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Sample records for learning reflective practice

  1. Teachers' Reflective Practice in Lifelong Learning Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annie Aarup; Thomassen, Anja Overgaard

    2018-01-01

    This chapter explores teachers' reflective practice in lifelong learning programs based on a qualitative study of five teachers representing three part-time Master's programs. The theoretical framework for analysis of the interview data is Ellström's (1996) model for categorizing levels of action......, knowledge and learning, activity theory (Engeström, 1987) and expansive learning (Engeström & Sannino, 2010). The results show a divergence between what the teachers perceive as the Master students' learning goals and the teachers' goals and objectives. This is highlighted through the teachers' experience...

  2. Towards a Theory of the Ecology of Reflection: Reflective Practice for Experiential Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Marina; Coulson, Debra; McMaugh, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Reflective practice is widely adopted across the field of experience-based learning subjects in higher education, including practicums, work-integrated learning, internships, service learning and community participation. This adoption of reflective practice implies that it supports student learning through experience. When reviewing the evidence…

  3. Guiding Moral Behavior through a Reflective Learning Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Patricia R.

    2017-01-01

    Reflective learning practice embedded across the business curriculum is a powerful way to equip students with intentionally formed moral habits of the mind and heart. This article explores why and how to apply reflective learning to the teaching of business ethics. To act with integrity in complicated work organizations, students need skills and…

  4. INTO THE DEEP REFLECTION ON LEARNING TEACHING PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Ortega-Díaz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the key priorities in the course of initial training for mainstream schools is the reflection of teaching practice, which is why it is necessary to learn how to analyze this process, for it is part of the deep learning approach; recognizing that reflection is central for innovation processes in professional practice. The research presented part of a qualitative study on the phenomenology depth interviews with students of fifth semester of the degree in early childhood education in a regular school in the State of Mexico apply. The results show that learning from reflection of teaching practice leans shallow focus.

  5. Reflective Practice as a Fuel for Organizational Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kati Tikkamäki

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning theories and their interpretations in management research recognize the role of reflection as a central element in the learning process. There also exists a broad consensus that organizational learning (OL happens at three intertwined levels of the individual, the group and the organization. This tri-level analysis has been most influentially presented by Crossan, Lane and White (1999, as a premise for their 4I framework of OL. Though the 4I framework builds strongly on existing literature on OL, it does not address the role of reflection as a factor operating between the inputs and outcomes in 4I sub-processes. Though a large body of research exists regarding the notion of reflection and its importance in terms of OL, this has not been discussed in the specific context of the 4I framework. This article contributes to the development of the 4I model by discussing how reflective practice—on three levels and within 4I sub-processes—fuels the OL process. The argumentation is based on an extensive literature review in three dimensions of learning, illustrated with an empirical inquiry into three business organizations and their reflective practice. In addition, the aim is to increase the understanding of reflection as not only an individual or group process, but as an organized practice, enabled by the tools of management control.

  6. Techniques to Promote Reflective Practice and Empowered Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Truong, Connie Kim Yen; Davis, Andra; Spencer, Cassius; Rasmor, Melody; Dekker, Lida

    2018-02-01

    Health care environments are fraught with fast-paced critical demands and ethical dilemmas requiring decisive nursing actions. Nurse educators must prepare nursing students to practice skills, behaviors, and attitudes needed to meet the challenges of health care demands. Evidence-based, innovative, multimodal techniques with novice and seasoned nurses were incorporated into a baccalaureate (BSN) completion program (RN to-BSN) to deepen learning, complex skill building, reflective practice, teamwork, and compassion toward the experiences of others. Principles of popular education for engaged teaching-learning were applied. Nursing students experience equitable access to content through co-constructing knowledge with four creative techniques. Four creative techniques include poem reading aloud to facilitate connectedness; mindfulness to cultivate self-awareness; string figure activities to demonstrate indigenous knowledge and teamwork; and cartooning difficult subject matter. Nursing school curricula can promote a milieu for developing organizational skills to manage simultaneous priorities, practice reflectively, and develop empathy and the authenticity that effective nursing requires. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(2):115-120.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Practicing What We Preach: Teacher Reflection Groups on Cooperative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.; Jacobs, George M.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the use of teacher reflection groups to aid teachers in their efforts to facilitate cooperative learning among their students. It is argued that these teacher reflection groups function best when they are organized with reference to eight cooperative learning principles. Furthermore, it is suggested that these reflective…

  8. Professional Learning in Human Resource Management: Problematising the Teaching of Reflective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, V.; Holden, R.; Rae, J.; Lawless, A.

    2015-01-01

    Reflection and reflective practice are much discussed aspects of professional education. This paper conveys our efforts to problematise teaching reflective practice in human resources (HR) education. The research, on which the paper is based, engages with stakeholders involved in the professional learning and education of reflective practice in…

  9. Connections between Learning and Teaching: EFL Teachers' Reflective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Chinh Duc

    2017-01-01

    This study explores six Vietnamese, English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers' reflections on their experiences of English language learning during the early 1980s to the late 1990s. Data collected in narrative interviews with the participating teachers revealed a wide range of issues that arose during their EFL learning, central to which was…

  10. Appreciated but Constrained: Reflective Practice of Student Teachers in Learning Communities in a Confucian Heritage Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ying; Wan, Zhi Hong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to understand the reflective practice of 23 Chinese student teachers in learning communities (LCs) during their practicum in a Confucian heritage culture. The reflective levels of the student teachers and the factors that mediated the effects of LCs on their reflective practice were explored using journals and post-journal…

  11. Developing critical reflection for professional practice through problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B

    2001-04-01

    To explore the influence of current learning traditions in nursing on the development of reflection and critical reflection as professional practice skills and to offer suggestions for nursing education that will specifically facilitate the development of critical reflection. ORGANIZATIONAL CONSTRUCTS: Mezirow's transformative learning theory, Barrows conceptualization of problem-based learning (PBL). Integrative literature review of published literature related to nursing, health science education and professional education from 1983-2000. Professional education scholars concur that specialized knowledge is clearly essential for professional practice, however, they also suggest that self-consciousness (reflection) and continual self-critique (critical reflection) are crucial to continued competence. While strategies to facilitate reflection have been outlined in the literature, specific strategies to facilitate the development of critical reflection and implications for nursing education are much less clear. Advocates of reflective and critically reflective practice suggest that the development of these abilities should be inextricably linked to professional development and can be developed through active repeated guided practice. In health care, PBL based on constructivism, has been identified as one way to facilitate the development of these skills. Nursing learners exposed to PBL develop the ability to be reflective and critically reflective in their learning and acquire the knowledge and skill within the discipline of nursing by encountering key professional practice situations as the stimulus and focus of their classroom learning. The learners' ability to be both reflective and critically reflective in their learning is developed by critical questioning of the faculty tutor during situational analysis, learning need determination, application of knowledge, critique of resources and personal problem-solving processes, and summarization of what was learned.

  12. Leveraging Faculty Reflective Practice to Understand Active Learning Spaces: Flashbacks and Re-Captures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Crystal M.; Guo, Xiuyan; Pursel, Barton K.

    2017-01-01

    Although learning spaces research is not new, research approaches that target the specific teaching and learning experiences of faculty and students who occupy active learning classrooms (ALCs) is nascent. We report on two novels data collection approaches: Flashbacks and Re-Captures. Both leverage faculty reflective practice and provide windows…

  13. A Practice-Based Approach to Student Reflection in the Workplace during a Work-Integrated Learning Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Christopher; Dean, Bonnie Amelia

    2013-01-01

    In the Work-Integrated Learning (WIL) curriculum, reflection on workplace activities is widely used to support student learning. Recent critiques have demonstrated the limitations of current approaches to support students' reflective learning of workplace practices. By employing a practice-based approach, we seek to refocus WIL reflection on…

  14. Blogging as a method to stimulate entrepreneurial reflective practice learning in physiotherapy education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringby, Betina

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to identify, create and test an easy and low cost method that stimulates physiotherapy students to become reflective practice learners. Thus blogging was selected as a tool for students to use in their learning process. Blogging is considered to be a useful tool to support students...

  15. Learning With Reflection: Practices in an Osteopathic Surgery Clinical Clerkship Through an Online Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kadriye O; Farber, Susan; Chen, Haiqin; Peska, Don N

    2015-11-01

    The value of reflective practices has gained momentum in osteopathic medical education. However, the use of reflective pedagogies has not been explored in the larger context of medical course delivery and design, to the authors' knowledge. To determine the types of reflection demonstrated by osteopathic medical students on an online discussion board and to explore differences in discussion engagement caused by the use of a reflective learning self-assessment tool. Using a mixed-method approach, reflection processes in an osteopathic surgery clinical clerkship online module were investigated in third-year osteopathic medical students. Discussion board messages were captured and coded. Both manual coding techniques and automated interrogation using NVivo9 (a computer program) for qualitative data were applied. Correlations of scores across 4 case-based discussion tasks and scores for self-reflection were computed as quantitative data. Twenty-eight students were included. Four main types of reflection (ie, content, contextual, dialogic, and personal) along with corresponding differentiated subthemes for each type of case-based discussion board group message were identified. Group collaboration revealed insights about the reflection process itself and also about the evidence of collective efforts, group engagements, and intragroup support among students. Student preparation revealed that students' metacognition was triggered when they judged their own contributions to group work. Challenges in completing readings and meeting deadlines were related to the students' long work hours. Reflective practices are essential to the practice of osteopathic medicine and medical education. Curricula can promote the development of reflective skills by integrating these deliberate practices in educational activities.

  16. Reflective Practice: Origins and Interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The idea of reflection is central to the theory and practice of learning--especially learning which is grounded in past or current experience. This paper proposes a working definition of reflection and reviews its origins and recent developments. The author also provides an account of "critical reflection", including its rationale and…

  17. Reflective Learning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    The main intent of this study was to identify the impact of using learning log as a learning strategy on the academic performance of university students. Second year psychology students were included as subjects of this study. In the beginning of the study, the students were divided into two: experimental group (N = 60) and ...

  18. Reflective Learning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    The experimental group students used learning log on a weekly basis while the control group did not. ... The term “memory” in psychology usually denotes an interest in the retention ... activities that contribute to information being remembered.

  19. Taking the learning beyond the individual: how reflection informs change in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Fiona; Scott, Mairi; McConville, Kevin; Watson, Kenneth; Behbehani, Kazem; Sukkar, Faten

    2014-02-08

    The purpose of this research was to explore the value of reflection and its application to practice through the implementation of educational modules within a new Diabetes Care and Education Master Degree Programme in Kuwait, and to realise how this teaching intervention informs changes in practice. A small exploratory case study was conducted within the Dasman Diabetes Institute, Kuwait. A qualitative approach using focus group interviews was carried out with seventeen participants all of whom are studying on the Diabetes Care and Education Master Degree Programme in Kuwait. An inductive approach to thematic analysis, which focused on examining themes within data, was performed. The results indicate that participants value the opportunity to study through organised, structured and assessed reflection. The learning provides useful information and support to the participant by highlighting the role which reflection plays to enhance personal and professional development, the value of educational theory, continuing professional development, collaboration and enhancing patient education and practice. The significance of reflection is often seen in the literature as an important aspect of professional competence. This research has highlighted the value of reflection as a key component within a new educational programme.

  20. A professional experience learning community for secondary mathematics: developing pre-service teachers' reflective practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Michael; McMaster, Heather

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports on the reflective practice of a group of nine secondary mathematics pre-service teachers. The pre-service teachers participated in a year-long, school-based professional experience program which focussed on observing, co-teaching and reflecting on a series of problem-solving lessons in two junior secondary school mathematics classrooms. The study used a mixed methods approach to consider the impact of shared pedagogical conversations on pre-service teachers' written reflections. It also examined whether there were differences in the focus of reflections depending on whether the lesson was taught by an experienced mathematics teacher, or taught by a pair of their peers, or co-taught by themselves with a peer. Results suggest that after participants have observed lessons taught by an experienced teacher and reflected collaboratively on those lessons, they continue to reflect on lessons taught by their peers and on their own lessons when co-teaching, rather than just describe or evaluate them. However, their written reflections across all contexts continued to focus primarily on teacher actions and classroom management rather than on student learning.

  1. A reflective analysis of medical education research on self-regulation in learning and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brydges, Ryan; Butler, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    In the health professions we expect practitioners and trainees to engage in self-regulation of their learning and practice. For example, doctors are responsible for diagnosing their own learning needs and pursuing professional development opportunities; medical residents are expected to identify what they do not know when caring for patients and to seek help from supervisors when they need it, and medical school curricula are increasingly called upon to support self-regulation as a central learning outcome. Given the importance of self-regulation in both health professions education and ongoing professional practice, our aim was to generate a snapshot of the state of the science in medical education research in this area. To achieve this goal, we gathered literature focused on self-regulation or self-directed learning undertaken from multiple perspectives. Then, with support from a multi-component theoretical framework, we created an overarching map of the themes addressed thus far and emerging findings. We built from that integrative overview to consider contributions, connections and gaps in research on self-regulation to date. Based on this reflective analysis, we conclude that the medical education community's understanding about self-regulation will continue to advance as we: (i) consider how learning is undertaken within the complex social contexts of clinical training and practice; (ii) think of self-regulation within an integrative perspective that allows us to combine disparate strands of research and to consider self-regulation across the training continuum in medicine, from learning to practice; (iii) attend to the grain size of analysis both thoughtfully and intentionally, and (iv) most essentially, extend our efforts to understand the need for and best practices in support of self-regulation. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  2. Reflective Practices for Teacher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulus Kuswandono

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on reflective practice in teacher education are increasingly getting more attention at least in the last 2 decades. This article discusses concepts of reflection and how it is implemented in educating pre-service teachers on their early stage of professional learning. The purposes of doing the reflection for pre-service teachers are not only for illuminating their professional learning experiences, but also to critically reflect their vocation as teachers, including the values which may be dictated to them through rigid regulations. Reflection in teacher education is crucial as it connects well with learning in that learners use reflection to exercise their mind and to evaluate their learning experiences. Besides, this article also highlights some perceived difficulties to implement reflective practice, as well as ways how to promote reflection.   DOI: https://doi.org/10.24071/llt.2012.150102

  3. Tracking Reflective Practice-Based Learning by Medical Students during an Ambulatory Clerkship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Harry

    2007-01-01

    Objective To explore the use of web and palm digital assistant (PDA)-based patient logs to facilitate reflective learning in an ambulatory medicine clerkship. Design Thematic analysis of convenience sample of three successive rotations of medical students’ patient log entries. Setting Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Participants MS3 and MS4 students rotating through a required block ambulatory medicine clerkship. Interventions Students are required to enter patient encounters into a web-based log system during the clerkship. Patient-linked entries included an open text field entitled, “Learning Need.” Students were encouraged to use this field to enter goals for future study or teaching points related to the encounter. Measurement and Main Results The logs of 59 students were examined. These students entered 3,051 patient encounters, and 51 students entered 1,347 learning need entries (44.1% of encounters). The use of the “Learning Need” field was not correlated with MS year, gender or end-of-clerkship knowledge test performance. There were strong correlations between the use of diagnostic thinking comments and observations of therapeutic relationships (Pearson’s r=.42, p<0.001), and between diagnostic thinking and primary interpretation skills (Pearson’s r=.60, p<0.001), but not between diagnostic thinking and factual knowledge (Pearson’s r =.10, p=.46). CONCLUSIONS We found that when clerkship students were cued to reflect on each patient encounter with the electronic log system, student entries grouped into categories that suggested different levels of reflective thinking. Future efforts should explore the use of such entries to encourage and track habits of reflective practice in the clinical curriculum. PMID:17786523

  4. Encouraging Reflective Practice in Conservatoire Students: A Pathway to Autonomous Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Gemma; Harrison, Scott; Dwyer, Rachael

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on first-year conservatoire students' reflections on their one-to-one performance learning through a reflective journal. One-to-one lessons have been a central part of the education of performing musicians, although their place in the twenty-first-century conservatoire is not beyond challenge. Recent research has indicated that…

  5. Pedagogical Perspectives and Practices Reflected in Metaphors of Learning and Digital Learning of ICT Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Ina; Grinberg, Ronen; Shamir-Inbal, Tamar

    2018-01-01

    This study examines the meaning attributed to the contribution of technology to pedagogical practices from the perspective of school ICT leaders. While previous studies use metaphors for bottom-up exploration, this study employs an innovative combination of bottom-up and top-down metaphor analysis based on two frameworks: (a) metaphors of general…

  6. Structure and Agency in Learning: A Critical Realist Theory of the Development of Capacity to Reflect on Academic Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Peter; Qualter, Anne; Young, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Theories of learning typically downplay the interplay between social structure and student agency. In this article, we adapt a causal hypothesis from realist social theory and draw on wider perspectives from critical realism to account for the development of capacity to engage in reflection on professional practice in academic roles. We thereby…

  7. Developing Mathematical Practices through Reflection Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholz, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on reflection in learning mathematical practices. While there is a long history of research on reflection in mathematics, it has focused primarily on the development of conceptual understanding. Building on notion of learning as participation in social practices, this paper broadens the theory of reflection in mathematics…

  8. Undergraduate Reflective Journaling in Work Integrated Learning: Is It Relevant to Professional Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Susan; Francis-Coad, Jacqueline; Connaughton, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the research findings from a study reviewing graduates' opinions on completing online reflective journaling tasks during work integrated learning as an undergraduate. The study was divided into two parts with an initial focus group conducted with six physiotherapy graduates seven months following graduation. Findings from the…

  9. Stop and Think: Exploring Mobile Notifications to Foster Reflective Practice on Meta-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuenca, Bernardo; Kalz, Marco; Ternier, Stefaan; Specht, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, smartphone users are constantly receiving notifications from applications that provide feedback, as reminders, recommendations or announcements. Nevertheless, there is little research on the effects of mobile notifications to foster meta-learning. This paper explores the effectiveness of mobile notifications to foster reflection on…

  10. Supporting Reflective Practices in Social Change Processes with the Dynamic Learning Agenda: An Example of Learning about the Process towards Disability Inclusive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen, Saskia C.; de Wildt-Liesveld, Renée; Bunders, Joske F. G.; Regeer, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Change processes are increasingly seen as the solution to entrenched (social) problems. However, change is difficult to realise while dealing with multiple actors, values, and approaches. (Inter)organisational learning is seen as a way to facilitate reflective practices in social change that support emergent changes, vicarious learning, and…

  11. Teachers’ Reflection Process to Improve Learning Assessment Practices in the Context of Education for Youngsters and Adults (EPJA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ariel Muñoz Olivero

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Education for youngsters and adults (in Spanish, EPJA has reached prominence in the Chilean educational system. It has had to give a new chance to a large number of young people who, for one reason or another, did not complete their studies in traditional training. In this scenario, it explores pedagogical practices developed by teachers working with youngsters and adults, especially those who refer to learning assessment. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to present the results of a reflection carried out by a group of teachers from a comprehensive adult education center, in order to improve their practices to evaluate their students’ learning. The research model is based on the qualitative approach with a case study design. It makes a comprehensive diagnostic of teaching practices, conducted through discussion groups. The analysis of the results shows that most teachers working at this educational center follow traditional assessment practices. They tend to copy conceptions of assessment centered around products that can be scored in order to check goal achievement, rather than around providing feedback that promotes self-regulated learning. However, the reflection also shows that teachers are willing to participate in pedagogical reflection sessions that guide them to improve their assessment practices.

  12. Peer Assisted Learning and Blogging: A Strategy to Promote Reflective Practice during Clinical Fieldwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladyshewsky, Richard K.; Gardner, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The use of peer assisted learning in clinical education is explored in this case study. Groups of undergraduate physiotherapy students were structured into communities of practice during the second half of their clinical fieldwork program. They collaborated online in an asynchronous manner, using information communications technology (blogs) and…

  13. Ten years of open practice: a reflection on the impact of OpenLearn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrina Law

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Open University (OU makes a proportion of all its taught modules available to the public via OpenLearn each year. This process involves the modification, of module excerpts, showcasing subject matter and teaching approach. This activity serves both the University's social and business missions through the delivery of free courses to the public, but increasingly its students are using it to inform module choice, to augment their studies and to boost confidence. In a year that celebrates 10 years of OpenLearn, this paper reports on the growth and impact of the platform as a vast open, learning resource and how a new study underlines how this is also serving the OU’s own students in terms of supporting motivation for learning and impact on achievements. The paper also discusses how the OU is mainstreaming open practice via module production in releasing content on OpenLearn from its paid-for modules in order to improve student module choice and preparedness and in doing so, is providing a richer learning experience for informal learners.

  14. Reflection as a Deliberative and Distributed Practice: Assessing Neuro-Enhancement Technologies via Mutual Learning Exercises (MLEs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Hub; Brenninkmeijer, Jonna; Eduard, Peter; Krabbenborg, Lotte; Laursen, Sheena; Revuelta, Gema; Toonders, Winnie

    2017-01-01

    In 1968, Jürgen Habermas claimed that, in an advanced technological society, the emancipatory force of knowledge can only be regained by actively recovering the 'forgotten experience of reflection'. In this article, we argue that, in the contemporary situation, critical reflection requires a deliberative ambiance, a process of mutual learning, a consciously organised process of deliberative and distributed reflection. And this especially applies, we argue, to critical reflection concerning a specific subset of technologies which are actually oriented towards optimising human cognition (neuro-enhancement). In order to create a deliberative ambiance, fostering critical upstream reflection on emerging technologies, we developed (in the context of a European 7 th Framework Programme project on neuro-enhancement and responsible research and innovation, called NERRI) the concept of a mutual learning exercise (MLE). Building on a number of case studies, we analyse what an MLE involves, both practically and conceptually, focussing on key aspects such as ambiance and expertise, the role of 'genres of the imagination' and the profiles of various 'subcultures of debate'. Ideally, an MLE becomes a contemporary version of the Socratic agora, providing a stage where multiple and sometimes unexpected voices and perspectives mutually challenge each other, in order to strength-en the societal robustness and responsiveness of emerg-ing technologies.

  15. The Reflective Learning Continuum: Reflecting on Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, James W.; Hay, Amanda; Drago, William

    2005-01-01

    The importance of reflection to marketing educators is increasingly recognized. However, there is a lack of empirical research that considers reflection within the context of both the marketing and general business education literature. This article describes the use of an instrument that can be used to measure four identified levels of a…

  16. Improving Inquiry Teaching through Reflection on Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotter, Christine R.; Miller, Cory

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we explore middle school science teachers' learning of inquiry-based instructional strategies through reflection on practice teaching sessions during a summer enrichment program with middle level students. The reflection sessions were part of a larger year-long inquiry professional development program in which teachers learned science content and inquiry pedagogy. The program included a 2-week summer institute in which teachers participated in science content sessions, practice teaching to middle level students, and small group-facilitated reflection sessions on their teaching. For this study, data collection focused on teachers' recorded dialogue during the facilitator - run reflection sessions, the teachers' daily written reflections, a final written reflection, and a written reflection on a videotaped teaching session. We investigated the teachers' reflection levels and the themes teachers focused on during their reflection sessions. Teachers were found to reflect at various reflection levels, from simple description to a more sophisticated focus on how to improve student learning. Recurrent themes point to the importance of providing situated learning environments, such as the practice teaching with immediate reflection for teachers to have time to practice new instructional strategies and gain insight from peers and science educators on how to handle student learning issues.

  17. REFLECTIVE PRACTICE IN ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING, CULTURAL SELF-UNDERSTANDING, AND COMMUNITY SELF-STRENGTHENING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Joshua

    2016-11-01

    The infant mental health field can amplify its effects when it extends its purview beyond the dyad to the larger contexts in which infants and adult caregivers interact and develop over time. Within health, mental health, education, and other human service organizations, the quality of relationships is a critical variable in the individual-level outcomes that such organizations seek. The goals of this work and the means for accomplishing them are highly dependent on human qualities and interactions that are shaped by organizational processes. In communities, too, processes that shape relationships also strongly influence child-, family-, and community-level outcomes. The Touchpoints approach to reflective practice can guide relational processes among professionals, parents, and infants in organizations and communities that influence these outcomes. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  18. Teachers' Critical Reflective Practice in the Context of Twenty-First Century Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benade, Leon

    2015-01-01

    In the twenty-first century, learning and teaching at school must prepare young people for engaging in a complex and dynamic world deeply influenced by globalisation and the revolution in digital technology. In addition to the use of digital technologies, is the development of flexible learning spaces. It is claimed that these developments demand,…

  19. Organizational Learning from Experience in High-Hazard Industries: Problem Investigation as Off-Line Reflective Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolph, Jenny; Hatakenaka, Sachi; Carroll, John S.

    2002-01-01

    Learning from experience, the cyclical interplay of thinking and doing, is increasingly important as organizations struggle to cope with rapidly changing environments and more complex and interdependent sets of knowledge. This paper confronts two central issues for organizational learning: (1) how is local learning (by individuals or small groups) integrated into collective learning by organizations? and (2) what are the differences between learning practices that focus on control, eliminatio...

  20. Students’ Learning through Reflective Journaling

    OpenAIRE

    Alvyda Liuolienė; Regina Metiūnienė

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the article is to get acquainted with the types of journals used in education to help students to learn. The paper presents some ways of fostering student’s learning through reflective journaling. It also describes the key aspects of a new method ARRIVE cycle in connection with teachers preparation to use reflective journals in a classroom. The article also presents self-assessment in reflective journaling and students’ need to self-evaluate their learning process. Reflective journ...

  1. The Soul of Teaching and Professional Learning: An Appreciative Inquiry into the Enneagram of Reflective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckcock, Tim

    2007-01-01

    This paper makes a contribution to the theory and practice of educational action research by introducing two theoretical and methodological resources as part of a personal review of sustained professional experience: "appreciative inquiry" and the "enneagram". It is more than a theoretical exercise, however, because it also…

  2. Examining value creation in a community of learning practice: Methodological reflections on story-telling and story-reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filitsa Dingyloudi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the abundant research on communities in various shapes and settings, examination of what community members gained from their participation remains a thorny issue. For this purpose, we adopted and refined the value creation framework developed by Wenger, Trayner and De Laat (2011 to divulge experienced values by community members through “scaffolded narratives” and categorization of the values reported through their stories. However, in doing so two methodological issues emerged – in particular in relation to “values”. This paper reports on our methodological reflection on the challenging process of capturing community members’ value creation within a community of learning practice. More specifically, we reflect on the following questions: (1 To what extent can the values that the participants originally intended to report be identified as such by the researchers/analysts’ without bias due to the researchers/analysts’ own perspectives? and (2 To what extent does a theoretically-driven pre-defined typology of values confine or enrich the range of possible values that can be identified? What adds to this challenging research endeavour is the concept of value in theoretical terms and its associated typologies. Hence, these methodological questions need to be discussed in order to comprehend both the phenomenon of value (creation per se as well as how it is examined – as close to the participants’ reality as possible – since value creation is the driving force for the sustainability of a community.

  3. Embedding reflection and learning into agile software development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babb, Jeffry; Hoda, Rashina; Nørbjerg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical underpinnings of agile methods emphasize regular reflection as a means to sustainable development pace and continuous learning, but in practice, high iteration pressure can diminish reflection opportunities. The Reflective Agile Learning Model (REALM) combines insights and results...... from studies of agile development practices in India, New Zealand, and the US with Schön’s theory of reflective practice to embed reflection in everyday agile practices....

  4. Practical research on junior high school mathematics about students' learning processes : using 'reflective sheet' (the Math Journal) et al.

    OpenAIRE

    吉岡, 睦美; 重松, 敬一

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the case study of mathematics education for Junior High School students' learning processes focusing students' metacognition and knowledge using 'Reflective Sheet' (the Math Journal) et al.. The metacognition is rather than direct action on the environment and the perception that target cognitive function and cognitive recognition of that, and say what happens in the mind. Especially, we use Reflective Sheet which is formed to check students' cognitive and metacognit...

  5. The Use of Orientation/Decision/Do/Discuss/Reflect (OD3R) Method to Increase Critical Thinking Skill and Practical Skill in Biochemistry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Yunita Arian Sani; Senam, Senam; Laksono, Endang W.

    2018-01-01

    We have developed an OD3R method that can be applied on Biochemistry learning. This OD3R consists of 5 phases: orientation, decision, do, discuss, and reflect to connect lessons in the class with practice in the laboratory. Implementation of OD3R method was done in 2 universities in Yogyakarta to increase critical thinking skill and practical…

  6. Students’ Learning through Reflective Journaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvyda Liuolienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to get acquainted with the types of journals used in education to help students to learn. The paper presents some ways of fostering student’s learning through reflective journaling. It also describes the key aspects of a new method ARRIVE cycle in connection with teachers preparation to use reflective journals in a classroom. The article also presents self-assessment in reflective journaling and students’ need to self-evaluate their learning process. Reflective journaling as central to students’ self-evaluation is described as a means of fostering metacognition.

  7. Reflecting on reflection in interprofessional education: implications for theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Phillip G

    2009-05-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) involves learning, and learning requires reflection. Educators need to "reflect more on reflection" if they are to be effective teachers in ensuring the learning outcomes essential for teamwork and interprofessional practice (IPP), including incorporating both theory and practice into the development of educational interventions. First, this discussion surveys the IPE-relevant literature on reflection, and then defines and refines the multidimensional concept of reflection as it relates to IPE in developing and implementing teamwork learning programs and experiences. Second, specific methods to promote reflection are presented and explored, including self-assessments, journaling, and written papers. Actual samples from student journals and assignments provide examples of the impacts of using these methods on participant reflection and learning. Finally, implications for an expanded understanding and application of reflection for IPE will be discussed, and recommendations made for educational practice and research in this area.

  8. "Refreshed…reinforced…reflective": A qualitative exploration of interprofessional education facilitators' own interprofessional learning and collaborative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Sherryn; Shaw, Nicole; Ward, Catherine; Hayley, Alexa

    2016-11-01

    While there is extensive research examining the outcomes of interprofessional education (IPE) for students, minimal research has investigated how facilitating student learning influences the facilitators themselves. This exploratory case study aimed to explore whether and how facilitating IPE influences facilitators' own collaborative practice attitudes, knowledge, and workplace behaviours. Sixteen facilitators of an online pre-licensure IPE unit for an Australian university participated in semi-structured telephone interviews. Inductive thematic analysis revealed three emergent themes and associated subthemes characterising participants' reflexivity as IPE facilitators: interprofessional learning; professional behaviour change; and collaborative practice expertise. Participants experienced interprofessional learning in their role as facilitators, improving their understanding of other professionals' roles, theoretical and empirical knowledge underlying collaborative practice, and the use and value of online communication. Participants also reported having changed several professional behaviours, including improved interprofessional collaboration with colleagues, a change in care plan focus, a less didactic approach to supervising students and staff, and greater enthusiasm impressing the value of collaborative practice on placement students. Participants reported having acquired their prior interprofessional collaboration expertise via professional experience rather than formal learning opportunities and believed access to formal IPE as learners would aid their continuing professional development. Overall, the outcomes of the IPE experience extended past the intended audience of the student learners and positively impacted on the facilitators as well.

  9. Assessing reflective thinking and approaches to learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Louise; Musolino, Gina M

    2011-01-01

    Facilitation of reflective practice is critical for the ongoing demands of health care practitioners. Reflective thinking concepts, grounded in the work of Dewey and Schön, emphasize critical reflection to promote transformation in beliefs and learning necessary for reflective practice. The Reflective Thinking Questionnaire (QRT) and Revised Study Process Questionnaire (RSPQ-2F) assess skill aspects of professional reasoning, with promise for measuring changes over time. The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability and responsiveness and the model validity of reflective thinking and approaches to learning measures for U.S. health professions students enrolled in entry-level occupational (MOT) and physical therapy (DPT) programs. This measurement study addressed reliability and responsiveness of two measures, the QRT and RSPQ-2F, for graduate health professionals. A convenience sample of 125 MOT and DPT students participated in the two-measure, test-retest investigation, with electronic data collection. Outcomes support the stability of the four-scale QRT (ICC 0.63 to 0.82) and the two-scale RSPQ-2F (ICC 0.91 and 0.87). Descriptive data supporting responsiveness are presented. With noted limitations, the results support the use of the QRT and RSPQ-2F measures to assess changes in reflective thinking and approaches to learning. Measurement of these learning outcomes furthers our understanding and knowledge about instructional strategies, development of professional reasoning, and fostering of self-directed learning within MOT and DPT programs.

  10. Reflective Practice for Psychology Students: The Use of Reflective Journal Feedback in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Andreina; Dell'Aversana, Giuseppina

    2017-01-01

    Reflective journals have emerged as an effective means of monitoring and developing reflective practice in higher education, as part of a wider metacognitive strategy to transform traditional learning approaches. In addition, assessment procedures of reflective journals appear to be an important factor in enhancing commitment to learning and…

  11. Reflection-Based Learning for Professional Ethical Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, William T; George, Maura

    2017-04-01

    One way practitioners learn ethics is by reflecting on experience. They may reflect in the moment (reflection-in-action) or afterwards (reflection-on-action). We illustrate how a teaching clinician may transform relationships with patients and teach person-centered care through reflective learning. We discuss reflective learning pedagogies and present two case examples of our preferred method, guided group reflection using narratives. This method fosters moral development alongside professional identity formation in students and advanced learners. Our method for reflective learning addresses and enables processing of the most pressing ethical issues that learners encounter in practice. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Exploring students' perceptions on the use of significant event analysis, as part of a portfolio assessment process in general practice, as a tool for learning how to use reflection in learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Andrew J; Vermunt, Jan D; Kinnersley, Paul; Houston, Helen

    2007-03-30

    Portfolio learning enables students to collect evidence of their learning. Component tasks making up a portfolio can be devised that relate directly to intended learning outcomes. Reflective tasks can stimulate students to recognise their own learning needs. Assessment of portfolios using a rating scale relating to intended learning outcomes offers high content validity. This study evaluated a reflective portfolio used during a final-year attachment in general practice (family medicine). Students were asked to evaluate the portfolio (which used significant event analysis as a basis for reflection) as a learning tool. The validity and reliability of the portfolio as an assessment tool were also measured. 81 final-year medical students completed reflective significant event analyses as part of a portfolio created during a three-week attachment (clerkship) in general practice (family medicine). As well as two reflective significant event analyses each portfolio contained an audit and a health needs assessment. Portfolios were marked three times; by the student's GP teacher, the course organiser and by another teacher in the university department of general practice. Inter-rater reliability between pairs of markers was calculated. A questionnaire enabled the students' experience of portfolio learning to be determined. Benefits to learning from reflective learning were limited. Students said that they thought more about the patients they wrote up in significant event analyses but information as to the nature and effect of this was not forthcoming. Moderate inter-rater reliability (Spearman's Rho .65) was found between pairs of departmental raters dealing with larger numbers (20-60) of portfolios. Inter-rater reliability of marking involving GP tutors who only marked 1-3 portfolios was very low. Students rated highly their mentoring relationship with their GP teacher but found the portfolio tasks time-consuming. The inter-rater reliability observed in this study should

  13. Community Engagement as Authentic Learning with Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Authentic learning in teacher education is deeply connected with students' future professional practice. This paper describes coaching and mentoring strands of a unit in the preparation of pre-service teachers and critically evaluates reflections made in terms of Professional Teacher Standards. (Contains 1 table.)

  14. The Clinical Learning Spiral: A Model to Develop Reflective Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockhausen, Lynette

    1994-01-01

    The Clinical Learning Spiral incorporates reflective processes into undergraduate nursing education. It entails successive cycles of four phases: preparative (briefing, planning), constructive (practice development), reflective (debriefing), and reconstructive (planning for change and commitment to action). (SK)

  15. John Dewey's Pragmatism: Implications for Reflection in Service-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, Harry Clark; Donnett, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    This essay examines the relationship of philosophical pragmatism to the practice of reflection in service-learning. Service-learning theory and practice often elides over or ignores entirely the principles of inquiry as developed by Dewey. The exercise of reflective thought requires that educators create a situation of discomfort for learners, and…

  16. Reflective practice and its implications for pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsingos, Cherie; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Smith, Lorraine

    2014-02-12

    Pharmacy students require critical-thinking and problem-solving skills to integrate theory learned in the classroom with the complexities of practice, yet many pharmacy students fall short of acquiring these skills.(1-2) Reflective practice activities encourage learning from the student's own experiences and those of others, and offer a possible solution for the integration of knowledge-based curricula with the ambiguities of practice, as well as enhance communication and collaboration within a multidisciplinary team. Although reflective practices have been embraced elsewhere in health professions education, their strengths and shortcomings need to be considered when implementing such practices into pharmacy curricula. This review provides an overview of the evolution of theories related to reflective practice, critically examines the use of reflective tools (such as portfolios and blogs), and discusses the implications of implementing reflective practices in pharmacy education.

  17. Reflections in the clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell-Carrió, F; Hernández-Clemente, J C

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze some models of expert decision and their impact on the clinical practice. We have analyzed decision-making considering the cognitive aspects (explanatory models, perceptual skills, analysis of the variability of a phenomenon, creating habits and inertia of reasoning and declarative models based on criteria). We have added the importance of emotions in decision making within highly complex situations, such as those occurring within the clinical practice. The quality of the reflective act depends, among other factors, on the ability of metacognition (thinking about what we think). Finally, we propose an educational strategy based on having a task supervisor and rectification scenarios to improve the quality of medical decision making. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Teaching health-care trainees empathy and homelessness IQ through service learning, reflective practice, and altruistic attribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisman-Khawam, Leanne; Abdullah, Neelab; Dhoopar, Arjun

    2017-05-01

    This article describes a novel inter-professional curriculum designed to address the needs of homeless patients in a Midwestern region of the United States which has high rates of poverty. The curriculum is intended for healthcare trainees coming from undergraduate pre-medical programs, nursing, pharmacy, social work, clinical psychology, medical school and post-graduate medical training in family medicine, medicine-pediatrics, and psychiatry. The clinical component is specifically designed to reach destitute patients and the curriculum is structured to reverse commonly held myths about homelessness among the trainees, thereby improving their Homelessness Information Quotient, the ability to more fully understand homelessness. Participants across all disciplines and specialties have shown greater empathy and helper behavior as determined by qualitative measures. Learners have also developed a greater understanding of health-care systems allowing them to more consistently address social determinants of health identified by the authors as their Disparity Information Quotient. This article outlines the process of initiating a homeless service program, a curriculum for addressing common myths about homelessness and the effective use of narrative methods, relational connections, and reflective practice to enable trainees to process their experience and decrease burnout by focusing on the value of altruism and finding meaning in their work.

  19. Reflection and Reflective Practice Discourses in Coaching: A Critical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushion, Christopher J.

    2018-01-01

    Reflection and reflective practice is seen as an established part of coaching and coach education practice. It has become a "taken-for-granted" part of coaching that is accepted enthusiastically and unquestioningly, and is assumed to be "good" for coaching and coaches. Drawing on sociological concepts, a primarily Foucauldian…

  20. Analyzing Service-Learning Reflections through Fink's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Meghan E.; Caprino, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Reflection is an increasingly essential component of experience-based learning in higher education to encourage students to draw connections between theoretical and practical knowledge and experiences. This qualitative study examines the reflections of undergraduate students in a service-learning course for secondary English teacher candidates.…

  1. "Keeping SCORE": Reflective Practice through Classroom Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.

    2011-01-01

    Reflective practice means that teachers must subject their own teaching beliefs and practices to critical examination. One way of facilitating reflective practice in ESL teachers is to encourage them to engage in classroom observations as part of their professional development. This paper reports on a case study of a short series of classroom…

  2. Enhancing quality of student teachers' practices through reflective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the role of journal writing in enhancing student teachers' learning during school practice. It analyses data from 22 student teachers' journals and 23 questionnaires. The study focuses on the areas that student teachers reflected on most, the nature of their reflection and the extent to which previous ...

  3. Learning in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helth, Poula

    on theories of aesthetic performance and transformative learning, and on empirical studies through interventive methods within action research and ethnography. Transformative learning in my study has been developed based on aesthetic performance addressing leaders’ learning in practice. This kind of learning......The thesis presents the essence of my study of how leaders transform their practice through aesthetic performance. The background of the study is leaders' need for learning in and through practice, as an alternative to learning in classrooms and to leadership education programs. The study is based...... happens when leaders become aware of the potential for transformation of their leadership practice when they experiment with aesthetic performance integrated in a learning process. The greatest impact in relation to organisational transformation is, when leaders base their learning on a collective...

  4. Learning to practice: Practicing to learn

    OpenAIRE

    McBride, F.

    2005-01-01

    There is clearly a lack of consensus regarding the terminology used to describe the APStraciJ eXp 0jtatjon of knowledge in an organisational context. The theory of knowledge exploitation is bound up in various concepts, the most familiar being Organisational Learning, Knowledge Management and the Learning Organisation. This report is an enquiry into the applicability of these concepts to the design led architectural practice. Implicit within this study is a suggestion that the firm can be suc...

  5. The Importance of Reflective Practice in Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Caldwell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reflection is an essential attribute for the development of autonomous, critical, and advanced practitioners (Mantzoukas & Jasper, 2004. According to Chong (2009, “Reflective practice should be a continuous cycle in which experience and reflection on experiences are inter-related” (p. 112. Studies have shown that nurses who take the time to reflect on their daily experiences provide enhanced nursing care, have a better understanding of theiractions, which in return develops their professional skills (Hansebo & Kihlgren, 2001. Reflective practice is the ability to examine ones actions and experiences with the outcome of developing their practice and enhancing clinicalknowledge. Reflective practice affects all levels of nursing, from students, to advanced practice nursing students, aswell as practicing nurses. Reflective practice is an important component of the nursing curriculum. Research has shown the relationship between student nurses and their mentors is vital. In order for reflection to be effective open-mindedness, courage, and a willingness to accept, and act on, criticism must be present (Bulmam, Lathlean, & Gobbi, 2012. This paper will explore the current literature and implications related to reflective practice in nursing.

  6. Enabling Critical Reflection on Research Supervisory Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Margot; Kayrooz, Carole

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an instrument--The Reflective Supervisor Questionnaire (RSQ). The RSQ maps the domain of research supervisory practice as a facilitative process involving educational tasks and activities. It is designed to assist research supervisors explore, by means of self-reflection and reflection on feedback from…

  7. Teacher Reflective Practice in Jesuit High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Joseph H.

    2010-01-01

    Teachers who engage in reflective practice are more effective and may encourage higher student achievement. The purpose of this study is to explore and describe the methods that teachers use in order to engage in reflective practice. Further, it is essential to gain an understanding of how schools, including Jesuit high schools, promote reflective…

  8. Reflections on Ethics in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Helen R.

    2009-01-01

    Each profession has its own code of ethics. The Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary (2008) defines professional ethics as "the principles of conduct governing an individual or a group." The Code of Ethics of the American Library Association (ALA Council 2008) has served librarians for seventy years and reflects the ideals toward which all librarians…

  9. Positive Stress and Reflective Practice Among Entrepreneurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kati Tikkamäki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While heavy stress loads seem an unavoidable aspect of entrepreneurship, the positive side of stress (often referred to as ‘eustress’ remains a neglected area of research. This paper contributes to entrepreneurship research by linking the research streams of eustress and reflective practice. As a tool for analysing and developing thoughts and actions, reflective practice plays an important role in the interpretative work essential to positive stress experiences. Following an overview of approaches to stress at work, eustress and reflective practice, the paper explores how entrepreneurs experience the role of positive stress and reflective practice in their work and describes the reflective tools utilized by entrepreneurs in promoting eustress. The research process was designed to support reflective dialogue among the 21 Finnish entrepreneurs from different fields who participated in the study, with results based mainly on qualitative interviews. Nine of the interviewed entrepreneurs also kept a positive stress diary, including a three-day physiological measurement analysing their heartbeat variability. The findings suggest that positive stress and reflective practice are intertwined in the experiences of entrepreneurs and illustrate the role of reflective practice as a crucial toolset for promoting positive stress, comprising six reflective tools: studying oneself, changing one’s point of view, putting things into perspective, harnessing a feeling of trust, regulating resources and engaging in dialogue. Individual reflective capabilities vary, and a theory-driven division of reflective practice into individual, social and contextual dimensions is considered useful in understanding those differences. The research offers a starting point for exploring how eustress and reflective practice affect the well-being of entrepreneurs

  10. Learning and Unlearning: Some Reflections on Feminist Praxis and Pedagogic Practice in Religious Studies and Religious Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Robinson

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates the actual impact and potential implications of feminist pedagogy for Religious Studies in universities and Religious Education in schools. It is based on the authors’ experience in the UK, including some international comparisons, with a focus on teaching and learning from a feminist perspective. Applying Grimmitt’s threefold model of pedagogy as encompassing aims and content as well as method, this article examines the evidence and extent of change in curricula both in universities and in schools in order to identify where change is required and what that change might be. It demonstrates how feminist pedagogy challenges Religious Studies and Religious Education to rethink their content, methods and aims in a variety of ways, pointing to significant advances and areas yet to be addressed. In so doing, it takes account of diverse feminist voices, other pedagogical priorities and other issues surrounding sex, gender and sexuality that challenge the category of the feminine and the appropriateness of a gendered analysis.

  11. Reflection amplifiers in self-regulated learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verpoorten, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Verpoorten, D. (2012). Reflection amplifiers in self-regulated learning. Doctoral thesis. November, 9, 2012, Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit (CELSTEC). Datawyse / Universitaire Pers Maastricht.

  12. Special Issue on: Awareness and Reflection in Technology Enhanced Learning. Vol.9, (2-3)

    OpenAIRE

    Kravcik, Milos; Mikroyannidis, Alexander; Pammer, Viktoria; Prilla, Michael; Ullmann, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Awareness and reflection play a crucial role in the learning process, helping the involved actors to succeed in self-regulated learning and to optimise their learning experience. Whether in traditional education, workplace training or lifelong learning, appropriate feedback together with proper assessment of previous practices can bring benefits for all the participants and cultivate their reflective skills, which are essential for effective learning.

  13. Reflect: a practical approach to web semantics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donoghue, S.I.; Horn, Heiko; Pafilisa, E.

    2010-01-01

    To date, adding semantic capabilities to web content usually requires considerable server-side re-engineering, thus only a tiny fraction of all web content currently has semantic annotations. Recently, we announced Reflect (http://reflect.ws), a free service that takes a more practical approach......: Reflect uses augmented browsing to allow end-users to add systematic semantic annotations to any web-page in real-time, typically within seconds. In this paper we describe the tagging process in detail and show how further entity types can be added to Reflect; we also describe how publishers and content...... web technologies....

  14. Effect of reflective practice education on self-reflection, insight, and reflective thinking among experienced nurses: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, Marilyn E; Fain, James A

    2013-01-01

    A mixed-method study was conducted to determine whether nurses' participation in a reflective practice continuing education program using a structured reflection model makes a difference in nurses' self-reflection, insight, and reflective thinking about clinical practice situations. Findings suggested that use of structured reflection using question cues, written narratives, and peer-facilitated reflection increased nurses' engagement in self-reflection and enhanced reflective thinking in practice. Including reflective practice education in novice orientation and preceptor training may be beneficial.

  15. Assessing Reflection: Understanding Skill Development through Reflective Learning Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathro, Virginia; O'Kane, Paula; Gilbertson, Deb

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to suggest ways in which business educators can interact successfully with reflective learning journals (RLJs). Specifically, the research was interested in how students used RLJs and how educators assessed these RLJs. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 31 RLJs, submitted as part of an international…

  16. FLIPPED LEARNING: PRACTICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Kuzminska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to issues of implementation of the flipped learning technology in the practice of higher education institutions. The article defines the principles of technology and a model of the educational process, it notes the need to establish an information support system. The article defines online platforms and resources; it describes recommendations for the design of electronic training courses and organization of the students in the process of implementing the proposed model, as well as tools for assessing its effectiveness. The article provides a description of flipped learning implementation scenario and formulates suggestions regarding the use of this model as a mechanism to improve the efficiency of the learning process in the ICT-rich environment of high school: use of learning management systems (LMS and personal learning environments (PLE of participants in a learning process. The article provides an example of implementation of the flipped learning model as a part of the Information Technologies course in the National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine (NULES. The article gives examples of tasks, resources and services, results of students’ research activity, as well as an example of the personal learning network, established in the course of implementation of the flipped learning model and elements of digital student portfolios. It presents the results of the monitoring of learning activities and students’ feedback. The author describes cautions against the mass introduction of the flipped learning model without monitoring of readiness of the participants of the educational process for its implementation

  17. Enhanced Student Learning in Accounting Utilising Web-Based Technology, Peer-Review Feedback and Reflective Practices: A Learning Community Approach to Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sue; Ryan, Mary; Pearce, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Higher education is becoming a major driver of economic competitiveness in an increasingly knowledge-driven global economy. Maintaining the competitive edge has seen an increase in public accountability of higher education institutions through the mechanism of ranking universities based on the quality of their teaching and learning outcomes. As a…

  18. Reflective practice: a framework for case manager development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubakken, Karen; Grant, Sara; Johnson, Mary K; Kollauf, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    The role of a nurse case manager (NCM) incorporates practice that is built upon knowledge gained in other roles as well as components unique to case management. The concept of reflective practice was used in creating a framework to recognize the developmental stages that occur within community based case management practice. The formation of this framework and its uses are described in this article. The practice setting is a community based case management department in a large midwestern metropolitan health care system with Magnet recognition. Advanced practice nurses provide care for clients with chronic health conditions. Twenty-four narratives were used to identify behaviors of community based case managers and to distinguish stages of practice. The behaviors of advanced practice found within the narratives were labeled and analyzed for similarities. Related behaviors were grouped and descriptor statements were written. These statements grouped into 3 domains of practice: relationship/partnership, coordination/collaboration, and clinical knowledge/decision making. The statements in each domain showed practice variations from competent to expert, and 3 stages were determined. Reliability and validity of the framework involved analysis of additional narratives. The reflective practice process, used for monthly case review presentations, provides opportunity for professional development and group learning focused on improving case manager practice. The framework is also being used in orientation as new case managers acclimate to the role. Reflective writing has unveiled the richness and depth of nurse case manager practice. The depth of knowledge and skills involved in community-based case management is captured within this reflective practice framework. This framework provides a format for describing community based case manager practice development over the course of time and has been used as a tool for orientation and peer review.

  19. Perceptions of UK medical graduates' preparedness for practice: a multi-centre qualitative study reflecting the importance of learning on the job.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illing, Jan C; Morrow, Gill M; Rothwell nee Kergon, Charlotte R; Burford, Bryan C; Baldauf, Beate K; Davies, Carol L; Peile, Ed B; Spencer, John A; Johnson, Neil; Allen, Maggie; Morrison, Jill

    2013-02-28

    There is evidence that graduates of different medical schools vary in their preparedness for their first post. In 2003 Goldacre et al. reported that over 40% of UK medical graduates did not feel prepared and found large differences between graduates of different schools. A follow-up survey showed that levels of preparedness had increased yet there was still wide variation. This study aimed to examine whether medical graduates from three diverse UK medical schools were prepared for practice. This was a qualitative study using a constructivist grounded theory approach. Prospective and cross-sectional data were collected from the three medical schools.A sample of 60 medical graduates (20 from each school) was targeted. They were interviewed three times: at the end of medical school (n = 65) and after four (n = 55) and 12 months (n = 46) as a Year 1 Foundation Programme doctor. Triangulated data were collected from clinicians via interviews across the three sites (n = 92). In addition three focus groups were conducted with senior clinicians who assess learning portfolios. The focus was on identifying areas of preparedness for practice and any areas of lack of preparedness. Although selected for being diverse, we did not find substantial differences between the schools. The same themes were identified at each site. Junior doctors felt prepared in terms of communication skills, clinical and practical skills and team working. They felt less prepared for areas of practice that are based on experiential learning in clinical practice: ward work, being on call, management of acute clinical situations, prescribing, clinical prioritisation and time management and dealing with paperwork. Our data highlighted the importance of students learning on the job, having a role in the team in supervised practice to enable them to learn about the duties and responsibilities of a new doctor in advance of starting work.

  20. Workplace diaries promoting reflective practice in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, Naomi; Dempsey, Shane E.; Warren-Forward, Helen M.

    2009-01-01

    Competency standards usually describe that radiation therapists are expected to display characteristics of reflective practice. Many radiation therapists may be unequipped to undertake reflective practice or produce evidence of reflective practice due to limited understanding of the process. There are many models to guide practitioners in their reflective journeys, however, the literature describing reflective practice can appear confusing. This paper will discuss the role of reflective practice, provide a definition for reflective practice and define concepts central to reflective journaling or workplace diaries. The paper will offer practical advice to increase radiation therapists knowledge and skills in the use of reflective workplace diaries.

  1. Workplace diaries promoting reflective practice in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Naomi [Medical Radiation Science, Faculty of Health Science, Box 16 Hunter Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)], E-mail: naomi.chapman@newcastle.edu.au; Dempsey, Shane E. [Medical Radiation Science, Faculty of Health Science, Box 16 Hunter Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)], E-mail: shane.e.dempsey@newcastle.edu.au; Warren-Forward, Helen M. [Medical Radiation Science, Faculty of Health Science, Box 16 Hunter Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)], E-mail: helen.warren-forward@newcastle.edu.au

    2009-05-15

    Competency standards usually describe that radiation therapists are expected to display characteristics of reflective practice. Many radiation therapists may be unequipped to undertake reflective practice or produce evidence of reflective practice due to limited understanding of the process. There are many models to guide practitioners in their reflective journeys, however, the literature describing reflective practice can appear confusing. This paper will discuss the role of reflective practice, provide a definition for reflective practice and define concepts central to reflective journaling or workplace diaries. The paper will offer practical advice to increase radiation therapists knowledge and skills in the use of reflective workplace diaries.

  2. Fostering reflective practice with mobile technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabuenca, Bernardo; Verpoorten, Dominique; Ternier, Stefaan; Westera, Wim; Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Tabuenca, B., Verpoorten, D., Ternier, S., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2012). Fostering reflective practice with mobile technologies. In A. Moore, V. Pammer, L. Pannese, M. Prilla, K. Rajagopal, W. Reinhardt, Th. D. Ullman, & Ch. Voigt (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Awareness and

  3. Learning to Become a Learning Professional: Reflections on One Year of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Karl; Armour, Kathleen M.

    2005-01-01

    This research aims to study the ways in which a teacher learns through and about professional practice. Data presented here is drawn from one year of teaching and focuses on pedagogical practices, critical reflection upon those practices and the impact of the implementation of a new physical education syllabus in Maltese secondary schools. The…

  4. Teaching-learning of psychology: reflections from interbehavioral scientific matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winter Edgar Reyna Cruz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In previous works it has been pointed out that the exercise of Psychology is not limited to a single type of practice; On the contrary, psychologists perform philosophical, theoretical, technological, professional and transdisciplinary practices. Derived from the above in the present work, it is argued that teaching-learning Psychology demands that the aforementioned practices be taught-learn, to a greater or lesser extent. Based on this, (a the specific characteristics of each practice are described roughly; (b there is an aroused presentation of the main interbehavioral theoretical contributions regarding the teaching-learning of Psychology, the didactic interaction and the teacher's performance, which have focused on the learning of the practice of scientific investigation and its teaching; and, derived from the previous points, (c some reflections are presented regarding the teaching practice of psychology, as well as the learning of it, taking into account the different practices that are carried out in this discipline and not only with respect to the research practice. In the final comments, the benefits of the distinction of psychological practices in the training of apprentices of the discipline are indicated

  5. Using flash cards to engage Indonesian nursing students in reflection on their practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanda, Dessie; Fowler, Cathrine; Wilson, Valerie

    2016-03-01

    Reflective practice is now widely used as a critical learning tool in undergraduate and postgraduate nursing programs in most developed countries. However in developing countries, reflective practice is in its infancy. To introduce reflective practice to postgraduate students in an Indonesian nursing education institution. This paper presents the positive meanings of reflection and reflective practice experienced by the students and the way they used reflection within their practice. A descriptive qualitative study was conducted to explore the meaning of reflection or reflective practice using flashcards. A clinical reflective practice model taking into consideration Indonesian culture was developed and applied during students' clinical placement. A few weeks post clinical placement, 21 students participated in an evaluation session. The meaning of reflection or reflective practice was explored using flash cards containing images of people and environment with different situations and events. Students were asked to choose a card that represented their viewpoints about reflective practice and share it with the group. Data were digitally captured and analyzed using thematic analysis. Reflection provided a positive experience for the students. In their own words, they discussed their journey of using reflection during the clinical placement period. The use of reflection was identified as expanding their view of nursing practice, providing a safe place to explore their experiences and clarity when they encountered challenging situations during their clinical practice. Reflecting on practice experiences resulted in increased self-awareness, and enhanced their learning. The findings indicate that reflective practice can be implemented successfully in Indonesia and may have value for other Eastern countries that share similar cultural characteristics. The use of flash cards assisted the students describe through stories their experiences of participating in this

  6. The educational practice of preceptors in healthcare residencies: a study on reflective practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Regina Barros RIBEIRO

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article was to reflect on the practice of preceptorship as an educational practice in the training and qualifications of professional health information for the public health system. This is a theoretical reflection with support in the literature. The teacher addresses the teaching-learning process and transforms the activities in the work on educational moments. In this area arise questions about what is being preceptor and their role in health education. It is necessary to teach knowledge beyond the content of the discipline, and reflecting about preceptorship as an educational practice in the workplace, the preceptor needs pedagogical preparation. Herewith, being a preceptor means being a teacher? This reflection places us in front of a problem present in our daily exercise, which is the pedagogical training of those who teach for a transformation of practice in health.

  7. Reflecting on Ethics in Practice Neuromarketing: Neuroethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Ferreira Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to answer to the following research problem: what are the relevant ethical questions related to neuromarketing practice? The objective is to explain the evolution of the field of neuromarketing from neurosciences and neuroeconomics; explain the main research techniques used on neuromarketing; to present the neuroethics field and apply the concept to the relevant ethical questions of the neuromarketing practice. Neuromarketing developed from neuroeconomics. By using the same techniques of image mapping, neuromarketing aims to investigate consumer behavior and utilize this information on marketing actions. The field of neuroethics can be understood as a reflection of the neuroscientific practices and ethical concepts. Questions of interest to neuroethics involve the practical applications of neurotechnology for people and the society in general. Marketing is a business activity with social implications and, therefore, can’t be done in the absence of values. This article contributes for the academic knowledge of neuromarketing beginning from a revision of international journals and the presentation of a new field of neuromarketing not discussed before by the academy in Brazil: neuroethics. The reflection about the ethics in the neuromarketing practice, neuroethics, it’s important to guide future and present researches in this field. 

  8. Web journaling. Using informational technology to teach reflective practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Judy A; Welch, Lorraine M

    2002-01-01

    Reflection is a process by which we think about experiences and relieve them. Web journaling is a tool that gives students opportunities to use reflection when they are away from the immediate clinical environment. Through such reflection the student's personal knowledge that informs their practice is revealed. The revelation of personal knowledge is key to structuring subsequent faculty guidance. The web journal is a vehicle for student/faculty dialogue aimed at expanding both the faculty's responses to students' learning needs and the students' responses to persons in their care. Questions formulated in the dialogue direct the student's web-based search for new information. Faculty guidance subsequently focuses on the student's decisions regarding the use of information to direct clinical practice. Web journaling done over several nursing courses reinforces a model of learning, which is increasingly more deliberative and intentional. Web journaling may contribute to the development of practice throughout a nursing career because it becomes a way for self-directed learning.

  9. A reflection on using play to facilitate learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Martin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: At the South Eastern Sydney Local Health District Nursing and Midwifery Practice and Workforce Unit, we use the framework of CARE (a compound acronym of Capacity, cApability, collaboRation and culturE to inform all aspects of work. The principles of practice development (Manley et al., 2008 also inform our work, a major focus of which is the use of coaching, action learning sets and active learning techniques. The use of questions and questioning is key to these. These techniques are part of our person-centred approach to professional development and learning. This article describes my reflections, using Gibbs’ model (1988, on the development of a questioning tool aimed at enhancing learning through play. The tool is an origami ‘chatterbox’, which was originally developed as part of a ‘poster’ presentation at the 2014 International Practice Development Conference in Toronto. Aims and objectives: This article aims to share a critical reflection on developing and using the chatterbox and to describe how this experience led to deeper reflections on the role of play in adult learning. Conclusions and implications for practice: The chatterbox has provided a simple and effective tool for introducing, practising and reinforcing the use of enabling questions. Its development allowed the categorisation of enabling questions. Personal reflections undertaken as part of the development of the tool inspired me to explore the literature about the role of play in adult learning. It has implications for supporting the learning of people who are interested in using enabling questions, by increasing their skill and confidence.

  10. FLIPPED LEARNING: PRACTICAL ASPECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Olena Kuzminska

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to issues of implementation of the flipped learning technology in the practice of higher education institutions. The article defines the principles of technology and a model of the educational process, it notes the need to establish an information support system. The article defines online platforms and resources; it describes recommendations for the design of electronic training courses and organization of the students in the process of implementing the proposed model,...

  11. Using children's picture books for reflective learning in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawley, Josephine; Ditzel, Liz; Walton, Sue

    2012-08-01

    One way in which nursing students may build their practice is through reflective learning from stories. Stories in children's literature offer a special source of narratives that enable students to build empathy and to examine and reconstruct their personal concepts around human experience. Illustrated storybooks written for children are a particularly attractive teaching resource, as they tend to be short, interesting, colourful and easy to read. Yet, little has been written about using such books as a reflective learning tool for nursing students. In this article we describe how we use two children's books and McDrury and Alterio's (2002) 'Reflective Learning through Storytelling' model to educate first year nursing students about loss, grief and death.

  12. The making of expert clinicians: reflective practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, J M; Szyld, D; Del Moral, I; Ortiz, G; Rudolph, J W

    2014-05-01

    Debriefing is a rigorous reflection process which helps trainees recognize and resolve clinical and behavioral dilemmas raised by a clinical case. This approach emphasizes eliciting trainees'assumptions about the situation and their reasons for performing as they did (mental models). It analyses their impact on actions, to understand if it is necessary to maintain them or construct new ones that may lead to better performance in the future. It blends evidence and theory from education research, the social and cognitive sciences, and experience drawn from conducting and teaching debriefing to clinicians worldwide, on how to improve professional effectiveness through "reflective practice". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Student reflections on learning with challenging tasks: `I think the worksheets were just for practice, and the challenges were for maths'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, James; Hopkins, Sarah

    2017-09-01

    The current study considered young students' (7 and 8 years old) experiences and perceptions of mathematics lessons involving challenging (i.e. cognitively demanding) tasks. We used the Constant Comparative Method to analyse the interview responses ( n = 73) regarding what work artefacts students were most proud of creating and why. Five themes emerged that characterised student reflections: enjoyment, effort, learning, productivity and meaningful mathematics. Overall, there was evidence that students embraced struggle and persisted when engaged in mathematics lessons involving challenging tasks and, moreover, that many students enjoyed the process of being challenged. In the second section of the paper, the lesson structure preferences of a subset of participants ( n = 23) when learning with challenging tasks are considered. Overall, more students preferred the teach-first lesson structure to the task-first lesson structure, primarily because it activated their cognition to prepare them for work on the challenging task. However, a substantial minority of students (42 %) instead endorsed the task-first lesson structure, with several students explaining they preferred this structure precisely because it was so cognitively demanding. Other reasons for preferring the task-first structure included that it allowed the focus of the lesson to be on the challenging task and the subsequent discussion of student work. A key implication of these combined findings is that, for many students, work on challenging tasks appeared to remain cognitively demanding irrespective of the structure of the lesson.

  14. Pondering practice: Enhancing the art of reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Carolyn; Jackson, Debra; Davidson, Patricia M; Daly, John; Power, Tamara

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the effect that immersive simulation experiences and guided reflection can have on the undergraduate nurses' understanding of how stressful environments impact their emotions, performance and ability to implement safe administration of medications. Patient safety can be jeopardised if nurses are unsure of how to appropriately manage and respond to interruptions. Medication administration errors are a major patient safety issue and often occur as a consequence of ineffective interruption management. The skills associated with medication administration are most often taught to, and performed by, undergraduate nurses in a controlled environment. However, the clinical environment in which nurses are expected to administer medications is often highly stressed and nurses are frequently interrupted. This study used role-play simulation and written reflections to facilitate deeper levels of student self-awareness. A qualitative approach was taken to explore students' understanding of the effects of interruptions on their ability to undertake safe medication administration. Convenience sampling of second-year undergraduate nursing students enrolled in a medical-surgical subject was used in this study. Data were obtained from 451:528 (85.42%) of those students and analysed using thematic analysis. Students reported increasing consciousness and the importance of reflection for evaluating performance and gaining self-awareness. They described self-awareness, effective communication, compassion and empathy as significant factors in facilitating self-efficacy and improved patient care outcomes. Following a role-play simulation experience, student nurses reported new knowledge and skill acquisition related to patient safety, and new awareness of the need for empathetic and compassionate care during medication administration. Practicing medication administration in realistic settings adds to current strategies that aim to reduce medication

  15. Personal Competencies/Personalized Learning: Reflection on Instruction. A Peer-to-Peer Learning and Observation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twyman, Janet; Redding, Sam

    2015-01-01

    This publication and its companion, "Personal Competencies/Personalized Learning: Lesson Plan Reflection Guide," were created in response to a request for further development of the practical application of personalized learning concepts by teachers. Personalized learning varies the time, place, and pace of learning for each student, and…

  16. Reflective practice: assessment of assignments in English for Specific Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Kavaliauskiené

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The construct alternative assessment has been widely used in higher education. It is often defined as any type of assessment of learners who provide a response to an assignment. The key features of alternative assessment are active participation of learners in self-evaluation of their performance, and the development of reflective thinking through reflective thinking (Schön, 1983. The success of alternative assessment in language teaching is predetermined by student’s performance and demonstrates learner’s language proficiency in contemporary communicative classrooms. This paper aims at researching the influence of students’ evaluations of various assignments for their linguistic development in English for Specific Purposes (ESP. The study uses learners’ assessment of different assignments and learners’ in-course and post-course written reflections on benefits to language mastery. Learners’ assignments included were contributions to portfolios (dossiers, such as essays and summaries, oral presentations, short impromptu talks, creative tasks, tests, and self-assessment notes (reflections on activities in learning ESP. Findings were obtained for two streams of the project participants. Results showed that self-assessment was beneficial for learners’ linguistic development. The context of learners’ reflections reveals that the attitudes to various assignments are affected by success or failure in students’ performance. Reflective practice might help teachers develop ways of dealing with previously identified difficulties and improve the quality of teaching.

  17. The Learning Leader: Reflecting, Modeling, and Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jacqueline E.; O'Gorman, Kevin L.

    2012-01-01

    With this book, principals, principals-in-training, and other school leaders get practical, easy-to-implement strategies for professional growth, strengthening relationships with faculty and staff, and making the necessary changes to improve K-12 learning environments. Grounded in specific, real-world examples and personal experiences, "The…

  18. Reflections and challenges in Networked Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonderup Dohn, Nina; Sime, Julie-Ann; Cranmer, Susan

    2018-01-01

    with a short presentation of each of the chapters. This leads us to identify broader themes which point out significant perspectives and challenges for future research and practice. Among these are social justice, criticality, mobility, new forms of openness and learning in the public arena (all leading themes...

  19. Mindfulness Practices and Learning Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borker, David R.

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing interest among educators in teaching and learning practices based on mindfulness, a concept derived from eastern meditative traditions. This paper describes how mindfulness practices and concepts can be used to enhance the student's learning experience in beginning economics courses. Specific areas with a high potential for…

  20. Learning design: reflections upon the current landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brock Craft

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The mounting wealth of open and readily available information and the accelerated evolution of social, mobile and creative technologies call for a re-conceptualisation of the role of educators: from providers of knowledge to designers of learning. This call is reverberated by the rising trend of research in learning design (LD. Addressing this, the Art and Science of Learning Design workshop brought together leading voices in the field, and provided a forum for discussing its key issues. It focused on three major themes: (1 practices, methods and methodologies, (2 tools and resources and (3 theoretical frameworks. This paper proposes a definition of LD, reviews the main contributions from the workshop, and suggests some challenges for future research.

  1. Cultivating Critical Reflection: Educators Making Sense and Meaning of Professional Identity and Relational Dynamics in Complex Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Critical reflection underpins socially just and inclusive practices that are distinguishing features of democratic learning communities. Critical reflection supports educators' interrogation of the underlying assumptions, intentions, values and beliefs that shape their worldview and sociocultural standpoint. Dominant sociocultural norms…

  2. Incorporating Self and Peer Assessment in Reflective Teaching Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Ratminingsih

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available More currently literature reviews suggests the use of authentic assessment, which aims to involve students to be more responsible with their learning. This article reports the findings of a descriptive study on student teachers’ perception on the use of self and peer assessment to give evaluation on planning the lesson and teaching performance in Reflective Teaching Class. There were 100 samples taken randomly from 234 students in a survey using questionnaire and 15 students participating in the focus group discussion (FGD. The finding from the questionnaire shows that they had a very positive perception toward the use of self and peer assessment. Additionally, from the FGD, they conveyed by practicing doing self assessment, they could learn to see self performance deeply, strengths and weaknesses. From peer-assessment, they could learn collaboratively from feedback given by peers how to make a better lesson plan and perform a more effective teaching. Hence, self and peer assessment is considered beneficial for preparing the real teaching practicum and future career development. However, there are some problems challenged them, such as feeling subjectivity in assessing both self or peers, embarrassed and less confidence, and time constraints to make evaluation and reflection in the classroom

  3. Reflective practice in ESL teacher development groups from practices to principles

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    Farrell, T

    2013-01-01

    Reflective Practise in ESL Teacher Development Groups  discusses the concept of reflective practice in ESL teachers using data from a 3-year collaborative partnership in which three ESL teachers in Canada explored their professional development through reflective practice.

  4. Reflect and learn together - when two supervisors interact in the learning support process of nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Mia; Sjögren, Reet; Ekebergh, Margaretha

    2012-03-01

    To describe the importance of supervisors working together in supporting the learning process of nurse students through reflective caring science supervision. A supervision model has been developed in order to meet the need for interweaving theory and practice. The model is characterized by learning reflection in caring science. A unique aspect of the present project was that the student groups were led by a teacher and a nurse. Data were collected through interviews with the supervisors. The analysis was performed with a phenomenological approach. The results showed that theory and practice can be made more tangible and interwoven by using two supervisors in a dual supervision. The essential structure is built on the constituents 'Reflection as Learning Support', 'Interweaving Caring Science with the Patient's Narrative', 'The Student as a Learning Subject' and 'The Learning Environment of Supervision'. The study concludes that supervision in pairs provides unique possibilities for interweaving and developing theory and practice. The supervision model offers unique opportunities for cooperation, for the development of theory and practice and for the development of the professional roll of nurses and teachers. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. The ReflecTable: Bridging the Gap between Theory and Practice in Design Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hook, Jonathan; Hjermitslev, Thomas; Iversen, Ole Sejer

    The ReflecTable is a digital learning environment that explores how design games and video-led reflection might be combined to bridge the gap between the theoretical and practical components of design education. The concept seeks to leverage the qualities of exploratory design games and video...... to inspire design students to critically reflect upon the relationship between their evolving design practices and the theories and techniques they are taught in lectures, by allowing them to capture, review and reflect upon short videos of a design game. In this paper, we present the ReflecTable design...

  6. Peer Learning in Instrumental Practicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Siw G; Johansen, Guro G; Jørgensen, Harald

    2018-01-01

    In higher music education (HME), the notion of "private teaching, private learning" has a long tradition, where the learning part rests on the student's individual practicing between instrumental lessons. However, recent research suggests that collaborative learning among peers is beneficial in several aspects, such as sense of belonging, motivation and self-efficacy. This is consistent with the concept of vicarious learning. In this study, we conducted a survey among bachelor music students in church music, performance or music education programs enrolled in a music academy ( N = 96), where parts of the questionnaire addressed peer learning and peer's influence on the students's instrumental practicing, and the degree of satisfaction with their practicing. These issues were seen in relation to gender, musical genre and study program. Overall, the students reported engaging in peer learning related to their instrumental practicing, to various degrees. This involved discussing practicing matters with peers, and practicing together with peers. However, student's reports of their views on peer learning, show that they perceive it more beneficial than the amount of time reported doing it would indicate. No significant gender differences were found, but students within improvised music/jazz engaged the most in peer learning, and church music students the least. Neither the degree of engaging in peer learning nor reported influence from peers correlated significantly with the degree of satisfaction. We discuss whether a general dissatisfaction is caused by being in a competitive learning environment combined with a privatized culture for learning. Finally, we suggest that collaborative forums for instrumental practicing within HME institutions can function as constructive and supportive arenas to enhance students learning and inner motivation.

  7. Troubling Muddy Waters: Problematizing Reflective Practice in Global Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Thirusha; Kumagai, Arno K

    2016-03-01

    The idea of exporting the concept of reflective practice for a global medical education audience is growing. However, the uncritical export and adoption of Western concepts of reflection may be inappropriate in non-Western societies. The emphasis in Western medical education on the use of reflection for a specific end--that is, the improvement of individual clinical practice--tends to ignore the range of reflective practice, concentrating on reflection alone while overlooking critical reflection and reflexivity. This Perspective places the concept of reflective practice under a critical lens to explore a broader view for its application in medical education outside the West. The authors suggest that ideas about reflection in medicine and medical education may not be as easily transferable from Western to non-Western contexts as concepts from biomedical science are. The authors pose the question, When "exporting" Western medical education strategies and principles, how often do Western-trained educators authentically open up to the possibility that there are alternative ways of seeing and knowing that may be valuable in educating Western physicians? One answer lies in the assertion that educators should aspire to turn exportation of educational theory into a truly bidirectional, collaborative exchange in which culturally conscious views of reflective practice contribute to humanistic, equitable patient care. This discussion engages in troubling the already-muddy waters of reflective practice by exploring the global applicability of reflective practice as it is currently applied in medical education. The globalization of medical education demands critical reflection on reflection itself.

  8. Uses of Technology to Support Reflective Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation researched and reported on how technology was used to facilitate and inform reflective teaching practices. It also identified the characteristics of benefits and barriers in using technology for teaching and reflection. The study, descriptive in nature, was designed to determine the reflective practices of instructors and how…

  9. A Service-Learning Project Using Crowdfunding Strategy: Students' Experience and Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat-jizat, Jessnor Elmy; Khalid, Khalizul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore students' experience and reflection in doing a Service Learning project as part of their course work. The Service Learning project allows the students to practice their knowledge of raising capital through crowdfunding, and at the same time situates them in an environment where they could learn from the…

  10. Peer Learning in Instrumental Practicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Siw G.; Johansen, Guro G.; Jørgensen, Harald

    2018-01-01

    In higher music education (HME), the notion of “private teaching, private learning” has a long tradition, where the learning part rests on the student's individual practicing between instrumental lessons. However, recent research suggests that collaborative learning among peers is beneficial in several aspects, such as sense of belonging, motivation and self-efficacy. This is consistent with the concept of vicarious learning. In this study, we conducted a survey among bachelor music students in church music, performance or music education programs enrolled in a music academy (N = 96), where parts of the questionnaire addressed peer learning and peer's influence on the students's instrumental practicing, and the degree of satisfaction with their practicing. These issues were seen in relation to gender, musical genre and study program. Overall, the students reported engaging in peer learning related to their instrumental practicing, to various degrees. This involved discussing practicing matters with peers, and practicing together with peers. However, student's reports of their views on peer learning, show that they perceive it more beneficial than the amount of time reported doing it would indicate. No significant gender differences were found, but students within improvised music/jazz engaged the most in peer learning, and church music students the least. Neither the degree of engaging in peer learning nor reported influence from peers correlated significantly with the degree of satisfaction. We discuss whether a general dissatisfaction is caused by being in a competitive learning environment combined with a privatized culture for learning. Finally, we suggest that collaborative forums for instrumental practicing within HME institutions can function as constructive and supportive arenas to enhance students learning and inner motivation. PMID:29599738

  11. Peer Learning in Instrumental Practicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siw G. Nielsen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In higher music education (HME, the notion of “private teaching, private learning” has a long tradition, where the learning part rests on the student's individual practicing between instrumental lessons. However, recent research suggests that collaborative learning among peers is beneficial in several aspects, such as sense of belonging, motivation and self-efficacy. This is consistent with the concept of vicarious learning. In this study, we conducted a survey among bachelor music students in church music, performance or music education programs enrolled in a music academy (N = 96, where parts of the questionnaire addressed peer learning and peer's influence on the students's instrumental practicing, and the degree of satisfaction with their practicing. These issues were seen in relation to gender, musical genre and study program. Overall, the students reported engaging in peer learning related to their instrumental practicing, to various degrees. This involved discussing practicing matters with peers, and practicing together with peers. However, student's reports of their views on peer learning, show that they perceive it more beneficial than the amount of time reported doing it would indicate. No significant gender differences were found, but students within improvised music/jazz engaged the most in peer learning, and church music students the least. Neither the degree of engaging in peer learning nor reported influence from peers correlated significantly with the degree of satisfaction. We discuss whether a general dissatisfaction is caused by being in a competitive learning environment combined with a privatized culture for learning. Finally, we suggest that collaborative forums for instrumental practicing within HME institutions can function as constructive and supportive arenas to enhance students learning and inner motivation.

  12. Service Learning in Undergraduate Nursing Education: Strategies to Facilitate Meaningful Reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Nola A; Brown, Janet M

    2016-01-01

    Service learning is recognized as a valuable pedagogy involving experiential learning, reflection, and reciprocal learning. Students develop critical thinking and social awareness by using the crucial activity of reflecting upon their experiential learning with community partners. The purpose of this paper is to demystify the process of reflection by identifying best practices to enhance reflection and offering suggestions for grading. By understanding "the what" and "the how" of reflection, educators can implement service learning experiences designed to include the essential component of reflection. Strategies for facilitating meaningful reflection are described including descriptions of what students should reflect upon and how to initiate reflection through writing, reading, doing, and telling. Grading rubrics are suggested to facilitate evaluation of student reflection. When properly implemented, service learning encourages students to be good citizens of the world. By using best practices associated with reflection, students can be challenged to think critically about the world and how their service can achieve community goals. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Reflective Practice in Physiotherapy Education: A Critical Conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouder, Lynn

    2000-01-01

    Describes how reflective practice is conceptualized and interpreted by practicing physiotherapists and undergraduate physiotherapy students. Analysis of qualitative interviews and workshops highlights both contextual and practical differences in modes of reflection by practitioners. Discussion notes the context of the task-oriented culture of the…

  14. Blogging for Reflection: The Use of Online Journals to Engage Students in Reflective Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muncy, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Reflective learning has long been studied in many disciplines. A primary way that reflective learning has been taught is through journaling. With the advent of e-learning, journaling has moved to the Web in the form of blogs. The current paper reviews the current state of journaling and blogging research with specific recommendations for marketing…

  15. Perceptions of the use of reflective learning journals in online graduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Malinda E; Brown, Sylvia T

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of graduate nursing students and a small sample of faculty regarding learning outcomes associated with reflective learning journals (RLJ) in online education. Reflective journaling is used extensively in nursing curricula, yet few studies have explored perceptions of learning outcomes with online students, specifically those preparing to become nurse educators.An electronic survey was developed utilizing items associated with four learning outcomes of reflective journaling: professional development, personal growth, empowerment, and facilitation of the learning process. Positive outcomes such as the connection between theory and practice, recognition of strengths and weaknesses, and integration of new ideas and concepts were identified. Obstacles included the amount of time needed for reflection and grading, and the development of trust between students and faculty. The results of this study indicate that graduate students and faculty perceive positive learning outcomes with the use of reflective journals in online education.

  16. Enhancing Self-Practice/Self-Reflection (SP/SR) approach to cognitive behaviour training through the use of reflective blogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrand, Paul; Perry, Jon; Linsley, Sue

    2010-07-01

    Self-Practice/Self-Reflection (SP/SR) is increasingly beginning to feature as a central component of CBT training programmes (Bennett-Levy et al., 2001). Programmes including a reflective element, however, are not unproblematic and it has been documented that simply setting time aside for reflection does not necessarily result in trainees using such time to reflect. Such limitations may be overcome by including a requirement to post reflections on reflective blogs. To examine the effect that a requirement to contribute to a reflective blog had upon a SP/SR approach to CBT training. A focus group methodology was adopted with data analyzed using a general inductive qualitative approach. The requirement to use blogs to reflect upon the self-practice of CBT techniques enhanced SP/SR, established a learning community, and improved course supervision, although some technical difficulties arose. Consideration should be given towards using reflective blogs to support a SP/SR approach to CBT training. Benefits afforded by the use of reflective blogs further establish SP/SR as a valid and flexible training approach.

  17. Researching Design, Experience and Practice of Networked Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodgson, Vivien; de Laat, Maarten; McConnell, David

    2014-01-01

    and final section draws attention to a growing topic of interest within networked learning: that of networked learning in informal practices. In addition, we provide a reflection on the theories, methods and settings featured in the networked learning research of the chapters. We conclude the introduction...

  18. [Linking learning theory with practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávalos-Carranza, María Teresa; Amador-Olvera, Eric; Zerón-Gutiérrez, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    It is often said that it is easier to learn what is observed and practiced on a daily basis; to the need to effectively link theory with practice considered in the process of teaching and learning, many strategies have been developed to allow this process to be carried out in a more efficiently maner. It is, therefore, very important to recognize that an appropriate teacher/student relationship is essential for students to acquire the skills and abilities required.

  19. Using Academic Journals to Help Students Learn Subject Matter Content, Develop and Practice Critical Reasoning Skills, and Reflect on Personal Values in Food Science and Human Nutrition Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaoka, Wayne T.; Crosetti, Lea M.

    2008-01-01

    It has been reported that students learn best when they use a wide variety of techniques to understand the information of the discipline, be it visual, auditory, discussion with others, metacognition, hands-on activities, or writing about the subject. We report in this article the use of academic journals not only as an aid for students to learn…

  20. Narrating practice: reflective accounts and the textual construction of reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Carolyn

    2003-05-01

    Two approaches dominate current thinking in health and welfare: evidence-based practice and reflective practice. Whilst there is debate about the merits of evidence-based practice, reflective practice is generally accepted with critical debate as an important educational tool. Where critique does exist it tends to adopt a Foucauldian approach, focusing on the surveillance and self-regulatory aspects of reflective practice. This article acknowledges the critical purchase on the concept of reflective practice offered by Foucauldian approaches but argues that microsociological and discourse analytic approaches can further illuminate the subject and thus serve as a complement to them. The claims of proponents of reflective practice are explored, in opposition to the technical-rational approach of evidence-based practice. Reflective practice tends to adopt a naive or romantic realist position and fails to acknowledge the ways in which reflective accounts construct the world of practice. Microsociological approaches can help us to understand reflective accounts as examples of case-talk, constructed in a narrative form in the same way as case records and presentations.

  1. Critically Reflective Pedagogical Model: a Pragmatic Blueprint for Enhancing Learning and Teaching in Construction Disciplines

    OpenAIRE

    Kamardeen, Imriyas

    2015-01-01

    University lecturers who aspire to provide an improved learning experience for their students continually, and be recognised for high quality teaching should embrace a critically reflective practice. Nonetheless, developing as a reflective lecturer is challenging, although there are pedagogical literatures as general guidelines. This study introduces a new pedagogical model of critically reflective practice to simplify the efforts for lecturers and to shorten their journey to becoming effecti...

  2. Fostering appropriate reflective learning in an undergraduate radiography course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, John; Druva, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Reflective learning is an important feature of many radiography courses. Writing tasks are used both to promote and monitor student reflective learning. However, students may not always fully understand the rationale behind this form of learning, nor have clear expectations about the writing required. This paper reports on an intervention to address issues identified in student reflective writing tasks based on clinical experiences. Lecturers noted a lack of depth in student observations and tendency to express criticism in a judgemental and self-righteous tone. In response to this, a workshop was developed to prepare students for reflective learning and to develop their awareness and skills in the reflective writing process. Potential areas of difficulty in reflective learning are considered in this article, as well as how to promote a critical perspective while also encouraging students to maintain a positive regard for the patients, practitioners and institutions that enable them to learn on clinical placement.

  3. Fostering appropriate reflective learning in an undergraduate radiography course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, John, E-mail: john.hamilton@med.monash.edu.a [Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Druva, Ruth [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia)

    2010-11-15

    Reflective learning is an important feature of many radiography courses. Writing tasks are used both to promote and monitor student reflective learning. However, students may not always fully understand the rationale behind this form of learning, nor have clear expectations about the writing required. This paper reports on an intervention to address issues identified in student reflective writing tasks based on clinical experiences. Lecturers noted a lack of depth in student observations and tendency to express criticism in a judgemental and self-righteous tone. In response to this, a workshop was developed to prepare students for reflective learning and to develop their awareness and skills in the reflective writing process. Potential areas of difficulty in reflective learning are considered in this article, as well as how to promote a critical perspective while also encouraging students to maintain a positive regard for the patients, practitioners and institutions that enable them to learn on clinical placement.

  4. Teaching and Learning Reflection in MPA Programs: Towards a Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, F. B.; Marks, P.

    2013-01-01

    Reflection is an essential ingredient of academic education in Public Administration, both for an academic and a professional career. Making a distinction between reflectivity and reflexivity we identify 30 foci of reflection. The main question of the article is how these forms of reflection can be taught and learned in PA programs, especially in…

  5. Action Learning as Relational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, Tom; Blantern, Chris

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we propose that all knowledge is made through social processes and is political (of the people involved). If one invests in a relational or historical ontology (a philosophical choice) there are implications for the way action learning is practiced. We illuminate some of these "relational practices". We purport that action learning…

  6. Honesty in Critically Reflective Essays: An Analysis of Student Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Stephen; Tai, Joanna Hong-Meng; Lo, Kristin; Molloy, Elizabeth; Ilic, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    In health professional education, reflective practice is seen as a potential means for self-improvement from everyday clinical encounters. This study aims to examine the level of student honesty in critical reflection, and barriers and facilitators for students engaging in honest reflection. Third year physiotherapy students, completing summative…

  7. Collaborative Learning in Practice

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The greatest challenge, as usual, is not to learn new things, but to unlearn old ..... One of the main lessons from the cases is that for CBNRM-PAR-oriented .... Also trying to identify emergent, unplanned elements resulting from the efforts. ..... men and women no longer leave the village looking for jobs, not even during the ...

  8. Reflections on independence in nurse practitioner practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Sandra A

    2008-07-01

    To examine factors that influence the ability of nurse practitioners (NPs) to practice as independent primary care providers. Extensive literature search on CINAHL, OVID, MEDLINE, Internet journal sources, and professional association Web sites. The legal authority for NPs to practice independently is recognized; however, the ability to put that authority into practice is undermined by the historical failure of political, professional, and social entities to recognize NPs as providers capable of providing primary care autonomously. Nonrecognition is responsible for complex reimbursement policies (both federal and state) that economically and professionally restrain the NP role; hence, NPs remain in a financially dependent relationship despite 40 years of proven safe practice. NPs must articulate their independence as practitioners more vociferously in order to meet society's healthcare requirements, as well as to attain professional fulfillment and forge collegial relationships. NPs will never be seen as members of a profession by either themselves or others without the practicality of independence and autonomy. Although legal independence is a fact, real practice independence in the pragmatic sense is contingent upon reimbursement. Without fiscal sustainability, practice independence is an impossibility. And, without professional autonomy, NPs will have only an employee's voice in the dynamic healthcare system in which they are really key players in providing healthcare services to the poor and undeserved populations.

  9. How assessment and reflection relate to more effective learning in adaptive management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Biggs

    2011-05-01

    Two other studies in the Kruger National Park, which have examined learning specifically, are also discussed. One of them suggests that in a complex environment, learning necessarily has a dual nature, with each component of seven contrasting pairs of the aspects of learning in partial tension with the other. We use these dualities to further probe assessment, reflection, inter-relatedness and learning in the cases presented. Each contrasting aspect of a ‘learning duality’ turns out to emphasise either assessment or reflection, which reinforces the idea that both are needed to facilitate sufficient learning for successful adaptive management. We hope this analysis can act as a springboard for further study, practice and reflection on these important and often underrated components of adaptive management. Conservation implications: The better understanding of assessment and reflection as being largely separate but complementary actions will assist adaptive management practitioners to give explicit attention to both, and to relate them better to each other.

  10. Reflective processes and competencies involved in teaching practice at university: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caetano da Costa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Founded on practical rationality, this qualitative case study aimed to explore the teaching practice at university, focusing on teacher's reflections and competencies. To this end, teaching practices were described, analyzed, and interpreted. These interactions with students on a course in the pharmacy program, brought about situations involving dilemmas and learning opportunities for problem-solving and decision-making skills. Throughout the study, students were encouraged to use knowledge-in-action, reflection-in-action, and reflection-on-action, and these processes were also experienced by the teacher. Analysis of the records from classroom observation and the interviews with students and the teacher showed the fundamental role of such reflective processes, which led to attainment of the intended objectives. In this sense, the teacher's reflective practice was essential for supporting the application of each curricular component of the course.

  11. Creative reflections on Enhancing Practice 16: new explorations, insights and inspirations for practice developers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Baldie

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It began two years ago, then Arriving in Edinburgh the enthusiasm abounds. The first day arrives – oozing anticipation. Great to gather old friends, new friends; Clans and clever creativity, having fun Energy in the room, creating, innovating, Creative ways transforming minds, creating impact. The International Practice Development Collaborative (IPDC is loose network of practice developers, academics and researchers who are committed to working together to develop healthcare practice. The IPDC believes that the aim of practice development is to work with people to develop person-centred cultures that are dignified, compassionate and safer for all. One of its four pillars of work is a biennial Enhancing Practice conference. Moving round the world, the IPDC members take it in turns to host the conference; in early September 2016 it was the turn of Queen Margaret University (QMU in Edinburgh. This article has been created collaboratively by a number of the people who attended this three-day conference. The IPDJ team invited participants to offer ‘the line of a poem’ that captured or reflected their experience and/or learning. These were then collected and shared, and together we created a series of poems and a collection of haiku (a three-line Japanese poem with 17 syllables, 5-7-5. Other participants have subsequently offered reflections, which we would also like to share with you here. We offer this article to you, as a celebration of our time together; our learning, connections and creating, in the hope that there might be some learning in here for you and that you may consider joining us at our next conference in Basel, Switzerland in 2018.

  12. Tools for Reflection: Video-Based Reflection Within a Preservice Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Susan; Park Rogers, Meredith

    2016-06-01

    Current reform in science education calls for teachers to understand student thinking within a lesson to effectively address students' needs (NRC in A framework for K-12 science education: practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas. National Academy Press, Washington, DC, 2012; NRC in Guide to implementing the Next Generation Science Standards. The National Academies Press, Washington, DC, 2015). This study investigates how to scaffold preservice teachers with learning to attend to students' thinking for the purpose of guiding curricular decisions. The study focuses on one team teaching a science unit during their early field experience. We sought to understand how participants' thoughts and abilities changed through participation in a moderated community of practice using video of their own teaching as a reflective tool. We examined how these changes affected both their classroom practice and their decision-making for future lessons. Evidence shows growth in participants' ability to identify opportunities to elicit, assess, and use students' thinking to guide instructional decisions. Implications for use of the approach used in this study to begin developing novice teachers' pedagogical content knowledge for teaching science are discussed.

  13. Promoting self-reflection in clinical practice among Chinese nursing undergraduates in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Wan Yim; Lui, May H; Chien, Wai Tong; Lee, Iris F; Lam, Lai Wah; Lee, Diana T

    2012-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a structured education programme on improving the self-reflection skills of Chinese nursing undergraduates in managing clinical situations. Johns' Structured Reflection Model was used as a framework for the development of the education programme. Thirty-eight nursing undergraduates attended a 3-hour interactive workshop on reflective skills and were encouraged to practise the skills learned under the guidance of a nurse instructor during their 4-week clinical practicum. The findings indicated that the programme was helpful in improving the undergraduates' reflective skills though only a few of them reached the highest level as critical reflectors. Some undergraduates identified time constraints and the lack of a trusting relationship with their nurse instructor as barriers to their reflective learning. The findings may help nurse educators develop education programmes with structured learning strategies to promote nursing undergraduates' self-refection in clinical practice.

  14. Reflection on Cuboid Net with Mathematical Learning Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Atikah; Suryadi, Didi; Syaodih, Ernawulan

    2017-09-01

    This research aims to formulate an alternative to the reflection in mathematics learning activities related to the activities of the professionalism of teachers motivated by a desire to improve the quality of learning. This study is a qualitative study using the Didactical Design research. This study was conducted in one of the elementary schools. The data collection techniques are triangulation with the research subject is teacher 5th grade. The results of this study indicate that through deep reflection, teachers can design learning design in accordance with the conditions of the class. Also revealed that teachers have difficulty in choosing methods of learning and contextual learning media. Based on the implementation of activities of reflection and make the learning design based on the results of reflection can be concluded that the quality of learning in the class will develop.

  15. Blended Delivery and Online Assessment: Scaffolding Student Reflections in Work-Integrated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Ingrid; Beatson, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This paper documents a teaching innovation addressing the challenges of embedding and assessing reflective practice in work-integrated learning, specifically marketing internships. We identify four issues relating to this problem: lack of knowledge or skill for reflection, limitations of physical journals, facilitation of different forms of…

  16. Using Online Learning Platforms to Enhance Students' Reflective and Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Sean M.

    2010-01-01

    A working paper on how to use common E-Learning platforms to incorporate critical thinking and reflection into traditional and hybrid formatted curriculums. Definitions and conceptual framework of both constructs are discussed and their benefits towards cognitions and reflection are highlighted. Best practices, including examples of previous…

  17. Teaching Strategy: Reflections on Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Damian

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores how strategic management concepts, especially the notion of 'wicked problems', can be useful in analysing the professional practice of teachers in higher education. The keeping of a dialogical journal with a colleague helped illuminate that strategic management and education have much in common. Both are situated in…

  18. Using a critical reflection process to create an effective learning community in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rachel; Cooke, Marie; Henderson, Amanda; Creedy, Debra K

    2013-05-01

    Learning circles are an enabling process to critically examine and reflect on practices with the purpose of promoting individual and organizational growth and change. The authors adapted and developed a learning circle strategy to facilitate open discourse between registered nurses, clinical leaders, clinical facilitators and students, to critically reflect on practice experiences to promote a positive learning environment. This paper reports on an analysis of field notes taken during a critical reflection process used to create an effective learning community in the workplace. A total of 19 learning circles were conducted during in-service periods (that is, the time allocated for professional education between morning and afternoon shifts) over a 3 month period with 56 nurses, 33 students and 1 university-employed clinical supervisor. Participation rates ranged from 3 to 12 individuals per discussion. Ten themes emerged from content analysis of the clinical learning issues identified through the four-step model of critical reflection used in learning circle discussions. The four-step model of critical reflection allowed participants to reflect on clinical learning issues, and raise them in a safe environment that enabled topics to be challenged and explored in a shared and cooperative manner. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Using an Intention/Reflection Practice to Focus Students towards Future Professions in a Short-Term International Travel Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierke, Kerry K.; Lepp, Gardner A.; Bastianelli, Karen; Vogelsang, Lisa; Tornabene, Ladona

    2016-01-01

    The article describes a student-centered approach to generating meaningful learning outcomes in a short-term study abroad program. A practice named Intention/Reflection (I/R) was used to help students to identify, articulate, and reflect upon learning objectives that were personally meaningful, within the broader framework of the intended outcomes…

  20. Leading for Learning: Reflective Management in EFL Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goker, Suleyman Davut

    2006-01-01

    Around the world there are many schools where native speakers of other languages study English as a foreign language (EFL). In this article, I introduce a school-based reflective management model (SBRM) for such EFL schools. The model centers on creating a learning community where all changes involve reflective learning and growth for students,…

  1. Reflections on learning online - the hype and the reality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reflections on learning online- the hype and the reality This article describes a UCT academic's experiences of a twelve week course on networked teaching and learning run entirely online through a British university. She reflects on her experiences of isolation, the difficulties to do with lack of a sense of audience and the ...

  2. Practical Reflection and Metaprogramming for Dependent Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, David Raymond

    to program in these embedded languages. Interpreters and compilers must always take these invariants into account at each stage, and authors of embedded languages must work hard to relieve users of the burden of proving these properties. Idris is a dependently typed functional programming language whose......Embedded domain-specific languages are special-purpose programming languages that are implemented within existing generalpurpose programming languages. Dependent type systems allow strong invariants to be encoded in representations of domain-specific languages, but it can also make it difficult...... semantics are given by elaboration to a core dependent type theory through a tactic language. This dissertation introduces elaborator reflection, in which the core operators of the elaborator are realized as a type of computations that are executed during the elaboration process of Idris itself, along...

  3. Supporting Faculty During Pedagogical Change Through Reflective Teaching Practice: An Innovative Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Deborah K; Asselin, Marilyn E

    Given the recent calls for transformation of nursing education, it is critical that faculty be reflective educators. Reflective teaching practice is a process of self-examination and self-evaluation to gain insight into teaching to improve the teaching-learning experience. Limited attention has been given to this notion in the nursing education literature. An innovative reflective teaching practice approach for nursing education is proposed, consisting of question cues, journaling, and a process of facilitated meetings. The authors describe their perceptions of using this approach with faculty during the implementation of a new pedagogy and suggest areas for further research.

  4. Reflections from my Pedagogical Practice: Spontaneity versus Formalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Brenes-Jiménez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an action research process undertaken with the main purpose of recognizing, re-evaluating and revising my pedagogical practices, together with the children I work with (two preschool groups: the first one is a preschool group I interacted with in 2012 comprised of 6 students ages 2 years and 3 months to 3 years and 3 months, while the second one is a group of 13 K-students ages 4 years and 3 months to 5 years and 3 months, with whom I shared in 2013.  This research process reflects the changes that drove me to a metamorphosis. In this process, evidence is given of findings, lessons learned and lessons unlearned which arose from the use of methodological strategies drawn from the naturalist paradigm. As part of the action research process, a change can be noted in my performance where I pass from a vertical epistemological position, in which my practices focused on memory, order and repetition, to a horizontal one in which children have the possibility of engaging in dialog, freely creating and sharing. The main tools to compile the information were filming and the classes shared with my students.

  5. Personal Coaching: Reflection on a Model for Effective Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Kerryn

    2015-01-01

    The article "Personal Coaching: A Model for Effective Learning" (Griffiths, 2006) appeared in the "Journal of Learning Design" Volume 1, Issue 2 in 2006. Almost ten years on, Kerryn Griffiths reflects upon her original article. Specifically, Griffiths looks back at the combined coaching-learning model she suggested in her…

  6. Journaling: A quasi-experimental study of student nurses’ reflective learning ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LP Fakude

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of journaling or journal writing in clinical education is one of the strategies used to develop critical thinking. Reflective journal writing, as it is commonly known, can nurture many qualities of a critical thinker and promote thoughtful nursing practice. Using a quasi-experimental design in this study, reflective journaling was introduced to a sample of first year Bridging Course student nurses at a Private Nursing Education Institution, to assess its effectiveness in reflective learning.

  7. Getting to why? Contemplative practice as reflection on intentionality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-31

    Aug 31, 2015 ... reflection may be facilitated by contemplative practices such as mindfulness and ... something else, liked, disliked, or called good or bad by the phantom self, the ego. ..... meta-cognition, and finally the release of attentional.

  8. Translating children's stories - reflections and practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muguras Constantinescu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7968.2016v36n1p155 The present article is concerned with the specificity of translations for children with an emphasis on the cultural dimension to be preserved in the target text. Following a brief historical and theoretical overview on the issue of translating texts for children, we undertake a succint analysis on a corpus made up of tales which display an overtness to the other while treating the identity-alterity issue. Starting from our own translation practice, we will insist upon those strategies and techniques fit to render the cultural dimension of the source text in order to give young readers access to a foreign culture. Translational strategies are analysed along editorial and pedagogical strategies, with a special focus on the paratext which aims at satisfying the readers’ curiosity and contributing to the development of their encyclopedic competence.

  9. Enhancing Reflective Practice in Multicultural Counseling through Cultural Auditing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra; Arthur, Nancy; Wong-Wylie, Gina

    2010-01-01

    Counselors work in an increasingly complex cultural milieu where every encounter with a client must be considered multicultural in nature. Reflective practice is a central component of professional competence and necessarily involves attention to culture. The cultural auditing model provides an effective and flexible reflective process for…

  10. Reflections around Artefacts: Using a Deliberative Approach to Teaching Reflective Practices in Fashion Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Michael; Brough, Dean

    2012-01-01

    While requiring students to think reflectively is a desirable teaching goal, it is often fraught with complexity and is sometimes poorly implemented in higher education. In this paper, we describe an approach to academic reflective practices that fitted a design subject in fashion education and was perceived as effective in enhancing student…

  11. Investigating the Efficiency of Scenario Based Learning and Reflective Learning Approaches in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hursen, Cigdem; Fasli, Funda Gezer

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this research is to investigate the efficiency of scenario based learning and reflective learning approaches in teacher education. The impact of applications of scenario based learning and reflective learning on prospective teachers' academic achievement and views regarding application and professional self-competence…

  12. Chapter Five: Language Learning and Discursive Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter is framed by the three questions related to learning in Practice Theory posed by Johannes Wagner (2008): (1) What is learned?; (2) Who is learning?; and (3) Who is participating in the learning? These questions are addressed in two learning theories: Language Socialization and Situated Learning theory. In Language Socialization, the…

  13. Reflection sessions and triangular cooperation in "return" practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baard Johannessen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose for this qualitative study is to tighten the gap between the student teachers’ understanding of theory and practice.Reflection plenaries and returning practicum were explored; in an attempt to educate student teachers who are more equip to meet the future occupational challenges. The student teachers attend two instead of four different practicum schools during their practicums. Semi structured focus group interviews with a triangulation of data from headmasters, students, and teacher educators were gathered. The data was analyzed using inductive content analysis.The result reveals four categories, which influence student teachers` pedagogical insight through pre-service teaching practice: connections between theory and practical training, plenaries of reflections, pedagogical insight by understanding own role and possibilities for more time for pedagogical work in the classroom. Reflection plenaries enhances the students’ independence, level of reflection, and increase their ability to develop partnerships that are equal with their teacher educators and headmasters.

  14. Understanding the impact of eating disorders: using the reflecting team as a learning strategy for students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringfellow, Alicia; Evans, Nicola; Evans, Anne-Marie

    2018-02-08

    This article outlines how the application of a reflecting team from systemic family therapy practice was used as a learning strategy for a postgraduate programme for healthcare students. The programme was designed to increase the students' skills, knowledge and awareness of the needs of people with eating disorders, and their families. There were some benefits to this learning strategy. Students reported that the use of a reflecting team enabled them to gain a deep understanding of the emotional impact of eating disorders on individuals and their carers. However, as this method of learning was new to the students, they needed some initial instruction on the approach. During the programme of study, it became evident that the health professionals were deeply affected by the experiences of people with eating disorders. This would suggest that possibly it was the presence of the sufferers themselves as part of the reflecting team that provided the pivotal learning opportunity, rather than the reflecting team per se.

  15. Critically Reflective Pedagogical Model: a Pragmatic Blueprint for Enhancing Learning and Teaching in Construction Disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imriyas Kamardeen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available University lecturers who aspire to provide an improved learning experience for their students continually, and be recognised for high quality teaching should embrace a critically reflective practice. Nonetheless, developing as a reflective lecturer is challenging, although there are pedagogical literatures as general guidelines. This study introduces a new pedagogical model of critically reflective practice to simplify the efforts for lecturers and to shorten their journey to becoming effective teachers. A two-phased action research strategy was adopted for the development and validation of the new model. The first phase operationalised the Brookfield’s four-lens framework to create a reflective teaching practice model, which was then validated with a case study in the second phase. The model offers a pragmatic blueprint for lecturers to build a career with sustained quality of teaching, which in turn translates into improved learning experiences for students.

  16. Reflections on evaluative practice in higher education: an experience collaborative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suênya Marley Mourão Batista

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to reflect on the evaluation practice of higher education teachers generated from research conducted as part of a private higher education institution. The objective of this study is to characterize the assessment practices of teachers who work in higher education and collaborate in order to facilitate the expansion of dynamic assessment practices were used as theoretical and methodological support the studies of Vygotsky (2007, Liberali (2008, Ibiapina (2007, 2008, Meier (2007, Campione (2002 and Hoffmann (2011. Field research was conducted in a qualitative approach to collaborative type with 3 (three in higher education using the reflective interview as data collection tool to promote critical thinking about assessment practices to develop. The results showed the prevalence of use of traditional assessment practices by teachers and the possibility of performing dynamic assessment practices from the understanding of these nurtured by the research and training process.

  17. Dialogue: network that intertwines the pedagogical relationship into the practical-reflective teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Margarete Maria de; Reibnitz, Kenya Schmidt; Kloh, Daiana; Vendruscolo, Carine; Corrêa, Aline Bússolo

    2016-01-01

    to understand how dialogue occurs in the pedagogical relation in the practical reflective teaching in an undergraduate program in nursing. qualitative research, case study. Data collection was conducted from May 2013 to September 2014 with eight professors of Nursing, by means of observation and interviews. Data analysis followed the operational proposal constituted by the exploratory stage and the interpretive stage. point the dialogue established within the pedagogical relation as a challenge to be faced in practical-reflective teaching, so professor and student build a relationship that foster thought and action in the theoretical context and in the field of practice. in establishing a dialogic-reflective tone in the pedagogical relationship, the professor opens paths to new discoveries, enabling the creation of teaching-learning spaces that stimulate autonomy, abilities, and critical and reflective attitudes of students along their education.

  18. Evaluation as a powerful practice in digital learning processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Birgitte Holm; Levinsen, Karin

    2014-01-01

    The present paper is based on two empirical research studies. The Netbook 1:1 project (2009–2012), funded by the municipality of Gentofte and Microsoft Denmark, is complete, while Students’ digital production and students as learning designers (2013–2015), funded by the Danish Ministry of Educati...... as a learning practice in a digitalised learning context focuses on students as actors, adressing their self‐reflections, responses to feedback from peers and feedforward processes....

  19. Data Mining Practical Machine Learning Tools and Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Witten, Ian H; Hall, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Data Mining: Practical Machine Learning Tools and Techniques offers a thorough grounding in machine learning concepts as well as practical advice on applying machine learning tools and techniques in real-world data mining situations. This highly anticipated third edition of the most acclaimed work on data mining and machine learning will teach you everything you need to know about preparing inputs, interpreting outputs, evaluating results, and the algorithmic methods at the heart of successful data mining. Thorough updates reflect the technical changes and modernizations that have taken place

  20. Critical reflection and dialogical learning design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Rikke Toft; Mathiesen, Kim Haagen; Nedergaard, Mathias Helbo

    2016-01-01

    Distance education and e-learning has been around for some time now. The ubiquitous development of the internet (Sharples, 2007) has however made way for the emergence of new educational formats such as the much talked-about Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Within MOOCs users have access...... to educational literature and tasks at all times, which allow users to fit the course into their own pace, place and Personal Learning Environment (Attwell 2007). Today MOOCs has spread across the globe, and in Denmark we now see institutions such as Aarhus University developing a new course with roots...... in the MOOC format, however without the ‘Massive’ part (Aarhus University, 2016). Over a 5 week period we conducted a netnographic (Kozinet, 2015) mixed methods research of the MOOC Blended Learning Essentials (https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/blended-learning-gettingstarted/2). Contrary to the acclaimed...

  1. Reflections on the newly qualified social worker's journey : From university training to qualified practice

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Clare

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative research study explores the experience of graduating social workers making the transition from university training into work as qualified social work practitioners. Most studies in this area look at the practice readiness of the newly qualified professional. This study looks at the participants’ experience in the work place. How do participants experience this journey of transition? What skills, particularly reflective practice and supervision, learned in training, are import...

  2. Unlocking reflective practice for nurses: innovations in working with master of nursing students in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce-McCoach, Joanne T; Parrish, Dominique R; Andersen, Patrea R; Wall, Natalie

    2013-09-01

    Being reflective is well established as an important conduit of practice development, a desirable tertiary graduate quality and a core competency of health professional membership. By assisting students to be more effective in their ability to reflect, they are better able to formulate strategies to manage issues experienced within a professional context, which ultimately assists them to be better service providers. However, some students are challenged by the practice of reflection and these challenges are even more notable for international students. This paper presents a teaching initiative that focused specifically on enhancing the capacity of an international cohort of nursing students, to engage in reflective practice. The initiative centered on an evaluation of a reflective practice core subject, which was taught in a Master of Nursing programme delivered in Hong Kong. A learning-centered framework was used to evaluate the subject and identify innovative strategies that would better assist international students to develop reflective practices. The outcomes of curriculum and teaching analysis and proposed changes and innovations in teaching practice to support international students are presented and discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Relinquishing knowing and reclaiming being: a heuristic self-search inquiry of becoming a counsellor through learning to tolerate uncertainty by reflecting on experiences in life, counselling practice and research

    OpenAIRE

    Tweedie, Krista Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Previous research emphasises the importance of a counsellor’s ‘way of being’ in determining therapeutic effectiveness and outcome. The capacity to tolerate uncertainty is regarded as an important counsellor attribute. However, failing to show how counsellors learn this, limits the practical relevance of the existing literature for psychotherapy and counselling. This study questions how a counsellor can learn to bring his or her self more fully into relationship with clients and wh...

  4. Reflections on Empowerment Evaluation: Learning from Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, David M.

    1999-01-01

    Reflects on empowerment evaluation, the use of evaluation to foster improvement and self-determination. Empowerment evaluation uses quantitative and qualitative methods, and usually focuses on program evaluation. Discusses the growth in empowerment evaluation as a result of interest in participatory evaluation. (SLD)

  5. Composing with New Technology: Teacher Reflections on Learning Digital Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, David L.; Chiu, Ming Ming

    2015-01-01

    This study explores teachers' reflections on their learning to compose with new technologies in the context of teacher education and/or teacher professional development. English language arts (ELA) teachers (n = 240) in 15 courses learned to use digital video (DV), completed at least one DV group project, and responded to open-ended survey…

  6. Professional Learning in Mathematical Reasoning: Reflections of a Primary Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Sandra; Widjaja, Wanty; Bragg, Leicha A.; Loong, Esther; Vale, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Reasoning is an important aspect in the understanding and learning of mathematics. This paper reports on a case study presenting one Australian primary teacher's reflections regarding the role played by a professional learning program in her developing understanding of mathematical reasoning. Examination of the transcripts of two interviews…

  7. Synchronous E-Learning: Reflections and Design Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Filiz; Rampal, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a personal reflection on the design, development, and delivery of online synchronous conferencing as a pedagogical tool complementing traditional, face-to-face content delivery and learning. The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate how instructors can combine collaborative and virtual learning principles in course design. In…

  8. Multilingualism as a learning scaffolding element: Reflection on first ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This reflective paper reports on the approach taken and the lesson learnt in introducing multilingualism as a Writing-To-Learn (WTL) strategy for active learning, especially for large classes. WTL strategies are well entrenched in social and humanities courses as opposed to 'technical' courses such as Information and ...

  9. Reflective portfolios support learning, personal growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion. Portfolios are an under-utilised assessment and self-development tool in postgraduate training. They allow students to self-assess their attainment of personal learning needs, professional growth and competency achievement and provide faculty with useful feedback on curriculum content, educational activities ...

  10. An Integrative Professional Theory and Practice Paper: Personal Reflections from the Journey through Clinical Pastoral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Gillian

    2015-12-01

    CPE is an experience-based approach to learning spiritual care which combines clinical care with qualified supervision, in-class education and group reflection (CASC--http://www.spiritualcare.ca/). Through didactic seminars, group presentations and personal reading there is opportunity for the student to acquire, apply and integrate relevant theoretical information into their practice. Written for my CPE Specialist application, this paper describes how, through the course of advanced CPE education, I learn to utilize and integrate theory into my clinical work. Beginning with three strands--authenticity, listening and storytelling--I then discuss how the behavioural sciences and theology inform my practice. Focusing on empathy, I speak of the application of disclosure, the use of counter-transference as a diagnostic tool, and the place of therapeutic termination. Group theory, family systems theory, theological reflection, liturgical ministry, and multi-faith practices are considered. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Supporting Fieldwork Learning by Visual Documentation and Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saltofte, Margit

    2017-01-01

    Photos can be used as a supplements to written fieldnotes and as a sources for mediating reflection during fieldwork and analysis. As part of a field diary, photos can support the recall of experiences and a reflective distance to the events. Photography, as visual representation, can also lead...... to reflection on learning and knowledge production in the process of learning how to conduct fieldwork. Pictures can open the way for abstractions and hidden knowledge, which might otherwise be difficult to formulate in words. However, writing and written field notes cannot be fully replaced by photos...... the role played by photos in their learning process. For students, photography is an everyday documentation form that can support their memory of field experience and serve as a vehicle for the analysis of data. The article discusses how photos and visual representations support fieldwork learning...

  12. A year on: a critical reflection on entering the world of practice development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Benson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and context: The Foundation of Nursing Studies, in collaboration with Mrs Elizabeth Tompkins, offered The Richard Tompkins Nurse Development Scholarship, a development opportunity to improve person-centred cultures of care. This paper reflects my experience of this scholarship year, which included attendance at a five-day residential International Practice Development Collaborative (IPDC practice development school hosted by the England Centre for Practice Development, and 12 months’ mentorship from FoNS. Aims and objectives: To reflect on my learning during the scholarship year and on its impact on my professional and personal growth. Conclusions: This experience has enabled me to examine my own values and beliefs about practice development, develop my facilitation skills and work towards becoming an effective nurse leader by integrating the principles of practice development into my everyday practice. It has been a year of challenge and meaningful reflection. The future involves engaging key individuals within the organisation to progress practice development across the workplace. Implications for practice: • The power of this mentorship experience has highlighted the importance of developing all staff, but ensuring potential mentors have had the right investment to develop the necessary skills and qualities to be effective in their role • Practice development values and beliefs have the ability to support change in culture. Using its principles to underpin ways of working leads to an engaged and enthused workforce • Being a facilitator of practice development requires energy, creativity and commitment

  13. See, reflect, learn more: qualitative analysis of breaking bad news reflective narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnieli-Miller, Orit; Palombo, Michal; Meitar, Dafna

    2018-05-01

    Breaking bad news (BBN) is a challenge that requires multiple professional competencies. BBN teaching often includes didactic and group role-playing sessions. Both are useful and important, but exclude another critical component of students' learning: day-to-day role-model observation in the clinics. Given the importance of observation and the potential benefit of reflective writing in teaching, we have incorporated reflective writing into our BBN course. The aim of this study was to enhance our understanding of the learning potential in reflective writing about BBN encounters and the ability to identify components that inhibit this learning. This was a systematic qualitative immersion/crystallization analysis of 166 randomly selected BBN narratives written by 83 senior medical students. We analysed the narratives in an iterative consensus-building process to identify the issues discussed, the lessons learned and the enhanced understanding of BBN. Having previously been unaware of, not invited to or having avoided BBN encounters, the mandatory assignment led students to search for or ask their mentors to join them in BBN encounters. Observation and reflective writing enhanced students' awareness that 'bad news' is relative and subjective, while shedding light on patients', families', physicians' and their own experiences and needs, revealing the importance of the different components of the BBN protocol. We identified diversity among the narratives and the extent of students' learning. Narrative writing provided students with an opportunity for a deliberative learning process. This led to deeper understanding of BBN encounters, of how to apply the newly taught protocol, or of the need for it. This process connected the formal and informal or hidden curricula. To maximise learning through reflective writing, students should be encouraged to write in detail about a recent observed encounter, analyse it according to the protocol, address different participants

  14. P3: a practice focused learning environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Paul W.; Obsniuk, Michael J.; Caballero, Marcos D.

    2017-09-01

    There has been an increased focus on the integration of practices into physics curricula, with a particular emphasis on integrating computation into the undergraduate curriculum of scientists and engineers. In this paper, we present a university-level, introductory physics course for science and engineering majors at Michigan State University called P3 (projects and practices in physics) that is centred around providing introductory physics students with the opportunity to appropriate various science and engineering practices. The P3 design integrates computation with analytical problem solving and is built upon a curriculum foundation of problem-based learning, the principles of constructive alignment and the theoretical framework of community of practice. The design includes an innovative approach to computational physics instruction, instructional scaffolds, and a unique approach to assessment that enables instructors to guide students in the development of the practices of a physicist. We present the very positive student related outcomes of the design gathered via attitudinal and conceptual inventories and research interviews of students’ reflecting on their experiences in the P3 classroom.

  15. Structured Ethical Reflection in Practitioner Inquiry: Theory, Pedagogy, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Douglas M.; Brydon-Miller, Mary; Raider-Roth, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Practitioner inquiry provides a powerful tool for improving practice and addressing critical issues in classrooms, schools, and broader communities. However, it also raises unique ethical challenges that often go unrecognized and unresolved. Structured Ethical Reflection (SER) provides teacher researchers with a process for identifying core values…

  16. Reflecting on Hospitality Management Education through a Practice Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stierand, Marc; Zizka, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to reflect on hospitality management education from a "practice epistemology" and discuss how a connecting of savoir (theoretical knowledge or "knowing"), savoir-faire (knowing how to do tasks, i.e. task-related skills) and savoir-être (knowing how to be, i.e. behavior) can develop into…

  17. Reflective Teaching and Practice: Interview with Thomas Farrell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Alvin

    2017-01-01

    Thomas Farrell is widely known for his views and publications on the topic of Reflective Practice, which is key to the professional development of teachers in 21st century classrooms. He is Professor of Applied Linguistics at Brock University, Canada. Farrell has been a language teacher and teacher educator since 1978 and has worked in Korea,…

  18. Turkish Prospective English Teachers' Reflections on Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Mine; Geçikli, Merve; Yesilyurt, Savas

    2016-01-01

    This study is an attempt to present the reflections of prospective English teachers in Turkey on teaching practice over their experiences and perceptions. A mixed-method research design was conducted through the use of a questionnaire involving a 5-Likert scale and one open-ended question. The participants were 120 senior students at ELT…

  19. Applied Drama and the Higher Education Learning Spaces: A Reflective Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Cletus

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores Applied Drama as a teaching approach in Higher Education learning spaces. The exploration takes a reflective analysis approach by first examining the impact that Applied Drama has had on my career as a Lecturer/Educator/Teacher working in Higher Education environments. My engagement with Applied Drama practice and theory is…

  20. Other Teachers' Teaching: Understanding the Roles of Peer Group Collaboration in Teacher Reflection and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielowich, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Although most innovative professional development encourages reflective dialogue among teachers, we still know very little about how such dialogue enables teacher learning. This study describes how teachers make sense of the conflicts among their intended goals and actual practices by responding to their peers' teaching. Four teachers in a large…

  1. Strengthening practical wisdom: mental health workers' learning and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Kristin Ådnøy; Dahl, Hellen; Karlsson, Bengt; Arman, Maria

    2014-09-01

    Practical wisdom, understood as knowing how to be or act in any present situation with clients, is believed to be an essential part of the knowledge needed to be a professional mental health worker. Exploring processes of adapting, extending knowledge and refining tacit knowledge grounded in mental health workers' experiences with being in practice may bring awareness of how mental health workers reflect, learn and practice professional 'artistry'. The aim of the article was to explore mental health workers' processes of development and learning as they appeared in focus groups intended to develop practical wisdom. The main research question was 'How might the processes of development and learning contribute to developing practical wisdom in the individual as well as in the practice culture?' The design was multi-stage focus groups, and the same participants met four times. A phenomenological hermeneutical method for researching lived experience guided the analysis. Eight experienced mental health workers representing four Norwegian municipalities participated. The research context was community-based mental health services. The study was reported to Norwegian Social Data Services, and procedures for informed consent were followed. Two examples of processes of re-evaluation of experience (Association, Integration, Validation, Appropriation and Outcomes and action) were explored. The health workers had developed knowledge in previous encounters with clients. In sharing practice experiences, this knowledge was expressed and developed, and also tested and validated against the aims of practice. Discussions led to adapted and extended knowledge, and as tacit knowledge was expressed it could be used actively. Learning to reflect, being ready to be provoked and learning to endure indecisiveness may be foundational in developing practical wisdom. Openness is demanding, and changing habits of mind is difficult. Reflection on, and confrontation with, set practices are

  2. Learning Styles and Organisational Development in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Jacob; Lauridsen, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    Issues of innovation and knowledge management are often treated from an organisational learning perspective. As a complement to this, there is a vast potential in the strategic enhancement of individual learning by implementing learning styles profiles and creating personal learning strategies...... for management and employees in a knowledge based organisation. Based on an action-research case study, we offer an example of how learning styles affects individual learning and thus personal knowledge creation in practice. The paper argues that innovation and knowledge management is enhanced and facilitated...... in practice by working with the learning styles of individuals and groups/teams....

  3. ECLIPPx: an innovative model for reflective portfolios in life-long learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, C Ronny

    2011-03-01

    For healthcare professionals, the educational portfolio is the most widely used component of lifelong learning - a vital aspect of modern medical practice. When used effectively, portfolios provide evidence of continuous learning and promote reflective practice. But traditional portfolio models are in danger of becoming outmoded, in the face of changing expectations of healthcare provider competences today. Portfolios in health care have generally focused on competencies in clinical skills. However, many other domains of professional development, such as professionalism and leadership skills, are increasingly important for doctors and health care professionals, and must be addressed in amassing evidence for training and revalidation. There is a need for modern health care learning portfolios to reflect this sea change. A new model for categorising the health care portfolios of professionals is proposed. The ECLIPPx model is based on personal practice, and divides the evidence of ongoing professional learning into four categories: educational development; clinical practice; leadership, innovation and professionalism; and personal experience. The ECLIPPx model offers a new approach for personal reflection and longitudinal learning, one that gives flexibility to the user whilst simultaneously encompassing the many relatively new areas of competence and expertise that are now required of a modern doctor. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  4. Communities of clinical practice: the social organization of clinical learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Tony; Jaye, Chrystal

    2009-01-01

    The social organization of clinical learning is under-theorized in the sociological literature on the social organization of health care. Professional scopes of practice and jurisdictions are formally defined by professional principles and standards and reflected in legislation; however, these are mediated through the day-to-day clinical activities of social groupings of clinical teams. The activities of health service providers typically occur within communities of clinical practice. These are also major sites for clinical curriculum delivery, where clinical students learn not only clinical skills but also how to be health professionals. In this article, we apply Wenger's model of social learning within organizations to curriculum delivery within a health service setting. Here, social participation is the basis of learning. We suggest that it offers a powerful framework for recognizing and explaining paradox and incongruence in clinical teaching and learning, and also for recognizing opportunities, and devising means, to add value to students' learning experiences.

  5. Learning effects of thematic peer-review: a qualitative analysis of reflective journals on spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, René; Tiesinga, Lucas J; Jochemsen, Henk; Post, Doeke

    2009-05-01

    This study describes the learning effects of thematic peer-review discussion groups (Hendriksen, 2000. Begeleid intervisie model, Collegiale advisering en probleemoplossing, Nelissen, Baarn.) on developing nursing students' competence in providing spiritual care. It also discusses the factors that might influence the learning process. The method of peer-review is a form of reflective learning based on the theory of experiential learning (Kolb, 1984. Experiential learning, Experience as the source of learning development. Englewoods Cliffs, New Jersey, Prentice Hill). It was part of an educational programme on spiritual care in nursing for third-year undergraduate nursing students from two nursing schools in the Netherlands. Reflective journals (n=203) kept by students throughout the peer-review process were analysed qualitatively The analysis shows that students reflect on spirituality in the context of personal experiences in nursing practice. In addition, they discuss the nursing process and organizational aspects of spiritual care. The results show that the first two phases in the experiential learning cycle appear prominently; these are 'inclusion of actual experience' and 'reflecting on this experience'. The phases of 'abstraction of experience' and 'experimenting with new behaviour' are less evident. We will discuss possible explanations for these findings according to factors related to education, the students and the tutors and make recommendations for follow-up research.

  6. Teachers' Reflections on Cooperative Learning: Issues of Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Robyn M.; Boyle, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Cooperative learning (CL) is a well documented pedagogical practice that promotes academic achievement and socialization, yet many teachers struggle with implementing it in their classes. This study reports on the perceptions of 10, middle-year teachers who implemented cooperative learning in a unit of work across two school terms. Data from the…

  7. Production Practice During Language Learning Improves Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopman, Elise W M; MacDonald, Maryellen C

    2018-04-01

    Language learners often spend more time comprehending than producing a new language. However, memory research suggests reasons to suspect that production practice might provide a stronger learning experience than comprehension practice. We tested the benefits of production during language learning and the degree to which this learning transfers to comprehension skill. We taught participants an artificial language containing multiple linguistic dependencies. Participants were randomly assigned to either a production- or a comprehension-learning condition, with conditions designed to balance attention demands and other known production-comprehension differences. After training, production-learning participants outperformed comprehension-learning participants on vocabulary comprehension and on comprehension tests of grammatical dependencies, even when we controlled for individual differences in vocabulary learning. This result shows that producing a language during learning can improve subsequent comprehension, which has implications for theories of memory and learning, language representations, and educational practices.

  8. Learning from Somaliland? Transferability of learning from volunteering to national health service practice in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillson, Esther; van Wees, Sibylle Herzig; McGowan, Charlotte; Franklin, Hannah; Jones, Helena; Bogue, Patrick; Aliabadi, Shirin; Baraitser, Paula

    2016-03-22

    Capacity building partnerships between healthcare institutions have the potential to benefit both partners particularly in staff development. Previous research suggests that volunteering can contribute to professional development but there is little evidence on how learning is acquired, the barriers and facilitators to learning in this context or the process of translation of learning to the home environment. Volunteers from a healthcare partnership between the UK and Somaliland reported learning in communication, interdisciplinary working, teaching, management, leadership and service development. This learning came from observing familiar practices in unfamiliar environments; alternative solutions to familiar problems; learning about Somali culture; opportunities to assume higher levels of responsibility and new professional relationships. There was variability in the extent of translation to NHS practice. Time and support available for reflection and mentoring were important facilitators of this process. The professional development outcomes documented in this study came directly from the experience of volunteering. Experiential learning theory suggests that this requires a complex process of critical reflection and new knowledge generation, testing and translation for use in new contexts. This process benefits from identification of learning as an important element of volunteering and support for reflection and the translation translation of learning to UK contexts. We suggest that missed opportunities for volunteer learning will remain until the volunteering process is overtly framed as part of continuing professional development.

  9. Reflective learning in community-based dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deogade, Suryakant C; Naitam, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Community-based dental education (CBDE) is the implementation of dental education in a specific social context, which shifts a substantial part of dental clinical education from dental teaching institutional clinics to mainly public health settings. Dental students gain additional value from CBDE when they are guided through a reflective process of learning. We propose some key elements to the existing CBDE program that support meaningful personal learning experiences. Dental rotations of 'externships' in community-based clinical settings (CBCS) are year-long community-based placements and have proven to be strong learning environments where students develop good communication skills and better clinical reasoning and management skills. We look at the characteristics of CBDE and how the social and personal context provided in communities enhances dental education. Meaningfulness is created by the authentic context, which develops over a period of time. Structured reflection assignments and methods are suggested as key elements in the existing CBDE program. Strategies to enrich community-based learning experiences for dental students include: Photographic documentation; written narratives; critical incident reports; and mentored post-experiential small group discussions. A directed process of reflection is suggested as a way to increase the impact of the community learning experiences. We suggest key elements to the existing CBDE module so that the context-rich environment of CBDE allows for meaningful relations and experiences for dental students and enhanced learning.

  10. Reflecting Team as an Evaluation/learning Instrument for Self-reflection of Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michling Malgorzata D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Reflecting Team (RT is a method derived from systemic therapy in the 1980s by the social psychiatrist Tom Andersen. It is increasingly being used in training and evaluation contexts. The aim of the method is to create a space for the development of diverse perspectives and appropriate ideas and solutions in which the integrity of the students/customers/clients is preserved and the acceptance of proposals is facilitated. To this end, the systems involved (advice seekers, consultants, and observers enter a common process of alternately directed and non-directed communication. The RT is not only suitable to address communication problems in group work and other educational situations, but it can also help to consider the traditional teaching and learning processes in a reflective way. Reflecting teams can also significantly improve the feedback and quality of teaching and learning. The article deals with the use of RT in the context of the collective exchange of teaching staff with their students. It uses a problem as an evaluation form and learning instrument to reflect on their pedagogical approach and, at the same time, their relationship with students during the lessons. This is to present the RT method for collegial exchange (Process Flow: Advice-seeker, teacher, Interviewer, RT and their need for teacher reflection as well as the experience of self-efficacy (empowerment and self-sufficiency.

  11. The integration of blended learning into an occupational therapy curriculum: a qualitative reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard-Ashton, Paula; Rothberg, Alan; McInerney, Patricia

    2017-08-17

    This paper presents a critical reflection of the integration of Blended Learning (BL) into an undergraduate occupational therapy curriculum which was delivered through Problem Based Learning (PBL). This is a qualitative reflection of a Participatory Action Research (PAR) study using Brookfield's model for critical reflection of an educator's practice. The model uses four 'lenses' through which to focus enquiry: Lens 1) our autobiography as a learner of practice; Lens 2) our learners' eyes; Lens 3) our colleagues' experiences; and Lens 4) the theoretical literature. Grounded theory analysis was applied to the data. The factors that contributed to successful integration of technology and e-Learning into an existing curriculum, the hurdles that were navigated along the way, and how these influenced decisions and innovation are explored. The core categories identified in the data were "drivers of change" and "outcomes of BL integration". Key situations and pivotal events are highlighted for their role in the process that led to the project maturing. Each lens reflects the successes and hurdles experienced during the study. Brookfield's model provides an objective method of reflection which showed that despite the hurdles, e-Learning was successfully integrated into the curriculum.

  12. E-learning and learning-E: reflections on training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Panciroli

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The increase of the traditional limits of education towards dinamic teaching and learning enviroments, of a strongly constructive nature, is strictly related with an always increasing request of knowledge elements by a part of society who made the cognitive dimension one of the development challenge. Telematic technologies, in particular those of e-learning, represents one of the possible interpretation that in this paper are going to be analysed with a problematicistic approach.

  13. REFLECTIVE PRACTICE THROUGH JOURNAL WRITING AND PEER OBSERVATION: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Samrajya LAKSHMI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Journal writing and Peer Observation in an educational context have become popular techniques, with several different types of applications. They have now been used quite widely in both language teaching and in teacher training. However, despite its reported advantages in both teaching and research, there are not many Peer Observation and Diary studies available based on the writing of experienced language teachers. The Teacher participants maintain Journal writing and Peer Observation as a means of reflective practice. They consider these practices as a mirror, which reflects the teacher’s own image as a practioner. The post-reflection discussion reveals that the teacher participants believe in reflective practice as an effective means of self-evaluation and of developing sensitivity to students’ learning. This paper examines Peer Observation and journal writing of two teachers working on the same language programme in terms of a variety of topic headings, and suggests that reflective practice can be a useful tool for both classroom research and teachers’ professional development.

  14. Intuition in medical practice: A reflection on Donald Schön's reflective practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickleborough, Tim

    2015-01-01

    In a recent commentary, Dr. Abhishek Biswas asks the question whether physicians should rely on their "gut feeling" when making clinical decisions. Biswas describes a situation where his intuition resulted in an immediate course of action that prompted urgent medical attention for a patient who had "routine" pain. Inspired by the author's account, I would like to further Biswas' discussion and examine its importance using the educational theories of Donald Schön and his concept of the reflective practitioner. Schön argues that technical knowledge alone is not sufficient to solve the complex problems that professionals face on a daily basis and intuition, developed through a reflective practice, is crucial for any professional's practice, especially in a time of greater uncertainty in the workplace.

  15. Standardised patient-simulated practice learning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teaching strategies must link theory to practice, foster critical thinking, be relevant and stimulate ... Standardised patient-simulated practice learning: A rich pedagogical .... relationship for them to grow and develop from novice to expert. They.

  16. Learning to walk the community of practice tightrope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Edgar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Community of Practice Research was established as a new local health district service initiative. The community comprises novice and experienced multidisciplinary health researchers. Aims: This paper reflects our experience of being Community of Practice Research members and aims to explore the practice development principles aligned to the purpose, progress and outcomes of this community. Conclusions: The journey is compared to walking a tightrope from the beginning to the end. Success in moving forward is attributed to positive leadership and group dynamics enabling a supportive environment. This environment allowed for different types of learning: new research skills and new understandings about oneself. Competing demands such as fluctuating membership and leadership, and the selection of a large initial project were identified as barriers to the Community of Practice Research. Implications for practice: As well as contributing to communities’ shared goals members should identify and make explicit their own learning goals to themselves, the community and their managers Community of practice meetings should include regular facilitated reflection about the learning that is occurring, the challenges and assumptions being made by the group, and the way forward A community of practice uses social processes to aid learning and collaboration across disciplines and organisations and therefore has potential to promote local culture change

  17. "(Dis)Empowered by What We See … ": Exploring the Use of Video-Stimulated Reflection in Physical Education Pedagogy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Amanda; Hickey, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Reflexive accounts of physical education (PE) pedagogy and practice offer potential to reveal much about the intended and unintended learning, for both students and teachers, that can result from certain pedagogic encounters. Despite the promotion of reflective practice/s as a possible "panacea" for improved teaching and learning, there…

  18. Practice of Connectivism As Learning Theory: Enhancing Learning Process Through Social Networking Site (Facebook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahriye Altınay Aksal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the digital age within learning and social interaction has been growing rapidly. The realm of digital age and computer mediated communication requires reconsidering instruction based on collaborative interactive learning process and socio-contextual experience for learning. Social networking sites such as facebook can help create group space for digital dialogue to inform, question and challenge within a frame of connectivism as learning theory within the digital age. The aim of this study is to elaborate the practice of connectivism as learning theory in terms of internship course. Facebook group space provided social learning platform for dialogue and negotiation beside the classroom learning and teaching process in this study. The 35 internship students provided self-reports within a frame of this qualitative research. This showed how principles of theory practiced and how this theory and facebook group space contribute learning, selfleadership, decision making and reflection skills. As the research reflects a practice of new theory based on action research, learning is not individualistic attempt in the digital age as regards the debate on learning in digital age within a frame of connectivism

  19. A Three-Year Reflective Writing Program as Part of Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Jessica; Kerr, Kevin; Zielenski, Christopher; Toppel, Brianna; Johnson, Lauren; McCauley, Patrina; Turner, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To implement and evaluate a 3-year reflective writing program incorporated into introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPEs) in the first- through third-year of a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. Design. Reflective writing was integrated into 6 IPPE courses to develop students’ lifelong learning skills. In their writing, students were required to self-assess their performance in patient care activities, identify and describe how they would incorporate learning opportunities, and then evaluate their progress. Practitioners, faculty members, and fourth-year PharmD students served as writing preceptors. Assessment. The success of the writing program was assessed by reviewing class performance and surveying writing preceptor’s opinions regarding the student’s achievement of program objectives. Class pass rates averaged greater than 99% over the 8 years of the program and the large majority of the writing preceptors reported that student learning objectives were met. A support pool of 99 writing preceptors was created. Conclusions. A 3-year reflective writing program improved pharmacy students’ reflection and reflective writing skills. PMID:23788811

  20. From evidence-based to evidence-reflected practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    “Knowledge” is of the utmost significance for professional practice and learning. Today, though, the established knowledge base is changing in all areas of the labour market (Alvesson, 2004). Work and society are dominated by commitment to demands for high levels of demonstrable accountability......, cost-efficiency and measurable quality. Thus, today, evidence-based practice has become an expectation and fashion, often used to emphasize the grounding of practice in research based knowledge that provides measurable evidence for best practice. But at the same time, there is a growing distrust...... of the supremacy of this kind of knowledge, and traditional monopolies of knowledge are challenged (Gabbay & May, 2010). In the literature, there is an on-going debate about professional knowledge enacted in diverse settings. This debate presents a wide range of epistemological terminologies and typologies, which...

  1. The Role of Genre in Reflective Practice: Tracing the Development of a Beginning Teacher's Journaling Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Heidi; Adam, Amy Rousselo

    2013-01-01

    In this article, a teacher educator and a first-year teacher identify the role that genre, in a rhetorical sense, plays in reflective practice. As reflection in teacher education has been criticized for its potential to reinforce prior attitudes and dispositions within pre-service and beginning teachers, we see how meta-knowledge of genre is…

  2. Measuring Effects of Reflection on Learning – A Physiological Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qi, Wen; Verpoorten, Dominique; Westera, Wim

    2014-01-01

    As an economical and feasible intervention, reflection demands learners using critical thinking to examine presented information, questioning its validity, and drawing conclusions based on the resulting ideas during a learning process. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the effects

  3. Collaborative Learning in Practice : Examples from Natural ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1 déc. 2010 ... Couverture du livre Collaborative Learning in Practice: Examples from Natural Resource Management in Asia ... Collaborative Learning in Practice saura intéresser les universitaires, les chercheurs et les étudiants des cycles supérieurs en études du développement, ... Strategic leverage on value chains.

  4. Using Reflective Practice to Facilitate Conversations and Transform Instructional Practice for Middle School Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higdon, Robbie L.

    The process of teaching, especially inquiry, is complex and requires extended time for developing one's instructional practice (Loucks-Horsley, Stiles, Mundry, Love, & Hewson, 2010). The implementation of a continued cycle of self-reflection can engage teachers in analyzing their prior experiences and understandings about their instructional practice to promote the accommodation of new concepts and transform their practice. However, many teachers have difficulty engaging in the cognitive dissonance needed to identify those problems and promote their own growth without support. As one's professional practice becomes more repetitive and routine, it is difficult for the practitioner to recognize opportunities in which to contemplate one's habitual actions (Schon, 1983). In this multi-case study, two middle school science teachers who were engaged within a sustained professional development initiative participated in a series of one-on-one reflective dialogues regarding the decisions they made about the utilization of inquiry-based instruction. In addition, these teachers were asked to reflect upon the criteria used to determine how and when to implement these inquiry-based practices. These reflective dialogue sessions provided the opportunity to observe teacher conceptions and stimulate teacher cognitive dissonance about instructional practice. Qualitative analysis of data collected from these reflective dialogues along with informal and formal classroom observations of instructional practice uncovered diverse perceptions regarding the implementation of inquiry-based methods into present teaching practice. The use of reflective dialogue within the existing structure of the professional development initiative allowed for the facilitators of the professional development initiative to tailor ongoing support and their effective implementation of inquiry-based instruction. Additional research is needed to investigate the impact of reflective dialogue in achieving

  5. Lifelong Learning: Policies, Practices, and Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Michael J., Ed.

    The 26 articles in this book focus on lifelong learning policies, practices, and programs in 13 Asia Pacific countries. The following papers are included: "Half a Revolution: A Brief Survey of Lifelong Learning in New Zealand" (P. Methven and J. Hansen); "HRD in a Multicultural Workplace: The Need for Lifelong Learning" (M.…

  6. Using reflective learning journals to improve students learning and awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter

    2008-01-01

    students are working in teams together and given special help to develop team and project work skills. When Danish and foreign students are grouped in mixed teams on the 2nd semester, still the Danish students are experts in project work and they are not familiar with taking in less skilled newcomers...... examples from the learning journals, proving that the students reach the learning goals of the course being able to discuss a more professional approach to their team work and they plan how to help foreigners entering their team.......This paper addresses the problem of mixing Danish engineering students having 3 years of experience with project work in teams (PBL setting at Aalborg University), with foreign students starting on Master Engineering educations with close to zero PBL experience. The first semester the foreign...

  7. The Effects of Coaching Using a Reflective Framework on Early Childhood Science Teachers' Depth of Reflection and Change in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomquist, Debra L.

    This embedded-mixed methods study examined if the use of a reflective framework with guiding prompts could support early childhood science teachers in improving their reflective practice and subsequently changing their pedagogy. It further investigated whether type of cognitive coaching group, individual or collaborative, impacted teacher depth of reflection and change in practice. Data included teacher reflections that were rated using the Level of Reflection-On-Action Assessment, reflective codes and inductive themes, as well as videos of participants lessons coded using the SCIIENCE instrument. Findings demonstrated that through guided reflection, teachers developed reflective thinking skills, and through this reflection became more critical and began to improve their pedagogical practice. Further findings supported that collaborative cognitive coaching may not be the most effective professional development for all teachers; as some teachers in the study were found to have difficulty improving their reflectivity and thus their teaching practice. Based on these findings it is recommended that coaches and designers of professional development continue to use reflective frameworks with guiding prompts to support teachers in the reflective process, but take into consideration that coaching may need to be differentiated for the various reflective levels demonstrated by teachers. Future studies will be needed to establish why some teachers have difficulty with the reflective process and how coaches or designers of professional development can further assist these teachers in becoming more critical reflectors.

  8. Exploring PCK ability of prospective science teachers in reflective learning on heat and transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmatin, S.; Rustaman, N. Y.

    2016-02-01

    Learning can be planned by the person him/herself when he or she tries to reflect his/her learning. A study involving prospective science teachers in junior secondary schools was carried out to analyze their ability on Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) in reflective learning after teaching practice. The study was focused especially in creating Pedagogical and Professional Repertoires (PaP-eRs) as part of resource-folios. PaP-eRs as a narrative writing in the learning activities are created by prospective science teachers after lesson plan implementation. Making the narrative writing is intended that prospective science teachers can reflect their learning in teaching. Research subjects are six prospective science teachers who are implementing "Program Pengalaman Lapangan" (PPL) in two junior secondary schools in Bandung, West Java, Indonesia. All of them were assigned by supervisor teachers to teach VII grade students on certain topic "heat and its transfer". Instruments used as a means of collecting data in this study is PaP-eRs. Collected PaP-eRs were then analyzed using PaP-eRs analysis format as instruments for analysis. The result of analyzing PaP-eRs indicates that learning activities, which narrated, involve initial activities, core activities and final activities. However, any activity, which is narrated just superficial as its big line so the narration cannot be, used as reflective learning. It indicates that PCK ability of prospective science teachers in creating narrative writing (PaP-eRs) for reflective learning is still low.

  9. Adult literacy, learning identities and pedagogic practice

    OpenAIRE

    Crowther, Jim; Maclachlan, Kathy; Tett, Lyn

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the relationship between persistence in adult literacy and numeracy\\ud programs, changes in the participants’ attitudes to engaging in learning and pedagogic practices\\ud using data from eight Scottish literacy education organizations. It argues that literacy learning can act as a resource that enables vulnerable adults to change their dispositions to learning, achieve their goals and make a transition towards their imagined futures. Pedagogic practices that operate fro...

  10. Mathematics teachers’ reflective practice within the context of adapted lesson study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Posthuma

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available There seems to be paucity of research in South Africa on mathematics teachers’ reflective practice. In order to study this phenomenon, the context of lesson study (in an adapted form was introduced to five mathematics teachers in a rural school in the Free State. The purpose was to investigate their reflective practice whilst they collaboratively planned mathematics lessons and reflected on the teaching of the lessons. Data were obtained through interviews, video-recorded lesson observations, field notes taken during the lesson study group meetings and document analyses (lesson plans and reflective writings. The adapted lesson study context provided a safe space for teachers to reflect on their teaching and they reported an increase in self-knowledge and finding new ways of teaching mathematics to learners. This finding has some potential value for planning professional learning programmes in which teachers are encouraged to talk about their classroom experiences, share their joys and challenges with one another and strive to build a community of reflective practitioners to enhance their learners’ understanding of mathematics.

  11. Cross cultural dimensions to the learning and practice of learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper focused on the question of cultural dimension to learning and the practice of learning in different schools. It can be argues that values mould a culture and this influences the interactions through their adherence to the daily practices. Thus the different schools experience different kinds of conflicts between their ...

  12. Knowledge and Learning in Engineering Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Anders

    2007-01-01

    , this chapter discusses the cencept of learning and purports to theorize learning in a Social Theory of Learning (STL). The attempt to reconstruct learning in an STL addresses three main issues: an STL must try to specify the subject-world relationship, describe the 'mechanism' of learning, and identify......During the 20th century, traditional epistemological theories of knowledge have been under siege. In recent years, efforts have been made to reconstruct the concept of 'knowledge' to emphasize its contextual, situated and social character. Drawing on the results and methods of these efforts...... the 'telos' of learning. This attempt will in fact give answers to three fundamental questions: 1) What is learning? 2) How do we learn? and 3) Why do we learn? These questions are discussed in relation to engineering practices of getting to know and learning....

  13. Web-based Collaborative learning in secondary education: Teachers’ reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsi-Chi Hsiao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the researchers’ reflections after twice participating in a Web-based Collaborative Learning Program Contest. The contests were held by Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC Cyber Academy (ACA. In collaborative learning, teachers are expected to provide participants with scaffolding assistance. The ACA is designed to provide student-centered activities for enhancing skills in information and communication technologies. Students are expected to find data, prepare presentations, and report their topics in English to communicate with other teams from other countries. During these processes, the researcher tried to apply theoretical models such as computerized instruction and topic based learning. The results of this study show the various benefits of Web-based Collaborative Learning for students and teachers. This study also includes several recommendations for primary and secondary schools.

  14. Register of practices and teacher training: reflection, memory and authorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Cristina Teagno Lopes Marques

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at analyzing the contribution of the register of practices in the process of inservice training and teacher development. It is organized in three parts: first, we elucidateconcepts of different authors about our object (FREIRE, 1996; GUARNIERI, 2001; SÁ-CHAVES, 2004, WARSCHAUER, 1993, 2001; ZABALZA, 1994, 2004, in the second part, we analyze some register of practices produced by a professor of early childhood education, seeking to highlight elements that indicate the relationship between register, reflection and training; inthe end, we indicate the need to move the register as individual attitude to the register as a collective process, as suggested by the perspective of pedagogical documentation describedin Italian literature (BALSAMO, 1998; BENZONI, 2001; BORGHI, APOSTOLI, 2001; GANDINI, GOLDHABER, 2002. The register of practices can contribute to the processes of professional and organizational development, in a reflective school (ALARCÃO, 2002, 2003 and trulypublic because it makes visible to society by documentation of the experiences that teachersand children build together (MALAGUZZI, 1999.

  15. Reflective practice as a tool to teach digital professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Justin W; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    2012-11-01

    Digital professionalism is increasingly being integrated into postgraduate medical education. We developed a small-group, reflective practice-based session incorporating radiology-specific cases to heighten residents' awareness about digital professionalism. Case-based, radiology-specific scenarios were created for a small-group, reflective practice-based session on digital professionalism. Anonymous pre- and postsession surveys evaluating residents' use of social media and their thoughts about the session were administered to the radiology residents. Twenty-five of 38 (66%) residents responded to the presession survey with 40% (10/25) reporting daily social media use; 50% (12/24) witnessing an unprofessional posting on Facebook; and 8% (2/25) posting something unprofessional themselves. Of the 21 residents who attended the session, 13 (62%) responded to the postsession survey. Residents reported that the session added to their understanding of professionalism 3.92, 95% CI (3.57-4.27). As a result of the session, residents stated that they were more aware of protecting patient privacy and confidentiality on social media sites 3.92, 95% CI (3.47-4.37), and would take a more active role in ensuring professional use of social media as it relates to patient care 4.00, 95% CI (3.66-4.34). Residents favorably viewed the reflective case-based session on digital professionalism as a means to be more aware of ways to avoid unprofessional interactions on the internet. Our results suggest that such reflective sessions are an effective method to educate residents on key concepts regarding digital professionalism. Copyright © 2012 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Doctors’ Knowledge of Hypertension Guidelines Recommendations Reflected in Their Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafees Ahmad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate doctors’ knowledge, attitude, and practices and predictors of adherence to Malaysian hypertension guidelines (CPG 2008. Methods. Twenty-six doctors involved in hypertension management at Penang General Hospital were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Doctors’ knowledge and attitudes towards guidelines were evaluated through a self-administered questionnaire. Their practices were evaluated by noting their prescriptions written to 520 established hypertensive outpatients (20 prescriptions/doctor. SPSS 17 was used for data analysis. Results. Nineteen doctors (73.07% had adequate knowledge of guidelines. Specialists and consultants had significantly better knowledge about guidelines’ recommendations. Doctors were positive towards guidelines with mean attitude score of 23.15±1.34 points on a 30-point scale. The median number of guidelines compliant prescriptions was 13 (range 5–20. Statistically significant correlation (rs = 0.635, P<0.001 was observed between doctors’ knowledge and practice scores. A total of 349 (67.1% prescriptions written were guidelines compliant. In multivariate analysis hypertension clinic (OR = 0.398, P=0.008, left ventricular hypertrophy (OR = 0.091, P=0.001 and heart failure (OR = 1.923, P=0.039 were significantly associated with guidelines adherence. Conclusion. Doctors’ knowledge of guidelines is reflected in their practice. The gap between guidelines recommendations and practice was seen in the pharmacotherapy of uncomplicated hypertension and hypertension with left ventricular hypertrophy, renal disease, and diabetes mellitus.

  17. Constructivism and Reflective Practice in Practice: Challenges and Dilemmas of a Mathematics Educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Sandra

    2000-01-01

    Examines some reasons for the gap between teacher education and school practices, a potential conflict between teacher educator's views and pre-service teacher's own views of their learning, and negligence in examining the discourses within which educational practices are constituted. (Contains 37 references.) (Author/ASK)

  18. Enhancing Community Service Learning Via Practical Learning Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Ronen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of learning communities focused on analyzing social issues and educational repercussions in the field are presented in this study. The research examines the contribution of a learning community to enhancing student teachers' responsibility and their social involvement. The assumption was that participating in learning community would further implement student teachers' community social involvement while enhancing responsibility in their field of action. A questionnaire aimed to present the student teachers' attitudes involving all aspects of studying in the learning community and their social activity in the community was conducted. The findings pinpointed that there were positive contributions of the learning communities from a personal aspect such as developing self-learning, and learning about “me”, as well as broaden their teaching skills, through methodology for teacher training, and developing reflective thought. These insights can also be implemented in various educational frameworks and during service learning as part of teacher training.

  19. Interconnecting Networks of Practice for Professional Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Mackey

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the complementary connections between communities of practice and the ways in which individuals orchestrate their engagement with others to further their professional learning. It does so by reporting on part of a research project conducted in New Zealand on teachers’ online professional learning in a university graduate diploma program on ICT education. Evolving from social constructivist pedagogy for online professional development, the research describes how teachers create their own networks of practice as they blend online and offline interactions with fellow learners and workplace colleagues. Teachers’ perspectives of their professional learning activities challenge the way universities design formal online learning communities and highlight the potential for networked learning in the zones and intersections between professional practice and study.The article extends the concepts of Lave and Wenger’s (1991 communities of practice social theory of learning by considering the role participants play in determining their engagement and connections in and across boundaries between online learning communities and professional practice. It provides insights into the applicability of connectivist concepts for developing online pedagogies to promote socially networked learning and for emphasising the role of the learner in defining their learning pathways.

  20. Reflective Practice: How the World Bank Explored Its Own Biases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Martin; Stuckler, David

    2015-12-10

    While many international organisations have independent evaluations, including the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Health organization (WHO), uniquely the World Bank in its 2015 World Development Report sought to ascertain the potential biases that influence how its staff interpret evidence and influence policy. Here, we describe the World Bank's study design, including experiments to ascertain the impact on Bank staff's judgements of complexity, confirmation bias, sunk cost bias, and an understanding of the wishes of those whom they seek to help. We then review the Bank's proposed mechanisms to minimise the impact of the biases they identified. We argue that this approach, that we refer to as 'reflective practice,' deserves to be adopted more widely among institutions that seek to use evidence from research to inform policy and practice. © 2016 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  1. Design Research and Practice for the Public Good: A Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Junginger

    Full Text Available Public sector managers and policymakers have begun to work with design researchers and design practitioners in an effort to create citizen-centric polices and user-centered public services. What role can design play in the approach taken by the public sector in organizational development and innovation? This paper reflects on an innovation project at a Brazilian Ministry where human-centered design was chosen as an approach to integrate innovation efforts among different government agencies and ministries. It offers an example of how human-centered design approaches can support efforts by civil servants to change their own design practices. Keywords: Design research, Design practice, Public sector, Civil servants, Organizational change & development

  2. The experience of being a member of the Student International Community of Practice: a collaborative reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brighide M. Lynch

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2010 a community of practice was set up for and by doctoral students engaged in person-centred and practitioner research. After three years, this community became part of a larger international community of practice. Aims and objectives: Captured under the stanzas of a poem and supported by the literature, this paper uses member narratives and creative expressions in a critical reflection on the experience of being a member of the Student International Community of Practice. Conclusions: Membership in the community of practice was experienced as beneficial, providing both support and challenge to enrich the doctoral students’ development as person-centred researchers. Retaining connectivity across an international landscape and finding effective ways to integrate new members into the community presented the greatest challenges. Implications for practice development: • The theoretical foundation and experiential knowledge could assist others considering support structures for the development of person-centred practices • Shared learning and co-creation of knowledge add value to the experience of being a doctoral researcher • Membership fluctuations present challenges to continuity of learning and the maintenance of a safe space with communities of practice. Such fluctuations, however, create chances for community members to experience diverse roles within the group and encourage explicit attention to person-centredness

  3. Time Well Spent in a Kindergarten Class:A Teacher’s Reflection on Using Talk to Learn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Hope-Southcott

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent changes in the Ontario curricular expectations for teaching and learning have led the author to re-examine some of her teaching practices, particularly in oral language learning. In this article, the author explores what learning through talk looks like, sounds like and feels like from the kindergarten teacher’s perspective. By inquiring into her own practice, drawing from the literature on classroom talk in the early years, and critically reflecting on vignettes of classroom talk as well as a teaching journal, the author as kindergarten teacher challenges her own assumptions about talk to gain a deeper understanding of its role in a kindergarten classroom. The vignettes, reflective writing and teaching journal act as signposts that map a growing understanding of talk as a tool for learning. These stories help to ground the discussion about talk in practice as well as theory, and provide insights into the challenges and opportunities of using talk for learning in kindergarten.

  4. The use of blogging in tertiary healthcare educational settings to enhance reflective learning in nursing leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Theodora C

    2014-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies such as blogs are increasingly used in academic settings; however, they are not widely used in hospital settings. This project explored the effectiveness of using a blog to enhance reflective learning in a nurse manager leadership development course of a tertiary care hospital setting. Differences in reflective learning between the blog group and traditional learning group were measured post training using a Reflective Learning and Interaction Questionnaire. Although the groups did not differ significantly on any reflective learning dimension (p educators contemplating to incorporate blogs into their learning strategies to enhance reflective learning.

  5. Latin American Investigative Journalism Education: Learning Practices, Learning Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz Weiss, Amy; de Macedo Higgins Joyce, Vanessa; Saldaña, Magdalena; Alves, Rosental Calmon

    2017-01-01

    This study seeks to examine the state of investigative journalism practices used in higher education in Latin America. Using a meta-theoretical framework called the Community of Practice (CoP), this study seeks to identify whether a particular learning practice exists in this region. Based on an online survey conducted on Latin American educators…

  6. TESOL, A Profession That Eats its Young: The Importance of Reflective Practice in Language Teacher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas SC Farrell

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The field of teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL is similar to other fields in that we must not take it for granted that novice teachers will survive their first year without some kind of support. This paper outlines how three novice ESL teachers in Canada survived their first year without any support from the school they were placed. Specifically, the paper outlines how they, with the aid of a facilitator, engaged in reflective practice by using a framework for reflecting on practice to help them navigate complex issues and challenges they faced during their first year of teaching. Had they not engaged in such structured reflection during their first year, they would have probably become another statistic of those who quit the profession and contribute to the growing perception that TESOL is a profession that eats its young. The paper suggests that language teacher educators and novice teachers should not just wait until their first year to learn the skills of reflective practice but should do so much earlier in their teacher education programs so that they can be better prepared for the transition from their teacher education programs to the first year of teaching.

  7. Using the Real-time Instructor Observing Tool (RIOT) for Reflection on Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Cassandra; West, Emily

    2018-03-01

    As physics educators, we are constantly looking for ways to improve our practice. There are many different kinds of professional development opportunities that have been shown to help us with this endeavor. We can seek assistance from professionals, like mentor teachers or centers for faculty development, we can attend workshops to learn new curricula or pedagogical skills, and we can engage in learning communities to develop shared visions and become more reflective educators. However, when these activities end, what can we do on our own to continue to improve? How can we track our improvement? And perhaps even most importantly, what can we do when these resources aren't available to us? While publications like The Physics Teacher offer excellent pedagogical practices we can try out in the classroom, how do we get feedback on what we decide to implement?

  8. Determinants of Self-Reflective Learning and Its Consequences in Online Master Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Yoram; Neumann, Edith; Lewis, Shelia

    2017-01-01

    Based on recent studies of self-reflective learning and its effects on various learning outcomes, this study examined the concept of self-reflective learning in the context of the Robust Learning Model (RLM), which is a learning model designed for improving the educational effectiveness of online degree programs. Two models were introduced to…

  9. Distance Learning: Practice and Dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatkovic, Nevenka; Sehanovic, Jusuf; Ruzic, Maja

    2006-01-01

    In accordance with the European processes of integrated and homogeneous education, the paper presents the essential viewpoints and questions covering the establishment and development of "distance learning" (DL) in Republic of Croatia. It starts from the advantages of distance learning versus traditional education taking into account…

  10. Distributed Practice and Retrieval Practice in Primary School Vocabulary Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.A.M.C. Goossens (Nicole)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractThe aim of this thesis was to investigate whether particular memory strategies stemming from cognitive and educational psychology, enhance primary school vocabulary learning. Th e memory strategies investigated in this thesis were distributed practice and retrieval practice. Th e

  11. Student's Reflections on Their Learning and Note-Taking Activities in a Blended Learning Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Minoru; Mutsuura, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Hiroh

    2016-01-01

    Student's emotional aspects are often discussed in order to promote better learning activity in blended learning courses. To observe these factors, course participant's self-efficacy and reflections upon their studies were surveyed, in addition to the surveying of the metrics of student's characteristics during a Bachelor level credit course.…

  12. Learning from clinical placement experience: Analysing nursing students' final reflections in a digital storytelling activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliadelis, Penny; Wood, Pamela

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports on the learning potential of a reflective activity undertaken by final year nursing students, in which they were asked to recount two meaningful events that occurred during their clinical placements over the duration of their 3-year nursing degree program and reflect on how these events contributed to their learning to become beginning level Registered Nurses (RNs). This descriptive qualitative study gathered narratives from 92 students as individual postings in an online forum created within the University's learning management system. An analysis of the students' reflections are the focus of this paper particularly in relation to the value of reflecting on the identified events. Four themes emerged that clearly highlight the way in which these students interpreted and learned from both positive and negative clinical experiences, their strong desire to fit into their new role and their ability to re-imagine how they might respond to clinical events when they become Registered Nurses. The findings of this study may contribute to developing nursing curricula that better prepares final year students for the realities of practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The contribution of audio recording using portable digital voice recorders to the development of reflective practice with trainee teachers in a Further Education setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knill, Marta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Developing reflective skills and habits during initial teacher education and progressing to deeper and more critical reflection are challenges for trainee teachers. This small-scale action research study investigates how two structured tasks using Digital Voice Recorders (DVRs initiated, sustained and improved reflection and reflective practice. Trainee teachers reported benefits in increased understanding of reflection, development of reflective skills, deepening of reflection and improvements in practice through joint reflection with Teacher Educators on specific aspects of teaching and learning. The structuring of the tasks with prompts and dialogue clearly contributed to the positive outcomes. The study suggests that use of the small, convenient and relatively low cost DVR technology has a place in learning to reflect.

  14. knowledge management practices in higher learning institutions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Knowledge Management (KM) Practices in Institutions of Higher Learning in .... quality and skills to cope with the labour market demands. .... Total. 44. 100.0. Source: Field Data (2012/13). Staff's Level of Awareness of Knowledge Management.

  15. Integrative learning for practicing adaptive resource management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. McLoughlin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive resource management is a learning-by-doing approach to natural resource management. Its effective practice involves the activation, completion, and regeneration of the "adaptive management cycle" while working toward achieving a flexible set of collaboratively identified objectives. This iterative process requires application of single-, double-, and triple-loop learning, to strategically modify inputs, outputs, assumptions, and hypotheses linked to improving policies, management strategies, and actions, along with transforming governance. Obtaining an appropriate balance between these three modes of learning has been difficult to achieve in practice and building capacity in this area can be achieved through an emphasis on reflexive learning, by employing adaptive feedback systems. A heuristic reflexive learning framework for adaptive resource management is presented in this manuscript. It is built on the conceptual pillars of the following: stakeholder driven adaptive feedback systems; strategic adaptive management (SAM; and hierarchy theory. The SAM Reflexive Learning Framework (SRLF emphasizes the types, roles, and transfer of information within a reflexive learning context. Its adaptive feedback systems enhance the facilitation of single-, double-, and triple-loop learning. Focus on the reflexive learning process is further fostered by streamlining objectives within and across all governance levels; incorporating multiple interlinked adaptive management cycles; having learning as an ongoing, nested process; recognizing when and where to employ the three-modes of learning; distinguishing initiating conditions for this learning; and contemplating practitioner mandates for this learning across governance levels. The SRLF is a key enabler for implementing the "adaptive management cycle," and thereby translating the theory of adaptive resource management into practice. It promotes the heuristics of adaptive management within a cohesive

  16. Can E-learning change work practices?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    Stand-alone e-learning is unlikely to change work practices. This claim contrasts with a comprehensive body of research arguing that e-learning is at least as effective as face-to-face instruction in improving work performance. Such a comparison is, however, problematic. On the one hand, it relies...... on the premise that face-to-face instruction is effective in changing work behaviors. This article argues that instruction—whether e-learning, face-to-face, or a blend of both—cannot stand alone. Individualized on-the-job scaffolding of employees is needed for meaningful learning transfer and sustainable...... behavior change to occur. On the other hand, e-learning can be as important as face-to-face instruction in preparing the ground for advancing work practices, when e-learning is designed in acknowledgement of its strength and limitations. In outlining the above arguments, this article contributes a four...

  17. Understanding the essential elements of work-based learning and its relevance to everyday clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Caroline

    2010-09-01

    To critically review the work-based learning literature and explore the implications of the findings for the development of work-based learning programmes. With NHS budgets under increasing pressure, and challenges to the impact of classroom-based learning on patient outcomes, work-based learning is likely to come under increased scrutiny as a potential solution. Evidence from higher education institutions suggests that work-based learning can improve practice, but in many cases it is perceived as little more than on-the-job training to perform tasks. The CINAHL database was searched using the keywords work-based learning, work-place learning and practice-based learning. Those articles that had a focus on post-registration nursing were selected and critically reviewed. Using the review of the literature, three key issues were explored. Work-based learning has the potential to change practice. Learning how to learn and critical reflection are key features. For effective work-based learning nurses need to take control of their own learning, receive support to critically reflect on their practice and be empowered to make changes to that practice. A critical review of the literature has identified essential considerations for the implementation of work-based learning. A change in culture from classroom to work-based learning requires careful planning and consideration of learning cultures. To enable effective work-based learning, nurse managers need to develop a learning culture in their workplace. They should ensure that skilled facilitation is provided to support staff with critical reflection and effecting changes in practice. CONTRIBUTION TO NEW KNOWLEDGE: This paper has identified three key issues that need to be considered in the development of work-based learning programmes. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Organisational learning as movements in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjær, Bente

    2013-01-01

    In the paper, I take the readers through a tour de force of the past, present and future of the field of organisational learning. This is structured around three concepts that stand out as important, namely organisational learning as changed behaviour, as changed theories of actions and as part...... of practice. I also point to the future of organisational learning as inspired by the work of pragmatist philosophy and as affected by the call for more concreteness in organisation studies as a whole....

  19. Cooperative Learning: Review of Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Robyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Cooperative learning is widely recognized as a pedagogical practice that promotes socialization and learning among students from pre-school through to tertiary level and across different subject domains. It involves students working together to achieve common goals or complete group tasks--goals and tasks that they would be unable to complete by…

  20. Can E-Learning Change Work Practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    Stand-alone e-learning is unlikely to change work practices. This claim contrasts with a comprehensive body of research arguing that e-learning is at least as effective as face-to-face instruction in improving work performance. Such a comparison is, however, problematic. On the one hand, it relies on the premise that face-to-face instruction is…

  1. Reflecting on practice development school for pre-registration nurses: a student nurse perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Agate

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Practice development has been evolving as a movement in nursing for decades but was first conceptualised by Garbett and McCormack (2002. At its core are the principles that embody a shared intention of developing and improving both professional practice and patient care (McCormack et al., 2013. Through effective, supportive and motivational facilitation, practice development has the capacity to transform dominant and oppressive task-oriented cultures, run by hierarchical leaderships, into cultures that empower and value the contributions of all stakeholders, allowing for transformational and emancipatory learning (McCormack et al., 2013. Aims: Today, there are nine defining principles of practice development (McCormack et al., 2013. Based loosely on Kolb’s model of reflection (1998, this article is an in-depth critical evaluation of my own learning, which took place in the context of a practice development school for pre-registration nurses. I have chosen to focus on the practice development principle that I found to be most transformative. Principle number eight states: ‘Practice development is associated with a set of processes including skilled facilitation that can be translated into a specific skill set required as near to the interface of care as possible’. Conclusions and implications for practice: This journey has taught me that knowledge and experience will inevitably influence facilitation (Crisp and Wilson, 2011. However, the skills and attributes embodied by an effective facilitator are multifaceted and the evolution of my own facilitation expertise will continue alongside with my journey as a practice developer. On the journey so far, I have learned to appreciate the value of authentic and meaningful engagement, how to inspire and evoke it, and to what extent it has the potential to influence effective facilitation. I have learned to use various facilitation methods to create and sustain high levels of engagement

  2. Are students' impressions of improved learning through active learning methods reflected by improved test scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everly, Marcee C

    2013-02-01

    To report the transformation from lecture to more active learning methods in a maternity nursing course and to evaluate whether student perception of improved learning through active-learning methods is supported by improved test scores. The process of transforming a course into an active-learning model of teaching is described. A voluntary mid-semester survey for student acceptance of the new teaching method was conducted. Course examination results, from both a standardized exam and a cumulative final exam, among students who received lecture in the classroom and students who had active learning activities in the classroom were compared. Active learning activities were very acceptable to students. The majority of students reported learning more from having active-learning activities in the classroom rather than lecture-only and this belief was supported by improved test scores. Students who had active learning activities in the classroom scored significantly higher on a standardized assessment test than students who received lecture only. The findings support the use of student reflection to evaluate the effectiveness of active-learning methods and help validate the use of student reflection of improved learning in other research projects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Critical incident analysis through narrative reflective practice: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S. C. Farrell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Teachers can reflect on their practices by articulating and exploring incidents they consider critical to themselves or others. By talking about these critical incidents, teachers can make better sense of seemingly random experiences that occur in their teaching because they hold the real inside knowledge, especially personal intuitive knowledge, expertise and experience that is based on their accumulated years as language educators teaching in schools and classrooms. This paper is about one such critical incident analysis that an ESL teacher in Canada revealed to her critical friend and how both used McCabe’s (2002 narrative framework for analyzing an important critical incident that occurred in the teacher’s class.

  4. Exploring Teacher Beliefs and Classroom Practices through Reflective Practice: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.; Ives, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a case study that explored and reflected on the relationship between the stated beliefs and observed classroom practices of one second language reading teacher. The findings of this study revealed that this particular teacher holds complex beliefs about teaching reading that were evident to some extent in many of his…

  5. Learning to Learn: A Hidden Dimension within Community Dance Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Sherrie

    2013-01-01

    This article explores ways of learning experienced by university dance students participating in a community dance project. The students were unfamiliar with community-based practices and found themselves needing to remediate held attitudes about dance. How the students came to approach their learning within the dance-making process drew on…

  6. Effects of Elicited Reflections combined with Tutor or Peer Feedback on Self-Regulated Learning and Learning Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Boom, Gerard; Paas, Fred; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2009-01-01

    Van den Boom, G., Paas, F., & Van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2007). Effects of elicited reflections combined with tutor or peer feedback on self-regulated learning and learning outcomes. Learning and Instruction, 17, 532-548.

  7. Methods of Reflection about Service Learning: Guided vs. Free, Dialogic vs. Expressive, and Public vs. Private

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgill, Amanda; Motley, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Reflection is a key component of service learning, but research shows that in order to maximize learning, the reflection must be of high quality. This paper compares the affordances of three different models of written reflection in engendering students' higher-order thought processes. Student reflections were compared across axes of guided versus…

  8. Periscope: Looking into Learning in Best-Practices Physics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Goertzen, Renee Michelle

    2018-02-01

    Periscope is a set of lessons to support learning assistants, teaching assistants, and faculty in learning to notice and interpret classroom events the way an accomplished teacher does. Periscope lessons are centered on video episodes from a variety of best-practices university physics classrooms. By observing, discussing, and reflecting on teaching situations similar to their own, instructors practice applying lessons learned about teaching to actual teaching situations and develop their pedagogical content knowledge. Instructors also get a view of other institutions' transformed courses, which can support and expand the vision of their own instructional improvement and support the transfer of course developments among faculty. Periscope is available for free to educators at http://physport.org/periscope.

  9. Interpretative Social Work: On the Uses of Qualitative Methods for Practice, Reflection and Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Völter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative methods could play an important role in the context of a lively, life-world oriented, and emancipatory self-reflective social work. They are already applied in three realms of social work: social work research, the daily practice of social workers and professional self-reflection. Even though these three realms overlap they are three distinct spheres of knowledge and action, which have specific aims. Therefore qualitative methods have to be adjusted to the needs of social science, practice and practice reflection. When students and practitioners of social work learn to use qualitative methods in this sense, they gain a competence which can be referred to as "ethnographic sophistication." This "ethnographic sophistication" contains essential elements of social work professionalism. Familiarity with qualitative methods and their application are highly relevant for the acquisition of basic competencies in social work, i.e., that what has become known as "reconstructive social pedagogy" is much more than just one social work method among others. But a consequence of the introduction of academic reforms of the so called "Bologna process" all over Europe is that it has become more difficult in many universities and universities of applied sciences to implement this approach. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0801563

  10. Learning within a product development working practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, John Bang

    . To identify the characteristics enabling or constraining the learning process, both chapters focus on the composition of the STP and the transformation process. First, the composition of the interorganisational, cross-functional and daily working STPs is analysed. Applied constitutive means and the role......This thesis examines learning within a PD working practice when creating a Wind Turbine Control (WTC) in collaboration with a customer. The focus of the research is on the learning that takes place when engineers conduct a PD activity, frequently referred to as workplace learning. The research......, the logic applied throughout the thesis is abduction. The abductive logic paves the way for studying how learning occurs in consequence of the engineers’ doings when conducting a PD activity within a PD working practice. As this logic rejects any kind of dualism, the engineers’ doings are neither...

  11. Learning Through Reflective Writing: A Teaching Strategy. A Review of: Sen, B. A. (2010. Reflective writing: A management skill. Library Management, 31(1/2, 79-93.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen L. Young

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To explore student thought on both reflection and reflective writing as a process, and to analyze the writing by the application of clearly defined and identifiable outcomes.Design – Mixed method approach consisting of a qualitative analysis of 116 written reflections from master’s level students as well as a quantitative statistical analysis.Setting –The University of Sheffield masters-level librarianship program’s course INF6005, “Management for LIS.”Subjects – Of the 31 students registered the course during the 2007-2008 academic year, 22 (71%, allowed their reflections to be used for the purposes of research. Of these, 7 students identified themselves as male, and 15 were female. All students included were over 21 years of age and had previous library experience, with varying degrees of management experience in supervisory roles. Not all supervisory experience was gathered within the library domain.Methods –A total of 116 reflective journal entries were submitted by the participating students during the eight month period from October 2008 to May 2009. In order to identify themes, qualitative analysis was applied to the reflective writing responses. Descriptive statistics were also applied to test the hypothesis, illustrate the relationships between reflective writing and outcomes, and locate identifiable outcomes.Main Results – Practising reflection demonstrated benefits for individuals groups both in and outside of the workplace. On the whole, individuals gained the most from reflection and saw it in the most positive light when it was practised as a daily activity. Quantitatively, when students began to master the practice of reflection, they demonstrated an increase in their ability to learn and an overall improvement of self-development and critical thinking skills, and gained a defined awareness of personal mental function. When decision making became easier, students understood they had begun to master

  12. Active learning techniques for librarians practical examples

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    A practical work outlining the theory and practice of using active learning techniques in library settings. It explains the theory of active learning and argues for its importance in our teaching and is illustrated using a large number of examples of techniques that can be easily transferred and used in teaching library and information skills to a range of learners within all library sectors. These practical examples recognise that for most of us involved in teaching library and information skills the one off session is the norm, so we need techniques that allow us to quickly grab and hold our

  13. Learning within a product development working practice

    OpenAIRE

    Bang Mathiasen, John

    2012-01-01

    The subject matter chosen for this PhD, learning within a Product Development (PD) working practice, might give rise to wonder given that I have a theoretical education within supply chain management, achieved practical experience as senior supply chain manager and finally, conducted a great many lectures dealing with supply chain management. Offhand, it may seem an odd choice, but my practical experience, briefly illustrated in the below, triggered the decision to study learni...

  14. Mobile and Online Learning Journal: Effects on Apprentices' Reflection in Vocational Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauroux, Laetitia; Könings, Karen D.; Zufferey, Jessica Dehler; Gurtner, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    While learning journals (LJs) have been shown to support self-regulated learning strategies, reflection and learning outcomes in academic contexts, few studies have investigated their relevance in vocational education. A mobile and online learning journal (MOLJ) was developed to support reflection on workplace experiences. However, acceptance of…

  15. Best Practices for Use of Blended Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Amanda R; Porter, Andrea L; Pitterle, Michael E

    2017-04-01

    Objective. To determine instructional best practice recommendations for use of blended learning from the students' perspective. Methods. Three focus groups were created, one for each of the first three years at a school of pharmacy. The focus group discussions were audio recorded and transcribed for content analysis. Results. Ten instructional best practices were identified from the focus groups: setting the stage, consistency when team teaching, timeliness in posting materials, time on task, accountability for online activities, use of structured active learning, instructor use of feedback on student preparation, incorporation of student feedback into the course, short reviews of online material during class, and ensuring technologies are user friendly. Conclusion. Instructors using blended learning should consider incorporating these best practices into their course design and management. More evaluation is needed to see if implementation of these practices affects student performance.

  16. Reflection about the students’ demotivation to learn and the affective, reflective and technical dimensions in teaching work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Steren Santos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The discussion about the importance of affectivity to the learning process is imperative. The article aims to discuss the relation between emotion and cognition emphasizing the importance of a positive link between teachers and students to initiate the concernment for learning. It highlights the complexity of the motivational process in view of the contribution given by affective-emotional, cognitive, social and unconscious aspects in human motivation. The present research was based on a qualitative approach of exploratory type, characterizing it as a bibliographic survey. The work was based in Jesus (2004 and Huertas (2001 references in what relates to the study of school motivation, because our work proposal in the field of education shows epistemological compatibility with the beliefs of the above referred authors. The purpose was to search for bibliographic support to understand how the affective aspects contribute with the motivation to learn. We emphasize that analyzing how the concern or the indifference in learning takes place requires from the researcher a study about the interpersonal between students and teachers and, ultimately between knowledge and teaching didactics. We highlight: the relevance of the “reflection on and for the pedagogical action”; the influence of the historic and social moment in which we are living – full of instabilities and uncertainties – the necessity the educator should demonstrate in continuously study in search to update and analyze the daily practice and, join to a theoretical positioning about the educational approaches. We can conclude that the positive relations between students and teachers provide better global development of the individual, both for students and for teachers, because the possibility of a well-being influences learning activities and leads us to understand the invalidity of the dualist paradigm that separated affection and cognition.

  17. Self-Assessment of Gerontology Teaching Practice: A First-Step in Enhancing Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    VonDras, Dean D.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses self-assessment of gerontology teaching practice. Through a process of self-reflection one may find insight into their teaching and, concomitantly, develop best-practices for enhancing student learning in gerontology. A self-assessment framework is presented, illuminating best-practices in the areas of the lecture-discussion…

  18. Player-Driven Video Analysis to Enhance Reflective Soccer Practice in Talent Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjort, Anders; Henriksen, Kristoffer; Elbæk, Lars

    2018-01-01

    consistent video analyses and tagging; coaches are important as role models and providers of feedback; and that the use of the platform primarily stimulated deliberate practice activities. PU can be seen as a source of inspiration for soccer players and clubs as to how analytical platforms can motivate......In the present article, we investigate the introduction of a cloud-based video analysis platform called Player Universe (PU). Video analysis is not a new performance-enhancing element in sports, but PU is innovative in how it facilitates reflective learning. Video analysis is executed in the PU...... platform by involving the players in the analysis process, in the sense that they are encouraged to tag game actions in video-documented soccer matches. Following this, players can get virtual feedback from their coach. Findings show that PU can improve youth soccer players' reflection skills through...

  19. Tracing the becoming of reflective practitioner through the enactment of epistemic practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trenca, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - This paper aims to develop a conceptual framework for tracing the cognitive and affective micro-processes management accountants can draw upon to construct themselves as reflective practitioners within organizational context. Design/methodology/approach - Drawing on pragmatic...... constructivism and Heron's (1992) theory of learning and personhood, the framework provides a methodology for tracing the way management accountants can construct themselves as reflective practitioners by enactig epistemic practices (Cetina, 2001). Furthermore, we enquire into the epistemological requirements...... for creating trustworthy knowledge and the processes through which actors can diminish the proactive-pragmatic truth gap. Findings - The framework shows how the participatory function of the mind, deeply rooted in affective processes, is implicated in creating empathic engagement with epistemic objects...

  20. Teachers’ Learning Design Practice for Students as Learning Designers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin Tweddell; Sørensen, Birgitte Holm

    2018-01-01

    that simultaneously scaffold students’ subject-related inquiry, agency, reflection and learning. Research studies have documented that this approach constitutes arenas that support students’ deep learning and mastery of both transdisciplinary and subject matter, along with their acquisition of digital literacy and 21......This paper contributes with elements of an emerging learning design methodology. The paper takes as its starting point the theory of Students as Learning Designers, which was developed by Sørensen and Levinsen and based on more than a decade of research-and-development projects in Danish primary...... schools (first to 10th grade). The research focussed on information and communication technology (ICT) within the Scandinavian tradition of Problem Oriented Project Pedagogy (POPP), Problem Based Learning (PBL) and students’ production. In recent years, the projects that provide the grounding...

  1. Practice stories in natural resource management continuing professional education: springboards for learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, Cathy Brown

    2014-01-01

    in supporting professional learning of new concepts. These uses of practice stories are not evident in public natural resource management (NRM) continuing professional education. In light of greater public involvement in NRM practice over the last 20 years, however, the use of practice stories could now...... practice. Feedback from workshop participants suggests that practice stories may be able to support NRM professionals in reflecting on previous experiences, learning from colleague's practice experiences and serving as a springboard for learning by fostering linkages between social science knowledge......The use of stories from professional experience in continuing professional education has been on the rise in many fields, often aimed at bolstering capacity through sharing professional knowledge and/or supporting reflective practice. Practice stories are also suggested to be beneficial...

  2. Heutagogy: An alternative practice based learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoyrub, John; Hurley, John; Neilson, Gavin R; Ramsay, Mike; Smith, Margaret

    2010-11-01

    Education has explored and utilised multiple approaches in attempts to enhance the learning and teaching opportunities available to adult learners. Traditional pedagogy has been both directly and indirectly affected by andragogy and transformational learning, consequently widening our understandings and approaches toward view teaching and learning. Within the context of nurse education, a major challenge has been to effectively apply these educational approaches to the complex, unpredictable and challenging environment of practice based learning. While not offered as a panacea to such challenges, heutagogy is offered in this discussion paper as an emerging and potentially highly congruent educational framework to place around practice based learning. Being an emergent theory its known conceptual underpinnings and possible applications to nurse education need to be explored and theoretically applied. Through placing the adult learner at the foreground of grasping learning opportunities as they unpredictability emerge from a sometimes chaotic environment, heutagogy can be argued as offering the potential to minimise many of the well published difficulties of coordinating practice with faculty teaching and learning. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Understanding the Development of a Hybrid Practice of Inquiry-Based Science Instruction and Language Development: A Case Study of One Teacher's Journey Through Reflections on Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitelli, Sarah; Hooper, Paula; Rankin, Lynn; Austin, Marilyn; Caven, Gennifer

    2016-04-01

    This qualitative case study looks closely at an elementary teacher who participated in professional development experiences that helped her develop a hybrid practice of using inquiry-based science to teach both science content and English language development (ELD) to her students, many of whom are English language learners (ELLs). This case study examines the teacher's reflections on her teaching and her students' learning as she engaged her students in science learning and supported their developing language skills. It explicates the professional learning experiences that supported the development of this hybrid practice. Closely examining the pedagogical practice and reflections of a teacher who is developing an inquiry-based approach to both science learning and language development can provide insights into how teachers come to integrate their professional development experiences with their classroom expertise in order to create a hybrid inquiry-based science ELD practice. This qualitative case study contributes to the emerging scholarship on the development of teacher practice of inquiry-based science instruction as a vehicle for both science instruction and ELD for ELLs. This study demonstrates how an effective teaching practice that supports both the science and language learning of students can develop from ongoing professional learning experiences that are grounded in current perspectives about language development and that immerse teachers in an inquiry-based approach to learning and instruction. Additionally, this case study also underscores the important role that professional learning opportunities can play in supporting teachers in developing a deeper understanding of the affordances that inquiry-based science can provide for language development.

  4. Reflections on the Use of Iterative, Agile and Collaborative Approaches for Blended Flipped Learning Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazel Owen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available E-learning experiences are widely becoming common practice in many schools, tertiary institutions and other organisations. However despite this increased use of technology to enhance learning and the associated investment involved the result does not always equate to more engaged, knowledgeable and skilled learners. We have observed two key prevalences. The first is an ingrained, and often unquestioned, set of beliefs and expectations held by the majority of people who have experienced formal education, and who are involved in the development of eLearning and blended learning experiences. These beliefs tend to impact the overall design of what a blended type of learning experience might consist of. The second prevalence is for educational institutions to embark on large-scale eLearning developments, which by their scale can prove problematic. In part because it is a long time before the school or organisation sees any benefit and there is an up-front cost before any learning value is realised. In this paper we will be discussing our experiences of the implementation of a large-scale blended-learning project at Unitec, a tertiary institution in Aotearoa, New Zealand. Approaches taken to implement the development were iterative and based on a phased rollout, with each subsequent stage being informed by the ones before it. Our discussion draws on personal reflections associated with three different perspectives and a variety of roles during the three initial phases of the change making process. Our overall aim is to share our contextualised experiences, to add to the knowledge base on blended learning, and to provide some general, practical recommendations.

  5. Does high antibiotic consumption still reflect bad practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levent, T; Delfosse, F; Lambiotte, F; Dezorzi, S; Gosteau, L; Vasseur, M

    2012-07-01

    The authors had for aim to assess the quality of antibiotic prescription in an intensive care unit because of their high rate of consumption. A prospective 5-month study was made of the first 50 prescriptions of ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, teicoplanin, vancomycin, and imipenem. Treatment was considered adequate at day 5 if the indication was relevant, with the right doses, and if the prescription was adapted to the antibiogram. Fifty treatments were evaluated (38 patients included). Eighty-four percent (42/50) was adequate at day 5. Glycopeptides and fluoroquinolones accounted for 2/3 of prescriptions. The absence of de-escalation was the most common mistake. The severity of presentations was evident with a mean SSI at 68 (22-113), and a mean BMI at 28 (18.5 - 50). Eighty-four percent (32/38) of patients were exposed to invasive devices, 47% died in the ICU. Most prescriptions were adequate. The patient profile could explain the high rate of antibiotic consumption. Bacteriological monitoring revealed an increased prevalence of resistant bacteria, which could explain a high rate of consumption along with adaptation of the dose to overweight. De-escalation, using aminosides more frequently, and shorter prescribed courses of fluoroquinolones should improve consumption rates does not always reflect bad practices, but may be adequate when considering bacterial ecology and patient profile. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Application of Reflectance Confocal Microscopy in Dermatology Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Esra Koku Aksu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM is a non-invasive method, imaging cellular structures in living skin at a level close to the histological resolution. It is easier to diagnose melanocytic and non-melanocytic skin tumors especially in difficult cases when RCM features have been identified. Determination of the cellular features, presence of cellular and structural atypia with RCM allows the discrimination of benign and malignant lesions. Preoperative differential diagnosis of malignant lesions, determining preoperative lesion borders in complicated cases, identification of local recurrence after excision of malignant lesions, monitoring the treatment efficacy in patients using topical treatment and who can not be operated, are the main areas of RCM in tumoral lesions. Besides, RCM is helpful in the establishing the diagnosis of inflammatory disease like psoriasis, contact dermatitis, lichen planus and in evaluation of therapeutic efficacy, detecting of infestation like tinea, skabiyes, demodicosis and determining the level of bullae in bullous disease. Due to being noninvasive, RCM is preferred in cosmetology, in clinical research and practice for the evaluation of the effectiveness of cosmetic products and cosmetic procedures.

  7. Learning and teaching entrepreneurship: Dilemmas, reflections and strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blenker, Per; Dreisler, Poul; Færgemann, Helle Meibom

    2006-01-01

    The question as to whether entrepreneurship could be learned - and whether it should be taught as part of University Studies in general, more particularly as part of business studies, has been discussed for a number of years. The most widespread answer today seems to be positive; yes......, entrepreneurship can be learned and should be taught. A major problem is that the traditional forms of teaching at universities and business schools have shown themselves quite inappropriate for enhancing the motivation and competencies of students towards innovation and entrepreneurship. This phenomenon has...... the secure context of the university auditorium or in small firms - or perhaps somewhere in between academia and practice. A fourth dilemma is whether students should work individually or collectively and a fifth is the question of how the substance of what is taught is formulated; whether entrepreneurship...

  8. Development of Interactive and Reflective Learning among Malaysian Online Distant Learners: An ESL Instructor’s Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puvaneswary Murugaiah

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Technology has brought tremendous advancements in online education, spurring transformations in online pedagogical practices. Online learning in the past was passive, using the traditional teacher-centred approach. However, with the tools available today, it can be active, collaborative, and meaningful. A well-developed task can impel learners to observe, to reflect, to strategize, and to plan their own learning. This paper describes an English as a Second Language (ESL instructor’s attempt to foster interactive and reflective learning among distance learners at a public university in Malaysia, working within the framework proposed by Salmon (2004. The authors found that proper planning and close monitoring of a writing activity that incorporates interactive and reflective learning helped to raise the students’ awareness of their own learning process and consequently helped them to be more responsible for their learning. The students acquired significant cognitive benefits and also valuable practical learning skills through the online discussions. However, there were challenges in carrying out the writing task to promote this form of learning, including students’ professional and family commitments and cultural attitudes as well as communication barriers in the online environment. To address these challenges, the authors recommend the following: ensure tutor guidance, enforce compulsory participation, address technical problems quickly, commence strategic training prior to the beginning of a task, and implement team teaching with each instructor taking on certain roles.

  9. The Nature of Reflective Practice and Emotional Intelligence in Tutorial Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Gobinder Singh

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to assess the nature of reflective practice and emotional intelligence in tutorial settings. Following the completion of a self-report measure of emotional intelligence, practitioners incorporated a model of reflective practice into their tutorial sessions. Practitioners were instructed to utilise reflective practice…

  10. Eliciting and Assessing Reflective Practice: A Case Study in Web 2.0 Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Kelly A.; Kajder, Sara

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of multimodal technologies in facilitating reflective processes and the subsequent assessment of reflectivity for students in pre-professional programs. Reflective practice has been established as a critical tool for developing identity in and on practice. This paper will focus firstly on reviewing salient literature…

  11. Experiential learning: transforming theory into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Sarah; Teunissen, Pim W; Dornan, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Whilst much is debated about the importance of experiential learning in curriculum development, the concept only becomes effective if it is applied in an appropriate way. We believe that this effectiveness is directly related to a sound understanding of the theory, supporting the learning. The purpose of this article is to introduce readers to the theories underpinning experiential learning, which are then expanded further in an AMEE Guide, which considers the theoretical basis of experiential learning from a social learning, constructionist perspective and applies it to three stages of medical education: early workplace experience, clerkships and residency. This article argues for the importance and relevance of experiential learning and addresses questions that are commonly asked about it. First, we answer the questions 'what is experiential learning?' and 'how does it relate to social learning theory?' to orientate readers to the principles on which our arguments are based. Then, we consider why those ideas (theories) are relevant to educators--ranging from those with responsibilities for curriculum design to 'hands-on' teachers and workplace supervisors. The remainder of this article discusses how experiential learning theories and a socio-cultural perspective can be applied in practice. We hope that this will give readers a taste for our more detailed AMEE Guide and the further reading recommended at the end of it.

  12. IMPLEMENTATION AND SUSTAINABILITY OF CHILD-PARENT PSYCHOTHERAPY: THE ROLE OF REFLECTIVE CONSULTATION IN THE LEARNING COLLABORATIVE MODEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noroña, Carmen Rosa; Acker, Michelle L

    2016-11-01

    Recent implementation science in mental health has focused on identifying the most effective strategies to disseminate and implement evidence-based treatments (EBTs) into real-world practice settings. The learning collaborative training methodology and its use of expert trainers/consultants have become increasingly popular as one of these approaches. Moreover, there is preliminary evidence that ongoing expert consultation may increase the adoption, learning, and sustainability of EBTs by an already practicing workforce and, consequently, help trainers, practitioners, and organizations address implementation barriers. This article describes the authors' experiences in facilitating Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) training and explores the role of reflective clinical consultation as an active process that supports the implementation of a rich, but complex, model that requires sophisticated knowledge and skills from practitioners. It examines the intricate range of the CPP consultant's functions, which ultimately support clinicians' reflective practice as they learn and adopt this EBT. Reflective consultation is proposed as an essential component for the integration of knowledge, experience, and emotions in practitioners and as a catalyst for organizational change. Using their voices as trainers-consultants and those of their trainees, the authors discuss the implications of reflective consultation for the effective implementation and sustainability of CPP. Reflections are offered on lessons learned. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  13. The Use of a Reflective Learning Journal in an Introductory Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Ashley Waggoner

    2018-01-01

    Reflective learning entails a thoughtful learning process through which one not only learns a particular piece of knowledge or skill, but better understands "how" one learned it--knowledge that can then be transferred well beyond the scope of the specific learning experience. This type of thinking empowers learners by making them more…

  14. Development of Interactive and Reflective Learning among Malaysian Online Distant Learners: An ESL Instructor’s Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Puvaneswary Murugaiah; Siew Ming Thang

    2010-01-01

    Technology has brought tremendous advancements in online education, spurring transformations in online pedagogical practices. Online learning in the past was passive, using the traditional teacher-centred approach. However, with the tools available today, it can be active, collaborative, and meaningful. A well-developed task can impel learners to observe, to reflect, to strategize, and to plan their own learning. This paper describes an English as a Second Language (ESL) instructor’s att...

  15. Analysis of Student Service-Learning Reflections for the Assessment of Transferable-Skills Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, D. M.; Dewoolkar, M.; Hayden, N.; Oka, L.; Pearce, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    The civil and environmental engineering (CEE) programs at the University of Vermont (UVM) incorporate systems thinking and a systems approach to sustainable engineering problem solving. A systems approach considers long-term social, environmental and economic factors within the context of the engineering problem solution and encompasses sustainable engineering solutions. Our goal is to prepare students to become leaders in their chosen field who can anticipate co-products associated with forecasted solutions. As a way of practicing the systems approach, we include service-learning projects in many of our undergraduate engineering courses, culminating with the senior capstone design course. We use a variety of formative and summative assessment methods to gage student understanding and attitudes including student surveys, focus groups, assessment of student projects, and student reflections. Student reflections from two courses -Modeling Environmental and Transportation Systems (31 juniors) and Senior Design Project (30 seniors) are compared. Of these, 25 students were common to both courses. The focus of the systems modeling service-learning project involved mentoring home-schooled children (11-14 yrs old) to solve problems of mobility, using the fun and inspiration of biomimicry. Students were required to invent innovative methods to move people or goods that improve associated constraints (i.e., minimize congestion, reduce pollution, increase safety), or reduce the need for transportation altogether. The capstone design project required a comprehensive engineering design involving two or more CEE sub-disciplines. Both service-learning projects were intended to enhance students’ academic learning experience, attain civic engagement and reinforce transferable skills (written and oral communication, teamwork, leadership and mentoring skills). The student course reflections were not guided; yet they provided valuable data to assess commonalities and differences in

  16. Transforming the Capstone: Transformative Learning as a Pedagogical Framework and Vehicle for Ethical Reflection in the Capstone Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jason M.; Strawser, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    This study emphasizes the importance of faculty development and training as a means to prepare faculty to design the capstone course as a high-impact educational practice. Specifically, this research explores transformative learning in the capstone class as a vehicle for reflection on personal and professional ethics. Students enrolled in a…

  17. How a Small Family Run Business Adopted Critical Reflection Action Learning Using Hand Drawn Images to Initiate Organisational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Gary

    2016-01-01

    In this account of practice I would like to share my experiences of facilitating a Critical Reflection Action Learning (CRAL) set with a small family run business, struggling to make change and expand their services due to the problems they encountered in separating their business lives from their family lives. The account I present here is based…

  18. Facial attractiveness judgements reflect learning of parental age characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrett, David I; Penton-Voak, Ian S; Little, Anthony C; Tiddeman, Bernard P; Burt, D Michael; Schmidt, Natalie; Oxley, Roz; Kinloch, Nicholas; Barrett, Louise

    2002-05-07

    Mate preferences are shaped by infant experience of parental characteristics in a wide variety of species. Similar processes in humans may lead to physical similarity between parents and mates, yet this possibility has received little attention. The age of parents is one salient physical characteristic that offspring may attend to. The current study used computer-graphic faces to examine how preferences for age in faces were influenced by parental age. We found that women born to 'old' parents (over 30) were less impressed by youth, and more attracted to age cues in male faces than women with 'young' parents (under 30). For men, preferences for female faces were influenced by their mother's age and not their father's age, but only for long-term relationships. These data indicate that judgements of facial attractiveness in humans reflect the learning of parental characteristics.

  19. Exploring the Principles and Practices of One Teacher of L2 Speaking: The Importance of Reflecting on Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S. C. Farrell

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Teacher principles encompass a teacher’s stated assumptions, beliefs, and conceptions about acquiring and teaching a second language (L2. Due to the complex and diversified nature of how principles take form, an individual teacher’s principles will influence their judgements, perceptions and instructional decisions, thus affecting the outcome of classroom practices. Exploring teacher principles and their impact on classroom practices and vice versa is an invaluable and necessary component to research in L2 teaching and learning since it plays an influential role in instructional outcomes.This paper explores the nature of the principles/practice relationship through an investigative case study with an ESL teacher of L2 speaking. Additionally, the results of research on principles and practices related to L2 teaching when conducted by academics rarely gets back to teachers in the front lines. Thus the researchers shared their findings with the teacher who as a result of reflecting on the analysis came up with a set of principles she says guides her teaching of L2 speaking.

  20. E-learning for medical education: reflections of learners on patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kieran

    2018-01-01

    There is a growing research interest in how healthcare professionals learn online. This paper reports an analysis of reflections that relate to patients from users of an e-learning resource, BMJ Learning. Healthcare professionals who use BMJ Learning are encouraged to reflect on their learning. Over one year, all of the learners' reflections that related to patients were captured by the programme's software and were analysed using thematic analysis. A number of key themes emerged from this analysis: many learners reflected on patients in the context of their disease; many learners reflected on how they had put their learning into action or planned to put their learning into action for the benefit of patients; many learners reflected on how they would pass on what they had learned to patients; learners greatly appreciated patients contributing to the learning. Learners predominantly reflect about patients in the context of their disease. The reflections demonstrate that learners are keen to put their learning into action for the benefit of their patients. Learners' reflections show a keen interest in the patient-centredness of the learning resources.

  1. Journaling: a quasi-experimental study of student nurses' reflective learning ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakude, L P; Bruce, J C

    2003-08-01

    The use of journaling or journal writing in clinical education is one of the strategies used to develop critical thinking. Reflective journal writing, as it is commonly known, can nurture many qualities of a critical thinker and promote thoughtful nursing practice. Using a quasi-experimental design in this study, reflective journaling was introduced to a sample of first year Bridging Course student nurses at a Private Nursing Education Institution, to assess its effectiveness in reflective learning. The study design enabled comparisons between two groups: one group of students assigned to do journaling (experimental group) and another group of students (control group) who did not journal. The students in the experimental group were given a period of eight weeks to journal their clinical experiences. At the end of this period, both groups were given an exercise, based on a clinical situation, to analyse reflectively and a comparison made on their performance. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse data and Fisher's Exact Test was used to determine the significance of differences observed within and between groups. The results showed that students in the experimental group performed better in exploring alternatives of action (p < 0.10) and formulating responses in similar future situations (p < 0.05) during the process of reflection. There was no significant difference between the groups' scores with regard to their ability to describe the clinical experience, to explore their related feelings, to evaluate the experience and to interpret/create meaning for themselves. Recommendations are made for continued student support and guidance during clinical education if reflection is considered to enhance reflective, thoughtful nursing practice.

  2. A Reflective Journey through Theory and Research in Mathematical Learning and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belbase, Shashidhar

    2010-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to reflect on class sessions during the fall 2010 in a course "Theory and Research in Mathematical Learning and Development". This reflection as a learning journey portrays discussions based on foundational perspectives (FP), historical highlights (HH), and guiding questions (GQ) related to mathematics learning and…

  3. The Effects of Reflective Activities on Skill Adaptation in a Work-Related Instrumental Learning Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessger, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    In work-related instrumental learning contexts, the role of reflective activities is unclear. Kolb's experiential learning theory and Mezirow's transformative learning theory predict skill adaptation as an outcome. This prediction was tested by manipulating reflective activities and assessing participants' response and error rates during novel…

  4. Learning by Thinking during Play: The Power of Reflection to Aid Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Angela K.

    2016-01-01

    Coupled with reflection, play leads to the development of thinking dispositions and promotes deep learning and understanding. The twenty-first century world demands that children learn how to learn by becoming reflective, self-regulating inquirers capable of metacognition (thinking about thinking). This manuscript aims to analyse how young minds…

  5. Transformative Learning as an "Inter-Practice" Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Transformative learning theory and practice-based theory both offer compelling but distinct accounts of adult learning. The vicissitudes of individual meaning-making is the focus of transformative learning theory whereas practice-based accounts view participation in social practices as the key to understanding learning. Despite their differing…

  6. Assessing High Impact Practices Using NVivo: An Automated Approach to Analyzing Student Reflections for Program Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaney, Jennifer; Filer, Kimberly; Lyon, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Critical reflection allows students to synthesize their learning and deepen their understanding of an experience (Ash & Clayton, 2009). A recommended reflection method is for students to write essays about their experiences. However, on a large scale, such reflection essays become difficult to analyze in a meaningful way. At Roanoke College,…

  7. Collaborative Learning. Research to Practice Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    A Fully Integrated Educational System practices collaborative learning among all peers. The study summarized in this report (Zhang, X., Anderson, R. C., Morris, J., Miller, B., Nguyen-Janiel, K. T., Lin, T., Zhang, J., Jadallah, M., Scott, T., Sun, J., Latawjec, B., Ma, S., Grabow, K., & Hsu, J. Y. (2016). "Improving children's competence…

  8. Policies on and Practices of Cultural Inclusivity in Learning Management Systems: Perspectives of Indigenous Holistic Pedagogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreamson, Neal; Thomas, Gary; Lee Hong, Anita; Kim, Soyoung

    2017-01-01

    Online learning has become a conventional term and practice in Australian higher education, yet cultural inclusivity for Indigenous (Indigenous for the purposes of this paper refers to Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples) students is insufficiently reflected in learning management system (LMS) policies and design. This study…

  9. Inquiry into Teaching: Using Reflective Teaching to Improve My Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    How effective is reflective teaching in increasing the engagement and achievement of pre-service teachers when utilized by a first-year college instructor? This article documents a practitioner inquiry project in which I reflected both on my own observations and student feedback regarding what teaching methods were most beneficial in an…

  10. Tracing the Reflective Practices of Student Teachers in Online Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Fiona; Riordan, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    During the course of pre-and in-service teacher education programmes, reflection can happen in a number of ways, for example: reflective journals, personal stories and pair/group co-operative discussions, professional development portfolios, and blogs and electronic portfolios. The aim of this paper is to examine various technologies such as…

  11. Fostering Self-Reflection and Meaningful Learning: Earth Science Professional Development for Middle School Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monet, Julie A.; Etkina, Eugenia

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes the analysis of teachers’ journal reflections during an inquiry-based professional development program. As a part of their learning experience, participants reflected on what they learned and how they learned. Progress of subject matter and pedagogical content knowledge was assessed though surveys and pre- and posttests. We found that teachers have difficulties reflecting on their learning and posing meaningful questions. The teachers who could describe how they reasoned from evidence to understand a concept had the highest learning gains. In contrast those teachers who seldom or never described learning a concept by reasoning from evidence showed the smallest learning gains. This analysis suggests that learning to reflect on one’s learning should be an integral part of teachers’ professional development experiences.

  12. Applying adult learning practices in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Suzanne; Shell, Richard; Kassis, Karyn; Tartaglia, Kimberly; Wallihan, Rebecca; Smith, Keely; Hurtubise, Larry; Martin, Bryan; Ledford, Cynthia; Bradbury, Scott; Bernstein, Henry Hank; Mahan, John D

    2014-07-01

    The application of the best practices of teaching adults to the education of adults in medical education settings is important in the process of transforming learners to become and remain effective physicians. Medical education at all levels should be designed to equip physicians with the knowledge, clinical skills, and professionalism that are required to deliver quality patient care. The ultimate outcome is the health of the patient and the health status of the society. In the translational science of medical education, improved patient outcomes linked directly to educational events are the ultimate goal and are best defined by rigorous medical education research efforts. To best develop faculty, the same principles of adult education and teaching adults apply. In a systematic review of faculty development initiatives designed to improve teaching effectiveness in medical education, the use of experiential learning, feedback, effective relationships with peers, and diverse educational methods were found to be most important in the success of these programs. In this article, we present 5 examples of applying the best practices in teaching adults and utilizing the emerging understanding of the neurobiology of learning in teaching students, trainees, and practitioners. These include (1) use of standardized patients to develop communication skills, (2) use of online quizzes to assess knowledge and aid self-directed learning, (3) use of practice sessions and video clips to enhance significant learning of teaching skills, (4) use of case-based discussions to develop professionalism concepts and skills, and (5) use of the American Academy of Pediatrics PediaLink as a model for individualized learner-directed online learning. These examples highlight how experiential leaning, providing valuable feedback, opportunities for practice, and stimulation of self-directed learning can be utilized as medical education continues its dynamic transformation in the years ahead

  13. Nurses' perceptions of the impact of Team-Based Learning participation on learning style, team behaviours and clinical performance: An exploration of written reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldland, Elizabeth; Currey, Judy; Considine, Julie; Allen, Josh

    2017-05-01

    Team-Based Learning (TBL) is a teaching strategy designed to promote problem solving, critical thinking and effective teamwork and communication skills; attributes essential for safe healthcare. The aim was to explore postgraduate student perceptions of the role of TBL in shaping learning style, team skills, and professional and clinical behaviours. An exploratory descriptive approach was selected. Critical care students were invited to provide consent for the use for research purposes of written reflections submitted for course work requirements. Reflections of whether and how TBL influenced their learning style, teamwork skills and professional behaviours during classroom learning and clinical practice were analysed for content and themes. Of 174 students, 159 participated. Analysis revealed three themes: Deep Learning, the adaptations students made to their learning that resulted in mastery of specialist knowledge; Confidence, in knowledge, problem solving and rationales for practice decisions; and Professional and Clinical Behaviours, including positive changes in their interactions with colleagues and patients described as patient advocacy, multidisciplinary communication skills and peer mentorship. TBL facilitated a virtuous cycle of feedback encouraging deep learning that increased confidence. Increased confidence improved deep learning that, in turn, led to the development of professional and clinical behaviours characteristic of high quality practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Transforming practice organizations to foster lifelong learning and commitment to medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankford, D M; Patterson, M A; Konrad, T R

    2000-07-01

    Practice organizations will increasingly engage in activities that are the functional equivalents of continuing medical education. The authors maintain that if these activities are properly structured within practice organizations, they can become powerful engines of socialization to enhance physicians' lifelong learning and commitment to medical professionalism. They propose that this promise can be realized if new or reformed practice organizations combine education and service delivery and institutionalize processes of individual and collective reflection. The resulting "institutions of reflective practice" would be ones of collegial, experiential, reflective lifelong learning concerning the technical and normative aspects of medical work. They would extend recent methods of medical education such as problem-based learning into the practice setting and draw on extant methods used in complex organizations to maximize the advantages and minimize the disadvantages that practice organizations typically present for adult learning. As such, these institutions would balance the potentially conflicting organizational needs for, on the one hand, (1) self-direction, risk taking, and creativity; (2) specialization; and (3) collegiality; and, on the other hand, (4) organizational structure, (5) coordination of division of labor, and (6) hierarchy. Overall, this institutionalization of reflective practice would enrich practice with education and education with practice, and accomplish the ideals of what the authors call "responsive medical professionalism." The medical profession would both contribute and be responsive to social values, and medical work would be valued intrinsically and as central to practitioners' self-identity and as a contribution to the public good.

  15. [Pedagogical reflective practice of nursing undergraduates: the portfolio as an instrument].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Débora Rodrigues; Prado, Cláudia

    2014-12-01

    Analyzing the narratives related to the pedagogical practice experienced during the Supervised Curricular Internship reported in the portfolios of Nursing undergraduate students, regarding the levels of reflection. This is a documentary descriptive exploratory study that examined two of the activities proposed for the portfolio preparation. Among the 28 analyzed portfolios, all showed the three levels of reflection (technical, critical and metacritical). The students had the opportunity to experience the pedagogical practice and presented reflections at metacritical level, reflecting on their performance, the construction of their teaching identity, and about the importance of reflecting on the practice with the objective of transforming it and transforming themselves.

  16. Self-assessment, reflection on practice and critical thinking in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles-González, José; Solano-Ruiz, Carmen

    2016-10-01

    In accordance with the principles of the European Higher Education Area, the aim of this study was to contribute to the implementation of self-assessment through the application of reflection on learning and critical thinking. The theoretical framework employed was Habermas's critical theory and emancipatory interest as a preliminary step to generate educational transformations. The methodological contribution is the design a student self-assessment document that promotes reflection on action and critical thinking. The development of assessment through peer evaluation and other intermediate solutions until achieving self-assessment entails a shift in the educational and scientific paradigm, but also involves the implementation in practice of democratic and ethical principles, values and premises in society. Self-assessment is a novel concept for students, and obliges them to reinterpret their role. Due to the diversity of students' principles, values, motivations, interests and aspirations, this reinterpretation of their role can have a positive outcome, stimulating an active and critical attitude towards group work and self-assessment; or, on the contrary, can generate a stance characterised by disinterest, passivity and lack of critical thinking. The forms of assessment adopted in a given educational system reflect ways of thinking related to ideologies, values, ethical principles and educational paradigms: in order to render implementation of effective self-assessment feasible, it is necessary to undertake structural and regulatory reforms. Students have little experience of reflection on practice or critical thinking. Massification and cultural and structural factors determine the form of assessment. In this context, it would seem advisable to move towards self-assessment gradually and cautiously. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Organisational Learning: Theoretical Shortcomings and Practical Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Aarum Andersen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses two problems related to learning and the use of knowledge at work. The first problem is the theoretical shortcomings stemming from the controversy between three different concepts of ‘organisational learning.’ In order to enhance scholarship in this field the notion that organisations - as organisations - can learn need to be rejected for theoretical and empirical reasons. The metaphorical use of ‘organisational learning’ creates only confusion. Learning is a process and knowledge is the outcome of that process. It is argued that learning and knowledge is only related to individuals. Knowledge is thus the individual capability to draw distinctions, within a domain of action, based on an appreciation of context or theory. Consequently, knowledge becomes organisational when it is created, developed and transmitted to other individuals in the organisation. In a strict sense knowledge becomes organisational when employees use it and act based on generalisations due to the rules and procedures found in their organisation. The gravest problem is practical challenges due to the fact that the emphasis on learning, knowledge and competence of the working force do not materialize in the application of the knowledge acquired. It is evident that employees do not use their increased knowledge. However, we do not know why they do not use it. An enormous waste of money is spent on learning and knowledge in organisations which does not yield what is expected. How can managers act in order to enhance the application of increased knowledge possessed by the workforce?

  18. e-Portfolio as reflection tool during teaching practice: The interplay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strydom, SC, Dr

    2017-02-01

    Feb 1, 2017 ... skills, and, to a lesser degree, to the memorisation of content, which suggests that ... reflective practice and develop their own personal theories, to utilise such practices as .... experiences in terms of employability and work-.

  19. The Impact of OER on Teaching and Learning Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Weller

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The OER Research Hub has been investigating the impact of OER, using eleven hypotheses, and a mixed methods approach to establish an evidence base. This paper explores the findings relating to teaching and learning. The findings reveal a set of direct impacts, including an increase in factors relating to student performance, increased reflection on the part of educators, and the use of OER to trial and supplement formal study. There are also indirect impacts, whose benefits will be seen after several iterations. These include the wide scale reporting of adaptation, and the increase in sharing and open practice that results from OER usage.

  20. Practice Stories in Natural Resource Management Continuing Professional Education: Springboards for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stummann, Cathy Brown

    2014-01-01

    The use of stories from professional experience in continuing professional education has been on the rise in many fields, often aimed at bolstering capacity through sharing professional knowledge and/or supporting reflective practice. Practice stories are also suggested to be beneficial in supporting professional learning of new concepts. These…

  1. Constructivism Based Learning: Design and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Kurniawati

    2016-06-01

    Inkuiri dan Pembelajaran Tematik, juga bagaimana pengembangan proses pembelajaran dari rencana pembelajaran ke pelaksanaan pembelajaran menunjukkan perubahan paradigma dari berpusat-pada-guru menjadi berpusat-pada-siswa. How to Cite : Kurniawati, L. Muin, A. Miftah, R., M. (2015. Constructivism Based Learning: Design and Practice. TARBIYA: Journal Of Education In Muslim Society, 2(2, 123-130. doi:10.15408/tjems.v2i2. 3183. Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15408/tjems.v2i2.3183

  2. Reflecting on the learning opportunities of presenting at a conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua, Beverly

    2017-03-22

    Background Research productivity is a major indicator of higher educational institutions' (HEI) academic performance. The increasing focus on research productivity is resulting in an expectation that academics publish their research initiatives, ideas and developments in their scope of work or area of interest. It can influence academic status and compel nursing academics to undertake higher degrees, including PhDs or other doctoral studies. Aim To articulate a nurse academic's reflection on presenting her doctoral thesis at an international conference and to encourage students to embrace the dissemination of research. Discussion In HEIs, academic work and research compete with each other. For the academic who is also a doctoral student, attending research conferences for knowledge and dissemination can be challenging and emotionally labouring. Conclusion It is important that doctoral students from the nursing professions engage in research dissemination at local and international level. This can improve their confidence, appreciation of research in terms of methodologies, findings, interventions and presenting styles. It can also help to develop confidence in articulating their own research epistemology and ontology while networking. Implications for practice Attendance at conferences contributes to the development of the doctoral student's confidence, knowledge, research capability, ability to identify good research practice and to engage in peer review.

  3. Lessons offered, lessons learned: reflections on how doing family therapy can affect therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heatherington, Laurie; Friedlander, Myrna L; Diamond, Gary M

    2014-08-01

    Only in working conjointly with couples and families do therapists literally witness clients struggling to improve their most intimate relationships. In writing this article, we realized that, in true systemic fashion, not only have many of our clients benefited from working with us, but also we have learned some invaluable lessons from them. Indeed, practicing couple and family therapy gives therapists many opportunities to learn about themselves, especially when it is done thoughtfully. In this article, we reflect on myriad ways in which couples and family therapy has affected each of us personally-as individuals, as partners, as parents, as adult children in our families of origin, and as educators. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. How do medical specialists value their own intercultural communication behaviour? A reflective practice study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternotte, E; Scheele, F; van Rossum, T R; Seeleman, M C; Scherpbier, A J J A; van Dulmen, A M

    2016-08-24

    practicing generic communication is more important than applying specific intercultural communication. They mentioned well-known critical incidences of ICC: language barriers, cultural differences, the presence of an interpreter, the role of the family and the atmosphere. Nevertheless, they showed a remarkably enthusiastic attitude overall was noteworthy. A strategy to make doctors more aware of their intercultural communication behaviour could be a combination of experiential learning and ICC training, for example a module with reflective practice.

  5. How do we help students as newcomers to create and develop better communities of practice for learning in a Project based learning environment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter

    2007-01-01

    The question for debate in this paper, is how to help students creating and developing good communities of practice for learning in a Project based learning environment? At Aalborg University it has proven very helpful for students to have both a course addressing communication, collaboration......, learning and project management (CLP) and a reflection on these issues in a written process analysis....

  6. Practicing health promotion in primary care -a reflective enquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, S; Chauhan, A S; Mahapatra, S; Sinha, R; Pati, S

    2017-12-01

    Health promotion is an integral part of routine clinical practice. The physicians' role in improving the health status of the general population, through effective understanding and delivery of health promotion practice, is evident throughout the international literature. Data from India suggest that physicians have limited skills in delivering specific health promotion services. However, the data available on this is scarce. This study was planned to document the current health promotion knowledge, perception and practices of local primary care physicians in Odisha. An exploratory study was planned between the months of January - February 2013 in Odisha among primary care physicians working in government set up. This exploratory study was conducted, using a two-step self-administered questionnaire, thirty physicians practicing under government health system were asked to map their ideal and current health promotion practice, and potential health promotion elements to be worked upon to enhance the practice. The study recorded a significant difference between the mean of current and ideal health promotion practices. The study reported that physicians want to increase their practice on health education. We concluded that inclusion of health promotion practices in routine care is imperative for a strong healthcare system. It should be incorporated as a structured health promotion module in medical curriculum as well.

  7. Effects of reviewing routine practices on learning outcomes in continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamede, Silvia; Loyens, Sofie; Ezequiel, Oscarina; Tibiriçá, Sandra; Penaforte, Júlio; Schmidt, Henk

    2013-07-01

    Conventional continuing medical education (CME) has been shown to have modest effects on doctor performance. New educational approaches based on the review of routine practices have brought better results. Little is known about factors that affect the outcomes of these approaches, especially in middle-income countries. This study aimed to investigate factors that influence the learning and quality of clinical performance in CME based on reflection upon experiences. A questionnaire and a clinical performance test were administered to 165 general practitioners engaged in a CME programme in Brazil. The questionnaire assessed behaviours related to four input variables (individual reflection on practices, peer review of experiences, self-regulated learning and learning skills) and two mediating variables (identification of learning needs and engagement in learning activities, the latter consisting of self-study of scientific literature, consultations about patient problems, and attendance at courses). Structural equation modelling was used to test a hypothesised model of relationships between these variables and the outcome variable of clinical performance, measured by the clinical performance test. After minor adjustments, the hypothesised model fit the empirical data well. Individual reflection fostered identification of learning needs, but also directly positively influenced the quality of clinical performance. Peer review did not affect identification of learning needs, but directly positively affected clinical performance. Learning skills and self-regulation did not help in identifying learning needs, but self-regulation enhanced study of the scientific literature, the learning activity that most positively influenced clinical performance. Consultation with colleagues, the activity most frequently triggered by the identification of learning needs, did not affect performance, and attendance of courses had only limited effect. This study shed light on the factors

  8. Measuring solar reflectance - Part II: Review of practical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul [Heat Island Group, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    A companion article explored how solar reflectance varies with surface orientation and solar position, and found that clear sky air mass 1 global horizontal (AM1GH) solar reflectance is a preferred quantity for estimating solar heat gain. In this study we show that AM1GH solar reflectance R{sub g,0} can be accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer, or an updated edition of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer (version 6). Of primary concern are errors that result from variations in the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight. Neglecting shadow, background and instrument errors, the conventional pyranometer technique can measure R{sub g,0} to within 0.01 for surface slopes up to 5:12 [23 ], and to within 0.02 for surface slopes up to 12:12 [45 ]. An alternative pyranometer method minimizes shadow errors and can be used to measure R{sub g,0} of a surface as small as 1 m in diameter. The accuracy with which it can measure R{sub g,0} is otherwise comparable to that of the conventional pyranometer technique. A solar spectrophotometer can be used to determine R{sub g,0}{sup *}, a solar reflectance computed by averaging solar spectral reflectance weighted with AM1GH solar spectral irradiance. Neglecting instrument errors, R{sub g,0}{sup *} matches R{sub g,0} to within 0.006. The air mass 1.5 solar reflectance measured with version 5 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer can differ from R{sub g,0}{sup *} by as much as 0.08, but the AM1GH output of version 6 of this instrument matches R{sub g,0}{sup *} to within about 0.01. (author)

  9. Reflection in the training of nurses in clinical practice settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumann Scheel, Linda; Peters, Micah D J; Meinertz Møbjerg, Anna Christine

    2017-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: This scoping review will seek to find answers for the following questions which will focus on the use of reflection in the education of nurses in clinical settings:The review will also extract and map data regarding: i) what outcomes have been found in relation to the use...... (e.g. first or second year undergraduate nursing students etc.); and v) barriers/challenges to the use of reflection approaches/tools. Additional details may also be extracted and mapped during the process of the scoping review and this will be explained in the final scoping review report....

  10. If These Walls Could Talk: Reflective Practice in Addiction Studies among Undergraduates in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study examined reflective practice among a class of students studying a "communities and addictions" course as part of the undergraduate health science degree. Most reflective practice publications are focused on medical or teachers' training rather than undergraduates in general. This is surprising given that reflective…

  11. Poster - 27: Incident Learning Practices in Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angers, Crystal; Medlam, Gaylene; Liszewski, Brian; Simniceanu, Carina [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Mississauga Halton/Central West Regional Cancer Center, Odette Cancer Centre, Cancer Care Ontario (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: The Radiation Incident and Safety Committee (RISC), established and supported by Cancer Care Ontario (CCO), is responsible for advising the Provincial Head of the Radiation Treatment program on matters relating to provincial reporting of radiation incidents with the goal of improved risk mitigation. Methods: The committee is made up of Radiation Incident Leads (RILs) with representation from each of the 14 radiation medicine programs in the province. RISC routinely meets to review recent critical incidents and to discuss provincial reporting processes and future directions of the committee. Regular face to face meetings have provided an excellent venue for sharing incident learning practices. A summary of the incident learning practices across Ontario has been compiled. Results: Almost all programs in Ontario employ an incident learning committee to review incidents and identify corrective actions or process improvements. Tools used for incident reporting include: paper based reporting, a number of different commercial products and software solutions developed in-house. A wide range of classification schema (data taxonomies) are employed, although most have been influenced by national guidance documents. The majority of clinics perform root cause analyses but utilized methodologies vary significantly. Conclusions: Most programs in Ontario employ a committee approach to incident learning. However, the reporting tools and taxonomies in use vary greatly which represents a significant challenge to provincial reporting. RISC is preparing to adopt the National System for Incident Reporting – Radiation Therapy (NSIR-RT) which will standardize incident reporting and facilitate data analyses aimed at identifying targeted improvement initiatives.

  12. Poster - 27: Incident Learning Practices in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angers, Crystal; Medlam, Gaylene; Liszewski, Brian; Simniceanu, Carina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The Radiation Incident and Safety Committee (RISC), established and supported by Cancer Care Ontario (CCO), is responsible for advising the Provincial Head of the Radiation Treatment program on matters relating to provincial reporting of radiation incidents with the goal of improved risk mitigation. Methods: The committee is made up of Radiation Incident Leads (RILs) with representation from each of the 14 radiation medicine programs in the province. RISC routinely meets to review recent critical incidents and to discuss provincial reporting processes and future directions of the committee. Regular face to face meetings have provided an excellent venue for sharing incident learning practices. A summary of the incident learning practices across Ontario has been compiled. Results: Almost all programs in Ontario employ an incident learning committee to review incidents and identify corrective actions or process improvements. Tools used for incident reporting include: paper based reporting, a number of different commercial products and software solutions developed in-house. A wide range of classification schema (data taxonomies) are employed, although most have been influenced by national guidance documents. The majority of clinics perform root cause analyses but utilized methodologies vary significantly. Conclusions: Most programs in Ontario employ a committee approach to incident learning. However, the reporting tools and taxonomies in use vary greatly which represents a significant challenge to provincial reporting. RISC is preparing to adopt the National System for Incident Reporting – Radiation Therapy (NSIR-RT) which will standardize incident reporting and facilitate data analyses aimed at identifying targeted improvement initiatives.

  13. Examining Transcription, Autonomy and Reflective Practice in Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study explores language development among a class of L2 students who were required to transcribe and reflect upon spoken performances. The class was given tasks for self and peer-evaluation and afforded the opportunity to assume more responsibility for assessing language development of both themselves and their peers. Several studies…

  14. Video Journaling as a Method of Reflective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sejal B.; Janson, Christopher; Singleton, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine seven school counseling students' experiences of creating reflective video journals during their first internship course. Specifically, this study focused on capturing the essence of the experiences related to personal reactions, feelings, and thoughts about creating two video journal…

  15. Methodological Reflections: Designing and Understanding Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamalainen, Raija

    2012-01-01

    Learning involves more than just a small group of participants, which makes designing and managing collaborative learning processes in higher education a challenging task. As a result, emerging concerns in current research have pointed increasingly to teacher orchestrated learning processes in naturalistic learning settings. In line with this…

  16. Reflections from Graduate Adult Learners about Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Geleana Drew; Clegg, T. E.; Clodfelter, Roy J., Jr.; Drye, Kimberly C.; Farrer, J. V.; Gould, Derek; Mohsin, Nidhal M.; Rankin, Tomiko N.; Ray, Sherri L.

    2016-01-01

    Adult education is grounded in responding to the needs of others, and the field places emphasis on adult learning theories such as transformative learning and experiential learning. Service learning is an educational approach that balances formal instruction and direction with the opportunity for adult learners to serve in the community as a…

  17. Economics of Distance and Online Learning Theory, Practice and Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    reviewed by TOJDE

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Economics of Distance and Online LearningTheory, Practice and ResearchBy William Bramble & Santosh PandaPrice: $125.00ISBN: 978-0-415-96388-6, Binding: Hardback, Publishedby: Routledge, New York, Publication Date: March 2008, Pages: 312TOJDEABOUT THE BOOKThis book provides a comprehensive overview of theorganizational models of distance and online learning froman international perspective and from the point of view ofeconomic planning, costing and management decisionmaking.The book points to directions for the further research anddevelopment in this area, and will promote furtherunderstanding and critical reflection on the part ofadministrators, practitioners and researchers of distanceeducation.The experiences and perspectives in distance education inthe US are balanced with those in other areas of the world.Table of ContentsPrefaceSECTION ONE: INTRODUCTIONChapter 1: Organizational and Cost Structures for Distanceand Online Learning, William J. Bramble and Santosh PandaSECTION TWO: PLANNING AND MANAGEMENTChapter 2: Changing Distance Education andChanging Organizational Issues, D. Randy Garrison and Heather KanukaChapter 3: Online Learning and the University, Chris Curran217Chapter 4: Virtual Schooling and Basic Education, Thomas ClarkChapter 5: Historical Perspectives on Distance Education in the United States, Paul J.Edelson and Von PittmanSECTION THREE: FUNDINGChapter 6: Funding of Distance and Online Learning in the United States, Mark J. Smithand William J. BrambleChapter 7: Funding Distance Education: A Regional Perspective, Santosh Panda andAshok GabaSECTION FOUR: COST STRUCTURES AND MODELSChapter 8: Costs and Quality of Online Learning, Alistair InglisChapter 9: Costing Virtual University Education, Insung JungChapter 10: Cost-Benefit of Student Retention Policies and Practices, Ormond SimpsonSECTION FIVE: DISTANCE TRAININGChapter 11: Cost Benefit of Online Learning, Zane Berge and Charlotte DonaldsonChapter 12: Transforming Workplace

  18. Contextualizing learning to improve care using collaborative communities of practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffs, Lianne; McShane, Julie; Flintoft, Virginia; White, Peggy; Indar, Alyssa; Maione, Maria; Lopez, A J; Bookey-Bassett, Sue; Scavuzzo, Lauren

    2016-09-02

    The use of interorganizational, collaborative approaches to build capacity in quality improvement (QI) in health care is showing promise as a useful model for scaling up and accelerating the implementation of interventions that bridge the "know-do" gap to improve clinical care and provider outcomes. Fundamental to a collaborative approach is interorganizational learning whereby organizations acquire, share, and combine knowledge with other organizations and have the opportunity to learn from their respective successes and challenges in improvement areas. This learning approach aims to create the conditions for collaborative, reflective, and innovative experiential systems that enable collective discussions regarding daily practice issues and finding solutions for improvement. The concepts associated with interorganizational learning and deliberate learning activities within a collaborative 'Communities-of-practice'(CoP) approach formed the foundation of the of an interactive QI knowledge translation initiative entitled PERFORM KT. Nine teams participated including seven teams from two acute care hospitals, one from a long term care center, and one from a mental health sciences center. Six monthly CoP learning sessions were held and teams, with the support of an assigned mentor, implemented a QI project and monitored their results which were presented at an end of project symposium. 47 individuals participated in either a focus group or a personal interview. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using an iterative content analysis. Four key themes emerged from the narrative dataset around experiences and perceptions associated with the PERFORM KT initiative: 1) being successful and taking it to other levels by being systematic, structured, and mentored; 2) taking it outside the comfort zone by being exposed to new concepts and learning together; 3) hearing feedback, exchanging stories, and getting new ideas; and 4) having a pragmatic and accommodating approach to

  19. Learning to learn self-regulation in practice: a 2 cohort evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharples, Kath; Moseley, Laurence G

    2011-11-01

    The transfer of nurse training into higher education following 'Project 2000' dramatically changed the status of student nurses. While the majority received a grant or bursary, students were no longer regarded as belonging to the hospital staffing complement. Elcock et al. (2007), argue that the intended advantage of supernumerary status following the move of nurse education into higher education has not been reflected in the student learning experience. Students have reported difficulties in being accepted into the community of practice, as they are no longer viewed as belonging in the professional sense to the practice environment (Cope et al., 2000). Students must therefore be prepared for their supernumerary role through the development of appropriate skills for learning in practice (Elcock et al., 2007). The Thames Valley University pre-registration nursing curriculum promotes the effective socialisation of students into the professional role (Fitzpatrick et al., 1996) through a 35-day practice orientation programme in the Common Foundation Programme. The results of a 2 cohort evaluation of a 35-day programme facilitated in the Brent and Harrow learning community indicate that novice pre-registration students will not always possess the self-directed ability to spontaneously engage with nursing care in practice. Students must be provided the opportunity to develop the skills that define the self-regulated learner (Langendyk, 2006). Students must be empowered to self-assess what they know and what they do not know. It is argued that in order to learn during practice experiences, the student nurse of today must first learn how to be self-regulated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Reflections on Clinical Learning in Novice Speech-Language Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anne E.; Davidson, Bronwyn J.; Theodoros, Deborah G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reflective practice is reported to enhance clinical reasoning and therefore to maximize client outcomes. The inclusion of targeted reflective practice in academic programmes in speech-language therapy has not been consistent, although providing opportunities for speech-language therapy students to reflect during their clinical practice…

  1. Service-Learning in Undergraduate Nursing Education: Where is the Reflection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Janet M; Schmidt, Nola A

    2016-01-01

    Service-Learning is recognized as a valuable pedagogy that involves experiential learning, reflection, and reciprocal learning. Reflection is a critical component because it assists students to develop critical thinking and social awareness as they reflect upon their experiential learning with community partners. Although there is a proliferation of literature about service-learning, upon closer examination, it is apparent that some authors do not place emphasis on reflection when reporting on service-learning projects. This begs the question, "Where is the reflection?" The purpose of this article is to provide an overview and describe misrepresentations and exemplars of service-learning. After providing an overview of service-learning, examples of how service-learning is misrepresented in the literature are discussed. Exemplars of service-learning are also cited. Calling attention to how service-learning is reported in the literature will increase awareness about the need to critically evaluate articles for evidence of reflection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Learning pathways during clinical placement of physiotherapy students: a Malaysian experience of using learning contracts and reflective diaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayiesah Ramli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Learning contracts and reflective diaries are educational tools that have been recently introduced to physiotherapy students from Malaysia during clinical education. It is unclear how students perceive the experience of using a learning contract and reflective diary. This study explores the learning pathways of the students after using a learning contract and a reflective diary for the first time in their clinical placement. Methods: A total of 26 final-year physiotherapy students completed a learning contract and a reflective diary during clinical placements. Two researchers explored the data qualitatively by the thematic content analysis method using NVivo. Results: A total of four and six main learning themes were identified from the data of the students through a learning contract and reflective diary. Conclusion: These learning themes reflected the views of the students about what they have considered to be important learning pathways during their clinical placements. They give valuable insights into the experiences and opinions of students during their clinical education process, which should be useful for enhancing teaching and learning methods in physiotherapy education.

  3. Using photography to enhance GP trainees' reflective practice and professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford; Forde, Emer; Priego-Hernandez, Jacqueline; Butcher, Aurelia; Wedderburn, Clare

    2018-02-08

    The capacity and the commitment to reflect are integral to the practice of medicine and are core components of most general practitioners (GP) training programmes. Teaching through the humanities is a growing area within medical education, but one which is often considered a voluntary 'add-on' for the interested doctor. This article describes an evaluation of a highly innovative pedagogical project which used photography as a means to enhance GP trainees' reflective capacity, self-awareness and professional development. Photography was used as a tool to develop GP trainees' skills in recognising and articulating the attitudes, feelings and values that might impact on their clinical work and to enhance their confidence in their ability to deal with these concerns/issues. We submit that photography is uniquely well suited for facilitating insight and self-reflection because it provides the ability to record 'at the touch of a button' those scenes and images to which our attention is intuitively drawn without the need for-or the interference of-conscious decisions. This allows us the opportunity to reflect later on the reasons for our intuitive attraction to these scenes. These photography workshops were a compulsory part of the GP training programme and, despite the participants' traditional scientific backgrounds, the results clearly demonstrate the willingness of participants to accept-even embrace-the use of art as a tool for learning. The GP trainees who took part in this project acknowledged it to be beneficial for both their personal and professional development. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Reflective Practice and Competencies in Global Health Training: Lesson for Serving Diverse Patient Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jonathan; Goldenhar, Linda M.; Baker, Raymond C.; Kahn, Robert S.; DeWitt, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Resident interest in global health care training is growing and has been shown to have a positive effect on participants' clinical skills and cultural competency. In addition, it is associated with career choices in primary care, public health, and in the service of underserved populations. The purpose of this study was to explore, through reflective practice, how participation in a formal global health training program influences pediatric residents' perspectives when caring for diverse patient populations. Methods Thirteen pediatric and combined-program residents enrolled in a year-long Global Health Scholars Program at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center during the 2007–2008 academic year. Educational interventions included a written curriculum, a lecture series, one-on-one mentoring sessions, an experience abroad, and reflective journaling assignments. The American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene global health competencies were used as an a priori coding framework to qualitatively analyze the reflective journal entries of the residents. Results Four themes emerged from the coded journal passages from all 13 residents: (1) the burden of global disease, as a heightened awareness of the diseases that affect humans worldwide; (2) immigrant/underserved health, reflected in a desire to apply lessons learned abroad at home to provide more culturally effective care to immigrant patients in the United States; (3) parenting, or observed parental, longing to assure that their children receive health care; and (4) humanitarianism, expressed as the desire to volunteer in future humanitarian health efforts in the United States and abroad. Conclusions Our findings suggest that participating in a global health training program helped residents begin to acquire competence in the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene competency domains. Such training also may strengthen residents' acquisition of professional skills, including the

  5. Chasing "Ubuntu": Using ICTs to Promote Reflective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Todd; Wilder, Hilary

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To describe an exploratory study in which an online learning system was used to provide an intercultural experience for pre-service education students from New Jersey and Namibia. Design/methodology/approach: Pre-service education students from New Jersey and Namibia were enrolled in an online course in the fall of 2004. The following…

  6. Developing Psychological Literacy: Is There a Role for Reflective Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Debra; Homewood, Judi

    2016-01-01

    Psychological literacy is an umbrella term that is widely used to describe the attributes or capabilities of psychology graduate (Cranney & Dunn 2011). This article explores some of the complexities inherent in the learning and teaching of psychological literacy by exploring challenges to the development of self-awareness and cultural…

  7. Professionalism in anaesthesiology practice: ethical reflection on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patient relations, improving quality of and access to care, ... and are possibly artificial, and that they influence and .... the recognition of need in our fellow human beings, having the .... wisdom (practical intelligence or phronesis in Aristotle's.

  8. The usefulness of a tool to assess reflection in a service-learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The students have to reflect in a structured manner on the service-learning experience to understand and appreciate not only the module and discipline, but also their sense of personal value and social responsibility. By providing structured opportunities for reflection, deeper learning can be facilitated, which enhances ...

  9. Reflective Learning in a Chinese MBA Programme: Scale Assessment and Future Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qian; Zhu, Pinghui; Hsu, Maxwell K.; Zhuang, Weiling; Peltier, James

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to use Chinese MBA students to validate the expanded reflective learning continuum and address the concerns raised in this regard in business education; (2) to determine whether the continuum concept holds true in a non-western culture and whether the reflective learning continuum remains a powerful force…

  10. Recognizing Our Cultural Biases as Counsellor Supervisors: A Reflective Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinson, Jesse A.

    2004-01-01

    This article encourages supervisors, in general, and counsellor supervisors, in particular, to engage in reflective learning as a way to identify their cultural biases. Awareness of counsellor bias has been addressed by ethical standards outlined for professional helpers. This article presents reflective learning as a potentially useful strategy…

  11. Collaborative Learning in Higher Education: Lecturers' Practices and Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Hei, Miranda Suzanna Angelique; Strijbos, Jan-Willem; Sjoer, Ellen; Admiraal, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative learning can, if designed and implemented properly, contribute to student learning outcomes and prepare them for teamwork. However, the design and implementation of collaborative learning in practice depend on beliefs of lecturers about teaching and learning in general, and collaborative learning in particular. One hundred and…

  12. Reflections on the assessment of student learning in Special Education at Basic Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sylvia Cardoso Carneiro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This text reflects on special education student's accomplishment at basic education level, focusing on issues concerning the assessment of learning. Educational policies from an inclusive perspective have guided education systems to develop strategies with the purpose to include these students in school life. This means recognizing them as subjects of learning, taking into account their limitations, but also their possibilities and especially their peculiarities and the different ways of learning and teaching resulting from that. For special education to be effective as an inclusive perspective, pedagogical practices in school at basic education level should be organized collectively in school, always preserving the role of the coordinating teacher in conducting the schooling processes for all students. However, this is not the dynamics found in most schools. The presence of students with disabilities in regular education schools further tightens discussions on the evaluation of learning, which will always be a task assigned to the coordinating teacher, the one who planned the teaching/learning process. Without ignoring the importance of specific accessibility resources to physical space and communication, as well as of adapting teaching materials to the needs of each student, it is important to consider that the education process for these subjects cannot be limited to the elimination of barriers, whether physical, communicational, informational or attitudinal. It is essential that the priorities of school pedagogical practices include the ownership of the historically produced knowledge on behalf of all students. For such empowerment to materialize, it is necessary to perform a teaching work articulated among different school professionals.

  13. Empowering Teachers and their Practices of Inclusion through Digital Dialogic Negotiation of Meaning in Learning Communities of Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldborg, Hanne; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    2016-01-01

    framework was developed. Through collaborative knowledge building and an Educational Design Research (EDR) method this study reports on a collaborative attempt to improve inclusive teaching/learning in ways that install ownership, reflection, and awareness of eLearning-to-Learn (eL2L). In the current study......The purpose of this paper is to develop and further refine a digital dialogic concept for the establishment of an including educational practice for teachers. The concept is inherently based on the view of teachers as co-researchers and with a view on inclusion as an endeavour best supported...... by digital dialogic negotiation of meaning in learning communities of practice (CoPs). The study is a continuation of an earlier study on establishing a digital dialogic architecture to fostering shared understanding and sustainable competence development in teacher practices of inclusion. A theoretical...

  14. Promoting Reflective Physics Teaching Through the Use of Collaborative Learning Annotation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner-Bolotin, Marina

    2018-05-01

    Effective physics teaching requires extensive knowledge of physics, relevant pedagogies, and modern educational technologies that can support student learning. Acquiring this knowledge is a challenging task, considering how fast modern technologies and expectations of student learning outcomes and of teaching practices are changing Therefore 21st-century physics teachers should be supported in developing a different way of thinking about technology-enhanced physics teaching and learning. We call it Deliberate Pedagogical Thinking with Technology, and base it on the original Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge frameworks. However, unlike the two aforementioned frameworks, the Deliberate Pedagogical Thinking with Technology emphasizes not only teachers' knowledge, but also their attitudes and dispositions about using digital tools in order to support student learning. This paper examines how an online system that allows an ongoing discussion of videos uploaded on it by the students can support reflection in physics teacher education. Examples of using such a system in physics teacher education and teacher-candidates' feedback on their experiences with it are also discussed.

  15. Reflections on providing sport science support for athletes with learning difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura; Utley, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    To highlight the benefits and the need for sport science support for athletes with learning difficulties, and to reflect on our experience of working with the GB squad for athletes with learning difficulties. A review of key and relevant literature is presented, followed by a discussion of the sport science support provision and the issues that emerged in working with athletes with learning difficulties. Pre- and post- physiological tests along with evaluations of athletes' potential to benefit from sport psychology support were conducted. The aim of these tests was to provide information for the athletes and the coaches on fitness levels, to use this information to plan future training, and to identify how well the performance could be enhanced. A case study is presented for one athlete, who had competed in distance events. The focus is the psychological support that was provided. It is clear that athletes with learning difficulties require the same type of sports science support as their mainstream peers. However, sport scientists will need to consider ways to extend their practice in order to provide the appropriate level of support.

  16. Innovative practices in teaching information sciences and technology experience reports and reflections

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, John M

    2014-01-01

    University teaching and learning has never been more innovative than it is now.This has been enabled by a better contemporary understanding of teaching and learning. Instructors now present situated projects and practices to their students, not just foundational principles. Lectures and structured practice are now often replaced by engaging and constructivist learning activities that leverage what students know about, think about and care about.Teaching innovation has also been enabled by online learning in the classroom, beyond the classroom and beyond the campus. Learning online is perhaps n

  17. Reflection as learning about the self in context: mentoring as catalyst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigate how the development of reflective practice through mentoring programmes ... the inevitable transitions that students have to make to the professional sector. ... Keywords: mentoring; pre-service teacher development; reflection;

  18. Analyzing Reflections in Service Learning to Promote Personal Growth and Community Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Martha J.; Van Oss, Tracy; McGeary, Signian

    2016-01-01

    The use of structured reflections for promoting personal understanding and community self-efficacy was examined in 65 occupational therapy college students in a service learning course. Students in the experimental group wrote structured reflections throughout the semester while students in the control groups used non-structured reflections.…

  19. How Educators Conceptualize and Teach Reflective Practice: A Survey of North American Pediatric Medical Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butani, Lavjay; Bannister, Susan L; Rubin, Allison; Forbes, Karen L

    2017-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore pediatric undergraduate medical educators' understanding of reflective practice, the barriers they face in teaching this, the curricular activities they use, and the value they assign to reflective practice. Nine survey questions were sent to members of the Council on Medical Student Education in Pediatrics, an international pediatric undergraduate medical educator group. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Open-ended responses were analyzed qualitatively through an iterative process to establish themes representing understanding of reflective practice and barriers in teaching this. Respondents representing 56% of all North American schools answered at least 1 survey question. Qualitative analysis of understanding of reflection revealed 11 themes spanning all components of reflective practice, albeit with a narrow view on triggers for reflection and a lower emphasis on understanding the why of things and on perspective-taking. The most frequent barriers in teaching this were the lack of skilled educators and limited time. Most respondents valued reflective skills but few reported confidence in their ability to teach reflection. Several curricular activities were used to teach reflection, the most common being narrative writing. Pediatric undergraduate medical educators value reflection and endorse its teaching. However, many do not have a complete understanding of the construct and few report confidence in teaching this. Implementing longitudinal curricula in reflective practice may require a culture change; opportunities exist for faculty development about the meaning and value of reflective practice and how best to teach this. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Developing Holistic Practice through Reflection, Action and Theorising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Mairin

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines how I, as a primary teacher engaging with a self-study action research process, have come to a deeper understanding of my practice. It explains how I have also come to an understanding of why I work in the way I do; of how this understanding influences my work, and the significance of this new understanding. My work as a…

  1. Tweeting dignity: A practical theological reflection on Twitter's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Social media makes an important contribution to a rapidly changing world in which various domains of meaning are described anew. The evolving nature and dynamic character of social media therefore provides for a rich praxis terrain with which to interact from a practical theological orientation. More specifically ...

  2. Autopsy practice in Ghana – reflections of a pathologist | Anim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autopsy practice in Ghana can be said to be far from satisfactory. Most Ghanaians do not know that there are different categories of death, which categories of death require an autopsy and who is required to perform the autopsy. The problems have further been complicated by the fact that, unlike other countries where ...

  3. Rethinking Critically Reflective Research Practice: Beyond Popper's Critical Rationalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Werner

    2006-01-01

    We all know that ships are safest in the harbor; but alas, that is not what ships are built for. They are destined to leave the harbor and to confront the challenges that are waiting beyond the harbor mole. A similar challenge confronts the practice of research. Research at work cannot play it safe and stay in whatever theoretical and…

  4. The Current Teacher Education Programs in Ethiopia: Reflection on Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Geberew Tulu

    2017-01-01

    This study threw light on the current practice of Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching Program at Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia. The study focused on the enrolment, graduation and attrition proportion of Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching candidates in the year 2011 and 2015. The 2011 and 2015 academic years have been purposively selected because the…

  5. Evaluation of learning: practices and alternatives to school inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Christofari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyze the evaluation of learning, considering this assessment as a process focusing on pedagogical relationship. Thus, we discuss the implications that emerge as nexus between a questioning on the evaluation and goal of education for all children in the mainstream school, including those with disabilities. Throughout the text are also discussed the singularities associated with disability and debated the evaluation of learning as a process that should involve the group-class, no differences in evaluative logic, even though it may refer to procedures that indicate some variability. The theme of learning evaluation evokes one of the more complex facets of the school curriculum and announces problematizations referred to school inclusion policies such as: all students learn? How to build different intervention strategies for teaching the same group? How to evaluate students considering the singularities of them? This text should be understood as a reflection based in the ransom of the historicity of the subject treated in this work, the analysis of academic production, supporting the literature which has been discussing the processes of learning assessment, and the welcome signs everyday school - explicit in certain practices - to prepare the analysis. It is therefore in this context, to discuss a kind of resizing, reshaping the concept of learning assessment looking at possibilities for dialogue with the perspective of education for all. It is conceived, well, as the evaluation process that should serve as monitoring the process of teaching and learning with the objective of building teaching strategies considering the singularities of students.

  6. Learning In Landscapes of Practice: Boundaries, Identity and Knowledgeability in Practice-Based Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfenden, Freda

    2015-01-01

    This short book is the latest output from Etienne Wenger-Trayner and collaborators,  an engaging conversation on professional learning firmly grounded in the work and voices of practitioners and those teaching or researching with practitioners across diverse fields, disciplines, professions and contexts – education, health, social care, environment, public relations and management. Over thirty contributors contribute stories of learning in their own practice, those in the first part of the bo...

  7. Learning to care: medical students’ reported value and evaluation of palliative care teaching involving meeting patients and reflective writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Borgstrom

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over recent years there has been an increase in teaching of both palliative care and reflective practice in UK medical schools. The palliative care teaching at the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine is multi-faceted and involves students writing reflective essays after individually meeting patients approaching the end of life during their final year general practice and hospital medicine placements. This paper draws on two studies examining this teaching element to analyse what the students found valuable about it and to comment on the practice of meeting patients and subsequent reflective writing. Methods Two studies have explored students’ perceptions of these course components. The first was a thematic analysis of 234 reflective essays from 123 students written in 2007-2008, including examining what students wrote about the exercise itself. The second project involved a semi-structured questionnaire that students completed anonymously; this paper reports on the free text elements of that study [sample size =107]. Since similar themes were found in both studies, the coding structures from each project were compared and combined, enabling triangulation of the findings around what the students found valuable from the palliative care teaching involving meeting patients and reflective writing. Results Overall, students reported that these components of the palliative care teaching are valuable. Four main themes were identified as aspects that students valued: (1 dedicated time with patients, (2 learning about wider elements of treatment and holistic care, (3 practicing communication skills, and (4 learning about themselves through reflective writing. Some students expressed a dislike for having to formally write a reflective essay. Conclusion It is possible to arrange for all of the medical students to individually meet at least two patients receiving palliative or end of life care. Students found these

  8. Documenting Student Engagement Using an Intention/Reflection Exercise during an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierke, Kerry K.; Lepp, Gardner A.

    2015-01-01

    The article shares the outcomes of a practice called Intention/Reflection (I/R) when applied to a group of ten students in a five-week course involving an international advanced pharmacy practice experience. Developed by the authors and founded on a combination of theoretical principles, this practice is unique because of the blend of formative…

  9. Reflections on e-Learning Readiness in Albanian Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezmolda Barolli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays e-Learning has been identified to be the future of learning worldwide since the very powerful platform of the Internet has accelerated the speed of communication. Adoption of e-learning has become the latest trend across universities all over the world. Albania is part of a global shift from material resources to knowledge and intellectual resources as the basis for economic growth. Educators across Albania are aware that students must have an education that enables the students to participate successfully in and contribute to the knowledge economy. E-Learning readiness is an initial part of e- Learning development. In order to benefit from e-learning, higher education institutions in Albania should conduct considerable up-front analysis to assess their readiness. In this paper we are trying to examine the status of e-Learning readiness in Albania, analyzing and discussing several components and criteria based on literature.

  10. Quality Practices: An Open Distance Learning Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemlall RAMDASS

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Global transformation in higher education over the past two decades has led to the implementation of national policies in order to measure the performance of institutions in South Africa. The Higher Education Quality Council (HEQC adopted the quality assurance (QA model for the purposes of accountability and governance in South African Higher Education. The first Council of Higher Education (CHE audit, encouraged a compliance mentality through a ‘tick box’ mentality, thereby encouraging compliance of minimum standards. Thus, quality assurance audits became a ‘feared’ phenomenon in all higher education institutions in South Africa. The complete lack of stewardship in addressing the culture of quality and its’ implications for continuous improvement has led to inefficiencies in the entire higher education landscape. In this paper the ‘fuzzy’ and perhaps ‘slippery’ nature of quality is addressed through a critical analysis of the concepts of development, enhancement and assurance in relation to the quality of teaching and learning in higher education through a case study methodology using qualitative analysis in an open distance learning institution (ODL. The key argument is that although quality is important for improvement, practices at the institution are not changing in the way they should because of a quality culture that is determined by the Department of Higher Education and Training. Hence the research question is to determine the status of quality with a view of recommending total quality management as a strategy that would enhance the practice of quality in the organization. Therefore, this paper explores the current quality practices with the intent to improve the delivery of teaching and learning in an ODL environment.

  11. Mobile Apps for Reflection in Learning: A Design Research in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Teemu; Keune, Anna; Veermans, Marjaana; Toikkanen, Tarmo

    2016-01-01

    This study takes a design-based research approach to explore how applications designed for mobile devices could support reflection in learning in K-12 education. Use of mobile devices is increasing in schools. Most of the educational apps support single-person use of interactive learning materials, simulations and learning games. Apps designed to…

  12. Reflection on the Use of Blended Learning at a Korean University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemsen, Katie Mae; Seong, Myeong Hee

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine students' satisfaction and investigate the potential of improved learning outcomes in smart and blended learning environments. This paper reflects on the experience of the delivery of a program at H University in Seoul, Korea using smart and blended learning. The goal was to apply the findings to current…

  13. Encouraging Student Reflection and Articulation Using a Learning Companion: A Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Bradley; Linton, Frank; Gaimari, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Our 1998 paper "Encouraging Student Reflection and Articulation using a Learning Companion" (Goodman et al. 1998) was a stepping stone in the progression of learning companions for intelligent tutoring systems (ITS). A simulated learning companion, acting as a peer in an intelligent tutoring environment ensures the availability of a…

  14. Systemic Family Therapy Using the Reflecting Team: The Experiences of Adults with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anslow, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to illuminate the experiences of adults with learning disabilities of the reflecting team, in the context of their systemic family therapy. Five adults with learning disabilities were recruited from one community learning disability team. A qualitative design using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) was appropriate…

  15. Appreciative Inquiry: Guided Reflection to Generate Change in Service-Learning Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahman, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Service-learning scholars contend that engaging students in systematic reflection during community service promotes one, if not all, of the following student outcomes: (1) academic learning; (2) personal growth; and (3) civic engagement. For communication instructors in particular, Applegate and Morreale (1999) proposed that service-learning both…

  16. Uncover it, students would learn leadership from Team-Based Learning (TBL): The effect of guided reflection and feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Maryam; Mirzazadeh, Azim; Parmelee, Dean X; Peyton, Elizabeth; Janani, Leila; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2017-04-01

    Little is known about best practices for teaching and learning leadership through Team-Based learning™ (TBL™) with medical students. We hypothesized that guided reflection and feedback would improve shared leadership and shared leadership capacity, and enhance team decision quality in TBL teams. We used the Kolb experiential learning theory as the theoretical framework. The study was conducted at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Three TBL sessions with 206 students (39 teams) participated in the study. Using a quasi-experimental design, one batch received guided reflection and feedback on their team leadership processes (n = 20 teams) and the other received only TBL (n = 19 teams). Observers measured shared leadership using a checklist. Shared leadership capacity was measured using a questionnaire. Scores on a team application exercise were used to assess quality of team decisions. Evidence did not support our first hypothesis that reflection and feedback enhance shared leadership in TBL teams. Percentages of teams displaying shared leadership did not differ between intervention and control groups in sessions 1 (p = 0.6), 2 (p = 1) or 3 (p = 1). The results did not support the second hypothesis. We found no difference in quality of decision making between the intervention and control groups for sessions 1 (p = 0.77), 2 (p = 0.23), or 3 (p = 0.07). The third hypothesis that the reflection and feedback would have an effect on shared leadership capacity was supported (T = -8.55, p > 0.001 adjusted on baseline; T = -8.55, p > 0.001 adjusted on gender). We found that reflection and feedback improved shared leadership capacity but not shared leadership behaviors or team decision quality. We propose medical educators who apply TBL, should provide guided exercise in reflection and feedback so that students may better understand the benefits of working in teams as preparation for their future roles as leaders and

  17. [Clinical ethics consultation - an integrative model for practice and reflection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter-Theil, Stella

    2008-07-01

    Broad evidence exists that health care professionals are facing ethical difficulties in patient care demanding a spectrum of useful ethics support services. Clinical ethics consultation is one of these forms of ethics support being effective in the acute setting. An authentic case is presented as an illustration. We introduce an integrative model covering the activities being characteristic for ethics consultation and going beyond "school"-specific approaches. Finally, we formulate some do's and don'ts of ethics consultation that are considered to be key issues for successful practice.

  18. Reflective Awareness in Mathematics Teachers' Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Olive

    2015-01-01

    The nature of mathematics teachers' knowledge specific to teaching mathematics [MTK] is of ongoing concern in mathematics education research. This article contributes to our under-standing of this knowledge with particular focus on reflective awareness. It discusses MTK based on ways it has been used in research. It highlights reflective awareness…

  19. [Teaching practices and learning strategies in health careers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco Z, Constanza; Pérez V, Cristhian; Torres A, Graciela; Fasce H, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    Medical Education, according to the constructivist education paradigm, puts students as the protagonists of the teaching and learning process. It demands changes in the practice of teaching. However, it is unclear whether this new model is coherent with the teachers’ ways to cope with learning. To analyze the relationship between teaching practices and learning strategies among teachers of health careers in Chilean universities. The Teaching Practices Questionnaire and Learning Strategies Inventory of Schmeck were applied to 200 teachers aged 24 to 72 years (64% females). Teachers use different types of teaching practices. They commonly use deep and elaborative learning strategies. A multiple regression analysis showed that learning strategies had a 13% predictive value to identify student-centered teaching, but they failed to predict teacher-centered teaching. Teaching practices and learning strategies of teachers are related. Teachers frequently select constructivist model strategies, using different teaching practices in their work.

  20. Adaptive trials for tuberculosis: early reflections on theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, C M

    2016-08-01

    Adaptive designs (ADs) have been proposed for anti-tuberculosis treatment trials. This call for innovation occurs against the backdrop of fundamental changes in the acceptable evidence base in anti-tuberculosis treatment. To contextualise ADs for tuberculosis (TB) and explore early responses from those working in the field. In this qualitative study investigating processes of theoretical and practical change in randomised controlled trials, 24 interviews were conducted with professionals involved in AD trials, half of whom worked in the TB field. Clinical trialists working on AD trials in TB are positive about the efficiency these designs offer, but remain cautious about their suitability. In addition to technical concerns, informants discussed the challenges of implementing AD in developing countries, including limited regulatory capacity to evaluate proposals, investments needed in infrastructure and site capacity, and challenges regarding informed consent. Respondents identified funding, interdisciplinary communication and regulatory and policy responses as additional concerns potentially affecting the success of AD for TB. Empirical research is needed into patient experiences of AD, including informed consent. Further consideration of the contexts of innovation in trial design is needed. These are fundamental to the successful translation of theory into practice.

  1. Formal caregivers of older adults: reflection about their practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Picazzio Perez Batista

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To understand the job function of caregivers of older adults and contribute to the debate on the consolidation of this professional practice. METHODOLOGICAL PROCEDURES This is a descriptive, qualitative, and exploratory study. Four focal group sessions were performed in 2011 with 11 elderly companions, formal caregivers of older adults in the Programa Acompanhante de Idosos (Program for Caregivers of Older Adults, Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil. These sessions, guided by a semi-structured script, were audio-recorded and fully transcribed. Data were analyzed using the Content Analysis technique, Thematic Modality. RESULTS In view of considering the caregivers of older adults as a new category of workers, it was difficult to define their duties. The elderly companions themselves as well as the care receivers, their families, and the professionals that comprised the team were unclear about their duties. The professional practice of these formal caregivers has been built on the basis of constant discussions and negotiations among them and other team members in Programa Acompanhante de Idosos during daily work. This was achieved via a recognition process of their job functions and by setting apart other workers’ exclusive responsibilities. CONCLUSIONS The delimitation of specific job functions for elderly companions is currently one of the greatest challenges faced by these workers to develop and consolidate their professional role as well as improve Programa Acompanhante de Idosos.

  2. Judith Butler's theories: reflections for nursing research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagington, Maurice G

    2016-10-01

    Judith Butler is one of the most influential late 20th and early 21st century philosophers in regard to left wing politics, as well as an active campaigner for social justice within the United States and worldwide. Her academic work has been foundational to the academic discipline of queer theory and has been extensively critiqued and applied across a hugely wide range of disciplines. In addition, Butler's work itself is extensive covering topics such as gender, sexuality, race, literary theory, and warfare. This article can only serve as a taster for the potential application of her work in relation to nursing, which is in its infancy. This introduction covers three of the potentially most productive themes in Butler's work, namely power, performativity, and ethics. Each of these themes are critically explored in turn, sometimes in relation to their actual application in nursing literature, but also in relation to their potential for producing novel critiques of nursing practice. Suggestions are made about how Butler's work can develop nursing research and practice. The article concludes with a short summary of Butler's key works as well as suggested reading for people interested in examining how her theories have been applied across different academic settings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Assuring Best Practice in Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppell, Mike; Suddaby, Gordon; Hard, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    This paper documents the development and findings of the Good Practice Report on Technology-Enhanced Learning and Teaching funded by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC). Developing the Good Practice Report required a meta-analysis of 33 ALTC learning and teaching projects relating to technology funded between 2006 and 2010. This…

  4. Learning Styles of Radiography Students during Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, L. Patrice

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the common learning styles of radiography students during clinical practice. Quantitative, descriptive research methodology identified the learning styles of radiography students. A single self-report questionnaire, developed to assess learning styles in clinical practice, was administered…

  5. The Potential of Self-reflection in the Learning Process of Collaborative negotiation Skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canal, Margarita

    In her doctoral thesis, Margarita Canal explores the value of self-reflection to facilitate the learning process of collaborative negotiation skills as well as how self-reflection as a mental capacity functions. She draws on theories of self-reflection from the higher and management education...... that reflection makes learning evident to both teachers and students. Moreover, the research sheds light on the understanding of reflection as a mental capacity, based on the conceptualization of the six psychic characteristics connected to it, namely: 1) making contact with oneself, 2) connecting to others, 3......) reality perspective, 4) understanding and expressing emotions, 5) balanced narcissism, and 6) change process. This knowledge constitutes a contribution that allows management teachers who use journaling, self-reflection, or learning portfolios to take into account students’ psychic characteristics...

  6. Reflective practice and vocational training: theoretical approaches in the field of Health and Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Netto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: Theoretical reflection that uses Reflexivity as a theoretical reference and its objective is to approach Donald Schön's reflective thinking, interrelating it with the innovative curriculum. Method: The writings of Schön and other authors who addressed the themes in their works were used. Results: The innovative curriculum as an expression of dissatisfaction with the fragmentation paradigm may favor reflective practice, since it is necessary to mobilize reflexivity for actions and contexts that are unpredictable in the field of health promotion. Conclusions: The innovative curriculum favors and is favored by a reflective practice and the development of competencies for the promotion of health. Implications for practice: The findings apply to the practice of nurses to deal with the conditioning and determinants of the health-disease process.

  7. Reflection of Learning Theories in Iranian ELT Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neghad, Hossein Hashem

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate Iranian ELT English textbooks (Senior High school and Pre-University) in the light of three learning theories i.e., behaviourism, cognitivism, and constructivism. Each of these learning theories embedding an array of instructional strategies and techniques acted as evaluation checklist. That is, Iranian ELT…

  8. Active Learning and Reflection in Product Development Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekar, Aruna

    2007-01-01

    Traditional engineering courses at tertiary level have been traditionally theory-based, supported by laboratory work, but there is now a world-wide trend towards project-based learning. In product development education, project-based learning is essential in order to integrate the disciplines of design, marketing and manufacturing towards the…

  9. Reflections from the Field: Creating an Elementary Living Learning Makerspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Kathryn L.

    2017-01-01

    This article features the creation of a makerspace in the elementary education (ELED) living and learning community (LLC) residence hall. This space was created based on the growing body of literature demonstrating the rise of makerspaces across learning environments as well as the need to expose pre-service teachers (PSTs) to early field…

  10. Connecting and Reflecting: Transformative Learning in Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Michaela D. Willi; Scharf, Emily

    2017-01-01

    This literature review is intended to examine transformative learning within the context of academic libraries and its applications for librarians. Although the main audience is academic librarians who facilitate student learning, it may also be of interest to other practitioners and researchers who are interested in applying transformative…

  11. Seamless learning: Technology-enhanced learning from practical experiences across contexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusman, Ellen

    2018-01-01

    Rusman, E. (2018, 8th of June). Seamless learning: Technology-enhanced learning from practical experiences across contexts. Keynote presentation at the Seamless learning conference, Maastricht, The Netherlands. http://www.ou.nl/slc

  12. Integrating 3D Printing into an Early Childhood Teacher Preparation Course: Reflections on Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Pamela; McCartney, Holly

    2017-01-01

    This reflection on practice describes a case study integrating 3D printing into a creativity course for preservice teachers. The theoretical rationale is discussed, and the steps for integration are outlined. Student responses and reflections on the experience provide the basis for our analysis. Examples and resources are provided, as well as a…

  13. Learning-related human brain activations reflecting individual finances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobler, Philippe N; Fletcher, Paul C; Bullmore, Edward T; Schultz, Wolfram

    2007-04-05

    A basic tenet of microeconomics suggests that the subjective value of financial gains decreases with increasing assets of individuals ("marginal utility"). Using concepts from learning theory and microeconomics, we assessed the capacity of financial rewards to elicit behavioral and neuronal changes during reward-predictive learning in participants with different financial backgrounds. Behavioral learning speed during both acquisition and extinction correlated negatively with the assets of the participants, irrespective of education and age. Correspondingly, response changes in midbrain and striatum measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging were slower during both acquisition and extinction with increasing assets and income of the participants. By contrast, asymptotic magnitudes of behavioral and neuronal responses after learning were unrelated to personal finances. The inverse relationship of behavioral and neuronal learning speed with personal finances is compatible with the general concept of decreasing marginal utility with increasing wealth.

  14. Nursing student voices: reflections on an international service learning experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, E Eve; Garrett-Wright, Dawn; Kerby, Molly

    2013-01-01

    For the past decade participation in service and experiential learning in higher education has increased. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of BSN and MSN students participating in a multidisciplinary service-learning course in a rural, underserved village in Belize. Researchers analyzed student journals utilizing qualitative data analysis techniques. There were eight consistent themes found in the student journals. The findings indicate that international service learning opportunities increase students' awareness of their place in a global society and the potential contribution they can make in society. For the past decade, service and experiential learning in higher education, including nursing education, has become increasingly important. Simply put, service and experiential learning combine community service activities with a student's academic study for the sole purpose of enriching the academic experience. As faculty, we feel the goal of baccalaureate and graduate nursing education is to produce an educated professional who will become a responsible citizen.

  15. Reflections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    making computer programs 'human like' by building in learning and ... discussed the problems of control and communication in the living organism and the machine. ... To be effective in warding off disastrous consequences, our understanding.

  16. Practical Applications and Experiences in K-20 Blended Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyei-Blankson, Lydia, Ed.; Ntuli, Esther, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Learning environments continue to change considerably and is no longer confined to the face-to-face classroom setting. As learning options have evolved, educators must adopt a variety of pedagogical strategies and innovative technologies to enable learning. "Practical Applications and Experiences in K-20 Blended Learning Environments"…

  17. "Getting Practical" and the National Network of Science Learning Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Georgina; Langley, Mark; Skilling, Gus; Walker, John

    2011-01-01

    The national network of Science Learning Centres is a co-ordinating partner in the Getting Practical--Improving Practical Work in Science programme. The principle of training provision for the "Getting Practical" programme is a cascade model. Regional trainers employed by the national network of Science Learning Centres trained the cohort of local…

  18. Making pictures in front of a mirror : a cognitive perspective on reflection in learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, I.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    This research project was inspired by the observation that self-managing teams are often said to succeed because of reflection practices. Notwithstanding some prejudice regarding the merits of reflection, the literature did not provide much insight into those ways of thinking central to reflection.

  19. Reflection as a Learning Tool in Graduate Medical Education: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Abigail Ford; Yingling, Sandra; Jones, Aubrie-Ann; Nicholson, Joey

    2017-08-01

    Graduate medical education programs employ reflection to advance a range of outcomes for physicians in training. However, the most effective applications of this tool have not been fully explored. A systematic review of the literature examined interventions reporting the use of reflection in graduate medical education. The authors searched Medline/PubMed, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, and ERIC for studies of reflection as a teaching tool to develop medical trainees' capacities. Key words and subject headings included reflection , narrative , residents/GME , and education / teaching / learning . No language or date limits were applied. The search yielded 1308 citations between inception for each database and June 15, 2015. A total of 16 studies, encompassing 477 residents and fellows, met eligibility criteria. Study quality was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme Qualitative Checklist. The authors conducted a thematic analysis of the 16 articles. Outcomes studied encompassed the impact of reflection on empathy, comfort with learning in complex situations, and engagement in the learning process. Reflection increased learning of complex subjects and deepened professional values. It appears to be an effective tool for improving attitudes and comfort when exploring difficult material. Limitations include that most studies had small samples, used volunteers, and did not measure behavioral outcomes. Critical reflection is a tool that can amplify learning in residents and fellows. Added research is needed to understand how reflection can influence growth in professional capacities and patient-level outcomes in ways that can be measured.

  20. How Teachers Reflect on Their Pedagogy: Learning from Teachers’ Pedagogical Vocabulary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Lea

    2016-01-01

    in practice and explored how teachers reflect on their pedagogy. In this paper, I consider what these reflections tell us about the choices teachers make about their practice. The findings reveal that teachers’ gut feelings play a significant role in shaping their thoughts and beliefs and in informing...

  1. Towards Sustaining Levels of Reflective Learning: How Do Transformational Leadership, Task Interdependence, and Self-Efficacy Shape Teacher Learning in Schools?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnoud Oude Groote Beverborg

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Whereas cross-sectional research has shown that transformational leadership, task interdependence, and self-efficacy are positively related to teachers’ engagement in reflective learning activities, the causal direction of these relations needs further inquiry. At the same time, individual teacher learning might play a mutual role in strengthening school-level capacity for sustained improvement. Building on previous research, this longitudinal study therefore examines how transformational leadership, task interdependence, self-efficacy, and teachers’ engagement in self-reflection mutually affect each other over time. Questionnaire data gathered on three measurement occasions from 655 Dutch Vocational Education and Training teachers was analyzed using a multivariate Latent Difference Score model. Results indicate that self-reflection and task interdependence reciprocally influence each other’s change. A considerate and stimulating transformational leader was found to contribute to this process. Change in self-efficacy was influenced by self-reflection, indicating that learning leads to competency beliefs. Together, the findings point to the important role transformational leadership practices play in facilitating teamwork, and sustaining teachers’ levels of learning in schools.

  2. College physics students' epistemological self-reflection and its relationship to conceptual learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, David B.; Etkina, Eugenia

    2002-12-01

    Students should develop self-reflection skills and appropriate views about knowledge and learning, both for their own sake and because these skills and views may be related to improvements in conceptual understanding. We explored the latter issue in the context of an introductory physics course for first-year engineering honors students. As part of the course, students submitted weekly reports, in which they reflected on how they learned specific physics content. The reports by 12 students were analyzed for the quality of reflection and some of the epistemological beliefs they exhibited. Students' conceptual learning gains were measured with standard survey instruments. We found that students with high conceptual gains tend to show reflection on learning that is more articulate and epistemologically sophisticated than students with lower conceptual gains. Some implications for instruction are suggested.

  3. From "Learning Disability to Intellectual Disability"--Perceptions of the Increasing Use of the Term "Intellectual Disability" in Learning Disability Policy, Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluley, Victoria

    2018-01-01

    Background: The term "intellectual disability" is increasingly used to refer to people with learning disabilities in British learning disability policy, practice and research. This change is undoubtedly a reflection of the changing international context. The inclusion of the term "intellectual disability" has been particularly…

  4. The utility of vignettes to stimulate reflection on professionalism: theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabeo, E C; Holmboe, E S; Ross, K; Chesluk, B; Ginsburg, S

    2013-08-01

    Professionalism remains a substantive theme in medical literature. There is an emerging emphasis on sociological and complex adaptive systems perspectives that refocuses attention from just the individual role to working within one's system to enact professionalism in practice. Reflecting on responses to professional dilemmas may be one method to help practicing physicians identify both internal and external factors contributing to (un) professional behavior. We present a rationale and theoretical framework that supports and guides a reflective approach to the self assessment of professionalism. Guided by principles grounded in this theoretical framework, we developed and piloted a set of vignettes on professionally challenging situations, designed to stimulate reflection in practicing physicians. Findings show that participants found the vignettes to be authentic and typical, and reported the group experience as facilitative around discussions of professional ambiguity. Providing an opportunity for physicians to reflect on professional behavior in an open and safe forum may be a practical way to guide physicians to assess themselves on professional behavior and engage with the complexities of their work. The finding that the focus groups led to reflection at a group level suggests that effective reflection on professional behavior may require a socially interactive process. Emphasizing both the behaviors and the internal and external context in which they occur can thus be viewed as critically important for understanding professionalism in practicing physicians.

  5. Existing facilities and past practices: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, D.; Tonkay, D.W.; Owens, K.

    2000-01-01

    Article 12 of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention) requires parties to the Joint Convention to review the safety of existing radioactive waste management facilities 'to ensure that, if necessary, all reasonably practicable improvements are made to upgrade the safety of such a facility'. Also required is a review of the results of past practices to determine 'whether any intervention is needed for reasons of radiation protection' and to consider whether the benefits of the intervention or remediation are sufficient, with regard to the costs and the impact on workers, the public and the environment. This paper discusses the experience of the United States Department of Energy in terms of the lessons learned from operating radioactive waste management facilities and from undertaking intervention or remedial action, and from decision making in an international context. Overarching safety principles are discussed, including integrating safety into all work practices and minimizing the generation of waste. Safety review lessons learned with existing facilities are discussed with respect to: applying new requirements to old facilities, taking a life-cycle perspective of waste management, improving high level waste facility management, and blending current and past practices with respect to the process used to arrive at decisions for intervention. Special emphasis is placed on the need to provide for early and substantive input from the involved regulatory agencies, Native American tribes, and those citizens and groups with an interest in the decisions. Examples of intervention decisions are discussed, including examples taken from uranium mill tailings operations, from cleanup of a former uranium processing plant site, from evaluation of pre-1970 buried 'transuranic waste' sites, and from decommissioning or closure of high level waste storage tanks. The paper concludes that on the

  6. Ways of knowing: Passionate humility and reflective practice in research and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yanow, D.

    2009-01-01

    For all the attention that the concept of reflective practice has attracted, very little has been said concerning what might incline someone to be open to engage in it. My concern in this essay is with two characteristics of professional, including administrative, practice-a language of certainty

  7. Novice Teachers Reflect on Their Instructional Practices While Teaching Adults Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Lynda

    2016-01-01

    Over three years, eighty-two teachers in their first or second year of teaching participated in orientation programs for new adult educators. During the programs, they reflected on their own instructional practices when teaching mathematics to adults. The teachers identified the practice they were likely to overemphasize and explained why they…

  8. A New Theory-to-Practice Model for Student Affairs: Integrating Scholarship, Context, and Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reason, Robert D.; Kimball, Ezekiel W.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we synthesize existing theory-to-practice approaches within the student affairs literature to arrive at a new model that incorporates formal and informal theory, institutional context, and reflective practice. The new model arrives at a balance between the rigor necessary for scholarly theory development and the adaptability…

  9. Learning Behavior Analysis of a Ubiquitous Situated Reflective Learning System with Application to Life Science and Technology Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Chen, Hong-Ren; Chen, Nian-Shing; Lin, Li-Kai; Chen, Jin-Wen

    2018-01-01

    Education research has shown that reflective study can efficiently enhance learning, and the acquisition of knowledge and skills from real-life situations has become a focus of interest for scholars. The knowledge-learning model based on verbal instruction, used in traditional classrooms, does not make use of real-life situations that encourage…

  10. Celebrating international collaboration: reflections on the first Virtual International Practice Development Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira Stephens

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the first Virtual International Practice Development Conference, held in May 2015 to celebrate International Nurses Day. The article describes key aspects of its planning, offers a flavour of the event itself and sets out an evaluation, including learning points and recommendations to assist with planning similar events in the future. Central to our learning are: The need for practice developers to grasp skills in technology associated with virtual space The need to embrace virtual space itself as another means by which creative and communicative spaces can be established for active learning and practice development activities The potential advantages that international virtual engagement has over face-to-face national or international engagement The delivery of this virtual event made a significant international contribution to global practice development activity within the International Practice Development Collaborative and to enabling practice developers to connect and celebrate on a more global basis. Implications for practice: Virtual space technology skills can assist with sharing and translating practice development research, innovations and critical commentary Virtual space can provide an adjunct to creative and communicative learning spaces Global networking opportunities can be developed and enhanced through the use of virtual space technology Practice developers need to role model the use of virtual technologies

  11. Reflections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    not only in linguistics hut also in allied fields, splitting social scientists into t\\VO groups, Chomskyan and others. ... views on language, IlO\\\\"knoVv'Il as 'Standard Theory', generated a ... For the human mind, learning is a kind of reminiscence.

  12. Sequence Learning Under Uncertainty in Children: Self-Reflection vs. Self-Assertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange-Küttner, Christiane; Averbeck, Bruno B; Hirsch, Silvia V; Wießner, Isabel; Lamba, Nishtha

    2012-01-01

    We know that stochastic feedback impairs children's associative stimulus-response (S-R) learning (Crone et al., 2004a; Eppinger et al., 2009), but the impact of stochastic feedback on sequence learning that involves deductive reasoning has not been not tested so far. In the current study, 8- to 11-year-old children (N = 171) learned a sequence of four left and right button presses, LLRR, RRLL, LRLR, RLRL, LRRL, and RLLR, which needed to be deduced from feedback because no directional cues were given. One group of children experienced consistent feedback only (deterministic feedback, 100% correct). In this condition, green feedback on the screen indicated that the children had been right when they were right, and red feedback indicated that the children had been wrong when they were wrong. Another group of children experienced inconsistent feedback (stochastic feedback, 85% correct, 15% false), where in some trials, green feedback on the screen could signal that children were right when in fact they were wrong, and red feedback could indicate that they were wrong when in fact they had been right. Independently of age, children's sequence learning in the stochastic condition was initially much lower than in the deterministic condition, but increased gradually and improved with practice. Responses toward positive vs. negative feedback varied with age. Children were increasingly able to understand that they could have been wrong when feedback indicated they were right (self-reflection), but they remained unable to understand that they could have been right when feedback indicated they were wrong (self-assertion).

  13. Sequence Learning Under Uncertainty in Children: Self-reflection vs. Self-Assertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane eLange-Küttner

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We know that stochastic feedback impairs children’s associative stimulus-response (S-R learning (Crone, Jennigs, & Van der Molen, 2004a; Eppinger, Mock, & Kray, 2009, but the impact of stochastic feedback on sequence learning that involves deductive reasoning has not been not tested so far. In the current study, 8- to 11-year-old children (N = 171 learned a sequence of four left and right button presses, LLRR, RRLL, LRLR, RLRL, LRRL and RLLR, that needed to be deduced from feedback because no directional cues were given. One group of children experienced consistent feedback only (deterministic feedback, 100% correct. In this condition, green feedback on the screen indicated that the children had been right when they were right, and red feedback indicated that the children had been wrong when they were wrong. Another group of children experienced inconsistent feedback (stochastic feedback, 85% correct, 15% false, where in some trials, green feedback on the screen could signal that children were right when in fact they were wrong, and red feedback could indicate that they were wrong when in fact they had been right. Independently of age, children’s sequence learning in the stochastic condition was initially much lower than in the deterministic condition, but increased gradually and improved with practice. Responses towards positive vs. negative feedback varied with age. Children were increasingly able to understand that they could have been wrong when feedback indicated they were right (self-reflection, but they remained unable to understand that they could have been right when feedback indicated they were wrong (self-assertion.

  14. Assessment of Teaching and Learning Styles in Practical Motor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of Teaching and Learning Styles in Practical Motor Vehicle Mechanics Work At ... Board should organize workshop for its teachers in technical colleges on the ... students to participate actively in any activities when teaching practical skills.

  15. Teaching Professionals Environmental Management: Combining Educational Learning and Practice Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Jørgensen, Ulrik

    2003-01-01

    semesters. The target groups are professional environmental managers working in businesses including consultants, governmental institutions and organizations. To get access to the education the students must have a technical/nature science competence at master level or bachelor level combined with relevant...... job experience. Generally the participants have had 5-15 years of practical experience and many have been or are in the position of an internal or external job change towards new tasks that require new knowledge, methodologies or management skills. The education of "Masters of Environmental Management...... they can use in complex situations on the job is not simply a question of combining different university disciplines in the right blend and topping it with some experience. It involves combining science-based knowledge into thematic structures in carefully organized learning processes. The education...

  16. Learning Strategy in Class Management: A Reflection from Manado Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suardi Wekke, Ismail; Yandra, Alexander; Hamuddin, Budianto

    2017-12-01

    This article is a research conducted with qualitative approach with various case studies underlining a strategy that becomes the basis for classroom management. The article discusses and links to the learning revolution that becomes today’s demands, including a discussion that analyses the condition of learners. The article based its data preliminary study conducted in Manado in the province of North Sulawesi in Indonesia. This region has its own characteristics with the encounter of Muslims and the Protestant community for century. Due to its uniqueness 3 Moslem schools and 3 Protestant schools in Manado were selected to study. Data collection was conducted for a year, from May 2016 to April 2017. The study employ four stages research steps: identification, data collection, data validity checking, and directed discussion. The stages include observation and in-depth interviews and conducting focus group discussions. Two important thought about the essence of learning strategy and learning revolution in class were shared briefly within this article.

  17. Learning Vicariously: Students' Reflections of the Leadership Lessons Portrayed in "The Office"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Gaea; Meyers, Courtney; Porter, Haley; Shaw, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Leadership educators are encouraged to identify and apply new ways to teach leadership. This paper provides the qualitative results of post-secondary students' reflections of learning leadership concepts after watching several episodes of the television show, "The Office." Students used reflective journaling to record their reactions and…

  18. Using Reflective Learning to Improve the Impact of Continuing Education in the Context of Work Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, Brigitte; Durand, Marie-Jose; LeBlanc, Jeannette

    2010-01-01

    Reflective learning has been described as a promising approach for ameliorating the impact of continuing education (CE) programs. However, there are still very few studies that have investigated how occupational therapists use reflection to improve the integration of CE program content in their decision-making processes. The study objectives were…

  19. The Evaluation of Students' Written Reflection on the Learning of General Chemistry Lab Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ng Sook; Li, Ho Ket; Sin, Lee Choy; Sin, Keng Pei

    2014-01-01

    Reflective writing is often used to increase understanding and analytical ability. The lack of empirical evidence on the effect of reflective writing interventions on the learning of general chemistry lab experiment supports the examination of this concept. The central goal of this exploratory study was to evaluate the students' written…

  20. Development of a student rating scale to evaluate teachers' competencies for facilitating reflective learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaub-de Jong, Mirabelle A.; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Dekker, Hanke; Verkerk, Marian; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    Context Teaching students in reflection calls for specific teacher competencies. We developed and validated a rating scale focusing on Student perceptions of their Teachers' competencies to Encourage Reflective Learning in small Groups (STERLinG). Methods We applied an iterative procedure to reduce

  1. Reflections versus Extended Quizzes: Which Is Better for Student Learning and Self-Regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, Virginia

    2018-01-01

    Both quizzes and reflections have been found to benefit student learning, but have been typically compared to passive or superficial controls. The purpose of this quasi-experiment is to test the relative effectiveness of brief quizzes followed by reflections compared to longer quizzes. Participants (N = 218) were introductory psychology students…

  2. Reflections on Service-Learning: Student Experiences in a Sport-Based Youth Development Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Meredith A.; Farrell, Kelly; Maisonet, Cindy; Hoffer, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Service-learning courses provide students with practical opportunities to enhance their learning and development in the field, along with getting students engaged in different communities and settings. However, there are still many challenges to designing and offering effective service-learning courses, such as requiring all students to…

  3. Reflections on clinical practice whilst developing a portfolio of evidence: Perceptions of undergraduate nursing students in the Western Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoire Ticha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to develop clinical judgement, nurses should be encouraged to become analytical and critical thinkers. Development of a portfolio of evidence (PoE of reflection on clinical experiences is one of the strategies that can be used to enhance analytical and critical thinking amongst nursing students. Students’ perceptions of the process are important in order to encourage their reflective practice. PoE compilation at a school of nursing at a university in the Western Cape includes evidence of students’ clinical learning which they present in a portfolio. The students are expected to reflect on their clinical learning experiences and include these reflections in their portfolios. Objective: To describe the perceptions of fourth-year nursing students regarding reflective practice whilst compiling their PoEs. Method: A qualitative design was used to explore the perceptions of registered fourth-year nursing students with regard to their reflective practice whilst compiling their PoEs. Purposive sampling was used for selection of participants. Three focus group discussions were held, each consisting of six to eight participants. Data saturation was reached during the third meeting. Tesch’s method of data analysis was used. Results: Findings revealed that reflection enabled the learners to gain experience and identify challenges related to the expected events and tasks carried out at the hospitals and in the classroom whilst developing their PoE. Conclusion: The compilation of a PoE was a good teaching and learning strategy, and the skills, experience and knowledge that the participants in this study acquired boosted their self-esteem, confidence and critical thinking. Reflection also assisted in self-directed learning.

  4. Toward re-thinking science education in terms of affective practices: reflections from the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayumova, Shakhnoza; Tippins, Deborah

    2016-09-01

    Rational and operationalized views of science and what it means for teachers and students to know and enact legitimate science practices have dominated science education research for many decades (Fusco and Barton in J Res Sci Teach 38(3):337-354, 2001. doi: 10.1002/1098-2736(200103)38:33.0.CO;2-0). Michalinos Zembylas challenges historically prevalent dichotomies of mind/body, reason/emotion, and emotion/affect, calling researchers and educators to move beyond the Cartesian dualisms, which have perpetuated a myth of scientific objectivity devoid of bias, subjectivity and emotions. Zembylas (Crit Stud Teach Learn 1(1):1-21, 2013. doi: 10.14426/cristal.v1i1.2) contends that the role of emotions and affect are best understood as relational and entangled in epistemological, cultural, and historical contexts of education, which represent contested sites of control and resistance. We argue that Zembylas' work is pivotal since "theoretical frames of reference for doing research in science education…[and] what constitutes knowledge and being within a particular frame" carry material bearings over the enactments of science teaching and learning (Kyle in J Res Sci Teach 31:695-696, 1994, p. 321. doi: 10.1002/tea.3660310703). In this paper, we hold cogen dialogue about how re-thinking notions of emotion and affect affords us, both science educators and researchers, to re-envision science education beyond cognitive and social frames. The framing of our dialogue as cogen builds on Wolff-Michael Roth and Kenneth Tobin's (At the elbows of another: learning to teach through coteaching. Peter Lang Publishing, New York, 2002) notion of cogenerative dialogue. Holding cogen is an invitation to an openly dialogic and safe area, which serves as a space for a dialogic inquiry that includes radical listening of situated knowledges and learning from similarities as well as differences of experiences (Tobin in Cult Stud Sci Educ, in review, 2015). From our situated experiences reforms

  5. Reflections on Ways Forward for Addressing Ethical Concerns in Mobile Learning Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishart, Jocelyn

    2016-01-01

    This paper reflects on a decade of discussions about the range of ethical issues arising in mobile learning research. Research into the educational potential of mobile, handheld technologies to enhance teaching and learning has been regularly frustrated by lecturers' and teachers' concerns about how their students might use such devices. At other…

  6. Enhancing the Pronunciation of English Suprasegmental Features through Reflective Learning Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwartono

    2014-01-01

    Suprasegmental features are of paramount importance in spoken English. Yet, these pronunciation features are marginalised in EFL/ESL teaching-learning. This article reported a study that was aimed at improving the students' mastery of English suprasegmental features through the use of reflective learning method. The study adopted Kemmis and…

  7. Social Learning, Natural Resource Management, and Participatory Activities: A reflection on construct development and testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodela, R.

    2014-01-01

    This analysis reflects on the use of multidimensional constructs for the study of social learning in natural resource management. Insight from deliberative democracy and adult learning literature are used to ground the identified four dimensions (the moral dimension the cognitive dimension, the

  8. Students' Reflections on Industry Placement: Comparing Four Undergraduate Work-Integrated Learning Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Karen; Mylonas, Aliisa; Benckendorff, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares four work-integrated learning (WIL) streams embedded in a professional Development course for tourism, hospitality and event management students. Leximancer was used to analyze key themes emerging from reflective portfolios completed by the 137 students in the course. Results highlight that student learning outcomes and…

  9. Making Sense of Undergraduate Students' Reflections as They Learn through Writing an Action Research Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoto, S.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores learning opportunities offered by students' written reflections as they learn through writing an action research proposal. From tapping into students' reported struggles, I analysed data using three stages of qualitative data analysis: data reduction, data display, and conclusion drawing (Miles and Huberman 1994). It emerged…

  10. Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in Technology-Enhanced Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moore, Adam; Pammer, Viktoria; Pannese, Lucia; Prilla, Michael; Rajagopal, Kamakshi; Reinhardt, Wolfgang; Ullman, Thomas; Voigt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Moore, A., Pammer, V., Pannese, L., Prilla, M., Rajagopal, K., Reinhardt, W., Ullman, Th. D., & Voigt, Ch. (Eds.) (2012). Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in Technology Enhanced Learning. In conjunction with the 7th European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning: 21st

  11. "Knowing Is Not Enough; We Must Apply": Reflections on a Failed Action Learning Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This paper reflects upon a sub-optimal action learning application with a strategic business re-design project. The objective of the project was to improve the long-term business performance of a subsidiary business and build the strategic plan. Action learning was introduced to aid the group in expanding their view of the real problems…

  12. Reflective Processes: A Qualitative Study Exploring Early Learning Student Teacher Mentoring Experiences in Student Teaching Practicums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    This doctoral thesis explored mentoring in early learning teacher preparation programs. This study explored the reflective processes embedded in the work between student teachers and their mentors during early learning student teacher experiences at Washington State community and technical colleges. Schon's (1987a) concepts of…

  13. Enabling Pupils with Learning Difficulties to Reflect on Their Own Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Stuart D.; Makin, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Reports on a study of the impact of metacognition among 10 middle school-aged British students with learning difficulties. Finds that student awareness and subsequent control over thought processes were enhanced through self-reporting and self-appraisal. Examines this kind of reflection on enhanced learning capabilities and self-esteem. (CFR)

  14. Bringing the Real World in: Reflection on Building a Virtual Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundkur, Anuradha; Ellickson, Cara

    2012-01-01

    We reflect on translating participatory and experiential learning methodologies into an online teaching environment through a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) that simulates the "real-world" contexts of international development in order to develop an applied critical understanding of gender analysis and gender mainstreaming. Rather than being…

  15. Looking Backward to Look Forward: Reflections of Past Presidents of the Council for Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poch, Apryl L.

    2018-01-01

    Anniversaries offer a time for reflection, celebration, validation, and sometimes, simply a candid conversation on the current state of a field. In the field of learning disabilities, anniversaries offer a time to consider how far the field has come and just how far is left to go to understand what a learning disability is. Definitional…

  16. Problematizing Service-Learning: Critical Reflections for Development and Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Trae, Ed.; Webster, Nicole, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Interest in and research on civic engagement and service-learning have increased exponentially. In this rapid growth, efforts have been made to institutionalize pedagogies of engagement across both K-12 and higher education. As a result, increased positive attention has been complemented equally by well-founded critiques complicating experiential…

  17. Juvenile Delinquent Girls Reflect Learning in Schools and Offer Suggestions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Dixie; Stremlau, Aliza; Ritzman, Mitzi; Snow, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Qualitative methods were used to conduct interviews of 41 female juvenile delinquents residing in a correctional facility to understand how participants would have improved learning in their former school if they had been the teachers. A total of 27 of 41 participants provided 70 comments that resulted in 93 meaning units/codes that emerged into 4…

  18. Barriers to Practical Learning in the Field: A Qualitative Study of Iranian Nursing Students' Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanpour, Faezeh; Azodi, Parviz; Azodi, Farzan; Khansir, Ali Akbar

    2016-06-01

    Clinical training is an integral part of nursing education; however, some studies have shown that it is not always efficient. This study aimed to find out the factors that can impede nursing students' clinical learning. In this qualitative study, data were collected via reflective journal writing. Purposeful sampling was used, and 12 senior nursing students were recruited to the study. The data were analyzed using a content analysis method. Three main categories were derived, including inappropriate communication, ineffective role models, and theory-practice gaps. Students perceived that inappropriate communication between instructors, staff members, and students had the greatest impact on student learning. The competence of clinical instructors and staff is an important factor affecting students' training. The clinical learning environment does not always integrate theory and practice together. Nursing students did not experience effective clinical learning. Having expert instructors and supportive communication are important factors in creating a clinical learning environment.

  19. The layered learning practice model: Lessons learned from implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Nicole R; Eckel, Stephen F; Vu, Maihan B; Weinberger, Morris; Roth, Mary T

    2016-12-15

    Pharmacists' views about the implementation, benefits, and attributes of a layered learning practice model (LLPM) were examined. Eligible and willing attending pharmacists at the same institution that had implemented an LLPM completed an individual, 90-minute, face-to-face interview using a structured interview guide developed by the interdisciplinary study team. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim without personal identifiers. Three researchers independently reviewed preliminary findings to reach consensus on emerging themes. In cases where thematic coding diverged, the researchers discussed their analyses until consensus was reached. Of 25 eligible attending pharmacists, 24 (96%) agreed to participate. The sample was drawn from both acute and ambulatory care practice settings and all clinical specialty areas. Attending pharmacists described several experiences implementing the LLPM and perceived benefits of the model. Attending pharmacists identified seven key attributes for hospital and health-system pharmacy departments that are needed to design and implement effective LLPMs: shared leadership, a systematic approach, good communication, flexibility for attending pharmacists, adequate resources, commitment, and evaluation. Participants also highlighted several potential challenges and obstacles for organizations to consider before implementing an LLPM. According to attending pharmacists involved in an LLPM, successful implementation of an LLPM required shared leadership, a systematic approach, communication, flexibility, resources, commitment, and a process for evaluation. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Embree

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ideally, editorials are written one to two months before publication in the Journal. It was my turn to write this one. I had planned to write the first draft the evening after my clinic on Tuesday, September 11. It didn't get done that night or during the next week. Somehow, the topic that I had originally chosen just didn't seem that important anymore as I, along my friends and colleagues, reflected on the changes that the events of that day were likely to have on our lives.

  1. reflective practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    administration, I have long relied on Tinto's work to provide a foundation for my own ... researchers, think about how to promote college student success. .... particularly students who are older, working full-time, and/or supporting a family of .... balance between institutional autonomy and accountability to the government?

  2. Reflection as Situated Practice: A Memory-Work Study of Lived Experience in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovens, Alan; Tinning, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to understand whether student teachers enact reflection differently as they encounter different situations within their teacher education programme. Group memory-work was used to generate and analyse five participants' memories of learning to teach. Three different discursive contexts were identified in the students'…

  3. Player-Driven Video Analysis to Enhance Reflective Soccer Practice in Talent Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjort, Anders; Henriksen, Kristoffer; Elbæk, Lars

    2018-01-01

    In the present article, we investigate the introduction of a cloud-based video analysis platform called Player Universe (PU). Video analysis is not a new performance-enhancing element in sports, but PU is innovative in how it facilitates reflective learning. Video analysis is executed in the PU platform by involving the players in the analysis…

  4. An analysis of medical students’ reflective essays in problem-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihyun Si

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose This study aimed to explore students’ learning experience in problem-based learning (PBL particularly in terms of what they learned and how they learned in one Korean medical school by analyzing their reflective essays with qualitative research methods. Methods This study included 44 first-year medical students. They took three consecutive PBL courses and wrote reflective essays 3 times anonymously on the last day of each course. Their reflective essays were analyzed using an inductive content analysis method. Results The coding process yielded 16 sub-categories and these categories were grouped into six categories according to the distinctive characteristics of PBL learning experience: integrated knowledge base, clinical problem solving, collaboration, intrinsic motivation, self-directed learning, and professional attitude. Among these categories, integrated knowledge base (34.68% and professional attitude (2.31% were the categories mentioned most and least frequently. Conclusion The findings of this study provide an overall understanding of the learning experience of Korean medical students during PBL in terms of what they learned and how they learned with rich descriptive commentaries from their perspectives as well as several thoughtful insights to help develop instructional strategies to enhance the effectiveness of PBL.

  5. Real life narratives enhance learning about the 'art and science' of midwifery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkison, Andrea; Giddings, Lynne; Smythe, Liz

    2016-03-01

    Health professional educators have long grappled with how to teach the more elusive art of practice alongside the science (a term that encompasses the sort of professional knowledge that can be directly passed on). A competent practitioner is one who knows when, how and for whom to apply knowledge and skills, thereby making the links between theory and practice. They combine art and science in such a way that integrates knowledge with insight. This participatory hermeneutic study explored the experience of teachers and students of implementing a narrative-centred curriculum in undergraduate midwifery education. It revealed that when real life narratives were central to the learning environment, students' learning about the art of midwifery practice was enhanced as they learned about midwifery decisions, reflected on their own values and beliefs and felt an emotional connection with the narrator. Further, art and science became melded together in the context specific wisdom of practice (phronesis).

  6. Progressive practice promotes motor learning and repeated transient increases in corticospinal excitability across multiple days

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lasse; Madsen, Mads Alexander Just; Bojsen-Møller, Emil

    2018-01-01

    Background: A session of motor skill learning is accompanied by transient increases in corticospinal excitability (CSE), which are thought to reflect acute changes in neuronal connectivity associated with improvements in sensorimotor performance. Factors influencing changes in excitability...... and motor skill with continued practice remain however to be elucidated. Objective/Hypothesis: Here we investigate the hypothesis that progressive motor practice during consecutive days can induce repeated transient increases in corticospinal excitability and promote motor skill learning. Methods: Changes...... in motor performance and CSE were assessed during 4 consecutive days of skill learning and 8 days after the last practice session. CSE was assessed as area under recruitment curves (RC) using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Two groups of participants (n = 12) practiced a visuomotor tracking...

  7. UNIVERSITY TEACHING-LEARNING PROCESS: REFLECTIONS THROUGHOUT THE AGENCY THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Jacques Parraguez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This work analyses some reasons that might explain the insufficient academic level which is perceived in universities of developing countries. The discussion element is the teacher-student relationship which is studied under the perspective of the agency theory. It is concluded that in absence of efficient monitoring mechanisms of the teacher and student’s behavior might proliferate gaps of due diligence which attempts against the quality of the teaching-learning process.

  8. Evolution and natural selection: learning by playing and reflecting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Herrero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific literacy is more than the simple reproduction of traditional school science knowledge and requires a set of skills, among them identifying scientific issues, explaining phenomena scientifically and using scientific evidence. Several studies have indicated that playing computer games in the classroom can support the development of students’ conceptual understanding about scientific phenomena and theories. Our paper presents a research study where the role of the video game Spore as a learning tool was analysed in a Biology class. An ethnographical perspective served as the framework for the organization and development of a workshop comprised of five sessions with 22 4th grade students, and their Biology teacher. The results show that this video game could become an interesting learning tool to improve students’ understanding of evolution and natural selection. The students could combine their previous knowledge with the academic knowledge obtained though the simulation presented by the video game. To sum up, an attempt has been made to give some empirical guidance about effective approaches to the utilisation of games in classrooms, additionally paying attention to a number of concerns related to the effectiveness of video games as learning tools.

  9. Strategies for application of learning theories in art studio practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study highlights the link between learning theories and art studio practices. The paper is of the opinion that if these theories are critically understood and applied to the practical aspect of fine and applied arts then learning will be more functional. Nigerian Journal of Technology and Education in Nigeria Vol. 8(1) 2003: ...

  10. Transfer of Online Professional Learning to Teachers' Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, Anthony; Herrington, Jan; Hoban, Garry; Reid, Doug

    2009-01-01

    Professional learning is an important process in enabling teachers to update their pedagogical knowledge and practices. The use of online technologies to support professional learning has a number of benefits in terms of flexibility and scalability. However, it is not clear how well the approach impacts on teachers' classroom practices. This…

  11. Integration of Learning and Practice for Job Sharing Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Krausse, Pamela Marie

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the forces that support the proliferation of the flexible work arrangement called job sharing. Moreover, the paper will illuminate the need for integrating learning and practice as a way to develop and support job sharing partners, or "Partners in Practice" (PiPs). The author puts forth a model derived from learning in…

  12. Learning New Practices in Small Business: Engagement and Localised Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrich, Lisa C.; Billett, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Discusses the findings of a study that investigated how the learning of innovative practices might best proceed in small businesses. The recent implementation of the Goods and Service Tax (GST) in Australia presented an opportunity for understanding how small business operatives learned to implement a new practice. The procedures comprised…

  13. Quality Teaching and Learning as Practice within Different Disciplinary Discourses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittek, Line; Habib, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on describing the interplay between teaching and learning practices in Higher Education and the disciplinary context of such practices. In particular, it aims to address the question of how course design, teaching, and learning activities take place within a particular academic culture and how those activities mutually shape…

  14. Quantity versus Quality in Project Based Learning Practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Keegan (Anne); J.R. Turner (Rodney)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn the midst of the turbulence wrought by the global economy, it has become common to see projects as an essential medium for achieving change. However, project based learning practices - as a subset of organizational learning practices- have not kept pace with this development. To

  15. Experiences of Practice-Based Learning in Phenomenographic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovio-Johansson, Airi

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to examine, within the context of professional practice and learning, how designers collaboratively working in international teams experience practice-based learning and how such occasions contribute to professional development. Design/methodology/approach: The paper introduces the cooperation project between Tibro Training…

  16. Workplace Learning by Action Learning: A Practical Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Peter

    2003-01-01

    An action learning approach to help managers enhance learning capacity involved a performance management seminar, work by action learning sets, implementation of a new performance management instrument with mentoring by action learning facilitators, and evaluation. Survey responses from 392 participants revealed satisfaction with managerial…

  17. Internships as case-based learning for professional practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piihl, Jesper; Rasmussen, Jens Smed; Rowley, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    be designed to integrate differences in conceptions of knowledge in professional practices and pressures from short deadlines. The chapter explores how internship can enhance students’ learning and how students develop their role as academics-in-practice. Internships qualify as case based learning when......Internship programs can enhance generic learning outcomes by develop-ing students’ ability to interact with stakeholders in real world complexi-ties and contribute to changes in knowledge and practice. Experience from Denmark and Australia is used as background to show how intern-ship programs can...... the design of the program focuses on generic learning outcomes over specific solutions to specific problems in the specific context....

  18. Students' Framing of Language Learning Practices in Social Networking Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz-Andersson, Annika; Vigmo, Sylvi; Bowen, Rhonwen

    2012-01-01

    The amount of time that people, especially young people, spend on communicative activities in social media is rapidly increasing. We are facing new arenas with great potential for learning in general and for language learning in particular, but their impact on learning is not yet acknowledged as such in educational practice (e.g., Conole, 2010;…

  19. Learning Social Responsibility in Schools: A Restorative Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macready, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Vygotsky regarded the site of learning to be within a matrix of relational action. From this perspective, learning social responsibility will involve a focus on the learning environments that are made available in schools. Adapting the concept of restorative justice to a school context, restorative practice offers a range of relevant learning…

  20. Blended Learning: Communication, Locations and Work-Life Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Carl Erik; Rye, Stale Angen

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses blended learning and how various delivery formats affect the way learning is situated in work-life practices. The authors approached this issue through an empirical study of an in-service training programme for middle-level managers in a number of case organisations. The programme used a combination of e-learning, textbooks…

  1. How clerkship students learn from real patients in practice settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steven, Kathryn; Wenger, Etienne; Boshuizen, Els; Scherpbier, Albert; Dornan, Tim

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To explore how undergraduate medical students learn from real patients in practice settings, the factors that affect their learning, and how clerkship learning might be enhanced. Method In 2009, 22 medical students in the three clerkship years of an undergraduate medical program in the

  2. Professional Learning in Higher Education: Making Good Practice Relevant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Jeannie

    2017-01-01

    Professionals working in a range of contexts are increasingly expected to engage in ongoing professional learning to maintain their skills and develop their practices. In this paper, I focus on professional learning in Higher Education and challenge the standardisation of professional learning that is becoming prevalent in a number of countries. I…

  3. e-Learning competency for practice nurses: an evaluation report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heartfield, Marie; Morello, Andrea; Harris, Melanie; Lawn, Sharon; Pols, Vincenza; Stapleton, Carolyn; Battersby, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Practice nurses in Australia are now funded to facilitate chronic condition management, including self-management support. Chronic disease management requires an established rapport, support and proactivity between general practitioners, patients and the practice nurses. To achieve this, training in shared decision making is needed. e-Learning supports delivery and achievement of such policy outcomes, service improvements and skill development. However, e-learning effectiveness for health care professionals' is determined by several organisational, economic, pedagogical and individual factors, with positive e-learning experience linked closely to various supports. This paper reinforces previous studies showing nurses' expanding role across general practice teams and reports on some of the challenges of e-learning. Merely providing practice nurses with necessary information via web-based learning systems does not ensure successful learning or progress toward improving health outcomes for patients.

  4. Using photography to enhance GP trainees’ reflective practice and professional development.

    OpenAIRE

    Rutherford,; Forde, Emer; Priego-Hernández, J.; Butcher, Aurelia; Wedderburn, Clare

    2018-01-01

    The capacity and the commitment to reflect are integral to the practice of medicine and are core components of most GP training programmes. Teaching through the Humanities is a growing area within medical education, but one which is often considered a voluntary ‘add on’ for the interested doctor. This article describes an evaluation of a highly innovative pedagogical project which used photography as a means to enhance GP trainees’ reflective capacity, self awareness and professional developm...

  5. Practicing the practice: Learning to guide elementary science discussions in a practice-oriented science methods course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashima Mathur

    University methods courses are often criticized for telling pre-service teachers, or interns, about the theories behind teaching instead of preparing them to actually enact teaching. Shifting teacher education to be more "practice-oriented," or to focus more explicitly on the work of teaching, is a current trend for re-designing the way we prepare teachers. This dissertation addresses the current need for research that unpacks the shift to more practice-oriented approaches by studying the content and pedagogical approaches in a practice-oriented, masters-level elementary science methods course (n=42 interns). The course focused on preparing interns to guide science classroom discussions. Qualitative data, such as video records of course activities and interns' written reflections, were collected across eight course sessions. Codes were applied at the sentence and paragraph level and then grouped into themes. Five content themes were identified: foregrounding student ideas and questions, steering discussion toward intended learning goals, supporting students to do the cognitive work, enacting teacher role of facilitator, and creating a classroom culture for science discussions. Three pedagogical approach themes were identified. First, the teacher educators created images of science discussions by modeling and showing videos of this practice. They also provided focused teaching experiences by helping interns practice the interactive aspects of teaching both in the methods classroom and with smaller groups of elementary students in schools. Finally, they structured the planning and debriefing phases of teaching so interns could learn from their teaching experiences and prepare well for future experiences. The findings were analyzed through the lens of Grossman and colleagues' framework for teaching practice (2009) to reveal how the pedagogical approaches decomposed, represented, and approximated practice throughout course activities. Also, the teacher educators

  6. The Learning Journal Bridge: From Classroom Concepts to Leadership Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maellaro, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    The value of reflective writing assignments as learning tools for business students has been well-established. While the management education literature includes numerous examples of such assignments that are based on Kolb's (1984) experiential learning model, many of them engage only the first two phases of the model. When students do not move…

  7. Taking over someone else's e-learning design: challenges trigger change in e-learning beliefs and practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M. Scott

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As universities invest in the development of e-learning resources, e-learning sustainability has come under consideration. This has largely focused on the challenges and facilitators of organisational and technological sustainability and scalability, and professional development. Little research has examined the experience of a teacher dealing with e-learning sustainability when taking over a course with an e-learning resource and associated assessment. This research focuses on a teacher who was inexperienced with e-learning technology, yet took over a blended unit of study with an e-learning resource that accounted for one-fifth of the subject assessment and was directed towards academic skills development relevant to the degree program. Taking a longitudinal approach, this research examines the challenges faced by the new teacher and the way she changed the e-learning resource and its implementation over two years. A focus of the research is the way the teacher's reflections on the challenges and changes provided an opportunity and stimulus for change in her e-learning beliefs and practices. This research has implications for the way universities support teachers taking over another teacher's e-learning resource, the need for explicit documentation of underpinning beliefs and structured handover, the benefit of teamwork in developing e-learning resources, and provision of on-going support.

  8. Pedagogical Reflections on a Blendede Learning Enviroment in Ghanaian Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyamfi, Samuel Adu

    Large enrolment of students in most African universities and its attendant problems have led to falling level of the quality of the university graduate in the area of Communication Skills, a skill that most employers value most in a university graduate seeking an employment.  Using formative...... experiment (Reinking & Watkins, 2000), this thesis explored the use of a blended learning environment named ABLECAT, to improve the students’ knowledge and skills in the course.  The result was the development of a local theory through the use of ‘motivate, explore, apply and review/assess’ design...

  9. Moments of movement: active learning and practice development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewing, Jan

    2010-01-01

    As our understanding of practice development becomes more sophisticated, we enhance our understanding of how the facilitation of learning in and from practice, can be more effectively achieved. This paper outlines an approach for enabling and maximizing learning within practice development known as 'Active Learning'. It considers how, given establishing a learning culture is a prerequisite for the sustainability of PD within organisations, practice developers can do more to maximize learning for practitioners and other stakeholders. Active Learning requires that more attention be given by organisations committed to PD, at a corporate and strategic level for how learning strategies are developed in the workplace. Specifically, a move away from a heavy reliance on training may be required. Practice development facilitators also need to review: how they organise and offer learning, so that learning strategies are consistent with the vision, aims and processes of PD; have skills in the planning, delivery and evaluation of learning as part of their role and influence others who provide more traditional methods of training and education.

  10. The learning of aquaponics practice in university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustina, T. W.; Rustaman, N. Y.; Riandi; Purwianingsih, W.

    2018-05-01

    This study aims to obtain a description of the perfomance capabilities of aquaponic technology and the assessment of product and packaging of harvest kale. The aquaponic practice used a STREAM (Science Technology Religion Art Matematics) approach. The method was explanatory sequential mixed method. The research was conducted on one class of Biology Education students in 6th semester. The sample was chosen purposively with 49 students. The study instruments are student worksheet, observation sheet, rubric performance and product assessment, interview sheet and field notes. The indicator of performance rubrics on the manufacture of aquaponic technology consisted of the product rubric, cultivation criteria and packing method of kale. The interview rubric is in the form of student constraints on the manufacture of aquaponics. Based on the results, most students have performance in designing technology that is categorized as enough up to good. Almost all students produce a very good kale harvest. Most of the students produce kale packaging products that are categorized as enough. The implications of this research are the learning of aquaponic with the STREAM approach can equip student’s performance and product capabilities.

  11. Reponsive and Open Learning Environments (ROLE: Requirements, Evaluation and Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effie Lai-Chong Law

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Coordinating requirements engineering (RE and evaluation studies across heterogeneous technology-enhanced learning (TEL environments is deemed challenging, because each of them is situated in a specific organizational, technical and socio-cultural context. We have dealt with such challenges in the project of ROLE (http://www.role-project.eu/ in which five test-beds are involved in deploying and evaluating Personal Learning Environments (PLEs. They include Higher Education Institutions (HEIs and global enterprises in and beyond Europe, representing a range of values and assumptions. While the diversity provides fertile grounds for validating our research ideas, it poses many challenges for conducting comparison studies. In the paper, we first provide an overview of the ROLE project, focusing on its missions and aims. Next we present a Web2.0-inspired RE approach called Social Requirements Engineering (SRE. Then we depict our initial attempts to evaluate the ROLE framework and report some preliminary findings. One major outcome is that the technology adoption process must work on the basis of existing LMS, extending them with the ROLE functionality rather than embracing LMS functionality in ROLE.

  12. The evaluation of reflective learning from the nursing student's point of view: A mixed method approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Peña, Rosario; Fuentes-Pumarola, Concepció; Malagón-Aguilera, M Carme; Bonmatí-Tomàs, Anna; Bosch-Farré, Cristina; Ballester-Ferrando, David

    2016-09-01

    Adapting university programmes to European Higher Education Area criteria has required substantial changes in curricula and teaching methodologies. Reflective learning (RL) has attracted growing interest and occupies an important place in the scientific literature on theoretical and methodological aspects of university instruction. However, fewer studies have focused on evaluating the RL methodology from the point of view of nursing students. To assess nursing students' perceptions of the usefulness and challenges of RL methodology. Mixed method design, using a cross-sectional questionnaire and focus group discussion. The research was conducted via self-reported reflective learning questionnaire complemented by focus group discussion. Students provided a positive overall evaluation of RL, highlighting the method's capacity to help them better understand themselves, engage in self-reflection about the learning process, optimize their strengths and discover additional training needs, along with searching for continuous improvement. Nonetheless, RL does not help them as much to plan their learning or identify areas of weakness or needed improvement in knowledge, skills and attitudes. Among the difficulties or challenges, students reported low motivation and lack of familiarity with this type of learning, along with concerns about the privacy of their reflective journals and about the grading criteria. In general, students evaluated RL positively. The results suggest areas of needed improvement related to unfamiliarity with the methodology, ethical aspects of developing a reflective journal and the need for clear evaluation criteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Building Learning Communities: Foundations for Good Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Alison; Ramsay, Jill; Lindfield, Helen; Couperthwaite, John

    2005-01-01

    The School of Health Sciences at the University of Birmingham provided opportunities for the development of student learning communities and online resources within the neurological module of the BSc Physiotherapy degree programme. These learning communities were designed to facilitate peer and independent learning in core aspects underpinning…

  14. Good learning practices in the field of science and technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Amante García

    2011-09-01

    their professional and personal lives.In the present issue we have selected a number of articles related to good practices taking place in the context of new studies plan implementation (EHEA in several Spanish Universities.In  the first paper: Reflections and conclusions on the work developed by the group  of teaching innovation in electronics at the university of Valladolid ,they present the main conclusions and results obtained over the three last  academic  years in  the Electronics and Automatic Industrial Engineering degree. As a result of cooperative work of the group, an improvement in activity coordination and provision of tools to facilitate the teaching-learning process has been obtained. The work in question shows relevant strategies and tools that facilitate the incorporation and evaluation of generic competences in the new degrees within the EHEA framework.The second article, Realising pedagogical potential of the Bologna Process third cycle is contextualised within the issues of internationalisation, standards and standardization of degree credit ratings, with special attention on collaboration and competition, and language and writing. In other words, the main challenges that the emerging EHEA poses  in terms of third cycle students needs as to the pedagogical essence is concerned, such as the structural change. The EHEA has many practical gains to offer, but it also has potential disadvantages that this research discusses in depth.The third article, (Best practices in academic assessment in higher education: A Case in formative and shared assessment presents an example of good practices of formative assessment in a course that bases the entire learning process on an ongoing, formative system with real shared student assessment .In the last article of this second issue of JOTSE, Design and analysis of questionnaires for survey skills in chemical engineering some specific questionnaires following the recommendations of the European Federation of

  15. A Reflection upon the "Getting Practical" Programme: Rethinking How We Teach Practical Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Nikki

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author provides an overview of the "Getting Practical" training programme of professional development for all those involved with teaching practical science at primary, secondary, and post-16 levels. The programme is being led by the ASE, working with its co-ordinating partners: the Centre for Science Education,…

  16. Leadership in innovation projects: an illustration of the reflective practitioner and the relation to organizational learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeij, P.R.A.; Gaspersz, J.B.R.; Vuuren, T. van; Dhondt, S.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual article is to demonstrate that Donald Schön’s Reflective Practitioner actually outlines an explicit model of the steps that project leaders in practice apply largely unaware. This reflective research model furthermore can be meaningfully combined with Argyris and

  17. The tacit care knowledge in reflective writing – a practical wisdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Rykkje

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Norwegian municipal welfare system provides home healthcare and residential services to a growing population of older people. The skills and competence of the personnel providing these services need to keep pace with demand, and continuing education is vital. A concern, though, is the way positivist knowledge permeates both education and healthcare services; recognising other types of knowledge, such as tacit knowledge together with practical wisdom, is important to complement the focus on evidence-based practice. Aims and objectives: This article addresses the need for healthcare professionals to develop open-minded reflection in writing and in action, as keys to expressing tacit knowledge and thus making it more visible. Moreover, tacit knowledge may also represent practical wisdom, or ‘phronesis’. The aim is to bring forward examples of the often invisible and unrecognised expertise held by experienced nurses and other healthcare professionals. Method: This discussion paper is based on reflection notes written by students doing continuing education in advanced gerontology. Some of the situational dilemmas that students bring forward in their texts are retold, and these stories represent traces of tacit care knowledge, and practical wisdom or phronesis. Findings: Reflection may strengthen students’ ethical autonomy and imagination, which is important in healthcare professionals’ caregiving. Reflective writing is part of the educational pathway and contributes to the development of personal tacit knowledge and wisdom. The experiences put forward in the student’s stories become part of their ability to act and care; this embodied knowledge is understood as part of what phronesis might be. Implications for practice: Fostering healthcare professionals’ self-awareness through reflection can help them come to a realisation and understanding that opens up new alternatives for action Reflection may increase awareness of

  18. Reflective Journaling for Critical Thinking Development in Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raterink, Ginger

    2016-02-01

    Critical thinking, clinical decision making, and critical reflection have been identified as skills required of nurses in every clinical situation. The Educating Nurses: A Call for Radical Transformation report suggested that critical reflection is a key to improving the educational process. Reflective journaling is a tool that helps develop such skills. This article presents the tool of reflective journaling and the use of this process by educators working with students. It describes the use of reflective journaling in graduate nursing education, as well as a scoring process to evaluate the reflection and provide feedback. Students and faculty found the journaling to be helpful for reflection of a clinical situation focused on critical thinking skill development. The rubric scoring tool provided faculty with a method for feedback. Reflective journaling is a tool that faculty and students can use to develop critical thinking skills for the role of the advanced practice RN. A rubric scoring system offers a consistent format for feedback. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. What do we do? Practices and learning strategies of medical education leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieff, Susan; Albert, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    Continuous changes in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education require faculty to assume a variety of new leadership roles. While numerous faculty development programmes have been developed, there is little evidence about the specific practices of medical education leaders or their learning strategies to help inform their design. This study aimed to explore what medical education leaders' actually do, their learning strategies and recommendations for faculty development. A total of 16 medical education leaders from a variety of contexts within the faculty of medicine of a large North American medical school participated in semi-structured interviews to explore the nature of their work and the learning strategies they employ. Using thematic analysis, interview transcripts were coded inductively and then clustered into emergent themes. Findings clustered into four key themes of practice: (1) intrapersonal (e.g., self-awareness), (2) interpersonal (e.g., fostering informal networks), (3) organizational (e.g., creating a shared vision) and (4) systemic (e.g. strategic navigation). Learning strategies employed included learning from experience and example, reflective practice, strategic mentoring or advanced training. Our findings illuminate a four-domain framework for understanding medical education leader practices and their learning preferences. While some of these findings are not unknown in the general leadership literature, our understanding of their application in medical education is unique. These practices and preferences have a potential utility for conceptualizing a coherent and relevant approach to the design of faculty development strategies for medical education leadership.

  20. Nursing students' perceptions of learning in practice environments: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Amanda; Cooke, Marie; Creedy, Debra K; Walker, Rachel

    2012-04-01

    Effective clinical learning requires integration of nursing students into ward activities, staff engagement to address individual student learning needs, and innovative teaching approaches. Assessing characteristics of practice environments can provide useful insights for development. This study identified predominant features of clinical learning environments from nursing students' perspectives across studies using the same measure in different countries over the last decade. Six studies, from three different countries, using the Clinical Leaning Environment Inventory (CLEI) were reviewed. Studies explored consistent trends about learning environment. Students rated sense of task accomplishment high. Affiliation also rated highly though was influenced by models of care. Feedback measuring whether students' individual needs and views were accommodated consistently rated lower. Across different countries students report similar perceptions about learning environments. Clinical learning environments are most effective in promoting safe practice and are inclusive of student learners, but not readily open to innovation and challenges to routine practices. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigating the Impact of Formal Reflective Activities on Skill Adaptation in a Work-Related Instrumental Learning Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessger, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    In work-related, instrumental learning contexts the role of reflective activities is unclear. Kolb's (1985) experiential learning theory and Mezirow's transformative learning theory (2000) predict skill-adaptation as a possible outcome. This prediction was experimentally explored by manipulating reflective activities and assessing participants'…

  2. Improvements in anatomy knowledge when utilizing a novel cyclical "Observe-Reflect-Draw-Edit-Repeat" learning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhouse, Mark; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Hutchinson, Joseph; Thandi, Charankumal S; Keenan, Iain D

    2017-01-01

    Innovative educational strategies can provide variety and enhance student learning while addressing complex logistical and financial issues facing modern anatomy education. Observe-Reflect-Draw-Edit-Repeat (ORDER), a novel cyclical artistic process, has been designed based on cognitivist and constructivist learning theories, and on processes of critical observation, reflection and drawing in anatomy learning. ORDER was initially investigated in the context of a compulsory first year surface anatomy practical (ORDER-SAP) at a United Kingdom medical school in which a cross-over trial with pre-post anatomy knowledge testing was utilized and student perceptions were identified. Despite positive perceptions of ORDER-SAP, medical student (n = 154) pre-post knowledge test scores were significantly greater (P learning methods (3.26, SD = ±2.25) than with ORDER-SAP (2.17, ±2.30). Based on these findings, ORDER was modified and evaluated in the context of an optional self-directed gross anatomy online interactive tutorial (ORDER-IT) for participating first year medical students (n = 55). Student performance was significantly greater (P  0.05) to those students without these characteristics. These findings will be of value to anatomy instructors seeking to engage students from diverse learning backgrounds in a research-led, innovative, time and cost-effective learning method, in the context of contrasting learning environments. Anat Sci Educ 10: 7-22. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  3. Expanding the "ports of entry" for speech-language pathologists: a relational and reflective model for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Elaine; Foley, Gilbert M

    2009-02-01

    To outline an expanded framework for clinical practice in speech-language pathology. This framework broadens the focus on discipline-specific knowledge and infuses mental health constructs within the study of communication sciences and disorders, with the objective of expanding the potential "ports or points of entry" (D. Stern, 1995) for clinical intervention with young children who are language impaired. Specific mental health constructs are highlighted in this article. These include relationship-based learning, attachment theory, working dyadically (the client is the child and parent), reflective practice, transference-countertransference, and the use of self. Each construct is explored as to the way it has been applied in traditional and contemporary models of clinical practice. The underlying premise in this framework is that working from a relationally based and reflective perspective augments change and growth in both client and parent(s). The challenge is for speech-language pathologists to embed mental health constructs within their discipline-specific expertise. This leads to paying attention to both observable aspects of clients' behaviors as well as their internal affective states.

  4. The research and practice of integrating conservation and development: Self-reflections by researchers on methodologies, objectives and influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Pasgaard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the application of mixed-method and participatory approaches to conservation and development research. Both approaches were applied in a research project on the relationship between ecosystem governance and the wellbeing of local communities adjacent to a protected area in Laos. By encouraging four of the involved field researchers to reflect upon and expose their practical approaches as scientific experts (in terms of methodologies, objectives, reliability of results and research influence, this article aims to improve our learning from research practice and to promote reflexivity in research. The reflexive study presented here emphasizes the social and political context or real world situation against which research outputs can and should be evaluated, and retrospectively sheds light on the barriers to reach research objectives. In essence, the article addresses the relation between science and policy, and underlines the political undercurrent of conservation and development research in facilitating institutional change. The article outlines the very role of researchers in developing conservation policies, and provides a foundation for institutions and individual researchers to promote critical and constructive self-reflections in scientific practices.

  5. What Teachers Can Learn from the Practice of Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This article considers how primary teachers can learn from the practice of artists in their own teaching of art. Fundamental to artistic practice is the notion of practising with various materials and tools. In the article I look at some children's images, as well as scrutinising some statements made by the painter Francis Bacon. The practices of…

  6. Exploring Practice-Research Networks for Critical Professional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Yvon; Hillier, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the contribution that practice-research networks can make to support critical professional development in the Learning and Skills sector in England. By practice-research networks we mean groups or networks which maintain a connection between research and professional practice. These networks stem from the philosophy of…

  7. E-Learning and Evidence Based Practice in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quong, Terrence

    2016-01-01

    JCTIC has used open source software to develop a unique school online environment that has made evidence based practice viable in their school. In this paper the proposition is made that eLearning enables evidence based practice which in turn leads to improved student outcomes. Much has been written about evidence based practice in schools, but…

  8. Applications of Situated Learning to Foster Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds-Cady, Cynthia; Sosulski, Marya R.

    2012-01-01

    The authors discuss 2 macro-level community practice courses, examining how each applies the concepts of situated learning to foster the development of communities of practice through use of a unique model for antioppressive practice. The theoretical underpinnings and a discussion of the implementation of each stage of the model is provided. The…

  9. Through the looking glass: how reflective learning influences the development of young faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Stacy; Bernstein, Lisa; Manning, Kimberly; Schneider, Jason; Kho, Anna; Brownfield, Erica; Branch, William T

    2011-01-01

    Faculty development is needed that will influence clinical teachers to better enable them to transmit humanistic values to their learners and colleagues. We sought to understand the processes whereby reflective learning influenced professional growth in a convenience sample of young faculty members. We analyzed appreciative inquiry narratives written over 4 years using the constant comparative method to identify major underlying themes and develop hypotheses concerning how reflective learning influenced participants in the faculty development program. Six of the participants and the facilitator were participant observers in the qualitative analysis. Group support, validation, and cohesion led to adoption of common values that informed the professional development of the participants over 4 years of the study. Common values influenced the group members as they progressed in their careers. Faculty development programs that focus on humanism and reflective learning can facilitate the growth of young faculty members by influencing their values and attitudes at crucial phases of their careers.

  10. e-Portfolio as reflection tool during teaching practice: The interplay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focuses on an e-portfolio pilot initiative at the Faculty of Education ... expectations of an e-portfolio aligns with the current practices and attributes ... will impact the potential success of the integration of e-portfolios as reflective tools.

  11. The Role of Reflective Practices in Building Social Capital in Organizations from an HRD Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshie Tomozumi; Yorks, Lyle

    2011-01-01

    Social capital has been receiving increasing attention in the field of human resource development (HRD). However, little is known as to how social capital has been formed or has grown over time with HRD interventions. There is limited research and discussion on how reflective practices play a role in the development of social capital as…

  12. Reflection into China's Business English Teaching Practices Based on GDUFS Graduates' Employment Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenzhong; Wu, Si; Guo, Tingting

    2009-01-01

    GDUFS, as one of China's top three foreign language universities with the longest history in business English teaching, has accumulated over 20-year experiences in this discipline. This research reflects into its business English teaching practices based on its graduates' employment status in recent years, and concludes that the students of…

  13. Chat It Up: Backchanneling to Promote Reflective Practice among In-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassner, Laura D.; Cassada, Kate M.

    2017-01-01

    In a graduate education course geared toward developing reflective teaching practice in in-service teachers, backchannels, in the form of chat rooms, were employed in small groups to facilitate peer feedback during viewings of video recorded instruction. This study examined the nature and quality of peer feedback exchanged in the digital medium…

  14. Reflective Practice as Professional Development: Experiences of Teachers of English in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a researcher's work on reflective practice with a group of high school teachers of English in Japan. Beginning with a series of uncomfortable teacher training sessions delivered to unwilling participants, the book charts the author's development of new methods of engaging her participants and making use of their own experiences…

  15. Exploring Students' Reflective Thinking Practice, Deep Processing Strategies, Effort, and Achievement Goal Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Huy Phuong

    2009-01-01

    Recent research indicates that study processing strategies, effort, reflective thinking practice, and achievement goals are important factors contributing to the prediction of students' academic success. Very few studies have combined these theoretical orientations within one conceptual model. This study tested a conceptual model that included, in…

  16. Following Alice: Theories of Critical Thinking and Reflective Practice in Action at Postgraduate Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanwick, Ruth; Kitchen, Ruth; Jarvis, Joy; McCracken, Wendy; O'Neil, Rachel; Powers, Steve

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a flexible framework of principles for teaching critical thinking and reflective practice skills at the postgraduate level. It reports on a collaborative project between four UK institutions providing postgraduate programmes in deaf education. Through a critical review of current theories of critical thinking and reflective…

  17. Reflective Practice in the Ballet Class: Bringing Progressive Pedagogy to the Classical Tradition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    This research seeks to broaden the dialogue on progressive ballet pedagogy through an examination of reflective practices in the ballet class. Ballet's traditional model of instruction has long required students to quietly comply with the pedagogue's directives, and it has thus become notorious for promoting student passivity. Despite strong…

  18. Some Reflections about Writing "A History of Thought and Practice in Educational Administration."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Roald F.

    A coauthor of a book on the history of thought and practice in educational administration reflects on issues raised during the writing of the book as follows: (1) Categories of administrative thought are difficult to establish. Two categories were derived from Richard Scott's rational systems approach--scientific management and bureaucracy. The…

  19. Mastery, Enjoyment, Tradition and Innovation: A Reflective Practice Model for Instrumental and Vocal Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Tom

    2016-01-01

    This article offers a model to assist music teachers in reflecting on their teaching practice in relation to their aims and values. Initially developed as a workshop aid for use on a music education MA program, the model is intended to provoke critical engagement with two prominent tensions in music education: that between mastery and enjoyment,…

  20. Collecting and analysing cost data for complex public health trials: reflections on practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batura, Neha; Pulkki-Brännström, Anni-Maria; Agrawal, Priya; Bagra, Archana; Haghparast-Bidgoli, Hassan; Bozzani, Fiammetta; Colbourn, Tim; Greco, Giulia; Hossain, Tanvir; Sinha, Rajesh; Thapa, Bidur; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene

    2014-01-01

    Background Current guidelines for the conduct of cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) are mainly applicable to facility-based interventions in high-income settings. Differences in the unit of analysis and the high cost of data collection can make these guidelines challenging to follow within public health trials in low- and middle- income settings. Objective This paper reflects on the challenges experienced within our own work and proposes solutions that may be useful to others attempting to collect, analyse, and compare cost data between public health research sites in low- and middle-income countries. Design We describe the generally accepted methods (norms) for collecting and analysing cost data in a single-site trial from the provider perspective. We then describe our own experience applying these methods within eight comparable cluster randomised, controlled, trials. We describe the strategies used to maximise adherence to the norm, highlight ways in which we deviated from the norm, and reflect on the learning and limitations that resulted. Results When the expenses incurred by a number of small research sites are used to estimate the cost-effectiveness of delivering an intervention on a national scale, then deciding which expenses constitute ‘start-up’ costs will be a nontrivial decision that may differ among sites. Similarly, the decision to include or exclude research or monitoring and evaluation costs can have a significant impact on the findings. We separated out research costs and argued that monitoring and evaluation costs should be reported as part of the total trial cost. The human resource constraints that we experienced are also likely to be common to other trials. As we did not have an economist in each site, we collaborated with key personnel at each site who were trained to use a standardised cost collection tool. This approach both accommodated our resource constraints and served as a knowledge sharing and capacity building process within the

  1. Collecting and analysing cost data for complex public health trials: reflections on practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Batura

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current guidelines for the conduct of cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA are mainly applicable to facility-based interventions in high-income settings. Differences in the unit of analysis and the high cost of data collection can make these guidelines challenging to follow within public health trials in low- and middle- income settings. Objective: This paper reflects on the challenges experienced within our own work and proposes solutions that may be useful to others attempting to collect, analyse, and compare cost data between public health research sites in low- and middle-income countries. Design: We describe the generally accepted methods (norms for collecting and analysing cost data in a single-site trial from the provider perspective. We then describe our own experience applying these methods within eight comparable cluster randomised, controlled, trials. We describe the strategies used to maximise adherence to the norm, highlight ways in which we deviated from the norm, and reflect on the learning and limitations that resulted. Results: When the expenses incurred by a number of small research sites are used to estimate the cost-effectiveness of delivering an intervention on a national scale, then deciding which expenses constitute ‘start-up’ costs will be a nontrivial decision that may differ among sites. Similarly, the decision to include or exclude research or monitoring and evaluation costs can have a significant impact on the findings. We separated out research costs and argued that monitoring and evaluation costs should be reported as part of the total trial cost. The human resource constraints that we experienced are also likely to be common to other trials. As we did not have an economist in each site, we collaborated with key personnel at each site who were trained to use a standardised cost collection tool. This approach both accommodated our resource constraints and served as a knowledge sharing and capacity

  2. Care erosion in hospitals: Problems in reflective nursing practice and the role of cognitive dissonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jan; Timmins, Fiona

    2016-03-01

    Care erosion - gradual decline in care level - is an important problem in health care today. Unfortunately, the mechanism whereby it occurs is complex and poorly understood. This paper seeks to address this by emphasising problems in reflective nursing practice. Critical reflection on quality of care which should drive good care instead spawns justifications, denial, and trivialisation of deficient care. This perpetuates increasingly poor care levels. We argue that cognitive dissonance theory provides a highly effective understanding of this process and suggest for this approach to be incorporated in all efforts to address care erosion. The paper includes a detailed discussion of examples and implications for practice, in particular the need to restore critical reflection in nursing, the importance of embracing strong values and standards, and the need for increased awareness of signs of care erosion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Shared learning in general practice--facilitators and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Mortel, Thea; Silberberg, Peter; Ahern, Christine

    2013-03-01

    Capacity for teaching in general practice clinics is limited. Shared learning sessions are one form of vertically integrated teaching that may ameliorate capacity constraints. This study sought to understand the perceptions of general practitioner supervisors, learners and practice staff of the facilitators of shared learning in general practice clinics. Using a grounded theory approach, semistructured interviews were conducted and analysed to generate a theory about the topic. Thirty-five stakeholders from nine general practices participated. Facilitators of shared learning included enabling factors such as small group facilitation skills, space, administrative support and technological resources; reinforcing factors such as targeted funding, and predisposing factors such as participant attributes. Views from multiple stakeholders suggest that the implementation of shared learning in general practice clinics would be supported by an ecological approach that addresses all these factors.

  4. Tensions in learning professional identities - nursing students' narratives and participation in practical skills during their clinical practice: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewertsson, Mona; Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta; Allvin, Renée; Blomberg, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Clinical practice is a pivotal part of nursing education. It provides students with the opportunity to put the knowledge and skills they have acquired from lectures into practice with real patients, under the guidance of registered nurses. Clinical experience is also essential for shaping the nursing students' identity as future professional nurses. There is a lack of knowledge and understanding of the ways in which students learn practical skills and apply knowledge within and across different contexts, i.e. how they apply clinical skills, learnt in the laboratory in university settings, in the clinical setting. The aim of this study was therefore to explore how nursing students describe, and use, their prior experiences related to practical skills during their clinical practice. An ethnographic case study design was used. Fieldwork included participant observations (82 h), informal conversations, and interviews ( n  = 7) that were conducted during nursing students' ( n  = 17) clinical practice at an emergency department at a university hospital in Sweden. The overarching theme identified was "Learning about professional identities with respect to situated power". This encompasses tensions in students' learning when they are socialized into practical skills in the nursing profession. This overarching theme consists of three sub-themes: "Embodied knowledge", "Divergent ways of assessing and evaluating knowledge" and "Balancing approaches". Nursing students do not automatically possess the ability to transfer knowledge from one setting to another; rather, their development is shaped by their experiences and interactions with others when they meet real patients. The study revealed different ways in which students navigated tensions related to power differentials. Reflecting on actions is a prerequisite for developing and learning practical skills and professional identities. This highlights the importance of both educators' and the preceptors' roles for

  5. Reflections of health care professionals on e-learning resources for patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kieran

    2018-01-01

    There is a paucity of evidence on how health care professionals view e-learning as a means of education to achieve safer health care. To address this gap, the reflections of health care professionals who used the resources on BMJ Learning were captured and analyzed. Key themes emerged from the analysis. Health care professionals are keen to put their e-learning into action to achieve safer health care and to learn how to follow guidelines that will help them achieve safer health care. Learners wanted their learning to remain grounded in reality. Finally, many commented that it was difficult for their individual learning to have a real impact when the culture of the organization did not change.

  6. Countering the Pedagogy of Extremism: Reflective Narratives and Critiques of Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Chris W. H.; Laxman, Kumar

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a critique against "purist" pedagogies found in the literature of student-centred learning. The article reproves extremism in education and questions the absolutism and teleological truths expounded in exclusive problem-based learning. The paper articulates the framework of a unifying pedagogical practice through Eve…

  7. Developing Communication Management Skills: Integrated Assessment and Reflection in an Experiential Learning Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyphert, Dale; Dodge, Elena Nefedova; Duclos (Wilson), Leslie K.

    2016-01-01

    The value of experiential learning is widely acknowledged, especially for the development of communication skills, but students are not always aware of their own learning. While we can observe students practicing targeted skills during the experiential activity, the experience can also color their explicit understanding of those skills. Transfer…

  8. Reflections on the Use of Iterative, Agile and Collaborative Approaches for Blended Flipped Learning Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Hazel; Dunham, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    E-learning experiences are widely becoming common practice in many schools, tertiary institutions and other organisations. However despite this increased use of technology to enhance learning and the associated investment involved the result does not always equate to more engaged, knowledgeable and skilled learners. We have observed two key…

  9. Perceptions of student nurses on the writing of reflective journals as a means for personal, professional and clinical learning development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazel T. Mahlanze

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reflective journals are used by the students to voice their views on the daily activities during clinical placement. Reflective journals are aimed at helping the student to observe and record as many facts about daily practice as the student finds relevant. Reflective journal writing can therefore be used as a tool to evaluate that clinical learning is actually taking place and what challenges students are experiencing which may influence their learning. Findings by Harris (2006:460–461 are encouraging that through journaling students will develop ability to identify and analyse their difficulties, make suggestions for solving problems and ask and pursue questions on their own. Some of the participants confirmed improved values clarification, self-valuing and personal growth. Bulman & Schutz (2008:172 recommends journal writing for recording processes the student observe, copy and internalize in her journey towards professional development. Objectives: This study aimed to determine student nurses' perceptions of reflective journal writing as a means for personal, professional development and clinical learning development. Method: A quantitative and descriptive survey was conducted in September 2013. Forty participants were recruited from second year student nurses of a University of Technology in uMgungundlovu District of KwaZulu-Natal. Purposive convenience sampling strategy was used. A structured questionnaire was designed by the researcher from literature reviewed. The questionnaire was piloted and modified, then used after permission had been granted by the Ethics Committee of the university concerned. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS 17 programme was used for data analysis. Results: Results indicated that the participants generally experienced writing of reflective journals to be a valuable tool enhancing personal development, professional growth and clinical learning. A significant number (n = 24

  10. Standard Practice for Calculation of Photometric Transmittance and Reflectance of Materials to Solar Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1988-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes the calculation of luminous (photometric) transmittance and reflectance of materials from spectral radiant transmittance and reflectance data obtained from Test Method E 903. 1.2 Determination of luminous transmittance by this practice is preferred over measurement of photometric transmittance by methods using the sun as a source and a photometer as detector except for transmitting sheet materials that are inhomogeneous, patterned, or corrugated. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  11. Teachers’ Learning Design Practice for Students as Learning Designers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin Tweddell; Sørensen, Birgitte Holm

    2018-01-01

    This paper contributes with elements of an emerging learning design methodology. The paper takes as its starting point the theory of Students as Learning Designers, which was developed by Sørensen and Levinsen and based on more than a decade of research-and-development projects in Danish primary...... schools (first to 10th grade). The research focussed on information and communication technology (ICT) within the Scandinavian tradition of Problem Oriented Project Pedagogy (POPP), Problem Based Learning (PBL) and students’ production. In recent years, the projects that provide the grounding...... for the theory have focussed specifically on learning designs that constitute students as learning designers of digital productions (both multimodal and coded productions). This includes learning designs that contribute to students’ empowerment, involvement and autonomy within the teacher-designed frameworks...

  12. Exploring nursing students’ experience of peer learning in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Bahreini, Masoud; Ravanipour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peer learning is an educational process wherein someone of the same age or level of experience level interacts with other students interested in the same topic. There is limited evidence specifically focusing on the practical use of peer learning in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students’ experiences of peer learning in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis was conducted. Focus groups were used to find the students’ experiences about peerlearning. Twenty-eight baccalaureate nursing students at Bushehr University of Medical Sciences were selected purposively, and were arranged in four groups of seven students each. The focus group interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview schedule. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: The analysis identified four themes: Paradoxical dualism, peer exploitation, first learning efficacy, and socialization practice. Gained advantages and perceived disadvantages created paradoxical dualism, and peer exploitation resulted from peer selection and peer training. Conclusion: Nursing students reported general satisfaction concerning peer learning due to much more in-depth learning with little stress than conventional learning methods. Peer learning is a useful method for nursing students for practicing educational leadership and learning the clinical skills before they get a job. PMID:26097860

  13. Does a summative portfolio foster the development of capabilities such as reflective practice and understanding ethics? An evaluation from two medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Anthony J; Howe, Amanda C; Miles, Susan; Harris, Peter; Hughes, Chris S; Jones, Philip; Scicluna, Helen; Leinster, Sam J

    2012-01-01

    Portfolios need to be evaluated to determine whether they encourage students to develop in capabilities such as reflective practice and ethical judgment. The aims of this study were (i) to determine whether preparing a portfolio helps promote students' development in a range of capabilities including understanding ethical and legal principles, reflective practice and effective communication, and (ii) to determine to what extent the format of the portfolio affected the outcome by comparing the experiences of students at two different medical schools. A questionnaire was designed to evaluate undergraduate medical students' experiences of completing a portfolio at two medical schools. A total of 526 (45% response rate) students answered the on-line questionnaire. Students from both medical schools gave the highest ranking for the portfolio as a trigger for reflective practice. 63% of students agreed their portfolio helped them develop reflective practice skills (p portfolios helped them understand ethical and legal principles whereas 29% disagreed (p portfolio helped them to develop effective communication. Students perceive portfolio preparation as an effective learning tool for the development of capabilities such as understanding ethical and legal principles and reflective practice, whereas other capabilities such as effective communication require complementary techniques and other modes of assessment.

  14. Professionalism and maintenance of certification: using vignettes describing interpersonal dilemmas to stimulate reflection and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabeo, Elizabeth C; Reddy, Siddharta G; Ginsburg, Shiphra; Holmboe, Eric S

    2014-01-01

    Physicians do not always agree on "rules" governing behavior in professionally challenging situations. Little is known about contextual factors that influence physician approaches in these situations. We explored the individual-, social-, and societal-level factors that physicians consider when responding to 2 common professional dilemmas. We were particularly interested in knowing the extent to which physicians engage in self-reflection as a result of responding to the vignettes. A cross-sectional Web-based survey was sent to a random sample of 396 physicians, prompting them to respond to scripted professional dilemmas. A total of 120 physicians responded, yielding a response rate of 32.6%. Physicians responded to these dilemmas in highly variable ways, negotiating a complex array of contextual factors in their decisions. Interacting factors involving individual-level physician (eg, worry, guilt), patient (eg, nature of medical condition or relationship with patient), and social/societal (eg, policy, what peers or colleagues do) were important drivers in physician responses. Qualitative analysis revealed that several interacting themes guide physician approaches to professional dilemmas: patient welfare; types of patients; political, ethical, or legal issues; guiding principles; values; rules; and habits. Physicians negotiate a complex set of individual-, social-, and societal-level factors in response to professional dilemmas. This finding has important implications for the promotion and assessment of professional behavior in practicing physicians. Reflecting on scenarios may be an opportunity for physicians to learn about how and why they make decisions in difficult situations. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  15. School Librarian as Inquisitor of Practice: Reimagine, Reflect, and React with the New Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    The modern school library is a complex social setting "grounded in standards and best practice" (AASL 2018). The new "National School Library Standards" have refreshed the student learning standards and aligned new Shared Foundations to the school library. Additionally, the competencies for learners are now complemented by…

  16. Reflective Practice as "Enrichment": How New Early Childhood Teachers Enact Preservice Values in Their Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Susan L.; Beck, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    This article is part of a larger exploratory study that followed preservice early childhood teachers through their program and into their first year of practice, giving voice to their understandings of quality teaching and learning, and insight into the ways their preservice program prepared them for the challenges of teaching in diverse settings.…

  17. Beyond Prejudice: Inclusive Learning in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vikki; Armstrong, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Promoting an inclusive learning environment that caters for all learners and their individual needs and meeting challenging targets set in this area is a huge under taking for providers across the learning and skills sector. This booklet provides an overview that illustrates the breadth and variety that the broad banner of inclusive learning…

  18. Collaborative Learning in Practice : Examples from Natural ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1 déc. 2010 ... Parmi ses publications récentes, citons Learning from the Field: Innovating China's Higher Education System (Foundation Books et CRDI, 2008) et Social and Gender Analysis in Natural Resource Management: Learning Studies and Lessons from Asia (Sage India, CAP et CRDI, 2006). Edición español: ...

  19. Virtual Action Learning: Practices and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, Mollie; Burgoyne, John; Pedler, Mike

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports findings from research that set out to explore virtual action learning (VAL) as an emerging variety of action learning (AL). In bringing together geographically dispersed individuals within and across organizations, and possibly across time, VAL has obvious potential in both educational and commercial contexts. Whilst there is…

  20. Learning beyond graduation: exploring newly qualified specialists' entrance into daily practice from a learning perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuyvers, Katrien; Donche, Vincent; Van den Bossche, Piet

    2016-05-01

    The entrance of newly qualified medical specialists into daily practice is considered to be a stressful period in which curriculum support is absent. Although engaging in both personal and professional learning and development activities is recognized fundamental for lifelong professional competence, research on medical professionals' entrance into practice is scarce. This research aims to contribute to the framework of medical professionals' informal learning and outlines the results of an exploratory study on the nature of learning in daily practice beyond postgraduate training. Eleven newly qualified physicians from different specialized backgrounds participated in a phenomenographic study, using a critical incident method and a grounded theory approach. Results demonstrated that learning in the workplace is, to a large extent, informal and associated with a variety of learning experiences. Analysis shows that experiences related to diagnostics and treatments are important sources for learning. Furthermore, incidents related to communication, changing roles, policy and organization offer learning opportunities, and therefore categorized as learning experiences. A broad range of learning activities are identified in dealing with these learning experiences. More specifically, actively engaging in actions and interactions, especially with colleagues of the same specialty, are the most mentioned. Observing others, consulting written sources, and recognizing uncertainties, are also referred to as learning activities. In the study, interaction, solely or combined with other learning activities, are deemed as very important by specialists in the initial entrance into practice. These insights can be used to develop workplace structures to support the entrance into practice following postgraduate training.