particularly the last published in 2003 (178 species). This annotated checklist provides concise information on endemism, taxonomic position, developmental stages, larval habitats, distribution, behavior, and vector-borne diseases potentially transmitted. The 235 species belong to 14 genera: Aedeomyia (3 species), Aedes (35 species), Anopheles (26 species), Coquillettidia (3 species), Culex (at least 50 species), Eretmapodites (4 species), Ficalbia (2 species), Hodgesia (at least one species), Lutzia (one species), Mansonia (2 species), Mimomyia (22 species), Orthopodomyia (8 species), Toxorhynchites (6 species), and Uranotaenia (73 species). Due to non-deciphered species complexes, several species remain undescribed. The main remarkable characteristic of Malagasy mosquito fauna is the high biodiversity with 138 endemic species (59%). Presence and abundance of species, and their association, in a given location could be a bio-indicator of environmental particularities such as urban, rural, forested, deforested, and mountainous habitats. Finally, taking into account that Malagasy culicidian fauna includes 64 species (27%) with a known medical or veterinary interest in the world, knowledge of their biology and host preference summarized in this paper improves understanding of their involvement in pathogen transmission in Madagascar. © M.L. Tantely et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2016.

  12. Checklist of bees (Apoidea) from a private conservation property in west-central Montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, Marirose; Burrows, Skyler

    2017-01-01

    Here we present preliminary results from the first three years of a long-term bee survey conducted at a 3,840-ha private conservation property in the northern Sapphire Mountains and Bitterroot River Valley, and a pilot study at an associated 80-ha property in the Swan River Valley, Missoula County, Montana, USA. The survey includes hand-net, bowl-trap, and blue-vane trap collections. The resulting checklist comprises 229 bee species and morphospecies within 5 families, 38 genera and 91 subgenera. Of the total species in the list, 34 of them represent first state records Montana. This survey expands the number of bee species recorded in Montana to 366. Included in these species is Megachile (Eutricharaea) apicalis Spinola, showing a range expansion for this introduced bee. We present new distributional records for 34 bee species, including Megachile (Eutricharaea) apicalis Spinola, an introduced bee that was discovered to be resident in North America in 1984 in Santa Barbara County, California. This species has since expanded its range in the across the west, but had not been previously recorded in Montana.

  13. Making a difference: using the safe surgery checklist to initiate continuing education for perioperative nurses in low-income settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifso, Genelle

    2014-03-01

    The WHO Safe Surgery Checklist (2008) patient safety focus and communication prompts are widely accepted. In many low-income regions (as defined by the World Bank and accepted by the World Health Organization) perioperative nurses have little or no formal training; continuing and in-service education are virtually unknown; nor does an articulated "culture of safety" exist. In 2009 the Canadian Network for International Surgery (CNIS) piloted a two-day perioperative nursing course, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, using lectures, case studies, skills sessions, and role-play exercises based on the SSSL Checklist outline and protocols. Canadian instructors (who are certified after taking the Canadian Network for International Surgery-sponsored Instructor's Course) have since returned and taught at additional sites in Ethiopia and Uganda. Course participants now include perioperative nurses, anaesthetists, and junior surgical residents--mirroring the interdisciplinary teamwork that is crucial to safe perioperative patient care. The course's facilitated discussions focus on workplace and practice issues in order to allow for appropriate evaluation and planning of future educational initiatives. Participants complete pre- and post-course questionnaires, which evaluate baseline and post-course knowledge, and further follow-up is completed four months after course completion. This article explains the need for aiding in the expansion of perioperative nursing knowledge and skill in low-income settings and provides the author's personal perspective and experience in responding to this need. Her experience as facilitator in a pilot project and subsequent course development described. The objective is to discuss ways that other perioperative nurses can work to make a positive difference on professional practice and patient care in low-income regions.

  14. Development and Preliminary Validation of Refugee Trauma History Checklist (RTHC)-A Brief Checklist for Survey Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigvardsdotter, Erika; Nilsson, Henrik; Malm, Andreas; Tinghög, Petter; Gottvall, Maria; Vaez, Marjan; Saboonchi, Fredrik

    2017-10-04

    A high proportion of refugees have been subjected to potentially traumatic experiences (PTEs), including torture. PTEs, and torture in particular, are powerful predictors of mental ill health. This paper reports the development and preliminary validation of a brief refugee trauma checklist applicable for survey studies. A pool of 232 items was generated based on pre-existing instruments. Conceptualization, item selection and item refinement was conducted based on existing literature and in collaboration with experts. Ten cognitive interviews using a Think Aloud Protocol (TAP) were performed in a clinical setting, and field testing of the proposed checklist was performed in a total sample of n = 137 asylum seekers from Syria. The proposed refugee trauma history checklist (RTHC) consists of 2 × 8 items, concerning PTEs that occurred before and during the respondents' flight, respectively. Results show low item non-response and adequate psychometric properties Conclusion: RTHC is a usable tool for providing self-report data on refugee trauma history surveys of community samples. The core set of included events can be augmented and slight modifications can be applied to RTHC for use also in other refugee populations and settings.

  15. Development and Preliminary Validation of Refugee Trauma History Checklist (RTHC—A Brief Checklist for Survey Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Sigvardsdotter

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A high proportion of refugees have been subjected to potentially traumatic experiences (PTEs, including torture. PTEs, and torture in particular, are powerful predictors of mental ill health. This paper reports the development and preliminary validation of a brief refugee trauma checklist applicable for survey studies. Methods: A pool of 232 items was generated based on pre-existing instruments. Conceptualization, item selection and item refinement was conducted based on existing literature and in collaboration with experts. Ten cognitive interviews using a Think Aloud Protocol (TAP were performed in a clinical setting, and field testing of the proposed checklist was performed in a total sample of n = 137 asylum seekers from Syria. Results: The proposed refugee trauma history checklist (RTHC consists of 2 × 8 items, concerning PTEs that occurred before and during the respondents’ flight, respectively. Results show low item non-response and adequate psychometric properties Conclusion: RTHC is a usable tool for providing self-report data on refugee trauma history surveys of community samples. The core set of included events can be augmented and slight modifications can be applied to RTHC for use also in other refugee populations and settings.

  16. Translation, Cultural Adaptation, and Validation of Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) and Self-Complete Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (S-LANSS) Questionnaires into the Greek Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistaki, Chrysanthi; Lyrakos, George; Drachtidi, Kalliopi; Stamatiou, Georgia; Kitsou, Maria-Chrysanthi; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia

    2016-06-01

    The LANSS and S-LANSS questionnaires represent two widely accepted and validated instruments used to assist the identification of neuropathic pain worldwide. The aim of this study was to translate, culturally adapt, and validate the LANSS and S-LANSS questionnaires into the Greek language. Forward and backward translations of both questionnaires were performed from the English to Greek language. The final versions were assessed by a committee of clinical experts, and they were then pilot-tested in 20 patients with chronic pain. Both questionnaires were validated in 200 patients with chronic pain (100 patients for each questionnaire), using as the "gold standard" the diagnosis of a clinical expert in pain management. Sensitivity and specificity of questionnaires were assessed, as well as the internal consistency (using Cronbach's alpha coefficient) and correlation with the "gold standard" diagnosis (using Pearson correlation coefficient). Sensitivity and specificity of the LANSS questionnaire were calculated to be 82.76% and 95.24%, while for the S-LANSS 86.21% and 95.24%, respectively. Positive predictive value for neuropathic pain was 96% for the LANSS and 96.15% for the S-LANSS. Cronbach's alpha was revealed to be acceptable for both questionnaires (0.65 for LANSS and 0.67 for the S-LANSS), while a significant correlation was observed compared to the "gold standard" diagnosis (rLANSS   = 0.79 και tSLANSS   = 0.77, respectively, P = 0.01). The LANSS and the S-LANSS diagnostic tools have been translated and validated into the Greek language and can be adequately used to assist the identification of neuropathic pain in everyday clinical practice. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  17. Six sigma tools for a patient safety-oriented, quality-checklist driven radiation medicine department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Ajay; Potters, Louis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and implement six sigma practices toward the enhancement of patient safety in an electronic, quality checklist-driven, multicenter, paperless radiation medicine department. A quality checklist process map (QPM), stratified into consultation through treatment-completion stages was incorporated into an oncology information systems platform. A cross-functional quality management team conducted quality-function-deployment and define-measure-analyze-improve-control (DMAIC) six sigma exercises with a focus on patient safety. QPM procedures were Pareto-sorted in order of decreasing patient safety risk with failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA). Quantitative metrics for a grouped set of highest risk procedures were established. These included procedural delays, associated standard deviations and six sigma Z scores. Baseline performance of the QPM was established over the previous year of usage. Data-driven analysis led to simplification, standardization, and refinement of the QPM with standard deviation, slip-day reduction, and Z-score enhancement goals. A no-fly policy (NFP) for patient safety was introduced at the improve-control DMAIC phase, with a process map interlock imposed on treatment initiation in the event of FMEA-identified high-risk tasks being delayed or not completed. The NFP was introduced in a pilot phase with specific stopping rules and the same metrics used for performance assessments. A custom root-cause analysis database was deployed to monitor patient safety events. Relative to the baseline period, average slip days and standard deviations for the risk-enhanced QPM procedures improved by over threefold factors in the NFP period. The Z scores improved by approximately 20%. A trend for proactive delays instead of reactive hard stops was observed with no adverse effects of the NFP. The number of computed potential no-fly delays per month dropped from 60 to 20 over a total of 520 cases. The fraction of computed

  18. Face and Convergent Validity of Persian Version of Rapid Office Strain Assessment (ROSA Checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrouz Armal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this work was the translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the Persian version of the Rapid Office Stress Assessment (ROSA checklist. Material & Methods: This methodological study was conducted according of IQOLA method. 100 office worker were selected in order to carry out a psychometric evaluation of the ROSA checklist by performing validity (face and convergent analyses. The convergent validity was evaluated using RULA checklist. Results: Upon major changes made to the ROSA checklist during the translation/cultural adaptation process, face validity of the Persian version was obtained. Spearman correlation coefficient between total score of ROSA check list and RULA checklist was significant (r=0.76, p<0.0001. Conclusion: The results indicated that the translated version of the ROSA checklist is acceptable in terms of face validity, convergent validity in target society, and hence provides a useful instrument for assessing Iranian office workers

  19. Validation of a checklist to assess ward round performance in internal medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Kirsten; Ringsted, Charlotte; Dolmans, Diana

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ward rounds are an essential responsibility for doctors in hospital settings. Tools for guiding and assessing trainees' performance of ward rounds are needed. A checklist was developed for that purpose for use with trainees in internal medicine. OBJECTIVE: To assess the content...... and construct validity of the task-specific checklist. METHODS: To determine content validity, a questionnaire was mailed to 295 internists. They were requested to give their opinion on the relevance of each item included on the checklist and to indicate the comprehensiveness of the checklist. To determine...... on the checklist were relevant to ward round performance and that the item collection was comprehensive. Checklist mean-item scores differed between levels of expertise: junior house officers 1.4 (1.0-1.9); senior house officers 2.0 (1.5-2.9); specialist trainees 2.5 (1.8-2.8), and specialists 2.7 (2...

  20. Validation of a checklist to assess ward round performance in internal medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Kirsten; Ringsted, Charlotte; Dolmans, Diana

    2004-01-01

    on the checklist were relevant to ward round performance and that the item collection was comprehensive. Checklist mean-item scores differed between levels of expertise: junior house officers 1.4 (1.0-1.9); senior house officers 2.0 (1.5-2.9); specialist trainees 2.5 (1.8-2.8), and specialists 2.7 (2......BACKGROUND: Ward rounds are an essential responsibility for doctors in hospital settings. Tools for guiding and assessing trainees' performance of ward rounds are needed. A checklist was developed for that purpose for use with trainees in internal medicine. OBJECTIVE: To assess the content...... and construct validity of the task-specific checklist. METHODS: To determine content validity, a questionnaire was mailed to 295 internists. They were requested to give their opinion on the relevance of each item included on the checklist and to indicate the comprehensiveness of the checklist. To determine...

  1. Safe surgery: validation of pre and postoperative checklists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpendre, Francine Taporosky; Cruz, Elaine Drehmer de Almeida; Dyniewicz, Ana Maria; Mantovani, Maria de Fátima; Silva, Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo E; Santos, Gabriela de Souza Dos

    2017-07-10

    to develop, evaluate and validate a surgical safety checklist for patients in the pre and postoperative periods in surgical hospitalization units. methodological research carried out in a large public teaching hospital in the South of Brazil, with application of the principles of the Safe Surgery Saves Lives Programme of the World Health Organization. The checklist was applied to 16 nurses of 8 surgical units and submitted for validation by a group of eight experts using the Delphi method online. the instrument was validated and it was achieved a mean score ≥1, level of agreement ≥75% and Cronbach's alpha >0.90. The final version included 97 safety indicators organized into six categories: identification, preoperative, immediate postoperative, immediate postoperative, other surgical complications, and hospital discharge. the Surgical Safety Checklist in the Pre and Postoperative periods is another strategy to promote patient safety, as it allows the monitoring of predictive signs and symptoms of surgical complications and the early detection of adverse events. elaborar, avaliar e validar um checklist de segurança cirúrgica para os períodos pré e pós-operatório de unidades de internação cirúrgica. pesquisa metodológica, realizada em hospital de ensino público de grande porte do Sul do Brasil, com aplicação dos fundamentos do Programa Cirurgias Seguras Salvam Vidas da Organização Mundial da Saúde. O checklist foi aplicado a 16 enfermeiros de oito unidades cirúrgicas, e submetido à validação por meio da técnica Delphi on-line com oito especialistas. o instrumento foi validado, obtendo-se ranking médio ≥1, grau de concordância ≥75% e Alfa de Cronbach >0,90. A versão final contemplou 97 indicadores de segurança organizados em seis categorias: identificação, pré-operatório, pós-operatório imediato, pós-operatório mediato, outras complicações cirúrgicas, e alta hospitalar. o Checklist de Segurança Cirúrgica Pré e P

  2. Use of a Surgical Safety Checklist to Improve Team Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Richard A; Eggenberger, Terry; Keller, Kathryn; Gallison, Barry S; Newman, David

    2016-09-01

    To improve surgical team communication, a team at Broward Health Imperial Point Hospital, Ft Lauderdale, Florida, implemented a program for process improvement using a locally adapted World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist. This program included a standardized, comprehensive time out and a briefing/debriefing process. Postimplementation responses to the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire revealed a significant increase in the surgical team's perception of communication compared with that reported on the pretest (6% improvement resulting in t79 = -1.72, P improved surgical teamwork behaviors and an enhanced culture of safety in the OR. Copyright © 2016 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A commented check-list of the Ephemeroptera of Mongolia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soldán, Tomáš; Enktaivan, S.; Godunko, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 31, suppl. 1 (2009), s. 653-670 ISSN 0165-0424. [International Perspectives in Mayfly and Stonefly Research. Proceedings of the International Conference on Ephemeroptera /12./ and International Symposium on Plecoptera /16./. Stuttgart, 08.06.2008-14.06.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS500070505; GA ČR GA206/08/1389 Grant - others:USA NSF Biotic Survey and Inventories(US) DEB 0206674 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Ephemeroptera * Mongolia * checklist Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.311, year: 2009

  4. A checklist of cercariae (Trematoda: Digenea) in molluscs from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Hudson Alves; De Melo, Alan Lane

    2013-01-01

    A checklist of digenetic trematodes found in molluscs from Brazil is presented based on 127 scientific articles published after a century of studies. To date 23 families, 35 genera and 46 species of trematodes were identified infecting 25 species of molluscs in the country. Another 36 species described in the collective-group Cercaria were found in 15 species of molluscs and have not yet been associated with the respective adult parasites. Larvae found in 20 species of molluscs and grouped into 10 cercarian types are also listed.

  5. Factor structure of the PAS-ADD Checklist with adults with intellectual disabilities.

    OpenAIRE

    Hatton, Chris; Taylor, John

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The PAS-ADD Checklist is designed to screen for likely mental health problems in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). The specificity of recommended subscales derived from diagnostic criteria is unclear. This paper therefore investigates the factor structure of the PAS-ADD Checklist to determine the adequacy of empirically derived subscales. \\ud METHOD: A total of 1,115 informants who had known service users for a median of 24 months completed the PAS-ADD Checklist on 1,155...

  6. Lessons from aviation - the role of checklists in minimally invasive cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, S; Adams, C; Cleland, A; Jones, P M; Walsh, G; Kiaii, B

    2016-01-01

    We describe an adverse event during minimally invasive cardiac surgery that resulted in a multi-disciplinary review of intra-operative errors and the creation of a procedural checklist. This checklist aims to prevent errors of omission and communication failures that result in increased morbidity and mortality. We discuss the application of the aviation - led "threats and errors model" to medical practice and the role of checklists and other strategies aimed at reducing medical errors. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Planning new medical library buildings: an annotated checklist with selected references.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J A

    1969-10-01

    Special attention is paid to several planning essentials for new medical library buildings. These should be covered in the program of requirements that appears as item six on the checklist. The checklist assumes that the decision to build a new medical library has been made and that monies have been allocated for that purpose. References pertaining to the checklist items are provided along with a suggested timetable for achieving each, based on the author's own experiences.

  8. A Checklist Intervention to Assess Resident Diagnostic Knee and Shoulder Arthroscopic Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Benedict; Gaudiani, Michael; Hammann-Scala, Jennifer; Ranawat, Anil

    The purpose of this investigation was to apply an arthroscopic shoulder and knee checklist in the evaluation of orthopedic resident arthroscopic skill efficiency and to demonstrate the use of a surgical checklist for assessing resident surgical efficiency over the course of a surgical rotation. Orthopedic surgery residents rotating on the sports medicine service at our institution between 2011 and 2015 were enrolled in this study. Residents were administered a shoulder and knee arthroscopy assessment tool at the beginning and end of their 6-week rotation. The assessment tools consisted of checklist items for knee and shoulder arthroscopy skills. Residents were timed while performing these checklist tasks. The primary outcome measure was resident improvement as a function of time to completion for the checklist items, and the intervention was participation in a 6-week resident rotation with weekly arthroscopy didactics, cadaver simulator work, and operating room experience. A paired t test was used to compare means. Mean time to checklist completion during week 1 among study participants for the knee checklist was 787.4 seconds for the knee checklist and 484.4 seconds at the end of the rotation. Mean time to checklist completion during week 1 among study participants for the shoulder checklist was 1655.3 seconds and 832.7 seconds for the shoulder checklist at the end of the rotation. Mean improvement in time to completion was 303 seconds (p = 0.0006, SD = 209s) and 822.6 seconds (p = 0.00008, SD = 525.2s) for the arthroscopic knee and shoulder assessments, respectively. An arthroscopic checklist is 1 method to evaluate and assess resident efficiency and improvement during surgical training. Among residents participating in this study, we found statistically significant improvements in time for arthroscopic task completion. II. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. THE IMPACT OF CHECKLIST-BASED TRAINING ON TEACHERS' USE OF THE ZONE DEFENSE SCHEDULE

    OpenAIRE

    Casey, Amy M; McWilliam, R.A

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the impact of checklist-based training on teaching teams' use of the zone defense schedule. Three teaching teams (lead teacher plus 2 assistant teachers) in an inclusive early childhood program participated. A multiple baseline design across teams was used to determine whether accurate implementation of the zone defense schedule increased when checklist-based training was provided. All teaching teams reached the preestablished criterion, implementing a minimum of 80% of checklist ...

  10. REPORTAGE\\ud Editorial Photo spread: Brexit : et au milieu coule l’Angleterre in Libération (France) Photographs © Garry Clarkson with journalist Guillaume Gendron, Envoyé spécial à Leeds et à Follifoot — 17 May 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Clarkson, Garry; Gendron, Guillaume; Libération Newspaper

    2016-01-01

    Libération (the one founded in Paris by Jean-Paul Sartre and Serge July in 1973) visit to North Yorkshire and Leeds concerning the Brexit European Referendum debate. \\ud \\ud Photographs © Garry Clarkson: Leeds Councillors, Dan Cohen and Neil Buckly, Slaughterhouse worker, Steve Hanson and environment around Follifoot village Yorkshire to show quintessential 'middle England'\\ud \\ud http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2016/05/17/brexit-et-au-milieu-coule-l-angleterre_1453266

  11. Improvement of teamwork and safety climate following implementation of the WHO surgical safety checklist at a university hospital in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Takashi; Taniwaki, Miki; Ogata, Kimiyo; Sakamoto, Miwa; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2014-06-01

    With the aim to optimize surgical safety, the World Health Organization (WHO) introduced the Surgical Safety Checklist (SSCL) in 2008. The SSCL has been piloted in many countries worldwide and shown to improve both safety attitudes within surgical teams and patient outcomes. In the study reported here we investigated whether implementation of the SSCL improved the teamwork and safety climate at a single university hospital in Japan. All surgical teams at the hospital implemented the SSCL in all surgical procedures with strict adherence to the SSCL implementation manual developed by WHO. Changes in safety attitudes were evaluated using the modified operating-room version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). A before and after design was used, with the questionnaire administered before and 3 months after SSCL implementation. Our analysis revealed that the mean scores on the SAQ had significantly improved 3 months after implementation of the SSCL compared to those before implementation. This finding implies that effective implementation of the SSCL could improve patient outcomes in Japan, similar to the findings of the WHO pilot study.

  12. A Family-Centered Rounds Checklist, Family Engagement, and Patient Safety: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Elizabeth D; Jacobsohn, Gwen C; Rajamanickam, Victoria P; Carayon, Pascale; Kelly, Michelle M; Wetterneck, Tosha B; Rathouz, Paul J; Brown, Roger L

    2017-05-01

    Family-centered rounds (FCRs) have become standard of care, despite the limited evaluation of FCRs' benefits or interventions to support high-quality FCR delivery. This work examines the impact of the FCR checklist intervention, a checklist and associated provider training, on performance of FCR elements, family engagement, and patient safety. This cluster randomized trial involved 298 families. Two hospital services were randomized to use the checklist; 2 others delivered usual care. We evaluated the performance of 8 FCR checklist elements and family engagement from 673 pre- and postintervention FCR videos and assessed the safety climate with the Children's Hospital Safety Climate Questionnaire. Random effects regression models were used to assess intervention impact. The intervention significantly increased the number of FCR checklist elements performed (β = 1.2, P checklist elements was associated with changes in these outcomes. For example, order read-back was associated with significantly more family engagement. Asking families for questions was associated with significantly better ratings of staff's communication openness and safety of handoffs and transitions. The performance of FCR checklist elements was enhanced by checklist implementation and associated with changes in family engagement and more positive perceptions of safety climate. Implementing the checklist improves delivery of FCRs, impacting quality and safety of care. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Lessons Learned From The 200 West Pump And Treatment Facility Construction Project At The US DOE Hanford Site - A Leadership For Energy And Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-Certified Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorr, Kent A.; Ostrom, Michael J.; Freeman-Pollard, Jhivaun R.

    2012-01-01

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) designed, constructed, commissioned, and began operation of the largest groundwater pump and treatment facility in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nationwide complex. This one-of-a-kind groundwater pump and treatment facility, located at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation Site (Hanford Site) in Washington State, was built in an accelerated manner with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds and has attained Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) GOLD certification, which makes it the first non-administrative building in the DOE Office of Environmental Management complex to earn such an award. There were many contractual, technical, configuration management, quality, safety, and LEED challenges associated with the design, procurement, construction, and commissioning of this $95 million, 52,000 ft groundwater pump and treatment facility. This paper will present the Project and LEED accomplishments, as well as Lessons Learned by CHPRC when additional ARRA funds were used to accelerate design, procurement, construction, and commissioning of the 200 West Groundwater Pump and Treatment (2W PandT) Facility to meet DOE's mission of treating contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site with a new facility by June 28, 2012

  14. Lessons Learned From The 200 West Pump And Treatment Facility Construction Project At The US DOE Hanford Site - A Leadership For Energy And Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-Certified Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorr, Kent A. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Ostrom, Michael J. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Freeman-Pollard, Jhivaun R. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-11-14

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) designed, constructed, commissioned, and began operation of the largest groundwater pump and treatment facility in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nationwide complex. This one-of-a-kind groundwater pump and treatment facility, located at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation Site (Hanford Site) in Washington State, was built in an accelerated manner with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds and has attained Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) GOLD certification, which makes it the first non-administrative building in the DOE Office of Environmental Management complex to earn such an award. There were many contractual, technical, configuration management, quality, safety, and LEED challenges associated with the design, procurement, construction, and commissioning of this $95 million, 52,000 ft groundwater pump and treatment facility. This paper will present the Project and LEED accomplishments, as well as Lessons Learned by CHPRC when additional ARRA funds were used to accelerate design, procurement, construction, and commissioning of the 200 West Groundwater Pump and Treatment (2W P&T) Facility to meet DOE's mission of treating contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site with a new facility by June 28, 2012.

  15. Checklist for One Health Epidemiological Reporting of Evidence (COHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan F. Davis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available One Health is defined as the intersection and integration of knowledge regarding humans, animals, and the environment, yet as the One Health scientific literature expands, there is considerable heterogeneity of approach and quality of reporting in One Health studies. In addition, many researchers who publish such studies do not include or integrate data from all three domains of human, animal, and environmental health. This points to a critical need to unify guidelines for One Health studies. This report details the Checklist for One Health Epidemiological Reporting of Evidence (COHERE to guide the design and publication format of future One Health studies. COHERE was developed by a core writing team and international expert review group that represents multiple disciplines, including human medicine, veterinary medicine, public health, allied professionals, clinical laboratory science, epidemiology, the social sciences, ecohealth and environmental health. The twin aims of the COHERE standards are to 1 improve the quality of reporting of observational or interventional epidemiological studies that collect and integrate data from humans, animals and/or vectors, and their environments; and 2 promote the concept that One Health studies should integrate knowledge from these three domains. The 19 standards in the COHERE checklist address descriptions of human populations, animal populations, environmental assessment, spatial and temporal relationships of data from the three domains, integration of analyses and interpretation, and inclusion of expertise in the research team from disciplines related to human health, animal health, and environmental health.

  16. Checklist of the benthic marine macroalgae from Algeria. I. Phaeophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ould-Ahmed, Nora

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The seaweed diversity of the Mediterranean is still not completely known, especially in some areas of its African coasts. As an effort to complete a more detailed catalogue to fill such gap, an updated checklist of the brown seaweeds (Phaeophyceae from Algeria, based on updated literature records, is provided using as starting point the checklist of Perret- Boudouresque & Seridi published in 1989. As a result, the total number of taxa at specific and infraspecific levels accepted for Algeria, under current taxonomy and nomenclature, is 93.La diversidad de las algas marinas del Mediterráneo no es del todo conocida, especialmente en algunas áreas de su costa africana. Como parte de un esfuerzo para completar un catálogo más detallado, que permita reducir esta carencia, se aporta una lista crítica de las algas pardas (Phaeophyceae de Argelia mediante la recopilación y actualización de todas las citas publicadas, tomando como punto de partida la de Perret-Boudou - resque & Seridi publicada el año 1989. Como resultado, el número total de táxones, a nivel específico e infraespecífico, aceptado para las costas de Argelia es de 93, de acuerdo con la taxonomía y la nomenclatura actuales

  17. Checklist of the flower flies of Ecuador (Diptera, Syrphidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Marín-Armijos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Syrphidae is one of the most speciose families of true flies, with more than 6,100 described species and worldwide distribution. They are important for humans acting as crucial pollinators, biological control agents, decomposers, and bioindicators. One third of its diversity is found in the Neotropical Region, but the taxonomic knowledge for this region is incomplete. Thus, taxonomic revisions and species checklists of Syrphidae in the Neotropics are the highest priority for biodiversity studies. Therefore, we present the first checklist of Syrphidae for Ecuador based on literature records, and provide as well the original reference for the first time species citations for the country. A total of 201 species were recorded for Ecuador, with more than 600 records from 24 provinces and 237 localities. Tungurahua, Pastaza, and Galápagos were the best sampled provinces. Although the reported Ecuadorian syrphid fauna only comprises 11.2 % of the described Neotropical species, Ecuador has the third highest flower fly diversity density after Costa Rica and Suriname. These data indicate the high species diversity for this country in such small geographic area.

  18. A social media self-evaluation checklist for medical practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Benjamin J; Huiskes, Florian; Korevaar, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Increasing numbers of medical practitioners and medical students are using online social and business-related networking websites such as Facebook, Doc2doc and LinkedIn. These rapidly evolving and growing social media have potential to promote public health by providing powerful instruments for communication and education. However, evidence is emerging from studies, legal cases, and media reports that the use of these new technologies is creating several ethical problems for medical practitioners as well as medical students. Improper online activities may harm not only individual reputations and careers, but also the medical profession as a whole, for example by breach of patient confidentiality, defamation of colleagues and employers, undisclosed conflict of interests that bias the medical practitioner's medical advice, posting of advice/information without an evidence base, and infringement of copyright. We developed a self-evaluation checklist for medical practitioners using social media. The checklist addresses three key elements in the use of social media: personal information and accessibility, connections, and postings. It contains questions specifically formulated to evaluate a medical practitioner's social media profile, to prevent unintended, improper online activities and to promote professional online behaviour.

  19. The Surgical Safety Checklist: Results of Implementation in Otorhinolaryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali S Al-Qahtani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the impact of implementing the surgical safety checklist (SSCL on the outcome of patient safety in otorhinolaryngology (ENT surgical procedures in two hospitals in Saudi Arabia: Aseer Central and Abha Private Hospitals. Methods: This retrospective study conducted over seven years (1 July 2008 to 30 June 2015 followed a staff educational and training program for the implementation of the World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist (WHO SSCL. The program included the use of audiovisual aids and practical demonstrations. Incidents of non-compliance were treated as sentinel events and were audited by the process of root cause analysis. Results: There were 5 144 elective ENT surgical cases in both hospitals in which the SSCL was utilized over the seven-year study period. The average compliance rate was 96.5%. Reasons for non-compliance included staff shortage, fast staff turnover, excessive workload, communication problems, and presence of existing processes. Conclusions: The implementation of the SSCL was a substantial leap in efforts towards ensuring surgical patients’ safety. It is compulsory in the healthcare system in many countries. Such progress in healthcare improvement can be accomplished with the commitment of the operating suite staff by spending few moments checking facts and establishing an environment of teamwork for the benefit of the surgical patient.

  20. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy studies of solid-vacuum, solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffer, Saskia [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Electron based surface probing techniques can provide detailed information about surface structure or chemical composition in vacuum environments. The development of new surface techniques has made possible in situ molecular level studies of solid-gas interfaces and more recently, solid-liquid interfaces. The aim of this dissertation is two-fold. First, by using novel sample preparation, Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and other traditional ultra high vacuum (UHV) techniques are shown to provide new information on the insulator/vacuum interface. The surface structure of the classic insulator NaCl has been determined using these methods. Second, using sum frequency generation (SFG) surface specific vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed on both the biopolymer/air and electrode/electrolyte interfaces. The surface structure and composition of polyetherurethane-silicone copolymers were determined in air using SFG, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SFG studies of the electrode (platinum, gold and copper)/electrolyte interface were performed as a function of applied potential in an electrochemical cell.

  1. Yorkshire's influence on the understanding and treatment of mental diseases in Victorian Britain: The golden triad of York, Wakefield, and Leeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Henry R; Reynolds, Edward H

    2018-01-01

    In the late-eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, a more humane approach to the care of the insane in Britain was catalyzed in part by the illness of King George III. The Reform Movement envisaged "moral" treatment in asylums in pleasant rural environments, but these aspirations were overwhelmed by industrialization, urbanization, and the scale of the need, such that most asylums became gigantic institutions for chronic insanity. Three institutions in Yorkshire remained beacons of enlightenment in the general gloom of Victorian alienism: the Retreat in York founded and developed by the Quaker Tuke family; the West Riding Lunatic Asylum in Wakefield led by Sir James Crichton-Browne, which initiated research into brain and mental diseases; and the Leeds Medical School and Wakefield axis associated with Sir Thomas Clifford Allbutt, which pioneered teaching of mental diseases and, later, the first Chair of Psychiatry. Three other Yorkshiremen who greatly influenced nineteenth-century "neuropsychiatry" in Britain and abroad were Thomas Laycock in York and Edinburgh, and Henry Maudsley and John Hughlings Jackson in London.

  2. Agreement Between the Douleur Neuropathique in 4 Questions and Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs Questionnaires to Classify Neuropathic Pain among Patients with Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Jamilly C. V.; Santos, Victor S.; Gurgel, Ricardo Q.; Santana, Julianne C. V.; Reis, Francisco P.; Cuevas, Luis E.; Feitosa, Vera L. C.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) often occurs during the course of leprosy, and screening tools to differentiate NP from non-NP are often used. However, their performance varies in different settings. The most frequently used scales are the Douleur Neuropathique in 4 questions (DN4) and the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs (LANSS) questionnaires. Thus, we conducted a study to evaluate the agreement between DN4 and LANSS questionnaires to classify NP in 195 leprosy patients attending two reference centers in Sergipe, Brazil. The DN4 and LANSS classified 166 and 110 patients, respectively, as having NP. One hundred and seven (54.8%) were classified as NP by both questionnaires; 59 (30.2%) solely by the DN4 questionnaire and three (1.5%) solely by the LANSS. The agreement of the questionnaires was 66.2% (weak agreement, Kappa = 0.30). Although both questionnaires identified a high proportion of NP, the development of more robust instruments is necessary to ensure the accuracy of diagnosis of leprosy patients classified as having NP. PMID:27458041

  3. Use of Leeds-Keio connective tissue prosthesis (L-K CTP) for reconstruction of deficient extensor mechanism with total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherief, Tamer I; Naguib, Ashraf M; Sefton, Graham K

    2005-08-01

    This study was carried out in order to assess the results of reconstruction of a deficient extensor mechanism in the presence of a total knee replacement (TKR) using the Leeds-Keio Connective Tissue Prosthesis (L-K CTP). The L-K CTP is available as flat tapes constructed from polyester in an open weave structure. It was used to reinforce and reconstruct the extensor mechanism, which was deficient in three patients who had undergone total knee replacement or were about to undergo total knee replacement. Two cases had extensor mechanism deficiency as a complication following total knee replacement while the third case had extensor mechanism deficiency at the time of the primary knee replacement. The average follow-up was 2 years (range of follow up was 12 to 48 months). All three cases showed good results with no extension lag and good range of movement at follow up. The use of L-K CTP for reconstruction of the knee extensor mechanism offers a good option for the management of the uncommon but difficult problem of extensor mechanism deficiency in patients with a total knee replacement.

  4. Environmental Assessment Methodologies for Commercial Buildings: An Elicitation Study of U.S. Building Professionals’ Beliefs on Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Kientzel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary environmental programs (VEPs have become increasingly popular around the world to address energy efficiency issues that mandatory building codes have not been able to tackle. Even though the utility of voluntary schemes is widely debated, they have become a de facto reality for many professionals in the building and construction sector. One topic that is neglected, however, in both academic and policy discussions, relates to how professionals (architects, engineers, real estate developers, etc. perceive the rise of voluntary rating schemes. In order to fill this gap in the literature, the present study investigates beliefs underlying adoption behavior regarding one of the most prominent voluntary assessment and certification programs in the U.S. building industry, the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED scheme. In this paper, an elicitation study, based on 14 semi-structured interviews with building professionals in the North East of the United States, was conducted to analyze this question. Building on the Reasoned Action Approach, this paper shows that, in addition to more conventional factors such as financial calculations and marketing aspects, the understanding of beliefs held by building professionals offers important insights into their decisions to work with Voluntary Environmental Assessment and Rating Programs.

  5. The impact of critical event checklists on medical management and teamwork during simulated crises in a surgical daycare facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, T C; Morgan, P J; Brydges, R; Kurrek, M; Tregunno, D; Cunningham, L; Chan, A; Forde, D; Tarshis, J

    2017-03-01

    Although the incidence of major adverse events in surgical daycare centres is low, these critical events may not be managed optimally due to the absence of resources that exist in larger hospitals. We aimed to study the impact of operating theatre critical event checklists on medical management and teamwork during whole-team operating theatre crisis simulations staged in a surgical daycare facility. We studied 56 simulation encounters (without and with a checklist available) divided between an initial session and then a retention session several months later. Medical management and teamwork were quantified via percentage adherence to key processes and the Team Emergency Assessment Measure, respectively. In the initial session, medical management was not improved by the presence of a checklist (56% without checklist vs. 62% with checklist; p = 0.50). In the retention session, teams performed significantly worse without the checklists (36% without checklist vs. 60% with checklist; p = 0.04). We did not observe a change in non-technical skills in the presence of a checklist in either the initial or retention sessions (68% without checklist vs. 69% with checklist (p = 0.94) and 69% without checklist vs. 65% with checklist (p = 0.36), respectively). Critical events checklists do not improve medical management or teamwork during simulated operating theatre crises in an ambulatory surgical daycare setting. © 2016 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  6. Efficiency analysis in the application of indicators LEED-ND, the arid zone of the north of Mexico, case of study: Parajes del Sur, Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua; Analisis de la eficiencia en la aplicacion de indicadores LEED-ND, en la zona arida del norte de Mexico, caso de estudio: parajes del sur, Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena Barrera, Leticia [Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2009-01-15

    This article presents the analysis realized to the urban design of a colony applying the indicators of The Leadership in Energy (LEED-ND). The advantages that represent as far as impact are established and also the limits are pointed out, evaluating their efficiency in the application of indicators to improve performance and energy saving. Based on the analysis applied to the colony under study, some right solutions in the urban design are obtained that should be established as a part of the in force standardization. Nevertheless, the follow up to this same company in other developments, reflects that the proposals are not determined as a strategy of self planning but only to fulfill the asked requirements, obtaining a result with smaller impact and as an index that allows offering residential alternatives in the city tending to the sustained development. [Spanish] Este articulo presenta el analisis realizado al diseno urbano de un fraccionamiento aplicando los indicadores de The Leadership in Energy (LEED-ND). Se establecen las ventajas que presenta en cuanto a impacto y tambien se senalan las limitantes, evaluando su eficiencia en la aplicacion de indicadores para mejorar desempeno y ahorro energetico. Con base en el analisis aplicado al fraccionamiento en estudio, se tienen algunas soluciones acertadas en el diseno urbano que debieran establecerse como parte de la normatividad vigente, sin embargo, el seguimiento a esta misma empresa en otros desarrollos, refleja que las propuestas no estan determinadas como una estrategia de planeacion propia sino unicamente para cumplir con los requerimientos solicitados, obteniendo un resultado con menor impacto y como indice que permitan ofrecer alternativas habitacionales en la ciudad tendientes al desarrollo sostenido.

  7. Operating Room Clinicians' Attitudes and Perceptions of a Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist at 1 Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Elizabeth K; Singer, Sara J; Sparks, William; Ozonoff, Al; Baxter, Jessica; Rangel, Shawn

    2016-03-01

    Despite mounting evidence that use of surgical checklists improves patient morbidity and mortality, compliance among surgical teams in executing required elements of checklists has been low. Recognizing that clinicians' receptivity is a major determinant of checklist use, we conducted a survey to investigate how mandated use of a surgical checklist impacts its operating room clinicians' attitudes about and perceptions of operating room safety, efficiency, teamwork, and prevention of medical errors. Operating room clinicians at 1 pediatric hospital were surveyed on their attitudes and perception of the novel Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist and the impact the checklist had on efficiency, teamwork, and prevention of medical errors 1 year after its implementation. The survey responses were compared and classified by multidisciplinary perioperative clinical staff. Most responses reflected positive attitudes toward checklist use. The respondents felt that the checklist reduced complications and errors and improved patient safety, communication among team members, teamwork in complex procedures, and efficiency in the operating room. Many operating room staff also reported that checklist use had prevented or averted an error or a complication. Perceptions varied according to perioperative clinical discipline, reflecting differences in perspectives. For example, the nurses perceived a higher rate of consent-related errors and site marking errors than did the physicians; the surgeons reported more antibiotic timing and equipment errors than did others. The surgical staff at 1 pediatric hospital who responded viewed the novel Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist as potentially beneficial to operative patient safety by improving teamwork and communication, reducing errors, and improving efficiency. Responses varied by discipline, indicating that team members view the checklist from different perspectives.

  8. A meta-model for computer executable dynamic clinical safety checklists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Shan; Van Gorp, Pieter; Lu, Xudong; Kaymak, Uzay; Korsten, Hendrikus; Vdovjak, Richard; Duan, Huilong

    2017-12-12

    Safety checklist is a type of cognitive tool enforcing short term memory of medical workers with the purpose of reducing medical errors caused by overlook and ignorance. To facilitate the daily use of safety checklists, computerized systems embedded in the clinical workflow and adapted to patient-context are increasingly developed. However, the current hard-coded approach of implementing checklists in these systems increase the cognitive efforts of clinical experts and coding efforts for informaticists. This is due to the lack of a formal representation format that is both understandable by clinical experts and executable by computer programs. We developed a dynamic checklist meta-model with a three-step approach. Dynamic checklist modeling requirements were extracted by performing a domain analysis. Then, existing modeling approaches and tools were investigated with the purpose of reusing these languages. Finally, the meta-model was developed by eliciting domain concepts and their hierarchies. The feasibility of using the meta-model was validated by two case studies. The meta-model was mapped to specific modeling languages according to the requirements of hospitals. Using the proposed meta-model, a comprehensive coronary artery bypass graft peri-operative checklist set and a percutaneous coronary intervention peri-operative checklist set have been developed in a Dutch hospital and a Chinese hospital, respectively. The result shows that it is feasible to use the meta-model to facilitate the modeling and execution of dynamic checklists. We proposed a novel meta-model for the dynamic checklist with the purpose of facilitating creating dynamic checklists. The meta-model is a framework of reusing existing modeling languages and tools to model dynamic checklists. The feasibility of using the meta-model is validated by implementing a use case in the system.

  9. Multiple interacting factors influence adherence, and outcomes associated with surgical safety checklists: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Anna R; Straus, Sharon E; Shojania, Kaveh G; Urbach, David R

    2014-01-01

    The surgical safety checklist (SSC) is meant to enhance patient safety but studies of its impact conflict. This study explored factors that influenced SSC adherence to suggest how its impact could be optimized. Participants were recruited purposively by profession, region, hospital type and time using the SSC. They were asked to describe how the SSC was adopted, associated challenges, perceived impact, and suggestions for improving its use. Grounded theory and thematic analysis were used to collect and analyse data. Findings were interpreted using an implementation fidelity conceptual framework. Fifty-one participants were interviewed (29 nurses, 13 surgeons, 9 anaesthetists; 18 small, 14 large and 19 teaching hospitals; 8 regions; 31 had used the SC for ≤12 months, 20 for 13+ months). The SSC was inconsistently reviewed, and often inaccurately documented as complete. Adherence was influenced by multiple issues. Extensive modification to accommodate existing practice patterns eliminated essential interaction at key time points to discuss patient management. Staff were often absent or not paying attention. They did not feel it was relevant to their work given limited evidence of its effectiveness, and because they were not engaged in its implementation. Organizations provided little support for implementation, training, monitoring and feedback, which are needed to overcome these, and other individual and team factors that challenged SSC adherence. Responses were similar across participants with different characteristics. Multiple processes and factors influenced SSC adherence. This may explain why, in studies evaluating SSC impact, outcomes were variable. Recommendations included continuing education, time for pilot-testing, and engaging all staff in SSC review. Others may use the implementation fidelity framework to plan SSC implementation or evaluate SSC adherence. Further research is needed to establish which SSC components can be modified without compromising

  10. Are CONSORT checklists submitted by authors adequately reflecting what information is actually reported in published papers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, David; Biggane, Alice M; Cobo, Erik

    2018-01-29

    Compulsory submission of a checklist from the relevant reporting guideline is one of the most widespread journal requirements aiming to improve completeness of reporting. However, the current suboptimal levels of adherence to reporting guidelines observed in the literature may indicate that this journal policy is not having a significant effect. We explored whether authors provided the appropriate CONSORT checklist extension for their study and whether there were inconsistencies between what authors claimed on the submitted checklist and what was actually reported in the published paper. We randomly selected 12 randomized trials from three journals that provide the originally submitted checklist and analyzed six core CONSORT items. Only one paper used the appropriate checklist extension and had no inconsistencies between what was claimed in the submitted checklist and what was reported in the published paper. Journals should take further actions to take full advantage of the requirement for the submission of fulfilled CONSORT checklists, thus ensuring that these checklists reflect what is reported in the manuscript.

  11. Nature and timing of incidents intercepted by the SURPASS checklist in surgical patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Eefje N.; Prins, Hubert A.; Bennink, M. Christine; Neijenhuis, Peter; van Stijn, Ilse; van Helden, Sven H.; van Putten, M. Agnès; Smorenburg, Susanne M.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: More than half of in-hospital adverse events can be attributed to a surgical discipline. Checklists can effectively decrease errors and adverse events. However, the mechanisms by which checklists lead to increased safety are unclear. This study aimed to assess the number, nature and

  12. Effect of a 19-item surgical safety checklist during urgent operations in a global patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Thomas G; Haynes, Alex B; Dziekan, Gerald; Berry, William R; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Gawande, Atul A

    2010-05-01

    To assess whether implementation of a 19-item World Health Organization (WHO) Surgical Safety Checklist in urgent surgical cases would improve compliance with basic standards of care and reduce rates of deaths and complications. Use of the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist has been shown to be associated with significant reductions in complications and deaths. Before evaluation of this safety tool, concern was raised about whether its use would be practical or beneficial during urgent surgical procedures. We prospectively collected clinical process and outcome data for 1750 consecutively enrolled patients 16 years of age or older undergoing urgent noncardiac surgery before and after introduction of the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist in 8 diverse hospitals around the world; 842 underwent urgent surgery-defined as an operation required within 24 hours of assessment to be beneficial-before introduction of the checklist and 908 after introduction of the checklist. The primary end point was the rate of complications, including death, during hospitalization up to 30 days following surgery. The complication rate was 18.4% (n=151) at baseline and 11.7% (n=102) after the checklist was introduced (P=0.0001). Death rates dropped from 3.7% to 1.4% following checklist introduction (P=0.0067). Adherence to 6 measured safety steps improved from 18.6% to 50.7% (PSafety Checklist in urgent operations is feasible and should be considered.

  13. Checklist of the birds of Aruba, Curaçao and Bonaire, South Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, T.G.; Reuter, J.H.; Debrot, A.O.; Wattel, J.; Nijman, V.

    2009-01-01

    We present an updated checklist of the birds of the islands of Aruba, Curaçao and Bonaire, and the islets of Klein Curaçao and Klein Bonaire, southern Caribbean, and compare this with earlier checklists (K.H. Voous, Stud. Fauna Curaçao Carib. Isl. 7: 1-260, 1957; Ardea 53: 205-234, 1965; Birds of

  14. Factor Structure of the PAS-ADD Checklist with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Chris; Taylor, John J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The PAS-ADD Checklist is designed to screen for likely mental health problems in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). The specificity of recommended subscales derived from diagnostic criteria is unclear. This paper therefore investigates the factor structure of the PAS-ADD Checklist to determine the adequacy of empirically…

  15. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 327 - Internal Management Control Review Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Internal Management Control Review Checklist B... B to Part 327—Internal Management Control Review Checklist (a) Task: Personnel and/or Organization... See footnote 2 to this Appendix B. (1) I attest that the above listed internal controls provide...

  16. 78 FR 18865 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Proposal Adequacy Checklist (DFARS Case 2011...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... accounting principles and procedures?'' Checklist item 4 is modified to read ``Does the proposal disclose any... year'' after ``consistent with your cost accounting system''. Checklist items 11 and 13 are removed in... inconsistencies with our established estimating and accounting principles and procedures?'' to more closely align...

  17. Implementation of an antibiotic checklist increased appropriate antibiotic use in the hospital on Aruba

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Daalen, Frederike Vera; Lagerburg, Anouk; de Kort, Jaclyn; Sànchez Rivas, Elena; Geerlings, Suzanne Eugenie

    2017-01-01

    No interventions have yet been implemented to improve antibiotic use on Aruba. In the Netherlands, the introduction of an antibiotic checklist resulted in more appropriate antibiotic use in nine hospitals. The aim of this study was to introduce the antibiotic checklist on Aruba, test its

  18. Procedures for Developing Evidence-Informed Performance Checklists for Improving Early Childhood Intervention Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Carl J.

    2017-01-01

    A conceptualization-operationalization-measurement framework is described for developing evidence-informed early childhood intervention performance checklists. Performance checklists include lists of practice indicators where the indicators, taken together, operationally define particular types of intervention practices that, when used as…

  19. Psychometric Properties and Norms of the German ABC-Community and PAS-ADD Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Elisabeth L.; Weber, Germain; Haveman, Meindert J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to standardize and generate psychometric evidence of the German language versions of two well-established English language mental health instruments: the "Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Community" (ABC-C) and the "Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adults with Developmental Disabilities" (PAS-ADD) Checklist. New…

  20. Exploring nurses' use of the WHO safety checklist in the perioperative setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Brid; Graham, Margaret M; Kelly, Sile Mary

    2017-09-01

    To explore nurses' use of the World Health Organization safety checklist in the perioperative setting. Promoting quality and safety in health care has received worldwide attention. The World Health Organization surgical safety checklist (2009) is promoted for reducing postoperative morbidity and mortality. The checklist has been introduced in Irish perioperative settings. A descriptive, qualitative approach was utilised. A purposeful sample of ten nurses participated in individual, semi-structured interviews. Participants were committed to promoting safety in navigating challenges in introducing, complying and accepting the value of the World Health Organization surgical safety checklist in concordance with best practice. Participants moved from task completion to embracing the checklist as an effective surgical safety checking tool. Challenges were identified around roles and responsibilities in overseeing the completion of the checklist. The management of processes is critical when implementing any safety initiative. This paper highlights the complexity and challenges in implementing the World Health Organization surgical safety checklist, contributing to global discussions around translating policy into practice. The effective implementation of a checklist requires a coordinated management approach in collaboration with team members. These approaches will support learning experiences contributing to a shared understanding of the change being implemented by all team members. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Annotated checklist of the plants of the Shimba hills, Kwale district ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An annotated checklist of the Shimba Hills in Kwale District is presented. The checklist includes the plants found in the Shimba Hills National Reserve, Mkongani North and West Forest Reserves, Matuga, Mwaluganje Forest Reserve and Elephant Sanctuary, as well as Kaya Chombo, Kaya Teleza, Chitsanze Sacred Grove ...

  2. Investigating Perceptions of Teachers and Teaching Using the Draw-a-Teacher Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Becky B.; Szabo, Susan; Redmond-Sanogo, Adrienne; Sennette, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in the pictorial representations of what teaching "looks like" for undergraduate students, intern teachers and graduate students enrolled in education classes. This new Draw-a-Teacher Checklist instrument was modeled after the Draw-a-Science-Teacher-Test Checklist (DASTT-C) developed…

  3. Checklist of copepods (Crustacea: Calanoida, Cyclopoida,Harpacticoida) from Wyoming, USA, with new state records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentation of a comprehensive checklist of the copepod fauna of Wyoming, USA with 41 species of copepods; based on museum specimens, literature reviews, and active surveillance. Of these species 19 were previously unknown from the state. This checklist includes species in the families Centropagida...

  4. Checklist Manifesto for Electronic Resources: Getting Ready for the Fiscal Year and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Lenore; Fu, Li; Miller, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Organization of electronic resources workflow is critical in the increasingly complicated and complex world of library management. A simple organizational tool that can be readily applied to electronic resources management (ERM) is the use of checklists. Based on the principles discussed in The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right, the…

  5. Implementation of an antibiotic checklist increased appropriate antibiotic use in the hospital on Aruba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Daalen, Frederike Vera; Lagerburg, Anouk; de Kort, Jaclyn; Sànchez Rivas, Elena; Geerlings, Suzanne Eugenie

    2017-06-01

    No interventions have yet been implemented to improve antibiotic use on Aruba. In the Netherlands, the introduction of an antibiotic checklist resulted in more appropriate antibiotic use in nine hospitals. The aim of this study was to introduce the antibiotic checklist on Aruba, test its effectiveness, and evaluate the possibility of implementing this checklist outside the Netherlands. The antibiotic checklist includes seven quality indicators (QIs) that define appropriate antibiotic use. It applies to adult patients with a suspected bacterial infection, treated with intravenous antibiotics. The primary endpoint was the QI sum score, calculated by the patient's sum of performed checklist-items divided by the total number of QIs that applied to that specific patient. Outcomes before and after the introduction of the checklist were compared. The percentage of patients with a QI sum score ≥50% increased significantly during the intervention (n=173) compared to baseline (n=150) (odds ratio 3.67, pchecklist was used in 63.3% of the eligible patients. The introduction of the antibiotic checklist increased appropriate antibiotic use on Aruba. Additional initiatives are necessary for further improvement per QI. These results suggest that the antibiotic checklist could be used internationally. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. 42 CFR Appendix C to Part 130 - Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist C Appendix C to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... C to Part 130—Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist ER31MY00.004...

  7. Sleep Items in the Child Behavior Checklist: A Comparison with Sleep Diaries, Actigraphy, and Polysomnography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Alice M.; Cousins, Jennifer C.; Forbes, Erika E.; Trubnick, Laura; Ryan, Neal D.; Axelson, David A.; Birmaher, Boris; Sadeh, Avi; Dahl, Ronald E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The Child Behavior Checklist is sometimes used to assess sleep disturbance despite not having been validated for this purpose. This study examined associations between the Child Behavior Checklist sleep items and other measures of sleep. Method: Participants were 122 youth (61% female, aged 7 through 17 years) with anxiety disorders…

  8. Checklist "Open Access Policies": Analysis of the Open Access Policies of Public Universities in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Bauer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This checklist provides an overview of the Open Access policies implemented at Austrian universities and extramural research institutions. Furthermore, the polices adopted at nine public universities are analyzed and the respective text modules are categorized thematically. The second part of the checklist presents measures for the promotion of Open Access following the implementation of an Open Access policy.

  9. Validation of a checklist to assess ward round performance in internal medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Kirsten; Ringsted, Charlotte; Dolmans, Diana

    2004-01-01

    on the checklist were relevant to ward round performance and that the item collection was comprehensive. Checklist mean-item scores differed between levels of expertise: junior house officers 1.4 (1.0-1.9); senior house officers 2.0 (1.5-2.9); specialist trainees 2.5 (1.8-2.8), and specialists 2.7 (2...

  10. Pilot Boarding Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pilot boarding areas are locations at sea where pilots familiar with local waters board incoming vessels to navigate their passage to a destination port. Pilotage is...

  11. Annotated checklist of Albanian butterflies (Lepidoptera, Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudi Verovnik

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Republic of Albania has a rich diversity of flora and fauna. However, due to its political isolation, it has never been studied in great depth, and consequently, the existing list of butterfly species is outdated and in need of radical amendment. In addition to our personal data, we have studied the available literature, and can report a total of 196 butterfly species recorded from the country. For some of the species in the list we have given explanations for their inclusion and made other annotations. Doubtful records have been removed from the list, and changes in taxonomy have been updated and discussed separately. The purpose of our paper is to remove confusion and conflict regarding published records. However, the revised checklist should not be considered complete: it represents a starting point for further research.

  12. Elaboration and Validation of the Medication Prescription Safety Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Aline de Oliveira Meireles; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Guimarães; Nascimento, Kleiton Gonçalves do; Felix, Márcia Marques Dos Santos; Pires, Patrícia da Silva; Barbosa, Maria Helena

    2017-08-03

    to elaborate and validate a checklist to identify compliance with the recommendations for the structure of medication prescriptions, based on the Protocol of the Ministry of Health and the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency. methodological research, conducted through the validation and reliability analysis process, using a sample of 27 electronic prescriptions. the analyses confirmed the content validity and reliability of the tool. The content validity, obtained by expert assessment, was considered satisfactory as it covered items that represent the compliance with the recommendations regarding the structure of the medication prescriptions. The reliability, assessed through interrater agreement, was excellent (ICC=1.00) and showed perfect agreement (K=1.00). the Medication Prescription Safety Checklist showed to be a valid and reliable tool for the group studied. We hope that this study can contribute to the prevention of adverse events, as well as to the improvement of care quality and safety in medication use. elaborar e validar um instrumento tipo checklist para identificar a adesão às recomendações na estrutura das prescrições de medicamentos, a partir do Protocolo do Ministério da Saúde e Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária. pesquisa metodológica, conduzida por meio do processo de validade e análise de confiabilidade, com amostra de 27 prescrições eletrônicas. análises realizadas confirmaram a validade de conteúdo e a confiabilidade da versão do instrumento. A validade de conteúdo, obtida por meio da avaliação de juízes, foi considerada satisfatória por contemplar itens que representam a adesão às recomendações na estrutura das prescrições de medicamentos. A confiabilidade, avaliada por interobservadores, apresentou-se excelente (ICC=1,00) e de concordância perfeita (K=1,00). o instrumento Lista de Verificação de Segurança na Prescrição de Medicamentos demonstrou-se válido e confiável para o grupo estudado. Espera

  13. An annotated checklist of the Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) from New Caledonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattier, Romain; Jourdan, Hervé; Mille, Christian; Chazeau, Jean

    2015-12-17

    We present an updated checklist of the ladybird beetle fauna of New Caledonia. Fifty species have been tracked from literature and collections, but six should be removed from the list as they represent false records, invalid or unestablished species: Coccinella boletifera Fauvel, Harmonia conformis (Boisduval), Menochilus duodecimpunctatus (Fauvel), Micraspis lineola (Fabricius), Orcus australasiae Boisduval, and Curinus coeruleus (Mulsant). After our investigations, the current described ladybird beetle fauna totals 44 named species, belonging to 18 valid genera. The endemism rate is 47.7% (21 species), with one endemic subgenus, Scymnus (Caledonus). Based on comparisons of the coccinellid faunas of surrounding regions, the New Caledonian fauna has affinities with Australia and Papua New Guinea more than with the rest of the Pacific area. At least 19 species (43.2%) seem to have been introduced by human activities (either deliberately or accidentally).

  14. A checklist to the wasps of Peru (Hymenoptera, Aculeata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Rasmussen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The first checklist to the 225 genera and 1169 reported species-group taxa of aculeate wasps of Peru is presented. The list is based on a literature survey and examination of Peruvian entomological collections and include locality references for each taxon. Bibliographic references for the identification of families, genera, and species are provided when available. The occurrence data are published in addition as a downloadable file (doi: 10.3897/zookeys.15.196.app.2.ds, doi: 10.3897/zookeys.15.196.app.3.ds, and 10.3897/zookeys.15.196.app.4.ds and were uploaded onto GBIF infrastructure simultaneously with the publication process. The following new combinations are proposed: Ancistroceroides cirrifer (Zavattari, 1912, Ancistrocerus epicus (Zavattari, 1912, and Stenodynerus corallineipes (Zavattari, 1912.

  15. Checklist of sea turtles endohelminth in Neotropical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werneck M. R.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a list of parasites described in sea turtles from the Neotropical region. Through the review of literature the occurrence of 79 taxa of helminthes parasites were observed, mostly consisting of the Phylum Platyhelminthes with 76 species distributed in 14 families and 2 families of the Phylum Nematoda within 3 species. Regarding the parasite records, the most studied host was the green turtle (Chelonia mydas followed by the hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata, olive ridley turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea, loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta and leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea. Overall helminths were reported in 12 countries and in the Caribbean Sea region. This checklist is the largest compilation of data on helminths found in sea turtles in the Neotropical region.

  16. An annotated checklist of the Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphidomorpha of Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowski Wacław

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a comprehensive compilation of 764 taxa (species and subspecies, distributed over 167 genera, belonging to 17 subfamilies, three families and three superfamilies of Aphidomorpha recorded to date from Poland. The systematic positions of 19 taxa have been revised in accordance with recent changes in nomenclature. The presence in the Polish aphidofauna of Drepanosiphum oregonensis and Coloradoa huculaki, previously included without any distribution data in checklists of Polish aphids, has been confirmed. One species Sitobion (Sitobion alopecuri is recognized as being new to Poland. At least 44 species (6% of local fauna of Aphidomorpha are alien to Poland; among them 11 species collected from plants imported or cultivated in indoor conditions are listed.

  17. A checklist of the fish fauna of Greenland waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter R.; Nielsen, Jørgen G.; Knudsen, Steen W.

    2010-01-01

    Although the Greenland fish fauna has been studied for more than 200 years, new species continue to be discovered. We here take the opportunity of the International Polar Year 2007-08 (IPY) to present an updated check-list of the fishes of Greenland and discuss whether the growing diversity can...... be explained by global warming. A total of 269 species from 80 families are known from the Greenland Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), based on published literature and specimens in museum collections. Since the latest publication covering all known Greenland fishes [ Nielsen & Bertelsen 1992], 57 species have...... of the many new records of deep-water fishes is most likely increasing fishing efforts down to depths of 1500 m. The deep waters off Greenland (> 1500 m), however, remain almost unstudied....

  18. A New Moss Checklist of Negara Brunei Darussalam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Benito C.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A new moss checklist with updated nomenclature is given for the small country of Brunei Darussalam located in the northern part of Borneo. A total of 103 species in 50 genera are now collected and reported. The country’s moss flora is still very much undercollected, judging from our present results: (i the absence of cosmopolitan and common paleotropical species such as Bryum apiculatum Schwägr., Callicostella papillata (Mont. Mitt., Funaria hygrometrica Hedw., Isopterygium minutirameum (Müll. Hal. A. Jaegr., Octoblepharum albidum Hedw. and Philonotis hastata (Duby Wijk & Margad.; (ii the absence of widespread families such as Pottiaceae and Ditrichaceae; and (iii the under-representation of speciose genera such as Ectropothecium, Macromitrium, Thuidium and Trichosteleum, with only one species collected. The incompleteness of our knowledge of the moss flora makes it impossible to assess the country’s endangered moss species.

  19. An annotated checklist of earthworms of Greece (Clitellata: Megadrili).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szederjesi, Tímea; Vavoulidou, Evangelia; Chalkia, Christina; Dányi, László; Csuzdi, Csaba

    2017-05-26

    The earthworm fauna of Greece is reviewed. According to the up-to-date checklist, the earthworm fauna of Greece consists of 67 species and subspecies, of which 59 taxa belong to the family Lumbricidae, three to Megascolecidae, two to Acanthodrilidae and to Ocnerodrilidae and one taxon to the family Criodrilidae. Three species are recorded for the first time from the country: Allolobophora kosowensis kosowensis Karaman, 1968, Amynthas gracilis (Kinberg, 1867) and Eukerria saltensis (Beddard, 1895). Eisenia spelaea var. athenica Černosvitov, 1938 is proposed to be a synonym of Aporrectodea rosea (Savigny, 1826). The earthworm fauna of Greece is characterized by a large number of strict endemic species belonging to the family Lumbricidae (9 taxa), together with the occurrence of another 10 Balkanic endemic species.

  20. Checklists: An under-used tool for the inventory and monitoring of plants and animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droege, S.; Cyr, A.; Larivee, J.

    1998-01-01

    Checklists are widely used to catalog field observations of plants and animals. We used 25 years of bird checklist data from the Etudes des Populations d'Oiseaux du Quebec program to examine the ability of checklists to produce reliable conservation, management, and ecological information. We found that checklists can provide reliable information on changes in bird populations, phenology, and geographic and climate abundance patterns at local, regional, and continental scales. Professional and amateur conservation groups that need to develop extensive monitoring programs should take advantage of the fact that checklists, unlike other time-consuming and expensive techniques, can be used to detect large-scale changes in an entire community of species.

  1. A Multimedia Child Developmental Screening Checklist: Design and Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Chen, Li-Ying; Cheng, Chih-Hsiu; Ju, Yan-Ying; Chen, Chia-Ling; Tseng, Kevin C

    2016-10-24

    Identifying disability early in life confers long-term benefits for children. The Taipei City Child Development Screening tool, second version (Taipei II) provides checklists for 13 child age groups from 4 months to 6 years. However, the usability of a text-based screening tool largely depends on the literacy level and logical reasoning ability of the caregivers, as well as language barriers caused by increasing numbers of immigrants. The objectives of this study were to (1) design and develop a Web-based multimedia version of the current Taipei II developmental screening tool, and (2) investigate the measurement equivalence of this multimedia version to the original paper-based version. To develop the multimedia version of Taipei II, a team of experts created illustrations, translations, and dubbing of the original checklists. The developmental screening test was administered to a total of 390 primary caregivers of children aged between 4 months and 6 years. Psychometric testing revealed excellent agreement between the paper and multimedia versions of Taipei II. Good to excellent reliabilities were demonstrated for all age groups for both the cross-mode similarity (mode intraclass correlation range 0.85-0.96) and the test-retest reliability (r=.93). Regarding the usability, the mean score was 4.80 (SD 0.03), indicating that users were satisfied with their multimedia website experience. The multimedia tool produced essentially equivalent results to the paper-based tool. In addition, it had numerous advantages, such as it can facilitate active participation and promote early screening of target populations. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02359591; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02359591 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6l21mmdNn).

  2. Checklist for transition to new highway fuel(s).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risch, C.; Santini, D.J. (Energy Systems)

    2011-12-15

    Transportation is vital to the U.S. economy and society. As such, U.S. Presidents have repeatedly stated that the nation needs to reduce dependence on petroleum, especially for the highway transportation sector. Throughout history, highway transportation fuel transitions have been completed successfully both in United States and abroad. Other attempts have failed, as described in Appendix A: Historical Highway Fuel Transitions. Planning for a transition is critical because the changes can affect our nation's ability to compete in the world market. A transition will take many years to complete. While it is tempting to make quick decisions about the new fuel(s) of choice, it is preferable and necessary to analyze all the pertinent criteria to ensure that correct decisions are made. Doing so will reduce the number of changes in highway fuel(s). Obviously, changes may become necessary because of occurrences such as significant technology breakthroughs or major world events. With any and all of the possible transitions to new fuel(s), the total replacement of gasoline and diesel fuels is not expected. These conventional fuels are envisioned to coexist with the new fuel(s) for decades, while the revised fuel and vehicle infrastructures are implemented. The transition process must analyze the needs of the primary 'players,' which consist of the customers, the government, the fuel industry, and the automotive industry. To maximize the probability of future successes, the prime considerations of these groups must be addressed. Section 2 presents a succinct outline of the Checklist. Section 3 provides a brief discussion about the groupings on the Checklist.

  3. A compiled checklist of seaweeds of Sudanese Red Sea coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Abdel Rahim Osman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present an updated and compiled checklist of Sudanese seaweeds as an example for the region for conservational as well as developmental purposes. Methods: The checklist was developed based on both field investigations using line transect method at 4 sites along the Red Sea coast of Sudan and review of available studies done on Sudanese seaweeds. Results: In total 114 macroalgal names were recorded and were found to be distributed in 16 orders, 34 families, and 62 genera. The Rhodophyceae macroalgae contained 8 orders, 17 families, 32 genera and 47 species. The Phaeophyceae macroalgae composed of 4 orders, 5 families, 17 genera, and 28 species. The 39 species of the Chlorophyceae macroalgae belong to 2 classes, 4 orders, 12 families, and 14 genera. The present paper proposed the addition of 11 macroalgal taxa to be included in Sudan seaweeds species list. These include 3 red seaweed species, 1 brown seaweed species and 7 green seaweed species. Conclusions: This list is not yet inclusive and it only represents the macroalgal species common to the intertidal areas of Sudan Red Sea coast. Further investigation may reveal the presence of more species. While significant levels of diversity and endemism were revealed for other groups of organisms in the Red Sea region, similar work still has to be performed for seaweeds. Considering the impact of climate change on communities’ structure and composition and the growing risk of maritime transportation through the Red Sea particularly that may originate from oil tankers as well as that may emanate from oil exploration, baseline data on seaweeds are highly required for management purposes.

  4. Probing the effect of OSCE checklist length on inter-observer reliability and observer accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Katrina F; Giffin, Nick A; Stewart, Samuel A; Bullock, Graham B

    2015-01-01

    The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is a widely employed tool for measuring clinical competence. In the drive toward comprehensive assessment, OSCE stations and checklists may become increasingly complex. The objective of this study was to probe inter-observer reliability and observer accuracy as a function of OSCE checklist length. Study participants included emergency physicians and senior residents in Emergency Medicine at Dalhousie University. Participants watched an identical series of four, scripted, standardized videos enacting 10-min OSCE stations and completed corresponding assessment checklists. Each participating observer was provided with a random combination of two 40-item and two 20-item checklists. A panel of physicians scored the scenarios through repeated video review to determine the 'gold standard' checklist scores. Fifty-seven observers completed 228 assessment checklists. Mean observer accuracy ranged from 73 to 93% (14.6-18.7/20), with an overall accuracy of 86% (17.2/20), and inter-rater reliability range of 58-78%. After controlling for station and individual variation, no effect was observed regarding the number of checklist items on overall accuracy (p=0.2305). Consistency in ratings was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficient and demonstrated no significant difference in consistency between the 20- and 40-item checklists (ranged from 0.432 to 0.781, p-values from 0.56 to 0.73). The addition of 20 checklist items to a core list of 20 items in an OSCE assessment checklist does not appear to impact observer accuracy or inter-rater reliability.

  5. Validation of the Malayalam version of Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs pain scale in cancer patients in the Regional Cancer Centre, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoukkathali Anzar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The Self-administered Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (S-LANSS is a 7-item self-report scale developed to identify pain which is of predominantly neuropathic origin. The aim of this study was to develop a Malayalam version of the LANSS and to test its validity and reliability in chronic pain patients. Methodology: We enrolled 101 Malayalam-speaking chronic pain patients who visited the Division of Palliative Medicine, Regional Cancer Centre, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India. The translated version of S- LANSS was constructed by standard means. Fifty-one neuropathic pain and fifty nociceptive pain patients were identified by an independent pain physician and were subjected to the new pain scale by a palliative care nurse who was blinded to the diagnosis. The “gold standard diagnosis” is what the physician makes after clinical examination. Its validation, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were determined. Results: Fifty-one neuropathic pain and fifty nociceptive pain patients were subjected to the Malayalam version of S-LANSS pain scale for validity testing. The agreement by Cohen's Kappa 0.743, Chi-square test P < 0.001, sensitivity 89.58, specificity 84.91, positive predictive value 84.31, negative predictive value 90.00, accuracy by 87.13, and likelihood ratio 5.94. Conclusion: The Malayalam version of S-LANSS pain scale is a validated screening tool for identifying neuropathic pain in chronic pain patients in Malayalam-speaking regions.

  6. Development of the Japanese Version of the Leeds Assessment of the Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs Pain Scale: Diagnostic Utility in a Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomura, Tatsuya; Sumitani, Masahiko; Matsudaira, Ko; Kawaguchi, Mika; Inoue, Reo; Hozumi, Jun; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Oshima, Hirofumi; Mori, Kanto; Taketomi, Shuji; Inui, Hiroshi; Tahara, Keitaro; Yamagami, Ryota; Hayakawa, Kazuhiro

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to assess the diagnostic utility of the linguistically validated Japanese version of the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs Pain Scale (LANSS-J) as a screening tool for neuropathic pain in the clinical setting. Patients with neuropathic pain or nociceptive pain who were 20 to 85 years of age were included. Sensitivity and specificity using the original cutoff value of 12 were assessed to evaluate the diagnostic utility of the LANSS-J. Sensitivity and specificity with possible cutoff values were calculated, along with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. We then evaluated agreement regarding assessment of the LANSS-J by two investigators. We used the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for the total score and Cohen's kappa coefficient for each item. Data for patients with neuropathic pain (n = 30) and those with nociceptive pain (n = 29) were analyzed. With a cutoff of 12, the sensitivity was 63.3% (19/30) and the specificity 93.1% (27/29). Sensitivity improved substantially with a cutoff of ≤ 11 (≥ 83.3%, 25/30). High specificity (93.1%, 27/29) was sustained with a cutoff of 9 to 12. The ICC for the total score was 0.85, indicating sufficient agreement. Kappa coefficients ranged from 0.68 to 0.84. The LANSS-J is a valid screening tool for detecting neuropathic pain. Our results suggest that employing the original cutoff value provides high specificity, although a lower cutoff value of 10 or 11 (with its high specificity maintained) may be more beneficial when pain attributed to neuropathic mechanisms is suspected in Japanese patients. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  7. Factor analysis of treatment outcomes from a UK specialist addiction service: relationship between the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire, Social Satisfaction Questionnaire and 10-item Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairhurst, Caroline; Böhnke, Jan R; Gabe, Rhian; Croudace, Tim J; Tober, Gillian; Raistrick, Duncan

    2014-11-01

    To examine the relationship between three outcome measures used by a specialist addiction service (UK): the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire (LDQ), the Social Satisfaction Questionnaire (SSQ) and the 10-item Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE-10). A clinical sample of 715 service user records was extracted from a specialist addiction service (2011) database. The LDQ (dependence), SSQ (social satisfaction) and CORE-10 (psychological distress) were routinely administered at the start of treatment and again between 3 and 12 months post-treatment. A mixed pre/post-treatment dataset of 526 service users was subjected to exploratory factor analysis. Parallel Analysis and the Hull method were used to suggest the most parsimonious factor solution. Exploratory factor analysis with three factors accounted for 66.2% of the total variance but Parallel Analysis supported two factors as sufficient to account for observed correlations among items. In the two-factor solution, LDQ items and nine of the 10 CORE-10 items loaded on the first factor >0.41, and the SSQ items on factor 2 with loadings >0.63. A two dimensional summary appears sufficient and clinically meaningful. Among specialist addiction service users, social satisfaction appears to be a unique construct of addiction and is not the same as variation due to psychological distress or dependence. Our interpretation of the findings is that dependence is best thought of as a specific psychological condition subsumed under the construct psychological distress. © 2014 The Authors. Drug and Alcohol Review published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  8. Validation of the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) questionnaire and its correlation with visual analog pain scales in Greek population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanos, Konstantinos; Lachanas, Vasileios A; Chan, Philip; Bargiota, Alexandra; Giannoukas, Athanasios D

    2015-01-01

    One of the diagnostic tools of neuropathetic pain (NP) relies on screening questionnaires including the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) questionnaire. To apply and validate the LANSS questionnaire in Greek population. To assess any correlation between LANSS score and visual analog pain scales. A prospective instrument validation study of LANSS was conducted in University Hospital of Larissa, on 70 patients (35 NP and 35 nociceptive pain), from April 2015 to June 2015. Visual analog pain scales (VAS-ADL; impact of pain on daily living activities, VAS-INT; pain intensity) were also assessed and correlated with LANSS scale. The mean age of NP and nociceptive pain group was 67.11±10.05 and 39.14±17.07years respectively. The mean LANSS score was 12.84 (±9.27) in initial test, and 12.54 (±9.41) in the retest evaluation. Cronbach's alpha was 0.895 and 0.901 at initial and retest examinations respectively, both values indicating good internal consistency. NP group had significant higher LANSS score than nocipeptive pain group (21.34 [±1.39] vs 4.34 [±4.86], pquestionnaire to distinguish neuropathic and nociceptive pain was 94.29% (95% CI: 80.81-99.13%), while its specificity was 88.57% (95% CI: 73.24-96.73%). A significant correlation was noticed between total LANSS score and VAS-ADL (initial r=0.248; p<0.05 and retest evaluation r=0.288; p<0.05). The LANSS score is a reliable and valuable instrument to assess neuropathic pain in diabetic patients and to differentiate it from nociceptive pain in Greek population. In diabetic patients LANSS score is associated with impact on daily activities and potentially with quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A 'paperless' wall-mounted surgical safety checklist with migrated leadership can improve compliance and team engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Aaron Pin Chien; Devcich, Daniel A; Hannam, Jacqueline; Lee, Tracey; Merry, Alan F; Mitchell, Simon J

    2016-12-01

    Outcome benefits of using the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist rely on compliance with checklist administration. To evaluate engagement of operating room (OR) subteams (anaesthesia, surgery and nursing), and compliance with administering checklist domains (Sign In, Time Out and Sign Out) and checklist items, after introducing a wall-mounted paperless checklist with migration of process leadership (Sign In, Time Out and Sign Out led by anaesthesia, surgery and nursing, respectively). This was a pre-post observational study in which 261 checklist domains in 111 operations were observed 2 months after changing the checklist administration paradigm. Compliance with administration of the checklist domains and individual checklist items was recorded, as was the number of OR subteams engaged. Comparison was made with 2013 data from the same OR suite prior to the paradigm change. Data are presented as 2013 versus the present study. The Sign In, Time Out and Sign Out domains were administered in 96% vs 98% (p=0.69), 99% vs 99% (p=1.00) and 22% vs 84% (pImprovements in team engagement and compliance with administering checklist items followed introduction of migrated leadership of checklist administration and a wall-mounted checklist. This paradigm change was relatively simple and inexpensive. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Guidelines 2.0: systematic development of a comprehensive checklist for a successful guideline enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schünemann, Holger J; Wiercioch, Wojtek; Etxeandia, Itziar; Falavigna, Maicon; Santesso, Nancy; Mustafa, Reem; Ventresca, Matthew; Brignardello-Petersen, Romina; Laisaar, Kaja-Triin; Kowalski, Sérgio; Baldeh, Tejan; Zhang, Yuan; Raid, Ulla; Neumann, Ignacio; Norris, Susan L; Thornton, Judith; Harbour, Robin; Treweek, Shaun; Guyatt, Gordon; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Reinap, Marge; Brozek, Jan; Oxman, Andrew; Akl, Elie A

    2014-02-18

    Although several tools to evaluate the credibility of health care guidelines exist, guidance on practical steps for developing guidelines is lacking. We systematically compiled a comprehensive checklist of items linked to relevant resources and tools that guideline developers could consider, without the expectation that every guideline would address each item. We searched data sources, including manuals of international guideline developers, literature on guidelines for guidelines (with a focus on methodology reports from international and national agencies, and professional societies) and recent articles providing systematic guidance. We reviewed these sources in duplicate, extracted items for the checklist using a sensitive approach and developed overarching topics relevant to guidelines. In an iterative process, we reviewed items for duplication and omissions and involved experts in guideline development for revisions and suggestions for items to be added. We developed a checklist with 18 topics and 146 items and a webpage to facilitate its use by guideline developers. The topics and included items cover all stages of the guideline enterprise, from the planning and formulation of guidelines, to their implementation and evaluation. The final checklist includes links to training materials as well as resources with suggested methodology for applying the items. The checklist will serve as a resource for guideline developers. Consideration of items on the checklist will support the development, implementation and evaluation of guidelines. We will use crowdsourcing to revise the checklist and keep it up to date.

  11. The check-list in operating rooms, as perceived by tunisians caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlili, Mohamed Ayoub; Mallouli, Manel; Aouicha, Wiem; Guedhami, Fatma; Ben Dhiab, Mohamed

    2017-02-01

    The operating room is a high-risk environment for the patient and the healthcare professional and therefore their safety remains a priority in this unit. The checklist "patient safety in the operating room" showed, through the years, its effectiveness in promoting the quality of care and the patient safety. To explore the perception of operating theaters professionals on the use of the checklist. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study among operating theaters professionals of the university hospitals in Sousse, Tunisia, and this during the period from 15 July 2015 until 15 September 2015. The measuring instrument used is derived from the validated questionnaire and proposed by the National Health Authority "individual questionnaire of opinion on the use of the checklist". 98.1% expressed agreement that the checklist improves safety culture and 97.2% say that it is an opportunity to avoid mistakes. 88.1% think that the checklist is an additional administrative burden. The whole study population (100%) confirms the usefulness of the checklist in improving patient safety in the operating room. Professionals operating theaters have expressed a positive attitude towards the checklist, however, its implementation raises some difficulties.

  12. Inter-rater reliability of an observation-based ergonomics assessment checklist for office workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Michelle Jessica; Straker, Leon Melville; Comans, Tracy Anne; Johnston, Venerina

    2016-12-01

    To establish the inter-rater reliability of an observation-based ergonomics assessment checklist for computer workers. A 37-item (38-item if a laptop was part of the workstation) comprehensive observational ergonomics assessment checklist comparable to government guidelines and up to date with empirical evidence was developed. Two trained practitioners assessed full-time office workers performing their usual computer-based work and evaluated the suitability of workstations used. Practitioners assessed each participant consecutively. The order of assessors was randomised, and the second assessor was blinded to the findings of the first. Unadjusted kappa coefficients between the raters were obtained for the overall checklist and subsections that were formed from question-items relevant to specific workstation equipment. Twenty-seven office workers were recruited. The inter-rater reliability between two trained practitioners achieved moderate to good reliability for all except one checklist component. This checklist has mostly moderate to good reliability between two trained practitioners. Practitioner Summary: This reliable ergonomics assessment checklist for computer workers was designed using accessible government guidelines and supplemented with up-to-date evidence. Employers in Queensland (Australia) can fulfil legislative requirements by using this reliable checklist to identify and subsequently address potential risk factors for work-related injury to provide a safe working environment.

  13. Incorporating the World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist into practice at two hospitals in Liberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Christina T; Walsh, Denise; Tomarken, James L; Alpern, Rachelle; Shakpeh, John; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2012-06-01

    The impact of the World Health Organization's Patient Safety Programme's 19-item Surgical Safety Checklist on surgical processes and outcomes was assessed in 2008-2009 at two hospitals in the resource-limited setting of Liberia. In the preintervention phase, data were prospectively collected on surgical processes and outcomes from 232 consecutively enrolled patients who were undergoing surgery. In the postintervention phase, data were collected on 249 consecutively enrolled patients after the introduction of the Surgical Safety Checklist. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the adjusted association between the introduction of the checklist and surgical process and outcome measures. These analyses were conducted among the pooled data, as well as for data stratified by hospital. The introduction of the checklist was associated with significant (p processes and surgical outcomes. The stratified analysis presented a more nuanced result by hospital. In Hospital 1, the checklist was significantly associated with improved adherence to the composite measure of surgical processes but was not associated with improved surgical outcomes. In contrast, in Hospital 2, it was significantly associated with improved surgical outcomes but was not associated with improved adherence to the composite measure of surgical processes. Although the implementation of a surgical safety checklist in Liberia was associated with significant improvements in processes and outcomes overall, differences at the hospital level suggest that the checklist's mechanism of improvement may be influenced by the availability of resources needed to complete recommended processes, variation in team functioning, and organizational context.

  14. Effect of daily use of electronic checklist on physical rehabilitation consultations in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rashid; Cornelius, Patrick J; Herasevich, Vitaly; Gajic, Ognjen; Kashyap, Rahul

    2017-04-01

    In intensive care unit (ICU) practice, great emphasis is placed on the functional stabilization of the major organ systems, sometimes at the expense of physical rehabilitation. Checklists have shown to be an effective tool for standardizing care models. Our aim was to the study the effect of the use of an electronic checklist on occupational therapy/physical therapy (OT-PT) consults in critically ill patients. A retrospective observational study of all adults admitted for the first time in an academic medical ICU in year 2014 was conducted. The patient demographics, outcomes, checklist use, and physical therapy consults were collected from Electronic Medical Records (EMR). A total of 2399 unique patients were admitted to the medical ICU, 55% were male and median (IQR) age was 65 (52-77) years. A total of 17% of patients received OT-PT consults among patients with checklist use (N=1897), and among non-checklist user (N=502), it was 7.6%. The total time of OT-PT administered in the ICU was 48 vs 31min, p=0.08.The patients who received the daily electronic checklist had high medical acuity but had lower ICU mortality. Hospital mortality was found to be no different. The use of the electronic checklist in the ICU was associated with increased number of the OT-PT consults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Improvement in documentation using an electronic checklist for shoulder dystocia deliveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deering, Shad H; Tobler, Kyle; Cypher, Rebecca

    2010-07-01

    To estimate if using an electronic checklist improved the documentation of shoulder dystocias that occurred at our institution. A standard checklist of key elements that should be included in the delivery note after a shoulder dystocia was added to the electronic delivery note at our institution. We identified shoulder dystocia deliveries from the department's delivery database for 3 years before and after the checklist was included and compared delivery notes written from these time periods with respect to their content. Forty-six shoulder dystocia deliveries were identified before the checklist being available and 82 after. There was a significant increase noted in the frequency with which several elements were documented after the checklist was implemented including McRoberts maneuver (before checklist 69%, compared with after checklist 90%, P=.003), head-to-body interval (22% compared with 84%, Pshoulder was anterior (48% compared with 96%, Pshoulder dystocia in the delivery note resulted in a significant improvement in the documentation of several critical elements. II.

  16. Barriers to the implementation of checklists in the office-based procedural setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Fred E; Fernando, Rohesh J; Urman, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety is critical for the patients, providers, and risk managers in the office-based procedural setting, and the same standard of care should be maintained regardless of the healthcare environment. Checklists may improve patient safety and potentially decrease risk. This study explored utilization of checklists in the office-based setting and the potential barriers to their implementation. A cross-sectional prospective study was performed by using a 19-question anonymous survey designed with REDCap®. Medical providers including physicians and nurses from 25 different offices that performed procedures participated, and 38 individual responses were included in the study. Only 50% of offices surveyed use safety checklists in their practice. Only 34% had checklists or equivalent protocol for emergencies such as anaphylaxis or failed airway. As many as 23.7% of respondents indicated that they encountered barriers to implementing checklists. The top barriers identified in the study were no incentive to use a checklist (77.8%), no mandate from a local or federal regulatory agency (44.4%), being too time consuming (33.3%), and lack of training (33.3%). Reasons identified that would encourage providers to use checklists included a clear mandate (36.8%) and evidence-based research (26.3%). Checklists are not being universally utilized in the office-based setting. There are barriers preventing their successful implementation. Risk managers may be able to improve patient safety and decrease risk by encouraging practitioners, possibly through incentives, to use customizable safety checklists. © 2014 American Society for Healthcare Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.

  17. Internationally Standardized Reporting (Checklist) on the Sustainable Development Performance of Uranium Mining and Processing Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The Internationally Standardized Reporting Checklist on the Sustainable Development Performance of Uranium Mining and Processing Sites: • A mutual and beneficial work between a core group of uranium miners and nuclear utilities; • An approach based on an long term experience, international policies and sustainable development principles; • A process to optimize the reporting mechanism, tools and efforts; • 11 sections focused on the main sustainable development subject matters known at an operational and headquarter level. The WNA will make available the sustainable development checklist for member utilities and uranium suppliers. Utilities and suppliers are encouraged to use the checklist for sustainable development verification.

  18. Annotated checklist and database for vascular plants of the Jemez Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxx, T. S.; Pierce, L.; Tierney, G. D.; Hansen, L. A.

    1998-03-01

    Studies done in the last 40 years have provided information to construct a checklist of the Jemez Mountains. The present database and checklist builds on the basic list compiled by Teralene Foxx and Gail Tierney in the early 1980s. The checklist is annotated with taxonomic information, geographic and biological information, economic uses, wildlife cover, revegetation potential, and ethnographic uses. There are nearly 1000 species that have been noted for the Jemez Mountains. This list is cross-referenced with the US Department of Agriculture Natural Resource Conservation Service PLANTS database species names and acronyms. All information will soon be available on a Web Page.

  19. CONSORT-EHEALTH: implementation of a checklist for authors and editors to improve reporting of web-based and mobile randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysenbach, Gunther

    2013-01-01

    Randomized trials of web-based and mobile interventions pose very specific issues and challenges. A set of best practices on how to conduct and report such trials was recently summarized in the CONSORT-EHEALTH statement (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials of Electronic and Mobile HEalth Applications and onLine TeleHealth), published in August 2011 as draft and in December 2011 as journal article (V1.6.1). The purpose of this presentation is to review the results of the pilot implementation at the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR), a leading eHealth journal, where reporting of trials in accordance with CONSORT-EHEALTH became mandatory in late 2011. Authors of all randomized trials submitted to JMIR were asked to complete an electronic questionnaire, which involved copying pertinent manuscript sections into a CONSORT EHEALTH database form, were asked to score the importance of CONSORT EHEALTH items, and were asked to provide narrative feedback on the value of the process. Between August 2011 and November 2012, 67 randomized trials were submitted, of which 61 were intended for publication in JMIR. Authors reported that it took between 1 and 16 hours to complete the checklist including making required changes to their manuscripts. 72% (48/67) of authors reported they made minor changes to the manuscript, 6% (4/67) made major changes. Most authors felt it was a useful process that improved their manuscripts: 63% (42/67) said it improved their manuscript, 13% (9/67) said it did not, 12% (8/67) indicated that it had improved a little. The CONSORT EHEALTH statement and checklist appeared successful in improving the quality of reporting. The checklist should be endorsed and used by authors and editors of other journals.

  20. Adopting a surgical safety checklist could save money and improve the quality of care in U.S. hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semel, Marcus E; Resch, Stephen; Haynes, Alex B; Funk, Luke M; Bader, Angela; Berry, William R; Weiser, Thomas G; Gawande, Atul A

    2010-09-01

    Use of the World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist has been associated with a significant reduction in major postoperative complications after inpatient surgery. We hypothesized that implementing the checklist in the United States would generate cost savings for hospitals. We performed a decision analysis comparing implementation of the checklist to existing practice in U.S. hospitals. In a hospital with a baseline major complication rate after surgery of at least 3 percent, the checklist generates cost savings once it prevents at least five major complications. Using the checklist would both save money and improve the quality of care in hospitals throughout the United States.

  1. A checklist of the vertebrates of Kerala State, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Nameer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the first publication on vertebrates of India (Blanford 1888–1890, a huge wealth of information has been compiled on the vertebrate fauna of various biogeographic zones of the country, especially the Western Ghats.  The state of Kerala comprising of a land area of 38,863km2, 590km coastline, an intricate system of backwaters along the coast, tropical moist forests of the Western Ghats, the highly undulating terrain, and the tropical monsoon is a unique geographical and environmental entity rich in biodiversity.  A region-specific checklist that summarises and documents the current status of vertebrate diversity provides benchmark data for documentation and appreciation of biodiversity at regional level.  Further, with the current rate of global biodiversity loss and concordant conservation efforts, the taxonomic community has a greater responsibility to make scientific information available to scientists, policy makers, politicians, research students and all relevant stakeholders, an attempt that has been made in the present paper.  The State of Kerala has 1847 species of vertebrates in 330 families and 81 orders, of which 386 are endemic to the Western Ghats region (of the Western Ghats - Sri Lanka Hotspot, and 205 species as threatened. Six hundred and eighty species of vertebrates of Kerala have been listed in the various schedules of the Indian Wildlife (Protection Act, while 148 are listed in the different appendices of CITES.  

  2. Tardigrades of Sweden; an updated check-list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, Roberto; Jönsson, K Ingemar; Kristensen, Reinhardt Møbjerg

    2015-07-07

    Tardigrades occur worldwide and in a variety of ecosystems and habitats representing an important component of the micrometazoan biodiversity. Several studies documenting the occurrence of tardigrades in Sweden have been published since the first reports in early 1900, but no comprehensive summary of these studies have been published. We compiled the available information on recorded tardigrades from Sweden, using material from published studies and museum and university collections. In total, our review document 101 species of tardigrades that have been recorded from Sweden (an updated checklist of tardigrades from Sweden will be available online), of which 14 species are new records for the country. The highest number of species was recorded in the northernmost province of Lappland and the more southern provinces of Uppland and Skåne, while much lower species numbers are reported from the middle part of Sweden. This pattern probably represents biased sampling activities of biologists rather than real differences in biodiversity of tardigrades. In view of the few studies that have been made on tardigrade biodiversity in Sweden, the relatively high number of tardigrade species recorded, representing almost a tenth of the species recorded worldwide, indicates that many more species remain to be found. In this respect, more studies of the marine ecosystems along the Swedish west coast and the long Baltic Sea coastline would be of particular interest.

  3. Annotated checklist of Solanum L. (Solanaceae for Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Särkinen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The genus Solanum is among the most species-rich genera both of the Peruvian flora and of the tropical Andes in general. The present revised checklist treats 276 species of Solanum L., of which 253 are native, while 23 are introduced and/or cultivated. A total of 74 Solanum species (29% of native species are endemic to Peru. Additional 58 species occur only in small number of populations outside Peru, and these species are here labelled as near-endemics to highlight the role Peru playes in their future protection. Species diversity is observed to peak between 2500 – 3000 m elevation, but endemic species diversity is highest between 3000 – 3500 m elevation. Cajamarca has the highest number of endemic (29 spp. and total species (130 spp., even when considering the effect of area. Centers of endemic species diversity are observed in provinces of Cajamarca (Cajamarca, Huaraz and Carhuaz (Ancash, and Canta and Huarochirí (Lima. Secondary centres of endemism with high concentrations of both endemics and near-endemics are found in San Ignacio and Cutervo (Cajamarca, Santiago de Chuco (La Libertad, Oxapampa (Pasco, and Cusco (Cusco. Current diversity patterns are highly correlated with collection densities, and further collecting is needed across all areas, especially from Arequipa, Ayacucho, Puno, Ancash, Huánuco, Amazonas and Cajamarca, where high levels of species diversity and endemism are indicated but only a few collections of many species are known.

  4. The Validity and Reliability of Autism Behavior Checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Yousefi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available  Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric features of the Persian version of the Autism Behavior Checklist (ABC.  Method:The International Quality of Life Assessment (IQOLA approach was used to translate the English ABC into Persian. A total sample of 184 parents of children including 114 children with autism disorder (mean age =7.21, SD =1.65 and 70 typically developing children (mean age = 6.82, SD =1.75 completed the ABC. Internal consistency, test-retest reliability, concurrent and discriminant validity, and cut-off score were assessed. Results: The results of this study revealed that the Persian version of the ABC has an acceptable degree of internal consistency (.73. Test–retest comparisons using interclass correlation confirmed the instrument’s time stability (.83. The instrument’s concurrent validity with Gilliam Autism Rating Scale (GARS was verified; the correlation between total scores was .94. In the discriminant validity, the autism group had significantly higher scores compared to the normal group. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC analysis revealed that individuals with total scores below 25 are less likely to be in the autism group. Conclusion:The Persian version of the ABC can be used as an initial screening tool in clinical contexts.

  5. Wind power installations in Switzerland - Checklist for investors in large-scale installations; Windkraftanlagen in der Schweiz. Checkliste fuer Investoren von Grossanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, W.; Kaufmann, Y.; Steiner, P. [Econcept AG, Zuerich (Switzerland); Gilgen, K.; Sartoris, A. [IRAP-HSR, Institut fuer Raumentwicklung an der Hochschule fuer Technik Rapperswil, Rapperswil (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    This report published by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at a checklist for investors in large-scale wind-power installations. The authors state that the same questions are often posed in the course of the planning and realisation of wind turbine installations. This document presents a checklist that will help achieve the following goals: Tackling the steps involved in the planning and implementation phases, increasing planning security, systematic implementation in order to reduce risks for investors and to shorten time-scales as well as the reduction of costs. Further, participative processes can be optimised by using comprehensively prepared information in order to reduce the risk of objections during project approval. The structure of the check-list is described and discussed.

  6. Correlation between Global Rating Scale and Specific Checklist Scores for Professional Behaviour of Physical Therapy Students in Practical Examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin Turner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the specific item checklist (checklist and global rating scale (GRS scores are correlated in practical skills examinations (PSEs. Professional behaviour was evaluated using both the checklist and GRS scores for 183 students in three PSEs. Mean, standard deviation, and correlation for checklist and GRS scores were calculated for each station, within each PSE. Pass rate for checklist and GRS was determined for each PSE, as well as for each individual checklist item within each PSE. Overall, pass rate was high for both checklist and GRS evaluations of professional behaviour in all PSEs. Generally, mean scores for the checklist and GRS were high, with low standard deviations, resulting in low data variability. Spearman correlation between total checklist and GRS scores was statistically significant for two out of five stations in PSE 1, five out of six stations in PSE 2, and three out of four stations in PSE 3. The GRS is comparable to the checklist for evaluation of professional behaviour in physical therapy (PT students. The correlation between the checklist and GRS appears to become stronger in the assessment of more advanced students.

  7. Psychometric Assessment of the Achenbach & Edelbrock Child Behavior Checklist in Pre-schoolers between 4,0 and 5,5 years old of lower Socioeconomic Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Zambrano Hernández

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Achenbach and Edelbrock Child Behavior Checklist was assessed psychometrically in a group of 100 preschool students between 4,0 and 5,5 years old who attend a public school at Bogota city. It was done by applying formats to parents and teachers. These formats were previously translated, linguistically adapted and piloted. The Cronbach’s Alpha for the total scale was 0,94 -0,94 for parents and 0,95 for teachers-. The analysis of factors by main components saturated the variance in 87%, although it did not correspond to the factors proposed by the original model. This measure gives diagnostic information about the children’s behavioral structure from a multiaxial perspective. Moreover, it identifies profiles of the internalizing and externalizing dimensions of behavior.

  8. Risk factors for fatigue among airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drongelen, Alwin; Boot, Cécile R L; Hlobil, Hynek; Smid, Tjabe; van der Beek, Allard J

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine risk factors for fatigue among airline pilots, taking into account person-, work-, health-, sleep-, and lifestyle-related characteristics. The study population consisted of 502 pilots who participated in the MORE Energy study. Included risk factors were either measured through an online questionnaire or provided by the company. The outcome of this study, fatigue, was assessed using the Checklist Individual Strength (CIS), and was defined as scoring more than 76 points on this questionnaire. The association of the risk factors with fatigue was determined using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Of the participating pilots, 29.5 % scored more than 76 points on the CIS and were classified as being fatigued. The fully adjusted regression model showed that person-, work-, health-, and lifestyle-related characteristics were associated with fatigue. Pilots who were aged 31 to 40 (OR 3.36, 95 % CI 1.32-8.53) or 41 to 50 (OR 4.19, 95 % CI 1.40-12.47), an evening type (OR 2.40, 95 % CI 1.38-4.16), scored higher on work-life balance disturbance (OR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.10-1.36), scored higher on need for recovery (OR 1.02, 95 % CI 1.01-1.04), scored lower on general health perception (OR 0.31, 95 % CI 0.20-0.47), were less physically active (OR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.66-0.89), and had a moderate alcohol consumption (OR 3.88, 95 % CI 1.21-12.43), were at higher risk for fatigue. Higher age, being an evening type, disturbance of the work-life balance, more need for recovery, a lower perceived health, less physical activity, and moderate alcohol consumption were shown to be risk factors for fatigue. Further longitudinal research is needed to elucidate the direction of the associations found and to evaluate the effects of possible countermeasures in airline pilots.

  9. An annotated checklist of the springtail fauna of Hungary (Hexapoda: Collembola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dányi, L

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A checklist of the species of springtails (Hexapoda: Collembola hitherto recorded from Hungary is presented. Each entry is accompanied by complete references, and remarks where appropriate. The present list contains 414 species.

  10. WHO Safer Surgery checklist compliance amongst paediatric emergency plastic surgery patients in an UK hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welmoed W. Keijzer

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: This audit showed a high overall level of compliance in the checklists that were scanned and available for scrutiny. We have identified the areas that most need improvement and suggest ways for doing so.

  11. Development of an adhesive surgical ward round checklist: a technique to improve patient safety.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dhillon, P

    2012-02-01

    Checklists have been shown to improve patient outcomes. Checklist use is seen in the pre-operative to post-operative phases of the patient pathway. An adhesive checklist was developed for ward rounds due to the positive impact it could have on improving patient safety. Over an eight day period data were collected from five consultant-led teams that were randomly selected from the surgical department and divided into sticker groups and control groups. Across the board percentage adherence to the Good Surgical Practice Guidelines (GSPG) was markedly higher in the sticker study group, 1186 (91%) in comparison with the control group 718 (55%). There was significant improvement of documentation across all areas measured. An adhesive checklist for ward round note taking is a simple and cost-effective way to improve documentation, communication, hand-over, and patient safety. Successfully implemented in a tertiary level centre in Dublin, Ireland it is easily transferable to other surgical departments globally.

  12. Examining the link between burnout and medical error: A checklist approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Tsiga

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: The Medical Error Checklists developed in this study advance the study of medical errors by proposing a comprehensive, valid and reliable self-assessment tool. The results highlight the importance of hospital organizational factors in preventing medical errors.

  13. Development of the American Society of Colon & Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) Rectal Cancer Surgery Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Sean C.; Morris, Arden M.; Baxter, Nancy N.; Fleshman, James W.; Alavi, Karim S.; Luchtefeld, Martin A.; Monson, John R. T.; Chang, George J.; Temple, Larissa K.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is excellent evidence that surgical safety checklists contribute to decreased morbidity and mortality. Objective To develop a surgical checklist comprising the key phases of care for rectal cancer patients. Design Consensus-oriented decision-making model involving iterative input from subject matter experts under the auspices of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. Results The process generated a 25-item checklist covering the spectrum of care for rectal cancer patients undergoing surgery. Limitations Lack of prospective validation. Conclusions The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Rectal Cancer Surgery checklist comprises the essential elements of pre-, intra- and postoperative care that must be addressed during the surgical treatment of patients with rectal cancer. PMID:27270511

  14. Prevention of Surgical Malpractice Claims by Use of a Surgical Safety Checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Eefje N.; Eikens-Jansen, Manon P.; Hamersma, Alice M.; Smorenburg, Susanne M.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess what proportion of surgical malpractice claims might be prevented by the use of a surgical safety checklist. Background: Surgical disciplines are overrepresented in the distribution of adverse events. The recently described multidisciplinary SURgical PAtient Safety System

  15. Critical appraisal and data extraction for systematic reviews of prediction modelling studies: the CHARMS checklist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel G M Moons

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Carl Moons and colleagues provide a checklist and background explanation for critically appraising and extracting data from systematic reviews of prognostic and diagnostic prediction modelling studies. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  16. 78 FR 38452 - Agency Information Collection (VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist) Activities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist) Activities Under OMB Review AGENCY: Office of Policy, Planning and Preparedness, Department of Veterans Affairs...

  17. A checklist of Pteridophyta of the north-eastern Orange Free State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Roux

    1986-07-01

    Full Text Available A checklist of Pteridophyta recorded within a defined area of the north-eastern Orange Free State is presented. The geology, climate and vegetation of this area are discussed in brief.

  18. A Unified Checklist for Observational and Experimental Research in Software Engineering (Version 1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, Roelf J.

    2012-01-01

    Current checklists for empirical software engineering cover either experimental research or case study research but ignore the many commonalities that exist across all kinds of empirical research. Identifying these commonalities, and explaining why they exist, would enhance our understanding of

  19. Surgical checklist for cataract surgery: progress with the initiative by the Royal College of Ophthalmologists to improve patient safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, S P; Steeples, L R; Smith, R; Azuara-Blanco, A

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The World Health Organisation (WHO) identified patient safety in surgery as an important public health matter and advised the adoption of a universal peri-operative surgical checklist. An adapted version of the WHO checklist has been mandatory in the National Health Service since 2010. Wrong intraocular lens (IOL) implantation is a particular safety concern in ophthalmology. The Royal College of Ophthalmologists launched a bespoke checklist for cataract surgery in 2010 to reduce the likelihood of preventable errors. We sought to ascertain the use of checklists in cataract surgery in 2012. Patients and methods A survey of members of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists seeking views on the use of checklists in cataract surgery. Four hundred and sixty-nine completed responses were received (18% response rate). Results Respondents worked in England (75%), Scotland (11%), Wales (5%), Northern Ireland (2%), the Republic of Ireland (1%), and overseas (6%). Ninety-four per cent of respondents support the use of a checklist for cataract surgery and 85% say that they always use a checklist before cataract surgery. Sixty-seven per cent of cataract surgeons stated they undertake a pre-operative team brief. Thirty-six per cent use a cataract surgery checklist developed locally, 18% use the college's bespoke cataract surgery checklist, 39% use a generic surgical checklist, and 4% reported that they do not use a checklist. Conclusion Ninety-three per cent of cataract surgeons responding to the questionnaire report using a surgical checklist and 67% use a team brief. However, only 54% use a checklist, which addresses the selection of the correct intraocular implant. We recommend wider adoption of checklists, which address risks relevant to cataract surgery, in particular the possibility of selection of an incorrect IOL. PMID:23703633

  20. Explosive Formulation Pilot Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Pilot Plant for Explosive Formulation supports the development of new explosives that are comprised of several components. This system is particularly beneficial...

  1. Avoidance of serious medical errors in refractive surgery using a custom preoperative checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Marie-Claude; Choi, Catherine J; Shapiro, Fred E; Urman, Richard D; Melki, Samir

    2015-10-01

    To implement and measure the effect of a surgical safety checklist on the prevention of serious medical errors (never-events). Boston Eye Group, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Retrospective cohort study. A safety checklist incorporating 28 sources of error was designed and implemented in December 2011 at the Boston Eye Group's refractive surgical center. Consecutive patients who had primary or enhancement laser vision correction (LVC) between July 2009 and February 2014 were included in this study. Before that date, a general checklist fashioned around the World Health Organization time-out procedure was used. The latter subjects were recruited as controls. The perioperative characteristics of both groups were retrospectively compared. The study comprised 2951 consecutive patients who had primary or enhancement LVC between July 2009 and February 2014; of these, 1417 patients (2744 eyes) had LVC after the implementation of a presurgical safety checklist. The general checklist fashioned around the World Health Organization time-out procedure was used for 1534 patients (2969 eyes). Both groups were comparable in patient age. The most common surgical procedures were laser in situ keratomileusis (78%) and laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy with mitomycin-C (16%). Although there were 2 (0.07%) serious errors in the prechecklist cohort, none occurred following implementation of the safety checklist protocol (P = .23). The medical errors involved wrong refractive aim in 1 patient and wrong person-wrong procedure-wrong aim in another. Multiple potential sources of error exist in refractive surgery. The broad-scale implementation of a detailed presurgical safety checklist was helpful in minimizing and preventing serious errors (never-events) during LVC. Drs. Shapiro and Urman are members of the Institute for Safety in Office-Based Surgery, a nonprofit organization whose aims are to implement safety checklists for office-based surgery. No author has a financial or

  2. Using a Checklist to Assess Pregnancy in Teenagers and Young Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, Maura K.; Tepper, Naomi K.; Kottke, Melissa; Curtis, Kathryn M.; Goedken, Peggy; Mandel, Michele G.; Marchbanks, Polly A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Health care providers should assess pregnancy in women seeking contraceptive services. Although urine pregnancy tests are available in most U.S. settings, their accuracy varies based on timing relative to missed menses, recent intercourse, or recent pregnancy. We examined the performance of a checklist based on criteria recommended in family planning guidance documents to assist health care providers in assessing pregnancy in a sample of U.S. teenagers and young women. METHODS Study participants were a convenience sample of sexually active black females aged 14–19 years seeking care in an urban family planning clinic. Each participant provided a urine sample for pregnancy testing and was then administered the checklist in two formats, audio computer-assisted self-interview and in-person interview. We estimated measures of the checklist performance compared with urine pregnancy test as the reference standard, including negative predictive value, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value. RESULTS Of 350 participants, 31 (8.9%) had a positive urine pregnancy test. The audio computer-assisted self-interview checklist indicated pregnancy was unlikely for 250 participants, of whom 241 had a negative urine pregnancy test (negative predictive value=96.4%). The sensitivity of the audio computer-assisted self-interview checklist was 71%, the specificity was 75.6%, and the positive predictive value was 22%. The in-person checklist yielded similar results. CONCLUSION The checklist may be a valuable tool to assist in assessing pregnancy in teenagers and young women. Appropriate use of the checklist by family planning providers in combination with discussion and clinically indicated use of urine pregnancy tests may reduce unnecessary barriers to contraception in this population. PMID:24785604

  3. Checklist of the earthworms (Oligochaeta) of Kerala, a constituent of Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, S Prasanth; Sathrumithra, S; Christopher, G; Thomas, A P; Julka, J M

    2016-11-15

    A checklist of earthworm species hitherto known from Kerala, a constituent of the Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot in India, is presented. In total, 88 species and subspecies are recorded, of which 55 are Kerala endemics, 9 near endemics, 14 exotics and 10 native peregrines. These belong to 26 genera and 9 families. The checklist includes the literature citation to the original description, type locality, any significant subsequent generic placements, and the district distributional pattern for each species/ subspecies.

  4. Impact of workflow on the use of the Surgical Safety Checklist: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Marshall, Andrea P; Gardiner, Therese; Lavin, Joanne; Withers, Teresa K

    2016-11-01

    Regardless of the benefits associated of the Surgical Safety Checklist, adherence across its three phases remains inconsistent. The aim of this study was to systematically identify issues around workflow that impact on surgical teams' ability to use the Surgical Safety Checklist in a large tertiary facility in Queensland, Australia. Observational audit of 10 surgical teams and 33 semi-structured interviews with 70 participants from nursing, medicine and the community were conducted. Data were collected during 2014-2015. Inductive and deductive approaches were used to analyse field observations and interview transcripts. The domain, impact of workflow on checklist utilization, was identified. Within this domain, seven categories illustrated the causal conditions which determined the ways in which workflow influenced checklist use. These categories included: 'busy doing the task'; 'clashing task priorities'; 'being pressured, running out of time'; 'adapting processes to work patterns'; 'doubling up on work'; 'a domino effect, leading to delays' and 'reality of the workflow'. One of the greatest systemic challenges to checklist use in surgery is workflow. Process changes in the way that surgical safety checklists are used need to incorporate the temporal demands of the workflow. Any changes made must ensure the process is reliable, is easily embedded into existing work routines and is not disruptive. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  5. Relationship Between Operating Room Teamwork, Contextual Factors, and Safety Checklist Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara J; Molina, George; Li, Zhonghe; Jiang, Wei; Nurudeen, Suliat; Kite, Julia G; Edmondson, Lizabeth; Foster, Richard; Haynes, Alex B; Berry, William R

    2016-10-01

    Studies show that using surgical safety checklists (SSCs) reduces complications. Many believe SSCs accomplish this by enhancing teamwork, but evidence is limited. Our study sought to relate teamwork to checklist performance, understand how they relate, and determine conditions that affect this relationship. Using 2 validated tools for observing and coaching operating room teams, we evaluated the association between checklist performance with surgeon buy-in and 4 domains of surgical teamwork: clinical leadership, communication, coordination, and respect. Hospital staff in 10 South Carolina hospitals observed 207 procedures between April 2011 and January 2013. We calculated levels of checklist performance, buy-in, and measures of teamwork, and evaluated their relationship, controlling for patient and case characteristics. Few teams completed most or all SSC items. Teams more often completed items considered procedural "checks" than conversation "prompts." Surgeon buy-in, clinical leadership, communication, a summary measure of teamwork overall, and observers' teamwork ratings positively related to overall checklist completion (multivariable model estimates from 0.04, p teamwork and surgeon buy-in related positively to completing more conversation prompts; none related significantly to procedural checks (estimates from 0.10, p teamwork characterized by shared clinical leadership, open communication, active coordination, and mutual respect were critical in prompting case-related conversations, but not in completing procedural checks. Findings highlight the importance of surgeon engagement and high-quality, consistent teamwork for promoting checklist use and ensuring a safe surgical environment. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Core elements of physiotherapy in cerebral palsy children: proposal for a trial checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghi, P; Rossetti, L; Corrado, C; Maran, E; Arosio, N; Ferrari, A

    2012-03-01

    Currently international literature describes physiotherapy in cerebral palsy (CP) children only in generic terms (traditional / standard / background / routine). The aim of this study is to create a checklist capable of describing the different modalities employed in physiotherapeutic treatment by means of a non-bias, common, universal, standardised language. A preliminary checklist was outlined by a group of physiotherapists specialised in child rehabilitation. For its experimentation, several physiotherapists from various paediatric units from all over Italy with different methodological approaches and backgrounds, were involved. Using the interpretative model, proposed by Ferrari et al., and through collective analysis and discussion of clinical videos, the core elements were progressively selected and codified. A reliability study was then carried out by eight expert physiotherapists using an inter-rate agreement model. The checklist analyses therapeutic proposals of CP rehabilitation through the description of settings, exercises and facilitations and consists of items and variables which codify all possible physiotherapeutic interventions. It is accompanied by written explanations, demonstrative videos, caregiver interviews and descriptions of applied environmental adaptations. All checklist items obtained a high level of agreement (according to Cohen's kappa coefficient), revealing that the checklist is clearly and easily interpretable. The checklist should facilitate interaction and communication between specialists and families, and lead to comparable research studies and scientific advances. The main value is to be able to correlate therapeutic results with core elements of adopted physiotherapy.

  7. Implementation of a Modified WHO Pediatric Procedural Sedation Safety Checklist and Its Impact on Risk Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Lindsay; Harsey, Lindsay; Patterson, Mary; Wachsberger, Don; Gothard, Dave; Holder, Michael; Forbes, Michael; Tirodker, Urmila

    2017-04-01

    Major adverse events (AEs) related to pediatric deep sedation occur at a low frequency but can be of high acuity. The high volume of deep sedations performed by 3 departments at our institution provided an opportunity to reduce variability and increase safety through implementation of a procedural sedation safety checklist. We hypothesized that implementation of a checklist would improve compliance of critical safety elements (CSEs) (primary outcome variable) and reduce the sedation-related AE rate (secondary outcome variable). This process improvement project was divided into 5 phases: a retrospective analysis to assess variability in capture of CSE within 3 departments that perform deep sedation and the association between noncapture of CSE and AE occurrence (phase 1), design of the checklist and trial in simulation (phase 2), provider education (phase 3), implementation and interim analysis of checklist completion (phase 4), and final analysis of completion and impact on outcome (phase 5). We demonstrated interdepartmental variability in compliance with CSE completion prechecklist implementation, and we identified elements associated with AEs. Completion of provider education was 100% in all 3 departments. Final analysis showed a checklist completion rate of 75%, and its use significantly improved capture of several critical safety elements. Its use did not significantly reduce AEs ( P = .105). This study demonstrates that the implementation of a sedation checklist improved process adherence and capture of critical safety elements; however, it failed to show a significant reduction in sedation-related AEs. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. A Checklist to Help Faculty Assess ACGME Milestones in a Video-Recorded OSCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easdown, L Jane; Wakefield, Marsha L; Shotwell, Matthew S; Sandison, Michael R

    2017-10-01

    Faculty members need to assess resident performance using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Milestones. In this randomized study we used an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) around the disclosure of an adverse event to determine whether use of a checklist improved the quality of milestone assessments by faculty. In 2013, a total of 20 anesthesiology faculty members from 3 institutions were randomized to 2 groups to assess 5 videos of trainees demonstrating advancing levels of competency on the OSCE. One group used milestones alone, and the other used milestones plus a 13-item checklist with behavioral anchors based on ideal performance. We classified faculty ratings as either correct or incorrect with regard to the competency level demonstrated in each video, and then used logistic regression analysis to assess the effect of checklist use on the odds of correct classification. Thirteen of 20 faculty members rated assessing performance using milestones alone as difficult or very difficult . Checklist use was associated with significantly greater odds of correct classification at entry level (odds ratio [OR] = 9.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.0-21.2) and at junior level (OR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.7) performance. For performance at other competency levels checklist use did not affect the odds of correct classification. A majority of anesthesiology faculty members reported difficulty with assessing a videotaped OSCE of error disclosure using milestones as primary assessment tools. Use of the checklist assisted in correct assessments at the entry and junior levels.

  9. Mortality Trends After a Voluntary Checklist-based Surgical Safety Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Alex B; Edmondson, Lizabeth; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Molina, George; Neville, Bridget A; Singer, Sara J; Moonan, Aunyika T; Childers, Ashley Kay; Foster, Richard; Gibbons, Lorri R; Gawande, Atul A; Berry, William R

    2017-12-01

    To determine whether completion of a voluntary, checklist-based surgical quality improvement program is associated with reduced 30-day postoperative mortality. Despite evidence of efficacy of team-based surgical safety checklists in improving perioperative outcomes in research trials, effective methods of population-based implementation have been lacking. The Safe Surgery 2015 South Carolina program was designed to foster state-wide engagement of hospitals in a voluntary, collaborative implementation of a checklist program. We compared postoperative mortality rates after inpatient surgery in South Carolina utilizing state-wide all-payer discharge claims from 2008 to 2013, linked with state vital statistics, stratifying hospitals on the basis of completion of the checklist program. Changes in risk-adjusted 30-day mortality were compared between hospitals, using propensity score-adjusted difference-in-differences analysis. Fourteen hospitals completed the program by December 2013. Before program launch, there was no difference in mortality trends between the completion cohort and all others (P = 0.33), but postoperative mortality diverged thereafter (P = 0.021). Risk-adjusted 30-day mortality among completers was 3.38% in 2010 and 2.84% in 2013 (P checklist-based surgical quality improvement program had a reduction in deaths after inpatient surgery over the first 3 years of the collaborative compared with other hospitals in the state. This may indicate that effective large-scale implementation of a team-based surgical safety checklist is feasible.

  10. Designing a safety checklist for dental implant placement: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, Adam; Schrader, Stuart; John, Vanchit; Zunt, Susan; Maupome, Gerardo; Prakasam, Sivaraman

    2014-02-01

    Complications during and after dental implant placement can be a hindrance to successful treatment. Checklists are emerging as useful tools in error reduction in various fields. The authors selected a Delphi panel to explore the appropriate clinical practices involved in implant placement, with the objective of formulating a safety checklist that would aid in reducing errors. The authors administered a Delphi method survey to an expert panel of 24 board-certified periodontists to determine if consensus existed regarding the critical steps involved in implant placement. They defined consensus as 90 percent agreement among participants. Using the Delphi data, the authors designed a safety checklist for implant placement. The panelists generated 20 consensus statements regarding essential steps in implant placement. The authors divided the statements into preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative phases. To determine the rationale for consensus decisions, the authors conducted a thematic qualitative analysis of responses to all open-ended questionnaire items, asking panel members how or why a particular procedure was performed. The panelists reached a consensus regarding the steps they considered critical in implant placement. Further research is needed to assess the acceptance and effectiveness of this type of checklist in a clinical setting. Practical Implications. The authors developed a checklist that may be useful in reducing errors in placement of dental implants. If effective, this checklist ultimately will aid in minimizing risk and increasing implant success rates, especially for inexperienced practitioners, dental students, surgical residents and dental implant trainees (that is, dentists undergoing training to place implants through continuing education courses).

  11. Lessons Learned from the 200 West Pump and Treatment Facility Construction Project at the US DOE Hanford Site - A Leadership for Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-Certified Facility - 13113

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorr, Kent A.; Freeman-Pollard, Jhivaun R.; Ostrom, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) designed, constructed, commissioned, and began operation of the largest groundwater pump and treatment facility in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nationwide complex. This one-of-a-kind groundwater pump and treatment facility, located at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation Site (Hanford Site) in Washington State, was built to an accelerated schedule with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds. There were many contractual, technical, configuration management, quality, safety, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) challenges associated with the design, procurement, construction, and commissioning of this $95 million, 52,000 ft groundwater pump and treatment facility to meet DOE's mission objective of treating contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site with a new facility by June 28, 2012. The project team's successful integration of the project's core values and green energy technology throughout design, procurement, construction, and start-up of this complex, first-of-its-kind Bio Process facility resulted in successful achievement of DOE's mission objective, as well as attainment of LEED GOLD certification (Figure 1), which makes this Bio Process facility the first non-administrative building in the DOE Office of Environmental Management complex to earn such an award. (authors)

  12. Lessons Learned from the 200 West Pump and Treatment Facility Construction Project at the US DOE Hanford Site - A Leadership for Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-Certified Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorr, Kent A.; Ostrom, Michael J.; Freeman-Pollard, Jhivaun R.

    2013-01-11

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) designed, constructed, commissioned, and began operation of the largest groundwater pump and treatment facility in the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) nationwide complex. This one-of-a-kind groundwater pump and treatment facility, located at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation Site (Hanford Site) in Washington State, was built to an accelerated schedule with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds. There were many contractual, technical, configuration management, quality, safety, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) challenges associated with the design, procurement, construction, and commissioning of this $95 million, 52,000 ft groundwater pump and treatment facility to meet DOE’s mission objective of treating contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site with a new facility by June 28, 2012. The project team’s successful integration of the project’s core values and green energy technology throughout design, procurement, construction, and start-up of this complex, first-of-its-kind Bio Process facility resulted in successful achievement of DOE’s mission objective, as well as attainment of LEED GOLD certification, which makes this Bio Process facility the first non-administrative building in the DOE Office of Environmental Management complex to earn such an award.

  13. Lessons Learned from the 200 West Pump and Treatment Facility Construction Project at the US DOE Hanford Site - A Leadership for Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-Certified Facility - 13113

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorr, Kent A.; Freeman-Pollard, Jhivaun R.; Ostrom, Michael J. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, P.O. Box 1600, MSIN R4-41, 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) designed, constructed, commissioned, and began operation of the largest groundwater pump and treatment facility in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nationwide complex. This one-of-a-kind groundwater pump and treatment facility, located at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation Site (Hanford Site) in Washington State, was built to an accelerated schedule with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds. There were many contractual, technical, configuration management, quality, safety, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) challenges associated with the design, procurement, construction, and commissioning of this $95 million, 52,000 ft groundwater pump and treatment facility to meet DOE's mission objective of treating contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site with a new facility by June 28, 2012. The project team's successful integration of the project's core values and green energy technology throughout design, procurement, construction, and start-up of this complex, first-of-its-kind Bio Process facility resulted in successful achievement of DOE's mission objective, as well as attainment of LEED GOLD certification (Figure 1), which makes this Bio Process facility the first non-administrative building in the DOE Office of Environmental Management complex to earn such an award. (authors)

  14. A model evaluation checklist for process-based environmental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson-Blake, Leah

    2015-04-01

    Mechanistic catchment-scale phosphorus models appear to perform poorly where diffuse sources dominate. The reasons for this were investigated for one commonly-applied model, the INtegrated model of CAtchment Phosphorus (INCA-P). Model output was compared to 18 months of daily water quality monitoring data in a small agricultural catchment in Scotland, and model structure, key model processes and internal model responses were examined. Although the model broadly reproduced dissolved phosphorus dynamics, it struggled with particulates. The reasons for poor performance were explored, together with ways in which improvements could be made. The process of critiquing and assessing model performance was then generalised to provide a broadly-applicable model evaluation checklist, incorporating: (1) Calibration challenges, relating to difficulties in thoroughly searching a high-dimensional parameter space and in selecting appropriate means of evaluating model performance. In this study, for example, model simplification was identified as a necessary improvement to reduce the number of parameters requiring calibration, whilst the traditionally-used Nash Sutcliffe model performance statistic was not able to discriminate between realistic and unrealistic model simulations, and alternative statistics were needed. (2) Data limitations, relating to a lack of (or uncertainty in) input data, data to constrain model parameters, data for model calibration and testing, and data to test internal model processes. In this study, model reliability could be improved by addressing all four kinds of data limitation. For example, there was insufficient surface water monitoring data for model testing against an independent dataset to that used in calibration, whilst additional monitoring of groundwater and effluent phosphorus inputs would help distinguish between alternative plausible model parameterisations. (3) Model structural inadequacies, whereby model structure may inadequately represent

  15. Resident Ratings of Communication Skills Using the Kalamazoo Adapted Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcerelli, John H; Brennan, Simone; Carty, Jennifer; Ziadni, Maisa; Markova, Tsveti

    2015-09-01

    The Kalamazoo Essential Elements Communication Checklist-Adapted (KEECC-A) is a well-regarded instrument for evaluating communication and interpersonal skills. To date, little research has been conducted that assesses the accuracy of resident self-ratings of their communication skills. To assess whether residents can accurately self-rate communication skills, using the KEECC-A, during an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). A group of 104 residents from 8 specialties completed a multistation OSCE as part of an institutional communication skills curriculum conducted at a single institution. Standardized patients (SPs) and observers were trained in rating communication skills using the KEECC-A. Standardized patient ratings and resident self-ratings were completed immediately following each OSCE encounter, and trained observers rated archived videotapes of the encounters. Resident self-ratings and SP ratings using the KEECC-A were significantly correlated (r104  = 0.238, P = .02), as were resident self-ratings and observer ratings (r104  = 0.284, P = .004). The correlation between the SP ratings and observer (r104  = 0.378, P = .001) ratings were larger in magnitude, but not significantly different (P > .05) from resident/SP or resident/observer correlations. The results suggest that residents, with a modicum of training using the KEECC-A, can accurately rate their own communication and interpersonal skills during an OSCE. Using trained observers to rate resident communication skills provides a unique opportunity for evaluating SP and resident self-ratings. Our findings also lend further support for the reliability and validity of the KEECC-A.

  16. Checklist of the helminth parasites of vertebrates in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Ortíz, Beatriz; García-Prieto, Luis; Pérez-Ponce de León, Gerardo

    2004-06-01

    Helminth parasites of vertebrates have been studied in Costa Rica for more than 50 years. Survey work on this group of parasites is far from complete. We assembled a database with all the records of helminth parasites of wild and domestic vertebrates in Costa Rica. Information was obtained from different sources such as literature search (all published accounts) and parasite collections. Here we present a checklist with a parasite-host list as well as a host-parasite list. Up to now, 303 species have been recorded, including 81 species of digeneans, 23 monogeneans, 63 cestodes, 12 acanthocephalans, and 124 nematodes. In total, 108 species of vertebrates have been studied for helminths in Costa Rica (31 species of fishes, 7 amphibians, 14 reptiles, 20 birds, and 36 mammals). This represents only 3.8% of the vertebrate fauna of Costa Rica since about 2,855 species of vertebrates occur in the country. Interestingly, 58 species (19.1 %) were recorded as new species from Costa Rica and most of them are endemic to particular regions. Considering the valuable information that parasites provide because it is synergistic with all the information about the natural history of the hosts, helminth parasites of vertebrates in Costa Rica should be considered within any initiatives to accomplish the national inventory of biological resources. Starting with this compilation work, the Colección de Helmintos de Costa Rica (CHCR), hosted at the Facultad de Microbiología, Universidad de Costa Rica, has re-emerged and it is our hope that it will have the standards of quality to assure that it will become the national depository of helminths in the country.

  17. Updated Checklist of the Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) of French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaga, Stanislas; Dejean, Alain; Carinci, Romuald; Gaborit, Pascal; Dusfour, Isabelle; Girod, Romain

    2015-09-01

    The incredible mosquito species diversity in the Neotropics can provoke major confusion during vector control programs when precise identification is needed. This is especially true in French Guiana where studies on mosquito diversity practically ceased 35 yr ago. In order to fill this gap, we propose here an updated and comprehensive checklist of the mosquitoes of French Guiana, reflecting the latest changes in classification and geographical distribution and the recognition of current or erroneous synonymies. This work was undertaken in order to help ongoing and future research on mosquitoes in a broad range of disciplines such as ecology, biogeography, and medical entomology. Thirty-two valid species cited in older lists have been removed, and 24 species have been added including 12 species (comprising two new genera and three new subgenera) reported from French Guiana for the first time. New records are from collections conducted on various phytotelmata in French Guiana and include the following species: Onirion sp. cf Harbach and Peyton (2000), Sabethes (Peytonulus) hadrognathus Harbach, Sabethes (Peytonulus) paradoxus Harbach, Sabethes (Peytonulus) soperi Lane and Cerqueira, Sabethes (Sabethinus) idiogenes Harbach, Sabethes (Sabethes) quasicyaneus Peryassú, Runchomyia (Ctenogoeldia) magna (Theobald), Wyeomyia (Caenomyiella) sp. cf Harbach and Peyton (1990), Wyeomyia (Dendromyia) ypsipola Dyar, Wyeomyia (Hystatomyia) lamellata (Bonne-Wepster and Bonne), Wyeomyia (Miamyia) oblita (Lutz), and Toxorhynchites (Lynchiella) guadeloupensis (Dyar and Knab). At this time, the mosquitoes of French Guiana are represented by 235 species distributed across 22 genera, nine tribes, and two subfamilies. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Introducing radiology report checklists among residents: adherence rates when suggesting versus requiring their use and early experience in improving accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Daniel K; Lin, Eaton; Silberzweig, James E; Kagetsu, Nolan J

    2014-03-01

    To retrospectively compare resident adherence to checklist-style structured reporting for maxillofacial computed tomography (CT) from the emergency department (when required vs. suggested between two programs). To compare radiology resident reporting accuracy before and after introduction of the structured report and assess its ability to decrease the rate of undetected pathology. We introduced a reporting checklist for maxillofacial CT into our dictation software without specific training, requiring it at one program and suggesting it at another. We quantified usage among residents and compared reporting accuracy, before and after counting and categorizing faculty addenda. There was no significant change in resident accuracy in the first few months, with residents acting as their own controls (directly comparing performance with and without the checklist). Adherence to the checklist at program A (where it originated and was required) was 85% of reports compared to 9% of reports at program B (where it was suggested). When using program B as a secondary control, there was no significant difference in resident accuracy with or without using the checklist (comparing different residents using the checklist to those not using the checklist). Our results suggest that there is no automatic value of checklists for improving radiology resident reporting accuracy. They also suggest the importance of focused training, checklist flexibility, and a period of adjustment to a new reporting style. Mandatory checklists were readily adopted by residents but not when simply suggested. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mishaps and unsafe conditions in recreational scuba diving and pre-dive checklist use: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranapurwala, Shabbar I; Wing, Steve; Poole, Charles; Kucera, Kristen L; Marshall, Stephen W; Denoble, Petar J

    2017-12-01

    Recreational scuba diving involves the use of complex instruments and specialized skills in an unforgiving environment. Errors in dive preparation in such an environment may lead to unsafe conditions, mishaps, injuries and fatalities. Diving mishaps can be major and minor based on their potential to cause injury and the severity of the resulting injury. The objective of this study is to assess the incidence of diving mishaps and unsafe conditions, and their associations with the participants' routine use of their own checklists. Between June and August 2012, 426 divers participated in the control group of a randomized trial to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention pre-dive checklist. The current nested analysis prospectively follows the control participants, who did not receive the intervention checklist. Poisson regression models with generalized estimating equations were used to estimate rate ratios comparing written checklist use with memorized and no checklist use. The overall incidence of major mishaps and minor mishaps was 11.2 and 18.2 per 100 dives, respectively. Only 8% participants reported written checklist use, 71% reported using memorized checklists, and 21% did not use any checklist. The rate ratio for written checklist use as compared to using a memorized or no checklist was 0.47 (95%CI: 0.27, 0.83) for all mishaps (major and minor combined), and 0.31 (95% CI: 0.10, 0.93) for major mishaps. The rate of mishaps among memorized checklist users was similar to no checklist users. This study reinforces the utility of written checklists to prevent mishaps and, potentially, injuries and fatalities.

  20. [Director Checklist and Child Care Checklist: Examinations for the Position of Center Director and the Position of Child Care Provider (with User Guides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheig Associates, Inc., Gig Harbor, WA.

    The two separate evaluation instruments combined here are designed to help companies identify applicants for the positions of director and child care provider who have the greatest probability of being outstanding performers on the job. Each instrument contains three sections. Section 1 is an interest and willingness checklist, which acts as a…

  1. Using a Parental Checklist to Identify Diagnostic Groups in Children with Communication Impairment: A Validation of the Children's Communication Checklist--2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, Courtenay Frazier; Nash, Marysia; Baird, Gillian; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2004-01-01

    Background: The Children's Communication Checklist (CCC 1998) was revised in 2003 (CCC-2) to provide a general screen for communication disorder and to identify pragmatic/social interaction deficits. Two validation studies were conducted with different populations of children with language and communication impairments. Methods & Procedures: In…

  2. Surgical checklist application and its impact on patient safety in pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oak, S N; Dave, N M; Garasia, M B; Parelkar, S V

    2015-01-01

    Surgical care is an essential component of health care of children worldwide. Incidences of congenital anomalies, trauma, cancers and acquired diseases continue to rise and along with that the impact of surgical intervention on public health system also increases. It then becomes essential that the surgical teams make the procedures safe and error proof. The World Health Organization (WHO) has instituted the surgical checklist as a global initiative to improve surgical safety. To assess the acceptance, application and adherence to the WHO Safe Surgery Checklist in Pediatric Surgery Practice at a university teaching hospital. In a prospective study, spanning 2 years, the checklist was implemented for all patients who underwent operative procedures under general anesthesia. The checklist identified three phases of an operation, each corresponding to a specific period in the normal flow of work: Before the induction of anesthesia ("sign in"), before the skin incision ("time out") and before the patient leaves the operating room ("sign out"). In each phase, an anesthesiologist,-"checklist coordinator," confirmed that the anesthesia, surgery and nursing teams have completed the listed tasks before proceeding with the operation and exit. The checklist was used for 3000 consecutive patients. No major perioperative errors were noted. In 54 (1.8%) patients, children had the same names and identical surgical procedure posted on the same operation list. The patient identification tag was missing in four (0.1%) patients. Mention of the side of procedures was missing in 108 (3.6%) cases. In 0.1% (3) of patients there was mix up of the mention of side of operation in the case papers and consent forms. In 78 (2.6%) patients, the consent form was not signed by parents/guardians or the side of the procedure was not quoted. Antibiotic orders were missing in five (0.2%) patients. In 12 (0.4%) cases, immobilization of the patients was suboptimal, which led to displacement of diathermy

  3. Development of a Child Abuse Checklist to Evaluate Prehospital Provider Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphonso, Aimee; Auerbach, Marc; Bechtel, Kirsten; Bilodeau, Kyle; Gawel, Marcie; Koziel, Jeannette; Whitfill, Travis; Tiyyagura, Gunjan Kamdar

    2017-01-01

    To develop and provide validity evidence for a performance checklist to evaluate the child abuse screening behaviors of prehospital providers. Checklist Development: We developed the first iteration of the checklist after review of the relevant literature and on the basis of the authors' clinical experience. Next, a panel of six content experts participated in three rounds of Delphi review to reach consensus on the final checklist items. Checklist Validation: Twenty-eight emergency medical services (EMS) providers (16 EMT-Basics, 12 EMT-Paramedics) participated in a standardized simulated case of physical child abuse to an infant followed by one-on-one semi-structured qualitative interviews. Three reviewers scored the videotaped performance using the final checklist. Light's kappa and Cronbach's alpha were calculated to assess inter-rater reliability (IRR) and internal consistency, respectively. The correlation of successful child abuse screening with checklist task completion and with participant characteristics were compared using Pearson's chi squared test to gather evidence for construct validity. The Delphi review process resulted in a final checklist that included 24 items classified with trichotomous scoring (done, not done, or not applicable). The overall IRR of the three raters was 0.70 using Light's kappa, indicating substantial agreement. Internal consistency of the checklist was low, with an overall Cronbach's alpha of 0.61. Of 28 participants, only 14 (50%) successfully screened for child abuse in simulation. Participants who successfully screened for child abuse did not differ significantly from those who failed to screen in terms of training level, past experience with child abuse reporting, or self-reported confidence in detecting child abuse (all p > 0.30). Of all 24 tasks, only the task of exposing the infant significantly correlated with successful detection of child abuse (p child abuse checklist that demonstrated strong content validity and

  4. Surgical checklist application and its impact on patient safety in pediatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S N Oak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical care is an essential component of health care of children worldwide. Incidences of congenital anomalies, trauma, cancers and acquired diseases continue to rise and along with that the impact of surgical intervention on public health system also increases. It then becomes essential that the surgical teams make the procedures safe and error proof. The World Health Organization (WHO has instituted the surgical checklist as a global initiative to improve surgical safety. Aims: To assess the acceptance, application and adherence to the WHO Safe Surgery Checklist in Pediatric Surgery Practice at a university teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: In a prospective study, spanning 2 years, the checklist was implemented for all patients who underwent operative procedures under general anesthesia. The checklist identified three phases of an operation, each corresponding to a specific period in the normal flow of work: Before the induction of anesthesia ("sign in", before the skin incision ("time out" and before the patient leaves the operating room ("sign out". In each phase, an anesthesiologist,-"checklist coordinator," confirmed that the anesthesia, surgery and nursing teams have completed the listed tasks before proceeding with the operation and exit. The checklist was used for 3000 consecutive patients. Results: No major perioperative errors were noted. In 54 (1.8% patients, children had the same names and identical surgical procedure posted on the same operation list. The patient identification tag was missing in four (0.1% patients. Mention of the side of procedures was missing in 108 (3.6% cases. In 0.1% (3 of patients there was mix up of the mention of side of operation in the case papers and consent forms. In 78 (2.6% patients, the consent form was not signed by parents/guardians or the side of the procedure was not quoted. Antibiotic orders were missing in five (0.2% patients. In 12 (0.4% cases, immobilization of the

  5. Development, inter-rater reliability and feasibility of a checklist to assess implementation (Ch-IMP) in systematic reviews: the case of provider-based prevention and treatment programs targeting children and youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargo, Margaret; Stankov, Ivana; Thomas, James; Saini, Michael; Rogers, Patricia; Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Hannes, Karin

    2015-09-07

    Several papers report deficiencies in the reporting of information about the implementation of interventions in clinical trials. Information about implementation is also required in systematic reviews of complex interventions to facilitate the translation and uptake of evidence of provider-based prevention and treatment programs. To capture whether and how implementation is assessed within systematic effectiveness reviews, we developed a checklist for implementation (Ch-IMP) and piloted it in a cohort of reviews on provider-based prevention and treatment interventions for children and young people. This paper reports on the inter-rater reliability, feasibility and reasons for discrepant ratings. Checklist domains were informed by a framework for program theory; items within domains were generated from a literature review. The checklist was pilot-tested on a cohort of 27 effectiveness reviews targeting children and youth. Two raters independently extracted information on 47 items. Inter-rater reliability was evaluated using percentage agreement and unweighted kappa coefficients. Reasons for discrepant ratings were content analysed. Kappa coefficients ranged from 0.37 to 1.00 and were not influenced by one-sided bias. Most kappa values were classified as excellent (n = 20) or good (n = 17) with a few items categorised as fair (n = 7) or poor (n = 1). Prevalence-adjusted kappa coefficients indicate good or excellent agreement for all but one item. Four areas contributed to scoring discrepancies: 1) clarity or sufficiency of information provided in the review; 2) information missed in the review; 3) issues encountered with the tool; and 4) issues encountered at the review level. Use of the tool demands time investment and it requires adjustment to improve its feasibility for wider use. The case of provider-based prevention and treatment interventions showed relevancy in developing and piloting the Ch-IMP as a useful tool for assessing the extent to

  6. Alien flora of Turkey: checklist, taxonomic composition and ecological attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Uludag

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides an updated checklist of the alien flora of Turkey with information on its structure. The alien flora of Turkey comprises 340 taxa, among which there are 321 angiosperms, 17 gymnosperms and two ferns. Of the total number of taxa, 228 (68% are naturalized and 112 (32% are casual. There are 275 neophytes (172 naturalized and 103 casual and 61 archaeophytes (52 naturalized and 9 casual; four species could not be classified with respect to the residence time. In addition, 47 frequently planted taxa with a potential to escape are also listed. The richest families are Asteraceae (38 taxa, Poaceae (30, Fabaceae (23 and Solanaceae (22. As for the naturalized alien plants, the highest species richness is found in Asteraceae (31 taxa, Poaceae (22, Amaranthaceae (18 and Solanaceae (15. The majority of alien taxa are perennial (63.8% of the total number of taxa with this life history assigned, including those with multiple life histories, annuals contribute 33.8% and 2.4% are biennial aliens. Among perennials the most common life forms are phanerophytes, of which 20.3% are trees and 12.6% shrubs; woody vines, stem succulents, and aquatic plants are comparatively less represented. Most of the 340 alien taxa introduced to Turkey have their native ranges in Americas (44.7% and Asia (27.6%. Of other regions, 9.1% originated in Africa, 4.4% in Eurasia, 3.8% in Australia and Oceania and 3.5% in the Mediterranean. The majority of taxa (71.9% were introduced intentionally, whereas the remaining (28.1% were introduced accidentally. Among the taxa introduced intentionally, the vast majority are ornamental plants (55.2%, 10.0% taxa were introduced for forestry and 6.7% as crops. Casual alien plants are most commonly found in urban and ruderal habitats (40.1% where naturalized taxa are also often recorded (27.3%. Plants that occur as agricultural weeds are typically naturalized rather than casual (16.0% vs 7.1%, respectively. However, (seminatural

  7. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Checklist for Managing Local Anesthetic Systemic Toxicity: 2017 Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Joseph M; Woodward, Crystal M; Harrison, T Kyle

    2018-02-01

    The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) periodically revises and updates its checklist for the management of local anesthetic systemic toxicity. The 2017 update replaces the 2012 version and reflects new information contained in the third ASRA Practice Advisory on Local Anesthetic Systemic Toxicity. Electronic copies of the ASRA checklist can be downloaded from the ASRA Web site (www.asra.com) for inclusion in local anesthetic toxicity rescue kits or perioperative checklist repositories.

  8. Five years' experience with a customized electronic checklist for radiation therapy planning quality assurance in a multicampus institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Sean L; Tierney, Kevin P; Elguindi, Sharif; Mechalakos, James G

    2017-12-24

    An electronic checklist has been designed with the intention of reducing errors while minimizing user effort in completing the checklist. We analyze the clinical use and evolution of the checklist over the past 5 years and review data in an incident learning system (ILS) to investigate whether it has contributed to an improvement in patient safety. The checklist is written as a standalone HTML application using VBScript. User selection of pertinent demographic details limits the display of checklist items only to those necessary for the particular clinical scenario. Ten common clinical scenarios were used to illustrate the difference between the maximum possible number of checklist items available in the code versus the number displayed to the user at any one time. An ILS database of errors and near misses was reviewed to evaluate whether the checklist influenced the occurrence of reported events. Over 5 years, the number of checklist items available in the code nearly doubled, whereas the number displayed to the user at any one time stayed constant. Events reported in our ILS related to the beam energy used with pacemakers, projection of anatomy on digitally reconstructed radiographs, orthogonality of setup fields, and field extension beyond match lines, did not recur after the items were added to the checklist. Other events related to bolus documentation and breakpoints continued to be reported. Our checklist is adaptable to the introduction of new technologies, transitions between planning systems, and to errors and near misses recorded in the ILS. The electronic format allows us to restrict user display to a small, relevant, subset of possible checklist items, limiting the planner effort needed to review and complete the checklist. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Development, validation and testing of a nursing home to emergency room transfer checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiu-Hsin; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2018-01-01

    To develop and test the feasibility of an instrument to support patients' nursing home to emergency room transfer. Transfers from a nursing home care facility to an acute care facility such as a hospital emergency room are common. However, the prevalence of an information gap for transferring residents' health data to acute care facility is high. An evidence-based transfer instrument, which could fill this gap, is lacking. Development of a nursing home to emergency room transfer checklist, validation of items using the Delphi method and testing the feasibility and benefits of using the nursing home to emergency room transfer checklist. Items were developed based on qualitative data from previous research. Delphi validation, retrospective chart review (baseline data) and a 6-month prospective study design were applied to test the feasibility of using the checklist. Variables for testing the feasibility of the checklist included residents' 30-day readmission rate and length of hospital stay. Development of the nursing home to emergency room transfer checklist resulted in four main parts: (i) demographic data of the nursing home resident; (ii) critical data for nursing home to emergency room transfer; (iii) contact information and (iv) critical data for emergency room to nursing home transfer. Two rounds of Delphi validation resulted in a mean score (standard deviation) ranging from 4.39 (1.13)-4.98 (.15). Time required to complete the checklist was 3-5 min. Use of the nursing home to emergency room transfer checklist resulted in a 30-day readmission rate of 13.4%, which was lower than the baseline rate of 15.9%. The nursing home to emergency room transfer checklist was developed for transferring nursing home residents to an emergency room. The instrument was found to be an effective tool for this process. Use of the nursing home to emergency room transfer checklist for nursing home transfers could fill the information gap that exists when transferring older adults

  10. Early warning signs checklists for relapse in bipolar depression and mania: utility, reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobban, Fiona; Solis-Trapala, Ivonne; Symes, Wendy; Morriss, Richard

    2011-10-01

    Recognising early warning signs (EWS) of mood changes is a key part of many effective interventions for people with Bipolar Disorder (BD). This study describes the development of valid and reliable checklists required to assess these signs of depression and mania. Checklists of EWS based on previous research and participant feedback were designed for depression and mania and compared with spontaneous reporting of EWS. Psychometric properties and utility were examined in 96 participants with BD. The majority of participants did not spontaneously monitor EWS regularly prior to use of the checklists. The checklists identified most spontaneously generated EWS and led to a ten fold increase in the identification of EWS for depression and an eight fold increase for mania. The scales were generally reliable over time and responses were not associated with current mood. Frequency of monitoring for EWS correlated positively with social and occupational functioning for depression (beta=3.80, p=0.015) and mania (beta=3.92, p=0.008). The study is limited by a small sample size and the fact that raters were not blind to measures of mood and function. EWS checklists are useful and reliable clinical and research tools helping to generate enough EWS for an effective EWS intervention. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Using Item Analysis to Assess Objectively the Quality of the Calgary-Cambridge OSCE Checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyrone Donnon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background:  The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of item analysis to assess objectively the quality of items on the Calgary-Cambridge Communications OSCE checklist. Methods:  A total of 150 first year medical students were provided with extensive teaching on the use of the Calgary-Cambridge Guidelines for interviewing patients and participated in a final year end 20 minute communication OSCE station.  Grouped into either the upper half (50% or lower half (50% communication skills performance groups, discrimination, difficulty and point biserial values were calculated for each checklist item. Results:  The mean score on the 33 item communication checklist was 24.09 (SD = 4.46 and the internal reliability coefficient was ? = 0.77. Although most of the items were found to have moderate (k = 12, 36% or excellent (k = 10, 30% discrimination values, there were 6 (18% identified as ‘fair’ and 3 (9% as ‘poor’. A post-examination review focused on item analysis findings resulted in an increase in checklist reliability (? = 0.80. Conclusions:  Item analysis has been used with MCQ exams extensively. In this study, it was also found to be an objective and practical approach to use in evaluating the quality of a standardized OSCE checklist.

  12. Internal Audit of Compliance with a Perioperative Checklist in a Tertiary Care Neurosurgical Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagné, Jean-François; Labidi, Moujahed; Turmel, André

    2016-01-01

    In 1999, the Institute of Medicine reported that, in the United States, 44,000 to 98,000 people die annually as a result of avoidable medical errors. Among the many initiatives undertaken to stem avoidable surgical errors, the World Health Organization (WHO) Surgical Safety Checklist has certainly been one of the most successful. Many surgical units have implemented adapted versions of the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist, audited their performance and discussed issues relating to the implementation process. However, such literature is still lacking in neurosurgery. A prospective observational study of 171 neurosurgical cases was conducted over an 8-week period. An independent observer assessed compliance with and completeness of the three steps in the perioperative checklist: Sign-in, Time-out and Sign-out. Factors that may reduce compliance were also analyzed. Compliance with the Sign-in, Time-out and Sign-out steps was 82%, 99% and 93% respectively. On average, 92% of the Time-out elements were verified. The emergent nature of a surgery was the only factor that caused a statistically significant reduction in compliance with the checklist. Overall compliance diminished during the observation period. In this internal audit study, compliance with the preoperative checklist reached a satisfactory level. Further work is still needed, however, on some aspects of our surgical strategy, namely, a relatively low compliance rate with the Sign-in process was recorded and emergent cases were associated with decreased performance.

  13. Surgical Safety in Pediatrics: practical application of the Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paula de Oliveira Pires

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to assess the practical application of the Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist on the preoperative period and to verify family satisfaction regarding the use of the material. Method: exploratory study that aimed to analyze the use of the checklist by children who underwent surgical interventions. The sample was constituted by 60 children (from preschoolers to teens and 60 family members. The variables related to demographic characterization, filling out the checklist, and family satisfaction, being evaluated through inferential and descriptive statistical analysis. Results: most children (71.7% were male, with a median age of 7.5 years. We identified the achievement of 65.3% of the checklist items, 30.0% were not filled due to non-performance of the team and 4.7% for children and family reasons. In the association analysis, we found that the removal of accessories item (p = 0.008 was the most checked by older children. Regarding satisfaction, the family members evaluated the material as great (63.3% and good (36.7% and believed that there was a reduction of the child's anxiety (83.3%. Conclusion: the use of the checklist in clinical practice can change health services regarding safety culture and promote customer satisfaction.

  14. Functional Communication Profile and speech-language diagnosis in children of the autism spectrum: checklist use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Mariana de Almeida; Fernandes, Fernanda Dreux Miranda

    2013-01-01

    The use of a different protocol to assess the same aspects of the Functional Communication Profile (FCP) may contribute to a faster and less expensive determination of individual profiles of abilities and inabilities. The purpose of this study was to verify the applicability of a checklist to replace the aforementioned complete protocol as a way to facilitate clinical and therapeutic follow-up processes. The participants in this study were 50 children aged from 3 to 12 years, with diagnoses within the autism spectrum who were receiving specialized speech-language therapy for at least six months. The participants were filmed while interacting with the speech-language pathologist, and the data were transcribed to the FCP protocol. After the recording and prior to the transcription, the speech-language pathologists were asked to answer the checklist of Communicative Functions. All answers on the checklist and on the FCP were compared. The results indicated that there were statistical differences in nine of the 20 communicative functions, and in nine of the 50 children. These results suggest that the checklist is efficient to describe a group of children but not to characterize them individually. Therefore, it is possible to identify differences in the communicative profile but not to specify the frequency with which each function occurs. The checklist can be used as a tool in the therapeutic follow-up processes of children with autism spectrum disorders, but it does not replace the complete FCP protocol.

  15. Factor analysis of Y-BOCS checklist and severity scale among patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Dua, Devakshi; Chakrabarti, Subho; Avasthi, Ajit

    2017-04-01

    To carry out factor analysis of YBOCS checklist and YBOCS severity scale among patients with schizophrenia. 181 patients of schizophrenia were assessed on the Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Symptom (YBOCS) checklist, YBOCS severity scale and, positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS). About one fourth (28.18%) of the patients fulfilled the diagnosis of current OCD and 29.83% of patients fulfilled the lifetime diagnosis of OCD. Factor analysis of YBOCS checklist yielded 5 factor structures. Factor analysis of YBOCS severity scale yielded a 2 factor model. The five factors of YBOCS checklist were named as: Hoarding (included hoarding obsessions and compulsions), contamination (included contamination obsessions and cleaning compulsions), symmetry & ordering (obsessions of symmetry and ordering compulsions), Blasphemous, religious & repetition (sexual and religious obsessions, repeating and counting compulsions) and Aggression and checking (aggressive and somatic obsessions, checking compulsions). In the two factor model of YBOCS severity scale, Factor-1 included 6 items related to time spent, interference and distress related to obsessions and compulsions; whereas factor-2 included items of resistance to and control over obsessions and compulsions. Present study suggests that YBOCS checklist yielded 5 factor structures and factor analysis of YBOCS severity scale results in a 2 factor model among patients with schizophrenia. The five factor model is comparable with what has been reported for patients with pure OCD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Checklist as a Memory Externalization Tool during a Critical Care Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Zhang, Zhan; Marsic, Ivan; Burd, Randall S

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed user interactions with a paper-based checklist in a regional trauma center to inform the design of digital cognitive aids for safety-critical medical teamwork. An initial review of paper checklists from actual trauma resuscitations revealed that trauma team leaders frequently wrote notes on the checklist. To understand this notetaking practice, we performed content analysis of 163 checklists collected over the period of four months. We found nine major categories of information that leaders recorded during resuscitations, including patient values, physical assessment findings, and pre-hospital information. An analysis of types and amount of notes written by leaders of different experience levels showed that more experienced leaders recorded more patient values and physical findings, while less experienced leaders recorded more notes about their activities and task completion status. These findings suggested that a checklist designed for a high-risk, fast-paced medical event has evolved into a dual function tool, serving both as a compliance and memory aid. Based on these findings, we derived requirements for designing digital cognitive aids to support safety-critical medical teamwork. PMID:28269905

  17. Towards more transparent and reproducible omics studies through a common metadata checklist and data publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolker, Eugene; Ozdemir, Vural; Martens , Lennart; Hancock, William S.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Anderson, Nathaniel; Aynacioglu, Sukru; Baranova, Ancha; Campagna, Shawn R.; Chen, Rui; Choiniere, John; Dearth, Stephen P.; Feng, Wu-Chun; Ferguson, Lynnette; Fox, Geoffrey; Frishman, Dmitrij; Grossman, Robert; Heath, Allison; Higdon, Roger; Hutz, Mara; Janko, Imre; Jiang, Lihua; Joshi, Sanjay; Kel, Alexander; Kemnitz, Joseph W.; Kohane, Isaac; Kolker, Natali; Lancet, Doron; Lee, Elaine; Li, Weizhong; Lisitsa, Andrey; Llerena, Adrian; MacNealy-Koch, Courtney; Marhsall, Jean-Claude; Masuzzo, Paolo; May, Amanda; Mias, George; Monroe, Matthew E.; Montague, Elizabeth; Monney, Sean; Nesvizhskii, Alexey; Noronha, Santosh; Omenn, Gilbert; Rajasimha, Harsha; Ramamoorthy, Preveen; Sheehan, Jerry; Smarr, Larry; Smith, Charles V.; Smith, Todd; Snyder, Michael; Rapole, Srikanth; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Stanberry, Larissa; Stewart, Elizabeth; Toppo, Stefano; Uetz, Peter; Verheggen, Kenneth; Voy, Brynn H.; Warnich, Louise; Wilhelm, Steven W.; Yandl, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Biological processes are fundamentally driven by complex interactions between biomolecules. Integrated high-throughput omics studies enable multifaceted views of cells, organisms, or their communities. With the advent of new post-genomics technologies omics studies are becoming increasingly prevalent yet the full impact of these studies can only be realized through data harmonization, sharing, meta-analysis, and integrated research,. These three essential steps require consistent generation, capture, and distribution of the metadata. To ensure transparency, facilitate data harmonization, and maximize reproducibility and usability of life sciences studies, we propose a simple common omics metadata checklist. The proposed checklist is built on the rich ontologies and standards already in use by the life sciences community. The checklist will serve as a common denominator to guide experimental design, capture important parameters, and be used as a standard format for stand-alone data publications. This omics metadata checklist and data publications will create efficient linkages between omics data and knowledge-based life sciences innovation and importantly, allow for appropriate attribution to data generators and infrastructure science builders in the post-genomics era. We ask that the life sciences community test the proposed omics metadata checklist and data publications and provide feedback for their use and improvement.

  18. Does the Use of a Checklist Help Medical Students in the Detection of Abnormalities on a Chest Radiograph?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Ellen M; Abed, Abdelrazek; Robben, Simon G F

    2017-12-01

    The interpretation of chest radiographs is a complex task that is prone to diagnostic error, especially for medical students. The aim of this study is to investigate the extent to which medical students benefit from the use of a checklist regarding the detection of abnormalities on a chest radiograph. We developed a checklist based on literature and interviews with experienced thorax radiologists. Forty medical students in the clinical phase assessed 18 chest radiographs during a computer test, either with (n = 20) or without (n = 20) the checklist. We measured performance and asked participants for feedback using a survey. Participants that used a checklist detected more abnormalities on images with multiple abnormalities (M = 50.1%) than participants that could not use a checklist (M = 41.9%), p = 0.04. The post-experimental survey shows that on average, participants considered the checklist helpful (M = 3.25 on a five-point scale), but also time consuming (M = 3.30 on a five-point scale). In conclusion, a checklist can help medical students to detect abnormalities in chest radiographs. Moreover, students tend to appreciate the use of a checklist as a helpful tool during the interpretation of a chest radiograph. Therefore, a checklist is a potentially important tool to improve radiology education in the medical curriculum.

  19. What is the value of the SAGES/AORN MIS checklist? A multi-institutional practical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benham, Emily; Richardson, William; Dort, Jonathan; Lin, Henry; Tummers, A Michael; Walker, Travelyan M; Stefanidis, Dimitrios

    2017-04-01

    Surgical safety checklists reduce perioperative complications and mortality. Given that minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is dependent on technology and vulnerable to equipment failure, SAGES and AORN partnered to create a MIS checklist to optimize case flow and minimize errors. The aim of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the SAGES/AORN checklist in preventing disruptions and determine its ease of use. The checklist was implemented across four institutions and completed by the operating team. To assess its effectiveness, we recorded how often the checklist identified problems and how frequently each of the 45 checklist items were not completed. The perceived usefulness, ease of use, and frustration associated with checklist use were rated on a 5-point Likert scale by the surgeon. We assessed any differences dependent on timing of checklist completion and among institutions. The checklist was performed during MIS procedures (n = 114). When used before the procedure (n = 36), the checklist identified missing items in 13 cases (36.11 %). When used after the procedure (n = 61), the checklist identified missing items in 18 cases (29.51 %) that caused a delay of 4.1 ± 11.1 min. The most frequently missed items included preference card review (14.0 %), readiness of the carbon dioxide insufflator (8.7 %), and availability of the Veress needle (3.6 %). The checklist took an average of 3.6 ± 2.7 min to complete with its usefulness rated 2.6 ± 1.5, ease of use 2.0 ± 1.2, and frustration 1.3 ± 1.1. The checklist identified problems in 24 % of cases that led to preventable delays. The checklist was easy to complete and not frustrating, indicating it could improve operative flow. This study also identified the most useful items which may help abbreviate the checklist, minimizing the frustration and time taken to complete it while maximizing its utility. These attributes of the SAGES/AORN MIS checklist should be explored in future

  20. Can the surgical checklist reduce the risk of wrong site surgery in orthopaedics? - can the checklist help? Supporting evidence from analysis of a national patient incident reporting system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleary Kevin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical procedures are now very common, with estimates ranging from 4% of the general population having an operation per annum in economically-developing countries; this rising to 8% in economically-developed countries. Whilst these surgical procedures typically result in considerable improvements to health outcomes, it is increasingly appreciated that surgery is a high risk industry. Tools developed in the aviation industry are beginning to be used to minimise the risk of errors in surgery. One such tool is the World Health Organization's (WHO surgery checklist. The National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA manages the largest database of patient safety incidents (PSIs in the world, already having received over three million reports of episodes of care that could or did result in iatrogenic harm. The aim of this study was to estimate how many incidents of wrong site surgery in orthopaedics that have been reported to the NPSA could have been prevented by the WHO surgical checklist. Methods The National Reporting and Learning Service (NRLS database was searched between 1st January 2008- 31st December 2008 to identify all incidents classified as wrong site surgery in orthopaedics. These incidents were broken down into the different types of wrong site surgery. A Likert-scale from 1-5 was used to assess the preventability of these cases if the checklist was used. Results 133/316 (42% incidents satisfied the inclusion criteria. A large proportion of cases, 183/316 were misclassified. Furthermore, there were fewer cases of actual harm [9% (12/133] versus 'near-misses' [121/133 (91%]. Subsequent analysis revealed a smaller proportion of 'near-misses' being prevented by the checklist than the proportion of incidents that resulted in actual harm; 18/121 [14.9% (95% CI 8.5 - 21.2%] versus 10/12 [83.3% (95%CI 62.2 - 104.4%] respectively. Summatively, the checklist could have been prevented 28/133 [21.1% (95%CI 14.1 - 28.0%] patient safety

  1. Temporomandibular disorders, trismus and malignancy: development of a checklist to improve patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddis, H P; Davies, S J; Budenberg, A; Horner, K; Pemberton, M N

    2014-10-01

    Trismus is a restriction in the ability to open the mouth. Trismus can occur following trauma, surgery, radiation therapy, infection, inflammatory diseases, temporomandibular disorders (TMD) or less commonly as a result of malignancy. Following two cases of delayed diagnosis of carcinoma presenting with features of TMD to a specialist clinic, a checklist was developed for completion in cases of trismus, to alert the clinician to suspicious features suggesting a possible non-TMD cause. The use of this checklist, together with an increased awareness, has improved early recognition of atypical features in patients presenting with trismus and has contributed to the early diagnosis of a further case of malignancy presenting to this clinic. This article discusses the presentation of malignancy with trismus, the relevance of imaging in these cases, and the implementation of a checklist to reduce the risk of future misdiagnosis.

  2. Test of a Process Evaluation Checklist to improve neonatal pain practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Janet; Stevens, Bonnie; Sidani, Souraya; Watt-Watson, Judy

    2015-05-01

    The Evidence-Based Practice Identification and Change (EPIC) strategy is a multifaceted knowledge translation intervention. Although the intervention promoted evidence-based practice, the process of delivering the intervention components is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the construct validity of the Process Evaluation Checklist developed for monitoring the fidelity of implementing the intervention to improve neonatal pain practices (i.e., documentation of ordering and administration of sucrose). A case study design was used. A research practice council in a single Neonatal Intensive Care Unit implemented the intervention. The Process Evaluation Checklist was used to record adherence in carrying out the intervention components. A significant improvement in the documentation of sucrose orders (p = .002) and administration (p = .004) provided evidence of the construct validity of this intervention fidelity measure. Using this measure in different contexts over longer periods of time will further validate the Process Evaluation Checklist. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Improving the safety of patient transfer from AMU using a written checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindmarsh, D; Lees, L

    2012-01-01

    Unsafe patient transfers are one of the top reasons for incident reporting in hospitals. Criteria guiding safe transfer have been issued by the NHS Litigation Authority. To meet this standard, a "transfer check list" was redesigned for all patients leaving the Acute Medical Unit (AMU) in the Heartlands Hospital. Following the introduction of the checklist two full audit cycles were conducted. The first cycle highlighted an extremely poor uptake of the checklist. After interventions to educate nursing staff and raise awareness of the issues at the regular staff meetings, re-audit demonstrated significant improvement in completion rate. Subsequent monitoring indicates continued improvement, with compliance up to 95% for completion of the transfer checklist on AMU. Incident reporting relating to transfer has also decreased significantly.

  4. Pilot Weather Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aviation weather reports relayed from pilots to FAA air traffic controllers or National Weather Service personnel. Elements include sky cover, turbulence, wind...

  5. CERN pilot greenhouse

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This pilot installation was situated near Bld. BA6 opposite to the main entrance of the Meyrin site, with respect to Route de Meyrin. See Weekly Bulletin 3/83, and also photo 8305594X, 8505898X, 8302200.

  6. Iniciativas para melhoria do fluxo de informações do processo licitatório de obras públicas que visam a obtenção de certificação LEED

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Karoline

    2014-01-01

    Resumo: O presente trabalho se propôs a efetuar uma análise tanto quantitativa como qualitativa do processo licitatório de uma obra em execução de uma IFE que visa à obtenção da certificação ambiental LEED. Para a concretização do trabalho, primeiramente, efetuouse um estudo maior com relação aos sistemas de certificação ambiental existentes no mundo e quais encontram-se mais difundidos em aspectos nacionais. Dentre estas, verificou-se qual certificação possuía critérios que se adaptassem ao...

  7. Methods and processes for development of a CONSORT extension for reporting pilot randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabane, Lehana; Hopewell, Sally; Lancaster, Gillian A; Bond, Christine M; Coleman, Claire L; Campbell, Michael J; Eldridge, Sandra M

    2016-01-01

    Feasibility and pilot studies are essential components of planning or preparing for a larger randomized controlled trial (RCT). They are intended to provide useful information about the feasibility of the main RCT-with the goal of reducing uncertainty and thereby increasing the chance of successfully conducting the main RCT. However, research has shown that there are serious inadequacies in the reporting of pilot and feasibility studies. Reasons for this include a lack of explicit publication policies for pilot and feasibility studies in many journals, unclear definitions of what constitutes a pilot or feasibility RCT/study, and a lack of clarity in the objectives and methodological focus. All these suggest that there is an urgent need for new guidelines for reporting pilot and feasibility studies. The aim of this paper is to describe the methods and processes in our development of an extension to the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) Statement for reporting pilot and feasibility RCTs, that are executed in preparation for a future, more definitive RCT. There were five overlapping parts to the project: (i) the project launch -which involved establishing a working group and conducting a review of the literature; (ii) stakeholder engagement -which entailed consultation with the CONSORT group, journal editors and publishers, the clinical trials community, and funders; (iii) a Delphi process -used to assess the agreement of experts on initial definitions and to generate a reporting checklist for pilot RCTs, based on the 2010 CONSORT statement extension applicable to reporting pilot studies; (iv) a consensus meeting -to discuss, add, remove, or modify checklist items, with input from experts in the field; and (v) write-up and implementation- which included a guideline document which gives an explanation and elaboration (E&E) and which will provide advice for each item, together with examples of good reporting practice. This final part also included a

  8. Methods for streamlining intervention fidelity checklists: an example from the chronic disease self-management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, SangNam; Smith, Matthew Lee; Altpeter, Mary; Belza, Basia; Post, Lindsey; Ory, Marcia G

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining intervention fidelity should be part of any programmatic quality assurance (QA) plan and is often a licensure requirement. However, fidelity checklists designed by original program developers are often lengthy, which makes compliance difficult once programs become widely disseminated in the field. As a case example, we used Stanford's original Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) fidelity checklist of 157 items to demonstrate heuristic procedures for generating shorter fidelity checklists. Using an expert consensus approach, we sought feedback from active master trainers registered with the Stanford University Patient Education Research Center about which items were most essential to, and also feasible for, assessing fidelity. We conducted three sequential surveys and one expert group-teleconference call. Three versions of the fidelity checklist were created using different statistical and methodological criteria. In a final group-teleconference call with seven national experts, there was unanimous agreement that all three final versions (e.g., a 34-item version, a 20-item version, and a 12-item version) should be made available because the purpose and resources for administering a checklist might vary from one setting to another. This study highlights the methodology used to generate shorter versions of a fidelity checklist, which has potential to inform future QA efforts for this and other evidence-based programs (EBP) for older adults delivered in community settings. With CDSMP and other EBP, it is important to differentiate between program fidelity as mandated by program developers for licensure, and intervention fidelity tools for providing an "at-a-glance" snapshot of the level of compliance to selected program indicators.

  9. Done or Almost Done? Improving OSCE Checklists to Better Capture Performance in Progress Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Debra; Halman, Samantha; Desjardins, Isabelle; Humphrey-Murto, Susan; Wood, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Construct: The impact of using nonbinary checklists for scoring residents from different levels of training participating in objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) progress tests was explored. OSCE progress tests typically employ similar rating instruments as traditional OSCEs. However, progress tests differ from other assessment modalities because learners from different stages of training participate in the same examination, which can pose challenges when deciding how to assign scores. In an attempt to better capture performance, nonbinary checklists were introduced in two OSCE progress tests. The purposes of this study were (a) to identify differences in the use of checklist options (e.g., done satisfactorily, attempted, or not done) by task type, (b) to analyze the impact of different scoring methods using nonbinary checklists for two OSCE progress tests (nonprocedural and procedural) for Internal Medicine residents, and (c) to determine which scoring method is better suited for a given task. A retrospective analysis examined differences in scores (n = 119) for two OSCE progress tests (procedural and nonprocedural). Scoring methods (hawk, dove, and hybrid) varied in stringency in how they awarded marks for nonbinary checklist items that were rated as done satisfactorily, attempted, or not done. Difficulty, reliability (internal consistency), item-total correlations and pass rates were compared for each OSCE using the three scoring methods. Mean OSCE scores were highest using the dove method and lowest using the hawk method. The hawk method resulted in higher item-total correlations for most stations, but there were differences by task type. Overall score reliability calculated using the three methods did not differ significantly. Pass-fail status differed as a function of scoring methods and exam type, with the hawk and hybrid methods resulting in higher failure rates for the nonprocedural OSCE and the dove method resulting in a higher failure rate

  10. Calibration of communication skills items in OSCE checklists according to the MAAS-Global.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyonugroho, Winny; Kropmans, Thomas; Kennedy, Kieran M; Stewart, Brian; van Dalen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Communication skills (CS) are commonly assessed using 'communication items' in Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) station checklists. Our aim is to calibrate the communication component of OSCE station checklists according to the MAAS-Global which is a valid and reliable standard to assess CS in undergraduate medical education. Three raters independently compared 280 checklists from 4 disciplines contributing to the undergraduate year 4 OSCE against the 17 items of the MAAS-Global standard. G-theory was used to analyze the reliability of this calibration procedure. G-Kappa was 0.8. For two raters G-Kappa is 0.72 and it fell to 0.57 for one rater. 46% of the checklist items corresponded to section three of the MAAS-Global (i.e. medical content of the consultation), whilst 12% corresponded to section two (i.e. general CS), and 8.2% to section one (i.e. CS for each separate phase of the consultation). 34% of the items were not considered to be CS. A G-Kappa of 0.8 confirms a reliable and valid procedure for calibrating OSCE CS checklist items using the MAAS-Global. We strongly suggest that such a procedure is more widely employed to arrive at a stable (valid and reliable) judgment of the communication component in existing checklists for medical students' communication behaviours. It is possible to measure the 'true' caliber of CS in OSCE stations. Students' results are thereby comparable between and across stations, students and institutions. A reliable calibration procedure requires only two raters. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. Is this health campaign really social marketing? A checklist to help you decide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Josephine Y; McGill, Bronwyn; Thomas, Margaret M; Carroll, Tom E; Bellew, William; Bauman, Adrian; Grunseit, Anne C

    2018-04-01

    Social marketing (SM) campaigns can be a powerful disease prevention and health promotion strategy but health-related campaigns may simply focus on the "promotions" communication activities and exclude other key characteristics of the SM approach. This paper describes the application of a checklist for identifying which lifestyle-related chronic disease prevention campaigns reported as SM actually represent key SM principles and practice. A checklist of SM criteria was developed, reviewed and refined by SM and mass media campaign experts. Papers identified in searches for "social marketing" and "mass media" for obesity, diet and physical activity campaigns in the health literature were classified using the checklist. Using the checklist, 66.6% of papers identified in the "SM" search and 39% of papers identified from the "mass media" search were classified as SM campaigns. Inter-rater agreement for classification using the abstract only was 92.1%. Health-related campaigns that self-identify as "social marketing" or "mass media" may not include the key characteristics of a SM approach. Published literature can provide useful guidance for developing and evaluating health-related SM campaigns, but health promotion professionals need to be able to identify what actually comprises SM in practice. SO WHAT?: SM could be a valuable strategy in comprehensive health promotion interventions, but it is often difficult for non-experts to identify published campaigns that represent a true SM approach. This paper describes the application of a checklist to assist policy makers and practitioners in appraising evidence from campaigns reflecting actual SM in practice. The checklist could also guide reporting on SM campaigns. © 2017 Australian Health Promotion Association.

  12. [Improving patient safety: Usefulness of safety checklists in a neonatal unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaga Redondo, María; Sanz López, Ester; Rodríguez Sánchez de la Blanca, Ana; Marsinyach Ros, Itziar; Collados Gómez, Laura; Díaz Redondo, Alicia; Sánchez Luna, Manuel

    2017-10-01

    Due to the complexity and characteristics of their patients, neonatal units are risk areas for the development of adverse events (AE). For this reason, there is a need to introduce and implement some tools and strategies that will help to improve the safety of the neonatal patient. Safety check-lists have shown to be a useful tool in other health areas but they are not sufficiently developed in Neonatal Units. A quasi-experimental prospective study was conducted on the design and implementation of the use of a checklist and evaluation of its usefulness for detecting incidents. The satisfaction of the health professionals on using the checklist tool was also assessed. The compliance rate in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was 56.5%, with 4.03 incidents per patient being detected. One incident was detected for every 5.3 checklists used. The most frequent detected incidents were those related to medication, followed by inadequate alarm thresholds, adjustments of the monitors, and medication pumps. The large majority (75%) of the NICU health professionals considered the checklist useful or very useful, and 68.75% considered that its use had managed to avoid an AE. The overall satisfaction was 83.33% for the professionals with less than 5 years working experience, and 44.4% of the professionals with more than 5 years of experience were pleased or very pleased. The checklists have shown to be a useful tool for the detection of incidents, especially in NICU, with a positive assessment from the health professionals of the unit. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Contribuição ao entendimento da aplicação da certificaçao LEED TM no Brasil com base em dois estudos de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Gomes da Silva

    Full Text Available No setor da construção civil, a busca por sustentabilidade ainda é incipiente. Este trabalho tem por objetivos analisar a aplicação da certificação LEED TM a empreendimentos brasileiros, entendendo as restrições de uso em uma realidade diferente da referência original norte-americana, e disseminar os resultados obtidos para dois estudos de caso nacionais. Os resultados obtidos confirmaram que (a a certificação LEED TM não é tarefa fácil e, no Brasil, significa, para vários aspectos, saltar da completa ausência de referência para atender a normas americanas; e (b mesmo em centros avançados da construção civil brasileira, o mercado ainda não está preparado para os "selos verdes" internacionais. Apesar dos obstáculos e limitações existentes, a entrada de certificações no Brasil abre a discussão para assuntos antes nunca abordados. Certificações, iniciativas voluntárias e instrumentos de market pull possuem o importante papel de propulsores da transformação do mercado da construção civil na busca da sustentabilidade. Não se pode perder de vista que estas pressupõem uma base anterior - composta de pesquisa e desenvolvimento e transferência de conhecimento e tecnologia ao mercado - para que possam se desenvolver plenamente. Deve-se evitar a ansiedade pela busca de certificação sem o preparo do mercado. Caso contrário, corre-se o risco de fragilizar o papel transformador das certificações.

  14. Validation of the "early detection Primary Care Checklist" in an Italian community help-seeking sample: The "checklist per la Valutazione dell'Esordio Psicotico".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizza, Lorenzo; Raballo, Andrea; Semrov, Enrico; Chiri, Luigi Rocco; Azzali, Silvia; Scazza, Ilaria; Garlassi, Sara; Paterlini, Federica; Fontana, Francesca; Favazzo, Rosanna; Pensieri, Luana; Fabiani, Michela; Cioncolini, Leonardo; Pupo, Simona

    2017-07-26

    To establish the concordant validity of the "Checklist per la Valutazione dell'Esordio Psicotico" (CVEP) in an Italian help-seeking population. The CVEP is the Italian adaptation of the "early detection Primary Care Checklist," a 20-item tool specifically designed to assist primary care practitioners in identifying young people in the early stages of psychosis. The checklist was completed by the referring practitioners of 168 young people referred to the "Reggio Emilia At Risk Mental States" Project, an early detection infrastructure developed under the aegis of the Regional Project on Early Detection of Psychosis in the Reggio Emilia Department of Mental Health. The concordant validity of the CVEP was established by comparing screen results with the outcome of the "Comprehensive Assessment of At Risk Mental States" (CAARMS), a gold standard assessment for identifying young people who may be at risk of developing psychosis. The simple checklist as originally conceived had excellent sensitivity (98%), but lower specificity (58%). Using only a CVEP total score of 20 or above as cut-off, the tool showed a slightly lower sensitivity (93%) with a substantial improvement in specificity (87%). Simple cross-tabulations of the individual CVEP item scores against CAARMS outcome to identify the more discriminant item in terms of sensitivity and specificity were carried out. In comparison to other, much longer, screening tools, the CVEP performed well to identify young people in the early stages of psychosis. Therefore, the CVEP is well suited to optimize appropriate referrals to specialist services, building on the skills and knowledge already available in primary care settings. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Comparison of two methods of inquiry for torture with East African refugees: single query versus checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermeyer, Joseph; Hollifield, Michael; Spring, Marline; Johnson, David; Jaranson, James

    2011-01-01

    First to compare two methods of inquiry regarding torture: i.e., the traditional means of inquiry versus a checklist of torture experiences previously identified for these African refugees. Second, we hoped to identify factors that might influence refugees to not report torture on a single query when checklist data indicated torture events had occurred or to report torture when checklist data indicated that torture had not occurred. Consisted of queries to 1,134 community-dwelling East African refugees (Somalia and Ethiopia) regarding the presence-versus-absence of torture in Africa (single query), a checklist of torture experiences in Africa that we had previously identified as occurring in these groups, demography, non-torture traumatic experiences in Africa, and current posttraumatic symptoms. Showed that 14% of the study participants reported a torture experience on a checklist, but not on a single query. Nine percent responded positively to the single query on torture, but then failed to check any torture experience. Those reporting trauma on an open-ended query, but not on a checklist, had been highly traumatized in other ways (warfare, civil chaos, robbery, assault, rape, trauma during flight out of the country). Those who reported torture on the checklist but not on the single query reported fewer instances of torture, suggesting that perhaps a "threshold" of torture experience influenced the single-query report. In addition, certain types of torture appeared more apt to be associated with a singlequery endorsement of torture. On regression analysis, a single-query self-report of torture was associated with traumatic experiences consistent with torture, older age, female gender, and nontorture trauma in Africa. Inconsistent reporting of torture occurred when two methods of inquiry (one openended and one a checklist) were employed in this sample. We believe that specific contexts of torture and non-torture trauma, together with individual demographic

  16. Do safety checklists improve teamwork and communication in the operating room? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Stephanie; Rout, Shantanu; Sevdalis, Nick; Moorthy, Krishna; Darzi, Ara; Vincent, Charles

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to assess the impact of surgical safety checklists on the quality of teamwork and communication in the operating room (OR). Safety checklists have been shown to impact positively on patient morbidity and mortality following surgery, but it is unclear whether this clinical improvement is related to an improvement in OR teamwork and communication. A systematic search strategy of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane Database for Systematic Reviews was undertaken to obtain relevant articles. After de-duplication and the addition of limits, 315 articles were screened for inclusion by 2 researchers and all articles meeting a set of prespecified inclusion criteria were retained. Information regarding the type of checklist, study design, assessment tools used, outcomes, and study limitations was extracted. Twenty articles formed the basis of this systematic review. All articles described an empirical study relating to a case-specific safety checklist for surgery as the primary intervention, with some measure of change/improvement in teamwork and/or communication relating to its use. The methods for assessing teamwork and communication varied greatly, including surveys, observations, interviews, and 360° assessments. The evidence suggests that safety checklists improve the perceived quality of OR teamwork and communication and reduce observable errors relating to poor team skills. This is likely to function through establishing an open platform for communication at the start of a procedure: encouraging the sharing of critical case-related information, promoting team coordination and decision making, flagging knowledge gaps, and enhancing team cohesion. However, the evidence would also suggest that when used suboptimally or when individuals have not bought in to the process, checklists may conversely have a negative impact on the function of the team. Safety checklists are beneficial for OR teamwork and

  17. Six things every plastic surgeon needs to know about teamwork training and checklists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Stephen W

    2013-03-01

    More than 20 years of teamwork, research, and experience in high-risk industries such as aviation, nuclear power, and military operations have clearly demonstrated that teamwork training and checklist usage can overcome the primary causes of adverse events. There is a growing body of evidence that checklist programs have the same error-reducing effect in operating rooms (OR) as in other industries. The benefits include documented improvements in patient safety and quality care; a better office, surgery center, or hospital in which to practice medicine; reduced exposure to malpractice risk; and increased efficiency in the OR.

  18. History of study, updated checklist, distribution and key of scorpions (Arachnida: Scorpiones) from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Zi-Zhong; Yin, Shi-Jin; Cao, Zhi-Jian; Li, Wen-Xin

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the history of taxonomic research on scorpions and provides an updated checklist and key of the scorpions currently known in China. This checklist is based on a thorough review of the extant literatures on scorpion species whose presence has been confirmed in China through field expeditions and examination of scorpion collections, excepting a few members that have no clear distribution or are currently in doubt. Totally, the scorpion fauna of China consists of 53 species and subspecies belonging to 12 genera crossing five families, with 33 species (62.3%) and one genus being recorded as endemic. Additionally, identification key and the distribution of scorpions from China are provided.

  19. Kommenteret checkliste over Danmarks bier – Del 1: Colletidae (Hymenoptera, Apoidea)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning Bang; Calabuig, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents Part 1 of a checklist for the taxa of bees occurring in Denmark, dealing with the family Colletidae, and covering 27 species. The remaining five families will be dealt with in future papers. The following species are hereby recorded as new to the Danish bee fauna: Colletes...... floralis Eversmann, 1852, Hylaeus angustatus (Schenck, 1861) and Hylaeus gracilicornis (Morawitz, 1867). Hylaeus annulatus (Linnaeus, 1758) is excluded from the Danish checklist. Species that have the potential to occur in Denmark are discussed briefly. A systematic overview of the bee families and genera...

  20. Additions to the checklist of the ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guénard, Benoit; Economo, Evan P

    2015-11-10

    A recent species checklist of the ants of Peru recorded 592 nominal species and 79 genera on the basis of a literature review. Here we complement the previously published checklist with the addition of 83 nominal species and six genera, including three genera recorded only from morphospecies. This increases the list of ants reported from Peru to at least 679 species and subspecies and 85 genera. We also modify the list of species known as endemic from Peru, discuss the historical importance of the Peruvian ant fauna in myrmecology, and highlight potential research for future studies.

  1. Reporting Guidelines and Checklists Improve the Reliability and Rigor of Research Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, J Haxby

    2016-03-01

    The Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT) requires the use of robust research reporting guidelines for all research report submissions, including the newly adopted RECORD (REporting of studies Conducted using Observational Routinely-collected health Data) statement. We remind authors submitting research to JOSPT to identify the appropriate guideline and checklist for their study design, and to submit a completely and accurately completed checklist with their manuscript. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(3):130. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0105.

  2. User Participation in Pilot Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torkilsheyggi, Arnvør Martinsdóttir á; Hertzum, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Pilot implementations provide users with real-work experiences of how a system will affect their daily work before the design of the system is finalized. On the basis of a pilot implementation of a system for coordinating the transport of patients by hospital porters, we investigate pilot...... the use of the pilot system because the porters and nurses learned about their needs throughout the pilot implementation, not just during use. Finally, we discuss how the scope and duration of a pilot implementation influence the conditions for participation....

  3. Factor Structure of the Hare Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version in German Female and Male Detainees and Community Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevecke, Kathrin; Pukrop, Ralf; Kosson, David S.; Krischer, Maya K.

    2009-01-01

    Substantial evidence exists for 3- and 4-factor models of psychopathy underlying patterns of covariation among the items of the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) in diverse adult samples. Although initial studies conducted with the Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL:YV) indicated reasonable fit for these models in incarcerated male…

  4. Violence Risk Assessment and Facet 4 of the Psychopathy Checklist: Predicting Institutional and Community Aggression in Two Forensic Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Glenn D.; Heilbrun, Kirk

    2010-01-01

    The Psychopathy Checklist and Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL/PCL-R) were used to predict institutional aggression and community violence in two groups of forensic patients. Results showed that Facet 4 (Antisocial) of the PCL/PCL-R or one of its parcels consistently achieved incremental validity relative to the first three facets, whereas the…

  5. Effect of Clinically Discriminating, Evidence-Based Checklist Items on the Reliability of Scores from an Internal Medicine Residency OSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Vijay J.; Bordage, Georges; Gierl, Mark J.; Yudkowsky, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) are used worldwide for summative examinations but often lack acceptable reliability. Research has shown that reliability of scores increases if OSCE checklists for medical students include only clinically relevant items. Also, checklists are often missing evidence-based items that high-achieving…

  6. Data for the elaboration of the CIPROS checklist with items for a patient registry software system: Examples and explanations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Lindoerfer

    2017-10-01

    The data presented per checklist item provide the relevant textual information (examples and a first qualitative summary (explanation. The examples and explanations provide the background information on CIPROS. They elucidate how to implement the checklist items in other projects. The literature list and the selected texts serve as a reference for scientists and system developers.

  7. High Quality Differentiated Instruction--A Checklist for Teacher Professional Development on Handling Differences in the General Education Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smets, Wouter

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a checklist that scaffolds teachers' professional decision-making with regard to differentiated instruction. It discusses the way the concept of differentiated instruction may be applied in an evidence-informed way by presenting a checklist for high-quality differentiated instruction (DI). We tried to tackle the question of how…

  8. DIRAC universal pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagni, F.; McNab, A.; Luzzi, C.; Krzemien, W.; Consortium, DIRAC

    2017-10-01

    In the last few years, new types of computing models, such as IAAS (Infrastructure as a Service) and IAAC (Infrastructure as a Client), gained popularity. New resources may come as part of pledged resources, while others are in the form of opportunistic ones. Most but not all of these new infrastructures are based on virtualization techniques. In addition, some of them, present opportunities for multi-processor computing slots to the users. Virtual Organizations are therefore facing heterogeneity of the available resources and the use of an Interware software like DIRAC to provide the transparent, uniform interface has become essential. The transparent access to the underlying resources is realized by implementing the pilot model. DIRAC’s newest generation of generic pilots (the so-called Pilots 2.0) are the “pilots for all the skies”, and have been successfully released in production more than a year ago. They use a plugin mechanism that makes them easily adaptable. Pilots 2.0 have been used for fetching and running jobs on every type of resource, being it a Worker Node (WN) behind a CREAM/ARC/HTCondor/DIRAC Computing element, a Virtual Machine running on IaaC infrastructures like Vac or BOINC, on IaaS cloud resources managed by Vcycle, the LHCb High Level Trigger farm nodes, and any type of opportunistic computing resource. Make a machine a “Pilot Machine”, and all diversities between them will disappear. This contribution describes how pilots are made suitable for different resources, and the recent steps taken towards a fully unified framework, including monitoring. Also, the cases of multi-processor computing slots either on real or virtual machines, with the whole node or a partition of it, is discussed.

  9. A case series using a care management checklist to decrease emergency department visits and hospitalizations in children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anup D

    2014-02-01

    Each year, 1 million people are seen in an emergency department for seizures or epilepsy. We implemented a care management checklist for patients with frequent visits. A database was searched for patients with the highest number of emergency department visits and/or unplanned hospitalizations in 2011. Four patients were selected. A care management checklist was implemented in 2012. Compliance with the office visits, number of emergency department visits and/or hospitalizations, and the associated costs were tracked following implementation of the checklist for 2011 and 2012. These 4 epilepsy patients accounted for 46 visits in the year 2011 with associated health care costs of $380,209. Following a year using a care management checklist, the same patients accounted for 11 visits with a cost reduction of $188,130. Using a care management checklist was useful in these 4 epilepsy patients to decrease emergency department visits and/or unplanned hospitalizations. A limitation of this study is its small numbers.

  10. The Empirical Versus DSM-Oriented Approach of the Child Behavior Checklist Similarities and Dissimilarities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wolff, Marianne S.; Vogels, Anton G. C.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2014-01-01

    The DSM-oriented approach of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) is a relatively new classification of problem behavior in children and adolescents. Given the clinical and scientific relevance of the CBCL, this study examines similarities and dissimilarities between the empirical and the

  11. The empirical versus DSM-oriented approach of the child behavior checklist: Similarities and dissimilarities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, M.S. de; Vogels, A.G.C.; Reijneveld, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    The DSM-oriented approach of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) is a relatively new classification of problem behavior in children and adolescents. Given the clinical and scientific relevance of the CBCL, this study examines similarities and dissimilarities between the empirical and the

  12. [Patient safety in the operating room. Checklist implementation of general surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celma Vicente, Matilde; Martín Cebrián, Carmen; Cano Gómez, Martina; Casanova Forner, M Teresa

    2012-05-01

    To plan, implement and evaluate strategies for implementation of Checklist in a general surgery operating rooms and preliminary evaluation of the experience in view of the nurses. Implementation and evaluation of technological application of a checklist format similar to that published by WHO. The process was conducted in three phases using strategies for planning, implementation and evaluation. After training the professionals, design the checklist at each stage, assign the responsibility of screening and determine how registration was applied for 10 months in 68% of planned interventions and 30% urgent. Preliminary evaluation using qualitative methods, discourse analysis of operating room nurses who participated in its implementation and monitoring during implementation. The qualitative assessment is useful to know the attitudes, opinions and problems of nurses for the implementation of innovations that require interdisciplinary collaboration The application workload increases, but makes visible some activities. The broad participation of nurses reveal their involvement to promote patient safety, but also their training needs. It is essential to the awareness of all professionals to carry out the checklist, which can only be imposed if there is a culture change, innovation and safety and teamwork. For the test does not fall into the routine, it would be wise to do a periodic evaluation. The list should be clear, concise and reliable.

  13. The Child Behavior Checklist Dysregulation Profile in Preschool Children: A Broad Dysregulation Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geeraerts, S.B.; Deutz, M.H.F.; Dekovic, M.; Bunte, T.; Schoemaker, K.; Espy, K.A.; Prinzie, P.; van Baar, A.; Matthys, W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Children with concurrent impairments in regulating affect, behavior, and cognition can be identified with the Anxious/Depressed, Aggressive Behavior, and Attention Problems scales (or AAA scales) of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Jointly, these scales form the Dysregulation Profile

  14. The Child Behavior Checklist Dysregulation Profile in Preschool Children: A Broad Dysregulation Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geeraerts, S.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412527146; Deutz, M.H.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372536115; Dekovic, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/088030563; Bunte, T.; Schoemaker, K; Espy, K.A.; Prinzie, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/26906110X; van Baar, A.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08504749X; Matthys, W.C.H.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074826484

    Objective Children with concurrent impairments in regulating affect, behavior, and cognition can be identified with the Anxious/Depressed, Aggressive Behavior, and Attention Problems scales (or AAA scales) of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Jointly, these scales form the Dysregulation Profile

  15. Use of a nursing checklist to facilitate implementation of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Kathleen Ryan; O'Brien, Molly; Pierce, Carol Daddio; Gazarian, Priscilla K

    2015-02-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has become a widely accepted intervention that is improving neurological outcomes following return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest. This intervention is highly complex but infrequently used, and prompt implementation of the many steps involved, especially achieving the target body temperature, can be difficult. A checklist was introduced to guide nurses in implementing the therapeutic hypothermia protocol during the different phases of the intervention (initiation, maintenance, rewarming, and normothermia) in an intensive care unit. An interprofessional committee began by developing the protocol, a template for an order set, and a shivering algorithm. At first, implementation of the protocol was inconsistent, and a lack of clarity and urgency in managing patients during the different phases of the protocol was apparent. The nursing checklist has provided all of the intensive care nurses with an easy-to-follow reference to facilitate compliance with the required steps in the protocol for therapeutic hypothermia. Observations of practice and feedback from nursing staff in all units confirm the utility of the checklist. Use of the checklist has helped reduce the time from admission to the unit to reaching the target temperature and the time from admission to continuous electroencephalographic monitoring in the cardiac intensive care unit. Evaluation of patients' outcomes as related to compliance with the protocol interventions is ongoing. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  16. Psychometric Study of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist in Fragile X Syndrome and Implications for Targeted Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Stephanie M.; Widaman, Keith F.; Hall, Scott S.; Reiss, Allan L.; Lightbody, Amy; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Lachiewicz, Ave; Brown, Elaine C.; Hessl, David

    2012-01-01

    Animal studies elucidating the neurobiology of fragile X syndrome (FXS) have led to multiple controlled trials in humans, with the Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Community (ABC-C) commonly adopted as a primary outcome measure. A multi-site collaboration examined the psychometric properties of the ABC-C in 630 individuals (ages 3-25) with FXS using…

  17. Increasing Direct Care Staff Compliance to Individualized Physical Therapy Body Positioning Prescriptions: Prescriptive Checklists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattimore, Jennifer; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The study confirmed previous research indicating that workshop training by itself is an ineffective method of increasing direct care staff compliance to treatment prescriptions, and that providing direct staff supervisors with a training and management tool (prescriptive checklists) may be an effective alternative for serving multihandicapped…

  18. An Evaluation of the Validity and Reliability of a Food Behavior Checklist Modified for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branscum, Paul; Sharma, Manoj; Kaye, Gail; Succop, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to report the construct validity and internal consistency reliability of the Food Behavior Checklist modified for children (FBC-MC), with low-income, Youth Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)-eligible children. Methods: Using a cross-sectional research design, construct validity was…

  19. Checklist of American sand flies ( Diptera , Psychodidae , Phlebotominae ): genera, species, and their distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Shimabukuro, Paloma Helena Fernandes; de Andrade, Andrey Jos?; Galati, Eunice Aparecida Bianchi

    2017-01-01

    Phlebotomine sand flies are dipteran insects of medical importance because many species are involved in the transmission of pathogens between human and non-human animals. A total of 530 American species of sand flies is presented in an updated checklist, along with their author(s) and year of publication using the classification by Galati (1995, 2003). Distribution by country is also provided.

  20. Validity of a Checklist for the Design, Content, and Instructional Qualities of Children's Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çer, Erkan; Sahin, Ertugrul

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a checklist whose validity has been tested in assessing children's books. Participants consisted of university students who had taken a course in children's literature. They were selected through convenience sampling and randomly assigned into experimental and control groups. Participants in the…

  1. Technical Bulletin, Evaluation of Land Application Systems: Evaluation Checklist and Supporting Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This document contains a checklist and background information for the evaluation for land application systems of wastewater. It is divided into three major sections dealing with facilities plans, design plans and specifications, and operation and maintenance manuals. The focus of section one is the thorough evaluation of alternatives and the…

  2. Structural, Item, and Test Generalizability of the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised to Offenders with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Catrin; Cooke, David; Michie, Christine; Hollin, Clive; Hogue, Todd; Lindsay, William R.; Taylor, John L.

    2010-01-01

    The Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) is the most widely used measure of psychopathy in forensic clinical practice, but the generalizability of the measure to offenders with intellectual disabilities (ID) has not been clearly established. This study examined the structural equivalence and scalar equivalence of the PCL-R in a sample of 185 male…

  3. Factor Structure of the Hare Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL: YV) in Adolescent Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosson, David S.; Neumann, Craig S.; Forth, Adelle E.; Salekin, Randall T.; Hare, Robert D.; Krischer, Maya K.; Sevecke, Kathrin

    2013-01-01

    Despite substantial evidence for the fit of the 3- and 4-factor models of Psychopathy Checklist-based ratings of psychopathy in adult males and adolescents, evidence is less consistent in adolescent females. However, prior studies used samples much smaller than recommended for examining model fit. To address this issue, we conducted a confirmatory…

  4. Predicting Recidivism with the Psychopathy Checklist: Are Factor Score Composites Really Necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Glenn D.; Wilson, Nick J.; Glover, Anthony J. J.

    2011-01-01

    In two previous studies on general and violent recidivism (Walters & Heilbrun, 2010; Walters, Knight, Grann, & Dahle, 2008), the summed composite antisocial facet of the Psychopathy Checklist displayed incremental validity relative to the other 3 facets (interpersonal, affective, lifestyle), whereas the other 3 facets generally failed to…

  5. Hazard identification checklist: Occupational safety and health issues associated with green building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwoert, J.; Ustailieva, E.

    2013-01-01

    This checklist accompanies the e-fact on the same topic and aims to help identify the potential hazards to workers’ safety and health associated with the planning and construction of green buildings, their maintenance, renovation (retrofitting), demolition, and on-site waste collection. It also

  6. An annotated checklist of the amphibians, reptiles and mammals of the Nylsvley nature reserve

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobsen, NHG

    1977-12-01

    Full Text Available frog, 3 tortoise, 1 terrapin, 23 lizard, 1 amphisbaenid, 29 snake and 62 mammal species were recorded on the Reserve. As new additions continued to be made late in the survey, it is clear that the checklist is not yet complete....

  7. From items to syndromes in the Hypomania Checklist (HCL-32): Psychometric validation and clinical validity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, P; Christensen, E M; Vinberg, M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Hypomania Checklist (HCL-32) was developed to identify subthreshold bipolarity in patients with major depression. An HCL-32 version with fewer items has been suggested. METHODS: Principal component analysis (PCA) without rotation was used to identify active/elevated mood versus ri...

  8. DIALECT CHECKLIST - PACIFIC NORTHWEST. SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL FOR ELEVENTH GRADE UNIT ON "LINGUISTIC GEOGRAPHY AND DIALECT."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portland Public Schools, OR.

    THE CHECKLIST WAS DESIGNED TO STUDY CHARACTERISTIC WORD USAGE IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST. THE STUDENT IS ASKED TO CIRCLE THE WORD IN A GROUP OF WORDS WHICH HE ORDINARILY USES TO DESIGNATE A SPECIFIC THING. FOR INSTANCE--SELF OVER FIREPLACE - MANTEL, MANTEL BOARD, MANTEL PIECE, SHELF, CHILDHOOD WORD FOR MOTHER - MA, MAMA, MOM, MOTHER, MOMMY. ONE…

  9. The Aberrant Behavior Checklist and the Behavior Problems Inventory: Convergent and Divergent Validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojahn, Johannes; Aman, Michael G.; Matson, Johnny L.; Mayville, Erik

    2003-01-01

    A study compared the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) and the Behavior Problems Inventory (BPI) for assessing the maladaptive behavior of 226 adults, mostly with severe or profound mental retardation. Individuals with elevated BPI scores generally had higher ABC scores, however, the extent of covariation differed across subscales. (Contains…

  10. Problems reported by parents of children in multiple cultures: the Child Behavior Checklist syndrome constructs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.M. Crijnen (Alfons); T.M. Achenbach (Thomas); F.C. Verhulst (Frank)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare syndromes of parent-reported problems for children in 12 cultures. METHOD: Child Behavior Checklists were analyzed for 13,697 children and adolescents, ages 6 through 17 years, from general population

  11. Checklist of the birds of Kipini Conservancy, Lamu and Tana River ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ground is fire-derived, as there were many signs of fire-damaged trees, or relict burnt stumps and in places the grassland was colonized by saplings of Hyphaene palms ...... Much singing, alarm-calling, chasing of neighbours gave the impres- sion breeding had started. Checklist of the birds of Kipini Conservancy, Kenya. 31 ...

  12. Comparison of Child Behavior Checklist subscales in screening for obsessive-compulsive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia Aaron Skovby; Bilenberg, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a prevalent psychiatric disorder in children and adolescents associated with significant functional impairment. Early and correct diagnosis is essential for an optimal treatment outcome. The purpose of this study was to determine which of four subscales...... derived from the Child Behavior Checklist best discriminates OCD patients from clinical and population-based controls....

  13. Syndrome dimensions and the Child Behavior Checklist and the Teacher Report Form: A critical empirical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, C.A.; Hox, J.; Auerbach, J.; Erol, N.; Fonseca, A.C.; Mellenbergh, G.J.; Novik, T.S.; Oosterlaan, J.; Roussos, A.C.; Shalev, R.S.; Zilber, N.; Sergeant, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    The construct representation of the cross-informant model of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and the Teacher Report Form (TRF) was evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis. Samples were collected in seven different countries. The results are based on 13,226 parent ratings and 8893 teacher

  14. The Aberrant Behavior Checklist with Children and Adolescents with Dual Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojahn, Johannes; Heisel, William J.

    1991-01-01

    The appropriateness of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) was investigated with 199 youngsters with dual diagnosis of mental retardation and psychiatric disturbance. With some cautions, the ABC is recommended, based on the robustness of its factor structure, clinically meaningfulness of the subscale scores, and internal consistency of the…

  15. [Guidelines 2.0: systematic development of a comprehensive checklist for a successful guideline enterprise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgano, Gian Paolo; Davoli, Marina; Moja, Lorenzo; Amato, Laura; Ferroni, Eliana; Tirani, Marcello

    2015-06-01

    Guideline developers worldwide are struggling with the lack of guidance for the practical steps in the guideline enterprise. Our objective was to systematically compile a comprehensive checklist of items linked to relevant resources and tools that guideline developers would consider for development and support of implementation. Data sources included manuals of international guideline developers, literature on guidelines for guidelines with a focus on international and national guideline agencies, professional societies, and recent systematic guidance articles. We reviewed these sources in duplicate, extracted items using a sensitive approach and developed overarching topics that are relevant to guidelines. In an iterative process, we reviewed items for duplication and omissions and involved experts in guideline development for revisions. We developed a checklist with 18 topics and 146 items and a webpage to facilitate its use by guideline developers (http://cebgrade.mcmaster.ca/guidecheck.html). The topics and items included cover all stages of the guideline enterprise, from planning to formulating recommendations, to dissemination and evaluation. The final itemized guideline development checklist (GDC) includes links to training material and resources for methodology. The GDC will serve as a resource for those involved in guideline development and we will use crowdsourcing to keep the checklist up to date and enhance it.

  16. Forty-fourth supplement to the American Ornithologists' Union Check-list of North American birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, R.C.; Cicero, C.; Dunn, J.L.; Kratter, A.W.; Rasmussen, P.C.; Remsen, J.V.; Rising, J.D.; Stotz, D.F.

    2003-01-01

    This is the third Supplement since publication of the 7th edition of the Check-list of North American Birds (American Ornithologists' Union [AOU] 1998). It summarizes decisions made by the AOU's Committee on Classification and Nomenclature between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2002.

  17. Forty-sixth supplement to the American Ornithologists' Union Check-list of North American Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, R.C.; Cicero, C.; Dunn, J.L.; Kratter, A.W.; Rasmussen, P.C.; Remsen, J.V.; Rising, J.D.; Stotz, D.F.

    2005-01-01

    This is the fifth Supplement since publication of the 7th edition of the Check-list of North American Birds (American Ornithologists' Union [AOU] 1998). It summarizes decisions made by the AOU's Committee on Classification and Nomenclature between 1 January and 31 December 2004.

  18. Forty-seventh supplement to the American Ornithologists' Union Check-list of North American birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, R.C.; Cicero, C.; Dunn, J.L.; Kratter, A.W.; Rasmussen, P.C.; Remsen, J.V.; Rising, J.D.; Stotz, D.F.

    2006-01-01

    This is the sixth Supplement since publication of the 7th edition of the Check-list of North American Birds (American Ornithologists' Union [AOU] 1998). It summarizes decisions made by the AOU's Committee on Classification and Nomenclature-North America between 1 January and 31 December 2005.

  19. Forty-fifth supplement to the American Ornithologists' Union Check-list of North American Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, R.C.; Cicero, C.; Dunn, J.L.; Kratter, A.W.; Rasmussen, P.C.; Remsen, J.V.; Rising, J.D.; Stotz, D.F.

    2004-01-01

    This is the fourth Supplement since publication of the 7th edition of the Check-list of North American Birds (American Ornithologists' Union [AOU] 1998). It summarizes decisions made by the AOU's Committee on Classification and Nomenclature between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2003.

  20. A check-list of indigenous trees and shrubs of Bura, Tana river ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents a case study on using a ethno-botanical approach of compiling plant taxonomy data. Introductory chapters deal with the study area in the semi-arid eastern part of Kenya, describing its physical characteristics and the various vegetation types. A check-list is presented of all woody plants found in the area.