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Sample records for lecture nuclear cardiology

  1. American Society of Nuclear Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... much more! class="box-li"> Journal of Nuclear Cardiology Official publication of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Clinical Guidelines Procedures, Appropriate Use Criteria, Information Statements ...

  2. Reporting nuclear cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trägårdh, Elin; Hesse, Birger; Knuuti, Juhani

    2015-01-01

    are available; therefore, an European position statement on how to report nuclear cardiology might be useful. The current paper combines the limited existing evidence with expert consensus, previously published recommendations as well as current clinical practices. For all the applications discussed......, and conclusion of the report. The statement also discusses recommended terminology in nuclear cardiology, image display, and preliminary reports. It is hoped that this statement may lead to more attention to create well-written and standardized nuclear cardiology reports and eventually lead to improved clinical...

  3. Recent advances in nuclear cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, H.; Petersen, C. Leth; Kjaer, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is an essential part of functional, non-invasive, cardiac imaging. Significant advances have been made in nuclear cardiology since planar (201)thallium ((201)TI) scintigraphy was introduced for the evaluation of left ventricular (LV) perfusion nearly 40 years ago. The use...... of nuclear cardiology has been steadily increasing over the last 20 years with important steps being the introduction of (99m)technetium- ((99m)Tc)-labelled perfusion radiotracers, the change from only planar to now much more single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography......-coronary cardiac diseases. The advances in nuclear cardiology are discussed under the four headlines of: 1) myocardial perfusion, 2) cardiac performance including LV and right ventricular (RV) function, 3) myocardial metabolism, and 4) experimental nuclear cardiology Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6...

  4. Recent advances in nuclear cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Woo [Dept. Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Nuclear cardiology is one of the major fields of nuclear medicine practice. Myocardial perfusion studies using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have played a crucial role in the management of coronary artery diseases. Positron emission tomography (PET) has also been considered an important tool for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion. However, the recent development of computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies and growing concerns about the radiation exposure of patients remain serious challenges for nuclear cardiology. In response to these challenges, remarkable achievements and improvements are currently in progress in the field of myocardial perfusion imaging regarding the applicable software and hardware. Additionally, myocardial perfusion positron emission tomography (PET) is receiving increasing attention owing to its unique capability of absolute myocardial blood flow estimation. An F-18-labeled perfusion agent for PET is under clinical trial with promising interim results. The applications of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and F-18 sodium fluoride (NaF) to cardiovascular diseases have revealed details on the basic pathophysiology of ischemic heart diseases. PET/MRI seems to be particularly promising for nuclear cardiology in the future. Restrictive diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis, are effectively evaluated using a variety of nuclear imaging tools. Considering these advances, the current challenges of nuclear cardiology will become opportunities if more collaborative efforts are devoted to this exciting field of nuclear medicine.

  5. Nuclear Medicine in Pediatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Ornella; Stellin, Giovanni; Zucchetta, Pietro

    2017-03-01

    Accurate cardiovascular imaging is essential for the successful management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Echocardiography and angiography have been for long time the most important imaging modalities in pediatric cardiology, but nuclear medicine has contributed in many situations to the comprehension of physiological consequences of CHD, quantifying pulmonary blood flow symmetry or right-to-left shunting. In recent times, remarkable improvements in imaging equipments, particularly in multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have led to the progressive integration of high resolution modalities in the clinical workup of children affected by CHD, reducing the role of diagnostic angiography. Technology has seen a parallel evolution in the field of nuclear medicine, with the advent of hybrid machines, as SPECT/CT and PET/CT scanners. Improved detectors, hugely increased computing power, and new reconstruction algorithms allow for a significant reduction of the injected dose, with a parallel relevant decrease in radiation exposure. Nuclear medicine retains its distinctive capability of exploring at the tissue level many functional aspects of CHD in a safe and reproducible way. The lack of invasiveness, the limited need for sedation, the low radiation burden, and the insensitivity to body habitus variations make nuclear medicine an ideal complement of echocardiography. This is particularly true during the follow-up of patients with CHD, whose increasing survival represent a great medical success and a challenge for the health system in the next decades. Metabolic imaging using (18)FDG PET/CT has expanded its role in the management of infection and inflammation in adult patients, particularly in cardiology. The same expansion is observed in pediatric cardiology, with an increasing rate of studies on the use of FDG PET for the evaluation of children with vasculitis, suspected valvular infection or infected prosthetic devices. The

  6. Advances in imaging instrumentation for nuclear cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Kovalski, Gil; Sharir, Tali; Lee, Dong Soo

    2017-07-17

    Advances in imaging instrumentation and technology have greatly contributed to nuclear cardiology. Dedicated cardiac SPECT cameras incorporating novel, highly efficient detector, collimator, and system designs have emerged with the expansion of nuclear cardiology. Solid-state radiation detectors incorporating cadmium zinc telluride, which directly convert radiation to electrical signals and yield improved energy resolution and spatial resolution and enhanced count sensitivity geometries, are increasingly gaining favor as the detector of choice for application in dedicated cardiac SPECT systems. Additionally, hybrid imaging systems in which SPECT and PET are combined with X-ray CT are currently widely used, with PET/MRI hybrid systems having also been recently introduced. The improved quantitative SPECT/CT has the potential to measure the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow and flow reserve. Rapid development of silicon photomultipliers leads to enhancement in PET image quality and count rates. In addition, the reduction of emission-transmission mismatch artifacts via application of accurate time-of-flight information, and cardiac motion de-blurring aided by anatomical images, are emerging techniques for further improvement of cardiac PET. This article reviews recent advances such as these in nuclear cardiology imaging instrumentation and technology, and the corresponding diagnostic benefits.

  7. Nuclear cardiology and heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giubbini, Raffaele; Bertagna, Francesco [University of Brescia, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brescia (Italy); Milan, Elisa [Ospedale Di Castelfranco Veneto, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Castelfranco Veneto (Italy); Mut, Fernando; Dondi, Maurizio [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria); Metra, Marco [University of Brescia, Department of Cardiology, Brescia (Italy); Rodella, Carlo [Health Physics Department, Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    The prevalence of heart failure in the adult population is increasing. It varies between 1% and 2%, although it mainly affects elderly people (6-10% of people over the age of 65 years will develop heart failure). The syndrome of heart failure arises as a consequence of an abnormality in cardiac structure, function, rhythm, or conduction. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of heart failure and it accounts for this disorder in 60-70% of all patients affected. Nuclear techniques provide unique information on left ventricular function and perfusion by gated-single photon emission tomography (SPECT). Myocardial viability can be assessed by both SPECT and PET imaging. Finally, autonomic dysfunction has been shown to increase the risk of death in patients with heart disease and this may be applicable to all patients with cardiac disease regardless of aetiology. MIBG scanning has a very promising prognostic value in patients with heart failure. (orig.)

  8. Integrating cardiology for nuclear medicine physicians. A guide to nuclear medicine physicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Movahed, Assad [East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (United States). Section of Cardiology; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath [Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Buscombe, John R.; Hall, Margaret [Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear cardiology is no longer a medical discipline residing solely in nuclear medicine. This is the first book to recognize this fact by integrating in-depth information from both the clinical cardiology and nuclear cardiology literature, and acknowledging cardiovascular medicine as the fundamental knowledge base needed for the practice of nuclear cardiology. The book is designed to increase the practitioner's knowledge of cardiovascular medicine, thereby enhancing the quality of interpretations through improved accuracy and clinical relevance.The text is divided into four sections covering all major topics in cardiology and nuclear cardiology: -Basic Sciences and Cardiovascular Diseases; -Conventional Diagnostic Modalities; -Nuclear Cardiology; -Management of Cardiovascular Diseases. (orig.)

  9. Start from scratch: the prospect of nuclear cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Woo [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The future is always hard to forecast but the prospect of nuclear cardiology has never been more unobtainable than these days. Myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (MPS) has been one of the major nuclear medicine studies for decades, but the annual number of MPS is stagnant or steadily decreasing in Korea and other countries. The challenge from coronary computed tomography (CCT) and the concern of radiation exposure of MPS were the main reasons for the stalemate of nuclear cardiology. Compared to the rapid technological progress of CCT, enabling greater image resolution in conjunction with lower radiation exposure to the patients, development of new radiopharmaceuticals or scintillation imaging techniques has been at a relatively slow pace. Therefore, the future of nuclear cardiology is really dependent on the application of the genuine nuclear medicine principle to patient's management. The review for current update of nuclear cardiology will ensue in the next issue of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  10. Current Status and Future Perspective of Nuclear Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, June Key [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Coronary artery disease is on the rise over the world. Myocardial perfusion SPECT is a well established technique to detect coronary artery disease and to assess left ventricular function. In addition, it has the unique ability to predict the prognosis of the patients. Moreover, the application of ECG-gated images provided the quantitative data and improved the accuracy. This approach has been proved to be cost-effective and suitable for the emerging economies as well as developed countries. However, the utilization of nuclear cardiology procedures vary widely considering the different countries and region of the world. Korea exits 2-3 times less utilization than Japan, and 20 times than the United States. Recently, with the emerging of new technology, namely cardiac CT, cardiac MR and stress echocardiography, the clinical usefulness of nuclear cardiology has been called in question and its role has been redefined. For the proper promotion of nuclear cardiology, special educations should be conducted since the nuclear cardiology has the contact points between nuclear medicine and cardiology. Several innovations are in horizon which will impact the diagnostic accuracy as well as imaging time and cost savings. Development of new tracers, gamma camera technology and hybrid systems will open the new avenue in cardiac imaging. The future of nuclear cardiology based on molecular imaging is very exciting. The newly defined biologic targets involving atherosclerosis and vascular vulnerability will allow the answers for the key clinical questions. Hybrid techniques including SPECT/CT indicate the direction in which clinical nuclear cardiology may be headed in the immediate future. To what extent nuclear cardiology will be passively absorbed by other modalities, or will actively incorporate other modalities, is up to the present and next generation of nuclear cardiologists.

  11. [Nuclear cardiology: the present functions and future perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xiaoli; Fan, Chengzhong

    2013-02-01

    For the past decade, the diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD) has shifted from the traditional model by evaluating coronary artery stenosis with morphological imaging methods to a novel model by focusing on the detection of ischemia for risk stratification. The myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using stress single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has become the most commonly used stress imaging technique for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with suspected or known CAD. It has got strong supports, including those of the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ACC/AHA/ASNC) and other numerous clinical guidelines. They all stressed that the SPECT MPI is recommended to be used as the "gate keeper" to coronary angiography in order to prevent unnecessary intervention test and save the cost. However, in China the introduction and application of nuclear cardiology was late and highly unbalanced. This leads to the lack of understanding of nuclear cardiology in some clinicians, and there often is misunderstanding on correct selection of coronary angiography, cardiac CT, CT coronary angiography and others for diagnosis and treatment of CAD which results in a trend of over-application of these traditional techniques. In this article, we will focus on the status of nuclear cardiology, including SPECT, positron emission tomography (PET) MPI in the patients with CAD for the diagnosis of ischemia, risk stratification and management decision-making, and also compare it with the traditional morphological imaging techniques. In addition, we will briefly introduce the recent advances in cardiac hybrid imaging and molecular imaging. The aim of this paper is to popularize the knowledge of nuclear cardiology, and promote the rational application of nuclear cardiology in China.

  12. NUCLEAR CARDIOLOGY, CURRENT APPLICATIONS IN CLINICAL-PRACTICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NIEMEYER, MG; VANDERWALL, EE; KUIJPER, AFM; CLEOPHAS, AT; PAUWELS, EKJ

    1995-01-01

    The clinical applications of nuclear cardiology have rapidly expanded since the introduction of suitable imaging cameras and readily applicable isotopes. The currently available methods can provide useful data on estimates of ventricular function and detection of myocardial ischemia for adequate pat

  13. Nuclear cardiology core syllabus of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimelli, Alessia; Neglia, Danilo; Schindler, Thomas H; Cosyns, Bernard; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Kitsiou, Anastasia

    2015-04-01

    The European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) Core Syllabus for Nuclear Cardiology is now available online. The syllabus lists key elements of knowledge in nuclear cardiology. It represents a framework for the development of training curricula and provides expected knowledge-based learning outcomes to the nuclear cardiology trainees. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Nuclear Cardiology in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paeng, Jin Chul; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging is very effective in the evaluation of patients with suspicious acute coronary syndrome (ACS), for adequate diagnosis and treatment. There have been many clinical evidences to support the efficacy and cost-effectiveness. In addition, many authoritative guidelines support the utility of myocardial perfusion imaging in ACS with an appropriate diagnostic protocol. However, with the development of other cardiac imaging modalities, the choice of modality for the diagnosis of suspicious ACS now depends on the availability of each modality in each institute. Newly developed imaging technologies, especially including molecular imaging, are expected to have great potential not only for diagnosis but also for primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of ACS.

  15. Cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Fahey, Tom; Schroeder, Knut

    2004-01-01

    This article describes recent developments in cardiology and cardiovascular disease that are likely to be relevant to primary healthcare professionals and their patients. The following subject areas are covered: Primary prevention: recent developments in pharmacological interventions, drug interactions, and drugs that are likely to cause harm; cardiovascular risk estimation and shared decision making with patients; and new developments in 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.Second...

  16. Emerging role of nuclear cardiology in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flotats, A; Carrió, I

    2010-04-01

    The management of patients with heart failure requires the integration of clinical skills and accurate complementary tests for the correct diagnosis, treatment and estimation of individual prognosis. Identification of those patients most at risk of death, and those most likely to benefit from currently available treatment technologies, remains a challenge. Although the basic characterization of patients with heart failure is supported primarily by the assessment of the left ventricular function, there are several nuclear cardiology techniques and tracers, either available or under development, which can provide important noninvasive imaging insights into the pathophysiology, prognosis and management of patients with heart failure. Nuclear techniques for molecular imaging of the myocardium such as those involved in the processes of myocardial perfusion, metabolism and viability, cellular injury, dyssynchrony, intersticial dysregulation and neurohormonal receptor function may facilitate better clinical outcomes for patients with heart failure. This review mainly focuses on cardiac sympathetic imaging, as other modalities of nuclear cardiology in the assessment of patients with HF are reviewed more extensively in other sections of this issue.

  17. Molecular imaging: a new approach to nuclear cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrucki, L.W.; Sinusas, A.J. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven (United States). Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear cardiology has historically played an important role in detection of cardiovascular disease as well as risk statification. With the growth of molecular biology have come new therapeutic interventions and the requirement for new diagnostic imaging approaches. Noninvasive targeted radiotracer based as well as transporter gene imaging strategies are evolving to meet these new needs, but require the development of an interdisciplinary approach which focuses on molecular processes, as well as the pathogenesis and progression of disease. This progress has been made possible with the availability of transgenic animal models along with many technological advances. Future adaptations of the developing experimental procedures and instrumentations will allow for the smooth translation and application to clinical practice. This review is intended as a brief overview on the subject molecular imaging. Basic concepts and historical perspective of molecular imaging will be reviewed first, followed by description of current technology, and concluding with current applications in cardiology. The emphasis will be on the use of both single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers, although other imaging modalities will be also briefly discussed. The specific approaches presented here will include receptor-based and reporter gene imaging of natural and therapeutical angiogenesis.

  18. Sample size considerations for clinical research studies in nuclear cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiuzan, Cody; West, Erin A; Duong, Jimmy; Cheung, Ken Y K; Einstein, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Sample size calculation is an important element of research design that investigators need to consider in the planning stage of the study. Funding agencies and research review panels request a power analysis, for example, to determine the minimum number of subjects needed for an experiment to be informative. Calculating the right sample size is crucial to gaining accurate information and ensures that research resources are used efficiently and ethically. The simple question "How many subjects do I need?" does not always have a simple answer. Before calculating the sample size requirements, a researcher must address several aspects, such as purpose of the research (descriptive or comparative), type of samples (one or more groups), and data being collected (continuous or categorical). In this article, we describe some of the most frequent methods for calculating the sample size with examples from nuclear cardiology research, including for t tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), non-parametric tests, correlation, Chi-squared tests, and survival analysis. For the ease of implementation, several examples are also illustrated via user-friendly free statistical software.

  19. Filter's importance in nuclear cardiology imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, Maria Celeste de; Lima, Ana Luiza S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica]. E-mails: celeste.fismed@gmail.com; analuslima@gmail.com; Santos, Joyra A. dos [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: joyra@cnen.gov.br; Megueriam, Berdj A. [Hospital Sao Vicente de Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: meguerian@hotmail.com

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear Medicine is a medical speciality that employs tomography procedures for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diseases. One of the most commonly used apparatus is the Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). To perform exams, a very small amount of a radiopharmaceutical must be given to the patient. Then, a gamma camera is placed in convenient positions to perform the photon counting, which is used to reconstruct a full 3 dimensional distribution of the radionuclide inside the body or organ. This reconstruction provides a 3-dimensional image in spatial coordinates, of the body or organ under study, allowing the physician to give the diagnostic. Image reconstruction is usually worked in the frequency domain, due to a great simplification introduced by the Fourier decomposition of image spectra. After the reconstruction, an inverse Fourier transform must be applied to trace back the image into spatial coordinates. To optimize this reconstruction procedure, digital filters are used to remove undesirable components of frequency, which can 'shadow' relevant physical signatures of diseases. Unfortunately, the efficiency of the applied filter are strongly dependent on its own mathematical parameters. Particularly in this work we demonstrate how filters interfere on image quality in cardiology examinations with SPECT, concerning perfusion and myocardial viability and the importance of the medical physicist in the choice of the right filters avoiding some serious problems that could occur in the inadequate processing of an image damaging the medical diagnosis. (author)

  20. Assessing the need for nuclear cardiology and other advanced cardiac imaging modalities in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitola, João V; Shaw, Leslee J; Allam, Adel H; Orellana, Pilar; Peix, Amalia; Ellmann, Annare; Allman, Kevin C; Lee, B N; Siritara, Chanika; Keng, Felix Y J; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Kiess, Marla C; Giubbini, Raffaele; Bouyoucef, Salaheddine E; He, Zuo-Xiang; Thomas, Gregory S; Mut, Fernando; Dondi, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, 80% of cardiovascular disease (CVD) deaths occurred in low- to middle-income countries (i.e., developing nations). Cardiovascular imaging, such as myocardial perfusion SPECT, is one method that may be applied to detect and foster improved detection of at-risk patients. This document will review the availability and utilization for nuclear cardiology procedures worldwide and propose strategies to devise regional centers of excellence to achieve quality imaging around the world. As a means to establish the current state of nuclear cardiology, International Atomic Energy Agency member and non-member states were queried as to annual utilization of nuclear cardiology procedures. Other sources for imaging statistics included data from medical societies (American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology, and the European Association of Nuclear Medicine) and nuclear cardiology working groups within several nations. Utilization was calculated by dividing annual procedural volume by 2007 population statistics (/100,000) and categorized as high (>1,000/100,000), moderate-high (250-999/100,000), moderate (100-249/100,000), low-moderate (50-99/100,000) and low (Algeria and Egypt); perhaps the result of accessible high-quality training programs. Worldwide utilization patterns for nuclear cardiology vary substantially and may be influenced by physician access to training and education programs. Development of regional training centers of excellence can guide utilization of nuclear cardiology through the application of guideline- and appropriateness-driven testing, training, continuing education, and quality assurance programs aiding developing nations to confront the epidemics of CVD.

  1. The present role of nuclear cardiology in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, A.N.; Beller, G.A. [Virginia University, Charlottesville (United States). Cardiovascular Division Department of Medicine

    2005-03-01

    Many advances have been made in the field of nuclear cardiology in the past decade for enhancing the diagnostic and prognostic value of stress myocardial variability using SPECT technology. Gated SPECT for determining regional and global function have provided incremental diagnostic and prognostic information in the evaluation of patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease. Left ventricular ejection fraction and regional myocardial wall thickening can now be simultaneously evaluated with regional perfusion particularly with the use of the {sup 99m}Tc-labeled perfusion agents such as sestamibi and tetrofosmin. Many studies have shown that the extent and severity of stress-induced perfusion defects have incremental prognostic value over exercise electrocardiographic stress test variables alone. Patients with normal perfusions scans have <1% combined cardiac death and myocardial infarction rates per year and thus have an excellent prognosis. Diabetics are particularly benefited from stress perfusion imaging for detection of coronary artery disease and risk assessment. Diabetics have a worse prognostic than non diabetics for the same amount of hypoperfusion on stress SPECT studies. Quantitative rest perfusion imaging with {sup 201}Tl or with one of the {sup 99m}Tc-labeled imaging agents, or PET imaging with {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose can accurately distinguish viable from irreversibility injured myocardium providing useful information for identifying which patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy benefit most from coronary revascularization with a subsequent improvement in left ventricular function and enhanced survival. Finally, serial stress perfusion imaging can be employed to monitor the efficacy of medical therapy that improves endothelial function and myocardial blood flow reserve.

  2. Nuclear cardiology practice and associated radiation doses in Europe: results of the IAEA Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Study (INCAPS) for the 27 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Oliver; Pascual, Thomas N B; Mercuri, Mathew; Acampa, Wanda; Burchert, Wolfgang; Flotats, Albert; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Kitsiou, Anastasia; Knuuti, Juhani; Underwood, S Richard; Vitola, João V; Mahmarian, John J; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Better, Nathan; Rehani, Madan M; Kashyap, Ravi; Dondi, Maurizio; Paez, Diana; Einstein, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear cardiology is widely used to diagnose coronary artery disease and to guide patient management, but data on current practices, radiation dose-related best practices, and radiation doses are scarce. To address these issues, the IAEA conducted a worldwide study of nuclear cardiology practice. We present the European subanalysis. In March 2013, the IAEA invited laboratories across the world to document all SPECT and PET studies performed in one week. The data included age, gender, weight, radiopharmaceuticals, injected activities, camera type, positioning, hardware and software. Radiation effective dose was calculated for each patient. A quality score was defined for each laboratory as the number followed of eight predefined best practices with a bearing on radiation exposure (range of quality score 0 - 8). The participating European countries were assigned to regions (North, East, South, and West). Comparisons were performed between the four European regions and between Europe and the rest-of-the-world (RoW). Data on 2,381 European patients undergoing nuclear cardiology procedures in 102 laboratories in 27 countries were collected. A cardiac SPECT study was performed in 97.9 % of the patients, and a PET study in 2.1 %. The average effective dose of SPECT was 8.0 ± 3.4 mSv (RoW 11.4 ± 4.3 mSv; P cardiology is lower and the average quality score is higher than in the RoW. There is regional variation in effective dose in relation to the best practice quality score. A possible reason for the differences between Europe and the RoW could be the safety culture fostered by actions under the Euratom directives and the implementation of diagnostic reference levels. Stress-only imaging and weight-adjusted activity might be targets for optimization of European nuclear cardiology practice.

  3. State of the Art of Imaging Equipment and Tools for Nuclear Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byeong Il [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Nuclear cardiology in Korea is less active, compared to nuclear oncology, but it has been specialized and ramified. Lately, sophisticated nuclear cardiac imaging methods provide more convenience for patients. It is necessary to accurately estimate the recent progress in the imaging devices for nuclear cardiology. Myocardial perfusion imaging is a well established study to evaluate heart function. Myocardial perfusion SPECT and PET have been used for assessment of coronary artery disease with various radiopharmaceuticals. And of late, the development of advanced imaging devices - multi-pinhole technique and high definition imaging technique - and software made the scanning time shorter and expanded the application field. Therefore, it is required to review the nuclear cardiology hardware/software for the clinical practice and research. In this review, the characteristics about recently-developed SPECT/PET and software for nuclear cardiology are described. It is hoped that this information would contribute to improving the activity of nuclear cardiac research in Korea where the research for the fusion imaging combining CT and nuclear imaging is drawing more attention.

  4. Highlights lecture EANM 2014: "Gimme gimme gimme those nuclear Super Troupers".

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Marion; Van Laere, Koen

    2015-04-01

    The EANM Congress 2014 took place in Gothenburg, Sweden, from 18 to 22 October under the presidency of Prof. Wim Oyen, chair of the EANM Scientific Committee. Prof. Peter Gjertsson chaired the Local Organizing Committee, according to the standardized EANM congress structure. The meeting was a highlight for the multidisciplinary community that forms the heart and soul of nuclear medicine; attendance was exceptionally high. In total almost 5,300 participants came to Gothenburg, and 1,397 colleagues participated via the EANM LIVE sessions ( http://eanmlive.eanm.org/index.php ). Participants from all continents were presented with an excellent programme consisting of symposia, scientific and featured sessions, CME sessions, and plenary lectures. These lectures were devoted to nuclear medicine therapy, hybrid imaging and molecular life sciences. Two tracks were included in the main programme, clustering multi-committee involvement: the 5th International Symposium on Targeted Radionuclide-therapy and Dosimetry (ISTARD) and the first Molecules to Man (M2M) track, an initiative of the EANM Committees for Translational Molecular Imaging, Radiopharmacy and Drug Development. The industry made a substantial contribution to the success of the congress demonstrating the latest technology and innovations in the field. During the closing Highlights Lecture, a selection of the best-rated abstracts was presented including diverse areas of nuclear medicine: physics and instrumentation, radiopharmacy, preclinical imaging, oncology (with a focus on the clinical application of newly developed tracers) and radionuclide therapy, cardiology and neurosciences. This Highlights Lecture could only be a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed during the meeting, which can be found in much greater detail in the congress proceedings book, published as Volume 41, Supplement 2 of the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging in October 2014.

  5. Highlights of the 12th International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsiou, Anastasia; Dorbala, Sharmila; Scholte, Arthur J H A

    2015-09-01

    The 12th International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT was held from 3 to 5 May 2015 in Madrid, Spain. In this article, the three Congress Program Committee Chairs summarize selected highlights of the presented abstracts. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is being published concurrently in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology (10.1007/s12350-015-0260-y) and European Heart Journal – Cardiovascular Imaging (10.1093/ehjci/jev179). The articles are identical except for minor stylistic and spelling differences in keeping with each journal’s style. Either citation can be used when citing this article.

  6. Nuclear cardiology practice and associated radiation doses in Europe: results of the IAEA Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Study (INCAPS) for the 27 European countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Oliver; Burchert, Wolfgang [University Hospital of the Ruhr University, Institute of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Heart and Diabetes Center North Rhine-Westphalia Bochum, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Pascual, Thomas N.B.; Kashyap, Ravi; Dondi, Maurizio; Paez, Diana [International Atomic Energy Agency, Section of Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria); Mercuri, Mathew [Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Acampa, Wanda [National Council of Research, Institute of Biostructures and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); Flotats, Albert [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Kitsiou, Anastasia [Sismanoglio Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Athens (Greece); Knuuti, Juhani [University of Turku, and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Underwood, S.R. [Imperial College London, National Heart and Lung Institute, London (United Kingdom); Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospitals, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Vitola, Joao V. [Quanta Diagnostico and Terapia, Curitiba (Brazil); Mahmarian, John J. [Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, Department of Cardiology, Houston, TX (United States); Karthikeyan, Ganesan [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Cardiology, New Delhi (India); Better, Nathan [Royal Melbourne Hospital and University of Melbourne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); Rehani, Madan M. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Radiation Protection of Patients Unit, Vienna (Austria); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Einstein, Andrew J. [Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Collaboration: for the INCAPS Investigators Group

    2016-04-15

    Nuclear cardiology is widely used to diagnose coronary artery disease and to guide patient management, but data on current practices, radiation dose-related best practices, and radiation doses are scarce. To address these issues, the IAEA conducted a worldwide study of nuclear cardiology practice. We present the European subanalysis. In March 2013, the IAEA invited laboratories across the world to document all SPECT and PET studies performed in one week. The data included age, gender, weight, radiopharmaceuticals, injected activities, camera type, positioning, hardware and software. Radiation effective dose was calculated for each patient. A quality score was defined for each laboratory as the number followed of eight predefined best practices with a bearing on radiation exposure (range of quality score 0 - 8). The participating European countries were assigned to regions (North, East, South, and West). Comparisons were performed between the four European regions and between Europe and the rest-of-the-world (RoW). Data on 2,381 European patients undergoing nuclear cardiology procedures in 102 laboratories in 27 countries were collected. A cardiac SPECT study was performed in 97.9 % of the patients, and a PET study in 2.1 %. The average effective dose of SPECT was 8.0 ± 3.4 mSv (RoW 11.4 ± 4.3 mSv; P < 0.001) and of PET was 2.6 ± 1.5 mSv (RoW 3.8 ± 2.5 mSv; P < 0.001). The mean effective doses of SPECT and PET differed between European regions (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). The mean quality score was 6.2 ± 1.2, which was higher than the RoW score (5.0 ± 1.1; P < 0.001). Adherence to best practices did not differ significantly among the European regions (range 6 to 6.4; P = 0.73). Of the best practices, stress-only imaging and weight-adjusted dosing were the least commonly used. In Europe, the mean effective dose from nuclear cardiology is lower and the average quality score is higher than in the RoW. There is regional variation in effective dose in

  7. Current status of nuclear cardiology in Japan: Ongoing efforts to improve clinical standards and to establish evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Tamaki, Nagara

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear cardiology imaging tests are widely performed in Japan as clinical practice. The Japanese nuclear cardiology community has developed new diagnostic imaging tests using (123)I-beta-methyl-p-iodophenyl-pentadecanoic acid, (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine, and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET for detecting cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis. These tests have become popular worldwide. The Japanese Circulation Society and the Japanese Society of Nuclear Cardiology have published clinical imaging guidelines showing indications and standards for the new imaging tests. JSNC is currently striving to improve the standard of clinical practice and is promoting research activities.

  8. Clinical applications of exercise nuclear cardiology studies in the era of healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, D S; Kiat, H; Friedman, J D; Diamond, G

    1995-04-13

    The challenge for nuclear cardiology is to demonstrate that it can provide more information than competitive modalities at comparable or lower cost. In considering patients for nuclear cardiology procedures, presentations can be divided into 9 subsets: within each subset, nuclear cardiology tests should be employed where incremental information is provided over the information available without performing the test. (1) Patients with no known coronary artery disease (CAD); for diagnosis, nuclear imaging is useful in patients with intermediate probability of CAD. For prognosis, assessment is based on extent of ischemia, where we have shown that nuclear testing provides incremental information, especially in patients with a high likelihood of CAD, such as those with typical angina. In the remaining categories (2-9), nuclear cardiology studies are predominantly used for purposes of risk stratification. Here the greatest value is in patients deemed to be at intermediate risk before nuclear testing. (2) Postmyocardial infarction: stress nuclear imaging provides an alternative to angiography for risk assessment of clinically uncomplicated patients. (3) Poor ventricular function: Nuclear testing is particularly useful for differentiating patients with hibernating myocardium (the defect is reversible), with stunned myocardium (no defect is present), or with myocardial infarction (the defect is persistent). (4) Unstable angina: Following current federal guidelines, nuclear imaging in medically stabilized low-to-intermediate risk patients with unstable angina is likely to increase. (5) Postcatheterization patients: Nuclear imaging is useful when there is uncertainty regarding the choice of medical management or revascularization. (6) Pre-noncardiac surgery patients: Nuclear imaging is clearly helpful in patients with intermediate clinical risk and may provide useful information in clinically high-risk patients. (7) Post-PTCA patients: Due to the intermediate likelihood of

  9. Improved compliance with reporting standards: A retrospective analysis of Intersocietal Accreditation Commission Nuclear Cardiology Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, P Tim; Farrell, Mary Beth; Ewing, Joseph A; Tilkemeier, Peter L

    2016-11-09

    In 2011, Tilkemeier et al reported significant nuclear cardiology laboratory noncompliance with reporting standards. The aim of this study was to identify and examine noncompliant reporting elements with the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission Nuclear/PET (IAC) Reporting Standards and to compare compliance between 2008 and 2014. This was a retrospective study of compliance with 18 reporting elements utilizing accreditation findings from all laboratories applying for accreditation in 2008 and 2014. 1816 labs applying for initial or subsequent accreditation were analyzed for compliance. The mean reporting noncompliance per lab decreased from 2008 to 2014 (2.48 ± 2.67 to 1.24 ± 1.79, P types, labs with Certification Board of Nuclear Cardiology physicians on staff, and by geographic region (P < .001). Overall severity of reporting issues decreased. Facilities with compliant reports increased from 35.0% in 2008 to 57.1% in 2014 (P < .001). Continuing medical education, accreditation, and other instructional activities aimed at improving nuclear cardiology reporting appear to have made a positive impact over time with the number and severity of noncompliance decreased. More labs are now compliant with the IAC Standards and, thus, reporting guidelines. However, the need for continued educational efforts remains.

  10. Current status of nuclear cardiology practice in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Diana; Peix, Amalia; Orellana, Pilar; Vitola, Joao; Mut, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Claudia; Plaza, Crosby; Becic, Tarik; Dondi, Maurizio; Estrada, Enrique

    2017-02-01

    The burden of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in the world is ever growing. They represent the first cause of death worldwide and in Latin America. Nuclear cardiology has a well-established role in the management of patient with CVDs and is being increasingly integrated into the healthcare systems in the region. However, there remains variability as to the infrastructure available across the countries, in terms of existing technology, radiopharmaceuticals, and human resources. The approximate number of gamma (γ) cameras in the region is 1348, with an average of 2.25 per million population; Argentina and Brazil having the largest number. Nearly 80% of the existing cameras are single-photon emission tomography (SPECT), of which 8% are hybrid SPECT-CT systems. Positron emission tomography technology is steadily increasing, and currently, there is an average of 0.25 scanners per million inhabitants, indicating that there is a potential to expand the capacities in order to cover the needs. Four countries have nuclear reactors for research purposes, which allow the production of technetium-99 m (Argentina, Chile, Mexico and Peru), while four (Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, and Mexico) assemble (99)Mo-(99m)Tc generators. As for the nuclear cardiology studies, about 80% of studies performed are gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging; less than 10% are multi-gated acquisition (mainly for evaluation of cardiac toxicity in cancer patients), and the other 10% correspond to other types of studies, such as viability detection, and adrenergic innervation studies with (123)I-MIBG. Physical stress is preferred, when possible, based on the clinical condition of the patient. Regarding human resources, there is an average of 1.1 physicians and 1.3 technologists per γ camera, with 0.1 medical physicists and 0.1 radiopharmacists per center in the region. The future of nuclear cardiology in Latin America and the Caribbean is encouraging, with great potential and possibilities for growth

  11. [The clinical management guidelines of the Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Nuclear cardiology: the technical bases and clinical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candell Riera, J; Castell Conesa, J; Jurado López, J A; López de Sá, E; Nuño de la Rosa, J A; Ortigosa Aso, F J; Valle Tudela, V

    1999-11-01

    Although the role of nuclear cardiology is currently well consolidated, the addition of new radiotracers and modern techniques prompt us to permanently update the requirements, equipment and clinical applications of these isotopic tests. Radioisotopic drugs, instrumentation and characteristics of radionuclide tests that are presently used are explained in the first part of this text. In the second part, diagnostic and prognostic indications of these tests are presented in detail.

  12. Highlights lecture EANM 2014: ''Gimme gimme gimme those nuclear Super Troupers''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC Rotterdam, Departments of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Laere, Koen van [University Hospital and KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-04-01

    The EANM Congress 2014 took place in Gothenburg, Sweden, from 18 to 22 October under the presidency of Prof. Wim Oyen, chair of the EANM Scientific Committee. Prof. Peter Gjertsson chaired the Local Organizing Committee, according to the standardized EANM congress structure. The meeting was a highlight for the multidisciplinary community that forms the heart and soul of nuclear medicine; attendance was exceptionally high. In total almost 5,300 participants came to Gothenburg, and 1,397 colleagues participated via the EANM LIVE sessions (http://eanmlive.eanm.org/index.php). Participants from all continents were presented with an excellent programme consisting of symposia, scientific and featured sessions, CME sessions, and plenary lectures. These lectures were devoted to nuclear medicine therapy, hybrid imaging and molecular life sciences. Two tracks were included in the main programme, clustering multi-committee involvement: the 5th International Symposium on Targeted Radionuclide-therapy and Dosimetry (ISTARD) and the first Molecules to Man (M2M) track, an initiative of the EANM Committees for Translational Molecular Imaging, Radiopharmacy and Drug Development. The industry made a substantial contribution to the success of the congress demonstrating the latest technology and innovations in the field. During the closing Highlights Lecture, a selection of the best-rated abstracts was presented including diverse areas of nuclear medicine: physics and instrumentation, radiopharmacy, preclinical imaging, oncology (with a focus on the clinical application of newly developed tracers) and radionuclide therapy, cardiology and neurosciences. This Highlights Lecture could only be a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed during the meeting, which can be found in much greater detail in the congress proceedings book, published as Volume 41, Supplement 2 of the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging in October 2014. (orig.)

  13. Monte Carlo Techniques for Nuclear Systems - Theory Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Monte Carlo Methods, Codes, and Applications Group; Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.

    2016-11-29

    These are lecture notes for a Monte Carlo class given at the University of New Mexico. The following topics are covered: course information; nuclear eng. review & MC; random numbers and sampling; computational geometry; collision physics; tallies and statistics; eigenvalue calculations I; eigenvalue calculations II; eigenvalue calculations III; variance reduction; parallel Monte Carlo; parameter studies; fission matrix and higher eigenmodes; doppler broadening; Monte Carlo depletion; HTGR modeling; coupled MC and T/H calculations; fission energy deposition. Solving particle transport problems with the Monte Carlo method is simple - just simulate the particle behavior. The devil is in the details, however. These lectures provide a balanced approach to the theory and practice of Monte Carlo simulation codes. The first lectures provide an overview of Monte Carlo simulation methods, covering the transport equation, random sampling, computational geometry, collision physics, and statistics. The next lectures focus on the state-of-the-art in Monte Carlo criticality simulations, covering the theory of eigenvalue calculations, convergence analysis, dominance ratio calculations, bias in Keff and tallies, bias in uncertainties, a case study of a realistic calculation, and Wielandt acceleration techniques. The remaining lectures cover advanced topics, including HTGR modeling and stochastic geometry, temperature dependence, fission energy deposition, depletion calculations, parallel calculations, and parameter studies. This portion of the class focuses on using MCNP to perform criticality calculations for reactor physics and criticality safety applications. It is an intermediate level class, intended for those with at least some familiarity with MCNP. Class examples provide hands-on experience at running the code, plotting both geometry and results, and understanding the code output. The class includes lectures & hands-on computer use for a variety of Monte Carlo calculations

  14. Position paper nuclear cardiology: Update 2008. State-of-the-art of scintigraphic methods; Positionspapier Nuklearkardiologie: Update 2008. Aktueller Stand der szintigraphischen Methodik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefers, Michael [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Bengel, F. [Johns Hopkins Univ. Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (United States). Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine; Buell, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Aachen (DE). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin] (and others)

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear cardiology is well established in clinical diagnostic algorithms for many years. This is an update 2008 of the first common position paper of the German Association of Nuclear Medicine and the German Association of Cardiology, Heart and Circulation Research published in 2001 aiming at an overview of state-of-the-art scintigraphic methods.

  15. Current worldwide nuclear cardiology practices and radiation exposure: results from the 65 country IAEA Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Cross-Sectional Study (INCAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Pascual, Thomas N. B.; Mercuri, Mathew; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Vitola, João V.; Mahmarian, John J.; Better, Nathan; Bouyoucef, Salah E.; Hee-Seung Bom, Henry; Lele, Vikram; Magboo, V. Peter C.; Alexánderson, Erick; Allam, Adel H.; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H.; Flotats, Albert; Jerome, Scott; Kaufmann, Philipp A.; Luxenburg, Osnat; Shaw, Leslee J.; Underwood, S. Richard; Rehani, Madan M.; Kashyap, Ravi; Paez, Diana; Dondi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Aims To characterize patient radiation doses from nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and the use of radiation-optimizing ‘best practices’ worldwide, and to evaluate the relationship between laboratory use of best practices and patient radiation dose. Methods and results We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of protocols used for all 7911 MPI studies performed in 308 nuclear cardiology laboratories in 65 countries for a single week in March–April 2013. Eight ‘best practices’ relating to radiation exposure were identified a priori by an expert committee, and a radiation-related quality index (QI) devised indicating the number of best practices used by a laboratory. Patient radiation effective dose (ED) ranged between 0.8 and 35.6 mSv (median 10.0 mSv). Average laboratory ED ranged from 2.2 to 24.4 mSv (median 10.4 mSv); only 91 (30%) laboratories achieved the median ED ≤ 9 mSv recommended by guidelines. Laboratory QIs ranged from 2 to 8 (median 5). Both ED and QI differed significantly between laboratories, countries, and world regions. The lowest median ED (8.0 mSv), in Europe, coincided with high best-practice adherence (mean laboratory QI 6.2). The highest doses (median 12.1 mSv) and low QI (4.9) occurred in Latin America. In hierarchical regression modelling, patients undergoing MPI at laboratories following more ‘best practices’ had lower EDs. Conclusion Marked worldwide variation exists in radiation safety practices pertaining to MPI, with targeted EDs currently achieved in a minority of laboratories. The significant relationship between best-practice implementation and lower doses indicates numerous opportunities to reduce radiation exposure from MPI globally. PMID:25898845

  16. Highlights lecture EANM 2015: the search for nuclear medicine's superheroes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Andreas; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-09-01

    contributions focused on cardiac inflammation, cardiac sarcoidosis, and specific imaging of large vessel vasculitis. The physics and instrumentation track included many highlights such as novel, high resolution scanners. The most noteworthy news and developments of this meeting were summarized in the highlights lecture. Only 55 scientific contributions were mentioned, and hence they represent only a brief summary, which is outlined in this article. For a more detailed view, all presentations can be accessed by the online version of the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (Volume 42, Supplement 1).

  17. 9th Annual William J. Rashkind Memorial Lecture in paediatric cardiology: "the reimbursement tsunami: preserving the passion".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robert

    2010-12-01

    In the early 1980s cardiology was dominated by "triple threat individuals" - doctors who were the very best clinicians, very best researchers, and very best teachers. This type of individual usually became the director of the division. Now, however, the amount of knowledge and specialisation in each of these three areas of expertise has exploded. It is not certain that triple threat individuals can or do exist today. Instead, we need to be aiming higher, for a "quintuple threat profession". Not only do we need expertise in clinical care, teaching, and research, but also we now require business leadership and alignment. No single person can be expert in all five of these areas. In paediatric cardiology we need to invest in the right people. Our new "quintuple threat profession" needs to match the expertise and passion of the right people with our current and future needs. Going forward, we should focus on leadership, teams, and alignment. We need to identify, develop, and empower leaders at all levels within our profession, including physicians, nurses, and hospital administrators. Ultimately, we need a profession that remains clinically led, but professionally managed. The second step of the formula is the development of successful teams, and teamwork. Successful "team behaviour" is not a part of traditional medical education. The third step is alignment. Alignment can be defined as representing the degree to which physicians and organisations, such as hospitals, acting out of enlightened self-interest, operate inside a common vision, mutual goals, and the acceptance of a shared destiny. Imagine the benefits to our profession and our kids if we can provide a new level of leadership, teamwork, and alignment going forward.

  18. Nuclear cardiology in Senegal: a luxury or a need?; Cardiologie nucleaire au Senegal: un luxe ou une necessite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbodj, M.; Seck Gassama, S.; Ndong, B.; Ndoye, O.; Toure Sow, H.; Senghor, S.R. [Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, Lab. Biophysique et Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Faculte de Medecine, de Pharmacie et d' Odontostomatologie, Dakar (UCAD) (Senegal); Diop, S.N. [Centre Antidiabetique Marc Sankale, Hopital Abass Ndao, Dakar (Senegal); Solanki, K.K. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Dept. de la Cooperation Technique, Section Medecine Nucleaire, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-06-15

    Aim: to sensitize at the same time experts and public authorities on the interest of the establishment of nuclear cardiology in Senegal. Material and method: the radioimmunoassay of micro-albuminuria, early marker of cardiovascular morbid-mortality was carried out in the nuclear medicine department of Dakar on a population of 100 diabetic patients (74 of type 1 and 26 of type 2) presenting one or more traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Out of these patients, 39% had abnormal rest ECG, asymptomatic in half of the cases. Results: prevalence of micro-albuminuria is high (24%). There is no significant difference in distribution between type I and type 2. Micro-albuminuria > 30 mg/24 h exists in 16,3% of patients with lipid abnormalities (ratio: total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol > 5), 30% of obese, 75% of hypertensive patients and 43,6% of patients with abnormal rest ECG, who would benefit from myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI): about 17% of patients involved in this study. No or weak correlation is found between micro-albuminuria and traditional risk factors. Conclusion: From these results and available epidemiological data in 2005, the estimate of the requirements in nuclear cardiology for the Senegalese diabetic population, indicates that 3740 patients should have benefited that year from it. Considering that this figure underestimates the real needs, taking into account the needs brought back to a population of 10 million inhabitants and the expect expansion of the diabetic disease, it appears justified to include the nuclear cardiology in the national programmes of prevention of the public health in Senegal. (author)

  19. Reporting nuclear cardiology: a joint position paper by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trägårdh, Elin; Hesse, Birger; Knuuti, Juhani; Flotats, Albert; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Kitsiou, Anastasia; Hacker, Marcus; Verberne, Hein J; Edenbrandt, Lars; Delgado, Victoria; Donal, Erwan; Edvardsen, Thor; Galderisi, Maurizio; Habib, Gilbert; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Nieman, Koen; Rosenhek, Raphael; Agostini, Denis; Gimelli, Alessia; Lindner, Oliver; Slart, Riemert; Ubleis, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    The report of an imaging procedure is a critical component of an examination, being the final and often the only communication from the interpreting physician to the referring or treating physician. Very limited evidence and few recommendations or guidelines on reporting imaging studies are available; therefore, an European position statement on how to report nuclear cardiology might be useful. The current paper combines the limited existing evidence with expert consensus, previously published recommendations as well as current clinical practices. For all the applications discussed in this paper (myocardial perfusion, viability, innervation, and function as acquired by single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography or hybrid imaging), headings cover laboratory and patient demographics, clinical indication, tracer administration and image acquisition, findings, and conclusion of the report. The statement also discusses recommended terminology in nuclear cardiology, image display, and preliminary reports. It is hoped that this statement may lead to more attention to create well-written and standardized nuclear cardiology reports and eventually lead to improved clinical outcome.

  20. Lectures notes on phase transformations in nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    López, Jorge A

    2000-01-01

    The atomic nucleus, despite of being one of the smallest objects found in nature, appears to be large enough to experience phase transitions. The book deals with the liquid and gaseous phases of nuclear matter, as well as with the experimental routes to achieve transformation between them.Theoretical models are introduced from the ground up and with increasing complexity to describe nuclear matter from a statistical and thermodynamical point of view. Modern critical phenomena, heavy ion collisions and computational techniques are presented while establishing a linkage to experimental data.The

  1. Lecture notes on phase transformations in nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    López, Jorge A

    2000-01-01

    The atomic nucleus, despite of being one of the smallest objects found in nature, appears to be large enough to experience phase transitions. The book deals with the liquid and gaseous phases of nuclear matter, as well as with the experimental routes to achieve transformation between them.Theoretical models are introduced from the ground up and with increasing complexity to describe nuclear matter from a statistical and thermodynamical point of view. Modern critical phenomena, heavy ion collisions and computational techniques are presented while establishing a linkage to experimental data.

  2. Hybrid cardiac imaging: SPECT/CT and PET/CT. A joint position statement by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flotats, Albert; Gutberlet, Matthias; Knuuti, Juhani

    2011-01-01

    . The European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC) in this paper want to present a position statement of the institutions on the current roles of SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid cardiac imaging in patients...

  3. Review of cardiovascular imaging in the journal of nuclear cardiology in 2015. Part 1 of 2: Plaque imaging, positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJaroudi, Wael A; Hage, Fadi G

    2016-02-01

    In 2015, many original articles pertaining to cardiovascular imaging with impressive quality were published in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology. In a set of 2 articles, we provide an overview of these contributions to facilitate for the interested reader a quick review of the advancements that occurred in the field over this year. In this first article, we focus on arterial plaque imaging, cardiac positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  4. Reducing radiation to patients and improving image quality in a real-world nuclear cardiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Stephen A; Meyers, Karen

    2017-03-22

    In part because of aging equipment and reduced reimbursement for imaging services in the last several years, nuclear cardiologists who remain in private practice face challenges in maintaining high quality and in reducing radiation exposure to patients. We review patient-centered approaches and affordable software solutions employed in our practice combined with supine-prone myocardial perfusion imaging to achieve increased interpretive confidence with reduced radiation exposure to patients.

  5. The best of nuclear cardiology and MRI in 2003; Essentiel de 2003 en cardiologie nucleaire et IRM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daou, D. [Hopital Lariboisiere, Groupe de Cardiologie Nucleaire et IRM, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-05-15

    As in previous years, the year 2003 was notable for clinical studies confirming the position occupied by Nuclear Cardiology and MRI in patient management. This was confirmed in the different areas tackled this year. In myocardial ischaemia, 2 points attracted our attention. Firstly, there is the good prognostic value of a normal myocardial perfusion (stress) CT with tetrofosmin (Myoview), which makes the good prognostic value of a normal SPECT independent of the type of tracer used ({sup 201}Tl, {sup 99m}Tc - MIBI, {sup 99m}Tc - Tetrofosmine). Secondly, an elegant study performed in 10627 patients, once more confirming the significance of using stress SPECT in the therapeutic strategy (medical treatment versus revascularization). Furthermore, in the area of myocardial infarction (MI), 3 points attracted our attention : the use of Annexin A5 - {sup 99m}Tc was advantageous for visualizing apoptosis in the territory at risk, the limits of studying regional myocardial function versus contrast MRI in the diagnosis of MI, and the good sensitivity of contrast MRI in the detection of sub-endocardial MI. In the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome, one study reported the sensitivity and specificity of emergency MRI (84 versus 85%). In the area of myocardial viability, one study reported the inferiority of electromechanical mapping compared to SPECT and positron emission tomography. In the area of post-infarct cardiac failure, studies have confirmed the place of LVEF in the evaluation of prognosis, and combining this with BNP and possibly the study of the angiotensin converting enzyme gene. Similarly another study reported the superiority of MIBG-1231 compared to cardiac frequency variability in the evaluation of prognosis. (author)

  6. Tom W. Bonner Prize in Nuclear Physics Lecture: The limits of nuclear landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    2012-03-01

    Understanding nuclei is a quantum many-body problem of incredible richness and diversity and studies of nuclei address some of the great challenges that are common throughout modern science. Nuclear structure research strives to build a unified and comprehensive microscopic framework in which bulk nuclear properties, nuclear excitations, and nuclear reactions can all be described. A new and exciting focus in this endeavor lies in the description of exotic and short-lived nuclei at the limits of proton-to-neutron asymmetry, mass, and angular momentum. In this talk, advances in the nuclear density functional theory will be reviewed in the context of the main scientific questions, experimental developments, and the advent of extreme-scale computing platforms.

  7. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in Europe 2007: a survey of the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Eliana; Underwood, S.R. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, London (United Kingdom); Wiener, Susanna [European Council of Nuclear Cardiology, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-01-15

    This is the second of a series of surveys designed to assess myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) practice in Europe. Data were collected from 258 centres in 18 countries. The number of MPS studies per million population (pmp) was estimated assuming that the nonresponding centres performed either no studies (lower estimate) or the same number as the responding centres (upper estimate). The responding centres served 24% of the population of their countries. The total number of noncardiac nuclear medicine studies was between 2,160 and 8,000 studies pmp. The total number of MPS studies was between 529 and 2,293 pmp. The median number of MPS studies per centre was 571 per year with 57% performing fewer than 500 studies per year and 23% of centres performing fewer than 250 studies per year. There was significant variation between countries, with higher numbers of MPS studies (lower limit of estimate above the mid-range of all countries combined) in Austria, Denmark, Hungary, Portugal and Slovenia, and lower numbers (upper limit of estimate below the mid-range of all countries) in Finland, Norway, Spain and Switzerland. The ratio of MPS to coronary angiography to revascularization procedures was 0.9 to 2.2 to 1. Pharmacological stress was used in 57% and technetium-99m-labelled tracers in 88% of studies. ECG gating was performed in 74% of studies and attenuation correction in 22%. MPS utilization in Europe remains low compared with coronary angiography although there has been a 21% increase in the number of studies pmp in centres that reported in both 2005 and 2007. Pharmacological agents continue to be the predominant form of stress. Despite the widespread use of technetium-99m-labelled tracers, ECG gating is not universally performed. As in the 2005 survey, imaging aids such as attenuation and motion correction and prone imaging are not commonly used. (orig.)

  8. Normal values and standardization of parameters in nuclear cardiology: Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine working group database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Matsumoto, Naoya; Kasai, Tokuo; Matsuo, Shinro; Kiso, Keisuke; Okuda, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    As a 2-year project of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine working group activity, normal myocardial imaging databases were accumulated and summarized. Stress-rest with gated and non-gated image sets were accumulated for myocardial perfusion imaging and could be used for perfusion defect scoring and normal left ventricular (LV) function analysis. For single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with multi-focal collimator design, databases of supine and prone positions and computed tomography (CT)-based attenuation correction were created. The CT-based correction provided similar perfusion patterns between genders. In phase analysis of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT, a new approach for analyzing dyssynchrony, normal ranges of parameters for phase bandwidth, standard deviation and entropy were determined in four software programs. Although the results were not interchangeable, dependency on gender, ejection fraction and volumes were common characteristics of these parameters. Standardization of (123)I-MIBG sympathetic imaging was performed regarding heart-to-mediastinum ratio (HMR) using a calibration phantom method. The HMRs from any collimator types could be converted to the value with medium-energy comparable collimators. Appropriate quantification based on common normal databases and standard technology could play a pivotal role for clinical practice and researches.

  9. Avian cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Anneliese; Wilson, G Heather

    2003-01-01

    The field of avian cardiology is continually expanding. Although a great deal of the current knowledge base has been derived from poultry data, research and clinical reports involving companion avian species have been published. This article will present avian cardiovascular anatomy and physiology, history and physical examination considerations in the avian cardiac disease patient, specific diagnostic tools, cardiovascular disease processes, and current therapeutic modalities.

  10. Nuclear ventriculography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ventriculography (RNV); Multiple gate acquisition scan (MUGA); Nuclear cardiology; Cardiomyopathy - nuclear ventriculography ... 56. Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby ...

  11. The best of nuclear cardiology and MRI in 2004; Essentiel de 2004 en cardiologie nucleaire et IRM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daou, D. [Hopital Lariboisiere, Groupe de Cardiologie Nucleaire et IRM, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-05-15

    In this review, we limit ourselves to original studies based on scintigraphic or MRI techniques performed in man. During the year 2004 we have learned several lessons from various interesting studies reported below, regarding different areas of cardiology including myocardial ischemia, myocarditis, myocardial infarction and myocardial viability. (author)

  12. Cardiology Mannequin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Education of medical students in cardiology requires access to patients having a variety of different forms of heart disease. But bringing together student, instructor and patient is a difficult and expensive process that does not benefit the patient. An alternate approach is substitution of a lifelike mannequin capable of simulating many conditions of heart disease. The mannequin pictured below, together with a related information display, is an advanced medical training system whose development benefited from NASA visual display technology and consultative input from NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The mannequin system represents more than 10 years of development effort by Dr. Michael S. Gordon, professor of cardiology at the University of Miami (Florida) School of Medicine.

  13. Coronaries disease: the nuclear cardiology face to the new non-invasive techniques of imaging; Maladie coronaire: la cardiologie nucleaire face aux nouvelles techniques d'imagerie non invasive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanzetto, G.; Fagret, D.; Thony, F.; Ferretti, G.; Saunier, C.; Machecourt, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2005-11-15

    Different techniques of imaging in nuclear cardiology are available today: SPECT, NMR, tomodensitometry, scintigraphy, echography. This article sums up the situation on the actual performances of each technique and considers what could be their respective place in the future strategies to take in charge the coronary disease. (N.C.)

  14. Present and future of clinical cardiovascular PET imaging in Europe - a position statement by the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guludec, D. [Bichat Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); European Council of Nuclear Cardiology, Vienna (Austria); Lautamaeki, R.; Bengel, F.M. [Johns Hopkins University, Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Knuuti, J. [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Bax, J.J. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2008-09-15

    This position statement was prepared by the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology and summarises the current and future potential of PET as a clinical cardiovascular diagnostic imaging tool. The first section describes how methodological developments have positively influenced the transition of PET from a research tool towards a clinical diagnostic test. In the second section, evidence in support of its superior diagnostic accuracy, its value to guide decision making and to predict outcome and its cost effectiveness is summarised. The third section finally outlines new PET-based approaches and concepts, which will likely influence clinical cardiovascular medicine in the future. The notion that integration of cardiac PET into healthcare systems and disease management algorithms will advance quality of care is increasingly supported by the literature highlighted in this statement. (orig.)

  15. Tele-cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molefi, M; Fortuin, J; Wynchank, S

    2006-01-01

    After defining tele-medicine, we describe its situation in the public health service of South Africa and its application to cardiology. Methods of communication relevant to tele-cardiology are outlined, together with their bearing on primary healthcare. The range of tele-cardiological applications to electrocardiology, echocardiology, auscultation, imaging and pathology are indicated. Tele-cardiology's contributions to a range of cardiological problems and types of management are described briefly. Finally, a mention is made of the relevance of tele-medicine to education and the costs related to cardiology, with an indication of some future needs for tele-cardiology.

  16. Llama cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, J A; Knight, A P; Moore, D H

    1994-07-01

    Auscultatory, ECG, and echocardiographic data have been presented for healthy llamas. The literature, however, contains little information on the incidence of congenital and acquired heart disease in the llama. Data compiled from the medical records at CSU-VTH and the VMDB provide an indication of the types of cardiac disease to be found in llamas in North America. A wide variety of congenital cardiac defects are found in llamas, the most prevalent defect of which is VSD. Llamas tend to do well with this defect but are unlikely to be useful pack animals. Acquired heart disease primarily involved inflammatory processes of the pericardium, endocardium, epicardium, and myocardium, and pericardial effusion without documented inflammatory disease. Although not every cardiac murmur necessitates a complete cardiac work-up, every effort should be made to compile accurate medical histories and physical findings related to the cardiac disease in llamas in order to advance our knowledge of these disorders. There also is a need to use available technologies to better define cardiac abnormalities in the llama and accurately report these findings in the literature before cardiology of llamas is fully understood.

  17. Cardiac CT and cardiac MRI - competitive or complementary for nuclear cardiology; Kardio-CT und Kardio-MR - konkurrierend oder komplementaer zur Nuklearkardiologie?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moshage, W. [Medizinische Abt. (Kardiologie, Angiologie, Pneumologie, Intensivmedizin), Klinikum Traunstein (Germany)

    2004-09-01

    In summary, cardiac computed tomography (CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) are two different technologies with distinct imaging properties that gain increasing importance in clinical cardiology. Even though images may look similar, the areas of application of CT and MR are quite different. Clinical applications of cardiac CT focus on on-invasive imaging of the coronary arteries. In this respect, the higher spatial resolution of cardiac CT constitutes a significant advantage as compared to MR and clinical results are superior. Clinical applications of cardiac MR, next to morphologic imaging of the heart, are most frequently found in the context of intra-and pericardial masses, complex congenital anomalies, and the assessment of left ventricular function (dobutamine) and perfusion (adenosine) under stress. The evaluation of the size and localization of myocardial necrosis, scars, and fibrosis gains increasing importance, for example in the workup of myocardial infarction, but also myocarditis and cardiomyopathies. In this respect, magnetic resonance imaging partly constitutes an alternative to nuclear medicine methods. Due to the lack of ionizing radiation and a relatively high spatial resolution, an increase of MR diagnostic procedures at the expense of nuclear medicine can be expected. (orig.)

  18. Cardiology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the year 2014, there were certain remarkable trials that have changed the practice of cardiology and beyond that these tried to explained some long awaited unanswered questions. Like SIMPLICITY HTN-3 trial clearly explained the uselessness of renal denervation therapy in systemic hypertension. PARADIGM-HF trial provided positive data that may be useful to enrich the basket of medical treatment with a new drug LCZ 696 after a long time. Another important meta-analysis in heart failure questioned the status of beta blockers as standard therapy to improve prognosis in patients with concomitant heart failure and atrial fibrillation . In myocardial infraction , CvLPRIT trial supported the concept of complete revascularization at the time of primary PCI and TASTE trials failed to show expected benefit of thrombus aspiration in acute MI. FFR got more strength from FAME 2 trial. Another important question that was addressed in SECURITY trial was optimal duration of DAPT after second generation DES implantation. One year follow-up results of ABSORB II suggested that bioresorbable scaffolds are currently facing problem of stent thrombosis that might be taken care in near future with improvement in strut technology. Successful use of "Heart in a box" machine provided a major thrust for cardiac transplantation. SEARCH-AF evaluated the efficacy of a novel mobile health technology in the real world to screen for atrial fibrillation (now called as life style disease. A Meta-analysis provided a more comprehensive picture of the new oral anticoagulants as a therapeutic option in atrial fibrillation. Positive results for trans catheter pm-VSD closure in paediatric population were also demonstrated by a randomized controlled trial. Role of corticosteroids in tubercular pericarditis also got the answer in a trial published in 2014.

  19. What can functional imaging do for cardiology?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucignani, G. [Milan Univ. (Italy). Scientific Institute H S. Raffele, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    1996-03-01

    New technologies including echo-cardiography and magnetic resonance imaging have been developed and their use validated for cardiology by comparison with nuclear studies. The size of market will influence significantly the industrial strategies of the future. The future of nuclear medicine is related to technological, methodological, biochemical, physiological and clinical expertise of the nuclear medicine physicians.

  20. Cardiology; Cardiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edet-Sanson, A.; Manrique, A.; Hitzel, A.; Vera, P. [Centre Henri Becquerel, 76 - Rouen (France); Kober, F.; Guedj, E.; Quilici, J.; Caus, T.; Mundler, O.; Cozzone, P.J.; Bonnet, J.L.; Bernard, M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France); Daou, D.; Coaguila, C.; Benada, A.; Tawileh, M.; Kaci, N. [Hopital Foch, 92 - Suresnes (France); Vilain, D. [Hopital Lariboisiere AP-HP, 75 - Paris (France); Maskali, F.; Poussier, S.; Boutley, H.; Karcher, G.; Olivier, P.; Py, M. [INSERM U684, Faculte de Medecine de Nancy, 54 (France); Vanhove, C.; Franken, P.R. [AZ-VUB Bruxelles (Belgium); Tran, N.; Groubatch, F. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 54 - Nancy (France)

    2005-11-15

    Spectrometry by nuclear magnetic resonance of the P31 and myocardium viability in correlation with the rest scintigraphy using thallium 201 is developed here, an imaging technique, the pinhole gated-SPECT allows to predict and quantify an experimental model of coronaries occlusion for the rat and is detailed. (N.C.)

  1. SFC/SFBMN guidelines update for nuclear cardiology procedures: stress testing in adults and children; Mise a jour des recommandations concernant la pratique des epreuves de provocation d'ischemie en cardiologie nucleaire chez l'adulte et chez l'enfant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manrique, A. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 76 - Rouen (France); Marie, P.Y. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Nancy-Brabois, Medecine Nucleaire, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Maunoury, Ch.; Acar, Ph. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Necker Enfants Malades Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France); Agostini, D. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 14 - Caen (France)

    2002-12-01

    The guidelines update for nuclear cardiology procedures are studied in this article. We find the minimum technique conditions for the stress testing practice, the recommendations for the different ischemia activation tests, the choice of the stress test. (N.C.)

  2. Clinical use of nuclear cardiology in the assessment of heart failure%核心脏病学在心力衰竭中的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩磊; 石洪成

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is the most commonly performed non-invasive cardiac imaging test in patients with heart failure, and it plays an important role in their assessment and management.Quantitative gated single positron emission computed tomography is used to assess quantitatively cardiac volume, left ventricular ejection fraction, stroke volume, and cardiac diastolic function.Resting and stress myocardial perfusion imaging can not only identify nonischemic heart failure and ischemic heart failure, but aslo demonstrat myocardial viability.Diastolic heart failure aslo termed as heart failure with a preserved left ventricular ejection fraction is readily identified by nuclear cardiology techniques and can accurately be estimated by peak filling rate and time to peak filling rate.With newer techniques such as three-dimensional, quantitative gated single positron emission computed tomography can assess movement of the left ventricle, and wall thickening evaluation aids its assessment.Myocardial perfusion imaging is also commonly used to identify candidates for implantable cardiac defibrillator and cardiac resynchronization therapies.Neurotransmitter imaging using 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine offers prognostic information in patients with heart failure.Metabolism and function in the heart are closely related, and energy substrate metabolism is a potential target of medical therapies to improve cardiac function in patients with heart failure.Cardiac metabolic imaging using 123I-15-(p-iodophenyl) 3-R, S-methylpentadecacoic acid is a commonly used tracer in clinical studies to diagnose metabolic heart failure.Nuclear cardiology tests, including neurotransmitter imaging and metabolic imaging, are now easily preformed with new tracers to improve heart failure diagnosis.Nuclear cardiology techniques contribute significantly to identifying patients with heart failure and to guiding their management decisions.%核心脏病学的显像技术是一种常用的无创的诊断心力

  3. Contributions of nuclear cardiology to prognosis and risk stratification in coronary artery disease; Nuklearkardiologische Methoden zur Prognosebeurteilung und Risikostratifizierung bei koronarer Herzkrankheit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, B. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum der RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2004-09-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease and stable symptoms enables not only accurate diagnosis of disease but also entails prognostic value. Myocardial perfusion SPECT contributes to assessment of future cardiac events independently of other clinical parameters. A normal stress myocardial perfusion scan is associated with a favorable prognosis in all pre-test risk subsets similar to that of the general population independent of history, symptoms, and exercise electrocardiography test variables. Cardiac risk and benefit from invasive therapeutic strategies increase in relation to the severity of the abnormality of perfusion and function assessed by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Thus, stress myocardial perfusion imaging may serve as a gatekeeper for referral to coronary angiography enabling effective risk stratification in patients with suspected or documented coronary artery disease. In severe coronary artery disease accompanied by left ventricular dysfunction preoperative prediction of reversibility of functional impairment and improvement in survival after revascularization can be achieved by viability testing using nuclear cardiology. Absence of viability is associated with no significant difference in functional and survival outcomes, irrespective of treatment strategy. Therefore, unnecessary revascularization can be avoided in cases with absent evidence of viability. (orig.)

  4. New gamma cameras in nuclear cardiology: D-SPECT; Les nouvelles gamma cameras en cardiologie nucleaire: D-Spect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouzet, F.; Bechara, T.; Ben Ali, K.; Nassar, P.; Grellier, J.F.; Burg, S.; Hyafil, F.; Le Guludec, D. [Service de medecine nucleaire, groupe hospitalier Bichat-Claude-Bernard, AP-HP, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-08-15

    Over the past few years, advances in nuclear medicine aimed at decreasing both the duration and dosimetry of exams, without decreasing image quality. In this setting, Spectrum Dynamics (D-Spect) is a new generation gamma camera dedicated to cardiac scintigraphy. Its technology includes solid-state detectors based on pixelated semiconductors, region-centric (cardiac area) scanning, high-sensitivity collimators and resolution recovery. An additional particularity is the patient position during scanning. Phantom studies showed an improvement of sensitivity compared to conventional cameras, at the price of a loss in geometric resolution, which is compensated by resolution recovery. Semiconductors detectors provide a better energy resolution than conventional detectors suited to double isotope acquisitions, and a high count rate allowing dynamic acquisitions. Only few clinical studies are available so far, they suggest performances similar to that of conventional cameras obtained with acquisitions duration reduced to few minutes. The next step is to establish a trade-off between acquisition duration and dosimetry reduction. (authors)

  5. Nuclear cardiology and coronary surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckardt, R.; Andersen, L.I.; Hesse, B.

    2008-01-01

    Rising age, repeated percutaneous coronary revascularizations, and co-morbidity such as overweight, diabetes, and hypertension, characterize a change over the last 20-30 years in coronary patients referred to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). This patient group represents a great part of to...

  6. The usefulness of the nuclear cardiology in the cellular implant in patients with severe myocardial damage; La utilidad de la cardiologia nuclear en el implante celular en pacientes con dano miocardico severo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omelas A, M.; Arguero S, R.; Garrido G, M.H.; Rodriguez C, A.; Careaga, G.; Castano G, R.; Nambo, M.J.; Pascual P, J.; Ortega R, A.; Gaxiola A, A.; Magana S, J.A.; Estrada A, H.; Equipo de Tecnicos en Medicina Nuclear [Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI IMSS Hospital de Cardiologia-Servicio de Medicina Nuclear Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The recent therapeutic advances as the cellular implant as well as those different protocols of image acquisition in the field of the Nuclear Cardiology its have allowed that the patient with severe myocardial damage and without some possibility of revascularization is benefited with these advances. Doubtless the Tl-201 par excellence has an important paper for standardize the more appropriate therapeutic behavior for the heart attack patient; reason by this investigation protocol was developed. The objective of the study was to identify the heart attack regions without viable tissue with SPECT in patient with important myocardial damage without some possibility of traditional revascularization; for the 'Stem cell' cellular implantation therapy. The methodology it was carried out by a study of myocardial perfusion in 10 patients with important myocardial damage previous cellular implants, with PICANUC/ SPECT methodology and using a software (Emory Tool Box) for the image processing validated by the University of Emory Atlanta GA; and using as tracer the Tl - 201 to identify the heart attack regions without presence of viable tissue with an analysis model of 17 segments standardized for the left ventricle; qualifying this way the myocardial perfusion in: 0 (normal), 1 (light), 2 (moderate), 3 (severe), 4 (absent) and x (bad technique). The conclusions were that the SPECT study with PICANUC methodology with Tl-201 is safe and effective for the precise localization for the cellular implantation via direct intra myocardial. (Author)

  7. Joseph A. Burton Forum Award Lecture: Managing Nuclear and Biological Risks: Building Resilience through International Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregenzer, Arian

    2012-03-01

    International technical cooperation has long been an important nonproliferation strategy, especially since the 1990s when cooperative threat reduction (CTR) to prevent theft or illicit transfer of nuclear weapons, material and expertise in the former Soviet Union became a keystone of U.S. policy. The CTR approach expanded to include engagement with scientists and engineers with expertise relevant to biological and chemical weapons, and continued in the 2000s with efforts in Iraq and Libya, and cooperation with a wide range of countries on export control and nuclear and biological security. In general, the goal of such efforts has been to prevent proliferation or WMD terrorism. In most cases, the United States (or the West) defines the threat, and then funds partner countries to implement solutions. This presentation will argue that the future requires a new approach. Nuclear capabilities are more widely available than ever before, repercussions of the A.Q. Khan network continue to unfurl, and countries such as the DPRK engage in illicit cooperation. In addition, there has been a global boom in biotechnology with many nations, particularly across South and East Asia, investing in the biotech industry as a source of fuels, food, and materials for their rapidly expanding populations. Compared to the 1990s, today's threat is more diffuse, and the line between legitimate and illegitimate technical capability is no longer so clear. In addition, the West has many fewer resources to invest due to the global economic downturn. In this environment, full commitment of all countries that benefit from nuclear and biological advances will be required to assure the safety and security of all. Technical cooperation can continue to play an important role, but with some significant changes: First, challenges should be defined from a local perspective to ensure full commitment and participation. Second, the goal of cooperation should shift from preventing specific threats to building

  8. [Perspectives in cardiological research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kübler, W

    2004-08-01

    German cardiological research is confronted with increasing difficulties. Clinical research is restricted by regulations, such as the working hours protecting law, the revised version of the legal articles against corruption and acceptance of advantage as well as by many parts of law for the general frame of the university structures. In addition more and more administrative duties are tranferred to doctors engaged in research. Furthermore cardiology is at a disadvantage as only part of the net profits for cardiological services are tranferred to the responsible clinic. Likewise the facilities for cooperation are increasingly restricted, as basic science institutions originally allocated to cardiological research, are now devoted to other subjects and as many pharmaceutical firms have left the country. Cardiology in our country is practically not supported by private research organizations. Research projects are, therefore, predominantly financed by grants from the Bundeministerium für Bildung und Forschung and by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. The financial resources for research in our country are declining and much smaller compared, e. g., to the USA. As a consequence of the shortage of resources not only are the weak projects turned down; it is feared that also the very innovative projects are likewise excluded for entering unknown territory. In periods of financial restrictions the central office and the experts evaluating the projects have a special responsibility, which cannot be met by technical objections, such as e. g., an "unsufficient impact factor". In order to improve the conditions for cardiological research the net profits for cardiological services should be transferred unrestricted to the responsible clinic. The acceptance rate of cardiologcal projects may be increased by more intensive cooperation. At the end, the principle of help by self-help also applies to cardiological research; the British Heart Foundation has developed into an

  9. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy: the evidence. A consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society, endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underwood, S.R. [Imperial College London, Royal Brompton Hospital, Sydney St, SW3 6NP, London (United Kingdom); Anagnostopoulos, C. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Sydney St, SW3 6NP, London (United Kingdom); Cerqueira, M. [Georgetown University Medical Center, 3800 Reservoir Road NW, WA 20007-2197, Washington DC (United States); Ell, P.J. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, The Middlesex Hospital, Mortimer Street, W1T 3AA, London (United Kingdom); Flint, E.J. [Dudley Group of Hospitals, Wordsley Hospital, DY8 5QX, Stourbridge, West Midlands (United Kingdom); Harbinson, M. [Antrim Area Hospital, Bush Road, Co Antrim, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Kelion, A.D. [Harefield Hospital, Hill End Road, UB9 6JH, Harefield, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Al-Mohammad, A. [Northern General Hospital, Herries Road, S5 7AU, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Prvulovich, E.M. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, The Middlesex Hospital, Mortimer Street, W1T 3AA, London (United Kingdom); Shaw, L.J. [Suite 225, Atlanta Cardiovascular Research Institute, 5665 Peachtree Dunwoody Road NE, 30342, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Tweddel, A.C. [Castle Hill Hospital, Castle Road, HU16 5JQ, Cottingham, E Yorkshire (United Kingdom)

    2004-02-01

    This review summarises the evidence for the role of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. It is the product of a consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society and is endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists. It was used to inform the UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence in their appraisal of MPS in patients with chest pain and myocardial infarction. MPS is a well-established, non-invasive imaging technique with a large body of evidence to support its effectiveness in the diagnosis and management of angina and myocardial infarction. It is more accurate than the exercise ECG in detecting myocardial ischaemia and it is the single most powerful technique for predicting future coronary events. The high diagnostic accuracy of MPS allows reliable risk stratification and guides the selection of patients for further interventions, such as revascularisation. This in turn allows more appropriate utilisation of resources, with the potential for both improved clinical outcomes and greater cost-effectiveness. Evidence from modelling and observational studies supports the enhanced cost-effectiveness associated with MPS use. In patients presenting with stable or acute chest pain, strategies of investigation involving MPS are more cost-effective than those not using the technique. MPS also has particular advantages over alternative techniques in the management of a number of patient subgroups, including women, the elderly and those with diabetes, and its use will have a favourable impact on cost-effectiveness in these groups. MPS is already an integral part of many clinical guidelines for the investigation and management of angina and myocardial infarction. However, the technique is underutilised in the UK, as judged by the inappropriately long waiting times and by

  10. Cardiology without borders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Wolk

    2004-01-01

    @@ Cardiovascular disease takes place in a border-free world. The challenge at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and anywhere else in the world is to hold patient care above the artificial barriers raised by geopolitical issues. Fundamentally, the goal of ACC members or of any cardiology societies in the world is to provide excellent patient care. Cardiovascular disease is essentially the same throughout the world. Where there are minor variations among individuals, as clinicians we find priceless opportunity to learn. Expanding- rather contracting -our experience base helps us as individuals to realize our best potential as practitioners.

  11. Artificial intelligence in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonderman, Diana

    2017-10-04

    Decision-making is complex in modern medicine and should ideally be based on available data, structured knowledge and proper interpretation in the context of an individual patient. Automated algorithms, also termed artificial intelligence that are able to extract meaningful patterns from data collections and build decisions upon identified patterns may be useful assistants in clinical decision-making processes. In this article, artificial intelligence-based studies in clinical cardiology are reviewed. The text also touches on the ethical issues and speculates on the future roles of automated algorithms versus clinicians in cardiology and medicine in general.

  12. The Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, S. Raj

    2011-01-01

    Academic lectures for the purpose of instruction maintain an important presence in most colleges and universities worldwide. This chapter examines the current state of the lecture and how learning sciences research can inform the most effective use of this method. The author presents evidence that the lecture can be an effective element of…

  13. The genome and cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Henning; Diness, Birgitte Rode; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    cardiac diseases. Clinical and genetic cascade family screening of the relatives to patients with inherited cardiac diseases is now organized in a national network of centres of cardiology, sharing pedigrees, clinical and genetic information. This gives unique opportunities for offering focused...

  14. University cardiology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borozanov, V

    2013-01-01

    In distant 1972, within framework of the Internal Clinic, a cardiologic department was organized which was soon, on 29.XII.1974, transformed into the Cardiology Clinic, later the Institute for Heart Diseases, and in 2008 was renamed the University Cardiology Clinic. The greater part of its foundation was possible owing to Prof. Dimitar Arsov and Prof. Radovan Percinkovski, who was the clinic's first director in the period from 1974 to 1984. In 1985, the Clinic moved into its own new building, and in that way was physically detached from the Internal Clinics. Until its move to the new building, the Clinic functioned in the Internal Clinics building, organized as an outpatient polyclinic and inpatient infirmary department with clinical beds, a coronary intensive care unit and a haemodynamics laboratory equipped with the most modern equipment of that time. Today the Clinic functions through two integral divisions: an inpatient infirmary department which comprises an intensive coronary care unit and fourteen wards which altogether have 139 clinical beds, and the diagnostic centre which comprises an emergency clinic and day hospital, a communal and consultative outpatients' clinic functioning on a daily basis, through which some 300-350 patients pass every day, and diagnostic laboratories with a capacity of nearly 100 non-invasive and 20-30 invasive diagnostic procedures daily. The Clinic is a teaching base, and its doctors are educators of students at the Medical, Dental and Pharmacy Faculties, and also of students at the High School for Nurses and X-ray technicians, but also for those in Internal Medicine and especially Cardiology. The Clinic is also a base for scientific Masters' and post-doctoral studies, and such higher degrees are achieved not only by doctors who work here, but also by doctors from Medical Centres both in the country and abroad. Doctors working in this institution publish widely, not only a great number of books and monographs, but also original

  15. Almanac 2012: Interventional cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Pascal Meier; Adam Timmis

    2013-01-01

    The field of interventional cardiology continues to progress quickly. The efficacy of percutaneous interventions with newer generation drug-eluting stents has advanced a lot over the last decade. This improvement in stent performance has broadened the level of indication towards more complex interventions such as left main and multi-vessel PCI. Major improvements continue in the field of medical co-therapy such as antiplatelet therapies (bivalirudin, prasugrel, and ticagrelor) and this will f...

  16. ICRP PUBLICATION 120: Radiological protection in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, C; Miller, D L; Bernardi, G; Rehani, M M; Schofield, P; Vañó, E; Einstein, A J; Geiger, B; Heintz, P; Padovani, R; Sim, K-H

    2013-02-01

    Cardiac nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomography (CT), interventional cardiology procedures, and electrophysiology procedures are increasing in number and account for an important share of patient radiation exposure in medicine. Complex percutaneous coronary interventions and cardiac electrophysiology procedures are associated with high radiation doses. These procedures can result in patient skin doses that are high enough to cause radiation injury and an increased risk of cancer. Treatment of congenital heart disease in children is of particular concern. Additionally, staff(1) in cardiac catheterisation laboratories may receive high doses of radiation if radiological protection tools are not used properly. The Commission provided recommendations for radiological protection during fluoroscopically guided interventions in Publication 85, for radiological protection in CT in Publications 87 and 102, and for training in radiological protection in Publication 113 (ICRP, 2000b,c, 2007a, 2009). This report is focused specifically on cardiology, and brings together information relevant to cardiology from the Commission's published documents. There is emphasis on those imaging procedures and interventions specific to cardiology. The material and recommendations in the current document have been updated to reflect the most recent recommendations of the Commission. This report provides guidance to assist the cardiologist with justification procedures and optimisation of protection in cardiac CT studies, cardiac nuclear medicine studies, and fluoroscopically guided cardiac interventions. It includes discussions of the biological effects of radiation, principles of radiological protection, protection of staff during fluoroscopically guided interventions, radiological protection training, and establishment of a quality assurance programme for cardiac imaging and intervention. As tissue injury, principally skin injury, is a risk for fluoroscopically guided interventions

  17. Cardiology Still a Man's Field, Survey Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162700.html Cardiology Still a Man's Field, Survey Finds Women less ... Dr. Claire Duvernoy, chair of the Women in Cardiology Council at the American College of Cardiology (ACC). ...

  18. Computer diagnosis in cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Wilfred Ewing

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports upon the emergence of a novel cognitive, computer-based technology which may lead to significantly improved methods of cardiological diagnosis and a rapid and inexpensive method of cardiological screening.The technology ‘Virtual Scanning’ illustrates how, in blood, the reaction of proteins and their reactive substrates releases light; that the colour and intensity of this bioluminescence is unique to each reaction and it’s rate; and that the development of pathologies influence cognition and visual perception. This illustrates that the function of the autonomic nervous system is linked to that of the physiological systems and that the rate of biochemical reactions, and the progression of disease, can be measured by a cognitive test procedure and used as an indication of the disease(s affecting heart function.The article discusses the limitations of the conventional biomarker technique, and the potential value of non-invasive cognitive techniques, such as Virtual Scanning, to the medical practitioner. Finally, it discusses how the ability of Virtual Scanning to diagnose disease from its presymptomatic origins may lead to improved diagnostic accuracy and significantly reduced costs.

  19. Mobile apps in cardiology: review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Herreros-González, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    .... The aim of this paper is to study the literature on mobile systems and applications currently available, as well as the existing apps related to cardiology from the leading app stores and to then...

  20. Sacler lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Bernstein, J

    1995-01-01

    The series of three lectures given at Tel-Aviv University in 1992: 1. Tensor categories. 2. Quantum groups. 3. Topological (quantum) field theories. Published as the preprint IAS 897-92 of Tel-Aviv University and The Mortimer and Raymond Sacler Institute of Advanced Studies.

  1. Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 More Information DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 7 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Fayard, O. Ullaland, D. Heagerty (CERN) Programme Presentation Workshops presentation Information on Computing Rules 10:15 - 11:00 R. Aymar (CERN) Introduction to CERN (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 J. Engelen (CERN) Introduction to CERN (2/2) 15:00 - 16:30 H. Menzel (CERN) An Introduction to Radiation Protection DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 8 july 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (1/4) 10:15 - 11:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Fundamental questions in modern nuclear physics: The challenge of exotic nuclei (1/2) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Friday 9 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (3/4) 10:15 - 11:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Fundamental questions in modern nuclear physics: The challenge of exotic nuclei (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 P....

  2. Geriatric Cardiology: An Emerging Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, John A.; Matlock, Daniel D.; Forman, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Given changing demographics, patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease in developed countries are now older and more complex than even a decade ago. This trend is expected to continue into the foreseeable future; accordingly, cardiologists in practice are encountering patients with a greater number of comorbid illnesses as well as “geriatric conditions” such as cognitive impairment and frailty which complicate management and influence outcomes. Simultaneously, technological advances have widened the therapeutic options available for patients, including those with the most advanced CV disease. In the setting of these changes, geriatric cardiology has recently emerged as a discipline that aims to adapt principles from geriatric medicine into everyday cardiology practice. Accordingly, the tasks of a “geriatric cardiologist” may include both traditional evidence-based CV management plus comprehensive geriatric assessment, medication reduction, team-based coordination of care, and explicit incorporation of patient goals into management. Given that the field is still in its relative infancy, the training pathways and structure of clinical programs in geriatric cardiology are still being delineated. In this review we highlight the rationale behind geriatric cardiology as a discipline, several current approaches by geriatric cardiology programs, and future directions for the field. PMID:27476988

  3. Geriatric Cardiology: An Emerging Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, John A; Matlock, Daniel D; Forman, Daniel E

    2016-09-01

    Given changing demographics, patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease in developed countries are now older and more complex than even a decade ago. This trend is expected to continue into the foreseeable future; accordingly, cardiologists are encountering patients with a greater number of comorbid illnesses as well as "geriatric conditions," such as cognitive impairment and frailty, which complicate management and influence outcomes. Simultaneously, technological advances have widened the therapeutic options available for patients, including those with the most advanced CV disease. In the setting of these changes, geriatric cardiology has recently emerged as a discipline that aims to adapt principles from geriatric medicine to everyday cardiology practice. Accordingly, the tasks of a "geriatric cardiologist" may include both traditional evidence-based CV management plus comprehensive geriatric assessment, medication reduction, team-based coordination of care, and explicit incorporation of patient goals into management. Given that the field is still in its relative infancy, the training pathways and structure of clinical programs in geriatric cardiology are still being delineated. In this review, we highlight the rationale behind geriatric cardiology as a discipline, several current approaches by geriatric cardiology programs, and future directions for the field. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 appropriate use criteria for cardiac computed tomography. A report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D; Kramer, Christopher M; Berman, Daniel; Brown, Alan; Chaudhry, Farooq A; Cury, Ricardo C; Desai, Milind Y; Einstein, Andrew J; Gomes, Antoinette S; Harrington, Robert; Hoffmann, Udo; Khare, Rahul; Lesser, John; McGann, Christopher; Rosenberg, Alan; Schwartz, Robert; Shelton, Marc; Smetana, Gerald W; Smith, Jr, Sidney C

    2010-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT...

  5. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD...

  6. Nuclear cardiology in the clinical setting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    positron emission tomography (PET) for the diagnosis and prognosis ... CAD, and as a screening test in those with intermediate CAD or at high ... endpoints (such as fatigue or shortness of breath). • beta-blocking drugs that limit heart rate.

  7. Improving Performance in a Nuclear Cardiology Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFleur, Doug; Smalley, Karolyn; Austin, John

    2005-01-01

    Improving performance in the medical industry is an area that is ideally suited for the tools advocated by the International Society of Performance Improvement (ISPI). This paper describes an application of the tools that have been developed by Dale Brethower and Geary Rummler, two pillars of the performance improvement industry. It allows the…

  8. Nuclear cardiology: Myocardial perfusion and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seldin, D.W. (Lahey Clinic Medical Center, Burlington, MA (United States))

    1991-08-01

    Myocardial perfusion studies continue to be a major focus of research, with new investigations of the relationship of exercise-redistribution thallium imaging to diagnosis, prognosis, and case management. The redistribution phenomenon, which seemed to be fairly well understood a few years ago, is now recognized to be much more complex than originally thought, and various strategies have been proposed to clarify the meaning of persistent defects. Pharmacologic intervention with dipyridamole and adenosine has become available as an alternative to exercise, and comparisons with exercise imaging and catheterization results have been described. Thallium itself is no longer the sole single-photon perfusion radiopharmaceutical; two new technetium agents are now widely available. In addition to perfusion studies, advances in the study of ventricular function have been made, including reports of studies performed in conjunction with technetium perfusion studies, new insights into cardiac physiology, and the prognostic and case-management information that function studies provide. Finally, work has continued with monoclonal antibodies for the identification of areas of myocyte necrosis. 41 references.

  9. Nuclear cardiology in acute coronary syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulow, H.; Schwaiger, M. [Nuclearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik Technische Universitat Munchen, Munich (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    Acute coronary syndromes are a frequent manifestation of a coronary artery disease, usually being associated with chest pain and presenting as a medical emergency. Since a considerable number of patients with chest pain, however, have a non cardiac etiology of trier pain, properly triaging these patients represents a diagnostic challenge for physicians in the emergency department. As the available diagnostic procedures have limited accuracy, many different diagnostic strategies have been evaluated. Among these, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) at rest or in combination with stress procedures has been investigated in many trails. MPI has been proven to be useful, especially in a patient population with a low to intermediate probability of an ischemic event. Perfusion scintigraphy has a high sensitivity in the detection of myocardial infarction and reveals an excellent negative predictive value, allowing a safe discharge strategy of patients with a negative scan result. Moreover, it enables risk stratification and provides incremental and independent prognostic information regarding short to long term future cardiac adverse events. Several cost effectiveness studies have shown that perfusion imaging leads to lower overall direct costs, mainly by a reduction of unnecessary hospital admissions and diagnostic angiograms, without worsening of the clinical outcome of these patients. As a possible study endpoint, myocardial perfusion imaging in the acute setting enables the quantification of salvaged myocardium and therefore the evaluation of treatment efficacy. Besides perfusion agents, several infarcts avid radiopharmaceuticals have been developed, which in part show promising results. However, larger randomized trials evaluating these tracers in clinical settings are needed to warrant routine clinical application.

  10. Summary Lecture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. O. Stenflo

    2000-09-01

    This summary lecture makes no attempt to summarize what was actually said at the meeting, since this is well covered by the other contributors. Instead I have structured my presentation in three parts: First I try to demonstrate why the Sun is unique by comparing it with laboratory plasmas. This is followed by some personal reminiscences that go back a significant fraction of the century. I conclude in the form of a poem about this memorable conference in honor of the centennial anniversary of the Kodaikanal Observatory.

  11. Assessing Competence in Pediatric Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Apul E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In response to the need to assure physician competence, a rating scale was developed at the University of Minnesota Medical School for use in evaluating clinical competence in pediatric cardiology. It was tested on first- and second-year specialists. Development and testing procedures are described. (JT)

  12. Physician Requirements-1990. For Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Octavious; Birchette-Pierce, Cheryl

    Professional requirements for physicians specializing in cardiology were estimated to assist policymakers in developing guidelines for graduate medical education. The determination of physician requirements was based on an adjusted needs rather than a demand or utilization model. For each illness, manpower requirements were modified by the…

  13. Assessing Competence in Pediatric Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Apul E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In response to the need to assure physician competence, a rating scale was developed at the University of Minnesota Medical School for use in evaluating clinical competence in pediatric cardiology. It was tested on first- and second-year specialists. Development and testing procedures are described. (JT)

  14. History of German pediatric cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintzen, P

    2002-01-01

    Due to the isolation of German medicine in World War II accompanied by the destruction of many hospitals, German pediatricians did not show any serious interest in the treatment of children with congenital heart diseases, nor did they take notice of the progress achieved by Helen Taussig, Alfred Blalock and other cardiologists and surgeons in the western world. This problem was even worse in East Germany. Only a few German internists and forward-looking surgeons were able and ready to take care of this group of principally operable children in places like Bonn/Düsseldorf, Marburg/Munich, Berlin, and Hamburg. However, in the early 1950s some directors of pediatrics at university hospitals--largely motivated by the cardiac surgeons--allowed or even encouraged younger colleagues to concentrate on pediatric cardiology and to begin application of heart catheterization and angiocardiography. In 1960 a group of colleagues interested in pediatric cardiology met for the first time in Frankfurt and became the nucleus of the future "working group" (1969) and finally the "German Society of Pediatric Cardiology" (1974). By 1972 pediatric cardiology had been approved as an independent (sub)specialty. Colleagues and friends from surrounding countries (Austria, Great Britain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the Netherlands) and also from the US and some eastern countries were either members or regular guests during or between the meetings. Pediatric cardiology is now represented in Germany by specialized practitioners, trainees and assistants who work in both community and university hospitals, and in specialized departments. Due to the foresightedness of the Chief of Pediatrics, Prof. G. Joppich, the first Chair of Pediatric Cardiology was founded in Göttingen in 1960 under the direction of A. Beuren. Another model of interdisciplinary cooperation between pediatric cardiologists, bioengineers, mathematicians and computer scientists was established in Kiel in 1966. In other places

  15. Mobile apps in cardiology: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Herreros-González, Jesús

    2013-07-24

    Cardiovascular diseases are the deadliest diseases worldwide, with 17.3 million deaths in 2008 alone. Among them, heart-related deaths are of the utmost relevance; a fact easily proven by the 7.25 million deaths caused by ischemic heart disease alone in that year. The latest advances in smartphones and mHealth have been used in the creation of thousands of medical apps related to cardiology, which can help to reduce these mortality rates. The aim of this paper is to study the literature on mobile systems and applications currently available, as well as the existing apps related to cardiology from the leading app stores and to then classify the results to see what is available and what is missing, focusing particularly on commercial apps. Two reviews have been developed. One is a literature review of mobile systems and applications, retrieved from several databases and systems such as Scopus, PubMed, IEEE Xplore, and Web of Knowledge. The other is a review of mobile apps in the leading app stores, Google play for Android and Apple's App Store for iOS. Search queries up to May 2013 located 406 papers and 710 apps related to cardiology and heart disease. The most researched section in the literature associated with cardiology is related to mobile heart (and vital signs) monitoring systems and the methods involved in the classification of heart signs in order to detect abnormal functions. Other systems with a significant number of papers are mobile cardiac rehabilitation systems, blood pressure measurement, and systems for the detection of heart failure. The majority of apps for cardiology are heart monitors and medical calculators. Other categories with a high number of apps are those for ECG education and interpretation, cardiology news and journals, blood pressure tracking, heart rate monitoring using an external device, and CPR instruction. There are very few guides on cardiac rehabilitation and apps for the management of the cardiac condition, and there were no

  16. [Problems in cardiology specialty training in Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Armağan

    2012-04-01

    Cardiology Specialty Training in our country should be made in accordance with the law numbered 1219 on the Practice of Medicine and Related Arts, and according to the Medical and Dental Specialist Training Regulation which is published according to the 9th article of this law. The duration of Cardiology Specialist Training has been defined as 4 years in our country. The European Society of Cardiology (ESC), European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), and the European Cardiology Section Foundation (ECSF) define the duration of Cardiology Specialist Training as 6 years. Therefore, insufficient Cardiology residency training occurs in our country due to the shortened length of time. In this report, the problems of the Cardiology Specialist Training in Turkey will be addressed under different headings.

  17. How to Practice Sports Cardiology: A Cardiology Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Christine E

    2015-07-01

    The rigorous cardiovascular (CV) demands of sport, combined with training-related cardiac adaptations, render the athlete a truly unique CV patient and sports cardiology a truly unique discipline. Cardiologists are advised to adopt a systematic approach to the CV evaluation of athletes, taking into consideration the individual sports culture, sports-specific CV demands, CV adaptations and their appearance on cardiac testing, any existing or potential interaction of the heart with the internal and external sports environment, short- and long-term CV risks, and potential effect of performance-enhancing agents and antidoping regulations. This article outlines the systematic approach, provides a detailed example, and outlines contemporary sports cardiology core competencies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Summary of the 4th Annual Scientific Session of Cardiology in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伊丽

    2002-01-01

    @@ The 4th Annual Scientific Session of South China was held from April 5 ~ 8, 2002 in Guangzhou. More than one thousand cardiologists came from Guangzhou,Guangxi, Hunan and Hainan Province participated in the meeting and 143 abstracts were presented. A distinguished faculty from the United States, Canada,Germany, Britain, Honkong, Beijing and Shanghai were invited to join this conference and gave a series of special lectures about the newest advances in cardiology.

  19. History of Cardiology in India

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Mrinal Kanti; Kumar, Soumitra; Deb, Pradip Kumar; Mishra, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    History as a science revolves around memories, travellers' tales, fables and chroniclers' stories, gossip and trans-telephonic conversations. Medicine itself as per the puritan's definition is a non-exact science because of the probability-predictability-sensitivity-specificity factors. Howsoever, the chronicles of Cardiology in India is quite interesting and intriguing. Heart and circulation was known to humankind from pre-Vedic era. Various therapeutics measures including the role of Yoga a...

  20. History of Cardiology in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mrinal Kanti; Kumar, Soumitra; Deb, Pradip Kumar; Mishra, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    History as a science revolves around memories, travellers' tales, fables and chroniclers' stories, gossip and trans-telephonic conversations. Medicine itself as per the puritan's definition is a non-exact science because of the probability-predictability-sensitivity-specificity factors. Howsoever, the chronicles of Cardiology in India is quite interesting and intriguing. Heart and circulation was known to humankind from pre-Vedic era. Various therapeutics measures including the role of Yoga and transcendental meditation in curing cardiovascular diseases were known in India. Only recently there has been resurgence of the same globally. There have been very few innovations in Cardiology in India. The cause of this paucity possibly lie in the limited resources. This has a vicious effect on the research mentality of the population who are busy in meeting their daily requirements. This socio-scientific aspect needs a thorough study and is beyond the scope of the present documentation. Present is the future of past and so one must not forget the history which is essentially past that give the present generation the necessary fulcrum to stand in good stead. The present article essentially aims to pay tribute to all the workers and pioneers in the field of Cardiology in India, who in spite of limited resources ventured in an unchartered arena. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. History of Cardiology in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mrinal Kanti; Kumar, Soumitra; Deb, Pradip Kumar; Mishra, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    History as a science revolves around memories, travellers' tales, fables and chroniclers' stories, gossip and trans-telephonic conversations. Medicine itself as per the puritan's definition is a non-exact science because of the probability-predictability-sensitivity-specificity factors. Howsoever, the chronicles of Cardiology in India is quite interesting and intriguing. Heart and circulation was known to humankind from pre-Vedic era. Various therapeutics measures including the role of Yoga and transcendental meditation in curing cardiovascular diseases were known in India. Only recently there has been resurgence of the same globally. There have been very few innovations in Cardiology in India. The cause of this paucity possibly lie in the limited resources. This has a vicious effect on the research mentality of the population who are busy in meeting their daily requirements. This socio-scientific aspect needs a thorough study and is beyond the scope of the present documentation. Present is the future of past and so one must not forget the history which is essentially past that give the present generation the necessary fulcrum to stand in good stead. The present article essentially aims to pay tribute to all the workers and pioneers in the field of Cardiology in India, who in spite of limited resources ventured in an unchartered arena. PMID:26071301

  2. Screening for mental disorders in cardiology outpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birket-Smith, M.; Rasmussen, A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the frequency of mental disorders in cardiology outpatients to the number of patients with psychological problems identified by cardiologists. In a cardiology outpatient service, 103 consecutive patients were asked to participate in the study. Of these 86......, were frequent in cardiology outpatients. Even in cases where the cardiologists identified psychological problems, the diagnosis had no consequence, as none of the patients was offered relevant treatment Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  3. Big Data for cardiology: novel discovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Schönberger, Viktor

    2016-03-21

    Big Data promises to change cardiology through a massive increase in the data gathered and analysed; but its impact goes beyond improving incrementally existing methods. The potential of comprehensive data sets for scientific discovery is examined, and its impact on the scientific method generally and cardiology in particular is posited, together with likely consequences for research and practice. Big Data in cardiology changes how new insights are being discovered. For it to flourish, significant modifications in the methods, structures, and institutions of the profession are necessary. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15% studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16% laureates, and two (6% were women. Fourteen (42% were American, 15 (45% Europeans and four (13% were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  5. Nobel prizes: contributions to cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-08-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize's history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  6. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15% studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16% laureates, and two (6% were women. Fourteen (42% were American, 15 (45% Europeans and four (13% were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  7. The history of veterinary cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, James W

    2013-03-01

    Throughout civilization, animals have played a pivotal role in the advancement of science and medicine. From as early as 400 BC when Hippocrates recognized that diseases had natural causes, the steadfast advances made by biologists, scientists, physicians and scholars were fueled by timely and important facts and information- much of it gained through animal observations that contributed importantly to understanding anatomy, physiology, and pathology. There have been many breakthroughs and historic developments. For example, William Harvey in the 16th and 17th centuries clarified the importance of the circulatory system, aided by observations in dogs and pigs, which helped to clarify and confirm his concepts. The nineteenth century witnessed advances in physical examination techniques including auscultation and percussion. These helped create the basis for enhanced proficiency in clinical cardiology. An explosion of technologic advances that followed in the 20th century have made possible sophisticated, accurate, and non-invasive diagnostics. This permitted rapid patient assessment, effective monitoring, the development of new cardiotonic drugs, clinical trials to assess efficacy, and multi-therapy strategies. The latter 20th century has marshaled a dizzying array of advances in medical genetics and molecular science, expanding the frontiers of etiologies and disease mechanisms in man, with important implications for animal health. Veterinary medicine has evolved during the last half century, from a trade designed to serve agrarian cultures, to a diverse profession supporting an array of career opportunities ranging from private, specialty practice, to highly organized, specialized medicine and subspecialty academic training programs in cardiology and allied disciplines.

  8. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg, E-mail: ronaldo@floralia.com.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  9. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male. PMID:25945466

  10. [Quality assurance in interventional cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülker, H

    2009-10-01

    Quality assurance in clinical studies aiming at approval of pharmaceutical products is submitted to strict rules, controls and auditing regulations. Comparative instruments to ensure quality in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are not available in interventional cardiology, likewise in other fields of cardiovascular medicine. Quality assurance simply consists of "quality registers" with basic data not externally controlled. Based on the experiences of clinical studies and their long history of standardization it is assumed that these data may be severely flawed thus being inappropriate to set standards for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The precondition for quality assurance are quality data. In invasive coronary angiography and intervention medical indications, the decision making process interventional versus surgical revascularization, technical performance and after - care are essential aspects affecting quality of diagnostics and therapy. Quality data are externally controlled data. To collect quality data an appropriate infrastructure is a necessary precondition which is not existent. For an appropriate infrastructure investments have to be done both to build up as well as to sustain the necessary preconditions. As long as there are no infrastructure and no investments there will be no "quality data". There exist simply registers of data which are not proved to be a basis for significant assurance and enhancement in quality in interventional coronary cardiology. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  11. Industry Lecture 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Helge

    2010-01-01

    Sammendrag af "Industry Lecture", Norsk Kjemisk Selskap, Universitetet i Oslo, givet 15/10 2010.......Sammendrag af "Industry Lecture", Norsk Kjemisk Selskap, Universitetet i Oslo, givet 15/10 2010....

  12. Industry Lecture 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Helge

    2010-01-01

    Sammendrag af "Industry Lecture", Norsk Kjemisk Selskap, Universitetet i Oslo, givet 15/10 2010.......Sammendrag af "Industry Lecture", Norsk Kjemisk Selskap, Universitetet i Oslo, givet 15/10 2010....

  13. Attention Breaks in Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, A. H.; Percival, F.

    1976-01-01

    Describes research into student attention patterns during lectures that suggests that student attention declines steadily during a lecture, and that the rate of decrease is dependent upon several variables including subject difficulty. (MLH)

  14. TransLectures

    OpenAIRE

    Silvestre Cerdà, Joan Albert; Del Agua Teba, Miguel Angel; Garcés Díaz-Munío, Gonzalo Vicente; GASCÓ MORA, GUILLEM; Giménez Pastor, Adrián; Martínez-Villaronga, Adrià Agustí; Pérez González de Martos, Alejandro Manuel; Sánchez-Cortina, Isaías; Serrano Martínez-Santos, Nicolás; Spencer, Rachel Nadine; Valor Miró, Juan Daniel; Andrés Ferrer, Jesús; Civera Saiz, Jorge; Sanchis Navarro, José Alberto; Juan Císcar, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    transLectures (Transcription and Translation of Video Lectures) is an EU STREP project in which advanced automatic speech recognition and machine translation techniques are being tested on large video lecture repositories. The project began in November 2011 and will run for three years. This paper will outline the project¿s main motivation and objectives, and give a brief description of the two main repositories being considered: VideoLectures.NET and poliMedia. The first re...

  15. Laughter in University Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesi, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses laughter in spoken academic discourse, with the aim of discovering why lecturers provoke laughter in their lectures. A further purpose of the paper is to identify episodes in British data which may differ from those in other cultural contexts where other lecturing practices prevail, and thus to inform the design of study skills…

  16. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization focused update: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A; Masoudi, Frederick A; Dehmer, Gregory J; Patel, Manesh R; Smith, Peter K; Chambers, Charles E; Ferguson, T Bruce; Garcia, Mario J; Grover, Frederick L; Holmes, David R; Klein, Lloyd W; Limacher, Marian C; Mack, Michael J; Malenka, David J; Park, Myung H; Ragosta, Michael; Ritchie, James L; Rose, Geoffrey A; Rosenberg, Alan B; Russo, Andrea M; Shemin, Richard J; Weintraub, William S; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Shaw, Leslee; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

    2012-04-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an update of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization frequently considered. In the initial document, 180 clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document, and the definition of appropriateness was unchanged. The technical panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate and likely to improve patients' health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization is considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores in the mid-range (4 to 6) indicate a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization will improve health outcomes or survival is uncertain. In general, as seen with the prior AUC, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia is appropriate. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy are viewed less favorably. The technical panel felt that based on recent studies, coronary artery bypass grafting remains an appropriate method of revascularization for patients with high burden of coronary artery disease (CAD

  17. Cross analysis of knowledge and learning methods followed by French residents in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menet, Aymeric; Assez, Nathalie; Lacroix, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    No scientific assessment of the theoretical teaching of cardiology in France is available. To analyse the impact of the available teaching modalities on the theoretical knowledge of French residents in cardiology. Electronic questionnaires were returned by 283 residents. In the first part, an inventory of the teaching/learning methods was taken, using 21 questions (Yes/No format). The second part was a knowledge test, comprising 15 multiple-choice questions, exploring the core curriculum. Of the 21 variables tested, four emerged as independent predictors of the score obtained in the knowledge test: access to self-assessment (P=0.0093); access to teaching methods other than lectures (P=0.036); systematic discussion about clinical decisions (P=0.013); and the opportunity to prepare and give lectures (P=0.039). The fifth variable was seniority in residency (P=0.0003). Each item of the knowledge test was analysed independently: the score was higher when teaching the item was driven by reading guidelines and was lower if the item had not been covered by the programme (Pcardiology by involving students in the training, by using teaching methods other than lectures and by facilitating access to self-assessment. The use of digital tools may be a particularly effective approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Overview of recent advances in molecular cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2006-01-01

    Molecular cardiology is a new and fast-growing area of cardiovascular medicine that aims to apply molecular biology techniques for the mechanistic investigation, diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. As an emerging discipline, it has changed conceptual thinking of cardiovascular development, disease etiology and pathophysiology. Although molecular cardiology is still at a very early stage, it has opened a promising avenue for understanding and controlling cardiovascul...

  19. NORMAN HOLTER AND HIS METHOD OF REMOTE CARDIOLOGIC MONITORING. CASE HISTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Rassadina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This publication is devoted to the personality and creative designs of uncommon American scientist, the engineer and the inventor – Norman Jefferis «Jeff» Holter. Norman Jefferis Holter introduced the terminology of «nuclear medicine» for the name of the new at that time area which associated with employment of the achievements of the nuclear physics in the medical goals. Also he is the author of ambulatory cardiological monitoring.

  20. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 13 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 Student Session (3/3) Course Review Course Review Tuesday 14 August 16:00 Poster Session Further information can be obtained on the web at the following URL: Summer Student Lecture ProgrammeSummer Student Lectures are available at: http://agenda.cern.ch/SSLP2001

  1. E-nhance Lectures

    OpenAIRE

    Naber, Larissa; Köhle, Monika

    2006-01-01

    Ever more lecturers find themselves forced to Web-enhance their courses out of economic pressure or prestige. Universities trapped between rising student numbers and decreasing budgets are turning to e-learning as the one-stop solution, with little concern for student or teacher needs. An e-(nhanced) learning environment can only be successful if it fulfils students' and lecturers' needs alike. The student needs to be supported in various stages of learning, whereas the lecturer cannot afford...

  2. CRYSTAL 2000 videotapes : lectures, CERN, Geneva, 22 Sep 1992

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear predicament or nuclear option - Synopsis of three lectures : 1- The physical basis of nuclear technology. Physics of fission. Chain reaction in reactors and weapons. Fission fragments. Separration of isotopes. Radiochemistry. 2- Nuclear reactors with slow and fast neutrons. Power, size, fuel and waste. Plutonium production. Dose rate, shielding and health hazard. The lessons of Chernobyl. 3- Nuclear weapons. Types, energy, blast and fallout. Fusion and hydrogen bombs. What to do with nuclear weapons when you cannot use them? Testing. Nonmilittary use. Can we get rid of the nuclear weapon? Nuclear proliferation. Is there a nuclear future?

  3. Current status of preventive cardiology training among United States cardiology fellowships and comparison to training guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Quinn R; Keteyian, Steven J; McBride, Patrick E; Weaver, W Douglas; Kim, Henry E

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated preventive cardiology education in United States cardiology fellowship programs and their adherence to Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium training guidelines, which recommend 1 month of training, faculty with expertise, and clinical experience in cardiac rehabilitation, lipid disorder management, and diabetes management as a part of the prevention curricula. We sent an anonymous survey to United States cardiology program directors and their chief fellow. The survey assessed the program curricula, rotation structure, faculty expertise, obstacles, and recommended improvements. The results revealed that 24% of surveyed programs met the Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium guidelines with a dedicated 1-month rotation in preventive cardiology, 24% had no formalized training in preventive cardiology, and 30% had no faculty with expertise in preventive cardiology, which correlated with fewer rotations in prevention than those with specialized faculty (p = 0.009). Fellows rotated though the following experiences (% of programs): cardiac rehabilitation, 71%; lipid management, 37%; hypertension, 15%; diabetes, 7%; weight management/obesity, 6%; cardiac nutrition, 6%; and smoking cessation, 5%. The program directors cited "lack of time" as the greatest obstacle to providing preventive cardiology training and the chief fellows reported "lack of a developed curriculum" (p = 0.01). The most recommended improvement was for the American College of Cardiology to develop a web-based curriculum/module. In conclusion, most surveyed United States cardiology training programs currently do not adhere to basic preventive cardiovascular medicine Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium recommendations. Additional attention to developing curricular content and structure, including the creation of an American College of Cardiology on-line knowledge module might improve fellowship training in preventive cardiology.

  4. A Geminoid as Lecturer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, Julie Rafn; Schärfe, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report our findings from an experiment with the teleoperated android Geminoid-DK. The geminoid took up the role of a university lecturer and delivered a 45 minute lecture in front of 150 freshmen students at Aalborg University. While considering the role of the geminoid in this e......In this paper we report our findings from an experiment with the teleoperated android Geminoid-DK. The geminoid took up the role of a university lecturer and delivered a 45 minute lecture in front of 150 freshmen students at Aalborg University. While considering the role of the geminoid...

  5. Effective lecture presentation skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelula, M H

    1997-02-01

    Lectures are the most popular form of teaching in medical education. As much as preparation and organization are key to the lecture's success, the actual presentation also depends upon the presenter's ability to reach the audience. Teaching is a lively activity. It calls for more than just offering ideas and data to an audience. It calls for direct contact with the audience, effective use of language, capability to use limited time effectively, and the ability to be entertaining. This article offers a structure to effective lecturing by highlighting the importance of voice clarity and speaking speed, approaches to using audiovisual aids, effectively using the audience to the lecture, and ways to be entertaining.

  6. Academic Training Lecture - Regular lecture programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Wednesday 28, Thursday 29 and Friday 30 September 2011 Supersymmetric Recipes by Prof. Ben Allanech / University of Cambridge, UK  from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN ( Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500 ) In these lectures, I shall describe the theory of supersymmetry accessible to people with a knowledge of basic quantum field theory. The lectures will contain recipes of how to calculate which interactions (and which special relations) are in supersymmetry, without providing detailed proofs of where they come from. We shall also cover: motivation for weak-scale supersymmetry and the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

  7. Lectures on Law Enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettleship, Lois

    Three lectures on law enforcement are presented that were prepared for study purposes at Johnson County Community College. The first lecture examines the fundamental ideas of the Age of Enlightenment and discusses their influence on the American Revolution, the United States Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. Major provisions of the Bill of…

  8. Lectures on combustion theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burstein, S.Z.; Lax, P.D.; Sod, G.A. (eds.)

    1978-09-01

    Eleven lectures are presented on mathematical aspects of combustion: fluid dynamics, deflagrations and detonations, chemical kinetics, gas flows, combustion instability, flame spread above solids, spark ignition engines, burning rate of coal particles and hydrocarbon oxidation. Separate abstracts were prepared for three of the lectures. (DLC)

  9. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel 73127

    2001-01-01

    28, 29, 30, 31 May and 1 June REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Quantum computing and Quantum cryptography T. Hey / University of Southampton, GB, and D. Ross / CERN-TH This course will give both an overview and a detailed introduction to quantum computing and quantum cryptography. The first lecture will survey the field, starting from its origins in Feyman's lecture in 1981. The next three lectures will explain in detail the relevance of Bell states and the workings of Grover's Quantum Search and Shor's quantum factorization algorithms. In addition, an explanation of quantum teleportation will be given. The last lecture will survey the recent progress towards realizing working quantum computers and quantum cryptographic systems.

  10. Quality control for invasive cardiology: Holland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plokker, H W

    1996-10-01

    Although no official registration of indications, treatments and results in patients with coronary heart disease has taken place in Holland, the following authorities and commissions have introduced guidelines for quality control: the Dutch government, the Dutch Society of Cardiology, the Working Group on Interventional Cardiology and the health insurers. Until 1991, the right to perform coronary interventions was tied to a license issued by the Ministry of Health. New recommendations were delineated 5 years ago: at least 500 interventions must be annually performed by 5 interventional cardiologists, i.e. ca. 100 interventions annually per cardiologist. No interventional cardiology may be performed without an in-house cardiac surgery and vice versa. In a survey by the Dutch Society of Cardiology on the quality of the Dutch centers, PTCA-mortality was ca. 0.3%, infarction rate was ca. 2%. An emergency bypass operation was necessary in 1.0 to 1.6% of the cases; the surgical team was on immediate alert for 11% of the patients. Selection of patients without risk was deemed impossible. Despite objections by some members the Dutch Society of Cardiology, it was recommended that cardiac surgery and interventions should not be separated. Data from health insurers showed no inappropriate indications for PTCA. The DUCAT-study, which used the RAND criteria, showed PTCA indications to be correct in more than 90% of the cases. The Dutch government wants to control the expansion of PTCA centers, so it is no wonder that waiting lists are becoming longer.

  11. Annual congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine. EANM'14. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-10-15

    The proceedings of the annual congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine EANM'14 contain abstracts on the following issues: nuclear cardiology practices, PET in lymphoma, advances in nuclear cardiology, dosimetry for intra-arterial treatment in the liver, pediatric nuclear medicine, therapeutic nuclear medicine, SPECT/CT, prostate cancer, extended competencies for nuclear medicine technologists, neurosciences - neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, radionuclide therapy and dosimetry - preclinical studies, physics and instrumentation, clinical molecular imaging, conventional and specialized nuclear medicine.

  12. [Sports cardiology - a general practice oriented update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmied, Christian

    2014-08-01

    As a sub-speciality, Sports Cardiology focuses on sport and physical training interacting with cardiac issues. Particularly, Sports Cardiology deals with the so-called "Sports Paradox", which implicates the fact the on one side regular physical training leads to a multitude of relevant health benefits. But on the other hand, exercise can also be a trigger for sudden cardiac death, particularly in case of an underlying cardiac disease. However, health benefits by regular training outweigh potential risks by far, but only if an adequate cardiac screening and individual recommendations for sports participation have been provided. This review highlights various aspects of Sports Cardiology like strategies to prevent sudden cardiac death in sports and training recommendations in patients with an underlying cardiovascular disease.

  13. Hippocrates, cardiology, Confucius and the Yellow Emperor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, T O

    2001-12-01

    Although Hippocrates (460-c.375 BC) has been traditionally recognized as the Father of Medicine, the fact that he was seminal in the development of cardiology is much less well known. Evidence is presented to support the notion that Hippocrates could also be considered the Father of Cardiology. Hippocrates also had many of the teachings and practices in common with Confucius (c.551-c.479 BC) and the Yellow Emperor of China (2695-2589 BC). Whereas Confucius was not a physician, the Yellow Emperor was an ancient Chinese physician whose Huang Di Neijing, the Yellow Emperor's Canon of Internal Medicine, is the oldest known treatise of medicine in existence.

  14. Cardiac magnetic resonance in clinical cardiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas; Kumar; Rodrigo; Bagur

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, cardiac magnetic resonance(CMR) has transformed from a research tool to a widely used diagnostic method in clinical cardiology. This method can now make useful, unique contributions to the work-up of patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease. Advantages of CMR, compared to other imaging methods, include very high resolution imaging with a spatial resolution up to 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm in plane, a large array of different imaging sequences to provide in vivo tissue characterization, and radiationfree imaging. The present manuscript highlights the relevance of CMR in the current clinical practice and new perspectives in cardiology.

  15. Measures of Knowledge and Attitude Toward Preventive Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Charlene A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The development and validation of an inventory of preventive cardiology at the University of Virginia is described. The inventory contains two instruments designed to measure medical students' preinstructional and postinstructional knowledge of and attitude toward preventive cardiology. (Author/MLW)

  16. Measures of Knowledge and Attitude Toward Preventive Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Charlene A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The development and validation of an inventory of preventive cardiology at the University of Virginia is described. The inventory contains two instruments designed to measure medical students' preinstructional and postinstructional knowledge of and attitude toward preventive cardiology. (Author/MLW)

  17. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    12, 13, 14, 15 & 16 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Telecommunication for the future Rob Parker / CERN-IT Few fields have experienced such a high level of technical advance over the last few decades as that of telecommunications. This lecture series will track the evolution of telecommunications systems since their inception, and consider how technology is likely to advance over the next years. A personal view will also be given of the effect of these innovations on our work and leisure activities.The lecture series will be aimed at an audience with no specific technical knowledge of telecommunications.

  18. Interactive lectures in engineering education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, L.A.; van den Berg, G.C.; van Keulen, H.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses an alternative approach to lecturing: the interactive lecture. In the literature, interactive teaching is forwarded as a means to increase the effectiveness of lectures. Members of lecturing staff still seem, however, reluctant to incorporate interactive teaching in their clas

  19. Interactive lectures in engineering education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, L.A.; van den Berg, G.C.; van Keulen, H.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses an alternative approach to lecturing: the interactive lecture. In the literature, interactive teaching is forwarded as a means to increase the effectiveness of lectures. Members of lecturing staff still seem, however, reluctant to incorporate interactive teaching in their

  20. Feynman Lectures on Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Feynman, Richard Phillips; Allen, Robin W

    1999-01-01

    "When, in 1984-86, Richard P. Feynman gave his famous course on computation at the California Institute of Technology, he asked Tony Hey to adapt his lecture notes into a book. Although led by Feynman,"

  1. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  2. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein`s mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  3. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  4. A Geminoid as Lecturer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, Julie Rafn; Schärfe, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report our findings from an experiment with the teleoperated android Geminoid-DK. The geminoid took up the role of a university lecturer and delivered a 45 minute lecture in front of 150 freshmen students at Aalborg University. While considering the role of the geminoid in this e...... in this educational context, we report results relating to large-room teaching, as well as gender differences in the perception of the robot....

  5. An Evaluation of a Clerkship In Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, John N.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Evaluation of the clinical clerkship in Cardiology for general practitioners proves there is an urgent need for continuing post graduate medical education for general practitioners. Clerkship was offered jointly by the Long Island College Hospital and the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York. (IR)

  6. Evaluation of Cardiology Training and Manpower Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Forrest H., Ed.; Mendenhall, Robert C., Ed.

    Begun in June, 1971 and completed in October 1973, the study had the following specific goals: to define the cardiologist's role; to determine cardiology training program objectives; to determine manpower needs for cardiologists; and to determine the educational needs of cardiologists. The major information was sought from all active cardiologists…

  7. An Evaluation of a Clerkship In Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, John N.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Evaluation of the clinical clerkship in Cardiology for general practitioners proves there is an urgent need for continuing post graduate medical education for general practitioners. Clerkship was offered jointly by the Long Island College Hospital and the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York. (IR)

  8. Evolution of interventional cardiology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wei-feng

    2009-01-01

    @@ On the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China, I am honored to review the interventional treatment of cardiovascular diseases in China. It is really interesting to evaluate the progress in such a field that did not exist 25 years ago in this country in the present context with the term "interventional cardiology".

  9. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 October LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 10:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 1 Introduction to particle accelerators E.J.N. Wilson / CERN-AC , Head of the CERN Accelerator School This new series of lectures is intended for anyone with a technical or scientific background who would like to become familiar with the principles of accelerator design. It is a complement to last year's course and includes new lectures on present day accelerators, and their applications as well as colliders and neutrino factories. Beam dynamics, which was treated at length in last year's course, has been compressed into one lecture, intended as revision for those who followed earlier courses and an introduction for newcomers to the field. The course should not be missed by those who will attend the CAS Intermediate Accelerator School in Seville. 1-10 10:00 Present-day Accelerators 11:00 - Beam Dynamics 2-10 10:00 Accelerating Cavities 11:00 - Non-linear Dynamics 3-10 10:00 E...

  10. Developing effective invasive cardiology services. Guideline report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, P L; Franc, C W; Lewis, S J

    1988-01-01

    Diseases of the heart are the leading cause of death and the major reason for days stayed in the hospital and discharges from the hospital. Nearly 1 million Americans died last year from cardiac disease, and over 60 million suffer from some form of cardiac disease. Conservatively stated, 300,000 cardiac surgeries and 600,000 cardiac catheterizations are performed annually, and the number is rising. Therefore, heart disease is understandably big business for hospitals and physicians. The organization of cardiac delivery systems is changing dramatically, primarily as the result of advancements made in the nonsurgical treatment of cardiac disease. The balance of power is shifting from cardiac surgery to cardiology, resulting in political and economic consequences for hospitals. Cardiac diagnosis is also undergoing a transformation, as less invasive procedures increase in sophistication. As hospitals consider their options in this market and observe physicians, medical groups, and alternative delivery systems providing competing services, the strategic alternatives become confusing and decidedly difficult. This report is written as a guide to assist hospitals in understanding the technological forces underlying the changing market and the effect these changes will have on the ownership, organization, and structure of delivery systems and, most specifically, on the delivery of cardiovascular services. Because of the tremendous interest in invasive cardiology services and the significance of the financial, organizational, and quality commitment involved in the delivery of invasive cardiology services, this guideline report addresses primarily those services. Noninvasive technologies also are addressed because of their importance to a cardiology program, the magnitude of the technological changes taking place, and their potential impact on the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease. The report begins with a discussion of the general planning issues that provide the

  11. Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Regular Lecture Programme 9 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Inner Tracking Detectors by Pippa Wells (CERN) 10 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Calorimeters (2/5) by Philippe Bloch (CERN) 11 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Muon systems (3/5) by Kerstin Hoepfner (RWTH Aachen) 12 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Particle Identification and Forward Detectors by Peter Krizan (University of Ljubljana and J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia) 13 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Trigger and Data Acquisition (5/5) by Dr. Brian Petersen (CERN) from 11:00 to 12:00 at CERN ( Bldg. 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant )

  12. Lectures on functor homology

    CERN Document Server

    Touzé, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    This book features a series of lectures that explores three different fields in which functor homology (short for homological algebra in functor categories) has recently played a significant role. For each of these applications, the functor viewpoint provides both essential insights and new methods for tackling difficult mathematical problems. In the lectures by Aurélien Djament, polynomial functors appear as coefficients in the homology of infinite families of classical groups, e.g. general linear groups or symplectic groups, and their stabilization. Djament’s theorem states that this stable homology can be computed using only the homology with trivial coefficients and the manageable functor homology. The series includes an intriguing development of Scorichenko’s unpublished results. The lectures by Wilberd van der Kallen lead to the solution of the general cohomological finite generation problem, extending Hilbert’s fourteenth problem and its solution to the context of cohomology. The focus here is o...

  13. Lectures on Chevalley groups

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberg, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Robert Steinberg's Lectures on Chevalley Groups were delivered and written during the author's sabbatical visit to Yale University in the 1967-1968 academic year. The work presents the status of the theory of Chevalley groups as it was in the mid-1960s. Much of this material was instrumental in many areas of mathematics, in particular in the theory of algebraic groups and in the subsequent classification of finite groups. This posthumous edition incorporates additions and corrections prepared by the author during his retirement, including a new introductory chapter. A bibliography and editorial notes have also been added. This is a great unsurpassed introduction to the subject of Chevalley groups that influenced generations of mathematicians. I would recommend it to anybody whose interests include group theory. -Efim Zelmanov, University of California, San Diego Robert Steinberg's lectures on Chevalley groups were given at Yale University in 1967. The notes for the lectures contain a wonderful exposition of ...

  14. Lectures for CERN pensioners

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service and the Pensioners Association are pleased to invite CERN pensioners to a series of lectures given by professors and specialists from the Teaching Hospitals and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva on the following topic: PROMOTION OF OPTIMUM BRAIN AGEING The lectures will take place in the Main CERN Auditorium (Building 60) from 2.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. on the following dates: Thursday 15 January 2009: Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease Pr Gabriel GOLD Wednesday 25 February 2009: What is the brain reserve? Speaker’s name to be announced at a later date. The lectures will be given in French, with transparencies in English, and will be followed by a wide-ranging debate with the participants. CERN Medical Service - Pensioners Association - CERN-ESO (GAC-EPA)

  15. Albert Einstein memorial lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Mechoulam, Raphael; The Israel Academy for Sciences and Humanities

    2012-01-01

    This volume consists of a selection of the Albert Einstein Memorial Lectures presented annually at the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities. Delivered by eminent scientists and scholars, including Nobel laureates, they cover a broad spectrum of subjects in physics, chemistry, life science, mathematics, historiography and social issues. This distinguished memorial lecture series was inaugurated by the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities following an international symposium held in Jerusalem in March 1979 to commemorate the centenary of Albert Einstein's birth. Considering that Einstein's interests, activities and influence were not restricted to theoretical physics but spanned broad fields affecting society and the welfare of humankind, it was felt that these memorial lectures should be addressed to scientists, scholars and erudite laypersons rather than to physicists alone.

  16. Memory for Lectures: How Lecture Format Impacts the Learning Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trish L Varao-Sousa

    Full Text Available The present study investigated what impact the presentation style of a classroom lecture has on memory, mind wandering, and the subjective factors of interest and motivation. We examined if having a professor lecturing live versus on video alters the learning experience of the students in the classroom. During the lectures, students were asked to report mind wandering and later complete a memory test. The lecture format was manipulated such that all the students received two lectures, one live and one a pre-recorded video. Results indicate that lecture format affected memory performance but not mind wandering, with enhanced memory in the live lectures. Additionally, students reported greater interest and motivation in the live lectures. Given that a single change to the classroom environment, professor presence, impacted memory performance, as well as motivation and interest, the present results have several key implications for technology-based integrations into higher education classrooms.

  17. Memory for Lectures: How Lecture Format Impacts the Learning Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varao-Sousa, Trish L; Kingstone, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated what impact the presentation style of a classroom lecture has on memory, mind wandering, and the subjective factors of interest and motivation. We examined if having a professor lecturing live versus on video alters the learning experience of the students in the classroom. During the lectures, students were asked to report mind wandering and later complete a memory test. The lecture format was manipulated such that all the students received two lectures, one live and one a pre-recorded video. Results indicate that lecture format affected memory performance but not mind wandering, with enhanced memory in the live lectures. Additionally, students reported greater interest and motivation in the live lectures. Given that a single change to the classroom environment, professor presence, impacted memory performance, as well as motivation and interest, the present results have several key implications for technology-based integrations into higher education classrooms.

  18. Use of smartphone technology in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang H; Silva, Jennifer N A

    2016-05-01

    Smartphone-based technologies along with broadband connectivity are changing the way modern cardiology is practiced. The ever broadening connectivity and increasing capabilities of smartphone-based technologies can better monitor, diagnose, and prevent cardiovascular diseases. Researchers can leverage the ubiquitous use of smartphone-based technologies and their constant stream of biometric data to establish large community-based clinical research studies. Patient engagement is enhanced with constant and on-demand access to physicians, daily self-monitoring, and expanding social networks. On the other hand, the exponential growth of smartphone-based technologies invariably disrupts the traditional healthcare model and leaves a vacuum in the infrastructure, medico-legal apparatus, and reimbursement systems that need to be addressed. In this review, we present a comprehensive discussion of the various applications utilizing smartphone-based technologies in cardiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation monitoring in interventional cardiology: a requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, T.; Uruchurtu, E. S.

    2017-01-01

    The increasing of procedures using fluoroscopy in interventional cardiology procedures may increase medical and patients to levels of radiation that manifest in unintended outcomes. Such outcomes may include skin injury and cancer. The cardiologists and other staff members in interventional cardiology are usually working close to the area under examination and they receive the dose primarily from scattered radiation from the patient. Mexico does not have a formal policy for monitoring and recording the radiation dose delivered in hemodynamic establishments. Deterministic risk management can be improved by monitoring the radiation delivered from X-ray devices. The objective of this paper is to provide cardiologist, techniques, nurses, and all medical staff an information on DR levels, about X-ray risks and a simple a reliable method to control cumulative dose.

  20. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    26, 27, 28 February and 1, 2 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Recent Results on CP Violation and B Physics P.F. HARRISON / QMW, London, UK With the advent of the asymmetric B factories in Japan and the US, exciting new results on CP Violation and B Physics are starting to be achieved. In these lectures, we review the existing experimental and phenomenological context of these measurements, we compare and contrast the new experimental facilities and discuss the implications of the recent results on our understanding. Finally we summarise the prospects for future developments.

  1. Lectures in general algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Kurosh, A G; Stark, M; Ulam, S

    1965-01-01

    Lectures in General Algebra is a translation from the Russian and is based on lectures on specialized courses in general algebra at Moscow University. The book starts with the basics of algebra. The text briefly describes the theory of sets, binary relations, equivalence relations, partial ordering, minimum condition, and theorems equivalent to the axiom of choice. The text gives the definition of binary algebraic operation and the concepts of groups, groupoids, and semigroups. The book examines the parallelism between the theory of groups and the theory of rings; such examinations show the

  2. Twenty lectures on thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Buchdahl, H A

    2013-01-01

    Twenty Lectures on Thermodynamics is a course of lectures, parts of which the author has given various times over the last few years. The book gives the readers a bird's eye view of phenomenological and statistical thermodynamics. The book covers many areas in thermodynamics such as states and transition; adiabatic isolation; irreversibility; the first, second, third and Zeroth laws of thermodynamics; entropy and entropy law; the idea of the application of thermodynamics; pseudo-states; the quantum-static al canonical and grand canonical ensembles; and semi-classical gaseous systems. The text

  3. Lectures on quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Dirac, Paul A M

    2001-01-01

    The author of this concise, brilliant series of lectures on mathematical methods in quantum mechanics was one of the shining intellects in the field, winning a Nobel prize in 1933 for his pioneering work in the quantum mechanics of the atom. Beyond that, he developed the transformation theory of quantum mechanics (which made it possible to calculate the statistical distribution of certain variables), was one of the major authors of the quantum theory of radiation, codiscovered the Fermi-Dirac statistics, and predicted the existence of the positron.The four lectures in this book were delivered

  4. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    26, 27, 28 February and 1, 2 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Recent Results on CP Violation and B Physics P.F. HARRISON / QMW, London, UK With the advent of the asymmetric B factories in Japan and the US, exciting new results on CP Violation and B Physics are starting to be achieved. In these lectures, we review the existing experimental and phenomenological context of these measurements, we compare and contrast the new experimental facilities and discuss the implications of the recent results on our understanding. Finally we summarise the prospects for future developments.

  5. Lectures on Constrained Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Date, Ghanashyam

    2010-01-01

    These lecture notes were prepared as a basic introduction to the theory of constrained systems which is how the fundamental forces of nature appear in their Hamiltonian formulation. Only a working knowledge of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulation of mechanics is assumed. These notes are based on the set of eight lectures given at the {\\em Refresher Course for College Teachers} held at IMSc during May-June, 2005. These are submitted to the arxiv for an easy access to a wider body of students.

  6. Update for 2014 on clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; López Díaz, Javier; Martín Santana, Antonio; García Pinilla, José Manuel; Gómez Doblas, Juan José; Gómez Bueno, Manuel; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Lambert, José Luis

    2015-04-01

    In the present article, we review publications from the previous year in the following 3 areas: clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation. Among the new developments in clinical cardiology are several contributions from Spanish groups on tricuspid and aortic regurgitation, developments in atrial fibrillation, syncope, and the clinical characteristics of heart disease, as well as various studies on familial heart disease and chronic ischemic heart disease. In geriatric cardiology, the most relevant studies published in 2014 involve heart failure, degenerative aortic stenosis, and data on atrial fibrillation in the geriatric population. In heart failure and transplantation, the most noteworthy developments concern the importance of multidisciplinary units and patients with preserved systolic function. Other notable publications were those related to iron deficiency, new drugs, and new devices and biomarkers. Finally, we review studies on acute heart failure and transplantation, such as inotropic drugs and ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Reconversion of nuclear weapons

    CERN Document Server

    Kapitza, Sergei P

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear predicament or nuclear option. Synopsis of three lectures : 1- The physical basis of nuclear technology. Physics of fission. Chain reaction in reactors and weapons. Fission fragments. Separration of isotopes. Radiochemistry.2- Nuclear reactors with slow and fast neutrons. Power, size, fuel and waste. Plutonium production. Dose rate, shielding and health hazard. The lessons of Chernobyl3- Nuclear weapons. Types, energy, blast and fallout. Fusion and hydrogen bombs. What to do with nuclear weapons when you cannot use them? Testing. Nonmilittary use. Can we get rid of the nuclear weapon? Nuclear proliferation. Is there a nuclear future?

  8. Women in interventional cardiology: The French experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vautrin, E; Marlière, S; Bellemain-Appaix, A; Gilard, M; Manzo-Silberman, S

    2016-12-01

    Exploring the discrepancy in sex-ratio among interventional cardiologists by analysing the population of the female interventionalist. Despite an increase number of women who graduate from medical school in France during the last generation today, women represent only 24% of all cardiologists and 3% are interventional cardiologists. To face this international gender-based issue of interventional cardiology, committees were established in US (WIN) and recently within the EAPCI: the Women EAPCI chaired by Drs Mehilli and Mauri. In France, the Intervention'Elles committee emerged in order to participate in this concern. As a first initiative, the Intervention'Elles group launched an e-survey to obtain information on the population of French female interventional cardiologists, focused on demography, work patterns, maternity and radiation exposure. Mean age is 40 years old (±7,4), 68% are working in large volume center, 28% have also structural interventional activity. Only 40% have left arm coverage. Despite 80% of French female interventional cardiologists wear personal dosimeters only 45% of them have a dosimetry feedback. Interestingly, even if 54% of women have children (mean: 1.9±1) 28% of them report that childbearing had interfered with their career plan. This questionnaire identifies for the first time the women population in interventional cardiology in France and highlights some of the issues encountered in more detail. This first descriptive step would help to develop strategies for attaining gender equality in interventional cardiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Behavioral cardiology: current advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Alan

    2014-07-08

    Growing epidemiological evidence identifies key domains relevant to behavioral cardiology, including health behaviors, emotions, mental mindsets, stress management, social connectedness, and a sense of purpose. Each of these domains exists along a continuum, ranging from positive factors that promote health, to negative factors, which are pathophysiological. To date, there has been relatively little translation of this growing knowledge base into cardiology practice. Four initiatives are proposed to meet this challenge: 1) promulgating greater awareness of the potency of psychosocial risks factors; 2) overcoming a current "artificial divide" between conventional and psychosocial risk factors; 3) developing novel cost-effective interventions using Internet and mobile health applications, group-based counseling, and development of tiered-care behavioral management; and 4) in recognition that "one size does not fit all" with respect to behavioral interventions, developing specialists who can counsel patients in multidisciplinary fashion and use evidence-based approaches for promoting patient motivation and execution of health goals. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Harvey lectures, Series 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botstein, D.; Cech, T.R.; Hille, B.; Lodish, H.F.; Majerus, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Harvey Lecture Series is published annually and provides reviews of research topics in the biomedical sciences. Eight lectures by investigators are included in the volume representing the most recent work in the major laboratories.

  11. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 October LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 10:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 1 Introduction to particle accelerators E.J.N. Wilson / CERN-AC , Head of the CERN Accelerator School This new series of lectures is intended for anyone with a technical or scientific background who would like to become familiar with the principles of accelerator design. It is a complement to last year's course and includes new lectures on present day accelerators, and their applications as well as colliders and neutrino factories. Beam dynamics, which was treated at length in last year's course, has been compressed into one lecture, intended as revision for those who followed earlier courses and an introduction for newcomers to the field. The course should not be missed by those who will attend the CAS Intermediate Accelerator School in Seville. 1-10 10:00 Present-day Accelerators 11:00 - Beam Dynamics 2-10 10:00 Accelerating Cavities 11:00 - Non-linear Dynamics 3-10 10:00 Electron Dynamics 11:00 - ...

  12. Podcasting a Physics Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, James E. R.

    2008-01-01

    The technology of podcasting, or creating audio or video files that can be subscribed to over the Internet, has grown in popularity over the past few years. Many educators have already begun realizing the potential of delivering such customized content, but most efforts have focused on lecture-style humanities courses or multimedia arts courses.…

  13. When Lecturing: Teach!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Warren R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques that can be used to make the lecture method of teaching more effective include using pictures or objects to facilitate memory, using guided fantasies to stimulate students' imagination of processes, and the suggestopedia method for memorizing facts, principles, and vocabulary. (MSE)

  14. Participatory Lecture Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battino, Rubin

    1979-01-01

    The use of participatory lecture demonstrations in the classroom is described. Examples are given for the following topics: chromatography, chemical kinetics, balancing equations, the gas laws, kinetic molecular theory, Henry's law of gas solubility, electronic energy levels in atoms, and translational, vibrational, and rotational energies of…

  15. Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 2 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Wells (CERN) The Higgs Saga at LEP 10:15 - 11:00 G. Cowan (Univ. of London) Introduction to Statistics (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 G. Cowan (Univ. of London) Introduction to Statistics (3/3) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Tuesday 3 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Sphicas (CERN) Trigger and Data Acquisition Systems (1/2) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) From Raw Data to Physics Results (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) G. Cowan (University of London) Discussion Session DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 4 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Sphicas (CERN) Trigger and Data Acquisition Systems (2/2) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) From Raw Data to Physics Results (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) Astroparticle Physics (1/3) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 5 August 09:15 - 10:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) Astroparticle Physics (2/3) 10:15 - 11:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) A...

  16. Optimising Lecture Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst-Christensen, Bo

    the students problems from the educator to the students. By using techniques that put more weight on student participation, cooperation and preparation, I have been able to cut significantly down on the time used for lecturing, allowing more time for student work and reflection. As an example by getting...

  17. When Lecturing: Teach!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Warren R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques that can be used to make the lecture method of teaching more effective include using pictures or objects to facilitate memory, using guided fantasies to stimulate students' imagination of processes, and the suggestopedia method for memorizing facts, principles, and vocabulary. (MSE)

  18. Computer Aided Lecturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meter, Donald E.

    1994-01-01

    Surveyed students taking a natural resource conservation course to determine the effects of computer software that provides tools for creating and managing visual presentations to students. Results indicated that 94% of the respondents believed computer-aided lectures helped them and recommended their continued use; note taking was more effective,…

  19. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/STS 2016 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manesh R; Calhoon, John H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Grantham, James Aaron; Maddox, Thomas M; Maron, David J; Smith, Peter K

    2017-03-06

    The American College of Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, have completed a 2-part revision of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. In prior coronary revascularization AUC documents, indications for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and stable ischemic heart disease were combined into 1 document. To address the expanding clinical indications for coronary revascularization, and in an effort to align the subject matter with the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the new AUC for coronary artery revascularization were separated into 2 documents addressing ACS and stable ischemic heart disease individually. This document presents the AUC for ACS. Clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, presence of clinical instability or ongoing ischemic symptoms, prior reperfusion therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, fractional flow reserve testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios that the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document but employs the recent modifications in the methods for developing AUC, most notably, alterations in the nomenclature for appropriate use categorization. A separate, independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate that revascularization is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario, whereas scores in the mid-range (4 to 6

  20. Usage Reporting on Recorded Lectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, Pierre; Bruggen, Jan van; Jochems, Wim

    2012-01-01

    This study analyses the interactions of students with the recorded lectures. We report on an analysis of students' use of recorded lectures at two Universities in the Netherlands. The data logged by the lecture capture system (LCS) is used and combined with collected survey data. We describe the pro

  1. In Defence of the Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    In response to the lecture format coming under "attack" and being replaced by online materials and smaller tutorials, this paper attempts to offer not only a defence but also to assert that the potential value of the lecture is difficult to replicate through other learning formats. Some of the criticisms against lectures will be…

  2. Training residents/fellows in paediatric cardiology: the Emory experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robert M

    2016-12-01

    Pediatric cardiology fellowship is a very busy time, with new responsibilities, new knowledge, new technology and fast pace. Above and beyond the science and art of pediatric cardiology, we emphasize that our cardiology fellows are in the middle of the "people business", with additional roles and responsibilities as they serve their patients and communities. This manuscript provides insight into these opportunities for our pediatric cardiac professionals.

  3. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 appropriate use criteria for cardiac computed tomography. A report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D; Kramer, Christopher M; Berman, Daniel; Brown, Alan; Chaudhry, Farooq A; Cury, Ricardo C; Desai, Milind Y; Einstein, Andrew J; Gomes, Antoinette S; Harrington, Robert; Hoffmann, Udo; Khare, Rahul; Lesser, John; McGann, Christopher; Rosenberg, Alan; Schwartz, Robert; Shelton, Marc; Smetana, Gerald W; Smith, Sidney C

    2010-11-23

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is frequently considered. The present document is an update to the original CCT/cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) appropriateness criteria published in 2006, written to reflect changes in test utilization, to incorporate new clinical data, and to clarify CCT use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria (1). The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Ninety-three clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of CCT angiography for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with low or intermediate risk or pretest probability for coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, whereas testing in high-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Use of noncontrast computed tomography (CT) for calcium scoring was rated as appropriate within intermediate- and selected low-risk patients. Appropriate applications of CCT are also within the category of cardiac structural and functional evaluation. It is anticipated that these results will have an impact on physician decision making, performance, and reimbursement policy, and that they will help guide future research.

  4. Feynman Lectures on Gravitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borcherds, P

    2003-05-21

    In the early 1960s Feynman lectured to physics undergraduates and, with the assistance of his colleagues Leighton and Sands, produced the three-volume classic Feynman Lectures in Physics. These lectures were delivered in the mornings. In the afternoons Feynman was giving postgraduate lectures on gravitation. This book is based on notes compiled by two students on that course: Morinigo and Wagner. Their notes were checked and approved by Feynman and were available at Caltech. They have now been edited by Brian Hatfield and made more widely available. The book has a substantial preface by John Preskill and Kip Thorne, and an introduction entitled 'Quantum Gravity' by Brian Hatfield. You should read these before going on to the lectures themselves. Preskill and Thorne identify three categories of potential readers of this book. 1. Those with a postgraduate training in theoretical physics. 2. 'Readers with a solid undergraduate training in physics'. 3. 'Admirers of Feynman who do not have a strong physics background'. The title of the book is perhaps misleading: readers in category 2 who think that this book is an extension of the Feynman Lectures in Physics may be disappointed. It is not: it is a book aimed mainly at those in category 1. If you want to get to grips with gravitation (and general relativity) then you need to read an introductory text first e.g. General Relativity by I R Kenyon (Oxford: Oxford University Press) or A Unified Grand Tour of Theoretical Physics by Ian D Lawrie (Bristol: IoP). But there is no Royal Road. As pointed out in the preface and in the introduction, the book represents Feynman's thinking about gravitation some 40 years ago: the lecture course was part of his attempts to understand the subject himself, and for readers in all three categories it is this that makes the book one of interest: the opportunity to observe how a great physicist attempts to tackle some of the hardest challenges of physics

  5. Handouts: making the lecture portable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroenke, K

    1991-01-01

    Previous medical literature on preparing lecture handouts has focused on their use in student education, where as part of a course there is a series of lectures followed by an examination. Conversely, resident and practising physicians usually attend single lectures on individual topics in order to update and improve their clinical skills. Handouts designed for the latter type of lecture can serve as a useful resource in subsequent day-to-day teaching and patient care. This article examines the purpose, distribution, structure, and substance of such handouts. Guidelines to assist the speaker in preparing lecture handouts are discussed.

  6. Recommendations of the European Board for the Specialty Cardiology (EBSC) for education and training in basic cardiology in Europe. The Executive Committee of the European Board for the Specialty Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The Cardiology Monosection of the UEMS and the European Society of Cardiology have created a European Board for the Specialty of Cardiology whose task is to prove guidelines for training and training institutions. The recommendations are presented here and in summary require at least 3 years education and training in basic cardiology (after at least 2 years of a common trunk of general internal medicine) at an approved institution with adequate exposure to all aspects of adult cardiological practice.

  7. Exploring Tablet PC Lectures: Lecturer Experiences and Student Perceptions in Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Julia; Kotsanas, George; Dawson, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Lecturers using tablet PCs with specialised pens can utilise real-time changes in lecture delivery via digital inking. We investigated student perceptions and lecturer experiences of tablet PC lectures in large-enrolment biomedicine subjects. Lecturers used PowerPoint or Classroom Presenter software for lecture preparation and in-lecture pen-based…

  8. Clinical cardiology consultation at non-cardiology departments: stepchild of patient care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellings, D.A.; Symersky, T.; Ottervanger, J.P.; Ramdat Misier, A.R.; Boer, M.J. de

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although patient care in cardiology departments may be of high quality, patients with cardiac disease in other departments tend to receive less attention from cardiologists. Driven by the shorter duration of admission nowadays and the fact that consultations are often performed in

  9. Nuclear War and Science Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Art

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that science-related material on nuclear war be included in introductory courses. Lists nuclear war topics for physics, psychology, sociology, biology/ecology, chemistry, geography, geology/meteorology, mathematics, and medical science. Also lists 11 lectures on nuclear physics which include nuclear war topics. (JN)

  10. The Year in Cardiology 2013: coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbel, Raimund; Wijns, William

    2014-02-01

    The year 2013 was rich of new developments in cardiology, and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in particular. This overview article will focus on contributions in the following areas: training for PCI, appropriateness and indications; access site selection, risk scores, peri-procedural myocardial infarction; trial results and long-term follow-up; PCI for specific patient and lesion subsets, including acute coronary syndrome and ST-segment myocardial infarction; prevention of ischemic and reperfusion injury; stent thrombosis and new coronary stents and scaffolds.

  11. A case study of technology transfer: Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, G.

    1974-01-01

    Research advancements in cardiology instrumentation and techniques are summarized. Emphasis is placed upon the following techniques: (1) development of electrodes which show good skin compatibility and wearer comfort; (2) contourography - a real time display system for showing the results of EKGs; (3) detection of arteriosclerosis by digital computer processing of X-ray photos; (4) automated, noninvasive systems for blood pressure measurement; (5) ultrasonoscope - a noninvasive device for use in diagnosis of aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valve disease; and (6) rechargable cardiac pacemakers. The formation of a biomedical applications team which is an interdisciplinary team to bridge the gap between the developers and users of technology is described.

  12. Caos, complejidad y cardiología

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Lavín,Manuel

    2012-01-01

    La ciencia es una disciplina en constante evolución. La medicina moderna está basada en la ciencia. El paradigma médico vigente es lineal y reduccionista. Existe una nueva teoría general avalada por cálculos computacionales avanzados, la teoría del caos y la complejidad. Esta nueva visión probablemente modificará la práctica de la medicina. La cardiología fue una puerta de entrada de la complejidad, al campo de la medicina. El caos y los fractales son fenómenos frecuentes en la fisiología car...

  13. Lectures on Classical Integrability

    CERN Document Server

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the lectures consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schroedinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin-Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel'fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  14. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    18, 19, 20, 21, 22 November LECTURE FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Telling the Truth with Statistics R. Barlow / Univ. of Manchester, UK This course of lectures will cover probability, distributions, fitting, errors and confidence levels, for practising High Energy Physicists who need to use Statistical techniques to express their results. Concentrating on these appropriate specialist techniques means that they can be covered in appropriate depth, while assuming only the knowledge and experience of a typical Particle Physicist. The different definitions of probability will be explained, and it will be appear why this basic subject is so controversial; there are several viewpoints and it is important to understand them all, rather than abusing the adherents of different beliefs. Distributions will be covered: the situations they arise in, their useful properties, and the amazing result of the Central Limit Theorem. Fitting a parametrisation to a set of data is one of the m...

  15. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    23, 24, 25, 26 and 27 April REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500, on 23 April from 11:15 to 12:15 hrs Searches for Dark Matter F. Feinstein / CPPM, Marseille, F The fact that the mass of the visible stars could not account for the gravitational cohesion of the galaxy clusters was the first manifestation of non-radiating matter in the Universe. Since then, many observations imply that most of the matter is indeed dark. Its nature is still unknown and likely to have several contributions. Recent results indicate that most of it may not be composed of normal matter. These lectures will review the experimental methods, which have been developed to unravel this 70-year long mystery and confront their results with the current theoretical framework of cosmology.

  16. Globe: Lecture series

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The LHC: an accelerator of science This series of lectures is all about understanding the scientific and technological challenges of the phenomenal LHC project and assessing its innovations through their everyday applications. Come and take a sneak preview of the LHC! Communicate: the Grid, a computer of global dimensions François Grey, head of communication in CERN’s Information Technology Department How will it be possible for the 15 million billion bytes of data generated by the LHC every year to be handled and stored by a computer that doesn’t have to be the size of a skyscraper? The computer scientists have the answer: the Grid, which will harness the power of tens of thousands of computers all over the world by creating a network of computers and making them operate as one. >>> Lectures are free and require no specialist knowledge. In french. 
 >>> By reservation only: tel. +41 (0)22 767 76 76

  17. Lectures on instantons

    CERN Document Server

    Vandoren, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    This is a self-contained set of lecture notes on instantons in (super) Yang-Mills theory in four dimensions and in quantum mechanics. First the basics are derived from scratch: the regular and singular one-instanton solutions for Yang-Mills theories with gauge groups SU(2) and SU(N), their bosonic and fermionic zero modes, the path integral instanton measure, and supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories in Euclidean space. Then we discuss applications: the \\theta-angle of QCD, the solution of the U(1) problem, the way Higgs fields solve the large-instanton problem, and tunneling and phase transitions in quantum mechanics and in nonabelian gauge theories. These lecture notes are an extension of a review on Yang-Mills and D-instantons written in 2000 by both authors and A.Belitsky

  18. Lecture 2: Software Security

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Computer security has been an increasing concern for IT professionals for a number of years, yet despite all the efforts, computer systems and networks remain highly vulnerable to attacks of different kinds. Design flaws and security bugs in the underlying software are among the main reasons for this. This lecture addresses the following question: how to create secure software? The lecture starts with a definition of computer security and an explanation of why it is so difficult to achieve. It then introduces the main security principles (like least-privilege, or defense-in-depth) and discusses security in different phases of the software development cycle. The emphasis is put on the implementation part: most common pitfalls and security bugs are listed, followed by advice on best practice for security development, testing and deployment. Sebastian Lopienski is CERN’s deputy Computer Security Officer. He works on security strategy and policies; offers internal consultancy and audit services; develops and ...

  19. Lectures on Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gomberoff, Andres

    2006-01-01

    The 2002 Pan-American Advanced Studies Institute School on Quantum Gravity was held at the Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS),Valdivia, Chile, January 4-14, 2002. The school featured lectures by ten speakers, and was attended by nearly 70 students from over 14 countries. A primary goal was to foster interaction and communication between participants from different cultures, both in the layman’s sense of the term and in terms of approaches to quantum gravity. We hope that the links formed by students and the school will persist throughout their professional lives, continuing to promote interaction and the essential exchange of ideas that drives research forward. This volume contains improved and updated versions of the lectures given at the School. It has been prepared both as a reminder for the participants, and so that these pedagogical introductions can be made available to others who were unable to attend. We expect them to serve students of all ages well.

  20. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 April REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 New Developments in Supersymmetry S. Raby / CERN-TH Introduction to supersymmetric grand unified theories. An introduction to the MSSM and different mechanisms for supersymmetry breaking. Then the details of SU(5) and SO(10) unification, the new gauge sector beyond the standard model, representations of quarks and leptons. Gauge and Yukawa coupling unification and some predictions.

  1. Lectures on knot homology

    CERN Document Server

    Nawata, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We provide various formulations of knot homology that are predicted by string dualities. In addition, we also explain the rich algebraic structure of knot homology which can be understood in terms of geometric representation theory in these formulations. These notes are based on lectures in the workshop "Physics and Mathematics of Link Homology" at Centre de Recherches Math\\'ematiques, Universit\\'e de Montr\\'eal.

  2. Lectures on classical electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Englert, Berthold-Georg

    2014-01-01

    These lecture notes cover classical electrodynamics at the level of advanced undergraduates or postgraduates. There is a strong emphasis on the general features of the electromagnetic field and, in particular, on the properties of electromagnetic radiation. It offers a comprehensive and detailed, as well as self-contained, account of material that can be covered in a one-semester course for students with a solid undergraduate knowledge of basic electricity and magnetism.

  3. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    9, 10 and 11 May REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 10:00 to 12:00 hrs on 9 and 10 May and on 11 May from 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Cosmology and Particle Physics K. Olive / CERN-TH A general overview of the standard big bang model will be presented with special emphasis on astro-particle physics. Specific topics will include: Inflation, Baryoogenesis, Nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter.

  4. B.Gregory Lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    Jacob,M

    1987-01-01

    Troisième série de "Gregory lectures" en mémoire de B.Gregory (1919-1977),DG de 1965 à 1970. La première conférence B.Gregory a été donné par le Prof.V.Weisskopf, son prédécesseur. Chris Greeg (?)de Berkley prend aussi la parole

  5. An LHC Lecture

    CERN Document Server

    Plehn, Tilman

    2009-01-01

    When we try to advance from a solid knowledge of field theory to LHC physics we usually encounter a frustrating problem: in particular Higgs physics and QCD techniques appear as a impenetrable granite block of phenomenological know-how, common lores, and historically grown intuition what works and what does not. I hope this lecture can drill a few holes into the rock and put you into a position to digest advanced writeups as well as some first research papers on the topic.

  6. Lectures for CERN pensioners

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service and the Pensioners Association are pleased to invite CERN pensioners to a series of lectures given by professors and specialists from the Teaching Hospitals and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva on the following topic: PROMOTION OF OPTIMUM BRAIN AGEING The lectures will take place in the Main CERN Auditorium (Building 60) from 2.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. on the following dates: Wednesday 12 November 2008: Assessing the extent of brain ageing Dr Dina ZEKRY Friday 12 December 2008: Can memory decline be prevented? Pr Jean-Pierre MICHEL Thursday 15 January 2009: Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease Pr Gabriel GOLD Wednesday 25 February 2009: What is the brain reserve? Speaker’s name to be announced at a later date The lectures will be given in French, with transparencies in English, and will be followed by a wide-ranging debate with the participants. CERN Medical Service - Pensioners Association - CERN-ESO (GAC-EPA)

  7. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Tracking at the LHC K. Safarik / CERN-EP The lecture will start with a short history of particle tracking in high-energy physics. Then we will concentrate on tracking in the LHC experiments. We will discuss various tracking devices proposed for these experiments, dividing them into two large groups: solid state detectors and gas detectors. Their characteristics, as well as their behaviour in different external conditions (i.e. magnetic field, radiation) will be compared. Furthermore, we will turn to the question: how to design a tracker using these various technologies, what are the essential parameters to be taken into account and we will apply these considerations to the proposed the LHC detectors. The last part of the lecture will be devoted to tracking software. We will mention simulation and concentrate on track finding and reconstruction, reviewing different algorithms prototyped for the LHC experiments. We will ...

  8. Lectures for CERN pensioners

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service and the Pensioners Association are pleased to invite CERN pensioners to a series of lectures given by professors and specialists from the Teaching Hospitals and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva on the following topic: PROMOTION OF OPTIMUM BRAIN AGEING The lectures will take place in the Main CERN Auditorium (Building 60) from 2.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. on the following dates: Wednesday 12 November 2008: Assessing the extent of brain ageing Dr Dina ZEKRY Friday 12 December 2008: Can memory decline be prevented? Pr Jean-Pierre MICHEL Thursday 15 January 2009: Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease Pr Gabriel GOLD Wednesday 25 February 2009: What is the brain reserve? Speaker’s name to be announced at a later date The lectures will be given in French, with transparencies in English, and will be followed by a wide-ranging debate with the participants. CERN Medical Service - Pensioners Association - CERN-ESO (GAC-EPA)

  9. Most recent Web Lectures

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Goldfarb

    Web Archives of ATLAS Plenary Sessions, Workshops, Meetings, and Tutorials recorded over the past two years are available via the University of Michigan portal here. Most recent additions include the ROOT Workshop held at CERN on March 26-27, the Physics Analysis Tools Workshop held in Bergen, Norway on April 23-27, and the CTEQ Workshop: "Physics at the LHC: Early Challenges" held at Michigan State University on May 14-15. Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally. In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal. Suggestions for events or tutorials to record in 2007, as well as feedback on existing archives is always welcome. Please contact us at wlap@umich.edu. Thank you and enjoy the lectures! The Michigan Web Lecture Team Tushar Bhatnagar, Steven Goldfarb, Jeremy Herr, Mitch McLachlan, Homer A....

  10. 1st Guidelines of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology on processes and skills for education in cardiology in Brazil--executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Marcos Roberto de; Mourilhe-Rocha, Ricardo; Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Köhler, Ilmar; Feitosa, Gilson Soares; Schneider, Jamil Cherem; Feitosa-Filho, Gilson Soares; Nicolau, José Carlos; Ferreira, João Fernando Monteiro; Morais, Nelson Siqueira de

    2012-02-01

    This article summarizes the "1st Guidelines of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology on Processes and Skills for Education in Cardiology in Brazil," which can be found in full at: . The guideline establishes the education time required in Internal Medicine and Cardiology with Specialization through theoretical and practical training. These requirements must be available at the center forming Specialists in Cardiology and the Cardiology contents.

  11. Practical application of natriuretic peptides in paediatric cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Julie; Goetze, Jens P; Andersen, Claus B

    2010-01-01

    It is still uncertain if cardiac natriuretic peptides are useful biomarkers in paediatric cardiology. In this review we identify four clinical scenarios in paediatric cardiology, where clinical decision-making can be difficult, and where we feel the paediatric cardiologists need additional...

  12. Practical application of natriuretic peptides in paediatric cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Julie; Goetze, Jens P; Andersen, Claus B

    2010-01-01

    It is still uncertain if cardiac natriuretic peptides are useful biomarkers in paediatric cardiology. In this review we identify four clinical scenarios in paediatric cardiology, where clinical decision-making can be difficult, and where we feel the paediatric cardiologists need additional...

  13. Current research in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in Italy: highlights of the 10th National Congress of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuocolo, A

    2011-06-01

    The 10th National Congress of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (AIMN) took place in Rimini on March 18-21, 2011 under the chairmanship of Professor Stefano Fanti. The program was of excellent quality and put a further step for the settlement of the standardized AIMN congress structure. A large industrial exhibition demonstrated the latest technological innovations and developments within the field. The congress was a great success with more than 1100 total participants and more than 360 abstracts received. Of these, 40 abstracts were accepted for oral and 285 for poster presentations. The original investigations presented were related to different areas of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, with particular focus on advances in instrumentation and data processing, progress in radiochemistry and pharmacy, novel diagnostics and therapeutics, and new insights in well established areas of clinical application, such as oncology, cardiology, neurology, psychiatry, endocrinology, paediatrics, and infection and inflammation. Noteworthy, several presentations at this congress, focusing on quantitative interpretation of the imaging data and on pragmatic endpoints, such as adverse outcomes, identified when nuclear medicine procedures achieved clinical effectiveness for patient care and patient management and further demonstrated that nuclear medicine plays a crucial role in the contemporary medical scenario. This highlights lecture is only a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed, which can be found in much greater detail in the congress abstract book, published as volume 55, supplement 1 of the Q J Nucl Med Mol Imaging in April 2011.

  14. [The origins of the Czech Society of Cardiology and of Czech cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widimský, J

    2013-06-01

    The paper presents the origins of the Czech Society of Cardiology on the one hand, and the origins of Czech cardiology on the other. The Czech Society of Cardiology is the third oldest in the world (after the American and German Societies). It was founded in 1929 by Prof. Libenský. As early as in 1933, the Society organised the first international congress of cardiologists in Prague, which was attended by 200 doctors, out of which 50 were from abroad. The most participants came from France and Poland. Other participants came from England, Argentina, Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, Romania, Spain and Switzerland. The worldwide importance of this congress is apparent from the fact that both the World Society of Cardiology and the European Society of Cardiology (EKS) were founded after World War II in the years 1950 and 1952, i.e. almost 20 years after the first international congress of cardiology in Prague. In 1964, the Fourth Congress of European Society of Cardiology was held in Prague with the participation of 1,500 specialists from 31 countries and chaired by Prof. Pavel Lukl, the later president of EKS (1964- 1968). The paper also presents the work of our specialists in WHO and the history of the international journal Cor et Vasa issued by the Avicenum publishing house in Prague in English and Russian in the years 1958- 1992. An important role in the development of our cardiology was played by certain departments and clinics. In 1951, the Institute for Cardiovascular Research (ÚCHOK) was founded in PrahaKrč, thanks to the initiative of MU Dr. František Kriegl, the Deputy Minister of Health. Its first director was Klement Weber, who published, as early as in 1929, a monograph on arrhythmias -  50 years earlier than arrhythmias started to be at the centre of attention of cardiologists. Klement Weber was one of the doctors of President T. G. Masaryk during his serious disease towards the end of his life. Jan Brod was the deputy of Klement Weber in the

  15. Development of Quality Metrics in Ambulatory Pediatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Devyani; Gurvitz, Michelle; Marelli, Ariane; Anderson, Jeffrey; Baker-Smith, Carissa; Diab, Karim A; Edwards, Thomas C; Hougen, Tom; Jedeikin, Roy; Johnson, Jonathan N; Karpawich, Peter; Lai, Wyman; Lu, Jimmy C; Mitchell, Stephanie; Newburger, Jane W; Penny, Daniel J; Portman, Michael A; Satou, Gary; Teitel, David; Villafane, Juan; Williams, Roberta; Jenkins, Kathy

    2017-02-07

    The American College of Cardiology Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology (ACPC) Section had attempted to create quality metrics (QM) for ambulatory pediatric practice, but limited evidence made the process difficult. The ACPC sought to develop QMs for ambulatory pediatric cardiology practice. Five areas of interest were identified, and QMs were developed in a 2-step review process. In the first step, an expert panel, using the modified RAND-UCLA methodology, rated each QM for feasibility and validity. The second step sought input from ACPC Section members; final approval was by a vote of the ACPC Council. Work groups proposed a total of 44 QMs. Thirty-one metrics passed the RAND process and, after the open comment period, the ACPC council approved 18 metrics. The project resulted in successful development of QMs in ambulatory pediatric cardiology for a range of ambulatory domains. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Basic science of nuclear medicine the bare bone essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Kai H

    2015-01-01

    Through concise, straightforward explanations and supporting graphics that bring abstract concepts to life, the new Basic Science of Nuclear Medicine—the Bare Bone Essentials is an ideal tool for nuclear medicine technologist students and nuclear cardiology fellows looking for an introduction to the fundamentals of the physics and technologies of modern day nuclear medicine.

  17. Three lectures on free probability

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    These are notes from a three-lecture mini-course on free probability given at MSRI in the Fall of 2010 and repeated a year later at Harvard. The lectures were aimed at mathematicians and mathematical physicists working in combinatorics, probability, and random matrix theory. The first lecture was a staged rediscovery of free independence from first principles, the second dealt with the additive calculus of free random variables, and the third focused on random matrix models.

  18. CHEP 1992 Computing in high energy physics videotapes : lectures, CERN, Geneva, 21 Sep 1992

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear predicament or nuclear option - Synopsis of three lectures : 1- The physical basis of nuclear technology. Physics of fission. Chain reaction in reactors and weapons. Fission fragments. Separration of isotopes. Radiochemistry. 2- Nuclear reactors with slow and fast neutrons. Power, size, fuel and waste. Plutonium production. Dose rate, shielding and health hazard. The lessons of Chernobyl. 3- Nuclear weapons. Types, energy, blast and fallout. Fusion and hydrogen bombs. What to do with nuclear weapons when you cannot use them? Testing. Nonmilittary use. Can we get rid of the nuclear weapon? Nuclear proliferation. Is there a nuclear future?

  19. Weak decays. [Lectures, phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojcicki, S.

    1978-11-01

    Lectures are given on weak decays from a phenomenological point of view, emphasizing new results and ideas and the relation of recent results to the new standard theoretical model. The general framework within which the weak decay is viewed and relevant fundamental questions, weak decays of noncharmed hadrons, decays of muons and the tau, and the decays of charmed particles are covered. Limitation is made to the discussion of those topics that either have received recent experimental attention or are relevant to the new physics. (JFP) 178 references

  20. Lectures in Micro Meteorology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling

    This report contains the notes from my lectures on Micro scale meteorology at the Geophysics Department of the Niels Bohr Institute of Copenhagen University. In the period 1993-2012, I was responsible for this course at the University. At the start of the course, I decided that the text books...... available in meteorology at that time did not include enough of the special flavor of micro meteorology that characterized the work of the meteorology group at Risø (presently of the Institute of wind energy of the Danish Technical University). This work was focused on Boundary layer flows and turbulence...

  1. Lectures on quantum chromodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Smilga, Andrei

    2001-01-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is the fundamental theory of strong interactions. It is a physical theory describing Nature. Lectures on Quantum Chromodynamics concentrates, however, not on the phenomenological aspect of QCD; books with comprehensive coverage of phenomenological issues have been written. What the reader will find in this book is a profound discussion on the theoretical foundations of QCD with emphasis on the nonperturbative formulation of the theory: What is gauge symmetry on the classical and on the quantum level? What is the path integral in field theory? How to define the path integ

  2. Lectures on electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    These lecture notes on electromagnetism have evolved from graduate and undergraduate EM theory courses given by the author at the University of Rochester, with the basics presented with clarity and his characteristic attention to detail. The thirteen chapters cover, in logical sequence, topics ranging from electrostatics, magnetostatics and Maxwell's equations to plasmas and radiation. Boundary value problems are treated extensively, as are wave guides, electromagnetic interactions and fields. This second edition comprises many of the topics expanded with more details on the derivation of vari

  3. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    26, 27, 28, 29 and 30 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes T. Damour / IHES, Bures-sur-Yvette, F. Conceptual foundations of General Relativity (GR). Uniqueness of GR. Mathematical framework: tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry, connection, 'spin' connection, curvature, Cartan's form calculus. Hilbert-Einstein action, Einstein equations. Weak gravitational fields. Post Newtonian Approximation. Gravitanional Waves. Exact solutions. Killing vectors. Experimental tests. Black Holes: extensions of the Schwarzschild solution; Kerr-Newman holes; no-hair theorems; energtics of black holes; the membrane approach; quantum mechanics of black holes; Bekenstein entropy; Hawking temperature; black holes and string theory.

  4. Lectures in particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Dan

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this book on particle physics is to present the theory in a simple way. The style and organization of the material is unique in that intuition is employed, not formal theory or the Monte Carlo method. This volume attempts to be more physical and less abstract than other texts without degenerating into a presentation of data without interpretation.This book is based on four courses of lectures conducted at Fermilab. It should prove very useful to advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

  5. Joseph Mountin Lecture

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-26

    In this podcast, William H. Foege, MD, MPH delivers the 29th Annual Joseph W. Mountin Lecture. Dr. Foege was a key leader in the smallpox effort and worked as an epidemiologist in the successful eradication campaign in the 1970s. Dr. Foege became chief of the Smallpox Eradication Program at CDC, and was appointed director of CDC in 1977.  Created: 10/26/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/29/2009.

  6. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. The Lecture's Absent Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciullo, Nick J.

    2017-01-01

    According to the "Oxford English Dictionary" ("OED"), the noun "lecture" dates from the 14th century and means the "action of reading, perusal. Also, that which is read or perused." This definition, while accurate and resonates today in many college classrooms, ignores a key feature of any lecture. The…

  7. Paediatric cardiology: the last 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Malcolm E

    2015-01-01

    In the last half-century, the outlook for children with heart disease has changed dramatically. Morphologists have transformed our understanding of heart defects. Improved imaging methods, such as echocardiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have made diagnostic cardiac catheterisation almost redundant. However, interventional catheterisation has flourished as transcatheter procedures have replaced surgery for many lesions. The ability to pharmacologically manipulate the duct has revolutionised the management of the sick neonate with major heart disease. Better surgical techniques, such as deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest, allow repair of lesions in early infancy before irreversible complications develop. Advances in anaesthesia and intensive care have been integral. New sub-disciplines, such as fetal cardiology and electrophysiology, have emerged. The sum of these numerous developments is enormous. Lesions that were previously considered lethal are now routinely treated. Consequently, the great majority of children with major heart disease now reach adulthood in good health.

  8. Future prospects of pediatric cardiology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Hong-fang; DU Jun-bao

    2010-01-01

    @@ In recent years, great progress has been made in the field of pediatric cardiology in China, including the development of diagnostic techniques and patient management and the elucidation of mechanisms responsible for cardiovascular diseases.1 The standardization of key diagnostic skills and patient management pathways, for example, has been continually improved.At the same time, the pathogenesis of pediatric cardiovascular diseases has been studied in depth,resulting in an increasing body of novel research findings with regard to the mechanisms responsible for these diseases. We must be aware, however, that great effort still needs to be made to further explore new diagnostic and treatment strategies and reveal the mysteries of cardiovascular diseases.

  9. [Cardiology in the Morgagni's anatomo pathological work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo; Iturralde, Pedro; Aranda Fraustro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    In the XVIII century, under the influence of the "systematic spirit", characteristic of the Enlightenment age, pathological anatomy was systematized in the Morgagni's fundamental treatise De sedibus et causis morborum per anatomen indagatis, published as letters in 1761. Certain biographical data of the author are reported here as well as some his more important contributions to cardiology such as the Morgagni's, Adams', Stokes' syndrome. His points of view on sudden death and his observations on post-infarct myocardial rupture, are related also. In his global evaluation of these facts, the speculative approach always predominates. Indeed, in these anatomist's works, we find a good example of the application of epistemologic principles to the medical field.

  10. Application of Contrast Echocardiography in Invasive Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Bulut

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Contrast echocardiography by rendering better imaging of the borders of cardiac chambers is a useful tool for evaluating cardiac function, mass, myocardial vascularization, microvascular structure (small vessel vasculature and viability. Contrast was first started to be used for patients with suboptimal image quality. It can be used in detecting defects in myocardial blood supply in patients with chest pain and determining the success of interventionalprocedures. It can also be of help in demonstrating myocardial viability after reperfusion treatment in patients who had myocardial infarction. It is expected to be used more widely in invasive cardiology for decision making, guiding and determining the success of the procedures. Advances in imaging techniques , development of contrast materials for evaluation of left system, contrast echocardiography may become a routine clinical practice.

  11. Lectures on Yangian symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loebbert, Florian

    2016-08-01

    In these introductory lectures we discuss the topic of Yangian symmetry from various perspectives. Forming the classical counterpart of the Yangian and an extension of ordinary Noether symmetries, first the concept of nonlocal charges in classical, two-dimensional field theory is reviewed. We then define the Yangian algebra following Drinfel’d's original motivation to construct solutions to the quantum Yang-Baxter equation. Different realizations of the Yangian and its mathematical role as a Hopf algebra and quantum group are discussed. We demonstrate how the Yangian algebra is implemented in quantum, two-dimensional field theories and how its generators are renormalized. Implications of Yangian symmetry on the two-dimensional scattering matrix are investigated. We furthermore consider the important case of discrete Yangian symmetry realized on integrable spin chains. Finally we give a brief introduction to Yangian symmetry in planar, four-dimensional super Yang-Mills theory and indicate its impact on the dilatation operator and tree-level scattering amplitudes. These lectures are illustrated by several examples, in particular the two-dimensional chiral Gross-Neveu model, the Heisenberg spin chain and { N }=4 superconformal Yang-Mills theory in four dimensions.

  12. Lectures on Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Basdevant, Jean-Louis

    2007-01-01

    Beautifully illustrated and engagingly written, Lectures on Quantum Mechanics presents theoretical physics with a breathtaking array of examples and anecdotes. Basdevant's style is clear and stimulating, in the manner of a brisk classroom lecture that students can follow with ease and enjoyment. Here is a sample of the book's style, from the opening of Chapter 1: "If one were to ask a passer-by to quote a great formula of physics, chances are that the answer would be 'E = mc2'. Nevertheless, the formula 'E=hV' which was written in the same year 1905 by the same Albert Einstein, and which started quantum theory, concerns their daily life considerably more. In fact, of the three watershed years for physics toward the beginning of the 20th century - 1905: the Special Relativity of Einstein, Lorentz and Poincaré; 1915: the General Relativity of Einstein, with its extraordinary reflections on gravitation, space and time; and 1925: the full development of Quantum Mechanics - it is surely the last which has the mos...

  13. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 5 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (1/3) 10:15-12:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (3&4/4) Tuesday 6 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (2/3) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (1/3) 11:15-12:00 R. JACOBSEN / T. NAKADA Discussion Session Wednesday 7 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (3/3) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (2/3) 11:15-12:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (1/4) 14:00-16:00 C. BENVENUTI Basic Science, Society, and Technological Innovation (Council Chamber, bldg. 503) Thursday 8 August 09:15-10:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (2/4) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (3/3) 11:15-12:00 J. CARR / J. LESGOURDES Discussion Session Friday 9 August 09:15-11:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (3&4/4) 11:15-12:00 C. JARLSKOG Historic Lecture 14:00-16:00 Course Review Monday 12 August 09:15-12:00 Students Sessi...

  14. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 P. WELLS Discussion Session 14:00 - 16:00 R. ASSMANN The CLIC Concept for a Future Particle Collider at the Energy Frontier Tuesday 30 July 09:15 - 10:00 F. ANTINORI Heavy Ions (1/2) 10:15 - 12:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (1&2/4) Wednesday 31 July  09:15 - 10:00 F. ANTINORI Heavy Ions (2/2) 10:15 - 11:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. DYDAK / F. ANTINORI Discussion Session Thursday 1 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (1/4) 10:15 - 11:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. BEDESCHI Experimental test of the SM Tevatron (1/2) Friday 2 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (2/4) 10:15 ? 11:00 F. BEDESCHI Experimental test of the SM Tevatron (2/2) 11:15 ? 12:00 F. BEDESCHI / T. NAKADA Di...

  15. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    14, 15 and 16 May REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 14, 15 May from 10:00 to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 16 May from 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Council Chamber, bldg 503 Modern Signal Processing: Wavelets vs. Fourier M. Vetterli / EPFL, Lausanne, CH and UC Berkeley Wavelets have established themselves as an important tool in modern signal processing as well as in applied mathematics. This is linked to several facts, among others: i. New theoretical advances have been achieved, like new forms of 4 time-frequency bases for signal analysis. ii. Efficient computational algorithms are available. iii. Many applications either used similar ideas, like for example the concept of multiresolution, or took advantage of the unified framework provided by wavelets. This combination of elegant theory, efficient algorithms, and successful applications makes the field of wavelets and signal processing quite exciting. It is the purpose of these lectures to establish the theory necessary to understand wavelets and related construct...

  16. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    14, 15 and 16 May REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 14, 15 May from 10:00 to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 16 May from 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Council Chamber, bldg 503 Modern Signal Processing: Wavelets vs. Fourier M. Vetterli / EPFL, Lausanne, CH and UC Berkeley Wavelets have established themselves as an important tool in modern signal processing as well as in applied mathematics. This is linked to several facts, among others: New theoretical advances have been achieved, like new forms of 4 time-frequency bases for signal analysis. Efficient computational algorithms are available. Many applications either used similar ideas, like for example the concept of multiresolution, or took advantage of the unified framework provided by wavelets. This combination of elegant theory, efficient algorithms, and successful applications makes the field of wavelets and signal processing quite exciting. It is the purpose of these lectures to establish the theory necessary to understand wavelets and related constructions. A...

  17. Surviving Lecture: A Pedagogical Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Whitney

    2008-01-01

    Lecture is the approach traditionally used to teach music theory courses. Although efficient in the delivery of large amounts of information in a short period of time, lecture lacks the effectiveness of an active learning approach. "Theory Survivor" is a unique cooperative-learning method based on the Student Teams-Achievement Divisions technique…

  18. La lecture à voix haute

    OpenAIRE

    Victoria Reyzabal, Maria

    2015-01-01

    La lecture à voix haute apparaît comme une technique pour la compréhension active des textes, elle ajoute d’autres possibilités de compréhension à la lecture silencieuse et peut préparer à des pratiques créatives et des productions personnelles.

  19. Career choices for cardiology: cohort studies of UK medical graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Fay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiology is one of the most popular of the hospital medical specialties in the UK. It is also a highly competitive specialty in respect of the availability of higher specialty training posts. Our aims are to describe doctors’ early intentions about seeking careers in cardiology, to report on when decisions about seeking a career in cardiology are made, to compare differences between men and women doctors in the choice of cardiology, and to compare early career choices with later specialty destinations. Methods Questionnaire surveys were sent to all UK medical graduates in selected qualification years from 1974–2009, at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 years after graduation. Results One year after graduation, the percentage of doctors specifying cardiology as their first choice of long-term career rose from the mid-1990s from 2.4% (1993 cohort to 4.2% (2005 cohort but then fell back to 2.7% (2009 cohort. Men were more likely to give cardiology as their first choice than women (eg 4.1% of men and 1.9% of women in the 2009 cohort. The percentage of doctors who gave cardiology as their first choice of career declined between years one and five after qualification: the fall was more marked for women. 34% of respondents who specified cardiology as their sole first choice of career one year post-graduation were later working in cardiology. 24% of doctors practising as cardiologists several years after qualification had given cardiology as their sole first choice in year one. The doctors’ ‘domestic circumstances’ were a relatively unimportant influence on specialty choice for aspiring cardiologists, while ‘enthusiasm/commitment’, ‘financial prospects’, ‘experiences of the job so far’ and ‘a particular teacher/department’ were important. Conclusions Cardiology grew as a first preference one year after graduation to 2005 but is now falling. It consistently attracts a higher percentage of men than women doctors. The

  20. Career choices for cardiology: cohort studies of UK medical graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Fay; Lambert, Trevor W; Pitcher, Alex; Goldacre, Michael J

    2013-01-25

    Cardiology is one of the most popular of the hospital medical specialties in the UK. It is also a highly competitive specialty in respect of the availability of higher specialty training posts. Our aims are to describe doctors' early intentions about seeking careers in cardiology, to report on when decisions about seeking a career in cardiology are made, to compare differences between men and women doctors in the choice of cardiology, and to compare early career choices with later specialty destinations. Questionnaire surveys were sent to all UK medical graduates in selected qualification years from 1974-2009, at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 years after graduation. One year after graduation, the percentage of doctors specifying cardiology as their first choice of long-term career rose from the mid-1990s from 2.4% (1993 cohort) to 4.2% (2005 cohort) but then fell back to 2.7% (2009 cohort). Men were more likely to give cardiology as their first choice than women (eg 4.1% of men and 1.9% of women in the 2009 cohort). The percentage of doctors who gave cardiology as their first choice of career declined between years one and five after qualification: the fall was more marked for women. 34% of respondents who specified cardiology as their sole first choice of career one year post-graduation were later working in cardiology. 24% of doctors practising as cardiologists several years after qualification had given cardiology as their sole first choice in year one. The doctors' 'domestic circumstances' were a relatively unimportant influence on specialty choice for aspiring cardiologists, while 'enthusiasm/commitment', 'financial prospects', 'experiences of the job so far' and 'a particular teacher/department' were important. Cardiology grew as a first preference one year after graduation to 2005 but is now falling. It consistently attracts a higher percentage of men than women doctors. The correspondence between early choice and later destination was not particularly strong for

  1. Lecture Notes: Approximate Molecular Orbital Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Lecture Notes for the introductory course "Quantum Chemistry & Spectroscopy" (Dept. Science, Roskilde University)......Lecture Notes for the introductory course "Quantum Chemistry & Spectroscopy" (Dept. Science, Roskilde University)...

  2. Lectures on LHC physics

    CERN Document Server

    Plehn, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    With the discovery of the Higgs boson, the LHC experiments have closed the most important gap in our understanding of fundamental interactions, confirming that such interactions between elementary particles can be described by quantum field theory, more specifically by a renormalizable gauge theory. This theory is a priori valid for arbitrarily high energy scales and does not require an ultraviolet completion. Yet, when trying to apply the concrete knowledge of quantum field theory to actual LHC physics - in particular to the Higgs sector and certain regimes of QCD - one inevitably encounters an intricate maze of phenomenological know-how, common lore and other, often historically developed intuitions about what works and what doesn’t. These lectures cover three aspects to help understand LHC results in the Higgs sector and in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model: they discuss the many facets of Higgs physics, which is at the core of this significantly expanded second edition; then QCD, to the deg...

  3. TASI Lectures on Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    In a series of five lectures I review inflationary cosmology. I begin with a description of the initial conditions problems of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology and then explain how inflation, an early period of accelerated expansion, solves these problems. Next, I describe how inflation transforms microscopic quantum fluctuations into macroscopic seeds for cosmological structure formation. I present in full detail the famous calculation for the primordial spectra of scalar and tensor fluctuations. I then define the inverse problem of extracting information on the inflationary era from observations of cosmic microwave background fluctuations. The current observational evidence for inflation and opportunities for future tests of inflation are discussed. Finally, I review the challenge of relating inflation to fundamental physics by giving an account of inflation in string theory.

  4. Lectures on Yangian Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Loebbert, Florian

    2016-01-01

    In these introductory lectures we discuss the topic of Yangian symmetry from various perspectives. Forming the classical counterpart of the Yangian and an extension of ordinary Noether symmetries, first the concept of nonlocal charges in classical, two-dimensional field theory is reviewed. We then define the Yangian algebra following Drinfeld's original motivation to construct solutions to the quantum Yang-Baxter equation. Different realizations of the Yangian and its mathematical role as a Hopf algebra and quantum group are discussed. We demonstrate how the Yangian algebra is implemented in quantum, two-dimensional field theories and how its generators are renormalized. Implications of Yangian symmetry on the two-dimensional scattering matrix are investigated. We furthermore consider the important case of discrete Yangian symmetry realized on integrable spin chains. Finally we give a brief introduction to Yangian symmetry in planar, four-dimensional super Yang-Mills theory and indicate its impact on the dila...

  5. Lectures on amenability

    CERN Document Server

    Runde, Volker

    2002-01-01

    The notion of amenability has its origins in the beginnings of modern measure theory: Does a finitely additive set function exist which is invariant under a certain group action? Since the 1940s, amenability has become an important concept in abstract harmonic analysis (or rather, more generally, in the theory of semitopological semigroups). In 1972, B.E. Johnson showed that the amenability of a locally compact group G can be characterized in terms of the Hochschild cohomology of its group algebra L^1(G): this initiated the theory of amenable Banach algebras. Since then, amenability has penetrated other branches of mathematics, such as von Neumann algebras, operator spaces, and even differential geometry. Lectures on Amenability introduces second year graduate students to this fascinating area of modern mathematics and leads them to a level from where they can go on to read original papers on the subject. Numerous exercises are interspersed in the text.

  6. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 October LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 10:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Introduction to Field Theory R. Kleiss / University of Nijmegen, NL Starting from the notion of path integrals as developed by Feynman, we discuss field theory in zero spacetime dimensions. The concepts of perturbation expansions, connected amplitudes, Feynman diagrams, classical solutions, renormalization and the effective action are developed. The model is extended to four spacetime dimensions, and the full Feynman rules for relativisitc scalar theory derived. The S matrix and the concept of unitarity are discussed, leading to the amputation rules for S matrix elements from considerations of unitarity. The rules are extended to include particles with spin-1/2 and spin-1. The high-energy behaviour of the theory is discussed as a method to derive the gauge symmetry of the various models.

  7. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    11, 12, 13, 14 and 15 June REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 What have we learned from LEP J. Ellis / CERN-TH The basic formalism of the Standard Model will be reviewed, and the limited state of our knowledge before the start-up of LEP will be recalled. Neutrino counting at LEP will be compared with astrophysical and cosmological constraints. The interpretation of precision electroweak data will be discussed, including their predictions for the top quark and the Higgs boson, and the hints they offer for the future direction beyond the Standard Model: probably a weakly-interacting theory that may be extrapolated up to a grand unification scale. Topics in QCD and heavy-flavour physics will be discussed briefly, and topics in W physics at greater length. Direct LEP searches for the Higgs boson and supersymmetric particles will be discussed, and the prospects for their discoveries at future accelerators will be previewed.

  8. Lecture on Thermal Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    2006-01-01

    This lecture will cover solar thermal radiation, particularly as it relates to the high energy solar processes that are the subject of this summer school. After a general review of thermal radiation from the Sun and a discussion of basic definitions, the various emission and absorption mechanisms will be described including black-body emission, bremsstrahlung, free-bound, and atomic line emissions of all kinds. The bulk of the time will be spent discussing the observational characteristics of thermal flare plasma and what can be learned about the flare energy release process from observations of the thermal radiation at all wavelengths. Information that has been learned about the morphology, temperature distribution, and composition of the flare plasma will be presented. The energetics of the thermal flare plasma will be discussed in relation to the nonthermal energy of the particles accelerated during the flare. This includes the total energy, the radiated and conductive cooling processes, and the total irradiated energy.

  9. Lectures on algebraic statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Drton, Mathias; Sullivant, Seth

    2009-01-01

    How does an algebraic geometer studying secant varieties further the understanding of hypothesis tests in statistics? Why would a statistician working on factor analysis raise open problems about determinantal varieties? Connections of this type are at the heart of the new field of "algebraic statistics". In this field, mathematicians and statisticians come together to solve statistical inference problems using concepts from algebraic geometry as well as related computational and combinatorial techniques. The goal of these lectures is to introduce newcomers from the different camps to algebraic statistics. The introduction will be centered around the following three observations: many important statistical models correspond to algebraic or semi-algebraic sets of parameters; the geometry of these parameter spaces determines the behaviour of widely used statistical inference procedures; computational algebraic geometry can be used to study parameter spaces and other features of statistical models.

  10. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    21, 22, 23 November LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 11:00 hrs - Council Chamber bldg. 503 on 21 November Auditorium, bldg 500 on 22, 23 November Introduction to symmetry breaking phenomena in physics E. Brezin / ENS, Paris, F. The notion of broken symmetries started slowly to emerge in the 19th century. The early studies of Pasteur on the parity asymmetry of life, the studies of Curie on piezoelectricity and on the symmetries of effects versus the symmetry of causes (which clearly excluded spontaneous symmetry breaking), are important historical landmarks. However the possibility of spontaneous symmetry breaking within the usual principles of statistical mechanics, waited for the work of Peierls and Onsager. The whole theory of phase transitions and critical phenomena, as well as the construction of field theoretic models as long distance limit of yet unknown physics, relies nowadays on the concept of criticality associated to spontaneous symmetry breaking. The phenomena of Goldstone bosons, of Meissn...

  11. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    19, 20, 21, 22 and 23 February REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - 19, 20 and 21 February Main Auditorium bldg. 500, 22 and 23 February Council Chamber, bldg 503 Introduction to Cryogenic Engineering J.G. Weisend / SLAC, Stanford, USA Cryogenic engineering is an important speciality at CERN. With the construction of LHC, this technology will have an even greater impact on machine operations. The goal of the course is to give people not working in cryogenics an appreciation of the basic principals and problems associated with the field. The course will also provide a foundation for future learning in cryogenics. Topics to be covered will include: properties of cryogenic fluids and materials, refrigeration, cryostat design, instrumentation, safety and propertiesof He II. Examples of working cryogenic systems, many of them from high energy physics, will be presented.

  12. Lecture critique de Luttwak

    OpenAIRE

    Guichaoua, Mickaël

    2016-01-01

    La grande stratégie de l’Empire romain d’Edward Luttwak, qui fut conseiller militaire du président Reagan, parut pour la première fois en 1974 mais ne fut éditée en français qu’en 1989. Cet ouvrage connaît toujours un grand succès dans les milieux universitaires et particulièrement chez les étudiants. Cette lecture entre dans le cadre de nos préoccupations sur le dialogue militaire entre Anciens et Modernes, sinon les contemporains. En effet, Luttwak explique, dans son introduction, qu’«  il ...

  13. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 October LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 10:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Introduction to Field Theory R. Kleiss / University of Nijmegen, NL Starting from the notion of path integrals as developed by Feynman, we discuss field theory in zero spacetime dimensions. The concepts of perturbation expansions, connected amplitudes, Feynman diagrams, classical solutions, renormalization and the effective action are developed. The model is extended to four spacetime dimensions, and the full Feynman rules for relativisitc scalar theory derived. The S matrix and the concept of unitarity are discussed, leading to the amputation rules for S matrix elements from considerations of unitarity. The rules are extended to include particles with spin-1/2 and spin-1. The high-energy behaviour of the theory is discussed as a method to derive the gauge symmetry of the various models.

  14. Göttingen Lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Woyczyński, Wojbor A

    1998-01-01

    These lecture notes are woven around the subject of Burgers' turbulence/KPZ model of interface growth, a study of the nonlinear parabolic equation with random initial data. The analysis is conducted mostly in the space-time domain, with less attention paid to the frequency-domain picture. However, the bibliography contains a more complete information about other directions in the field which over the last decade enjoyed a vigorous expansion. The notes are addressed to a diverse audience, including mathematicians, statisticians, physicists, fluid dynamicists and engineers, and contain both rigorous and heuristic arguments. Because of the multidisciplinary audience, the notes also include a concise exposition of some classical topics in probability theory, such as Brownian motion, Wiener polynomial chaos, etc.

  15. Pediatric cardiology. Clinical and practical experiences with heart diseases of children, juveniles and young adults; Kinderkardiologie. Klinik und Praxis der Herzerkrankungen bei Kindern, Jugendlichen und jungen Erwachsenen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Nikolaus A. [Herz- und Diabeteszentrum NRW, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany). Klinik fuer angeborene Herzfehler; Kleideiter, Ulrich [Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Coesfeld (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The book on pediatric cardiology covers the following chapters: (I) Fundamentals and diagnostics: pediatric cardiologic anamnesis, electrocardiograms, thorax X-radiography, MRT and CT of the heart, nuclear medical diagnostics, exercise tests, heart catheter examination, electrophysiological tests. (II) Leading symptoms: Cyanosis, cardiac murmur, thorax pain, palpitation, syncopes. (III) Disease pictures: congenital heart defects, acquired heart defects, cardiomyopathies, heart rhythm disturbances, heart insufficiency, arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, other heart involving syndromes. (IV) Therapy: Catheter interventional therapy, post-surgical pediatric cardiac therapy, surgery involving the life-support machine, mechanical cardiovascular support systems, initial treatment of newborns with critical heart defects, heart transplantation, vaccination of children with heart diseases, medicinal therapy.

  16. Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses for Cardiology Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Munes; Alahdab, Fares; Alsaied, Tarek

    2016-07-01

    Participating in a scholarly activity is one of the training requirements for cardiology fellows. However, it can be very challenging to complete a research project during such a busy period of clinical training. To help the cardiology fellows in choosing and starting off a research project, a light has been shed on the process of conducting a systematic review, and the importance of this research activity, as well as its limitations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY, AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION AND EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY GUIDELINES (2006 FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION (ENDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fuster

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A report of the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines and the European Society of Cardiology Committee for practice guidelines.

  18. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY, AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION AND EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY GUIDELINES (2006 FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION (ENDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fuster

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A report of the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines and the European Society of Cardiology Committee for practice guidelines.

  19. Electrocardiographic interpretation skills of cardiology residents: are they competent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, Matthew; Davies, Edward G; Dorian, Paul; Yu, Eric H C

    2014-12-01

    Achieving competency at electrocardiogram (ECG) interpretation among cardiology subspecialty residents has traditionally focused on interpreting a target number of ECGs during training. However, there is little evidence to support this approach. Further, there are no data documenting the competency of ECG interpretation skills among cardiology residents, who become de facto the gold standard in their practice communities. We tested 29 Cardiology residents from all 3 years in a large training program using a set of 20 ECGs collected from a community cardiology practice over a 1-month period. Residents interpreted half of the ECGs using a standard analytic framework, and half using their own approach. Residents were scored on the number of correct and incorrect diagnoses listed. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 58%. Of 6 potentially life-threatening diagnoses, residents missed 36% (123 of 348) including hyperkalemia (81%), long QT (52%), complete heart block (35%), and ventricular tachycardia (19%). Residents provided additional inappropriate diagnoses on 238 ECGs (41%). Diagnostic accuracy was similar between ECGs interpreted using an analytic framework vs ECGs interpreted without an analytic framework (59% vs 58%; F(1,1333) = 0.26; P = 0.61). Cardiology resident proficiency at ECG interpretation is suboptimal. Despite the use of an analytic framework, there remain significant deficiencies in ECG interpretation among Cardiology residents. A more systematic method of addressing these important learning gaps is urgently needed. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Oskar Klein Memorial Lectures

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    The Oskar Klein Memorial Lectures, instituted in 1988 and supported by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences through its Nobel Committee for Physics, are given at Stockholm University in Sweden, where Oskar Klein was professor in Theoretical Physics 1930-1962.Volume 1 contains the 1988 lectures on "Symmetry and Physics" and "From the Bethe-Hulthén Hypothesis to the Yang-Baxter Equation," given by C N Yang, Nobel Prize winner (1957) and professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. The 1989 lectures on "Beyond the Standard Models," referring to models for cosmology and elementar

  1. Speculative Considerations about Some Cardiology Enigmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa; Schmidt, Andre; Arcêncio, Livia; Marin-Neto, José Antonio

    2017-03-17

    Write a review text or point-of-view that takes into account the interests, if not of all, but of most readers of a scientific journal is an arduous task. The editorial can be grounded in published articles, even in a single article of undeniable importance and, it can also represent a trend of specialty. Therefore, especially for the sake of the reader's motivation, the present text was freely designed to discuss some cardiology enigmas in the context of the heart valve and coronary artery disease (CAD). Concerning the CAD five well-known enigmas will be considered: 1) The absence of arteriosclerosis in intramyocardial coronary arteries; 2) The unique and always confirmed superior evolution of the left internal thoracic artery as a coronary graft; 3) The prophylactic left internal thoracic artery graft in mildly-stenosed coronary lesions, and; 4) The high incidence of perioperative atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with CAD, and; 5) The handling of disease-free saphenous vein graft at the time of reoperation. Concerning the cardiac valve disease these enigmas topics will be discussed: 1) Why some young patients present acute pulmonary edema as the first sign of mitral stenosis, and other patients with significant hemodynamic changes are mildly symptomatic or asymptomatic, and; 2) The enigma of aortic stenosis protection against CAD.

  2. Human gene therapy and imaging: cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Joseph C. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Yla-Herttuala, Seppo [University of Kuopio, A.I.Virtanen Institute, Kuopio (Finland)

    2005-12-01

    This review discusses the basics of cardiovascular gene therapy, the results of recent human clinical trials, and the rapid progress in imaging techniques in cardiology. Improved understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of coronary heart disease has made gene therapy a potential new alternative for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Experimental studies have established the proof-of-principle that gene transfer to the cardiovascular system can achieve therapeutic effects. First human clinical trials provided initial evidence of feasibility and safety of cardiovascular gene therapy. However, phase II/III clinical trials have so far been rather disappointing and one of the major problems in cardiovascular gene therapy has been the inability to verify gene expression in the target tissue. New imaging techniques could significantly contribute to the development of better gene therapeutic approaches. Although the exact choice of imaging modality will depend on the biological question asked, further improvement in image resolution and detection sensitivity will be needed for all modalities as we move from imaging of organs and tissues to imaging of cells and genes. (orig.)

  3. Occupational eye dose in interventional cardiology procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Yoshihiro; Chida, Koichi; Kaga, Yuji; Sota, Masahiro; Meguro, Taiichiro; Zuguchi, Masayuki

    2017-04-03

    It is important to measure the radiation dose [3-mm dose equivalent, Hp(3)] in the eye. This study was to determine the current occupational radiation eye dose of staff conducting interventional cardiology procedures, using a novel direct eye dosimeter. We measured the occupational eye dose [Hp(3)] in physicians and nurses in a catheterization laboratory for 6-months. The eye doses [Hp(3)] of 12 physicians (9 with Pb glasses, 3 without), and 11 nurses were recorded using a novel direct eye dosimeter, the DOSIRIS(TM). We placed dosimeters above and under the glasses. We also estimated the eye dose [0.07-mm dose equivalent] using a neck personal dosimeter. The eye doses among interventional staff ranked in the following order: physicians without Pb glasses > physicians with Pb glasses > nurses. The shielding effect of the glasses (0.07-mm Pb) in a clinical setting was approximately 60%. In physicians who do not wear Pb glasses, the eye dose may exceed the new regulatory limit for IR staff. We found good correlations between the neck dosimeter dose and eye dosimeter dose (inside or outside glasses, R(2) = 0.93 and R(2) = 0.86, respectively) in physicians. We recommend that interventional physicians use an eye dosimeter for correct evaluation of the lens dose.

  4. Preliminary reference levels in interventional cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neofotistou, V. [Department of Medical Physics, Regional Athens General Hospital, 154 Mesogion Avenue, 11527, Athens (Greece); Vano, E. [Department of Medical Physics, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Padovani, R. [Servizio di Fisica Medica, Ospedale S. Maria della Misericordia, Udine (Italy); Kotre, J.; Willis, S. [Department of Regional Medical Physics, Newcastle General Hospital, Newcastle (United Kingdom); Dowling, A. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, St. James' s Hospital and Haughton Institute, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Toivonen, M. [STUK, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinski (Finland); Kottou, S. [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, Athens University, Athens (Greece); Tsapaki, V. [Department of Bioengineering, Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center, Athens (Greece); Bernardi, G. [Unita Operativa de Cardiologia, Ospedale S. Maria d. Misericordia, Udine (Italy); Faulkner, K. [Quality Assurance Reference Center, Newcastle General Hospital, Newcastle (United Kingdom)

    2003-10-01

    This article describes the European DIMOND approach to defining reference levels (RLs) for radiation doses delivered to patients during two types of invasive cardiology procedures, namely coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Representative centres of six European countries recorded patients' doses in terms of dose-area product (DAP), fluoroscopy time and number of radiographic exposures, using X-ray equipment that has been subject to constancy testing. In addition, a DAP trigger level for cardiac procedures which should alert the operator to possible skin injury, was set to 300 Gy x cm{sup 2}. The estimation of maximum skin dose was recommended in the event that a DAP trigger level was likely to be exceeded. The proposed RLs for CA and PTCA were for DAP 45 Gy x cm{sup 2} and 75 Gy x cm{sup 2}, for fluoroscopy time 7.5 min and 17 min and for number of frames 1250 and 1300, respectively. The proposed RLs should be considered as a first approach to help in the optimisation of these procedures. More studies are required to establish certain ''tolerances'' from the proposed levels taking into account the complexity of the procedure and the patient's size. (orig.)

  5. The contributions of Carl Ludwig to cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, H G

    1999-03-01

    The basic instruments for measuring functional cardiovascular parameters and the most important discoveries made by Carl Ludwig and his disciples in cardiovascular physiology are described and put into perspective in regard to the further development of his methods and ideas. The most important apparatus was the kymograph, which, for the first time, made recording and documenting of functional parameters possible. This instrument was also used for the functional evaluation of the isolated perfused frog heart that was developed by Elias Cyon in Ludwig's Leipzig Physiological Institute. In the isolated frog heart, important phenomena were discovered such as the staircase ('Treppe'), the absolute refractory period and the all-or-none law of the heart. The isolated dog heart was used to determine the origin of the first heart sound, which was characterized as a muscle tone. To measure regional blood flow and eventually cardiac output, a flowmeter ('Stromuhr') was designed. Precise measurements of cardiac output became possible only when Adolf Fick had developed his principle, which served as the basis for the modern indicator methods. Cyon and Ludwig also discoverd the depressor nerve, which constitutes the basis of the baroreceptor reflex. Finally, the precise localization of the vasomotor centre in the ventrolateral medulla was achieved in Ludwig's Leipzig Physiological Institute. This was confirmed more than 100 years later with modern neuroanatomical methods making use of retrograde axonal transport. Thus, Ludwig and his scholars made major substantial contributions to cardiovascular knowledge that can be considered to constitute the basis of modern cardiology.

  6. To Lecture or Not to Lecture? That is the Question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oja, Kenneth John; Kelly, Lesly

    2016-01-01

    A quasi-experimental mixed-methods study compared the effects of an unfolding case study with lecture in a nursing orientation class on new graduate registered nurses' knowledge, perceived learning, and satisfaction with the instructional method. Although results showed that the unfolding case study was engaging, learners who received content in a lecture format achieved significantly higher posttest scores. Nursing professional development specialists will find this article helpful when considering instructional methods for new graduate registered nurses.

  7. Detection of nuclear radiations; Deteccion de Radiaciones nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanarro Sanz, A.

    1967-07-01

    A summary of the lectures about the ordinary detectors of nuclear radiations explained by the author in the courses of Nuclear Engineering held at the J.E.N. up to the date of publication is given. Those lectures are considered to be a necessary introduction to Nuclear Instrumentation and Applied Electronics to Nuclear Engineering so it has been intended to underline those characteristics of radiation detectors that must be taken in consideration in choosing or designing the electronic equipment associated to them in order to take advantage of each detector possibilities. (Author)

  8. Detection of nuclear radiations; Detectores de radiaciones nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanarro Sanz, A.

    1959-07-01

    A summary of the lectures about the ordinary detectors of nuclear radiations given by the author in the Courses of Introduction to Nuclear Engineering held at the JEN up to the date of publication is given. Those lectures are considered to be a necessary introduction to Nuclear Instrumentation and Applied electronics to Nuclear Engineering so it has been intent to underline those characteristics of radiation detectors that must be taken in consideration in choosing or designing the electronic equipment associated to them in order to take advantage of each detector possibilities. (Author) 8 refs.

  9. The Oskar Fehr Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J S

    2016-06-01

    The first Oskar Fehr lecture is given in honour of Professor Fehr, a well respected ophthalmologist, who was head physician of the Department of Eye Diseases at the Rudolf Virchow Hospital from 1918. He practiced there until 1938, when he was forbidden to enter the clinic because he was Jewish and subject to the anti-Semitic laws that were instituted after the rise of the Nazi party. Dr. Fehr escaped to Great Britain, where he practiced ophthalmology into his eighties. He was the first to distinguish between granular corneal dystrophy, lattice corneal dystrophy and macular corneal dystrophy. The topic of the first Oskar Fehr lecture is Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD), an autosomal dominantly inherited corneal dystrophy associated with abnormal cholesterol deposition in the cornea. The clinical, histopathologic and genetic findings of 115 individuals with SCD followed over 18 years are discussed. The impact of systemic cholesterol metabolism on other diseases is reviewed. Corneal findings in SCD are predictable on the basis of patient age. All patients develop progressive corneal haze because of abnormal deposition of corneal lipid, but only half of patients with SCD have evidence of corneal crystals. The prior name for this disease, Schnyder crystalline corneal dystrophy, led me to create the International Committee for the Classification of Corneal Dystrophies, in order to create a more up-to-date and accurate nomenclature for SCD and other corneal dystrophies. The name was then changed to Schnyder corneal dystrophy. Histopathology of excised SCD corneas demonstrates abnormal deposition of only HDL cholesterol. Mutations in the UBIAD1 gene result in SCD. Three dimensional protein modeling shows that mutations result in impaired vitamin K synthesis, suggesting a common link between vitamin K and cholesterol metabolism. UBIAD1 mutations are associated with other diseases, such as bladder carcinoma and Parkinson's disease like findings in Drosophila. Studies of the

  10. [Guideline for the education of the specialist in cardiology in Spain. Comisión Nacional de la Especialidad de Cardiología].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosín Aguilar, J; Plaza Celemín, L; Martín Durán, R; Zarco Gutiérrez, P; López Merino, V; Cortina Llosa, A; Ferreira Montero, I; García-Cosío Mir, F; Castro Beiras, A; Martínez Monzonís, A

    2000-02-01

    This article presents the program for training in cardiology. The document was elaborated by the National Committee of the Specialty of Cardiology, from the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Education, and describes the theoretical and practical aspects of training in cardiology prevailing at present in Spain.

  11. Introductory Lectures on Collider Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Tim M. P.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2013-12-01

    These are elementary lectures about collider physics. They are aimed at graduate students who have some background in computing Feynman diagrams and the Standard Model, but assume no particular sophistication with the physics of high energy colliders.

  12. Lectures on general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Papapetrou, Achille

    1974-01-01

    This book is an elaboration of lecture notes for the graduate course on General Rela­ tivity given by the author at Boston University in the spring semester of 1972. It is an introduction to the subject only, as the time available for the course was limited. The author of an introduction to General Relativity is faced from the beginning with the difficult task of choosing which material to include. A general criterion as­ sisting in this choice is provided by the didactic character of the book: Those chapters have to be included in priority, which will be most useful to the reader in enabling him to understand the methods used in General Relativity, the results obtained so far and possibly the problems still to be solved. This criterion is not sufficient to ensure a unique choice. General Relativity has developed to such a degree, that it is impossible to include in an introductory textbook of a reasonable length even a very condensed treatment of all important problems which have been discussed unt...

  13. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 16 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN C. Gaspar / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (1/8) Accelerators (1/5) Trigger and Data Acquisition (1/3) Tuesday 17 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN C. Gaspar / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (2/8) Accelerators (2/5) Trigger and Data Acquisition (2/3) Wednesday 18 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN A. Pich and O. Brüning Particle Physics: the Standard Model (3/8) Accelerators (3/5) Discussion Session Thursday 19 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN C. Gaspar / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (4/8) Accelerators (4/5) Trigger and Data Acquisition (3/3) Friday 20 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN A. Pich and O. Brüning Particle Physics: the Standard Model (5/8) Accelerators (5/5) Discussion Session Monday 23 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich R. Jacobse...

  14. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 23 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich R. Jacobsen / LBLN, Berkeley (USA) T. Cass / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (6/8) From Raw Data to Physics Results (1/3) Computing at CERN (1/3) Tuesday 24 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich R. Jacobsen / LBLN, Berkeley (USA) T. Cass / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (7/8) From Raw Data to Physics Results (2/3) Computing at CERN (2/3) Wednesday 25 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich R. Jacobsen / LBLN, Berkeley (USA) A. Pich and R. Jacobsen J. Tuckmantel / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (8/8) From Raw Data to Physics Results (3/3) Discussion Session Superconducting cavities Thursday 26 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 T. Nakada / CERN P. Wells / CERN T. Cass / CERN Violation of Particle Anti-particle Symmetry (1/3) LEP Physics (1/4) Computing at CERN (3/3) Friday 27July 9:15 10:15 11:15 T. Nakada / CERN P. Wells / CERN T. Nakada; T. Cass T. Nakada in main auditorium T. Cass in TH auditorium Violati...

  15. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 30 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN T. Nakada / CERN P. Wells / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (1/3) Violation of Particle Anti-particle Symmetry (3/3) LEP Physics (3/4) Tuesday 31 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN F. Dydak / CERN P. Wells / CERN P. Lebrun / CERN P. Lebrun / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (2/3) Neutrino Physics (1/4) LEP Physics (4/4) Superconducting Technology for particle accelerators (1/2) Superconducting Technology for particle accelerators (2/2) Wednesday 1 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN F. Dydak / CERN G. Guidice; P. Wells G. Guidice in main auditorium, P. Wells in TH auditorium) O. Grobner / CERN O. Grobner / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) Neutrino Physics (2/4) Discussion Session Ultra High Vacuum Technology (1/2) Ultra High Vacuum Technology (2/2) Thursday 2 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 F. Antinori / CERN F. Dydak / CERN J. Aysto / CERN Heavy Ions (1/2) Neutrino Physics (3/4) Isolde Physics O...

  16. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Wednesday 4 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 15:45 L. Maiani / CERN L. Maiani / CERN M. Franklin / CERN G. Stevenson M. Diemoz O. Ullaland Introduction to CERN & Particle Physics (1/2) Introduction to CERN & Particle Physics (2/2) Classic Experiments (1/3) CERN Radiation Protection CERN Information on Activities CERN Intro to workshops Thursday 5 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 16:30 M. Franklin / CERN M. Franklin / CERN M. Franklin / CERN F. Close F. Close   Classic Experiments (2/3) Classic Experiments (3/3) Discussion session Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (1/4) Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (2/4) Welcome Drink Friday 6 July 9:15 10:15 F. Close F. Close Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (3/4) Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (4/4) Monday 9 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN L. Rolandi / CERN L. Rolandi / CERN Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) Big Experime...

  17. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Wednesday 4 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 15:45 L. Maiani / CERN L. Maiani / CERN M. Franklin / CERN G. Stevenson M. Diemoz O. Ullaland Introduction to CERN & Particle Physics (1/2) Introduction to CERN & Particle Physics (2/2) Classic Experiments (1/3) CERN Radiation Protection CERN Information on Activities CERN Intro to workshops Thursday 5 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 16:30 M. Franklin / CERN M. Franklin / CERN M. Franklin / CERN F. Close F. Close   Classic Experiments (2/3) Classic Experiments (3/3) Discussion session Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (1/4) Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (2/4) Welcome Drink Friday 6 July 9:15 10:15 F. Close F. Close Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (3/4) Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (4/4) Further information can be obtained on the web at the following URL: http://cern.web.cern.ch/CERN/Divisions/PE/HRS/Recruitment/sum_prog99.html

  18. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 6 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 F. Gianotti / CERN J. Carr / CERN E. Copeland / Centre for Theoretical Physics University of Sussex, UK LHC Physics (1/3) Astroparticle Physics (1/3) Introduction to Cosmology (1/2) Tuesday 7 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 F. Gianotti / CERN J. Carr / CERN E. Copeland / Centre for Theoretical Physics University of Sussex, UK LHC Physics (2/3) Astroparticle Physics (2/3) Introduction to Cosmology (2/2) Wednesday 8 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 F. Gianotti / CERN J. Carr / CERN J. Carr; F. Gianotti J. Carr in main auditorium F. Gianotti in TH auditorium LHC Physics (2/3) Astroparticle Physics (2/3) Discussion Session Thursday 9 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Veneziano / CERN G. Veneziano; E. Copeland G. Veneziano in main auditorium E. Copeland in TH auditorium Dreams of a Finite Theory (1/2) Student Session (1/3) Discussion Session Friday 10 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Veneziano / CERN L. Okun / CERN Student Se...

  19. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 9 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN L. Rolandi / CERN L. Rolandi / CERN Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) Big Experiments Discussion Session Tuesday 10 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN R. Kleiss / CERN C. Joram Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (2/6) Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (3/6) Particle Detectors (1/5) Wednesday 11 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN C. Joram / CERN R. Kleiss / C. Joram Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (4/6) Particle Detectors (2/5) Discussion Session Thursday 12 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN C. Joram / CERN C. Joram / CERN Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (5/6) Particle Detectors (3/5) Particle Detectors (4/5) Friday 13 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN C. Joram / CERN R. Kleiss / C. Joram Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (6/6) Particle Detectors (5/5) Discussion Session Monday 16 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning C...

  20. Lectures on Bound states

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Even a first approximation of bound states requires contributions of all powers in the coupling. This means that the concept of "lowest order bound state" needs to be defined. In these lectures I discuss the "Born" (no loop, lowest order in $\\hbar$) approximation. Born level states are bound by gauge fields which satisfy the classical field equations. As a check of the method, Positronium states of any momentum are determined as eigenstates of the QED Hamiltonian, quantized at equal time. Analogously, states bound by a strong external field $A^\\mu(\\xv)$ are found as eigenstates of the Dirac Hamiltonian. Their Fock states have dynamically created $e^+e^-$ pairs, whose distribution is determined by the Dirac wave function. The linear potential of $D=1+1$ dimensions confines electrons but repels positrons. As a result, the mass spectrum is continuous and the wave functions have features of both bound states and plane waves. The classical solutions of Gauss' law are explored for hadrons in QCD. A non-vanishing bo...

  1. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    14, 15, 16, 17, 18 January LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 11:00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg 500 Superconducting materials suitable for magnets D.C. Larbalestier / Univ. of Wisconsin, USA The range of materials available for superconducting magnets is steadily expanding, even as the choice of material becomes potentially more complex. When virtually all magnets were cooled by helium at ~2-5 K it was easy to separate the domain of Nb-Ti from those of Nb3Sn applications and very little surprise that more than 90% of all magnets are still made from Nb-Ti. But the development of useful conductors of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and YBa2Cu3Ox high temperature superconductors, coupled to the recent discovery of the 39 K superconductor MgB2 and the developing availability of cryocoolers suggests that new classes of higher temperature, medium field magnets based on other than Nb-based conductors could become available in the next 5-10 years. My talks will discuss the essential physics and materials science of these 5 classes...

  2. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2002-01-01

    14, 15, 16, 17, 18 January LECTURE SERIES From 11:00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg 500 Superconducting materials suitable for magnets D.C. Larbalestier / Univ. of Wisconsin, USA The range of materials available for superconducting magnets is steadily expanding, even as the choice of material becomes potentially more complex. When virtually all magnets were cooled by helium at ~2-5 K it was easy to separate the domain of Nb-Ti from those of Nb3Sn applications and very little surprise that more than 90% of all magnets are still made from Nb-Ti. But the development of useful conductors of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and YBa2Cu3Ox high temperature superconductors, coupled to the recent discovery of the 39 K superconductor MgB2 and the developing availability of cryocoolers suggests that new classes of higher temperature, medium field magnets based on other than Nb-based conductors could become available in the next 5-10 years. My talks will discuss the essential physics and materials science of these 5 classes of material - Nb-Ti...

  3. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    27, 28, 29 June and 2, 3 July REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Council Chamber bldg. 503 on 27, 28, 29 June and Auditorium, bldg 500 on 2, 3 July Particle Identification at the LHC P. Eerola / Lund University, SE The LHC experiments will explore new frontiers of particle physics. To maximize the physics potential of LHC, we need identification of leptons, hadrons, photons and 'invisible' particles. This is realized through reconstruction of electrons and muons, charged particle tracking and identification, b- and tau-tagging, and jet reconstruction. In addition, missing energy has to be measured in order to look for signatures of invisible particles. The experimental conditions posed by the collider, which will be operating at higher energy and luminosity than the present ones, are demanding. A large dynamical range is required in order to measure energies and momenta ranging from below one GeV to several TeVs. The detectors should be able to cope with the 40 MHz collision rate, with a large number ...

  4. John Adams Lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    13 December 2010 14:30 - Council Chamber, Bldg.503-1-001 Accelerator Breakthroughs, Achievements and Lessons from the Tevatron Collider V. Shiltsev / Fermilab’s Accelerator Physics Centre This year we celebrate the 25th anniversary of the first proton-antiproton collisions in the Tevatron. For two and a half decades the Tevatron at Fermilab (Batavia, IL, USA) was a centerpiece of the US and world’s High Energy Physics as the world’s highest energy particle collider at 1.8 TeV center of mass energy. While funding agencies are deciding on a 3-year extension of the Collider Run II operation through 2014, we – in this 2010 John Adams Lecture - will take a look in exciting story of the Tevatron: the story of long preparations, great expectations, numerous difficulties, years of “blood and sweat”, continuous upgrades, exceeding original goals (by a factor of 400) and high emotions. An accelerator scientist prospective will be given on a wide spectrum o...

  5. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    27, 28, 29 June and 2, 3 July REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Council Chamber bldg. 503 on 27, 28, 29 June and Auditorium, bldg 500 on 2, 3 July Particle Identification at the LHC P. Eerola / Lund University, SE The LHC experiments will explore new frontiers of particle physics. To maximize the physics potential of LHC, we need identification of leptons, hadrons, photons and 'invisible' particles. This is realized through reconstruction of electrons and muons, charged particle tracking and identification, b- and tau-tagging, and jet reconstruction. In addition, missing energy has to be measured in order to look for signatures of invisible particles. The experimental conditions posed by the collider, which will be operating at higher energy and luminosity than the present ones, are demanding. A large dynamical range is required in order to measure energies and momenta ranging from below one GeV to several TeVs. The detectors should be able to cope with the 40 MHz collision rate, with a large number ...

  6. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (6/8) 10:15 - 11:00 J. CARR  Astroparticles (1/3) 11:15 - 12:00 J. SHIERS Computing (1/3) Tuesday 23 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (7/8) 10:15 - 11:00 J. CARR  Astroparticles (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 J. SHIERS Computing (2/3) Wednesday 24July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (8/8) 10:15 - 11:00 J. CARR  Astroparticles (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session 14:00 - 16:00 O. GROBNER UHV Technology Thursday 25 July (Theory Auditorium) 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (1/3) (TH) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (1/3) (TH) 11:15 - 12:00 J. SHIERS Computing (3/3) (TH) Friday 26 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (2/3) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00  R...

  7. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 15 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (1/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (1/5) 11:15 - 12:00 C. GASPAR Trigger and Data Acquisition (1/3) Tuesday 16 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (2/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 C. GASPAR Trigger and Data Acquisition (2/3) Wednesday 17 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (3/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (3/5) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 18 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (4/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (4/5) 11:15 - 12:00 C. GASPAR Trigger and Data Acquisition (3/3) Friday 19 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (5/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (5/5) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (6/8) 10:15 - 11:00 T. WENAUS From Raw Data to Physics ...

  8. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 8 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 M. FRANKLIN Classic Experiments (1/3) 14:00 - 15:00 M. LINDROOS Isolde 15:30 - 16:30 M. LINDROOS Visit of the Experiment Tuesday 9 july 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (2/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (3/5) 11:15 - 12:00 M. FRANKLIN Classic Experiments (2/3) Wednesday 10 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (3/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (4/5) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 11 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (4/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (5/5) 11:15 - 12:00 M. FRANKLIN Classic Experiments (3/3) Friday 12 July 09:15 - 11:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (5&6/6) 11:15 ...

  9. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 3 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. FAYARD, O. ULLALAND Presentation of the Summer Student Programm 10:15 - 12:00 L. MAIANI Introduction to CERN (1&2/2) 14:00 - 15:00 G. Stevenson Radiation Protection (Council Chamber, bldg.503) Thursday 4 July 09:15 - 11:00 F. CLOSE Introduction to Particle Physics for non Physics Students (1&2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (1/5) Friday 5 July 09:15 - 11:00 F. CLOSE Introduction to Particle Physics for non Physics Students (3&4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 8 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 M. FRANKLIN Classic Experiments (1/3) 14:00 - 15:00 M. LINDROOS Isolde 15:30 - 16:30 M. LINDROOS Visit of the Experiment Tuesday 9 july 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (2/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Part...

  10. Optional Student Use of Online Lecture Resources: Resource Preferences, Performance and Lecture Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabe, M.; Christopherson, K.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most common uses of a course management system in the on-campus environment is to offer lecture resources to students. Few researchers have investigated how students use such resources. This study considers student use of lecture resources that offer a representation of the lecture presented (i.e. lecture outline, lecture summary, audio…

  11. Training Program for Cardiology Residents to Perform Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Examination with Portable Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Vicente N; Mancuso, Frederico J N; Campos, Orlando; De Paola, Angelo A; Carvalho, Antonio C; Moises, Valdir A

    2015-10-01

    Training requirements for general cardiologists without echocardiographic expertise to perform focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU) with portable devices have not yet been defined. The objective of this study was to evaluate a training program to instruct cardiology residents to perform FCU with a hand-carried device (HCD) in different clinical settings. Twelve cardiology residents were subjected to a 50-question test, 4 lectures on basic echocardiography and imaging interpretation, the supervised interpretation of 50 echocardiograms and performance of 30 exams using HCD. After this period, they repeated the written test and were administered a practical test comprising 30 exams each (360 patients) in different clinical settings. They reported on 15 parameters and a final diagnosis; their findings were compared to the HCD exam of a specialist in echocardiography. The proportion of correct answers on the theoretical test was higher after training (86%) than before (51%; P = 0.001). The agreement was substantial among the 15 parameters analyzed (kappa ranging from 0.615 to 0.891; P < 0.001). The percentage of correct interpretation was lower for abnormal (75%) than normal (95%) items, for valve abnormalities (85%) compared to other items (92%) and for graded scale (87%) than for dichotomous (95%) items (P < 0.0001, for all). For the final diagnoses, the kappa value was higher than 0.941 (P < 0.001; 95% CI [0.914, 0.955]). The training proposed enabled residents to perform FCU with HCD, and their findings were in good agreement with those of a cardiologist specialized in echocardiography. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. 19. Brazilian congress on biology and nuclear medicine; 19. Congresso brasileiro de biologia e medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The issue contain 97 abstracts of 19 Brazilian congress on biology and nuclear medicine held in Pernambuco, Brazil, from November 4 to 8, 1998. The subjects addressed are diagnostic and therapy nuclear medicine techniques, especially scintiscanning, SPECT and PET and their uses. The main topics were as follows: cardiology, neuro-psychiatry, oncology, endocrinology, radiopharmacy, infectious diseases, radiobiology and others.

  13. A Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Boot Camp improves trainee confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Catherine K; Tannous, Paul; DeWitt, Elizabeth; Farias, Michael; Mansfield, Laura; Ronai, Christina; Schidlow, David; Sanders, Stephen P; Lock, James E; Newburger, Jane W; Brown, David W

    2016-12-01

    Introduction New paediatric cardiology trainees are required to rapidly assimilate knowledge and gain clinical skills to which they have limited or no exposure during residency. The Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Boot Camp (PCBC) at Boston Children's Hospital was designed to provide incoming fellows with an intensive exposure to congenital cardiac pathology and a broad overview of major areas of paediatric cardiology practice. The PCBC curriculum was designed by core faculty in cardiac pathology, echocardiography, electrophysiology, interventional cardiology, exercise physiology, and cardiac intensive care. Individual faculty contributed learning objectives, which were refined by fellowship directors and used to build a programme of didactics, hands-on/simulation-based activities, and self-guided learning opportunities. A total of 16 incoming fellows participated in the 4-week boot camp, with no concurrent clinical responsibilities, over 2 years. On the basis of pre- and post-PCBC surveys, 80% of trainees strongly agreed that they felt more prepared for clinical responsibilities, and a similar percentage felt that PCBC should be offered to future incoming fellows. Fellows showed significant increase in their confidence in all specific knowledge and skills related to the learning objectives. Fellows rated hands-on learning experiences and simulation-based exercises most highly. We describe a novel 4-week-long boot camp designed to expose incoming paediatric cardiology fellows to the broad spectrum of knowledge and skills required for the practice of paediatric cardiology. The experience increased trainee confidence and sense of preparedness to begin fellowship-related responsibilities. Given that highly interactive activities were rated most highly, boot camps in paediatric cardiology should strongly emphasise these elements.

  14. Contrast-induced nephropathy in interventional cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarsky D

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Doron Sudarsky, Eugenia NikolskyCardiology Department, Rambam Health Care Campus and Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, IsraelAbstract: Development of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN, ie, a rise in serum creatinine by either ≥0.5 mg/dL or by ≥25% from baseline within the first 2–3 days after contrast administration, is strongly associated with both increased inhospital and late morbidity and mortality after invasive cardiac procedures. The prevention of CIN is critical if long-term outcomes are to be optimized after percutaneous coronary intervention. The prevalence of CIN in patients receiving contrast varies markedly (from <1% to 50%, depending on the presence of well characterized risk factors, the most important of which are baseline chronic renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Other risk factors include advanced age, anemia, left ventricular dysfunction, dehydration, hypotension, renal transplant, low serum albumin, concomitant use of nephrotoxins, and the volume of contrast agent. The pathophysiology of CIN is likely to be multifactorial, including direct cytotoxicity, apoptosis, disturbances in intrarenal hemodynamics, and immune mechanisms. Few strategies have been shown to be effective to prevent CIN beyond hydration, the goal of which is to establish brisk diuresis prior to contrast administration, and to avoid hypotension. New strategies of controlled hydration and diuresis are promising. Studies are mixed on whether prophylactic oral N-acetylcysteine reduces the incidence of CIN, although its use is generally recommended, given its low cost and favorable side effect profile. Agents which have been shown to be ineffective or harmful, or for which data supporting routine use do not exist, include fenoldopam, theophylline, dopamine, calcium channel blockers, prostaglandin E1, atrial natriuretic peptide, statins, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.Keywords: contrast-induced nephropathy, contrast media

  15. Exploring medical student decisions regarding attending live lectures and using recorded lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anmol; Saks, Norma Susswein

    2013-09-01

    Student decisions about lecture attendance are based on anticipated effect on learning. Factors involved in decision-making, the use of recorded lectures and their effect on lecture attendance, all warrant investigation. This study was designed to identify factors in student decisions to attend live lectures, ways in which students use recorded lectures, and if their use affects live lecture attendance. A total of 213 first (M1) and second year (M2) medical students completed a survey about lecture attendance, and rated factors related to decisions to attend live lectures and to utilize recorded lectures. Responses were analyzed overall and by class year and gender. M1 attended a higher percentage of live lectures than M2, while both classes used the same percentage of recorded lectures. Females attended more live lectures, and used a smaller percentage of recorded lectures. The lecturer was a key in attendance decisions. Also considered were the subject and availability of other learning materials. Students use recorded lectures as replacement for live lectures and as supplement to them. Lectures, both live and recorded, are important for student learning. Decisions about lecture placement in the curriculum need to be based on course content and lecturer quality.

  16. Nuclear cardiac imaging: Principles and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskandrian, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book is divided into 11 chapters. The first three provide a short description of the instrumentation, radiopharmaceuticals, and imaging techniques used in nuclear cardiology. Chapter 4 discusses exercise testing. Chapter 5 gives the theory, technical aspects, and interpretations of thallium-201 myocardial imaging and radionuclide ventriculography. The remaining chapters discuss the use of these techniques in patients with coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, valvular heart disease, and other forms of cardiac disease. The author intended to emphasize the implications of nuclear cardiology procedures on patient care management and to provide a comprehensive bibliography.

  17. 1995 Edward Teller Lecture Patience and Optimism (LIRPP Vol. 12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, George H.

    2016-10-01

    Remarks made in the author's acceptance lecture for the 1995 Edward Teller Medal are presented and expanded. Topics covered include research on nuclear-pumped lasers, the first direct e-beam-pumped laser, direct energy conversion and advanced fuel fusion, plus recent work on inertial electrostatic confinement. "Patience" and "optimism" are viewed as essential elements needed by scientists following the "zig-zag" path to fusion energy production.

  18. Practical strategies for effective lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Peter H; McCallister, Jennifer W; Luks, Andrew M; Le, Tao T; Fessler, Henry E

    2015-04-01

    Lecturing is an essential teaching skill for scientists and health care professionals in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. However, few medical or scientific educators have received training in contemporary techniques or technology for large audience presentation. Interactive lecturing outperforms traditional, passive-style lecturing in educational outcomes, and is being increasingly incorporated into large group presentations. Evidence-based techniques range from the very simple, such as inserting pauses for audience discussion, to more technologically advanced approaches such as electronic audience response systems. Alternative software platforms such as Prezi can overcome some of the visual limits that the ubiquitous PowerPoint imposes on complex scientific narratives, and newer technology formats can help foster the interactive learning environment. Regardless of the technology, adherence to good principles of instructional design, multimedia learning, visualization of quantitative data, and informational public speaking can improve any lecture. The storyline must be clear, logical, and simplified compared with how it might be prepared for scientific publication. Succinct outline and summary slides can provide a roadmap for the audience. Changes of pace, and summaries or other cognitive breaks inserted every 15-20 minutes can renew attention. Graphics that emphasize clear, digestible data graphs or images over tables, and simple, focused tables over text slides, are more readily absorbed. Text slides should minimize words, using simple fonts in colors that contrast to a plain background. Adherence to these well-established principles and addition of some new approaches and technologies will yield an engaging lecture worth attending.

  19. Lectures on gas theory

    CERN Document Server

    Boltzmann, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    One of the great masterpieces of theoretical physics, this classic work contains a comprehensive exposition of the kinetic theory of gases that is still relevant today, nearly 100 years after its first publication. Although the modifications of quantum mechanics have rendered some parts of the work obsolete, many of the topics dealt with still yield to the classical-mechanics approach outlined by Boltzmann; moreover, a variety of problems in aerodynamics, nuclear reactors, and thermonuclear power generation are best solved by Boltzmann's famous transport equation.The work is divided into two

  20. What to Expect from the Evolving Field of Geriatric Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Susan P.; Orr, Nicole M.; Dodson, John A.; Rich, Michael W.; Wenger, Nanette K.; Blum, Kay; Harold, John Gordon; Tinetti, Mary; Maurer, Mathew S.; Forman, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    The population of older adults is expanding rapidly and aging predisposes to cardiovascular disease. The principle of patient-centered care must respond to the preponderance of cardiac disease that now occurs in combination with complexities of old age. Geriatric cardiology melds cardiovascular perspectives with multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty, cognitive decline, and other clinical, social, financial, and psychological dimensions of aging. While some assume a cardiologist may instinctively cultivate some of these skills over the course of a career, we assert that the volume and complexity of older cardiovascular patients in contemporary practice warrants a more direct approach to achieve suitable training and a more reliable process of care. We present a rationale and vision for geriatric cardiology as a melding of primary cardiovascular and geriatrics skills, and thereby infusing cardiology practice with expanded proficiencies in diagnosis, risks, care coordination, communications, end-of-life, and other competences required to best manage older cardiovascular patients. PMID:26361161

  1. Pediatric Cardiology in India: Onset of a New Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Bagri, Narendra

    2015-07-01

    Pediatric cardiology is outgrowing from the shadows of adult cardiology and cardiac surgery departments in India. It promises to be an attractive and sought-after subspeciality of Pediatrics, dealing with not only congenital cardiac diseases but also metabolic, rheumatic and host of other cardiac diseases. The new government policy shall provide more training avenues for the budding pediatric cardiologists, pediatric cardiac surgeons, pediatric anesthetists, pediatric cardiac intensivists, neonatologists and a host of supportive workforce. The proactive role of Indian Academy of Pediatrics and Pediatric Cardiac Society of India, towards creating a political will at the highest level for framing policies towards building infrastructure, training of workforce and subsidies for pediatric cardiac surgeries and procedures shall fuel the development of multiple tertiary cardiac centers in the country, making pediatric cardiology services accessible to the needy population.

  2. Lecture Quiz Extended: An Improvement of the Lecture Quiz Game

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Long Tien

    2008-01-01

    Lecture Quiz is a game used to provide more active and participant students in lectures. The game is based on a server, a teacher client and a student client. In a master thesis done in 2007, Ole Kristian Mørch-Storstein and Terje Øfsdahl have explored concept of game to be used in higher education and develop a prototype game to further evaluate that concept. Their game has three components; the first one is the server part running on a server. This component connect to a database and provid...

  3. Accurate diagnosis of CHD by Paediatricians with Expertise in Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Hannah C; Massey, Hannah; Yates, Robert W M; Kelsall, A Wilfred

    2017-08-01

    Introduction Paediatricians with Expertise in Cardiology assess children with a full history, examination, and often perform an echocardiogram. A minority are then referred to an outreach clinic run jointly with a visiting paediatric cardiologist. The accuracy of the echocardiography diagnosis made by the Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology is unknown. Materials and methods We conducted a retrospective review of clinic letters for children seen in the outreach clinic for the first time between March, 2004 and March, 2011. Children with CHD diagnosed antenatally or elsewhere were excluded. We recorded the echocardiography diagnosis made by the paediatric cardiologist and previously by the Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology. The Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology referred 317/3145 (10%) children seen in the local cardiac clinics to the outreach clinic over this period, and among them 296 were eligible for inclusion. Their median age was 1.5 years (range 1 month-15.1 years). For 244 (82%) children, there was complete diagnostic agreement between the Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology and the paediatric cardiologist. For 29 (10%) children, the main diagnosis was identical with additional findings made by the paediatric cardiologist. The abnormality had resolved in 17 (6%) cases by the time of clinic attendance. In six (2%) patients, the paediatric cardiologist made a different diagnosis. In total, 138 (47%) patients underwent a surgical or catheter intervention. Discussion Paediatricians with Expertise in Cardiology can make accurate diagnoses of CHD in children referred to their clinics. This can allow effective triage of children attending the outreach clinic, making best use of limited specialist resources.

  4. [Heart rate recovery after exercise in subjects undergoing cardiologic rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejer, Anna; Urzedowicz, Beata; Rembek-Wieliczko, Magdalena; Koziróg, Marzena; Ciećwierz, Julita; Kowalski, Jan

    2012-12-01

    Research indicates that slow heart rate recovery 1-2 minutes after exercise is a predictor of cardiovascular mortality, sudden mortality as well. It is hardly related to myocardial ischemia; most of all, it is related to impaired activities of the parasympathetic system. The purpose of this study was to assess HRR in subjects after a surgical treatment (percutaneous coronary intervention - PCI) of acute coronary syndromes (ACS), undergoing cardiologic rehabilitation. The study comprised 58 subjects, 42 men and 16 women aged 49-68 (56.8 +/- 7.6) after ACS treated with PCI undergoing cardiologic rehabilitation (stage 2)--group I. The comparative group comprised 34 subjects, 25 men and 9 women aged 46-61 (55.5 +/- 8.9 lat) who were clinically healthy and who underwent a single sub-maximal exercise test--group II. In subjects undergoing rehabilitation, an exercise test was performed twice --before and after stage 2 of rehabilitation. HRR was defined as a difference between the peak heart rate and those after the 1st (HRR1) and 2nd (HRR) minute of recovery. After stationary rehabilitation as a part of stage 2 of cardiologic rehabilitation, HRR2 was 26.3 +/- 10.6/min and was 40.8/min +/- 13.8/min; both these values were not significantly different from values observed in healthy subjects (p > 0.05). Significant increase in HRR1 and HRR2 was observed after the completion of stage 2 of cardiologic rehabilitation in ill subjects (p < 0.05) as compared to initial values. In subjects after ACS treated with PCI, it is observed that HRR changes back to normal values observed in healthy subjects as a result of underwent cardiologic rehabilitation. HRR should become an important factor in assessing effectiveness of conducted cardiologic rehabilitation.

  5. Lectures on Conformal Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Qualls, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    These lectures notes are based on courses given at National Taiwan University, National Chiao-Tung University, and National Tsing Hua University in the spring term of 2015. Although the course was offered primarily for graduate students, these lecture notes have been prepared for a more general audience. They are intended as an introduction to conformal field theories in various dimensions, with applications related to topics of particular interest: topics include the conformal bootstrap program, boundary conformal field theory, and applications related to the AdS/CFT correspondence. We assume the reader to be familiar with quantum mechanics at the graduate level and to have some basic knowledge of quantum field theory. Familiarity with string theory is not a prerequisite for this lectures, although it can only help.

  6. "Don't Lecture Me"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Often I will listen to public radio on long drives when I am alone. Recently I happened to catch a program called "Don't Lecture Me" and it really caught my attention for several reasons. First, the speakers were all notable leaders in Physics Education Research such as Joe Redish, David Hestenes, and Eric Mazur. (See this month's WebSights column.) These folks are among many who have devoted their energies to understanding how students learn physics and how teachers can design classroom instruction and interactions to best meet the needs of learners. Second, on this particular trip, I had just observed a teacher whose class was very teacher-centered as the teacher lectured most of the class period. As we discussed this later, she expressed concern that she had to cover the material and didn't feel that she could do it without lecturing.

  7. ``Don't Lecture Me''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Patricia

    2011-11-01

    Often I will listen to public radio on long drives when I am alone. Recently I happened to catch a program called ``Don't Lecture Me'' and it really caught my attention for several reasons. First, the speakers were all notable leaders in Physics Education Research such as Joe Redish, David Hestenes, and Eric Mazur. (See this month's WebSights column.) These folks are among many who have devoted their energies to understanding how students learn physics and how teachers can design classroom instruction and interactions to best meet the needs of learners. Second, on this particular trip, I had just observed a teacher whose class was very teacher-centered as the teacher lectured most of the class period. As we discussed this later, she expressed concern that she had to cover the material and didn't feel that she could do it without lecturing.

  8. Almanac 2012: interventional cardiology. The national society journals present selected research that has driven recent advances in clinical cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meier Pascal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The field of interventional cardiology continues to progress quickly. The efficacy of percutaneous interventions with newer generation drug-eluting stents has advanced a lot over the last decade. This improvement in stent performance has broadened the level of indication towards more complex interventions such as left main and multivessel PCI. Major improvements continue in the field of medical co-therapy such as antiplatelet therapies (bivalirudin, prasugrel, ticagrelor and this will further improve outcomes of PCI. The same is true for intravascular imaging such as ultrasound IVUS and optical coherence tomography OCT. However, interventional cardiology has become a rather broad field, also including alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, etc. At the moment, the fastest growing area is the structural interventions, especially for aortic valve stenosis (transcatheter aortic valve implantation TAVI and for mitral regurgitation (mitral clipping.This review covers recent advances in all these different fields of interventional cardiology.

  9. Eight lectures on theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Planck, Max

    1997-01-01

    In 1909 the great German physicist and Nobel Prize winner Max Planck (1858-1947) delivered a series of eight lectures at Columbia University giving a fascinating overview of the new state of physics, which he had played a crucial role in bringing about. The first, third, fifth, and sixth lectures present his account of the revolutionary developments occasioned when he first applied the quantum hypothesis to blackbody radiation. The reader is given an invaluable opportunity to witness Planck's thought processes both on the level of philosophical principles as well as their application to physi

  10. Displacement ventilation in lecture halls

    OpenAIRE

    Egorov, Artem

    2013-01-01

    This thesis considers several important goals. The main purpose is to see how displacement ventilation sys-tem works in the lecture hall of M-building and compare obtained results with D2 and Indoor Climate Classi-fication. The second one is to analyze the function of the ventilation system. The last one is to realize when displacement ventilation is preferable to mixing ventilation. Analysis of the system was carried out with instruments from MUAS HVAC laboratory. In lecture hall were me...

  11. TASI Lectures on Flavor Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ligeti, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    These notes overlap with lectures given at the TASI summer schools in 2014 and 2011, as well as at the European School of High Energy Physics in 2013. This is primarily an attempt at transcribing my hand-written notes, with emphasis on topics and ideas discussed in the lectures. It is not a comprehensive introduction or review of the field, nor does it include a complete list of references. I hope, however, that someone may find it useful to better understand the reasons for excitement about recent progress and future opportunities in flavor physics.

  12. TASI Lectures on Flavor Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeti, Zoltan

    These notes overlap with lectures given at the TASI summer schools in 2014 and 2011, as well as at the European School of High Energy Physics in 2013. This is primarily an attempt at transcribing my handwritten notes, with emphasis on topics and ideas discussed in the lectures. It is not a comprehensive introduction or review of the field, nor does it include a complete list of references. I hope, however, that some may find it useful to better understand the reasons for excitement about recent progress and future opportunities in flavor physics.

  13. Mind the Gap: Representation of Medical Education in Cardiology-Related Articles and Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Clint; Berlacher, Kathryn; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Auseon, Alex J

    2016-07-01

    Cardiology fellowship programs are at the interface of medical education and the care of patients suffering from the leading cause of mortality in the United States, yet there is an apparent lack of research guiding the effective education of fellows. We sought to quantify the number of publications in cardiology journals that pertained to the education of cardiology trainees and the number of cardiologists participating in education research. For the period between January and December 2012, we cataloged cardiology-specific and general medical/medical education journals and sorted them by impact factor. Tables of content were reviewed for articles with an educational focus, a cardiology focus, or both. We recorded the authors' areas of medical training, and keywords from each cardiology journal's mission statement were reviewed for emphasis on education. Twenty-six cardiology journals, containing 6645 articles, were reviewed. Only 4 articles had education themes. Ten general medical and 15 medical education journals contained 6810 articles. Of these, only 7 focused on medical education in cardiology, and none focused on cardiology fellowship training. Among the 4887 authors of publications in medical education journals, 25 were cardiologists (less than 1%), and among the 1036 total words in the mission statements of all cardiology journals, the term "education" appeared once. Published educational research is lacking in cardiology training, and few cardiologists appear to be active members of the education scholarship community. Cardiology organizations and academic journals should support efforts to identify target areas of study and publish scholarship in educational innovation.

  14. Videotaped Lectures in a Graduate Cytogenetics Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R. L.; Jellen, E. N.

    1994-01-01

    Graduate students evaluated the use of videotape recordings of lectures on chromosome configurations in a cytogenetics course. Ninety-two percent of the students indicated that videotaping was worthwhile. Advantages for using the videotaped cytogenetics lectures are presented. (MDH)

  15. Interventional cardiology in Europe 1993. Working Group on Coronary Circulation of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, B J; Meier, B; Bonzel, T; Fabian, J; Heyndrickx, G; Morice, M C; Mühlberger, V; Piscione, F; Rothman, M; Wijns, W; van den Brand, M

    1996-09-01

    An annual survey on cardiac interventions in Europe is performed by the working group on Coronary Circulation of the European Society of Cardiology with the help of the national societies of cardiology. A questionnaire about cardiac interventions in 1993 was mailed to a representative of the national societies of 35 members of the European Society of Cardiology. The data collection of coronary interventions was delayed by slow backreporting and from 10 of the 35 national members data were missing or grossly incomplete. They were excluded from the analysis. A total of 756,822 coronary angiograms were reported resulting in an incidence of 1146 +/- 1024 per 10(6) inhabitants, ranging from 24 (Romania) to 3499 (Germany). This represents an increase of 12% compared to 1992. Germany (279,882 cases), France (157,237), the United Kingdom (77,000), Italy (44,934) and Spain (37,591) registered 79% of all the coronary angiograms performed. A total of 183,728 percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty cases were reported in 1993, 24% more than in 1992. On average, they accounted for 18 +/- 7% (range 8 (Romania) to 35% (Sweden) of the coronary angiograms. Most of these percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties (82%) were confined to a single vessel. In 13% only, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty took place immediately after the diagnostic study. Adjusted per capita. Germany ranks first with 873 percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties per 10(6) inhabitants, followed by France (737), Holland (725), Belgium (713), and Switzerland (665). The European mean of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties per 10(6) inhabitants was 270 +/- 279, representing an increase of 14% compared with 1992. A major in-hospital complication was reported in 3.8% of the patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty: 0.6% hospital deaths, 1.5% emergency coronary artery bypass grafting, and 1.7% myocardial infarctions. In 1993 stents were

  16. Weekly Interdisciplinary Colloquy on Cardiology: A Decade of Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrmacher, William H.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    An experimental, continuing, weekly interdisciplinary colloquy on cardiology is described. It is organized between the departments of medicine and physiology of Loyola University Medical Center to promote interaction between basic scientists and practicing physicians in the medical school. (Author/MLW)

  17. Burnout, Perceived Stress, and Depression among Cardiology Residents in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Silvina V.; Diez, Juan Cruz Lopez; Arazi, Hernan Cohen; Linetzky, Bruno; Guinjoan, Salvador; Grancelli, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Because medical residency is a stressful time for training physicians, placing residents at increased risk for psychological distress, the authors studied the prevalence of burnout, perceived stress, and depression in cardiology residents in Argentina and examined the association between sociodemographic characteristics and these…

  18. Comparison of Two Educational Strategies in Teaching Preventive Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup-Benham, Christine A.; And Others

    This study assessed the impact of two educational strategies: text only versus text plus small group discussion, among two groups of third-year internal medicine clerkship students in a preventive cardiology course. The course was a required, 12-week Internal Medical clerkship at the University of Texas Medical Branch. The first group reviewed…

  19. What to Expect From the Evolving Field of Geriatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Susan P; Orr, Nicole M; Dodson, John A; Rich, Michael W; Wenger, Nanette K; Blum, Kay; Harold, John Gordon; Tinetti, Mary E; Maurer, Mathew S; Forman, Daniel E

    2015-09-15

    The population of older adults is expanding rapidly, and aging predisposes to cardiovascular disease. The principle of patient-centered care must respond to the preponderance of cardiac disease that now occurs in combination with the complexities of old age. Geriatric cardiology melds cardiovascular perspectives with multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty, cognitive decline, and other clinical, social, financial, and psychological dimensions of aging. Although some assume that a cardiologist may instinctively cultivate some of these skills over the course of a career, we assert that the volume and complexity of older cardiovascular patients in contemporary practice warrants a more direct approach to achieve suitable training and a more reliable process of care. We present a rationale and vision for geriatric cardiology as a melding of primary cardiovascular and geriatrics skills, thereby infusing cardiology practice with expanded proficiencies in diagnosis, risks, care coordination, communications, end-of-life, and other competences required to best manage older cardiovascular patients. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS. POSITION OF NIFEDIPINE IN MODERN CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Garganeeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Position of nifedipine in modern cardiology practice is highlighted. Nifedipine usage for arterial hypertension therapy , including combined one, stroke prevention, treatment of hypertensive crisis and ischemic heart disease is considered. Advantages of nifedipine innovative formulations are presented. Possible usage of nifedipine in pulmonary hypertension as well as pregnancy is discussed specially.

  1. Burnout, Perceived Stress, and Depression among Cardiology Residents in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Silvina V.; Diez, Juan Cruz Lopez; Arazi, Hernan Cohen; Linetzky, Bruno; Guinjoan, Salvador; Grancelli, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Because medical residency is a stressful time for training physicians, placing residents at increased risk for psychological distress, the authors studied the prevalence of burnout, perceived stress, and depression in cardiology residents in Argentina and examined the association between sociodemographic characteristics and these…

  2. Ionizing radiation exposure in interventional cardiology: current radiation protection practice of invasive cardiology operators in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valuckiene, Zivile; Jurenas, Martynas; Cibulskaite, Inga

    2016-09-01

    Ionizing radiation management is among the most important safety issues in interventional cardiology. Multiple radiation protection measures allow the minimization of x-ray exposure during interventional procedures. Our purpose was to assess the utilization and effectiveness of radiation protection and optimization techniques among interventional cardiologists in Lithuania. Interventional cardiologists of five cardiac centres were interviewed by anonymized questionnaire, addressing personal use of protective garments, shielding, table/detector positioning, frame rate (FR), resolution, field of view adjustment and collimation. Effective patient doses were compared between operators who work with and without x-ray optimization. Thirty one (68.9%) out of 45 Lithuanian interventional cardiologists participated in the survey. Protective aprons were universally used, but not the thyroid collars; 35.5% (n  =  11) operators use protective eyewear and 12.9% (n  =  4) wear radio-protective caps; 83.9% (n  =  26) use overhanging shields, 58.1% (n  =  18)-portable barriers; 12.9% (n  =  4)-abdominal patient's shielding; 35.5% (n  =  11) work at a high table position; 87.1% (n  =  27) keep an image intensifier/receiver close to the patient; 58.1% (n  =  18) reduce the fluoroscopy FR; 6.5% (n  =  2) reduce the fluoro image detail resolution; 83.9% (n  =  26) use a 'store fluoro' option; 41.9% (N  =  13) reduce magnification for catheter transit; 51.6% (n  =  16) limit image magnification; and 35.5% (n  =  11) use image collimation. Median effective patient doses were significantly lower with x-ray optimization techniques in both diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Many of the ionizing radiation exposure reduction tools and techniques are underused by a considerable proportion of interventional cardiology operators. The application of basic radiation protection tools and

  3. TASI Lectures on Jet Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Shelton, Jessie

    2013-01-01

    Jet physics is a rich and rapidly evolving field, with many applications to physics in and beyond the Standard Model. These notes, based on lectures delivered at the June 2012 Theoretical Advanced Study Institute, provide an introduction to jets at the Large Hadron Collider. Topics covered include sequential jet algorithms, jet shapes, jet grooming, and boosted Higgs and top tagging.

  4. Koshiba, Tanaka give Nobel lectures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Masatoshi Kosiba and Koichi Tanaka presented lectures in English on Sunday, touching on topics ranging from particle physics, to teamwork to commemorate their reception of this year's Nobel Prize for Physics and Chemistry. The two will receive their respective prizes in an awards ceremony scheduled for Tuesday (1 page).

  5. Six Lectures on Commutative Algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Elias, J; Miro-Roig, Rosa Maria; Zarzuela, Santiago

    2009-01-01

    Interest in commutative algebra has surged over the years. In order to survey and highlight the developments in this rapidly expanding field, the Centre de Recerca Matematica in Bellaterra organized a ten-days Summer School on Commutative Algebra in 1996. This title offers a synthesis of the lectures presented at the Summer School

  6. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  7. TASI lectures on complex structures

    CERN Document Server

    Denef, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    These lecture notes give an introduction to a number of ideas and methods that have been useful in the study of complex systems ranging from spin glasses to D-branes on Calabi-Yau manifolds. Topics include the replica formalism, Parisi's solution of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, overlap order parameters, supersymmetric quantum mechanics, D-brane landscapes and their black hole duals.

  8. TASI Lectures on Complex Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denef, Frederik

    2012-11-01

    These lecture notes give an introduction to a number of ideas and methods that have been useful in the study of complex systems ranging from spin glasses to D-branes on Calabi-Yau manifolds. Topics include the replica formalism, Parisi's solution of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, overlap order parameters, supersymmetric quantum mechanics, D-brane landscapes and their black hole duals.

  9. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  10. Embedding Laboratory Experience in Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, James R.; Barroso, Luciana R.; Simpson, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Demonstrations can be very effective at enhancing student learning and represent a mechanism for embedding laboratory experiences within a classroom setting. A key component to an effective demonstration is active student engagement throughout the entire process, leading to a guided laboratory experience in a lecture setting. Students are involved…

  11. College Students' Perception of Lecturers Using Humor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, Ron; Zillmann, Dolf

    1981-01-01

    Audio-taped lectures by male or female professors were produced in four versions: no humor; sexual humor; other-disparaging humor; and self-disparaging humor. Male and female students rated lecturers' intelligence and appeal. Intelligence ratings were unaffected by humor variations, but significant lecturer-student sex interactions were found on…

  12. Interactive Lecture Discourse for University EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Interactive lectures play an important role in improving comprehension and in enhancing communicative competence in the English language for EFL university students taking content lecture courses. This article considers the interactive discourse in lectures of the English Studies Department at the University of Alicante, Spain. It describes an…

  13. Clickers and Formative Feedback at University Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelandsdal, Kjetil; Krumsvik, Rune Johan

    2017-01-01

    Lecturing is often criticized for being a monological and student passive way of teaching. However, digital technology such as Student Response Systems (SRS) can be used to reconstruct the traditional lecturing format. During a series of five two-hour lectures in "qualitative methods" for first year psychology students, we used SRS to…

  14. Criticality Calculations with MCNP6 - Practical Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Monte Carlo Methods, Codes, and Applications (XCP-3); Rising, Michael Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Monte Carlo Methods, Codes, and Applications (XCP-3); Alwin, Jennifer Louise [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Monte Carlo Methods, Codes, and Applications (XCP-3)

    2016-11-29

    These slides are used to teach MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) usage to nuclear criticality safety analysts. The following are the lecture topics: course information, introduction, MCNP basics, criticality calculations, advanced geometry, tallies, adjoint-weighted tallies and sensitivities, physics and nuclear data, parameter studies, NCS validation I, NCS validation II, NCS validation III, case study 1 - solution tanks, case study 2 - fuel vault, case study 3 - B&W core, case study 4 - simple TRIGA, case study 5 - fissile mat. vault, criticality accident alarm systems. After completion of this course, you should be able to: Develop an input model for MCNP; Describe how cross section data impact Monte Carlo and deterministic codes; Describe the importance of validation of computer codes and how it is accomplished; Describe the methodology supporting Monte Carlo codes and deterministic codes; Describe pitfalls of Monte Carlo calculations; Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of Monte Carlo and Discrete Ordinants codes; The diffusion theory model is not strictly valid for treating fissile systems in which neutron absorption, voids, and/or material boundaries are present. In the context of these limitations, identify a fissile system for which a diffusion theory solution would be adequate.

  15. Overview of nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, R.B.

    2003-06-30

    For many years, nuclear structure and decay data have been compiled and disseminated by an International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) evaluators under the auspices of the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In this lecture I will discuss the kinds of data that are available and describe various ways to obtain this information. We will learn about some of the publications that are available and Internet sources of nuclear data. You will be introduced to Isotope Explorer software for retrieving and displaying nuclear structure and radioactive decay data. The on-line resources Table of Radioactive Isotopes, PGAA Database Viewer, Nuclear Science Reference Search, Table of Isotopes Educational Website, and other information sources will be discussed. Exercises will be provided to increase your ability to understand, access, and use nuclear data.

  16. Three Lectures on Hadron Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Craig D

    2015-01-01

    These lectures explain that comparisons between experiment and theory can expose the impact of running couplings and masses on hadron observables and thereby aid materially in charting the momentum dependence of the interaction that underlies strong-interaction dynamics. The series begins with a primer on continuum QCD, which introduces some of the basic ideas necessary in order to understand the use of Schwinger functions as a nonperturbative tool in hadron physics. It continues with a discussion of confinement and dynamical symmetry breaking (DCSB) in the Standard Model, and the impact of these phenomena on our understanding of condensates, the parton structure of hadrons, and the pion electromagnetic form factor. The final lecture treats the problem of grand unification; namely, the contemporary use of Schwinger functions as a symmetry-preserving tool for the unified explanation and prediction of the properties of both mesons and baryons. It reveals that DCSB drives the formation of diquark clusters in bar...

  17. Kindergarten Quantum Mechanics lectures notes

    CERN Document Server

    Coecke, B

    2005-01-01

    These lecture notes survey some joint work with Samson Abramsky as it was presented by me at several conferences in the summer of 2005. It concerns `doing quantum mechanics using only pictures of lines, squares, triangles and diamonds'. This picture calculus can be seen as a very substantial extension of Dirac's notation, and has a purely algebraic counterpart in terms of so-called Strongly Compact Closed Categories (introduced by Abramsky and I in quant-ph/0402130 and [4]) which subsumes my Logic of Entanglement quant-ph/0402014. For a survey on the `what', the `why' and the `hows' I refer to a previous set of lecture notes quant-ph/0506132. In a last section we provide some pointers to the body of technical literature on the subject.

  18. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES-QUESTIONNAIRE

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  19. Lectures on Dark Matter Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lisanti, Mariangela

    2016-01-01

    Rotation curve measurements from the 1970s provided the first strong indication that a significant fraction of matter in the Universe is non-baryonic. In the intervening years, a tremendous amount of progress has been made on both the theoretical and experimental fronts in the search for this missing matter, which we now know constitutes nearly 85% of the Universe's matter density. These series of lectures, first given at the TASI 2015 summer school, provide an introduction to the basics of dark matter physics. They are geared for the advanced undergraduate or graduate student interested in pursuing research in high-energy physics. The primary goal is to build an understanding of how observations constrain the assumptions that can be made about the astro- and particle physics properties of dark matter. The lectures begin by delineating the basic assumptions that can be inferred about dark matter from rotation curves. A detailed discussion of thermal dark matter follows, motivating Weakly Interacting Massive P...

  20. Lectures on matrix field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ydri, Badis

    2017-01-01

    These lecture notes provide a systematic introduction to matrix models of quantum field theories with non-commutative and fuzzy geometries. The book initially focuses on the matrix formulation of non-commutative and fuzzy spaces, followed by a description of the non-perturbative treatment of the corresponding field theories. As an example, the phase structure of non-commutative phi-four theory is treated in great detail, with a separate chapter on the multitrace approach. The last chapter offers a general introduction to non-commutative gauge theories, while two appendices round out the text. Primarily written as a self-study guide for postgraduate students – with the aim of pedagogically introducing them to key analytical and numerical tools, as well as useful physical models in applications – these lecture notes will also benefit experienced researchers by providing a reference guide to the fundamentals of non-commutative field theory with an emphasis on matrix models and fuzzy geometries.

  1. Lectures on Matrix Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ydri, Badis

    The subject of matrix field theory involves matrix models, noncommutative geometry, fuzzy physics and noncommutative field theory and their interplay. In these lectures, a lot of emphasis is placed on the matrix formulation of noncommutative and fuzzy spaces, and on the non-perturbative treatment of the corresponding field theories. In particular, the phase structure of noncommutative $\\phi^4$ theory is treated in great detail, and an introduction to noncommutative gauge theory is given.

  2. Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 25 & Wednesday 26 May 2010 from 11:00 to 12:30 - Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500-1-001 Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe by Prof. Hitoshi Murayama (University of California, Berkeley) In two lectures, the following topics will be discussed: (1) Why baryon asymmetry is a problem at all (2) Review of the Sakharov's conditions (3) Why old models based on GUT did not work (4) Electroweak baryogenesis (5) Leptogenesis (6) Connections to the near-future experiments

  3. Lecture Notes on Differential Forms

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This is a series of lecture notes, with embedded problems, aimed at students studying differential topology. Many revered texts, such as Spivak's "Calculus on Manifolds" and Guillemin and Pollack's "Differential Topology" introduce forms by first working through properties of alternating tensors. Unfortunately, many students get bogged down with the whole notion of tensors and never get to the punch lines: Stokes' Theorem, de Rham cohomology, Poincare duality, and the realization of various t...

  4. TASI 2006 Lectures on Leptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; /Fermilab /UC, Irvine

    2007-03-01

    The origin of the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter of the Universe has been one of the great challenges in particle physics and cosmology. Leptogenesis as a mechanism for generating the cosmological baryon asymmetry of the Universe has gained significant interests ever since the advent of the evidence of non-zero neutrino masses. In these lectures presented at TASI 2006, I review various realizations of leptogenesis and allude to recent developments in this subject.

  5. MGMT 30100: Management Career Lectures

    OpenAIRE

    Landis, Maureen Huffer

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Management Career Lectures (MGMT 30100) is designed to help undergraduate management students with their overall career/professional development whether that focus on internship/job search processes or graduate school attendance. The course also supports the development, refinement and enrichment of the competencies within the “Launching Business Leaders” initiative. Students develop skills useful for the internship/job search process, gain knowledge that benefits short and long-ter...

  6. Three Lectures on Hadron Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Craig D.

    2016-04-01

    These lectures explain that comparisons between experiment and theory can expose the impact of running couplings and masses on hadron observables and thereby aid materially in charting the momentum dependence of the interaction that underlies strong-interaction dynamics. The series begins with a primer on continuum QCD, which introduces some of the basic ideas necessary in order to understand the use of Schwinger functions as a nonperturbative tool in hadron physics. It continues with a discussion of confinement and dynamical symmetry breaking (DCSB) in the Standard Model, and the impact of these phenomena on our understanding of condensates, the parton structure of hadrons, and the pion electromagnetic form factor. The final lecture treats the problem of grand unification; namely, the contemporary use of Schwinger functions as a symmetry-preserving tool for the unified explanation and prediction of the properties of both mesons and baryons. It reveals that DCSB drives the formation of diquark clusters in baryons and sketches a picture of baryons as bound-states with Borromean character. Planned experiments are capable of validating the perspectives outlined in these lectures.

  7. The value of independent specialty designation for interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, James C; Powell, Wayne A; Gray, Dawn R; Duffy, Peter L

    2017-01-01

    Interventional cardiology has finally completed, after 26 years of advocacy, a professional hat trick: independent board certification, membership as a unique specialty in the American Medical Association House of Delegates (AMA HOD), and recognition by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) as a separate medical specialty. This article points out how these distinctions for interventional cardiology and its professional society, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), have led to clear and definite benefits for interventional cardiologists and their patients. We focus on the least understood of these three-recognition by CMS and its implications for reimbursement and quality assessment for interventional cardiologists. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Safety of pharmacotherapy of osteoporosis in cardiology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapolski, Tomasz; Wysokiński, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The commonest medical conditions following menopause are osteoporosis and atherosclerotic disease. This review considers the safety of pharmacotherapy of osteoporosis in cardiology patients. Drugs used for osteoporosis treatment may have adverse effects on the cardiovascular system. This article has detailed analysed of current drug classes, such as the bisphosphonates and strontium ranelate, as well as reviewed of the controversy surrounding hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and the selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). Additionally, we discuss the adverse effects on the heart of calcium and drugs influencing calcium metabolism such as vitamin D, parathormone and calcitonin. We look at the interference between osteoporosis treatment and the drugs used for atherosclerosis. Moreover, the side effects on bones of cardiology drugs are analysed. Lastly, the possible advantages of selected drugs used for cardiovascular diseases in terms of osteoporosis prevention are evaluated.

  9. Longer-term impact of cardiology e-consults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasfy, Jason H; Rao, Sandhya K; Kalwani, Neil; Chittle, Melissa D; Richardson, Calvin A; Gallen, Kathleen M; Isselbacher, Eric M; Kimball, Alexandra B; Ferris, Timothy G

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac e-consults may be an effective way to deliver value-oriented outpatient cardiology care in an accountable care organization. Initial results of cardiac e-consults have demonstrated high satisfaction among both patients and referring providers, no known adverse events, and low rates of diagnostic testing. Nevertheless, differences between e-consults and traditional consults, effects of e-consults on traditional consult volume, and whether patients seek traditional consults after e-consults are unknown. We established a cardiac e-consult program on January 13, 2014. We then conducted detailed medical record reviews of all patients with e-consults to detect any adverse clinical events and detect subsequent traditional visits to cardiologists. We also performed 2 comparisons. First, we compared age, gender, and referral reason for e-consults vs traditional consults. Second, we compared changes in volume of referrals to cardiology vs other medical specialties that did not have e-consults. From January 13 to December 31, 2014, 1,642 traditional referrals and 165 e-consults were requested. The proportion of e-consults of all evaluations requested over that period was 9.1%. Gender balance was similar among traditional consults and e-consults (44.8% male for e-consults vs 45.0% for traditional consults, P = .981). E-consult patients were younger than traditional consult patients (55.3 vs 60.4 years, P cardiology visit during the follow-up period. E-consults are an effective and safe mechanism to enhance value in outpatient cardiology care, with low rates of bounceback to traditional consults. E-consults can account for nearly one-tenth of total outpatient consultation volume at 1 year within an accountable care organization and are associated with a reduction in traditional referrals to cardiologists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Preliminary results of quality assurance implementation in interventional cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikodemova, D. [Slovak Medical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The dramatic increase in the frequency of the interventional procedures reflects the significant benefit which directly affects the patient. However parallel is this benefit accompanied by some concern about the consequent increase in doses to patient and staff. The question of safety has prompted the European commission and Who to issue and advise to conduct research in the area of the intervention radiology and to prepare standard protocols for quality assurance of interventional procedures. The presentation is focused on the optimization of interventional procedures in cardiology with aim to reduce the risk level of high exposures and to elaborate national standard methods of quality assurance program, as well as, the procedures used for the case of overexposure. Study was conducted at Slovak Institute of Cardiology, as well as, at Slovak Pediatric Cardiology Center, where wide variation of specific interventional procedures are performed. Skin dose date of patient were measured by Unfors Patient Skin Dosemeter P.S.D. - 4 and the values of Dose area products followed during all examinations. All technical parameters used for examinations were identified. Simultaneously were measured the personal doses of the medical staff present by the examinations. For personal dose measurements Unfors E.D.D.30 dose meter was used, as well as, T.L.D. for measurements of doses on extremities. Preliminary results confirm wide spread of patient doses and professional doses of medical staff. The causes of this spread will by discussed. (authors)

  11. Review of paediatric cardiology services in district general hospitals in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Hannah; Singh, Yogen

    2016-03-01

    Following the Safe and Sustainable review of Paediatric Services in 2012/2013, National Health Service England recommended that local paediatric cardiology services should be provided by specially trained paediatricians with expertise in cardiology in all non-specialist hospitals. To understand the variation in local paediatric cardiology services provided across district general hospitals in the United Kingdom. An internet-based questionnaire was sent out via the Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology Special Interest Group and the Neonatologists with Interest in Cardiology and Haemodynamics contact databases and the National Health Service directory. Non-responders were followed-up via telephone. The response rate was 80% (141 of 177 hospitals), and paediatricians with expertise in cardiology were available in 68% of those. Local cardiology clinics led by paediatricians with expertise in cardiology were provided in 96 hospitals (68%), whereas specialist outreach clinics were held in 123 centres (87%). A total of 11 hospitals provided neither specialist outreach clinics nor any local cardiology clinics led by paediatricians with expertise in cardiology. Paediatric echocardiography services were provided in 83% of the hospitals, 12-lead electrocardiogram in 96%, Holter electrocardiogram in 91%, and exercise testing in only 47% of the responding hospitals. Telemedicine facilities were established in only 52% of the centres, where sharing echocardiogram images via picture archiving and communication system was used most commonly. There has been a substantial increase in the availability of paediatricians with expertise in cardiology since 2008. Most of the hospitals are well-supported by specialist cardiology centres via outreach clinics; however, there remains significant variation in the local paediatric cardiology services provided across district general hospitals in the United Kingdom.

  12. How Interactive can a Lecture Become?

    OpenAIRE

    Koohgilani,Mehran

    2014-01-01

    The uses of technology have been well documented and many people have tried to use the available technology. In an age of increasingly idevices dependent generation where on average students check their portable devices at least every 15 minutes for 15 seconds, the way students engage with the lecture and the lecturer has changed. The dynamic environment of the lecture is one which can be very enjoyable, demanding and noisy. It requires the attention of the student, note taking skills, teachi...

  13. Lecture Notes on Multigrid Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassilevski, P S

    2010-06-28

    The Lecture Notes are primarily based on a sequence of lectures given by the author while been a Fulbright scholar at 'St. Kliment Ohridski' University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria during the winter semester of 2009-2010 academic year. The notes are somewhat expanded version of the actual one semester class he taught there. The material covered is slightly modified and adapted version of similar topics covered in the author's monograph 'Multilevel Block-Factorization Preconditioners' published in 2008 by Springer. The author tried to keep the notes as self-contained as possible. That is why the lecture notes begin with some basic introductory matrix-vector linear algebra, numerical PDEs (finite element) facts emphasizing the relations between functions in finite dimensional spaces and their coefficient vectors and respective norms. Then, some additional facts on the implementation of finite elements based on relation tables using the popular compressed sparse row (CSR) format are given. Also, typical condition number estimates of stiffness and mass matrices, the global matrix assembly from local element matrices are given as well. Finally, some basic introductory facts about stationary iterative methods, such as Gauss-Seidel and its symmetrized version are presented. The introductory material ends up with the smoothing property of the classical iterative methods and the main definition of two-grid iterative methods. From here on, the second part of the notes begins which deals with the various aspects of the principal TG and the numerous versions of the MG cycles. At the end, in part III, we briefly introduce algebraic versions of MG referred to as AMG, focusing on classes of AMG specialized for finite element matrices.

  14. Live lecture versus video-recorded lecture: are students voting with their feet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardall, Scott; Krupat, Edward; Ulrich, Michael

    2008-12-01

    In light of educators' concerns that lecture attendance in medical school has declined, the authors sought to assess students' perceptions, evaluations, and motivations concerning live lectures compared with accelerated, video-recorded lectures viewed online. The authors performed a cross-sectional survey study of all first- and second-year students at Harvard Medical School. Respondents answered questions regarding their lecture attendance; use of class and personal time; use of accelerated, video-recorded lectures; and reasons for viewing video-recorded and live lectures. Other questions asked students to compare how well live and video-recorded lectures satisfied learning goals. Of the 353 students who received questionnaires, 204 (58%) returned responses. Collectively, students indicated watching 57.2% of lectures live, 29.4% recorded, and 3.8% using both methods. All students have watched recorded lectures, and most (88.5%) have used video-accelerating technologies. When using accelerated, video-recorded lecture as opposed to attending lecture, students felt they were more likely to increase their speed of knowledge acquisition (79.3% of students), look up additional information (67.7%), stay focused (64.8%), and learn more (63.7%). Live attendance remains the predominant method for viewing lectures. However, students find accelerated, video-recorded lectures equally or more valuable. Although educators may be uncomfortable with the fundamental change in the learning process represented by video-recorded lecture use, students' responses indicate that their decisions to attend lectures or view recorded lectures are motivated primarily by a desire to satisfy their professional goals. A challenge remains for educators to incorporate technologies students find useful while creating an interactive learning culture.

  15. TASI lectures: Collisions in anti-de Sitter space, conformal symmetry, and holographic superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Gubser, Steven S

    2010-01-01

    In four lectures, delivered at the TASI 2010 summer school, I cover selected topics in the application of the gauge-string duality to nuclear and condensed matter physics. On the nuclear side, I focus on multiplicity estimates from trapped surfaces in AdS_5, and on the consequences of conformal symmetry for relativistic hydrodynamics. On the condensed matter side, I explain the fermion response to the zero-temperature limit of p-wave holographic superconductors.

  16. Improving Lecture Quality through Training in Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowbray, Robert; Perry, Laura B.

    2015-01-01

    Lecturing is a common instructional format but poor lecturing skills can detract from students' learning experiences and outcomes. As lecturing is essentially a form of public communication, training in public speaking may improve lecture quality. Twelve university lecturers in Malaysia participated in a six-week public speaking skills training…

  17. Improving Lecture Quality through Training in Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowbray, Robert; Perry, Laura B.

    2015-01-01

    Lecturing is a common instructional format but poor lecturing skills can detract from students' learning experiences and outcomes. As lecturing is essentially a form of public communication, training in public speaking may improve lecture quality. Twelve university lecturers in Malaysia participated in a six-week public speaking skills training…

  18. Mechanics lectures on theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sommerfeld, Arnold Johannes Wilhelm

    1952-01-01

    Mechanics: Lectures on Theoretical Physics, Volume I covers a general course on theoretical physics. The book discusses the mechanics of a particle; the mechanics of systems; the principle of virtual work; and d'alembert's principle. The text also describes oscillation problems; the kinematics, statics, and dynamics of a rigid body; the theory of relative motion; and the integral variational principles of mechanics. Lagrange's equations for generalized coordinates and the theory of Hamilton are also considered. Physicists, mathematicians, and students taking Physics courses will find the book

  19. Lectures on the Strominger system

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Fernandez, Mario

    2016-01-01

    These notes give an introduction to the Strominger system of partial differential equations, and are based on lectures given in September 2015 at the GEOQUANT School, held at the Institute of Mathematical Sciences (ICMAT) in Madrid. We describe the links with the theory of balanced metrics in hermitian geometry, the Hermite-Yang-Mills equations, and its origins in physics, that we illustrate with many examples. We also cover some recent developments in the moduli problem and the interrelation of the Strominger system with generalized geometry, via the cohomological notion of string class.

  20. Lectures on quantum field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ashok

    2008-01-01

    This book consists of the lectures for a two-semester course on quantum field theory, and as such is presented in a quite informal and personal manner. The course starts with relativistic one-particle systems, and develops the basics of quantum field theory with an analysis of the representations of the Poincaré group. Canonical quantization is carried out for scalar, fermion, Abelian and non-Abelian gauge theories. Covariant quantization of gauge theories is also carried out with a detailed description of the BRST symmetry. The Higgs phenomenon and the standard model of electroweak interactio

  1. Lectures on Logic and Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    foundational, introductory and advanced courses, as well as workshops, covering a wide variety of topics within the three areas of interest: Language and Computation, Language and Logic, and Logic and Computation. During two weeks, around 50 courses and 10 workshops are offered to the attendants, each of 1.......5 hours per day during a five days week, with up to seven parallel sessions. ESSLLI also includes a student session (papers and posters by students only, 1.5 hour per day during the two weeks) and four evening lectures by senior scientists in the covered areas. The 6 course notes were carefully reviewed...

  2. Lecture Notes in Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, D

    2006-01-01

    These lecture notes cover undergraduate textbook topics (e.g. as in Sakurai), and also additional advanced topics at the same level of presentation. In particular: EPR and Bell; Basic postulates; The probability matrix; Measurement theory; Entanglement; Quantum computation; Wigner-Weyl formalism; The adiabatic picture; Berry phase; Linear response theory; Kubo formula; Modern approach to scattering theory with mesoscopic orientation; Theory of the resolvent and the Green function; Gauge and Galilei Symmetries; Motion in magnetic field; Quantum Hall effect; Quantization of the electromagnetic field; Fock space formalism.

  3. The Relative Effects of Traditional Lectures and Guided Notes Lectures on University Student Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, W. Larry; Weil, Timothy M.; Porter, James C. K.

    2012-01-01

    Guided notes were employed in two undergraduate Psychology courses involving 71 students. The study design utilized an alternating treatments format to compare Traditional Lectures with Guided Notes lectures. In one of the two courses, tests were administered after each class lecture, whereas the same type of test was administered at the beginning…

  4. The Use of Lecture Recordings in Higher Education: A Review of Institutional, Student, and Lecturer Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Frances V.; Neumann, David L.; Jones, Liz; Creed, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Web-based lecture technologies are being used increasingly in higher education. One widely-used method is the recording of lectures delivered during face-to-face teaching of on-campus courses. The recordings are subsequently made available to students on-line and have been variously referred to as lecture capture, video podcasts, and Lectopia. We…

  5. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. Lecture and Active Learning as a Dialectical Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallin, Irwin

    2017-01-01

    Lecture remains a valuable tool in the student learning toolbox--one that at its best helps students unpack what they read for class, place course material in context, and see how a subject matter expert solves problems. It may be useful to think of lecture and active learning as a dialectical tension satisfied by the interactive lecture. Just as…

  6. Online Lecture Recordings and Lecture Attendance: Investigating Student Preferences in a Large First Year Psychology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Alexandra; Raju, Sadhana; Sharma, Manjula D.

    2016-01-01

    While blended learning has been around for some time, the interplay between lecture recordings, lecture attendance and grades needs further examination particularly for large cohorts of over 1,000 students in 500 seat lecture theatres. This paper reports on such an investigation with a cohort of 1,450 first year psychology students' who indicated…

  7. Impact of post myocardial infarction depression on drug adherence of cardiological medicines

    OpenAIRE

    Hemanta Dutta; Soumitra Ghosh; DJ Dutta

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depressive symptoms are very usual in patients experiencing a history of myocardial infarction (MI). An individual who has developed depression after an episode of MI becomes non compliant with the treatment of cardiology. Aim: To test the impact of post MI depression on drug adherence of cardiological medicines. Settings and design: The study was conducted on patients of acute MI (n=50) attending cardiology outpatient department (OPD) of Assam Medical College and Hospital...

  8. Opening Speech at the 5th Great Wall International Forum on Geriatric Cardiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiwen WANG

    2006-01-01

    @@ Good morning, ladies and gentlemen, In the golden autumn of Beijing, on behalf of the Organizing Committee of the Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology, and the Institute of Geriatric Cardiology at Chinese PLA General Hospital, I am very delighted to extend my warmest welcome to the representatives, colleagues and distinguished guests, both domestic and abroad, to the 5th International Forum on Geriatric Cardiology.

  9. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  10. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  11. Position paper: proposal for a core curriculum for a European Sports Cardiology qualification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidbuchel, Hein; Papadakis, Michael; Panhuyzen-Goedkoop, Nicole; Carré, François; Dugmore, Dorian; Mellwig, Klaus-Peter; Rasmusen, Hanne Kruuse; Solberg, Erik E; Borjesson, Mats; Corrado, Domenico; Pelliccia, Antonio; Sharma, Sanjay

    2013-10-01

    Sports cardiology is a new and rapidly evolving subspecialty. It aims to elucidate the cardiovascular effects of regular exercise and delineate its benefits and risks, so that safe guidance can be provided to all individuals engaging in sports and/or physical activity in order to attain the maximum potential benefit at the lowest possible risk. The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) advocates systematic preparticipation cardiovascular screening in an effort to identify competitive athletes at risk of exercise-related cardiovascular events and sudden cardiac death. However, the implementation of preparticipation screening is hindered because of lack of structured training and as a result lack of sufficient expertise in the field of sports cardiology. In 2008 the European Society of Cardiology published a core curriculum for the general cardiologist, in which sports cardiology was incorporated within the topic 'Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology'. However, the exponential rise in knowledge and the growing demand for expertise in the field of sports cardiology dictates the need to systematically structure the knowledge base of sports cardiology into a detailed curriculum. We envisage that the curriculum would facilitate more uniform training and guideline implementation throughout Europe, and safeguard that evaluation and guidance of competitive athletes or individuals who wish to engage in leisure-time sports activities is performed by physicians with expertise in the field. The current manuscript provides a comprehensive curriculum for sports cardiology, which may serve as a framework upon which universities and national and international health authorities will develop the training, evaluation and accreditation in sports cardiology.

  12. Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelson, Roger M.

    The fluid kaleidoscope of the Earth's ocean and atmosphere churns and sparkles with jets, gyres, eddies, waves, streams, and cyclones. These vast circulations, essential elements of the physical environment that support human life, are given a special character by the Earth's rotation and by their confinement to a shallow surficial layer, thin relative to the solid Earth in roughly the same proportion as an apple skin is to an apple. Geophysical fluid dynamics exploits this special character to develop a unified theoretical approach to the physics of the ocean and atmosphere.With Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Rick Salmon has added an insightful and provocative volume to the handful of authoritative texts currently available on the subject. The book is intended for first-year graduate students, but advanced students and researchers also will find it useful. It is divided into seven chapters, the first four of these adapted from course lectures. The book is well written and presents a fresh and stimulating perspective that complements existing texts. It would serve equally well either as the main text for a core graduate curriculum or as a supplementary resource for students and teachers seeking new approaches to both classical and contemporary problems. A lively set of footnotes contains many references to very recent work. The printing is attractive, the binding is of high quality, and typographical errors are few.

  13. Lectures on Dark Matter Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisanti, Mariangela

    Rotation curve measurements from the 1970s provided the first strong indication that a significant fraction of matter in the Universe is non-baryonic. In the intervening years, a tremendous amount of progress has been made on both the theoretical and experimental fronts in the search for this missing matter, which we now know constitutes nearly 85% of the Universe's matter density. These series of lectures provide an introduction to the basics of dark matter physics. They are geared for the advanced undergraduate or graduate student interested in pursuing research in high-energy physics. The primary goal is to build an understanding of how observations constrain the assumptions that can be made about the astro- and particle physics properties of dark matter. The lectures begin by delineating the basic assumptions that can be inferred about dark matter from rotation curves. A detailed discussion of thermal dark matter follows, motivating Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, as well as lighter-mass alternatives. As an application of these concepts, the phenomenology of direct and indirect detection experiments is discussed in detail.

  14. Web Lectures - ATLAS Overview Week

    CERN Multimedia

    Tushar Bhatnagar; Jeremy Herr; Mitch McLachlan; Homer A. Neal

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS Web Archives Web Archives of the ATLAS Overview Week in Glasgow are now available from the University of Michigan portal here. Archives of ATLAS Plenary Sessions, Workshops, Meetings, and Tutorials recorded over the past two years are available via the University of Michigan Lecture Portal. Other recent additions include the ROOT Workshop held at CERN on March 26-27, the Physics Analysis Tools Workshop held in Bergen, Norway on April 23-27, and the CTEQ Workshop: "Physics at the LHC: Early Challenges" held at Michigan State University on May 14-15. Viewing requires a standard Web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the Web or downloaded locally. In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal. Feedback & Suggestions Welcome Suggestions for events or tutorials to record in 2007, as well as feedback on existing archives, is always welcome...

  15. Influencing factors on lecture attendance at a tertiary institution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tendency towards decreasing class attendance by students is a concern for ... Various factors contribute to the motivation of students, which in turn directly or ... lecture attendance, lecture/r quality as well as reasons for attending classes.

  16. Short lecture series in sustainable product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Tim C.

    2005-01-01

    Three lectures in sustainable product development models, methods and mindsets should give insight into the way of thinking about the environment when developing products. The first two lectures will guide you through: . Environmental problems in industry & life-cycle thinking . Professional...... methods for analysing and changing products’ environmental profiles . Sustainability as a driver for innovation...

  17. The Role of Lecturers and Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Víctor M.; Perera Rodríguez, Víctor Hugo; Melero Aguilar, Noelia; Cotán Fernández, Almudena; Moriña, Anabel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of how lecturers respond to students with disabilities, the initial question being: do lecturers aid or hinder students? Findings pertain to a broader research project employing a non-usual research methodology in higher education research and students with disabilities: the biographical-narrative methodology. The…

  18. The Role of Lecturers and Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Víctor M.; Perera Rodríguez, Víctor Hugo; Melero Aguilar, Noelia; Cotán Fernández, Almudena; Moriña, Anabel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of how lecturers respond to students with disabilities, the initial question being: do lecturers aid or hinder students? Findings pertain to a broader research project employing a non-usual research methodology in higher education research and students with disabilities: the biographical-narrative methodology. The…

  19. In Defense of the Populist Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrad, Mark Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) programs like Microsoft PowerPoint and Apple Keynote have become the norm for large university lecture classes, but their record in terms of student engagement and active learning is mixed at best. Here, the author presents the merits of a "populist" lecture style that takes full advantage of the…

  20. Lectures on Composite Materials for Aircraft Structures,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    lectures are related to structural applications of composites . In Lecture 7, the basic theory that is needed for composite structural analysis is...which composites have been taken up for aeronautical applications. Several specific applications of composites in aircraft structures am described in

  1. Short lecture series in sustainable product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Tim C.

    2005-01-01

    Three lectures in sustainable product development models, methods and mindsets should give insight into the way of thinking about the environment when developing products. The first two lectures will guide you through: . Environmental problems in industry & life-cycle thinking . Professional...

  2. Lecture Notes in Statistics. 3rd Semester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements of the curriculum for the 3rd smester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business.......The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements of the curriculum for the 3rd smester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business....

  3. Lecture 11: Some More Suggestions and Remarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montessori, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This lecture discusses how the careful preparation of the observer, control of conditions, and precise use of materials will allow the child to "be free to manifest the phenomena which we wish to observe." This lecture was delivered at the International Training Course, London, 1921. [Reprinted from "AMI Communications" (2008).

  4. Sir Nevill F. Mott Lecture Award

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.

    2010-01-01

    The Mott Lecture is awarded to scientists working in the tradition of Nobel laureate Sir Nevill F. Mott, with exceptional contributions to the fields important to the ICANS conference. The ICANS23 Mott Lecture was awarded to Prof. Dr. Sigurd Wagner of Princeton University. He is recognized for his g

  5. Students' Perception of Live Lectures' Inherent Disadvantages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Juraj; Pale, Predrag

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to provide insight into various properties of live lectures from the perspective of sophomore engineering students. In an anonymous online survey conducted at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb, we investigated students' opinions regarding lecture attendance, inherent disadvantages of live…

  6. A Case Against Mandatory Lecture Attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Richard M.; Flournoy, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Students' lecture attendance, course grades, class rank at the end of the first year of medical school, and scores on the NBME Part I examinations were correlated. The data suggest that a significant number of students who did not attend lectures did well academically. (MLW)

  7. Lecture Notes in Statistics. 3rd Semester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements of the curriculum for the 3rd smester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business.......The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements of the curriculum for the 3rd smester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business....

  8. Metabolomics, a promising approach to translational research in cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martino Deidda

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we will provide a description of metabolomics in comparison with other, better known “omics” disciplines such as genomics and proteomics. In addition, we will review the current rationale for the implementation of metabolomics in cardiology, its basic methodology and the available data from human studies in this discipline. The topics covered will delineate the importance of being able to use the metabolomic information to understand the mechanisms of diseases from the perspective of systems biology, and as a non-invasive approach to the diagnosis, grading and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  9. The Paediatric Cardiology Hall of Fame – Donald Nixon Ross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Jane

    2015-10-01

    Donald Nixon Ross, FRCS (4 October 1922 to 7 July 2014) was a South African-born British cardiothoracic surgeon, who developed the pulmonary autograft, known as the Ross procedure, for the treatment of aortic valve disease, and also performed the first heart transplant in the United Kingdom in 1968. This paper, written by Jane Somerville, Professor of Cardiology [Retired], Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom, provides the personal recollections about Donald Ross from Jane Somerville, and thus provides a unique snapshot of cardiac surgical history.

  10. Benefits of an international working exchange in pediatric cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, John P; Ramsay, James M; Bullock, Andrew; Chen, Robert P; Warren, Andrew E; Wong, Kenny K

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a 1-year exchange between members of two pediatric cardiology centers: one in Canada and one in Australia. Five cardiologists participated in sequence, fully engaging in the activities of the host department. The motivation of the exchange was broadly educational including clinical experience, shared expertise, teaching, and research collaboration. Structured debriefing confirmed the value of the exchange. In addition to the experience of working in a different medical system, eight research papers were developed, with two research projects ongoing as well as subsequent exchanges of nursing and technical personnel. Interchange between two academic departments can add strength to both and allow development of new skills and research activity.

  11. [Methods of the elaboration of data of the cardiological importance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, C; Taddei, A; Varanini, M

    1987-12-01

    This paper deals with some introductory topics of signal processing and decision making in cardiology. In both instances the matter is referred to general schemes well suited to host different applications. Signal processing is divided in some phases: acquisition, storing, analysis and each of them is described with applications to specific signals. In a similar manner the methods for decision making have been simplified to a scheme including a "knowledge base" and an "inference method". The scheme is used to classify various implementations. Bayes analysis and expert systems have been introduced with some details.

  12. Richard Feynman's popular lectures on quantum electrodynamics: The 1979 Robb lectures at Auckland University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, J. M.; Kwan, A. M.

    1996-06-01

    The subject of quantum electrodynamics (QED) was the subject of QED—The Strange Theory of Light and Matter, the popular book by Richard Feynman which was published by Princeton University Press in 1985. On p. 1, Feynman makes passing reference to the fact that the book is based on a series of general lectures on QED which were, however, first delivered in New Zealand. At Auckland University, these lectures were delivered in 1979, as the Sir Douglas Robb lectures, and videotapes of the lectures are held by the Auckland University Physics Department. We have carried out a detailed examination of these videotapes, and we discuss here the major differences between the original Auckland lectures and the published version. We use selected quotations from the lectures to show that the original lectures provide additional insight into Feynman's character, and have great educational value.

  13. Anthropocentric Video Segmentation for Lecture Webcasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Rojas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Many lecture recording and presentation systems transmit slides or chalkboard content along with a small video of the instructor. As a result, two areas of the screen are competing for the viewer's attention, causing the widely known split-attention effect. Face and body gestures, such as pointing, do not appear in the context of the slides or the board. To eliminate this problem, this article proposes to extract the lecturer from the video stream and paste his or her image onto the board or slide image. As a result, the lecturer acting in front of the board or slides becomes the center of attention. The entire lecture presentation becomes more human-centered. This article presents both an analysis of the underlying psychological problems and an explanation of signal processing techniques that are applied in a concrete system. The presented algorithm is able to extract and overlay the lecturer online and in real time at full video resolution.

  14. Lectures on Foliation Dynamics: Barcelona 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Hurder, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This survey is based on a series of five lectures, given May 3--7, 2010, at the Centre de Recerca Matematica, Barcelona. The goal of the lectures was to present aspects of the theory of foliation dynamical systems which have particular importance for the classification of foliations of compact manifolds. The lectures emphasized intuitive concepts and informal discussion, while taking the reader into topics of active research in this subject. These notes update and expand on the lectures, and include more recent progress. This article also includes an extensive set of references, as well as highlighting many open questions and problems. A set of "homework problems" is also included, one for each day of lecture.

  15. Anthropocentric Video Segmentation for Lecture Webcasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas Raul

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many lecture recording and presentation systems transmit slides or chalkboard content along with a small video of the instructor. As a result, two areas of the screen are competing for the viewer's attention, causing the widely known split-attention effect. Face and body gestures, such as pointing, do not appear in the context of the slides or the board. To eliminate this problem, this article proposes to extract the lecturer from the video stream and paste his or her image onto the board or slide image. As a result, the lecturer acting in front of the board or slides becomes the center of attention. The entire lecture presentation becomes more human-centered. This article presents both an analysis of the underlying psychological problems and an explanation of signal processing techniques that are applied in a concrete system. The presented algorithm is able to extract and overlay the lecturer online and in real time at full video resolution.

  16. Lecture notes on diophantine analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zannier, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    These lecture notes originate from a course delivered at the Scuola Normale in Pisa in 2006. Generally speaking, the prerequisites do not go beyond basic mathematical material and are accessible to many undergraduates. The contents mainly concern diophantine problems on affine curves, in practice describing the integer solutions of equations in two variables. This case historically suggested some major ideas for more general problems. Starting with linear and quadratic equations, the important connections with Diophantine Approximation are presented and Thue's celebrated results are proved in full detail. In later chapters more modern issues on heights of algebraic points are dealt with, and applied to a sharp quantitative treatment of the unit equation. The book also contains several Supplements, hinted exercises and an Appendix on recent work on heights.

  17. Lectures on Gravity and Entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Van Raamsdonk, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The AdS/CFT correspondence provides quantum theories of gravity in which spacetime and gravitational physics emerge from ordinary non-gravitational quantum systems with many degrees of freedom. Recent work in this context has uncovered fascinating connections between quantum information theory and quantum gravity, suggesting that spacetime geometry is directly related to the entanglement structure of the underlying quantum mechanical degrees of freedom and that aspects of spacetime dynamics (gravitation) can be understood from basic quantum information theoretic constraints. In these notes, we provide an elementary introduction to these developments, suitable for readers with some background in general relativity and quantum field theory. The notes are based on lectures given at the CERN Spring School 2014, the Jerusalem Winter School 2014, the TASI Summer School 2015, and the Trieste Spring School 2015.

  18. Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (1/3), by Maria Teresa Dova (Universidad Nacional de La Plata & CONICET, Argentina).   Wednesday, April 25, 2012 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN (500-1-001 - Main Auditorium ) The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with energies above 1000 TeV, is still unknown. The discovery of their sources will reveal the engines of the most energetic astrophysical accelerators in the universe. In these lectures we present the recent observational results from HiRes, Telescope Array and Pierre Auger Observatory as well as (some of) the possible astrophysical origins of UHECR. These experiments deal with particle interactions at energies orders of magnitude higher than achieved in terrestrial accelerators. Organised by Luis Alvarez-Gaume.

  19. Lecture notes: Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ogilvie, Gordon I

    2016-01-01

    These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes, and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is 'frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, includin...

  20. Collide@CERN - public lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to a public lecture by Gilles Jobin, first winner of the Collide@CERN Geneva Dance and Performance Artist-in-residence Prize, and his CERN inspiration partner, Joao Pequenao. They will present their work in dance and science at the Globe of Science and Innovation on Wednesday, 23 May 2012 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6.30 p.m.).   
                                                  Programme 19:00 Opening address by - Professor Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, - Ariane Koek...

  1. Lecture 3: Web Application Security

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Computer security has been an increasing concern for IT professionals for a number of years, yet despite all the efforts, computer systems and networks remain highly vulnerable to attacks of different kinds. Design flaws and security bugs in the underlying software are among the main reasons for this. This lecture focuses on security aspects of Web application development. Various vulnerabilities typical to web applications (such as Cross-site scripting, SQL injection, cross-site request forgery etc.) are introduced and discussed. Sebastian Lopienski is CERN’s deputy Computer Security Officer. He works on security strategy and policies; offers internal consultancy and audit services; develops and maintains security tools for vulnerability assessment and intrusion detection; provides training and awareness raising; and does incident investigation and response. During his work at CERN since 2001, Sebastian has had various assignments, including designing and developing software to manage and support servic...

  2. Enabling Precision Cardiology Through Multiscale Biology and Systems Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kipp W. Johnson, BS

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The traditional paradigm of cardiovascular disease research derives insight from large-scale, broadly inclusive clinical studies of well-characterized pathologies. These insights are then put into practice according to standardized clinical guidelines. However, stagnation in the development of new cardiovascular therapies and variability in therapeutic response implies that this paradigm is insufficient for reducing the cardiovascular disease burden. In this state-of-the-art review, we examine 3 interconnected ideas we put forth as key concepts for enabling a transition to precision cardiology: 1 precision characterization of cardiovascular disease with machine learning methods; 2 the application of network models of disease to embrace disease complexity; and 3 using insights from the previous 2 ideas to enable pharmacology and polypharmacology systems for more precise drug-to-patient matching and patient-disease stratification. We conclude by exploring the challenges of applying a precision approach to cardiology, which arise from a deficit of the required resources and infrastructure, and emerging evidence for the clinical effectiveness of this nascent approach.

  3. Simulation-based planning of surgical interventions in pediatric cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Alison

    2012-11-01

    Hemodynamics plays an essential role in the progression and treatment of cardiovascular disease. This is particularly true in pediatric cardiology, due to the wide variation in anatomy observed in congenital heart disease patients. While medical imaging provides increasingly detailed anatomical information, clinicians currently have limited knowledge of important fluid mechanical parameters. Treatment decisions are therefore often made using anatomical information alone, despite the known links between fluid mechanics and disease progression. Patient-specific simulations now offer the means to provide this missing information, and, more importantly, to perform in-silico testing of new surgical designs at no risk to the patient. In this talk, we will outline the current state of the art in methods for cardiovascular blood flow simulation and virtual surgery. We will then present new methodology for coupling optimization with simulation and uncertainty quantification to customize treatments for individual patients. Finally, we will present examples in pediatric cardiology that illustrate the potential impact of these tools in the clinical setting.

  4. Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigó, José M; Small, Michael

    2017-06-28

    The application of mathematics, natural sciences and engineering to medicine is gaining momentum as the mutual benefits of this collaboration become increasingly obvious. This theme issue is intended to highlight the trend in the case of mathematics. Specifically, the scope of this theme issue is to give a general view of the current research in the application of mathematical methods to medicine, as well as to show how mathematics can help in such important aspects as understanding, prediction, treatment and data processing. To this end, three representative specialties have been selected: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology. Concerning the topics, the 12 research papers and one review included in this issue cover biofluids, cardiac and virus dynamics, computational neuroscience, functional magnetic resonance imaging data processing, neural networks, optimization of treatment strategies, time-series analysis and tumour growth. In conclusion, this theme issue contains a collection of fine contributions at the intersection of mathematics and medicine, not as an exercise in applied mathematics but as a multidisciplinary research effort that interests both communities and our society in general.This article is part of the themed issue 'Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Simulation based planning of surgical interventions in pediatric cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Alison L.

    2013-10-01

    Hemodynamics plays an essential role in the progression and treatment of cardiovascular disease. However, while medical imaging provides increasingly detailed anatomical information, clinicians often have limited access to hemodynamic data that may be crucial to patient risk assessment and treatment planning. Computational simulations can now provide detailed hemodynamic data to augment clinical knowledge in both adult and pediatric applications. There is a particular need for simulation tools in pediatric cardiology, due to the wide variation in anatomy and physiology in congenital heart disease patients, necessitating individualized treatment plans. Despite great strides in medical imaging, enabling extraction of flow information from magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging, simulations offer predictive capabilities that imaging alone cannot provide. Patient specific simulations can be used for in silico testing of new surgical designs, treatment planning, device testing, and patient risk stratification. Furthermore, simulations can be performed at no direct risk to the patient. In this paper, we outline the current state of the art in methods for cardiovascular blood flow simulation and virtual surgery. We then step through pressing challenges in the field, including multiscale modeling, boundary condition selection, optimization, and uncertainty quantification. Finally, we summarize simulation results of two representative examples from pediatric cardiology: single ventricle physiology, and coronary aneurysms caused by Kawasaki disease. These examples illustrate the potential impact of computational modeling tools in the clinical setting.

  6. Training fellows in paediatric cardiology: the Harvard experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David W; Allan, Catherine K; Newburger, Jane W

    2016-12-01

    The Fellowship Program of the Department of Cardiology at Boston Children's Hospital seeks to train academically oriented leaders in clinical care and laboratory and clinical investigation of cardiovascular disease in the young. The core clinical fellowship involves 3 years in training, comprising 24 months of clinical rotations and 12 months of elective and research experience. Trainees have access to a vast array of research opportunities - clinical, basic, and translational. Clinical fellows interested in basic science may reverse the usual sequence and start their training in the laboratory, deferring clinical training for 1 or more years. An increasing number of clinical trainees apply to spend a fourth year as a senior fellow in one of the subspecialty areas of paediatric cardiology. From the founding of the Department to the present, we have maintained a fundamental and unwavering commitment to training and education in clinical care and research in basic science and clinical investigation, as well as to the training of outstanding young clinicians and investigators.

  7. The increasing impact of laboratory medicine on clinical cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerico, Aldo

    2003-07-01

    The practice of cardiology continues to evolve along with a better understanding of the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and the development of new therapeutic procedures. Consequently, new demands are being made on the in vitro diagnostics industry to improve the performance of existing cardiac markers and to develop novel markers for new cardiac disease indications. Indeed, in the last 20 years there has been a progressive increase in new laboratory tests for markers of cardiac diseases. Several highly sensitive and/or specific assays for the detection of myocardial ischemic damage as well as some immunoassays for cardiac natriuretic hormones, now considered a reliable marker of myocardial function, have become commercially available. In parallel, a growing number of some novel risk factors, which can be assessed and monitored by laboratory methods, have been added to the classical risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Finally, the recent explosion of genetic analysis may soon place at the clinical cardiologist's disposal many laboratory tests for defining the diagnosis at the molecular level, assessing new risk factors, and better targeting the pharmaceutical approaches in patients with cardiovascular disease. In the present article, after a brief description of the analytical tests included in these four groups, each group's impact on clinical cardiology is discussed in detail.

  8. COMPARING MEASURED AND CALCULATED DOSES IN INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY PROCEDURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira da Silva, M W; Canevaro, L V; Hunt, J; Rodrigues, B B D

    2017-03-16

    Interventional cardiology requires complex procedures and can result in high doses and dose rates to the patient and medical staff. The many variables that influence the dose to the patient and staff include the beam position and angle, beam size, kVp, filtration, kerma-area product and focus-skin distance. A number of studies using the Monte Carlo method have been undertaken to obtain prospective dose assessments. In this paper, detailed irradiation scenarios were simulated mathematically and the resulting dose estimates were compared with real measurements made previously under very similar irradiation conditions and geometries. The real measurements and the calculated doses were carried out using or simulating an interventional cardiology system with a flat monoplane detector installed in a dedicated room with an Alderson phantom placed on the procedure table. The X-ray spectra, beam angles, focus-skin distance, measured kerma-area product and filtration were simulated, and the real dose measurements and calculated doses were compared. It was shown that the Monte Carlo method was capable of reproducing the real dose measurements within acceptable levels of uncertainty.

  9. Optimization and surgical design for applications in pediatric cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Alison; Bernstein, Adam; Taylor, Charles; Feinstein, Jeffrey

    2007-11-01

    The coupling of shape optimization to cardiovascular blood flow simulations has potential to improve the design of current surgeries and to eventually allow for optimization of surgical designs for individual patients. This is particularly true in pediatric cardiology, where geometries vary dramatically between patients, and unusual geometries can lead to unfavorable hemodynamic conditions. Interfacing shape optimization to three-dimensional, time-dependent fluid mechanics problems is particularly challenging because of the large computational cost and the difficulty in computing objective function gradients. In this work a derivative-free optimization algorithm is coupled to a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver that has been tailored for cardiovascular applications. The optimization code employs mesh adaptive direct search in conjunction with a Kriging surrogate. This framework is successfully demonstrated on several geometries representative of cardiovascular surgical applications. We will discuss issues of cost function choice for surgical applications, including energy loss and wall shear stress distribution. In particular, we will discuss the creation of new designs for the Fontan procedure, a surgery done in pediatric cardiology to treat single ventricle heart defects.

  10. Possible helio-geomagnetic activity influence on cardiological cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsavrias, Christos

    Eruptive solar events as flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) occur during solar activ-ity periods. Energetic particles, fast solar wind plasma and electromagnetic radiation pass through interplanetary space, arrive on Earth's ionosphere-magnetosphere and produce various disturbances. It is well known the negative influence of geomagnetic substorms on the human technological applications on geospace. During the last 25 years, many studies concerning the possible influence on the human health are published. Increase of the Acute Coronary Syn-dromes and disorders of the Cardiac Rhythm, increase of accidents as well as neurological and psychological disorders (e.g. increase of suicides) during or near to the geomagnetic storms time interval are reported. In this study, we research the problem in Greece, focusing on patients with Acute Myocardial Infraction, hospitalized in the 2nd Cardiological Department of the General Hospital of Nikaea (Piraeus City), for the time interval 1997-2007 (23rd solar cycle) and also to the arrival of emergency cardiological cases to Emergency Department of two greek hospitals, the General Hospital of Lamia City and the General Hospital of Veria City during the selected months, with or without helio-geomagnetic activity, of the 23rd solar cycle. Increase of cases is recorded during the periods with increase helio-geomagnetic activity. The necessity of continuing the research for a longer period and with a bigger sample is high; so as to exact more secure conclusions.

  11. Business process re-engineering a cardiology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Syed Murtuza Hussain

    2014-01-01

    The health care sector is the world's third largest industry and is facing several problems such as excessive waiting times for patients, lack of access to information, high costs of delivery and medical errors. Health care managers seek the help of process re-engineering methods to discover the best processes and to re-engineer existing processes to optimize productivity without compromising on quality. Business process re-engineering refers to the fundamental rethinking and radical redesign of business processes to achieve dramatic improvements in critical, contemporary measures of performance, such as cost, quality and speed. The present study is carried out at a tertiary care corporate hospital with 1000-plus-bed facility. A descriptive study and case study method is used with intensive, careful and complete observation of patient flow, delays, short comings in patient movement and workflow. Data is collected through observations, informal interviews and analyzed by matrix analysis. Flowcharts were drawn for the various work activities of the cardiology department including workflow of the admission process, workflow in the ward and ICCU, workflow of the patient for catheterization laboratory procedure, and in the billing and discharge process. The problems of the existing system were studied and necessary suggestions were recommended to cardiology department module with an illustrated flowchart.

  12. Bionic autonomic neuromodulation revolutionizes cardiology in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    In this invited session, we would like to address the impact of bionic neuromodulation on cardiovascular diseases. It has been well established that cardiovascular dysregulation plays major roles in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. This is the reason why most drugs currently used in cardiology have significant pharmacological effects on the cardiovascular regulatory system. Since the ultimate center for cardiovascular regulation is the brainstem, it is conceivable that autonomic neuromodulation would have significant impacts on cardiovascular diseases. On the basis of this framework, we first developed a bionic, neurally regulated artificial pacemaker. We then substituted the brainstem by CPU and developed a bionic artificial baroreflex system. We further developed a bionic brain that achieved better regulatory conditions than the native brainstem in order to improve survival in animal model with heart failure. We recently developed a bionic neuromodulation system to reduce infarction size following acute myocardial infarction. We believe that the bionic neuromodulation will inspire even more intricate applications in cardiology in the 21(st) century.

  13. Linux thin-client conversion in a large cardiology practice: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echt, Martin P; Rosen, Jordan

    2004-01-01

    Capital Cardiology Associates (CCA) is a single-specialty cardiology practice with offices in New York and Massachusetts. In 2003, CCA converted its IT system from a Microsoft-based network to a Linux network employing Linux thin-client technology with overall positive outcomes.

  14. Myocardial scintigraphy. Clinical use and consequence in a non-invasive cardiological department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dümcke, Christine Elisabeth; Graff, J; Rasmussen, SPL

    2006-01-01

    to analyse the clinical use of MPI in a university hospital without invasive cardiological laboratory. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the period 01.01.2002 to 31.12.2003, 259 patients (141 women, 118 men) were referred to MPI from our department of cardiology. RESULTS: Normal MPI was seen in 111 patients (43...

  15. Major achievements in cardiology in the past century : influence on Dutch cardiovascular medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wall, E. E.; de Boer, M-J; Doevendans, P. A.; Wilde, A. A.; Zijlstra, F.

    At the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the Netherlands Society of Cardiology, it is interesting to look back on the major scientific achievements in cardiovascular medicine of the last century, and to pail attention to the impact of these achievements on Dutch Cardiology. It might be a nice

  16. Impact of a Preventive Cardiology Curriculum on Knowledge and Attitudes of First-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitia, Marie C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study of 54 first-year Marshall University (West Virginia) medical students found that a preventive cardiology curriculum improved both knowledge of and attitudes about preventive cardiology in general and on all 4 subscales (epidemiological evidence, risk factor characteristics, pathophysiology, primary interventions). (Author/MSE)

  17. Mental disorders and general well-being in cardiology outpatients--6-year survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birket-Smith, Morten; Hansen, Baiba H; Hanash, Jamal A

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Long-term survival in a sample of cardiology outpatients with and without mental disorders and other psychosocial risk factors. METHODS: In a cardiology outpatient setting, 103 consecutive patients were asked to participate in the study. Of these, 86 were included and screened for mental...

  18. Ceremony for the inaugural issuance of the Journal of Geriatric Cardiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ The Journal of Geriatric Cardiology ( JGC )started publication in September 2004. To announce the publication of its first issue, a ceremony was held at China Grand Hotel in Beijing on October 18th, 2004during the 15th Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology. Many guests were present at the ceremony.

  19. Myocardial scintigraphy. Clinical use and consequence in a non-invasive cardiological department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dümcke, Christine Elisabeth; Graff, J; Rasmussen, SPL

    2006-01-01

    to analyse the clinical use of MPI in a university hospital without invasive cardiological laboratory. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the period 01.01.2002 to 31.12.2003, 259 patients (141 women, 118 men) were referred to MPI from our department of cardiology. RESULTS: Normal MPI was seen in 111 patients (43...

  20. Summary of the 5th Annual Scientific Session of Cardiology in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伊丽

    2003-01-01

    @@ The 5th Annual Scientific Session of Cardiology inSouth China was held from April 3 -7, 2003 inGuangzhou. A seminar-- "The Frontline Problemsand New Viewpoints in Cardiology in Recent Times"was held at the same time.

  1. [Management control of cardiology: the experience of a departmental unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccanelli, A; Spandonaro, F

    2000-01-01

    In most Italian hospitals, sanitary reform is being applied, while at the same time a new organization of the National Health System is being planned. The director of the medical hospital (head doctor) is becoming more and more involved in management and this aspect has modified his professional attributes. Cardiology is a branch of medicine that, through its scientific preparatory work consisting in debates, management courses, ethics, and production of managerial software, is closer to applying the reform without risking improper administrative aspects. This, obviously, comes about after thoroughly reviewing past work methods and the need to have an administrative organization, which allocates efficient use of manpower and materials, helping to eliminate any sources of inefficiency. The logical procedure foresees an actual analysis in terms of sanitary needs and availability of resources, and so attempting to better balance and harmonize both aspects of the problem. Certainly, the acquisition of theoretical norms and practices, which today are present because of the upsurge in training courses for doctors, is not enough to guarantee the achievement of optimal results. Furthermore, we find that theoretical models need to be validated and adapted to real work situations in the public hospital sector. This paper proposes, therefore, to explain the managerial experiences achieved in actual work situations at the Cardiology Department Unit of the San Giovanni Addolorata Hospital in Rome. In particular, it shows that in order to reach its clinical and economical objectives, it is essential to make available correct informative support for strategic and operational decisions. We can observe that there is a continuing lack of computer support systems being integrated into the present organization of most cardiology units. The use of software distributed to cardiology units from the Associazione Nazionale Medici Cardiologi Ospedalieri (ANMCO) has enabled us to partially

  2. Instructional analysis of lecture video recordings and its application for quality improvement of medical lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sunyong; Im, Sun Ju; Lee, Sun Hee; Kam, Beesung; Yune, So Joung; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Jung A; Lee, Yuna; Lee, Sang Yeoup

    2011-12-01

    The lecture is a technique for delivering knowledge and information cost-effectively to large medical classes in medical education. The aim of this study was to analyze teaching quality, based on triangle analysis of video recordings of medical lectures, to strengthen teaching competency in medical school. The subjects of this study were 13 medical professors who taught 1st- and 2nd-year medical students and agreed to a triangle analysis of video recordings of their lectures. We first performed triangle analysis, which consisted of a professional analysis of video recordings, self-assessment by teaching professors, and feedback from students, and the data were crosschecked by five school consultants for reliability and consistency. Most of the distress that teachers experienced during the lecture occurred in uniform teaching environments, such as larger lecture classes. Larger lectures that primarily used PowerPoint as a medium to deliver information effected poor interaction with students. Other distressing factors in the lecture were personal characteristics and lack of strategic faculty development. Triangle analysis of video recordings of medical lectures gives teachers an opportunity and motive to improve teaching quality. Faculty development and various improvement strategies, based on this analysis, are expected to help teachers succeed as effective, efficient, and attractive lecturers while improving the quality of larger lecture classes.

  3. [THE DISCUSSION CONCERNING THE PLACE OF LECTURES AND COMPULSORY LECTURE ATTENDANCE IN MEDICAL EDUCATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Shmuel

    2016-04-01

    Luder shows that there is a lack of correlation between lecture attendance in medical school and examination performance, and thus draws attention to a discourse concerning the place of lectures and lecture attendance enforcement in 2015 and beyond. The paper addresses 4 questions: First, what is the current place of the traditional lecture in the education of medical students? Second, are there alternatives to this format of teaching? Third, what are the educational consequences of mandating lecture attendance; and fourth, should there be such enforcement? The author discusses these questions and concludes that lectures should be used sparingly, after a careful evaluation that they have an added value over learning away from the classroom. Furthermore, that there are clear guidelines on how to make the traditional lecture enhanced and educationally effective, as well as alternatives such as the "flipped classroom", e-learning and more to lectures. In addition, that lectures frequently drive learning negatively and enforcing attendance in Israel entails serious unintended consequences such as a need to monitor attendance, and a host of disciplinary adverse reactions. Finally, that besides lecture efficiency and economy (when having added value) one reason to consider compulsory attendance, may be when poor attendance negatively influences teachers morale.

  4. The Lecture Video Scene Extracting System

    OpenAIRE

    石黒, 信啓; 白井,治彦; 黒岩,丈介; 小高, 知宏; 小倉, 久和; ISHIGURO, Nobuhiko; SHIRAI, Haruhiko; KUROIWA, Josuke; ODAKA, Tomohiko; OGURA, Hisakazu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose the system of extracting feature of scenes in a lecture video. To avoid a hand work on a lecture video, we propose a new method automate the judgment of importance of a scene. This system uses the TF-IDF method that is the technique of the natural language processing. Our system has four functions to watch a lecture video efficiently. They are the function of extracting feature of scenes, character string choice, keyword search and important scene choice.These functi...

  5. Towards Automated Lecture Capture, Navigation and Delivery System for Web-Lecture on Demand

    CERN Document Server

    Kannan, Rajkumar

    2010-01-01

    Institutions all over the world are continuously exploring ways to use ICT in improving teaching and learning effectiveness. The use of course web pages, discussion groups, bulletin boards, and e-mails have shown considerable impact on teaching and learning in significant ways, across all disciplines. ELearning has emerged as an alternative to traditional classroom-based education and training and web lectures can be a powerful addition to traditional lectures. They can even serve as a main content source for learning, provided users can quickly navigate and locate relevant pages in a web lecture. A web lecture consists of video and audio of the presenter and slides complemented with screen capturing. In this paper, an automated approach for recording live lectures and for browsing available web lectures for on-demand applications by end users is presented.

  6. 20. Brazilian congress on biology and nuclear medicine. Abstracts; 20. Congresso brasileiro de biologia e medicina nuclear. Resumos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    Several aspects concerning the use of nuclear medicine in cardiology, oncology, neurology, endocrinology among other areas are studied. Various topics related to diagnosis and treatment of diseases are presented, e.g. radiotracers use, radiopharmaceuticals (mainly associated with technetium 99), development and standardization of radionuclides, structural chemical analysis, metabolism, biological functions. The scintiscanning is the most reported diagnostic technique.

  7. Why do students miss lectures? A study of lecture attendance amongst students of health science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bati, A Hilal; Mandiracioglu, Aliye; Orgun, Fatma; Govsa, Figen

    2013-06-01

    In the domain of health sciences, attendance by students at lectures is more critical. Lecture attendance is an issue which has been widely neglected. This study aims to determine those factors which affect the lecture attendance. The research data was collected by means of a questionnaire during the second semester of the academic year 2010-2011 from second-year students of the Faculties of Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry and Nursing. Together with demographic data, the questionnaire includes a Likert-type scale aiming to determine the factors influencing attendance at lectures. 663 participated in this study on a voluntary basis from Medical, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Nursing Faculties. Raising attainment levels, being able to take their own lecture notes, learning which aspects of the lecture content were being emphasized, and the opportunity to ask questions were amongst the chief reasons for attending lectures. It appears that the factors preventing students from attending lectures are mainly individual. Amongst the most frequently cited causes of non-attendance, sleeplessness, ill health and the inefficiency of lectures in overcrowded halls are emphasized. In the totals and sub-dimensions of the Lecture Attendance Scale, Medical Faculty students have average scores higher than those of students at other faculties. The vital nature of professional expertise and its applications, health sciences students' attendance at lectures carries greater importance. It is important to strengthen the mentoring system with regard to individual and external factors, which have been implicated as having a substantial influence on lecture attendance by students. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Impact of Online Lecture Recordings on Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew; Birch, Elisa; Hancock, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The use of online lecture recordings as a supplement to physical lectures is an increasingly popular tool at many universities. This paper combines survey data with student record data for students in a "Microeconomics Principles" class to examine the relative effects of lecture attendance and online lecture recordings. The main finding is that…

  9. The Impact of Online Lecture Recordings on Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew; Birch, Elisa; Hancock, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The use of online lecture recordings as a supplement to physical lectures is an increasingly popular tool at many universities. This paper combines survey data with student record data for students in a "Microeconomics Principles" class to examine the relative effects of lecture attendance and online lecture recordings. The main finding…

  10. The Impact of Online Lecture Recordings on Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew; Birch, Elisa; Hancock, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The use of online lecture recordings as a supplement to physical lectures is an increasingly popular tool at many universities. This paper combines survey data with student record data for students in a "Microeconomics Principles" class to examine the relative effects of lecture attendance and online lecture recordings. The main finding…

  11. Factors Shaping Mathematics Lecturers' Service Teaching in Different Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingolbali, E.; Ozmantar, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we focus on university lecturers' approaches to the service teaching and factors that influence their approaches. We present data obtained from the interviews with 19 mathematics and three physics lecturers along with the observations of two mathematics lecturers' calculus courses. The findings show that lecturers' approaches to…

  12. Add a Teacher-Led Stimulation to Your Lecturing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlbaw, Lynn Matthew

    1991-01-01

    Provides a way to enliven the classroom lecture by involving students in the lecture. Students role-play characters in the teacher's lecture becoming active learners through participation. Students learn their roles and make decisions based on the lecture situation presented. Provides an example unit on the growth of big business in U.S. history…

  13. Lectures on Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    OpenAIRE

    Gripaios, Ben

    2015-01-01

    These four lectures, given at the British Universities Summer School in Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics (BUSSTEPP), held in 2014 in Southampton, are a brief introduction to a selection of current topics in physics Beyond the Standard Model.

  14. Lecture about crowdsourcing and social media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Hanze Honours Lecture, 19-12-12. Het lectoraat Regisseren van Ondernemende Netwerken richt zich op onderzoek naar het effect van regisserend leiderschap in een wereld waarin internet nieuwe verbindingen tussen mensen en organisaties creëert.

  15. Lectures on Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    OpenAIRE

    Gripaios, Ben

    2015-01-01

    These four lectures, given at the British Universities Summer School in Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics (BUSSTEPP), held in 2014 in Southampton, are a brief introduction to a selection of current topics in physics Beyond the Standard Model.

  16. Introductory Lectures on Quantum Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2014-01-01

    In these lectures we present a few topics in Quantum Field Theory in detail. Some of them are conceptual and some more practical. They have been selected because they appear frequently in current applications to Particle Physics and String Theory.

  17. Stream restoration hydraulic design course: lecture notes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newbury, R

    2002-01-01

    Steam restoration encompasses a broad range of activities and disciplines. This lecture series is designed for practitioners who must fit habitat improvement works in the hydraulics of degraded channels...

  18. Dynamica 3-A: Lecture Notes wb1303

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, P.

    1997-01-01

    Lecture Notes for course wb 1303 Dynamica 3-A, Faculty 3me/Mechanical Engineering, TU Delft. Contents: Continuous systems; Dynamics of a reciprocating engine; Non-linear systems; Kinematics and dynamics of multi-body systems; Exercises.

  19. Making lectures memorable: A cognitive perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Azam; Babar, Shazia

    2016-08-01

    Lectures have been a cornerstone of medical education since the introduction of a discipline based curricular model more than two hundred years ago. Recently this instructional strategy has come under criticism because of its reliance on passive learning. There are still many medical schools that cover content predominantly through lectures due to its feasibility. With the introduction of the flipped classrooms, lectures have been given a new lease of life. Improving cognitive imprinting during lectures would enhance retrieval and promote long term storage. Simplifying the content reduces the cognitive load of the information being received and makes it more meaningful hence more memorable. To make learning memorable, rehearsal should be built into the sessions. With the exponential increase in online learning, the need for online learning technologies will require a generation of a large amount of asynchronous video content which should ideally be truly meaningful and memorable, and inspirational to our students.

  20. Recently Published Lectures and Tutorials for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Herr

    2006-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project, a collaboration between the University of Michigan and CERN, has developed a synchronized system for recording and publishing educational multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. The current system, including future developments for the project and the field in general, was recently presented at the CHEP 2006 conference in Mumbai, India. The relevant presentations and papers can be found here: The Web Lecture Archive Project A Web Lecture Capture System with Robotic Speaker Tracking This year, the University of Michigan team has been asked to record and publish all ATLAS Plenary sessions, as well as a large number of Physics and Computing tutorials. A significant amount of this material has already been published and can be accessed via the links below. All lectures can be viewed on any major platform with any common internet browser, either via streaming or local download (for limited bandwidth). Please enjoy the l...

  1. Recently Published Lectures and Tutorials for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, S.

    2006-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project, WLAP, a collaboration between the University of Michigan and CERN, has developed a synchronized system for recording and publishing educational multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. The current system, including future developments for the project and the field in general, was recently presented at the CHEP 2006 conference in Mumbai, India. The relevant presentations and papers can be found here: The Web Lecture Archive Project. A Web Lecture Capture System with Robotic Speaker Tracking This year, the University of Michigan team has been asked to record and publish all ATLAS Plenary sessions, as well as a large number of Physics and Computing tutorials. A significant amount of this material has already been published and can be accessed via the links below. All lectures can be viewed on any major platform with any common internet browser, either via streaming or local download (for limited bandwidth). Please e...

  2. Educational technology and the traditional lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Jacobs

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available I was recently invited to give a lecture at the opening of a new high-technology lecture theatre at Leeds Metropolitan University. It is one of the best examples of its kind I have seen. Its impressive features include hi-fi surround sound, an enormous back-projected screen giving superb picture quality from either a VCR or directly from a computer for live demonstrations, online facilities, the latest remote-control slide-projection equipment, complete lecturer's control panel, and several nice touches such as automatic dimming of the auditorium lights when Play is pressed on any of the hidden video playback machines. The overhead projectors and their screens are of the best quality and correctly positioned for the clearest possible display. There are also video-link facilities for spill-over into a secondary lecture theatre which itself is well fitted out in presentational equipment.

  3. Paul Dirac lectures at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    When a group of physicists entered the Main Auditorium, during the evening of 29 June, they felt they had opened a time portal.   Paul Dirac in front of a blackboard showing his formula. ©Sandra Hoogeboom An attentive audience, dressed in early 1900 costumes, were watching a lecture by the elusive Paul Dirac, presenting for the first time his famous formula on the blackboard. Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac (1902-1984) was a British mathematical physicist at Cambridge, and one of the "fathers" of quantum mechanics. When he first wrote it, in 1928, Dirac was not sure what his formula really meant. As demonstrated by Andersson four year later, what Dirac had written on the blackboard was the first definition of a positron, hence he is credited with having anticipated the existence of antimatter. The actor John Kohl performs as Paul Dirac. ©Sandra Hoogeboom What the group of puzzled physicists were really observing when they entered the CERN Auditorium was the shoo...

  4. Lectures on advances in combinatorics

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlswede, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    The main focus of these lectures is basis extremal problems and inequalities – two sides of the same coin. Additionally they prepare well for approaches and methods useful and applicable in a broader mathematical context. Highlights of the book include a solution to the famous 4m-conjecture of Erdös/Ko/Rado 1938, one of the oldest problems in combinatorial extremal theory, an answer to a question of Erdös (1962) in combinatorial number theory "What is the maximal cardinality of a set of numbers smaller than n with no k+1 of its members pair wise relatively prime?", and the discovery that the AD-inequality implies more general and sharper number theoretical inequalities than for instance Behrend's inequality. Several concepts and problems in the book arise in response to or by rephrasing questions from information theory, computer science, statistical physics. The interdisciplinary character creates an atmosphere rich of incentives for new discoveries and lends Ars Combinatoria a special status in mathemat...

  5. A peculiar lecture by Ettore Majorana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, S.

    2006-09-01

    We give, for the first time, the English translation of a manuscript by Ettore Majorana, which probably corresponds to the text for a seminar lecture delivered at the University of Naples in 1938, where he lectured on theoretical physics. Some passages reveal a physical interpretation of quantum mechanics which anticipates for several years the Feynman approach in terms of path integrals, independent of the underlying mathematical formulation.

  6. Lecture Notes in Statistics. 3rd Semester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements for the 3rd semester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business. It focuses on multiple regression models, analysis of variance, and log-linear models.......The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements for the 3rd semester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business. It focuses on multiple regression models, analysis of variance, and log-linear models....

  7. Lectures on flips and minimal models

    OpenAIRE

    Corti, Alessio; Hacking, Paul; Kollár, János; Lazarsfeld, Robert; Mustaţă, Mircea

    2007-01-01

    This document contains notes from the lectures of Corti, Koll\\'ar, Lazarsfeld, and Musta\\c{t}\\u{a} at the workshop ``Minimal and canonical models in algebraic geometry" at MSRI, Berkeley, April 2007. The lectures give an overview of the recent advances on canonical and minimal models of algebraic varieties obtained by Hacon--McKernan and Birkar--Cascini--Hacon--McKernan.

  8. Lecture Notes in Statistics. 3rd Semester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements for the 3rd semester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business. It focuses on multiple regression models, analysis of variance, and log-linear models.......The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements for the 3rd semester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business. It focuses on multiple regression models, analysis of variance, and log-linear models....

  9. Early readmission in a high complexity public hospital in cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herminia Ricci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the early readmission of patients in a high complexity public hospital in cardiology. Methods: this is a descriptive, documental and retrospective study, carried out in a public hospital. Results: in 2012, 729 of the 9,218 hospitalized patients were readmitted, 47.9% of them were readmitted within 30 days after discharge, 61% were men, with a mean age of 57 years old, with the main medical diagnosis of heart disease (heart failure, treatment of acute coronary syndrome, among others on admission (44.7% and readmission (45.8%. Most were readmitted for the same medical reason that led to their first hospitalization. Conclusion: considering the profile of the population admitted and readmitted to the institution, it is believed that the rate of readmission is mainly due to the profile of the patients, considering the high prevalence of non-communicable chronic diseases, and coronary artery disease considered unapproachable for percutaneous or surgical when hospitalized.

  10. Open source cardiology electronic health record development for DIGICARDIAC implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugarte, Nelson; Medina, Rubén.; Huiracocha, Lourdes; Rojas, Rubén.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the development of a Cardiology Electronic Health Record (CEHR) system. Software consists of a structured algorithm designed under Health Level-7 (HL7) international standards. Novelty of the system is the integration of high resolution ECG (HRECG) signal acquisition and processing tools, patient information management tools and telecardiology tools. Acquisition tools are for management and control of the DIGICARDIAC electrocardiograph functions. Processing tools allow management of HRECG signal analysis searching for indicative patterns of cardiovascular pathologies. Telecardiology tools incorporation allows system communication with other health care centers decreasing access time to the patient information. CEHR system was completely developed using open source software. Preliminary results of process validation showed the system efficiency.

  11. Categories by Heart: Shortcut Reasoning in a Cardiology Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Jacobsson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the practice of doctors and nurses to invoke the categories of age, sex, class, ethnicity, and/or lifestyle factors when discussing individual patients and patient groups. In what situations are such references explicitly made, and what does this practice accomplish? The material consists of field notes from a cardiology clinic in Sweden, and a theory of descriptive practice guided the analysis. When professionals describe patients, discuss decisions, or explain why a patient is ill, age, sex, class, ethnicity, and/or lifestyle serve as contextualization cues, often including widespread results from epidemiological research about groups of patients at higher or lower risk for cardiac disease. These categories work as shortcut reasoning to nudge interpretations in a certain direction, legitimize decisions, and strengthen arguments. In general, studying the descriptions of patients/clients/students provides an entrance to professional methods of reasoning, including their implicit moral assumptions.

  12. PET and PET/CT in clinical cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Kyoung Sook [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-02-15

    Cardiac PET emerged as a powerful tool that allowed in vivo quantification of physiologic processes including myocardial perfusion and metabolism, as well as neuronal and receptor function for more than 25 years. Now PET imaging has been playing an important role in the clinical evaluation of patients with known or suspected ischemic heart disease. This important clinical role is expected to grow with the availability of PET/CT scanner that allow a true integration of structure and function. The objective of this review is to provide and update on the current and future role of PET in clinical cardiology with a special eye on the great opportunities now offered by PET/CT.

  13. Exploiting expert systems in cardiology: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, George-Peter K; Sourla, Efrosini; Stamatopoulou, Konstantina-Maria; Syrimpeis, Vasileios; Sioutas, Spyros; Tsakalidis, Athanasios; Tzimas, Giannis

    2015-01-01

    An improved Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) in the field of critical cardiovascular diseases is presented. The system stems from an earlier application based only on a Sugeno-type Fuzzy Expert System (FES) with the addition of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) computational structure. Thus, inherent characteristics of ANNs, along with the human-like knowledge representation of fuzzy systems are integrated. The ANFIS has been utilized into building five different sub-systems, distinctly covering Coronary Disease, Hypertension, Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Failure, and Diabetes, hence aiding doctors of medicine (MDs), guide trainees, and encourage medical experts in their diagnoses centering a wide range of Cardiology. The Fuzzy Rules have been trimmed down and the ANNs have been optimized in order to focus into each particular disease and produce results ready-to-be applied to real-world patients.

  14. On New Spain and Mexican medicinal botany in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli-Serra, Alfredo Alessandro; Izaguirre-Ávila, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    Towards the middle of the XVI century, the empirical physician Martín de la Cruz, in New Spain, compiled a catalogue of the local medicinal herbs and plants, which was translated into Latin by Juan Badiano, professor at the Franciscan college of Tlatelolco. On his side, Dr. Francisco Hernández, the royal physician (protomédico) from 1571 until 1577, performed a systematic study of the flora and fauna in this period. His notes and designs were not published at that time, but two epitomes of Hernández' works appeared, respectively, in 1615 in Mexico and in 1651 in Rome. During the XVIII century, two Spanish scientific expeditions arrived to these lands. They were led, respectively, by the Spanish naturalist Martín Sessé and the Italian seaman, Alessandro Malaspina di Mulazzo, dependent from the Spanish Government. These expeditions collected and carried rich scientific material to Spain. At the end of that century, the Franciscan friar Juan Navarro depicted and described several Mexican medicinal plants in the fifth volume of his botanic work. In the last years of the colonial period, the fundamental works of Humboldt and Bonpland on the geographic distribution of the American plants were published. In the modern age, the first research about the Mexican medicinal botany was performed in the laboratory of the Instituto Médico Nacional [National Medical Institute] under the leadership of Dr. Fernando Altamirano, who started pharmacological studies in this country. Later, trials of cardiovascular pharmacology were performed in the small laboratories of the cardiological unit at the General Hospital of Mexico City, on Dr. Ignacio Chávez' initiative. The Mexican botanical-pharmacological tradition persists alive and vigorous at the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología and other scientific institutions of the country.

  15. Medication reconciliation in patients hospitalized in a cardiology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Gabriella Fernandes; Santos, Gláucia Noblat de Carvalho; Santos, Gláucia Beisl Noblat de Carvalho; Rosa, Mário Borges; Noblat, Lúcia de Araújo Costa Beisl

    2014-01-01

    To compare drugs prescribed on hospital admission with the list of drugs taken prior to admission for adult patients admitted to a cardiology unit and to identify the role of a pharmacist in identifying and resolving medication discrepancies. This study was conducted in a 300 bed university hospital in Brazil. Clinical pharmacists taking medication histories and reconciling medications prescribed on admission with a list of drugs used prior to admission. Discrepancies were classified as justified (e.g., based on the pharmacotherapeutic guidelines of the hospital studied) or unintentional. Treatments were reviewed within 48 hours following hospitalization. Unintentional discrepancies were further classified according to the categorization of medication error severity. Pharmacists verbally contacted the prescriber to recommend actions to resolve the discrepancies. A total of 181 discrepancies were found in 50 patients (86%). Of these discrepancies, 149 (82.3%) were justified changes to the patient's home medication regimen; however, 32 (17.7%) discrepancies found in 24 patients were unintentional. Pharmacists made 31 interventions and 23 (74.2%) were accepted. Among unintentional discrepancies, the most common was a different medication dose on admission (42%). Of the unintentional discrepancies 13 (40.6%) were classified as error without harm, 11 (34.4%) were classified as error without harm but which could affect the patient and require monitoring, 3 (9.4%) as errors could have resulted in harm and 5 (15.6%) were classified as circumstances or events that have the capacity to cause harm. The results revealed a high number of unintentional discrepancies and the pharmacist can play an important role by intervening and correcting medication errors at a hospital cardiology unit.

  16. Medication reconciliation in patients hospitalized in a cardiology unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Fernandes Magalhães

    Full Text Available To compare drugs prescribed on hospital admission with the list of drugs taken prior to admission for adult patients admitted to a cardiology unit and to identify the role of a pharmacist in identifying and resolving medication discrepancies.This study was conducted in a 300 bed university hospital in Brazil. Clinical pharmacists taking medication histories and reconciling medications prescribed on admission with a list of drugs used prior to admission. Discrepancies were classified as justified (e.g., based on the pharmacotherapeutic guidelines of the hospital studied or unintentional. Treatments were reviewed within 48 hours following hospitalization. Unintentional discrepancies were further classified according to the categorization of medication error severity. Pharmacists verbally contacted the prescriber to recommend actions to resolve the discrepancies.A total of 181 discrepancies were found in 50 patients (86%. Of these discrepancies, 149 (82.3% were justified changes to the patient's home medication regimen; however, 32 (17.7% discrepancies found in 24 patients were unintentional. Pharmacists made 31 interventions and 23 (74.2% were accepted. Among unintentional discrepancies, the most common was a different medication dose on admission (42%. Of the unintentional discrepancies 13 (40.6% were classified as error without harm, 11 (34.4% were classified as error without harm but which could affect the patient and require monitoring, 3 (9.4% as errors could have resulted in harm and 5 (15.6% were classified as circumstances or events that have the capacity to cause harm.The results revealed a high number of unintentional discrepancies and the pharmacist can play an important role by intervening and correcting medication errors at a hospital cardiology unit.

  17. Flipped classroom or an active lecture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, James D; Roberts, David J H

    2017-08-31

    Recent changes in anatomy education have seen the introduction of flipped classrooms as a replacement to the traditional didactic lecture. This approach utilizes the increasing availability of digital technology to create learning resources that can be accessed prior to attending class, with face-to-face sessions then becoming more student-centered via discussion, collaborative learning, and problem-solving activities. Although this approach may appear intuitive, this viewpoint commentary presents a counter opinion and highlights a simple alternative that utilizes evidence-based active learning approaches as part of the traditional lecture. The active lecture takes the traditional lecture, and (1) ensures the lecture content is relevant and has clear objectives, (2) contains lecture material that is designed according to the latest evidence-base, (3) complements it with additional supplementary material, (4) creates space to check prior understanding and knowledge levels, and (5) utilizes suitable technology to facilitate continual engagement and interaction. Clin. Anat., 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Indian dental students' preferences regarding lecture courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolia, Abhishek; Mohan, Mandakini; Kundabala, M; Shenoy, Ramya

    2012-03-01

    Teaching and learning activities in the dental clinic or hospital are a challenging area for students as well as teachers. With various teaching methodologies being used in dental schools around the world, gaining greater understanding of students' attitudes toward these methodologies would be useful for dental educators. The objective of this study was to explore the preferences of dental students in India about various aspects of lecture courses. A structured survey consisting of ten closed-ended questions was developed, and 2,680 undergraduate students from forty-three dental schools in India were approached via e-mail with a follow-up postal mailing. Of these, 1,980 students responded, for a response rate of 73.8 percent. Most of the students reported preferring lectures with the aid of PowerPoint and chalkboard. They preferred morning lectures from 8 am to 10 am for a maximum of thirty to forty minutes for each lecture, and they preferred to receive information about the lecture topic in advance. The students said that delivery of clinical demonstrations was beneficial after the lectures, and they preferred learning-based rather than exam-oriented education. The respondents also said that attendance should be made compulsory and that numerical marking of examinations should not be replaced by a grading system.

  19. Envisioning the Transformative Role of IT in Lectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo Zarraonandia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most widely used methods for teaching is the lecture. During the last few decades lecturers and students have taken advantage of the progressive introduction of new technology for supporting these lectures. As this trend is very likely to continue, in this paper we will try to anticipate some possible technology enriched future lecture scenarios. We also present ALFs, a system which aims to improve the communication between participants in a lecture making use of augmented reality techniques.

  20. Revitalizing the Live Lecture Class With Instructor-Created Videos

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Alpert

    2016-01-01

    Today, the lecture class as a format for higher education is under attack more than ever. This article addresses the research question of how lectures can be modernized and revitalized through new uses of digital technology—in particular, video. Critics of lecturing have for a long time observed that lecture classes can be weak on student engagement and motivation to attend class. This article introduces one way to help modernize and revitalize the live lecture class session, a new conceptual...

  1. Embedding patient simulation in a pediatric cardiology rotation: a unique opportunity for improving resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Shaun; Follansbee, Christopher; Nwankwo, Ugonna; Hofkosh, Dena; Sherman, Frederick S; Hamilton, Melinda F

    2015-01-01

    High-fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) has been used in medical education to bridge gaps in medical knowledge and clinical skills. Few studies have analyzed the impact of HFPS in subspecialty rotations for pediatric residents. We hypothesized that pediatric residents exposed to HFPS with a structured content curriculum would perform better on a case quiz than residents without exposure to HFPS. Prospective randomized controlled Tertiary-care free standing children's hospital During a cardiology rotation, senior pediatric residents completed an online pediatric cardiology curriculum and a cardiology quiz. After randomization into two groups, the study group participated in a fully debriefed HFPS session. The control group had no HFPS. Both groups completed a case quiz. Confidence surveys pre- and postsimulation were completed. From October 2010 through March 2013, 55 residents who rotated through the pediatric cardiology rotation were used in the final analysis (30 control, 25 in the study group). There was no significant difference between groups on the initial cardiology quiz. The study group scored higher on the case quiz compared with the control group (P = .024). Based on pre- and postsimulation questionnaires, residents' confidence in approaching a pediatric cardiology patient improved from an average Likert score of 5.1 to 7.5 (on scale of 0-10) (P cardiology rotation was feasible and well received. Our study suggests that simulation promotes increased confidence and may modestly improve clinical reasoning compared to traditional educational techniques. Targeted simulation sessions may readily be incorporated into pediatric subspecialty rotations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Waist circumference as a vital sign in cardiology 20 years after its initial publication in the American Journal of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Després, Jean-Pierre

    2014-07-15

    In 1994, we reported in The American Journal of Cardiology that a simple anthropometric measurement, waist circumference, was related to the amount of abdominal visceral adipose tissue measured by computed tomography. An elevated waist circumference was also found to be associated with several features of the cardiometabolic risk profile such as glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, and an atherogenic dyslipidemic profile that included hypertriglyceridemia and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Although a linear relation was found between waist circumference and these metabolic alterations, we reported that a waist circumference value of about 100 cm was associated with a high probability of finding diabetogenic and atherogenic abnormalities. The present short report provides a brief update of issues that have been raised regarding the measurement of waist circumference and its clinical use over a period of 20 years since the original publication.

  3. Argonne lectures on particles accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devred, A

    1999-09-01

    The quest for elementary particles has promoted the development of particle accelerators producing beams of increasingly higher energies. In a synchrotron, the particle energy is directly proportional to the product of the machine's radius times the bending magnets' field strength. Present proton experiments at the TeV scale require facilities with circumferences ranging from a few to tens of kilometers and relying on a large number (several hundred to several thousand) high field dipole magnets and high field gradient quadrupole magnets. These electro-magnets use high-current-density, low-critical-temperature superconducting cables and are cooled down at liquid helium temperature. They are among the most costly and the most challenging components of the machine. After explaining what are the various types of accelerator magnets and why they are needed (lecture 1), we briefly recall the origins of superconductivity and we review the parameters of existing superconducting particle accelerators (lecture 2). Then, we review the superconducting materials that are available at industrial scale (chiefly, NbTi and Nb{sub 3}Sn) and we explain in details the manufacturing of NbTi wires and cables (lecture 3). We also present the difficulties of processing and insulating Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors, which so far have limited the use of this material in spite of its superior performances. We continue by discussing the two dimensional current distributions which are the most appropriate for generating pure dipole and quadrupole fields and we explain how these ideal distributions can be approximated by so called cos{theta} and cos 2{theta} coil designs (lecture 4). We also present a few alternative designs which are being investigated and we describe the difficulties of realizing coil ends. Next, we present the mechanical design concepts that are used in existing accelerator magnets (lecture 5) and we describe how the magnets are assembled (lecture 6). Some of the toughest

  4. Nuclear power - the glittering prizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, C.C.

    The paper on the benefits of nuclear power is based on a lecture given for the Institution of Nuclear Engineers, London, 1986. Suggestions for short term benefits include a clean environment and a cheap energy source, whereas suggestions for long term benefits include freedom from want in the world and avoidance of 'energy wars'. These benefits are discussed along with alternative energy sources, the financial savings to be saved from nuclear power, world energy wealth, depletion of world energy reserves, and risks due to radiation exposure.

  5. Report of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions 2016, Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-25

    The 65(th)Annual Scientific Sessions of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) were held at McCormick Place, Chicago, from April 2-4, 2016. The ACC Scientific Sessions are one of the 2 major scientific cardiology meetings in the USA and one of the major scientific meetings of cardiology in the world. It had an attendance of 18,769 and over 2,000 oral and poster abstracts, including 8 late-breaking clinical trials. This report presents the key presentations and the highlights from the ACC Scientific Sessions 2016 in Chicago. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1308-1313).

  6. Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) of dynamic image processing for cardiologic diagnostics of transportation workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnedenko, Valeri G.; Ioseliani, D. G.; Nikiforov, S. N.; Fainberg, Evgeny M.

    2002-04-01

    Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) are the most perspective branch of medical technologies development. One of the most mass, cheap and effective methods of diagnostics and treatment of cardio-vascular diseases is interventional cardiology based on angiologic procedures. The principal difference of PACS for interventional cardiology is in necessity of gaining, analysis and archiving of dynamic images (angiology scenes). Russian Research Center > has developed and successfully implemented the first Russian PACS for interventional cardiology - complex for diagnostics, monitoring and treatment of cardio-vascular disease > which is described later in the article.

  7. Zoning and workstation analysis in interventional cardiology; Zonage et etude de poste en cardiologie interventionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degrange, J.P. [RP-Consult, 42 rue Pouchet, 75017 Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    As interventional cardiology can induce high doses not only for patients but also for the personnel, the delimitation of regulated areas (or zoning) and workstation analysis (dosimetry) are very important in terms of radioprotection. This paper briefly recalls methods and tools for the different steps to perform zoning and workstation analysis. It outlines the peculiarities of interventional cardiology, presents methods and tools adapted to interventional cardiology, and then discusses the same issues but for workstation analysis. It also outlines specific problems which can be met, and their possible adapted solutions

  8. Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology Specialist Heart Failure Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDonagh, Theresa A; Gardner, Roy S; Lainscak, Mitja

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that organized care of heart failure patients, including specialist management by cardiologists, improves patient outcomes. In response to this, other national training bodies (the UK and the USA) have developed heart failure subspecialty curricula within their Cardiology...... Training Curricula. In addition, European Society of Cardiology (ESC) subspecialty curricula exist for Interventional Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Management. The purpose of this heart failure curriculum is to provide a framework which can be used as a blueprint for training across Europe. This blueprint...

  9. Characteristics of good mathematics lecturers based on students and lecturers perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapsari, Trusti; Putri, Dian Permana; Raharjo, Jajo Firman

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to determine the characteristics of good mathematics lecturers based on students' and lecturers' perspectivesand compare the characteristics of good lecturers/ teachers which are in accordance with the findings of some previous studies and the theories. This study is survey study. The Data were collected through questionnaires and interview. The population consists of some mathematics students from the first level through the third level and some mathematics education lecturers of a private university in West Java. Qualitative analysis was undertaken to examine the results of questionnaires and interviews. The finding shows that the characteristic of good mathematics lecturers is inspiring. They can inspire other mathematics lecturers and educators in general. Based on the students and lecturers' perspective, some characteristics of good mathematics lecturers are mastering the materials well, being on time, being objective, understanding the students, presenting the materials with clearly, and being disciplined. Some other characteristic mentioned are: teaching eagerly, being unhurried, being friendly, giving exemplary and preparing the lesson well. These characteristics are not much different from the characteristics described by some previous researchers and some theories of experts, i.e. mastering the subject matters well, pedagogic, and work wholeheartedly.

  10. Reaction Lecture : Text Messaging to Increase Student Engagement in Large-Scale Lectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winnips, Koos; Heutink, Joost; Beldhuis, Hans; Greener, S; Rospigliosi, A

    2011-01-01

    By helping to be active during large scale lectures, students remember better what is presented, and can better connect new knowledge to entry knowledge. In large scale lectures with more than 150 students, it is nearly impossible to manage personal, face-to-face discussions and interaction. Based u

  11. Reaction Lecture : Text Messaging to Increase Student Engagement in Large-Scale Lectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winnips, Koos; Heutink, Joost; Beldhuis, Hans; Greener, S; Rospigliosi, A

    2011-01-01

    By helping to be active during large scale lectures, students remember better what is presented, and can better connect new knowledge to entry knowledge. In large scale lectures with more than 150 students, it is nearly impossible to manage personal, face-to-face discussions and interaction. Based

  12. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. The Lost Art of Lecturing: Cultivating Student Listening and Notetaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Kevin R.; Hunt, Stephen K.

    2017-01-01

    As this forum's call for papers notes, lecture represents one of the more "controversial forms of instructional communication," yet remains a predominant instructional method in academia. Ironically, instructors face increasing pressure to abandon lecture at a time when these classes are popular and students readily enroll in lecture…

  13. Modeling of the time sharing for lecturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Shakhova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of modernization of the Russian system of higher education, it is necessary to analyze the working time of the university lecturers, taking into account both basic job functions as the university lecturer, and others.The mathematical problem is presented for the optimal working time planning for the university lecturers. The review of the documents, native and foreign works on the study is made. Simulation conditions, based on analysis of the subject area, are defined. Models of optimal working time sharing of the university lecturers («the second half of the day» are developed and implemented in the system MathCAD. Optimal solutions have been obtained.Three problems have been solved:1 to find the optimal time sharing for «the second half of the day» in a certain position of the university lecturer;2 to find the optimal time sharing for «the second half of the day» for all positions of the university lecturers in view of the established model of the academic load differentiation;3 to find the volume value of the non-standardized part of time work in the department for the academic year, taking into account: the established model of an academic load differentiation, distribution of the Faculty number for the positions and the optimal time sharing «the second half of the day» for the university lecturers of the department.Examples are given of the analysis results. The practical application of the research: the developed models can be used when planning the working time of an individual professor in the preparation of the work plan of the university department for the academic year, as well as to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the administrative decisions in the development of local university regulations.

  14. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Background Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. Methods A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ) assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8–12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Results Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785). The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p lecturer-students interactions were increased in the EVS lecture for one lecturer and reduced for the other. Both lecturers felt that the EVS lectures were difficult to prepare, that they were able to keep to time in the traditional lectures, that the educational value of both lecture styles was similar, and that they were neutral-to-slightly favourably disposed

  15. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Paul M; Palmer, Edward; Devitt, Peter

    2007-07-27

    Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ) assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8-12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785). The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p higher-order lecturer-students interactions were increased in the EVS lecture for one lecturer and reduced for the other. Both lecturers felt that the EVS lectures were difficult to prepare, that they were able to keep to time in the traditional lectures, that the educational value of both lecture styles was similar, and that they were neutral-to-slightly favourably disposed to continue with

  16. The Web-Lecture - a viable alternative to the traditional lecture format?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meibom, S.

    2004-12-01

    Educational research shows that students learn best in an environment with emphasis on teamwork, problem-solving, and hands-on experience. Still professors spend the majority of their time with students in the traditional lecture-hall setting where the combination of large classes and limited time prevents sufficient student-teacher interaction to foster an active learning environment. Can modern computer technology be used to provide "lecture-type" information to students via the World Wide Web? If so, will that help professors make better and/or different use of their scheduled time with the students? Answering these questions was the main motivation for the Extra-Solar Planet Project. The Extra-Solar Planet Project was designed to test the effectiveness of a lecture available to the student on the World Wide Web (Web-Lecture) and to engage the students in an active learning environment were their use the information presented in the Web-Lecture. The topic of the Web-Lecture was detection of extra-solar planets and the project was implemented into an introductory astronomy course at University of Wisconsin Madison in the spring of 2004. The Web-Lecture was designed to give an interactive presentation of synchronized video, audio and lecture notes. It was created using the eTEACH software developed at the University of Wisconsin Madison School of Engineering. In my talk, I will describe the project, show excerpts of the Web-Lecture, and present assessments of student learning and results of student evaluations of the web-lecture format.

  17. Vocal intensity in lecturers: Results of measurements conducted during lecture sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Mikulski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational voice users (inter alia: lecturers speak with different levels of vocal intensity. Speakers adjust this intensity knowingly (e.g. to underline the importance of fragments of the speech or unknowingly. The unknown adjustment of voice intensity occurs e.g. in the presence of high acoustic background noise (so-called Lombard effect, but it also results from many other factors: hearing loss, construction of the vocal tract, habits and others. The aim of the article is to confirm the thesis that in similar conditions of acoustic properties of the room different lecturers speak with different levels of vocal intensity. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a group of 10 lecturers in the same conference room. A-weighted sound pressure level determined at 1 m from the lecturer's mouth was adopted as a parameter defining the intensity of the lecturer's voice. The levels of all lecturers' voice intensity were compared and evaluated according to the criteria defined in EN ISO 9921. Results: Nine in ten lecturers were speaking with normal voice intensity (60-65 dB and only one full-time university lecturer was speaking with raised voice (66-71 dB. Conclusions: It was found that in the room of the same acoustic conditions the lecturers spoke with different intensities of voice. Some lecturers occasionally, and one all the time spoke with the voice intensity specified by PN-EN ISO 9921 as a raised voice. The results of the preliminary study warrant further studies in a larger group of teachers. Med Pr 2013;64(6:797–804

  18. Explicit constructivism: a missing link in ineffective lectures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, E S

    2010-06-01

    This study tested the possibility that interactive lectures explicitly based on activating learners' prior knowledge and driven by a series of logical questions might enhance the effectiveness of lectures. A class of 54 students doing the respiratory system course in the second year of the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery program in my university was randomized to two groups to receive one of two types of lectures, "typical" lectures (n = 28, 18 women and 10 men) or "constructivist" lectures (n = 26, 19 women and 7 men), on the same topic: the regulation of respiration. Student pretest scores in the two groups were comparable (P > 0.1). Students that received the constructivist lectures did much better in the posttest conducted immediately after the lectures (6.8 +/- 3.4 for constructivist lectures vs. 4.2 +/- 2.3 for typical lectures, means +/- SD, P = 0.004). Although both types of lectures were well received, students that received the constructivist lectures appeared to have been more satisfied with their learning experience. However, on a posttest conducted 4 mo later, scores obtained by students in the two groups were not any different (6.9 +/- 3 for constructivist lectures vs. 6.9 +/- 3.7 for typical lectures, P = 0.94). This study adds to the increasing body of evidence that there is a case for the use of interactive lectures that make the construction of knowledge and understanding explicit, easy, and enjoyable to learners.

  19. Interactive lectures: Clickers or personal devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Lesley J; Joyce, Domino A

    2015-01-01

    Audience response systems ('clickers') are frequently used to promote participation in large lecture classes, and evidence suggests that they convey a number of benefits to students, including improved academic performance and student satisfaction. The limitations of these systems (such as limited access and cost) can be overcome using students' personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops together with text message, web- or app-based polling systems. Using questionnaires, we compare student perceptions of clicker and smartphone based polling systems. We find that students prefer interactive lectures generally, but those that used their own device preferred those lectures over lectures using clickers. However, device users were more likely to report using their devices for other purposes (checking email, social media etc.) when they were available to answer polling questions. These students did not feel that this distracted them from the lecture, instead, concerns over the use of smartphones centred around increased battery usage and inclusivity for students without access to suitable technology. Our results suggest that students generally preferred to use their own devices over clickers, and that this may be a sensible way to overcome some of the limitations associated with clickers, although issues surrounding levels of distraction and the implications for retention and recall of information need further investigation.

  20. [The GIPSY-RECPAM model: a versatile approach for integrated evaluation in cardiologic care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinci, F

    2009-01-01

    Tree-structured methodology applied for the GISSI-PSICOLOGIA project, although performed in the framework of earliest GISSI studies, represents a powerful tool to analyze different aspects of cardiologic care. The GISSI-PSICOLOGIA project has delivered a novel methodology based on the joint application of psychometric tools and sophisticated statistical techniques. Its prospective use could allow building effective epidemiological models relevant to the prognosis of the cardiologic patient. The various features of the RECPAM method allow a versatile use in the framework of modern e-health projects. The study used the Cognitive Behavioral Assessment H Form (CBA-H) psychometrics scales. The potential for its future application in the framework of Italian cardiology is relevant and particularly indicated to assist planning of systems for integrated care and routine evaluation of the cardiologic patient.

  1. NEWS FROM THE ANNUAL CONGRESS OF EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY (BARCELONA 2014: REALIZED AND UNREALIZED EXPECTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available News from Congress of the European Society of Cardiology (Barcelona, 2014 is highlighted. Results of recent controlled clinical trials, new clinical recommendations and registers data that were presented at the Congress are discussed.

  2. NEWS FROM THE ANNUAL CONGRESS OF EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY (BARCELONA 2014: REALIZED AND UNREALIZED EXPECTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available News from Congress of the European Society of Cardiology (Barcelona, 2014 is highlighted. Results of recent controlled clinical trials, new clinical recommendations and registers data that were presented at the Congress are discussed.

  3. Nuclear medicine 2009. Abstracts; NuklearMedizin 2009. Vortraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    The journal contains the abstracts of 188 lectures and the abstracts of 103 poster contributions concerning the following topics: systemic therapy; oncology: PET/therapy; physics: device technology; oncology: PET/new pharmaceuticals; neurology: receptors; motion correction methods; oncology: PET/FDG; cardiology; malign thyroid tumors; neuroendocrine tumors; radiochemistry {sup 1}8F, oncology: pre-clinic PET; neurology-oncology-activation; physics: quantification; various topics; radiochemistry: radioactive metals; benign thyroid tumors; therapeutical studies; neurology: neurodegeneration; oncology: SPECT/planar scintigraphy; local therapy; inflammation; dosimetry - radiation protection; radiochemistry: halogens.

  4. OntoDiagram: Automatic Diagram Generation for Congenital Heart Defects in Pediatric Cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Vishwanath, Kartik; Viswanath, Venkatesh; Drake, William; Lee, Yugyung

    2005-01-01

    In pediatric cardiology as well as many other medical specialties, the accurate portrayal of a large volume of patient information is crucial to providing good patient care. Our research aims at utilizing clinical and spatial ontologies representing the human heart, to automatically generate a Mullins-like diagram [6] based on a patient's information in the cardiology databases. Our ontology allows an intuitive way of modeling congenital defects with the structure of the hum...

  5. [The practical clinical guidelines of the Sociedad Española de Cardiología on interventional cardiology: coronary angioplasty and other technics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplugas, E; Alfonso, F; Alonso, J J; Asín, E; Elizaga, J; Iñiguez, A; Revuelta, J M

    2000-02-01

    Interventional cardiology has had an extraordinary expansion in last years. This clinical guideline is a review of the scientific evidence of the techniques in relation to clinical and anatomic findings. The review includes: 1. Coronary arteriography. 2. Coronary balloon angioplasty. 3. Coronary stents. 4. Other techniques: directional atherectomy, rotational atherectomy, transluminal extraction atherectomy, cutting balloon, laser angioplasty and transmyocardial laser and endovascular radiotherapy. 5. Platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors. 6. New diagnostic techniques: intravascular ultrasound, coronary angioscopy, Doppler and pressure wire. For the recommendations we have used the classification system: class I, IIa, IIb, III like in the guidelines of the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association.

  6. Do prerecorded lecture VODcasts affect lecture attendance of first-yearpre-clinical Graduate Entry to Medicine students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Mark G; O'Malley, Dervla

    2017-03-01

    There is increasing concern amongst educators that the provision of recorded lectures may reduce student attendance of live lectures. We therefore sought to determine if the provision of prerecorded lecture video podcasts (VODcasts) to first-year Graduate Entry to Medicine (GEM) students, affected attendance at 21 Physiology lectures within three separate pre-clinical modules. Data on lecture attendance, utilization of VODcasts, and whether VODcasts should replace live lectures were drawn from three surveys conducted in academic years 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 on all first-year GEM students in two first-year pre-clinical modules where prerecorded Physiology VODcasts were available for viewing or downloading prior to scheduled live lectures. A total of 191/214 (89%) students responded to the three surveys, with 84.3% of students attending all 21 lectures in the study. Only 4% of students missed more than one lecture in each of the three lecture series, with 79% indicating that VODcasts should not replace lectures. Therefore, we conclude that the attendance of pre-clinical GEM students at live lectures is not significantly impacted upon by the provision of lecture VODcasts, with most students viewing them as useful revision tools rather than as a replacement for live lectures.

  7. Lecture Notes on Network Information Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gamal, Abbas El

    2010-01-01

    Network information theory deals with the fundamental limits on information flow in networks and optimal coding techniques and protocols that achieve these limits. It extends Shannon's point-to-point information theory and the Ford--Fulkerson max-flow min-cut theorem to networks with multiple sources and destinations, broadcasting, interference, relaying, distributed compression and computing. Although a complete theory is yet to be developed, several beautiful results and techniques have been developed over the past forty years with potential applications in wireless communication, the Internet, and other networked systems. This set of lecture notes, which is a much expanded version of lecture notes used in graduate courses over the past eight years at Stanford, UCSD, CUHK, UC Berkeley, and EPFL, aims to provide a broad coverage of key results, techniques, and open problems in network information theory. The lectures are organized in a "top-down" manner into four parts: background, single-hop networks, multi...

  8. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES QUESTIONNAIRE: SUGGEST AND WIN!

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Time to plan for the 2001-02 lecture series. From today until April 9 you have the chance to give your contribution to improved planning for next year's Academic Training Lectures Series. At the web site: http://wwwinfo/support/survey/academic-training/ you will find questionnaires concerning the following different categories: high energy physics, applied physics, science and society and post-graduate students lectures. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at CERN bookshop.

  9. Professional development of international classroom lecturers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.

    With a rapidly growing number of students learning and lecturers teaching through a language other than their own first language, there is equally a growing need to consider how lecturers are trained to teach in the international classroom where students have a range of different linguistic...... to planning and managing multilingual and multicultural learning environments (best practice) and (ii) to suggest possible formats of suitable training sessions for university lecturers. Based on a comprehensive literature review, the study comprises cases of professional development programmes offered...... and weaknesses) and discuss their applicability in a wider context. Key words: Professional development; International classroom; English Medium Instruction, Opportunities and challenges Simon, Eszter & Gabriela Pleschová (eds).2013. Teacher Development in Higher Education. Existing Programs, Program Impact...

  10. Lectures on formal and rigid geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    A first version of this work appeared in 2005 as a Preprint of the Collaborative Research Center "Geometrical Structures in Mathematics" at the University of Münster. Its aim was to offer a concise and self-contained 'lecture-style' introduction to the theory of classical rigid geometry established by John Tate, together with the formal algebraic geometry approach launched by Michel Raynaud. These Lectures are now viewed commonly as an ideal means of learning advanced rigid geometry, regardless of the reader's level of background. Despite its parsimonious style, the presentation illustrates a number of key facts even more extensively than any other previous work. This Lecture Notes Volume is a revised and slightly expanded version of the original preprint and has been published at the suggestion of several experts in the field.

  11. Lectures in the history of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Bos, Henk J M

    1993-01-01

    "[These lectures] are about themes of the history of mathematics which, for various reasons, are dear to me. The early differential and integral calculus, the work of Christiaan Huygens, and the concept of construction in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century mathematics are the three themes around which much of my research has concentrated and which continue to fascinate me by the insights they offer in the development of that special human activity called mathematics." -from the Introduction This volume contains eleven lectures ranging over a variety of topics in the history of mathematics. The lectures, presented between 1970 and 1987, were delivered in a variety of venues and appeared only in less accessible publications. Those who teach mathematics, as well as mathematics historians, will appreciate this insightful, wide-ranging book.

  12. Impact of post myocardial infarction depression on drug adherence of cardiological medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemanta Dutta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depressive symptoms are very usual in patients experiencing a history of myocardial infarction (MI. An individual who has developed depression after an episode of MI becomes non compliant with the treatment of cardiology. Aim: To test the impact of post MI depression on drug adherence of cardiological medicines. Settings and design: The study was conducted on patients of acute MI (n=50 attending cardiology outpatient department (OPD of Assam Medical College and Hospital, Dibrugarh at eight weeks after the index event. Methods: Screening was performed by the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD and diagnoses of major depressive disorder were established according to the text revision of the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR criteria. The eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Questionnaire was applied to the patients to assess drug adherence after eight weeks from the MI episode. Results: Statistically significant strong association and correlation were found between post MI depression and drug adherence of cardiological medicines (Wald 9.84, Odd’s ratio 2.054, p=0.002, rho=0.714. Conclusion: The result of analysis has revealed that post MI depression has an unfavourable impact on drug adherence, ultimately contributing to increased risk of cardiological morbidity and death rate. Therefore, routine screening of depressive symptoms should be mandatory in cardiology.

  13. On performing concepts during science lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzer-Ardenghi, Lilian; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2007-01-01

    When lecturing, teachers make use of both verbal and nonverbal communication. What is called teaching, therefore, involves not only the words and sentences a teacher utters and writes on the board during a lesson, but also all the hands/arms gestures, body movements, and facial expressions a teacher performs in the classroom. All of these communicative modalities constitute resources that are made available to students for making sense of and learning from lectures. Yet in the literature on teaching science, these other means of communication are little investigated and understood - and, correspondingly, they are undertheorized. The purpose of this position paper is to argue for a different view of concepts in lectures: they are performed simultaneously drawing on and producing multiple resources that are different expressions of the same holistic meaning unit. To support our point, we provide examples from a database of 26 lectures in a 12th-grade biology class, where the human body was the main topic of study. We analyze how different types of resources - including verbal and nonverbal discourse and various material artifacts - interact during lectures. We provide evidence for the unified production of these various sense-making resources during teaching to constitute a meaning unit, and we emphasize particularly the use of gestures and body orientations inside this meaning unit. We suggest that proper analyses of meaning units need to take into account not only language and diagrams but also a lecturer's pointing and depicting gestures, body positions, and the relationships between these different modalities. Scientific knowledge (conceptions) exists in the concurrent display of all sense-making resources, which we, following Vygotsky, understand as forming a unit (identity) of nonidentical entities.

  14. The potential role of MRI in veterinary clinical cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Stephen H; McConnell, Fraser J; Holden, Arun V; Sivananthan, Mohan U; Dukes-McEwan, Joanna

    2010-02-01

    Over the last decade, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become established as a useful referral diagnostic method in veterinary medicine that is widely used in small animal brain and spinal diseases, aural, nasal and orbital disorders, planning soft tissue surgery, oncology and small animal and equine orthopaedics. The use of MRI in these disciplines has grown due to its unparalleled capability to image soft tissue structures. This has been exploited in human cardiology where, despite the inherent difficulties in imaging a moving, contractile structure, cardiac MRI (CMRI) has become the optimal technique for the morphological assessment and quantification of ventricular function. Both CMRI hardware and software systems have developed rapidly in the last 10 years but although several preliminary veterinary CMRI studies have been reported, the technique's growth has been limited and is currently used primarily in clinical research. A review of published studies is presented with a description of CMRI technology and the potential of CMRI is discussed along with some of the reasons for its limited usage.

  15. [Cardiology was born with the modern medical science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Modern medical science was born in the post-Renaissance age and began to consolidate towards the middle of the XVII century thanks to physicists, physiologists and biologists, most of whom were direct or indirect pupils of Galileo. The discovery of blood circulation by Harvey is now considered the only progress in physiology at the beginning of the XVII century, comparable to the current advances seen in physical sciences. The history of this exploit could be written from view point of the progressive advance in knowledge. In his experiments, Harvey referred to the authentic not imaginary experiments, and put forward irrefutable quantitative arguments. We can therefore claim that his discovery of blood circulation was the first proper explanation of an organic process and the starting point leading to experimental physiology. So it seems justified to assert that modern medical science did not all rise suddenly, but was gradually structured starting from the middle of the XVII century following the path traced by William Harvey in light of Galileo's thought. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Milestones in pediatric cardiology: making possible the impossible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mormile, Raffaella; Quadrini, Ilaria; Squarcia, Umberto

    2013-02-01

    Pediatric Cardiology as a discipline has been proposed to have been born on August 26, 1938, when Robert Gross at the age of 33 years, successfully ligated a patent ductus arteriosus of a 7 years girl at the Children's Hospital in Boston. In November 1944, Helen Taussig convinced Alfred Blalock to anastomose the left subclavian artery to the left pulmonary artery after Robert Gross had declined to cooperate with her. About the 1950s, at the University of Minneapolis, Clarence Walton Lillehei worked on a controlled "crossed circulation" in which the cardiopulmonary bypass machine was another human, generally one of the patient's parents. In 1966 Williams Rashkind introduced ballon septostomy as a palliative approach to complete transposition of the Great Arteries, followed later by Jean Kan's balloon valvuloplasty to open the pulmonary valve. During the 1960s Giancarlo Rastelli developed a new classification of the Atrio Ventricular Canal defect which allowed to have a strikingly better surgical results. Today, even the hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), at one time a fatal condition, is operable. The completion of the Human Genome Project has been an enormous help in the understanding the genetic causes of cardiac anomalies. However, there are very few approved application for stem cells, and stem cells will not likely replace organ transplantation any time soon. Recently, the protein survivin has been described as a novel player in cardioprotection against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. The science needs to be made with love to warrant the humanity of Research.

  17. [Innovations in cardiology. We are too fast with new methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegeler, A

    2016-03-01

    Cardiology is rapidly developing on many levels. New treatment methods are introduced at ever decreasing intervals. Against the background of economization of other areas in medicine, dangers are lurking here for patients if safety, usefulness and sustainability of the treatment methods cannot be sufficiently proven. The German Federal Ministry of Health (Bundesministerium für Gesundheit, BMG) aims to adjust the regulatory framework for the approval of new medical products to the legal requirements of the European Union. With the establishment of the Institute for Quality Assessment and Transparency in Health Care (Institut für Qualitätssicherung und Transparenz im Gesundheitswesen, IQTIG) more precise quality controls should be carried out. Implantation registers will be soon implemented and the routinely performed quality control of different interventions will be coordinated across different healthcare sectors in order to achieve a better understanding of long-term results. Medicine in general and the safety of patients in particular, ultimately benefit from more stringent controls, neutrality and transparency in the assessment of new methods.

  18. Update in cardiology: vascular risk and cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galve, Enrique; Alegría, Eduardo; Cordero, Alberto; Fácila, Lorenzo; Fernández de Bobadilla, Jaime; Lluís-Ganella, Carla; Mazón, Pilar; de Pablo Zarzosa, Carmen; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2014-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease develops in a slow and subclinical manner over decades, only to manifest suddenly and unexpectedly. The role of prevention is crucial, both before and after clinical appearance, and there is ample evidence of the effectiveness and usefulness of the early detection of at-risk individuals and lifestyle modifications or pharmacological approaches. However, these approaches require time, perseverance, and continuous development. The present article reviews the developments in 2013 in epidemiological aspects related to prevention, includes relevant contributions in areas such as diet, weight control methods (obesity is now considered a disease), and physical activity recommendations (with warnings about the risk of strenuous exercise), deals with habit-related psychosocial factors such as smoking, provides an update on emerging issues such as genetics, addresses the links between cardiovascular disease and other pathologies such as kidney disease, summarizes the contributions of new, updated guidelines (3 of which have recently been released on topics of considerable clinical importance: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease), analyzes the pharmacological advances (largely mediocre except for promising lipid-related results), and finishes by outlining developments in the oft-neglected field of cardiac rehabilitation. This article provides a briefing on controversial issues, presents interesting and somewhat surprising developments, updates established knowledge with undoubted application in clinical practice, and sheds light on potential future contributions. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation exposure to cardiologists performing interventional cardiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delichas, Miltiadis; Psarrakos, Kyriakos; Molyvda-Athanassopoulou, Elisabeth E-mail: moly@med.auth.gr; Giannoglou, Georgios; Sioundas, Anastasios; Hatziioannou, Konstantinos; Papanastassiou, Emmanouil

    2003-12-01

    Medical doctors, who practice interventional cardiology, receive a noticeable radiation dose. In this study, we measured the radiation dose to 9 cardiologists during 144 procedures (72 coronary angiographies and 70 percutaneus translumined coronary angioplasties) in two Greek hospitals. Absorbed doses were measured with TLD placed underneath and over the lead apron at the thyroid protective collar. Based on these measurements, the effective dose was calculated using the Niklason method. In addition, dose area product (DAP) was registered. The effective doses, E, were normalised to the total DAP measured in each procedure, producing the E/DAP index. The mean effective dose values were found to be in the range of 1.2-2.7 {mu}Sv while the mean E/DAP values are in the range of 0.010-0.035 {mu}Sv/Gy cm{sup 2}. The dependence of dose to the X-ray equipment, the exposure parameters and the technique of the cardiologist were examined. Taking under consideration the laboratories' annual workload, the maximum annual dose was estimated to be 1.9 and 2.8 mSv in the two hospitals.

  20. Motivation and frustration in cardiology trial participation: the patient perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silmara Meneguin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The participation of humans in clinical cardiology trials remains essential, but little is known regarding participant perceptions of such studies. We examined the factors that motivated participation in such studies, as well as those that led to participant frustration. METHODS: Patients who had participated in hypertension and coronary arterial disease (phases II, III, and IV clinical trials were invited to answer a questionnaire. They were divided into two groups: Group I, which included participants in placebo-controlled clinical trials after randomization, and Group II, which included participants in clinical trials in which the tested treatment was compared to another drug after randomization and in which a placebo was used in the washout period. RESULTS: Eighty patients (47 patients in Group I and 33 patients in Group II with different socio-demographic characteristics were interviewed. Approximately 60% of the patients were motivated to participate in the trial with the expectation of personal benefit. Nine participants (11.2% expressed the desire to withdraw, which was due to their perception of risk during the testing in the clinical trial (Group I and to the necessity of repeated returns to the institution (Group II. However, the patients did not withdraw due to fear of termination of hospital treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Although this study had a small patient sample, the possibility of receiving a benefit from the new tested treatment was consistently reported as a motivation to participate in the trials.