WorldWideScience

Sample records for layer transition protuberance

  1. Version 2 of the Protuberance Correlations for the Shuttle-Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Rudolph A.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Berry, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    Orbiter-specific transition data, acquired in four ground-based facilities (LaRC 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel, LaRC 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel, LaRC 20-Inch Mach 6 CF4 Tunnel, and CUBRC LENS-I Shock Tunnel) with three wind tunnel model scales (0.75, 0.90, and 1.8%) and from Orbiter historical flight data, have been analyzed to improve a pre-existing engineering tool for reentry transition prediction on the windward side of the Orbiter. Boundary layer transition (BLT) engineering correlations for transition induced by isolated protuberances are presented using a laminar Navier-Stokes (N-S) database to provide the relevant boundary-layer properties. It is demonstrated that the earlier version of the BLT correlation that had been developed using parameters derived from an engineering boundary-layer code has improved data collapse when developed with the N-S database. Of the new correlations examined, the proposed correlation 5, based on boundary-layer edge and wall properties, was found to provide the best overall correlation metrics when the entire database is employed. The second independent correlation (proposed correlation 7) selected is based on properties within the boundary layer at the protuberance height. The Aeroheating Panel selected a process to derive the recommended coefficients for Version 2 of the BLT Tool. The assumptions and limitations of the recommended protuberance BLT Tool V.2 are presented.

  2. Boundary Layer Transition Protuberance Tests at NASA JSC Arc-Jet Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, Max E.; Marichalar, Jeremiah J.; Kinder, Gerald R.; Campbell, Charles H.; Riccio, Joseph R.; Nguyen, Tien Q.; Del Papa, Steven V.; Pulsonetti, Maria V.

    2010-01-01

    A series of tests conducted recently at the NASA JSC arc -jet test facility demonstrated that a protruding tile material can survive the exposure to the high enthalpy flows characteristic of the Space Shuttle Orbiter re-entry environments. The tests provided temperature data for the protuberance and the surrounding smooth tile surfaces, as well as the tile bond line. The level of heating needed to slump the protuberance material was achieved. Protuberance failure mode was demonstrated.

  3. Space Shuttle Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Ground Testing Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Flight Experiment (FE) Project in which a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for STS-119, STS- 128, STS-131 and STS-133 as well as Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour for STS-134, a significant ground test campaign was completed. The primary goals of the test campaign were to provide ground test data to support the planning and safety certification efforts required to fly the flight experiment as well as validation for the collected flight data. These test included Arcjet testing of the tile protuberance, aerothermal testing to determine the boundary layer transition behavior and resultant surface heating and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) testing in order to gain a better understanding of the flow field characteristics associated with the flight experiment. This paper provides an overview of the BLT FE Project ground testing. High-level overviews of the facilities, models, test techniques and data are presented, along with a summary of the insights gained from each test.

  4. Heating Augmentation for Short Hypersonic Protuberances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Ali R.; Wood, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Computational aeroheating analyses of the Space Shuttle Orbiter plug repair models are validated against data collected in the Calspan University of Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) 48 inch shock tunnel. The comparison shows that the average difference between computed heat transfer results and the data is about 9.5%. Using CFD and Wind Tunnel (WT) data, an empirical correlation for estimating heating augmentation on short hypersonic protuberances (k/delta less than 0.3) is proposed. This proposed correlation is compared with several computed flight simulation cases and good agreement is achieved. Accordingly, this correlation is proposed for further investigation on other short hypersonic protuberances for estimating heating augmentation.

  5. Tile Surface Thermocouple Measurement Challenges from the Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Berger, Karen; Anderson, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Hypersonic entry flight testing motivated by efforts seeking to characterize boundary layer transition on the Space Shuttle Orbiters have identified challenges in our ability to acquire high quality quantitative surface temperature measurements versus time. Five missions near the end of the Space Shuttle Program implemented a tile surface protuberance as a boundary layer trip together with tile surface thermocouples to capture temperature measurements during entry. Similar engineering implementations of these measurements on Discovery and Endeavor demonstrated unexpected measurement voltage response during the high heating portion of the entry trajectory. An assessment has been performed to characterize possible causes of the issues experienced during STS-119, STS-128, STS-131, STS-133 and STS-134 as well as similar issues encountered during other orbiter entries.

  6. Friedel Transition in Layered Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzierzawa, M.; Zamora, M.; Baeriswyl, D.; Bagnoud, X.

    1996-01-01

    Weakly coupled superconducting layers are described by the anisotropic 3D XY model. A low-temperature layer decoupling due to a proliferation of fluxons between planes, as proposed by Friedel, does not occur. The same is true for a periodic superlattice of high and low T c layers, although the interplane coherence can become extremely weak. On the other hand a true layer decoupling is found for a random stack. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  7. Aerodynamics characteristic of axisymmetric surface protuberance in supersonic regime

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan; Sanghi, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    The present work deals with the problem of an axi-symmetric surface protuberance mounted on a spherical nosed body of revolution. The numerical computations are carried out for laminar supersonic viscous flow for trapezoidal shape axi-symmetric protuberances. A free stream Mach number ranging from 3 to 8 in steps of 1 at a fixed free stream Reynolds number of 1.8x10(4) has been used in the present study. The steady solutions are obtained using a time marching approach. A newly developed Particle Velocity Upwinding (PVU) scheme has been used for the computation. The spatial flow pattern exhibits a strong bow shock in front of the hemispherical nose, which engulfs the entire base body. Near the protuberance, the fluid particle decelerates due to the adverse pressure created by the protuberance and thus the flow separates in front of the protuberance. This point of separation is found to be a function of Mach number and the protuberance shape. A low-pressure expansion region dominates the base region of the obstacle. The reattachment point for the base separation is also a function of Mach number. As the Mach number is increased the reattachment point shifts toward the protuberances base. A weak recompression shock is also seen in the base, which affects the separated zone behind the protuberance. The important design parameters such as skin friction, heat transfer, drag, and surface pressure coefficients are reported extensively.

  8. Longitudinal vortices in a transitioning boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, J.B.; Backwelder, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    Naturally occurring spanwise variations of the streamwise velocity component, characteristic of longitudinal vortices embedded in a transitioning boundary layer were explored using hot-wire anemometers. A vibrating ribbon introduced stable or unstable Tollmien-Schlichting waves into the laminar boundary layer. These damped or growing disturbances always developed a strong three-dimensional pattern even though no spanwise perturbations were artificially induced. Changing the radius of the leading edge and other modifications to the flat plate, wind tunnel and boundary layer did not alter the spanwise wavelength of the vortices. (orig.)

  9. Bypass transition in compressible boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervegt, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Transition to turbulence in aerospace applications usually occurs in a strongly disturbed environment. For instance, the effects of free-stream turbulence, roughness and obstacles in the boundary layer strongly influence transition. Proper understanding of the mechanisms leading to transition is crucial in the design of aircraft wings and gas turbine blades, because lift, drag and heat transfer strongly depend on the state of the boundary layer, laminar or turbulent. Unfortunately, most of the transition research, both theoretical and experimental, has focused on natural transition. Many practical flows, however, defy any theoretical analysis and are extremely difficult to measure. Morkovin introduced in his review paper the concept of bypass transition as those forms of transition which bypass the known mechanisms of linear and non-linear transition theories and are currently not understood by experiments. In an effort to better understand the mechanisms leading to transition in a disturbed environment, experiments are conducted studying simpler cases, viz. the effects of free stream turbulence on transition on a flat plate. It turns out that these experiments are very difficult to conduct, because generation of free stream turbulence with sufficiently high fluctuation levels and reasonable homogeneity is non trivial. For a discussion see Morkovin. Serious problems also appear due to the fact that at high Reynolds numbers the boundary layers are very thin, especially in the nose region of the plate where the transition occurs, which makes the use of very small probes necessary. The effects of free-stream turbulence on transition are the subject of this research and are especially important in a gas turbine environment, where turbulence intensities are measured between 5 and 20 percent, Wang et al. Due to the fact that the Reynolds number for turbine blades is considerably lower than for aircraft wings, generally a larger portion of the blade will be in a laminar

  10. Critical Transitions in Thin Layer Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Santiago; Alexakis, Alexandros

    2017-11-01

    We investigate a model of thin layer turbulence that follows the evolution of the two-dimensional motions u2 D (x , y) along the horizontal directions (x , y) coupled to a single Fourier mode along the vertical direction (z) of the form uq (x , y , z) = [vx (x , y) sin (qz) ,vy (x , y) sin (qz) ,vz (x , y) cos (qz) ] , reducing thus the system to two coupled, two-dimensional equations. Its reduced dimensionality allows a thorough investigation of the transition from a forward to an inverse cascade of energy as the thickness of the layer H = π / q is varied.Starting from a thick layer and reducing its thickness it is shown that two critical heights are met (i) one for which the forward unidirectional cascade (similar to three-dimensional turbulence) transitions to a bidirectional cascade transferring energy to both small and large scales and (ii) one for which the bidirectional cascade transitions to a unidirectional inverse cascade when the layer becomes very thin (similar to two-dimensional turbulence). The two critical heights are shown to have different properties close to criticality that we are able to analyze with numerical simulations for a wide range of Reynolds numbers and aspect ratios. This work was Granted access to the HPC resources of MesoPSL financed by the Region Ile de France and the project Equip@Meso (reference ANR-10-EQPX-29-01).

  11. Nonlinear Transient Growth and Boundary Layer Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Parabolized stability equations (PSE) are used in a variational approach to study the optimal, non-modal disturbance growth in a Mach 3 at plate boundary layer and a Mach 6 circular cone boundary layer. As noted in previous works, the optimal initial disturbances correspond to steady counter-rotating streamwise vortices, which subsequently lead to the formation of streamwise-elongated structures, i.e., streaks, via a lift-up effect. The nonlinear evolution of the linearly optimal stationary perturbations is computed using the nonlinear plane-marching PSE for stationary perturbations. A fully implicit marching technique is used to facilitate the computation of nonlinear streaks with large amplitudes. To assess the effect of the finite-amplitude streaks on transition, the linear form of plane- marching PSE is used to investigate the instability of the boundary layer flow modified by spanwise periodic streaks. The onset of bypass transition is estimated by using an N- factor criterion based on the amplification of the streak instabilities. Results show that, for both flow configurations of interest, streaks of sufficiently large amplitude can lead to significantly earlier onset of transition than that in an unperturbed boundary layer without any streaks.

  12. Numerical Simulations of Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkowicz, Matthew David

    Numerical schemes for supersonic flows tend to use large amounts of artificial viscosity for stability. This tends to damp out the small scale structures in the flow. Recently some low-dissipation methods have been proposed which selectively eliminate the artificial viscosity in regions which do not require it. This work builds upon the low-dissipation method of Subbareddy and Candler which uses the flux vector splitting method of Steger and Warming but identifies the dissipation portion to eliminate it. Computing accurate fluxes typically relies on large grid stencils or coupled linear systems that become computationally expensive to solve. Unstructured grids allow for CFD solutions to be obtained on complex geometries, unfortunately, it then becomes difficult to create a large stencil or the coupled linear system. Accurate solutions require grids that quickly become too large to be feasible. In this thesis a method is proposed to obtain more accurate solutions using relatively local data, making it suitable for unstructured grids composed of hexahedral elements. Fluxes are reconstructed using local gradients to extend the range of data used. The method is then validated on several test problems. Simulations of boundary layer transition are then performed. An elliptic cone at Mach 8 is simulated based on an experiment at the Princeton Gasdynamics Laboratory. A simulated acoustic noise boundary condition is imposed to model the noisy conditions of the wind tunnel and the transitioning boundary layer observed. A computation of an isolated roughness element is done based on an experiment in Purdue's Mach 6 quiet wind tunnel. The mechanism for transition is identified as an instability in the upstream separation region and a comparison is made to experimental data. In the CFD a fully turbulent boundary layer is observed downstream.

  13. Role of animal pole protuberance and microtubules during meiosis in sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhenguo; Chang, Yaqing; Sun, Huiling; Yu, Jiaping

    2010-05-01

    Fully grown oocytes of Apostichopus japonicus have a cytoplasmic protuberance where the oocyte attaches to the follicle. The protuberance and the oolamina located on the opposite side of the oocyte indicate the animal-vegetal axis. Two pre-meiotic centrosomes are anchored to the protuberance by microtubules between centrosomes and protuberance. After meiosis reinitiation induced by DTT solution, the germinal vesicle (GV) migrates towards the protuberance. The GV breaks down after it migrates to the oocyte membrane on the protuberance side. The protuberance then contracts back into the oocyte and the first polar body extrudes from the site of the former protuberance. The second polar body forms beneath the first. Thus the oocyte protuberance indicates the presumptive animal pole well before maturation of the oocyte.

  14. Transition from single to multiple double layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, C.; Hershkowitz, N.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that laboratory double layers become multiple double layers when the ratio of Debye length to system length is decreased. This result exhibits characteristics described by boundary layer theory

  15. Prediction of boundary-layer transition caused by crossflow disturbances

    OpenAIRE

    Nomura, Toshiyuki; 野村 聡幸

    1999-01-01

    A prediction system for boundary layer transition is developed which consists of the Navier-Stokes code computing a compressible boundary layer, the linear PSE (Parabolized Stability Equations) code computing the spatial growth of a disturbance, and the N-factor code integrating the growth rate. The system is applied to the case that the transition of the compressible boundary layer on a swept cylinder is caused by cross flow disturbances which have the same spanwise wavelength as observed in...

  16. Transition to turbulence in the Hartmann boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thess, A.; Krasnov, D.; Boeck, T.; Zienicke, E. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Ilmenau Univ. of Tech. (Germany); Zikanov, O. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of Michigan, Dearborn, MI (United States); Moresco, P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Alboussiere, T. [Lab. de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, Observatoire des Science de l' Univers de Grenoble, Univ. Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France)

    2007-07-01

    The Hartmann boundary layer is a paradigm of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows. Hartmann boundary layers develop when a liquid metal flows under the influence of a steady magnetic field. The present paper is an overview of recent successful attempts to understand the mechanisms by which the Hartmann layer undergoes a transition from laminar to turbulent flow. (orig.)

  17. Flight Experiment Verification of Shuttle Boundary Layer Transition Prediction Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Scott A.; Berger, Karen T.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Wood, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Boundary layer transition at hypersonic conditions is critical to the design of future high-speed aircraft and spacecraft. Accurate methods to predict transition would directly impact the aerothermodynamic environments used to size a hypersonic vehicle's thermal protection system. A transition prediction tool, based on wind tunnel derived discrete roughness correlations, was developed and implemented for the Space Shuttle return-to-flight program. This tool was also used to design a boundary layer transition flight experiment in order to assess correlation uncertainties, particularly with regard to high Mach-number transition and tunnel-to-flight scaling. A review is provided of the results obtained from the flight experiment in order to evaluate the transition prediction tool implemented for the Shuttle program.

  18. On hairpin vortices in a transitional boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uruba Václav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the presented paper the results of experiments on transitional boundary layer are presented. The boundary layer was generated on smooth flat wall with zero pressure gradient forming one side of the channel of rectangular cross section. The hairpin vortices, packets of hairpin vortices, turbulent spots and calmed regions were experimentally investigated using time-resolved PIV technique.

  19. Comments on Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    mechanism by which boundary-layer disturbance growth is generally initiated and establishes the initial distur- banca amplitude at the onset of disturbance...Patankar, S. V., and Spalding, P. B., Heat and Mass Transfer in Boundary Lavers, CRC Press , Cleveland, Ohio, 1968. 87. Neumann, R. D., and Patterson, .J. 1

  20. Boundary layer turbulence in transitional and developed states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, George Ilhwan; Wallace, James M.; Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz

    2012-03-01

    Using the recent direct numerical simulations by Wu and Moin ["Transitional and turbulent boundary layer with heat transfer," Phys. Fluids 22, 85 (2010)] of a flat-plate boundary layer with a passively heated wall, statistical properties of the turbulence in transition at Reθ ≈ 300, from individual turbulent spots, and at Reθ ≈ 500, where the spots merge (distributions of the mean velocity, Reynolds stresses, kinetic energy production, and dissipation rates, enstrophy and its components) have been compared to these statistical properties for the developed boundary layer turbulence at Reθ = 1840. When the distributions in the transitional regions are conditionally averaged so as to exclude locations and times when the flow is not turbulent, they closely resemble the distributions in the developed turbulent state at the higher Reynolds number, especially in the buffer layer. Skin friction coefficients, determined in this conditional manner at the two Reynolds numbers in the transitional flow are, of course, much larger than when their values are obtained by including both turbulent and non-turbulent information there, and the conditional averaged values are consistent with the 1/7th power law approximation. An octant analysis based on the combinations of signs of the velocity and temperature fluctuations, u, v, and θ shows that the momentum and heat fluxes are predominantly of the mean gradient type in both the transitional and developed regions. The fluxes appear to be closely associated with vortices that transport momentum and heat toward and away from the wall in both regions of the flow. The results suggest that there may be little fundamental difference between the nonlinear processes involved in the formation of turbulent spots that appear in transition and those that sustain the turbulence when it is developed. They also support the view that the transport processes and the vortical structures that drive them in developed and transitional boundary

  1. Boundary-Layer Bypass Transition Over Large-Scale Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-16

    behaviour of the velocity and pressure changes with the curvature. This work aims to extend the results of the flat-plate boundary layer to a Rankine...example, consume an enormous amount of energy due to friction, many works have been directed to the suppression of transitional boundary layer disturbances...decrease of the enormous amount of energy consumed by airplanes during flight, moreover flight costs and aerodynamic noise could be reduced and number

  2. Transition of hydrated oxide layer for aluminum electrolytic capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Choong-Soo; Jeong, Yongsoo; Ahn, Hong-Joo; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Jung-Gu; Lee, Jun-Hee; Jang, Kyung-Wook; Oh, Han-Jun

    2007-01-01

    A hydrous oxide film for the application as dielectric film is synthesized by immersion of pure aluminum in hot water. From a Rutherford backscattering analysis, the ratio of aluminum to oxygen atoms was found to be 3:2 in the anodized aluminum oxide film, and 2:1 in the hydrous oxide layer. Anodization of the hydrous oxide layer was more effective for the transition of amorphous anodic oxides to the crystalline aluminum oxides

  3. Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer in Transitional Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting

    2007-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to investigate the effects of elevated free-stream turbulence and streamwise acceleration on flow and thermal structures in transitional boundary layers. The free-stream turbulence ranges from 0.5 to 6.4% and the streamwise acceleration ranges from K = 0 to 0.8 x 10(exp -6). The onset of transition, transition length and the turbulent spot formation rate are determined. The statistical results and conditionally sampled results of th streamwise and cross-stream velocity fluctuations, temperature fluctuations, Reynolds stress and Reynolds heat fluxes are presented.

  4. Atmospheric boundary layer evening transitions over West Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    A systemic analysis of the atmospheric boundary layer behavior during some evening transitions over West Texas was done using the data from an extensive array of instruments which included small and large aperture scintillometers, net radiometers, and meteorological stations. The analysis also comp...

  5. Periodic and aperiodic flow patterns around an airfoil with leading-edge protuberances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chang; Zuo, Zhigang; Maeda, Takao; Kamada, Yasunari; Li, Qing'an; Shimamoto, Kensei; Liu, Shuhong

    2017-11-01

    Recently leading-edge protuberances have attracted great attention as a passive method for separation control. In this paper, the effect of multiple leading-edge protuberances on the performance of a two-dimensional airfoil is investigated through experimental measurement of aerodynamic forces, surface tuft visualization, and numerical simulation. In contrast to the sharp stall of the baseline airfoil with large hysteresis effect during AOA (angle of attack) increasing and decreasing, the stall process of the modified airfoil with leading-edge protuberances is gentle and stable. Flow visualization revealed that the flow past each protuberance is periodic and symmetric at small AOAs. Streamwise vortices are generated on the shoulders of the protuberance, leading to a larger separation around the valley sections and a longer attachment along the peak sections. When some critical AOA is exceeded, aperiodic and asymmetric flow patterns occur on the protuberances at different spanwise positions, with leading-edge separation on some of the valley sections and non-stalled condition elsewhere. A combined mechanism, involving both the compartmentalization effect of the slender momentum-enhanced attached flows on the protuberance peaks and the downwash effect of the local stalled region with low circulation, is proposed to explain the generation of the aperiodic flow patterns. The influence of the number of protuberances is also investigated, which shows similar aperiodic flow patterns. The distance between the neighboring local stalled valley sections is found to be in the range of 4-7 times the protuberance wavelength. According to the proposed mechanism, it is speculated that the distance between the neighboring local stalled valley sections is inclined to increase with a smaller protuberance amplitude or at a larger AOA.

  6. Four-parametric two-layer algebraic model of transition boundary layer at a planar plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labusov, A.N.; Lapin, Yu.V.

    1996-01-01

    Consideration is given to four-parametric two-layer algebraic model of transition boundary layer on a plane plate, based on generalization of one-parametric algebraic Prandtl-Loitsjansky-Klauzer-3 model. The algebraic model uses Prandtl formulas for mixing path with Loitsjansky damping multiplier in the internal region and the relation for turbulent viscosity, based on universal scales of external region and named the Klauzer-3 formula. 12 refs., 10 figs

  7. New Theories on Boundary Layer Transition and Turbulence Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoqun Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a short review of our recent DNS work on physics of late boundary layer transition and turbulence. Based on our DNS observation, we propose a new theory on boundary layer transition, which has five steps, that is, receptivity, linear instability, large vortex structure formation, small length scale generation, loss of symmetry and randomization to turbulence. For turbulence generation and sustenance, the classical theory, described with Richardson's energy cascade and Kolmogorov length scale, is not observed by our DNS. We proposed a new theory on turbulence generation that all small length scales are generated by “shear layer instability” through multiple level ejections and sweeps and consequent multiple level positive and negative spikes, but not by “vortex breakdown.” We believe “shear layer instability” is the “mother of turbulence.” The energy transferring from large vortices to small vortices is carried out by multiple level sweeps, but does not follow Kolmogorov's theory that large vortices pass energy to small ones through vortex stretch and breakdown. The loss of symmetry starts from the second level ring cycle in the middle of the flow field and spreads to the bottom of the boundary layer and then the whole flow field.

  8. Phase Transitions in Layered Diguanidinium Hexachlorostannate(IV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szafranski, Marek; Ståhl, Kenny

    2016-01-01

    is different. The transitions involve also transformations in the networks of N-H center dot center dot center dot Cl hydrogen bonds. The large volume (similar to 3%) and entropy (similar to R ln 3) change at the transition between phases II and III, and the giant pressure coefficient of -755 K GPa(-1......Five crystalline phases of diguanidinium hexachlorostannate(IV), [C(NH2)(3)](2)SnCl6, have been identified and characterized by calorimetric and dielectric measurements, single crystal X-ray diffraction at atmospheric and high pressure, and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. The crystal...... structures of all phases are built of similar layers in which the tin hexachloride anions are connected to the guanidinium cations by N-H center dot center dot center dot Cl hydrogen bonds, forming a interact primarily by Coulombic forces between the ions from ap. double H-bonded sheets. The layers, neutral...

  9. Transition Delay in Hypersonic Boundary Layers via Optimal Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of nonlinear optimal streaks on disturbance growth in a Mach 6 axisymmetric flow over a 7deg half-angle cone is investigated in an e ort to expand the range of available techniques for transition control. Plane-marching parabolized stability equations are used to characterize the boundary layer instability in the presence of azimuthally periodic streaks. The streaks are observed to stabilize nominally planar Mack mode instabilities, although oblique Mack mode disturbances are destabilized. Experimentally measured transition onset in the absence of any streaks correlates with an amplification factor of N = 6 for the planar Mack modes. For high enough streak amplitudes, the transition threshold of N = 6 is not reached by the Mack mode instabilities within the length of the cone, but subharmonic first mode instabilities, which are destabilized by the presence of the streaks, reach N = 6 near the end of the cone. These results suggest a passive flow control strategy of using micro vortex generators to induce streaks that would delay transition in hypersonic boundary layers.

  10. Comparison of turbulence in a transitional boundary layer to turbulence in a developed boundary layer*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, G. I.; Wallace, J.; Wu, X.; Moin, P.

    2010-11-01

    Using a recent DNS of a flat-plate boundary layer, statistics of turbulence in transition at Reθ= 500 where spots merge (distributions of the mean velocity, rms velocity and vorticity fluctuations, Reynolds shear stress, kinetic energy production and dissipation rates and enstrophy) have been compared to these statistics for the developed boundary layer turbulence at Reθ= 1850. When the distributions in the transitional region, determined in narrow planes 0.03 Reθ wide, exclude regions and times when the flow is not turbulent, they closely resemble those in the developed turbulent state at the higher Reynolds number, especially in the buffer and sublayers. The skin friction coefficient, determined in this conditional manner in the transitional flow is, of course, much larger than that obtained by including both turbulent and non-turbulent information there, and is consistent with a value obtained by extrapolating from the developed turbulent region. We are attempting to perform this data analysis even further upstream in the transitioning flow at Reθ= 300 where the turbulent spots are individuated. These results add further evidence to support the view that the structure of a developed turbulent boundary layer is little different from its structure in its embryonic form in turbulent spots. *CTR 2010 Summer Program research.

  11. Buckling transition and boundary layer in non-Euclidean plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efrati, Efi; Sharon, Eran; Kupferman, Raz

    2009-07-01

    Non-Euclidean plates are thin elastic bodies having no stress-free configuration, hence exhibiting residual stresses in the absence of external constraints. These bodies are endowed with a three-dimensional reference metric, which may not necessarily be immersible in physical space. Here, based on a recently developed theory for such bodies, we characterize the transition from flat to buckled equilibrium configurations at a critical value of the plate thickness. Depending on the reference metric, the buckling transition may be either continuous or discontinuous. In the infinitely thin plate limit, under the assumption that a limiting configuration exists, we show that the limit is a configuration that minimizes the bending content, among all configurations with zero stretching content (isometric immersions of the midsurface). For small but finite plate thickness, we show the formation of a boundary layer, whose size scales with the square root of the plate thickness and whose shape is determined by a balance between stretching and bending energies.

  12. Effect of nose bluntness on boundary layer stability and transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, M. R.; Spall, R. E.; Chang, C.-L.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of nose bluntness on boundary layer instability is studied theoretically for a Mach 8 flow past a 7 degree semivertex cone. The basic flow is computed by solving the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. Linear stability analysis of the basic flow reveals that, with small amount of bluntness, the critical Reynolds number for the onset of instability increases by an order of magnitude compared to the sharp cone value. The computed second mode frequencies are also in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. The results are used to explain the effect of unit Reynolds number on transition present in the quiet aeroballistic range data.

  13. Dynamics of turbulent spots in transitional boundary layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hladík, Ondřej; Jonáš, Pavel; Uruba, Václav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 318, č. 032028 (2011), s. 1-5 E-ISSN 1742-6596. [European turbulence conference /13./. Warsaw, 12.09.2011-15.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/08/1112; GA ČR GAP101/10/1230 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : boundary layer transition * hairpin vortex * calmed region Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/318/3/032028?fromSearchPage=true

  14. Numerical Simulation of Transition in Hypersonic Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    sile domes. AGARD Report CP 493. Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development. 273 Horvath, T. 2002 Boundary layer transition on slender...reference skin-friction coefficient cp , cv Specific heats at constant pressure and volume, respectively cph Phase speed in propagation direction e...y)) 73 and two-dimensional (W = 0): u = U (y) + u′ , (4.9a) v = v′ , (4.9b) w = w′ , (4.9c) p = 1 + p′ , (4.9d) T = T (y) + T ′ , (4.9e) ρ = 1 T (y

  15. Comparative study of the synthesis of layered transition metal molybdates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, S.; Gomez-Aviles, A.; Gardner, C.; Jones, W.

    2010-01-01

    Mixed metal oxides (MMOs) prepared by the mild thermal decomposition of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) differ in their reactivity on exposure to aqueous molybdate containing solutions. In this study, we investigate the reactivity of some T-Al containing MMOs (T=Co, Ni, Cu or Zn) towards the formation of layered transition metal molybdates (LTMs) possessing the general formula AT 2 (OH)(MoO 4 ) 2 .H 2 O, where A=NH 4 + , Na + or K + . The phase selectivity of the reaction was studied with respect to the source of molybdate, the ratio of T to Mo and the reaction pH. LTMs were obtained on reaction of Cu-Al and Zn-Al containing MMOs with aqueous solutions of ammonium heptamolybdate. Rehydration of these oxides in the presence of sodium or potassium molybdate yielded a rehydrated LDH phase as the only crystalline product. The LTM products obtained by the rehydration of MMO precursors were compared with LTMs prepared by direct precipitation from the metal salts in order to study the influence of preparative route on their chemical and physical properties. Differences were noted in the composition, morphology and thermal properties of the resulting products. - Graphical abstract: Mixed metal oxides (MMOs) derived from layered double hydroxide precursors differ in their reactivity on exposure to aqueous molybdate containing solutions. We investigate the influence of the molybdate source, the rehydration pH and the ratio of T/Mo on the reactivity of some T-Al containing MMOs (T=Co, Ni, Cu or Zn) towards the formation of layered transition metal molybdates of general formula AT 2 (OH)(MoO 4 ) 2 .H 2 O (where A + =NH 4 + , K + or Na + ).

  16. Effect of free-stream turbulence on boundary layer transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M E

    2014-07-28

    This paper is concerned with the transition to turbulence in flat plate boundary layers due to moderately high levels of free-stream turbulence. The turbulence is assumed to be generated by an (idealized) grid and matched asymptotic expansions are used to analyse the resulting flow over a finite thickness flat plate located in the downstream region. The characteristic Reynolds number Rλ based on the mesh size λ and free-stream velocity is assumed to be large, and the turbulence intensity ε is assumed to be small. The asymptotic flow structure is discussed for the generic case where the turbulence Reynolds number εRλ and the plate thickness and are held fixed (at O(1) and O(λ), respectively) in the limit as [Formula: see text] and ε→0. But various limiting cases are considered in order to explain the relevant transition mechanisms. It is argued that there are two types of streak-like structures that can play a role in the transition process: (i) those that appear in the downstream region and are generated by streamwise vorticity in upstream flow and (ii) those that are concentrated near the leading edge and are generated by plate normal vorticity in upstream flow. The former are relatively unaffected by leading edge geometry and are usually referred to as Klebanoff modes while the latter are strongly affected by leading edge geometry and are more streamwise vortex-like in appearance. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Transitional and turbulent boundary layer with heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz

    2010-08-01

    We report on our direct numerical simulation of an incompressible, nominally zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate boundary layer from momentum thickness Reynolds number 80-1950. Heat transfer between the constant-temperature solid surface and the free-stream is also simulated with molecular Prandtl number Pr=1. Skin-friction coefficient and other boundary layer parameters follow the Blasius solutions prior to the onset of turbulent spots. Throughout the entire flat-plate, the ratio of Stanton number and skin-friction St/Cf deviates from the exact Reynolds analogy value of 0.5 by less than 1.5%. Mean velocity and Reynolds stresses agree with experimental data over an extended turbulent region downstream of transition. Normalized rms wall-pressure fluctuation increases gradually with the streamwise growth of the turbulent boundary layer. Wall shear stress fluctuation, τw,rms'+, on the other hand, remains constant at approximately 0.44 over the range, 800spots are tightly packed with numerous hairpin vortices. With the advection and merging of turbulent spots, these young isolated hairpin forests develop into the downstream turbulent region. Isosurfaces of temperature up to Reθ=1900 are found to display well-resolved signatures of hairpin vortices, which indicates the persistence of the hairpin forests.

  18. Dynamical Properties of Vortex Furrows in Transitioning Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Peter

    2011-11-01

    A vortex filament simulation of the spatially growing transitional boundary layer reveals the presence of low speed streaks underlying furrow-like streamwise oriented folds in the surface vorticity layer (AIAA J. Vol. 48, 2010; Proc. ETC13, 2011). The putative hairpin vortices and packets widely observed in boundary layers are found to be an illusion created by assigning the status of structure to the visualized form of regions of rotational motion created by the vortex furrows. Thus, at best, hairpins roughly describe the shape taken by that part of the vorticity within the furrows that directly causes rotation while ignoring the ``invisible'' and considerable non-rotational part. The life history of the furrows is discussed here including a description of how they grow and the dynamics of the vorticity field within them. Long lived furrows represent ``factories'' within which initially spanwise vorticity progresses from arch to either one or two-lobed mushroom-like structures in a continuous stream. Furrows grow by this same process. At the heart of the furrow phenomenon is a self-reinforcing process by which streamwise vorticity begets more streamwise vorticity.

  19. Investigation of transition scenarios in boundary-layer flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolte, A.

    1999-11-01

    Laminar-turbulent transition mechanisms triggered by crossflow instability in three-dimensional, accelerated boundary-layer flows are investigated using numerical methods of stability analysis. The investigations are based on the DLR swept plate experiment, where stationary and traveling crossflow modes can be selectively introduced into the flow field. Nonlinear instability analyses employing the parabolized stability equations (PSE) show that unique saturation amplitudes do neither exist for stationary crossflow vortices nor for traveling crossflow waves. This phenomenon is explained by means of a spatial bifurcation model. Using Floquet theory, temporal secondary instability analyses are then performed for the mean flow distorted by primary disturbances. In these analyses, secondary high-frequency disturbances with high growth rates are found. The location of these disturbances correlates well with regions of high shear in the primarily distorted flow field, especially on the back of the primary crossflow vortices. (orig.)

  20. Production of Transitional Diffused Layers by Electrospark Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolentsev, Vladislav P.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.; Smolentsev, Evgeniy V.; Boldyrev, Alexander A.; Mozgalin, Vladislav L.

    2018-03-01

    The article presents a new method for production of diffused transitional layers with nano- and microthickness by local removal of nanofilms on aluminum alloys. This allows procuring of high-quality coatings on fusible alloys (for example, on aluminum ones) by materials, the melting point of which is 2-3 times higher than that of the basis (for example, of cast iron). This permits imparting new useful properties to workpieces made from light alloys with decent values for electrochemical working. The authors show that application of coatings provides minimum heating of workpieces. This enables the regulation in temperature condition of operating environment and permits efficiency improving during the process of electrochemical working by means of higher density current supply.

  1. Comparative study of the synthesis of layered transition metal molybdates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, S.; Gómez-Avilés, A.; Gardner, C.; Jones, W.

    2010-01-01

    Mixed metal oxides (MMOs) prepared by the mild thermal decomposition of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) differ in their reactivity on exposure to aqueous molybdate containing solutions. In this study, we investigate the reactivity of some T-Al containing MMOs ( T=Co, Ni, Cu or Zn) towards the formation of layered transition metal molybdates (LTMs) possessing the general formula AT2(OH)(MoO 4) 2·H 2O, where A=NH 4+, Na + or K +. The phase selectivity of the reaction was studied with respect to the source of molybdate, the ratio of T to Mo and the reaction pH. LTMs were obtained on reaction of Cu-Al and Zn-Al containing MMOs with aqueous solutions of ammonium heptamolybdate. Rehydration of these oxides in the presence of sodium or potassium molybdate yielded a rehydrated LDH phase as the only crystalline product. The LTM products obtained by the rehydration of MMO precursors were compared with LTMs prepared by direct precipitation from the metal salts in order to study the influence of preparative route on their chemical and physical properties. Differences were noted in the composition, morphology and thermal properties of the resulting products.

  2. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid. PMID:27966540

  3. Impact of GaN transition layers in the growth of GaN epitaxial layer on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Danmei; Zhao Degang; Jiang Desheng; Liu Zongshun; Zhu Jianjun; Chen Ping; Liu Wei; Li Xiang; Shi Ming

    2015-01-01

    A method for growing GaN epitaxial layer on Si (111) substrate is investigated. Due to the large lattice mismatch between GaN and AlN, GaN grown directly above an AlN buffer layer on the Si substrate turns out to be of poor quality. In this study, a GaN transition layer is grown additionally on the AlN buffer before the GaN epitaxial growth. By changing the growth conditions of the GaN transition layer, we can control the growth and merging of islands and control the transfer time from 3D to 2D growth mode. With this method, the crystalline quality of the GaN epitaxial layer can be improved and the crack density is reduced. Here, we have investigated the impact of a transition layer on the crystalline quality and stress evolution of a GaN epitaxial layer with methods of X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and in situ reflectivity trace. With the increasing thickness of transition layer, the crack decreases and the crystalline quality is improved. But when the transition layer exceeds a critical thickness, the crystalline quality of the epilayer becomes lower and the crack density increases. (paper)

  4. Electronic self-organization in layered transition metal dichalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritschel, Tobias

    2015-10-30

    The interplay between different self-organized electronically ordered states and their relation to unconventional electronic properties like superconductivity constitutes one of the most exciting challenges of modern condensed matter physics. In the present thesis this issue is thoroughly investigated for the prototypical layered material 1T-TaS{sub 2} both experimentally and theoretically. At first the static charge density wave order in 1T-TaS{sub 2} is investigated as a function of pressure and temperature by means of X-ray diffraction. These data indeed reveal that the superconductivity in this material coexists with an inhomogeneous charge density wave on a macroscopic scale in real space. This result is fundamentally different from a previously proposed separation of superconducting and insulating regions in real space. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction data uncover the important role of interlayer correlations in 1T-TaS{sub 2}. Based on the detailed insights into the charge density wave structure obtained by the X-ray diffraction experiments, density functional theory models are deduced in order to describe the electronic structure of 1T-TaS{sub 2} in the second part of this thesis. As opposed to most previous studies, these calculations take the three-dimensional character of the charge density wave into account. Indeed the electronic structure calculations uncover complex orbital textures, which are interwoven with the charge density wave order and cause dramatic differences in the electronic structure depending on the alignment of the orbitals between neighboring layers. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that these orbital-mediated effects provide a route to drive semiconductor-to-metal transitions with technologically pertinent gaps and on ultrafast timescales. These results are particularly relevant for the ongoing development of novel, miniaturized and ultrafast devices based on layered transition metal dichalcogenides. The discovery of orbital textures

  5. Novel doping alternatives for single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2017-11-01

    Successful doping of single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) remains a formidable barrier to their incorporation into a range of technologies. We use density functional theory to study doping of molybdenum and tungsten dichalcogenides with a large fraction of the periodic table. An automated analysis of the energetics, atomic and electronic structure of thousands of calculations results in insightful trends across the periodic table and points out promising dopants to be pursued experimentally. Beyond previously studied cases, our predictions suggest promising substitutional dopants that result in p-type transport and reveal interesting physics behind the substitution of the metal site. Doping with early transition metals (TMs) leads to tensile strain and a significant reduction in the bandgap. The bandgap increases and strain is reduced as the d-states are filled into the mid TMs; these trends reverse as we move into the late TMs. Additionally, the Fermi energy increases monotonously as the d-shell is filled from the early to mid TMs and we observe few to no gap states, indicating the possibility of both p- (early TMs) and n- (mid TMs) type doping. Quite surprisingly, the simulations indicate the possibility of interstitial doping of TMDs; the energetics reveal that a significant number of dopants, increasing in number from molybdenum disulfide to diselenide and to ditelluride, favor the interstitial sites over adsorbed ones. Furthermore, calculations of the activation energy associated with capturing the dopants into the interstitial site indicate that the process is kinetically possible. This suggests that interstitial impurities in TMDs are more common than thought to date and we propose a series of potential interstitial dopants for TMDs relevant for application in nanoelectronics based on a detailed analysis of the predicted electronic structures.

  6. Oxidative C-H activation of amines using protuberant lychee-like goethite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goethite with protuberant lychee morphology has been synthesized that accomplishes C-H activation of N-methylanilines to generate α-aminonitriles; the catalyst takes oxygen from air and uses it as a cooxidant in the process. Inspired by nature, we aspired to design a protocol for...

  7. Thermal Stress and Heat Transfer Coefficient for Ceramics Stalk Having Protuberance Dipping into Molten Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Nao-Aki; Hendra; Li, Wenbin; Takase, Yasushi; Ogura, Hiroki; Higashi, Yusuke

    Low pressure die casting is defined as a net shape casting technology in which the molten metal is injected at high speeds and pressure into a metallic die. The low pressure die casting process plays an increasingly important role in the foundry industry as a low-cost and high-efficiency precision forming technique. In the low pressure die casting process is that the permanent die and filling systems are placed over the furnace containing the molten alloy. The filling of the cavity is obtained by forcing the molten metal, by means of a pressurized gas, to rise into a ceramic tube having protuberance, which connects the die to the furnace. The ceramics tube, called stalk, has high temperature resistance and high corrosion resistance. However, attention should be paid to the thermal stress when the stalk having protuberance is dipped into the molten aluminum. It is important to reduce the risk of fracture that may happen due to the thermal stresses. In this paper, thermo-fluid analysis is performed to calculate surface heat transfer coefficient. The finite element method is applied to calculate the thermal stresses when the stalk having protuberance is dipped into the crucible with varying dipping speeds. It is found that the stalk with or without protuberance should be dipped into the crucible slowly to reduce the thermal stress.

  8. Study of the influence of a sinusoidal protuberance on the transfers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The governing elliptic equations are discretized in a two-dimensional domain using the finite-volume method with non-staggered variable arrangement and the PISO algorithm for the velocity-pressure coupling is employed. We analyze the influence of the amplitude of the protuberance and the heat flux applied to its base ...

  9. Layering of confined water between two graphene sheets and its liquid–liquid transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xuyan; Duan Yunrui; Wang Long; Liu Sida; Li Tao; Li Yifan; Li Hui

    2017-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to explore the layering structure and liquid–liquid transition of liquid water confined between two graphene sheets with a varied distance at different pressures. Both the size of nanoslit and pressure could cause the layering and liquid–liquid transition of the confined water. With increase of pressure and the nanoslit’s size, the confined water could have a more obvious layering. In addition, the neighboring water molecules firstly form chain structure, then will transform into square structure, and finally become triangle with increase of pressure. These results throw light on layering and liquid–liquid transition of water confined between two graphene sheets. (paper)

  10. Self-sustained Flow-acoustic Interactions in Airfoil Transitional Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-09

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0235 Self-sustained flow-acoustic interactions in airfoil transitional boundary layers Vladimir Golubev EMBRY-RIDDLE...From - To)      01-04-2012 to 31-03-2015 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Self-sustained flow-acoustic interactions in airfoil transitional boundary layers 5a...complementary experimental and numerical studies of flow-acoustic resonant interactions in transitional airfoils and their impact on airfoil surface

  11. Quasi-liquid layer theory based on the bulk first-order phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryzhkin, I. A.; Petrenko, V. F.

    2009-01-01

    The theory of the superionic phase transition (bulk first-order transition) proposed in [1] is used to explain the existence of a quasi-liquid layer at an ice surface below its melting point. An analytical expression is derived for the quasi-liquid layer thickness. Numerical estimates are made and compared with experiment. Distinction is made between the present model and other quasi-liquid layer theories

  12. Analysis of Windward Side Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition on Blunted Cones at Angle of Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-09

    correlated with PSE/LST N-Factors. 15. SUBJECT TERMS boundary layer transition, hypersonic, ground test 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION ...Maccoll) solution e condition at boundary layer edge w condition at wall, viscous ∞ condition in freestream Conventions LST Linear Stability Theory PSE...STATES AIR FORCE AFRL-RQ-WP-TP-2017-0169 ANALYSIS OF WINDWARD SIDE HYPERSONIC BOUNDARY LAYER TRANSITION ON BLUNTED CONES AT ANGLE OF ATTACK Roger

  13. Effect of the space charge layer on pre-transition corrosion rate of Zr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanikawa, S.; Etoh, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The pre- and post-transition oxide films formed in steam at 673 K were investigated by an AC impedance method. The results showed that the space charge layer was present in the pre-transition oxide film and it was absent in the post-transition oxide film. The oxidation kinetics was simulated by oxygen diffusion in the space charge layer. Cubic or one-fourth power law was explained by the effect of the space charge layer. Supposing that the space charge layer formed the potential difference through the oxide film by 0.7 V, calculated oxidation kinetics agreed with the experimental one before transition. This potential difference corresponded to the measured value by AC impedance method within the experimental error. Shadow effect could be explained by this simulation supposing the disappearance of the space charge layer due to the formation of a negative electric field by β-rays. (author)

  14. Modeling the influence of the seeding layer on the transition behavior of a ferroelectric thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oubelkacem, A.; Essaoudi, I.; Ainane, A.; Saber, M.; Dujardin, F.

    2011-01-01

    The transition properties of a ferroelectric thin film with seeding layers were studied using the effective field theory with a probability distribution technique that accounts for the self-spin correlation functions. The effect of interaction parameters for the seeding layer on the phase diagram was also examined. We calculated the critical temperature and the polarization of the ferroelectric thin film for different seeding layer structures. We found that the seeding layer can greatly increase the Curie temperature and the polarization.

  15. Physics of Transitional Shear Flows Instability and Laminar–Turbulent Transition in Incompressible Near-Wall Shear Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Boiko, Andrey V; Grek, Genrih R; Kozlov, Victor V

    2012-01-01

    Starting from fundamentals of classical stability theory, an overview is given of the transition phenomena in subsonic, wall-bounded shear flows. At first, the consideration focuses on elementary small-amplitude velocity perturbations of laminar shear layers, i.e. instability waves, in the simplest canonical configurations of a plane channel flow and a flat-plate boundary layer. Then the linear stability problem is expanded to include the effects of pressure gradients, flow curvature, boundary-layer separation, wall compliance, etc. related to applications. Beyond the amplification of instability waves is the non-modal growth of local stationary and non-stationary shear flow perturbations which are discussed as well. The volume continues with the key aspect of the transition process, that is, receptivity of convectively unstable shear layers to external perturbations, summarizing main paths of the excitation of laminar flow disturbances. The remainder of the book addresses the instability phenomena found at l...

  16. A preliminary investigation of boundary-layer transition along a flat plate with adverse pressure gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Doenhoff, Albert E

    1938-01-01

    Boundary-layer surveys were made throughout the transition region along a smooth flat plate placed in an airstream of practically zero turbulence and with an adverse pressure gradient. The boundary-layer Reynolds number at the laminar separation point was varied from 1,800 to 2,600. The test data, when considered in the light of certain theoretical deductions, indicated that transition probably began with separation of the laminar boundary layer. The extent of the transition region, defined as the distance from a calculated laminar separation point to the position of the first fully developed turbulent boundary-layer profile, could be expressed as a constant Reynolds number run of approximately 70,000. Some speculations are presented concerning the application of the foregoing concepts, after certain assumptions have been made, to the problem of the connection between transition on the upper surface of an airfoil at high angles of attack and the maximum lift.

  17. On the gyro resonance electron-whistler interaction in transition layers of near-earth plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erokhin, N.S.; Zol'nikova, N.N.; Mikhajlovskaya, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    Gyro resonance interaction of electrons with low amplitude triggered whistler in the transition layers of the ionospheric and magnetospheric plasma that correspond to the blurred jumps of the magnetic field and plasma concentration was studied

  18. Valley polarization in magnetically doped single-layer transition-metal dichalcogenides

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yingchun; Zhang, Q. Y.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that valley polarization can be induced and controlled in semiconducting single-layer transition-metal dichalcogenides by magnetic doping, which is important for spintronics, valleytronics, and photonics devices. As an example, we

  19. Assessment of a transitional boundary layer theory at low hypersonic Mach numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamroth, S. J.; Mcdonald, H.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to assess the accuracy of a transitional boundary layer theory in the low hypersonic Mach number regime. The theory is based upon the simultaneous numerical solution of the boundary layer partial differential equations for the mean motion and an integral form of the turbulence kinetic energy equation which controls the magnitude and development of the Reynolds stress. Comparisions with experimental data show the theory is capable of accurately predicting heat transfer and velocity profiles through the transitional regime and correctly predicts the effects of Mach number and wall cooling on transition Reynolds number. The procedure shows promise of predicting the initiation of transition for given free stream disturbance levels. The effects on transition predictions of the pressure dilitation term and of direct absorption of acoustic energy by the boundary layer were evaluated.

  20. Modeling of the heat transfer in bypass transitional boundary-layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Frederick F.; Stephens, Craig A.

    1991-01-01

    A low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model and conditioned momentum, energy and turbulence equations were used to predict bypass transition heat transfer on a flat plate in a high-disturbance environment with zero pressure gradient. The use of conditioned equations was demonstrated to be an improvement over the use of the global-time-averaged equations for the calculation of velocity profiles and turbulence intensity profiles in the transition region of a boundary layer. The approach of conditioned equations is extended to include heat transfer and a modeling of transition events is used to predict transition onset and the extent of transition on a flat plate. The events, which describe the boundary layer at the leading edge, result in boundary-layer regions consisting of: (1) the laminar, (2) pseudolaminar, (3) transitional, and (4) turbulent boundary layers. The modeled transition events were incorporated into the TEXSTAN 2-D boundary-layer code which is used to numerically predict the heat transfer. The numerical predictions in general compared well with the experimental data and revealed areas where additional experimental information is needed.

  1. A review and analysis of boundary layer transition data for turbine application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaugler, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A number of data sets from the open literature that include heat transfer data in apparently transitional boundary layers, with particular application to the turbine environment, were reviewed and analyzed to extract transition information. The data were analyzed by using a version of the STAN5 two-dimensional boundary layer code. The transition starting and ending points were determined by adjusting parameters in STAN5 until the calculations matched the data. The results are presented as a table of the deduced transition location and length as functions of the test parameters. The data sets reviewed cover a wide range of flow conditions, from low-speed, flat-plate tests to full-scale turbine airfoils operating at simulated turbine engine conditions. The results indicate that free-stream turbulence and pressure gradient have strong, and opposite, effects on the location of the start of transition and on the length of the transition zone.

  2. Characterization of Transition Metal Carbide Layers Synthesized by Thermo-reactive Diffusion Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Mads Brink; Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2015-01-01

    . In this study halide-activated pack cementation techniques were used on tool steel Vanadis 6 and martensitic stainless steel AISI 420 in order to produce hard layers of titanium carbide (TiC), vanadium carbide (V8C7) and chromium carbides (Cr23C6 and Cr7C3). Surface layers were characterized by scanning......Hard wear resistant surface layers of transition metal carbides can be produced by thermo-reactive diffusion processes where interstitial elements from a steel substrate together with external sources of transition metals (Ti, V, Cr etc.) form hard carbide and/or nitride layers at the steel surface...... electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Vickers hardness testing. The study shows that porosityfree, homogenous and very hard surface layers can be produced by thermo-reactive diffusion processes. The carbon availability of the substrate influences thickness of obtained layers, as Vanadis 6 tool steel...

  3. Interaction Between Aerothermally Compliant Structures and Boundary-Layer Transition in Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Zachary Bryce

    The use of thin-gauge, light-weight structures in combination with the severe aero-thermodynamic loading makes reusable hypersonic cruise vehicles prone to fluid-thermal-structural interactions. These interactions result in surface perturbations in the form of temperature changes and deformations that alter the stability and eventual transition of the boundary layer. The state of the boundary layer has a significant effect on the aerothermodynamic loads acting on a hypersonic vehicle. The inherent relationship between boundary-layer stability, aerothermodynamic loading, and surface conditions make the interaction between the structural response and boundary-layer transition an important area of study in high-speed flows. The goal of this dissertation is to examine the interaction between boundary layer transition and the response of aerothermally compliant structures. This is carried out by first examining the uncoupled problems of: (1) structural deformation and temperature changes altering boundary-layer stability and (2) the boundary layer state affecting structural response. For the former, the stability of boundary layers developing over geometries that typify the response of surface panels subject to combined aerodynamic and thermal loading is numerically assessed using linear stability theory and the linear parabolized stability equations. Numerous parameters are examined including: deformation direction, deformation location, multiple deformations in series, structural boundary condition, surface temperature, the combined effect of Mach number and altitude, and deformation mode shape. The deformation-induced pressure gradient alters the boundary-layer thickness, which changes the frequency of the most-unstable disturbance. In regions of small boundary-layer growth, the disturbance frequency modulation resulting from a single or multiple panels deformed into the flowfield is found to improve boundary-layer stability and potentially delay transition. For the

  4. Double layer effects in the electroreduction of transition metal ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fawcett, W. R.; Hromadová, Magdaléna

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 4 (2008), s. 347-351 ISSN 1432-8488 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400400603; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : sphere electrode reactions * crystal gold electrodes * diffuse double - layer Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.597, year: 2008

  5. Boundary Layer Transition During the Orion Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Lindsay C.

    2016-01-01

    Boundary layer transition was observed in the thermocouple data on the windside backshell of the Orion reentry capsule. Sensors along the windside centerline, as well as off-centerline, indicated transition late in the flight at approximately Mach 4 conditions. Transition progressed as expected, beginning at the sensors closest to the forward bay cover (FBC) and moving towards the heatshield. Sensors placed in off-centerline locations did not follow streamlines, so the progression of transition observed in these sensors is less intuitive. Future analysis will include comparisons to pre-flight predictions and expected transitional behavior will be investigated. Sensors located within the centerline and off-centerline launch abort system (LAS) attach well cavities on the FBC also showed indications of boundary layer transition. The transition within the centerline cavity was observed in the temperature traces prior to transition onset on the sensors upstream of the cavity. Transition behavior within the off centerline LAS attach well cavity will also be investigated. Heatshield thermocouples were placed within Avcoat plugs to attempt to capture transitional behavior as well as better understand the aerothermal environments. Thermocouples were placed in stacks of two or five vertically within the plugs, but the temperature data obtained at the sensors closest to the surface did not immediately indicate transitional behavior. Efforts to use the in depth thermocouple temperatures to reconstruct the surface heat flux are ongoing and any results showing the onset of boundary layer transition obtained from those reconstructions will also be included in this paper. Transition on additional features of interest, including compression pad ramps, will be included if it becomes available.

  6. Tunable phase transition in single-layer TiSe2 via electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhuang, Houlong L.

    2018-06-01

    Phase transition represents an intriguing physical phenomenon that exists in a number of single-layer transition-metal dichalcogenides. This phenomenon often occurs below a critical temperature and breaks the long-range crystalline order leading to a reconstructed superstructure called the charge-density wave (CDW) structure, which can therefore be recovered by external stimuli such as temperature. Alternatively, we show here that another external stimulation, electric field can also result in the phase transition between the regular and CDW structures of a single-layer transition-metal dichalcogenide. We used single-layer TiSe2 as an example to elucidate the mechanism of the CDW followed by calculations of the electronic structure using a hybrid density functional. We found that applying electric field can tune the phase transition between the 1T and CDW phases of single-layer TiSe2. Our work opens up a route of tuning the phase transition of single-layer materials via electric field.

  7. Secondary instability and transition in three-dimensional boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolte, A.; Bertolotti, F.P.; Koch, W. (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Goettingen (Germany). Inst. fuer Stroemungsmechanik)

    1999-01-01

    Stationary and traveling crossflow modes are the most prominent disturbances in the highly accelerated three-dimensional flow near the leading edge of a swept wing. Near transition onset, secondary three-dimensional instabilities of high frequency can be observed in such flows. A model flow on the basis of a DLR swept plate experiment allows a detailed study of transition scenarios triggered by crossflow instabilities, since the favorable pressure gradient over the whole plate inhibits instabilities of Tollmien-Schlichting type. In order to shed some light upon the role of the high-frequency secondary instabilities, the saturation characteristics of crossflow vortices in this model flow are investigated using the parabolized stability equations. In contrast to nonlinear equilibrium solutions of steady crossflow vortices, the nonlinear Polarized Stability Equations (PSE) results yield different maximal disturbance amplitudes for different initial amplitudes. (orig./AKF)

  8. Secondary instability and transition in three-dimensional boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolte, A.; Bertolotti, F.P.; Koch, W. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Goettingen (Germany). Inst. fuer Stroemungsmechanik

    1999-12-01

    Stationary and traveling crossflow modes are the most prominent disturbances in the highly accelerated three-dimensional flow near the leading edge of a swept wing. Near transition onset, secondary three-dimensional instabilities of high frequency can be observed in such flows. A model flow on the basis of a DLR swept plate experiment allows a detailed study of transition scenarios triggered by crossflow instabilities, since the favorable pressure gradient over the whole plate inhibits instabilities of Tollmien-Schlichting type. In order to shed some light upon the role of the high-frequency secondary instabilities, the saturation characteristics of crossflow vortices in this model flow are investigated using the parabolized stability equations. In contrast to nonlinear equilibrium solutions of steady crossflow vortices, the nonlinear Polarized Stability Equations (PSE) results yield different maximal disturbance amplitudes for different initial amplitudes. (orig./AKF)

  9. Experimental study of boundary layer transition on an airfoil induced by periodically passing wake (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, T.C. [Seoul National University Graduate School, Seoul (Korea); Jeon, W.P.; Kang, S.H. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-06-01

    This paper describes the phenomena of wake-induced transition of the boundary layers on a NACA0012 airfoil using measured phase-averaged data. Especially, the phase-averaged wall shear stresses are reasonably evaluated using the principle of Computational Preston Tube Method. Due to the passing wake, the turbulent patch is generated in the laminar boundary layer on the airfoil and the boundary layer becomes temporarily transitional. The patches propagate downstream with less speed than free-stream velocity and merge with each other at further downstream station, and the boundary layer becomes more transitional. The generation of turbulent patch at the leading edge of the airfoil mainly depends on velocity defects and turbulent intensity profiles of passing wakes. However, the growth and merging of turbulent patches depend on local streamwise pressure gradients as well as characteristics of turbulent patches. In this transition process, the present experimental data show very similar features to the previous numerical and experimental studies. It is confirmed that the two phase-averaged mean velocity dips appear in the outer region of transitional boundary layer for each passing cycle. Relatively high values of the phase-averaged turbulent fluctuations in the outer region indicate the possibility that breakdown occurs in the outer layer not near the wall. (author). 21 refs., 12 figs.

  10. Atomic Layer Deposition Alumina-Passivated Silicon Nanowires: Probing the Transition from Electrochemical Double-Layer Capacitor to Electrolytic Capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaboriau, Dorian; Boniface, Maxime; Valero, Anthony; Aldakov, Dmitry; Brousse, Thierry; Gentile, Pascal; Sadki, Said

    2017-04-19

    Silicon nanowires were coated by a 1-5 nm thin alumina layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in order to replace poorly reproducible and unstable native silicon oxide by a highly conformal passivating alumina layer. The surface coating enabled probing the behavior of symmetric devices using such electrodes in the EMI-TFSI electrolyte, allowing us to attain a large cell voltage up to 6 V in ionic liquid, together with very high cyclability with less than 4% capacitance fade after 10 6 charge/discharge cycles. These results yielded fruitful insights into the transition between an electrochemical double-layer capacitor behavior and an electrolytic capacitor behavior. Ultimately, thin ALD dielectric coatings can be used to obtain hybrid devices exhibiting large cell voltage and excellent cycle life of dielectric capacitors, while retaining energy and power densities close to the ones displayed by supercapacitors.

  11. Experimental study of boundary-layer transition on an airfoil induced by periodically passing wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, W.P. [Center for Turbulence and Flow Control Research Institute of Advanced Machinery and Design, Seoul National University (Korea); Park, T.C.; Kang, S.H. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University (Korea)

    2002-02-01

    Hot-wire measurements are performed in boundary-layer flows developing on a NACA 0012 airfoil over which wakes pass periodically. The periodic wakes are generated by rotating circular cylinders clockwise or counterclockwise around the airfoil. The time- and phase-averaged mean streamwise velocities and turbulence fluctuations are measured to investigate the phenomena of wake-induced transition. Especially, the phase-averaged wall shear stresses are evaluated using a computational Preston tube method. The passing wakes significantly change the pressure distribution on the airfoil, which has influence on the transition process of the boundary layer. The orientation of the passing wake alters the pressure distribution in a different manner. Due to the passing wake, the turbulent patches are generated inside the laminar boundary layer on the airfoil, and the boundary layer becomes temporarily transitional. The patches propagate downstream at a speed smaller than the free-stream velocity and merge together further downstream. Relatively high values of phase-averaged turbulence fluctuations in the outer part of the boundary layer indicate the possibility that breakdown occurs in the outer layer away from the wall. It is confirmed that the phase-averaged mean velocity profile has two dips in the outer region of the transitional boundary layer for each passing cycle. (orig.)

  12. Prediction of wall shear stresses in transitional boundary layers using near-wall mean velocity profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Woo Pyung; Shin, Sung Ho; Kang, Shin Hyoung

    2000-01-01

    The local wall shear stress in transitional boundary layer was estimated from the near-wall mean velocity data using the principle of Computational Preston tube Method(CPM). The previous DNS and experimental databases of transitional boundary layers were used to demonstrate the accuracy of the method and to provide the applicable range of wall unit y + . The skin friction coefficients predicted by the CPM agreed well with those from previous studies. To reexamine the applicability of the CPM, near-wall hot-wire measurements were conducted in developing transitional boundary layers on a flat plate with different freestream turbulence intensities. The intermittency profiles across the transitional boundary layers were reasonably obtained from the conditional sampling technique. An empirical correlation between the representative intermittency near the wall and the free parameter K 1 of the extended wall function of CPM has been newly proposed using the present and other experimental data. The CPM has been verified as a useful tool to measure the wall shear stress in transitional boundary layer with reasonable accuracy

  13. Numerical investigation of hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer transition mechanism induced by different roughness shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yunlong; Zhao, Yunfei; Xu, Dan; Chai, Zhenxia; Liu, Wei

    2016-10-01

    The roughness-induced laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition is significant for high-speed aerospace applications. The transition mechanism is closely related to the roughness shape. In this paper, high-order numerical method is used to investigate the effect of roughness shape on the flat-plate laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition. Computations are performed in both the supersonic and hypersonic regimes (free-stream Mach number from 3.37 up to 6.63) for the square, cylinder, diamond and hemisphere roughness elements. It is observed that the square and diamond roughness elements are more effective in inducing transition compared with the cylinder and hemisphere ones. The square roughness element has the longest separated region in which strong unsteadiness exists and the absolute instability is formed, thus resulting in the earliest transition. The diamond roughness element has a maximum width of the separated region leading to the widest turbulent wake region far downstream. Furthermore, transition location moves backward as the Mach number increases, which indicates that the compressibility significantly suppresses the roughness-induced boundary layer transition.

  14. Dislocation Coupling-Induced Transition of Synchronization in Two-Layer Neuronal Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Hui-Xin; Ma Jun; Wang Chun-Ni; Jin Wu-Yin

    2014-01-01

    The mutual coupling between neurons in a realistic neuronal system is much complex, and a two-layer neuronal network is designed to investigate the transition of electric activities of neurons. The Hindmarsh—Rose neuron model is used to describe the local dynamics of each neuron, and neurons in the two-layer networks are coupled in dislocated type. The coupling intensity between two-layer networks, and the coupling ratio (Pro), which defines the percentage involved in the coupling in each layer, are changed to observe the synchronization transition of collective behaviors in the two-layer networks. It is found that the two-layer networks of neurons becomes synchronized with increasing the coupling intensity and coupling ratio (Pro) beyond certain thresholds. An ordered wave in the first layer is useful to wake up the rest state in the second layer, or suppress the spatiotemporal state in the second layer under coupling by generating target wave or spiral waves. And the scheme of dislocation coupling can be used to suppress spatiotemporal chaos and excite quiescent neurons. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  15. A wet-tolerant adhesive patch inspired by protuberances in suction cups of octopi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Sangyul; Kim, Da Wan; Park, Youngjin; Lee, Tae-Jin; Ho Bhang, Suk; Pang, Changhyun

    2017-06-01

    Adhesion strategies that rely on mechanical interlocking or molecular attractions between surfaces can suffer when coming into contact with liquids. Thus far, artificial wet and dry adhesives have included hierarchical mushroom-shaped or porous structures that allow suction or capillarity, supramolecular structures comprising nanoparticles, and chemistry-based attractants that use various protein polyelectrolytes. However, it is challenging to develop adhesives that are simple to make and also perform well—and repeatedly—under both wet and dry conditions, while avoiding non-chemical contamination on the adhered surfaces. Here we present an artificial, biologically inspired, reversible wet/dry adhesion system that is based on the dome-like protuberances found in the suction cups of octopi. To mimic the architecture of these protuberances, we use a simple, solution-based, air-trap technique that involves fabricating a patterned structure as a polymeric master, and using it to produce a reversed architecture, without any sophisticated chemical syntheses or surface modifications. The micrometre-scale domes in our artificial adhesive enhance the suction stress. This octopus-inspired system exhibits strong, reversible, highly repeatable adhesion to silicon wafers, glass, and rough skin surfaces under various conditions (dry, moist, under water and under oil). To demonstrate a potential application, we also used our adhesive to transport a large silicon wafer in air and under water without any resulting surface contamination.

  16. Numerical simulation of flow characteristics behind the aerodynamic performances on an airfoil with leading edge protuberances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a numerical investigation of the effects of leading-edge protuberances on airfoil stall and post-stall performance. An improved delayed detached eddy simulation (IDDES method was adopted. As a result, to clarify the effects of ‘bi-periodic’ phenomenon around stall region, it was found that the flow separation at troughs was the main inducement of aerodynamic lift degradation within pre-stall regime and the flow pattern where vortices diverged was predominant. It was also found that the variations in flow patterns led to the gentle stall process. Furthermore, to study the statistical characteristics of unsteady vortex shedding, corresponding spectrum characteristics were also analyzed from another perspective, suggesting that the vortex shedding frequency was higher where vortices converged. Eventually, the improved performances of tubercled airfoil within post-stall regime could be attributed to the strong streamwise vortices generated by the leading-edge protuberances. Deploying the methods of vortex dynamics, the generation and evolution of the streamwise vortices were depicted. It turned out that the primary and secondary vortices were induced by spanwise pressure gradient at airfoil surface; meanwhile, vortex stretching played a key role in primary vortex evolution, which initially enhanced the strength of vortices corresponding to the acceleration of streamwise velocity.

  17. Application of a transitional boundary-layer theory in the low hypersonic Mach number regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamroth, S. J.; Mcdonald, H.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is made to assess the capability of a finite-difference boundary-layer procedure to predict the mean profile development across a transition from laminar to turbulent flow in the low hypersonic Mach-number regime. The boundary-layer procedure uses an integral form of the turbulence kinetic-energy equation to govern the development of the Reynolds apparent shear stress. The present investigation shows the ability of this procedure to predict Stanton number, velocity profiles, and density profiles through the transition region and, in addition, to predict the effect of wall cooling and Mach number on transition Reynolds number. The contribution of the pressure-dilatation term to the energy balance is examined and it is suggested that transition can be initiated by the direct absorption of acoustic energy even if only a small amount (1 per cent) of the incident acoustic energy is absorbed.

  18. Three-dimensional boundary layer stability and transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, M. R.; Li, F.

    1992-01-01

    Nonparallel and nonlinear stability of a three-dimensional boundary layer, subject to crossflow instability, is investigated using parabolized stability equations (PSEs). Both traveling and stationary disturbances are considered and nonparallel effect on crossflow instability is found to be destabilizing. Our linear PSE results for stationary disturbances agree well with the results from direct solution of Navier-Stokes equations obtained by Spalart (1989). Nonlinear calculations have been carried out for stationary vortices and the computed wall vorticity pattern results in streamwise streaks which resemble remarkably well with the surface oil-flow visualizations in swept-wing experiments. Other features of the stationary vortex development (half-mushroom structure, inflected velocity profiles, vortex doubling, etc.) are also captured in our nonlinear calculations. Nonlinear interaction of the stationary amplitude of the stationary vortex is large as compared to the traveling mode, and the stationary vortex dominates most of the downstream development. When the two modes have the same initial amplitude, the traveling mode dominates the downstream development owing to its higher growth rate, and there is a tendency for the stationary mode to be suppressed. The effect of nonlinear wave development on the skin-friction coefficient is also computed.

  19. Magnetic layering transitions in a polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer nano-structure: Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziti, S.; Aouini, S.; Labrim, H.; Bahmad, L.

    2017-02-01

    We study the magnetic layering transitions in a polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer nano-structure, under the effect of an external magnetic field. We examine the magnetic properties, of this model of the spin S=1 Ising ferromagnetic in real nanostructure used in several scientific domains. For T=0, we give and discuss the ground state phase diagrams. At non null temperatures, we applied the Monte Carlo simulations giving important results summarized in the form of the phase diagrams. We also analyzed the effect of varying the external magnetic field, and found the layering transitions in the polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer nano-structure.

  20. Application of renormalization group theory to the large-eddy simulation of transitional boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Zang, Thomas A.; Speziale, Charles G.; Lund, Thomas S.

    1990-01-01

    An eddy viscosity model based on the renormalization group theory of Yakhot and Orszag (1986) is applied to the large-eddy simulation of transition in a flat-plate boundary layer. The simulation predicts with satisfactory accuracy the mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles, as well as the development of the important scales of motion. The evolution of the structures characteristic of the nonlinear stages of transition is also predicted reasonably well.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Separated and Transitional Boundary Layers Under Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoil Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Volino, Ralph J.

    2002-01-01

    Modern low-pressure turbine airfoils are subject to increasingly stronger pressure gradients as designers impose higher loading in an effort to improve efficiency and to reduce part count. The adverse pressure gradients on the suction side of these airfoils can lead to boundary-layer separation, particularly under cruise conditions. Separation bubbles, notably those which fail to reattach, can result in a significant degradation of engine efficiency. Accurate prediction of separation and reattachment is hence crucial to improved turbine design. This requires an improved understanding of the transition flow physics. Transition may begin before or after separation, depending on the Reynolds number and other flow conditions, has a strong influence on subsequent reattachment, and may even eliminate separation. Further complicating the problem are the high free-stream turbulence levels in a real engine environment, the strong pressure gradients along the airfoils, the curvature of the airfoils, and the unsteadiness associated with wake passing from upstream stages. Because of the complicated flow situation, transition in these devices can take many paths that can coexist, vary in importance, and possibly also interact, at different locations and instances in time. The present work was carried out in an attempt to systematically sort out some of these issues. Detailed velocity measurements were made along a flat plate subject to the same nominal dimensionless pressure gradient as the suction side of a modern low-pressure turbine airfoil ('Pak-B'). The Reynolds number based on wetted plate length and nominal exit velocity, Re, was varied from 50;000 to 300; 000, covering cruise to takeoff conditions. Low, 0.2%, and high, 7%, inlet free-stream turbulence intensities were set using passive grids. These turbulence levels correspond to about 0.2% and 2.5% turbulence intensity in the test section when normalized with the exit velocity. The Reynolds number and free

  2. A Comment Upon Previous Studies on 3-D Boundary Layer Transition

    OpenAIRE

    ÇARPINLIOĞLU, Melda Özdinç

    2014-01-01

    The common feature of the experimental studies upon 3-D boundary layer development on swept flat plates cited in the available literature is the application of streamwise and/or spanwise pressure gradients. In fact; presence of the pressure gradients was suggested to be vital for having crossflow effective in 3-D boundary layer transition. In the presented paper here, this idea is questioned evaluating the results of an experimental investigation conducted on swept flat plates under the ab...

  3. Instability waves and transition in adverse-pressure-gradient boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Rikhi; Zaki, Tamer A.; Durbin, Paul A.

    2018-05-01

    Transition to turbulence in incompressible adverse-pressure-gradient (APG) boundary layers is investigated by direct numerical simulations. Purely two-dimensional instability waves develop on the inflectional base velocity profile. When the boundary layer is perturbed by isotropic turbulence from the free stream, streamwise elongated streaks form and may interact with the instability waves. Subsequent mechanisms that trigger transition depend on the intensity of the free-stream disturbances. All evidence from the present simulations suggest that the growth rate of instability waves is sufficiently high to couple with the streaks. Under very low levels of free-stream turbulence (˜0.1 % ), transition onset is highly sensitive to the inlet disturbance spectrum and is accelerated if the spectrum contains frequency-wave-number combinations that are commensurate with the instability waves. Transition onset and completion in this regime is characterized by formation and breakdown of Λ vortices, but they are more sporadic than in natural transition. Beneath free-stream turbulence with higher intensity (1-2 % ), bypass transition mechanisms are dominant, but instability waves are still the most dominant disturbances in wall-normal and spanwise perturbation spectra. Most of the breakdowns were by disturbances with critical layers close to the wall, corresponding to inner modes. On the other hand, the propensity of an outer mode to occur increases with the free-stream turbulence level. Higher intensity free-stream disturbances induce strong streaks that favorably distort the boundary layer and suppress the growth of instability waves. But the upward displacement of high amplitude streaks brings them to the outer edge of the boundary layer and exposes them to ambient turbulence. Consequently, high-amplitude streaks exhibit an outer-mode secondary instability.

  4. Correlations for modeling transitional boundary layers under influences of freestream turbulence and pressure gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suluksna, Keerati; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Juntasaro, Ekachai

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents mathematical expressions for two significant parameters which control the onset location and length of transition in the γ-Re θ transition model of Menter et al. [Menter, F.R., Langtry, R.B., Volker, S., Huang, P.G., 2005. Transition modelling for general purpose CFD codes. In: ERCOFTAC International Symposium on Engineering Turbulence Modelling and Measurements]. The expressions are formulated and calibrated by means of numerical experiments for predicting transitional boundary layers under the influences of freestream turbulence and pressure gradient. It was also found that the correlation for transition momentum thickness Reynolds number needs only to be expressed in terms of local turbulence intensity, so that the more complex form that includes pressure gradient effects is unnecessary. Transitional boundary layers on a flat plate both with and without pressure gradients are employed to assess the performance of these two expressions for predicting the transition. The results show that the proposed expressions can work well with the model of Menter et al. (2005)

  5. Transitional-turbulent spots and turbulent-turbulent spots in boundary layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz; Wallace, James M; Skarda, Jinhie; Lozano-Durán, Adrián; Hickey, Jean-Pierre

    2017-07-03

    Two observations drawn from a thoroughly validated direct numerical simulation of the canonical spatially developing, zero-pressure gradient, smooth, flat-plate boundary layer are presented here. The first is that, for bypass transition in the narrow sense defined herein, we found that the transitional-turbulent spot inception mechanism is analogous to the secondary instability of boundary-layer natural transition, namely a spanwise vortex filament becomes a [Formula: see text] vortex and then, a hairpin packet. Long streak meandering does occur but usually when a streak is infected by a nearby existing transitional-turbulent spot. Streak waviness and breakdown are, therefore, not the mechanisms for the inception of transitional-turbulent spots found here. Rather, they only facilitate the growth and spreading of existing transitional-turbulent spots. The second observation is the discovery, in the inner layer of the developed turbulent boundary layer, of what we call turbulent-turbulent spots. These turbulent-turbulent spots are dense concentrations of small-scale vortices with high swirling strength originating from hairpin packets. Although structurally quite similar to the transitional-turbulent spots, these turbulent-turbulent spots are generated locally in the fully turbulent environment, and they are persistent with a systematic variation of detection threshold level. They exert indentation, segmentation, and termination on the viscous sublayer streaks, and they coincide with local concentrations of high levels of Reynolds shear stress, enstrophy, and temperature fluctuations. The sublayer streaks seem to be passive and are often simply the rims of the indentation pockets arising from the turbulent-turbulent spots.

  6. Single-layer dispersions of transition metal dichalcogenides in the synthesis of intercalation compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golub, Alexander S; Zubavichus, Yan V; Slovokhotov, Yurii L; Novikov, Yurii N

    2003-01-01

    Chemical methods for the exfoliation of transition metal dichalcogenides in a liquid medium to give single-layer dispersions containing quasi-two-dimensional layers of these compounds are surveyed. Data on the structure of dispersions and their use in the synthesis of various types of heterolayered intercalation compounds are discussed and described systematically. Structural features, the electronic structure and the physicochemical properties of the resulting intercalation compounds are considered. The potential of this method of synthesis is compared with that of traditional solid-state methods for the intercalation of layered crystals.

  7. Interaction of discrete and continuous boundary layer modes to cause transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durbin, Paul A.; Zaki, Tamer A.; Liu Yang

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of discrete and continuous Orr-Sommerfeld modes in a boundary layer is studied by computer simulation. The discrete mode is an unstable Tollmien-Schlichting wave. The continuous modes generate jet-like disturbances inside the boundary layer. Either mode alone does not cause transition to turbulence; however, the interaction between them does. The continuous mode jets distort the discrete modes, producing Λ shaped vortices. Breakdown to turbulence is subsequent. The lateral spacing of the Λ's is sometimes the same as the wavelength of the continuous mode, sometimes it differs, depending on the ratio of wavelength to boundary layer thickness.

  8. Single-Column Model Simulations of Subtropical Marine Boundary-Layer Cloud Transitions Under Weakening Inversions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neggers, R.A.J.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Angevine, W. M.; Bazile, Eric; Beau, I.; Blossey, P. N.; Boutle, I. A.; de Bruijn, C.; cheng, A; van der Dussen, J.J.; Fletcher, J.; Dal Gesso, S.; Jam, A.; Kawai, H; Cheedela, S. K.; Larson, V. E.; Lefebvre, Marie Pierre; Lock, A. P.; Meyer, N. R.; de Roode, S.R.; de Rooy, WC; Sandu, I; Xiao, H; Xu, K. M.

    2017-01-01

    Results are presented of the GASS/EUCLIPSE single-column model intercomparison study on the subtropical marine low-level cloud transition. A central goal is to establish the performance of state-of-the-art boundary-layer schemes for weather and climate models for this cloud regime, using

  9. Measured Boundary Layer Transition and Rotor Hover Performance at Model Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overmeyer, Austin D.; Martin, Preston B.

    2017-01-01

    An experiment involving a Mach-scaled, 11:08 f t: diameter rotor was performed in hover during the summer of 2016 at NASA Langley Research Center. The experiment investigated the hover performance as a function of the laminar to turbulent transition state of the boundary layer, including both natural and fixed transition cases. The boundary layer transition locations were measured on both the upper and lower aerodynamic surfaces simultaneously. The measurements were enabled by recent advances in infrared sensor sensitivity and stability. The infrared thermography measurement technique was enhanced by a paintable blade surface heater, as well as a new high-sensitivity long wave infrared camera. The measured transition locations showed extensive amounts, x=c>0:90, of laminar flow on the lower surface at moderate to high thrust (CT=s > 0:068) for the full blade radius. The upper surface showed large amounts, x=c > 0:50, of laminar flow at the blade tip for low thrust (CT=s boundary layer transition models in CFD and rotor design tools. The data is expected to be used as part of the AIAA Rotorcraft SimulationWorking Group

  10. Experimental study of boundary layer transition on an airfoil induced by periodically passing wake (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, T.C. [Seoul National University Graduate School, Seoul (Korea); Jeon, W.P.; Kang, S.H. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-06-01

    Hot-wire measurements are performed in boundary layers developing on a NACA0012 airfoil over which wakes pass periodically. The Reynolds number based on chord length of the airfoil is 2X10{sup 5} and the wakes are generated by circular cylinders rotating clockwise and counterclockwise around the airfoil. This paper and its companion Part II describe the phenomena of wake-induced transition of the boundary layers on the airfoil using measured data; phase- and time-averaged streamwise mean velocities, turbulent fluctuations, integral parameters and wall skin frictions. This paper describes the background and facility together with results of time-averaged quantities. Due to the passing wake with mean velocity defects and high turbulence intensities, the laminar boundary layer is periodically disturbed at the upstream station and becomes steady-state transitional boundary layer at the downstream station. The velocity defect in the passing wake changes the local pressure at the leading of the airfoil, significantly affects the time-mean pressure distribution on the airfoil and eventually, has influence on the transition process of the boundary layer. (author). 22 refs., 9 figs.

  11. A purely nonlinear route to transition approaching the edge of chaos in a boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherubini, S; De Palma, P; Robinet, J-Ch; Bottaro, A

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of transition in shear flows has recently progressed along new paradigms based on the central role of coherent flow structures and their nonlinear interactions. We follow such paradigms to identify, by means of a nonlinear optimization of the energy growth at short time, the initial perturbation which most easily induces transition in a boundary layer. Moreover, a bisection procedure has been used to identify localized flow structures living on the edge of chaos, found to be populated by hairpin vortices and streaks. Such an edge structure appears to act as a relative attractor for the trajectory of the laminar base state perturbed by the initial finite-amplitude disturbances, mediating the route to turbulence of the flow, via the triggering of a regeneration cycle of Λ and hairpin structures at different space and time scales. These findings introduce a new, purely nonlinear scenario of transition in a boundary-layer flow. (paper)

  12. Transition due to streamwise streaks in a supersonic flat plate boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-12-01

    Transition induced by stationary streaks undergoing transient growth in a supersonic flat plate boundary layer flow is studied using numerical computations. While the possibility of strong transient growth of small-amplitude stationary perturbations in supersonic boundary layer flows has been demonstrated in previous works, its relation to laminar-turbulent transition cannot be established within the framework of linear disturbances. Therefore, this paper investigates the nonlinear evolution of initially linear optimal disturbances that evolve into finite amplitude streaks in the downstream region, and then studies the modal instability of those streaks as a likely cause for the onset of bypass transition. The nonmodal evolution of linearly optimal stationary perturbations in a supersonic, Mach 3 flat plate boundary layer is computed via the nonlinear plane-marching parabolized stability equations (PSE) for stationary perturbations, or equivalently, the perturbation form of parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. To assess the effect of the nonlinear finite-amplitude streaks on transition, the linear form of plane-marching PSE is used to investigate the instability of the boundary layer flow modified by the spanwise periodic streaks. The onset of transition is estimated using an N -factor criterion based on modal amplification of the secondary instabilities of the streaks. In the absence of transient growth disturbances, first mode instabilities in a Mach 3, zero pressure gradient boundary layer reach N =10 at Rex≈107 . However, secondary instability modes of the stationary streaks undergoing transient growth are able to achieve the same N -factor at Rex<2 ×106 when the initial streak amplitude is sufficiently large. In contrast to the streak instabilities in incompressible flows, subharmonic instability modes with twice the fundamental spanwise wavelength of the streaks are found to have higher amplification ratios than the streak instabilities at fundamental

  13. Coherent fine scale eddies in turbulence transition of spatially-developing mixing layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Tanahashi, M.; Miyauchi, T.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between characteristics of the coherent fine scale eddy and a laminar-turbulent transition, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a spatially-developing turbulent mixing layer with Re ω,0 = 700 was conducted. On the onset of the transition, strong coherent fine scale eddies appears in the mixing layer. The most expected value of maximum azimuthal velocity of the eddy is 2.0 times Kolmogorov velocity (u k ), and decreases to 1.2u k , which is an asymptotic value in the fully-developed state, through the transition. The energy dissipation rate around the eddy is twice as high compared with that in the fully-developed state. However, the most expected diameter and eigenvalues ratio of strain rate acting on the coherent fine scale eddy are maintained to be 8 times Kolmogorov length (η) and α:β:γ = -5:1:4 in the transition process. In addition to Kelvin-Helmholtz rollers, rib structures do not disappear in the transition process and are composed of lots of coherent fine scale eddies in the fully-developed state instead of a single eddy observed in early stage of the transition or in laminar flow

  14. SURFACE LAYER ACCRETION IN CONVENTIONAL AND TRANSITIONAL DISKS DRIVEN BY FAR-ULTRAVIOLET IONIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Becker, Daniel; Chiang, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Whether protoplanetary disks accrete at observationally significant rates by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) depends on how well ionized they are. Disk surface layers ionized by stellar X-rays are susceptible to charge neutralization by small condensates, ranging from ∼0.01 μm sized grains to angstrom-sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Ion densities in X-ray-irradiated surfaces are so low that ambipolar diffusion weakens the MRI. Here we show that ionization by stellar far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation enables full-blown MRI turbulence in disk surface layers. Far-UV ionization of atomic carbon and sulfur produces a plasma so dense that it is immune to ion recombination on grains and PAHs. The FUV-ionized layer, of thickness 0.01-0.1 g cm -2 , behaves in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic limit and can accrete at observationally significant rates at radii ∼> 1-10 AU. Surface layer accretion driven by FUV ionization can reproduce the trend of increasing accretion rate with increasing hole size seen in transitional disks. At radii ∼<1-10 AU, FUV-ionized surface layers cannot sustain the accretion rates generated at larger distance, and unless turbulent mixing of plasma can thicken the MRI-active layer, an additional means of transport is needed. In the case of transitional disks, it could be provided by planets.

  15. Control of electronic properties of 2D carbides (MXenes) by manipulating their transition metal layers

    KAUST Repository

    Anasori, Babak

    2016-02-24

    In this study, a transition from metallic to semiconducting-like behavior has been demonstrated in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides by replacing titanium with molybdenum in the outer transition metal (M) layers of M3C2 and M4C3 MXenes. The MXene structure consists of n + 1 layers of near-close packed M layers with C or N occupying the octahedral site between them in an [MX]nM arrangement. Recently, two new families of ordered 2D double transition metal carbides MXenes were discovered, M′2M′′C2 and M′2M′′2C3 – where M′ and M′′ are two different early transition metals, such as Mo, Cr, Ta, Nb, V, and Ti. The M′ atoms only occupy the outer layers and the M′′ atoms fill the middle layers. In other words, M′ atomic layers sandwich the middle M′′–C layers. Using X-ray atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis on Mo2TiC2 and Mo2Ti2C3 MXenes, we present the first quantitative analysis of structures of these novel materials and experimentally confirm that Mo atoms are in the outer layers of the [MC]nM structures. The electronic properties of these Mo-containing MXenes are compared with their Ti3C2 counterparts, and are found to be no longer metallic-like conductors; instead the resistance increases mildly with decreasing temperatures. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that OH terminated Mo–Ti MXenes are semiconductors with narrow band gaps. Measurements of the temperature dependencies of conductivities and magnetoresistances have confirmed that Mo2TiC2Tx exhibits semiconductor-like transport behavior, while Ti3C2Tx is a metal. This finding opens new avenues for the control of the electronic and optical applications of MXenes and for exploring new applications, in which semiconducting properties are required.

  16. The atmospheric boundary layer evening transitions: an observational and numerical study from two different datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, Mariano; Yagüe, Carlos; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Maqueda, Gregorio; Ander Arrillaga, Jon

    2015-04-01

    In this work we study the temporal evolution of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) along the transition period from a diurnal typical convection to a nocturnal more frequently stable situation. This period is known as late afternoon or evening transition, depending on the specific definitions employed by different authors [1]. In order to obtain a proper characterization, we try to learn whether or not the behaviour of these transitional boundary layers is strongly dependent on local conditions. To do so, two sets of evening transitions are studied from data collected at two different experimental sites. These locations correspond to research facilities named CIBA (Spain) and CRA (France), which are the places where atmospheric field campaigns have been conducted during the last years, such as CIBA2008 and BLLAST 2011, respectively. In order to get comparable situations, we focus especially on transitions with weak synoptic forcing, and consider daily astronomical sunset as a reference time. A statistical analysis on main parameters related to the transition is carried out for both locations, and the average behaviour is shown as well as extreme values according to the timing. A similar pattern in the qualitative evolution of many variables is found. Nevertheless, several relevant differences in the progress of key variables are obtained too. Moisture, both from the soil and the air, is thought to have great relevance in explaining many of the differences found between the two sites. Some case studies are explored, focusing on the role played by the atmospheric turbulence. Complementary, numerical experiments are also performed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model, in order to test the role of humidity, by artificially varying it in some of the simulations. [1] Lothon, M. and coauthors (2014): The BLLAST field experiment: Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 10931-10960.

  17. Transition Prediction in Hypersonic Boundary Layers Using Receptivity and Freestream Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, P.; Chou, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Boundary-layer transition in hypersonic flows over a straight cone can be predicted using measured freestream spectra, receptivity, and threshold values for the wall pressure fluctuations at the transition onset points. Simulations are performed for hypersonic boundary-layer flows over a 7-degree half-angle straight cone with varying bluntness at a freestream Mach number of 10. The steady and the unsteady flow fields are obtained by solving the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in axisymmetric coordinates using a 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using a third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. The calculated N-factors at the transition onset location increase gradually with increasing unit Reynolds numbers for flow over a sharp cone and remain almost the same for flow over a blunt cone. The receptivity coefficient increases slightly with increasing unit Reynolds numbers. They are on the order of 4 for a sharp cone and are on the order of 1 for a blunt cone. The location of transition onset predicted from the simulation including the freestream spectrum, receptivity, and the linear and the weakly nonlinear evolutions yields a solution close to the measured onset location for the sharp cone. The simulations over-predict transition onset by about twenty percent for the blunt cone.

  18. Observations of the Early Evening Boundary-Layer Transition Using a Small Unmanned Aerial System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Timothy; Chilson, Phillip; Zielke, Brett; Fedorovich, Evgeni

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of the lower portion of the planetary boundary layer is investigated using the Small Multifunction Research and Teaching Sonde (SMARTSonde), an unmanned aerial vehicle developed at the University of Oklahoma. The study focuses on the lowest 200 m of the atmosphere, where the most noticeable thermodynamic changes occur during the day. Between October 2010 and February 2011, a series of flights was conducted during the evening hours on several days to examine the vertical structure of the lower boundary layer. Data from a nearby Oklahoma Mesonet tower was used to supplement the vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, and pressure, which were collected approximately every 30 min, starting 2 h before sunset and continuing until dusk. From the profiles, sensible and latent heat fluxes were estimated. These fluxes were used to diagnose the portion of the boundary layer that was most affected by the early evening transition. During the transition period, a shallow cool and moist layer near the ground was formed, and as the evening progressed the cooling affected an increasingly shallower layer just above the surface.

  19. Penetration of magnetosonic waves into the magnetosphere: influence of a transition layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Leonovich

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available We have constructed a theory for the penetration of magnetosonic waves from the solar wind into the magnetosphere through a transition layer in a plane-stratified model for the medium. In this model the boundary layer is treated as a region, inside of which the parameters of the medium vary from values characteristic for the magnetosphere, to values typical of the solar wind. It is shown that if such a layer has sufficiently sharp boundaries, then magnetosonic eigen-oscillations can be excited inside of it. The boundaries of such a layer are partially permeable for magnetosonic waves. Therefore, if the eigen-oscillations are not sustained by an external source, they will be attenuated, because some of the energy is carried away by the oscillations that penetrate the solar wind and the magnetosphere. It is shown that about 40% of the energy flux of the waves incident on the transition layer in the magnetotail region penetrate to the magnetosphere’s interior. This energy flux suffices to sustain the stationary convection of magnetospheric plasma. The total energy input to the magnetosphere during a time interval of the order of the substorm growth phase time is comparable with the energetics of an average substorm.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities; solar wind–magnetosphere interactions – Space plasma physics (kinetic and MHD theory

  20. Penetration of magnetosonic waves into the magnetosphere: influence of a transition layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Leonovich

    Full Text Available We have constructed a theory for the penetration of magnetosonic waves from the solar wind into the magnetosphere through a transition layer in a plane-stratified model for the medium. In this model the boundary layer is treated as a region, inside of which the parameters of the medium vary from values characteristic for the magnetosphere, to values typical of the solar wind. It is shown that if such a layer has sufficiently sharp boundaries, then magnetosonic eigen-oscillations can be excited inside of it. The boundaries of such a layer are partially permeable for magnetosonic waves. Therefore, if the eigen-oscillations are not sustained by an external source, they will be attenuated, because some of the energy is carried away by the oscillations that penetrate the solar wind and the magnetosphere. It is shown that about 40% of the energy flux of the waves incident on the transition layer in the magnetotail region penetrate to the magnetosphere’s interior. This energy flux suffices to sustain the stationary convection of magnetospheric plasma. The total energy input to the magnetosphere during a time interval of the order of the substorm growth phase time is comparable with the energetics of an average substorm.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities; solar wind–magnetosphere interactions – Space plasma physics (kinetic and MHD theory

  1. Numerical simulation of the control of the three-dimensional transition process in boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, L. D.; Fasel, H. F.

    1990-01-01

    Surface heating techniques to control the three-dimensional laminar-turbulent transition process are numerically investigated for a water boundary layer. The Navier-Stokes and energy equations are solved using a fully implicit finite difference/spectral method. The spatially evolving boundary layer is simulated. Results of both passive and active methods of control are shown for small amplitude two-dimensional and three-dimensional disturbance waves. Control is also applied to the early stages of the secondary instability process using passive or active control techniques.

  2. Carrier Lifetime in Exfoliated Few-Layer Graphene Determined from Intersubband Optical Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Thomas; Feldmann, Jochen; Da Como, Enrico

    2013-05-01

    We report a femtosecond transient spectroscopy study in the near to middle infrared range, 0.8-0.35 eV photon energy, on graphene and few layer graphene single flakes. The spectra show an evolving structure of photoinduced absorption bands superimposed on the bleaching caused by Pauli blocking of the interband optically coupled states. Supported by tight-binding model calculations, we assign the photoinduced absorption features to intersubband transitions as the number of layers is increased. Interestingly, the intersubband photoinduced resonances show a longer dynamics than the interband bleaching, because of their independence from the absolute energy of the carriers with respect to the Dirac point. The dynamic of these intersubband transitions reflects the lifetime of the hot carriers and provides an elegant method to access it in this important class of semimetals.

  3. Carrier lifetime in exfoliated few-layer graphene determined from intersubband optical transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Thomas; Feldmann, Jochen; Da Como, Enrico

    2013-05-24

    We report a femtosecond transient spectroscopy study in the near to middle infrared range, 0.8-0.35 eV photon energy, on graphene and few layer graphene single flakes. The spectra show an evolving structure of photoinduced absorption bands superimposed on the bleaching caused by Pauli blocking of the interband optically coupled states. Supported by tight-binding model calculations, we assign the photoinduced absorption features to intersubband transitions as the number of layers is increased. Interestingly, the intersubband photoinduced resonances show a longer dynamics than the interband bleaching, because of their independence from the absolute energy of the carriers with respect to the Dirac point. The dynamic of these intersubband transitions reflects the lifetime of the hot carriers and provides an elegant method to access it in this important class of semimetals.

  4. Photo-modulation of the spin Hall conductivity of mono-layer transition metal dichalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Parijat; Bellotti, Enrico [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2016-05-23

    We report on a possible optical tuning of the spin Hall conductivity in mono-layer transition metal dichalcogenides. Light beams of frequencies much higher than the energy scale of the system (the off-resonant condition) do not excite electrons but rearrange the band structure. The rearrangement is quantitatively established using the Floquet formalism. For such a system of mono-layer transition metal dichalcogenides, the spin Hall conductivity (calculated with the Kubo expression in presence of disorder) exhibits a drop at higher frequencies and lower intensities. Finally, we compare the spin Hall conductivity of the higher spin-orbit coupled WSe{sub 2} to MoS{sub 2}; the spin Hall conductivity of WSe{sub 2} was found to be larger.

  5. Numerical Investigation of Transition in Supersonic Boundary Layers Using DNS and LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-31

    differential arc length ds can be represented in both coordinate systems- in Cartesian coordinates simply through Pythagoras in three dimensions ds2 = dx 2...incompressible boundary layers where the two-dimensional waves are more am- plified than three-dimensional waves according to the Squire’s Theorem , the...subhar- monic breakdown is a strong mechanism governing the transition process for many applications. Note, that exceptions of Squire’s Theorem exist

  6. Transition layers formation on the boundaries carbon fiber-copper dependence on the active additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wlosinski, W.; Pietrzak, K.

    1993-01-01

    The basic problem connected with fabrication of carbon fiber-copper composites is to overcome the problem of low wettability of carbon fiber by copper. One of the possible solutions of that problem is to use the copper doped with active metals. The investigation results of transition layer forming on the phase boundary in the system have been discussed in respect of the kind and content of active elements added to the copper. 5 refs, 5 figs, 5 tabs

  7. Examples of the Re-number effect on the transitional flat plate boundary layers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Antoš, Pavel; Jonáš, Pavel; Procházka, Pavel P.; Uruba, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2014), s. 605-606 ISSN 1617-7061. [Annual Meeting of the International Association of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics /85./. Erlangen, 10.03.2014-14.03.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/12/1271 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : transition * flat plate * boundary layer Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pamm.201410290

  8. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the presence of a density transition layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavakoli, A.; Tskhakaya, D.D.; Tsintsadze, N.L.

    1999-01-01

    A new type of symmetry for the Rayleigh equation is found. For small Atwood number an analytic solution is obtained for a smoothly varying density profile. The spectra of unstable modes are defined. It is shown that a transition layer with finite width can undergo stratification, and velocity shear between new-formed sublayers forms. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. Characterizing the Effects of Convection on the Afternoon to Evening Boundary Layer Transition During Pecan 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    daytime boundary layer is dominated by thermally buoyant eddies , resulting from sensible and latent heat fluxes. There is a similar transition in the...Atmospheric Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS). Currently COAMPS uses a bulk parametrization scheme known as Coupled Ocean Air Response Experiment...commercially manufactured coherent Doppler LIDAR from the UMBC location. The instrument produces line-of-sight wind speeds derived from the Doppler

  10. Boundary-layer transition prediction using a simplified correlation-based model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Chenchao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a simplified transition model based on the recently developed correlation-based γ-Reθt transition model. The transport equation of transition momentum thickness Reynolds number is eliminated for simplicity, and new transition length function and critical Reynolds number correlation are proposed. The new model is implemented into an in-house computational fluid dynamics (CFD code and validated for low and high-speed flow cases, including the zero pressure flat plate, airfoils, hypersonic flat plate and double wedge. Comparisons between the simulation results and experimental data show that the boundary-layer transition phenomena can be reasonably illustrated by the new model, which gives rise to significant improvements over the fully laminar and fully turbulent results. Moreover, the new model has comparable features of accuracy and applicability when compared with the original γ-Reθt model. In the meantime, the newly proposed model takes only one transport equation of intermittency factor and requires fewer correlations, which simplifies the original model greatly. Further studies, especially on separation-induced transition flows, are required for the improvement of the new model.

  11. Probing Critical Point Energies of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides: Surprising Indirect Gap of Single Layer WSe 2

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chendong

    2015-09-21

    By using a comprehensive form of scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we have revealed detailed quasi-particle electronic structures in transition metal dichalcogenides, including the quasi-particle gaps, critical point energy locations, and their origins in the Brillouin zones. We show that single layer WSe surprisingly has an indirect quasi-particle gap with the conduction band minimum located at the Q-point (instead of K), albeit the two states are nearly degenerate. We have further observed rich quasi-particle electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides as a function of atomic structures and spin-orbit couplings. Such a local probe for detailed electronic structures in conduction and valence bands will be ideal to investigate how electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides are influenced by variations of local environment.

  12. Probing Critical Point Energies of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides: Surprising Indirect Gap of Single Layer WSe 2

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chendong; Chen, Yuxuan; Johnson, Amber; Li, Ming-yang; Li, Lain-Jong; Mende, Patrick C.; Feenstra, Randall M.; Shih, Chih Kang

    2015-01-01

    By using a comprehensive form of scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we have revealed detailed quasi-particle electronic structures in transition metal dichalcogenides, including the quasi-particle gaps, critical point energy locations, and their origins in the Brillouin zones. We show that single layer WSe surprisingly has an indirect quasi-particle gap with the conduction band minimum located at the Q-point (instead of K), albeit the two states are nearly degenerate. We have further observed rich quasi-particle electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides as a function of atomic structures and spin-orbit couplings. Such a local probe for detailed electronic structures in conduction and valence bands will be ideal to investigate how electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides are influenced by variations of local environment.

  13. Transitional and turbulent flat-plate boundary layers with heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz

    2010-11-01

    We report on our direct numerical simulation of two incompressible, nominally zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate boundary layers from momentum thickness Reynolds number 80 to 1950. Heat transfer between the constant-temperature solid surface and the free-stream is also simulated with molecular Prandtl number=1. Throughout the entire flat-plate, the ratio of Stanton number and skin-friction St/Cfdeviates from the exact Reynolds analogy value of 0.5 by less than 1.5%. Turbulent Prandtl number t peaks at the wall. Preponderance of hairpin vortices is observed in both the transitional and turbulent regions of the boundary layers. In particular, the internal structure of merged turbulent spots is hairpin forest; the internal structure of infant turbulent spots is hairpin packet. Numerous hairpin vortices are readily detected in both the near-wall and outer regions of the boundary layers up to momentum thickness Reynolds number 1950. This suggests that the hairpin vortices in the turbulent region are not simply the aged hairpin forests convected from the upstream transitional region. Temperature iso-surfaces in the companion thermal boundary layers are found to be a useful tracer in identifying hairpin vortex structures.

  14. Transitional boundary layer in low-Prandtl-number convection at high Rayleigh number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Joerg; Bandaru, Vinodh; Pandey, Ambrish; Scheel, Janet

    2016-11-01

    The boundary layer structure of the velocity and temperature fields in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard flows in closed cylindrical cells of unit aspect ratio is revisited from a transitional and turbulent viscous boundary layer perspective. When the Rayleigh number is large enough the boundary layer dynamics at the bottom and top plates can be separated into an impact region of downwelling plumes, an ejection region of upwelling plumes and an interior region (away from side walls) that is dominated by a shear flow of varying orientation. This interior plate region is compared here to classical wall-bounded shear flows. The working fluid is liquid mercury or liquid gallium at a Prandtl number of Pr = 0 . 021 for a range of Rayleigh numbers of 3 ×105 Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  15. The lobe to plasma sheet boundary layer transition: Theory and observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Treumann, R.; Nakamura, M.; Kistler, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    The lobe and the plasma sheet boundary layer in the Earth's magnetotail are regions of different plasma conditions and share a common interface. The transition from the lobe to the plasma sheet boundary layer is examined here using AMPTE/IRM data. When the satellite crossed from the lobe to the plasma sheet boundary layer, intense narrow banded wave bursts at 1 kHz were observed an d then broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) immediately followed. Simultaneous with the onset of BEN, high energy earthward streaming proton beams at > 40 keV (> 2,700 km/s) were detected. These results are used as input into a numerical simulation to study ion beam instabilities in the PSBL

  16. Comprehensive kinetic analysis of the plasma-wall transition layer in a strongly tilted magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tskhakaya, D. D.; Kos, L.

    2014-01-01

    The magnetized plasma-wall transition (MPWT) layer at the presence of the obliquity of the magnetic field to the wall consists of three sub-layers: the Debye sheath (DS), the magnetic pre-sheath (MPS), and the collisional pre-sheath (CPS) with characteristic lengths λ D (electron Debye length), ρ i (ion gyro-radius), and ℓ (the smallest relevant collision length), respectively. Tokamak plasmas are usually assumed to have the ordering λ D ≪ρ i ≪ℓ, when the above-mentioned sub-layers can be distinctly distinguished. In the limits of ε Dm (λ D /ρ i )→0 and ε mc (ρ i /ℓ)→0 (“asymptotic three-scale (A3S) limits”), these sub-layers are precisely defined. Using the smallness of the tilting angle of the magnetic field to the wall, the ion distribution functions are found for three sub-regions in the analytic form. The equations and characteristic length-scales governing the transition (intermediate) regions between the neighboring sub-layers (CPS – MPS and MPS – DS) are derived, allowing to avoid the singularities arising from the ε Dm →0 and ε mc →0 approximations. The MPS entrance and the related kinetic form of the Bohm–Chodura condition are successfully defined for the first time. At the DS entrance, the Bohm condition maintains its usual form. The results encourage further study and understanding of physics of the MPWT layers in the modern plasma facilities

  17. Modeling boundary-layer transition in DNS and LES using Parabolized Stability Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Duran, Adrian; Hack, M. J. Philipp; Moin, Parviz

    2016-11-01

    The modeling of the laminar region and the prediction of the point of transition remain key challenges in the numerical simulation of boundary layers. The issue is of particular relevance for wall-modeled large eddy simulations which require 10 to 100 times higher grid resolution in the thin laminar region than in the turbulent regime. Our study examines the potential of the nonlinear parabolized stability equations (PSE) to provide an accurate, yet computationally efficient treatment of the growth of disturbances in the pre-transitional flow regime. The PSE captures the nonlinear interactions that eventually induce breakdown to turbulence, and can as such identify the onset of transition without relying on empirical correlations. Since the local PSE solution at the point of transition is the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, it provides a natural inflow condition for large eddy and direct simulations by avoiding unphysical transients. We show that in a classical H-type transition scenario, a combined PSE/DNS approach can reproduce the skin-friction distribution obtained in reference direct numerical simulations. The computational cost in the laminar region is reduced by several orders of magnitude. Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  18. Internal Occipital Crest Misalignment with Internal Occipital Protuberance: A Case Report of Posterior Cranial Fossa Anatomic Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Ha

    2016-01-01

    During gross anatomy head and neck laboratory session, one dissection group observed an abnormal anatomic variation in the posterior cranial fossa of a 94-year-old male cadaver. The internal occipital crest was not aligned with internal occipital protuberance and groove for superior sagittal sinus. It seemed that the internal occipital protuberance was shifted significantly to the right side. As a result the skull was overly stretched in order to connect with the internal occipital ridge. These internal skull variations of occipital bone landmarks can influence the location of adjacent dural venous sinuses and possibly influence cerebrospinal fluid flow. Similar anatomical anomalies have been attributed to presence of hydrocephalus and abnormalities in cisterna magna. PMID:27648322

  19. Evidence of a Transition Layer between the Free Surface and the Bulk

    KAUST Repository

    Ogieglo, Wojciech

    2018-02-21

    The free surface, a very thin layer at the interface between polymer and air, is considered the main source of the perturbations in the properties of ultrathin polymer films, i.e., nanoconfinement effects. The structural relaxation of such a layer is decoupled from the molecular dynamics of the bulk. The free surface is, in fact, able to stay liquid even below the temperature where the polymer resides in the glassy state. Importantly, this surface layer is expected to have a very sharp interface with the underlying bulk. Here, by analyzing the penetration of n-hexane into polystyrene films, we report on the existence of a transition region, not observed by previous investigations, extending for 12 nm below the free surface. The presence of such a layer permits reconciling the behavior of interfacial layers with current models and has profound implications on the performance of ultrathin membranes. We show that the expected increase in the flux of the permeating species is actually overruled by nanoconfinement.

  20. Evidence of a Transition Layer between the Free Surface and the Bulk

    KAUST Repository

    Ogieglo, Wojciech; Tempelman, Kristianne; Napolitano, Simone; Benes, Nieck E.

    2018-01-01

    The free surface, a very thin layer at the interface between polymer and air, is considered the main source of the perturbations in the properties of ultrathin polymer films, i.e., nanoconfinement effects. The structural relaxation of such a layer is decoupled from the molecular dynamics of the bulk. The free surface is, in fact, able to stay liquid even below the temperature where the polymer resides in the glassy state. Importantly, this surface layer is expected to have a very sharp interface with the underlying bulk. Here, by analyzing the penetration of n-hexane into polystyrene films, we report on the existence of a transition region, not observed by previous investigations, extending for 12 nm below the free surface. The presence of such a layer permits reconciling the behavior of interfacial layers with current models and has profound implications on the performance of ultrathin membranes. We show that the expected increase in the flux of the permeating species is actually overruled by nanoconfinement.

  1. Evidence of a Transition Layer between the Free Surface and the Bulk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogieglo, Wojciech; Tempelman, Kristianne; Napolitano, Simone; Benes, Nieck E

    2018-03-15

    The free surface, a very thin layer at the interface between polymer and air, is considered the main source of the perturbations in the properties of ultrathin polymer films, i.e., nanoconfinement effects. The structural relaxation of such a layer is decoupled from the molecular dynamics of the bulk. The free surface is, in fact, able to stay liquid even below the temperature where the polymer resides in the glassy state. Importantly, this surface layer is expected to have a very sharp interface with the underlying bulk. Here, by analyzing the penetration of n-hexane into polystyrene films, we report on the existence of a transition region, not observed by previous investigations, extending for 12 nm below the free surface. The presence of such a layer permits reconciling the behavior of interfacial layers with current models and has profound implications on the performance of ultrathin membranes. We show that the expected increase in the flux of the permeating species is actually overruled by nanoconfinement.

  2. Control of 3-D Modes in a Boundary Layer Undergoing Subharmonic Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corke, T. C.; Peto, J.; Speer, A.; Paroozan, P.; Sciammarella, C.

    1997-11-01

    The effect of alternating standing patterns of wall displacements in the transition region of a Falkner-Skan boundary layer with an adverse pressure gradient is investigated. Transition is controlled by introducing disturbances to excite a pair of oblique modes along with a plane TS mode. The oblique modes are at the TS subharmonic frequency in order to promote subharmonic resonance. Measurements consist of a spanwise rake of hot-wire sensors placed near the wall below the critical layer, and a 2-D (15 x 15) array of optical pressure sensors. The space-time data series are processed using 2-D Fourier analysis to determine the spanwise wave number content of the flow. Of particular interest is the streamwise vortex mode which results from a difference interaction of the subharmonic oblique modes. We examine the effect of different patterns and amplitudes of upstream wall displacements on the development of the travelling and stationary modes in this case leading to transition. Supported by ARO Grant No. DAAH04-93-G-0212

  3. Detecting the chaotic nature in a transitional boundary layer using symbolic information-theory quantifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Liu, Peiqing; Guo, Hao; Wang, Jinjun

    2017-11-01

    The permutation entropy and the statistical complexity are employed to study the boundary-layer transition induced by the surface roughness. The velocity signals measured in the transition process are analyzed with these symbolic quantifiers, as well as the complexity-entropy causality plane, and the chaotic nature of the instability fluctuations is identified. The frequency of the dominant fluctuations has been found according to the time scales corresponding to the extreme values of the symbolic quantifiers. The laminar-turbulent transition process is accompanied by the evolution in the degree of organization of the complex eddy motions, which is also characterized with the growing smaller and flatter circles in the complexity-entropy causality plane. With the help of the permutation entropy and the statistical complexity, the differences between the chaotic fluctuations detected in the experiments and the classical Tollmien-Schlichting wave are shown and discussed. It is also found that the chaotic features of the instability fluctuations can be approximated with a number of regular sine waves superimposed on the fluctuations of the undisturbed laminar boundary layer. This result is related to the physical mechanism in the generation of the instability fluctuations, which is the noise-induced chaos.

  4. Turbulence production in an APG-boundary-layer transition induced by randomized perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodulin, V. I.; Kachanov, Y. S.; Roschektayev, A. P.

    This paper is devoted to an experimental investigation of formation and development of coherent vortical structures at late stages of a laminar-turbulent transition initiated by a harmonic, almost two-dimensional Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave perturbed by weak (initially) broadband disturbances. The initial base flow represented a self-similar boundary layer with an adverse pressure gradient (APG) with Hartree parameter ßH = -0.115. Experiments were performed at controlled disturbance conditions with the help of the ‘deterministic noise’ method and a universal disturbance source of instability waves. The main measurements were carried out by means of a hot-wire anemometer in a broad spatial region of the flow starting with stages of quasi-sinusoidal small-amplitude instability wave and ending with final stages of transition characterized by formation of concentrated localized vortical structures. The excited perturbations were partly random (within 20 TS-wave fundamental periods) but periodical at very large time scales during which the flow passes the model several times. The detailed measurements and the experimental data processing gave us the possibility to obtain instantaneous velocity and vorticity fields in the (x, y, z, t)-space and to perform computer-aided ‘visualization’ of the instantaneous flow structure. Specific features of the turbulence production mechanism occurring at late stages of transition are studied and compared with previously reported data obtained at sinusoidal excitation. A qualitative similarity is found between essentially nonlinear stages of transition observed in the present (randomized) case and those studied previously in cases of transition initiated by a harmonic TS wave or by a TS wave packet. It is found that interaction of primary wave with a broadband ‘noise’ of 3D TS waves leads at late stages of transition to formation of ?-vortices, intensive ? -shaped high-shear (HS) layers, O -shaped vortices, ring

  5. Electrochemically-induced reversible transition from the tunneled to layered polymorphs of manganese dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boeun; Yoon, Chong Seung; Lee, Hae Ri; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Cho, Byung Won; Oh, Si Hyoung

    2014-08-01

    Zn-ion batteries are emerging energy storage systems eligible for large-scale applications, such as electric vehicles. These batteries consist of totally environmentally-benign electrode materials and potentially manufactured very economically. Although Zn/α-MnO2 systems produce high energy densities of 225 Wh kg-1, larger than those of conventional Mg-ion batteries, they show significant capacity fading during long-term cycling and suffer from poor performance at high current rates. To solve these problems, the concrete reaction mechanism between α-MnO2 and zinc ions that occur on the cathode must be elucidated. Here, we report the intercalation mechanism of zinc ions into α-MnO2 during discharge, which involves a reversible phase transition of MnO2 from tunneled to layered polymorphs by electrochemical reactions. This transition is initiated by the dissolution of manganese from α-MnO2 during discharge process to form layered Zn-birnessite. The original tunneled structure is recovered by the incorporation of manganese ions back into the layers of Zn-birnessite during charge process.

  6. Morphological instability of Ag films caused by phase transition in the underlying Ta barrier layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardani, Shabnam, E-mail: shabnam.mardani@angstrom.uu.se; Vallin, Örjan; Wätjen, Jörn Timo; Norström, Hans; Olsson, Jörgen; Zhang, Shi-Li, E-mail: shili.zhang@angstrom.uu.se [Solid State Electronics, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, SE-75121 (Sweden)

    2014-08-18

    Wide-bandgap (WBG) semiconductor technologies are maturing and may provide increased device performance in many fields of applications, such as high-temperature electronics. However, there are still issues regarding the stability and reliability of WBG devices. Of particular importance is the high-temperature stability of interconnects for electronic systems based on WBG-semiconductors. For metallization without proper encapsulation, morphological degradation can occur at elevated temperatures. Sandwiching Ag films between Ta and/or TaN layers in this study is found to be electrically and morphologically stabilize the Ag metallization up to 800 °C, compared to 600 °C for uncapped films. However, the barrier layer plays a key role and TaN is found to be superior to Ta, resulting in the best achieved stability, whereas the difference between Ta and TaN caps is negligible. The β-to-α phase transition in the underlying Ta barrier layer is identified as the major cause responsible for the morphological instability observed above 600 °C. It is shown that this phase transition can be avoided using a stacked Ta/TaN barrier.

  7. A wavelet-based intermittency detection technique from PIV investigations in transitional boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Daniele; Lengani, Davide; Guida, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The transition process of the boundary layer growing over a flat plate with pressure gradient simulating the suction side of a low-pressure turbine blade and elevated free-stream turbulence intensity level has been analyzed by means of PIV and hot-wire measurements. A detailed view of the instantaneous flow field in the wall-normal plane highlights the physics characterizing the complex process leading to the formation of large-scale coherent structures during breaking down of the ordered motion of the flow, thus generating randomized oscillations (i.e., turbulent spots). This analysis gives the basis for the development of a new procedure aimed at determining the intermittency function describing (statistically) the transition process. To this end, a wavelet-based method has been employed for the identification of the large-scale structures created during the transition process. Successively, a probability density function of these events has been defined so that an intermittency function is deduced. This latter strictly corresponds to the intermittency function of the transitional flow computed trough a classic procedure based on hot-wire data. The agreement between the two procedures in the intermittency shape and spot production rate proves the capability of the method in providing the statistical representation of the transition process. The main advantages of the procedure here proposed concern with its applicability to PIV data; it does not require a threshold level to discriminate first- and/or second-order time-derivative of hot-wire time traces (that makes the method not influenced by the operator); and it provides a clear evidence of the connection between the flow physics and the statistical representation of transition based on theory of turbulent spot propagation.

  8. Improved-Delayed-Detached-Eddy Simulation of cavity-induced transition in hypersonic boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Lianghua; Xiao, Zhixiang; Duan, Zhiwei; Fu, Song

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This work is about hypersonic cavity-induced transition with IDDES approach. • The length-to-width-to-depth ratio of the cavity is 19.9:3.57:1 at AoA −10° and −15°. • Flow remains laminar at −10°, transition occurs at −15° and cavity changed from open to close type. • Streamwise vortices, impingement shock, traveling shocks and exit shock are observed. • Breakdown of these vortices triggering rapid flow transition. - Abstract: Hypersonic flow transition from laminar to turbulent due to the surface irregularities, like local cavities, can greatly affect the surface heating and skin friction. In this work, the hypersonic flows over a three-dimensional rectangular cavity with length-to-width-to-depth ratio, L:W:D, of 19.9:3.57:1 at two angles of attack (AoA) were numerically studied with Improved-Delayed-Detached-Eddy Simulation (IDDES) method to highlight the mechanism of transition triggered by the cavity. The present approach was firstly applied to the transonic flow over M219 rectangular cavity. The results, including the fluctuating pressure and frequency, agreed with experiment well. In the hypersonic case at Mach number about 9.6 the cavity is seen as “open” at AoA of −10° but “closed” at AoA of −15° unconventional to the two-dimensional cavity case where the flow always exhibits closed cavity feature when the length-to-depth ratio L/D is larger than 14. For the open cavity flow, the shear layer is basically steady and the flow maintains laminar. For the closed cavity case, the external flow goes into the cavity and impinges on the bottom floor. High intensity streamwise vortices, impingement shock and exit shock are observed causing breakdown of these vortices triggering rapid flow transition

  9. Study on Stress Development in the Phase Transition Layer of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Chai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress development is one of the significant factors leading to the failure of thermal barrier coating (TBC systems. In this work, stress development in the two phase mixed zone named phase transition layer (PTL, which grows between the thermally grown oxide (TGO and the bond coat (BC, is investigated by using two different homogenization models. A constitutive equation of the PTL based on the Reuss model is proposed to study the stresses in the PTL. The stresses computed with the proposed constitutive equation are compared with those obtained with Voigt model-based equation in detail. The stresses based on the Voigt model are slightly higher than those based on the Reuss model. Finally, a further study is carried out to explore the influence of phase transition proportions on the stress difference caused by homogenization models. Results show that the stress difference becomes more evident with the increase of the PTL thickness ratio in the TGO.

  10. Late-Stage Vortical Structures and Eddy Motions in a Transitional Boundary Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Bing, Liu; Zheng-Qing, Chen; Chao-Qun, Liu

    2010-01-01

    A high-order direct numerical simulation of flow transition over a flat-plate at a free stream Mach number 0.5 is carried out. Formation and development of three-dimensional vortical structures, typically shown as A-vortices, hairpin vortices and ring-like vortices, are observed. Numerical results show that there is a strong downdraft motion of fluid excited by every ring-like vortex in the late-stage of the transition process. At two sides of the vortical structure centerline, the downdraft motions induced by the ring-like vortex and the rotating legs superimpose. This is responsible for the appearance of a high-speed streak associated with the positive spike observed in a previous investigation and the appearance of a high-shear layer in the near wall region. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  11. Alkali metal and alkali metal hydroxide intercalates of the layered transition metal disulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanzaki, Y.; Konuma, M.; Matsumoto, O.

    1981-01-01

    The intercalation reaction of some layered transition metal disulfides with alkali metals, alkali metal hydroxides, and tetraalkylammonium hydroxides were investigated. The alkali metal intercalates were prepared in the respective metal-hexamethylphosphoric triamide solutions in vaccuo, and the hydroxide intercalates in aqueous hydroxide solutions. According to the intercalation reaction, the c-lattice parameter was increased, and the increase indicated the expansion of the interlayer distance. In the case of alkali metal intercalates, the expansion of the interlayer distance increased continuously, corresponding to the atomic radius of the alkali metal. On the other hand, the hydroxide intercalates showed discrete expansion corresponding to the effective ionic radius of the intercalated cation. All intercalates of TaS 2 amd NbS 2 were superconductors. The expansion of the interlayer distance tended to increase the superconducting transition temperature in the intercalates of TaS 2 and vice versa in those of NbS 2 . (orig.)

  12. Turbulent boundary layer over roughness transition with variation in spanwise roughness length scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerweel, Jerry; Tomas, Jasper; Eisma, Jerke; Pourquie, Mathieu; Elsinga, Gerrit; Jonker, Harm

    2016-11-01

    Both large-eddy simulations (LES) and water-tunnel experiments, using simultaneous stereoscopic PIV and LIF were done to investigate pollutant dispersion in a region where the surface changes from rural to urban roughness. This consists of rectangular obstacles where we vary the spanwise aspect ratio of the obstacles. A line source of passive tracer was placed upstream of the roughness transition. The objectives of the study are: (i) to determine the influence of the aspect ratio on the roughness-transition flow, and (ii) to determine the dominant mechanisms of pollutant removal from street canyons in the transition region. It is found that for a spanwise aspect ratio of 2 the drag induced by the roughness is largest of all considered cases, which is caused by a large-scale secondary flow. In the roughness transition the vertical advective pollutant flux is the main ventilation mechanism in the first three streets. Furthermore, by means of linear stochastic estimation the mean flow structure is identied that is responsible for exchange of the fluid between the roughness obstacles and the outer part of the boundary layer. Furthermore, it is found that the vertical length scale of this structure increases with increasing aspect ratio of the obstacles in the roughness region.

  13. Evolution of solenoidal and dilatational perturbations in transitional supersonic and hypersonic boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Omar; Hickey, Jean-Pierre; Scalo, Carlo; Hussain, Fazle

    2017-11-01

    We have investigated the interaction between the dilatational and solenoidal components of instability waves relying on DNS simulations of temporally-evolving compressible boundary layers ranging from Mach numbers of 2.0 to 10.0. For idealized flow conditions at subsonic-to-moderate supersonic speeds, transition to turbulence occurs due to amplification of Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves (first Mack mode) exponentially amplified until nonlinear breakdown and transition to turbulence occurs. Under the same conditions, at hypersonic speeds, transition is governed by acoustically resonating trapped waves (second Mack mode). While the former are expected to be solenoidal in nature and the latter predominantly dilatational, we demonstrate that, in general, they always coexist and that, even at Mach=10 there is an appreciable energy transfer from the dilatational to the solenoidal at limit-cycle amplitude conditions in 2D simulations. In three-dimensional simulations very rapid breakdown is observed. Mechanisms of energy exchange between the dilatational and solenoidal components during the transition will be discussed.

  14. Emerging Energy Applications of Two-Dimensional Layered Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Henan

    2015-10-31

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have attracted significant attention for their great potential in nano energy. TMDC layered materials represent a diverse and largely untapped source of 2D systems. High-quality TMDC layers with an appropriate size, variable thickness, superior electronic and optical properties can be produced by the exfoliation or vapour phase deposition method. Semiconducting TMDC monolayers have been demonstrated feasible for various energy related applications, where their electronic properties and uniquely high surface areas offer opportunities for various applications such as nano generators, green electronics, electrocatalytic hydrogen generation and energy storage. In this review, we start from the structure, properties and preparation, followed by detailed discussions on the development of TMDC-based nano energy applications. Graphical abstract The structure characterizations and preparative methods of 2D TMDCs have obtained significant progresses. Their recent advances for nano energy generation, solar harvesting, conversion and storage, and green electronics are reviewed.

  15. Valley polarization in magnetically doped single-layer transition-metal dichalcogenides

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yingchun

    2014-04-28

    We demonstrate that valley polarization can be induced and controlled in semiconducting single-layer transition-metal dichalcogenides by magnetic doping, which is important for spintronics, valleytronics, and photonics devices. As an example, we investigate Mn-doped MoS2 by first-principles calculations. We study how the valley polarization depends on the strength of the spin orbit coupling and the exchange interaction and discuss how it can be controlled by magnetic doping. Valley polarization by magnetic doping is also expected for other honeycomb materials with strong spin orbit coupling and the absence of inversion symmetry.

  16. Measurements in a Transitioning Cone Boundary Layer at Freestream Mach 3.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Rudolph A.; Chou, Amanda; Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Owens, Lewis R.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in the Supersonic Low-Disturbance Tunnel to investigate naturally-occurring instabilities in a supersonic boundary layer on a 7 deg half- angle cone. All tests were conducted with a nominal freestream Mach number of M(sub infinity) = 3:5, total temperature of T(sub 0) = 299:8 K, and unit Reynolds numbers of Re(sub infinity) x 10(exp -6) = 9:89, 13.85, 21.77, and 25.73 m(exp -1). Instability measurements were acquired under noisy- ow and quiet- ow conditions. Measurements were made to document the freestream and the boundary-layer edge environment, to document the cone baseline flow, and to establish the stability characteristics of the transitioning flow. Pitot pressure and hot-wire boundary- layer measurements were obtained using a model-integrated traverse system. All hot- wire results were single-point measurements and were acquired with a sensor calibrated to mass ux. For the noisy-flow conditions, excellent agreement for the growth rates and mode shapes was achieved between the measured results and linear stability theory (LST). The corresponding N factor at transition from LST is N 3:9. The stability measurements for the quiet-flow conditions were limited to the aft end of the cone. The most unstable first-mode instabilities as predicted by LST were successfully measured, but this unstable first mode was not the dominant instability measured in the boundary layer. Instead, the dominant instabilities were found to be the less-amplified, low-frequency disturbances predicted by linear stability theory, and these instabilities grew according to linear theory. These low-frequency unstable disturbances were initiated by freestream acoustic disturbances through a receptivity process that is believed to occur near the branch I locations of the cone. Under quiet-flow conditions, the boundary layer remained laminar up to the last measurement station for the largest Re1, implying a transition N factor of N greater than 8:5.

  17. Investigation of CeO2 Buffer Layer Effects on the Voltage Response of YBCO Transition-Edge Bolometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohajeri, Roya; Nazifi, Rana; Wulff, Anders Christian

    2016-01-01

    The effect on the thermal parameters of superconducting transition-edge bolometers produced on a single crystalline SrTiO3 (STO) substrate with and without a CeO2 buffer layer was investigated. Metal-organic deposition was used to deposit the 20-nm CeO2 buffer layer, whereas RF magnetron sputtering...

  18. SURFACE LAYER ACCRETION IN TRANSITIONAL AND CONVENTIONAL DISKS: FROM POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS TO PLANETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Becker, Daniel; Chiang, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    'Transitional' T Tauri disks have optically thin holes with radii ∼>10 AU, yet accrete up to the median T Tauri rate. Multiple planets inside the hole can torque the gas to high radial speeds over large distances, reducing the local surface density while maintaining accretion. Thus multi-planet systems, together with reductions in disk opacity due to grain growth, can explain how holes can be simultaneously transparent and accreting. There remains the problem of how outer disk gas diffuses into the hole. Here it has been proposed that the magnetorotational instability (MRI) erodes disk surface layers ionized by stellar X-rays. In contrast to previous work, we find that the extent to which surface layers are MRI-active is limited not by ohmic dissipation but by ambipolar diffusion, the latter measured by Am: the number of times a neutral hydrogen molecule collides with ions in a dynamical time. Simulations by Hawley and Stone showed that Am ∼ 100 is necessary for ions to drive MRI turbulence in neutral gas. We calculate that in X-ray-irradiated surface layers, Am typically varies from ∼10 -3 to 1, depending on the abundance of charge-adsorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, whose properties we infer from Spitzer observations. We conclude that ionization of H 2 by X-rays and cosmic rays can sustain, at most, only weak MRI turbulence in surface layers 1-10 g cm -2 thick, and that accretion rates in such layers are too small compared to observed accretion rates for the majority of disks.

  19. Phase transitions during formation of Ag nanoparticles on In{sub 2}S{sub 3} precursor layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang, E-mail: yang.liu@helmholtz-berlin.de; Fu, Yanpeng; Dittrich, Thomas; Sáez-Araoz, Rodrigo; Schmid, Martina; Hinrichs, Volker; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch.; Fischer, Christian-Herbert

    2015-09-01

    Phase transitions have been investigated for silver deposition onto In{sub 2}S{sub 3} precursor layers by spray chemical vapor deposition from a trimethylphosphine (hexafluoroacetylacetonato) silver (Ag(hfacac)(PMe{sub 3})) solution. The formation of Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on top of the semiconductor layer set on concomitant with the formation of AgIn{sub 5}S{sub 8}. The increase of the diameter of Ag NPs was accompanied by the evolution of orthorhombic AgInS{sub 2}. The formation of Ag{sub 2}S at the interface between Ag NPs and the semiconductor layer was observed. Surface photovoltage spectroscopy indicated charge separation and electronic transitions in the ranges of corresponding band gaps. The phase transition approach is aimed to be applied for the formation of plasmonic nanostructures on top of extremely thin semiconducting layers. - Highlights: • Silver nanoparticles were deposited onto In{sub 2}S{sub 3} precursor layer by spray pyrolysis. • The silver nanoparticle size and density could be controlled by deposition time. • Phase transitions during deposition and material properties were investigated. • The layers still show semiconducting properties after phase transitions. • Plasmonic absorption enhancement has been demonstrated.

  20. Impacts of solar-absorbing aerosol layers on the transition of stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of an initially overlying layer of solar-absorbing aerosol on the transition of stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds are examined using large-eddy simulations. For lightly drizzling cloud the transition is generally hastened, resulting mainly from increased cloud droplet number concentration (Nc induced by entrained aerosol. The increased Nc slows sedimentation of cloud droplets and shortens their relaxation time for diffusional growth, both of which accelerate entrainment of overlying air and thereby stratocumulus breakup. However, the decrease in albedo from cloud breakup is more than offset by redistributing cloud water over a greater number of droplets, such that the diurnal-average shortwave forcing at the top of the atmosphere is negative. The negative radiative forcing is enhanced by sizable longwave contributions, which result from the greater cloud breakup and a reduced boundary layer height associated with aerosol heating. A perturbation of moisture instead of aerosol aloft leads to a greater liquid water path and a more gradual transition. Adding absorbing aerosol to that atmosphere results in substantial reductions in liquid water path (LWP and cloud cover that lead to positive shortwave and negative longwave forcings on average canceling each other. Only for heavily drizzling clouds is the breakup delayed, as inhibition of precipitation overcomes cloud water loss from enhanced entrainment. Considering these simulations as an imperfect proxy for biomass burning plumes influencing Namibian stratocumulus, we expect regional indirect plus semi-direct forcings to be substantially negative to negligible at the top of the atmosphere, with its magnitude sensitive to background and perturbation properties.

  1. Effect of Compliant Walls on Secondary Instabilities in Boundary-Layer Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Morris, Philip J.

    1991-01-01

    For aerodynamic and hydrodynamic vehicles, it is highly desirable to reduce drag and noise levels. A reduction in drag leads to fuel savings. In particular for submersible vehicles, a decrease in noise levels inhibits detection. A suggested means to obtain these reduction goals is by delaying the transition from laminar to turbulent flow in external boundary layers. For hydrodynamic applications, a passive device which shows promise for transition delays is the compliant coating. In previous studies with a simple mechanical model representing the compliant wall, coatings were found that provided transition delays as predicted from the semi-empirical e(sup n) method. Those studies were concerned with the linear stage of transition where the instability of concern is referred to as the primary instability. For the flat-plate boundary layer, the Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave is the primary instability. In one of those studies, it was shown that three-dimensional (3-D) primary instabilities, or oblique waves, could dominate transition over the coatings considered. From the primary instability, the stretching and tilting of vorticity in the shear flow leads to a secondary instability mechanism. This has been theoretical described by Herbert based on Floquet theory. In the present study, Herbert's theory is used to predict the development of secondary instabilities over isotropic and non-isotropic compliant walls. Since oblique waves may be dominant over compliant walls, a secondary theory extention is made to allow for these 3-D primary instabilities. The effect of variations in primary amplitude, spanwise wavenumber, and Reynolds number on the secondary instabilities are examined. As in the rigid wall case, over compliant walls the subharmonic mode of secondary instability dominates for low-amplitude primary disturbances. Both isotropic and non-isotropic compliant walls lead to reduced secondary growth rates compared to the rigid wall results. For high frequencies

  2. DNS of Laminar-Turbulent Transition in Swept-Wing Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, L.; Choudhari, M.; Li, F.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed to examine laminar to turbulent transition due to high-frequency secondary instability of stationary crossflow vortices in a subsonic swept-wing boundary layer for a realistic natural-laminar-flow airfoil configuration. The secondary instability is introduced via inflow forcing and the mode selected for forcing corresponds to the most amplified secondary instability mode that, in this case, derives a majority of its growth from energy production mechanisms associated with the wall-normal shear of the stationary basic state. An inlet boundary condition is carefully designed to allow for accurate injection of instability wave modes and minimize acoustic reflections at numerical boundaries. Nonlinear parabolized stability equation (PSE) predictions compare well with the DNS in terms of modal amplitudes and modal shape during the strongly nonlinear phase of the secondary instability mode. During the transition process, the skin friction coefficient rises rather rapidly and the wall-shear distribution shows a sawtooth pattern that is analogous to the previously documented surface flow visualizations of transition due to stationary crossflow instability. Fully turbulent features are observed in the downstream region of the flow.

  3. Pressure-induced spin reorientation transition in layered ferromagnetic insulator Cr2Ge2Te6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhisheng; Lohmann, Mark; Ali, Zulfikhar A.; Tang, Chi; Li, Junxue; Xing, Wenyu; Zhong, Jiangnan; Jia, Shuang; Han, Wei; Coh, Sinisa; Beyermann, Ward; Shi, Jing

    2018-05-01

    The anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) of Cr2Ge2Te6 (CGT), a layered ferromagnetic insulator, is investigated under an applied hydrostatic pressure up to 2 GPa. The easy-axis direction of the magnetization is inferred from the AMR saturation feature in the presence and absence of an applied pressure. At zero applied pressure, the easy axis is along the c direction or perpendicular to the layer. Upon application of a hydrostatic pressure > 1 GPa, the uniaxial anisotropy switches to easy-plane anisotropy which drives the equilibrium magnetization from the c axis to the a b plane at zero magnetic field, which amounts to a giant magnetic anisotropy energy change (> 100%). As the temperature is increased across the Curie temperature, the characteristic AMR effect gradually decreases and disappears. Our first-principles calculations confirm the giant magnetic anisotropy energy change with moderate pressure and assign its origin to the increased off-site spin-orbit interaction of Te atoms due to a shorter Cr-Te distance. Such a pressure-induced spin reorientation transition is very rare in three-dimensional ferromagnets, but it may be common to other layered ferromagnets with similar crystal structures to CGT, and therefore offers a unique way to control magnetic anisotropy.

  4. Transition behavior of asymmetric polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) films: A stable hexagonally modulated layer structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sungmin; Koo, Kyosung; Kim, Kyunginn; Ahn, Hyungju; Lee, Byeongdu; Park, Cheolmin; Ryu, Du Yeol

    2015-03-09

    The phase transitions in the films of an asymmetric polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) were investigated by grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Compared with the sequential transitions in the bulk, hexagonally perforated layer (HPL) – gyroid (GYR) – disorder (DIS) upon heating, the transitions in film geometry were dramatically changed with decreasing thickness due to the growing preferential interactions from substrate, resulting in a thickness-dependent transition diagram including four different morphologies of hexagonally modulated layer (HML), coexisting (HML and GYR), GYR, and DIS. Particularly in the films ≤10Lo, where Lo is d-spacing at 150 °C, a stable HML structure was identified even above the order-to-disorder transition (ODT) temperature of the bulk, which was attributed to the suppressed compositional fluctuations by the enhanced substrate interactions.

  5. Electronic and optical properties of vacancy defects in single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. A.; Erementchouk, Mikhail; Hendrickson, Joshua; Leuenberger, Michael N.

    2017-06-01

    A detailed first-principles study has been performed to evaluate the electronic and optical properties of single-layer (SL) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) (M X 2 ; M = transition metal such as Mo, W, and X = S, Se, Te), in the presence of vacancy defects (VDs). Defects usually play an important role in tailoring electronic, optical, and magnetic properties of semiconductors. We consider three types of VDs in SL TMDCs: (i) X vacancy, (ii) X2 vacancy, and (iii) M vacancy. We show that VDs lead to localized defect states (LDS) in the band structure, which in turn gives rise to sharp transitions in in-plane and out-of-plane optical susceptibilities, χ∥ and χ⊥. The effects of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) are also considered. We find that SOC splitting in LDS is directly related to the atomic number of the transition metal atoms. Apart from electronic and optical properties we also find magnetic signatures (local magnetic moment of ˜μB ) in MoSe2 in the presence of the Mo vacancy, which breaks the time-reversal symmetry and therefore lifts the Kramers degeneracy. We show that a simple qualitative tight-binding model (TBM), involving only the hopping between atoms surrounding the vacancy with an on-site SOC term, is sufficient to capture the essential features of LDS. In addition, the existence of the LDS can be understood from the solution of the two-dimensional Dirac Hamiltonian by employing infinite mass boundary conditions. In order to provide a clear description of the optical absorption spectra, we use group theory to derive the optical selection rules between LDS for both χ∥ and χ⊥.

  6. Photoelectrolysis at the oxide-electrolyte interface as interpreted through the 'transition' layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, R. K.; Weber, Michael F.; Schumacher, L.; Dignam, M. J.

    1980-12-01

    A transition layer model of the oxide-electrolyte interface, proposed earlier by one of us, is outlined and then examined in the light of experimental data relating primarily to photoelectrolysis of water at semiconducting oxide electrodes. The model provides useful insight into the behaviour of the system and allows a calculation of thc minimum bias potential needed for photoelectrolysis, thus illuminating the origin of the requirement for such an external bias. In order to electrolyse water without a bias, the model requires an n-type oxide to be sufficiently reduced so that it is thermodynamically capable of chemically reducing water to produce hydrogen at 1 atm pressure. Similarly, for bias-free operation, a p-type metal oxide must be thermodynamically unstable with respect to the release of oxygen at 1 atm pressure. In the face of these requirements it is apparent that oxide stability is bound to be in general a serious problem for nonstoichiometric single metal oxides.

  7. Growth and electronic structure of single-layered transition metal dichalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dendzik, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    only a weak interaction between SL MoS2 and graphene, which leads to a quasi-freestanding band structure, but also to the coexistence of multiple rotational domains. Measurements of SL WS2 on Ag(111), on the other hand, reveals formation of interesting in-gap states which make WS2 metallic. Low...... different from graphene’s. For example, semiconducting TMDCs undergo an indirectdirect band gap transition when thinned to a single layer (SL); this results in greatly enhanced photoluminescence, making those materials attractive for applications in optoelectronics. Furthermore, metallic TMDCs can host......-quality SL TMDCs. We demonstrate the synthesis of SL MoS2, WS2 and TaS2 on Au(111), Ag(111) and graphene on SiC. The morphology and crystal structure of the synthesized materials is characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). The electronic structure of SL...

  8. Aerodynamic heating in transitional hypersonic boundary layers: Role of second-mode instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yiding; Chen, Xi; Wu, Jiezhi; Chen, Shiyi; Lee, Cunbiao; Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of second-mode instabilities in hypersonic boundary layers and its effects on aerodynamic heating are investigated. Experiments are conducted in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using fast-response pressure sensors, fluorescent temperature-sensitive paint, and particle image velocimetry. Calculations based on parabolic stability equations and direct numerical simulations are also performed. It is found that second-mode waves, accompanied by high-frequency alternating fluid compression and expansion, produce intense aerodynamic heating in a small region that rapidly heats the fluid passing through it. As the second-mode waves decay downstream, the dilatation-induced aerodynamic heating decreases while its shear-induced counterpart keeps growing. The latter brings about a second growth of the surface temperature when transition is completed.

  9. Analysis of turbulent heat and momentum transfer in a transitionally rough turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doosttalab, Ali; Dharmarathne, Suranga; Tutkun, Murat; Adrian, Ronald; Castillo, Luciano

    2016-11-01

    A zero-pressure-gradient (ZPG) turbulent boundary layer over a transitionally rough surface is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). The rough surface is modeled as 24-grit sandpaper which corresponds to k+ 11 , where k+ is roughness height. Reynolds number based on momentum thickness is approximately 2400. The walls are isothermal and turbulent flow Prandtl number is 0.71. We simulate temperature as passive scalar. We compute the inner product of net turbulent force (d (u1ui) / dxi) and net turbulent heat flux (d (ui θ / dxi)) in order to investigate (i) the correlation between these vectorial quantities, (II) size of the projection of these fields on each other and (IIi) alignment of momentum and hear flux. The inner product in rough case results in larger projection and better alignment. In addition, our study on the vortices shows that surface roughness promotes production of vortical structures which affects the thermal transport near the wall.

  10. Wetting and layering transitions in a nano-dendrimer PAMAM structure: Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouini, S.; Ziti, S.; Labrim, H.; Bahmad, L.

    2016-10-01

    This study is based on a nano-model of the dendrimer polyamidoamine (PAMAM). The idea is to examine the magnetic properties of such models in the context of wetting and the layering transitions. The studied system consists of spins σ ={1/2} Ising ferromagnetic in real nanostructure found in different scientific domains. To study this system, we perform Monte Carlo simulations leading to interesting results recapitulated in two classes. The former is the ground state phase diagrams study. The latter is the magnetic properties at non null temperatures. Also, we analyzed the effect of the terms present in the Hamiltonian governing our system such as the external magnetic field and the exchange couplings interactions.

  11. Electronic transport and dielectric properties of low-dimensional structures of layered transition metal dichalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ashok, E-mail: ashok.1777@yahoo.com; Ahluwalia, P.K., E-mail: pk_ahluwalia7@yahoo.com

    2014-02-25

    Graphical abstract: We present electronic transport and dielectric response of layered transition metal dichalcogenides nanowires and nanoribbons. Illustration 1: Conductance (G) and corresponding local density of states(LDOS) for LTMDs wires at applied bias. I–V characterstics are shown in lowermost panels. Highlights: • The studied configurations show metallic/semiconducting nature. • States around the Fermi energy are mainly contributed by the d orbitals of metal atoms. • The studied configurations show non-linear current–voltage (I–V) characteristics. • Additional plasmonic features at low energy have been observed for both wires and ribbons. • Dielectric functions for both wires and ribbons are anisotropic (isotropic) at low (high) energy range. -- Abstract: We present first principle study of the electronic transport and dielectric properties of nanowires and nanoribbons of layered transition metal dichalcogenides (LTMDs), MX{sub 2} (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te). The studied configuration shows metallic/semiconducting nature and the states around the Fermi energy are mainly contributed by the d orbitals of metal atoms. Zero-bias transmission show 1G{sub 0} conductance for the ribbons of MoS{sub 2} and WS{sub 2}; 2G{sub 0} conductance for MoS{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}, WSe{sub 2} wires, and ribbons of MoTe{sub 2} and WTe{sub 2}; and 3G{sub 0} conductance for WSe{sub 2} ribbon. The studied configurations show non-linear current–voltage (I–V) characteristics. Negative differential conductance (NDC) has also been observed for the nanoribbons of the selenides and tellurides of both Mo and W. Furthermore, additional plasmonic features below 5 eV energy have been observed for both wires and ribbons as compared to the corresponding monolayers, which is found to be red-shifted on going from nanowires to nanoribbons.

  12. Boundary-layer development and transition due to free-stream exothermic reactions in shock-induced flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A study of the effect of free-stream thermal-energy release from shock-induced exothermic reactions on boundary-layer development and transition is presented. The flow model is that of a boundary layer developing behind a moving shock wave in two-dimensional unsteady flow over a shock-tube wall. Matched sets of combustible hydrogen-oxygen-nitrogen mixtures and inert hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures were used to obtain transition data over a range of transition Reynolds numbers from 1,100,000 to 21,300,000. The heat-energy is shown to significantly stabilize the boundary layer without changing its development character. A method for application of this data to flat-plate steady flows is included.

  13. Radiation pre-vulcanization effect on properties of the truck tyre's transition layer and the truck tyre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Mingcheng; Zhu Jun; Li Kunhao; Guo Dongquan; Zhang Hongna; Zhang Benshang; Li Zhaopeng

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the natural rubber is chosen as the main constituents for the transition layer of all-steel load radial tyre, which is pre-vulcanized by 500-keV E-beam irradiation of up to 60 kGy. The results show that the green strength of transitional layer increases with the dose, reaching four times as much as the control (without irradiation) at 60 kGy. The final mechanical properties do not differ significantly from those of the control except that the aging and fatigue performance increased. However, thickness of the natural rubber transitional layer for an average single tyre can be reduced by 1 mm (or 1.5 kg) without obvious adverse effect on tyre performance. (authors)

  14. Analysis of magnetic correlations in layered or multiferroic transition element oxides using neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finger, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Due to a great variety of physical phenomena the material class of transition metal oxides offers a large field of work for researchers, the more so as many underlying mechanisms are not understood yet. Of these materials a set of systems closely related to the manganates is investigated in this thesis via neutron scattering, emphasizing the analysis of magnetic correlations. It is shown, that for doping concentrations 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5 the Co 2+ -ions in the layered cobaltates always exhibit a high-spin state with S = (3)/(2), whereas existing Co 3+ -ions adopt a low-spin state with S = 0 and stay non-magnetic. Furthermore, the magnetic correlations of three chiral multiferroics are investigated: Firstly, in MnWO 4 a memory effect is described; the crystal remembers its preceding chiral state even in the paramagnetic phase. In TbMnO 3 chiral fluctuations slightly above the multiferroic transition are investigated; it is possible to switch them by an applied external E-field. Finally, in DyMnO 3 the magnetic excitations are examined for the first time; they are comparable to those in TbMnO 3 .

  15. Structural Phase Transition and Material Properties of Few-Layer Monochalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehboudi, Mehrshad; Fregoso, Benjamin M; Yang, Yurong; Zhu, Wenjuan; van der Zande, Arend; Ferrer, Jaime; Bellaiche, L; Kumar, Pradeep; Barraza-Lopez, Salvador

    2016-12-09

    GeSe and SnSe monochalcogenide monolayers and bilayers undergo a two-dimensional phase transition from a rectangular unit cell to a square unit cell at a critical temperature T_{c} well below the melting point. Its consequences on material properties are studied within the framework of Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and density-functional theory. No in-gap states develop as the structural transition takes place, so that these phase-change materials remain semiconducting below and above T_{c}. As the in-plane lattice transforms from a rectangle into a square at T_{c}, the electronic, spin, optical, and piezoelectric properties dramatically depart from earlier predictions. Indeed, the Y and X points in the Brillouin zone become effectively equivalent at T_{c}, leading to a symmetric electronic structure. The spin polarization at the conduction valley edge vanishes, and the hole conductivity must display an anomalous thermal increase at T_{c}. The linear optical absorption band edge must change its polarization as well, making this structural and electronic evolution verifiable by optical means. Much excitement is drawn by theoretical predictions of giant piezoelectricity and ferroelectricity in these materials, and we estimate a pyroelectric response of about 3×10^{-12}  C/K m here. These results uncover the fundamental role of temperature as a control knob for the physical properties of few-layer group-IV monochalcogenides.

  16. Multigrid direct numerical simulation of the whole process of flow transition in 3-D boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoqun; Liu, Zhining

    1993-01-01

    A new technology was developed in this study which provides a successful numerical simulation of the whole process of flow transition in 3-D boundary layers, including linear growth, secondary instability, breakdown, and transition at relatively low CPU cost. Most other spatial numerical simulations require high CPU cost and blow up at the stage of flow breakdown. A fourth-order finite difference scheme on stretched and staggered grids, a fully implicit time marching technique, a semi-coarsening multigrid based on the so-called approximate line-box relaxation, and a buffer domain for the outflow boundary conditions were all used for high-order accuracy, good stability, and fast convergence. A new fine-coarse-fine grid mapping technique was developed to keep the code running after the laminar flow breaks down. The computational results are in good agreement with linear stability theory, secondary instability theory, and some experiments. The cost for a typical case with 162 x 34 x 34 grid is around 2 CRAY-YMP CPU hours for 10 T-S periods.

  17. A model for a scrape-off-layer low-high (L-H) mode transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Xu, X.

    1995-01-01

    Increasing the radial mode number has a stabilizing effect on the conducting-wall and curvature-driven interchange modes in a tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL), arising from the increased polarization response. Such an effect is naturally imposed as the SOL width is decreased, and for a narrow-enough SOL, the stabilizing effect is stronger than the increase in the instability drives. By combining a mixing-length estimate for the thermal diffusivity with energy conservation and heat conduction equations and the condition of continuity of the heat flux at the separatrix, it is found that the resultant turbulence-transport system admits two solutions, one stable and one unstable, at different SOL widths; the inclusion of additional physics can add a second stable root at lower width. These roots are plausibly identified with SOL behavior in low (L) and high (H) modes. Particularly when a model is introduced for finite-β, finite-k parallel effects on the modes, a power threshold for transition to the narrower root is obtained, suggesting a possible L-H transition mechanism. The non-monotonic dependence of the turbulent heat flux vs SOL width and the possibility of multiple solutions for the equilibrium SOL width are verified with nonlinear simulations. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  18. Tunneling measurements in amorphous layers of superconducting transition metals: molybdenum, vanadium, and niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roll, U.

    1981-01-01

    Tunneling experiments with amorphous Molybdenum and Vanadium layers are presented, showing no significant increase of the reduced energy gap 2δ(O)/kTsub(c)(δ) compared with the BCS-value, in contrast to all previous measurement on amorphous superconducting materials of simple s-p-metals, showing on enhanced electron-phonon-interaction. This fact may lead to the conclusion that the strong electron-phonon coupling is caused by the amorphous structure of the superconductor. The present results, however, indicate that the strong electron-phonon interaction cannot be explained only ba the amorphous structure of the superconductor. In the measurements of the second derivative d 2 U/dI 2 no phonon-induced structures have been observed for amorphous molybdenum, vanadium and niobium films. Apparently the phonon density of states F(#betta#) of amorphous transition metals has no structure, thus the longitudinal and transverse phonons cannot be identified in the measured (d 2 U/dI 2 )-curves. This particular behaviour of the amorphous transition metals in contrast to the simple s-p-metals may be interpreted by the strongly localized d-electrons. (orig./GG) [de

  19. New Findings by High-Order DNS for Late Flow Transition in a Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoqun Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper serves as a summary of new discoveries by DNS for late stages of flow transition in a boundary layer. The widely spread concept “vortex breakdown” is found theoretically impossible and never happened in practice. The ring-like vortex is found the only form existing inside the flow field. The ring-like vortex formation is the result of the interaction between two pairs of counter-rotating primary and secondary streamwise vortices. Following the first Helmholtz vortex conservation law, the primary vortex tube rolls up and is stretched due to the velocity gradient. In order to maintain vorticity conservation, a bridge must be formed to link two Λ-vortex legs. The bridge finally develops as a new ring. This process keeps going on to form a multiple ring structure. The U-shaped vortices are not new but existing coherent vortex structure. Actually, the U-shaped vortex, which is a third level vortex, serves as a second neck to supply vorticity to the multiple rings. The small vortices can be found on the bottom of the boundary layer near the wall surface. It is believed that the small vortices, and thus turbulence, are generated by the interaction of positive spikes and other higher level vortices with the solid wall. The mechanism of formation of secondary vortex, second sweep, positive spike, high shear distribution, downdraft and updraft motion, and multiple ring-circle overlapping is also investigated.

  20. Wetting and layering transitions of a spin-1/2 Ising model in a random transverse field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahmad, L.; Benyoussef, A.; El-Kenz, A.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.

    2000-09-01

    The effect of a random transverse field (RTF) on the wetting and layering transitions of a spin-1/2 Ising model, in the presence of bulk and surface fields, is studied within an effective field theory by using the differential operator technique. Indeed, the dependencies of the wetting temperature and wetting transverse field on the probability of the presence of a transverse field are established. For specific values of the surface field we show the existence of a critical probability p, above which wetting and layering transitions disappear. (author)

  1. Excitation of hybridized Dirac plasmon polaritons and transition radiation in multi-layer graphene traversed by a fast charged particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Kamran; Mišković, Zoran L.; Segui, Silvina; Gervasoni, Juana L.; Arista, Néstor R.

    2018-06-01

    We analyze the energy loss channels for a fast charged particle traversing a multi-layer graphene (MLG) structure with N layers under normal incidence. Focusing on a terahertz (THz) range of frequencies, and assuming equally doped graphene layers with a large enough separation d between them to neglect interlayer electron hopping, we use the Drude model for two-dimensional conductivity of each layer to describe hybridization of graphene’s Dirac plasmon polaritons (DPPs). Performing a layer decomposition of ohmic energy losses, which include excitation of hybridized DPPs (HDPPs), we have found for N = 3 that the middle HDPP eigenfrequency is not excited in the middle layer due to symmetry constraint, whereas the excitation of the lowest HDPP eigenfrequency produces a Fano resonance in the graphene layer that is first traversed by the charged particle. While the angular distribution of transition radiation emitted in the far field region also shows asymmetry with respect to the traversal order by the incident charged particle at supra-THz frequencies, the integrated radiative energy loss is surprisingly independent of both d and N for N ≤ 5, which is explained by a dominant role of the outer graphene layers in transition radiation. We have further found that the integrated ohmic energy loss in optically thin MLG scales as ∝1/N at sub-THz frequencies, which is explained by exposing the role of dissipative processes in graphene at low frequencies. Finally, prominent peaks are observed at supra-THz frequencies in the integrated ohmic energy loss for MLG structures that are not optically thin. The magnitude of those peaks is found to scale with N for N ≥ 2, while their shape and position replicate the peak in a double-layer graphene (N = 2), which is explained by arguing that plasmon hybridization in such MLG structures is dominated by electromagnetic interaction between the nearest-neighbor graphene layers.

  2. Digital to analog resistive switching transition induced by graphene buffer layer in strontium titanate based devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Tao; Qu, Bo; Du, Haiwei; Lin, Xi; Lin, Qianru; Wang, Da-Wei; Cazorla, Claudio; Li, Sean; Liu, Sidong; Chu, Dewei

    2018-02-15

    Resistive switching behaviour can be classified into digital and analog switching based on its abrupt and gradual resistance change characteristics. Realizing the transition from digital to analog switching in the same device is essential for understanding and controlling the performance of the devices with various switching mechanisms. Here, we investigate the resistive switching in a device made with strontium titanate (SrTiO 3 ) nanoparticles using X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and direct electrical measurements. It is found that the well-known rupture/formation of Ag filaments is responsible for the digital switching in the device with Ag as the top electrode. To modulate the switching performance, we insert a reduced graphene oxide layer between SrTiO 3 and the bottom FTO electrode owing to its good barrier property for the diffusion of Ag ions and high out-of-plane resistance. In this case, resistive switching is changed from digital to analog as determined by the modulation of interfacial resistance under applied voltage. Based on that controllable resistance, potentiation and depression behaviours are implemented as well. This study opens up new ways for the design of multifunctional devices which are promising for memory and neuromorphic computing applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Epitaxial Growth of Two-Dimensional Layered Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides: Growth Mechanism, Controllability, and Scalability

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Henan

    2017-07-06

    Recently there have been many research breakthroughs in two-dimensional (2D) materials including graphene, boron nitride (h-BN), black phosphors (BPs), and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). The unique electrical, optical, and thermal properties in 2D materials are associated with their strictly defined low dimensionalities. These materials provide a wide range of basic building blocks for next-generation electronics. The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique has shown great promise to generate high-quality TMDC layers with scalable size, controllable thickness, and excellent electronic properties suitable for both technological applications and fundamental sciences. The capability to precisely engineer 2D materials by chemical approaches has also given rise to fascinating new physics, which could lead to exciting new applications. In this Review, we introduce the latest development of TMDC synthesis by CVD approaches and provide further insight for the controllable and reliable synthesis of atomically thin TMDCs. Understanding of the vapor-phase growth mechanism of 2D TMDCs could benefit the formation of complicated heterostructures and novel artificial 2D lattices.

  4. Single-Column Model Simulations of Subtropical Marine Boundary-Layer Cloud Transitions Under Weakening Inversions: SCM SIMULATIONS OF CLOUD TRANSITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neggers, R. A. J. [Institute for Geophysics and Meteorology, Department of Geosciences, University of Cologne, Cologne Germany; Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt The Netherlands; Ackerman, A. S. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York NY USA; Angevine, W. M. [CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder CO USA; NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder CO USA; Bazile, E. [Météo France/CNRM, Toulouse France; Beau, I. [Météo France/ENM, Toulouse France; Blossey, P. N. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Boutle, I. A. [Met Office, Exeter UK; de Bruijn, C. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt The Netherlands; Cheng, A. [NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Environmental Modeling Center, College Park MD USA; van der Dussen, J. [Department of Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Delft University of Technology, Delft The Netherlands; Fletcher, J. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; University of Leeds, Leeds UK; Dal Gesso, S. [Institute for Geophysics and Meteorology, Department of Geosciences, University of Cologne, Cologne Germany; Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt The Netherlands; Jam, A. [Météo-France/CNRM & CNRS/IPSL/LMD, Toulouse France; Kawai, H. [Meteorological Research Institute, Climate Research Department, Japan Meteorological Agency, Tsukuba Japan; Cheedela, S. K. [Department of Atmosphere in the Earth System, Max-Planck Institut für Meteorologie, Hamburg Germany; Larson, V. E. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee WI USA; Lefebvre, M. -P. [Météo-France/CNRM & CNRS/IPSL/LMD, Toulouse France; Lock, A. P. [Met Office, Exeter UK; Meyer, N. R. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee WI USA; de Roode, S. R. [Department of Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Delft University of Technology, Delft The Netherlands; de Rooy, W. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt The Netherlands; Sandu, I. [Section of Physical Aspects, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading UK; Xiao, H. [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles CA USA; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Xu, K. -M. [NASA Langley Research Centre, Hampton VI USA

    2017-10-01

    Results are presented of the GASS/EUCLIPSE single-column model inter-comparison study on the subtropical marine low-level cloud transition. A central goal is to establish the performance of state-of-the-art boundary-layer schemes for weather and climate mod- els for this cloud regime, using large-eddy simulations of the same scenes as a reference. A novelty is that the comparison covers four different cases instead of one, in order to broaden the covered parameter space. Three cases are situated in the North-Eastern Pa- cific, while one reflects conditions in the North-Eastern Atlantic. A set of variables is considered that reflects key aspects of the transition process, making use of simple met- rics to establish the model performance. Using this method some longstanding problems in low level cloud representation are identified. Considerable spread exists among models concerning the cloud amount, its vertical structure and the associated impact on radia- tive transfer. The sign and amplitude of these biases differ somewhat per case, depending on how far the transition has progressed. After cloud breakup the ensemble median ex- hibits the well-known “too few too bright” problem. The boundary layer deepening rate and its state of decoupling are both underestimated, while the representation of the thin capping cloud layer appears complicated by a lack of vertical resolution. Encouragingly, some models are successful in representing the full set of variables, in particular the verti- cal structure and diurnal cycle of the cloud layer in transition. An intriguing result is that the median of the model ensemble performs best, inspiring a new approach in subgrid pa- rameterization.

  5. Multi-channels coupling-induced pattern transition in a tri-layer neuronal network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fuqiang; Wang, Ya; Ma, Jun; Jin, Wuyin; Hobiny, Aatef

    2018-03-01

    Neurons in nerve system show complex electrical behaviors due to complex connection types and diversity in excitability. A tri-layer network is constructed to investigate the signal propagation and pattern formation by selecting different coupling channels between layers. Each layer is set as different states, and the local kinetics is described by Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model. By changing the number of coupling channels between layers and the state of the first layer, the collective behaviors of each layer and synchronization pattern of network are investigated. A statistical factor of synchronization on each layer is calculated. It is found that quiescent state in the second layer can be excited and disordered state in the third layer is suppressed when the first layer is controlled by a pacemaker, and the developed state is dependent on the number of coupling channels. Furthermore, the collapse in the first layer can cause breakdown of other layers in the network, and the mechanism is that disordered state in the third layer is enhanced when sampled signals from the collapsed layer can impose continuous disturbance on the next layer.

  6. Exact solution of the Takagi-Taupin equation for dynamical X-ray Bragg diffraction by a crystal with a transition layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chukhovskii, F.N.; Khapachev, Yu. P.

    1985-01-01

    The general problem of dynamical diffraction on a crystal with a transition layer is theoretically considered. It is shown that the problem of dynamical diffraction on such a crystal can be solved analytically. Special attention is paid to the dependence of the curves of diffractional reflection on the parameters of the transition layer. (author)

  7. The influence of compressibility on nonlinear spectral energy transfer - Part 2: Effect on hypersonic boundary layer transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Ankita; Girimaji, Sharath

    2017-11-01

    We examine the effect of compressible spectral energy transfer in the nonlinear regime of transition to turbulence of hypersonic boundary layers. The nature of spectral energy transfer between perturbation modes is profoundly influenced by two compressibility mechanisms. First and foremost, the emergence of nonlinear pressure-dilatation mechanism leads to kinetic-internal energy exchange within the perturbation field. Such interchange is absent in incompressible flow as pressure merely reorients the perturbation amplitude vector while conserving kinetic energy. Secondly, the nature of triadic interactions also changes due to variability in density. In this work, we demonstrate that the efficiency of nonlinear spectral energy transfer is diminished in compressible boundary layers. Emergence of new perturbation modes or `broad-banding' of the perturbation field is significantly delayed in comparison to incompressible boundary layer undergoing transition. A significant amount of perturbation energy is transformed to internal energy and thus unavailable for `tripping' the flow into turbulent state. These factors profoundly change the nature of the nonlinear stage of transition in compressible boundary layer leading to delayed onset of full-fledged turbulence.

  8. On the Unsteadiness of a Transitional Shock Wave-Boundary Layer Interaction Using Fast-Response Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lash, E. Lara; Schmisseur, John

    2017-11-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint has been used to evaluate the unsteady dynamics of transitional and turbulent shock wave-boundary layer interactions generated by a vertical cylinder on a flat plate in a Mach 2 freestream. The resulting shock structure consists of an inviscid bow shock that bifurcates into a separation shock and trailing shock. The primary features of interest are the separation shock and an upstream influence shock that is intermittently present in transitional boundary layer interactions, but not observed in turbulent interactions. The power spectral densities, frequency peaks, and normalized wall pressures are analyzed as the incoming boundary layer state changes from transitional to fully turbulent, comparing both centerline and outboard regions of the interaction. The present study compares the scales and frequencies of the dynamics of the separation shock structure in different boundary layer regimes. Synchronized high-speed Schlieren imaging provides quantitative statistical analyses as well as qualitative comparisons to the fast-response pressure sensitive paint measurements. Materials based on research supported by the U.S. Office of Naval Research under Award Number N00014-15-1-2269.

  9. Observations of transitional tidal boundary layers and their impact on sediment transport in the Great Bay, NH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koetje, K. M.; Foster, D. L.; Lippmann, T. C.

    2017-12-01

    Observations of the vertical structure of tidal flows obtained in 2016 and 2017 in the Great Bay Estuary, NH show evidence of transitional tidal boundary layers at deployment locations on shallow mudflats. High-resolution bottom boundary layer currents, hydrography, turbidity, and bed characteristics were observed with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV), conductivity-depth-temperature (CTD) sensors, optical backscatter sensors, multibeam bathymetric surveys, and sediment grab samples and cores. Over the 2.5 m tidal range and at water depths ranging from 0.3 m to 1.5 m at mean lower low water, peak flows ranged from 10 cm/s to 30 cm/s and were primarily driven by the tides. A downward-looking ADCP captured the velocity profile over the lowest 1 m of the water column. Results consistently show a dual-log layer system, with evidence of a lower layer within 15 cm of the bed, another layer above approximately 30 cm from the bed, and a transitional region where the flow field rotates between that the two layers that can be as much as 180 degrees out of phase. CTD casts collected over a complete tidal cycle suggest that the weak thermohaline stratification is not responsible for development of the two layers. On the other hand, acoustic and optical backscatter measurements show spatial and temporal variability in suspended sediments that are dependant on tidal phase. Current work includes an examination of the relationship between sediment concentrations in the water column and velocity profile characteristics, along with an effort to quantify the impact of rotation and dual-log layers on bed stress.

  10. Numerical Investigation of Wall Cooling and Suction Effects on Supersonic Flat-Plate Boundary Layer Transition Using Large Eddy Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suozhu Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Reducing friction resistance and aerodynamic heating has important engineering significance to improve the performances of super/hypersonic aircraft, so the purpose of transition control and turbulent drag reduction becomes one of the cutting edges in turbulence research. In order to investigate the influences of wall cooling and suction on the transition process and fully developed turbulence, the large eddy simulation of spatially evolving supersonic boundary layer transition over a flat-plate with freestream Mach number 4.5 at different wall temperature and suction intensity is performed in the present work. It is found that the wall cooling and suction are capable of changing the mean velocity profile within the boundary layer and improving the stability of the flow field, thus delaying the onset of the spatial transition process. The transition control will become more effective as the wall temperature decreases, while there is an optimal wall suction intensity under the given conditions. Moreover, the development of large-scale coherent structures can be suppressed effectively via wall cooling, but wall suction has no influence.

  11. Growth mode transition of tetrahydrofuran clathrate hydrates in the guest/host concentration boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabase, Yuichiro; Nagashima, Kazushige

    2009-11-19

    Clathrate hydrates are known to form a thin film along a guest/host boundary. We present here the first report of tetrahydrofuran (THF) clathrate hydrate formation in a THF/water concentration boundary layer. We found that the THF-water system also forms a hydrate film separating the guest/host phases. The lateral growth rate of the film increases as supercooling increases. The thickness of the film at the growth tip decreases as supercooling and the lateral growth rate increase. These tendencies are consistent with reports of experiments for other hydrates and predictions of heat-transfer models. After film formation and slight melting, two types of growth modes are observed, depending on temperature T. At T = 3.0 degrees C, the film slowly thickens. The thickening rate is much lower than the lateral growth rate, as reported for other hydrates. At T agglomerate of small polycrystalline hydrates forms in each phase. Grain boundaries in the film and pore spaces in the agglomerate act as paths for permeation of each liquid. Timing when continuous nucleation starts is dominantly controlled by the time of initiation of liquid permeation through the film. Digital particle image velocimetry analysis of the agglomerate shows that it expands not by growth at the advancing front but rather by continuous nucleation in the interior. Expansion rates of the agglomerate tend to be higher for the cases of multipermeation paths in the film and the thinner film. We suppose that the growth mode transition to continuous nucleation is caused by the memory effect due to slight melting of the hydrate film.

  12. Acoustic detection of momentum transfer during the abrupt transition from a laminar to a turbulent atmospheric boundary layer1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, J.F.

    1977-01-01

    Acoustic sounder measurements of a vertical profile of the abrupt transition from a laminar to a turbulent atmospheric boundary layer were compared with meteorological measurements made at 10 and 137 m on an instrumented tower. Sounder data show that conditions necessary for the onset of the momentum burst phenomenon exist sometime during a clear afternoon when heat flux changes sign and the planetary surface cools. Under these conditions, the lowest part of the atmospheric boundary layer becomes stable. Prior to this situation, the entire boundary layer is in turbulent motion from surface heating. The boundary layer is then an effective barrier for all fluxes, and as the maximum flux Richardson number is reached at some height close to but above the surface, turbulence is dampened and a laminar layer forms. The profile of this layer is recorded by the sounder. Surface temperature drops, a strong wind shear develops, and the Richardson number decreases below its critical value (Ri/sub cr/<0.25). Subsequently, the laminar layer is eroded by turbulence from above, and with a burst of momentum and heat, it eventually reaches the ground

  13. Tuning SPT-3G Transition-Edge-Sensor Electrical Properties with a Four-Layer Ti-Au-Ti-Au Thin-Film Stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, F. W.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Anderson, A. J.; Austermann, J. E.; Avva, J. S.; Thakur, R. Basu; Bender, A. N.; Benson, B. A.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Cecil, T.; Chang, C. L.; Cliche, J. F.; Cukierman, A.; Denison, E. V.; de Haan, T.; Ding, J.; Divan, R.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dutcher, D.; Everett, W.; Foster, A.; Gannon, R. N.; Gilbert, A.; Groh, J. C.; Halverson, N. W.; Harke-Hosemann, A. H.; Harrington, N. L.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Huang, N.; Irwin, K. D.; Jeong, O. B.; Jonas, M.; Khaire, T.; Kofman, A. M.; Korman, M.; Kubik, D.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuo, C. L.; Kutepova, V.; Lee, A. T.; Lowitz, A. E.; Meyer, S. S.; Michalik, D.; Miller, C. S.; Montgomery, J.; Nadolski, A.; Natoli, T.; Nguyen, H.; Noble, G. I.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Pan, Z.; Pearson, J.; Posada, C. M.; Rahlin, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saunders, L. J.; Sayre, J. T.; Shirley, I.; Shirokoff, E.; Smecher, G.; Sobrin, J. A.; Stan, L.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suzuki, A.; Tang, Q. Y.; Thompson, K. L.; Tucker, C.; Vale, L. R.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Yefremenko, V.; Yoon, K. W.; Young, M. R.

    2018-04-01

    We have developed superconducting Ti transition-edge sensors with Au protection layers on the top and bottom for the South Pole Telescope's third-generation receiver (a cosmic microwave background polarimeter, due to be upgraded this austral summer of 2017/2018). The base Au layer (deposited on a thin Ti glue layer) isolates the Ti from any substrate effects; the top Au layer protects the Ti from oxidation during processing and subsequent use of the sensors. We control the transition temperature and normal resistance of the sensors by varying the sensor width and the relative thicknesses of the Ti and Au layers. The transition temperature is roughly six times more sensitive to the thickness of the base Au layer than to that of the top Au layer. The normal resistance is inversely proportional to sensor width for any given film configuration. For widths greater than five micrometers, the critical temperature is independent of width.

  14. Temporal direct numerical simulation of transitional natural-convection boundary layer under conditions of considerable external turbulence effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, Alexey G; Smirnov, Evgueni M; Goryachev, Valery D

    2014-01-01

    Results of direct numerical simulations for time-developing air natural-convection boundary layer are presented. Computations have been performed assuming periodicity conditions in both the directions parallel to the vertical isothermal hot plate. The contribution is mainly focused on understanding of laminar–turbulent transition peculiarities in the case of perturbation action of external turbulence that is modeled by isotropic disturbances initially introduced into the computational domain. Special attention is paid to identification and analysis of evolving three-dimensional vortices that clearly manifest themselves through the whole stages of laminar–turbulent transition in the boundary layer. A comparison of computed profiles of mean velocity, mean temperature and fluctuation characteristics for turbulent regimes of convection with experimental data is performed as well. (paper)

  15. Assessing Uncertainties in Boundary Layer Transition Predictions for HIFiRE-1 at Non-zero Angles of Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Lindsay C.

    2011-01-01

    Boundary layer stability was analyzed for the HIFiRE-1 flight vehicle geometry for ground tests conducted at the CUBRC LENS I hypersonic shock test facility and the Langley Research Center (LaRC) 20- inch Mach 6 Tunnel. Boundary layer stability results were compared to transition onset location obtained from discrete heat transfer measurements from thin film gauges during the CUBRC test and spatially continuous heat transfer measurements from thermal phosphor paint data during the LaRC test. The focus of this analysis was on conditions at non-zero angles of attack as stability analysis has already been performed at zero degrees angle of attack. Also, the transition onset data obtained during flight testing was at nonzero angles of attack, so this analysis could be expanded in the future to include the results of the flight test data. Stability analysis was performed using the 2D parabolized stability software suite STABL (Stability and Transition Analysis for Hypersonic Boundary Layers) developed at the University of Minnesota and the mean flow solutions were computed using the DPLR finite volume Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver. A center line slice of the 3D mean flow solution was used for the stability analysis to incorporate the angle of attack effects while still taking advantage of the 2D STABL software suite. The N-factors at transition onset and the value of Re(sub theta)/M(sub e), commonly used to predict boundary layer transition onset, were compared for all conditions analyzed. Ground test data was analyzed at Mach 7.2 and Mach 6.0 and angles of attack of 1deg, 3deg and 5deg. At these conditions, the flow was found to be second mode dominant for the HIFiRE-1 slender cone geometry. On the leeward side of the vehicle, a strong trend of transition onset location with angle of attack was observed as the boundary layer on the leeward side of the vehicle developed inflection points at streamwise positions on the vehicle that correlated to

  16. Experimental investigations on characteristics of boundary layer and control of transition on an airfoil by AC-DBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xi; Shi, Zhiwei; Cheng, Keming; Dong, Hao; Zhao, Qun; Chen, Sinuo

    2018-03-01

    Plasma-based flow control is one of the most promising techniques for aerodynamic problems, such as delaying the boundary layer transition. The boundary layer’s characteristics induced by AC-DBD plasma actuators and applied by the actuators to delay the boundary layer transition on airfoil at Ma = 0.3 were experimentally investigated. The PIV measurement was used to study the boundary layer’s characteristics induced by the plasma actuators. The measurement plane, which was parallel to the surface of the actuators and 1 mm above the surface, was involved in the test, including the perpendicular plane. The instantaneous results showed that the induced flow field consisted of many small size unsteady vortices which were eliminated by the time average. The subsequent oil-film interferometry skin friction measurement was conducted on a NASA SC(2)-0712 airfoil at Ma = 0.3. The coefficient of skin friction demonstrates that the plasma actuators successfully delay the boundary layer transition and the efficiency is better at higher driven voltage.

  17. Multi-layer planting as a strategy of greening the transitional space in high-rise buildings: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prihatmanti, Rani; Taib, Nooriati

    2018-03-01

    The issues regarding the rapid development in the urban have resulted in the increasing number of infrastructure built, including the high-rise buildings to accommodate the urban dwellers. Lack of greeneries due to the land limitation in the urban area has increased the surface radiation as well as the air temperature that leads to the Urban Heat Island (UHI) phenomena. Where urban land is limited, growing plants vertically could be a solution. Plants, which are widely known as one of the sustainability elements in the built environment could be integrated in building as a part of urban faming by growing edible plant species. This is also to address the food security issue in the urban as well as high-density cities. Since space is limited, the function of transitional space could be optimized for the green space. This paper explores the strategy of greening transitional space in the high-rise setting. To give a maximum impact in a limited space, multi-layer planting concept could be introduced. This concept is believed that multiple layers of plants could modify the microclimate, as well as the radiation to the building, compare to single layer plant. In addition to that, the method selected also determines the efficacy of the vertical greeneries. However, there are many other limitations related to the multi-layer planting method if installed in a transitional space that needs to be further studied. Despite its limitations, the application of vertical greeneries with multi-layer planting concept could be a promising solution for greening the limited space as well as improving the thermal comfort in the high-rise building.

  18. Large Eddy Simulation of Supersonic Boundary Layer Transition over a Flat-Plate Based on the Spatial Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suozhu Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The large eddy simulation (LES of spatially evolving supersonic boundary layer transition over a flat-plate with freestream Mach number 4.5 is performed in the present work. The Favre-filtered Navier-Stokes equations are used to simulate large scales, while a dynamic mixed subgrid-scale (SGS model is used to simulate subgrid stress. The convective terms are discretized with a fifth-order upwind compact difference scheme, while a sixth-order symmetric compact difference scheme is employed for the diffusive terms. The basic mean flow is obtained from the similarity solution of the compressible laminar boundary layer. In order to ensure the transition from the initial laminar flow to fully developed turbulence, a pair of oblique first-mode perturbation is imposed on the inflow boundary. The whole process of the spatial transition is obtained from the simulation. Through the space-time average, the variations of typical statistical quantities are analyzed. It is found that the distributions of turbulent Mach number, root-mean-square (rms fluctuation quantities, and Reynolds stresses along the wall-normal direction at different streamwise locations exhibit self-similarity in fully developed turbulent region. Finally, the onset and development of large-scale coherent structures through the transition process are depicted.

  19. Boundary layer transition observations on a body of revolution with surface heating and cooling in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakeri, V. H.

    1980-04-01

    Boundary layer flow visualization in water with surface heat transfer was carried out on a body of revolution which had the predicted possibility of laminar separation under isothermal conditions. Flow visualization was by in-line holographic technique. Boundary layer stabilization, including elimination of laminar separation, was observed to take place on surface heating. Conversely, boundary layer destabilization was observed on surface cooling. These findings are consistent with the theoretical predictions of Wazzan et al. (1970).

  20. Appraisal of boundary layer trips for landing gear testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Philip; Feltham, Graham; Ekmekci, Alis

    2013-11-01

    Dynamic similarity during scaled model testing is difficult to maintain. Forced boundary layer transition via a surface protuberance is a common method used to address this issue, however few guidelines exist for the effective tripping of complex geometries, such as aircraft landing gears. To address this shortcoming, preliminary wind tunnel tests were performed at Re = 500,000. Surface transition visualisation and pressure measurements show that zigzag type trips of a given size and location are effective at promoting transition, thus preventing the formation of laminar separation bubbles and increasing the effective Reynolds number from the critical regime to the supercritical regime. Extension of these experiments to include three additional tripping methods (wires, roughness strips, CADCUT dots) in a range of sizes, at Reynolds number of 200,000 and below, have been performed in a recirculating water channel. Analysis of surface pressure measurements and time resolved PIV for each trip device, size and location has established a set of recommendations for successful use of tripping for future, low Reynolds number landing gear testing.

  1. The Effect of Backward-Facing Step Height on Instability Growth and Breakdown in Swept Wing Boundary-Layer Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppink, Jenna L.; Wlezien, Richard W.; King, Rudolph A.; Choudhari, Meelan

    2015-01-01

    A low-speed experiment was performed on a swept at plate model with an imposed pressure gradient to determine the effect of a backward-facing step on transition in a stationary-cross flow dominated flow. Detailed hot-wire boundary-layer measurements were performed for three backward-facing step heights of approximately 36, 45, and 49% of the boundary-layer thickness at the step. These step heights correspond to a subcritical, nearly-critical, and critical case. Three leading-edge roughness configurations were tested to determine the effect of stationary-cross flow amplitude on transition. The step caused a local increase in amplitude of the stationary cross flow for the two larger step height cases, but farther downstream the amplitude decreased and remained below the baseline amplitude. The smallest step caused a slight local decrease in amplitude of the primary stationary cross flow mode, but the amplitude collapsed back to the baseline case far downstream of the step. The effect of the step on the amplitude of the primary cross flow mode increased with step height, however, the stationary cross flow amplitudes remained low and thus, stationary cross flow was not solely responsible for transition. Unsteady disturbances were present downstream of the step for all three step heights, and the amplitudes increased with increasing step height. The only exception is that the lower frequency (traveling crossflow-like) disturbance was not present in the lowest step height case. Positive and negative spikes in instantaneous velocity began to occur for the two larger step height cases and then grew in number and amplitude downstream of reattachment, eventually leading to transition. The number and amplitude of spikes varied depending on the step height and cross flow amplitude. Despite the low amplitude of the disturbances in the intermediate step height case, breakdown began to occur intermittently and the flow underwent a long transition region.

  2. Laser transit anemometer and Pitot probe comparative measurements in a sharp cone boundary layer at Mach 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, W. W., Jr.; Ocheltree, S. L.; Russ, C. E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Laser transit anemometer (LTA) measurements of a 7 degree sharp cone boundary layer were conducted in the Air Force/AEDC Supersonic Tunnel A Mach 4 flow field. These measurements are compared with Pitot probe measurements and tricone theory provided by AEDC staff. Measurements were made both in laminar and turbulent boundary layers of the model. Comparison of LTA measurements with theory showed agreement to better than 1 percent for the laminar boundary layer cases. This level of agreement was obtained after small position corrections, 0.01 to 0.6 mm, were applied to the experimental data sets. Pitot probe data when compared with theory also showed small positioning errors. The Pitot data value was also limited due to probe interference with the flow near the model. The LTA turbulent boundary layer data indicated a power law dependence of 6.3 to 6.9. The LTA data was analyzed in the time (Tau) domain in which it was obtained and in the velocity domain. No significant differences were noted between Tau and velocity domain results except in one turbulent boundary layer case.

  3. Study on turbulent characteristics and transition behavior of combined-convection boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Yasuo

    2001-01-01

    The stabilizing mechanism of the turbulent combined-convection boundary layer along an isothermally-heated flat plate in air aided by a weak freestream are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The turbulent statistics of the combined-convection boundary layer measured with hot- and cold wires at different Grashof numbers indicates that with an increase in the freestream velocity, a similar change in the turbulent quantities appears independently of local Grashof number. Then based on the such experimental results, it is verified that the laminarization of the boundary layer due to an increase in freestream velocity arises at Grx / Rex 6 . Then, through the experiments with a particle image velocimetry (PIV), the spatio-temporal structure of the turbulent combined-convection boundary layer is investigated. For instantaneous velocity vectors obtained with PIV, large-scale fluid motions, which play a predominant role in the generation of turbulence, are frequently observed in the outer layer, while quasi-coherent structures do not exist in the near-wall region. Thus, it is revealed that increasing freestream restricts large-scale fluid motions in the outer layer, and consequently the generation of turbulence is suppressed and the boundary layer becomes laminar. (author)

  4. High-order non-uniform grid schemes for numerical simulation of hypersonic boundary-layer stability and transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Xiaolin; Tatineni, Mahidhar

    2003-01-01

    The direct numerical simulation of receptivity, instability and transition of hypersonic boundary layers requires high-order accurate schemes because lower-order schemes do not have an adequate accuracy level to compute the large range of time and length scales in such flow fields. The main limiting factor in the application of high-order schemes to practical boundary-layer flow problems is the numerical instability of high-order boundary closure schemes on the wall. This paper presents a family of high-order non-uniform grid finite difference schemes with stable boundary closures for the direct numerical simulation of hypersonic boundary-layer transition. By using an appropriate grid stretching, and clustering grid points near the boundary, high-order schemes with stable boundary closures can be obtained. The order of the schemes ranges from first-order at the lowest, to the global spectral collocation method at the highest. The accuracy and stability of the new high-order numerical schemes is tested by numerical simulations of the linear wave equation and two-dimensional incompressible flat plate boundary layer flows. The high-order non-uniform-grid schemes (up to the 11th-order) are subsequently applied for the simulation of the receptivity of a hypersonic boundary layer to free stream disturbances over a blunt leading edge. The steady and unsteady results show that the new high-order schemes are stable and are able to produce high accuracy for computations of the nonlinear two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for the wall bounded supersonic flow

  5. Multi-layer Lanczos iteration approach to calculations of vibrational energies and dipole transition intensities for polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Hua-Gen

    2015-01-01

    We report a rigorous full dimensional quantum dynamics algorithm, the multi-layer Lanczos method, for computing vibrational energies and dipole transition intensities of polyatomic molecules without any dynamics approximation. The multi-layer Lanczos method is developed by using a few advanced techniques including the guided spectral transform Lanczos method, multi-layer Lanczos iteration approach, recursive residue generation method, and dipole-wavefunction contraction. The quantum molecular Hamiltonian at the total angular momentum J = 0 is represented in a set of orthogonal polyspherical coordinates so that the large amplitude motions of vibrations are naturally described. In particular, the algorithm is general and problem-independent. An application is illustrated by calculating the infrared vibrational dipole transition spectrum of CH based on the ab initio T8 potential energy surface of Schwenke and Partridge and the low-order truncated ab initio dipole moment surfaces of Yurchenko and co-workers. A comparison with experiments is made. The algorithm is also applicable for Raman polarizability active spectra

  6. Epitaxial Growth of Two-Dimensional Layered Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides: Growth Mechanism, Controllability, and Scalability

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Henan; Li, Ying; Aljarb, Areej; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong

    2017-01-01

    to generate high-quality TMDC layers with scalable size, controllable thickness, and excellent electronic properties suitable for both technological applications and fundamental sciences. The capability to precisely engineer 2D materials by chemical approaches

  7. Radiation pre-vulcanization of transitional layer of all-steel load meridian tyre and performance tests of the tyre products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Benshang; Zhu Chengshen; Ying Shizhou; Liu Kebo; Li Zhaopeng; Li Kunhao; Zhang Hongna; Zhao Meihong; Yang Mingcheng

    2012-01-01

    In this article, natural rubber is chosen as transitional layer of all-steel load meridian tyre, which is pre-vulcanized by 500 keV E-beam irradiation of up to 60 kGy. The results show that the Green strength of transitional layer increases with the dose, reaching four times at 60 kGy as much as the control (without irradiation). The viscosity of transitional layer increases rapidly below about 29 kGy, but changes little at higher doses. The final mechanical properties do not differ significantly from those of the control. However, thickness of the natural rubber transitional layer for an average single tire can be reduced by 1 mm (or 1.5 kg), without obvious adverse effect on the tyre performance. (authors)

  8. Assessment of intermittency transport equations for modeling transition in boundary layers subjected to freestream turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suluksna, Keerati; Juntasaro, Ekachai

    2008-01-01

    The γ-Re θ transition model of Menter et al. [Menter, F.R., Langtry, R.B., Volker, S., Huang, P.G., 2005. Transition modelling for general purpose CFD codes. ERCOFTAC International Symposium Engineering Turbulence Modelling and Measurements] is a highly generalized transport equation model in which it has been developed based on the concept of local variables compatible with modern CFD methods where the unstructured grid and the parallel computing technique are usually integrated in. To perform the prediction with this model, two essential parameters, F length which is used to control the length of the transition region and Re θc which is used to control the onset of the transition location, must be specified to close the model. At present, both parameters are proprietary and their formulations are unpublished. For the first time here, the relations for both parameters are formulated by means of numerical experiments and analysis under the assumption of Re θc = Re θt corresponding with the bypass transition behavior. Based on this analysis, the optimized values of the parameters are found and their relations can be constructed as follows: Re θc = 803.73(Tu ∞ , le + 0.6067) -1.027 and F length = 163 ln(Tu ∞ , le ) + 3.625. The performance of this transition model is assessed by testing with the experimental cases of T3AM, T3A, and T3B. Detailed comparisons with the predicted results by the transition models of Suzen and Huang [Suzen, Y.B., Huang, P.G., 2000. Modeling of flow transition using an intermittency transport equation. J. Fluids Eng. 122, 273-284] and Lodefier et al. [Lodefier, K., Merci, B., De Langhe, C., Dick, E., 2003. Transition modelling with the SST turbulence model and intermittency transport equation. ASME Turbo Expo, Atlanta, GA, USA, June 16-19], and also with the predicted results by the k-ε model of Launder and Sharma [Launder, B.E., Sharma, B., 1974. Application of the energy dissipation model of turbulence to the calculation of

  9. Unit Reynolds number, Mach number and pressure gradient effects on laminar-turbulent transition in two-dimensional boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risius, Steffen; Costantini, Marco; Koch, Stefan; Hein, Stefan; Klein, Christian

    2018-05-01

    The influence of unit Reynolds number (Re_1=17.5× 106-80× 106 {m}^{-1}), Mach number (M= 0.35-0.77) and incompressible shape factor (H_{12} = 2.50-2.66) on laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition was systematically investigated in the Cryogenic Ludwieg-Tube Göttingen (DNW-KRG). For this investigation the existing two-dimensional wind tunnel model, PaLASTra, which offers a quasi-uniform streamwise pressure gradient, was modified to reduce the size of the flow separation region at its trailing edge. The streamwise temperature distribution and the location of laminar-turbulent transition were measured by means of temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) with a higher accuracy than attained in earlier measurements. It was found that for the modified PaLASTra model the transition Reynolds number (Re_{ {tr}}) exhibits a linear dependence on the pressure gradient, characterized by H_{12}. Due to this linear relation it was possible to quantify the so-called `unit Reynolds number effect', which is an increase of Re_{ {tr}} with Re_1. By a systematic variation of M, Re_1 and H_{12} in combination with a spectral analysis of freestream disturbances, a stabilizing effect of compressibility on boundary layer transition, as predicted by linear stability theory, was detected (`Mach number effect'). Furthermore, two expressions were derived which can be used to calculate the transition Reynolds number as a function of the amplitude of total pressure fluctuations, Re_1 and H_{12}. To determine critical N-factors, the measured transition locations were correlated with amplification rates, calculated by incompressible and compressible linear stability theory. By taking into account the spectral level of total pressure fluctuations at the frequency of the most amplified Tollmien-Schlichting wave at transition location, the scatter in the determined critical N-factors was reduced. Furthermore, the receptivity coefficients dependence on incidence angle of acoustic waves was used to

  10. Existence and Stability of the Periodic Solution with an Interior Transitional Layer in the Problem with a Weak Linear Advection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay N. Nefedov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, we study a singularly perturbed periodic in time problem for the parabolic reaction-advection-diffusion equation with a weak linear advection. The case of the reactive term in the form of a cubic nonlinearity is considered. On the basis of already known results, a more general formulation of the problem is investigated, with weaker sufficient conditions for the existence of a solution with an internal transition layer to be provided than in previous studies. For convenience, the known results are given, which ensure the fulfillment of the existence theorem of the contrast structure. The justification for the existence of a solution with an internal transition layer is based on the use of an asymptotic method of differential inequalities based on the modification of the terms of the constructed asymptotic expansion. Further, sufficient conditions are established to fulfill these requirements, and they have simple and concise formulations in the form of the algebraic equation w(x0,t = 0 and the condition wx(x0,t < 0, which is essentially a condition of simplicity of the root x0(t and ensuring the stability of the solution found. The function w is a function of the known functions appearing in the reactive and advective terms of the original problem. The equation w(x0,t = 0 is a problem for finding the zero approximation x0(t to determine the localization region of the inner transition layer. In addition, the asymptotic Lyapunov stability of the found periodic solution is investigated, based on the application of the so-called compressible barrier method. The main result of the paper is formulated as a theorem. 

  11. Roughness of the SiC/SiO{sub 2} vicinal interface and atomic structure of the transition layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Peizhi; Li, Guoliang; Duscher, Gerd, E-mail: gduscher@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Sharma, Yogesh K.; Ahyi, Ayayi C.; Isaacs-Smith, Tamara; Williams, John R.; Dhar, Sarit [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface is generally considered to be the cause for the reduced electron mobility of SiC power devices. Previous studies have shown a correlation between the mobility and the transition layer width at the SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface. The authors investigated this interface with atomic resolution Z-contrast imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and discovered that this transition region was due to the roughness of the vicinal interface. The roughness of a vicinal interface consisted of atomic steps and facets deviating from the ideal off-axis cut plane. The authors conclude that this roughness is limiting the mobility in the channels of SiC MOSFETs.

  12. Numerical and experimental modelling of transition in a separated boundary layer on the NACA63A421 Airfiol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ďuriš, M.; Popelka, Lukáš; Příhoda, Jaromír; Šimurda, David

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2010), s. 47-53 ISSN 1210-0471. [International Meeting of Departments of Fluid Mechanics and Thermomechanics held in Rožnov pod Radhoštěm /29./. Rožnov pod Radhoštěm, 23.06.2010-25.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06031; GA ČR GA103/09/0977 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : boundary layer transition * CFD * airfoil Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  13. Relationship between superconducting transition temperature and number of CuO2 layers in mercury-based superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaojia; Xu Zhuan; Jiao Zhengkuan; Zhang Qirui

    1997-01-01

    The nonmonotonic dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on the number of CuO 2 layers (n) per unit cell for mercury-based cuprate systems is investigated with the framework of the electrostatic model and the Ginsburg-Landau theory. It is found that the largest value of the normalized density of states is 1.8 when n=3, which corresponds to the highest T c in this series. Using reasonable parameters we predict an upper limit of T c of 160 K. (orig.)

  14. Layered crust-mantle transition zone below a large crustal intrusion in the Norwegian-Danish basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrin, Alessandro; Nielsen, Lars; Thybo, Hans

    2009-01-01

    the lowermost crust (7.7 km/s) and the uppermost mantle (7.9-8.0 km/s). The seismic data show a "ringing" Moho below the western part of the intrusion. The coda trailing the main PmP reflection is about 1.0 s long and is composed of 4-5 wavelets. We demonstrate that this feature may be explained by a layered......The crust and uppermost mantle below the large positive gravity anomaly in the central part of the Norwegian-Danish Basin, the Silkeborg Gravity High (SGH), is investigated using controlled source seismic data. A more than 80 km long and ~ 20 km thick intrusion is interpreted. The seismic velocity...... transition zone between 30 and 35 km depth, where high-velocity layers of mantle affinity (7.9-8.05 km/s) alternate with layers of typical lower crustal velocity (6.7-7.3 km/s). The characteristics of this layering, which causes thePmP coda, are modelled by matching synthetic seismograms to the observed data...

  15. Transition Delay in Hypervelocity Boundary Layers By Means of CO2/Acoustic Instability Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-16

    fit to the results shown in a). the transition process. Turbulent spots are observed propagating in heat flux “ movies ” of the developed cone surface...Ludwieg tube using a scale model of the cone used in the T5 study to examine the fluid dynamics of injection without non- equilibrium effects

  16. Transition radiation excited by a load moving over the interface of two elastic layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dalen, K.N.; Metrikine, A.; Tsouvalas, A.

    2014-01-01

    Transition radiation is emitted when a perturbation source (e.g., electric charge, mechanical load), which does not possess an inherent frequency, moves along a straight line at a constant velocity in or near an inhomogeneous medium. The phenomenon was described for the first time in

  17. UV light induced insulator-metal transition in ultra-thin ZnO/TiO{sub x} stacked layer grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, D., E-mail: sahaphys@gmail.com, E-mail: pmisra@rrcat.gov.in; Misra, P., E-mail: sahaphys@gmail.com, E-mail: pmisra@rrcat.gov.in; Joshi, M. P.; Kukreja, L. M. [Laser Materials Processing Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India)

    2016-08-28

    In the present study, atomic layer deposition has been used to grow a series of Ti incorporated ZnO thin films by vertically stacking different numbers (n = 1–7) of ZnO/TiO{sub x} layers on (0001) sapphire substrates. The effects of defect states mediated chemisorption of O{sub 2} and/OH groups on the electrical properties of these films have been investigated by illuminating the samples under UV light inside a high vacuum optical cryostat. The ultra-thin film having one stacked layer (n = 1) did not show any change in its electrical resistance upon UV light exposure. On the contrary, marginal drop in the electrical resistivity was measured for the samples with n ≥ 3. Most surprisingly, the sample with n = 2 (thickness ∼ 12 nm) showed an insulator to metal transition upon UV light exposure. The temperature dependent electrical resistivity measurement on the as grown film (n = 2) showed insulating behaviour, i.e., diverging resistivity on extrapolation to T→ 0 K. However, upon UV light exposure, it transformed to a metallic state, i.e., finite resistivity at T → 0 K. Such an insulator-metal transition plausibly arises due to the de-trapping of conduction electrons from the surface defect sites which resulted in an upward shift of the Fermi level above the mobility edge. The low-temperature electron transport properties on the insulating film (n = 2) were investigated by a combined study of zero field electrical resistivity ρ(T) and magnetoresistance (MR) measurements. The observed negative MR was found to be in good agreement with the magnetic field induced suppression of quantum interference between forward-going paths of tunnelling electrons. Both ρ(T) and MR measurements provided strong evidence for the Efros-Shklovskii type variable range hopping conduction in the low-temperature (≤40 K) regime. Such studies on electron transport in ultra-thin n-type doped ZnO films are crucial to achieve optimum functionality

  18. Control of electronic properties of 2D carbides (MXenes) by manipulating their transition metal layers

    KAUST Repository

    Anasori, Babak; Shi, Chenyang; Moon, Eun Ju; Xie, Yu; Voigt, Cooper A.; Kent, Paul R. C.; May, Steven J.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Barsoum, Michel W.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-01-01

    M′′–C layers. Using X-ray atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis on Mo2TiC2 and Mo2Ti2C3 MXenes, we present the first quantitative analysis of structures of these novel materials and experimentally confirm that Mo atoms are in the outer

  19. Interband magneto-optical transitions in a layer of semiconductor nano-rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskoboynikov, O.; Wijers, Christianus M.J.; Liu, J.L.; Lee, C.P.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a quantitative theory of the collective electromagnetic response of layers of semiconductor nano-rings. The response can be controlled by means of an applied magnetic field through the optical Aharonov-Bohm effect and is ultimately required for the design of composite materials. We

  20. Wavelet Cross-Spectrum Analysis of Multi-Scale Disturbance Instability and Transition on Sharp Cone Hypersonic Boundary Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jian, Han; Nan, Jiang

    2008-01-01

    Experimental measurement of hypersonic boundary layer stability and transition on a sharp cone with a half angle of 5° is carried out at free-coming stream Mach number 6 in a hypersonic wind tunnel. Mean and fluctuation surface-thermal-flux characteristics of the hypersonic boundary layer flow are measured by Pt-thin-film thermocouple temperature sensors installed at 28 stations on the cone surface along longitudinal direction. At hypersonic speeds, the dominant flow instabilities demonstrate that the growth rate of the second mode tends to exceed that of the low-frequency mode. Wavelet-based cross-spectrum technique is introduced to obtain the multi-scale cross-spectral characteristics of the fluctuating signals in the frequency range of the second mode. Nonlinear interactions both of the second mode disturbance and the first mode disturbance are demonstrated to be dominant instabilities in the initial stage of laminar-turbulence transition for hypersonic shear flow. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  1. Analysis of euv limb-brightening observations from ATM. I. Model for the transition layer and the corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariska, J T; Withbroe, G L [Harvard Coll. Observatory, Cambridge, Mass. (USA)

    1975-09-01

    Limb-brightening curves for euv resonance lines of O VI and Mg X have been constructed from spectroheliograms (5 sec resolution) of quiet limb regions observed with the Harvard experiment on Skylab. The observations are interpreted with a simple model for the transition layer and the corona. A comparison of theoretical and observed limb-brightening curves indicates that the lower boundary of the corona, where T/sub e/ = 10/sup 6/K, is at a height of about 8000 km in typical quiet areas. For 1.01 R(sun) approximately = to or < r < 1.25(sun), the corona can be represented by a homogeneous model in hydrostatic equilibrium with a temperature of 10/sup 6/K for 1.01 R(sun) approximately = to or < r < 1.1 R(sun) and 1.1x10/sup 6/K for r > approximately = to 1.1 R(sun). The model for the transition layer is inhomogeneous, with the temperature gradient a factor of 3 shallower in the network than in the intranetwork regions. It appears that spicules should be included in the model in order to account for the penetration into the corona of cool (T/sub e/ < 10/sup 6/K) euv-emitting material to heights up to 20000 km above the limb.

  2. Effects of interfacial transition layers on the electrical properties of individual Fe 30 Co 61 Cu 9 /Cu multilayer nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we accurately measure the electrical properties of individual Fe30Co61Cu9/Cu multilayered nanowires using nanomanipulators in in situ scanning electron microscopy to reveal that interfacial transition layers are influential in determining their transport behaviors. We investigate the morphology, crystal structure and chemistry of the Fe30Co61Cu9/Cu multilayered nanowires to characterize them at the nanoscale. We also compare the transport properties of these multilayered nanowires to those of individual pure Cu nanowires and to those of alloy Fe30Co61Cu9 nanowires. The multilayered nanowires with a 50 nm diameter had a remarkable resistivity of approximately 5.41 × 10-7 Ω m and a failure current density of 1.54 × 1011 A m-2. Detailed analysis of the electrical data reveals that interfacial transition layers influence the electrical properties of multilayered nanowires and are likely to have a strong impact on the life of nanodevices. This work contributes to a basic understanding of the electrical parameters of individual magnetic multilayered nanowires for their application as functional building blocks and interconnecting leads in nanodevices and nanoelectronics, and also provides a clear physical picture of a single multilayered nanowire which explains its electrical resistance and its source of giant magnetoresistance. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2016.

  3. Atomic-Resolution Visualization of Distinctive Chemical Mixing Behavior of Ni, Co and Mn with Li in Layered Lithium Transition-Metal Oxide Cathode Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Pengfei; Zheng, Jianming; Lv, Dongping; Wei, Yi; Zheng, Jiaxin; Wang, Zhiguo; Kuppan, Saravanan; Yu, Jianguo; Luo, Langli; Edwards, Danny J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Amine, Khalil; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie; Pan, Feng; Chen, Guoying; Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Chong M.

    2015-07-06

    Capacity and voltage fading of layer structured cathode based on lithium transition metal oxide is closely related to the lattice position and migration behavior of the transition metal ions. However, it is scarcely clear about the behavior of each of these transition metal ions. We report direct atomic resolution visualization of interatomic layer mixing of transition metal (Ni, Co, Mn) and lithium ions in layer structured oxide cathodes for lithium ion batteries. Using chemical imaging with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and DFT calculations, we discovered that in the layered cathodes, Mn and Co tend to reside almost exclusively at the lattice site of transition metal (TM) layer in the structure or little interlayer mixing with Li. In contrast, Ni shows high degree of interlayer mixing with Li. The fraction of Ni ions reside in the Li layer followed a near linear dependence on total Ni concentration before reaching saturation. The observed distinctively different behavior of Ni with respect to Co and Mn provides new insights on both capacity and voltage fade in this class of cathode materials based on lithium and TM oxides, therefore providing scientific basis for selective tailoring of oxide cathode materials for enhanced performance.

  4. Modeling boundary-layer transition in direct and large-eddy simulations using parabolized stability equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Durán, A.; Hack, M. J. P.; Moin, P.

    2018-02-01

    We examine the potential of the nonlinear parabolized stability equations (PSE) to provide an accurate yet computationally efficient treatment of the growth of disturbances in H-type transition to turbulence. The PSE capture the nonlinear interactions that eventually induce breakdown to turbulence and can as such identify the onset of transition without relying on empirical correlations. Since the local PSE solution at the onset of transition is a close approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations, it provides a natural inflow condition for direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large-eddy simulations (LES) by avoiding nonphysical transients. We show that a combined PSE-DNS approach, where the pretransitional region is modeled by the PSE, can reproduce the skin-friction distribution and downstream turbulent statistics from a DNS of the full domain. When the PSE are used in conjunction with wall-resolved and wall-modeled LES, the computational cost in both the laminar and turbulent regions is reduced by several orders of magnitude compared to DNS.

  5. The swelling transition of lepidocrocite-type protonated layered titanates into anatase under hydrothermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huiyu; Besselink, Rogier; Liao, Zhaoliang; Ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2014-04-01

    The common facets of anatase crystals are the (001) and (101) planes. However, the phase transformation from lepidocrocite-type titanate into anatase by hydrothermal processing yields an anatase microstructure with high concentration of exposed (010) planes. The phase transformation of a lepidocrocite-type protonated layered titanate (HTO) into anatase was studied using XRD, TEM, FTIR, and measurement of pH and zeta potential. It was found that HTO is proton-deficient. The phase transformation process begins after uptake of a sufficient number of protons into the lepidocrocite-type structure. With the uptake of protons new hydroxyl groups form on the internal surfaces of the layered titanate and result in a bilayer state of HTO. The phase transformation reaction is a topotactic dehydration reaction in which anatase forms and water is expelled by syneresis.

  6. The swelling transition of lepidocrocite-type protonated layered titanates into anatase under hydrothermal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huiyu; Besselink, Rogier; Liao, Zhaoliang; Ten Elshof, Johan E

    2014-04-03

    The common facets of anatase crystals are the (001) and (101) planes. However, the phase transformation from lepidocrocite-type titanate into anatase by hydrothermal processing yields an anatase microstructure with high concentration of exposed (010) planes. The phase transformation of a lepidocrocite-type protonated layered titanate (HTO) into anatase was studied using XRD, TEM, FTIR, and measurement of pH and zeta potential. It was found that HTO is proton-deficient. The phase transformation process begins after uptake of a sufficient number of protons into the lepidocrocite-type structure. With the uptake of protons new hydroxyl groups form on the internal surfaces of the layered titanate and result in a bilayer state of HTO. The phase transformation reaction is a topotactic dehydration reaction in which anatase forms and water is expelled by syneresis.

  7. Two-dimensional analysis of limiter/divertor transition in scrape-off layer plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, N.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.I.

    1989-01-01

    The structures of scrape-off layer and divertor plasmas have been studied numerically with a neutral code and a two-dimensional fluid code. Doublet-III is taken as an example for an open divertor configuration. A decisive parameter is the distance between the plasma surface (determined by the magnetic separatrix) and the limiter, which is varied in order to assess the interaction of the plasma with the limiter as well as the effect of neutrals on the main plasma. The minimum value of the limiter clearance needed to prevent plasma-limiter interaction is determined. The scaling of the edge temperature and the dependence of the e-folding length of the scrape-off layer plasma on the heating power are obtained. (author). 16 refs, 17 figs

  8. The swelling transition of lepidocrocite-type protonated layered titanates into anatase under hydrothermal treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Huiyu; Besselink, Rogier; Liao, Zhaoliang; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2014-01-01

    The common facets of anatase crystals are the (001) and (101) planes. However, the phase transformation from lepidocrocite-type titanate into anatase by hydrothermal processing yields an anatase microstructure with high concentration of exposed (010) planes. The phase transformation of a lepidocrocite-type protonated layered titanate (HTO) into anatase was studied using XRD, TEM, FTIR, and measurement of pH and zeta potential. It was found that HTO is proton-deficient. The phase transformatio...

  9. Trip-Induced Transition Measurements in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer Using Molecular Tagging Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Johansen, Craig T.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of mean streamwise velocity, fluctuating streamwise velocity, and instantaneous streamwise velocity profiles in a hypersonic boundary layer were obtained over a 10-degree half-angle wedge model. A laser-induced fluorescence-based molecular tagging velocimetry technique was used to make the measurements. The nominal edge Mach number was 4.2. Velocity profiles were measured both in an untripped boundary layer and in the wake of a 4-mm diameter cylindrical tripping element centered 75.4 mm downstream of the sharp leading edge. Three different trip heights were investigated: k = 0.53 mm, k = 1.0 mm and k = 2.0 mm. The laminar boundary layer thickness at the position of the measurements was approximately 1 mm, though the exact thickness was dependent on Reynolds number and wall temperature. All of the measurements were made starting from a streamwise location approximately 18 mm downstream of the tripping element. This measurement region continued approximately 30 mm in the streamwise direction. Additionally, measurements were made at several spanwise locations. An analysis of flow features show how the magnitude, spatial location, and spatial growth of streamwise velocity instabilities are affected by parameters such as the ratio of trip height to boundary layer thickness and roughness Reynolds number. The fluctuating component of streamwise velocity measured along the centerline of the model increased from approximately 75 m/s with no trip to +/-225 m/s with a 0.53-mm trip, and to +/-240 m/s with a 1-mm trip, while holding the freestream Reynolds number constant. These measurements were performed in the 31-inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  10. Assembly of Layered Monetite-Chitosan Nanocomposite and Its Transition to Organized Hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Qichao; Liberman, David; Zhang, Yuzheng; Ren, Dongni; Zhang, Yunpeng; Nutt, Steven; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2016-06-13

    Bioinspired synthesis of hierarchically structured calcium phosphate (CaP) material is a highly promising strategy for developing improved bone substitute materials. However, synthesis of CaP materials with outstanding mechanical properties still remains an ongoing challenge. Inspired by the formation of lamellar structure in nacre, we designed an organic matrix composed of chitosan and cis-butenediolic acid (maleic acid, MAc) that could assemble into a layered complex and further guide the mineralization of monetite crystals, resulting in the formation of organized and parallel arrays of monetite platelets with a brick-and-mortar structure. Using the layered monetite-chitosan composite as a precursor, we were able to synthesize hydroxyapatite (HAp) with multiscale hierarchically ordered structure via a topotactic phase transformation process. On the nanoscale, needlelike HAp crystallites assembled into organized bundles that aligned to form highly oriented plates on the microscale. On the large-scale level, these plates with different crystal orientations were stacked together to form a layered structure. The organized structures and composite feature yielded CaP materials with improved mechanical properties close to those of bone. Our study introduces a biomimetic approach that may be practical for the design of advanced, mechanically robust materials for biomedical applications.

  11. Solution processed transition metal oxide anode buffer layers for efficiency and stability enhancement of polymer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameen, M. Yoosuf; Shamjid, P.; Abhijith, T.; Reddy, V. S.

    2018-01-01

    Polymer solar cells were fabricated with solution-processed transition metal oxides, MoO3 and V2O5 as anode buffer layers (ABLs). The optimized device with V2O5 ABL exhibited considerably higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) compared to the devices based on MoO3 and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) ABLs. The space charge limited current measurements and impedance spectroscopy results of hole-only devices revealed that V2O5 provided a very low charge transfer resistance and high hole mobility, facilitating efficient hole transfer from the active layer to the ITO anode. More importantly, incorporation of V2O5 as ABL resulted in substantial improvement in device stability compared to MoO3 and PEDOT:PSS based devices. Unencapsulated PEDOT:PSS-based devices stored at a relative humidity of 45% have shown complete failure within 96 h. Whereas, MoO3 and V2O5 based devices stored in similar conditions retained 22% and 80% of their initial PCEs after 96 h. Significantly higher stability of the V2O5-based device is ascribed to the reduction in degradation of the anode/active layer interface, as evident from the electrical measurements.

  12. TRANSIT

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. TRANSIT. SYSTEM: DETERMINE 2D-POSITION GLOBALLY BUT INTERMITTENT (POST-FACTO). IMPROVED ACCURACY. PRINCIPLE: POLAR SATELLITES WITH INNOVATIONS OF: GRAVITY-GRADIENT ATTITUDE CONTROL; DRAG COMPENSATION. WORKS ...

  13. Pressure induced magneto-structural phase transitions in layered RMn2X2 compounds (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Shane; Wang, Jianli; Campbell, Stewart; Hofmann, Michael; Dou, Shixue

    2014-01-01

    We have studied a range of pseudo-ternaries derived from the parent compound PrMn 2 Ge 2 , substituting for each constituent element with a smaller one to contract the lattice. This enables us to observe the magneto-elastic transitions that occur as the Mn-Mn nearest neighbour distance is reduced and to assess the role of Pr on the magnetism. Here, we report on the PrMn 2 Ge 2−x Si x , Pr 1−x Y x Mn 2 Ge 2 , and PrMn 2−x Fe x Ge 2 systems. The pressure produced by chemical substitution in these pseudo-ternaries is inherently non-uniform, with local pressure variations dependent on the local atomic distribution. We find that concentrated chemical substitution on the R or X site (e.g., in Pr 0.5 Y 0.5 Mn 2 Ge 2 and PrMn 2 Ge 0.8 Si 1.2 ) can produce a separation into two distinct magnetic phases, canted ferromagnetic and canted antiferromagnetic, with a commensurate phase gap in the crystalline lattice. This phase gap is a consequence of the combination of phase separation and spontaneous magnetostriction, which is positive on transition to the canted ferromagnetic phase and negative on transition to the canted antiferromagnetic phase. Our results show that co-existence of canted ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases depends on chemical pressure from the rare earth and metalloid sites, on local lattice strain distributions and on applied magnetic field. We demonstrate that the effects of chemical pressure bear close resemblance to those of mechanical pressure on the parent compound

  14. Boundary Layer Transition Detection on a Rotor Blade Using Rotating Mirror Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineck, James T.; Schuelein, Erich; Raffel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Laminar-to-turbulent transition on a rotor blade in hover has been imaged using an area-scan infrared camera. A new method for tracking a blade using a rotating mirror was employed. The mirror axis of rotation roughly corresponded to the rotor axis of rotation and the mirror rotational frequency is 1/2 that of the rotor. This permitted the use of cameras whose integration time was too long to prevent image blur due to the motion of the blade. This article will show the use of this method for a rotor blade at different collective pitch angles.

  15. Topological Phase Transition in Layered GaS and GaSe

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong; Cheng, Yingchun; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2012-01-01

    By fully relativistic first principles calculations, we predict that appropriate strain engineering of layered GaX (X=S, Se) leads to a new class of three-dimensional topological insulators with an excitation gap of up to 135 meV. Our results provide a new perspective on the formation of three-dimensional topological insulators. Band inversion can be induced by strain only, without considering any spin-orbit coupling. The latter, however, is indispensable for the formation of local band gaps at the crossing points of the inverted bands. Our study indicates that three-dimensional topological insulators can also be realized in materials which comprise light elements only.

  16. Topological Phase Transition in Layered GaS and GaSe

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong

    2012-06-29

    By fully relativistic first principles calculations, we predict that appropriate strain engineering of layered GaX (X=S, Se) leads to a new class of three-dimensional topological insulators with an excitation gap of up to 135 meV. Our results provide a new perspective on the formation of three-dimensional topological insulators. Band inversion can be induced by strain only, without considering any spin-orbit coupling. The latter, however, is indispensable for the formation of local band gaps at the crossing points of the inverted bands. Our study indicates that three-dimensional topological insulators can also be realized in materials which comprise light elements only.

  17. Integrated high-transition temperature magnetometer with only two superconducting layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, R.; Kingston, J.J.; Miklich, A.H.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and testing of an integrated YBa2Cu3O7-x thin-film magnetometer consisting of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), with biepitaxial grain boundary junctions, integrated with a flux transformer on a single substrate. Only two superconducting layers...... are required, the SQUID body serving as the crossunder that completes the multiturn flux transformer. The highest temperature at which any of the magnetometers functioned was 76 K. At 60 K the magnetic field gain of this device was 63, and the magnetic field noise was 160 fT Hz-1/2 at 2 kHz, increasing to 3...

  18. Structural and electronic properties of the transition layer at the SiO2/4H-SiC interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using first-principles methods, we generate an amorphous SiO2/4H-SiC interface with a transition layer. Based this interface model, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the interfacial transition layer. The calculated Si 2p core-level shifts for this interface are comparable to the experimental data, indicating that various SiCxOy species should be present in this interface transition layer. The analysis of the electronic structures reveals that the tetrahedral SiCxOy structures cannot introduce any of the defect states at the interface. Interestingly, our transition layer also includes a C-C=C trimer and SiO5 configurations, which lead to the generation of interface states. The accurate positions of Kohn-Sham energy levels associated with these defects are further calculated within the hybrid functional scheme. The Kohn-Sham energy levels of the carbon trimer and SiO5 configurations are located near the conduction and valence band of bulk 4H-SiC, respectively. The result indicates that the carbon trimer occurred in the transition layer may be a possible origin of near interface traps. These findings provide novel insight into the structural and electronic properties of the realistic SiO2/SiC interface.

  19. Hydrogen-induced structural transition in single layer ReS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagmurcukardes, M.; Bacaksiz, C.; Senger, R. T.; Sahin, H.

    2017-09-01

    By performing density functional theory-based calculations, we investigate how structural, electronic and mechanical properties of single layer ReS2 can be tuned upon hydrogenation of its surfaces. It is found that a stable, fully hydrogenated structure can be obtained by formation of strong S-H bonds. The optimized atomic structure of ReS2H2 is considerably different than that of the monolayer ReS2 which has a distorted-1T phase. By performing phonon dispersion calculations, we also predict that the Re2-dimerized 1T structure (called 1T {{}\\text{R{{\\text{e}}2}}} ) of the ReS2H2 is dynamically stable. Unlike the bare ReS2 the 1T {{}\\text{R{{\\text{e}}2}}} -ReS2H2 structure which is formed by breaking the Re4 clusters into separated Re2 dimers, is an indirect-gap semiconductor. Furthermore, mechanical properties of the 1T {{}\\text{R{{\\text{e}}2}}} phase in terms of elastic constants, in-plane stiffness (C) and Poisson ratio (ν) are investigated. It is found that full hydrogenation not only enhances the flexibility of the single layer ReS2 crystal but also increases anisotropy of the elastic constants.

  20. An investigation of the reflection of low energy electrons from the surfaces of layered transition metal dichalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.E.; Mohamed, M.H.; Wohlenberg, T.; Johnson, E.; Chadderton, L.T.; Moeller, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental measurements, using the total current spectroscopy (TCS) technique, on the energy dependence of the reflection of low energy electrons from clean surfaces of layered transition metal dichalcogenides are reported for the molybdenum semiconductor compounds 2H-MoS 2 and 2H-MoSe 2 . A simple model calculation involving both elastic and inelastic scattering is presented and correspondence established with the experimental spectra. In this picture information on the electronic band structure of the materials can then be extracted from the single particle component of the inelastic scattering. The model is extended to show that a feature in the 2H-MoS 2 experimental spectrum may be attributed to the excitation of an intermediate plasmon. (Auth.)

  1. Phase transition in the Ruddlesden-Popper layered perovskite Li2SrTa2O7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagnier, T.; Rosman, N.; Galven, C.; Suard, E.; Fourquet, J.L.; Le Berre, F.; Crosnier-Lopez, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structure of the Ruddlesden-Popper layered perovskite Li 2 SrTa 2 O 7 has been characterized at various temperatures between -185 and 300 deg. C by several techniques: X-ray and neutron powder diffraction, single crystal diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The low temperature structure has been confirmed to be orthorhombic Cmcm with a small octahedra antiphase tilting (ΦΦ0) (ΦΦ0) inside the perovskite blocks. With temperature, the tilting progressively vanishes leading around 230 deg. C to a tetragonal symmetry (S.G. I4/mmm). This reversible phase transition, followed by X-ray and neutron thermodiffraction and thermal Raman measurements, is considered as of second order. An attribution of the Raman bands based on normal mode analysis is proposed. - Graphical abstract: Thermal evolution of Li 2 SrTa 2 O 7 X-ray powder diffraction patterns showing the structural transformation from orthorhombic to tetragonal cell

  2. Preparation of self-supporting molecularly imprinted films via transition layer construction and RAFT polymerization, and their use in HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Peng; Tang, Shengfu; Shi, Liyi; Li, Zongzhou; Song, Na

    2013-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted films with self-supporting property (SS-MIFs) have been prepared by using the strategy of transition layer construction followed by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The structure, composition and selectivity of the SS-MIFs as well as the mechanism of mass transfer were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform IR spectrometry, specific surface area analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and HPLC. Surface area analysis showed the samples possessed specific surface areas as high as 80.5 m 2 .g −1 . This is almost 9 times more than that of the original porous anodic aluminum oxide substrate. Thermogravimetric analysis also showed the samples to be thermally stable up to 350 °C. The separating power was investigated by HPLC and revealed a selective separation effect for the target molecules theobromine. The separation factor is 5.37. (author)

  3. Structural phase transition and erasable optically memorized effect in layered γ-In2Se3 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Ching-Hwa; Chen, Ying-Cen; Pan, Chia-Chi

    2014-01-01

    We have grown In 2 Se 3 layered-type crystals using chemical vapor transport method with ICl 3 as the transport agent. The as-grown crystals show two different color groups of black shiny for α-phase In 2 Se 3 and red to yellow for γ-phase In 2 Se 3 . High-resolution transmission electron micro scopy verifies crystalline state and structural polytype of the as-grown In 2 Se 3 . The results indicate that the α-In 2 Se 3 crystals present more crystalline states than those of the other amorphous γ-In 2 Se 3 . The amorphous effect on the advancing of optoelectronic property of γ-In 2 Se 3 shows erasable optical-memorized effect in the disordered and polycrystalline γ-In 2 Se 3 layers. Laser-induced photodarkening and annealed-recovery test verified that a reversible structural-phase transition of γ↔α can occur inside the γ-In 2 Se 3 . Thermoreflectance and Raman scattering measurements are carried out to identify the inter-phase transformation of the γ-In 2 Se 3 polycrystals using different heat treatments. Direct band gaps and Raman vibration modes for the γ- and α-In 2 Se 3 crystalline phases are, respectively, characterized and identified. The character of γ↔α inter-phase transition promotes feasible optical and optoelectronic applications of the γ-In 2 Se 3 material in optical memory, optics, and solar-energy devices

  4. Structural phase transition and erasable optically memorized effect in layered γ-In2Se3 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ching-Hwa; Chen, Ying-Cen; Pan, Chia-Chi

    2014-01-01

    We have grown In2Se3 layered-type crystals using chemical vapor transport method with ICl3 as the transport agent. The as-grown crystals show two different color groups of black shiny for α-phase In2Se3 and red to yellow for γ-phase In2Se3. High-resolution transmission electron micro scopy verifies crystalline state and structural polytype of the as-grown In2Se3. The results indicate that the α-In2Se3 crystals present more crystalline states than those of the other amorphous γ-In2Se3. The amorphous effect on the advancing of optoelectronic property of γ-In2Se3 shows erasable optical-memorized effect in the disordered and polycrystalline γ-In2Se3 layers. Laser-induced photodarkening and annealed-recovery test verified that a reversible structural-phase transition of γ↔α can occur inside the γ-In2Se3. Thermoreflectance and Raman scattering measurements are carried out to identify the inter-phase transformation of the γ-In2Se3 polycrystals using different heat treatments. Direct band gaps and Raman vibration modes for the γ- and α-In2Se3 crystalline phases are, respectively, characterized and identified. The character of γ↔α inter-phase transition promotes feasible optical and optoelectronic applications of the γ-In2Se3 material in optical memory, optics, and solar-energy devices.

  5. Electrochemical Modeling and Performance of a Lithium- and Manganese-Rich Layered Transition-Metal Oxide Positive Electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dees, Dennis W.; Abraham, Daniel P; Lu, Wenquan; Gallagher, Kevin G.; Bettge, Martin; Jansen, Andrew N

    2015-01-21

    The impedance of a lithium- and manganese-rich layered transition-metal oxide (MR-NMC) positive electrode, specifically Li1.2Ni0.15Mn0.55Co0.1O2, is compared to two other transition-metal layered oxide materials, specifically LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA) and Li1.05(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)0.95O2 (NMC). A more detailed electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) study is conducted on the LMR-NMC electrode, which includes a range of states-of-charge (SOCs) for both current directions (i.e. charge and discharge) and two relaxation times (i.e. hours and one hundred hours) before the EIS sweep. The LMR-NMC electrode EIS studies are supported by half-cell constant current and galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT) studies. Two types of electrochemical models are utilized to examine the results. The first type is a lithium ion cell electrochemical model for intercalation active material electrodes that includes a complex active material/electrolyte interfacial structure. In conclusion, the other is a lithium ion half-cell electrochemical model that focuses on the unique composite structure of the bulk LMR-NMC materials.

  6. Morphing Wing: Experimental Boundary Layer Transition Determination and Wing Vibrations Measurements and Analysis =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondji Chendjou, Yvan Wilfried

    This Master's thesis is written within the framework of the multidisciplinary international research project CRIAQ MDO-505. This global project consists of the design, manufacture and testing of a morphing wing box capable of changing the shape of the flexible upper skin of a wing using an actuator system installed inside the wing. This changing of the shape generates a delay in the occurrence of the laminar to turbulent transition area, which results in an improvement of the aerodynamic performances of the morphed wing. This thesis is focused on the technologies used to gather the pressure data during the wind tunnel tests, as well as on the post processing methodologies used to characterize the wing airflow. The vibration measurements of the wing and their real-time graphical representation are also presented. The vibration data acquisition system is detailed, and the vibration data analysis confirms the predictions of the flutter analysis performed on the wing prior to wind tunnel testing at the IAR-NRC. The pressure data was collected using 32 highly-sensitive piezoelectric sensors for sensing the pressure fluctuations up to 10 KHz. These sensors were installed along two wing chords, and were further connected to a National Instrument PXI real-time acquisition system. The acquired pressure data was high-pass filtered, analyzed and visualized using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Standard Deviation (SD) approaches to quantify the pressure fluctuations in the wing airflow, as these allow the detection of the laminar to turbulent transition area. Around 30% of the cases tested in the IAR-NRC wind tunnel were optimized for drag reduction by the morphing wing procedure. The obtained pressure measurements results were compared with results obtained by infrared thermography visualization, and were used to validate the numerical simulations. Two analog accelerometers able to sense dynamic accelerations up to +/-16g were installed in both the wing and the aileron boxes

  7. Investigation of the boundary layer during the transition from volume to surface dominated H- production at the BATMAN test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, C.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.

    2016-02-01

    BATMAN (Bavarian Test Machine for Negative ions) is a test facility equipped with a 1/8 scale H- source for the ITER heating neutral beam injection. Several diagnostics in the boundary layer close to the plasma grid (first grid of the accelerator system) followed the transition from volume to surface dominated H- production starting with a Cs-free, cleaned source and subsequent evaporation of caesium, while the source has been operated at ITER relevant pressure of 0.3 Pa: Langmuir probes are used to determine the plasma potential, optical emission spectroscopy is used to follow the caesiation process, and cavity ring-down spectroscopy allows for the measurement of the H- density. The influence on the plasma during the transition from an electron-ion plasma towards an ion-ion plasma, in which negative hydrogen ions become the dominant negatively charged particle species, is seen in a strong increase of the H- density combined with a reduction of the plasma potential. A clear correlation of the extracted current densities (jH-, je) exists with the Cs emission.

  8. Investigation of the boundary layer during the transition from volume to surface dominated H⁻ production at the BATMAN test facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, C; Schiesko, L; Fantz, U

    2016-02-01

    BATMAN (Bavarian Test Machine for Negative ions) is a test facility equipped with a 18 scale H(-) source for the ITER heating neutral beam injection. Several diagnostics in the boundary layer close to the plasma grid (first grid of the accelerator system) followed the transition from volume to surface dominated H(-) production starting with a Cs-free, cleaned source and subsequent evaporation of caesium, while the source has been operated at ITER relevant pressure of 0.3 Pa: Langmuir probes are used to determine the plasma potential, optical emission spectroscopy is used to follow the caesiation process, and cavity ring-down spectroscopy allows for the measurement of the H(-) density. The influence on the plasma during the transition from an electron-ion plasma towards an ion-ion plasma, in which negative hydrogen ions become the dominant negatively charged particle species, is seen in a strong increase of the H(-) density combined with a reduction of the plasma potential. A clear correlation of the extracted current densities (j(H(-)), j(e)) exists with the Cs emission.

  9. 3D spin-flop transition in enhanced 2D layered structure single crystalline TlCo2Se2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Z.; Xia, Z.-C.; Wei, M.; Yang, J.-H.; Chen, B.; Huang, S.; Shang, C.; Wu, H.; Zhang, X.-X.; Huang, J.-W.; Ouyang, Z.-W.

    2016-10-01

    The enhanced 2D layered structure single crystalline TlCo2Se2 has been successfully fabricated, which exhibits field-induced 3D spin-flop phase transitions. In the case of the magnetic field parallel to the c-axis (B//c), the applied magnetic field induces the evolution of the noncollinear helical magnetic coupling into a ferromagnetic (FM) state with all the magnetization of the Co ion parallel to the c-axis. A striking variation of the field-induced strain within the ab-plane is noticed in the magnetic field region of 20-30 T. In the case of the magnetic field perpendicular to the c-axis (B  ⊥  c), the inter-layer helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) coupling may transform to an initial canted AFM coupling, and then part of it transforms to an intermediate metamagnetic phase with the alignment of two-up-one-down Co magnetic moments and finally to an ultimate FM coupling in higher magnetic fields. The robust noncollinear AFM magnetic coupling is completely destroyed above 30 T. In combination with the measurements of magnetization, magnetoresistance and field-induced strain, a complete magnetic phase diagram of the TlCo2Se2 single crystal has been depicted, demonstrating complex magnetic structures even though the crystal geometry itself gives no indication of the magnetic frustration.

  10. Bubble-induced skin-friction drag reduction and the abrupt transition to air-layer drag reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbing, Brian R.; Winkel, Eric S.; Lay, Keary A.; Ceccio, Steven L.; Dowling, David R.; Perlin, Marc

    To investigate the phenomena of skin-friction drag reduction in a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) at large scales and high Reynolds numbers, a set of experiments has been conducted at the US Navy's William B. Morgan Large Cavitation Channel (LCC). Drag reduction was achieved by injecting gas (air) from a line source through the wall of a nearly zero-pressure-gradient TBL that formed on a flat-plate test model that was either hydraulically smooth or fully rough. Two distinct drag-reduction phenomena were investigated; bubble drag reduction (BDR) and air-layer drag reduction (ALDR).The streamwise distribution of skin-friction drag reduction was monitored with six skin-friction balances at downstream-distance-based Reynolds numbers to 220 million and at test speeds to 20.0msinitial zone1. These results indicated that there are three distinct regions associated with drag reduction with air injection: Region I, BDR; Region II, transition between BDR and ALDR; and Region III, ALDR. In addition, once ALDR was established: friction drag reduction in excess of 80% was observed over the entire smooth model for speeds to 15.3ms1 with the surface fully roughened (though approximately 50% greater volumetric air flux was required); and ALDR was sensitive to the inflow conditions. The sensitivity to the inflow conditions can be mitigated by employing a small faired step (10mm height in the experiment) that helps to create a fixed separation line.

  11. APCVD Transition Metal Oxides – Functional Layers in ''Smart windows''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesheva, K A; Ivanova, T M; Bodurov, G K

    2014-01-01

    Transition metal oxides (TMO) exhibit electrochromic effect. Under a small voltage they change their optical transmittance from transparent to collored (absorbing) state. The individual material can manifest its electrochromic properties only when it is part of electrochromic (EC) multilayer system. Smart window is controlling the energy of solar flux entering the building or car and makes the interiors comfortable and energy utilization more effective. Recently the efforts of material researchers in this field are directed to price decreasing. APCVD technology is considered as promissing as this process permits flowthrough large-scale production process. The paper presents results on device optimization based on WO 3 -MoO 3 working electrode. Extensive research reveals that WO 3 -MoO 3 structure combines positive features of single oxides: excellent electrochromic performance of WO 3 and better kinetic properties of MoO 3 deposition. The achieved color efficiency of APCVD WO 3 -MoO 3 films is 200cm 2 /C and optical modulation of 65-70% are practically favorable electrochromic characteristics. To respond to low cost requirement, the expensive hexacarbonyl can be replaced with acetylacetonate. We have started with this precursor to fabricate mixed W x V 1-x O 3 films. The films possess excellent surface coverage and high growth-rate. CVD deposition of VO 2 , a promissing thermochromic thin film material is also presented

  12. Layered lithium transition metal nitrides as novel anodes for lithium secondary batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yu; Horikawa, Kumi; Fujiyosi, Minako; Imanishi, Nobuyuki; Hirano, Atsushi; Takeda, Yasuo

    2004-01-01

    We report the approach to overcome the deterrents of the hexagonal Li 2.6 Co 0.4 N as potential insertion anode for lithium ion batteries: the rapid capacity fading upon long cycles and the fully Li-rich state before cycling. Research reveals that the appropriate amount of Co substituted by Cu can greatly improve the cycling performance of Li 2.6 Co 0.4 N. It is attributed to the enhanced electrochemical stability and interfacial comparability. However, doped Cu leads to a slightly decreased capacity. High energy mechanical milling (HEMM) was found to effectively improve the reversible capacity associated with the electrochemical kinetics by modifying the active hosts' morphology characteristics. Moreover, the composite based on mesocarbon microbead (MCMB) and Li 2.6 Co 0.4 N was developed under HEMM. The composite demonstrates a high first cycle efficiency at 100% and a large reversible capacity of ca. 450 mAh g -1 , as well as a stable cycling performance. This work may contribute to a development of the lithium transition metal nitrides as novel anodes for lithium ion batteries

  13. Heterogeneous photocatalysis with transition metal modified layered titanates for solar hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilarski, Martin

    2016-09-05

    The objective of this work was the validation of Cu as a low priced co-catalyst material in comparison to the frequently used noble metal co-catalysts Rh, Au and Pt, as well as the evaluation of alternative sacrificial agents for photocatalytic H2 production. An effective conversion of glycerol was a primary aim of this work, due to its abundance as a coproduct of the bio fuel production. Furthermore, photocatalysts were prepared, which are capable to absorb light from the visible range of the light spectrum. The required band gap reduction was realized by cation doping. In the course of the cation doping process Cu{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 3+} cations were incorporated by a sol-gel synthesis route into the crystal lattice of the layered Cs{sub 0.68}Ti{sub 1.83}O{sub 4}, which was used as a photocatalyst material. The photocatalytic activity of the prepared photocatalysts was investigated in a self constructed test setup under the irradiation of a xenon arc lamp.

  14. Design, simulation and fabrication of a flexible bond pad with a hollow annular protuberance to improve the thermal fatigue lifetime for through-silicon vias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Guilian; Ding, Guifu; Luo, Jiangbo; Niu, Di; Zhao, Junhong; Zhao, Xiaolin; Wang, Yan; Liu, Rui

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a flexible bond pad (FBP) with a hollow annular protuberance to improve the thermal fatigue lifetime for its application to through-silicon vias (TSVs). The hollow annular protuberance structure across the interface between the filled copper in TSV and silicon substrate not only isolates the FBP from stress/strain concentration regions (the corners of the TSV) but also disperses TSV-induced deformation. The plastic strain distributions of the FBP and conventional plate-type bond pad (CPBP) were simulated by finite element method (FEM) under the temperature cycles. Based on the simulation results, the thermal fatigue lifetimes of the CPBP and the FBP with different TSV diameters were predicted by the Coffin–Manson equation. The results indicate that thermal fatigue lifetimes of the FBP are significantly greater than those of the CPBP and their fatigue lifetimes both decrease with the increase of TSV diameter. To examine the reliability of the predicted results, the CPBP and the FBP with TSV diameter of 100 µm were fabricated by MEMS technology and temperature cycling tests (TCTs) were performed to obtain their thermal fatigue lifetimes. The test results are in good agreement with the numerical simulation results, and it shows that the proposed FBP can effectively improve the thermal fatigue lifetime for TSVs. (paper)

  15. Proceedings of the 17th and 18th NAL Workshops on Investigation and Control of Boundary-Layer Transition

    OpenAIRE

    National Aerospace Laboratory; 航空宇宙技術研究所

    1996-01-01

    The following topics were discussed: vortex shedding, laminar boundary layer measurement, vortex ring, turbulent flow measurement, high Reynolds number turbulence, pulsed flow, boundary layer instability, Ekman boundary layer, sound receptivity, Tollmien-Schlichting wave in supersonic boundary layer, flow field instability, turbulent flow pattern, vorticity distribution in shear flow, turbulence wedge, streamwise vortex mixing, thermal convection, oblique wave generation in boundary layer, in...

  16. The plasma-wall transition layers in the presence of collisions with a magnetic field parallel to the wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, J.; Faudot, E.; Devaux, S.; Heuraux, S.

    2018-01-01

    The plasma-wall transition is studied by means of a particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation in the configuration of a parallel to the wall magnetic field (B), with collisions between charged particles vs. neutral atoms taken into account. The investigated system consists of a plasma bounded by two absorbing walls separated by 200 electron Debye lengths (λd). The strength of the magnetic field is chosen such as the ratio λ d / r l , with rl being the electron Larmor radius, is smaller or larger than unity. Collisions are modelled with a simple operator that reorients randomly ion or electron velocity, keeping constant the total kinetic energy of both the neutral atom (target) and the incident charged particle. The PIC simulations show that the plasma-wall transition consists in a quasi-neutral region (pre-sheath), from the center of the plasma towards the walls, where the electric potential or electric field profiles are well described by an ambipolar diffusion model, and in a second region at the vicinity of the walls, called the sheath, where the quasi-neutrality breaks down. In this peculiar geometry of B and for a certain range of the mean-free-path, the sheath is found to be composed of two charged layers: the positive one, close to the walls, and the negative one, towards the plasma and before the neutral pre-sheath. Depending on the amplitude of B, the spatial variation of the electric potential can be non-monotonic and presents a maximum within the sheath region. More generally, the sheath extent as well as the potential drop within the sheath and the pre-sheath is studied with respect to B, the mean-free-path, and the ion and electron temperatures.

  17. Large scale simulations of the mechanical properties of layered transition metal ternary compounds for fossil energy power system applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, Wai-Yim [Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2014-12-31

    Advanced materials with applications in extreme conditions such as high temperature, high pressure, and corrosive environments play a critical role in the development of new technologies to significantly improve the performance of different types of power plants. Materials that are currently employed in fossil energy conversion systems are typically the Ni-based alloys and stainless steels that have already reached their ultimate performance limits. Incremental improvements are unlikely to meet the more stringent requirements aimed at increased efficiency and reduce risks while addressing environmental concerns and keeping costs low. Computational studies can lead the way in the search for novel materials or for significant improvements in existing materials that can meet such requirements. Detailed computational studies with sufficient predictive power can provide an atomistic level understanding of the key characteristics that lead to desirable properties. This project focuses on the comprehensive study of a new class of materials called MAX phases, or Mn+1AXn (M = a transition metal, A = Al or other group III, IV, and V elements, X = C or N). The MAX phases are layered transition metal carbides or nitrides with a rare combination of metallic and ceramic properties. Due to their unique structural arrangements and special types of bonding, these thermodynamically stable alloys possess some of the most outstanding properties. We used a genomic approach in screening a large number of potential MAX phases and established a database for 665 viable MAX compounds on the structure, mechanical and electronic properties and investigated the correlations between them. This database if then used as a tool for materials informatics for further exploration of this class of intermetallic compounds.

  18. Reduced Fokker-Planck models for fast particle distribution across a transition layer of disparate plasma temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xian-Zhu; Berk, H. L.; Guo, Zehua; McDevitt, C. J.

    2014-03-01

    Across a transition layer of disparate plasma temperatures, the high energy tail of the plasma distribution can have appreciable deviations from the local Maxwellian distribution due to the Knudson layer effect. The Fokker-Planck equation for the tail particle population can be simplified in a series of practically useful limiting cases. The first is the approximation of background Maxwellian distribution for linearizing the collision operator. The second is the supra-thermal particle speed ordering of vTi ≪ v ≪ vTe for the tail ions and vTi ≪ vTe ≪ v for the tail electrons. Keeping both the collisional drag and energy scattering is essential for the collision operator to produce a Maxwellian tail distribution. The Fokker-Planck model for following the tail ion distribution for a given background plasma profile is explicitly worked out for systems of one spatial dimension, in both slab and spherical geometry. A third simplification is an expansion of the tail particle distribution using the spherical harmonics, which are eigenfunctions of the pitch angle scattering operator. This produces a set of coupled Fokker-Planck equations that contain energy-dependent spatial diffusion terms in two coordinates (position and energy), which originate from pitch angle scattering in the original Fokker-Planck equation. It is shown that the well-known diffusive Fokker-Planck model is a poor approximation of the two-mode truncation model, which itself has fundamental deficiency compared with the three-mode truncation model. The cause is the lack of even-symmetry representation in pitch dependence in the two-mode truncation model.

  19. Electrochemical Characteristics of Layered Transition Metal Oxide Cathode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries: Surface, Bulk Behavior, and Thermal Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chixia; Lin, Feng; Doeff, Marca M

    2018-01-16

    Layered lithium transition metal oxides, in particular, NMCs (LiNi x Co y Mn z O 2 ) represent a family of prominent lithium ion battery cathode materials with the potential to increase energy densities and lifetime, reduce costs, and improve safety for electric vehicles and grid storage. Our work has focused on various strategies to improve performance and to understand the limitations to these strategies, which include altering compositions, utilizing cation substitutions, and charging to higher than usual potentials in cells. Understanding the effects of these strategies on surface and bulk behavior and correlating structure-performance relationships advance our understanding of NMC materials. This also provides information relevant to the efficacy of various approaches toward ensuring reliable operation of these materials in batteries intended for demanding traction and grid storage applications. In this Account, we start by comparing NMCs to the isostructural LiCoO 2 cathode, which is widely used in consumer batteries. Effects of changing the metal content (Ni, Mn, Co) upon structure and performance of NMCs are briefly discussed. Our early work on the effects of partial substitution of Al, Fe, and Ti for Co on the electrochemical and bulk structural properties is then covered. The original aim of this work was to reduce the Co content (and thus the raw materials cost) and to determine the effect of the substitutions on the electrochemical and bulk structural properties. More recently, we have turned to the application of synchrotron and advanced microscopy techniques to understand both bulk and surface characteristics of the NMCs. Via nanoscale-to-macroscale spectroscopy and atomically resolved imaging techniques, we were able to determine that the surfaces of NMC undergo heterogeneous reconstruction from a layered structure to rock salt under a variety of conditions. Interestingly, formation of rock salt also occurs under abuse conditions. The surface

  20. Enhancement of superconducting transition temperature in FeSe electric-double-layer transistor with multivalent ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Tomoki; Shiogai, Junichi; Shimizu, Sunao; Matsumoto, Michio; Ito, Yukihiro; Harada, Takayuki; Fujiwara, Kohei; Nojima, Tsutomu; Itoh, Yoshimitsu; Aida, Takuzo; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Tsukazaki, Atsushi

    2018-03-01

    We report on an enhancement of the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of the FeSe-based electric-double-layer transistor (FeSe-EDLT) by applying the multivalent oligomeric ionic liquids (ILs). The IL composed of dimeric cation (divalent IL) enables a large amount of charge accumulation on the surface of the FeSe ultrathin film, resulting in inducing electron-rich conduction even in a rather thick 10 nm FeSe channel. The onset Tc in FeSe-EDLT with the divalent IL is enhanced to be approaching about 50 K at the thin limit, which is about 7 K higher than that in EDLT with conventional monovalent ILs. The enhancement of Tc is a pronounced effect of the application of the divalent IL, in addition to the large capacitance, supposing preferable interface formation of ILs driven by geometric and/or Coulombic effect. The present finding strongly indicates that multivalent ILs are powerful tools for controlling and improving physical properties of materials.

  1. Thermally driven smoothening of molecular thin films: Structural transitions in n-alkane layers studied in real-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pithan, Linus; Weber, Christopher; Zykov, Anton; Sauer, Katrein; Opitz, Andreas; Kowarik, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.kowarik@physik.hu-berlin.de [Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Meister, Eduard; Brütting, Wolfgang [Institut für Physik, Universität Augsburg, 86135 Augsburg (Germany); Jin, Chenyu; Riegler, Hans [Max-Planck-Institut für Kolloid- und Grenzflächenforschung, 14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2015-10-28

    We use thermal annealing to improve smoothness and to increase the lateral size of crystalline islands of n-tetratetracontane (TTC, C{sub 44}H{sub 90}) films. With in situ x-ray diffraction, we find an optimum temperature range leading to improved texture and crystallinity while avoiding an irreversible phase transition that reduces crystallinity again. We employ real-time optical phase contrast microscopy with sub-nm height resolution to track the diffusion of TTC across monomolecular step edges which causes the unusual smoothing of a molecular thin film during annealing. We show that the lateral island sizes increase by more than one order of magnitude from 0.5 μm to 10 μm. This desirable behavior of 2d-Ostwald ripening and smoothing is in contrast to many other organic molecular films where annealing leads to dewetting, roughening, and a pronounced 3d morphology. We rationalize the smoothing behavior with the highly anisotropic attachment energies and low surface energies for TTC. The results are technically relevant for the use of TTC as passivation layer and as gate dielectric in organic field effect transistors.

  2. Characterization of the Embryogenic Tissue of the Norway Spruce Including a Transition Layer between the Tissue and the Culture Medium by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kořínek R.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the visualization of the cells (ESEs and mucilage (ECMSN in an embryogenic tissue via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI relaxometry measurement combined with the subsequent multi-parametric segmentation. The computed relaxometry maps T1 and T2 show a thin layer (transition layer between the culture medium and the embryogenic tissue. The ESEs, mucilage, and transition layer differ in their relaxation times T1 and T2; thus, these times can be used to characterize the individual parts within the embryogenic tissue. The observed mean values of the relaxation times T1 and T2 of the ESEs, mucilage, and transition layer are as follows: 1469 ± 324 and 53 ± 10 ms, 1784 ± 124 and 74 ± 8 ms, 929 ± 164 and 32 ± 4.7 ms, respectively. The multi-parametric segmentation exploiting the T1 and T2 relaxation times as a classifier shows the distribution of the ESEs and mucilage within the embryogenic tissue. The discussed T1 and T2 indicators can be utilized to characterize both the growth-related changes in an embryogenic tissue and the effect of biotic/abiotic stresses, thus potentially becoming a distinctive indicator of the state of any examined embryogenic tissue.

  3. Photoreflectance study of the near-band-edge transitions of chemical vapor deposition-grown mono- and few-layer MoS{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Kuang-I, E-mail: kilin@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Jen; Wang, Bo-Yan; Cheng, Yung-Chen [Department of Materials Science, National University of Tainan, Tainan 70005, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chang-Hsiao, E-mail: chsiaoc@fcu.edu.tw [Department of Automatic Control Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-21

    Room-temperature photoreflectance (PR) and reflectance (R) spectroscopy are utilized to investigate the near-band-edge transitions of molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) thin films grown on sapphire substrates by a hot-wall chemical vapor deposition system. The layer thickness and optical properties of the MoS{sub 2} thin films are confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscope, and photoluminescence (PL) analysis. The B exciton shows relatively weak PL intensity in comparing with the A exciton even for monolayer MoS{sub 2} films. In the R spectrum of few‐layer MoS{sub 2}, it is not possible to clearly observe exciton related features. The PR spectra have two sharp, derivative-like features on a featureless background. Throughout the PR lineshape fitting, the transition energies are designated as the A and B excitons at the K-point of the Brillouin zone, but at room temperature there seems to be no distinguishable feature corresponding to an H‐point transition for the mono- and few-layer MoS{sub 2} films unlike in bulk. These transition energies are slightly larger than those obtained by PL, which is attributed to the Stokes shifts related to doping level. The obtained values of valence-band spin-orbit splitting are in good agreement with those from other experimental methods. By comparing the PR lineshapes, the dominant modulation mechanism is attributed to variations of the exciton transition energies due to change in the built-in electric field. On the strength of this study, PR spectroscopy is demonstrated as a powerful technique for characterizing the near-band-edge transitions of MoS{sub 2} from monolayer to bulk.

  4. Pollutant Dispersion in Boundary Layers Exposed to Rural-to-Urban Transitions: Varying the Spanwise Length Scale of the Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, J. M.; Eisma, H. E.; Pourquie, M. J. B. M.; Elsinga, G. E.; Jonker, H. J. J.; Westerweel, J.

    2017-05-01

    Both large-eddy simulations (LES) and water-tunnel experiments, using simultaneous stereoscopic particle image velocimetry and laser-induced fluorescence, have been used to investigate pollutant dispersion mechanisms in regions where the surface changes from rural to urban roughness. The urban roughness was characterized by an array of rectangular obstacles in an in-line arrangement. The streamwise length scale of the roughness was kept constant, while the spanwise length scale was varied by varying the obstacle aspect ratio l / h between 1 and 8, where l is the spanwise dimension of the obstacles and h is the height of the obstacles. Additionally, the case of two-dimensional roughness (riblets) was considered in LES. A smooth-wall turbulent boundary layer of depth 10 h was used as the approaching flow, and a line source of passive tracer was placed 2 h upstream of the urban canopy. The experimental and numerical results show good agreement, while minor discrepancies are readily explained. It is found that for l/h=2 the drag induced by the urban canopy is largest of all considered cases, and is caused by a large-scale secondary flow. In addition, due to the roughness transition the vertical advective pollutant flux is the main ventilation mechanism in the first three streets. Furthermore, by means of linear stochastic estimation the mean flow structure is identified that is responsible for street-canyon ventilation for the sixth street and onwards. Moreover, it is shown that the vertical length scale of this structure increases with increasing aspect ratio of the obstacles in the canopy, while the streamwise length scale does not show a similar trend.

  5. An Application of CFD to Guide Forced Boundary-Layer Transition for Low-Speed Tests of a Hybrid Wing-Body Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckring, James M.; Deere, Karen A.; Childs, Robert E.; Stremel, Paul M.; Long, Kurtis R.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid transition trip-dot sizing and placement test technique was developed in support of recent experimental research on a hybrid wing-body configuration under study for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. The approach combines traditional methods with Computational Fluid Dynamics. The application had three-dimensional boundary layers that were simulated with either fully turbulent or transitional flow models using established Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes methods. Trip strip effectiveness was verified experimentally using infrared thermography during a low-speed wind tunnel test. Although the work was performed on one specific configuration, the process was based on fundamental flow physics and could be applicable to other configurations.

  6. The LENS Facilities and Experimental Studies to Evaluate the Modeling of Boundary Layer Transition, Shock/Boundary Layer Interaction, Real Gas, Radiation and Plasma Phenomena in Contemporary CFD Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Layer Interaction, Real Gas, Radiation and Plasma Phenomena in Contemporary CFD Codes Michael S. Holden, PhD CUBRC , Inc. 4455 Genesee Street Buffalo...NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) CUBRC , Inc. 4455 Genesee Street Buffalo, NY 14225, USA 8. PERFORMING...HyFly Navy EMRG Reentry-F Slide 2 X-43 HIFiRE-2 Figure 17: Transition in Hypervelocity Flows: CUBRC Focus – Fully Duplicated Ground Test

  7. Characterization of the Embryogenic Tissue of the Norway Spruce Including a Transition Layer between the Tissue and the Culture Medium by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kořínek, Radim; Mikulka, J.; Hřib, J.; Hudec, Jiří; Havel, L.; Bartušek, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2017), s. 19-26 ISSN 1335-8871 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22777S; GA ČR GA13-09086S; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Norway spruce * ESEs * mucilage * transition layer * MRI relaxometry Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.344, year: 2016

  8. Infrared Images of Boundary Layer Transition on the D8 Transport Configuration in the LaRC 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Michelle L.; Gatlin, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Grit, trip tape, or trip dots are routinely applied on the leading-edge regions of the fuselage, wings, tails or nacelles of wind tunnel models to trip the flow from laminar to turbulent. The thickness of the model's boundary layer is calculated for nominal conditions in the wind tunnel test to determine the effective size of the trip dots, but the flow over the model may not transition as intended for runs with different flow conditions. Temperature gradients measured with an infrared camera can be used to detect laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition on a wind tunnel model. This non-intrusive technique was used in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel to visualize the behavior of the flow over a D8 transport configuration model. As the flow through the wind tunnel either increased to or decreased from the run conditions, a sufficient temperature difference existed between the air and the model to visualize the transition location (due to different heat transfer rates through the laminar and the turbulent boundary layers) for several runs in this test. Transition phenomena were visible without active temperature control in the atmospheric wind tunnel, whether the air was cooler than the model or vice-versa. However, when the temperature of the model relative to the air was purposely changed, the ability to detect transition in the infrared images was enhanced. Flow characteristics such as a wing root horseshoe vortex or the presence of fore-body vortical flows also were observed in the infrared images. The images of flow features obtained for this study demonstrate the usefulness of current infrared technology in subsonic wind tunnel tests.

  9. Investigation of magnetic transitions through ultrasonic measurements in double-layered CMR manganite La1.2Sr1.8Mn2O7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Y. S.; Vishnuvardhan Reddy, C.

    2014-03-01

    A polycrystalline, double-layered, colossal magnetoresistive manganite La1.2Sr1.8Mn2O7 is synthesized by sol-gel process and its magnetic and ultrasonic properties were investigated in the temperature range 80-300 K. The sample has Curie temperature at 124 K, where the sample exhibits a transition from paramagnetic insulator to ferromagnetic metallic state. The longitudinal sound velocity measurements show a significant hardening of sound velocity below TC, which may be attributed to the coupling between ferromagnetic spins and longitudinal acoustic phonons. The magnetization and ultrasonic studies reveal the presence of secondary transition at ≈ 260 K in this sample. The present sound velocity measurement results confirm the reliability of ultrasonic investigations as an independent tool to probe magnetic transitions in manganites.

  10. Experiments in a boundary layer subjected to free stream turbulence. Part 2: The role of TS waves in the transition process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiko, A.V.; Westin, K.J.A.; Klingmann, B.G.B.; Kozlov, V.V.; Alfredsson, P.H.

    1993-12-01

    The natural occurrence of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves has so far only been observed in boundary layers subjected to moderate levels of free stream turbulence (Tu <1%), due to the difficulty in detecting small-amplitude waves in highly perturbed boundary layers. By introducing controlled oscillations with a vibrating ribbon, it is possible to study small amplitude waves using phase-selective filtering techniques. In the present work, the effect of TS-waves on the transition is studied at Tu = 1.5%. It is demonstrated that TS-waves can exist and develop in a similar way as in an undisturbed boundary layer. It is also found that TS-waves with quite small amplitudes are involved in nonlinear interactions which lead to a regeneration of TS-waves in the whole unstable frequency band. This results in a significant increase in the number of turbulent spots, which promote the onset of turbulence. 28 refs

  11. Study of multi-layer active magnetic regenerators using magnetocaloric materials with first and second order phase transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Tian; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein

    2016-01-01

    Magnetocaloric materials (MCM) with a first order phase transition (FOPT) usually exhibit a large, although sharp, isothermal entropy change near their Curie temperature, compared to materials with a second order phase transition (SOPT). Experimental results of applying FOPT materials in recent...

  12. Electromodulation spectroscopy of direct optical transitions in Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layers under hydrostatic pressure and built-in strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dybała, F.; Żelazna, K.; Maczko, H.; Gladysiewicz, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Kudrawiec, R., E-mail: robert.kudrawiec@pwr.wroc.pl [Faculty of Fundamental Problems of Technology, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wrocław (Poland); Lin, H.; Chen, R.; Shang, C.; Huo, Y.; Kamins, T. I.; Harris, J. S. [Solid State and Photonics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4075 (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Unstrained Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layers of various Sn concentration (1.5%, 3%, 6% Sn) and Ge{sub 0.97}Sn{sub 0.03} layers with built-in compressive (ε = −0.5%) and tensile (ε = 0.3%) strain are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and studied by electromodulation spectroscopy (i.e., contactless electroreflectance and photoreflectance (PR)). In order to obtain unstrained GeSn layers and layers with different built-in in-plane strains, virtual InGaAs substrates of different compositions are grown prior to the deposition of GeSn layers. For unstrained Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layers, the pressure coefficient for the direct band gap transition is determined from PR measurements at various hydrostatic pressures to be 12.2 ± 0.2 meV/kbar, which is very close to the pressure coefficient for the direct band gap transition in Ge (12.9 meV/kbar). This suggests that the hydrostatic deformation potentials typical of Ge can be applied to describe the pressure-induced changes in the electronic band structure of Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} alloys with low Sn concentrations. The same conclusion is derived for the uniaxial deformation potential, which describes the splitting between heavy-hole (HH) and light-hole (LH) bands as well as the strain-related shift of the spin-orbit (SO) split-off band. It is observed that the HH, LH, and SO related transitions shift due to compressive and tensile strain according to the Bir-Pikus theory. The dispersions of HH, LH, and SO bands are calculated for compressive and tensile strained Ge{sub 0.97}Sn{sub 0.03} with the 8-band kp Hamiltonian including strain effects, and the mixing of HH and LH bands is discussed. In addition, the dispersion of the electronic band structure is calculated for unstrained Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layers (3% and 6% Sn) at high hydrostatic pressure with the 8-band kp Hamiltonian, and the pressure-induced changes in the electronic band structure are discussed.

  13. Size-Induced Depression of First-Order Transition Lines and Entropy Jump in Extremely Layered Nanocrystalline Vortex Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolz, M I; Fasano, Y; Cejas Bolecek, N R; Pastoriza, H; Mosser, V; Li, M; Konczykowski, M

    2015-09-25

    We detect the persistence of the solidification and order-disorder first-order transition lines in the phase diagram of nanocrystalline Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8} vortex matter down to a system size of less than one hundred vortices. The temperature location of the vortex solidification transition line is not altered by decreasing the sample size although there is a depletion of the entropy jump at the transition with respect to macroscopic vortex matter. The solid order-disorder phase transition field moves upward on decreasing the system size due to the increase of the surface-to-volume ratio of vortices entailing a decrease on the average vortex binding energy.

  14. Polarization sensitive behaviour of the band-edge transitions in ReS2 and ReSe2 layered semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, C H; Lee, H W; Wu, C C

    2004-01-01

    The polarization sensitive behaviour of the band-edge transitions in ReS 2 and ReSe 2 layered compounds was studied using polarized-transmission and polarized-thermoreflectance (PTR) measurements with polarization angles from θ = 0 deg. (Evector parallel b-axis) to θ = 90 deg. (Evector perpendicular b-axis) at 300 K. The polarization dependence of the polarized energy gaps of ReS 2 and ReSe 2 shows a sinusoidal-like variation with respect to the angular change of the linearly polarized light. The angular dependences of the polarized energy gaps of ReS 2 and ReSe 2 were evaluated. The polarization sensitive behaviour of the band-edge excitons in rhenium disulfide and diselenide was characterized using angular dependent PTR measurements from θ = 0 deg. to 90 deg. The polarized transition intensities of the band-edge excitons (E 1 ex and E 2 ex ) of ReX 2 (X = S, Se) demonstrate a sinusoidal variation with respect to the angular change of the linearly polarized light. The angular dependence of the polarized transition probabilities of E 1 ex and E 2 ex is analysed. The polarization sensitive behaviours of ReX 2 (X = S, Se) layers are discussed

  15. Technologies for deposition of transition metal oxide thin films: application as functional layers in “Smart windows” and photocatalytic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesheva, K.; Ivanova, T.; Bodurov, G.; Szilágyi, I. M.; Justh, N.; Kéri, O.; Boyadjiev, S.; Nagy, D.; Aleksandrova, M.

    2016-02-01

    “Smart windows” are envisaged for future low-energy, high-efficient architectural buildings, as well as for the car industry. By switching from coloured to fully bleached state, these windows regulate the energy of solar flux entering the interior. Functional layers in these devices are the transition metals oxides. The materials (transitional metal oxides) used in smart windows can be also applied as photoelectrodes in water splitting photocells for hydrogen production or as photocatalytic materials for self-cleaning surfaces, waste water treatment and pollution removal. Solar energy utilization is recently in the main scope of numerous world research laboratories and energy organizations, working on protection against conventional fuel exhaustion. The paper presents results from research on transition metal oxide thin films, fabricated by different methods - atomic layer deposition, atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition, physical vapour deposition, and wet chemical methods, suitable for flowthrough production process. The lower price of the chemical deposition processes is especially important when the method is related to large-scale glazing applications. Conclusions are derived about which processes are recently considered as most prospective, related to electrochromic materials and devices manufacturing.

  16. Technologies for deposition of transition metal oxide thin films: application as functional layers in “Smart windows” and photocatalytic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesheva, K; Ivanova, T; Bodurov, G; Szilágyi, I M; Justh, N; Kéri, O; Boyadjiev, S; Nagy, D; Aleksandrova, M

    2016-01-01

    “Smart windows” are envisaged for future low-energy, high-efficient architectural buildings, as well as for the car industry. By switching from coloured to fully bleached state, these windows regulate the energy of solar flux entering the interior. Functional layers in these devices are the transition metals oxides. The materials (transitional metal oxides) used in smart windows can be also applied as photoelectrodes in water splitting photocells for hydrogen production or as photocatalytic materials for self-cleaning surfaces, waste water treatment and pollution removal. Solar energy utilization is recently in the main scope of numerous world research laboratories and energy organizations, working on protection against conventional fuel exhaustion. The paper presents results from research on transition metal oxide thin films, fabricated by different methods - atomic layer deposition, atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition, physical vapour deposition, and wet chemical methods, suitable for flowthrough production process. The lower price of the chemical deposition processes is especially important when the method is related to large-scale glazing applications. Conclusions are derived about which processes are recently considered as most prospective, related to electrochromic materials and devices manufacturing. (paper)

  17. On the structural phase transitions of the perovskite-type layer structures (Csub(n)Hsub(2n+1)NH3)2MeCl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heger, G.

    1978-01-01

    The perovskite-type layer compounds (Csub(n)Hsub(2n+1)NH 3 ) 2 MeCl 4 show a variety of different structural modifications. They differ from oneanother by the order and dynamical behaviour of the CH 3 -CH 2 -...-CH 2 -NH 3 chain molecules and the [MeCl 6 ] octahedra layers. These two structural members are coupled together by N-H...Cl hydrogen bonds. According to group theoretical relations the modifications of (Csub(n)Hsub(2n+1)NH 3 ) 2 MeCl 4 were ordered in the scheme of a 'family tree'. Taking (CH 3 NH 3 ) 2 MnCl 4 as an example, various experimental investigations incorporated neutron diffraction are reported. They lead to a sequence of phase transitions. For these phase transitions a model is developed based on the orientations of the CH 3 NH 3 dump-bell molecules and their interactions with the [MnCl 6 ] layers. (orig./HPOE) [de

  18. Synthesis-microstructure-performance relationship of layered transition metal oxides as cathode for rechargeable sodium batteries prepared by high-temperature calcination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Man; Luo, Rui; Lu, Jun; Chen, Renjie; Wu, Feng; Wang, Xiaoming; Zhan, Chun; Wu, Huiming; Albishri, Hassan M; Al-Bogami, Abdullah S; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Amine, Khalil

    2014-10-08

    Research on sodium batteries has made a comeback because of concern regarding the limited resources and cost of lithium for Li-ion batteries. From the standpoint of electrochemistry and economics, Mn- or Fe-based layered transition metal oxides should be the most suitable cathode candidates for affordable sodium batteries. Herein, this paper reports a novel cathode material, layered Na1+x(Fey/2Niy/2Mn1-y)1-xO2 (x = 0.1-0.5), synthesized through a facile coprecipitation process combined with subsequent calcination. For such cathode material calcined at 800 °C for 20 h, the Na/Na1+x(Fey/2Niy/2Mn1-y)1-xO2 (x = 0.4) electrode exhibited a good capacity of 99.1 mAh g(-1) (cycled at 1.5-4.0 V) and capacity retention over 87% after 50 cycles. Optimization of this material would make layered transition metal oxides a strong candidate for the Na-ion battery cathode.

  19. Thermal Analysis and Flame-Retarded Mechanism of Composites Composed of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate and Layered Double Hydroxides Containing Transition Metals (Mn, Co, Cu, Zn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of transition metals on the hydrophobicity of nano–structured layered double hydroxides (LDHs and the compatibility of LDHs/ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA composites have seldom been reported. NiMgAl–LDHs slightly surface–modified with stearate and doped with transition metal cations (Mn2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ are investigated. Compared to the pure EVA, not only were the maximal degradation–rate temperatures (Tmax of the ethylene–based chains enhanced, but also the smoke production rate (SPR and the production rate of CO (COP were sharply decreased for all the composites. Most importantly, a new flame retardant mechanism was found, namely the peak heat release rate (pk-HRR time, which directly depends on the peak production rate of CO2 (pk-CO2 time for EVA and all composites by cone calorimeter test. Moreover, the Mn–doped LDH S–NiMgAl–Mn shows more uniform dispersion and better interfacial compatibility in the EVA matrix. The cone calorimetric residue of S–NiMgAl–Mn/EVA has the intumescent char layer and the compact metal oxide layer. Therefore, S–NiMgAl–Mn/EVA shows the lowest pk-HRR and the longest pk-HRR time among all the composites.

  20. Transitional analysis of organic thin color filter layers in displays during baking process using multi-speckle diffusing wave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Baek Sung; Hyung, Kyung Hee; Oh, Gwi Jeong; Jung, Hyun Wook

    2018-02-01

    The color filter (CF) is one of the key components for improving the performance of TV displays such as liquid crystal display (LCD) and white organic light emitting diodes (WOLED). The profile defects like undercut during the fine fabrication processes for CF layers are inevitably generated through the UV exposure and development processes, however, these can be controlled through the baking process. In order to resolve the profile defects of CF layers, in this study, the real-time dynamic changes of CF layers are monitored during the baking process by changing components such as polymeric binder and acrylate. The motion of pigment particles in CF layers during baking is quantitatively interpreted using multi-speckle diffusing wave spectroscopy (MSDWS), in terms of the autocorrelation function and the characteristic time of α-relaxation.

  1. The Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) : LST, Linear and Nonlinear PSE for 2-D, Axisymmetric, and Infinite Swept Wing Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2003-01-01

    During the past two decades, our understanding of laminar-turbulent transition flow physics has advanced significantly owing to, in a large part, the NASA program support such as the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), High-speed Civil Transport (HSCT), and Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST). Experimental, theoretical, as well as computational efforts on various issues such as receptivity and linear and nonlinear evolution of instability waves take part in broadening our knowledge base for this intricate flow phenomenon. Despite all these advances, transition prediction remains a nontrivial task for engineers due to the lack of a widely available, robust, and efficient prediction tool. The design and development of the LASTRAC code is aimed at providing one such engineering tool that is easy to use and yet capable of dealing with a broad range of transition related issues. LASTRAC was written from scratch based on the state-of-the-art numerical methods for stability analysis and modem software technologies. At low fidelity, it allows users to perform linear stability analysis and N-factor transition correlation for a broad range of flow regimes and configurations by using either the linear stability theory (LST) or linear parabolized stability equations (LPSE) method. At high fidelity, users may use nonlinear PSE to track finite-amplitude disturbances until the skin friction rise. Coupled with the built-in receptivity model that is currently under development, the nonlinear PSE method offers a synergistic approach to predict transition onset for a given disturbance environment based on first principles. This paper describes the governing equations, numerical methods, code development, and case studies for the current release of LASTRAC. Practical applications of LASTRAC are demonstrated for linear stability calculations, N-factor transition correlation, non-linear breakdown simulations, and controls of stationary crossflow instability in supersonic swept wing boundary

  2. Adsorbed layers on (111)InAs faces in contact with In-As-Cl-H gas phase, and the possibility of phase transitions in the adsorbed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, A. A.; Ruzaikin, M. P.

    1981-04-01

    Adsorption of various species existing in the In-As-Cl-H CVD gaseous system on both InAs (111) faces is considered. Arsenic is supposed to be adsorbed in the form of triangles As 3 and tetrahedrons As 4, each of them occupying 3 atomic sites above In or As atoms on (111)In or (111)As, respectively. The system of polyatomic adsorption equations was used to find the coverages of the faces by various species. Admolecule-surface bond strengths are taken to be equal to the ones for the single bonds in molecules. Pauling electronegativities were used to find the effective charges of the atoms in the adsorption layer. Thus, the dipole moments of adsorbed molecules which arise are directed along the In-As bonds in the InAs lattice. With this geometry, the calculated electrostatic dipole-dipole attraction between InCl molecules forming a dense layer on (111)As exceeds 12 kcal/mol. Thus, condensation of the two-dimensional gas of adsorbed InCl molecules should be expected. Corresponding S-shape isotherms θ( P) are calculated for different As 3 vapor pressures, θ and P being the surface coverage and bulk vapor pressure of InCl. Intervals of {InCl 3}/{H 2} ratios at different temperatures where the two-dimensional condensation may occur, are presented for realistic CVD conditions. Two-dimensional condensation may result in sharp changes in kinetic coefficient and thus in autho-oscillations in growth rate and doping level creating periodic superstructures. Nucleation and CVD growth processes are discussed.

  3. Contribution to the study of low-energy X-ray-induced degradations on the oxide-silicon interfacial transition layer of MOS structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukabache, Ali

    1983-01-01

    The Si-SiO_2 interface is considered as a transition layer. Its thickness is typically about 10 A. It contains traps which exchange charges with silicon by a tunneling mechanism. Its influence on MOS capacitor, gate-controlled diode and MOS transistor is analyzed. Long channel MOST's (P-Substrate) are irradiated with low energy X-ray (between 0 and 240 Krads) in order to validate the model. Capacitance, recombination velocity and 1/f noise measurements indicate that the X- ray induce traps distributed in space and in energy. These traps provoke a decrease in mobility. Additionally, X-rays create a fixed oxide charge which induce a shift in the characteristics of MOS structures. Finally, under irradiation the behaviour of the gate-controlled diode and the MOS capacitor are in accordance with theoretical model of the interfacial layer. The overall noise behaviour cannot be explained by existing theoretical models. (author) [fr

  4. Anisotropic thermal properties and ferroelectric phase transitions in layered CuInP2S6 and CuInP2Se6 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liubachko, V.; Shvalya, V.; Oleaga, A.; Salazar, A.; Kohutych, A.; Pogodin, A.; Vysochanskii, Yu. M.

    2017-12-01

    Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity have been studied for the layered crystals CuInP2S6, CuInP2Se6 from 30 K to 350 K, showing a relevant thermal anisotropy. Heat is much more efficiently transferred within the layers than perpendicular to them. The ferrielectric transition in CuInP2S6 is proven to be clearly first order while the ferroelectric one in CuInP2Se6 has a weak first order character. The behavior of the thermal conductivity as a function of temperature in the ferroelectric phases shows that heat conduction is phonon driven. Disorder in the paraelectric phases due to hopping motions of Cu ions significantly reduces the thermal conductivity to extremely low values.

  5. Investigations of Magnetic Structural Phase Transition of Layered Systems by Moessbauer Effect and by Dielectric Constant Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulhem, J.; Mostafa, M.; Shaban, H.

    2002-01-01

    Moessbauer Effect (ME) of compounds like (C n H 2 N +1 NH 3 ) 2 -Fe(Π)CL 4 and (CH 2 ) 6 (NH 3 ) 2 Fe(Π)CL 4 have been measured. The results indicate a conted spin antiferromagnet, with transition temperatures and magnetic field strengths according to value of n. Dielectric constant measurements of the above compounds as afunction of temperatures at different selected frequencies also have been carried out. The results confirm existence of structural phase transition shown by Me. (Author's) 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  6. Structural Characterization of the Foliated-Layered Gabbro Transition in Wadi Tayin of the Samail Ophiolite, Oman; Oman Drilling Project Holes GT1A and GT2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, J. R.; Crispini, L.; Cheadle, M. J.; Harris, M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Matter, J. M.; Takazawa, E.; Coggon, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Oman Drilling Project Holes GT1A and GT2A were drilled into the Wadi Tayin massif, Samail ophiolite and both recovered ca. 400 m of continuous core through a section of the layered gabbros and the foliated-layered gabbro transition. Hole GT1A is cut by a discrete fault system including localized thin ultracataclastic fault zones. Hole GT2A is cut by a wider zone of brittle deformation and incipient brecciation. Here we report the structural history of the gabbros reflecting formation at the ridge to later obduction. Magmatic and high temperature history- 1) Both cores exhibit a pervasive, commonly well-defined magmatic foliation delineated by plagioclase, olivine and in places clinopyroxene. Minor magmatic deformation is present. 2) The dip of the magmatic foliation varies cyclically, gradually changing dip by 30o from gentle to moderate over a 50 m wavelength. 3) Layering is present throughout both cores, is defined by changes in mode and grain size ranging in thickness from 2 cm to 3 m and is commonly sub-parallel to the foliation. 4) There are no high temperature crystal-plastic shear zones in the core. Key observations include: no simple, systematic shallowing of dip with depth across the foliated-layered gabbro transition and layering is continuous across this transition. Cyclic variation of magmatic foliation dip most likely reflects the process of plate separation at the ridge axis. Near-axis faulting- i) On or near-axis structures consist of epidote-amphibole bearing hydraulic breccias and some zones of intense cataclasis with intensely deformed epidote and seams of clay and chlorite accompanied by syntectonic alteration of the wall rock. Early veins are filled with amphibole, chlorite, epidote, and anhydrite. ii) The deformation ranges from brittle-ductile, causing local deflection of the magmatic foliation, to brittle offset of the foliation and core and mantle structures in anhydrite veins. iii) The prevalent sense of shear is normal and slickenfibers

  7. Titanium Surface Priming with Phase-Transited Lysozyme to Establish a Silver Nanoparticle-Loaded Chitosan/Hyaluronic Acid Antibacterial Multilayer via Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xue; Song, Yunjia; Yang, Peng; Wang, Yao; Jiang, Shaoyun; Zhang, Xu; Li, Changyi

    2016-01-01

    The formation of biofilm around implants, which is induced by immediate bacterial colonization after installation, is the primary cause of post-operation infection. Initial surface modification is usually required to incorporate antibacterial agents on titanium (Ti) surfaces to inhibit biofilm formation. However, simple and effective priming methods are still lacking for the development of an initial functional layer as a base for subsequent coatings on titanium surfaces. The purpose of our work was to establish a novel initial layer on Ti surfaces using phase-transited lysozyme (PTL), on which multilayer coatings can incorporate silver nanoparticles (AgNP) using chitosan (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA) via a layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technique. In this study, the surfaces of Ti substrates were primed by dipping into a mixture of lysozyme and tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) to obtain PTL-functionalized Ti substrates. The subsequent alternating coatings of HA and chitosan loaded with AgNP onto the precursor layer of PTL were carried out via LbL self-assembly to construct multilayer coatings on Ti substrates. The results of SEM and XPS indicated that the necklace-like PTL and self-assembled multilayer were successfully immobilized on the Ti substrates. The multilayer coatings loaded with AgNP can kill planktonic and adherent bacteria to 100% during the first 4 days. The antibacterial efficacy of the samples against planktonic and adherent bacteria achieved 65%-90% after 14 days. The sustained release of Ag over 14 days can prevent bacterial invasion until mucosa healing. Although the AgNP-containing structure showed some cytotoxicity, the toxicity can be reduced by controlling the Ag release rate and concentration. The PTL priming method provides a promising strategy for fabricating long-term antibacterial multilayer coatings on titanium surfaces via the LbL self-assembly technique, which is effective in preventing implant-associated infections in the

  8. Titanium Surface Priming with Phase-Transited Lysozyme to Establish a Silver Nanoparticle-Loaded Chitosan/Hyaluronic Acid Antibacterial Multilayer via Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Zhong

    Full Text Available The formation of biofilm around implants, which is induced by immediate bacterial colonization after installation, is the primary cause of post-operation infection. Initial surface modification is usually required to incorporate antibacterial agents on titanium (Ti surfaces to inhibit biofilm formation. However, simple and effective priming methods are still lacking for the development of an initial functional layer as a base for subsequent coatings on titanium surfaces. The purpose of our work was to establish a novel initial layer on Ti surfaces using phase-transited lysozyme (PTL, on which multilayer coatings can incorporate silver nanoparticles (AgNP using chitosan (CS and hyaluronic acid (HA via a layer-by-layer (LbL self-assembly technique.In this study, the surfaces of Ti substrates were primed by dipping into a mixture of lysozyme and tris(2-carboxyethylphosphine (TCEP to obtain PTL-functionalized Ti substrates. The subsequent alternating coatings of HA and chitosan loaded with AgNP onto the precursor layer of PTL were carried out via LbL self-assembly to construct multilayer coatings on Ti substrates.The results of SEM and XPS indicated that the necklace-like PTL and self-assembled multilayer were successfully immobilized on the Ti substrates. The multilayer coatings loaded with AgNP can kill planktonic and adherent bacteria to 100% during the first 4 days. The antibacterial efficacy of the samples against planktonic and adherent bacteria achieved 65%-90% after 14 days. The sustained release of Ag over 14 days can prevent bacterial invasion until mucosa healing. Although the AgNP-containing structure showed some cytotoxicity, the toxicity can be reduced by controlling the Ag release rate and concentration.The PTL priming method provides a promising strategy for fabricating long-term antibacterial multilayer coatings on titanium surfaces via the LbL self-assembly technique, which is effective in preventing implant-associated infections

  9. Effects of Blade Boundary Layer Transition and Daytime Atmospheric Turbulence on Wind Turbine Performance Analyzed with Blade-Resolved Simulation and Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Tarak Nath

    Relevant to utility scale wind turbine functioning and reliability, the present work focuses on enhancing our understanding of wind turbine responses from interactions between energy-dominant daytime atmospheric turbulence eddies and rotating blades of a GE 1.5 MW wind turbine using a unique data set from a GE field experiment and computer simulations at two levels of fidelity. Previous studies have shown that the stability state of the lower troposphere has a major impact on the coherent structure of the turbulence eddies, with corresponding differences in wind turbine loading response. In this study, time-resolved aerodynamic data measured locally at the leading edge and trailing edge of three outer blade sections on a GE 1.5 MW wind turbine blade and high-frequency SCADA generator power data from a daytime field campaign are combined with computer simulations that mimic the GE wind turbine within a numerically generated atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow field which is a close approximation of the atmospheric turbulence experienced by the wind turbine in the field campaign. By combining the experimental and numerical data sets, this study describes the time-response characteristics of the local loadings on the blade sections in response to nonsteady nonuniform energetic atmospheric turbulence eddies within a daytime ABL which have spatial scale commensurate with that of the turbine blade length. This study is the first of its kind where actuator line and blade boundary layer resolved CFD studies of a wind turbine field campaign are performed with the motivation to validate the numerical predictions with the experimental data set, and emphasis is given on understanding the influence of the laminar to turbulent transition process on the blade loadings. The experimental and actuator line method data sets identify three important response time scales quantified at the blade location: advective passage of energy-dominant eddies (≈25 - 50 s), blade rotation (1P

  10. Hydration layer dynamics and association mechanisms of food and antifreeze proteins : A Molecular Dynamics and Transition Path Sampling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brotzakis, Z.F.

    2017-01-01

    By the time the reader reads this line, billions of protein association events just occurred in our body, such as the ones regulating cell communication, signaling pathways, or in initiating a self-assembly processes, such as tissue fabrication, etc. The timescale of such transitions is slow,

  11. Stimulus-dependent state transition between synchronized oscillation and randomly repetitive burst in a model cerebellar granular layer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeru Honda

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Information processing of the cerebellar granular layer composed of granule and Golgi cells is regarded as an important first step toward the cerebellar computation. Our previous theoretical studies have shown that granule cells can exhibit random alternation between burst and silent modes, which provides a basis of population representation of the passage-of-time (POT from the onset of external input stimuli. On the other hand, another computational study has reported that granule cells can exhibit synchronized oscillation of activity, as consistent with observed oscillation in local field potential recorded from the granular layer while animals keep still. Here we have a question of whether an identical network model can explain these distinct dynamics. In the present study, we carried out computer simulations based on a spiking network model of the granular layer varying two parameters: the strength of a current injected to granule cells and the concentration of Mg²⁺ which controls the conductance of NMDA channels assumed on the Golgi cell dendrites. The simulations showed that cells in the granular layer can switch activity states between synchronized oscillation and random burst-silent alternation depending on the two parameters. For higher Mg²⁺ concentration and a weaker injected current, granule and Golgi cells elicited spikes synchronously (synchronized oscillation state. In contrast, for lower Mg²⁺ concentration and a stronger injected current, those cells showed the random burst-silent alternation (POT-representing state. It is suggested that NMDA channels on the Golgi cell dendrites play an important role for determining how the granular layer works in response to external input.

  12. Morphology transition of raft-model membrane induced by osmotic pressure: Formation of double-layered vesicle similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onai, Teruaki; Hirai, Mitsuhiro

    2010-01-01

    The effect of osmotic pressure on the structure of large uni-lamellar vesicle (LUV) of the lipid mixtures of monosialoganglioside (G M1 )-cholesterol-dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) was studies by using wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) method. The molar ratios of the mixtures were 0.1/0.1/1, 0/0.1/1, and 0/0/1. The ternary lipid mixture is a model of lipid rafts. The value of osmotic pressure was varied from 0 to 4.16x10 5 N/m 2 by adding the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in the range from 0 to 25 % w/v. In the case of the mixtures without G M1 , the rise of the osmotic pressure just enhances the multi-lamellar stacking with deceasing the inter-lamellar spacing. On the other hand, the mixture containing G M1 shows the structural transition from a uni-lamellar vesicle to a double-layered vesicle (a liposome including a smaller one inside) by the rise of osmotic pressure. In this morphology transition the total surface area of the double-layered vesicle is mostly as same as that of the LUV at the initial state. The polar head region of G M1 is bulky and highly hydrophilic due to the oligosaccharide chain containing a sialic acid residue. Then, the present results suggest that the existence of G M1 in the outer-leaflet of the LUV is essentially important for such a double-layered vesicle formation. Alternatively, a phenomenon similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis in cells can be caused simply by a variation of osmotic pressure.

  13. First photoresponsive liquid crystalline materials with small layer shrinkage at the phase transition to the ferroelectric phase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotná, Vladimíra; Hamplová, Věra; Bubnov, Alexej; Kašpar, Miroslav; Glogarová, Milada; Kapernaum, N.; Bezner, S.; Giesselmann, F.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 23 (2009), s. 3992-3997 ISSN 0959-9428 R&D Projects: GA MŠk MEB050818; GA AV ČR IAA100100710; GA MŠk OC 175; GA AV ČR(CZ) GA202/09/0047 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : photosensitive * liquid crystals * De Vries behaviour * layer shrinkage Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.795, year: 2009

  14. PROBING THE STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF THE TRANSITION LAYER BETWEEN THE MAGELLANIC STREAM AND THE HALO IN H I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigra, Lou; Stanimirović, Snežana; Gallagher, John S. III; Wood, Kenneth; Nidever, David; Majewski, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The Magellanic Stream (MS) is a nearby laboratory for studying the fate of cool gas streams injected into a gaseous galactic halo. We investigate properties of the boundary layer between the cool MS gas and the hot Milky Way halo with 21 cm H I observations of a relatively isolated cloud having circular projection in the northern MS. Through averaging and modeling techniques, our observations, obtained with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, reach unprecedented 3σ sensitivity of ∼1 × 10 17 cm –2 , while retaining the telescope's 9.'1 resolution in the essential radial dimension. We find an envelope of diffuse neutral gas with FWHM of 60 km s –1 , associated in velocity with the cloud core having FWHM of 20 km s –1 , extending to 3.5 times the core radius with a neutral mass seven times that of the core. We show that the envelope is too extended to represent a conduction-dominated layer between the core and the halo. Its observed properties are better explained by a turbulent mixing layer driven by hydrodynamic instabilities. The fortuitous alignment of the NGC 7469 background source near the cloud center allows us to combine UV absorption and H I emission data to determine a core temperature of 8350 ± 350 K. We show that the H I column density and size of the core can be reproduced when a slightly larger cloud is exposed to Galactic and extragalactic background ionizing radiation. Cooling in the large diffuse turbulent mixing layer envelope extends the cloud lifetime by at least a factor of two relative to a simple hydrodynamic ablation case, suggesting that the cloud is likely to reach the Milky Way disk.

  15. Ni And Co Segregations On Selective Surface Facets And Rational Design Of Layered Lithium Transition-metal Oxide Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Pengfei; Zheng, Jianming; Zheng, Jiaxin; Wang, Zhiguo; Teng, Gaofeng; Kuppan, Saravanan; Xiao, Jie; Chen, Guoying; Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Chong M.; Pan, Feng

    2016-05-05

    The chemical processes occurring on the surface of cathode materials during battery cycling play a crucial role in determining battery’s performance. However, our understanding on such surface chemistry is far from clear due to the complexity of redox chemistry during battery charge/discharge. In this work, through intensive aberration corrected STEM investigation on eight layered oxide cathode materials, we report two important findings on the pristine oxides. First, Ni and Co show strong plane selectivity when building up their respective surface segregation layers (SSL). Specifically, Ni-SSL is exclusively developed on (200)m facet in Li-Mn-rich oxides (monoclinic C2/m symmetry) and (012)h facet in Mn-Ni equally rich oxides (hexagonal R-3m symmetry), while Co-SSL has a strong preference to (20-2)m plane with minimal Co-SSL also developed on some other planes in LMR cathodes. Structurally, Ni-SSLs tend to form spinel-like lattice while Co-SSLs are in a rock-salt-like structure. Secondly, by increasing Ni concentration in these layered oxides, Ni and Co SSLs can be suppressed and even eliminated. Our findings indicate that Ni and Co SSLs are tunable through controlling particle morphology and oxide composition, which opens up a new way for future rational design and synthesis of cathode materials.

  16. Modification of Ni-Rich FCG NMC and NCA Cathodes by Atomic Layer Deposition: Preventing Surface Phase Transitions for High-Voltage Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Debasish; Dahlberg, Kevin; King, David M.; David, Lamuel A.; Sefat, Athena S.; Wood, David L.; Daniel, Claus; Dhar, Subhash; Mahajan, Vishal; Lee, Myongjai; Albano, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    The energy density of current lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) based on layered LiMO2 cathodes (M = Ni, Mn, Co: NMC; M = Ni, Co, Al: NCA) needs to be improved significantly in order to compete with internal combustion engines and allow for widespread implementation of electric vehicles (EVs). In this report, we show that atomic layer deposition (ALD) of titania (TiO2) and alumina (Al2O3) on Ni-rich FCG NMC and NCA active material particles could substantially improve LIB performance and allow for increased upper cutoff voltage (UCV) during charging, which delivers significantly increased specific energy utilization. Our results show that Al2O3 coating improved the NMC cycling performance by 40% and the NCA cycling performance by 34% at 1 C/-1 C with respectively 4.35 V and 4.4 V UCV in 2 Ah pouch cells. High resolution TEM/SAED structural characterization revealed that Al2O3 coatings prevented surface-initiated layered-to-spinel phase transitions in coated materials which were prevalent in uncoated materials. EIS confirmed that Al2O3-coated materials had significantly lower increase in the charge transfer component of impedance during cycling. The ability to mitigate degradation mechanisms for Ni-rich NMC and NCA illustrated in this report provides insight into a method to enable the performance of high-voltage LIBs.

  17. Immiscibility of Fluid Phases at Magmatic-hydrothermal Transition: Formation of Various PGE-sulfide Mineralization for Layered Basic Intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitova, L.; Borisenko, A.; Morgunov, K.; Zhukova, I.

    2007-12-01

    Fluid inclusions in quartz of the Merensky Reef (Bushveld Complex, South Africa) and the Chineisky Pluton (Transbaikal Region, Russia) were studied using cryometry, microthermometry, Raman-spectroscopy, LA ICP- MS, scanning electronic microscopy, gas-chromatography and isotopic methods. This allowed us to document some examples of fluid phase separation resulting in formation of different types of PGE-sulfide mineralization for layered basic intrusions. The results obtained show at least three generations of fluid separated from boiling residual alumosilicate intercumulus liquid of the Merensky Reef. The earliest fluid phase composed of homogenous high-dense methane and nitrogen gas mixture was identified in primary gas and co-existing anomalous fluid inclusions from symplectitic quartz. The next generation, heterophase fluid, composed of brines containing a free low-dense (mostly of carbon dioxide) gas phase, was observed in primary multiphase and coexisting gas-rich inclusions of miarolitic quartz crystals. The latest generation was also a heterophase fluid (low salinity water-salt solution and free low-dense methane gas phase) found in primary water-salt and syngenetic gas inclusions from peripheral zones of miarolitic quartz crystals. For the Chineisky Pluton reduced endocontact magmatogene fluids changed to oxidized low salinity hydrothermal fluids in exocontact zone. This resulted in formation of sulfide-PGE enrichment marginal zones of intrusion. The results obtained give us a possibility to suggest that: 1) Fluid phase separation is a typical feature of magmatogene fluids for layered basic intrusions. 2) Reduced fluids can extract and transport substantial PGE and sulfide concentrations. 3) Oxidation of reduced fluids is one of the most important geochemical barriers causing abundant PGE minerals and sulfides precipitation. This in turn results in both formation of PGE reefs or enriched contact zones of layered basic intrusions. This work was supported by

  18. Field induced phase transition in layered honeycomb spin system α-RuCl3 studied by thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Ian; Bornstein, Alex; Choi, Kwang-Yong; Lee, Minhyea

    α -RuCl3, a quasi -two-dimensional honeycomb lattice is known to be a candidate material to realize the Heisenberg-Kitaev spin model of a highly anisotropic bond-dependent exchange interaction. We investigate in-plane thermal conductivity (κ) as a function of temperature (T) and in-plane applied field (H). At H = 0 , the onset of a strong increase in κ marks the spontaneous long range ordering temperature, Tc = 6 . 5 K , corresponding to ``zigzag'' antiferromagnetic ordering. A broad peak appearing below Tc in κ was found to be suppressed significantly as H increases up to ~ 7 T , implying the system undergoes a field-induced transition from ordered to a new spin-disordered state analogous to the transverse-field Ising model. Further increasing H above 7 . 1 T , the large field seems to begin polarizing spins thus increasing the phonon mean free path, resulting in a significant rise in κ. This tendency is clearly shown in the field dependence of κ below Tc, which has a pronounced minimum at Hmin = 7 . 1 T . We will discuss our scaling analysis to characterize this field-induced phase transition and compare to the transverse-field Ising spin system. Work at the University of Colorado was supported by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences under Award No. DE-SC0006888.

  19. Numerical simulations of contrail-to-cirrus transition – Part 2: Impact of initial ice crystal number, radiation, stratification, secondary nucleation and layer depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Unterstrasser

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of contrail-to-cirrus transition were performed with an LES model. In Part 1 the impact of relative humidity, temperature and vertical wind shear was explored in a detailed parametric study. Here, we study atmospheric parameters like stratification and depth of the supersaturated layer and processes which may affect the contrail evolution. We consider contrails in various radiation scenarios herein defined by the season, time of day and the presence of lower-level cloudiness which controls the radiance incident on the contrail layer. Under suitable conditions, controlled by the radiation scenario and stratification, radiative heating lifts the contrail-cirrus and prolongs its lifetime. The potential of contrail-driven secondary nucleation is investigated. We consider homogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous nucleation of preactivated soot cores released from sublimated contrail ice crystals. In our model the contrail dynamics triggered by radiative heating does not suffice to force homogeneous freezing of ambient liquid aerosol particles. Furthermore, our model results suggest that heterogeneous nucleation of preactivated soot cores is unimportant. Contrail evolution is not controlled by the depth of the supersaturated layer as long as it exceeds roughly 500 m. Deep fallstreaks however need thicker layers. A variation of the initial ice crystal number is effective during the whole evolution of a contrail. A cut of the soot particle emission by two orders of magnitude can reduce the contrail timescale by one hour and the optical thickness by a factor of 5. Hence future engines with lower soot particle emissions could potentially lead to a reduction of the climate impact of aviation.

  20. Turbulence kinetic energy budget during the afternoon transition - Part 1: Observed surface TKE budget and boundary layer description for 10 intensive observation period days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Erik; Lohou, Fabienne; Lothon, Marie; Pardyjak, Eric; Mahrt, Larry; Darbieu, Clara

    2016-07-01

    The decay of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and its budget in the afternoon period from midday until zero-buoyancy flux at the surface is studied in a two-part paper by means of measurements from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign for 10 intensive observation period days. Here, in Part 1, near-surface measurements from a small tower are used to estimate a TKE budget. The overall boundary layer characteristics and mesoscale situation at the site are also described based upon taller tower measurements, radiosoundings and remote sensing instrumentation. Analysis of the TKE budget during the afternoon transition reveals a variety of different surface layer dynamics in terms of TKE and TKE decay. This is largely attributed to variations in the 8 m wind speed, which is responsible for different amounts of near-surface shear production on different afternoons and variations within some of the afternoon periods. The partitioning of near-surface production into local dissipation and transport in neutral and unstably stratified conditions was investigated. Although variations exist both between and within afternoons, as a rule of thumb, our results suggest that about 50 % of the near-surface production of TKE is compensated for by local dissipation near the surface, leaving about 50 % available for transport. This result indicates that it is important to also consider TKE transport as a factor influencing the near-surface TKE decay rate, which in many earlier studies has mainly been linked with the production terms of TKE by buoyancy and wind shear. We also conclude that the TKE tendency is smaller than the other budget terms, indicating a quasi-stationary evolution of TKE in the afternoon transition. Even though the TKE tendency was observed to be small, a strong correlation to mean buoyancy production of -0.69 was found for the afternoon period. For comparison with previous results, the TKE budget terms are normalized with

  1. Turbulence kinetic energy budget during the afternoon transition – Part 1: Observed surface TKE budget and boundary layer description for 10 intensive observation period days

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nilsson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The decay of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE and its budget in the afternoon period from midday until zero-buoyancy flux at the surface is studied in a two-part paper by means of measurements from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST field campaign for 10 intensive observation period days. Here, in Part 1, near-surface measurements from a small tower are used to estimate a TKE budget. The overall boundary layer characteristics and mesoscale situation at the site are also described based upon taller tower measurements, radiosoundings and remote sensing instrumentation. Analysis of the TKE budget during the afternoon transition reveals a variety of different surface layer dynamics in terms of TKE and TKE decay. This is largely attributed to variations in the 8 m wind speed, which is responsible for different amounts of near-surface shear production on different afternoons and variations within some of the afternoon periods. The partitioning of near-surface production into local dissipation and transport in neutral and unstably stratified conditions was investigated. Although variations exist both between and within afternoons, as a rule of thumb, our results suggest that about 50 % of the near-surface production of TKE is compensated for by local dissipation near the surface, leaving about 50 % available for transport. This result indicates that it is important to also consider TKE transport as a factor influencing the near-surface TKE decay rate, which in many earlier studies has mainly been linked with the production terms of TKE by buoyancy and wind shear. We also conclude that the TKE tendency is smaller than the other budget terms, indicating a quasi-stationary evolution of TKE in the afternoon transition. Even though the TKE tendency was observed to be small, a strong correlation to mean buoyancy production of −0.69 was found for the afternoon period. For comparison with previous results, the TKE

  2. Coupled Electronic and Magnetic Phase Transition in the Infinite-Layer Phase LaSrNiRuO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Midori Amano; Zeng, Dihao; Bower, Ryan; McGrady, John E; Hayward, Michael A

    2016-09-06

    Topochemical reduction of the ordered double perovskite LaSrNiRuO6 with CaH2 yields LaSrNiRuO4, an extended oxide phase containing infinite sheets of apex-linked, square-planar Ni(1+)O4 and Ru(2+)O4 units ordered in a checkerboard arrangement. At room temperature the localized Ni(1+) (d(9), S = (1)/2) and Ru(2+) (d(6), S = 1) centers behave paramagnetically. However, on cooling below 250 K the system undergoes a cooperative phase transition in which the nickel spins align ferromagnetically, while the ruthenium cations appear to undergo a change in spin configuration to a diamagnetic spin state. Features of the low-temperature crystal structure suggest a symmetry lowering Jahn-Teller distortion could be responsible for the observed diamagnetism of the ruthenium centers.

  3. DNS of heat transfer in transitional, accelerated boundary layer flow over a flat plate affected by free-stream fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissink, Jan G.; Rodi, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of flow over and heat transfer from a flat plate affected by free-stream fluctuations were performed. A contoured upper wall was employed to generate a favourable streamwise pressure gradient along a large portion of the flat plate. The free-stream fluctuations originated from a separate LES of isotropic turbulence in a box. In the laminar portions of the accelerating boundary layer flow the formation of streaks was observed to induce an increase in heat transfer by the exchange of hot fluid near the surface of the plate and cold fluid from the free-stream. In the regions where the streamwise pressure gradient was only mildly favourable, intermittent turbulent spots were detected which relaminarised downstream as the streamwise pressure gradient became stronger. The relaminarisation of the turbulent spots was reflected by a slight decrease in the friction coefficient, which converged to its laminar value in the region where the streamwise pressure gradient was strongest.

  4. Temperature dependent current-voltage characteristics of Au/n-Si Schottky barrier diodes and the effect of transition metal oxides as an interface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Somnath; Puigdollers, Joaquim

    2018-02-01

    Temperature dependent current-voltage (I‒V) characteristics of Au/n-type silicon (n-Si) Schottky barrier diodes have been investigated. Three transition metal oxides (TMO) are used as an interface layer between gold and silicon. The basic Schottky diode parameters such as ideality factor (n), barrier height (ϕb 0) and series resistance (Rs) are calculated and successfully explained by the thermionic emission (TE) theory. It has been found that ideality factor decreased and barrier height increased with increased of temperature. The conventional Richardson plot of ln(I0/T2) vs. 1000/T is determined the activation energy (Ea) and Richardson constant (A*). Whereas value of 'A*' is much smaller than the known theoretical value of n-type Si. The temperature dependent I-V characteristics obtained the mean value of barrier height (ϕb 0 bar) and standard deviation (σs) from the linear plot of ϕap vs. 1000/T. From the modified Richardson plot of ln(I0/T2) ˗ (qσ)2/2(kT)2 vs. 1000/T gives Richardson constant and homogeneous barrier height of Schottky diodes. Main observation in this present work is the barrier height and ideality factor shows a considerable change but the series resistance value exhibits negligible change due to TMO as an interface layer.

  5. Numerical and Experimental Modelling of Transition in a Separated Boundary Layer on the NACA63A421 Airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav ĎURIŠ

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with design and numerical calculation of a variable test section for small supersonic wind tunnel. The supersonic wind tunnel is designed to be driven by a supersonic ejector. The test section, which is in focus, is considered to by placed on its suction inlet. Schlieren method will be used to investigate the flow within. The purpose of the test section is to demonstrate effects, which occur in supersonic flows, e.g. shock waves, interactions of shock waves with boundary layers etc. Proper demonstration of such phenomenon requires different conditions gained within test section. Internal parts of the device are designed to be interchangeable or variable to provide this capability. The work deals with investigation and design of construction of the variable test section. Consequently, shape of the supersonic inlet nozzles for chosen Mach numbers are carried out. Methods of characteristics and CFD are employed to manage this task. The construction of the test section and obtained numerical results are presented.

  6. Growth of transition metal oxides in 2D layers : probing and tuning the properties of matter at the atomic-scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obermüller, T.

    2015-01-01

    In surface science, accurate controlling and detailed characterization of metal supported ultrathin film growth of transition metal oxides (TMO) is a central requirement for collecting reliable empirical data which in turn can be used to improve and extend the existing theoretical models and approaches, such as density functional theory (DFT). In this work, the controlled growth of TMOs on the Ag(100) surface is investigated by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in conjunction with various other surface science techniques. In addition, a novel promising experimental approach to effectively affect and control the growth of TMOs by high electric fields is presented. The investigations concerned the TMO systems MnxOy and WOx on the Ag(100) surface. The strikingly anisotropic growth of the (2x1)-MnO/Ag(100) system is characterized by long and narrow stripes which form a complex 2D surface network of MnO islands. The growth mechanism of this system has been rationalized by first-principle DFT calculations. The (WO3)3 clusters deposited at room temperature form ramified fractal islands. Above a threshold temperature of 700 K, a fully intact 2D WOx wetting layer emerges at the surface. On top of this layer, beginning 3D growth in form of sharp needles is observed. Since the area of the wetting layer exceeds the nanometer-scale (up to 1 µm), also low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) has been employed to study the growth kinetics of the WOx/Ag(100) system. Strong electric field experiments (1-2 V/nm) have been performed on both systems by employing a custom-designed UHV apparatus. Significant field-induces surface modifications have been observed in all experiments, and have been characterized by STM and Auger electron spectroscopy. (author) [de

  7. The silence of the layers: Archaeological site visibility in the Pleistocene-Holocene transition at the Ebro Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alday, Alfonso; Domingo, Rafael; Sebastián, María; Soto, Adriana; Aranbarri, Josu; González-Sampériz, Penélope; Sampietro-Vattuone, María Marta; Utrilla, Pilar; Montes, Lourdes; Peña-Monné, José Luis

    2018-03-01

    The Ebro Basin constitutes one of the most representative territories in SW Europe for the study of prehistoric societies during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. The correlation of palaeoenvironmental and geomorphological proxies obtained from sedimentary records with chronologically well-constrained reference archaeological sites has allowed defining this time frame precisely, such that three main pilot areas haven been broadly depicted: the Alavese region, the Pre-Pyrenees and the Bajo Aragón. Overall, the human imprint in the Ebro Basin was rare during the Upper Palaeolithic, but more visible from the Upper Magdalenian (14500-13500 cal BP) to Neolithic times (up to 5500 cal BP). Local environmental resources were continuously managed by the prehistoric communities in the different areas of study. In fact, the Ebro Basin acted during those millennia as a whole, developing the same cultural trends, industrial techniques and settlement patterns in parallel throughout the territory. However, some gaps exist in the 14C frequency curve (SCDPD curve). This is partially related to prehistoric sites in particular lithologies and geological structures that could have partly been lost by erosional processes, especially during the Early Holocene. In addition, this gap also parallels the reconstructed climate trend for the Pre-Pyrenean and the Bajo Aragón areas, which are defined by high frequencies of xerophilous flora until ca. 9500 cal BP, suggesting that continental climate features could have hampered the presence of well-established human communities in inland regions. The interdisciplinary research (archaeology, geomorphology and palaeoclimatology) discussed in this paper offers clues to understand the existence of fills and gaps in the archaeological record of the Ebro Basin, and can be applied in other territories with similar geographic and climate patterns.

  8. Boundary Layer Transition and Trip Effectiveness on an Apollo Capsule in the JAXA High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel (HIEST) Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Lindsay C.; Lillard, Randolph P.; Olejniczak, Joseph; Tanno, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Computational assessments were performed to size boundary layer trips for a scaled Apollo capsule model in the High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel (HIEST) facility at the JAXA Kakuda Space Center in Japan. For stagnation conditions between 2 MJ/kg and 20 MJ/kg and between 10 MPa and 60 MPa, the appropriate trips were determined to be between 0.2 mm and 1.3 mm high, which provided kappa/delta values on the heatshield from 0.15 to 2.25. The tripped configuration consisted of an insert with a series of diamond shaped trips along the heatshield downstream of the stagnation point. Surface heat flux measurements were obtained on a capsule with a 250 mm diameter, 6.4% scale model, and pressure measurements were taken at axial stations along the nozzle walls. At low enthalpy conditions, the computational predictions agree favorably to the test data along the heatshield centerline. However, agreement becomes less favorable as the enthalpy increases conditions. The measured surface heat flux on the heatshield from the HIEST facility was under-predicted by the computations in these cases. Both smooth and tripped configurations were tested for comparison, and a post-test computational analysis showed that kappa/delta values based on the as-measured stagnation conditions ranged between 0.5 and 1.2. Tripped configurations for both 0.6 mm and 0.8 mm trip heights were able to effectively trip the flow to fully turbulent for a range of freestream conditions.

  9. Core-level spectra and binding energies of transition metal nitrides by non-destructive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy through capping layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greczynski, G.; Primetzhofer, D.; Lu, J.; Hultman, L.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • First non-destructive measurements of XPS core level binding energies for group IVb-VIb transition metal nitrides are presented. • All films are grown under the same conditions and analyzed in the same instrument, providing a useful reference for future XPS studies. • Extracted core level BE values are more reliable than those obtained from sputter-cleaned N-deficient surfaces. • Comparison to Ar+-etched surfaces reveals that even mild etching conditions result in the formation of a nitrogen-deficient surface layer. • The N/metal concentration ratios from capped samples are found to be 25-90% higher than those from the corresponding ion-etched surfaces. - Abstract: We present the first measurements of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core level binding energies (BE:s) for the widely-applicable group IVb-VIb polycrystalline transition metal nitrides (TMN’s) TiN, VN, CrN, ZrN, NbN, MoN, HfN, TaN, and WN as well as AlN and SiN, which are common components in the TMN-based alloy systems. Nitride thin film samples were grown at 400 °C by reactive dc magnetron sputtering from elemental targets in Ar/N 2 atmosphere. For XPS measurements, layers are either (i) Ar + ion-etched to remove surface oxides resulting from the air exposure during sample transfer from the growth chamber into the XPS system, or (ii) in situ capped with a few nm thick Cr or W overlayers in the deposition system prior to air-exposure and loading into the XPS instrument. Film elemental composition and phase content is thoroughly characterized with time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF-E ERDA), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), and x-ray diffraction. High energy resolution core level XPS spectra acquired with monochromatic Al Kα radiation on the ISO-calibrated instrument reveal that even mild etching conditions result in the formation of a nitrogen-deficient surface layer that substantially affects the extracted binding energy values. These

  10. Core-level spectra and binding energies of transition metal nitrides by non-destructive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy through capping layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greczynski, G., E-mail: grzgr@ifm.liu.se [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Primetzhofer, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Lu, J.; Hultman, L. [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • First non-destructive measurements of XPS core level binding energies for group IVb-VIb transition metal nitrides are presented. • All films are grown under the same conditions and analyzed in the same instrument, providing a useful reference for future XPS studies. • Extracted core level BE values are more reliable than those obtained from sputter-cleaned N-deficient surfaces. • Comparison to Ar+-etched surfaces reveals that even mild etching conditions result in the formation of a nitrogen-deficient surface layer. • The N/metal concentration ratios from capped samples are found to be 25-90% higher than those from the corresponding ion-etched surfaces. - Abstract: We present the first measurements of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core level binding energies (BE:s) for the widely-applicable group IVb-VIb polycrystalline transition metal nitrides (TMN’s) TiN, VN, CrN, ZrN, NbN, MoN, HfN, TaN, and WN as well as AlN and SiN, which are common components in the TMN-based alloy systems. Nitride thin film samples were grown at 400 °C by reactive dc magnetron sputtering from elemental targets in Ar/N{sub 2} atmosphere. For XPS measurements, layers are either (i) Ar{sup +} ion-etched to remove surface oxides resulting from the air exposure during sample transfer from the growth chamber into the XPS system, or (ii) in situ capped with a few nm thick Cr or W overlayers in the deposition system prior to air-exposure and loading into the XPS instrument. Film elemental composition and phase content is thoroughly characterized with time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF-E ERDA), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), and x-ray diffraction. High energy resolution core level XPS spectra acquired with monochromatic Al Kα radiation on the ISO-calibrated instrument reveal that even mild etching conditions result in the formation of a nitrogen-deficient surface layer that substantially affects the extracted binding energy

  11. Tuning Li2MO3 phase abundance and suppressing migration of transition metal ions to improve the overall performance of Li- and Mn-rich layered oxide cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiming; Tang, Tian; Ma, Zhihua; Gu, Haitao; Du, Wubing; Gao, Mingxia; Liu, Yongfeng; Jian, Dechao; Pan, Hongge

    2018-03-01

    The poor cycling stability of Li- and Mn-rich layered oxide cathodes used in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) has severely limited their practical application. Unfortunately, current strategies to improve their lifecycle sacrifice initial capacity. In this paper, we firstly report the synergistic improvement of the electrochemical performance of a Li1.2Ni0.13Co0.13Mn0.54O2 (LNCMO) cathode material, including gains for capacity, cycling stability, and rate capability, by the partial substitution of Li+ ions by Mg2+ ions. Electrochemical performance is evaluated by a galvanostatic charge and discharge test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Structure and morphology are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Compared with the substitution of transition metal (TM) ions with Mg2+ ions reported previously, the substitution of Li+ ions by Mg2+ ions not only drastically ameliorates the capacity retention and rate performance challenges of LNCMO cathodes but also markedly suppresses their voltage fading, due to the inhibition of the migration of TM ions during cycling, while also increasing the capacity of the cathode due to an increased abundance of the Li2MO3 phase.

  12. The effects of wetting layer on electronic and optical properties of intersubband P-to-S transitions in strained dome-shaped InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Shahzadeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors report on the impact of wetting layer thickness and quantum dot size on the electronic and optical properties of dome-shaped InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs with strained potential. Two wetting layer thicknesses of 0.5 and 2.0 nm were compared. A strong size dependence of P-to-S transition energy, transition dipole moment, oscillator strength, and linear and third-order nonlinear susceptibilities were concluded. The P-to-S transition dipole moment was shown to be purely in-plane polarization. The linear and nonlinear absorption and dispersion showed a red shift when the wetting layer thickness was increased. Our results revealed that the nonlinear susceptibility is much more sensitive to QD size compared to the linear susceptibility. An interpretation of the results was presented based on the probability density of finding the electron inside the dot and wetting layer. The results are in good agreement with previously reported experimental data.

  13. Metallization of ion beam synthesized Si/3C-SiC/Si layer systems by high-dose implantation of transition metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, J.K.N.; Wenzel, S.; Stritzker, B.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of metal silicide layers contacting an ion beam synthesized buried 3C-SiC layer in silicon by means of high-dose titanium and molybdenum implantations is reported. Two different strategies to form such contact layers are explored. The titanium implantation aims to convert the Si top layer of an epitaxial Si/SiC/Si layer sequence into TiSi 2 , while Mo implantations were performed directly into the SiC layer after selectively etching off all capping layers. Textured and high-temperature stable C54-TiSi 2 layers with small additions of more metal-rich silicides are obtained in the case of the Ti implantations. Mo implantations result in the formation of the high-temperature phase β-MoSi 2 , which also grows textured on the substrate. The formation of cavities in the silicon substrate at the lower SiC/Si interface due to the Si consumption by the growing silicide phase is observed in both cases. It probably constitutes a problem, occurring whenever thin SiC films on silicon have to be contacted by silicide forming metals independent of the deposition technique used. It is shown that this problem can be solved with ion beam synthesized contact layers by proper adjustment of the metal ion dose

  14. Resistivity features in intercalated graphite compounds with bromine and iodine chloride in the region of structural phase transitions in the layer of intercalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovsyijenko, Yi.V.; Lazarenko, O.A.; Matsuj, L.Yu.; Prokopov, O.Yi.

    2013-01-01

    In the paper anomalous changes of resistivity in graphite intercalated compounds with iodine chloride and bromine are investigated in the phase transition temperature interval. It is shown that these anomalies are caused by the change of carriers mobility in the phase transitional interval as well as by the origin of ''mobile ions liquids''

  15. The influence of the relative thermal expansion and electric permittivity on phase transitions in the perovskite-type bidimensional layered NH3(CH2)3NH3CdBr4 compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staśkiewicz, Beata; Staśkiewicz, Anna

    2017-07-01

    Hydrothermal method has been used to synthesized the layered hybrid compound NH3(CH2)3NH3CdBr4 of perovskite architecture. Structural, dielectric and dilatometric properties of the compound have been analyzed. Negative thermal expansion (NTE) effect in the direction perpendicular to the perovskite plane as well as an unusual phase sequence have been reported based on X-ray diffraction analysis. Electric permittivity measurements evidenced the phase transitions at Tc1=326/328 K and Tc2=368/369 K. Relative linear expansion measurements almost confirmed these temperatures of phase transitions. Anomalies of electric permittivity and expansion behavior connected with the phase transitions are detected at practically the same temperatures as those observed earlier in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared (IR), far infrared (FIR) and Raman spectroscopy studies. Mechanism of the phase transitions is explained. Relative linear expansion study was prototype to estimate critical exponent value β for continuous phase transition at Tc1. It has been inferred that there is a strong interplay between the distortion of the inorganic network, those hydrogen bonds and the intermolecular interactions of the organic component.

  16. Study of first electronic transition and hydrogen bonding state of ultra-thin water layer of nanometer thickness on an α-alumina surface by far-ultraviolet spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Takeyoshi; Kinugasa, Tomoya

    2018-05-01

    The first electronic transition (A˜ ← X˜) and the hydrogen bonding state of an ultra-thin water layer of nanometer thickness between two α-alumina surfaces (0.5-20 nm) were studied using far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectroscopy in the wavelength range 140-180 nm. The ultra-thin water layer of nanometer thickness was prepared by squeezing a water droplet ( 1 μL) between a highly polished α-alumina prism and an α-alumina plate using a high pressure clamp ( 4.7 MPa), and the FUV spectra of the water layer at different thicknesses were measured using the attenuated total reflection method. As the water layer became thinner, the A˜ ← X˜ bands were gradually shifted to higher or lower energy relative to that of bulk water; at thicknesses smaller than 4 nm, these shifts were substantial (0.1-0.2 eV) in either case. The FUV spectra of the water layer with thickness lost at thicknesses below 4 nm, because of steric hydration forces between the α-alumina surfaces.

  17. Origin of exotic ferromagnetic behavior in exfoliated layered transition metal dichalcogenides MoS.sub.2./sub. and WS.sub.2./sub.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luxa, J.; Jankovský, O.; Sedmidubský, D.; Medlín, R.; Maryško, Miroslav; Pumera, M.; Sofer, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2016), s. 1960-1967 ISSN 2040-3364 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : transition metal dichalcogenides * ferromagnetism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.367, year: 2016

  18. Effect of transition metal composition on electrochemical performance of nickel-manganese-based lithium-rich layer-structured cathode materials in lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, Hiroaki, E-mail: hiroaki.konishi.yj@hitachi.com; Gunji, Akira; Feng, Xiaoliang; Furutsuki, Sho

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the effect of transition metal composition on the electrochemical properties of Li-rich layer-structured cathode materials, Li{sub 1.2}Ni{sub x}Mn{sub 0.8−x}O{sub 2} (x=0.2, 0.25, 0.3, and 0.4) were synthesized, and their electrochemical properties were investigated. As nickel content x increased in Li{sub 1.2}Ni{sub x}Mn{sub 0.8−x}O{sub 2} (x=0.2, 0.25, 0.3, and 0.4), charge-discharge capacities at a low C-rate (0.05 C) decreased. The results obtained by dQ/dV curves indicate that, as the nickel content increased, the discharge capacity below 3.6 V greatly decreased, but that above 3.6 V increased. As the C-rate of the discharge process increased, the discharge reaction of Li{sub 1.2}Ni{sub x}Mn{sub 0.8−x}O{sub 2} (x=0.2) below 3.6 V greatly decreased. In contrast, that above 3.6 V slightly decreased. This indicates that the discharge reaction above 3.6 V exhibits higher rate performance than that below 3.6 V. For the high-nickel-content cathodes, the ratio of the discharge capacity above 3.6 V to the total discharge capacity was high. Therefore, they exhibited high rate performance. - Graphical abstract: Figure shows the discharge curves of Li{sub 1.2}Ni{sub x}Mn{sub 0.8−x}O{sub 2} (x=0.2 and 0.3) within potential range of 2.5−4.6 V (vs. Li/Li{sup +}) at 0.05 and 3 C. At low C-rate (0.05 C), the discharge capacity of high-nickel-content cathode (Li{sub 1.2}Ni{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 0.5}O{sub 2}) was less than that of low-nickel-content cathode (Li{sub 1.2}Ni{sub 0.2}Mn{sub 0.6}O{sub 2}); however, the discharge potential and capacity of Li{sub 1.2}Ni{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 0.5}O{sub 2} was higher than those of Li{sub 1.2}Ni{sub 0.2}Mn{sub 0.6}O{sub 2} at high C-rate (3 C). This means that the increase in Ni/Mn ratio was effective in improving rate-performance.

  19. The mechanism of abrupt transition between theta and hyper-excitable spiking activity in medial entorhinal cortex layer II stellate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilman Kispersky

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that stellate cells (SCs of the medial entorhinal cortex become hyper-excitable in animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy. These studies have also demonstrated the existence of recurrent connections among SCs, reduced levels of recurrent inhibition in epileptic networks as compared to control ones, and comparable levels of recurrent excitation among SCs in both network types. In this work, we investigate the biophysical and dynamic mechanism of generation of the fast time scale corresponding to hyper-excitable firing and the transition between theta and fast firing frequency activity in SCs. We show that recurrently connected minimal networks of SCs exhibit abrupt, threshold-like transition between theta and hyper-excitable firing frequencies as the result of small changes in the maximal synaptic (AMPAergic conductance. The threshold required for this transition is modulated by synaptic inhibition. Similar abrupt transition between firing frequency regimes can be observed in single, self-coupled SCs, which represent a network of recurrently coupled neurons synchronized in phase, but not in synaptically isolated SCs as the result of changes in the levels of the tonic drive. Using dynamical systems tools (phase-space analysis, we explain the dynamic mechanism underlying the genesis of the fast time scale and the abrupt transition between firing frequency regimes, their dependence on the intrinsic SC's currents and synaptic excitation. This abrupt transition is mechanistically different from others observed in similar networks with different cell types. Most notably, there is no bistability involved. 'In vitro' experiments using single SCs self-coupled with dynamic clamp show the abrupt transition between firing frequency regimes, and demonstrate that our theoretical predictions are not an artifact of the model. In addition, these experiments show that high-frequency firing is burst-like with a duration modulated by an M-current.

  20. Wind tunnel noise reduction at Mach 5 with a rod-wall sound shield. [for prevention of premature boundary layer transition on wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creel, T. R.; Beckwith, I. E.

    1983-01-01

    A method of shielding a wind-tunnel model from noise radiated by the tunnel-wall boundary layer has been developed and tested at the Langley Research Center. The shield consists of a rectangular array of longitudinal rods with boundary-layer suction through gaps between the rods. Tests were conducted at Mach 5 over a unit Reynolds number range of 1.0-3.5 x 10 to the 7th/m. Hot-wire measurements indicated the freestream noise, expressed in terms of the rms pressure fluctuations normalized by the mean pressure, was reduced from about 1.4 percent just upstream of the shielded region of a minimum level of about 0.4 percent in the forward portion of the shielded flow.

  1. Reversible transition between bipolar and unipolar resistive switching in Cu2O/Ga2O3 binary oxide stacked layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. S. Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Both unipolar resistive switching (URS and bipolar resistive switching (BRS behaviors are observed in Cu2O/Ga2O3 stacked layer. The conversion between BRS and URS is controllable and reversible. The switching operations in BRS mode requires smaller voltage than that in the URS mode. The oxygen vacancies closed to the Cu2O/Ga2O3 interface contributes to the BRS, and the bias-controlling filament formation/rupture in depletion layer is considered to contribute to the URS. The URS happens only in the negative voltage part due to the nature of directionality of the p-n junction. The process reported here can be developed to design memory device.

  2. Effect of gold subsurface layer on the surface activity and segregation in Pt/Au/Pt{sub 3}M (where M = 3d transition metals) alloy catalyst from first-principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang-Eun [Fuel Cell Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), 39-1 Hawolgok, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Global E3 Institute and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 120-749 Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Dong-Hee [Fuel Cell Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), 39-1 Hawolgok, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Environmental Engineering, Chungbuk National University, 1 Chungdae-ro, Seowon-Gu, Cheongju, Chungbuk 362-763 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Juhn; Yoon, Sung Pil; Han, Jonghee; Nam, Suk Woo [Fuel Cell Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), 39-1 Hawolgok, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Seong-Ahn [Fuel Cell Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), 39-1 Hawolgok, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Advanced Materials Chemistry, Korea University, Sejong-city 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Soon, Aloysius, E-mail: aloysius.soon@yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: hchahm@kist.re.kr [Global E3 Institute and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 120-749 Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ham, Hyung Chul, E-mail: aloysius.soon@yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: hchahm@kist.re.kr [Fuel Cell Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), 39-1 Hawolgok, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Clean Energy and Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology (UST), 217 Gajungro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-21

    The effect of a subsurface hetero layer (thin gold) on the activity and stability of Pt skin surface in Pt{sub 3}M system (M = 3d transition metals) is investigated using the spin-polarized density functional theory calculation. First, we find that the heterometallic interaction between the Pt skin surface and the gold subsurface in Pt/Au/Pt{sub 3}M system can significantly modify the electronic structure of the Pt skin surface. In particular, the local density of states projected onto the d states of Pt skin surface near the Fermi level is drastically decreased compared to the Pt/Pt/Pt{sub 3}M case, leading to the reduction of the oxygen binding strength of the Pt skin surface. This modification is related to the increase of surface charge polarization of outmost Pt skin atoms by the electron transfer from the gold subsurface atoms. Furthermore, a subsurface gold layer is found to cast the energetic barrier to the segregation loss of metal atoms from the bulk (inside) region, which can enhance the durability of Pt{sub 3}M based catalytic system in oxygen reduction condition at fuel cell devices. This study highlights that a gold subsurface hetero layer can provide an additional mean to tune the surface activity toward oxygen species and in turn the oxygen reduction reaction, where the utilization of geometric strain already reaches its practical limit.

  3. Effect of gold subsurface layer on the surface activity and segregation in Pt/Au/Pt3M (where M = 3d transition metals) alloy catalyst from first-principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Eun; Lim, Dong-Hee; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Juhn; Yoon, Sung Pil; Han, Jonghee; Nam, Suk Woo; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Soon, Aloysius; Ham, Hyung Chul

    2015-01-21

    The effect of a subsurface hetero layer (thin gold) on the activity and stability of Pt skin surface in Pt3M system (M = 3d transition metals) is investigated using the spin-polarized density functional theory calculation. First, we find that the heterometallic interaction between the Pt skin surface and the gold subsurface in Pt/Au/Pt3M system can significantly modify the electronic structure of the Pt skin surface. In particular, the local density of states projected onto the d states of Pt skin surface near the Fermi level is drastically decreased compared to the Pt/Pt/Pt3M case, leading to the reduction of the oxygen binding strength of the Pt skin surface. This modification is related to the increase of surface charge polarization of outmost Pt skin atoms by the electron transfer from the gold subsurface atoms. Furthermore, a subsurface gold layer is found to cast the energetic barrier to the segregation loss of metal atoms from the bulk (inside) region, which can enhance the durability of Pt3M based catalytic system in oxygen reduction condition at fuel cell devices. This study highlights that a gold subsurface hetero layer can provide an additional mean to tune the surface activity toward oxygen species and in turn the oxygen reduction reaction, where the utilization of geometric strain already reaches its practical limit.

  4. Hydrostatic-pressure studies of confined transitions in cubic Zn1-xCdxSe/ZnSe strained-layer quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.J.; Chandrasekhar, H.R.; Chandrasekhar, M.; Samarth, N.; Luo, H.; Furdyna, J.

    1992-01-01

    Photoluminescence spectra of cubic Zn 0.82 Cd 0.18 Se quantum wells of widths 30, 60, and 200 A are studied as a function of hydrostatic pressure (0--60 kbar) at 80 K. The pressure coefficients of heavy-hole excitons are found to decrease with increasing well width. The photoluminescence energies of the ZnSe barrier and cap layers are also observed to shift as a function of hydrostatic pressure, providing a measure of the pressure coefficient of the direct gap in this material

  5. Separation-induced boundary layer transition: Modeling with a non-linear eddy-viscosity model coupled with the laminar kinetic energy equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlahostergios, Z.; Yakinthos, K.; Goulas, A.

    2009-01-01

    We present an effort to model the separation-induced transition on a flat plate with a semi-circular leading edge, using a cubic non-linear eddy-viscosity model combined with the laminar kinetic energy. A non-linear model, compared to a linear one, has the advantage to resolve the anisotropic behavior of the Reynolds-stresses in the near-wall region and it provides a more accurate expression for the generation of turbulence in the transport equation of the turbulence kinetic energy. Although in its original formulation the model is not able to accurately predict the separation-induced transition, the inclusion of the laminar kinetic energy increases its accuracy. The adoption of the laminar kinetic energy by the non-linear model is presented in detail, together with some additional modifications required for the adaption of the laminar kinetic energy into the basic concepts of the non-linear eddy-viscosity model. The computational results using the proposed combined model are shown together with the ones obtained using an isotropic linear eddy-viscosity model, which adopts also the laminar kinetic energy concept and in comparison with the existing experimental data.

  6. PREFACE: INERA Workshop: Transition Metal Oxide Thin Films-functional Layers in "Smart windows" and Water Splitting Devices. Parallel session of the 18th International School on Condensed Matter Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Special issue presents the papers for the INERA Workshop entitled "Transition Metal Oxides as Functional Layers in Smart windows and Water Splitting Devices", which was held in Varna, St. Konstantin and Elena, Bulgaria, from the 4th-6th September 2014. The Workshop is organized within the context of the INERA "Research and Innovation Capacity Strengthening of ISSP-BAS in Multifunctional Nanostructures", FP7 Project REGPOT 316309 program, European project of the Institute of Solid State Physics at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. There were 42 participants at the workshop, 16 from Sweden, Germany, Romania and Hungary, 11 invited lecturers, and 28 young participants. There were researchers present from prestigious European laboratories which are leaders in the field of transition metal oxide thin film technologies. The event contributed to training young researchers in innovative thin film technologies, as well as thin films characterization techniques. The topics of the Workshop cover the field of technology and investigation of thin oxide films as functional layers in "Smart windows" and "Water splitting" devices. The topics are related to the application of novel technologies for the preparation of transition metal oxide films and the modification of chromogenic properties towards the improvement of electrochromic and termochromic device parameters for possible industrial deployment. The Workshop addressed the following topics: Metal oxide films-functional layers in energy efficient devices; Photocatalysts and chemical sensing; Novel thin film technologies and applications; Methods of thin films characterizations; From the 37 abstracts sent, 21 manuscripts were written and later refereed. We appreciate the comments from all the referees, and we are grateful for their valuable contributions. Guest Editors: Assoc. Prof. Dr.Tatyana Ivanova Prof. DSc Kostadinka Gesheva Prof. DSc Hassan Chamatti Assoc. Prof. Dr. Georgi Popkirov Workshop Organizing Committee Prof

  7. Ion-exchange mechanism of layered transition-metal oxides: case study of LiNi(0.5)Mn(0.5)O₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwon, Hyeokjo; Kim, Sung-Wook; Park, Young-Uk; Hong, Jihyun; Ceder, Gerbrand; Jeon, Seokwoo; Kang, Kisuk

    2014-08-04

    An ion-exchange process can be an effective route to synthesize new quasi-equilibrium phases with a desired crystal structure. Important layered-type battery materials, such as LiMnO2 and LiNi(0.5)Mn(0.5)O2, can be obtained through this method from a sodium-containing parent structure, and they often show electrochemical properties remarkably distinct from those of their solid-state synthesized equivalents. However, while ion exchange is generally believed to occur via a simple topotactic reaction, the detailed phase transformation mechanism during the process is not yet fully understood. For the case of layered LiNi(0.5)Mn(0.5)O2, we show through ex situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) that the ion-exchange process consists of several sequential phase transformations. By a study of the intermediate phase, it is shown that the residual sodium ions in the final structure may greatly affect the electrochemical (de)lithiation mechanism.

  8. Magnetic phase transition in layered inorganic-organic hybrid (C12H25NH3)2CuCl4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochalya, Madhu; Kumar, Sunil; Kanaujia, Pawan K.; Prakash, G. Vijaya

    2018-05-01

    Inorganic-organic (IO) hybrids are material systems which have become an interesting theme of research for physicist and chemists recently due to the possibility of engineering specific magnetic, thermal or optoelectronic properties by playing around with the transition metal, halides and the organic components. Our experiments on (C12H25NH3)2CuCl4 show that the system exhibits a long range ferromagnetic order below ˜11 K. In such an inorganic-organic hybrid system, Jahn-Teller distortion of the copper ions results into a weak ferromagnetic order as compared to the antiferromagnetic spin-spin exchange in the pure inorganic CuCl2 compound. Moreover, this particular hybrid system also exhibits photoluminescence when excited below absorption maximum related to charge transfer peak though the effect is much weaker as compared to that in extensively studied other MX4-based (M = Sn, Pb; X = Cl, Br, I) counterparts.

  9. Pressure-induced structural changes and insulator-metal transition in layered bismuth triiodide, BiI3: a combined experimental and theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devidas, T R; Chandra Shekar, N V; Sundar, C S; Chithaiah, P; Rao, C N R; Sorb, Y A; Bhadram, V S; Chandrabhas, N; Pal, K; Waghmare, U V

    2014-01-01

    Noting that BiI 3 and the well-known topological insulator (TI) Bi 2 Se 3 have the same high symmetry parent structures, and that it is desirable to find a wide-band gap TI, we determine here the effects of pressure on the structure, phonons and electronic properties of rhombohedral BiI 3 . We report a pressure-induced insulator-metal transition near 1.5 GPa, using high pressure electrical resistivity and Raman measurements. X-ray diffraction studies, as a function of pressure, reveal a structural peculiarity of the BiI 3 crystal, with a drastic drop in c/a ratio at 1.5 GPa, and a structural phase transition from rhombohedral to monoclinic structure at 8.8 GPa. Interestingly, the metallic phase, at relatively low pressures, exhibits minimal resistivity at low temperatures, similar to that in Bi 2 Se 3 . We corroborate these findings with first-principles calculations and suggest that the drop in the resistivity of BiI 3 in the 1–3 GPa range of pressure arises possibly from the appearance of an intermediate crystal phase with a lower band-gap and hexagonal crystal structure. Calculated Born effective charges reveal the presence of metallic states in the structural vicinity of rhombohedral BiI 3 . Changes in the topology of the electronic bands of BiI 3 with pressure, and a sharp decrease in the c/a ratio below 2 GPa, are shown to give rise to changes in the slope of phonon frequencies near that pressure. (paper)

  10. Novel elastic, lattice dynamics and thermodynamic properties of metallic single-layer transition metal phosphides: 2H-M 2P (Mo2P, W2P, Nb2P and Ta2P)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jiuren; Wu, Bozhao; Wang, Yanggang; Li, Zhimi; Yao, Yuanpeng; Jiang, Yong; Ding, Yanhuai; Xu, Fu; Zhang, Ping

    2018-04-01

    Recently, there has been a surge of interest in the research of two-dimensional (2D) phosphides due to their unique physical properties and wide applications. Transition metal phosphides 2H-M 2Ps (Mo2P, W2P, Nb2P and Ta2P) show considerable catalytic activity and energy storage potential. However, the electronic structure and mechanical properties of 2D 2H-M 2Ps are still unrevealed. Here, first-principles calculations are employed to investigate the lattice dynamics, elasticity and thermodynamic properties of 2H-M 2Ps. Results show that M 2Ps with lower stiffness exhibit remarkable lateral deformation under unidirectional loads. Due to the largest average Grüneisen parameter, single-layer Nb2P has the strongest anharmonic vibrations, resulting in the highest thermal expansion coefficient. The lattice thermal conductivities of Ta2P, W2P and Nb2P contradict classical theory, which would predict a smaller thermal conductivity due to the much heavier atom mass. Moreover, the calculations also demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of Ta2P is the highest as well as the lowest thermal expansion, owing to its weak anharmonic phonon scattering and the lowest average Grüneisen parameter. The insight provided by this study may be useful for future experimental and theoretical studies concerning 2D transition metal phosphide materials.

  11. Developmental changes in electrophysiological properties and a transition from electrical to chemical coupling between excitatory layer 4 neurons in the rat barrel cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fliza eValiullina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During development, sensory systems switch from an immature to an adult mode of function along with the emergence of the active cortical states. Here, we used patch-clamp recordings from neocortical slices in vitro to characterize the developmental changes in the basic electrophysiological properties of excitatory L4 neurons and their connectivity before and after the developmental switch, which occurs in the rat barrel cortex in vivo at postnatal day P8. Prior to the switch, L4 neurons had lower resting membrane potentials, higher input resistance, lower membrane capacity, as well as action potentials (APs with smaller amplitudes, longer durations and higher AP thresholds compared to the neurons after the switch. A sustained firing pattern also emerged around the switch. Dual patch-clamp recordings from L4 neurons revealed that recurrent connections between L4 excitatory cells do not exist before and develop rapidly across the switch. In contrast, electrical coupling between these neurons waned around the switch. We suggest that maturation of electrophysiological features, particularly acquisition of a sustained firing pattern, and a transition from the immature electrical to mature chemical synaptic coupling between excitatory L4 neurons, contributes to the developmental switch in the cortical mode of function.

  12. Engineering of the energetic structure of the anode of organic photovoltaic devices utilizing hot-wire deposited transition metal oxide layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilopoulou, M., E-mail: mariva@imel.demokritos.gr [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Department of Microelectronics, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, POB 60228, 15310 Agia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Stathopoulos, N.A.; Savaidis, S.A. [Department of Electronics, Technological and Educational Institute (TEI) of Piraeus, Petrou Ralli & Thivon, 12244 Aegaleo (Greece); Kostis, I. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Department of Microelectronics, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, POB 60228, 15310 Agia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Department of Electronics, Technological and Educational Institute (TEI) of Piraeus, Petrou Ralli & Thivon, 12244 Aegaleo (Greece); Papadimitropoulos, G. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Department of Microelectronics, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, POB 60228, 15310 Agia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Davazoglou, D., E-mail: d.davazoglou@imel.demokritos.gr [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Department of Microelectronics, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, POB 60228, 15310 Agia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece)

    2015-09-30

    Graphical abstract: In this work we perform successful engineering of the anode of organic photovoltaics based on poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl butyric acid methyl ester blends by using metal oxide transport layers exhibiting shallow gap states which act as a barrier-free path for hole transport toward the anode. - Highlights: • Interface engineering of the anode. • Organic photovoltaics (OPVs). • Shallow gap states. • Barrier-free hole transport. • Design rules for interface engineering in OPVs. - Abstract: In this work we use hydrogen deposited molybdenum and tungsten oxides (chemically described as H:MO{sub x}x ≤ 3 where M = Mo or W) to control the energetics at the anode of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaics (OPVs) based on poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PC{sub 71}BM) blends. Significantly improved current densities and open circuit voltages were achieved as a result of improved hole transport from the P3HT highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) toward indium tin oxide (ITO) anode. This was attributed to the formation of shallow gap states in these oxides which are located just below the Fermi level and above the polymer HOMO and thus may act as a barrier-free path for the extraction of holes. Consequently, these states can be used for controlling the energetic structure of the anode of OPVs. By using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy it was found that dependent on the deposition conditions these gap states and work function of the metal oxides may be tailored to contribute to the precise alignment of the HOMO of the organic semiconductor (OSC) with the Fermi level of the anode electrode resulting in further enhancement of the device performance.

  13. Globular, Sponge-like to Layer-like Morphological Transition in 1-n-Alkyl-3-methylimidazolium Octylsulfate Ionic Liquid Homologous Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Utkarsh; Shah, Jindal K

    2018-01-11

    Segregation of polar and nonpolar domains in ionic liquids for which either the cation or anion is responsible for inducing nonpolar domains is well understood. On the other hand, information regarding the nanoscale heterogeneities originating due to the presence of nonpolar content on both the ions is rudimentary at this point. The present contribution is aimed at addressing this question and focuses on a molecular dynamics simulation study to probe nanoscale structural and aggregation features of the 1-n-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium [C n mim] octylsulfate [C 8 SO 4 ] ionic liquid homologous series (n = 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12). The objective of this work is to determine the effect of increasing alkyl chain length in the cation on nonpolar domain formation, especially when the alkyl chain lengths from both the ions participate in defining such domains. The results indicate that all the ionic liquids form nonpolar domains, morphology of which gradually changes from globular, sponge-like to layer-like structure with increase in the cationic alkyl chain length. The length of the nonpolar domains calculated from the total structure factor for [C 10 mim][C 8 SO 4 ] is considerably higher than that reported for other imidazolium-based ionic liquid containing smaller anions. The structure factor for [C 12 mim][C 8 SO 4 ] ionic liquid contains multiple intermediate peaks separating the charge alternation peak and pre-peak, which points to nonpolar domains of varying lengths, an observation that remains to be validated. Analysis of the heterogeneous order parameters and orientational correlation functions of the alkyl chains further suggests an increase in the spatial heterogeneity and long-range order along the homologous series. The origin of rich diversity of structures obtained by introducing nonpolar content on both the ions is discussed.

  14. Formation of double layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, P.; Wong, A.Y.; Quon, B.H.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on both stationary and propagating double layers and a related analytical model are described. Stationary double layers were produced in a multiple plasma device, in which an electron drift current was present. An investigation of the plasma parameters for the stable double layer condition is described. The particle distribution in the stable double layer establishes a potential profile, which creates electron and ion beams that excite plasma instabilities. The measured characteristics of the instabilities are consistent with the existence of the double layer. Propagating double layers are formed when the initial electron drift current is large. Ths slopes of the transition region increase as they propagate. A physical model for the formation of a double layer in the experimental device is described. This model explains the formation of the low potential region on the basis of the space charge. This space charge is created by the electron drift current. The model also accounts for the role of ions in double layer formation and explains the formation of moving double layers. (Auth.)

  15. Layered Ultrathin Coherent Structures (LUCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuller, I.K.; Falco, C.M.

    1979-01-01

    A new class of superconducting materials, Layered Ultrathin Coherent Structures (LUCS) are described. These materials are produced by sequentially depositing ultrathin layers of materials using high rate magnetron sputtering or thermal evaporation. Strong evidence is presented that layers as thin as 10 A can be prepared in this fashion. Resistivity data indicates that the mean free path is layer thickness limited. A strong disagreement is found between the experimentally measured transition temperatures T/sub c/ and the T/sub c/'s calculated using the Cooper limit approximation. This is interpreted as a change in the band structure or the phonon structure of the material due to layering or to surfaces

  16. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dennis P [Maplewood, MN; Schmoeckel, Alison K [Stillwater, MN; Vernstrom, George D [Cottage Grove, MN; Atanasoski, Radoslav [Edina, MN; Wood, Thomas E [Stillwater, MN; Yang, Ruizhi [Halifax, CA; Easton, E Bradley [Halifax, CA; Dahn, Jeffrey R [Hubley, CA; O'Neill, David G [Lake Elmo, MN

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  17. Chemical solution seed layer for rabits tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Wee, Sung-Hun

    2014-06-10

    A method for making a superconducting article includes the steps of providing a biaxially textured substrate. A seed layer is then deposited. The seed layer includes a double perovskite of the formula A.sub.2B'B''O.sub.6, where A is rare earth or alkaline earth metal and B' and B'' are different rare earth or transition metal cations. A superconductor layer is grown epitaxially such that the superconductor layer is supported by the seed layer.

  18. Towards Natural Transition in Compressible Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-29

    These mechanisms are relevant because in more complex cases, such as wave packets, several of their characteristics have been qualitatively observed...existence of tuned fundamental and sub- harmonic resonance of H-type and K-type in the packet. Influence of compressibility in the wave packet evolution was...Subharmonic seed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 4.4.4 Fundamental bands

  19. Understanding Transition to Turbulence in Shear Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    manuscript with the S formalism, it was sidetra.ked for several years as not cor- rectly posed mathematically. At this writing, emotional preferences O... KELTNER , G. (1973): Spatial stability of incompressible two-dimensional Gaussian wake in steady viscous flow, Phys. Fluids, v 16, 1368-1370

  20. Towards Natural Transition in Compressible Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-29

    Email: marcello@sc.usp.br Investigator: Germán Andrés Gaviria Mart́ınez Email: 4ndres.gaviria@gmail.com Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil Grant...hidrodinamica linear do escoamento compressivel em uma cavidade. Master’s thesis, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Escola de Engenharia de São Carlos, Universidade

  1. Transitional Justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gissel, Line Engbo

    This presentation builds on an earlier published article, 'Contemporary Transitional Justice: Normalising a Politics of Exception'. It argues that the field of transitional justice has undergone a shift in conceptualisation and hence practice. Transitional justice is presently understood to be th...... to be the provision of ordinary criminal justice in contexts of exceptional political transition.......This presentation builds on an earlier published article, 'Contemporary Transitional Justice: Normalising a Politics of Exception'. It argues that the field of transitional justice has undergone a shift in conceptualisation and hence practice. Transitional justice is presently understood...

  2. Exploring the magnetospheric boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hapgood, M.A.; Bryant, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    We show how, for most crossings of the boundary layer, one can construct a 'transition parameter', based on electron density and temperature, which orders independent plasma measurements into well-defined patterns which are consistent from case to case. We conclude that there is a gradual change in the balance of processes which determine the structure of the layer and suggest that there is no advantage in dividing the layer into different regions. We further conclude that the mixing processes in layer act in an organised way to give the consistent patterns revealed by the transition parameter. More active processes must sometimes take to give the extreme values (e.g. in velocity) which are seen in some crossings

  3. Thin pentacene layer under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srnanek, R.; Jakabovic, J.; Kovac, J.; Donoval, D.; Dobrocka, E.

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors have got a lot of interest during the last years, due to their usability for organic thin film transistor. Pentacene, C 22 H 14 , is one of leading candidates for this purpose. While we obtain the published data about pressure-induced phase transition only on single crystal of pentacene we present pressure-induced phase transition in pentacene thin layers for the first time. Changes in the pentacene structure, caused by the pressure, were detected by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Applying the defined pressure to the pentacene layer it can be transformed from thin phase to bulk phase. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was found as useful method for detection of changes and phases identification in the pentacene layer induced by mechanical pressure. Such a pressure-induced transformation of pentacene thin layers was observed and identified for the first time. (authors)

  4. Supporting Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Asima; Petrucco, James

    2018-01-01

    Meadowbrook Primary School has explored the use of The Teacher Assessment in Primary Science (TAPS) to support transition, initially for transfer to secondary school and now for transition from Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) into Key Stage 1 (ages 5-7). This article will consider an example of a secondary transition project and discuss the…

  5. Unstacked double-layer templated graphene for high-rate lithium-sulphur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Huang, Jia-Qi; Tian, Gui-Li; Nie, Jing-Qi; Peng, Hong-Jie; Wei, Fei

    2014-03-01

    Preventing the stacking of graphene is essential to exploiting its full potential in energy-storage applications. The introduction of spacers into graphene layers always results in a change in the intrinsic properties of graphene and/or induces complexity at the interfaces. Here we show the synthesis of an intrinsically unstacked double-layer templated graphene via template-directed chemical vapour deposition. The as-obtained graphene is composed of two unstacked graphene layers separated by a large amount of mesosized protuberances and can be used for high-power lithium-sulphur batteries with excellent high-rate performance. Even after 1,000 cycles, high reversible capacities of ca. 530 mA h g-1 and 380 mA h g-1 are retained at 5 C and 10 C, respectively. This type of double-layer graphene is expected to be an important platform that will enable the investigation of stabilized three-dimensional topological porous systems and demonstrate the potential of unstacked graphene materials for advanced energy storage, environmental protection, nanocomposite and healthcare applications.

  6. Reflective article having a sacrificial cathodic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; Buchanan, Michael J.; Scott, Matthew S.; Rearick, Brian K.; Medwick, Paul A.; McCamy, James W.

    2017-09-12

    The present invention relates to reflective articles, such as solar mirrors, that include a sacrificial cathodic layer. The reflective article, more particularly includes a substrate, such as glass, having a multi-layered coating thereon that includes a lead-free sacrificial cathodic layer. The sacrificial cathodic layer includes at least one transition metal, such as a particulate transition metal, which can be in the form of flakes (e.g., zinc flakes). The sacrificial cathodic layer can include an inorganic matrix formed from one or more organo-titanates. Alternatively, the sacrificial cathodic layer can include an organic polymer matrix (e.g., a crosslinked organic polymer matrix formed from an organic polymer and an aminoplast crosslinking agent). The reflective article also includes an outer organic polymer coating, that can be electrodeposited over the sacrificial cathodic layer.

  7. Boosting water oxidation layer-by-layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Acosta, Jonnathan C; Scanlon, Micheál D; Méndez, Manuel A; Amstutz, Véronique; Vrubel, Heron; Opallo, Marcin; Girault, Hubert H

    2016-04-07

    Electrocatalysis of water oxidation was achieved using fluorinated tin oxide (FTO) electrodes modified with layer-by-layer deposited films consisting of bilayers of negatively charged citrate-stabilized IrO2 NPs and positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) polymer. The IrO2 NP surface coverage can be fine-tuned by controlling the number of bilayers. The IrO2 NP films were amorphous, with the NPs therein being well-dispersed and retaining their as-synthesized shape and sizes. UV/vis spectroscopic and spectro-electrochemical studies confirmed that the total surface coverage and electrochemically addressable surface coverage of IrO2 NPs increased linearly with the number of bilayers up to 10 bilayers. The voltammetry of the modified electrode was that of hydrous iridium oxide films (HIROFs) with an observed super-Nernstian pH response of the Ir(III)/Ir(IV) and Ir(IV)-Ir(IV)/Ir(IV)-Ir(V) redox transitions and Nernstian shift of the oxygen evolution onset potential. The overpotential of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) was essentially pH independent, varying only from 0.22 V to 0.28 V (at a current density of 0.1 mA cm(-2)), moving from acidic to alkaline conditions. Bulk electrolysis experiments revealed that the IrO2/PDDA films were stable and adherent under acidic and neutral conditions but degraded in alkaline solutions. Oxygen was evolved with Faradaic efficiencies approaching 100% under acidic (pH 1) and neutral (pH 7) conditions, and 88% in alkaline solutions (pH 13). This layer-by-layer approach forms the basis of future large-scale OER electrode development using ink-jet printing technology.

  8. Vortex lattices in layered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokic, V.; Davidovic, D.; Dobrosavljevic-Grujic, L.

    1995-01-01

    We study vortex lattices in a superconductor--normal-metal superlattice in a parallel magnetic field. Distorted lattices, resulting from the shear deformations along the layers, are found to be unstable. Under field variation, nonequilibrium configurations undergo an infinite sequence of continuous transitions, typical for soft lattices. The equilibrium vortex arrangement is always a lattice of isocell triangles, without shear

  9. Tunneling current between graphene layers

    OpenAIRE

    Poklonski, Nikolai A.; Siahlo, Andrei I.; Vyrko, Sergey A.; Popov, Andrey M.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2013-01-01

    The physical model that allows to calculate the values of the tunneling current be-tween graphene layers is proposed. The tunneling current according to the pro-posed model is proportional to the area of tunneling transition. The calculated value of tunneling conductivity is in qualitative agreement with experimental data.

  10. Diffractive Hyperbola of a Skin Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubov, V. P.; Vaiman, E. V.; Shipilov, S. È.; Prasath, A. K.

    2018-03-01

    Based on an analysis of physics of the phase transition from the quasistatic state field to the running wave field of elementary electric and magnetic dipoles located in absorbing media, it is concluded that the skin layer is formed at the boundary of this phase transition. The possibility is considered of obtaining the diffractive hyperbola of the skin layer and its subsequent application for sensing of objects in strongly absorbing media.

  11. Transition radiation and transition scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.L.

    1982-01-01

    Transition radiation is a process of a rather general character. It occurs when some source, which does not have a proper frequency (for example, a charge) moves at a constant velocity in an inhomogeneous and (or) nonstationary medium or near such a medium. The simplest type of transition radiation takes place when a charge crosses a boundary between two media (the role of one of the media may be played by vacuum). In the case of periodic variation of the medium, transition radiation possesses some specific features (resonance transition radiation or transition scattering). Transition scattering occurs, in particular, when a permittivity wave falls onto an nonmoving (fixed) charge. Transition scattering is closely connected with transition bremsstrahlung radiation. All these transition processes are essential for plasma physics. Transition radiation and transition scattering have analogues outside the framework of electrodynamics (like in the case of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation). In the present report the corresponding range of phenomena is elucidated, as far as possible, in a generally physical aspect. (Auth.)

  12. Layered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and

  13. Structure of the oceanic mixed layer in western Bay of Bengal during MONEX

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anto, A.F.; Somayajulu, Y.K.

    layer conditions of the overlying atmosphere. Structure of OML, as delineated with respect to the diurnal variation of temperature with depth, revealed three sub-layers: wave mixed, diurnal thermocline and transition layer. The first two sub...

  14. Phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Sole, Ricard V; Solé, Ricard V; Solé, Ricard V; Sol, Ricard V; Solé, Ricard V

    2011-01-01

    Phase transitions--changes between different states of organization in a complex system--have long helped to explain physics concepts, such as why water freezes into a solid or boils to become a gas. How might phase transitions shed light on important problems in biological and ecological complex systems? Exploring the origins and implications of sudden changes in nature and society, Phase Transitions examines different dynamical behaviors in a broad range of complex systems. Using a compelling set of examples, from gene networks and ant colonies to human language and the degradation of diverse ecosystems, the book illustrates the power of simple models to reveal how phase transitions occur. Introductory chapters provide the critical concepts and the simplest mathematical techniques required to study phase transitions. In a series of example-driven chapters, Ricard Solé shows how such concepts and techniques can be applied to the analysis and prediction of complex system behavior, including the origins of ...

  15. Transition Models for Engineering Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, C. J.

    2007-01-01

    While future theoretical and conceptual developments may promote a better understanding of the physical processes involved in the latter stages of boundary layer transition, the designers of rotodynamic machinery and other fluid dynamic devices need effective transition models now. This presentation will therefore center around the development of of some transition models which have been developed as design aids to improve the prediction codes used in the performance evaluation of gas turbine blading. All models are based on Narasimba's concentrated breakdown and spot growth.

  16. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a weakly ionized layer

    OpenAIRE

    Shadmehri, Mohsen; Downes, Turlough P.

    2007-01-01

    We study the linear theory of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a layer of ions and neutrals with finite thickness. In the short wavelength limit the thickness of the layer has a negligible effect on the growing modes. However, perturbations with wavelength comparable to layer's thickness are significantly affected by the thickness of the layer. We show that the thickness of the layer has a stabilizing effect on the two dominant growing modes. Transition between the modes not only depends on th...

  17. Transit transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Public transit agencies have employed intelligent systems for determining : schedules and routes and for monitoring the real-time location and status of their : vehicle fleets for nearly two decades. But until recently, the data generated by : daily ...

  18. ALICE Transition Radiation Detector (TRD), test beam.

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Electrons and positrons can be discriminated from other charged particles using the emission of transition radiation - X-rays emitted when the particles cross many layers of thin materials. To develop such a Transition Radiation Detector(TRD) for ALICE many detector prototypes were tested in mixed beams of pions and electrons, as in the example shown here.

  19. Measurements of Heat Transfer and Boundary-Layer Transition on an 8-Inch-Diameter Hemisphere-Cylinder in Free Flight for a Mach Number Range of 2.00 to 3.88

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Benjamine J.; Chauvin, Leo T.

    1957-01-01

    Measurements of aerodynamic heat transfer have been made along the hemisphere and cylinder of a hemisphere-cylinder rocket-propelled model in free flight up to a Mach number of 3.88. The test Reynolds number based on free-stream condition and diameter of model covered a range from 2.69 x l0(exp 6) to 11.70 x 10(exp 6). Laminar, transitional, and turbulent heat-transfer coefficients were obtained. The laminar data along the body agreed with laminar theory for blunt bodies whereas the turbulent data along the cylinder were consistently lower than that predicted by the turbulent theory for a flat plate. Measurements of heat transfer at the stagnation point were, in general, lower than the theory for stagnation-point heat transfer. When the Reynolds number to the junction of the hemisphere-cylinder was greater than 6 x l0(exp 6), the transitional Reynolds number varied from 0.8 x l0(exp 6) to 3.0 x 10(exp 6); however, than 6 x l(exp 6) when the Reynolds number to the junction was less, than the transitional Reynolds number varied from 7.0 x l0(exp 6) to 24.7 x 10(exp 6).

  20. Irradiation induced crystalline to amorphous transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgoin, J.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation of a crystalline solid with energetic heavy particles results in cascades of defects which, with increasing dose, overlap and form a continuous disordered layer. In semiconductors the physical properties of such disordered layers are found to be similar to those of amorphous layers produced by evaporation. It is shown in the case of silicon, that the transition from a disordered crystalline (X) layer to an amorphous (α) layer occurs when the Gibbs energy of the X phase and of the defects it contains becomes larger than the Gibbs energy of the α phase. (author)

  1. Superconducting Metallic Glass Transition-Edge-Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Charles C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A superconducting metallic glass transition-edge sensor (MGTES) and a method for fabricating the MGTES are provided. A single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is deposited on a substrate. The single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is an absorber for the MGTES and is electrically connected to a circuit configured for readout and biasing to sense electromagnetic radiation.

  2. Overview of stability and transition in external aerodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkes, R.A.W.M.; Van Ingen, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The boundary layer along the fuselage, wings and tailplanes of aircraft will usually be laminar at the leading edge and will become unstable further downstream. Once the boundary layer has become unstable it will undergo transition to turbulence. Stability and transition can be considered as one of

  3. Air Layer Drag Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccio, Steven; Elbing, Brian; Winkel, Eric; Dowling, David; Perlin, Marc

    2008-11-01

    A set of experiments have been conducted at the US Navy's Large Cavitation Channel to investigate skin-friction drag reduction with the injection of air into a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer. Testing was performed on a 12.9 m long flat-plate test model with the surface hydraulically smooth and fully rough at downstream-distance-based Reynolds numbers to 220 million and at speeds to 20 m/s. Local skin-friction, near-wall bulk void fraction, and near-wall bubble imaging were monitored along the length of the model. The instrument suite was used to access the requirements necessary to achieve air layer drag reduction (ALDR). Injection of air over a wide range of air fluxes showed that three drag reduction regimes exist when injecting air; (1) bubble drag reduction that has poor downstream persistence, (2) a transitional regime with a steep rise in drag reduction, and (3) ALDR regime where the drag reduction plateaus at 90% ± 10% over the entire model length with large void fractions in the near-wall region. These investigations revealed several requirements for ALDR including; sufficient volumetric air fluxes that increase approximately with the square of the free-stream speed, slightly higher air fluxes are needed when the surface tension is reduced, higher air fluxes are required for rough surfaces, and the formation of ALDR is sensitive to the inlet condition.

  4. Accurate identification of layer number for few-layer WS2 and WSe2 via spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanzheng; Li, Xinshu; Yu, Tong; Yang, Guochun; Chen, Heyu; Zhang, Cen; Feng, Qiushi; Ma, Jiangang; Liu, Weizhen; Xu, Haiyang; Liu, Yichun; Liu, Xinfeng

    2018-03-23

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) with a typical layered structure are highly sensitive to their layer number in optical and electronic properties. Seeking a simple and effective method for layer number identification is very important to low-dimensional TMD samples. Herein, a rapid and accurate layer number identification of few-layer WS 2 and WSe 2 is proposed via locking their photoluminescence (PL) peak-positions. As the layer number of WS 2 /WSe 2 increases, it is found that indirect transition emission is more thickness-sensitive than direct transition emission, and the PL peak-position differences between the indirect and direct transitions can be regarded as fingerprints to identify their layer number. Theoretical calculation confirms that the notable thickness-sensitivity of indirect transition derives from the variations of electron density of states of W atom d-orbitals and chalcogen atom p-orbitals. Besides, the PL peak-position differences between the indirect and direct transitions are almost independent of different insulating substrates. This work not only proposes a new method for layer number identification via PL studies, but also provides a valuable insight into the thickness-dependent optical and electronic properties of W-based TMDs.

  5. Phase transitions, optical and electronic properties of the layered perovskite hybrid [NH3(CH2)2COOH ]2CdCl4 of Y-aminobutyric acid (GABA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShammari, Mohammed B.; Kaiba, A.; Guionneau, P.; Geesi, Mohammed H.; Aljohani, Talal; Riadi, Yassine

    2018-06-01

    A new organic-inorganic hybrid with the formula (NH3C3H6CO2H)2CdCl4 has been crystallized and investigated by X-ray diffraction. Structural investigations highlight a first-order reversible structural phase transition occurring within the range (290-370 K) between a chiral (phase II) and non-centrosymmetric (Phase I) crystal packing. This strong structural reorganization is the result of conformational changes in the organic chains accompanied by a decrease in octahedral distortion. The accurate crystallographic analysis illustrates the crucial role of organic moieties. The experimental energy gap value (3.65 eV) is in good agreement with the theoretical value obtained by density functional theory.

  6. Layering and Ordering in Electrochemical Double Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yihua [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Kawaguchi, Tomoya [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Pierce, Michael S. [Rochester Institute of Technology, School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester, New York 14623, United States; Komanicky, Vladimir [Faculty of Science, Safarik University, 041 54 Kosice, Slovakia; You, Hoydoo [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States

    2018-02-26

    Electrochemical double layers (EDL) form at electrified interfaces. While Gouy-Chapman model describes moderately charged EDL, formation of Stern layers was predicted for highly charged EDL. Our results provide structural evidence for a Stern layer of cations, at potentials close to hydrogen evolution in alkali fluoride and chloride electrolytes. Layering was observed by x-ray crystal truncation rods and atomic-scale recoil responses of Pt(111) surface layers. Ordering in the layer is confirmed by glancing-incidence in-plane diffraction measurements.

  7. Transit space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raahauge, Kirsten Marie

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with representations of one specific city, Århus, Denmark, especially its central district. The analysis is based on anthropological fieldwork conducted in Skåde Bakker and Fedet, two well-off neighborhoods. The overall purpose of the project is to study perceptions of space...... and the interaction of cultural, social, and spatial organizations, as seen from the point of view of people living in Skåde Bakker and Fedet. The focus is on the city dwellers’ representations of the central district of Århus with specific reference to the concept of transit space. When applied to various Århusian...

  8. Transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, C.

    1977-01-01

    The Glossary is designed to be a technical dictionary that will provide solar workers of various specialties, students, other astronomers and theoreticians with concise information on the nature and the properties of phenomena of solar and solar-terrestrial physics. Each term, or group of related terms, is given a concise phenomenological and quantitative description, including the relationship to other phenomena and an interpretation in terms of physical processes. The references are intended to lead the non-specialist reader into the literature. This section deals with: transition region; di-electronic recombination; intersystem or intercombination lines; satellite lines; grazing-incidence optics; and crystal spectrometers. (B.R.H.)

  9. Magnetism in layered Ruthenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffens, Paul C.

    2008-07-01

    In this thesis, the magnetism of the layered Ruthenates has been studied by means of different neutron scattering techniques. Magnetic correlations in the single-layer Ruthenates of the series Ca{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}RuO{sub 4} have been investigated as function of Sr-concentration (x=0.2 and 0.62), temperature and magnetic field. These inelastic neutron scattering studies demonstrate the coexistence of ferromagnetic paramagnon scattering with antiferromagnetic fluctuations at incommensurate wave vectors. The temperature dependence of the amplitudes and energies of both types of excitations indicate the proximity to magnetic instabilities; their competition seems to determine the complex behavior of these materials. In Ca{sub 1.8}Sr{sub 0.2}RuO{sub 4}, which shows a metamagnetic transition, the ferromagnetic fluctuations are strongly suppressed at low temperature, but appear at higher temperature or application of a magnetic field. In the high-field phase of Ca{sub 1.8}Sr{sub 0.2}RuO{sub 4} above the metamagnetic transition, a ferromagnetic magnon dominates the excitation spectrum. Polarized neutron scattering revealed the existence of a very broad signal around the zone centre, in addition to the well-known incommensurate excitations at Q=(0.3,0.3,0) in the unconventional superconductor Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}. With this additional contribution, it is possible to set up a general model for the Q-dependent magnetic susceptibility, which is well consistent with the results of other measurement methods that do not resolve the Q-dependence. Upon doping with Ti, the incommensurate fluctuations are enhanced, in particular near the critical concentration for the onset of magnetic order, but no divergence down to very low temperature is observed. In the bilayer Ti-doped Ca{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}, the existence of magnetic order with a propagation vector of about ((1)/(4),(1)/(4),0) has been discovered and characterized in detail. Above and below T{sub N}, excitations at this

  10. Magnetism in layered Ruthenates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffens, Paul C.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, the magnetism of the layered Ruthenates has been studied by means of different neutron scattering techniques. Magnetic correlations in the single-layer Ruthenates of the series Ca 2-x Sr x RuO 4 have been investigated as function of Sr-concentration (x=0.2 and 0.62), temperature and magnetic field. These inelastic neutron scattering studies demonstrate the coexistence of ferromagnetic paramagnon scattering with antiferromagnetic fluctuations at incommensurate wave vectors. The temperature dependence of the amplitudes and energies of both types of excitations indicate the proximity to magnetic instabilities; their competition seems to determine the complex behavior of these materials. In Ca 1.8 Sr 0.2 RuO 4 , which shows a metamagnetic transition, the ferromagnetic fluctuations are strongly suppressed at low temperature, but appear at higher temperature or application of a magnetic field. In the high-field phase of Ca 1.8 Sr 0.2 RuO 4 above the metamagnetic transition, a ferromagnetic magnon dominates the excitation spectrum. Polarized neutron scattering revealed the existence of a very broad signal around the zone centre, in addition to the well-known incommensurate excitations at Q=(0.3,0.3,0) in the unconventional superconductor Sr 2 RuO 4 . With this additional contribution, it is possible to set up a general model for the Q-dependent magnetic susceptibility, which is well consistent with the results of other measurement methods that do not resolve the Q-dependence. Upon doping with Ti, the incommensurate fluctuations are enhanced, in particular near the critical concentration for the onset of magnetic order, but no divergence down to very low temperature is observed. In the bilayer Ti-doped Ca 3 Ru 2 O 7 , the existence of magnetic order with a propagation vector of about ((1)/(4),(1)/(4),0) has been discovered and characterized in detail. Above and below T N , excitations at this wave vector and another one, related to Sr 3 Ru 2 O 7 , have been

  11. Transitional issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This discussion paper, the fifth in the series developed at the IPPSO Market Design Conference, addressed the issue of the need to prevent Ontario Hydro from taking unfair advantage of independent producers and other stakeholders through activities and investments in new power generating capacity in the transitional period leading up to deregulation. The need for controls is predicated on the assumption that the short-term actions and investments of Ontario Hydro could seriously compromise the position of independent generators, and that without such controls the level playing field essential to the operation of a competitive market, does not exist. Various actual and potential actions of Ontario Hydro were discussed, all of which point to the need for strict controls over Ontario Hydro exercising its dominant market power in an unfair way. It was recommended that as a minimum, the provincial government should no longer provide guarantees for Ontario Hydro capital projects, and that Ontario Hydro be instructed to defer any investment on new or returning generating capacity until the new market is in place. Limits could also be placed on Ontario Hydro's marketing efforts to enter into contracts during the transition period, and Ontario Hydro and municipal utilities should be required to keep separate accounts of their commercial preparation, and to settle such accounts separate from ratepayer revenue

  12. Validation of three-dimensional incompressible spatial direct numerical simulation code: A comparison with linear stability and parabolic stability equation theories for boundary-layer transition on a flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Streett, Craig L.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    1992-01-01

    Spatially evolving instabilities in a boundary layer on a flat plate are computed by direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. In a truncated physical domain, a nonstaggered mesh is used for the grid. A Chebyshev-collocation method is used normal to the wall; finite difference and compact difference methods are used in the streamwise direction; and a Fourier series is used in the spanwise direction. For time stepping, implicit Crank-Nicolson and explicit Runge-Kutta schemes are used to the time-splitting method. The influence-matrix technique is used to solve the pressure equation. At the outflow boundary, the buffer-domain technique is used to prevent convective wave reflection or upstream propagation of information from the boundary. Results of the DNS are compared with those from both linear stability theory (LST) and parabolized stability equation (PSE) theory. Computed disturbance amplitudes and phases are in very good agreement with those of LST (for small inflow disturbance amplitudes). A measure of the sensitivity of the inflow condition is demonstrated with both LST and PSE theory used to approximate inflows. Although the DNS numerics are very different than those of PSE theory, the results are in good agreement. A small discrepancy in the results that does occur is likely a result of the variation in PSE boundary condition treatment in the far field. Finally, a small-amplitude wave triad is forced at the inflow, and simulation results are compared with those of LST. Again, very good agreement is found between DNS and LST results for the 3-D simulations, the implication being that the disturbance amplitudes are sufficiently small that nonlinear interactions are negligible.

  13. Bandgap tunability at single-layer molybdenum disulphide grain boundaries

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yu Li; Chen, Yifeng; Zhang, Wenjing; Quek, Su Ying; Chen, Chang-Hsiao; Li, Lain-Jong; Hsu, Wei-Ting; Chang, Wen-Hao; Zheng, Yu Jie; Chen, Wei; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2015-01-01

    represents a prototype two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide, has an electronic bandgap that increases with decreasing layer thickness. Using high-resolution scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, we measure the apparent quasiparticle

  14. Impact of rheological layering on rift asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaquet, Yoann; Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Duretz, Thibault

    2015-04-01

    Although numerous models of rift formation have been proposed, what triggers asymmetry of rifted margins remains unclear. Parametrized material softening is often employed to induce asymmetric fault patterns in numerical models. Here, we use thermo-mechanical finite element models that allow softening via thermal weakening. We investigate the importance of lithosphere rheology and mechanical layering on rift morphology. The numerical code is based on the MILAMIN solver and uses the Triangle mesh generator. Our model configuration consists of a visco-elasto-platic layered lithosphere comprising either (1) only one brittle-ductile transition (in the mantle) or (2) three brittle-ductile transitions (one in the upper crust, one in the lower crust and one in the mantle). We perform then two sets of simulations characterized by low and high extensional strain rates (5*10-15 s-1, 2*10-14 s-1). The results show that the extension of a lithosphere comprising only one brittle-ductile transition produces a symmetric 'neck' type rift. The upper and lower crusts are thinned until the lithospheric mantle is exhumed to the seafloor. A lithosphere containing three brittle-ductile transitions favors strain localization. Shear zones at different horizontal locations and generated in the brittle levels of the lithosphere get connected by the weak ductile layers. The results suggest that rheological layering of the lithosphere can be a reason for the generation of asymmetric rifting and subsequent rift morphology.

  15. Energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2013-01-01

    The yearly environmental conference will hold on September 2013 to evaluate the negotiations led at the national and local levels for december 2012. The government will have then to decide of an energy programming bill which will be submitted to the Parliament at the beginning of the year 2014. 30 main propositions have emerged of the decentralised debates. One of them is the ecological taxation which raise the question of the gas oil and petrol taxation. The current environmental taxes are for almost three quarters of them taxes on energy consumptions and mainly on fossil energies. The Economic, Social and Environmental Council, gives his opinion on the way to find resources to ensure the ecological and energy transition while reducing the public deficit of the State. (O.M.)

  16. Transition welds in welding of two-ply steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fartushnyj, V.G.; Evsyukov, Yu.G.

    1977-01-01

    Studied were physico-mechanical properties of welds made by various welding wires of chromium-nickel and nickel-chromium steels in submerged arc welding of double-layer steels with main layer of the VSt.3sp. carbon steel. It is shown that service-reliable structures welded of two-layer steels are obtained by providing the content from 11 to 20 % Ni in the automatically welded transition layer

  17. Numerical simulation of transitional flow on a wind turbine airfoil with RANS-based transition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Sun, Zhengzhong; van Zuijlen, Alexander; van Bussel, Gerard

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of transitional flow on the wind turbine airfoil DU91-W2-250 with chord-based Reynolds number Rec = 1.0 × 106. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes based transition model using laminar kinetic energy concept, namely the k - kL - ω model, is employed to resolve the boundary layer transition. Some ambiguities for this model are discussed and it is further implemented into OpenFOAM-2.1.1. The k - kL - ω model is first validated through the chosen wind turbine airfoil at the angle of attack (AoA) of 6.24° against wind tunnel measurement, where lift and drag coefficients, surface pressure distribution and transition location are compared. In order to reveal the transitional flow on the airfoil, the mean boundary layer profiles in three zones, namely the laminar, transitional and fully turbulent regimes, are investigated. Observation of flow at the transition location identifies the laminar separation bubble. The AoA effect on boundary layer transition over wind turbine airfoil is also studied. Increasing the AoA from -3° to 10°, the laminar separation bubble moves upstream and reduces in size, which is in close agreement with wind tunnel measurement.

  18. Superconductivity in few-layer stanene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Menghan; Zang, Yunyi; Guan, Zhaoyong; Li, Haiwei; Gong, Yan; Zhu, Kejing; Hu, Xiao-Peng; Zhang, Ding; Xu, Yong; Wang, Ya-Yu; He, Ke; Ma, Xu-Cun; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2018-04-01

    A single atomic slice of α-tin—stanene—has been predicted to host the quantum spin Hall effect at room temperature, offering an ideal platform to study low-dimensional and topological physics. Although recent research has focused on monolayer stanene, the quantum size effect in few-layer stanene could profoundly change material properties, but remains unexplored. By exploring the layer degree of freedom, we discover superconductivity in few-layer stanene down to a bilayer grown on PbTe, while bulk α-tin is not superconductive. Through substrate engineering, we further realize a transition from a single-band to a two-band superconductor with a doubling of the transition temperature. In situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) together with first-principles calculations elucidate the corresponding band structure. The theory also indicates the existence of a topologically non-trivial band. Our experimental findings open up novel strategies for constructing two-dimensional topological superconductors.

  19. Layer-by-layer thinning of MoSe_2 by soft and reactive plasma etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sha, Yunfei; Xiao, Shaoqing; Zhang, Xiumei; Qin, Fang; Gu, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Soft plasma etching technique using SF_6 + N_2 as precursors for layer-by-layer thinning of MoSe_2 was adopted in this work. • Optical microscopy, Raman, photoluminescence and atomic force microscopy measurements were used to confirm the thickness change. • Layer-dependent vibrational and photoluminescence spectra of the etched MoSe_2 were also demonstrated. • Equal numbers of MoSe_2 layers can be removed uniformly without affecting the underlying SiO_2 substrate and the remaining MoSe_2 layers. - Abstract: Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) like molybdenum diselenide (MoSe_2) have recently gained considerable interest since their properties are complementary to those of graphene. Unlike gapless graphene, the band structure of MoSe_2 can be changed from the indirect band gap to the direct band gap when MoSe_2 changed from bulk material to monolayer. This transition from multilayer to monolayer requires atomic-layer-precision thining of thick MoSe_2 layers without damaging the remaining layers. Here, we present atomic-layer-precision thinning of MoSe_2 nanaosheets down to monolayer by using SF_6 + N_2 plasmas, which has been demonstrated to be soft, selective and high-throughput. Optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman and photoluminescence spectra suggest that equal numbers of MoSe_2 layers can be removed uniformly regardless of their initial thickness, without affecting the underlying SiO_2 substrate and the remaining MoSe_2 layers. By adjusting the etching rates we can achieve complete MoSe_2 removal and any disired number of MoSe_2 layers including monolayer. This soft plasma etching method is highly reliable and compatible with the semiconductor manufacturing processes, thereby holding great promise for various 2D materials and TMD-based devices.

  20. Buffer layers for REBCO films for use in superconducting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit; Wee, Sung-Hun

    2014-06-10

    A superconducting article includes a substrate having a biaxially textured surface. A biaxially textured buffer layer, which can be a cap layer, is supported by the substrate. The buffer layer includes a double perovskite of the formula A.sub.2B'B''O.sub.6, where A is rare earth or alkaline earth metal and B' and B'' are different transition metal cations. A biaxially textured superconductor layer is deposited so as to be supported by the buffer layer. A method of making a superconducting article is also disclosed.

  1. The theory of double layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schamel, H.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical and in some degree laboratory experiments suggest the existence of at least two different kinds of time-independent double layers: a strictly monotonic transition of the electrostatic potential and a transition accompanied by a negative spike at the low potential side (ion acoustic DL). An interpretation of both is presented in terms of analytic BGK modes. The first class of DLs commonly observed in voltage- or beam-driven plasmas needs for its existence beam-type distributions satisfying a Bohm criterion. The potential drop is at least of the order of Tsub(e), and stability arguments favour currents which satisfy the Langmuir condition. The second class found in current-driven plasma simulations is correlated with ion holes. This latter kind of nonlinear wave-solutions is linearly based on the slow ion-acoustic mode and exists due to a vortex-like distortion of the ion distribution in the thermal range. During the growth of an ion hole which is triggered by ion-acoustic fluctuations, the partial reflection of streaming electrons causes different plasma states on both sides of the potential dip and makes the ion hole asymmetric giving rise to an effective potential drop. This implies that the amplitude of this second type of double layers has an upper limit of 1-2 Tsub(e) and presumes a temperature ratio of Tsub(e)/Tsub(i) > or approximately 3 in coincidence with the numerical results. (Auth.)

  2. Layered van der Waals crystals with hyperbolic light dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerding, Morten Niklas; Petersen, R.; Pedersen, T.G.

    2017-01-01

    Compared to artificially structured hyperbolic metamaterials, whose performance is limited by the finite size of the metallic components, the sparse number of naturally hyperbolic materials recently discovered are promising candidates for the next generation of hyperbolic materials. Using first......-principles calculations, we extend the number of known naturally hyperbolic materials to the broad class of layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). The diverse electronic properties of the transition metal dichalcogenides result in a large variation of the hyperbolic frequency regimes ranging from the near...... materials with hyperbolic dispersion among the family of layered transition metal dichalcogenides....

  3. High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Design with Transition Prediction, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To enhance aerodynamic design capabilities, Desktop Aeronautics proposes to combine a new sweep/taper integrated-boundary-layer (IBL) code that includes transition...

  4. Hairpin vortices in turbulent boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eitel-Amor, G; Schlatter, P; Flores, O

    2014-01-01

    The present work addresses the question whether hairpin vortices are a dominant feature of near-wall turbulence and which role they play during transition. First, the parent-offspring mechanism is investigated in temporal simulations of a single hairpin vortex introduced in a mean shear flow corresponding to turbulent channels and boundary layers up to Re τ = 590. Using an eddy viscosity computed from resolved simulations, the effect of a turbulent background is also considered. Tracking the vortical structure downstream, it is found that secondary hairpins are created shortly after initialization. Thereafter, all rotational structures decay, whereas this effect is enforced in the presence of an eddy viscosity. In a second approach, a laminar boundary layer is tripped to transition by insertion of a regular pattern of hairpins by means of defined volumetric forces representing an ejection event. The idea is to create a synthetic turbulent boundary layer dominated by hairpin-like vortices. The flow for Re τ < 250 is analysed with respect to the lifetime of individual hairpin-like vortices. Both the temporal and spatial simulations demonstrate that the regeneration process is rather short-lived and may not sustain once a turbulent background has formed. From the transitional flow simulations, it is conjectured that the forest of hairpins reported in former DNS studies is an outer layer phenomenon not being connected to the onset of near-wall turbulence.

  5. Overview of stability and transition in external aerodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Henkes, R.A.W.M.; Van Ingen, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The boundary layer along the fuselage, wings and tailplanes of aircraft will usually be laminar at the leading edge and will become unstable further downstream. Once the boundary layer has become unstable it will undergo transition to turbulence. Stability and transition can be considered as one of the most complex problems of fluid dynamics. The details depend on a number of parameters, such as the type of initial perturbations (e.g. free-stream turbulence level, wall roughness), Reynolds nu...

  6. VSWI Wetlands Advisory Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset represents the DEC Wetlands Program's Advisory layer. This layer makes the most up-to-date, non-jurisdictional, wetlands mapping avaiable to the public...

  7. Detached Eddy Simulations of Hypersonic Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, S.; Barnhardt, M.; Candler, G.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) of hypersonic transistion. The objective of the study was to investigate the feasibility of using CFD in general, DES in particular, for prediction of roughness-induced boundary layer transition to turbulence and the resulting increase in heat transfer.

  8. Layer-by-layer cell membrane assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matosevic, Sandro; Paegel, Brian M.

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic subcellular membrane systems, such as the nuclear envelope or endoplasmic reticulum, present a rich array of architecturally and compositionally complex supramolecular targets that are as yet inaccessible. Here we describe layer-by-layer phospholipid membrane assembly on microfluidic droplets, a route to structures with defined compositional asymmetry and lamellarity. Starting with phospholipid-stabilized water-in-oil droplets trapped in a static droplet array, lipid monolayer deposition proceeds as oil/water-phase boundaries pass over the droplets. Unilamellar vesicles assembled layer-by-layer support functional insertion both of purified and of in situ expressed membrane proteins. Synthesis and chemical probing of asymmetric unilamellar and double-bilayer vesicles demonstrate the programmability of both membrane lamellarity and lipid-leaflet composition during assembly. The immobilized vesicle arrays are a pragmatic experimental platform for biophysical studies of membranes and their associated proteins, particularly complexes that assemble and function in multilamellar contexts in vivo.

  9. PMMA highlights the layering transition of PDMS in Langmuir films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardini, C.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Arnaudov, L.N.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    We report a system consisting of a mixed Langmuir monolayer, made of water-insoluble, spreadable, fluid-like polymers polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) with a minority P(DMS-b-MMA) copolymer. We have performed both Langmuir trough pressure/area isotherm measurements and

  10. Characterization of hypersonic roughness-induced boundary-layer transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirtey, S. C.; Chazot, O.; Walpot, L.

    2011-02-01

    The flow-field structure in the vicinity and in the wake of an isolated 3D roughness element has been studied. Different experimental techniques have been coupled and supported by CFD simulation for a good understanding of the flow-field topology. The results have shown strong flow-field similarities for different roughness elements. A model describing the flow structure and interaction mechanisms has been proposed. This model is in good agreement with experimental and CFD results as well as the literature.

  11. Redox Liquid Phase Exfoliation of Layered Transition Metal Dichalcogenides (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-29

    a l Figure S18. AFM images and line cuts of TMD flakes. Intermediate heights or steps were not observed for all samples. Small particulates...Dordrecht, 2001; pp 89–99. (10) Backes, C.; Smith, R. J.; McEvoy, N.; Berner, N. C.; McCloskey, D.; Nerl, H. C.; O’Neill, A.; King, P. J.; Higgins , T

  12. Double layers in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlqvist, P.

    1982-07-01

    For more than a decade it has been realised that electrostatic double layers are likely to occur in space. We briefly discuss the theoretical background of such double layers. Most of the paper is devoted to an account of the observational evidence for double layers in the ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth. Several different experiments are reviewed including rocket and satellite measurements and ground based observations. It is concluded that the observational evidence for double layers in space is very strong. The experimental results indicate that double layers with widely different properties may exist in space. (Author)

  13. Double layers in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlqvist, P.

    1982-01-01

    For more than a decade it has been realised that electrostatic double layers are likely to occur in space. The author briefly discusses the theoretical background of such double layers. Most of the paper is devoted to an account of the observational evidence for double layers in the ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth. Several different experiments are reviewed including rocket and satellite measurements and ground based observations. It is concluded that the observational evidence for double layers in space is very strong. The experimental results indicate that double layers with widely different properties may exist in space. (Auth.)

  14. Laminar turbulent transition in heated free jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejci, L.; Marsik, F.; Nenicka, V.

    1998-01-01

    The evolution of heat and mass transfer in the initial region of a transitional plasma plume is investigated and discussed. The results show that these transport processes are controlled and limited by the plume shear layer instability. The process of laminar-turbulent transition is consecutively controlled by the plume core shear layer instability where interrelation of the effective thickness of the shear temperature and density layers play decisive role. When the absolute instability occurs the resonances in the jet and arc chamber must be taken into account. These processes are manifested in three events. Between the first and second phase, there is a maximum of arc heater exit average enthalpy. The other two thresholds occur at maximum and minimum stagnation heat flux from the plume core. It seems that these processes also influence the thermal energy production in the arc chamber cavity. (author)

  15. Equinoctial transitions in the ionosphere and thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mikhailov

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Equinoctial summer/winter transitions in the parameters of the F2-region are analyzed using ground-based ionosonde and incoherent scatter observations. Average transition from one type of diurnal NmF2 variation to another takes 20–25 days, but cases of very fast (6–10 days transitions are observed as well. Strong day-time NmF2 deviations of both signs from the monthly median, not related to geomagnetic activity, are revealed for the transition periods. Both longitudinal and latitudinal variations take place for the amplitude of such quiet time NmF2 deviations. The summer-type diurnal NmF2 variation during the transition period is characterized by decreased atomic oxygen concentration [O] and a small equatorward thermospheric wind compared to winter-type days with strong poleward wind and increased [O]. Molecular N2 and O2 concentrations remain practically unchanged in such day-to-day transitions. The main cause of the F2-layer variations during the transition periods is the change of atomic oxygen abundance in the thermosphere related to changes of global thermospheric circulation. A possible relationship with an equinoctial transition of atomic oxygen at the E-region heights is discussed.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (thermosphere – composition and chemistry – Ionosphere (ionosphere- atmosphere interactions; ionospheric disturbances

  16. Self-organization in circular shear layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergeron, K.; Coutsias, E.A.; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    1996-01-01

    Experiments on forced circular shear layers performed in both magnetized plasmas and in rotating fluids reveal qualitatively similar self-organization processes leading to the formation of patterns of coherent vortical structures with varying complexity. In this paper results are presented from...... both weakly nonlinear analysis and full numerical simulations that closely reproduce the experimental observations. Varying the Reynolds number leads to bifurcation sequences accompanied by topological changes in the distribution of the coherent structures as well as clear transitions in the total...

  17. Baryon inhomogeneity from the cosmic quark-hadron phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurki-Suonio, H.

    1991-01-01

    We discuss the generation of inhomogeneity in the baryon-number density during the cosmic quark-hadron phase transition. We use a simple model with thin-wall phase boundaries and ideal-gas equations of state. The nucleation of the phase transition introduces a new distance scale into the universe which will be the scale of the generated inhomogeneity. We review the estimate of this scale. During the transition baryon number is likely to collect onto a layer at the phase boundary. These layers may in the end be deposited as small regions of very high baryon density. 21 refs., 1 fig

  18. Multi-layers castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented the possibility of making of multi-layers cast steel castings in result of connection of casting and welding coating technologies. First layer was composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy, which was put directly in founding process of cast carbon steel 200–450 with use of preparation of mould cavity method. Second layer were padding welds, which were put with use of TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas surfacing by welding technology with filler on Ni matrix, Ni and Co matrix with wolfram carbides WC and on the basis on Fe-Cr-C alloy, which has the same chemical composition with alloy, which was used for making of composite surface layer. Usability for industrial applications of surface layers of castings were estimated by criterion of hardness and abrasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral.

  19. A double layer review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, L.P.

    1977-06-01

    A review of the main results on electrostatic double layers (sometimes called space charge layers or sheaths) obtained from theory, and laboratory and space experiments up to the spring of 1977 is given. By means of barium jets and satellite probes, double layers have now been found at the altitudes, earlier predicted theoretically. The general potential distribution above the auroral zone, suggested by inverted V-events and electric field reversals, is corroborated. (author)

  20. Two layer powder pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, H.

    1979-01-01

    First, significance and advantages of sintered materials consisting of two layers are pointed out. By means of the two layer powder pressing technique metal powders are formed resulting in compacts with high accuracy of shape and mass. Attributes of basic powders, different filling methods and pressing techniques are discussed. The described technique is supposed to find further applications in the field of two layer compacts in the near future

  1. Economical Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Richard; Davis, Robert; Linford, Matthew

    2010-10-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition is a self limiting deposition process that can produce films at a user specified height. At BYU we have designed a low cost and automated atomic layer deposition system. We have used the system to deposit silicon dioxide at room temperature using silicon tetrachloride and tetramethyl orthosilicate. Basics of atomic layer deposition, the system set up, automation techniques and our system's characterization are discussed.

  2. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The development of robust stable boundary layer parameterizations for use in NWP and climate models is hampered by the multiplicity of processes and their unknown interactions. As a result, these models suffer ...

  3. Synchronization of coupled metronomes on two layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yu, Yi-Zhen; Wang, Xin-Gang

    2017-12-01

    Coupled metronomes serve as a paradigmatic model for exploring the collective behaviors of complex dynamical systems, as well as a classical setup for classroom demonstrations of synchronization phenomena. Whereas previous studies of metronome synchronization have been concentrating on symmetric coupling schemes, here we consider the asymmetric case by adopting the scheme of layered metronomes. Specifically, we place two metronomes on each layer, and couple two layers by placing one on top of the other. By varying the initial conditions of the metronomes and adjusting the friction between the two layers, a variety of synchronous patterns are observed in experiment, including the splay synchronization (SS) state, the generalized splay synchronization (GSS) state, the anti-phase synchronization (APS) state, the in-phase delay synchronization (IPDS) state, and the in-phase synchronization (IPS) state. In particular, the IPDS state, in which the metronomes on each layer are synchronized in phase but are of a constant phase delay to metronomes on the other layer, is observed for the first time. In addition, a new technique based on audio signals is proposed for pattern detection, which is more convenient and easier to apply than the existing acquisition techniques. Furthermore, a theoretical model is developed to explain the experimental observations, and is employed to explore the dynamical properties of the patterns, including the basin distributions and the pattern transitions. Our study sheds new lights on the collective behaviors of coupled metronomes, and the developed setup can be used in the classroom for demonstration purposes.

  4. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Walter C.

    1994-01-01

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is .gtoreq.2 and is the number of selective layers.

  5. Electroless atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David Bruce; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Sheridan, Leah B.; Stickney, John L.; Benson, David M.

    2017-10-31

    A method of electroless atomic layer deposition is described. The method electrolessly generates a layer of sacrificial material on a surface of a first material. The method adds doses of a solution of a second material to the substrate. The method performs a galvanic exchange reaction to oxidize away the layer of the sacrificial material and deposit a layer of the second material on the surface of the first material. The method can be repeated for a plurality of iterations in order to deposit a desired thickness of the second material on the surface of the first material.

  6. Entropy Generation in Steady Laminar Boundary Layers with Pressure Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald M. McEligot

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In an earlier paper in Entropy [1] we hypothesized that the entropy generation rate is the driving force for boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Subsequently, with our colleagues we have examined the prediction of entropy generation during such transitions [2,3]. We found that reasonable predictions for engineering purposes could be obtained for flows with negligible streamwise pressure gradients by adapting the linear combination model of Emmons [4]. A question then arises—will the Emmons approach be useful for boundary layer transition with significant streamwise pressure gradients as by Nolan and Zaki [5]. In our implementation the intermittency is calculated by comparison to skin friction correlations for laminar and turbulent boundary layers and is then applied with comparable correlations for the energy dissipation coefficient (i.e., non-dimensional integral entropy generation rate. In the case of negligible pressure gradients the Blasius theory provides the necessary laminar correlations.

  7. HIFiRE-5 Boundary Layer Transition and HIFiRE-1 Shock Boundary Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    comparisons to the computational data. It should also be noted that multi-dimensional conduction effects, not accounted for in the flight data analysis...are reasonable for much of the HIFiRE-5 trajectory, and may account for discrepancies between measured and computed laminar and turbulent heat...coasted until the second stage ignited at 15 seconds. Orion burnout occurred at 43 seconds. The payload remained attached to the second stage

  8. Characterization of thin gold layers on polyethyleneterephthalate: transition from discontinuous to continuous, homohenous layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švorčík, V.; Zehentner, J.; Rybka, V.; Slepička, P.; Hnatowicz, Vladimír

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 75, - (2002), s. 541-544 ISSN 0947-8396 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/01/1324; GA AV ČR KSK1010104 Keywords : polymers * films Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 2.231, year: 2002

  9. Multi-layer monochromator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenborn, B.P.; Caspar, D.L.D.

    1975-01-01

    This invention provides an artificial monochromator crystal for efficiently selecting a narrow band of neutron wavelengths from a neutron beam having a Maxwellian wavelength distribution, by providing on a substrate a plurality of germanium layers, and alternate periodic layers of a different metal having tailored thicknesses, shapes, and volumetric and neutron scattering densities. (U.S.)

  10. Ozone Layer Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Research Centers Contact Us Share Ozone Layer Protection The stratospheric ozone layer is Earth’s “sunscreen” – protecting ... GreenChill Partnership Responsible Appliance Disposal (RAD) Program Ozone Protection vs. Ozone Pollution This website addresses stratospheric ozone ...

  11. Skin layer mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerligs, M.

    2010-01-01

    The human skin is composed of several layers, each with an unique structure and function. Knowledge about the mechanical behavior of these skin layers is important for clinical and cosmetic research, such as the development of personal care products and the understanding of skin diseases. Until

  12. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  13. Non-equilibrium phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottola, E.; Cooper, F.M.; Bishop, A.R.; Habib, S.; Kluger, Y.; Jensen, N.G.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Non-equilibrium phase transitions play a central role in a very broad range of scientific areas, ranging from nuclear, particle, and astrophysics to condensed matter physics and the material and biological sciences. The aim of this project was to explore the path to a deeper and more fundamental understanding of the common physical principles underlying the complex real time dynamics of phase transitions. The main emphasis was on the development of general theoretical tools to deal with non-equilibrium processes, and of numerical methods robust enough to capture the time-evolving structures that occur in actual experimental situations. Specific applications to Laboratory multidivisional efforts in relativistic heavy-ion physics (transition to a new phase of nuclear matter consisting of a quark-gluon plasma) and layered high-temperature superconductors (critical currents and flux flow at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory) were undertaken

  14. Conductive transition metal oxide nanostructured electrochromic material and optical switching devices constructed thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, Tracy M.; Koo, Bonil; Garcia, Guillermo; Milliron, Delia J.; Trizio, Luca De; Dahlman, Clayton

    2017-10-10

    An electrochromic device includes a nanostructured transition metal oxide bronze layer that includes one or more transition metal oxide and one or more dopant, a solid state electrolyte, and a counter electrode. The nanostructured transition metal oxide bronze selectively modulates transmittance of near-infrared (NIR) spectrum and visible spectrum radiation as a function of an applied voltage to the device.

  15. Development of boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.

    1980-01-01

    Boundary layers develop along the blade surfaces on both the pressure and the suction side in a non-stationary flow field. This is due to the fact that there is a strongly fluctuating flow on the downstream blade row, especially as a result of the wakes of the upstream blade row. The author investigates the formation of boundary layers under non-stationary flow conditions and tries to establish a model describing the non-stationary boundary layer. For this purpose, plate boundary layers are measured, at constant flow rates but different interferent frequency and variable pressure gradients. By introducing the sample technique, measurements of the non-stationary boundary layer become possible, and the flow rate fluctuation can be divided in its components, i.e. stochastic turbulence and periodical fluctuation. (GL) [de

  16. Improved electron transport layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides: a method of preparing a coating ink for forming a zinc oxide electron transport layer, comprising mixing zinc acetate and a wetting agent in water or methanol; a coating ink comprising zinc acetate and a wetting agent in aqueous solution or methanolic solution......; a method of preparing a zinc oxide electron transporting layer, which method comprises: i) coating a substrate with the coating ink of the present invention to form a film; ii) drying the film; and iii) heating the dry film to convert the zinc acetate substantially to ZnO; a method of preparing an organic...... photovoltaic device or an organic LED having a zinc oxide electron transport layer, the method comprising, in this order: a) providing a substrate bearing a first electrode layer; b) forming an electron transport layer according to the following method: i) coating a coating ink comprising an ink according...

  17. Biodiesel Mass Transit Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    The Biodiesel Mass Transit Demonstration report is intended for mass transit decision makers and fleet managers considering biodiesel use. This is the final report for the demonstration project implemented by the National Biodiesel Board under a gran...

  18. Public Transit Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — fixed rail transit stations within the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The modes of transit that are serviced...

  19. Tension layer winding of cable-in-conduit conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devernoe, A.; Ciancetta, G.; King, M.; Parizh, M.; Painter, T.; Miller, J.

    1996-01-01

    A 710 mm i.d. by 440 mm long, 6 layer Cable-in-Conduit (CIC) coil was precision tension layer wound with Incoloy 908 jacketed conductor to model winding technology that will be used for the Nb 3 Sn outsert coils of the 45 Tesla Hybrid Magnet Project at the US National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. This paper reports on the set up of a new winding facility with unique capabilities for insulating and winding long length CIC conductor and on special procedures which were developed to wind and support layer to layer transitions and to safely form conductor into and out of the winding. Analytical methods used to predict conduit keystoning, springback and back tensioning requirements before winding are reported in comparison to results obtained during winding and actual winding build-up dimensions on a layer by layer basis in comparison to design requirements

  20. Quantum phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, S.

    1999-01-01

    Phase transitions are normally associated with changes of temperature but a new type of transition - caused by quantum fluctuations near absolute zero - is possible, and can tell us more about the properties of a wide range of systems in condensed-matter physics. Nature abounds with phase transitions. The boiling and freezing of water are everyday examples of phase transitions, as are more exotic processes such as superconductivity and superfluidity. The universe itself is thought to have passed through several phase transitions as the high-temperature plasma formed by the big bang cooled to form the world as we know it today. Phase transitions are traditionally classified as first or second order. In first-order transitions the two phases co-exist at the transition temperature - e.g. ice and water at 0 deg., or water and steam at 100 deg. In second-order transitions the two phases do not co-exist. In the last decade, attention has focused on phase transitions that are qualitatively different from the examples noted above: these are quantum phase transitions and they occur only at the absolute zero of temperature. The transition takes place at the ''quantum critical'' value of some other parameter such as pressure, composition or magnetic field strength. A quantum phase transition takes place when co-operative ordering of the system disappears, but this loss of order is driven solely by the quantum fluctuations demanded by Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. The physical properties of these quantum fluctuations are quite distinct from those of the thermal fluctuations responsible for traditional, finite-temperature phase transitions. In particular, the quantum system is described by a complex-valued wavefunction, and the dynamics of its phase near the quantum critical point requires novel theories that have no analogue in the traditional framework of phase transitions. In this article the author describes the history of quantum phase transitions. (UK)

  1. Cosmological phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, E.W.

    1993-10-01

    If modern ideas about the role of spontaneous symmetry breaking in fundamental physics are correct, then the Universe should have undergone a series of phase transitions early in its history. The study of cosmological phase transitions has become an important aspect of early-Universe cosmology. In this lecture I review some very recent work on three aspects of phase transitions: the electroweak transition, texture, and axions

  2. Stability and transition on swept wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckert, Greg; Herbert, Thorwald; Esfahanian, Vahid

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the extension and application of the Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE) to the stability and transition of the supersonic three-dimensional laminar boundary layer on a swept wing. The problem formulation uses a general coordinate transformation for arbitrary curvilinear body-fitted computational grids. Some testing using these coordinates is briefly described to help validate the software used for the investigation. The disturbance amplitude ratios as a function of chord position for supersonic (Mach 1.5) boundary layers on untapered, untwisted wings of different sweep angles are then presented and compared with those obtained from local parallel analyses.

  3. Modeling for transition management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chappin, E.J.L.; Dijkema, G.P.J.

    2015-01-01

    A framework for the modeling and simulation of transitions is presented. A transition, “substantial change in the state of a socio-technical system”, typically unfolds over a long timespan. We therefore suggest to use simulation to inform transition managers on the effect of their decisions.

  4. Modeling for Transition Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chappin, Emile J L; Dijkema, Gerard P.J.

    2015-01-01

    A framework for the modeling and simulation of transitions is presented. A transition, “substantial change in the state of a socio-technical system”, typically unfolds over a long timespan. We therefore suggest to use simulation to inform transition managers on the effect of their decisions.

  5. Microwave stability at transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.A.; Colestock, P.L.

    1995-05-01

    The question of microwave stability at transition is revisited using a Vlasov approach retaining higher order terms in the particle dynamics near the transition energy. A dispersion relation is derived which can be solved numerically for the complex frequency in terms of the longitudinal impedance and other beam parameters. Stability near transition is examined and compared with simulation results

  6. Transit manager's handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    This handbook provides an overview of public transit in Iowa and how to do business with the Iowa Department of Transportation (Iowa DOT) Office of Public Transit (OPT). It is intended to be a tool to assist transit managers navigate through the many...

  7. Transit labor relations guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    This report is designed as a guide for those involved in labor relations in the transit industry. It begins with a history of transit labor relations. The economic, political, and legal environment of transit relations is then discussed. A section fo...

  8. Transition: Preschool to Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Transition is movement or change without interruption. It should be a smooth flow from one place or condition to another. While the transition plan for a student receiving special education services is designed to prepare him or her for life after high school, transition can start when a child enters preschool. The second of six distinct stages of…

  9. The Application of Layer Theory to Design: The Control Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Andrew S.; Langton, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    A theory of design layers proposed by Gibbons ("An Architectural Approach to Instructional Design." Routledge, New York, 2014) asserts that each layer of an instructional design is related to a body of theory closely associated with the concerns of that particular layer. This study focuses on one layer, the control layer, examining…

  10. Topologically nontrivial quantum layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carron, G.; Exner, P.; Krejcirik, D.

    2004-01-01

    Given a complete noncompact surface Σ embedded in R 3 , we consider the Dirichlet Laplacian in the layer Ω that is defined as a tubular neighborhood of constant width about Σ. Using an intrinsic approach to the geometry of Ω, we generalize the spectral results of the original paper by Duclos et al. [Commun. Math. Phys. 223, 13 (2001)] to the situation when Σ does not possess poles. This enables us to consider topologically more complicated layers and state new spectral results. In particular, we are interested in layers built over surfaces with handles or several cylindrically symmetric ends. We also discuss more general regions obtained by compact deformations of certain Ω

  11. Transition Theory – Sustainable Transition of Socio-Technical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergård, Bent; Holm, Jesper; Stauning, Inger

    2015-01-01

    Theories of transition management, transition studies and social practise theory Applied to studies of hosuing and construction......Theories of transition management, transition studies and social practise theory Applied to studies of hosuing and construction...

  12. Gifts from Exoplanetary Transits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Norio

    2009-08-01

    The discovery of transiting extrasolar planets has enabled us to do a number of interesting studies. Transit photometry reveals the radius and the orbital inclination of transiting planets, which allows us to learn the true mass and density of the respective planets by the combined information from radial velocity (RV) measurements. In addition, follow-up observations of transiting planets, looking at such things as secondary eclipses, transit timing variations, transmission spectroscopy, and the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, provide us information about their dayside temperatures, unseen bodies in systems, planetary atmospheres, and the obliquity of planetary orbits. Such observational information, which will provide us a greater understanding of extrasolar planets, is available only for transiting planets. Here, I briefly summarize what we can learn from transiting planets and introduce previous studies.

  13. Arctic Mixed Layer Dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morison, James

    2003-01-01

    .... Over the years we have sought to understand the heat and mass balance of the mixed layer, marginal ice zone processes, the Arctic internal wave and mixing environment, summer and winter leads, and convection...

  14. Layered inorganic solids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čejka, Jiří; Morris, R. E.; Nachtigall, P.; Roth, Wieslaw Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 27 (2014), s. 10274-10275 ISSN 1477-9226 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : layered inorganic solids * physical chemistry * catalysis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.197, year: 2014

  15. Addressing Ozone Layer Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Access information on EPA's efforts to address ozone layer depletion through regulations, collaborations with stakeholders, international treaties, partnerships with the private sector, and enforcement actions under Title VI of the Clean Air Act.

  16. Layered Fault Management Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sztipanovits, Janos

    2004-01-01

    ... UAVs or Organic Air Vehicles. The approach of this effort was to analyze fault management requirements of formation flight for fleets of UAVs, and develop a layered fault management architecture which demonstrates significant...

  17. The Bottom Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, John H; Lentz, Steven J

    2018-01-03

    The oceanic bottom boundary layer extracts energy and momentum from the overlying flow, mediates the fate of near-bottom substances, and generates bedforms that retard the flow and affect benthic processes. The bottom boundary layer is forced by winds, waves, tides, and buoyancy and is influenced by surface waves, internal waves, and stratification by heat, salt, and suspended sediments. This review focuses on the coastal ocean. The main points are that (a) classical turbulence concepts and modern turbulence parameterizations provide accurate representations of the structure and turbulent fluxes under conditions in which the underlying assumptions hold, (b) modern sensors and analyses enable high-quality direct or near-direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes and dissipation rates, and (c) the remaining challenges include the interaction of waves and currents with the erodible seabed, the impact of layer-scale two- and three-dimensional instabilities, and the role of the bottom boundary layer in shelf-slope exchange.

  18. The Bottom Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, John H.; Lentz, Steven J.

    2018-01-01

    The oceanic bottom boundary layer extracts energy and momentum from the overlying flow, mediates the fate of near-bottom substances, and generates bedforms that retard the flow and affect benthic processes. The bottom boundary layer is forced by winds, waves, tides, and buoyancy and is influenced by surface waves, internal waves, and stratification by heat, salt, and suspended sediments. This review focuses on the coastal ocean. The main points are that (a) classical turbulence concepts and modern turbulence parameterizations provide accurate representations of the structure and turbulent fluxes under conditions in which the underlying assumptions hold, (b) modern sensors and analyses enable high-quality direct or near-direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes and dissipation rates, and (c) the remaining challenges include the interaction of waves and currents with the erodible seabed, the impact of layer-scale two- and three-dimensional instabilities, and the role of the bottom boundary layer in shelf-slope exchange.

  19. Stoner magnetism in an inversion layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golosov, D.I., E-mail: Denis.Golosov@biu.ac.il

    2016-02-15

    Motivated by recent experimental work on magnetic properties of Si-MOSFETs, we report a calculation of magnetisation and susceptibility of electrons in an inversion layer, taking into account the co-ordinate dependence of electron wave function in the direction perpendicular to the plane. It is assumed that the inversion-layer carriers interact via a contact repulsive potential, which is treated at a mean-field level, resulting in a self-consistent change of profile of the wave functions. We find that the results differ significantly from those obtained in the pure 2DEG case (where no provision is made for a quantum motion in the transverse direction). Specifically, the critical value of interaction needed to attain the ferromagnetic (Stoner) instability is decreased and the Stoner criterion is therefore relaxed. This leads to an increased susceptibility and ultimately to a ferromagnetic transition deep in the high-density metallic regime. In the opposite limit of low carrier densities, a phenomenological treatment of the in-plane correlation effects suggests a ferromagnetic instability above the metal–insulator transition. Results are discussed in the context of the available experimental data. - Highlights: • Stoner-type mean field theory for electrons in an inversion layer is constructed. • Wave function change under an in-plane magnetic field is taken into account. • Tendency toward ferromagnetism is strengthened in comparison with a usual Stoner theory. • In-plane correlations at low densities are taken into account phenomenologically.

  20. Correlation-based Transition Modeling for External Aerodynamic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medida, Shivaji

    Conventional turbulence models calibrated for fully turbulent boundary layers often over-predict drag and heat transfer on aerodynamic surfaces with partially laminar boundary layers. A robust correlation-based model is developed for use in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations to predict laminar-to-turbulent transition onset of boundary layers on external aerodynamic surfaces. The new model is derived from an existing transition model for the two-equation k-omega Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model, and is coupled with the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras (SA) turbulence model. The transition model solves two transport equations for intermittency and transition momentum thickness Reynolds number. Experimental correlations and local mean flow quantities are used in the model to account for effects of freestream turbulence level and pressure gradients on transition onset location. Transition onset is triggered by activating intermittency production using a vorticity Reynolds number criterion. In the new model, production and destruction terms of the intermittency equation are modified to improve consistency in the fully turbulent boundary layer post-transition onset, as well as ensure insensitivity to freestream eddy viscosity value specified in the SA model. In the original model, intermittency was used to control production and destruction of turbulent kinetic energy. Whereas, in the new model, only the production of eddy viscosity in SA model is controlled, and the destruction term is not altered. Unlike the original model, the new model does not use an additional correction to intermittency for separation-induced transition. Accuracy of drag predictions are improved significantly with the use of the transition model for several two-dimensional single- and multi-element airfoil cases over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The new model is able to predict the formation of stable and long laminar separation bubbles on low-Reynolds number airfoils that

  1. Direct simulation of flat-plate boundary layer with mild free-stream turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz

    2014-11-01

    Spatially evolving direct numerical simulation of the flat-plate boundary layer has been performed. The momentum thickness Reynolds number develops from 80 to 3000 with a free-stream turbulence intensity decaying from 3 percent to 0.8 percent. Predicted skin-friction is in agreement with the Blasius solution prior to breakdown, follows the well-known T3A bypass transition data during transition, and agrees with the Erm and Joubert Melbourne wind-tunnel data after the completion of transition. We introduce the concept of bypass transition in the narrow sense. Streaks, although present, do not appear to be dynamically important during the present bypass transition as they occur downstream of infant turbulent spots. For the turbulent boundary layer, viscous scaling collapses the rate of dissipation profiles in the logarithmic region at different Reynolds numbers. The ratio of Taylor microscale and the Kolmogorov length scale is nearly constant over a large portion of the outer layer. The ratio of large-eddy characteristic length and the boundary layer thickness scales very well with Reynolds number. The turbulent boundary layer is also statistically analyzed using frequency spectra, conditional-sampling, and two-point correlations. Near momentum thickness Reynolds number of 2900, three layers of coherent vortices are observed: the upper and lower layers are distinct hairpin forests of large and small sizes respectively; the middle layer consists of mostly fragmented hairpin elements.

  2. INCOMPRESSIBLE LAMINAR BOUNDARY LAYER CONTROL BY BLOWING AND SUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AZZEDINE NAHOUI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A two-dimensional incompressible laminar boundary layer and its control using blowing and suction over a flat plate and around the NACA 0012 and 661012 profiles, is studied numerically. The study is based on the Prandtl boundary layer model using the finite differences method and the Crank-Nicolson scheme. The velocity distribution, the boundary layer thickness and the friction coefficient, are determined and presented with and without control. The application of the control technique, has demonstrated its positive effect on the transition point and the friction coefficient. Both control procedures are compared for different lengths, speeds and angles of blowing and suction.

  3. Coherent structures in wave boundary layers. Part 2. Solitary motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Jensen, Palle Martin; Sørensen, Lone B.

    2010-01-01

    This study continues the investigation of wave boundary layers reported by Carstensen, Sumer & Fredsøe (J. Fluid Mech., 2010, part 1 of this paper). The present paper summarizes the results of an experimental investigation of turbulent solitary wave boundary layers, simulated by solitary motion...... the boundary-layer flow experiences a regular array of vortex tubes near the bed over a short period of time during the deceleration stage; and (iii) transitional regime characterized with turbulent spots, revealed by single/multiple, or, sometimes, quite dense spikes in the bed shear stress traces...

  4. Atmospheric Surface Layer Characterization: Preliminary Desert Lapse Rate Study 22-25 August 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elliott, Doyle

    2003-01-01

    Results of the August 2000 Desert Lapse Rate (DLR) Experiment are presented. The DLR Experiment was performed to document the night-to-day transition effects on the desert Atmospheric Surface Layer (ASL...

  5. Workers in transition

    OpenAIRE

    Rutkowski, Michael

    1995-01-01

    After Central and Eastern European and Central Asian economies abandoned central planning, nearly 195 million workers had to adjust to new rules of work and life. Most transition economies have not yet fully committed themselves to the rules of the market place. A few that have are already enjoying growth in wages and employment; in other countries, labor income growth is still to come. Reform has not been so well accepted in countries that were forced to enter the transition. Transition brou...

  6. Transition and Social networks

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavan, Raghu; Pawson, N.

    2011-01-01

    School leavers with learning disabilities often face difficulties in making a smooth transition from school to college, employment or more broadly, to adult life. The transition phase is traumatic for the young person with learning disabilities and their families as it often results in the loss of friendships, relationships and social networks. The aim of this chapter is to explore the issues of transition from adolescence to adulthood for young people with learning disabilities and its effe...

  7. Stability of mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher; Krothapalli, A

    1993-01-01

    The research program for the first year of this project (see the original research proposal) consists of developing an explicit marching scheme for solving the parabolized stability equations (PSE). Performing mathematical analysis of the computational algorithm including numerical stability analysis and the determination of the proper boundary conditions needed at the boundary of the computation domain are implicit in the task. Before one can solve the parabolized stability equations for high-speed mixing layers, the mean flow must first be found. In the past, instability analysis of high-speed mixing layer has mostly been performed on mean flow profiles calculated by the boundary layer equations. In carrying out this project, it is believed that the boundary layer equations might not give an accurate enough nonparallel, nonlinear mean flow needed for parabolized stability analysis. A more accurate mean flow can, however, be found by solving the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. The advantage of the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations is that its accuracy is consistent with the PSE method. Furthermore, the method of solution is similar. Hence, the major part of the effort of the work of this year has been devoted to the development of an explicit numerical marching scheme for the solution of the Parabolized Navier-Stokes equation as applied to the high-seed mixing layer problem.

  8. Bristled shark skin: a microgeometry for boundary layer control?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, A W; Hidalgo, P; Westcott, M; Motta, P

    2008-01-01

    There exists evidence that some fast-swimming shark species may have the ability to bristle their scales during fast swimming. Experimental work using a water tunnel facility has been performed to investigate the flow field over and within a bristled shark skin model submerged within a boundary layer to deduce the possible boundary layer control mechanisms being used by these fast-swimming sharks. Fluorescent dye flow visualization provides evidence of the formation of embedded cavity vortices within the scales. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) data, used to evaluate the cavity vortex formation and boundary layer characteristics close to the surface, indicate increased momentum in the slip layer forming above the scales. This increase in flow velocity close to the shark's skin is indicative of boundary layer control mechanisms leading to separation control and possibly transition delay for the bristled shark skin microgeometry

  9. Bristled shark skin: a microgeometry for boundary layer control?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, A W; Hidalgo, P; Westcott, M [Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics Department, University of Alabama, Box 870280, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Motta, P [Biology Department, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Avenue, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States)], E-mail: alang@eng.ua.edu

    2008-12-01

    There exists evidence that some fast-swimming shark species may have the ability to bristle their scales during fast swimming. Experimental work using a water tunnel facility has been performed to investigate the flow field over and within a bristled shark skin model submerged within a boundary layer to deduce the possible boundary layer control mechanisms being used by these fast-swimming sharks. Fluorescent dye flow visualization provides evidence of the formation of embedded cavity vortices within the scales. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) data, used to evaluate the cavity vortex formation and boundary layer characteristics close to the surface, indicate increased momentum in the slip layer forming above the scales. This increase in flow velocity close to the shark's skin is indicative of boundary layer control mechanisms leading to separation control and possibly transition delay for the bristled shark skin microgeometry.

  10. Laminar-turbulent transition tripped by step on transonic compressor profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaszynski, Pawel; Doerffer, Piotr; Szwaba, Ryszard; Piotrowicz, Michal; Kaczynski, Piotr

    2018-02-01

    The shock wave boundary layer interaction on the suction side of transonic compressor blade is one of the main objectives of TFAST project (Transition Location Effect on Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interaction). The experimental and numerical results for the flow structure investigations are shown for the flow conditions as the existing ones on the suction side of the compressor profile. The two cases are investigated: without and with boundary layer tripping device. In the first case, boundary layer is laminar up to the shock wave, while in the second case the boundary layer is tripped by the step. Numerical results carried out by means of Fine/Turbo Numeca with Explicit Algebraic Reynolds Stress Model including transition modeling are compared with schlieren, Temperature Sensitive Paint and wake measurements. Boundary layer transition location is detected by Temperature Sensitive Paint.

  11. Disintegration of fluids under supercritical conditions from mixing layer studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okong'o, N.; Bellan, J.

    2003-01-01

    Databases of transitional states obtained from Direct Numerical simulations (DNS) of temporal, supercritical mixing layers for two species systems, O2/H2 and C7H16/N2, are analyzed to elucidate species-specific turbulence aspects and features of fluid disintegration.

  12. Inter-layer Cooper pairing of two-dimensional electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Masahiro; Takemori, Tadashi; Yoshizaki, Ryozo; Sakudo, Tunetaro; Ohtaka, Kazuo

    1987-01-01

    The authors point out the possibility that the high transition temperatures of the recently discovered oxide superconductors are dominantly caused by the inter-layer Cooper pairing of two-dimensional electrons that are coupled through the exchange of three-dimensional phonons. (author)

  13. Quantized layer growth at liquid-crystal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ocko, B. M.; Braslau, A.; Pershan, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    of the specular reflectivity is consistent with a sinusoidal density modulation, starting at the surface and terminating abruptly, after an integral number of bilayers. As the transition is approached the number of layers increases in quantized steps from zero to five before the bulk undergoes a first...

  14. Detection of Lateglacial distal tephra layers in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davies, S.M.; Hoek, W.Z.; Bohncke, S.J.P.; Lowe, J.; Pyne O'Donnle, S.; Turney, C.S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Three distal tephra layers or cryptotephras have been detected within a sedimentary sequence from the Netherlands that spans the last glacial-interglacial transition. Geochemical analyses identify one as the Vedde Ash, which represents the southernmost discovery of this mid-Younger Dryas tephra so

  15. Thermodynamics of phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cofta, H.

    1972-01-01

    The phenomenology of the phase transitions has been considered. The definitions of thermodynamic functions and parameters, as well as those of the phase transitions, are given and some of the relations between those quantities are discussed. The phase transitions classification proposed by Ehrenfest has been described. The most important features of phase transitions are discussed using the selected physical examples including the critical behaviour of ferromagnetic materials at the Curie temperature and antiferromagnetic materials at the Neel temperature. Some aspects of the Ehrenfest's equations, that have been derived, for the interfacial lines and surfaces are considered as well as the role the notion of interfaces. (S.B.)

  16. The Energy Transition Chronicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappelletti, Floriane; Vallar, Jean-Pierre; Wyssling, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Energy Cities provides local authorities with support for implementing their own energy transition process. The Proposals for the energy transition of cities and towns (www.energy-cities.eu/30proposals) are illustrated with around a hundred of inspirational examples from all over Europe. In this document composed of five case reports, Energy Cities goes further and tells the tale of energy transition success stories. Because it is important to show that energy transition is 'possible'. Why, how, with whom, for what results? We interviewed local players and decision-makers to find out more. Here are their stories

  17. Transit Benefit Program Data -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This data set contains information about any US government agency participating in the transit benefits program, funding agreements, individual participating Federal...

  18. Growth of hydrated gel layers in nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.M.; Machiels, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    The hydration kinetics of waste glasses in contact with an aqueous solution has been studied by using three different approaches. Emphasis has been placed on modeling processes in the transition zone defined as the region in which the nature of the glass changes from the original dry glass to an open hydrated structure. The first model relies on concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients to obtain a transition zone in which the ions mobility is extremely low compared to that in the gel layer. In the second model, the transition zone and hydrated layer are treated as distinct phases and it is assumed that ion exchange at their common boundary is the rate-controlling process. The third model treats the transition zone as a thin film of constant thickness and low diffusivity. In the absence of appreciable network dissolution, all three models indicate that growth of the gel layer becomes eventually proportional to the square root of time; however, as long as processes in the transition zone are rate controlling, growth is linearly proportional to time

  19. Three-layer magnetoconvection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M.-K.; Silvers, L.J.; Proctor, M.R.E.

    2008-01-01

    It is believed that some stars have two or more convection zones in close proximity near to the stellar photosphere. These zones are separated by convectively stable regions that are relatively narrow. Due to the close proximity of these regions it is important to construct mathematical models to understand the transport and mixing of passive and dynamic quantities. One key quantity of interest is a magnetic field, a dynamic vector quantity, that can drastically alter the convectively driven flows, and have an important role in coupling the different layers. In this Letter we present the first investigation into the effect of an imposed magnetic field in such a geometry. We focus our attention on the effect of field strength and show that, while there are some similarities with results for magnetic field evolution in a single layer, new and interesting phenomena are also present in a three layer system

  20. Layered tin dioxide microrods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Junhong; Huang Hongbo; Gong Jiangfeng; Zhao Xiaoning; Cheng Guangxu; Yang Shaoguang

    2007-01-01

    Single-crystalline layered SnO 2 microrods were synthesized by a simple tin-water reaction at 900 deg. C. The structural and optical properties of the sample were characterized by x-ray powder diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman scattering and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies and selected area electron diffraction patterns revealed that the layered SnO 2 microrods are single crystalline and their growth direction is along [1 1 0]. The growth mechanism of the microrods was proposed based on SEM, TEM characterization and thermodynamic analysis. It is deduced that the layered microrods grow by the stacking of SnO 2 sheets with a (1 1 0) surface in a vapour-liquid-solid process. Three emission peaks at 523, 569 and 626 nm were detected in room-temperature PL measurements

  1. Superfluid Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, G W; Parker, N G; Barenghi, C F

    2017-03-31

    We model the superfluid flow of liquid helium over the rough surface of a wire (used to experimentally generate turbulence) profiled by atomic force microscopy. Numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation reveal that the sharpest features in the surface induce vortex nucleation both intrinsically (due to the raised local fluid velocity) and extrinsically (providing pinning sites to vortex lines aligned with the flow). Vortex interactions and reconnections contribute to form a dense turbulent layer of vortices with a nonclassical average velocity profile which continually sheds small vortex rings into the bulk. We characterize this layer for various imposed flows. As boundary layers conventionally arise from viscous forces, this result opens up new insight into the nature of superflows.

  2. Flocking Transition in Confluent Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoluzzi, Matteo; Giavazzi, Fabio; Macchi, Marta; Scita, Giorgio; Cerbino, Roberto; Manning, Lisa; Marchetti, Cristina

    The emerging of collective migration in biological tissues plays a pivotal role in embryonic morphogenesis, wound healing and cancer invasion. While many aspects of single cell movements are well established, the mechanisms leading to coherent displacements of cohesive cell groups are still poorly understood. Some of us recently proposed a Self-Propelled Voronoi (SPV) model of dense tissues that combines self-propelled particle models and vertex models of confluent cell layers and exhibits a liquid-solid transition as a function of cell shape and cell motility. We now examine the role of cell polarization on collective cell dynamics by introducing an orientation mechanism that aligns cell polarization with local cell motility. The model predicts a density-independent flocking transition tuned by the strength of the aligning interaction, with both solid and liquid flocking states existing in different regions of parameter space. MP and MCM were supported by the Simons Foundation Targeted Grant in the Mathematical Modeling of Living Systems Number: 342354 and by the Syracuse Soft Matter Program.

  3. First-principles study of hydrogen dissociation and diffusion on transition metal-doped Mg(0 0 0 1) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhiwen; Guo, Xinjun; Wu, Mingyi; Sun, Qiang; Jia, Yu

    2014-01-01

    First-principles calculations within the density functional theory (DFT) have been carried out to study hydrogen molecules dissociation and diffusion on clean and transition metals (TMs) doped Mg(0 0 0 1) surfaces following Pozzo et al. work. Firstly, the stability of Mg(0 0 0 1) surface doped with transition metals atom has been studied. The results showed that transition metals on the left of the table tend to substitute Mg in the second layer, while the other transition metals prefer to substitute Mg in the first layer. Secondly, we studied hydrogen molecules dissociation and diffusion on clean and Mg(0 0 0 1) surfaces which the transition metal atoms substituted both in the first layer and second layer. When transition metal atoms substitute in the first layer, the results agree with the Pozzo et al. result; when transition metal atoms substitute in the second layer, the results showed that the transition metals on the left of the periodic table impact on the dissociation barriers is less. However, for the transition metals (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) on the right, there is a great impact on the barriers. The transition metals doped surfaces bind the dissociated H atoms loosely, making them easily diffused. The results further reveal that the Fe dopant on the Mg surface is the best choice for H 2 dissociation and hydrogen storage.

  4. Magnetic transition in Co/(Gd-Co) multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svalov, A.V.; Fernandez, A.; Barandiaran, J.M.; Vas'kovskiy, V.O.; Orue, I.; Tejedor, M.; Kurlyandskaya, G.V.

    2008-01-01

    [Co/Gd 0.36 Co 0.64 ] 4 /Co multilayers with Co termination layer have been prepared by rf sputtering. They form macroscopic ferrimagnets with a compensation temperature (T comp ) determined by the thickness ratio of the layers. In low fields the magnetization of Co and Gd-Co layers are along the axis of the applied field. Increasing field makes the moments of both the Co and Gd-Co layers deviate from the axis of the field giving rise to a transition into a twisted state. These magnetic transitions were studied by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), magneto-optic Kerr effect and magnetoresistance measurements at various temperatures. The nucleation and evolution of surface- and bulk-twisted magnetic states were also observed in these multilayers

  5. Relative Humidity in the Tropopause Saturation Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkirk, H. B.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Pfister, L.; Thornberry, T. D.; Bui, T. V.

    2017-12-01

    The tropical tropopause separates two very different atmospheric regimes: the stable lower stratosphere where the air is both extremely dry and nearly always so, and a transition layer in the uppermost tropical troposphere, where humidity on average increases rapidly downward but can undergo substantial temporal fluctuations. The processes that control the humidity in this layer below the tropopause include convective detrainment (which can result in either a net hydration or dehydration), slow ascent, wave motions and advection. Together these determine the humidity of the air that eventually passes through the tropopause and into the stratosphere, and we refer to this layer as the tropopause saturation layer or TSL. We know from in situ water vapor observations such as Ticosonde's 12-year balloonsonde record at Costa Rica that layers of supersaturation are frequently observed in the TSL. While their frequency is greatest during the local rainy season from June through October, supersaturation is also observed in the boreal winter dry season when deep convection is well south of Costa Rica. In other words, local convection is not a necessary condition for the presence of supersaturation. Furthermore, there are indications from airborne measurements during the recent POSIDON campaign at Guam that if anything deep convection tends to `reset' the TSL locally to a state of just-saturation. Conversely, it may be that layers of supersaturation are the result of slow ascent. To explore these ideas we take Ticosonde water vapor observations from the TSL, stratify them on the basis of relative humidity and report on the differences in the the history of upstream convective influence between supersaturated parcels and those that are not.

  6. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  7. Eigenstate Phase Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo

    Phase transitions are one of the most exciting physical phenomena ever discovered. The understanding of phase transitions has long been of interest. Recently eigenstate phase transitions have been discovered and studied; they are drastically different from traditional thermal phase transitions. In eigenstate phase transitions, a sharp change is exhibited in properties of the many-body eigenstates of the Hamiltonian of a quantum system, but not the thermal equilibrium properties of the same system. In this thesis, we study two different types of eigenstate phase transitions. The first is the eigenstate phase transition within the ferromagnetic phase of an infinite-range spin model. By studying the interplay of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis and Ising symmetry breaking, we find two eigenstate phase transitions within the ferromagnetic phase: In the lowest-temperature phase the magnetization can macroscopically oscillate by quantum tunneling between up and down. The relaxation of the magnetization is always overdamped in the remainder of the ferromagnetic phase, which is further divided into phases where the system thermally activates itself over the barrier between the up and down states, and where it quantum tunnels. The second is the many-body localization phase transition. The eigenstates on one side of the transition obey the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis; the eigenstates on the other side are many-body localized, and thus thermal equilibrium need not be achieved for an initial state even after evolving for an arbitrary long time. We study this many-body localization phase transition in the strong disorder renormalization group framework. After setting up a set of coarse-graining rules for a general one dimensional chain, we get a simple "toy model'' and obtain an almost purely analytical solution to the infinite-randomness critical fixed point renormalization group equation. We also get an estimate of the correlation length critical exponent nu

  8. Instantaneous fluctuation velocity and skewness distributions upstream of transition onset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernon, D.; Walsh, E.J.; McEligot, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    The development of streamwise orientated disturbances through the boundary layer thickness prior to transition onset for zero-pressure gradient boundary layer flow under the influence %Tu = 4.2 is presented. The analysis concentrates on the development of the maximum positive and negative of the fluctuation velocity in order to gain further insight into the transition process. The average location of the peak negative fluctuation velocity over a range of Reynolds numbers was measured in the upper portion of the boundary layer at y/δ ∼ 0.6, whereas the location of the peak positive value was measured at y/δ ∼ 0.3. The disturbance magnitude of the negative fluctuation velocity increased beyond that of the positive as transition onset approached. The distribution and disturbance magnitude of the maximum positive and negative fluctuation velocities indicate that the initiation of transition may occur on the low-speed components of the flow that are lifted up to the upper region of the boundary layer. This is in qualitative agreement with recent direct numerical simulations on the breakdown of the flow on the lifted low-speed streaks near the boundary layer edge. The results presented in this investigation also demonstrate the increased physical insight gained by examining the distributions of the maximum positive and negative of the streamwise fluctuation velocity component associated with the low- and high-speed streaks, compared to time-averaged values, in determining what structures cause the breakdown to turbulence

  9. Immobilization of transition metal ions on zirconium phosphate monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melezhik, A.V.; Brej, V.V.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that ions of transition metals (copper, iron, vanadyl, titanium) are adsorbed on zirconium phosphate monolayers. The zirconium phosphate threshold capacity corresponds to substitution of all protons of hydroxyphosphate groups by equivalent amounts of copper, iron or vanadyl. Adsorption of polynuclear ions is possible in case of titanium. The layered substance with specific surface up to 300 m 2 /g, wherein ultradispersed titanium dioxide particles are intercalirated between zirconium-phosphate layers, is synthesized

  10. Electrophoretic formation of semiconductor layers with adjustable band gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindrov, Alexander; Yuvchenko, Sergey; Vikulova, Maria; Tretyachenko, Elena; Zimnyakov, Dmitry; Gorokhovsky, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    The ceramic layers of the potassium polytitanates modified by transition metal salts were electrophoretically deposited onto the surface of glassy substrate coated with indium-tin oxide. The deposition allows obtaining a dense ceramic layer formed by composite agglomerates consisting of nanoscale particles with average size of 130-190 nm. The optical absorption spectra of the coatings modified in the mixtures of aqueous solutions of different transition metal salts were investigated. It was recognized that a bandgap value of these composites can be adjusted in a range from 1.4 to 2.3 eV depending the chemical composition of layered double hydroxide obtained during modification. This might be very promising for optoelectronic applications of such coatings due to an explicit control of optical properties.

  11. Theoretical skin-friction law in a turbulent boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheskidov, A.

    2005-01-01

    We study transitional and turbulent boundary layers using a turbulent velocity profile equation recently derived from the Navier-Stokes-alpha and Leray-alpha models. From this equation we obtain a theoretical prediction of the skin-friction coefficient in a wide range of Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness, and deduce the maximal value of c f max =0.0063 for turbulent velocity profiles. A two-parameter family of solutions to the equation matches experimental data in the transitional boundary layers with different free-stream turbulence intensity, while one-parameter family of solutions, obtained using our skin-friction coefficient law, matches experimental data in the turbulent boundary layer for moderately large Reynolds numbers

  12. Multi-layered controllable stiffness beams for morphing: energy, actuation force, and material strain considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Gabriel; Gandhi, Farhan

    2010-01-01

    Morphing aerospace structures could benefit from the ability of structural elements to transition from a stiff load-bearing state to a relatively compliant state that can undergo large deformation at low actuation cost. The present paper focuses on multi-layered beams with controllable flexural stiffness—comprising polymer layers affixed to the surfaces of a base beam and cover layers, in turn, affixed to the surfaces of the polymer layers. Heating the polymer through the glass transition reduces its shear modulus, decouples the cover layers from the base beam and reduces the overall flexural stiffness. Although the stiffness and actuation force required to bend the beam reduce, the energy required to heat the polymer layer must also be considered. Results show that for beams with low slenderness ratios, relatively thick polymer layers, and cover layers whose extensional stiffness is high, the decoupling of the cover layers through softening of the polymer layers can result in flexural stiffness reductions of over 95%. The energy savings are also highest for these configurations, and will increase as the deformation of the beam increases. The decoupling of the cover layers from the base beam through the softening of the polymer reduces the axial strains in the cover layers significantly; otherwise material failure would prevent large deformation. Results show that when the polymer layer is stiff, the cover layers are the dominant contributors to the total energy in the beam, and the energy in the polymer layers is predominantly axial strain energy. When the polymer layers are softened the energy in the cover layers is a small contributor to the total energy which is dominated by energy in the base beam and shear strain energy in the polymer layer

  13. Transitivity of Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenwetter, Michel; Dana, Jason; Davis-Stober, Clintin P.

    2011-01-01

    Transitivity of preferences is a fundamental principle shared by most major contemporary rational, prescriptive, and descriptive models of decision making. To have transitive preferences, a person, group, or society that prefers choice option "x" to "y" and "y" to "z" must prefer "x" to…

  14. Alaska Community Transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant Information Human Services Funding 5310 5316 (Repealed) 5317 (Repealed) Alaska Mental Health Trust Department of Transportation & Public Facilities/ Alaska Community Transit Search DOT&PF State of Alaska Photo banner DOT&PF> Program Development > Alaska Community Transit Home About Us

  15. Distance-transitive graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, A.M.; Beineke, L.W.; Wilson, R.J.; Cameron, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    In this chapter we investigate the classification of distance-transitive graphs: these are graphs whose automorphism groups are transitive on each of the sets of pairs of vertices at distance i, for i = 0, 1,.... We provide an introduction into the field. By use of the classification of finite

  16. Towards Transition Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Haan (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is a treatise on a theory for societal transitions: pillar theory. Societal transitions are complex processes taking place in complex systems, large-scale, long-term processes in which societal systems radically change the way they are composed and function. Since we all are

  17. Matter in transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Raghuram, Nikhil; Taylor, Washington

    2016-01-01

    We explore a novel type of transition in certain 6D and 4D quantum field theories, in which the matter content of the theory changes while the gauge group and other parts of the spectrum remain invariant. Such transitions can occur, for example, for SU(6) and SU(7) gauge groups, where matter fields in a three-index antisymmetric representation and the fundamental representation are exchanged in the transition for matter in the two-index antisymmetric representation. These matter transitions are realized by passing through superconformal theories at the transition point. We explore these transitions in dual F-theory and heterotic descriptions, where a number of novel features arise. For example, in the heterotic description the relevant 6D SU(7) theories are described by bundles on K3 surfaces where the geometry of the K3 is constrained in addition to the bundle structure. On the F-theory side, non-standard representations such as the three-index antisymmetric representation of SU(N) require Weierstrass models that cannot be realized from the standard SU(N) Tate form. We also briefly describe some other situations, with groups such as Sp(3), SO(12), and SU(3), where analogous matter transitions can occur between different representations. For SU(3), in particular, we find a matter transition between adjoint matter and matter in the symmetric representation, giving an explicit Weierstrass model for the F-theory description of the symmetric representation that complements another recent analogous construction.

  18. Transitional Employment Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulle, Paul J.; And Others

    The paper examines the need and implementation of transitional employment programs for handicapped youth. Effects on the handicapped of future automation are considered along with the need for school-business cooperation to prepare for the future. The importance of initial success in any innovation is noted. A Chicago transitional employment…

  19. Transitive probabilistic CLIR models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaij, W.; de Jong, Franciska M.G.

    2004-01-01

    Transitive translation could be a useful technique to enlarge the number of supported language pairs for a cross-language information retrieval (CLIR) system in a cost-effective manner. The paper describes several setups for transitive translation based on probabilistic translation models. The

  20. Bridging the Transition Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    period and provide recommendations to guide future research and policy development. 4 DEFINING THE TRANSITIONAL SECURITY GAP There have been...BRIDGING THE TRANSITION GAP A Monograph by MAJ J.D. Hansen United States Army School of Advanced Military Studies United States Army...suggestions for reducing this burden to Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704

  1. Transition probabilities for atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.K.

    1980-01-01

    Current status of advanced theoretical methods for transition probabilities for atoms and ions is discussed. An experiment on the f values of the resonance transitions of the Kr and Xe isoelectronic sequences is suggested as a test for the theoretical methods

  2. Physical layer network coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukui, Hironori; Popovski, Petar; Yomo, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Physical layer network coding (PLNC) has been proposed to improve throughput of the two-way relay channel, where two nodes communicate with each other, being assisted by a relay node. Most of the works related to PLNC are focused on a simple three-node model and they do not take into account...

  3. Thin layer activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweickert, H.; Fehsenfeld, P.

    1995-01-01

    The reliability of industrial equip ment is substantially influenced by wear and corrosion; monitoring can prevent accidents and avoid down-time. One powerful tool is thin layer activation analysis (TLA) using accelerator systems. The information is used to improve mechanical design and material usage; the technology is used by many large companies, particularly in the automotive industry, e.g. Daimler Benz. A critical area of a machine component receives a thin layer of radioactivity by irradiation with charged particles from an accelerator - usually a cyclotron. The radioactivity can be made homogeneous by suitable selection of particle, beam energy and angle of incidence. Layer thickness can be varied from 20 microns to around 1 mm with different depth distributions; the position and size of the wear zone can be set to within 0.1 mm. The machine is then reassembled and operated so that wear can be measured. An example is a combustion engine comprising piston ring, cylinder wall, cooling water jacket and housing wall, where wear measurements on the cylinder wall are required in a critical zone around the dead-point of the piston ring. Proton beam bombardment creates a radioactive layer whose thickness is known accurately, and characteristic gamma radiation from this radioactive zone penetrates through the engine and is detected externally. Measurements can be made either of the activity removed from the surface, or of the (reduced) residual activity; wear measurement of the order of 10 -9 metres is possible

  4. Our Shrinking Ozone Layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Depletion of the ozone layer is therefore having significant effects on life on .... but there is always a net balance between the rate of formation and destruction ..... award of Commonwealth Fellowship during the present work and also being an ...

  5. Layer-Cake Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedford, Rebecca; Warny, Sophie

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors offer a safe, fun, effective way to introduce geology concepts to elementary school children of all ages: "coring" layer cakes. This activity introduces the concepts and challenges that geologists face and at the same time strengthens students' inferential, observational, and problem-solving skills. It also addresses…

  6. Layered double hydroxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López Rayo, Sandra; Imran, Ahmad; Hansen, Hans Chr. Bruun

    2017-01-01

    A novel zinc (Zn) fertilizer concept based on Zn doped layered double hydroxides (Zn-doped Mg-Fe-LDHs) has been investigated. Zn-doped Mg-Fe-LDHs were synthetized, their chemical composition was analyzed and their nutrient release was studied in buffered solutions with different pH values. Uptake...

  7. Contemporary Transitional Justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gissel, Line Engbo

    2017-01-01

    This article studies the contemporary expression of transitional justice, a field of practice through which global governance is exercised. It argues that transitional justice is being normalised, given the normative and empirical de-legitimisation of its premise of exceptionalism. The article...... theorises exceptionalism and normalcy in transitional justice and identifies three macro-level causes of normalisation: the legalisation, internationalisation, and professionalization of the field. This argument is illustrated by a study of Uganda’s trajectory of transitional justice since 1986. Across five...... phases of transitional justice, processes of legalisation, internationalisation, and professionalization have contributed to the gradual dismantling of the country’s exceptional justice. The case demonstrates, further, that normalization is a contested and incomplete process....

  8. Experiments in a boundary layer subjected to free stream turbulence. Part 1: Boundary layer structure and receptivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westin, K.J.A.; Boiko, A.V.; Klingmann, B.G.B.; Kozlov, V.V.; Alfredsson, P.H.

    1993-12-01

    The modification of the mean and fluctuating characteristics of a flat plate boundary layer subjected to nearly isotropic free stream turbulence (FST) is studied experimentally using hot-wire anemometry. The study is focussed on the region upstream of the transition onset, where the fluctuations inside the boundary layer are dominated by elongated flow structures which grow downstream both in amplitude and length. Their downstream development and scaling is investigated, and the results are compared to those obtained by previous authors. This allows some conclusions about the parameters which are relevant for the modelling of the transition process. The mechanisms underlying the transition process and the relative importance of the Tollmien-Schlichting wave instability in this flow are treated in an accompanying paper. 25 refs

  9. MITRE sensor layer prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Francis; McGarry, Donald; Zasada, David; Foote, Scott

    2009-05-01

    The MITRE Sensor Layer Prototype is an initial design effort to enable every sensor to help create new capabilities through collaborative data sharing. By making both upstream (raw) and downstream (processed) sensor data visible, users can access the specific level, type, and quantities of data needed to create new data products that were never anticipated by the original designers of the individual sensors. The major characteristic that sets sensor data services apart from typical enterprise services is the volume (on the order of multiple terabytes) of raw data that can be generated by most sensors. Traditional tightly coupled processing approaches extract pre-determined information from the incoming raw sensor data, format it, and send it to predetermined users. The community is rapidly reaching the conclusion that tightly coupled sensor processing loses too much potentially critical information.1 Hence upstream (raw and partially processed) data must be extracted, rapidly archived, and advertised to the enterprise for unanticipated uses. The authors believe layered sensing net-centric integration can be achieved through a standardize-encapsulate-syndicateaggregate- manipulate-process paradigm. The Sensor Layer Prototype's technical approach focuses on implementing this proof of concept framework to make sensor data visible, accessible and useful to the enterprise. To achieve this, a "raw" data tap between physical transducers associated with sensor arrays and the embedded sensor signal processing hardware and software has been exploited. Second, we encapsulate and expose both raw and partially processed data to the enterprise within the context of a service-oriented architecture. Third, we advertise the presence of multiple types, and multiple layers of data through geographic-enabled Really Simple Syndication (GeoRSS) services. These GeoRSS feeds are aggregated, manipulated, and filtered by a feed aggregator. After filtering these feeds to bring just the type

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of mushy layers induced by external stochastic fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Dmitri V; Bashkirtseva, Irina A; Ryashko, Lev B

    2018-02-28

    The time-dependent process of directional crystallization in the presence of a mushy layer is considered with allowance for arbitrary fluctuations in the atmospheric temperature and friction velocity. A nonlinear set of mushy layer equations and boundary conditions is solved analytically when the heat and mass fluxes at the boundary between the mushy layer and liquid phase are induced by turbulent motion in the liquid and, as a result, have the corresponding convective form. Namely, the 'solid phase-mushy layer' and 'mushy layer-liquid phase' phase transition boundaries as well as the solid fraction, temperature and concentration (salinity) distributions are found. If the atmospheric temperature and friction velocity are constant, the analytical solution takes a parametric form. In the more common case when they represent arbitrary functions of time, the analytical solution is given by means of the standard Cauchy problem. The deterministic and stochastic behaviour of the phase transition process is analysed on the basis of the obtained analytical solutions. In the case of stochastic fluctuations in the atmospheric temperature and friction velocity, the phase transition interfaces (mushy layer boundaries) move faster than in the deterministic case. A cumulative effect of these noise contributions is revealed as well. In other words, when the atmospheric temperature and friction velocity fluctuate simultaneously due to the influence of different external processes and phenomena, the phase transition boundaries move even faster. This article is part of the theme issue 'From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns'.This article is part of the theme issue 'From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  11. Prediction and Analysis of the Nonsteady Transition and Separation Processes on an Oscillating Wind Turbine Airfoil using the \\gamma-Re_\\theta Transition Model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, Taraj; Brasseur, James; Vijayakumar, Ganesh

    2016-01-04

    This study is aimed at gaining insight into the nonsteady transitional boundary layer dynamics of wind turbine blades and the predictive capabilities of URANS based transition and turbulence models for similar physics through the analysis of a controlled flow with similar nonsteady parameters.

  12. Scaling the heterogeneously heated convective boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heerwaarden, C.; Mellado, J.; De Lozar, A.

    2013-12-01

    We have studied the heterogeneously heated convective boundary layer (CBL) by means of large-eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). What makes our study different from previous studies on this subject are our very long simulations in which the system travels through multiple states and that from there we have derived scaling laws. In our setup, a stratified atmosphere is heated from below by square patches with a high surface buoyancy flux, surrounded by regions with no or little flux. By letting a boundary layer grow in time we let the system evolve from the so-called meso-scale to the micro-scale regime. In the former the heterogeneity is large and strong circulations can develop, while in the latter the heterogeneity is small and does no longer influence the boundary layer structure. Within each simulation we can now observe the formation of a peak in kinetic energy, which represents the 'optimal' heterogeneity size in the meso-scale, and the subsequent decay of the peak and the development towards the transition to the micro-scale. We have created a non-dimensional parameter space that describes all properties of this system. By studying the previously described evolution for different combinations of parameters, we have derived three important conclusions. First, there exists a horizontal length scale of the heterogeneity (L) that is a function of the boundary layer height (h) and the Richardson (Ri) number of the inversion at the top of the boundary layer. This relationship has the form L = h Ri^(3/8). Second, this horizontal length scale L allows for expressing the time evolution, and thus the state of the system, as a ratio of this length scale and the distance between two patches Xp. This ratio thus describes to which extent the circulation fills up the space that exists between two patch centers. The timings of the transition from the meso- to the micro-scale collapse under this scaling for all simulations sharing the same flux

  13. Plume Splitting in a Two-layer Stratified Ambient Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yongxing; Flynn, Morris; Sutherland, Bruce

    2017-11-01

    A line-source plume descending into a two-layer stratified ambient fluid in a finite sized tank is studied experimentally. Although the total volume of ambient fluid is fixed, lower- and upper-layer fluids are respectively removed and added at a constant rate mimicking marine outfall through diffusers and natural and hybrid ventilated buildings. The influence of the plume on the ambient depends on the value of λ, defined as the ratio of the plume buoyancy to the buoyancy loss of the plume as it crosses the ambient interface. Similar to classical filling-box experiments, the plume can always reach the bottom of the tank if λ > 1 . By contrast, if λ < 1 , an intermediate layer eventually forms as a result of plume splitting. Eventually all of the plume fluid spreads within the intermediate layer. The starting time, tv, and the ending time, tt, of the transition process measured from experiments correlate with the value of λ. A three-layer ambient fluid is observed after transition, and the mean value of the measured densities of the intermediate layer fluid is well predicted using plume theory. Acknowledgments: Funding for this study was provided by NSERC.

  14. Photo-induced wettability of TiO{sub 2} film with Au buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purkayastha, Debarun Dhar; Sangani, L. D. Varma; Krishna, M. Ghanashyam [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad-500046 (India); Madhurima, V., E-mail: madhurima.v@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Central University of Tamil Nadu, Thiruvarur-610004 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The effect of thickness of Au buffer layer (15-25 nm) between TiO{sub 2} film and substrate on the wettability of TiO{sub 2} films is reported. TiO{sub 2} films grown on Au buffer layer have a higher contact angle of 96-;100° as compared to 47.6o for the film grown without buffer layer. The transition from hydrophobicity to hydrophilicity under UV irradiation occurs within 10 min. for the buffer layered films whereas it is almost 30 min. for the film grown without buffer layer. The enhanced photo induced hydrophilicity is shown to be surface energy driven.

  15. Laser induced single-crystal transition in polycrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitali, G.; Bertolotti, M.; Foti, G.; Rimini, E.

    1978-01-01

    Transition to single crystal of polycrystalline Si material underlying a Si crystal substrate of 100 orientation was obtained via laser irradiation. The changes in the structure were analyzed by reflection high energy electron diffraction and by channeling effect technique using 2.0 MeV He Rutherford scattering. The power density required to induce the transition in a 4500 A thick polycrystalline layer is about 70 MW/cm 2 (50ns). The corresponding amorphous to single transition has a threshold of about 45 MW/cm 2 . (orig.) 891 HPOE [de

  16. The BLLAST field experiment: Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lothon, M.; Lohou, F.; Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Boer, van de A.; Coster, de O.; Moene, A.F.; Steeneveld, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the major role of the sun in heating the earth's surface, the atmospheric planetary boundary layer over land is inherently marked by a diurnal cycle. The afternoon transition, the period of the day that connects the daytime dry convective boundary layer to the night-time stable boundary

  17. Coordination of IVI and transit signal priority on transit evacuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    During an emergency evacuation, execution time is always critical to the evacuees who are : transit dependent. Transit Signal Priority (TSP) can speed up the transit services by prioritizing : the approaching bus at a signalized intersection. With th...

  18. Cosmological phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, E.W.

    1987-01-01

    If the universe stated from conditions of high temperature and density, there should have been a series of phase transitions associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking. The cosmological phase transitions could have observable consequences in the present Universe. Some of the consequences including the formation of topological defects and cosmological inflation are reviewed here. One of the most important tools in building particle physics models is the use of spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB). The proposal that there are underlying symmetries of nature that are not manifest in the vacuum is a crucial link in the unification of forces. Of particular interest for cosmology is the expectation that are the high temperatures of the big bang symmetries broken today will be restored, and that there are phase transitions to the broken state. The possibility that topological defects will be produced in the transition is the subject of this section. The possibility that the Universe will undergo inflation in a phase transition will be the subject of the next section. Before discussing the creation of topological defects in the phase transition, some general aspects of high-temperature restoration of symmetry and the development of the phase transition will be reviewed. 29 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  19. Peeling Back the Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image of the rock target named 'Mazatzal' on sol 77 (March 22, 2004). It is a close-up look at the rock face and the targets that will be brushed and ground by the rock abrasion tool in upcoming sols. Mazatzal, like most rocks on Earth and Mars, has layers of material near its surface that provide clues about the history of the rock. Scientists believe that the top layer of Mazatzal is actually a coating of dust and possibly even salts. Under this light coating may be a more solid portion of the rock that has been chemically altered by weathering. Past this layer is the unaltered rock, which may give scientists the best information about how Mazatzal was formed. Because each layer reveals information about the formation and subsequent history of Mazatzal, it is important that scientists get a look at each of them. For this reason, they have developed a multi-part strategy to use the rock abrasion tool to systematically peel back Mazatzal's layers and analyze what's underneath with the rover's microscopic imager, and its Moessbauer and alpha particle X-ray spectrometers. The strategy began on sol 77 when scientists used the microscopic imager to get a closer look at targets on Mazatzal named 'New York,' 'Illinois' and 'Arizona.' These rock areas were targeted because they posed the best opportunity for successfully using the rock abrasion tool; Arizona also allowed for a close-up look at a range of tones. On sol 78, Spirit's rock abrasion tool will do a light brushing on the Illinois target to preserve some of the surface layers. Then, a brushing of the New York target should remove the top coating of any dust and salts and perhaps reveal the chemically altered rock underneath. Finally, on sol 79, the rock abrasion tool will be commanded to grind into the New York target, which will give scientists the best chance of observing Mazatzal's interior. The Mazatzal targets were named after the home states of

  20. Shear layer flame stabilization sensitivities in a swirling flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Foley

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A variety of different flame configurations and heat release distributions exist in high swirl, annular flows, due to the existence of inner and outer shear layers as well a vortex breakdown bubble. Each of these different configurations, in turn, has different thermoacoustic sensitivities and influences on combustor emissions, nozzle durability, and liner heating. This paper presents findings on the sensitivities of the outer shear layer- stabilized flames to a range of parameters, including equivalence ratio, bulkhead temperature, flow velocity, and preheat temperature. There is significant hysteresis for flame attachment/detachment from the outer shear layer and this hysteresis is also described. Results are also correlated with extinction stretch rate calculations based on detailed kinetic simulations. In addition, we show that the bulkhead temperature near the flame attachment point has significant impact on outer shear layer detachment. This indicates that understanding the heat transfer between the edge flame stabilized in the shear layer and the nozzle hardware is needed in order to predict shear layer flame stabilization limits. Moreover, it shows that simulations cannot simply assume adiabatic boundary conditions if they are to capture these transitions. We also show that the reference temperature for correlating these transitions is quite different for attachment and local blow off. Finally, these results highlight the deficiencies in current understanding of the influence of fluid mechanic parameters (e.g. velocity, swirl number on shear layer flame attachment. For example, they show that the seemingly simple matter of scaling flame transition points with changes in flow velocities is not understood.

  1. Milestoning with transition memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Alexander T.; Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2011-12-01

    Milestoning is a method used to calculate the kinetics and thermodynamics of molecular processes occurring on time scales that are not accessible to brute force molecular dynamics (MD). In milestoning, the conformation space of the system is sectioned by hypersurfaces (milestones), an ensemble of trajectories is initialized on each milestone, and MD simulations are performed to calculate transitions between milestones. The transition probabilities and transition time distributions are then used to model the dynamics of the system with a Markov renewal process, wherein a long trajectory of the system is approximated as a succession of independent transitions between milestones. This approximation is justified if the transition probabilities and transition times are statistically independent. In practice, this amounts to a requirement that milestones are spaced such that trajectories lose position and velocity memory between subsequent transitions. Unfortunately, limiting the number of milestones limits both the resolution at which a system's properties can be analyzed, and the computational speedup achieved by the method. We propose a generalized milestoning procedure, milestoning with transition memory (MTM), which accounts for memory of previous transitions made by the system. When a reaction coordinate is used to define the milestones, the MTM procedure can be carried out at no significant additional expense as compared to conventional milestoning. To test MTM, we have applied its version that allows for the memory of the previous step to the toy model of a polymer chain undergoing Langevin dynamics in solution. We have computed the mean first passage time for the chain to attain a cyclic conformation and found that the number of milestones that can be used, without incurring significant errors in the first passage time is at least 8 times that permitted by conventional milestoning. We further demonstrate that, unlike conventional milestoning, MTM permits

  2. Magnetic and Electric Properties of , ( Layered Perovskites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The electric and magnetic properties of layered perovskites have been investigated systematically over the doping range . It was found that both Sr1.5Y0.5CoO4 and Sr1.4Y0.6CoO4 undergo ferromagnetic (FM transition around 145 K and 120 K, respectively. On the other hand, Sr1.3Y0.7CoO4 and Sr1.2Y0.8CoO4 compounds showed paramagnetic behavior over a wide range of temperatures. In addition, spin-glass transition ( was observed at 10 K for Sr1.3Y0.7CoO4. All investigated samples are semiconducting-like within the temperature range of 10–300 K. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity, , was described by two-dimensional variable range hopping (2D-VRH model at 50 K < ≤ 300 K. Comparison with other layered perovskites was discussed in this work.

  3. Turbulent Spot Characterization and the Modeling of Transitional Heat Transfer in Turbines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LaGraff, John

    2001-01-01

    .... The purpose of this research is to obtain more information on the generation. propagation and coalescence of turbulent spots in a transitional boundary layer and examine the effects of free stream turbulence pressure gradient and cross flow...

  4. Laterally Stitched Heterostructures of Transition Metal Dichalcogenide: Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth on Lithographically Patterned Area

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Henan; Li, Peng; Huang, Jing Kai; Li, Ming-yang; Yang, Chih-Wen; Shi, Yumeng; Zhang, Xixiang; Li, Lain-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have shown great promise in electronics and optoelectronics due to their unique electrical and optical properties. Heterostructured TMDC layers such as the laterally stitched TMDCs offer

  5. DNS Studies of Transitional Hypersonic Reacting Flows Over 3-D Hypersonic Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhong, Xiaolin

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this research project are to develop CFD techniques and to conduct DNS studies of fundamental flow physics leading to boundary-layer instability and transition in hypersonic flows...

  6. Martensitic phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petry, W.; Neuhaus, J.

    1996-01-01

    Many elements transform from a high temperature bcc phase to a more dense packed temperature phase. The great majority of these transitions are of 1st order, displacive and reconstructive. The lattice potentials which govern these martensitic transitions can be probed by inelastic neutron scattering, thereby answering fundamental questions like : Will the transition be announced by dynamical or static fluctuations? What are the trajectories for the displacements needed for the transformation? Does the vibrational entropy stabilize the high temperature phase? Are the unusual transport properties in these materials related to their ability to transform? (author) 17 figs., 1 tab., 46 refs

  7. Variational Transition State Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truhlar, Donald G. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-09-29

    This is the final report on a project involving the development and applications of variational transition state theory. This project involved the development of variational transition state theory for gas-phase reactions, including optimized multidimensional tunneling contributions and the application of this theory to gas-phase reactions with a special emphasis on developing reaction rate theory in directions that are important for applications to combustion. The development of variational transition state theory with optimized multidimensional tunneling as a useful computational tool for combustion kinetics involved eight objectives.

  8. Martensitic phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petry, W; Neuhaus, J [Techn. Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E13, Munich (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Many elements transform from a high temperature bcc phase to a more dense packed temperature phase. The great majority of these transitions are of 1st order, displacive and reconstructive. The lattice potentials which govern these martensitic transitions can be probed by inelastic neutron scattering, thereby answering fundamental questions like : Will the transition be announced by dynamical or static fluctuations? What are the trajectories for the displacements needed for the transformation? Does the vibrational entropy stabilize the high temperature phase? Are the unusual transport properties in these materials related to their ability to transform? (author) 17 figs., 1 tab., 46 refs.

  9. The energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passalacqua, Arnaud; Billes-Garabedian, Laurent; Jancovici, Jean-Marc; Arnoux, Mathieu; Auverlot, Dominique; Leguet, Benoit; Grandjean, Alain; Morel, Julien; Lambert, Quentin; Tranie, Jean-Pascal; Bureau, Dominique; Dron, Dominique; Beeker, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    This special dossier about energy transition is made of 10 contributions dealing with: thousands of years of energy transition (Jean-Marc Jancovici); a recurring problem after a thousand years of fight (Mathieu Arnoux); urban mobility: another energy story (Arnaud Passalacqua); an opportunity subjected to conditions for the French competitiveness (Dominique Auverlot, Benoit Leguet); Germany: an energy utopia or a role model? (Etienne Beeker); environment: the financing stakes (Dominique Dron); reconciling the economical, social and ecological stakes (Alain Grandjean); Sweden in the face of transportation challenge (Julien Morel, Quentin Lambert); India and China with a commitment to global warming (Jean-Pascal Tranie); training the energy transition managers (Dominique Bureau)

  10. Thermal Analysis of Low Layer Density Multilayer Insulation Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wesley L.

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of the thermal performance of low layer density multilayer insulations is important for designing long-duration space exploration missions involving the storage of cryogenic propellants. Theoretical calculations show an analytical optimal layer density, as widely reported in the literature. However, the appropriate test data by which to evaluate these calculations have been only recently obtained. As part of a recent research project, NASA procured several multilayer insulation test coupons for calorimeter testing. These coupons were configured to allow for the layer density to be varied from 0.5 to 2.6 layer/mm. The coupon testing was completed using the cylindrical Cryostat-l00 apparatus by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center. The results show the properties of the insulation as a function of layer density for multiple points. Overlaying these new results with data from the literature reveals a minimum layer density; however, the value is higher than predicted. Additionally, the data show that the transition region between high vacuum and no vacuum is dependent on the spacing of the reflective layers. Historically this spacing has not been taken into account as thermal performance was calculated as a function of pressure and temperature only; however the recent testing shows that the data is dependent on the Knudsen number which takes into account pressure, temperature, and layer spacing. These results aid in the understanding of the performance parameters of MLI and help to complete the body of literature on the topic.

  11. Physical Layer Network Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukui, Hironori; Yomo, Hironori; Popovski, Petar

    2013-01-01

    of interfering nodes and usage of spatial reservation mechanisms. Specifically, we introduce a reserved area in order to protect the nodes involved in two-way relaying from the interference caused by neighboring nodes. We analytically derive the end-to-end rate achieved by PLNC considering the impact......Physical layer network coding (PLNC) has the potential to improve throughput of multi-hop networks. However, most of the works are focused on the simple, three-node model with two-way relaying, not taking into account the fact that there can be other neighboring nodes that can cause....../receive interference. The way to deal with this problem in distributed wireless networks is usage of MAC-layer mechanisms that make a spatial reservation of the shared wireless medium, similar to the well-known RTS/CTS in IEEE 802.11 wireless networks. In this paper, we investigate two-way relaying in presence...

  12. Crack layer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1987-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  13. Gravitational double layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senovilla, José M M

    2014-01-01

    I analyze the properties of thin shells through which the scalar curvature R is discontinuous in gravity theories with Lagrangian F(R) = R − 2Λ + αR 2 on the bulk. These shells/domain walls are of a new kind because they possess, in addition to the standard energy–momentum tensor, an external energy flux vector, an external scalar pressure/tension and, most exotic of all, another energy–momentum contribution resembling classical dipole distributions on a shell: a double layer. I prove that all these contributions are necessary to make the entire energy–momentum tensor divergence-free. This is the first known occurrence of such a type of double layer in a gravity theory. I present explicit examples in constant-curvature five-dimensional bulks, with a brief study of their properties: new physical behaviors arise. (fast track communications)

  14. Reversibility of temperature driven discrete layer-by-layer formation of dioctyl-benzothieno-benzothiophene films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohr, M; Ehmann, H M A; Jones, A O F; Salzmann, I; Shen, Q; Teichert, C; Ruzié, C; Schweicher, G; Geerts, Y H; Resel, R; Sferrazza, M; Werzer, O

    2017-03-22

    Film forming properties of semiconducting organic molecules comprising alkyl-chains combined with an aromatic unit have a decisive impact on possible applications in organic electronics. In particular, knowledge on the film formation process in terms of wetting or dewetting, and the precise control of these processes, is of high importance. In the present work, the subtle effect of temperature on the morphology and structure of dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT) films deposited on silica surfaces by spin coating is investigated in situ via X-ray diffraction techniques and atomic force microscopy. Depending on temperature, bulk C8-BTBT exhibits a crystalline, a smectic A and an isotropic phase. Heating of thin C8-BTBT layers at temperatures below the smectic phase transition temperature leads to a strong dewetting of the films. Upon approaching the smectic phase transition, the molecules start to rewet the surface in the form of discrete monolayers with a defined number of monolayers being present at a given temperature. The wetting process and layer formation is well defined and thermally stable at a given temperature. On cooling the reverse effect is observed and dewetting occurs. This demonstrates the full reversibility of the film formation behavior and reveals that the layering process is defined by an equilibrium thermodynamic state, rather than by kinetic effects.

  15. Boundary-layer theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schlichting (Deceased), Hermann

    2017-01-01

    This new edition of the near-legendary textbook by Schlichting and revised by Gersten presents a comprehensive overview of boundary-layer theory and its application to all areas of fluid mechanics, with particular emphasis on the flow past bodies (e.g. aircraft aerodynamics). The new edition features an updated reference list and over 100 additional changes throughout the book, reflecting the latest advances on the subject.

  16. Rural transit emergency planning guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Providing safe, reliable transportation has long been a priority at all levels of the transit industry including the Federal Transit Administration (FTA), California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and individual transit providers. Over the l...

  17. Transit ridership, reliability, and retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    This project explores two major components that affect transit ridership: travel time reliability and rider : retention. It has been recognized that transit travel time reliability may have a significant impact on : attractiveness of transit to many ...

  18. Barrier layer arrangement for conductive layers on silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, L.S.; Agostinelli, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a circuit element comprised of a silicon substrate and a conductive layer located on the substrate. It is characterized in that the conductive layer consists essentially of a rare earth alkaline earth copper oxide and a barrier layer triad is interposed between the silicon substrate and the conductive layer comprised of a first triad layer located adjacent the silicon substrate consisting essentially of silica, a third triad layer remote from the silicon substrate consisting essentially of a least one Group 4 heavy metal oxide, and a second triad layer interposed between the first and third triad layers consisting essentially of a mixture of silica and at lease one Group 4 heavy metal oxide

  19. Modeling Metropolitan Detroit transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    "The seven-county Southeast Michigan region, that encompasses the Detroit Metropolitan Area, : ranks fifth in population among top 25 regions in the nation. It also ranks among bottom five in : the transit service provided, measured in miles or hours...

  20. Generalizing smooth transition autoregressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chini, Emilio Zanetti

    We introduce a variant of the smooth transition autoregression - the GSTAR model - capable to parametrize the asymmetry in the tails of the transition equation by using a particular generalization of the logistic function. A General-to-Specific modelling strategy is discussed in detail, with part......We introduce a variant of the smooth transition autoregression - the GSTAR model - capable to parametrize the asymmetry in the tails of the transition equation by using a particular generalization of the logistic function. A General-to-Specific modelling strategy is discussed in detail......, with particular emphasis on two different LM-type tests for the null of symmetric adjustment towards a new regime and three diagnostic tests, whose power properties are explored via Monte Carlo experiments. Four classical real datasets illustrate the empirical properties of the GSTAR, jointly to a rolling...