WorldWideScience

Sample records for laser tweezers spectroscopy

  1. Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy of single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, De

    Raman scattering is an inelastic collision between the vibrating molecules inside the sample and the incident photons. During this process, energy exchange takes place between the photon and the scattering molecule. By measuring the energy change of the photon, the molecular vibration mode can be probed. The vibrational spectrum contains valuable information about the disposition of atomic nuclei and chemical bonds within a molecule, the chemical compositions and the interactions between the molecule and its surroundings. In this dissertation, laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) technique is applied for the analysis of biological cells and human cells at single cell level. In LTRS, an individual cell is trapped in aqueous medium with laser tweezers, and Raman scattering spectra from the trapped cell are recorded in real-time. The Raman spectra of these cells can be used to reveal the dynamical processes of cell growth, cell response to environment changes, and can be used as the finger print for the identification of a bacterial cell species. Several biophysical experiments were carried out using LTRS: (1) the dynamic germination process of individual spores of Bacillus thuringiensis was detected via Ca-DPA, a spore-specific biomarker molecule; (2) inactivation and killing of Bacillus subtilis spores by microwave irradiation and wet heat were studied at single cell level; (3) the heat shock activation process of single B. subtilis spores were analyzed, in which the reversible transition from glass-like state at low temperature to liquid-like state at high temperature in spore was revealed at the molecular level; (4) the kinetic processes of bacterial cell lysis of E. coli by lysozyme and by temperature induction of lambda phage were detected real-time; (5) the fixation and rehydration of human platelets were quantitatively evaluated and characterized with Raman spectroscopy method, which provided a rapid way to quantify the quality of freeze-dried therapeutic

  2. Inactivation of Spores of Bacillus Species by Wet Heat: Studies on Single Spores Using Laser Tweezers Taman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    germination using phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and optical tweezers, Nature Protocols , (04 2011): . doi: 05/11...multiple individual spores [ Nature Protocols , 6, 625 (2011)]. (1e) We developed a multiple-trap laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) array for

  3. [Analysis of astaxanthin in Phaffia rhodozyma using laser tweezers raman spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Sun, Mei-Juan; Liu, Jun-Xian; Deng, Yang-Ge; Mo, Yu-Xiang; Tao, Zhan-Hua

    2012-09-01

    In the present paper, a method was established based on laser tweezer Raman spectroscopy for rapid quantification of astaxanthin in Phaffia rhodozyma cells. First, the Raman spectra of astaxanthin standard solution with different concentrations were determined and the standard curve for astaxanthin with the peak intensity at 1 520 cm- was plotted; And then the Phaffia yeast cells cultivated in different nitrogen source and carbon source medium were divided into two parts, one for the detection of Raman spectra, and the other for the determination of ultraviolet visible spectrophotometry; Finally the relationship between the two methods was analyzed. The correlation coefficient of standard curve for astaxanthin is 0.998 3. Comparing laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy method with traditional ultraviolet visible spectrophotometry in analyzing the content of astaxanthin in unit mass Phaffia rhodozyma and the yield of astaxanthin in unit volume fermentation broth of Phaffia rhodozyma, the authors found that the data obtained have good linear relationship. And the correlation coefficients are 0.917 7 and 0.905 4, respectively. Therefore, both methods have almost the same effect of measuement. But laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy method is more efficient in the quantitative analysis of astaxanthin in Phaffia rhodozyma cells.

  4. Application of laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy techniques to the monitoring of single cell response to stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, James W.; Liu, Rui; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2012-06-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) combines optical trapping with micro-Raman spectroscopy to enable label-free biochemical analysis of individual cells and small biological particles in suspension. The integration of the two technologies greatly simplifies the sample preparation and handling of suspension cells for spectroscopic analysis in physiologically meaningful conditions. In our group, LTRS has been used to study the effects of external perturbations, both chemical and mechanical, on the biochemistry of the cell. Single cell dynamics can be studied by performing longitudinal studies to continuously monitor the response of the cell as it interacts with its environment. The ability to carry out these measurements in-vitro makes LTRS an attractive tool for many biomedical applications. Here, we discuss the use of LTRS to study the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutics and bacteria cells to antibiotics and show that the life cycle and apoptosis of the cells can be detected. These results show the promise of LTRS for drug discovery/screening, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and chemotherapy response monitoring applications. In separate experiments, we study the response of red blood cells to the mechanical forces imposed on the cell by the optical tweezers. A laser power dependent deoxygenation of the red blood cell in the single beam trap is reported. Normal, sickle cell, and fetal red blood cells have a different behavior that enables the discrimination of the cell types based on this mechanochemical response. These results show the potential utility of LTRS for diagnosing and studying red blood cell diseases.

  5. Laser tweezers: spectroscopy of optically trapped micron-sized particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, K.M.; Livett, M.K.; Nugent, K.W. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Information is often obtained about biological systems by analysis of single cells in the system. The optimum conditions for this analysis are when the cells are living and in their natural surroundings as they will be performing their normal functions and interactions. Analysis of cells can be difficult due to their mobility. Laser tweezing is a non contact method that can be employed to overcome this problem and provides a powerful tool in the analysis of functions and interactions at single cell level. In this investigation Raman spectra of a molecule of {beta} - carotene, dissolved in microdroplets of oil was obtained. The droplets were trapped using Nd-YAG beam and a low intensity Ar{sup +} beam was used to analyse the trapped particles. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Novel single-cell functional analysis of red blood cells using laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy: application for sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Mao, Ziliang; Matthews, Dennis L; Li, Chin-Shang; Chan, James W; Satake, Noriko

    2013-07-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the oxygenation response of single normal adult, sickle, and cord blood red blood cells (RBCs) to an applied mechanical force. Individual cells were subjected to different forces by varying the laser power of a single-beam optical trap, and the intensities of several oxygenation-specific Raman spectral peaks were monitored to determine the oxygenation state of the cells. For all three cell types, an increase in laser power (or mechanical force) induced a greater deoxygenation of the cell. However, sickle RBCs deoxygenated more readily than normal RBCs when subjected to the same optical forces. Conversely, cord blood RBCs were able to maintain their oxygenation better than normal RBCs. These results suggest that differences in the chemical or mechanical properties of fetal, normal, and sickle cells affect the degree to which applied mechanical forces can deoxygenate the cell. Populations of normal, sickle, and cord RBCs were identified and discriminated based on this mechanochemical phenomenon. This study demonstrates the potential application of laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy as a single-cell, label-free analytical tool to characterize the functional (e.g., mechanical deformability, oxygen binding) properties of normal and diseased RBCs.

  7. Monitoring Dynamic Protein Expression in Single Living E. Coli. Bacterial Cells by Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J W; Winhold, H; Corzett, M H; Ulloa, J M; Cosman, M; Balhorn, R; Huser, T

    2007-01-09

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) is a novel, nondestructive, and label-free method that can be used to quantitatively measure changes in cellular activity in single living cells. Here, we demonstrate its use to monitor changes in a population of E. coli cells that occur during overexpression of a protein, the extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG(1-120)) Raman spectra were acquired of individual E. coli cells suspended in solution and trapped by a single tightly focused laser beam. Overexpression of MOG(1-120) in transformed E. coli Rosetta-Gami (DE3)pLysS cells was induced by addition of isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). Changes in the peak intensities of the Raman spectra from a population of cells were monitored and analyzed over a total duration of three hours. Data was also collected for concentrated purified MOG(1-120) protein in solution, and the spectra compared with that obtained for the MOG(1-120) expressing cells. Raman spectra of individual, living E. coli cells exhibit signatures due to DNA and protein molecular vibrations. Characteristic Raman markers associated with protein vibrations, such as 1257 cm{sup -1}, 1340 cm{sup -1}, 1453 cm{sup -1} and 1660 cm{sup -1}, are shown to increase as a function of time following the addition of IPTG. Comparison of these spectra and the spectra of purified MOG protein indicates that the changes are predominantly due to the induction of MOG protein expression. Protein expression was found to occur mostly within the second hour, with a 470% increase relative to the protein expressed in the first hour. A 230% relative increase between the second and third hour indicates that protein expression begins to level off within the third hour. It is demonstrated that LTRS has sufficient sensitivity for real-time, nondestructive, and quantitative monitoring of biological processes, such as protein expression, in single living cells. Such capabilities, which are not currently available in

  8. Microcrystal manipulation with laser tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Armin, E-mail: armin.wagner@diamond.ac.uk; Duman, Ramona [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Stevens, Bob [Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham NG1 4BU (United Kingdom); Ward, Andy [Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Optical trapping has successfully been applied to select and mount microcrystals for subsequent X-ray diffraction experiments. X-ray crystallography is the method of choice to deduce atomic resolution structural information from macromolecules. In recent years, significant investments in structural genomics initiatives have been undertaken to automate all steps in X-ray crystallography from protein expression to structure solution. Robotic systems are widely used to prepare crystallization screens and change samples on synchrotron beamlines for macromolecular crystallography. The only remaining manual handling step is the transfer of the crystal from the mother liquor onto the crystal holder. Manual mounting is relatively straightforward for crystals with dimensions of >25 µm; however, this step is nontrivial for smaller crystals. The mounting of microcrystals is becoming increasingly important as advances in microfocus synchrotron beamlines now allow data collection from crystals with dimensions of only a few micrometres. To make optimal usage of these beamlines, new approaches have to be taken to facilitate and automate this last manual handling step. Optical tweezers, which are routinely used for the manipulation of micrometre-sized objects, have successfully been applied to sort and mount macromolecular crystals on newly designed crystal holders. Diffraction data from CPV type 1 polyhedrin microcrystals mounted with laser tweezers are presented.

  9. Development and biological applications of optical tweezers and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chang'an

    Optical tweezers is a three-dimensional manipulation tool that employs a gradient force that originates from the single highly focused laser beam. Raman spectroscopy is a molecular analytical tool that can give a highly unique "fingerprint" for each substance by measuring the unique vibrations of its molecules. The combination of these two optical techniques offers a new tool for the manipulation and identification of single biological cells and microscopic particles. In this thesis, we designed and implemented a Laser-Tweezers-Raman-Spectroscopy (LTRS) system, also called the Raman-tweezers, for the simultaneous capture and analysis of both biological particles and non-biological particles. We show that microparticles can be conveniently captured at the focus of a laser beam and the Raman spectra of trapped particles can be acquired with high quality. The LTRS system overcomes the intrinsic Brownian motion and cell motility of microparticles in solution and provides a promising tool for in situ identifying suspicious agents. In order to increase the signal to noise ratio, several schemes were employed in LTRS system to reduce the blank noise and the fluorescence signal coming from analytes and the surrounding background. These techniques include near-infrared excitation, optical levitation, confocal microscopy, and frequency-shifted Raman difference. The LTRS system has been applied for the study in cell biology at the single cell level. With the built Raman-tweezers system, we studied the dynamic physiological processes of single living cells, including cell cycle, the transcription and translation of recombinant protein in transgenic yeast cells and the T cell activation. We also studied cell damage and associated biochemical processes in optical traps, UV radiations, and evaluated heating by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. These studies show that the Raman-tweezers system is feasible to provide rapid and reliable diagnosis of cellular disorders and can be

  10. Rotation of microscopic propellers in laser tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galajda, Peter; Ormos, Pal [Institute of Biophysics, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged, PO Box 521, H-6701 (Hungary)

    2002-04-01

    Particles of helical shape trapped in laser tweezers are rotated by light, independently of its polarization state. Light scattering by such propeller-like particles generates the momentum to drive the rotation. The efficiency of the rotation depends on the geometry of the particles. We used photopolymerization of light curing resins to create micrometre-size rotors with different shapes. The rotation of such particles was studied: the effect of shape and size on the rotation, as well as on the stability of the position in the laser tweezers.

  11. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  12. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2008-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations.

  13. Resource Letter: LBOT-1: Laser-based optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Matthew J.; Block, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on optical tweezers, also known as laser-based, gradient-force optical traps. Journal articles and books are cited for the following main topics: general papers on optical tweezers, trapping instrument design, optical detection methods, optical trapping theory, mechanical measurements, single molecule studies, and sections on biological motors, cellular measurements and additional applications of optical tweezers. PMID:16971965

  14. Resource Letter: LBOT-1: Laser-based optical tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Matthew J.; Block, Steven M.

    2003-01-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on optical tweezers, also known as laser-based, gradient-force optical traps. Journal articles and books are cited for the following main topics: general papers on optical tweezers, trapping instrument design, optical detection methods, optical trapping theory, mechanical measurements, single molecule studies, and sections on biological motors, cellular measurements and additional applications of optical tweezers.

  15. Uptake of and Resistance to the Antibiotic Berberine by Individual Dormant, Germinating and Outgrowing Bacillus Spores as Monitored by Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiwei; Yu, Jing; Suvira, Milomir; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2015-01-01

    Berberine, an alkaloid originally extracted from the plant Coptis chinensis and other herb plants, has been used as a pharmacological substance for many years. The therapeutic effect of berberine has been attributed to its interaction with nucleic acids and blocking cell division. However, levels of berberine entering individual microbial cells minimal for growth inhibition and its effects on bacterial spores have not been determined. In this work the kinetics and levels of berberine accumulation by individual dormant and germinated spores were measured by laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy and differential interference and fluorescence microscopy, and effects of berberine on spore germination and outgrowth and spore and growing cell viability were determined. The major conclusions from this work are that: (1) colony formation from B. subtilis spores was blocked ~ 99% by 25 μg/mL berberine plus 20 μg/mL INF55 (a multidrug resistance pump inhibitor); (2) 200 μg/mL berberine had no effect on B. subtilis spore germination with L-valine, but spore outgrowth was completely blocked; (3) berberine levels accumulated in single spores germinating with ≥ 25 μg/mL berberine were > 10 mg/mL; (4) fluorescence microscopy showed that germinated spores accumulated high-levels of berberine primarily in the spore core, while dormant spores accumulated very low berberine levels primarily in spore coats; and (5) during germination, uptake of berberine began at the time of commitment (T1) and reached a maximum after the completion of CaDPA release (Trelease) and spore cortex lysis (Tlysis).

  16. Pulse laser assisted optical tweezers for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Tadao; Maeda, Saki; Honda, Ayae

    2012-01-01

    Optical tweezers which enables to trap micron to nanometer sized objects by radiation pressure force is utilized for manipulation of particles under a microscope and for measurement of forces between biomolecules. Weak force of optical tweezers causes some limitations such as particle adhesion or steric barrier like lipid membrane in a cell prevent further movement of objects. For biomedical applications we need to overcome these difficulties. We have developed a technique to exert strong instantaneous force by use of a pulse laser beam and to assist conventional optical tweezers. A pulse laser beam has huge instantaneous laser power of more than 1000 times as strong as a conventional continuous-wave laser beam so that the instantaneous force is strong enough to break chemical bonding and molecular force between objects and obstacles. We derive suitable pulse duration for pulse assist of optical tweezers and demonstrate particle manipulation in difficult situations through an experiment of particle removal from sticky surface of glass substrate.

  17. Temperature-dependent conformations of a membrane supported zinc porphyrin tweezer by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widom, Julia R; Lee, Wonbae; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Molinski, Tadeusz F; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Marcus, Andrew H

    2013-07-25

    We studied the equilibrium conformations of a zinc porphyrin tweezer composed of two carboxylphenyl-functionalized zinc tetraphenyl porphyrin subunits connected by a 1,4-butyndiol spacer, which was suspended inside the amphiphilic regions of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) liposomes. By combining phase-modulation two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D FS) with linear absorbance and fluorimetry, we determined that the zinc porphyrin tweezer adopts a mixture of folded and extended conformations in the membrane. By fitting an exciton-coupling model to a series of data sets recorded over a range of temperatures (17-85 °C) and at different laser center wavelengths, we determined that the folded form of the tweezer is stabilized by a favorable change in the entropy of the local membrane environment. Our results provide insights toward understanding the balance of thermodynamic factors that govern molecular assembly in membranes.

  18. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., ultrafast lasers (atto- and femto-second lasers) and parametric oscillators, coherent matter waves, Doppler-free Fourier spectroscopy with optical frequency combs, interference spectroscopy, quantum optics, the interferometric detection of gravitational waves and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  19. Determination of motility forces on isolated chromosomes with laser tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatibzadeh, Nima; Stilgoe, Alexander B; Bui, Ann A M; Rocha, Yesenia; Cruz, Gladys M; Loke, Vince; Shi, Linda Z; Nieminen, Timo A; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Berns, Michael W

    2014-10-31

    Quantitative determination of the motility forces of chromosomes during cell division is fundamental to understanding a process that is universal among eukaryotic organisms. Using an optical tweezers system, isolated mammalian chromosomes were held in a 1064 nm laser trap. The minimum force required to move a single chromosome was determined to be ≈ 0.8-5 pN. The maximum transverse trapping efficiency of the isolated chromosomes was calculated as ≈ 0.01-0.02. These results confirm theoretical force calculations of ≈ 0.1-12 pN to move a chromosome on the mitotic or meiotic spindle. The verification of these results was carried out by calibration of the optical tweezers when trapping microspheres with a diameter of 4.5-15 µm in media with 1-7 cP viscosity. The results of the chromosome and microsphere trapping experiments agree with optical models developed to simulate trapping of cylindrical and spherical specimens.

  20. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., frequency doubling in external cavities, reliable cw-parametric oscillators, tunable narrow-band UV sources, more sensitive detection techniques, tunable femtosecond and sub-femtosecond lasers (X-ray region and the attosecond range), control of atomic and molecular excitations, frequency combs able to synchronize independent femtosecond lasers, coherent matter waves, and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  1. Two-laser optical tweezers with a blinking beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamperska, Weronika; Masajada, Jan; Drobczyński, Sławomir; Gusin, Paweł

    2017-07-01

    We report on a two-laser holographic optical tweezers setup and present its two major advantages over single-laser one. First, the trap stiffness of a weak trapping beam can be measured with a considerable accuracy. Second, a novel method of examining local viscosity of fluid is proposed. Both measurements are performed based on forcing the oscillations of a microscopic polystyrene bead placed between two optical traps. The two beams are generated by separate laser sources and therefore their trapping power can vary. Moreover, a stronger trap 'blinks', modulated by an electronic shutter. The blinking frequency can be precisely adjusted to the experimental conditions, which results in high accuracy of the measurements.

  2. In Situ Raman Spectroscopy of COOH-Functionalized SWCNTs Trapped with Optoelectronic Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Pauzauskie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optoelectronic tweezers (OETs were used to trap and deposit aqueous dispersions of carboxylic-acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. Dark-field video microscopy was used to visualize the dynamics of the bundles both with and without virtual electrodes, showing rapid accumulation of carbon nanotubes when optical virtual electrodes are actuated. Raman microscopy was used to probe SWCNT materials following deposition onto metallic fiducial markers as well as during trapping. The local carbon nanotube concentration was observed to increase rapidly during trapping by more than an order of magnitude in less than one second due to localized optical dielectrophoresis forces. This combination of enrichment and spectroscopy with a single laser spot suggests a broad range of applications in physical, chemical, and biological sciences.

  3. Optical tweezers for medical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFratta, Christopher N

    2013-07-01

    Laser trapping by optical tweezers makes possible the spectroscopic analysis of single cells. Use of optical tweezers in conjunction with Raman spectroscopy has allowed cells to be identified as either healthy or cancerous. This combined technique is known as laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS), or Raman tweezers. The Raman spectra of cells are complex, since the technique probes nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids; but statistical analysis of these spectra makes possible differentiation of different classes of cells. In this article the recent development of LTRS is described along with two illustrative examples for potential application in cancer diagnostics. Techniques to expand the uses of LTRS and to improve the speed of LTRS are also suggested.

  4. Numerical study of the properties of optical vortex array laser tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chun-Fu; Chu, Shu-Chun

    2013-11-01

    Chu et al. constructed a kind of Ince-Gaussian modes (IGM)-based vortex array laser beams consisting of p x p embedded optical vortexes from Ince-Gaussian modes, IG(e)(p,p) modes [Opt. Express 16, 19934 (2008)]. Such an IGM-based vortex array laser beams maintains its vortex array profile during both propagation and focusing, and is applicable to optical tweezers. This study uses the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method to study the properties of the IGM-based vortex array laser tweezers while it traps dielectric particles. This study calculates the resultant force exerted on the spherical dielectric particles of different sizes situated at the IGM-based vortex array laser beam waist. Numerical results show that the number of trapping spots of a structure light (i.e. IGM-based vortex laser beam), is depended on the relation between the trapped particle size and the structure light beam size. While the trapped particle is small comparing to the beam size of the IGM-based vortex array laser beams, the IGM-based vortex array laser beams tweezers are suitable for multiple traps. Conversely, the tweezers is suitable for single traps. The results of this study is useful to the future development of the vortex array laser tweezers applications.

  5. Automated multi-parametric sorting of micron-sized particles via multi-trap laser tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaputa, Daniel S.

    The capabilities of laser tweezers have rapidly expanded since the first demonstration by Ashkin and co-workers in 1970 of the ability to trap particles using optical energy. Laser tweezers have been used to measure piconewton forces in many biological and material science application, sort bacteria, measure DNA bond strength, and even perform microsurgery. The laser tweezers system developed for this dissertation foreshadows the next generation of laser tweezer systems that provide automated particle sorted based upon multiple criteria. Many laser tweezer sorting applications today entail the operator sorting cells from a bulk sample, one by one. This dissertation demonstrates the technologies of pattern recognition and image processing that allow for an entire microscope slide to be sorted without any operator intervention. We already live in an automated world where the cars we drive are built by machines instead of humans. The technology is there, and the only factors limiting the advancements of fully automated biological instrumentation is the lack of developers with the appropriate knowledge sets. This dissertation introduces the concept of sorting particles via a multi-parametric approach where several parameters such as size, fluorescence, and Raman spectra are used as sorting criteria. Since the advent of laser tweezers, several groups have demonstrated the ability to sort cells and other particle by size, or by fluorescence, or by any other parameter, but to our knowledge there does not exist a laser tweezer sorting system that can sort particles based upon multiple parameters. Sorting via a single parameter can be a severe limitation as the method lacks the robustness and class specificity that exists when sorting based upon multiple parameters. Simply put, it makes more sense to determine the worth of a baseball card by considering it's condition as well as it's age, rather then solely upon its condition. By adding another parameter such as the name of

  6. Manipulation of cells with laser microbeam scissors and optical tweezers: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Karl Otto

    2017-02-01

    The use of laser microbeams and optical tweezers in a wide field of biological applications from genomic to immunology is discussed. Microperforation is used to introduce a well-defined amount of molecules into cells for genetic engineering and optical imaging. The microwelding of two cells induced by a laser microbeam combines their genetic outfit. Microdissection allows specific regions of genomes to be isolated from a whole set of chromosomes. Handling the cells with optical tweezers supports investigation on the attack of immune systems against diseased or cancerous cells. With the help of laser microbeams, heart infarction can be simulated, and optical tweezers support studies on the heartbeat. Finally, laser microbeams are used to induce DNA damage in living cells for studies on cancer and ageing.

  7. Condition Optimization of Astaxanthin Production in Phaffia Rhodozyma Using Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy%激光镊子拉曼光谱法优化红法夫酵母合成虾青素条件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雪; 孙美娟; 刘军贤; 邓洋鸽; 莫玉香; 陶站华

    2013-01-01

    用激光镊子拉曼光谱法优化红法夫酵母生产虾青素的条件.首先,将红法夫酵母细胞拉曼光谱与虾青素标准品溶液拉曼光谱进行对比,找出定量虾青素的拉曼特征峰;然后对照红法夫酵母生长曲线与不同时间点红法夫酵母细胞内虾青素含量曲线,进行发酵时间的优化;最后将红法夫酵母分别用不同氮源、碳源培养基培养,对比其细胞的虾青素拉曼特征峰强度,最终优化培养基.由实验可得,适宜定量虾青素的拉曼特征峰是1520 cm-1峰;最佳发酵时间为72 h;最佳优化培养基氮源含硫酸铵4 g/L+硝酸钾4g/L,碳源含蔗糖60 g/L.从上述结果可知,用激光镊子拉曼光谱法对红法夫酵母合成虾青素的条件进行优化,充分发挥了其操作简便、耗时短、样品用量少、对样品无损伤等优势,使所得结果更准确可信.因此,激光镊子拉曼光谱法是红法夫酵母细胞合成虾青素条件优化的理想选择.%In this paper,laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS)is used for optimizing fermentation condition of astaxanthin in Phaffia Rhodozyma.First,For identifying the characteristic peak of astaxanthin we compare the Raman spectra of Phaffia Rhodozyma cells with that of astaxanthin standard solution; Then we contradistinguish growth curve of Phaffia Rhodozyma from content curve of astaxanthin in Phaffia Rhodozyma cells in different fermentation time for optimization fermentation time; Finally,we culture Phaffia Rhodozyma cells in different carbon medium or nitrogen medium,and compare the Raman spectra of cells in different medium for the medium optimization.The results are as follows:The peak at 152o cm-1 is an appropriate characteristic raman peak for astaxanthin quantitation; The optimal fermentation time is 72 h; The optimal medium contain sucrose 60 g/L for carbon source and ammonium sulfate 4 g/L,potassium nitrate 4 g/L for nitrogen source.The above results suggest LTRS when

  8. Shape deformations of giant unilamellar vesicles with a laser tweezer array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losert, Wolfgang; Poole, Cory; Bradford, Peter; English, Doug

    2004-10-01

    Vesicles are phospholipid bilayers that form a surface enclosing a volume of water or solution. They are of importance as model systems to study cells, as well as having practical applications such as containers for performing nanochemistry and facilitating drug delivery. Their properties have been studied for decades. Using a holographic laser tweezer array (LTA), which converts a single laser beam into many laser tweezer points, we stretch the vesicles in controlled ways from several points at once, measuring each force applied. Here, we present data on shape deformations of simple, spherical vesicles and on membrane fracture.

  9. Near-field enhanced optical tweezers utilizing femtosecond-laser nanostructured substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Kotsifaki, Domna G; Lagoudakis, Pavlos G

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence of plasmonic-enhanced optical tweezers, of polystyrene beads in deionized water in the vicinity of metal-coated nanostructures. The optical tweezers operate with a continuous wave (CW) near-infrared laser. We employ a Cu/Au bilayer that significantly improves dissipation of heat generated by the trapping laser beam and avoid de-trapping from heat convection currents. We investigate the improvement of the optical trapping force, the effective trapping quality factor, and observe an exponential distance dependence of the trapping force from the nanostructures, expected from the evanescent plasmon field.

  10. Near-field enhanced optical tweezers utilizing femtosecond-laser nanostructured substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsifaki, D. G., E-mail: dkotsif@eie.gr; Kandyla, M. [Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, 48 Vasileos Constantinou Avenue, 11635 Athens (Greece); Lagoudakis, P. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-23

    We present experimental evidence of plasmonic-enhanced optical tweezers, of polystyrene beads in deionized water in the vicinity of metal-coated nanostructures. The optical tweezers operate with a continuous wave near-infrared laser. We employ a Cu/Au bilayer that significantly improves dissipation of heat generated by the trapping laser beam and avoid de-trapping from heat convection currents. We investigate the improvement of the optical trapping force and the effective trapping quality factor, and observe an exponential distance dependence of the trapping force from the nanostructures, indicative of evanescent plasmonic enhancement.

  11. An Optical Tweezers Platform for Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy in Organic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jacob; Kamenetska, Maria; Ganim, Ziad

    2017-10-03

    Observation at the single molecule level has been a revolutionary tool for molecular biophysics and materials science, but single molecule studies of solution-phase chemistry are less widespread. In this work we develop an experimental platform for solution-phase single molecule force spectroscopy in organic solvents. This optical-tweezer-based platform was designed for broad chemical applicability and utilizes optically trapped core-shell microspheres, synthetic polymer tethers, and click chemistry linkages formed in situ. We have observed stable optical trapping of the core-shell microspheres in ten different solvents, and single molecule link formation in four different solvents. These experiments demonstrate how to use optical tweezers for single molecule force application in the study of solution-phase chemistry.

  12. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Shuxun; Wang Xiaolin; Sun Dong [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Cheng Jinping; Han Cheng, Shuk [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Kong, Chi-Wing [Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Consortium, and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, LKS Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Li, Ronald A. [Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Consortium, and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, LKS Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Center of Cardiovascular Research, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  13. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuxun; Cheng, Jinping; Kong, Chi-Wing; Wang, Xiaolin; Han Cheng, Shuk; Li, Ronald A.; Sun, Dong

    2013-07-01

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  14. Raman tweezers spectroscopy study of free radical induced oxidative stress leading to eryptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkur, Surekha; Bankapur, Aseefhali; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2016-11-01

    Raman tweezers spectroscopy study of effect of free radicals was carried out on erythrocytes. We prepared hydroxyl radicals using Fenton reaction (which yields hydroxyl radicals). Raman spectra were acquired from single, trapped erythrocytes after supplementing with these free radicals. The changes in the Raman bands such as 1211 cm-1, 1224 cm-1, 1375 cm-1 indicate deoxygenation of red blood cells (RBCs). Our study shows that free radicals can induce oxidative stress on erythrocytes. The changes in the Raman spectra as well as shape of erythrocytes indicate that oxidative stress can trigger eryptosis in erythrocytes.

  15. Laser cooling a neutral atom to the three-dimensional vibrational ground state of an optical tweezer

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, Adam M; Regal, Cindy A

    2012-01-01

    We report three-dimensional ground state cooling of a single neutral atom in an optical tweezer. After employing Raman sideband cooling for 33 ms, we measure via sideband spectroscopy a three-dimensional ground state occupation of ~90%. Ground state neutral atoms in optical tweezers will be instrumental in numerous quantum logic applications and for nanophotonic interfaces that require a versatile platform for storing, moving, and manipulating ultracold single neutral atoms.

  16. Foundations of laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stenholm, Stig

    2005-01-01

    A simple presentation of the theoretical foundations of steady-state laser spectroscopy, this text helps students to apply theory to calculations with a systematic series of examples and exercises. 1984 edition.

  17. Micromanipulation of InP lasers with optoelectronic tweezers for integration on a photonic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvert, Joan; Zhang, Shuailong; Eddie, Iain; Mitchell, Colin J; Reed, Graham T; Wilkinson, James S; Kelly, Anthony; Neale, Steven L

    2016-08-08

    The integration of light sources on a photonic platform is a key aspect of the fabrication of self-contained photonic circuits with a small footprint that does not have a definitive solution yet. Several approaches are being actively researched for this purpose. In this work we propose optoelectronic tweezers for the manipulation and integration of light sources on a photonic platform and report the positional and angular accuracy of the micromanipulation of standard Fabry-Pérot InP semiconductor laser die. These lasers are over three orders of magnitude bigger in volume than any previously assembled with optofluidic techniques and the fact that they are industry standard lasers makes them significantly more useful than previously assembled microdisk lasers. We measure the accuracy to be 2.5 ± 1.4 µm and 1.4 ± 0.4° and conclude that optoelectronic tweezers are a promising technique for the micromanipulation and integration of optoelectronic components in general and semiconductor lasers in particular.

  18. Laser spectroscopy of protonium

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S

    1999-01-01

    High-precision laser spectroscopy of protonium (pp) is one of the future experiments being considered by ASACUSA collaboration at CERN AD. A possible scheme to produce protonium in vacuum and to detect laser transitions is presented, and implications of reaching high precision are discussed. (7 refs).

  19. Binding mechanism of PicoGreen to DNA characterized by magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Schellenberg, Helene; Walhorn, Volker; Toensing, Katja; Anselmetti, Dario

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescent dyes are broadly used in many biotechnological applications to detect and visualize DNA molecules. However, their binding to DNA alters the structural and nanomechanical properties of DNA and, thus, interferes with associated biological processes. In this work we employed magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the binding of PicoGreen to DNA at room temperature in a concentration-dependent manner. PicoGreen is an ultrasensitive quinolinium nucleic acid stain exhibiting hardly any background signal from unbound dye molecules. By means of stretching and overwinding single, torsionally constrained, nick-free double-stranded DNA molecules, we acquired force-extension and supercoiling curves which allow quantifying DNA contour length, persistence length and other thermodynamical binding parameters, respectively. The results of our magnetic tweezers single-molecule binding study were well supported through analyzing the fluorescent spectra of stained DNA. On the basis of our work, we could identify a concentration-dependent bimodal binding behavior, where, apparently, PicoGreen associates to DNA as an intercalator and minor-groove binder simultaneously.

  20. Application of optical tweezers and excimer laser to study protoplast fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantawang, Titirat; Samipak, Sompid; Limtrakul, Jumras; Chattham, Nattaporn

    2015-07-01

    Protoplast fusion is a physical phenomenon that two protoplasts come in contact and fuse together. Doing so, it is possible to combine specific genes from one protoplast to another during fusion such as drought resistance and disease resistance. There are a few possible methods to induce protoplast fusion, for example, electrofusion and chemical fusion. In this study, chemical fusion was performed with laser applied as an external force to enhance rate of fusion and observed under a microscope. Optical tweezers (1064 nm with 100X objective N.A. 1.3) and excimer laser (308 nm LMU-40X-UVB objective) were set with a Nikon Ti-U inverted microscope. Samples were prepared by soaking in hypertonic solution in order to induce cell plasmolysis. Elodea Canadensis and Allium cepa plasmolysed leaves were cut and observed under microscope. Concentration of solution was varied to induce difference turgor pressures on protoplasts pushing at cell wall. Free protoplasts in solution were trapped by optical tweezers to study the effect of Polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution. PEG was diluted by Ca+ solution during the process to induced protoplast cell contact and fusion. Possibility of protoplast fusion by excimer laser was investigated and found possible. Here we report a novel tool for plant cell fusion using excimer laser. Plant growth after cell fusion is currently conducted.

  1. Non-destructive Analysis of the Nuclei of Transgenic Living Cells Using Laser Tweezers and Near-infrared Raman Spectroscopic Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Tang; Ronald J. Newton; Chang-An Xie; Yong-Qing Li; Nicki Whitley

    2005-01-01

    Transgenic cell lines of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) were analyzed by a compact laser-tweezers-Raman-spectroscopy (LTRS) system in this investigation. A low power diode laser at 785 nm was used for both laser optical trapping of single transgenic cells and excitation for near-infrared Raman spectroscopy of the nuclei of synchronized cells, which were treated as single organic particles, at the S-phase of the cell cycle. Transgenic living cells with gfp and uidA genes were used as biological samples to test this LTRS technique. As expected, different Raman spectra were observed from the tested biological samples. This technique provides a high sensitivity and enables real-time spectroscopic measurements of transgenic cell lines. It could be a valuable tool for the study of the fundamental cell and molecular biological process by trapping single nucleus and by providing a wealth of molecular information about the nuclei of cells.

  2. Power spectrum analysis for optical tweezers. II: Laser wavelength dependence of parasitic filtering, and how to achieve high bandwidth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Peterman, Erwin J G; Weber, Tom

    2006-01-01

    In a typical optical tweezers detection system, the position of a trapped object is determined from laser light impinging on a quadrant photodiode. When the laser is infrared and the photodiode is of silicon, they can act together as an unintended low-pass filter. This parasicit effect is due...... this detection system of optical tweezers a bandwidth, accuracy, and precision that are limited only by the data acquisition board's bandwidth and bandpass ripples, here 96.7 kHz and 0.005 dB, respectively. ©2006 American Institute of Physics...

  3. Characterization of bacterial spore germination using integrated phase contrast microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-Qing

    2010-05-01

    We present a methodology that combines external phase contrast microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and optical tweezers to monitor a variety of changes during the germination of single Bacillus cereus spores in both nutrient (l-alanine) and non-nutrient (Ca-dipicolinic acid (DPA)) germinants with a temporal resolution of approximately 2 s. Phase contrast microscopy assesses changes in refractility of individual spores during germination, while Raman spectroscopy gives information on changes in spore-specific molecules. The results obtained include (1) the brightness of the phase contrast image of an individual dormant spore is proportional to the level of CaDPA in that spore; (2) the end of the first Stage of germination, revealed as the end of the rapid drop in spore refractility by phase contrast microscopy, precisely corresponds to the completion of the release of CaDPA as revealed by Raman spectroscopy; and (3) the correspondence between the rapid drop in spore refractility and complete CaDPA release was observed not only for spores germinating in the well-controlled environment of an optical trap but also for spores germinating when adhered on a microscope coverslip. Using this latter method, we also simultaneously characterized the distribution of the time-to-complete-CaDPA release (T(release)) of hundreds of individual B. cereus spores germinating with both saturating and subsaturating concentrations of l-alanine and with CaDPA.

  4. Femtosecond laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaford, Peter

    2005-01-01

    As concepts and methodologies have evolved over the past two decades, the realm of ultrafast science has become vast and exciting and has impacted many areas of chemistry, biology and physics, and other fields such as materials science, electrical engineering, and optical communication. The field has recently exploded with the announcement of a series of remarkable new developments and advances. This volume surveys this recent growth in eleven chapters written by leading international researchers in the field. It includes sections on femtosecond optical frequency combs, soft x-ray femtosecond laser sources, and attosecond laser sources. In addition, the contributors address real-time spectroscopy of molecular vibrations with sub-5-fs pulses and multidimensional femtosecond coherent spectroscopies for studying molecular and electron dynamics. Novel methods for measuring and characterizing ultrashort laser pulses and ultrashort pulses of light are also described. The topics covered are revolutionizing the field...

  5. Optically-driven red blood cell rotor in linearly polarized laser tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manas Khan; Samarendra K Mohanty; A K Sood

    2005-11-01

    We have constructed a dual trap optical tweezers set-up around an inverted microscope where both the traps can be independently controlled and manipulated in all the three dimensions. Here we report our observations on rotation of red blood cells (RBCs) in a linearly polarized optical trap. Red blood cells deform and become twisted in hypertonic phosphate buffer saline and when trapped, experience an unbalanced radiation pressure force. The torque generated from the unbalanced force causes the trapped RBC to rotate. Addition of Ca++ ions in the solution, keeping the osmolarity same, makes the cell membranes stiffer and the cells deform less. Thus the speed of rotation of the red blood cells can be controlled, as less deformation and in turn less asymmetry in shape produces less torque under the radiation pressure resulting in slower rotation at the same laser power.

  6. Optical tweezers for single molecule force spectroscopy on bacterial adhesion organelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Magnus; Axner, Ove; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Fällman, Erik

    2006-08-01

    Instrumentation and methodologies for single molecule force spectroscopy on bacterial adhesion organelles by the use of force measuring optical tweezers have been developed. A thorough study of the biomechanical properties of fimbrial adhesion organelles expressed by uropathogenic E. coli, so-called pili, is presented. Steady-state as well as dynamic force measurements on P pili, expressed by E. coli causing pyelonephritis, have revealed, among other things, various unfolding and refolding properties of the helical structure of P pili, the PapA rod. Based on these properties an energy landscape model has been constructed by which specific biophysical properties of the PapA rod have been extracted, e.g. the number of subunits, the length of a single pilus, bond lengths and activation energies for bond opening and closure. Moreover, long time repetitive measurements have shown that the rod can be unfolded and refolded repetitive times without losing its intrinsic properties. These properties are believed to be of importance for the bacteria's ability to maintain close contact with host cells during initial infections. The results presented are considered to be of importance for the field of biopolymers in general and the development of new pharmaceuticals towards urinary tract infections in particular. The results show furthermore that the methodology can be used to gain knowledge of the intrinsic biomechanical function of adhesion organelles. The instrumentation is currently used for characterization of type 1 pili, expressed by E. coli causing cystitis, i.e. infections in the bladder. The first force spectrometry investigations of these pili will be presented.

  7. Laser spectroscopy of radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santra, Bodhaditya; Dammalapati, Umakanth; Jungmann, Klaus; Willmann, Lorenz [KVI, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-07-01

    Searches for permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) of fundamental particles are sensitive probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. Fundamental EDMs can experience enhancements in atomic and molecular systems. In particular, isotopes of the heavy alkaline earth element radium exhibit the largest known enhancement factors for any atomic systems due to their atomic and nuclear structure. A sensitive search for EDMs will require an efficient use of the rare isotopes, which are available from radioactive sources or at rare isotope facilities like TRI{mu}P at KVI. Here, laser cooling and trapping methods play a crucial role. The main transitions from the ground state have been identified by laser spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the strongest cooling transitions 7s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}-7s7p {sup 1}P{sub 1} suffers from strong leakage to metastable states, similar to the case of barium. We describe the experimental approach to determine the wavelength of the three needed repump transitions, which then will permit an efficient capture of radium atoms into a magneto optical trap.

  8. Detection of Recombinant Protein Expression of Formate Dehydrogenase in Single Living Escherichia Coli Cell by Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy%单细胞激光拉曼光谱检测重组大肠杆菌细胞表达甲酸脱氢酶

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢明倩; 董蓉; 温顺华; 张韦; 王巧贞; 黄庶识; 陈丽梅

    2012-01-01

    甲酸脱氢酶(FDH,EC1.2.1.2)在工业生产中有重要的应用价值,工业上应用的FDH可以通过构建高水平表达重组FDH蛋白的基因工程菌生产,用分子生物学的方法检测重组蛋白的高效表达和积累操作繁杂,耗时耗力且需要破碎细胞.为了寻找一种简单快速,不需破碎细胞,且能实时检测FDH重组蛋白在基因工程菌中表达情况的方法,本研究应用单细胞激光拉曼光谱分析技术(LTRS),研究IPTG诱导不同时间后甲酸脱氢酶重组蛋白(FDH)在大肠杆菌细胞中的表达水平.结果表明,FDH的特征峰1004,1355,1455和1667 cm-1随着IPTG诱导时间的延长而增强,说明在诱导培养过程中FDH重组蛋白在重组大肠杆菌细胞中表达并积累,这4个峰强的增加值所反映的FDH表达量与SDS-PAGE电泳分析结果一致.实验结果证明,LTRS是快速有效检测单个大肠杆菌活细胞体内重组FDH实时表达的一种非入侵方法.%The detection of the expression of formate dehydrogenase (FDH) recombination proteins in E. coli by molecular methods is time-consuming and hard-working and needs to destruct E. coli cells. To explore a simple and rapid method without cell destruction to detect the real-time expression of FDH recombination proteins in E. coli, Laser Tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) was used to investigate the recombinant protein expression of formate dehydrogenase (FDH) in the single living E. coli cell at different culture times following the induction with isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). The result showed that the characteristic peaks corresponding to the recombinant FDH protein were gradually enhanced with an in increase in IPTG induction time, indicating the expression and the accumulation of FDH protein in recombinant E. coli cells. This result is consistent with that obtained by the analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). This evidence confirms that LTRS is an effectively method

  9. Laser Spectroscopy and Frequency Combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2013-12-01

    The spectrum of a frequency comb, commonly generated by a mode-locked femtosecond laser consists of several hundred thousand precisely evenly spaced spectral lines. Such laser frequency combs have revolutionized the art measuring the frequency of light, and they provide the long-missing clockwork for optical atomic clocks. The invention of the frequency comb technique has been motivated by precision laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom. The availability of commercial instruments is facilitating the evolution of new applications far beyond the original purpose. Laser combs are becoming powerful instruments for broadband molecular spectroscopy by dramatically improving the resolution and recording speed of Fourier spectrometers and by creating new opportunities for highly multiplexed nonlinear spectroscopy, such as two-photon spectroscopy or coherent Raman spectroscopy. Other emerging applications of frequency combs range from fundamental research in astronomy, chemistry, or attosecond science to telecommunications and satellite navigation.

  10. Force spectroscopy with dual-trap optical tweezers: molecular stiffness measurements and coupled fluctuations analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M; Ritort, F

    2012-11-07

    Dual-trap optical tweezers are often used in high-resolution measurements in single-molecule biophysics. Such measurements can be hindered by the presence of extraneous noise sources, the most prominent of which is the coupling of fluctuations along different spatial directions, which may affect any optical tweezers setup. In this article, we analyze, both from the theoretical and the experimental points of view, the most common source for these couplings in dual-trap optical-tweezers setups: the misalignment of traps and tether. We give criteria to distinguish different kinds of misalignment, to estimate their quantitative relevance and to include them in the data analysis. The experimental data is obtained in a, to our knowledge, novel dual-trap optical-tweezers setup that directly measures forces. In the case in which misalignment is negligible, we provide a method to measure the stiffness of traps and tether based on variance analysis. This method can be seen as a calibration technique valid beyond the linear trap region. Our analysis is then employed to measure the persistence length of dsDNA tethers of three different lengths spanning two orders of magnitude. The effective persistence length of such tethers is shown to decrease with the contour length, in accordance with previous studies. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of bacterial spore germination using phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Guiwen; Yu, Jing; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2011-05-01

    This protocol describes a method combining phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and optical tweezers to characterize the germination of single bacterial spores. The characterization consists of the following steps: (i) loading heat-activated dormant spores into a temperature-controlled microscope sample holder containing a germinant solution plus a nucleic acid stain; (ii) capturing a single spore with optical tweezers; (iii) simultaneously measuring phase-contrast images, Raman spectra and fluorescence images of the optically captured spore at 2- to 10-s intervals; and (iv) analyzing the acquired data for the loss of spore refractility, changes in spore-specific molecules (in particular, dipicolinic acid) and uptake of the nucleic acid stain. This information leads to precise correlations between various germination events, and takes 1-2 h to complete. The method can also be adapted to use multi-trap Raman spectroscopy or phase-contrast microscopy of spores adhered on a cover slip to simultaneously obtain germination parameters for multiple individual spores.

  12. On chip shapeable optical tweezers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Renaut, C; Cluzel, B; Dellinger, J; Lalouat, L; Picard, E; Peyrade, D; Hadji, E; de Fornel, F

    2013-01-01

    Particles manipulation with optical forces is known as optical tweezing. While tweezing in free space with laser beams was established in the 1980s, integrating the optical tweezers on a chip is a challenging task...

  13. Laser Spectroscopy : XII International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Allegrini, Maria; Sasso, Antonio

    1996-01-01

    This text includes all the recent advances in the field of laser spectroscopy. Major results span from the control of matter by electromagnetic fields (trapping and coding) to high precision measurements on simple atomic systems and to quantum optics with single atoms. It includes a report of the Bose-Einstein condensation achieved by laser-cooling of rubidium atoms. Achievements in the technology of tunable sources, in particular of miniaturized solid state devices, are also reported. Most recent advances in molecular spectroscopy are illustrated with emphasis on "cooled" spectra, clusters and high accuracy frequency references. Topics such as atomic interferometry and microcavity quantum optics are also covered.

  14. CELLULAR AND SUBCELLULAR LEVEL INVESTIGATION OF BIOLOGICAL OBJECTS BY MEANS OF FEMTOSECOND LASER OPTICAL TWEEZERS-SCALPEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Rakityansky

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was developing of elements of the precise three-dimensional positioning technology of one or several micron and submicron size biological objects. Thereto a laboratory unit of hardware-software complex of optical femtosecond laser tweezers-scalpel was developed and constructed in the Joint institute for high temperatures RAS using material resources of Russia. Experimental data concerning a maximal manipulation speed of CHO and cells, produced from mammalian spinal ganglia (using protocols for producing pure culture of Schwann cells was received. Besides facts of interaction of laser radiation with intracellular structures that lead to unexpected behavior of cell in the zone of optical trap and change of maximal speed of cell manipulation were determined. 

  15. Laser spectroscopy of cold molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Borri, Simone

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent results in high-resolution spectroscopy on cold molecules. Laser spectroscopy of cold molecules addresses issues of symmetry violation, like in the search for the electric dipole moment of the electron and the studies on energy differences in enantiomers of chiral species; tries to improve the precision to which fundamental physical constants are known and tests for their possible variation in time and space; tests quantum electrodynamics, and searches for a fifth force. Further, we briefly review the recent technological progresses in the fields of cold molecules and mid-infrared lasers, which are the tools that mainly set the limits for the resolution that is currently attainable in the measurements.

  16. Comparative study of methods to calibrate the stiffness of a single-beam gradient-force optical tweezers over various laser trapping powers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarshar, Mohammad; Wong, Winson T; Anvari, Bahman

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers have become an important instrument in force measurements associated with various physical, biological, and biophysical phenomena. Quantitative use of optical tweezers relies on accurate calibration of the stiffness of the optical trap. Using the same optical tweezers platform operating at 1064 nm and beads with two different diameters, we present a comparative study of viscous drag force, equipartition theorem, Boltzmann statistics, and power spectral density (PSD) as methods in calibrating the stiffness of a single beam gradient force optical trap at trapping laser powers in the range of 0.05 to 1.38 W at the focal plane. The equipartition theorem and Boltzmann statistic methods demonstrate a linear stiffness with trapping laser powers up to 355 mW, when used in conjunction with video position sensing means. The PSD of a trapped particle's Brownian motion or measurements of the particle displacement against known viscous drag forces can be reliably used for stiffness calibration of an optical trap over a greater range of trapping laser powers. Viscous drag stiffness calibration method produces results relevant to applications where trapped particle undergoes large displacements, and at a given position sensing resolution, can be used for stiffness calibration at higher trapping laser powers than the PSD method.

  17. Assembly of Acircular SnO2 Rod Using Optical Tweezers and Laser Curing of Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Chanhyuk; Hong, Daehie; Chung, Jaeik; Chung, Jaewon; Hwang, Insung; Lee, Jongheun; Ko, Seunghwan; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2010-05-01

    Acicular tin dioxide (SnO2) rods (1-2 µm in diameter, 5-20 µm long) were assembled and fused on the patterned gold electrode by an optical tweezer. In addition, the electrical contact between the assembled SnO2 rod and the gold electrode was improved by laser curing of gold nanoparticles and the subsequent sintering in the oven. Here, the nanoparticles covered the entire area of the assembled SnO2 rod by evaporating a droplet of nanoparticle solution dripped on the assembled SnO2 rod. Subsequently, nanoparticles near the contact area between the rod and electrode were locally cured by direct heating with a focused infrared laser beam, which induced desorption of the surface monolayer. Therefore, the cured gold nanoparticles could be sintered after the non-laser irradiated nanoparticles were cleaned by the initial solvent application. Without sintering of the nanoparticles, the resistance of the assembled SnO2 rod was measured over several MΩ. After the nanoparticle sintering it could be reduced to a few hundred kΩ, which was in agreement with the resistance of the assembled SnO2 rod.

  18. Single-molecule force spectroscopy using the NanoTracker optical tweezers platform: from design to application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, A; van Mameren, J; Ragona, S

    2009-08-01

    Since the development of detection and analysis techniques for optical tweezers setups, there has been an ever-increasing interest in optical tweezers as a quantitative method, shifting its applications from a pure manipulation tool towards the investigation of motions and forces. With the capability of manipulation and detection of forces of a few hundred picoNewtons down to a fraction of a picoNewton, optical tweezers are perfectly suitable for the investigation of single molecules. Accordingly, the technique has been extensively used for the biophysical characterization of biomolecules, ranging from the mechanical and elastic properties of biological polymers to the dynamics associated with enzymatic activity and protein motility. Here, the use of state-of-the-art optical tweezers on the elasticity of single DNA molecules is presented, highlighting the possibilities this technique offers for the investigation of protein-DNA interaction, but also for other single molecule applications. Technical in nature, design aspects of the NanoTracker optical tweezers setup are addressed, presenting the recent advances in the development of optical tweezers, ranging from noise reduction to detection and calibration methodology.

  19. Towards laser spectroscopy of antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walz, J [CERN-EP/APE, CH-1211 Geneve (Switzerland); Fendel, P [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Herrmann, M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Koenig, M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pahl, A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pittner, H [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schatz, B [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Haensch, T W [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2003-02-14

    Cold antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic trap will open up a fascinating field of very precise CPT tests by ultrahigh-resolution laser spectroscopy. Equally exciting is the prospect for experiments on the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. For both types of experiment it is of great importance to have antihydrogen as cold as possible. Laser cooling of antihydrogen can be done on the strong 1S-2P transition at Lyman-{alpha} (121.56 nm). The highest cooling efficiency, lowest temperature, and best magnetic sublevel selectivity is expected for continuous coherent radiation. We present an account of the first source for continuous coherent radiation at Lyman-{alpha} and discuss possible applications in experiments with antihydrogen.

  20. On chip shapeable optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaut, C; Cluzel, B; Dellinger, J; Lalouat, L; Picard, E; Peyrade, D; Hadji, E; de Fornel, F

    2013-01-01

    Particles manipulation with optical forces is known as optical tweezing. While tweezing in free space with laser beams was established in the 1980s, integrating the optical tweezers on a chip is a challenging task. Recent experiments with plasmonic nanoantennas, microring resonators, and photonic crystal nanocavities have demonstrated optical trapping. However, the optical field of a tweezer made of a single microscopic resonator cannot be shaped. So far, this prevents from optically driven micromanipulations. Here we propose an alternative approach where the shape of the optical trap can be tuned by the wavelength in coupled nanobeam cavities. Using these shapeable tweezers, we present micromanipulation of polystyrene microspheres trapped on a silicon chip. These results show that coupled nanobeam cavities are versatile building blocks for optical near-field engineering. They open the way to much complex integrated tweezers using networks of coupled nanobeam cavities for particles or bio-objects manipulation at a larger scale.

  1. Laser spectroscopy of atomic radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot, Alexander; Jungmann, Klaus; Santra, Bodhaditya; Willmann, Lorenz; Wilschut, Hans W. [KVI, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    The heavy alkaline earth elements radium (Ra) offers a unique sensitivity to a parity and time reversal violating permanent electric dipole moments (EDM). In particular, Ra exhibits the largest known atomic enhancements factors for EDMs. The intrinsic sensitivity arises from the specific atomic and nuclear structure of Ra. All Ra isotopes with nuclear spin I are radioactive. The lifetimes are shorter than 15 d. Several Ra isotopes are available at the TRI{mu}P facility at KVI. For the exploitation of the sensitivity Ra atoms have to be collected in a neutral atom trap. The main laser cooling is done on the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition at 482.7 nm, similar to the laser cooling and trapping of the chemical homologue barium. Laser spectroscopy of the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transitions is presented. The light at this wavelength is provided by frequency doubling of a Ti:sapphire laser in a KNbO{sub 3} crystal. Of particular interest is the decay branching of the excited state to the metastable D-states. Such measurements are indispensable input for current atomic structure calculations, which are necessary for the analysis of a EDM measurement using Ra.

  2. Raman Spectroscopy of Single Nanoparticles in a Double-Nanohole Optical Tweezer System

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Steven; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    A double nanohole in a metal film was used to trap nanoparticles (20 nm diameter) and simultaneously record their Raman spectrum using the trapping laser as the excitation source. This allowed for the identification of characteristic Stokes lines for titania and polystyrene nanoparticles, showing the capability for material identification of nanoparticles once trapped. Increased Raman signal is observed for the trapping of multiple nanoparticles. This system combines the benefits of nanoparticle isolation and manipulation with unique identification.

  3. Raman spectroscopy of single nanoparticles in a double-nanohole optical tweezer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven; Balushi, Ahmed A. Al; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-10-01

    A double nanohole in a metal film was used to trap nanoparticles (20 nm diameter) and simultaneously record their Raman spectrum using the trapping laser as the excitation source. This allowed for the identification of characteristic Stokes lines for titania and polystyrene nanoparticles, showing the capability for material identification of nanoparticles once trapped. Increased Raman signal was observed for the trapping of multiple nanoparticles. This system combines the benefits of nanoparticle isolation and manipulation with unique identification.

  4. Optical Tweezer Assembly and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Timothy M.

    2004-01-01

    An Optical Tweezer, as the name implies, is a useful tool for precision manipulation of micro and nano scale objects. Using the principle of electromagnetic radiation pressure, an optical tweezer employs a tightly focused laser beam to trap and position objects of various shapes and sizes. These devices can trap micrometer and nanometer sized objects. An exciting possibility for optical tweezers is its future potential to manipulate and assemble micro and nano sized sensors. A typical optical tweezer makes use of the following components: laser, mirrors, lenses, a high quality microscope, stage, Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera, TV monitor and Position Sensitive Detectors (PSDs). The laser wavelength employed is typically in the visible or infrared spectrum. The laser beam is directed via mirrors and lenses into the microscope. It is then tightly focused by a high magnification, high numerical aperture microscope objective into the sample slide, which is mounted on a translating stage. The sample slide contains a sealed, small volume of fluid that the objects are suspended in. The most common objects trapped by optical tweezers are dielectric spheres. When trapped, a sphere will literally snap into and center itself in the laser beam. The PSD s are mounted in such a way to receive the backscatter after the beam has passed through the trap. PSD s used with the Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) technique provide highly precise data. Most optical tweezers employ lasers with power levels ranging from 10 to 100 miliwatts. Typical forces exerted on trapped objects are in the pico-newton range. When PSDs are employed, object movement can be resolved on a nanometer scale in a time range of milliseconds. Such accuracy, however, can only by utilized by calibrating the optical tweezer. Fortunately, an optical tweezer can be modeled accurately as a simple spring. This allows Hook s Law to be used. My goal this summer at NASA Glenn Research Center is the assembly and

  5. Raman Tweezers Spectroscopy of Live, Single Red and White Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankapur, Aseefhali; Zachariah, Elsa; Chidangil, Santhosh; Valiathan, Manna; Mathur, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    An optical trap has been combined with a Raman spectrometer to make high-resolution measurements of Raman spectra of optically-immobilized, single, live red (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC) under physiological conditions. Tightly-focused, near infrared wavelength light (1064 nm) is utilized for trapping of single cells and 785 nm light is used for Raman excitation at low levels of incident power (few mW). Raman spectra of RBC recorded using this high-sensitivity, dual-wavelength apparatus has enabled identification of several additional lines; the hitherto-unreported lines originate purely from hemoglobin molecules. Raman spectra of single granulocytes and lymphocytes are interpreted on the basis of standard protein and nucleic acid vibrational spectroscopy data. The richness of the measured spectrum illustrates that Raman studies of live cells in suspension are more informative than conventional micro-Raman studies where the cells are chemically bound to a glass cover slip. PMID:20454686

  6. Raman tweezers spectroscopy of live, single red and white blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseefhali Bankapur

    Full Text Available An optical trap has been combined with a Raman spectrometer to make high-resolution measurements of Raman spectra of optically-immobilized, single, live red (RBC and white blood cells (WBC under physiological conditions. Tightly-focused, near infrared wavelength light (1064 nm is utilized for trapping of single cells and 785 nm light is used for Raman excitation at low levels of incident power (few mW. Raman spectra of RBC recorded using this high-sensitivity, dual-wavelength apparatus has enabled identification of several additional lines; the hitherto-unreported lines originate purely from hemoglobin molecules. Raman spectra of single granulocytes and lymphocytes are interpreted on the basis of standard protein and nucleic acid vibrational spectroscopy data. The richness of the measured spectrum illustrates that Raman studies of live cells in suspension are more informative than conventional micro-Raman studies where the cells are chemically bound to a glass cover slip.

  7. Manipulation of inclusions with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škarabot, Miha

    In this chapter the basic techniques and underlaying concepts of trapping and manipulation of microparticles in liquid crystal (LC) systems are presented. The laser trapping in LCs is extremely efficient and it is based on different principles than laser trapping in isotropic solvents. In addition to conventional laser trapping, the laser light can reorient LC molecules and at high powers also heat the LC in isotropic phase. Due to these optical and thermal effects of laser tweezers on LC different trapping mechanisms are possible at different rate of laser power and all are presented qualitatively and quantitatively by measuring the trapping forces. Besides trapping and manipulation of single inclusions, laser tweezers are also used for assisted self-assembly of variety of periodic 2D and 3D colloidal structures, while most of them can not be assembled without help of laser tweezers. The concepts and different techniques of laser assisted assembly are presented.

  8. Physics of optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Timo A; Knöner, Gregor; Heckenberg, Norman R; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2007-01-01

    We outline the basic principles of optical tweezers as well as the fundamental theory underlying optical tweezers. The optical forces responsible for trapping result from the transfer of momentum from the trapping beam to the particle and are explained in terms of the momenta of incoming and reflected or refracted rays. We also consider the angular momentum flux of the beam in order to understand and explain optical torques. In order to provide a qualitative picture of the trapping, we treat the particle as a weak positive lens and the forces on the lens are shown. However, this representation does not provide quantitative results for the force. We, therefore, present results of applying exact electromagnetic theory to optical trapping. First, we consider a tightly focused laser beam. We give results for trapping of spherical particles and examine the limits of trappability in terms of type and size of the particles. We also study the effect of a particle on the beam. This exact solution reproduces the same qualitative effect as when treating the particle as a lens where changes in the convergence or divergence and in the direction of the trapping beam result in restoring forces acting on the particle. Finally, we review the fundamental theory of optical tweezers.

  9. Optical tweezers for confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, A.; Meyer zu Hörste, G.; Pilarczyk, G.; Monajembashi, S.; Uhl, V.; Greulich, K. O.

    2000-11-01

    In confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSMs), lasers can be used for image formation as well as tools for the manipulation of microscopic objects. In the latter case, in addition to the imaging lasers, the light of an extra laser has to be focused into the object plane of the CLSM, for example as optical tweezers. Imaging as well as trapping by optical tweezers can be done using the same objective lens. In this case, z-sectioning for 3D imaging shifts the optical tweezers with the focal plane of the objective along the optical axis, so that a trapped object remains positioned in the focal plane. Consequently, 3D imaging of trapped objects is impossible without further measures. We present an experimental set-up keeping the axial trapping position of the optical tweezers at its intended position whilst the focal plane can be axially shifted over a distance of about 15 μm. It is based on fast-moving correctional optics synchronized with the objective movement. First examples of application are the 3D imaging of chloroplasts of Elodea densa (Canadian waterweed) in a vigorous cytoplasmic streaming and the displacement of zymogen granules in pancreatic cancer cells (AR42 J).

  10. Resonance ionization spectroscopy using ultraviolet laser

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J M; Ko, D K; Park, H M; Rhee, Y J

    2002-01-01

    In this study, Ti:sapphire laser which is pumped by the enhanced Nd:YAG laser using laser diode, was designed and manufactured. The AO Q-switched CW Nd:YAG laser was converted into a high repetition plus-type laser using the AO Q-switch, and two heads were installed inside the cavity in order to improve the laser beam quality. The Nd:YAG laser enhancement was completed by optimization using a simulation for the cavity length, structure and thermal lens effect that greatly effected the laser beam output and quality. As the result of the enhancement, a 30W laser at 532nm and at 5k-Hz was successfully made. Also, the Ti:sapphire laser that will be used for atomic spectroscopy which is pumped by the Nd:YAG laser, was completely designed. As a basic experiment for laser oscillation. We measured the tunability of the laser, and it turned out that the wave tunability range was 730 850 nm. A self-seeding type tunable laser using grating for narrow line width, is planned to be designed due to the fact that the Ti:sapp...

  11. Non-destructive analysis of the nuclei of transgenic living cells using laser tweezers and near-infrared raman spectroscopic technique

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tang, Wei; Newton, Ronald J; Xie, Chang An; Li, Yong Qing; Whitley, Nicki

    2005-01-01

    ...) system in this investigation. A low power diode laser at 785 nm was used for both laser optical trapping of single transgenic cells and excitation for near-infrared Raman spectroscopy of the nuclei of synchronized cells, which...

  12. Biaxial crystal-based optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Maksimyak, Andrew P.; Maksimyak, Peter P.;

    2010-01-01

    We suggest an optical tweezer setup based on an optically biaxial crystal. To control movements of opaque particles, we use shifts. The results of experimental studies are reported which are concerned with this laser tweezer setup. We demonstrate a movement of microparticles of toner using...... a singular-optical trap, rotation of particles due to orbital angular momentum of the field, and converging or diverging of two different traps when changing transmission plane of polariser at the input of our polarisation interferometer....

  13. Biaxial crystal-based optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Maksimyak, Andrew P.; Maksimyak, Peter P.

    2010-01-01

    We suggest an optical tweezer setup based on an optically biaxial crystal. To control movements of opaque particles, we use shifts. The results of experimental studies are reported which are concerned with this laser tweezer setup. We demonstrate a movement of microparticles of toner using...... a singular-optical trap, rotation of particles due to orbital angular momentum of the field, and converging or diverging of two different traps when changing transmission plane of polariser at the input of our polarisation interferometer....

  14. Optical tweezers absolute calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Dutra, R S; Neto, P A Maia; Nussenzveig, H M

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past fifteen years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spo...

  15. Photon Correlation Spectroscopy for Observing Natural Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Dravins, Dainis

    2007-01-01

    Natural laser emission may be produced whenever suitable atomic energy levels become overpopulated. Strong evidence for laser emission exists in astronomical sources such as Eta Carinae, and other luminous stars. However, the evidence is indirect in that the laser lines have not yet been spectrally resolved. The lines are theoretically estimated to be extremely narrow, requiring spectral resolutions very much higher (R approx.= 10**8) than possible with ordinary spectroscopy. Such can be attained with photon-correlation spectroscopy on nanosecond timescales, measuring the autocorrelation function of photon arrival times to obtain the coherence time of light, and thus the spectral linewidth. A particular advantage is the insensitivity to spectral, spatial, and temporal shifts of emission-line components due to local velocities and probable variability of 'hot-spots' in the source. A laboratory experiment has been set up, simulating telescopic observations of cosmic laser emission. Numerically simulated observa...

  16. Plasma spectroscopy using optical vortex laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Toda, Yasunori; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Shikano, Yutaka

    2014-10-01

    Laser spectroscopy is a useful tool for nonintrusive plasma diagnostics; it can provide many important quantities in a plasma such as temperature, density, and flow velocity of ions and neutrals from the spectrum obtained by scanning the frequency of narrow bandwidth laser. Obtainable information is, however, limited in principle to the direction parallel to the laser path. The aim of this study is to introduce a Laguerre-Gaussian beam, which is called as optical vortex, in place of a widely used Hermite-Gaussian beam. One of the remarkable properties of the Laguerre-Gaussian beam is that it carries an angular momentum in contrast to the Hermite-Gaussian beam. It follows that particles in the laser beam feel the Doppler effect even in the transverse direction of the laser path. Therefore it is expected that the limitation imposed by the laser path can be overcome by using an optical vortex laser. The concept of optical vortex spectroscopy, the development of the laser system, and some preliminary results of a proof-of-principle experiment will be presented. This work is performed with the support and under the auspices of NINS young scientists collaboration program for cross-disciplinary study, NIFS collaboration research program (NIFS13KOAP026), and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25287152.

  17. Fluorescence Detection of H5N1 Virus Gene Sequences Based on Optical Tweezers with Two-Photon Excitation Using a Single Near Infrared Nanosecond Pulse Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Yu; Cao, Di; Kang, Ya-Feng; Lin, Yi; Cui, Ran; Pang, Dai-Wen; Tang, Hong-Wu

    2016-04-19

    We present an analytical platform by combining near-infrared optical tweezers with two-photon excitation for fluorescence detection of H5N1 virus gene sequences. A heterogeneous enrichment strategy, which involved polystyrene (PS) microsphere and quantum dots (QDs), was adopted. The final hybrid-conjugate microspheres were prepared by a facile one-step hybridization procedure by using PS microspheres capturing target DNA and QDs tagging, respectively. Quantitative detection was achieved by the optical tweezers setup with a low-cost 1064 nm nanosecond pulse laser for both optical trapping and two-photon excitation for the same hybrid-conjugate microsphere. The detection limits for both neuraminidase (NA) gene sequences and hemagglutinin (HA) gene sequences are 16-19 pM with good selectivity for one-base mismatch, which is approximately 1 order of magnitude lower than the most existing fluorescence-based analysis method. Besides, because of the fact that only signal from the trapped particle is detected upon two-photon excitation, this approach showed extremely low background in fluorescence detection and was successfully applied to directly detect target DNA in human whole serum without any separation steps and the corresponding results are very close to that in buffer solution, indicating the strong anti-interference ability of this method. Therefore, it can be expected to be an emerging alternative for straightforward detecting target species in complex samples with a simple procedure and high-throughput.

  18. Diamond: a material for laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castex, M. C.; Riedel, D.; Museur, L.; Chardonnet, Christian; Gicquel, Alix; Foulon, Francois; Borel, C.; Bergonzo, P.; Jany, C.

    1998-10-01

    Diamond polycrystalline films synthesized by chemical vapor deposition techniques present interesting feature for laser spectroscopy due to several advantages arising from their optical, electronic, thermal and mechanical properties. Their wide transmission band from the far IR to the UV make them attractive as optical devices for high-power laser beam. Moreover, with a wide band gap, a short carrier lifetime and a high damage threshold, diamond is an ideal semiconductor material for the fabrication of fast and solar blind VUV detectors. We report here results of laser studies performed with tow different objectives. With use of a pulsed VUV laser at 125 nm we have determined the photoconductive response of polycrystalline diamond detectors. With a CO2 laser we have investigated the polarization properties of auto-supported films having thicknesses smaller than the wavelength.

  19. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clouthier, D.J. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to study the vibrational and electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of a number of transient sulfur and oxygen species. A variety of supersonic jet techniques, as well as high resolution FT-IR and intracavity dye laser spectroscopy, have been applied to these studies.

  20. Axial Optical Traps: A New Direction for Optical Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehoshua, Samuel; Pollari, Russell; Milstein, Joshua N

    2015-06-16

    Optical tweezers have revolutionized our understanding of the microscopic world. Axial optical tweezers, which apply force to a surface-tethered molecule by directly moving either the trap or the stage along the laser beam axis, offer several potential benefits when studying a range of novel biophysical phenomena. This geometry, although it is conceptually straightforward, suffers from aberrations that result in variation of the trap stiffness when the distance between the microscope coverslip and the trap focus is being changed. Many standard techniques, such as back-focal-plane interferometry, are difficult to employ in this geometry due to back-scattered light between the bead and the coverslip, whereas the noise inherent in a surface-tethered assay can severely limit the resolution of an experiment. Because of these complications, precision force spectroscopy measurements have adapted alternative geometries such as the highly successful dumbbell traps. In recent years, however, most of the difficulties inherent in constructing a precision axial optical tweezers have been solved. This review article aims to inform the reader about recent progress in axial optical trapping, as well as the potential for these devices to perform innovative biophysical measurements. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Laser photoelectron spectroscopy of ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, G.B. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States)

    1993-12-01

    During the last year the author has (a) completed a review article that critically contrasts three methods to measure R-H bond energies, (b) finished a spectroscopic study of the phenylnitrene anion, and (c) successfully completed an overhaul of the light source of the photodetachment spectrometer. The new light source is based on an Ar III laser that provides approximately 100 W of 3.531 eV photons.

  2. Introduction to Optical Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Matthias D; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2017-01-01

    Thirty years after their invention by Arthur Ashkin and colleagues at Bell Labs in 1986 [1], optical tweezers (or traps) have become a versatile tool to address numerous biological problems. Put simply, an optical trap is a highly focused laser beam that is capable of holding and applying forces to micron-sized dielectric objects. However, their development over the last few decades has converted these tools from boutique instruments into highly versatile instruments of molecular biophysics. This introductory chapter intends to give a brief overview of the field, highlight some important scientific achievements, and demonstrate why optical traps have become a powerful tool in the biological sciences. We introduce a typical optical setup, describe the basic theoretical concepts of how trapping forces arise, and present the quantitative position and force measurement techniques that are most widely used today.

  3. Raman sorting and identification of single living micro-organisms with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changan; Chen, De; Li, Yong-Qing

    2005-07-01

    We report on a novel technique for sorting and identification of single biological cells and food-borne bacteria based on laser tweezers and Raman spectroscopy (LTRS). With this technique, biological cells of different physiological states in a sample chamber were identified by their Raman spectral signatures and then they were selectively manipulated into a clean collection chamber with optical tweezers through a microchannel. As an example, we sorted the live and dead yeast cells into the collection chamber and validated this with a standard staining technique. We also demonstrated that bacteria existing in spoiled foods could be discriminated from a variety of food particles based on their characteristic Raman spectra and then isolated with laser manipulation. This label-free LTRS sorting technique may find broad applications in microbiology and rapid examination of food-borne diseases.

  4. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Zhe; Zeng, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Jun-Jie

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical detection technique based on atomic emission spectroscopy to measure the elemental composition. LIBS has been extensively studied and developed due to the non-contact, fast response, high sensitivity, real-time and multi-elemental detection features. The development and applications of LIBS technique in Asia are summarized and discussed in this review paper. The researchers in Asia work on different aspects of the LIBS study in fundamentals, data processing and modeling, applications and instrumentations. According to the current research status, the challenges, opportunities and further development of LIBS technique in Asia are also evaluated to promote LIBS research and its applications.

  5. Laser Spectroscopy of Muonic Atoms and Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Randolf; Fernandes, Luis M P; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Amaro, Fernando D; Amaro, Pedro; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M R; Covita, Daniel S; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Diepold, Marc; Franke, Beatrice; Galtier, Sandrine; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L; Götzfried, Johannes; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hildebrandt, Malte; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Kirch, Klaus; Knecht, Andreas; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Bigot, Eric-Olivier Le; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A M; Ludhova, Livia; Machado, Jorge; Monteiro, Cristina M B; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; Santos, Joaquim M F dos; Santos, José Paulo; Schaller, Lukas A; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Szabo, Csilla I; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F C A; Voss, Andreas; Weichelt, Birgit; Antognini, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy of the Lamb shift (2S-2P energy difference) in light muonic atoms or ions, in which one negative muon $\\mu^-$ is bound to a nucleus, has been performed. The measurements yield significantly improved values of the root-mean-square charge radii of the nuclei, owing to the large muon mass, which results in a vastly increased muon wave function overlap with the nucleus. The values of the proton and deuteron radii are 10 and 3 times more accurate than the respective CODATA values, but 7 standard deviations smaller. Data on muonic helium-3 and -4 ions is being analyzed and will give new insights. In future, the (magnetic) Zemach radii of the proton and the helium-3 nuclei will be determined from laser spectroscopy of the 1S hyperfine splittings, and the Lamb shifts of muonic Li, Be and B can be used to improve the respective charge radii.

  6. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kasem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS, known also as laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS, is a well-known spectrochemical elemental analysis technique. The field of LIBS has been rapidly matured as a consequence of growing interest in real-time analysis across a broad spectrum of applied sciences and recent development of commercial LIBS analytical systems. In this brief review, we introduce the contributions of the research groups in the African continent in the field of the fundamentals and applications of LIBS. As it will be shown, the fast development of LIBS in Africa during the last decade was mainly due to the broad environmental, industrial, archaeological, and biomedical applications of this technique.

  7. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy on meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Giacomo, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bari (Italy); MIP-CNR sec Bari (Italy)], E-mail: alessandro.degiacomo@ba.imip.cnr.it; Dell' Aglio, M.; De Pascale, O. [MIP-CNR sec Bari (Italy); Longo, S.; Capitelli, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bari (Italy); MIP-CNR sec Bari (Italy)

    2007-12-15

    The classification of meteorites when geological analysis is unfeasible is generally made by the spectral line emission ratio of some characteristic elements. Indeed when a meteorite impacts Earth's atmosphere, hot plasma is generated, as a consequence of the braking effect of air, with the consequent ablation of the falling body. Usually, by the plasma emission spectrum, the meteorite composition is determined, assuming the Boltzmann equilibrium. The plasma generated during Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) experiment shows similar characteristics and allows one to verify the mentioned method with higher accuracy. On the other hand the study of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy on meteorite can be useful for both improving meteorite classification methods and developing on-flight techniques for asteroid investigation. In this paper certified meteorites belonging to different typologies have been investigated by LIBS: Dofhar 461 (lunar meteorite), Chondrite L6 (stony meteorite), Dofhar 019 (Mars meteorite) and Sikhote Alin (irony meteorite)

  8. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in laser gradient field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is capable of probing dynamic processes in living biological systems. From photon fluctuation of fluorescing particles which diffuse through a small detection volume, FCS reveals information on the concentration and the structure of the particles, as well as information on microscopic environment.In this note, we study the radiation forces experienced by Rayleigh particles in a laser field in details, and analyze the effects of gradient field on FCS measurements.

  9. Applications of absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lizhu; Tian, Guang; Li, Jingsong; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis.

  10. Laser techniques for spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.; Falcone, R. W.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Willison, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    We discuss three techniques which allow the use of tunable lasers for high resolution and picosecond time scale spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels. These are: anti-Stokes absorption spectroscopy, laser induced emission from metastable levels, and laser designation of selected core-excited levels.

  11. Ultrafast laser spectroscopy in complex solid state materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tianqi [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This thesis summarizes my work on applying the ultrafast laser spectroscopy to the complex solid state materials. It shows that the ultrafast laser pulse can coherently control the material properties in the femtosecond time scale. And the ultrafast laser spectroscopy can be employed as a dynamical method for revealing the fundamental physical problems in the complex material systems.

  12. Manipulation on human red blood cells with femtosecond optical tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Zhou; Haifeng Yang; Jianke Di; Enlan Zhao

    2008-01-01

    Different types of femtosecond optical tweezers have become a powerful tool in the modern biological field. However, how to control the irregular targets, including biological cells, using femtosecond optical tweezers remains to be explored. In this study, human red blood cells (hRBCs) are manipulated with femtosecond optical tweezers, and their states under different laser powers are investigated. The results indicate that optical potential traps only can capture the edge of hRBCs under the laser power from 1.4 to 2.8 mW, while it can make hRBCs turn over with the laser power more than 2.8 roW. It is suggested that femtosecond optical tweezers could not only manipulate biological cells, but also subtly control its states by adjusting the laser power.

  13. Tweezers controlled resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminski, Samuel; Carmon, Tal

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate trapping a microdroplet with an optical tweezer and then enabling it as a microresonator by bringing it close to a tapered fiber coupler. Our tweezers facilitated the tuning of the coupling from the under-coupled to the critically coupled regime with an optical Q of 12 million and microresonator size at the 85 mirons scale.

  14. An optical tweezer for complex plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schablinski, Jan; Wieben, Frank; Block, Dietmar [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Leibnizstrasse 17-19, 24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    This paper describes the experimental realization of an optical trap for microparticles levitating in the plasma sheath. Single particles can be trapped in a laser beam comparable to optical tweezers known from colloidal suspensions. The trapping mechanism is discussed and two applications of the system are shown.

  15. Laser spectroscopy used in nuclear physics; La spectroscopie laser appliquee a la physique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Blanc, F

    2001-04-05

    The study of nuclear shapes is a basic topic since it constitutes an excellent ground for testing and validating nuclear models. Measurements of the electron quadrupolar moment, of the nuclear charge radius and of the magnetic dipolar moment shed light on the nuclear deformation. Laser spectroscopy is a specific tool for such measurements, it is based on the interaction of the nucleus with the surrounding electron cloud (hyperfine structure), it is then an external approach of the shape of the nucleus whereas the classical nuclear spectroscopy ({alpha}, {beta} or {gamma}) gives information on the deformation from the inside of the nucleus. The author describes 2 techniques of laser spectroscopy: the colinear spectroscopy directly applied to a beam issued from an isotope separator and the resonant ionization spectroscopy linked with atom desorption that allows the study of particular nuclei. In order to illustrate both methods some effective measurements are presented: - the colinear spectroscopy has allowed the achievement of the complete description of the isomeric state (T = 31 years) of hafnium-178; - The experiment Complis has revealed an unexpected even-odd zigzag effect on very neutron-deficient platinum isotopes; and - the comparison of 2 isotopes of gold and platinum with their isomers has shown that the inversion of 2 levels of neutron, that was found out by nuclear spectroscopy, is in fact a consequence of a change in the nuclear shape. (A.C.)

  16. Laser photoluminescence spectroscopy of photodissociation fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, W. M.; Cody, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Laser induced photoluminescence spectroscopy has been used to study the energy partitioning among CN fragments produced by the photodissociation of C2N2. The CN radicals are produced in both the A 2Pi and the X 2Sigma+ states. The A state is formed primarily in the nu-prime = 0 level, and the X state is formed in the lower vibrational levels. Since the photodissociation process does not produce the maximum amount of vibrational excitation in the CN fragments, it is suggested that the excess energy goes into either translational and/or rotational excitation of the CN.

  17. A novel differential velocity modulation laser spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Experimental investigation of a novel differential velocity modulation laser spectroscopy is reported and demonstrated with the spectra of Meinel system. The S/N ratio excesses 500︰1, about 60 times higher than that with the traditional non-differential technique. With this technique, we obtained the high-resolution electronic absorption spectra of (1, 0) vibration-al band of CS+ for the first time. It is confirmed that this technique will be a powerful method and receive wide application in studies of new molecular ions.

  18. A lab-on-a-chip for hypoxic patch clamp measurements combined with optical tweezers and spectroscopy- first investigations of single biological cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrifaiy, Ahmed; Borg, Johan; Lindahl, Olof A; Ramser, Kerstin

    2015-04-18

    The response and the reaction of the brain system to hypoxia is a vital research subject that requires special instrumentation. With this research subject in focus, a new multifunctional lab-on-a-chip (LOC) system with control over the oxygen content for studies on biological cells was developed. The chip was designed to incorporate the patch clamp technique, optical tweezers and absorption spectroscopy. The performance of the LOC was tested by a series of experiments. The oxygen content within the channels of the LOC was monitored by an oxygen sensor and verified by simultaneously studying the oxygenation state of chicken red blood cells (RBCs) with absorption spectra. The chicken RBCs were manipulated optically and steered in three dimensions towards a patch-clamp micropipette in a closed microfluidic channel. The oxygen level within the channels could be changed from a normoxic value of 18% O 2 to an anoxic value of 0.0-0.5% O 2. A time series of 3 experiments were performed, showing that the spectral transfer from the oxygenated to the deoxygenated state occurred after about 227 ± 1 s and a fully developed deoxygenated spectrum was observed after 298 ± 1 s, a mean value of 3 experiments. The tightness of the chamber to oxygen diffusion was verified by stopping the flow into the channel system while continuously recording absorption spectra showing an unchanged deoxygenated state during 5400 ± 2 s. A transfer of the oxygenated absorption spectra was achieved after 426 ± 1 s when exposing the cell to normoxic buffer. This showed the long time viability of the investigated cells. Successful patching and sealing were established on a trapped RBC and the whole-cell access (Ra) and membrane (Rm) resistances were measured to be 5.033 ± 0.412 M Ω and 889.7 ± 1.74 M Ω respectively.

  19. Laser fabrication and spectroscopy of organic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahi, T; Sugiyama, T; Masuhara, H

    2008-12-01

    In working with nanoparticles, researchers still face two fundamental challenges: how to fabricate the nanoparticles with controlled size and shape and how to characterize them. In this Account, we describe recent advances in laser technology both for the synthesis of organic nanoparticles and for their analysis by single nanoparticle spectroscopy. Laser ablation of organic microcrystalline powders in a poor solvent has opened new horizons for the synthesis of nanoparticles because the powder sample is converted directly into a stable colloidal solution without additives and chemicals. By tuning laser wavelength, pulse width, laser fluence, and total shot number, we could control the size and phase of the nanoparticles. For example, we describe nanoparticle formation of quinacridone, a well-known red pigment, in water. By modifying the length of time that the sample is excited by the laser, we could control the particle size (30-120 nm) for nanosecond excitation down to 13 nm for femtosecond irradiation. We prepared beta- and gamma-phase nanoparticles from the microcrystal with beta-phase by changing laser wavelength and fluence. We present further results from nanoparticles produced from several dyes, C(60), and an anticancer drug. All the prepared colloidal solutions were transparent and highly dispersive. Such materials could be used for nanoscale device development and for biomedical and environmental applications. We also demonstrated the utility of single nanoparticle spectroscopic analysis in the characterization of organic nanoparticles. The optical properties of these organic nanoparticles depend on their size within the range from a few tens to a few hundred nanometers. We observed perylene nanoscrystals using single-particle spectroscopy coupled with atomic force microscopy. Based on these experiments, we proposed empirical equations explaining their size-dependent fluorescence spectra. We attribute the size effect to the change in elastic properties of

  20. Tomographic laser absorption spectroscopy using Tikhonov regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Avishek; Schoegl, Ingmar

    2014-12-01

    The application of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) to flames with nonhomogeneous temperature and concentration fields is an area where only few studies exist. Experimental work explores the performance of tomographic reconstructions of species concentration and temperature profiles from wavelength-modulated TDLAS measurements within the plume of an axisymmetric McKenna burner. Water vapor transitions at 1391.67 and 1442.67 nm are probed using calibration-free wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second harmonic detection (WMS-2f). A single collimated laser beam is swept parallel to the burner surface, where scans yield pairs of line-of-sight (LOS) data at multiple radial locations. Radial profiles of absorption data are reconstructed using Tikhonov regularized Abel inversion, which suppresses the amplification of experimental noise that is typically observed for reconstructions with high spatial resolution. Based on spectral data reconstructions, temperatures and mole fractions are calculated point-by-point. Here, a least-squares approach addresses difficulties due to modulation depths that cannot be universally optimized due to a nonuniform domain. Experimental results show successful reconstructions of temperature and mole fraction profiles based on two-transition, nonoptimally modulated WMS-2f and Tikhonov regularized Abel inversion, and thus validate the technique as a viable diagnostic tool for flame measurements.

  1. Laser frequency combs for precision astronomical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ycas, Gabriel George

    Laser frequency comb sources promise to enable precision astronomical spectroscopy at the 10-11 level, enabling observations aimed at locating potentially habitable planets. Frequency combs allow for the simultaneous generation of thousands of individual laser lines, each with optical frequency referenced to the SI second, and are capable of providing a bright, simple, and stable spectrum ideal for the calibration of grating-based astronomical spectrographs. In order for frequency combs and spectrographs to be used in tandem, key technical challenges must be addressed. Most critically, it is necessary to increase the mode-spacing of the frequency comb to more than 20 GHz while simultaneously retaining the stability and broad optical bandwidth of the comb. This thesis also offers an overview of modern astronomical spectroscopy, along with a thorough discussion of the technical details of mode-locked lasers and frequency comb design. This thesis begins by presenting a frequency comb system with mode-spacing of 25 GHz suitable for the near-infrared between 1500 and 1700 nm. Examples are shown from the successful calibration of the Penn State University Pathfinder astronomical spectrograph located at the Hobby-Eberly telescope using the frequency comb system. In the second half of the thesis, the erbium-fiber frequency comb is shown to generate highly coherent, ultrafast, and bright pulses at 1050 nm. The short duration and high peak power of these pulses enable coherent and continuous extension of the comb to visible wavelengths. Next, an accurate model of a nonlinear fiber optic amplifiers is developed and tested, then applied to optimize the selection of fiber lengths in the design of ultrafast nonlinear fiber-optic systems. Finally, a broad-bandwidth optical filter cavity for the generation of a 980--1110 nm suitable for calibration of next-generation spectrographs was designed and tested.

  2. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  3. Laser Spectroscopy of bi-alkali molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sourav; Altaf, A.; Lorenz, J.; Elliott, D.; Chen, Yong

    2010-03-01

    We report a study of laser spectroscopy of bi-alkali molecules, such as Li2, Rb2 and LiRb (work is in progress). We have constructed a dual-species (Li/Rb) heat pipe oven with a side viewport. The molecular fluorescence is excited by a dye laser with Rh6G dye (operating between 564 nm and 610 nm) and various home-made diode lasers (operating near 635 nm and 665 nm). The fluorescence is recorded using a .5ex1 -.1em/ -.15em.25ex4 m monochromator with a 0.1 nm (˜ 3 cm-1) spectral resolution. Transitions to the X^1σg^+ in Li2 and Rb2 have been measured and studies on LiRb are in progress. Molecular parameters, such as force constant, may be obtained from the analysis of the data (which agree with previously known values to within ˜ 3%). Using the known values of dissociation energy De and harmonic frequency φe for the alkali dimers, we also demonstrate that simple calculations with Morse potential approximation can be used to estimate the molecular transition wavelengths to within a few (1-3) nanometers from the experimentally measured values. Such information will aid in creating cold molecules via photoassociation in a dual species magneto-optical trap (LiRb in our case).

  4. Achieving sensitive, high-resolution laser spectroscopy at CRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groote, R. P. de [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven (Belgium); Lynch, K. M., E-mail: kara.marie.lynch@cern.ch [EP Department, CERN, ISOLDE (Switzerland); Wilkins, S. G. [The University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Collaboration: the CRIS collaboration

    2017-11-15

    The Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment, located at the ISOLDE facility, has recently performed high-resolution laser spectroscopy, with linewidths down to 20 MHz. In this article, we present the modifications to the beam line and the newly-installed laser systems that have made sensitive, high-resolution measurements possible. Highlights of recent experimental campaigns are presented.

  5. Laboratory diode laser spectroscopy in molecular planetary astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy of planetary atmospheres is performed at high spectral resolution comparable to that in the laboratory. This requires that laboratory spectroscopy use the highest resolution and the most accurate techniques. Tunable diode laser spectroscopy can supply many of the spectroscopic parameters needed by astronomers. In particular, line positions, line strengths, and collisional line widths are measured with diode lasers, and these are often among the best values available. Diode laser spectra are complimentary to lower resolution, broader-coverage Fourier transform spectra. Certain procedures must be adopted, however, when using diode lasers, for determining their output characteristics and for calibrating each spectrum against quality references.

  6. Molecular Laser Spectroscopy as a Tool for Gas Analysis Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javis Anyangwe Nwaboh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used the traceable infrared laser spectrometric amount fraction measurement (TILSAM method to perform absolute concentration measurements of molecular species using three laser spectroscopic techniques. We report results performed by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS, quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS, and cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS, all based on the TILSAM methodology. The measured results of the different spectroscopic techniques are in agreement with respective gravimetric values, showing that the TILSAM method is feasible with all different techniques. We emphasize the data quality objectives given by traceability issues and uncertainty analyses.

  7. Stable optical trapping and sensitive characterization of nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-ying; Ling, Dong-xiong; Ling, Lin; Li, William; Li, Yong-qing

    2017-01-01

    Optical manipulation and label-free characterization of nanoscale structures open up new possibilities for assembly and control of nanodevices and biomolecules. Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped particle, but is generally less effective for individual nanoparticles. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints. PMID:28211526

  8. Stable optical trapping and sensitive characterization of nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-Ying; Ling, Dong-Xiong; Ling, Lin; Li, William; Li, Yong-Qing

    2017-02-01

    Optical manipulation and label-free characterization of nanoscale structures open up new possibilities for assembly and control of nanodevices and biomolecules. Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped particle, but is generally less effective for individual nanoparticles. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints.

  9. Ultrafast Laser-Based Spectroscopy and Sensing: Applications in LIBS, CARS, and THz Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan R. Leahy-Hoppa

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast pulsed lasers find application in a range of spectroscopy and sensing techniques including laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS, coherent Raman spectroscopy, and terahertz (THz spectroscopy. Whether based on absorption or emission processes, the characteristics of these techniques are heavily influenced by the use of ultrafast pulses in the signal generation process. Depending on the energy of the pulses used, the essential laser interaction process can primarily involve lattice vibrations, molecular rotations, or a combination of excited states produced by laser heating. While some of these techniques are currently confined to sensing at close ranges, others can be implemented for remote spectroscopic sensing owing principally to the laser pulse duration. We present a review of ultrafast laser-based spectroscopy techniques and discuss the use of these techniques to current and potential chemical and environmental sensing applications.

  10. Laser spectroscopy of neutron deficient Sn isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the ground state properties of neutron-deficient Sn isotopes towards the doubly-magic nucleus $^{100}$Sn. Nuclear spins, changes in the rms charge radii and electromagnetic moments of $^{101-121}$Sn will be measured by laser spectroscopy using the CRIS experimental beam line. These ground-state properties will help to clarify the evolution of nuclear structure properties approaching the $\\textit{N = Z =}$ 50 shell closures. The Sn isotopic chain is currently the frontier for the application of state-of-the-art ab-initio calculations. Our knowledge of the nuclear structure of the Sn isotopes will set a benchmark for the advances of many-body methods, and will provide an important test for modern descriptions of the nuclear force.

  11. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Capabilities and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    sample preparation. 14 6. References 1. Cremers D.A.; Radziemski, L. J. Handbook of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy; West Sussex, England...30 (21), 2882–2884. 17. Salle, B.; Lacour, J. L.; Vors, E.; Fichet, P.; Maurice, S.; Cremers , D. A.; et al. Laser- Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy...90. Martin , M. Z.; Labbe, N.; Andre, N.; Harris, R.; Ebinger, M.; Wullschleger, S. D.; et al. High Resolution Applications of Laser-Induced

  12. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Laser Cooled CaH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Molecular ions trapped in RF Paul traps and sympathetically- cooled with laser - cooled atomic ions have been shown to be a great platform to measure...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Laser Cooled CaH+ The views, opinions and/or findings contained in...Angeles, CA 90095 -1406 ABSTRACT Vibrational Spectroscopy of Laser Cooled CaH+ Report Title Cold molecules and molecular ions are leading to a renaissance

  13. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Kotsifaki, Domna G; Lagoudakis, Pavlos G

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dep...

  14. COMPLIS: COllinear spectroscopy Measurements using a Pulsed Laser Ion Source

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    A Pulsed Laser spectroscopy experiment has been installed for the study of hyperfine structure and isotope shift of refractory and daughter elements from ISOLDE beams. It includes decelerated ion-implantation, element-selective laser ionization, magnetic and time-of-flight mass separation. The laser spectroscopy has been performed on the desorbed atoms in a set-up at ISOLDE-3 but later on high resolution laser collinear spectroscopy with the secondary pulsed ion beam is planned for the Booster ISOLDE set-up. During the first operation time of ISOLDE-3 we restricted our experiments to Doppler-limited resonant ionization laser and $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$ nuclear spectroscopy on neutron deficient platinum isotopes of even mass number down to A~=~186 and A~=~179 respectively. These isotopes have been produced by implantation of radioactive Hg and their subsequent $\\beta$-decay.

  15. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Díaz, M.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  16. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena-Diaz, M; Ponce, L; Arronte, M; Flores, T [Laboratorio TecnologIa Laser, CICATA-IPN, Unidad Altamira, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Ind. Altamira, 89600, TAMPS (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  17. Frequency-comb-referenced tunable diode laser spectroscopy and laser stabilization applied to laser cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordell, Thomas; Wallin, Anders E; Lindvall, Thomas; Vainio, Markku; Merimaa, Mikko

    2014-11-01

    Laser cooling of trapped atoms and ions in optical clocks demands stable light sources with precisely known absolute frequencies. Since a frequency comb is a vital part of any optical clock, the comb lines can be used for stabilizing tunable, user-friendly diode lasers. Here, a light source for laser cooling of trapped strontium ions is described. The megahertz-level stability and absolute frequency required are realized by stabilizing a distributed-feedback semiconductor laser to a frequency comb. Simple electronics is used to lock and scan the laser across the comb lines, and comb mode number ambiguities are resolved by using a separate, saturated absorption cell that exhibits easily distinguishable hyperfine absorption lines with known frequencies. Due to the simplicity, speed, and wide tuning range it offers, the employed technique could find wider use in precision spectroscopy.

  18. Optical tweezers: wideband microrheology

    CERN Document Server

    Preece, Daryl; Tassieri, Manlio; Evans, R M L; Gibson, Graham M; Padgett, Miles J; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2010-01-01

    Microrheology is a branch of rheology having the same principles as conventional bulk rheology, but working on micron length scales and micro-litre volumes. Optical tweezers have been successfully used with Newtonian fluids for rheological purposes such as determining fluid viscosity. Conversely, when optical tweezers are used to measure the viscoelastic properties of complex fluids the results are either limited to the material's high-frequency response, discarding important information related to the low-frequency behavior, or they are supplemented by low-frequency measurements performed with different techniques, often without presenting an overlapping region of clear agreement between the sets of results. We present a simple experimental procedure to perform microrheological measurements over the widest frequency range possible with optical tweezers. A generalised Langevin equation is used to relate the frequency-dependent moduli of the complex fluid to the time-dependent trajectory of a probe particle as...

  19. Collinear laser spectroscopy of atomic cadmium

    CERN Document Server

    Frömmgen, Nadja; Bissell, Mark L; Bieroń, Jacek; Blaum, Klaus; Cheal, Bradley; Flanagan, Kieran; Fritzsche, Stephan; Geppert, Christopher; Hammen, Michael; Kowalska, Magdalena; Kreim, Kim; Krieger, Andreas; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Rajabali, Mustafa M; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Papuga, Jasna; Yordanov, Deyan T

    2015-01-01

    Hyperfine structure $A$ and $B$ factors of the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\rm{P}_2 \\rightarrow 5s\\,6s\\,\\; ^3\\rm{S}_1$ transition are determined from collinear laser spectroscopy data of $^{107-123}$Cd and $^{111m-123m}$Cd. Nuclear magnetic moments and electric quadrupole moments are extracted using reference dipole moments and calculated electric field gradients, respectively. The hyperfine structure anomaly for isotopes with $s_{1/2}$ and $d_{5/2}$ nuclear ground states and isomeric $h_{11/2}$ states is evaluated and a linear relationship is observed for all nuclear states except $s_{1/2}$. This corresponds to the Moskowitz-Lombardi rule that was established in the mercury region of the nuclear chart but in the case of cadmium the slope is distinctively smaller than for mercury. In total four atomic and ionic levels were analyzed and all of them exhibit a similar behaviour. The electric field gradient for the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\mathrm{P}_2$ level is derived from multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculatio...

  20. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, A. K.; Rai, N. K.; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A. K.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Rai, Pramod K.

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail.

  1. Cold Antihydrogen for Precise Laser Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Gabrielse, G S; Walz, J; Hessels, E A; Tan, J; Oelert, W; George, M C; Grzonka, D J; Kossick, M; Storry, C H; Sefzick, T

    2002-01-01

    %AD-2 %title\\\\ \\\\The Antihydrogen TRAP Collaboration (ATRAP) seeks to do precise laser spectroscopy of antihydrogen. Comparisons of antihydrogen and hydrogen atoms should provide the most stringent test of CPT invariance involving baryons and leptons. ATRAP is an expansion of the TRAP collaboration that developed the techniques to take CERN antiprotons from an energy of 6 MeV (momentum 100 MeV/c) all the way down to thermal equilibrium at 4 K for storage. This storage energy is lower than realized previously by more than ten orders of magnitude. The TRAP techniques include slowing, capturing, electron cooling and stacking of antiprotons. ATRAP and other collaborations will use antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD). This new facility makes sense for such experiments because we showed that antiprotons can be accumulated in a trap at much lower expense than was required in the earlier CERN AC-AA-LEAR complex. In the closest approach yet to the production of cold antihydrogen, collaboration members wer...

  2. Quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy of single cancer cells

    KAUST Repository

    Patel, Imran

    2017-03-27

    Quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy is a next generation novel imaging technique allowing high resolution spectral imaging of cells. We show after spectral pre-processing, identification of different cancer cell populations within minutes.

  3. Compact High Sensitive Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Instrument Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a versatile tool for in situ substance characterization. Existing LIBS instruments are not compact enough for space...

  4. Laser spectroscopy of gas confined in nanoporous materials

    CERN Document Server

    Svensson, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    We show that high-resolution laser spectroscopy can probe surface interactions of gas confined in nano-cavities of porous materials. We report on strong line broadening and unfamiliar lineshapes due to tight confinement, as well as signal enhancement due to multiple photon scattering. This new domain of laser spectroscopy constitute a challenge for the theory of collisions and spectroscopic lineshapes, and open for new ways of analyzing porous materials and processes taking place therein.

  5. Optical Tweezers Array and Nimble Tweezers Probe Generated by Spatial- Light Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Jassemnejad, Baha; Seibel, Robin E.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    2003-01-01

    An optical tweezers is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center as a visiblelight interface between ubiquitous laser technologies and the interrogation, visualization, manufacture, control, and energization of nanostructures such as silicon carbide (SiC) nanotubes. The tweezers uses one or more focused laser beams to hold micrometer-sized particles called tools (sometimes called tips in atomic-force-microscope terminology). A strongly focused laser beam has an associated light-pressure gradient that is strong enough to pull small particles to the focus, in spite of the oppositely directed scattering force; "optical tweezers" is the common term for this effect. The objective is to use the tools to create carefully shaped secondary traps to hold and assemble nanostructures that may contain from tens to hundreds of atoms. The interaction between a tool and the nanostructures is to be monitored optically as is done with scanning probe microscopes. One of the initial efforts has been to create, shape, and control multiple tweezers beams. To this end, a programmable spatial-light modulator (SLM) has been used to modify the phase of a laser beam at up to 480 by 480 points. One program creates multiple, independently controllable tweezer beams whose shapes can be tailored by making the SLM an adaptive mirror in an interferometer (ref. 1). The beams leave the SLM at different angles, and an optical Fourier transform maps these beams to different positions in the focal plane of a microscope objective. The following figure shows two arrays of multiple beams created in this manner. The patterns displayed above the beam array control the intensity-to-phase transformation required in programming the SLM. Three of the seven beams displayed can be used as independently controllable beams.

  6. Simultaneous calibration of optical tweezers spring constant and position detector response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, Antoine; Perronet, Karen; Dulin, David; Villing, André; Bouyer, Philippe; Visscher, Koen; Westbrook, Nathalie

    2010-12-06

    We demonstrate a fast and direct calibration method for systems using a single laser for optical tweezers and particle position detection. The method takes direct advantage of back-focal-plane interferometry measuring not an absolute but a differential position, i.e. the position of the trapped particle relative to the center of the optical tweezers. Therefore, a fast step-wise motion of the optical tweezers yields the impulse response of the trapped particle. Calibration parameters such as the detector's spatial and temporal response and the spring constant of the optical tweezers then follow readily from fitting the measured impulse response.

  7. Laser frequency stabilization based on Sagnac interferometric spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Yan; Guoqing Yang; Jin Wang; Mingsheng Zhan

    2008-01-01

    @@ A simple method based on Sagnac interferometric spectroscopy (SIS) is applied for frequency stabilization of diode lasers. Sagnac interferometric spectra of rubidium vapor are investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The interference signal at the output of the Sagnac interferometer displays a sharp dispersion feature near the atomic resonance. This dispersion curve is used as the feedback error signal to stabilize the laser frequency. Linewidth of a diode laser is stabilized down to 1 MHz by this modulation-free method.

  8. A Step-by-step Guide to the Realisation of Advanced Optical Tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Pesce, Giuseppe; Marago, Onofrio M; Jones, Philip H; Gigain, Sylvain; Sasso, Antonio; Volpe, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Since the pioneering work of Arthur Ashkin, optical tweezers have become an indispensable tool for contactless manipulation of micro- and nanoparticles. Nowadays optical tweezers are employed in a myriad of applications demonstrating the importance of these tools. While the basic principle of optical tweezers is the use of a strongly focused laser beam to trap and manipulate particles, ever more complex experimental set-ups are required in order to perform novel and challenging experiments. With this article, we provide a detailed step- by-step guide for the construction of advanced optical manipulation systems. First, we explain how to build a single-beam optical tweezers on a home-made microscope and how to calibrate it. Improving on this design, we realize a holographic optical tweezers, which can manipulate independently multiple particles and generate more sophisticated wavefronts such as Laguerre-Gaussian beams. Finally, we explain how to implement a speckle optical tweezers, which permit one to employ ...

  9. Trace metal mapping by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Jozef [ORNL; Novotny, Dr. Karel [Masaryk University; Hrdlicka, A [Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic; Malina, R [Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic; Hartl, M [Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic; Kizek, R [Mendel University of Brno; Adam, V [Mendel University of Brno

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique capable of fast multi-elemental analysis of solid, gaseous and liquid samples. The potential applications of lasers for spectrochemical analysis were developed shortly after its invention; however the massive development of LIBS is connected with the availability of powerful pulsed laser sources. Since the late 80s of 20th century LIBS dominated the analytical atomic spectroscopy scene and its application are developed continuously. Here we review the utilization of LIBS for trace elements mapping in different matrices. The main emphasis is on trace metal mapping in biological samples.

  10. Frequency Comb Assisted Broadband Precision Spectroscopy with Cascaded Diode Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Junqiu; Pfeiffer, Martin H P; Kordts, Arne; Kamel, Ayman N; Guo, Hairun; Geiselmann, Michael; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2016-01-01

    Frequency comb assisted diode laser spectroscopy, employing both the accuracy of an optical frequency comb and the broad wavelength tuning range of a tunable diode laser, has been widely used in many applications. In this letter we present a novel method using cascaded frequency agile diode lasers, which allows extending the measurement bandwidth to 37.4 THz (1355 to 1630 nm) at MHz resolution with scanning speeds above 1 THz/s. It is demonstrated as a useful tool to characterize a broadband spectrum for molecular spectroscopy and in particular it enables to characterize the dispersion of integrated microresonators up to the fourth order.

  11. Spectroscopy of Nd-doped laser materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Simi A.; Hayden, Joseph S.

    2014-02-01

    Laser design codes utilize laser properties provided by materials manufacturers for performance modeling. Large scale manufacturing of materials during compositional developments for a particular laser design is not economically feasible. Nevertheless, the laser properties derived from the available sample volumes must be reliable and reproducible. In recent years, as a result of the renewed interest in novel glasses for ultrafast laser applications, SCHOTT has developed improved measurements and methodologies for providing the most accurate information possible to laser scientists. Even though the J-O method is robust and time tested for the spectroscopic characterization of Nd3+, the accuracy of the results requires reliable measurements. This paper outlines the J-O approximation for manifold to manifold transitions, measurements needed, and some of the pitfalls to watch for during the collection of data for Nd-doped materials.

  12. Study of abnormal erythrocyte in patients with arrhythmia and myocardial infarction by optical tweezers Raman spectroscopy%心律失常与心肌梗死患者红细胞异常的光镊拉曼光谱分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴智辉; 肖熙; 黄代政; 陈朝旺; 莫华

    2012-01-01

    Objective To measure the red blood cells' Raman spectra of healthy person, patients of arrhythmia and myocardial infarction with laser optical tweezers Raman spectroscopy system. Methods Taking the fresh venous blood samples, then isolating red blood cells after washed and centrifuged, and determining Raman spectra of red blood cells by optical tweezers Raman spectroscopy system. Results Compared with normal red blood cells, the o-verall intensity of Raman spectra in patients with cardiovascular disease was significantly different. The overall spectrum of red blood cells was weaker. Some characteristic peaks had a few displacements. Conclusion According to measure the Raman scattering spectrum through separating and capturing red blood cells. Researching and analyzing the contents of red blood cell and the changes of biological macromolecules through quick and easy spectral analysis methods, so as to further collect the Raman spectra data of cardiovascular disease, and provide theoretical and experimental basis for studying the type and pathogenesis of common cardiovascular disease at the molecular level.%目的 利用激光光镊拉曼光谱系统,测定健康者、心律失常患者和心肌梗死患者红细胞的拉曼光谱.方法 取新鲜静脉血样本,经洗涤、离心处理后分离出红细胞,用激光光镊拉曼系统采集其红细胞的拉曼光谱.结果 与正常红细胞比较,心血管疾病患者红细胞的光镊拉曼光谱有较大的差异,红细胞的整体谱线偏弱;部分特征谱数发生位移.结论 通过对红细胞的分离和捕获并测定其拉曼散射光谱,研究和分析红细胞的内容物及生物大分子的变化.进一步收集并建立心血管疾病的拉曼光谱数据库,为分子水平上探讨常见心血管疾病的类型及发病机制提供依据.

  13. Constructing Dual Beam Optical Tweezers for Undergraduate Biophysics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daudelin, Brian; West-Coates, Devon; Del'Etoile, Jon; Grotzke, Eric; Paramanathan, Thayaparan

    Optical tweezing, or trapping, is a modern physics technique which allows us to use the radiation pressure from laser beams to trap micron sized particles. Optical tweezers are commonly used in graduate level biophysics research but seldom used at the undergraduate level. Our goal is to construct a dual beam optical tweezers for future undergraduate biophysical research. Dual beam optical tweezers use two counter propagating laser beams to provide a stronger trap. In this study we discuss how the assembly of the dual beam optical tweezers is done through three main phases. The first phase was to construct a custom compressed air system to isolate the optical table from the vibrations from its surroundings so that we can measure pico-newton scale forces that are observed in biological systems. In addition, the biomaterial flow system was designed with a flow cell to trap biomolecules by combining several undergraduate semester projects. During the second phase we set up the optics to image and display the inside of the flow cell. Currently we are in the process of aligning the laser to create an effective trap and developing the software to control the data collection. This optical tweezers set up will enable us to study potential cancer drug interactions with DNA at the single molecule level and will be a powerful tool in promoting interdisciplinary research at the undergraduate level.

  14. Development of narrowband lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hori M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We review some lasers developed by the ASACUSA collaboration of CERN, to carry out spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms. These lasers were based on the technique of continuous-wave injection seeding of pulsed lasers. The laser output covered the wavelength regions 264–1154 nm, with peak powers of ~ 1 MW and spectral resolutions of 6–40 MHz. The devices were recently used to measure the transition frequencies of antiprotonic helium atoms to a fractional precision of several parts in ~ 109.

  15. Polarization-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for laser stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Paul D; Heavner, Thomas P; Jefferts, Steven R

    2013-11-20

    We demonstrate a variation of pump-probe spectroscopy that is particularly useful for laser frequency stabilization. The polarization-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (POLEAS) signal provides a significant improvement in signal-to-noise ratio over saturated absorption spectroscopy (SAS) for the important and commonly used atomic cycling transitions. The improvements can directly increase the short-term stability of a laser frequency lock, given sufficient servo loop bandwidth. The long-term stability of the POLEAS method, which is limited by environmental sensitivities, is comparable to that of SAS. The POLEAS signal is automatically Doppler-free, without requiring a separate Doppler subtraction beam, and lends itself to straightforward compact packaging. Finally, by increasing the amplitude of the desired (cycling) peak, while reducing the amplitude of all other peaks in the manifold, the POLEAS method eases the implementation of laser auto-locking schemes.

  16. Laser spectroscopy of trapped Th^3+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Adam; Campbell, Corey; Churchill, Layne; Depalatis, Michael; Naylor, David; Kuzmich, Alex; Chapman, Michael

    2008-05-01

    We are applying the techniques of laser cooling and ion trapping to investigate the low lying nuclear isomeric state in ^229Th. We will confine Th^3+ atoms in an RF trap [1] and sympathetically cool them with barium ions. The ions are produced by laser ablation from a thorium metal target by the third harmonic of a Q-switched YAG laser. Using mass-spectroscopic techniques we separate out the Th^3+ ions from the plume of ablation products. We once trapped we will observe fluorescence from the trapped ions using transitions at 984 nm and 690 nm. [1] Peik E. and Tamm Chr., Europhysics Letters, 61 (2) (2003)

  17. Laser frequency stabilization by magnetically assisted rotation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzemień, Leszek; Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Noga, Andrzej; Witkowski, Marcin; Zachorowski, Jerzy; Zawada, Michał; Gawlik, Wojciech

    2011-03-01

    We present a method of Doppler-free laser frequency stabilization based on magnetically assisted rotation spectroscopy (MARS) which combines the Doppler-free velocity-selective optical pumping (VSOP) and magnetic rotation spectroscopy. The stabilization is demonstrated for the atomic rubidium transitions at 780 nm. The proposed method is largely independent of stray magnetic fields and does not require any modulation of the laser frequency. Moreover, the discussed method allows one to choose between locking the laser exactly to the line center, or with a magnetically-controlled shift to an arbitrary frequency detuned by up to several natural linewidths. This feature is useful in many situations, e.g. for laser cooling experiments. In addition to presenting the principle of the method, its theoretical background and peculiarities inherent to the repopulation VSOP are discussed.

  18. Compositional Analysis of Drugs by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldjilali, S. A.; Axente, E.; Belasri, A.; Baba-Hamed, T.; Hermann, J.

    2017-07-01

    The feasibility of the compositional analysis of drugs by calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was investigated using multivitamin tablets as a sample material. The plasma was produced by a frequencyquadrupled Nd:YAG laser delivering UV pulses with a duration of 5 ns and an energy of 12 mJ, operated at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The relative fractions of the elements composing the multivitamin drug were determined by comparing the emission spectrum of the laser-produced plume with the spectral radiance computed for a plasma in a local thermodynamic equilibrium. Fair agreement of the measured fractions with those given by the manufacturer was observed for all elements mentioned in the leafl et of the drug. Additional elements such as Ca, Na, Sr, Al, Li, K, and Si were detected and quantifi ed. The present investigations demonstrate that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a viable technique for the quality control of drugs.

  19. Decay-Assisted Laser Spectroscopy of Neutron-Deficient Francium

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, K M; Bissell, M L; Budincevic, I; Cocolios, T E; De Groote, R P; De Schepper, S; Fedosseev, V N; Flanagan, K T; Franchoo, S; Garcia Ruiz, R F; Heylen, H; Marsh, B A; Neyens, G; Procter, T J; Rossel, R E; Rothe, S; Strashnov, I; Stroke, H H; Wendt, K D A

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the hyperfine-structure and radioactive-decay studies of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes $^{202-206}$Fr performed with the Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at the ISOLDE facility, CERN. The high resolution innate to collinear laser spectroscopy is combined with the high efficiency of ion detection to provide a highly-sensitive technique to probe the hyperfine structure of exotic isotopes. The technique of decay-assisted laser spectroscopy is presented, whereby the isomeric ion beam is deflected to a decay spectroscopy station for alpha-decay tagging of the hyperfine components. Here, we present the first hyperfine-structure measurements of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes $^{202-206}$Fr, in addition to the identification of the low-lying states of $^{202,204}$Fr performed at the CRIS experiment.

  20. Laser spectroscopy of gallium isotopes using the ISCOOL RFQ cooler

    CERN Multimedia

    Blaum, K; Kowalska, M; Ware, T; Procter, T J

    2007-01-01

    We propose to study the radioisotopes of gallium (Z=31) by collinear laser spectroscopy using the ISCOOL RFQ ion cooler. The proposed measurements on $^{62-83}$Ga will span both neutron-deficient and neutron-rich isotopes. Of key interest is the suggested development of a proton-skin in the neutron-deficient isotopes. The isotope shifts measured by laser spectroscopy will be uniquely sensitive to this feature. The measurements will also provide a wealth of new information on the gallium nuclear spins, static moments and nuclear charge radii.

  1. Time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xian-yun; ZHANG Wei-jun; WANG Zhen-ya; HAO Li-qing; HUANG Ming-qiang; ZHAO Wen-wu; LONG Bo; Zhao Wei

    2008-01-01

    We develop a system to measure the elemental composition of unprepared samples using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in our laboratory, which can be used for the determination of elements in solids, liquids and aerosols. A description of the instrumentation, including laser, sample chamber and detection, is followed by a brief discussion. The time-resolved LIBS of aluminum at atmospheric pressure is presented. At the end, the possibilities and later uses of this technique are briefly discussed.

  2. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy for astronomical purposes. [laser applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townes, C. H.

    1978-01-01

    Heterodyne infrared astronomy was carried out using CO2 lasers and some solid state tunable lasers. The best available detectors are mercury cadmium telluride photodiodes. Their quantum efficiencies reach values near 0.5 and in an overall system an effective quantum efficiency, taking into account optical losses and amplifier noise, of about 0.25 was demonstrated. Initial uses of 10 micron heterodyne spectroscopy were for the study of planetary molecular spectra.

  3. LASER CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY (LCS) AND ITS CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES IN OPHTHALMOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Karganov Mikhail; Eskina Erika; Stepanova Maria

    2015-01-01

    The method of laser correlation spectroscopy (LCS) is based on the analysis of the spectrum of quasielastic light scatter during coherent monochromatic laser irradiation of micro-particles in biological fluids (blood serum, urine, oropharyngeal washout fluid, tear fluid etc.). Spectrum provides information on dynamic processes in the analyzed system: translation motion of scattering particles and their orientation and conformation dynamics. Special procedures of cluster analysis make it possi...

  4. Highly sensitive detection using Herriott cell for laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chongyi; Song, Guangming; Du, Yang; Zhao, Xiaojun; Wang, Wenju; Zhong, Liujun; Hu, Mai

    2016-11-01

    The tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy combined with the long absorption path technique is a significant method to detect harmful gas. The long optical path could come true by Herriott cell reducing the size of the spectrometers. A 15 cm long Herriott cell with 28.8 m optical absorption path after 96 times reflection was designed that enhanced detection sensitivity of absorption spectroscopy. According to the theory data of calculation, Herriott cell is analyzed and simulated by softwares Matlab and Lighttools.

  5. Sub-kilohertz laser linewidth narrowing using polarization spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrance, Joshua S; Sparkes, Ben M; Turner, Lincoln D; Scholten, Robert E

    2016-05-30

    We identify several beneficial characteristics of polarization spectroscopy as an absolute atomic reference for frequency stabilization of lasers, and demonstrate sub-kilohertz laser spectral linewidth narrowing using polarization spectroscopy with high-bandwidth feedback. Polarization spectroscopy provides a highly dispersive velocity-selective absolute atomic reference based on frequency-dependent birefringence in an optically pumped atomic gas. The pumping process leads to dominance of the primary closed transition, suppressing closely-spaced subsidiary resonances which reduce the effective capture range for conventional atomic references. The locking signal is based on subtraction of two orthogonal polarization signals, reducing the effect of laser intensity noise to the shot noise limit. We measure noise-limited servo bandwidth comparable to that of a high-finesse optical cavity without the frequency limit or complexity imposed by optical modulation normally associated with high bandwidth laser frequency stabilization. We demonstrate narrowing to 600±100 Hz laser linewidth using the beatnote between two similarly locked external cavity diode lasers.

  6. Setting up of holographic optical tweezer arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepak K.; Tata, B. V. R.; Ravindran, T. R.

    2017-05-01

    Optical tweezers use tightly focused laser beams to hold and move microscopic objects in a solvent. However, many applications require simultaneous control over multitude of particles, positioning them in 3D space at desired locations with desired symmetry, which is made possible by the use of holographic optical tweezers using the technique of beam shaping and holography. We have designed and developed a holographic optical tweezer set-up using a phase only liquid crystal, reflective spatial light modulator. We employ the technique of phase modulation to modulate the phase of the beam by generating holograms using Random Superposition (RS) and weighted Gerchberg Saxton algorithm (WGS) algorithm for generating desired patterns of light at the trapping plane. A 4×4 array of beams with square symmetry was generated using WGS algorithm and trapped polystyrene particles of size 1.2 micron in a 4×4 two dimensional array. There were uniformity issues among the trap intensities, as we move away from the zeroth order spot. This was corrected by taking into account diffraction effects due to the pixelated nature of SLM modulating the intensity of the trap spots and the ghost order suppression by spatial disorder.

  7. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-08-01

    We use a two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to measure the coupled absorption and emission properties of atomic species in plasmas produced via laser ablation of solid aluminum targets at atmospheric pressure. Emission spectra from the Al I 394.4 nm and Al I 396.15 nm transitions are measured while a frequency-doubled, continuous-wave, Ti:Sapphire laser is tuned across the Al I 396.15 nm transition. The resulting two-dimensional spectra show the energy coupling between the two transitions via increased emission intensity for both transitions during resonant absorption of the continuous-wave laser at one transition. Time-delayed and gated detection of the emission spectrum is used to isolate the resonantly-excited fluorescence emission from the thermally-excited emission from the plasma. In addition, the tunable continuous-wave laser measures the absorption spectrum of the Al transition with ultra-high resolution after the plasma has cooled, resulting in narrower spectral linewidths than observed in emission spectra. Our results highlight that fluorescence spectroscopy employing continuous-wave laser re-excitation after pulsed laser ablation combines benefits of both traditional emission and absorption spectroscopic methods.

  8. Detection of early caries by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    To improve sensitivity of dental caries detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis, it is proposed to utilize emission peaks in the ultraviolet. We newly focused on zinc whose emission peaks exist in ultraviolet because zinc exists at high concentration in the outer layer of enamel. It was shown that by using ratios between heights of an emission peak of Zn and that of Ca, the detection sensitivity and stability are largely improved. It was also shown that early caries are differentiated from healthy part by properly setting a threshold in the detected ratios. The proposed caries detection system can be applied to dental laser systems such as ones based on Er:YAG-lasers. When ablating early caries part by laser light, the system notices the dentist that the ablation of caries part is finished. We also show the intensity of emission peaks of zinc decreased with ablation with Er:YAG laser light.

  9. Application of antimonide diode lasers in photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilt, Stéphane; Vicet, Aurore; Werner, Ralph; Mattiello, Mario; Thévenaz, Luc; Salhi, Abdelmajid; Rouillard, Yves; Koeth, Johannes

    2004-12-01

    First investigations of photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy (PAS) of methane using an antimonide semiconductor laser are reported. The laser fabrication is made in two steps. The structure is firstly grown by molecular beam epitaxy, then a metallic distributed-feedback (DFB) grating is processed. The laser operates at 2371.6 nm in continuous wave and at room temperature. It demonstrates single-mode emission with typical tuning coefficients of 0.04 nm mA(-1) and 0.2 nm K(-1). PA detection of methane was performed by coupling this laser into a radial PA cell. A detection limit of 20 ppm has been achieved in a preliminary configuration that was not optimised for the laser characteristics.

  10. Laser frequency stabilization and shifting by using modulation transfer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bing; Wang, Zhao-Ying; Wu, Bin; Xu, Ao-Peng; Wang, Qi-Yu; Xu, Yun-Fei; Lin, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    The stabilizing and shifting of laser frequency are very important for the interaction between the laser and atoms. The modulation transfer spectroscopy for the 87Rb atom with D2 line transition F = 2 → F' = 3 is used for stabilizing and shifting the frequency of the external cavity grating feedback diode laser. The resonant phase modulator with electro—optical effect is used to generate frequency sideband to lock the laser frequency. In the locking scheme, circularly polarized pump- and probe-beams are used. By optimizing the temperature of the vapor, the pump- and probe-beam intensity, the laser linewidth of 280 kHz is obtained. Furthermore, the magnetic field generated by a solenoid is added into the system. Therefore the system can achieve the frequency locking at any point in a range of hundreds of megahertz frequency shifting with very low power loss.

  11. Interferometer Control of Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses progress in using spatial light modulators and interferometry to control the beam profile of an optical tweezers. The approach being developed is to use a spatial light modulator (SLM) to control the phase profile of the tweezers beam and to use a combination of the SLM and interferometry to control the intensity profile. The objective is to perform fine and calculable control of the moments and forces on a tip or tool to be used to manipulate and interrogate nanostructures. The performance of the SLM in generating multiple and independently controllable tweezers beams is also reported. Concurrent supporting research projects are mentioned and include tweezers beam scattering and neural-net processing of the interference patterns for control of the tweezers beams.

  12. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Chlorophyll a Flourescence Transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Jens

    of a sufficient quality; something that remains a problem for many in-situ methods. In my PhD, I present my work with two such in-situ methods, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and OJIP transients, the rising part of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients from dark-adapted leaves....

  13. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Chlorophyll a Flourescence Transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Jens

    of a sufficient quality; something that remains a problem for many in-situ methods. In my PhD, I present my work with two such in-situ methods, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and OJIP transients, the rising part of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients from dark-adapted leaves....

  14. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Trace Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Stephen (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; West, Joseph R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of trace metal determination in liquids is demonstrated. The limits of detection (LOD) for the technique ranged from 10 ppb to 10 ppm for 15 metals metals (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb) tested.

  15. Detection of diamond in ore using pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lamprecht, GH

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The viability of using pulsed laser excited Raman spectroscopy as a method for diamond detection from ore, has been investigated. In this method the spontaneous Stokes Raman signal is used as indicator of diamond, and a dual channel system...

  16. Recent results on neutron rich tin isotopes by laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Roussière, B; Crawford, J E; Essabaa, S; Fedosseev, V; Geithner, W; Genevey, J; Girod, M; Huber, G; Horn, R; Kappertz, S; Lassen, J; Le Blanc, F; Lee, J K P; Le Scornet, G; Lettry, Jacques; Mishin, V I; Neugart, R; Obert, J; Oms, J; Ouchrif, A; Peru, S; Pinard, J; Ravn, H L; Sauvage, J; Verney, D

    2001-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy measurements have been performed on neutron rich tin isotopes using the COMPLIS experimental setup. The nuclear charge radii of the even-even isotopes from A=108 to 132 are compared to the results of macroscopic and microscopic calculations. The improvements and optimizations needed to perform the isotope shift measurement on $^{134}$Sn are presented.

  17. Ramsey-comb spectroscopy with intense ultrashort laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Morgenweg, Jonas; Eikema, Kjeld S E

    2014-01-01

    Optical frequency combs based on mode-locked lasers have revolutionised the field of metrology and precision spectroscopy by providing precisely calibrated optical frequencies and coherent pulse trains. Amplification of the pulsed output from these lasers is very desirable, as nonlinear processes can then be employed to cover a much wider range of transitions and wavelengths for ultra-high precision, direct frequency comb spectroscopy. Therefore full repetition rate laser amplifiers and enhancement resonators have been employed to produce up to microjoule-level pulse energies. Here we show that the full frequency comb accuracy and resolution can be obtained by using only two frequency comb pulses amplified to the millijoule pulse energy level, orders of magnitude more energetic than what has previously been possible. The novel properties of this approach, such as cancellation of optical light-shift effects, is demonstrated on weak two-photon transitions in atomic rubidium and caesium, thereby improving the fr...

  18. Oxygen measurement by multimode diode lasers employing gas correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xiutao; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2009-02-10

    Multimode diode laser (MDL)-based correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC) was used to measure oxygen in ambient air, thereby employing a diode laser (DL) having an emission spectrum that overlaps the oxygen absorption lines of the A band. A sensitivity of 700 ppm m was achieved with good accuracy (2%) and linearity (R(2)=0.999). For comparison, measurements of ambient oxygen were also performed by tunable DL absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technique employing a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. We demonstrate that, despite slightly degraded sensitivity, the MDL-based COSPEC-based oxygen sensor has the advantages of high stability, low cost, ease-of-use, and relaxed requirements in component selection and instrument buildup compared with the TDLAS-based instrument.

  19. Laser ablation mass spectroscopy of nineteenth century daguerreotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Danel L. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Golovlev, Valerie V. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Gresalfi, Michael J. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Chaney, John A. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Feigerle, Charles S. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Miller, John C. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Romer, Grant [International Museum of Photography and Film, George Eastman House, 900 East Ave., Rochester, New York 14607-2298 (United States); Messier, Paul [Boston Art Conservation, 60 Oak Square Ave., Boston, Massachusetts 02135 (United States)

    1999-10-01

    Laser desorption mass spectroscopy has been used to characterize both modern and {approx}150-year-old daguerreotypes. Such investigations are a necessary prelude to attempts to clean them of tarnish and other contaminants by laser ablation of the surface layers. Both positive- and negative-ion time-of-flight spectra were obtained following YAG laser ablation/desorption at 1064, 532, and 355 nm. Major peaks obtained from several daguerreotypes reveal expected elements from the substrate (Ag, Cu) as well as the developing (Hg) and gilding (Au) processes. Silver clusters (Ag{sub n}) may reflect surface desorption of molecules or, alternatively, aggregates formed in the ejection process. Silver sulfide molecules observed from old daguerreotypes are the signature of the tarnishing process. (c) 2000 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  20. Diode-Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of an Optically Thick Plasma in Combination with Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nomura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distortion of laser-induced fluorescence profiles attributable to optical absorption and saturation broadening was corrected in combination with laser absorption spectroscopy in argon plasma flow. At high probe-laser intensity, saturated absorption profiles were measured to correct probe-laser absorption. At low laser intensity, nonsaturated absorption profiles were measured to correct fluorescence reabsorption. Saturation broadening at the measurement point was corrected using a ratio of saturated to non-saturated broadening. Observed LIF broadening and corresponding translational temperature without correction were, respectively, 2.20±0.05 GHz and 2510±100 K and corrected broadening and temperature were, respectively, 1.96±0.07 GHz and 1990±150 K. Although this correction is applicable only at the center of symmetry, the deduced temperature agreed well with that obtained by LAS with Abel inversion.

  1. Laser correlation spectroscopy for diagnostics gallstone diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolevich, Alexander N.; Prigun, N. P.; Khairullina, A. Y.; Belsley, M. S.

    2003-10-01

    The method of dynamical spectroscopy the change in sizes of aggregates of bile vesicules caused by different nucleating factors has been investigated. It is shown that the bile vesicule sizes at chronic cholecystites vary from 90-200 nm. In so doing, the presence of a large fraction of bile vesicules characterized, as shown in the paper, by a higher concentration of cholesterol can serve as a criterion for cholestitis acuteness and litogenesis intensity.

  2. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouthier, D. J.

    1994-02-01

    Work was done on sub-Doppler spectroscopy of thioformaldehyde, electronic spectrum of FS2 radical, FTIR spectra of the transient molecule formyl chloride (HCOCl and DCOCl), and high-resolution FTIR spectra of the nu(sub 9) (CH2 wag) and nu(sub 5) (CSO symm. stretch) bands of sulfine (H2CSO), a transient species formed in pyrolysis of dimethyl sulfoxide and oxidation of thioformaldehyde.

  3. Laser Spectroscopy Investigations of Materials for Solid State Laser Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-01

    Experimental geometry for anisotropic self-diffraction expert. Permanent address: Departamento de Optics y Estructura de Is Materia, mints. e refers to the...the helium-neon laser and PMT is the photo- "Permanent address: Departamento de Optics y Estructura de Ia Materia, multiplier tube. The results are sent

  4. Graded-index optical fiber tweezers with long manipulation length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yuan; Huang, Wei; Liu, Qun-Feng; Wu, Yu; Rao, Yunjiang; Peng, Gang-Ding; Lang, Jinyi; Zhang, Ke

    2014-10-20

    Long manipulation length is critical for optical fiber tweezers to enhance the flexibility of non-contact trapping. In this paper a long manipulation distance of more than 40 μm is demonstrated experimentally by the graded-index fiber (GIF) tweezers, which is fabricated by chemically etching a GIF taper with a large cone angle of 58°. The long manipulation distance is obtained by introducing an air cavity between the lead-in single mode fiber and the GIF as well as by adjusting the laser power in the existence of a constant background flow. The influence of the cavity length and the GIF length on the light distribution and the focusing length of the GIF taper is investigated numerically, which is helpful for optimizing the parameters to perform stable optical trapping. This kind of optical fiber tweezers has advantages including low-cost, easy-to-fabricate and easy-to-use.

  5. Two-step laser ionization schemes for in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy of radioactive isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudryavtsev, Yu., E-mail: yuri.kudryavtsev@fys.kuleuven.be; Ferrer, R.; Huyse, M.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vermeeren, L. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2014-02-15

    The in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy technique has been developed at the Leuven isotope separator on-line facility for the production and in-source laser spectroscopy studies of short-lived radioactive isotopes. In this article, results from a study to identify efficient optical schemes for the two-step resonance laser ionization of 18 elements are presented.

  6. Apparatus, system, and method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, Jr., Andrew J; Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R

    2014-11-18

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an apparatus includes a pulsed laser configured to generate a pulsed laser signal toward a sample, a constructive interference object and an optical element, each located in a path of light from the sample. The constructive interference object is configured to generate constructive interference patterns of the light. The optical element is configured to disperse the light. A LIBS system includes a first and a second optical element, and a data acquisition module. The data acquisition module is configured to determine an isotope measurement based, at least in part, on light received by an image sensor from the first and second optical elements. A method for performing LIBS includes generating a pulsed laser on a sample to generate light from a plasma, generating constructive interference patterns of the light, and dispersing the light into a plurality of wavelengths.

  7. Diode laser absorption spectroscopy of lithium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Ignacio E.; González, Iván A.

    2016-10-01

    We study Doppler-limited laser intensity absorption, in a thermal lithium vapor containing 7Li and 6Li atoms in a 9 to 1 ratio, using a narrow-linewidth single-longitudinal-mode tunable external cavity diode laser at the wavelength of 670.8 nm. The lithium vapor was embedded in helium or argon buffer gas. The spectral lineshapes were rigorously predicted for D_1 and D_2 for the lithium 6 and 7 isotope lines using reduced optical Bloch equations, specifically derived, from a density matrix analysis. Here, a detailed comparison is provided of the predicted lineshapes with the measured 7Li-D_2, 7Li-D_1, 6Li-D_2 and 6Li-D_1 lines, in the case of high vapor density and with intensity above the saturation intensity. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such detailed comparison is reported in the open literature. The calculations were also extended to saturated absorption spectra and compared to measured Doppler-free 7Li-D_2 and 6Li-D_2 hyperfine lines.

  8. Characterization of hard coatings produced by laser cladding using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela, J.A.; Amado, J.M.; Tobar, M.J.; Mateo, M.P.; Yañez, A.; Nicolas, G., E-mail: gines@udc.es

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Chemical mapping and profiling by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of coatings produced by laser cladding. • Production of laser clads using tungsten carbide (WC) and nickel based matrix (NiCrBSi) powders. • Calibration by LIBS of hardfacing alloys with different WC concentrations. - Abstract: Protective coatings with a high abrasive wear resistance can be obtained from powders by laser cladding technique, in order to extend the service life of some industrial components. In this work, laser clad layers of self-fluxing NiCrBSi alloy powder mixed with WC powder have been produced on stainless steel substrates of austenitic type (AISI 304) in a first step and then chemically characterized by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. With the suitable laser processing parameters (mainly output power, beam scan speed and flow rate) and powders mixture proportions between WC ceramics and NiCrBSi alloys, dense pore free layers have been obtained on single tracks and on large areas with overlapped tracks. The results achieved by LIBS technique and applied for the first time to the analysis of laser clads provided the chemical composition of the tungsten carbides in metal alloy matrix. Different measurement modes (multiple point analyses, depth profiles and chemical maps) have been employed, demonstrating the usefulness of LIBS technique for the characterization of laser clads based on hardfacing alloys. The behavior of hardness can be explained by LIBS maps which evidenced the partial dilution of some WC spheres in the coating.

  9. Digital control of diode laser for atmospheric spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, R. T.; Rutledge, C. W. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A system is described for remote absorption spectroscopy of trace species using a diode laser tunable over a useful spectral region of 50 to 200 cm(-1) by control of diode laser temperature over range from 15 K to 100 K, and tunable over a smaller region of typically 0.1 to 10 cm(-1) by control of the diode laser current over a range from 0 to 2 amps. Diode laser temperature and current set points are transmitted to the instrument in digital form and stored in memory for retrieval under control of a microprocessor during measurements. The laser diode current is determined by a digital to analog converter through a field effect transistor for a high degree of ambient temperature stability, while the laser diode temperature is determined by set points entered into a digital to analog converter under control of the microprocessor. Temperature of the laser diode is sensed by a sensor diode to provide negative feedback to the temperature control circuit that responds to the temperature control digital to analog converter.

  10. Advances in Spectroscopy for Lasers and Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, Baldassare; New Development in Optics and Related Fields

    2006-01-01

    This volume presents the Proceedings of "New Development in Optics and Related Fields," held in Erice, Sicily, Italy, from the 6th to the 21st of June, 2005. This meeting was organized by the International School of Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy of the "Ettore Majorana" Center for Scientific Culture. The purpose of this Institute was to provide a comprehensive and coherent treatment of the new techniques and contemporary developments in optics and related fields. Several lectures of the course addressed directly the technologies required for the detection and identification of chemical and biological threats; other lectures considered the possible applications of new techniques and materials to the detection and identification of such threats. Each lecturer developed a coherent section of the program starting at a somewhat fundamental level and ultimately reaching the frontier of knowledge in the field in a systematic and didactic fashion.

  11. Method for laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, M., E-mail: Masaki.Hori@mpq.mpg.de; Sótér, A.; Aghai-Khozani, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik (Germany); Barna, D. [CERN (Switzerland); Dax, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland); Hayano, R. S.; Murakami, Y.; Yamada, H. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The PiHe collaboration is currently attempting to carry out laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms using the high-intensity π{sup −} beam of the ring cyclotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. These atoms are heretofore hypothetical three-body Coulomb systems each composed of a helium nucleus, a π{sup −} occupying a Rydberg state, and an electron occupying the 1s ground state. We briefly review the proposed method by which we intend to detect the laser spectroscopic signal. This complements our experiments on metastable antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN.

  12. [Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy system for trace ethylene detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Dai, Jing-Min; Song, Kai

    2012-10-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was characterized by ultra-narrow line width laser and wavelength modulation, which makes it possible to scan a single absorption line. TDLAS has an advantage in trace gas analysis for its high resolution, high sensitivity and quick response. The 1 626.8 nm absorption line of ethylene was selected for detecting by analyzing its absorption line characteristic. The TDLAS system was developed with a white type multi-pass cell, combined with wavelength modulation and harmonic detection. Ethylene concentration ranges from 20 to 1 200 ppmv were tested using this system. The estimated detection limit of the system is 10 ppmv.

  13. Laser photodissociation and spectroscopy of mass-separated biomolecular ions

    CERN Document Server

    Polfer, Nicolas C

    2014-01-01

    This lecture notes book presents how enhanced structural information of biomolecular ions can be obtained from interaction with photons of specific frequency - laser light. The methods described in the book ""Laser photodissociation and spectroscopy of mass-separated biomolecular ions"" make use of the fact that the discrete energy and fast time scale of photoexcitation can provide more control in ion activation. This activation is the crucial process producing structure-informative product ions that cannot be generated with more conventional heating methods, such as collisional activation. Th

  14. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filamentation channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also partly explains the reason for the occurrence of atomic plume during fs LIBS in air compared to long-pulse ns LIBS.

  15. Progress in fieldable laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2012-06-01

    In recent years there has been great progress in the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technology field. Significant advances have been made both in fundamental and applied research as well as in data processing/chemometrics. Improvements in components, most notably lasers/optics and spectrometers are enabling the development of new devices that are suitable for field use. These new commercial devices recently released to the marketplace, as well as ones currently under development, are bringing the potential of LIBS for CBRNE threat analysis into real-world applications.

  16. Laser Raman Tweezer Spectroscopy (RTS) for the Molecular and Functional Characterization of Single Live Mouse Mammary Tumor Initiating Cells (TIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Medicine and was used in these studies. BALB/c female mice (3- to 5-weeks old) were injected with pieces of p53 null mouse mammary tumors (1-3mm in...A. B. 12 REFERENCES: Zhang, M., Behbod, F., Atkinson, R. L., Landis , M. D., Kittrell, F., Edwards, D., Medina, D., Tsimelzon, A

  17. Laser Raman Tweezer Spectroscopy for the Molecular and Functional Characterization of Single Live Mouse Mammary Tumor-Initiating Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Rosen’s laboratory at Baylor College of Medicine , in Houston, Texas. The tumors were shipped to our laboratory frozen and over night. The tumors...Atkinson, R. L., Landis , M. D., Kittrell, F., Edwards, D., Medina, D., Tsimelzon, A., Hilsenbeck, S., Green, J. E., et al. (2008). Identification of

  18. Precision spectroscopy of hydrogen and femtosecond laser frequency combs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänsch, T W; Alnis, J; Fendel, P; Fischer, M; Gohle, C; Herrmann, M; Holzwarth, R; Kolachevsky, N; Udem, Th; Zimmermann, M

    2005-09-15

    Precision spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom has inspired dramatic advances in optical frequency metrology: femtosecond laser optical frequency comb synthesizers have revolutionized the precise measurement of optical frequencies, and they provide a reliable clock mechanism for optical atomic clocks. Precision spectroscopy of the hydrogen 1S-2S two-photon resonance has reached an accuracy of 1.4 parts in 10(14), and considerable future improvements are envisioned. Such laboratory experiments are setting new limits for possible slow variations of the fine structure constant alpha and the magnetic moment of the caesium nucleus mu(Cs) in units of the Bohr magneton mu(B).

  19. Optical fiber sensing based on reflection laser spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Gianluca; Salza, Mario; Ferraro, Pietro; Chehura, Edmond; Tatam, Ralph P; Gangopadhyay, Tarun K; Ballard, Nicholas; Paz-Soldan, Daniel; Barnes, Jack A; Loock, Hans-Peter; Lam, Timothy T-Y; Chow, Jong H; De Natale, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    An overview on high-resolution and fast interrogation of optical-fiber sensors relying on laser reflection spectroscopy is given. Fiber Bragg-gratings (FBGs) and FBG resonators built in fibers of different types are used for strain, temperature and acceleration measurements using heterodyne-detection and optical frequency-locking techniques. Silica fiber-ring cavities are used for chemical sensing based on evanescent-wave spectroscopy. Various arrangements for signal recovery and noise reduction, as an extension of most typical spectroscopic techniques, are illustrated and results on detection performances are presented.

  20. Optical Fiber Sensing Based on Reflection Laser Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Gagliardi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An overview on high-resolution and fast interrogation of optical-fiber sensors relying on laser reflection spectroscopy is given. Fiber Bragg-gratings (FBGs and FBG resonators built in fibers of different types are used for strain, temperature and acceleration measurements using heterodyne-detection and optical frequency-locking techniques. Silica fiber-ring cavities are used for chemical sensing based on evanescent-wave spectroscopy. Various arrangements for signal recovery and noise reduction, as an extension of most typical spectroscopic techniques, are illustrated and results on detection performances are presented.

  1. High-resolution laser spectroscopy of nickel isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    This proposal aims to measure the nuclear ground-state spins, moments and mean-square charge radii of $^{56-71}$Ni using collinear laser spectroscopy. This will enable direct measurements of isotopes in the region of shell closure $^{56}$Ni, structural change $^{68}$Ni and monopole migration beyond N = 40. Optical spectroscopy serves as a detailed probe not only of the changing single-particle behaviour, but also for the study of collective properties such as size and shape. Measurements of the most neutron-rich isotopes available at ISOLDE will critically test models which seek to extrapolate the data to the doubly magic region of $^{78}$Ni.

  2. Applications of laser-induced gratings to spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohlfing, E.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program has traditionally emphasized two principal areas of research. The first is the spectroscopic characterization of large-amplitude motion on the ground-state potential surface of small, transient molecules. The second is the reactivity of carbonaceous clusters and its relevance to soot and fullerene formation in combustion. Motivated initially by the desire to find improved methods of obtaining stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra of transients, most of our recent work has centered on the use of laser-induced gratings or resonant four-wave mixing in free-jet expansions. These techniques show great promise for several chemical applications, including molecular spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics. The author describes recent applications of two-color laser-induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) to obtain background-free SEP spectra of transients and double resonance spectra of nonfluorescing species, and the use of photofragment transient gratings to probe photodissociation dynamics.

  3. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Perini, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), a widely used atomic emission spectroscopy technique for elemental analysis of materials. It is based on the use of a high-power, short pulse laser excitation. The book is divided into two main sections: the first one concerning theoretical aspects of the technique, the second one describing the state of the art in applications of the technique in different scientific/technological areas. Numerous examples of state of the art applications provide the readers an almost complete scenario of the LIBS technique. The LIBS theoretical aspects are reviewed. The book helps the readers who are less familiar with the technique to understand the basic principles. Numerous examples of state of the art applications give an almost complete scenario of the LIBS technique potentiality. These examples of applications may have a strong impact on future industrial utilization. The authors made important contributions to the development of this field.

  4. Laser Materials and Laser Spectroscopy - A Satellite Meeting of IQEC '88

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijiang; Zhang, Zhiming

    1989-03-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Laser Materials * Laser Site Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Ions in Glass * Spectroscopy of Chromium Doped Tunable Laser Materials * Spectroscopic Properties of Nd3+ Ions in LaMgAl11O19 Crystal * Spectral Study and 2.938 μm Laser Emission of Er3+ in the Y3Al5O12 Crystal * Raman-infrared Spectra and Radiationless Relaxation of Laser Crystal NdAl3(BO3)4 * A Study on HB and FLN in BaFCl0.5Br0.5:Sm2+ at 77K * Pair-pumped Upconversion Solid State Lasers * CW Upconversion Laser Action in Neodymium and Erbium doped Solids * Ultra-high Sensitive Upconversion Fluorescence of YbF3 Doped with Trace Tm3+ and Er3+ * The Growth and Properties of NYAB and EYAB Multifunctional Crystal * Study on Fluorescence and Laser Light of Er3+ in Glass * Growth and Properties of Single Crystal Fibers for Laser Materials * A Study on the Quality of Sapphire, Ruby and Ti3+ Doped Sapphire Grown by Temperature Gradient Technique (TGT) and Czochralski Technique (CZ) * The Measurement of Output Property of Ti3+ Al2O3 Laser Crystal * An Xα Study of the Laser Crystal MgF2 : V2+ * Q-switched NAB Laser * Miniature YAG Lasers * Study of High Efficiency {LiF}:{F}^-_2 Color Center Crystals * Study on the Formation Conditions and Optical Properties of (F2+)H Color Center in NaCl:OH- Crystals * Novel Spectroscopic Properties of {LiF}:{F}^+_3 - {F}_2 Mixed Color Centers Laser Crystals * Terraced Substrate Visible GaAlAs Semiconductor Lasers with a Large Optical Cavity * The Temperature Dependence of Gain Spectra, Threshold Current and Auger Recombination in InGaAsP-InP Double Heterojunction Laser diode * Time-resolved Photoluminescence and Energy Transfer of Bound Excitons in GaP:N Crystals * Optical Limiting with Semiconductors * A Critical Review of High-efficiency Crystals for Tunable Lasers * Parametric Scattering in β - BaB2O4 Crystal Induced by Picosecond Pulses * Generation of Picosecond Pulses at 193 nm by Frequency Mixing in β - BaB2O4

  5. Computational Laser Spectroscopy in a Biological Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gantri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical spectroscopic study of visible and infrared laser radiation in a biological tissue. We derive a solution of a general two-dimensional time dependent radiative transfer equation in a tissue-like medium. The used model is suitable for many situations especially when the external source is time-dependent or continuous. We use a control volume-discrete ordinate method associated with an implicit three-level second-order time differencing scheme. We consider a very thin rectangular biological-tissue-like medium submitted to a visible or a near infrared light sources. The RTE is solved for a set of different wavelength source. All sources are assumed to be monochromatic and collimated. The energetic fluence rate is computed at a set of detector points on the boundaries. According to the source type, we investigate either the steady-state or transient response of the medium. The used model is validated in the case of a heterogeneous tissue-like medium using referencing experimental results from the literature. Also, the developed model is used to study changes on transmitted light in a rat-liver tissue-like medium. Optical properties depend on the source wavelength and they are taken from the literature. In particular, light-transmission in the medium is studied for continuous wave and for short pulse.

  6. A Simple LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) Laboratory Experiment to Introduce Undergraduates to Calibration Functions and Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2012-01-01

    This laboratory experiment introduces students to a different type of atomic spectroscopy: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS uses a laser-generated spark to excite the sample; once excited, the elemental emission is spectrally resolved and detected. The students use LIBS to analyze a series of standard synthetic silicate samples…

  7. A Simple LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) Laboratory Experiment to Introduce Undergraduates to Calibration Functions and Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2012-01-01

    This laboratory experiment introduces students to a different type of atomic spectroscopy: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS uses a laser-generated spark to excite the sample; once excited, the elemental emission is spectrally resolved and detected. The students use LIBS to analyze a series of standard synthetic silicate samples…

  8. Application of Laser Correlation Spectroscopy for Measuring Virus Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, V N; Vinogradov, S E; Ivanov, A V; Efremova, E V; Kalnina, L B; Bychenko, A B; Tentsov, Yu Yu; Manykin, A A

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic light scattering method or laser correlation spectroscopy was applied to evaluation of the size of viruses. We measured correlation functions of the light scattered by human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and hepatitis A viruses (HAV) and found that size of HIV-1 (subtype A and B) and HAV virions were 104 nm and 28 nm, respectively. Comparison of these findings with electron microscopy data for fixed samples of the same viruses showed good agreement of the results.

  9. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Fundamentals, Applications, and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Anabitarte, F.; Cobo, A.; J. M. Lopez-Higuera

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique that provides an accurate in situ quantitative chemical analysis and, thanks to the developments in new spectral processing algorithms in the last decade, has achieved a promising performance as a quantitative chemical analyzer at the atomic level. These possibilities along with the fact that little or no sample preparation is necessary have expanded the application fields of LIBS. In this paper, we review the state of the ar...

  10. Multi-Beam Optical Tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Glückstad, Jesper; Eriksen, Rene Lynge; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2003-01-01

    A set of multi-beam electromagnetic tweezers is provided comprising a multi-beam generator for emission of a plurality of electromagnetic beams, at least some of the electromagnetic beams intersecting each other, or, having an individually controlled polarization whereby the position and/or angular orientation of a plurality of micro-objects may be individually controlled.A set of multi-beam electromagnetic tweezers is provided comprising a multi-beam generator for emission of a plurality of ...

  11. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10-5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 104 atoms cm-3. The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  12. Spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas: Setting up of high-performance laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Unnikrishnan; Kamlesh Alti; Rajesh Nayak; Rodney Bernard; V B Kartha; C Santhosh; G P Gupta; B M Suri

    2010-12-01

    It is a well-known fact that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has emerged as one of the best analytical techniques for multi-elemental compositional analysis of samples. We report assembling and optimization of LIBS set up using high resolution and broad-range echelle spectrograph coupled to an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) to detect and quantify trace elements in environmental and clinical samples. Effects of variations of experimental parameters on spectroscopy signals of copper and brass are reported. Preliminary results of some plasma diagnostic calculations using recorded time-resolved optical emission signals are also reported for brass samples.

  13. Visual guide to optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Isaac C. D.; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Nieminen, Timo A.

    2017-05-01

    It is common to introduce optical tweezers using either geometric optics for large particles or the Rayleigh approximation for very small particles. These approaches are successful at conveying the key ideas behind optical tweezers in their respective regimes. However, they are insufficient for modelling particles of intermediate size and large particles with small features. For this, a full field approach provides greater insight into the mechanisms involved in trapping. The advances in computational capability over the last decade have led to better modelling and understanding of optical tweezers. Problems that were previously difficult to model computationally can now be solved using a variety of methods on modern systems. These advances in computational power allow for full field solutions to be visualised, leading to increased understanding of the fields and behaviour in various scenarios. In this paper we describe the operation of optical tweezers using full field simulations calculated using the finite difference time domain method. We use these simulations to visually illustrate various situations relevant to optical tweezers, from the basic operation of optical tweezers, to engineered particles and evanescent fields.

  14. BaH molecular spectroscopy with relevance to laser cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarallo, M. G.; Iwata, G. Z.; Zelevinsky, T.

    2016-03-01

    We describe a simple experimental apparatus for laser ablation of barium monohydride (BaH) molecules and the study of their rovibrational spectra relevant to direct laser cooling. BaH is a promising candidate for laser cooling and ultracold fragmentation, both of which are precursors to novel experiments in many-body physics and precision measurement. We present a detailed analysis of the properties of ablation plumes that can improve the understanding of surface ablation and deposition technologies. A range of absorption spectroscopy and collisional thermalization regimes has been studied. We directly measured the Franck-Condon factor of the B 2Σ+(v'=0 ) ←X 2Σ+(v''=1 ) cycling transition. Prospects for production of a high luminosity cryogenic BaH beam are outlined.

  15. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of IrN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. F. Pang; A. S. C. Cheung

    2009-01-01

    High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra of IrN in the spectral region between 394and 520 nm were recorded using laser vaporization/reaction free jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Seven new vibronic transition bands were observed and analyzed. TwoΩ=1 and five Ω=0 new states were identified. Least squares fit of rotationally resolved transition lines yielded accurate molecular constants for the upper states. Spectra of isotopic molecules were observed, which provided confirmation for the vibrational assignment. Comparison of the observed electronic states of IrB, IrC, and IrN provides a good understanding of the chemical bonding of this group of molecules.

  16. BaH molecular spectroscopy with relevance to laser cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Tarallo, M G; Zelevinsky, T

    2015-01-01

    We describe a simple experimental apparatus for laser ablation of barium monohydride (BaH) molecules and the study of their rovibrational spectra that are relevant to direct laser cooling. We present a detailed analysis of the properties of ablation plumes that can improve the understanding of surface ablation and deposition technologies. A range of absorption spectroscopy and collisional thermalization regimes has been studied. We directly measured the Franck-Condon factor of the $\\mathrm{B}^2\\Sigma^+(v'=0)\\leftarrow\\mathrm{X}^2\\Sigma^+(v"=1)$ transition. Prospects for production of a high luminosity cryogenic BaH beam are outlined. This molecule is a promising candidate for laser cooling and ultracold fragmentation, both of which are precursors to novel experiments in many-body physics and precision measurement.

  17. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy with Quantum Cascade Lasers for Trace Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Scamarcio

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Various applications, such as pollution monitoring, toxic-gas detection, noninvasive medical diagnostics and industrial process control, require sensitive and selectivedetection of gas traces with concentrations in the parts in 109 (ppb and sub-ppb range.The recent development of quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs has given a new aspect toinfrared laser-based trace gas sensors. In particular, single mode distributed feedback QCLsare attractive spectroscopic sources because of their excellent properties in terms of narrowlinewidth, average power and room temperature operation. In combination with these lasersources, photoacoustic spectroscopy offers the advantage of high sensitivity and selectivity,compact sensor platform, fast time-response and user friendly operation. This paper reportsrecent developments on quantum cascade laser-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for tracegas detection. In particular, different applications of a photoacoustic trace gas sensoremploying a longitudinal resonant cell with a detection limit on the order of hundred ppb ofozone and ammonia are discussed. We also report two QC laser-based photoacousticsensors for the detection of nitric oxide, for environmental pollution monitoring andmedical diagnostics, and hexamethyldisilazane, for applications in semiconductormanufacturing process.

  18. Analysis of Pulverized Coal by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to detect atomic species in various environments. The quantitative analysis (C, H, O, N and S) of representative coal samples are being carried out with LIBS, and the effects of particle size are analyzed.A powerful pulse Nd:YAG laser is focused on the coal sample at atmosphere pressure, and the emission spectra from laser-induced plasmas are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy, and the intensity of analyzed spectral lines is obtained through observing the laser plasma with a delay time of 0.4μs. The experimental results show that the slope of calibration curve is nearly 1 when the concentration of the analyzed element is relatively low, and the slope of curve is nearly 0.5 when the concentration of C is higher than other elements. In addition, using the calibration-free model without self-absorption effect, the results show that the decreasing of particle size leads to an increase of the plasma temperature.

  19. Fibre lasers for photo-acoustic gas spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsad, Norhana; Stewart, George

    2011-05-01

    We report here on the use of fiber lasers for recovery of gas absorption line shapes by photo-acoustic spectroscopy. We demonstrate the principle of operation using an erbium-doped fiber, stabilized using a length of un-pumped doped fibre as a saturable absorber. Intensity modulation of the laser output for phase sensitive detection is performed by modulation of the pump current while the wavelength is scanned through the absorption line by a PZT on a fibre Bragg grating. This avoids the distortions that arise in recovered signals due to simultaneous wavelength and intensity modulation, as is the case with conventional DFB diode lasers. Furthermore, the near zero off-line signals with photo-acoustic spectroscopy means that high modulation indices can be used with simple intensity modulation of the fiber laser output. The modulation frequency is set to the acoustic resonance frequency of the gas cell and measurements are made on the P17 absorption line of acetylene at 1535.39nm showing good agreement with the theoretical line-shape profile.

  20. [Measurement of oxygen concentration using multimode diode laser absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guang-zhen; Cai, Ting-dong; Hu, Bo; Jia, Tian-jun

    2015-01-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is a widely used technique for high sensitivity, good selectivity and fast response. It is widely used in environment monitoring, industrial process control and biomedical sensing. In order to overcome the drawbacks of TDLAS including high cost, poor stability and center wavelength shift problem. A multi-mode diode laser system based on correlation spectroscopy and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (TMDL-COSPEC-WMS) was used to measure O2 concentration near 760nm at the 1%~30% range of near room temperature. During the experiment, the light is splitter into two beams, respectively through the sample and measuring cell, two receiving optical signal collection containing gas concentration information sent back stage treatment, invert the oxygen concentration through correlation and ratio between measured signal and reference signal, the correlation spectroscopy harmonic detection technique is used to improve the stability of the system and the signal to noise ratio. The result showed that, there was a good linear relationship between the measured oxygen concentration and the actual concentration value. A detection limit of 280 pmm. m in the 1 atmospheric which approved of the same sample. A continuous measurement for oxygen with the standard deviation of 0. 056% in ambient air during approximately 30 minutes confirms the stability and the capability of the system. The design of the system includes soft and hardware can meet the needs of oxygen online monitoring. The experimental device is simple and easy to use, easy to complex environment application.

  1. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsifaki, D. G.; Kandyla, M.; Lagoudakis, P. G.

    2016-05-01

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dependent on the wavelength of the trapping beam. Surprisingly, a wavelength characterization of plasmon-enhanced trapping efficiencies has evaded the literature. Here, we exploit the repeatability of the recorded trapping efficiency, offered by the gold-coated black silicon platform, and perform a wavelength-dependent characterization of the trapping process, revealing the resonant character of the trapping efficiency maxima. Gold-coated black silicon is a promising platform for large-scale parallel trapping applications that will broaden the range of optical manipulation in nanoengineering, biology, and the study of collective biophotonic effects.

  2. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsifaki, D G; Kandyla, M; Lagoudakis, P G

    2016-05-19

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dependent on the wavelength of the trapping beam. Surprisingly, a wavelength characterization of plasmon-enhanced trapping efficiencies has evaded the literature. Here, we exploit the repeatability of the recorded trapping efficiency, offered by the gold-coated black silicon platform, and perform a wavelength-dependent characterization of the trapping process, revealing the resonant character of the trapping efficiency maxima. Gold-coated black silicon is a promising platform for large-scale parallel trapping applications that will broaden the range of optical manipulation in nanoengineering, biology, and the study of collective biophotonic effects.

  3. Elemental profiling of laser cladded multilayer coatings by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V. N.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A.; Filippov, M. N.; Grishin, M. Ya.; Filichkina, V. A.; Stavertiy, A. Ya.; Tretyakov, R. S.; Bunkin, A. F.; Pershin, S. M.

    2017-09-01

    Multilayer tungsten carbide wear resistant coatings were analyzed by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Coaxial laser cladding technique was utilized to produce tungsten carbide coating deposited on low alloy steel substrate with additional inconel 625 interlayer. EDX and LIBS techniques were used for elemental profiling of major components (Ni, W, C, Fe, etc.) in the coating. A good correlation between EDX and LIBS data was observed while LIBS provided additional information on light element distribution (carbon). A non-uniform distribution of tungsten carbide grains along coating depth was detected by both LIBS and EDX. In contrast, horizontal elemental profiling showed a uniform tungsten carbide particles distribution. Depth elemental profiling by layer-by-layer LIBS analysis was demonstrated to be an effective method for studying tungsten carbide grains distribution in wear resistant coating without any sample preparation.

  4. Laser absorption spectroscopy based on a broadband external cavity quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Juan; Liu, Ningwu; Deng, Hao; Ding, Junya; Sun, Jiancha; Zhang, Lei; Li, Jingsong

    2017-02-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) system based on a broad band external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) near 7.78 μm was used to study volatile organic compounds (VOCs) measurements. Instead of using a standard infrared mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) detector, a quartz crystal tuning fork (QCTF) as a light detector was successfully used for laser signal detection. Fast Fourier transform (FFT) was used to extract vibration intensity information of QCTF. Primary results indicate that the new developed system has a good reproducibility, and a good agreement was obtained by comparing with data taken from standard spectroscopic database.

  5. Indirect absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers: mid-infrared refractometry and photothermal spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Marcel; Ruf, Alexander; Fischer, Peer

    2013-11-04

    We record vibrational spectra with two indirect schemes that depend on the real part of the index of refraction: mid-infrared refractometry and photothermal spectroscopy. In the former, a quantum cascade laser (QCL) spot is imaged to determine the angles of total internal reflection, which yields the absorption line via a beam profile analysis. In the photothermal measurements, a tunable QCL excites vibrational resonances of a molecular monolayer, which heats the surrounding medium and changes its refractive index. This is observed with a probe laser in the visible. Sub-monolayer sensitivities are demonstrated.

  6. Measurement of interaction forces between red blood cells in aggregates by optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maklygin, A Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Karmenian, A; Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Obolenskii, I S; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Kisun Li

    2012-06-30

    We have fabricated double-beam optical tweezers and demonstrated the possibility of their use for measuring the interaction forces between red blood cells (erythrocytes). It has been established experimentally that prolonged trapping of red blood cells in a tightly focused laser beam does not cause any visible changes in their shape or size. We have measured the interaction between red blood cells in the aggregate, deformed by optical tweezers.

  7. Self-normalizing phase measurement in multimode terahertz spectroscopy based on photomixing of three lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Thirunavukkuarasu, K; Roggenbuck, A; Vidal, E; Schmitz, H; Hemberger, J; Grüninger, M

    2014-01-01

    Photomixing of two near-infrared lasers is well established for continuous-wave terahertz spectroscopy. Photomixing of three lasers allows us to measure at three terahertz frequencies simultaneously. Similar to Fourier spectroscopy, the spectral information is contained in an nterferogram, which is equivalent to the waveform in time-domain spectroscopy. We use one fixed terahertz frequency \

  8. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with picosecond pulse train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, Vasily N.; Pershin, Sergey M.; Sdvizhenskii, Pavel A.; Grishin, Mikhail Ya; Davydov, Mikhail A.; Stavertiy, Anton Ya; Tretyakov, Roman S.

    2017-02-01

    Picosecond pulse train and nanosecond pulse were compared for laser ablation and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements. A detailed study revealed that the picosecond pulse train ablation improved the quality of laser craters (symmetric crater walls and the absence of large redeposited droplets), which was explained by a smaller heat affected zone and suppression of melt splash. Greater plasma dimensions and brighter plasma emission were observed by gated imaging for picosecond pulse train compared to nanosecond pulse ablation. Increased intensity of atomic and ionic lines in gated and time integrated spectra provided better signal-to-noise ratio for picosecond pulse train sampling. Higher temperature and electron density were detected during first microsecond for the plasma induced by the picosecond pulse train. Improved shot-to-shot reproducibility for atomic/ionic line intensity in the case of picosecond pulse train LIBS was explained by more effective atomization of target material in plasma and better quality of laser craters. Improved precision and limits of detections were determined for picosecond pulse train LIBS due to better reproducibility of laser sampling and increased signal-to-noise ratio.

  9. Laser Ultrasound Spectroscopy Scanning for 3D Printed Parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, Guendalyn Kendra [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-04

    One of the challenges of additive manufacturing is quality control due to the possibility of unseen flaws in the final product. The current methods of inspection are lacking in detail, too slow for practical use, or unable to validate internal structure. This report examines the use of laser ultrasound spectroscopy in layer by layer scans of 3D printed parts as they are created. The result is fast and detailed quality control. An additional advantage of this method is the ability to cancel a print as soon as a defect is detected, therefore saving materials and time. This technique, though simple in concept, has been a challenge to implement. I discuss tweaking the 3D printer configuration, and finding the optimal settings for laser scanning small parts made of ABS plastic, as well as the limits of how small of a detail the laser can detect. These settings include the frequency of the ultrasonic transducer, the speed of the laser, and the distance from the laser to the part.

  10. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, N; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M; Sorrentino, F; Drullinger, R E; Tino, G M

    2006-04-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable P23 state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trapping close to the "magic wavelength" for the 0-1 intercombination line at 689 nm. The 689 nm laser was already employed to perform a frequency measurement of the 0-1 intercombination line with a relative accuracy of 2.3 x 10(-11), and the ensemble of laser sources allowed the loading in a conservative dipole trap of multi-isotopes strontium mixtures. The simple and compact setup developed represents one of the first steps towards the realization of a transportable optical standards referenced to atomic strontium.

  11. Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Measuring Uranium Isotopes in Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hartig, Kyle C.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-05-30

    We present the first two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy measurements of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plasmas. A new method of signal normalization is presented to reduce noise in absorption-based measurements of laser ablation.

  12. Fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy using single wavelength laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao XIE; Chaoqing DONG; Jicun REN

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we first introduced the basic principle of fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) and then established an FCCS setup using a single wavelength laser. We systematically optimized the setup, and the detection volume reached about 0.7 fL. The home-built setup was successfully applied for the study of the binding reaction of human immunoglobulin G with goat antihuman immunoglobulin G. Using quantum dots (745 nm emission wavelength) and Rhodamine B (580 nm emission wavelength) as labeling probes and 532 nm laser beam as an excitation source, the cross-talk effect was almost completely suppressed. The molecule numbers in a highly focused volume, the concentration, and the diffusion time and hydrodynamic radii of the reaction products can be determined by FCCS system.

  13. On-line laser spectroscopy with thermal atomic beams

    CERN Document Server

    Thibault, C; De Saint-Simon, M; Duong, H T; Guimbal, P; Huber, G; Jacquinot, P; Juncar, P; Klapisch, Robert; Liberman, S; Pesnelle, A; Pillet, P; Pinard, J; Serre, J M; Touchard, F; Vialle, J L

    1981-01-01

    On-line high resolution laser spectroscopy experiments have been performed in which the light from a CW tunable dye laser interacts at right angles with a thermal atomic beam. /sup 76-98/Rb, /sup 118-145 /Cs and /sup 208-213/Fr have been studied using the ionic beam delivered by the ISOLDE on-line mass separator at CERN while /sup 30-31/Na and /sup 38-47/K have been studied by setting the apparatus directly on-line with the PS 20 GeV proton beam. The principle of the method is briefly explained and some results concerning nuclear structure are given. The hyperfine structure, spins and isotope shifts of the alkali isotopes and isomers are measured. (8 refs).

  14. LASER CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY (LCS AND ITS CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES IN OPHTHALMOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karganov Mikhail

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The method of laser correlation spectroscopy (LCS is based on the analysis of the spectrum of quasielastic light scatter during coherent monochromatic laser irradiation of micro-particles in biological fluids (blood serum, urine, oropharyngeal washout fluid, tear fluid etc.. Spectrum provides information on dynamic processes in the analyzed system: translation motion of scattering particles and their orientation and conformation dynamics. Special procedures of cluster analysis make it possible to find out to which linkage group a particular spectrum belongs. LCS allows evaluation of sub-fractional composition of biological fluids in a wide range of molecular sizes (from 1 to 10,000 nm, which determines principal novelty of this approach in ophthalmology.

  15. Spectrum standardization for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhe; West, Logan; Li, Zheng; Ni, Weidou

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a spectra normalization method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements by converting the recorded characteristic line intensity at varying conditions to the intensity under a standard condition with standard plasma temperature, degree of ionization, and total number density of the interested species to reduce the measurement uncertainty. The characteristic line intensities of the interested species are first converted to the intensity at a fixed temperature and standard degree of ionization but varying total number density for each laser pulse analysis. Under this state, if the influence of the variation of plasma morphology is neglected, the sum of multiple spectral line intensities for the measured element can be regarded proportional to the total number density of the specific element, and the fluctuation of the total number density, or the variation of ablation mass, was compensated for by the application of this relationship. In the experiments with 29 brass alloy...

  16. Tunable diode laser spectroscopy as a technique for combustion diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshov, M. A.; Kuritsyn, Yu. A.; Romanovskii, Yu. V.

    2015-04-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) has become a proven method of rapid gas diagnostics. In the present review an overview of the state of the art of TDL-based sensors and their applications for measurements of temperature, pressure, and species concentrations of gas components in harsh environments is given. In particular, the contemporary tunable diode laser systems, various methods of absorption detection (direct absorption measurements, wavelength modulation based phase sensitive detection), and relevant algorithms for data processing that improve accuracy and accelerate the diagnostics cycle are discussed in detail. The paper demonstrates how the recent developments of these methods and algorithms made it possible to extend the functionality of TDLAS in the tomographic imaging of combustion processes. Some prominent examples of applications of TDL-based sensors in a wide range of practical combustion aggregates, including scramjet engines and facilities, internal combustion engines, pulse detonation combustors, and coal gasifiers, are given in the final part of the review.

  17. Use of laser diodes in cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, R.N.; Paldus, B.A.; Ma, Y.; Xie, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    We have demonstrated that cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), a highly sensitive absorption technique, is versatile enough to serve as a complete diagnostic for materials process control. In particular, we have used CRDS in the ultraviolet to determine the concentration profile of methyl radicals in a hot-filament diamond reactor; we have applied CRDS in the mid-infrared to detect 50 ppb of methane in a N{sub 2} environment; and, we have extended CRDS so that we can use continuous-wave diode laser sources. Using a laser diode at 810 nm, we were able to achieve a sensitivity of 2 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup -1}. Thus, CRDS can be used not only as an in situ diagnostic for investigating the chemistry of diamond film deposition, but it can also be used as a gas purity diagnostic for any chemical vapor deposition system.

  18. Analysis of fresco by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caneve, L., E-mail: luisa.caneve@enea.i [ENEA, CR Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Diamanti, A. [Universita ' Tor Vergata' , Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Grimaldi, F. [ENEA, CR Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Palleschi, G. [Universita ' Tor Vergata' , Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Spizzichino, V. [ENEA, CR Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Valentini, F. [Universita ' Tor Vergata' , Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    The laser-based techniques have been shown to be a very powerful tool for artworks characterization and are used in the field of cultural heritage for the offered advantages of minimum invasiveness, in situ applicability and high sensitivity. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, in particular, has been applied in this field to many different kinds of ancient materials with successful results. In this work, a fragment of a Roman wall painting from the archaeological area of Pompeii has been investigated by LIBS. The sample elemental composition resulting from LIBS measurements suggested the presence of certain pigments. The ratio of the intensities of different lines related to some characteristic elements is proposed as an indicator for pigment recognition. The depth profiling permitted to put in evidence the presence of successive paint layers with different compositions. A comparison with the results obtained by the microscopy inspection of the sample has been done.

  19. Analysis of fresco by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneve, L.; Diamanti, A.; Grimaldi, F.; Palleschi, G.; Spizzichino, V.; Valentini, F.

    2010-08-01

    The laser-based techniques have been shown to be a very powerful tool for artworks characterization and are used in the field of cultural heritage for the offered advantages of minimum invasiveness, in situ applicability and high sensitivity. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, in particular, has been applied in this field to many different kinds of ancient materials with successful results. In this work, a fragment of a Roman wall painting from the archaeological area of Pompeii has been investigated by LIBS. The sample elemental composition resulting from LIBS measurements suggested the presence of certain pigments. The ratio of the intensities of different lines related to some characteristic elements is proposed as an indicator for pigment recognition. The depth profiling permitted to put in evidence the presence of successive paint layers with different compositions. A comparison with the results obtained by the microscopy inspection of the sample has been done.

  20. Standoff detection of gases using infrared laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Piotr; Stachowiak, Dorota; Nikodem, Michał

    2016-04-01

    In this work we present a laser-based system for standoff/remote, sensitive detection of gases based on a tunable diode laser source and Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy method (WMS). System performance was experimentally characterized. The constructed device has proven its capacity of efficient detection of methane in air at the single ppm levels and distances from 10 to 50 m (distance to a scattering object). The minimum detection limit of the system was estimated at the level of 10 ppm-m for the standoff arrangement and the measurement path of approximately 20 m (round trip). Potential application of the device to hydrogen sulfide detection and current limitations in this area are discussed.

  1. Quantitative analysis of gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vivek K; Singh, Vinita; Rai, Awadhesh K; Thakur, Surya N; Rai, Pradeep K; Singh, Jagdish P

    2008-11-01

    The utility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for categorizing different types of gallbladder stone has been demonstrated by analyzing their major and minor constituents. LIBS spectra of three types of gallstone have been recorded in the 200-900 nm spectral region. Calcium is found to be the major element in all types of gallbladder stone. The spectrophotometric method has been used to classify the stones. A calibration-free LIBS method has been used for the quantitative analysis of metal elements, and the results have been compared with those obtained from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) measurements. The single-shot LIBS spectra from different points on the cross section (in steps of 0.5 mm from one end to the other) of gallstones have also been recorded to study the variation of constituents from the center to the surface. The presence of different metal elements and their possible role in gallstone formation is discussed.

  2. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-07-15

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He), O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis.

  3. Measurement of Irradiated Pyroprocessing Samples via Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phongikaroon, Supathorn [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)

    2016-10-31

    The primary objective of this research is to develop an applied technology and provide an assessment to remotely measure and analyze the real time or near real time concentrations of used nuclear fuel (UNF) dissolute in electrorefiners. Here, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), in UNF pyroprocessing facilities will be investigated. LIBS is an elemental analysis method, which is based on the emission from plasma generated by focusing a laser beam into the medium. This technology has been reported to be applicable in the media of solids, liquids (includes molten metals), and gases for detecting elements of special nuclear materials. The advantages of applying the technology for pyroprocessing facilities are: (i) Rapid real-time elemental analysis|one measurement/laser pulse, or average spectra from multiple laser pulses for greater accuracy in < 2 minutes; (ii) Direct detection of elements and impurities in the system with low detection limits|element specific, ranging from 2-1000 ppm for most elements; and (iii) Near non-destructive elemental analysis method (about 1 g material). One important challenge to overcome is achieving high-resolution spectral analysis to quantitatively analyze all important fission products and actinides. Another important challenge is related to accessibility of molten salt, which is heated in a heavily insulated, remotely operated furnace in a high radiation environment with an argon atmosphere.

  4. Dust Removal on Mars Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R. V.; Clegg, S. M.; Wiens, R. C.; Anderson, R. B.

    2011-01-01

    Dust coatings on the surface of Mars complicate and, if sufficiently thick, mask the spectral characteristics and compositional determination of underlying material from in situ and remote sensing instrumentation. The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) portion of the Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) instrument, aboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, will be the first active remote sensing technique deployed on Mars able to remove dust. ChemCam utilizes a 5 ns pulsed 1067 nm high-powered laser focused to less than 400 m diameter on targets at distances up to 7 m [1,2]. With multiple laser pulses, dust and weathering coatings can be remotely analyzed and potentially removed using this technique [2,3]. A typical LIBS measurement during MSL surface operations is planned to consist of 50 laser pulses at 14 mJ, with the first 5 to 10 pulses used to analyze as well as remove any surface coating. Additionally, ChemCam's Remote Micro-Imager (RMI) is capable of resolving 200 m details at a distance of 2 m, or 1 mm at 10 m [1,4]. In this study, we report on initial laboratory experiments conducted to characterize the removal of dust coatings using similar LIBS parameters as ChemCam under Mars-like conditions. These experiments serve to better understand the removal of surface dust using LIBS and to facilitate the analysis of ChemCam LIBS spectral data and RMI images.

  5. Spatial confinement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingwen; Yang, Zefeng; Wu, Jian; Wei, Wenfu; Qiu, Yan; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2017-01-01

    The spatial confinement of plasma produced by a nanosecond laser is investigated using time resolved spectroscopy, fast imaging, interferometry, and numerical computation. The dynamics of the plasma, depending on shock waves, laser power, and wall distances, are studied. Experimental results confirm that the plasma is constricted by the reflected shock associated with a temperature and density gradient. The peak laser power determines the initial plasma parameters which affect the spectral intensities and the velocity of the reflective shock waves. The wall distance determines the reflection time of the shocks, which in turn influences the time delay of the collision between the two reflective shocks. The numerical results reveal a fast propagation process surrounding the reflective shocks, which indicates that the velocity of the reflective shock wave is influenced by the density of the plasma. The maximum enhancement factor ~5.2 is realized at a delay time of 11.7 µs under a pulse laser energy of 180 mJ and a wall distance of 9 mm.

  6. Biomedical and environmental applications of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Unnikrishnan; K S Choudhari; Suresh D Kulkarni; Rajesh Nayak; V B Kartha; C Santhosh; B M Suri

    2014-02-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging analytical technique with numerous advantages such as rapidity, multi-elemental analysis, minimal sample preparation, minimal destruction, low cost and versatility of being applied to a wide range of materials. In this paper, we report the preliminary observations we obtained using LIBS for clinical and environmental samples. Elemental analysis has been done qualitatively in human teeth samples which show encouraging results. It has also been demonstrated in this paper that LIBS can be very well utilized in field applications such as plastic waste sorting and recycling.

  7. Controlled calibration method for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Chijian Zhang; Yuan Feng

    2008-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a potential technique for rapid analysis of samples present in solids, gases and liquids. In the last two decades it was an object of extensive studies. Controlled calibration method used to analysis the LIBS spectra is investigated. Compared with the inner calibration and calibration-free (CF) methods, this new method overcomes "matrix effect", and demonstrates a better ability to cope with the spectra. It is used to analyze natural soil, and errors of the concentration are decreased about 5%. The result shows that the new method is feasible and accurate.

  8. Construction of an optical tweezer for nanometer scale rheology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Raghu; Sharath Ananthamurthy

    2005-10-01

    The optical tweezer is a versatile set-up that can be employed in a wide variety of studies investigating the microscopic properties of materials. In particular, this set-up has in recent times been gainfully employed in probing rheological properties of materials that exhibit viscoelasticity. These measurements can provide data at the micro and nanometer scales, not normally accessible by rheometers that are used for measurements on bulk samples. In this work we describe a single laser beam optical tweezer set-up, which is built around an inverted open microscope. The trapped polystyrene particle bead's deviation from the trap potential minimum is monitored by laser back-scattering technique and the bead position measured by a quadrant photodiode detector. Additionally, a provision is made for video microscopic studies on dispersed beads using a CCD camera. A single particle microrheological experiment that can be performed using the set-up is described with relevant calculations.

  9. Analysis of dissolved C2H2 in transformer oils using laser Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somekawa, Toshihiro; Kasaoka, Makoto; Kawachi, Fumio; Nagano, Yoshitomo; Fujita, Masayuki; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2013-04-01

    We have developed a laser Raman spectroscopy technique for assessing the working conditions of transformers by measuring dissolved C2H2 gas concentrations present in transformer oils. A frequency doubled Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) was used as a laser source, and Raman signals at ~1972 cm(-1) originating from C2H2 gas dissolved in oil were detected. The results show that laser Raman spectroscopy is a useful alternative method for detecting transformer faults.

  10. Optical tweezers principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Philip; Volpe, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Combining state-of-the-art research with a strong pedagogic approach, this text provides a detailed and complete guide to the theory, practice and applications of optical tweezers. In-depth derivation of the theory of optical trapping and numerical modelling of optical forces are supported by a complete step-by-step design and construction guide for building optical tweezers, with detailed tutorials on collecting and analysing data. Also included are comprehensive reviews of optical tweezers research in fields ranging from cell biology to quantum physics. Featuring numerous exercises and problems throughout, this is an ideal self-contained learning package for advanced lecture and laboratory courses, and an invaluable guide to practitioners wanting to enter the field of optical manipulation. The text is supplemented by www.opticaltweezers.org, a forum for discussion and a source of additional material including free-to-download, customisable research-grade software (OTS) for calculation of optical forces, dig...

  11. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry in the diagnostics of alopecia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomorokha, Diana P.; Pigoreva, Yulia N.; Salmin, Vladimir V.

    2016-04-01

    Development of optical biopsy methods has a great interest for medical diagnostics. In clinical and experimental studies it is very important to analyze blood circulation quickly and accurately, thereby laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is widely used. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (UV LIFS) is express highly sensitive and widely-spread method with no destructive impact, high excitation selectivity and the possibility to use in highly scattering media. The goal of this work was to assess a correlation of UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry parameters, and a possibility to identify or to differentiate various types of pathological changes in tissues according to their autofluorescence spectra. Three groups of patients with diffuse (symptomatic) alopecia, androgenic alopecia, and focal alopecia have been tested. Each groups consisted of not less than 20 persons. The measurements have been done in the parietal and occipital regions of the sculls. We used the original automated spectrofluorimeter to record autofluorescence spectra, and standard laser Doppler flowmeter BLF-21 (Transonic Systems, Inc., USA) to analyze the basal levels of blood circulation. Our results show that UV LIFS accurately distinguishes the zones with different types of alopecia. We found high correlation of the basal levels of blood circulation and the integrated intensity of autofluorescence in the affected tissue.

  12. Optical lock-in particle tracking in optical tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Michael A; Bowen, Warwick P

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a lock-in particle tracking scheme in optical tweezers based on stroboscopic modulation of an illuminating optical field. This scheme is found to evade low frequency noise sources while otherwise producing an equivalent position measurement to continuous measurement. This was demonstrated, and found to yield on average 20dB of noise suppression in the frequency range 10-5000 Hz, where low frequency laser noise and electronic noise was significant, and 35 dB of noise suppression in the range 550-710 kHz where laser relaxation oscillations introduced laser noise. The setup is simple, and compatible with any trapping optics.

  13. Coaxial Atomic Force Microscope Tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, K A; Westervelt, R M

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate coaxial atomic force microscope (AFM) tweezers that can trap and place small objects using dielectrophoresis (DEP). An attractive force is generated at the tip of a coaxial AFM probe by applying a radio frequency voltage between the center conductor and a grounded shield; the origin of the force is found to be DEP by measuring the pull-off force vs. applied voltage. We show that the coaxial AFM tweezers (CAT) can perform three dimensional assembly by picking up a specified silica microsphere, imaging with the microsphere at the end of the tip, and placing it at a target destination.

  14. Multi-Beam Optical Tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A set of multi-beam electromagnetic tweezers is provided comprising a multi-beam generator for emission of a plurality of electromagnetic beams, at least some of the electromagnetic beams intersecting each other, or, having an individually controlled polarization whereby the position and/or angular...... orientation of a plurality of micro-objects may be individually controlled.A set of multi-beam electromagnetic tweezers is provided comprising a multi-beam generator for emission of a plurality of electromagnetic beams, at least some of the electromagnetic beams intersecting each other, or, having...

  15. Investigation of Diode Pumped Alkali Laser Atmospheric Transmission Using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    House Appropriations hearing on May 20th, 2010 where Robert Gates, then U.S. Secretary of Defense, said the following in answer to a question from Rep...Henry, B. P. Wert, T. Gilpin , and J. R. Drummond. “Tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer for ground-based measurements of formaldehyde”. Journal...spectroscopy (TDLAS) at 1.37 µm”. Applied Physics B: Lasers and Optics, 92(3):393–401, 2008. 43. Kormann, Robert , Horst Fischer, and Frank G. Wienhold

  16. Laser ablation of powdered samples and analysis by means of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ctvrtnickova, T.; Cabalin, L.; Laserna, J.; Kanicky, V.; Nicolas, G.

    2009-03-01

    The presented work proves the capacities of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a fast, universal, and versatile technique for analysis of complex materials as ceramics. This paper reports on the analysis of ceramic raw materials (brick clays and kaolin) submitted to laser ablation in the form of pressed pellets. Spectrographic study was provided by standard single-pulse LIBS technique and orthogonal reheating double-pulse LIBS. It was found that both methods are comparable in terms of analytical performance, if adequate experimental parameters and signal detection systems are used.

  17. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Laser Ablation Plumes Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2017-02-06

    We used a CW laser as a narrow-band (~50kHz) tunable LIF excitation source to probe absorption from selected atomic transitions (Al, U etc. ) in a ns laser ablation plume. A comparison of fluorescence signal with respect to emission spectroscopy show significant increase in the magnitude and persistence from selected Al and U transitions in a LIBS plume. The high spectral resolution provided by the LIF measurement allows peaks to be easily separated even if they overlap in the emission spectra.

  18. Ring-Down Spectroscopy for Characterizing a CW Raman Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    .A relatively simple technique for characterizing an all-resonant intracavity continuous-wave (CW) solid-state Raman laser involves the use of ring-down spectroscopy. As used here, characterizing signifies determining such parameters as threshold pump power, Raman gain, conversion efficiency, and quality factors (Q values) of the pump and Stokes cavity modes. Heretofore, in order to characterize resonant-cavity-based Raman lasers, it has usually been necessary to manipulate the frequencies and power levels of pump lasers and, in each case, to take several sets of measurements. In cases involving ultra-high-Q resonators, it also has been desirable to lock pump lasers to resonator modes to ensure the quality of measurement data. Simpler techniques could be useful. In the present ring-down spectroscopic technique, one infers the parameters of interest from the decay of the laser out of its steady state. This technique does not require changing the power or frequency of the pump laser or locking the pump laser to the resonator mode. The technique is based on a theoretical analysis of what happens when the pump laser is abruptly switched off after the Raman generation reaches the steady state. The analysis starts with differential equations for the evolution of the amplitudes of the pump and Stokes electric fields, leading to solutions for the power levels of the pump and Stokes fields as functions of time and of the aforementioned parameters. Among other things, these solutions show how the ring-down time depends, to some extent, on the electromagnetic energy accumulated in the cavity. The solutions are readily converted to relatively simple equations for the parameters as functions of quantities that can be determined from measurements of the time-dependent power levels. For example, the steady-state intracavity conversion efficiency is given by G1/G2 1 and the threshold power is given by Pin(G2/G1)2, where Pin is the steady-state input pump power immediately prior to

  19. Discrimination of forensic trace evidence using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Candice Mae

    Elemental analysis in forensic laboratories can be tedious and many trace evidence items are not analyzed to determine their elemental composition. Presently, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) is the primary analytical tool for determining the elemental composition of trace evidence items. However, due to the time it takes to obtain the required vacuum and the limited number of samples that can be analyzed at any one time, SEM-EDS can be impractical for a high volume of evidence items. An alternative instrument that can be used for this type of analysis is laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). While LA-ICP-MS is a very precise and quantitative analytical method that determines elemental composition based on isotopic mass measurements; however, the instrumentation is relatively expensive and therefore is budgetarily prohibitive for many forensic laboratories. It is the purpose of this research to evaluate an inexpensive instrument that can potentially provide rapid elemental analysis for many forensic laboratories. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical method that meets these requirements and offers information about the elemental composition based on ionic, atomic and diatomic molecular emissions.

  20. PREFACE: 21st International Conference on Laser Spectroscopy - ICOLS 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Dmitry; Häffner, Hartmut; Müller, Holger

    2013-12-01

    The 21st International Conference on Laser Spectroscopy (ICOLS) took place at Berkeley, California on 9-14 June 2013. Following the tradition of previous meetings in this series, the conference featured about thirty invited talks broadly covering this burgeoning field of science that refuses to show any sign of saturation after more than half a century of continuous boom. In addition to the invited talks, there were two informative poster sessions, where the more than 300 ICOLS participants had an opportunity to exchange the latest scientific news and ideas while enjoying the gorgeous view of the San Francisco Bay from the vista of the Claremont Hotel, the meeting's venue. The heights of the cultural program of the meeting were excursions to several of the Bay Area gems (including the Lick observatory), as well as the conference banquet where the participants were treated to addresses by an inventor of the laser Professor Charles H Townes, a nonlinear optics pioneer Professor Erwin L Hahn, and one of the previous ICOLS chairs Professor Y R Shen. While the field of Laser Spectroscopy and the series of the bi-annual ICOLS meetings are as 'healthy' as one could imagine, the same cannot be said about the concept of published conference proceedings. With new ways to publish scientific articles and preprints, submitting papers to conference proceedings seems to be rapidly losing popularity. For this meeting, the great interest in attendance and opportunities to present is sharply contrasted with a somewhat sluggish response to the call for submission of the proceedings papers. The present collection represents a dozen or so contributions from the 'hero' invited speakers, to whom we are deeply grateful for submitting their work. We hope that this selection will faithfully convey to the readers the excitement of modern laser spectroscopy. In addition to these papers, we draw the reader's attention to the audio recordings and selected viewgraphs from the invited talks, and

  1. Optical tweezer manipulation for atom tetris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosub; Lee, Woojun; Ahn, Jaewook

    2017-04-01

    Atoms can be individually captured and guided by light through optical dipole-trapping. However, applying this to many atoms simultaneously has been difficult due to the low inertia of atoms. Recently dynamically-controlled laser beams achieved such demonstrations, enabling a bottom-up approach to form arbitrary atom lattices, deterministic atom loading, atom-sorting, and even single-atom-level machinery. Here we report the latest improvements of the single-atom-level dynamic holographic optical tweezers. With the hardware and software upgrades to be explained in the text, the overall performance has improved to form arbitrary 2D lattices of a size about N=20, with success probability exceeding 50%.

  2. Enhancing the analytical performance of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremers, D.A.; Chinni, R.C.; Pichahchy, A.E.; Thornquist, H.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work is to enhance the analytical capabilities of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS is a method of elemental analysis in which powerful laser pulses are focused on a sample to form a microplasma. LIBS is perhaps the most versatile elemental analysis method, applicable to a variety of different real-world analysis problems. Therefore, it is important to enhance the capabilities of the method as much as possible. Accomplishments include: (1) demonstration of signal enhancements of 5--30 times from soils and metals using a double pulse method; (2) development of a model of the observed enhancement obtained using double pulses; (3) demonstration that the analytical performance achievable using low laser-pulse energies (10 and 25 mJ) can match that achievable using an energy of 100 mJ; and (4) demonstration that time-gated detection is not necessary with LIBS.

  3. Applying Quantum Cascade Laser Spectroscopy in Plasma Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Röpcke

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The considerably higher power and wider frequency coverage available from quantum cascade lasers (QCLs in comparison to lead salt diode lasers has led to substantial advances when QCLs are used in pure and applied infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, they can be used in both pulsed and continuous wave (cw operation, opening up new possibilities in quantitative time resolved applications in plasmas both in the laboratory and in industry as shown in this article. However, in order to determine absolute concentrations accurately using pulsed QCLs, careful attention has to be paid to features like power saturation phenomena. Hence, we begin with a discussion of the non-linear effects which must be considered when using short or long pulse mode operation. More recently, cw QCLs have been introduced which have the advantage of higher power, better spectral resolution and lower fluctuations in light intensity compared to pulsed devices. They have proved particularly useful in sensing applications in plasmas when very low concentrations have to be monitored. Finally, the use of cw external cavity QCLs (EC-QCLs for multi species detection is described, using a diagnostics study of a methane/nitrogen plasma as an example. The wide frequency coverage of this type of QCL laser, which is significantly broader than from a distributed feedback QCL (DFB-QCL, is a substantial advantage for multi species detection. Therefore, cw EC-QCLs are state of the art devices and have enormous potential for future plasma diagnostic studies.

  4. Single-shot spectroscopy of broadband Yb fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Yoneya, Shin; Kuroda, Hiroto

    2017-02-01

    We have experimentally reported on a real-time single-shot spectroscopy of a broadband Yb-doped fiber (YDF) laser which based on a nonlinear polarization evolution by using a time-stretched dispersive Fourier transformation technique. We have measured an 8000 consecutive single-shot spectra of mode locking and noise-like pulse (NLP), because our developed broadband YDF oscillator can individually operate the mode locking and NLP by controlling a pump LD power and angle of waveplates. A shot-to-shot spectral fluctuation was observed in NLP. For the investigation of pulse formation dynamics, we have measured the spectral evolution in an initial fluctuations of mode locked broadband YDF laser at an intracavity dispersion of 1500 and 6200 fs2 for the first time. In both case, a build-up time between cw and steady-state mode locking was estimated to be 50 us, the dynamics of spectral evolution between cw and mode locking, however, was completely different. A shot-to-shot strong spectral fluctuation, as can be seen in NLP spectra, was observed in the initial timescale of 20 us at the intracavity dispersion of 1500 fs2. These new findings would impact on understanding the birth of the broadband spectral formation in fiber laser oscillator.

  5. A compact field-portable double-pulse laser system to enhance laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuo; Liu, Lei; Yan, Aidong; Huang, Sheng; Huang, Xi; Chen, Rongzhang; Lu, Yongfeng; Chen, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports the development of a compact double-pulse laser system to enhance laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for field applications. Pumped by high-power vertical-surface emitting lasers, the laser system that produces 16 ns pulse at 12 mJ/pulse with total weight less than 10 kg is developed. The inter-pulse delay can be adjusted from 0 μ s with 0.5 μ s increment. Several LIBS experiments were carried out on NIST standard aluminum alloy samples. Comparing with the single-pulse LIBS, up to 9 times enhancement in atomic emission line was achieved with continuum background emission reduced by 70%. This has led to up to 10 times improvement in the limit of detection. Signal stability was also improved by 128% indicating that a more robust and accurate LIBS measurement can be achieved using a compact double-pulse laser system. This paper presents a viable and field deployable laser tool to dramatically improve the sensitivity and applicability of LIBS for a wide array of applications.

  6. Optical tweezers stretching of chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pope, L.H.; Bennink, Martin L.; Greve, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Recently significant success has emerged from exciting research involving chromatin stretching using optical tweezers. These experiments, in which a single chromatin fibre is attached by one end to a micron-sized bead held in an optical trap and to a solid surface or second bead via the other end,

  7. Double-pulse laser ablation coupled to laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaus, Reto, E-mail: reglaus@ufl.edu; Hahn, David W.

    2014-08-01

    Laser ablation coupled to laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LA-LIBS) is an analytical method, which minimizes sample matrix effects typically found in quantitative LIBS-based direct solid analyses. This paper reports the application of double-pulse laser ablation (DP-LA) to improve the analyte response and the achievable precisions of LA-LIBS. Two coaxial laser beams were applied at the ablation site and the analytical signals were then collected from a second free-standing LIBS plasma downstream of the ablation site. Signal improvements of up to one order of magnitude were observed compared to single-pulse LA-LIBS. The effect of the interpulse delay on the observed signal-to-noise ratios was studied and the quantification capabilities of the optimized DP-LA-LIBS setup were investigated for manganese and iron in a broad range of different alloy types. A linear response was observed for manganese across the different matrices, allowing for nonmatrix-matched calibrations. Matrix effects were observed when analyzing aluminum samples, which, however, could be compensated for by applying iron as internal standard. Size distributions of the ablated material and electron density measurements provide additional insight into the double-pulse process, with additional future work suggested. - Highlights: • Double-pulse laser ablation was coupled to laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. • Nonmatrix-matched calibration of manganese in various alloys was performed. • Improved sensitivities and precisions compared to single-pulse LA were demonstrated. • Remaining matrix effects and internal standardization are discussed.

  8. [Multi-harmonic analysis of quasi-continuous-wave laser modulation absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ru-bin; Du, Zhen-hui; Meng, Fan-li; Li, Jin-yi; Gao, Dong-yu; Xu, Xiao-bin; Chen, Wen-liang; Xu, Ke-xin

    2012-03-01

    Numerous harmonic components such as multiple frequency, sum frequency and difference frequency of multiple modulation signals were found in quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) diode laser modulation absorption spectroscopy. Then, the authors analyzed these harmonic components' existence in terms of non-linear interactions of laser and gas absorption line. And the signals' characteristics were studied experimentally. The results shows that there are some sum frequency and difference frequency components that have larger amplitudes compared to the second harmonic wavelength modulation spectroscopy signal (2f-WMS) commonly used in tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLAS), and it may improve the detection sensitivity of QCW modulation spectroscopy.

  9. Measurement of nuclear moments and radii by collinear laser spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Geithner, W R; Lievens, P; Kotrotsios, G; Silverans, R; Kappertz, S

    2002-01-01

    %IS304 %title\\\\ \\\\Collinear laser spectroscopy on a fast beam has proven to be a widely applicable and very efficient tool for measurements of changes in mean square nuclear charge radii, nuclear spins, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments. Recent developments of extremely sensitive non-optical detection schemes enabled for some elements the extension of the measurements towards the very short-lived isotopes in the far wings of the ISOLDE production curves. The gain in sensitivity opens up new perspectives, particularly for measurements on lighter nuclei whose ground-state properties can be interpreted by large scale microscopic calculations instead of the more phenomenologic models used for heavier nuclei.\\\\ \\\\ For the sequence of argon isotopes $^{32-40}$Ar and $^{46}$Ar isotope shifts and nuclear moments were measured by optical pumping followed by state selective collisional ionization and detection of the $\\beta$-decay. Similarly, the low-background $\\alpha$-detection was used to extend earlie...

  10. Parity violation tests in chiral molecules by laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chardonnet, Ch.; Daussy, Ch.; Marrel, T.; Amy-Klein, A.; Nguyen, C.T.; Borde, Ch.J. [Paris-13 Univ., 93 - Villetaneuse (France). Lab. de Physique des Lasers

    1999-07-01

    A laser nonlinear spectroscopy experiment has been designed and implemented to test the conjecture that enantiomers of chiral molecules may have different spectra because of the parity violation associated with neutral currents in the weak interaction between electrons and nuclei. We review the theoretical reasons that lead to this prediction and we outline the method currently used to calculate energy and frequency differences between mirror image molecules. Preliminary experimental tests have been conducted on hyperfine components of vibration-rotation transitions of CHFClBr in the 9.3 {mu}m spectral range. The frequencies of saturation resonances of separated enantiomers have been compared and found identical within 13 Hz ({delta}{nu}/{nu} <4.10{sup -13}). (authors)

  11. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Noll, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive source of the fundamentals, process parameters, instrumental components and applications of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The effect of multiple pulses on material ablation, plasma dynamics and plasma emission is presented. A heuristic plasma modeling allows to simulate complex experimental plasma spectra. These methods and findings form the basis for a variety of applications to perform quantitative multi-element analysis with LIBS. These application potentials of LIBS have really boosted in the last years ranging from bulk analysis of metallic alloys and non-conducting materials, via spatially resolved analysis and depth profiling covering measuring objects in all physical states: gaseous, liquid and solid. Dedicated chapters present LIBS investigations for these tasks with special emphasis on the methodical and instrumental concepts as well as the optimization strategies for a quantitative analysis. Requirements, concepts, design and characteristic features of LI...

  12. Elemental Analysis of Soils by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondal, Mohammed Ashraf; Dastageer, Mohamed A.

    The chemical and elemental composition of soil is very complex as it contains many constituents like minerals, organic matters, living organisms, fossils, air and water. Considering the diversity of soil contents, quality and usability, a systematic scientific study on the elemental and chemical composition of soil is very important. In order to study the chemical composition of soil, Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied recently. The important features of LIBS system and its applications for the measurement of nutrients in green house soil, on-line monitoring of remediation process of chromium polluted soil, determination of trace elements in volcanic erupted soil samples collected from ancient cenozoic lava eruption sites and detection of toxic metals in Gulf war oil spill contaminated soil using LIBS are described in this chapter.

  13. Analytical study of seashell using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, LI; Yanhong, GU; Ying, Zhang; Yuandong, LI; Yuan, LU

    2017-02-01

    Seashell has been applied as an indicator for ocean research and element analysis of the seashell is used to track biological or environmental evolution. In this work, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied for elementary analysis of an ezo scallop-shell, and a graphite enrichment method was used as the assistance. It was found that LIBS signal intensity of Ca fluctuated less than 5%, in spite of the sampling positions, and Sr/Ca was related to the shell growth. A similar variation was also found when using a direct LIBS analysis on the shell surface, and it might be more practicable to track shell growth by investigating Sr/Ca ratio with Sr ionic line at 421.6 nm. The obtained results prove that calcium (Ca) is qualified as an internal reference for shell analysis, and LIBS is a potential analytical method for seashell study.

  14. Characterization of a Continuous Wave Laser for Resonance Ionization Mass Spectroscopy Analysis in Nuclear Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    OF A CONTINUOUS WAVE LASER FOR RESONANCE IONIZATION MASS SPECTROSCOPY ANALYSIS IN NUCLEAR FORENSICS by Sunny G. Lau June 2015 Thesis...IONIZATION MASS SPECTROSCOPY ANALYSIS IN NUCLEAR FORENSICS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Sunny G. Lau 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...200 words) The application of resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) to nuclear forensics involves the use of lasers to selectively ionize

  15. Observing Nanometre Scale Particles with Light Scattering for Manipulation Using Optical Tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jin-Hua; Qu Lian-Jie; Yao Kun; ZHONG Min-Cheng; LI Yin-Mei

    2008-01-01

    Nanometre-scale particles can be manipulated using optical tweezers,but cannot be directly observed.We Drasent a simple method that nanoparticles can be directly observed using optical tweezers combined with dark field microscopy.A laser beam perpendicular to a tightly focused laser beam for trap illuminates specimen and does not enter objective,nanoparticles in focal plane all can be directly observed in dark field because of light scattering.It is implemented that the polystyrene beads of diameter 100nm can be directly observed and trapped.

  16. Application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy under Polar Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, J. L.; Hark, R.; Bol'shakov, A.; Plumer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade our research team has evaluated the use of commercial-off-the-shelf laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for chemical analysis of snow and ice samples under polar conditions. One avenue of research explored LIBS suitability as a detector of paleo-climate proxy indicators (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) in ice as it relates to atmospheric circulation. LIBS results revealed detection of peaks for C and N, consistent with the presence of organic material, as well as major ions (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) and trace metals (Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ti). The detection of Ca, K, Mg, and Na confirmed that LIBS has sufficient sensitivity to be used as a tool for characterization of paleo-climate proxy indicators in ice-core samples. Techniques were developed for direct analysis of ice as well as indirect measurements of ice via melting and filtering. Pitfalls and issues of direct ice analysis using several cooling techniques to maintain ice integrity will be discussed. In addition, a new technique, laser ablation molecular isotopic spectroscopy (LAMIS) was applied to detection of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in ice as isotopic analysis of ice is the main tool in paleoclimatology and glaciology studies. Our results demonstrated that spectra of hydroxyl isotopologues 16OH, 18OH, and 16OD can be recorded with a compact spectrograph to determine hydrogen and oxygen isotopes simultaneously. Quantitative isotopic calibration for ice analysis can be accomplished using multivariate chemometric regression as previously realized for water vapor. Analysis with LIBS and LAMIS required no special sample preparation and was about ten times faster than analysis using ICP-MS. Combination of the two techniques in one portable instrument for in-field analysis appears possible and would eliminate the logistical and cost issues associated with ice core management.

  17. Novel Applications of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Amy J Ray; Buckley, Steven G

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this review article is to provide a description of recent and novel laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) applications and developments, especially those discussed during the NASLIBS Conference, held during SciX in Providence, RI, in September 2015. This topic was selected in view of the numerous recent overall review papers that have successfully given a broad view of the current understanding of laser-material interactions and plasma development and have also discussed the wide landscape of analytical applications of LIBS. This paper is divided into sections that focus on a few of the many applications under development in the LIBS community. We provide a summary of updates to calibration-free LIBS (CF-LIBS) and associated developments using plasma characteristics to improve quantification in LIBS output, both in a dedicated section and as applications are discussed. We have also described the most recent publications studying the sources, generation, and use of molecular features in LIBS, including those naturally present in the spectra of organic materials, and those induced with the addition of salts to enable the measurement of halogens, not typically present in LIBS signals. In terms of development of applications of LIBS, we focused on the use of LIBS for indirect measurements such as pH and degree of humification in soil and heating value in coal. We also reviewed the extant literature on LIBS analysis of agricultural materials, coal, minerals, and metals. Finally, we discuss the nascent developments of spatially heterodyne spectroscopy, a method that seeks to circumnavigate a serious drawback of most spectrometers - very small optical throughput - through the use of interferometers.

  18. Remote sensing of atmospheric trace gases by diode laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianguo; Kan, Ruifeng; He, Yabai; He, Ying; Zhang, Yujun; Xie, Pinhua; liu, Wenqing

    2016-04-01

    Gaseous ammonia is the most abundant alkaline trace gas in the atmosphere. In order to study its role in acid deposition and aerosol formation, as well as its influence on the regional air quality and atmospheric visibility, several instruments has been developed based on TDLAS (Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy) techniques. In this paper, a long open path TDLAS system and a continuous-wave CRDS (Cavity-Ring down Spectroscopy) system are presented. The long open path system has been developed for NH3 in-situ monitoring by combining wavelength modulation with harmonic detection techniques to obtain the necessary detection sensitivity. The prototype instrument has been used to monitor atmospheric NH3 concentration at an urban site near Beijing National Stadium during Beijing Olympics in 2008, and recently used to measure the fluxes of NH3 from farm fields by flux-gradient method. The detection limit for ammonia is proved approximately 3ppb for a total path length of 456m. The continuous-wave, rapidly swept CRDS system has been developed for localized atmospheric sensing of trace gases at remote sites. Passive open-path optical sensor units could be coupled by optical fiber over distances of >1 km to a single transmitter/receiver console incorporating a photodetector and a swept-frequency diode laser tuned to molecule-specific near-infrared wavelengths. A noise-limited minimum detectable mixing ratio of ~11 ppbv is attained for ammonia at atmospheric pressure. The developed instruments are deployable in agricultural, industrial, and natural atmospheric environments.

  19. High-resolution in-source laser spectroscopy in perpendicular geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinke, R., E-mail: reinhard.heinke@uni-mainz.de; Kron, T. [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik (Germany); Raeder, S. [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Reich, T.; Schönberg, P. [Universität Mainz, Institut für Kernchemie (Germany); Trümper, M.; Weichhold, C.; Wendt, K. [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Operation of the novel laser ion source unit LIST (Laser Ion Source and Trap), operating at the on-line radioactive ion beam facility ISOLDE at CERN allowed for the production of ultra-pure beams of exotic isotopes far-off stability as well as direct isobar-free laser spectroscopy, giving access to the study of atomic and nuclear properties of so far inaccessible nuclides. We present a specific upgrade and adaption of the LIST targeted for high resolution spectroscopy with a Doppler-reduced perpendicular atom - laser beam geometry. With this PI-LIST (Perpendicularly Illuminated Laser Ion Source and Trap) setup, experimental linewidths below 100 MHz could be demonstrated in optical laser spectroscopy off-line, applying a pulsed injection-locked high repetition rate Ti:sapphire laser. A dual repeller configuration ensured highest suppression of isobaric interferences and almost background-free measurements on small samples in the order of 10{sup 11} atoms.

  20. Intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy detection of HCO radicals in atmospheric pressure hydrocarbon flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheskis, Sergey

    1995-01-01

    Formyl radical, HCO, was monitored for the first time in an atmospheric pressure premixed hydrocarbon flame. Intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy based on quasi-(cw) argon-ion pumped dye laser was used. The sensitivity of the detection is ˜5×1012 cm-3 and can be improved with better flame and laser stabilization.

  1. Frequency-comb-assisted broadband precision spectroscopy with cascaded diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Junqiu; Brasch, Victor; Pfeiffer, Martin H. P.;

    2016-01-01

    Frequency-comb-assisted diode laser spectroscopy, employing both the accuracy of an optical frequency comb and the broad wavelength tuning range of a tunable diode laser, has been widely used in many applications. In this Letter, we present a novel method using cascaded frequency agile diode lasers...

  2. Laser-frequency locking using light-pressure-induced spectroscopy in a calcium beam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollema, A. K.; Wansbeek, L. W.; Willmann, L.; Jungmann, K.; Timmermans, R. G. E.; Hoekstra, R.

    We demonstrate a spectroscopy method that can be applied in an atomic beam, light-pressure-induced spectroscopy (LiPS). A simple pump and probe experiment yields a dispersivelike spectroscopy signal that can be utilized for laser frequency stabilization. The underlying principles are discussed and

  3. Studying the mechanical responses of proteins using magnetic tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaodan; Zeng, Xiangjun; Lu, Chen; Yan, Jie

    2017-10-01

    The mechanical stability of proteins has been extensively studied using AFM as a single-molecule force spectroscopy method. While this has led to many important results, these studies have been mainly limited to fast unfolding at a high-force regime due to the rapid mechanical drift in most AFM stretching experiments. Therefore, there is a gap between the knowledge obtained at a high-force regime and the mechanical properties of proteins at a lower force regime which is often more physiologically relevant. Recent studies have demonstrated that this gap can be addressed by stretching single protein molecules using magnetic tweezers, due to the excellent mechanical stability this technology offers. Here we review magnetic tweezers technology and its current application in studies of the force-dependent stability and interactions of proteins.

  4. A guide to magnetic tweezers and their applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupa Sarkar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic force spectroscopy is a rapidly developing single molecule technique that found numerous applications at the interface of physics and biology. Since the invention of the first magnetic tweezers, a number of modifications were incorporated into the approach that helped relieve the limitations of the original design and amplified its strengths. Inventive molecular biology solutions further advanced the technique by expanding its possible applications. In its present form, the method can be applied to single molecules and live cells without resorting to intense sample irradiation, can be easily multiplexed, accommodates multiple DNAs, displays impressive resolution, and allows a remarkable ease in stretching and twisting macromolecules. In this review, we describe the architecture of magnetic tweezers, key requirements to the experimental design and analysis of data, and outline several applications of the method that illustrate its versatility.

  5. A guide to magnetic tweezers and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Rupa; Rybenkov, Valentin

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic force spectroscopy is a rapidly developing single molecule technique that found numerous applications at the interface of physics and biology. Since the invention of the first magnetic tweezers, a number of modifications were incorporated into the approach that helped relieve the limitations of the original design and amplified its strengths. Inventive molecular biology solutions further advanced the technique by expanding its possible applications. In its present form, the method can be applied to single molecules and live cells without resorting to intense sample irradiation, can be easily multiplexed, accommodates multiple DNAs, displays impressive resolution, and allows a remarkable ease in stretching and twisting macromolecules. In this review, we describe the architecture of magnetic tweezers, key requirements to the experimental design and analysis of data, and outline several applications of the method that illustrate its versatility.

  6. Fast analysis of wood preservers using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, A.; Loebe, K.; Kreuchwig, L.

    2001-06-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used for the investigation of wood preservers in timber and in furniture. Both experiments in laboratory and practical applications in recycling facilities and on a building site prove the new possibilities for the fast detection of harmful agents in wood. A commercial system was developed for mobile laser-plasma-analysis as well as for industrial use in sorting plants. The universal measuring principle in combination with an Echelle optics permits real simultaneous multi-element-analysis in the range of 200-780 nm with a resolution of a few picometers. It enables the user to detect main and trace elements in wood within a few seconds, nearly independent of the matrix, knowing that different kinds of wood show an equal elemental composition. Sample preparation is not required. The quantitative analysis of inorganic wood preservers (containing, e.g. Cu, Cr, B, As, Pb, Hg) has been performed exactly using carbon as reference element. It can be shown that the detection limits for heavy metals in wood are in the ppm-range. Additional information is given concerning the quantitative analysis. Statistical data, e.g. the standard deviation (S.D.), were determined and calibration curves were used for each particular element. A comparison between ICP-AES and LIBS is given using depth profile correction factors regarding the different penetration depths with respect to the different volumes in wood analyzed by both analytical methods.

  7. Laser Spectroscopy Studies in the Neutron-Rich Sn Region

    CERN Multimedia

    Obert, J

    2002-01-01

    We propose to use the powerful laser spectroscopy method to determine the magnetic moment $\\mu$ and the variation of the mean square charge radius ($\\delta\\,\\langle$r$_{c}^{2}\\,\\rangle$) for ground and long-lived isomeric states of the Sn isotopes from A=125 to the doubly-magic $^{132}$Sn isotope and beyond. For these neutron-rich Sn nuclei, numerous $\\delta\\,\\langle$r$^{2}_{c}\\,\\rangle$ curves have already been calculated and the predictions depend upon the effective interactions used. Therefore, a study of the effect of the shell closure N=82 on the $\\delta\\,\\langle$r$^{2}_{c}\\,\\rangle$ values in the Z=50 magic nuclei is of great interest, especially because $^{132}$Sn is located far from the stability valley. It will help to improve the parameters of the effective interactions and make them more suitable to predict the properties of exotic nuclei. \\\\ \\\\The neutron-rich Sn isotopes produced with an uranium carbide target, are ionized using either a hot plasma ion source or the resonant ionization laser ion ...

  8. Laser Raman Spectroscopy in studies of corrosion and electrocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendres, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Laser Raman Spectroscopy (LRS) has become an important tool for the in-situ structural study of electrochemical systems and processes in recent years. Following a brief introduction of the experimental techniques involved in applying LRS to electrochemical systems, we survey the literature for examples of studies in the inhibition of electrode reactions by surface films (e.g., corrosion and passivation phenomena) as well as the acceleration of reactions by electro-sorbates (electrocatalysis). We deal mostly with both normal and resonance Raman effects on fairly thick surface films in contrast to surface-enhanced Raman investigations of monolayer adsorbates, which is covered in another lecture. Laser Raman spectroelectrochemical studies of corrosion and film formation on such metals as Pb, Ag, Fe, Ni, Co, Cr, Au, stainless steel, etc. in various solution conditions are discussed. Further extension of the technique to studies in high-temperature and high-pressure aqueous environments is demonstrated. Results of studies of the structure of corrosion inhibitors are also presented. As applications of the LRS technique in the area of electrocatalysis, we cite studies of the structure of transition metal macrocyclic compounds, i.e., phthalocyanines and porphyrins, used for catalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. 104 refs., 20 figs.

  9. Analysis of human nails by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2011-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is applied to analyze human fingernails using nanosecond laser pulses. Measurements on 45 nail samples are carried out and 14 key species are identified. The elements detected with the present system are: Al, C, Ca, Fe, H, K, Mg, N, Na, O, Si, Sr, Ti as well as CN molecule. Sixty three emission lines have been identified in the spectrum that are dominated by calcium lines. A discriminant function analysis is used to discriminate among different genders and age groups. This analysis demonstrates efficient discrimination among these groups. The mean concentration of each element is compared between different groups. Correlation between concentrations of elements in fingernails is calculated. A strong correlation is found between sodium and potassium while calcium and magnesium levels are inversely correlated. A case report on high levels of sodium and potassium in patients with hyperthyroidism is presented. It is shown that LIBS could be a promising technique for the analysis of nails and therefore identification of health problems.

  10. Tunable diode laser spectroscopy as a technique for combustion diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolshov, M.A., E-mail: bolshov@isan.troitsk.ru; Kuritsyn, Yu.A.; Romanovskii, Yu.V.

    2015-04-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) has become a proven method of rapid gas diagnostics. In the present review an overview of the state of the art of TDL-based sensors and their applications for measurements of temperature, pressure, and species concentrations of gas components in harsh environments is given. In particular, the contemporary tunable diode laser systems, various methods of absorption detection (direct absorption measurements, wavelength modulation based phase sensitive detection), and relevant algorithms for data processing that improve accuracy and accelerate the diagnostics cycle are discussed in detail. The paper demonstrates how the recent developments of these methods and algorithms made it possible to extend the functionality of TDLAS in the tomographic imaging of combustion processes. Some prominent examples of applications of TDL-based sensors in a wide range of practical combustion aggregates, including scramjet engines and facilities, internal combustion engines, pulse detonation combustors, and coal gasifiers, are given in the final part of the review. - Highlights: • Overview of modern TDL-based sensors for combustion • TDL systems, methods of absorption detection and algorithms of data processing • Prominent examples of TDLAS diagnostics of the combustion facilities • Extension of the TDLAS on the tomographic imaging of combustion processes.

  11. [Rapid detection of chlorinated organic mixture by laser Raman spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing

    2014-07-01

    In order to realize the rapid, nondestructive detection of organic compounds, a two-dimensional analysis method based on technology of laser Raman spectroscopy was proposed. The results show that using 532 nm laser as excitation light source, the observation of 236.2, 348.9, 449.4 and 513.6 cm(-1), the four vibrational Raman spectra, and the intensity ratio of 6.4 : 1.7: 9.4 : 1.0 can determine the existence of tetrachloroethylene. The observation of 707.5, 1 087.9, 1 175.8 and 3 078.6 cm(-1), the four vibrational Raman spectra, and the intensity ratio of 9.6 : 6.4 : 1.0 : 3.9 can determine the existence of chlorobenzene. In other words, that through the comprehensive study of spectral lines and intensity ratio of some spectral lines, the presence of organic compounds in the mixed solution can be determined quickly. In the aspect of quantitative analysis, using multi-spectral analysis combined with least square fitting method can improve the reliability of the measurement, The accuracy of sample concentration was 98.4%. This spectral measurement method is a potential tool for organic component identification and concentration analysis which has a prosperous application prospects.

  12. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for polymer identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Sylvain; Boudinet, Marjorie; Pelascini, Frédéric; Surma, Fabrice; Detalle, Vincent; Holl, Yves

    2011-07-01

    This study aims at differentiating several organic materials, particularly polymers, by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The goal is to apply this technique to the fields of polymer recycling and cultural heritage conservation. We worked with some usual polymers families: polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polyoxymethylene, (POM), poly(vinyl chloride), polytetrafluoroethylene, polyoxyethylene (POE), and polyamide for the aliphatic ones, and poly(butylene terephthalate), acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene, polystyrene, and polycarbonate for the aromatic ones. The fourth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (266 nm) in ambient air at atmospheric pressure was used. A careful analysis of the C(2) Swan system (0,0) band in polymers containing no C-C (POM), few C-C (POE), or aromatic C-C linkages led us to the conclusion that the C(2) signal might be native, i.e., the result of direct ablation from the sample. With use of these results, aliphatic and aromatic polymers could be differentiated. Further data treatments, such as properly chosen line ratios, principal component analysis, and partial least squares regression, were evaluated. It was shown that many polymers could be separated, including PE and PP, despite their similar chemical structures.

  13. Unsupervised verification of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy dataset clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Michał R.; Zdunek, Rafał; Antończak, Arkadiusz J.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a versatile, optical technique used in a wide range of qualitative and quantitative analyses conducted with the use of various chemometric techniques. The aim of this research is to demonstrate the possibility of unsupervised clustering of an unknown dataset using K-means clustering algorithm, and verifying its input parameters through investigating generalized eigenvalues derived with linear discriminant analysis. In all the cases, principal component analyses have been applied to reduce data dimensionality and shorten computation time of the whole operation. The experiment was conducted on a dataset collected from twenty four different materials divided into six groups: metals, semiconductors, ceramics, rocks, metal alloys and others with the use of a three-channel spectrometer (298.02-628.73nm overall spectral range) and a UV (248nm) excimer laser. Additionally, two more complex groups containing all specimens and all specimens excluding rocks were created. The resulting spaces of eigenvalues were calculated for every group and three different distances in the multidimensional space (cosine, square Euclidean and L1). As expected, the correct numbers of specimens within groups with small deviations were obtained, and the validity of the unsupervised method has thus been proven.

  14. Application of laser Raman spectroscopy to dental diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, Takahiro; Wakaki, Moriaki

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this research is related with the diagnosis of caries by use of a laser. We study the fundamental characterization of the diagnosis method using both fluorescence and Raman scattering spectroscopy. We try to evaluate the possibility of the caries diagnosis using Raman spectroscopy and its clinical application. We focus on the PO34- ion that flows out with the dissolution of hydroxyapatite (HAp), and the fluorescence that increases in connection with caries. The Raman line of P-O vibration is overlapped on the continuous, background spectrum by fluorescence. Consequently, we try to find out the correlation between a healthy part and a carious part by analyzing both fluorescence and Raman spectra. It was found that Raman intensity of HAp at carious lesion was weaker than those of healthy parts and the florescence intensity at the same portions was stronger. We have obtained the feasibility to estimate the degree of caries and health condition by deriving the ratio between Raman and florescence intensity. And the trial measurements in vivo were carried out to verify the availability of the method by using a fiber probe type multi channel Raman spectrometer. The process of remineralization is under researching for the development of preventive medicine.

  15. Single fiber laser based wavelength tunable excitation for CRS spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jue; Xie, Ruxin; Johnson, Carey K; Hui, Rongqing

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate coherent Raman spectroscopy (CRS) using a tunable excitation source based on a single femtosecond fiber laser. The frequency difference between the pump and the Stokes pulses was generated by soliton self-frequency shifting (SSFS) in a nonlinear optical fiber. Spectra of C-H stretches of cyclohexane were measured simultaneously by stimulated Raman gain (SRG) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and compared. We demonstrate the use of spectral focusing through pulse chirping to improve CRS spectral resolution. We analyze the impact of pulse stretching on the reduction of power efficiency for CARS and SRG. Due to chromatic dispersion in the fiber-optic system, the differential pulse delay is a function of Stokes wavelength. This differential delay has to be accounted for when performing spectroscopy in which the Stokes wavelength needs to be scanned. CARS and SRG signals were collected and displayed in two dimensions as a function of both the time delay between chirped pulses and the Stokes wavelength, and we demonstrate how to find the stimulated Raman spectrum from the two-dimensional plots. Strategies of system optimization consideration are discussed in terms of practical applications.

  16. Steerable optical tweezers for ultracold atom studies

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Kris O.; McKellar, Thomas; Fekete, Julia; Rakonjac, Ana; Deb, Amita B.; Kjærgaard, Niels

    2013-01-01

    We report on the implementation of an optical tweezer system for controlled transport of ultracold atoms along a narrow, static confinement channel. The tweezer system is based on high-efficiency acousto-optical deflectors and offers two-dimensional control over beam position. This opens up the possibility for tracking the transport channel when shuttling atomic clouds along the guide, forestalling atom spilling. Multiple clouds can be tracked independently by time-shared tweezer beams addres...

  17. Comparative investigation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in bulk water using 532- and 1064-nm lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Xue, Boyang; Song, Jiaojian; Lu, Yuan; Li, Ying; Zheng, Ronger

    2017-07-01

    The influence of laser wavelength on the characteristics of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in bulk water was investigated by using 532- and 1064-nm lasers. We demonstrated that higher laser energy does not lead to higher LIBS signals because of the strong plasma shielding occurring at high laser energies, as shown by the spectroscopic and fast imaging results in this work. At threshold energies of 100% breakdown probability, the 1064 nm beam could induce a plasma with higher electron density and temperature than the 532 nm beam, which leads to higher signal-to-noise ratios and longer lifetimes of the emission lines.

  18. A simple optical tweezers for trapping polystyrene particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiddiq, Minarni; Nasir, Zulfa; Yogasari, Dwiyana

    2013-09-01

    Optical tweezers is an optical trap. For decades, it has become an optical tool that can trap and manipulate any particle from the very small size like DNA to the big one like bacteria. The trapping force comes from the radiation pressure of laser light which is focused to a group of particles. Optical tweezers has been used in many research areas such as atomic physics, medical physics, biophysics, and chemistry. Here, a simple optical tweezers has been constructed using a modified Leybold laboratory optical microscope. The ocular lens of the microscope has been removed for laser light and digital camera accesses. A laser light from a Coherent diode laser with wavelength λ = 830 nm and power 50 mW is sent through an immersion oil objective lens with magnification 100 × and NA 1.25 to a cell made from microscope slides containing polystyrene particles. Polystyrene particles with size 3 μm and 10 μm are used. A CMOS Thorlabs camera type DCC1545M with USB Interface and Thorlabs camera lens 35 mm are connected to a desktop and used to monitor the trapping and measure the stiffness of the trap. The camera is accompanied by camera software which makes able for the user to capture and save images. The images are analyzed using ImageJ and Scion macro. The polystyrene particles have been trapped successfully. The stiffness of the trap depends on the size of the particles and the power of the laser. The stiffness increases linearly with power and decreases as the particle size larger.

  19. Photonic Nanojet in Optical Tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Neves, Antonio Alvaro Ranha

    2015-01-01

    Photonic nanojets has been brought into attention ten years ago for potential application as ultramicroscopy technique, using its sub-wavelength resolution to enhance detection and interaction with matter. For these novel applications under development, optically trapping a sphere, acts as an ideal framework to employ these nanojets. In this case, the nanojet is generated by a highly focused incident beam contrary to the traditional plane wave. It inherits the advantage from optical trapping, with the microsphere in equilibrium on the beam propagation axis, and be positioned arbitrarily in space, especially for intracellular applications. Moreover, due to optical scattering forces, when in equilibrium, there is a shift of the sphere centre with respect to the beam focus. However, within the stable equilibrium of an optical tweezers configuration, it does not allow the formation of a photonic nanojet. To overcome this, a double optical tweezers, in an unorthodox configuration of two collinearly and co-propagat...

  20. Laser ablation-laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the measurement of total elemental concentration in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Jhon; López, Sebastian; Jaramillo, Daniel; Hahn, David W; Molina, Alejandro

    2013-04-10

    The performances of traditional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation-LIBS (LA-LIBS) were compared by quantifying the total elemental concentration of potassium in highly heterogeneous solid samples, namely soils. Calibration curves for a set of fifteen samples with a wide range of potassium concentrations were generated. The LA-LIBS approach produced a superior linear response different than the traditional LIBS scheme. The analytical response of LA-LIBS was tested with a large set of different soil samples for the quantification of the total concentration of Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, Na, and K. Results showed an acceptable linear response for Ca, Fe, Mg, and K while poor signal responses were found for Na and Mn. Signs of remaining matrix effects for the LA-LIBS approach in the case of soil analysis were found and discussed. Finally, some improvements and possibilities for future studies toward quantitative soil analysis with the LA-LIBS technique are suggested.

  1. Chirped laser dispersion spectroscopy for laser-based hydrogen sulfide detection in open-path conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikodem, Michał

    2016-05-16

    In this paper the design and characterization of a near-IR Chirped Laser Dispersion Spectroscopy (CLaDS)-based setup for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) detection is reported. This system can be implemented for open-path sensing also in standoff configuration. Target transition selection, system noise and detection limit are discussed and characterized. Furthermore, the cross-interference with other molecules is analyzed. CLaDS-based detection is shown to be highly immune to background carbon dioxide changes, which is a critical issue in accurate open-path sensing of hydrogen sulfide.

  2. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy Diagnostic of Laser-Induced Optical Breakdown

    OpenAIRE

    Parigger, Christian G.; Hornkohl, James O.; László Nemes

    2010-01-01

    Transient laser plasma is generated in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB). Here we report experiments conducted with 10.6-micron CO2 laser radiation, and with 1.064-micron fundamental, 0.532-micron frequency-doubled, 0.355-micron frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser radiation. Characterization of laser induced plasma utilizes laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) techniques. Atomic hydrogen Balmer series emissions show electron number density of 1017 cm−3 measured approximately 10 μs and ...

  3. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Brumfield, Brian E.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hartig, Kyle C.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-06-19

    We demonstrate measurement of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plumes using two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2DFS). The high-resolution, tunable CW-laser spectroscopy technique clearly distinguishes atomic absorption from 235U and 238U in natural and highly enriched uranium metal samples. We present analysis of spectral resolution and analytical performance of 2DFS as a function of ambient pressure. Simultaneous measurement using time-resolved absorption spectroscopy provides information on temporal dynamics of the laser ablation plume and saturation behavior of fluorescence signals. The rapid, non-contact measurement is promising for in-field, standoff measurements of uranium enrichment for nuclear safety and security applications.

  4. Laser-induced atomic fragment fluorescence spectroscopy: a facile technique for molecular spectroscopy of spin-forbidden states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun; Chen, Yang; Keil, Mark

    2009-03-01

    Spectra of spin-forbidden and spin-allowed transitions in the mixed b (3)Pi(u) approximately A (1)Sigma(u)(+) state of Na(2) are measured separately by two-photon excitation using a single tunable dye laser. The two-photon excitation produces Na(*)(3p) by photodissociation, which is easily and sensitively detected by atomic fluorescence. At low laser power, only the A (1)Sigma(u)(+) state is excited, completely free of triplet excitation. At high laser power, photodissociation via the intermediate b (3)Pi(u) triplet state becomes much more likely, effectively "switching" the observations from singlet spectroscopy to triplet spectroscopy with only minor apparatus changes. This technique of perturbation-assisted laser-induced atomic fragment fluorescence may therefore be especially useful as a general vehicle for investigating perturbation-related physics pertinent to the spin-forbidden states, as well as for studying allowed and forbidden states of other molecules.

  5. Micro spatial analysis of seashell surface using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yuan; Li, Yuandong; Li, Ying [Optics and Optoelectronics Lab, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Wang, Yangfan; Wang, Shi; Bao, Zhenmin [Life Science College, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003 (China); Zheng, Ronger, E-mail: rzheng@ouc.edu.cn [Optics and Optoelectronics Lab, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2015-08-01

    The seashell has been studied as a proxy for the marine researches since it is the biomineralization product recording the growth development and the ocean ecosystem evolution. In this work a hybrid of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman spectroscopy was introduced to the composition analysis of seashell (scallop, bivalve, Zhikong). Without any sample treatment, the compositional distribution of the shell was obtained using LIBS for the element detection and Raman for the molecule recognition respectively. The elements Ca, K, Li, Mg, Mn and Sr were recognized by LIBS; the molecule carotene and carbonate were identified with Raman. It was found that the LIBS detection result was more related to the shell growth than the detection result of Raman. The obtained result suggested the shell growth might be developing in both horizontal and vertical directions. It was indicated that the LIBS–Raman combination could be an alternative way for the shell researches. - Highlights: • A LIBS–Raman hybrid system was developed. • A seashell has been analyzed for the elementary and molecular distribution with a system. • The shell growth development was studied on the surface and in the depth.

  6. Self-calibration wavelength modulation spectroscopy for acetylene detection based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qin-Bin; Xu, Xue-Mei; Li, Chen-Jing; Ding, Yi-Peng; Cao, Can; Yin, Lin-Zi; Ding, Jia-Feng

    2016-11-01

    The expressions of the second harmonic (2f) signal are derived on the basis of absorption spectral and lock-in theories. A parametric study indicates that the phase shift between the intensity and wavelength modulation makes a great contribution to the 2f signal. A self-calibration wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) method based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is applied, combining the advantages of ambient pressure, temperature suppression, and phase-shift influences elimination. Species concentration is retrieved simultaneously from selected 2f signal pairs of measured and reference WMS-2f spectra. The absorption line of acetylene (C2H2) at 1530.36 nm near-infrared is selected to detect C2H2 concentrations in the range of 0-400 ppmv. System sensitivity, detection precision and limit are markedly improved, demonstrating that the self-calibration method has better detecting performance than the conventional WMS. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61172047, 61502538, and 61501525).

  7. Theory of optical-tweezers forces near a plane interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, R. S.; Neto, P. A. Maia; Nussenzveig, H. M.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    2016-11-01

    Optical-tweezers experiments in molecular and cell biology often take place near the surface of the microscope slide that defines the bottom of the sample chamber. There, as elsewhere, force measurements require force-calibrated tweezers. In bulk, one can calculate the tweezers force from first principles, as recently demonstrated. Near the surface of the microscope slide, this absolute calibration method fails because it does not account for reverberations from the slide of the laser beam scattered by the trapped microsphere. Nor does it account for evanescent waves arising from total internal reflection of wide-angle components of the strongly focused beam. In the present work we account for both of these phenomena. We employ Weyl's angular spectrum representation of spherical waves in terms of real and complex rays and derive a fast-converging recursive series of multiple reflections that describes the reverberations, including also evanescent waves. Numerical simulations for typical setup parameters evaluate these effects on the optical force and trap stiffness, with emphasis on axial trapping. Results are in good agreement with available experimental data. Thus, absolute calibration now applies to all situations encountered in practice.

  8. Toward optical-tweezers-based force microscopy for airborne microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Rory M; Burnham, Daniel R; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-12-20

    Optical tweezers have found widespread application in biological and colloidal physics for the measurement of pN forces over nanometer to micrometer length scales. Similar aerosol-phase measurements of interparticle force have not been reported in spite of the potential to better resolve particle coagulation kinetics. Various refractive index mismatches in the beam path as well as the need to explicitly account for gravity and inertial particle motion provide a number of challenges that must be overcome to make such measurements tractable. In this regard, we demonstrate schemes by which the particle position and trap stiffness may be unambiguously measured using bright-field microscopy with resolution comparable with analogous condensed-phase measurements. Moreover, some of the challenges of working with highly dynamic aqueous particles are introduced and exploited to observe size-dependent phenomena in aerosol optical tweezers. Notably, when combined with cavity-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, this provides a unique opportunity to explore trapping forces over a continuum of particle size and refractive index. It is expected that the methods developed will provide a basis for the measurement of pairwise interaction forces in aerosol optical tweezers while providing a probe of fundamental airborne particle trapping dynamics.

  9. Portable Infrared Laser Spectroscopy for On-site Mycotoxin Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieger, Markus; Kos, Gregor; Sulyok, Michael; Godejohann, Matthias; Krska, Rudolf; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2017-03-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of fungi that spoil food, and severely impact human health (e.g., causing cancer). Therefore, the rapid determination of mycotoxin contamination including deoxynivalenol and aflatoxin B1 in food and feed samples is of prime interest for commodity importers and processors. While chromatography-based techniques are well established in laboratory environments, only very few (i.e., mostly immunochemical) techniques exist enabling direct on-site analysis for traders and manufacturers. In this study, we present MYCOSPEC - an innovative approach for spectroscopic mycotoxin contamination analysis at EU regulatory limits for the first time utilizing mid-infrared tunable quantum cascade laser (QCL) spectroscopy. This analysis technique facilitates on-site mycotoxin analysis by combining QCL technology with GaAs/AlGaAs thin-film waveguides. Multivariate data mining strategies (i.e., principal component analysis) enabled the classification of deoxynivalenol-contaminated maize and wheat samples, and of aflatoxin B1 affected peanuts at EU regulatory limits of 1250 μg kg‑1 and 8 μg kg‑1, respectively.

  10. Analysis of bakery products by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, Gonca; Boyacı, İsmail Hakkı; Eseller, Kemal Efe; Tamer, Uğur; Çakır, Serhat

    2015-08-15

    In this study, we focused on the detection of Na in bakery products by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a quick and simple method. LIBS experiments were performed to examine the Na at 589 nm to quantify NaCl. A series of standard bread sample pellets containing various concentrations of NaCl (0.025-3.5%) were used to construct the calibration curves and to determine the detection limits of the measurements. Calibration graphs were drawn to indicate functions of NaCl and Na concentrations, which showed good linearity in the range of 0.025-3.5% NaCl and 0.01-1.4% Na concentrations with correlation coefficients (R(2)) values greater than 0.98 and 0.96. The obtained detection limits for NaCl and Na were 175 and 69 ppm, respectively. Performed experimental studies showed that LIBS is a convenient method for commercial bakery products to quantify NaCl concentrations as a rapid and in situ technique.

  11. Portable Infrared Laser Spectroscopy for On-site Mycotoxin Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieger, Markus; Kos, Gregor; Sulyok, Michael; Godejohann, Matthias; Krska, Rudolf; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of fungi that spoil food, and severely impact human health (e.g., causing cancer). Therefore, the rapid determination of mycotoxin contamination including deoxynivalenol and aflatoxin B1 in food and feed samples is of prime interest for commodity importers and processors. While chromatography-based techniques are well established in laboratory environments, only very few (i.e., mostly immunochemical) techniques exist enabling direct on-site analysis for traders and manufacturers. In this study, we present MYCOSPEC - an innovative approach for spectroscopic mycotoxin contamination analysis at EU regulatory limits for the first time utilizing mid-infrared tunable quantum cascade laser (QCL) spectroscopy. This analysis technique facilitates on-site mycotoxin analysis by combining QCL technology with GaAs/AlGaAs thin-film waveguides. Multivariate data mining strategies (i.e., principal component analysis) enabled the classification of deoxynivalenol-contaminated maize and wheat samples, and of aflatoxin B1 affected peanuts at EU regulatory limits of 1250 μg kg−1 and 8 μg kg−1, respectively. PMID:28276454

  12. Study of Bacterial Samples Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    W, A. Farooq; M, Atif; W, Tawfik; M, S. Alsalhi; Z, A. Alahmed; M, Sarfraz; J, P. Singh

    2014-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to investigate two different types of bacteria, Escherichia coli (B1) and Micrococcus luteus (B2) deposited on glass slides using Spectrolaser 7000. LIBS spectra were analyzed using spectrolaser software. LIBS spectrum of glass substrate was compared with bacteria spectra. Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, S, Cl, Fe, Al, Mn, Cu, C, H and CN-band appeared in bacterial samples in air. Two carbon lines at 193.02 nm, 247.88 nm and one hydrogen line at 656.28 nm with intensity ratios of 1.9, 1.83 and 1.53 appeared in bacterial samples B1 and B2 respectively. Carbon and hydrogen are the important components of the bio-samples like bacteria and other cancer cells. Investigation on LIBS spectra of the samples in He and Ar atmospheres is also presented. Ni lines appeared only in B2 sample in Ar atmosphere. From the present experimental results we are able to show that LIBS technique has a potential in the identification and discrimination of different types of bacteria.

  13. Optical humidity detection based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Keke; Liu, Shixuan; Chen, Shizhe; Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Xuanqun; Wang, Wenyan; Wu, Yushang

    2017-02-01

    Humidity is an important environmental parameter, which is difficult to be measured accurately and quickly using traditional measurement methods. Under the environment of low temperature or high humidity, traditional humidity and temperature sensor has shortages in humidity measurement accuracy, corresponding time and wet fade speed. To solve these problems, this paper proposes a method to measure the environmental humidity with wavelength modulation technology and harmonic detection technology based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. H2O molecular absorption line near 1392 nm is selected as the characteristic spectra. The effects of temperature, pressure and water concentration on the absorption spectrum width, the wavelength modulation coefficient and the amplitude of the harmonic signal are analyzed. Humidity and temperature sensor is modified using temperature and pressure compensation model, and the influence of the water concentration variation is eliminated by the iterative algorithm. The new humidity and temperature sensor prototype is developed, and the structure of the optical system is simple, which is easy to be adjusted. The response frequency of the humidity detection is 40 Hz. The experiment was carried out for 3 months at Qingdao national basic weather station. Experimental results show that the consistency of the humidity and temperature data is very good, which can proves the validity of the humidity measurement technology.

  14. Multiphoton Ionization Detection in Collinear Laser Spectroscopy of Isolde Beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiments using the multiphoton ionization technique have been continued in the beginning of 1990 with stable beam tests on the modified apparatus and with another radioactive beam time on Yb. Higher laser power and an increased vacuum in the ionization region (see figure) yielded a further gain in sensitivity, mainly due to the better suppression of the background ions produced in rest gas collisions. For even Yb isotopes we have now reached a detection efficiency of $\\epsilon$~=~1~x~10$^{-5}$ ions per incoming atom at a background count rate of 30~ions from a beam of 5~x~10$^9$. This sensitivity was high enough for spectroscopy on $^{157}$Yb, where the typical ISOLDE yield of 5~x~10$^7$Yb ions is covered by an isobaric contamination of more than 10$^{10}$ ions. Measurements have also been performed on $^{175}$Yb. These give the first precise value for the magnetic moment of this isotope, $\\mu$~=~0.766(8)$ mu _{N} $, which agrees rather well with the magnetic moment of the isotone $^{177}$Hf. The isoto...

  15. In-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes: From atomic physics to nuclear structure

    CERN Multimedia

    Rothe, S

    2014-01-01

    The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source RILIS [1] at the CERN-ISOLDE on-line radioactive ion beam facility is essential for ion beam production for the majority of experiments, but it is also powerful tool for laser spectroscopy of rare isotopes. A series of experiments on in-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes [2, 3] revealed the nuclear ground state properties of 191;211;216;218Po. However, limitations caused by the isobaric background of surface-ionized francium isotopes hindered the study of several neutron rich polonium isotopes. The development of the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) [4] and finally its integration at ISOLDE has led to a dramatic suppression of surface ions. Meanwhile, the RILIS laser spectroscopy capabilities have advanced tremendously. Widely tunable titanium:sapphire (Ti:Sa) lasers were installed to complement the established dye laser system. Along with a new data acquisition system [5], this more versatile laser setup enabled rst ever laser spectroscopy of the radioact...

  16. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gimenez, Y; Busser, B; Trichard, F; Kulesza, A; Laurent, J M; Zaun, V; Lux, F; Benoit, J M; Panczer, G; Dugourd, P; Tillement, O; Pelascini, F; Sancey, L; Motto-Ros, V

    2016-01-01

    .... The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy...

  17. Mapping chemical bonding of reaction intermediates with femtosecond X-ray laser spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wernet, P.; Beye, M.; de Groot, F.; Düsterer, S.; Grübel, S.; Gaffney, K.; Hartsock, R.; Hennies, F.; Josefsson, I.; Kennedy, B.; Kunnus, K.; Leitner, T.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Nordlund, D.; Odelius, M.; Quevedo, W.; Radcliffe, P.; Rajkovic, I.; Schlotter, B.; Scholz, M.; Schreck, S.; Suljoti, E.; Techert, S.; Turner, J.; Weniger, C.; Zhang, W.; Föhlisch, A.

    2013-01-01

    We determine the pathways in the photo-dissociation reactions of Fe(CO)5 both in the gas phase and in solution by mapping the valence electronic structure of the reaction intermediates with femtosecond X-ray laser spectroscopy.

  18. MEASUREMENT OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM MECHANICALLY VENTILATED POULTRY HOUSES USING MULTIPATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia emissions from mechanically ventilated poultry operations are an important environmental concern. Open Path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy has emerged as a robust real-time method for gas phase measurement of ammonia concentrations in agricultural settings. ...

  19. Characterisation of coated aerosols using optical tweezers and neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S. H.; Ward, A.; King, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Thin organic films are believed to form naturally on the surface of aerosols [1,2] and influence aerosol properties. Cloud condensation nuclei formation and chemical reactions such as aerosol oxidation are effected by the presence of thin films [3]. There is a requirement to characterise the physical properties of both the core aerosol and its organic film in order to fully understand the contribution of coated aerosols to the indirect effect. Two complementary techniques have been used to study the oxidation of thin organic films on the surface of aerosols; laser optical tweezers and neutron reflectometry. Micron sized polystyrene beads coated in oleic acid have been trapped in air using two counter propagating laser beams. Polystyrene beads are used as a proxy for solid aerosol. The trapped aerosol is illuminated with a white LED over a broadband wavelength range and the scattered light collected to produce a Mie spectrum [4]. Analysis of the Mie spectrum results in determination of the core polystyrene bead radius, the oleic acid film thickness and refractive index dispersion of the core and shell [5]. A flow of ozone gas can then be introduced into the aerosol environment to oxidise the thin film of oleic acid and the reaction followed by monitoring the changes in the Mie spectrum. The results demonstrate complete removal of the oleic acid film. We conclude that the use of a counter propagating optical trap combined with white light Mie spectroscopy can be used to study a range of organic films on different types of aerosols and their oxidation reactions. Neutron reflectometry has been used as a complementary technique to study the oxidation of monolayer films at the air-water interface in order to gain information on reaction kinetics. The oxidation of an oleic acid film at the air-water interface by the common tropospheric oxidant ozone has been studied using a Langmuir trough. Results indicate complete removal of the oleic acid film with ozone in agreement

  20. Optical tweezers in concentrated colloidal dispersions : Manipulating and imaging individual particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, Dirk Leo Joep

    2004-01-01

    Using a laser beam that is focused down to a diffraction-limited spot, particles with a size ranging from several nanometers up to tens of micrometers can be trapped and manipulated. This technique, known as "optical tweezers" or "optical trapping", has been used in a wide variety of (interdisciplin

  1. Optical tweezers in concentrated colloidal dispersions : Manipulating and imaging individual particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, Dirk Leo Joep

    2004-01-01

    Using a laser beam that is focused down to a diffraction-limited spot, particles with a size ranging from several nanometers up to tens of micrometers can be trapped and manipulated. This technique, known as "optical tweezers" or "optical trapping", has been used in a wide variety of

  2. High-refractive index particles in counter-propagating optical tweezers - manipulation and forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, Astrid van der

    2006-01-01

    With a tightly focused single laser beam, also called optical tweezers, particles of a few nanometers up to several micrometers in size can be trapped and manipulated in 3D. The size, shape and refractive index of such colloidal particles are of influence on the optical forces exerted on them in the

  3. Laser Calorimetry Spectroscopy for ppm-level Dissolved Gas Detection and Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nagapriya K. S.; Shashank Sinha; Prashanth R.; Samhitha Poonacha; Gunaranjan Chaudhry; Anandaroop Bhattacharya; Niloy Choudhury; Saroj Mahalik; Sandip Maity

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we report a newly developed technique – laser calorimetry spectroscopy (LCS), which is a combination of laser absorption spectroscopy and calorimetry - for the detection of gases dissolved in liquids. The technique involves determination of concentration of a dissolved gas by irradiating the liquid with light of a wavelength where the gas absorbs, and measuring the temperature change caused by the absorbance. Conventionally, detection of dissolved gases with sufficient sensitivi...

  4. Multivariate Analysis of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Discrimination between Explosives and Plastics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qian-Qian; LIU Kai; ZHAO Hua

    2012-01-01

    A method to distinguish explosives from plastics using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is discussed. A model for classification with cross-validation theory is built based on the partial least-square discriminant analysis method. Seven types of plastics and one explosive are used as samples to test the model. The experimental results demonstrate that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has the capacity to discriminate explosives from plastics combined with chemometrics methods. The results could be useful for prospective research of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy on the differentiation of explosives and other materials.%A method to distinguish explosives from plastics using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is discussed.A model for classification with cross-validation theory is built based on the partial least-square discriminant analysis method.Seven types of plastics and one explosive are used as samples to test the model.The experimental results demonstrate that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has the capacity to discriminate explosives from plastics combined with chemometrics methods.The results could be useful for prospective research of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy on the differentiation of explosives and other materials.

  5. Photonic Crystal Optical Tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Benjamin K; Bachar, Stephanie; Knouf, Emily; Bendoraite, Ausra; Tewari, Muneesh; Pun, Suzie H; Lin, Lih Y

    2009-01-01

    Non-invasive optical manipulation of particles has emerged as a powerful and versatile tool for biological study and nanotechnology. In particular, trapping and rotation of cells, cell nuclei and sub-micron particles enables unique functionality for various applications such as tissue engineering, cancer research and nanofabrication. We propose and demonstrate a purely optical approach to rotate and align particles using the interaction of polarized light with photonic crystal nanostructures to generate enhanced trapping force. With a weakly focused laser beam we observed efficient trapping and transportation of polystyrene beads with sizes ranging from 10 um down to 190 nm as well as cancer cell nuclei. In addition, we demonstrated alignment of non-spherical particles using a 1-D photonic crystal structure. Bacterial cells were trapped, rotated and aligned with optical intensity as low as 17 uW/um^2. Finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulations of the optical near-field and far-field above the photonic c...

  6. Optoelectronic tweezers for medical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Clemens; Neale, Steven; Menachery, Anoop; Barrett, Mike; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) allows the spatial patterning of electric fields through selected illumination of a photoconductive surface. This enables the manipulation of micro particles and cells by creating non-uniform electrical fields that then produce dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces. The DEP responses of cells differ and can produce negative or positive (repelled or attracted to areas of high electric field) forces. Therefore OET can be used to manipulate individual cells and separate different cell types from each other. Thus OET has many applications for medical diagnostics, demonstrated here with work towards diagnosing Human African Trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness.

  7. First measurement of radioisotopes by collinear laser spectroscopy at an ion-guide separator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooke, JL; Billowes, J; Campbell, P; Cochrane, ECA; Cooper, TG; Dendooven, P; Evans, DE; Griffith, JAR; Grant, IS; Honkanen, A; Huhta, M; Levins, JMG; Oinonen, M; Pearson, MR; Penttila, H; Persson, B.L.; Richardson, DS; Tungate, G; Wheeler, PD; Zybert, L; Aysto, J

    1997-01-01

    The first successful application of an ion-guide separator (IGISOL) for collinear laser spectroscopy of radioisotopes has achieved an efficiency comparable with the best obtained with catcher-ionizer facilities. The ion beam energy spread was determined to be less than 6 eV, allowing laser fluoresce

  8. First collinear laser spectroscopy measurements of radioisotopes from an IGISOL ion source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Billowes, J; Campbell, P; Cochrane, ECA; Cooke, JL; Dendooven, P; Evans, DE; Grant, IS; Griffith, JAR; Honkanen, A; Huhta, M; Levins, JMG; Liukkonen, E; Oinonen, M; Pearson, MR; Penttila, H; Persson, B.L.; Richardson, DS; Tungate, G; Wheeler, P; Zybert, L; Aysto, J

    1997-01-01

    The standard Doppler-free technique of collinear laser spectroscopy has been successfully applied to radioisotopes from the ion-guide isotope separator (IGISOL) at the Universiry of Jyvaskyla. The laser resonance fluorescence signals for the Ba-140.142,Ba-144 radioisotopes show that the ion beam ene

  9. 2-PHOTON LASER SPECTROSCOPY OF THE MUONIUM 1S-2S TRANSITION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungmann, Klaus-Peter; Baird, Patrick E.G.; Barr, John R.M.; Bressler, Christian; Curley, P.F.; Dixson, Ron; Eaton, Gordon H.; Ferguson, Alister I.; Geerds, Hans; Hughes, Vernon W.; Kenntner, Joachim; Lea, Steven N.; Maas, Frank; Persaud, Michael A.; zu Putlitz, Gisbert; Sandards, Patrick G.H.; Schwarz, Willi; Toner, William T.; Towrie, Michael; Woodman, George; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Zhizhang

    1991-01-01

    The 1(2) S 1/2 (F = 1) - 2(2) S 1/2 (F = 1) energy interval in muonium has been investigated by Doppler-free two-photon laser spectroscopy. The transition was observed by uniquely identifying and counting the muons released after the photoionization of the 2 S state by the same laser field. The meas

  10. The Self-Injected Laser for Picosecond Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Armani, F.; Martini, F; Mataloni, P.

    1983-01-01

    The principles of operation and the characteristics of the self-injected picosecond laser are presented. We show that in spite of its simple design our device is able to generate very high power pulses in the picosecond domain. This warrants the use of this laser for time resolved spectroscopy in the picosecond domain.

  11. Deformation change in light iridium nuclei from laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verney, D.; Le Blanc, F.; Obert, J.; Oms, J.; Puteaux, J.C.; Roussiere, B.; Sauvage, J. [IN2P3-CNRS/Universite Paris Sud-XI, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay Cedex (France); Cabaret, L.; Duong, H.T.; Pinard, J. [CNRS, Laboratoire Aime Cotton, Orsay Cedex (France); Crawford, J.E.; Lee, J.K.P. [McGill University, Physics Department, Montreal (Canada); Fricke, B.; Rashid, K. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik der Universitaet Kassel, Kassel (Germany); Genevey, J.; Ibrahim, F. [IN2P3-CNRS/Universite Joseph Fourier-Grenoble I, Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Grenoble Cedex (France); Huber, G.; Krieg, M.; Sebastian, V. [Institut fuer Physik der Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Le Scornet, G.; Lunney, D. [IN2P3-CNRS/Universite Paris Sud-XI, Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, Orsay Cedex (France)

    2006-12-15

    Laser spectroscopy measurements have been performed on neutron-deficient and stable Ir isotopes using the COMPLIS experimental setup installed at ISOLDE-CERN. The radioactive Ir atoms were obtained from successive decays of a mass-separated Hg beam deposited onto a carbon substrate after deceleration to 1kV and subsequently laser desorbed. A three-color, two-step resonant scheme was used to selectively ionize the desorbed Ir atoms. The hyperfine structure (HFS) and isotope shift (IS) of the first transition of the ionization path 5d{sup 7}6s{sup 24}F{sub 9/2}{yields}5d{sup 7}6s6p{sup 6}F{sub 11/2} at 351.5nm were measured for {sup 182-189}Ir, {sup 186}Ir{sup m} and the stable {sup 191,193}Ir. The nuclear magnetic moments {mu}{sub I} and the spectroscopic quadrupole moments Q{sub s} were obtained from the HFS spectra and the change of the mean square charge radii from the IS measurements. The sign of {mu}{sub I} was experimentally determined for the first time for the masses 182{<=}A{<=}189 and the isomeric state {sup 186}Ir{sup m}. The spectroscopic quadrupole moments of {sup 182}Ir and {sup 183}Ir were measured also for the first time. A large mean square charge radius change between {sup 187}Ir and {sup 186}Ir{sup g} and between {sup 186}Ir{sup m} and {sup 186}Ir{sup g} was observed corresponding to a sudden increase in deformation: from {beta}{sub 2}{approx_equal}+0.16 for the heavier group A = 193, 191, 189, 187 and 186m to {beta}{sub 2}{>=}+0.2 for the lighter group A=186g, 185, 184, 183 and 182. These results were analyzed in the framework of a microscopic treatment of an axial rotor plus one or two quasiparticle(s). This sudden deformation change is associated with a change in the proton state that describes the odd-nuclei ground state or that participates in the coupling with the neutron in the odd-odd nuclei. This state is identified with the {pi}3/2 {sup +}[402 ] orbital for the heavier group and with the {pi}1/2{sup -}[541 ] orbital stemming from the 1h

  12. Nanoparticle detection in aqueous solutions using Raman and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sovago, M.; Buis, E.-J.; Sandtke, M.

    2013-01-01

    We show the chemical identification and quantification of the concentration and size of nanoparticle (NP) dispersions in aqueous solutions by using a combination of Raman Spectroscopy and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). The two spectroscopic techniques are applied to demonstrate the NP

  13. Nanoparticle detection in aqueous solutions using Raman and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sovago, M.; Buis, E.-J.; Sandtke, M.

    2013-01-01

    We show the chemical identification and quantification of the concentration and size of nanoparticle (NP) dispersions in aqueous solutions by using a combination of Raman Spectroscopy and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). The two spectroscopic techniques are applied to demonstrate the NP

  14. Stretching Submicron Biomolecules with Constant-Force Axial Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yih-Fan; Blab, Gerhard A.; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2009-01-01

    Optical tweezers have become powerful tools to manipulate biomolecular systems, but are increasingly difficult to use when the size of the molecules is optical manipulation protocol that makes this length scale accessible by stretching the molecule in the axial direction of the laser beam, thus avoiding limiting artifacts from steric hindrances from the microscope coverslip and other surface effects. The molecule is held under constant mechanical tension by a combination of optical gradient forces and backscattering forces, eliminating the need for electronic feedback. We demonstrate the utility of this method through a measurement of the force-extension relationship of a 1298 bp ds-DNA molecule. PMID:19486692

  15. Actively controlled tuning of an external cavity diode laser by polarization spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Führer, Thorsten; Stang, Denise; Walther, Thomas

    2009-03-30

    We report on an universal method to achieve and sustain a large mode-hop free tuning range of an external cavity diode laser. By locking one of the resonators using a closed loop control based on polarization spectroscopy while tuning the laser we achieved mode-hop free tuning of up to 130 GHz with a non AR-coated, off-the-shelf laser diode.

  16. Methanogenic activity tests by Infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Cruz, Karla; Sepulveda-Jauregui, Armando; Escobar-Orozco, Nayeli; Thalasso, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    Methanogenic activity (MA) tests are commonly carried out to estimate the capability of anaerobic biomass to treat effluents, to evaluate anaerobic activity in bioreactors or natural ecosystems, or to quantify inhibitory effects on methanogenic activity. These activity tests are usually based on the measurement of the volume of biogas produced by volumetric, pressure increase or gas chromatography (GC) methods. In this study, we present an alternative method for non-invasive measurement of methane produced during activity tests in closed vials, based on Infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (MA-TDLAS). This new method was tested during model acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity tests and was compared to a more traditional method based on gas chromatography. From the results obtained, the CH(4) detection limit of the method was estimated to 60 ppm and the minimum measurable methane production rate was estimated to 1.09(.)10(-3) mg l(-1) h(-1), which is below CH(4) production rate usually reported in both anaerobic reactors and natural ecosystems. Additionally to sensitivity, the method has several potential interests compared to more traditional methods among which short measurements time allowing the measurement of a large number of MA test vials, non-invasive measurements avoiding leakage or external interferences and similar cost to GC based methods. It is concluded that MA-TDLAS is a promising method that could be of interest not only in the field of anaerobic digestion but also, in the field of environmental ecology where CH(4) production rates are usually very low. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Independent component analysis classification of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forni, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.forni@irap.omp.eu [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysiqe et Planétologie, Toulouse (France); CNRS, IRAP, 9, av. Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Cedex 4, Toulouse (France); Maurice, Sylvestre, E-mail: sylvestre.maurice@irap.omp.eu [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysiqe et Planétologie, Toulouse (France); CNRS, IRAP, 9, av. Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Cedex 4, Toulouse (France); Gasnault, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.gasnault@irap.omp.eu [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysiqe et Planétologie, Toulouse (France); CNRS, IRAP, 9, av. Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Cedex 4, Toulouse (France); Wiens, Roger C., E-mail: rwiens@lanl.gov [Space Remote Sensing, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Cousin, Agnès, E-mail: acousin@lanl.gov [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysiqe et Planétologie, Toulouse (France); CNRS, IRAP, 9, av. Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Cedex 4, Toulouse (France); Chemical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Clegg, Samuel M., E-mail: sclegg@lanl.gov [Chemical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Sirven, Jean-Baptiste, E-mail: jean-baptiste.sirven@cea.f [CEA Saclay, DEN/DPC/SCP, 91191 Cedex, Gif sur Yvette (France); Lasue, Jérémie, E-mail: jeremie.lasue@irap.omp.eu [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysiqe et Planétologie, Toulouse (France); CNRS, IRAP, 9, av. Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Cedex 4, Toulouse (France)

    2013-08-01

    The ChemCam instrument on board Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover uses the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique to remotely analyze Martian rocks. It retrieves spectra up to a distance of seven meters to quantify and to quantitatively analyze the sampled rocks. Like any field application, on-site measurements by LIBS are altered by diverse matrix effects which induce signal variations that are specific to the nature of the sample. Qualitative aspects remain to be studied, particularly LIBS sample identification to determine which samples are of interest for further analysis by ChemCam and other rover instruments. This can be performed with the help of different chemometric methods that model the spectra variance in order to identify a the rock from its spectrum. In this paper we test independent components analysis (ICA) rock classification by remote LIBS. We show that using measures of distance in ICA space, namely the Manhattan and the Mahalanobis distance, we can efficiently classify spectra of an unknown rock. The Mahalanobis distance gives overall better performances and is easier to manage than the Manhattan distance for which the determination of the cut-off distance is not easy. However these two techniques are complementary and their analytical performances will improve with time during MSL operations as the quantity of available Martian spectra will grow. The analysis accuracy and performances will benefit from a combination of the two approaches. - Highlights: • We use a novel independent component analysis method to classify LIBS spectra. • We demonstrate the usefulness of ICA. • We report the performances of the ICA classification. • We compare it to other classical classification schemes.

  18. Laser Desorption Supersonic Jet Spectroscopy of Hydrated Tyrosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Hikari; Shimozono, Yoko; Ishiuchi, Shun-Ichi; Fujii, Masaaki; Carcabal, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    The structure of tyrosine (tyr) consists of amino-acid chain and phenol, and it has roughly two possible binding sites for water, amino-acid site and phenolic OH site. Investigating how water molecule binds to tyr will give fundamental information for hydrations of peptide and protein. Resonance enhanced multi photon ionization (REMPI) spectrum of tyr-water 1:1 cluster has already been reported by de Vries and co-workers, however, no analysis on the hydrated structures has been reported. In the REMPI spectrum, two clusters of bands are observed; one appears at ˜35600 cm^{-1} energy region which is the almost same with 0-0 transitions of tyr monomer, and another is observed at ˜300 cm^{-1} lower than the former. Based on the electronic transition energy of phenylalanine and the hydrated clusters, the former is expected to be derived from a structure that water binds to amino acid site. On the other hand, it is plausibly predicted that the latter originates from a structure that water binds to phenolic OH group, because the electronic transition of mono hydrated phenol is ˜300 cm^{-1} red-shifted from the monomer. We applied IR dip spectroscopy which can measure conformer selective IR spectra to the tyr-(H_{2}O)_{1} clusters by using laser desorption supersonic jet technique to confirm the assignments. Especially in the phenolic OH bound isomer, it was found that the intra molecular hydrogen bond within amino-acid chain, which is far from the water molecule and cannot interact directly with each other, is strengthened by the hydration. A. Abio-Riziq et al., J. Phys. Chem. A, 115, 6077 (2011). Y. Shimozono, et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., (2013) DOI: 10.1039/c3cp43573c. T. Ebata et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 8, 4783 (2006). T. Watanabe et al., J. Chem. Phys., 105, 408 (1996).

  19. Hong-Ou-Mandel atom interferometry in tunnel-coupled optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Brian; Kaufman, Adam; Reynolds, Collin; Wall, Michael; Foss-Feig, Michael; Hazzard, Kaden; Rey, Ana Maria; Regal, Cindy

    2014-05-01

    We present recent work in which we demonstrate near-complete control over all the internal and external degrees of freedom of laser-cooled 87Rb atoms trapped in sub-micron optical tweezers. Utilizing this control for two atoms in two optical tweezers, we implement a massive-particle analog of the Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer where atom tunneling plays the role of the photon beamsplitter. The interferometer is used to probe the effect of atomic indistinguishability on the two-atom dynamics for a variety of initial conditions. These experiments demonstrate the viability of the optical tweezer platform for bottom-up generation of low-entropy quantum systems and pave the way toward the direct observation of quantum dynamics in more complex finite-sized systems.

  20. Thermal gradient induced tweezers for the manipulation of particles and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiajie; Cong, Hengji; Loo, Fong-Chuen; Kang, Zhiwen; Tang, Minghui; Zhang, Haixi; Wu, Shu-Yuen; Kong, Siu-Kai; Ho, Ho-Pui

    2016-11-01

    Optical tweezers are a well-established tool for manipulating small objects. However, their integration with microfluidic devices often requires an objective lens. More importantly, trapping of non-transparent or optically sensitive targets is particularly challenging for optical tweezers. Here, for the first time, we present a photon-free trapping technique based on electro-thermally induced forces. We demonstrate that thermal-gradient-induced thermophoresis and thermal convection can lead to trapping of polystyrene spheres and live cells. While the subject of thermophoresis, particularly in the micro- and nano-scale, still remains to be fully explored, our experimental results have provided a reasonable explanation for the trapping effect. The so-called thermal tweezers, which can be readily fabricated by femtosecond laser writing, operate with low input power density and are highly versatile in terms of device configuration, thus rendering high potential for integration with microfluidic devices as well as lab-on-a-chip systems.

  1. Mapping force of interaction between PLGA nanoparticle with cell membrane using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhajed, Suyash; Gu, Ling; Homayoni, Homa; Nguyen, Kytai; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2011-03-01

    Drug delivery using magnetic (Fe 3 O4) Poly Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid (PLGA) nanoparticles is finding increasing usage in therapeutic applications due to its biodegradability, biocompatibility and targeted localization. Since optical tweezers allow non-contact, highly sensitive force measurement, we utilized optical tweezers for studying interaction forces between the Fe 3 O4 -PLGA nanoparticles with prostate cancer PC3 cells. Presence of Fe 3 O4 within the PLGA shell allowed efficient trapping of these nanoparticles in near-IR optical tweezers. The conglomerated PLGA nanoparticles could be dispersed by use of the optical tweezers. Calibration of trapping stiffness as a function of laser beam power was carried out using equipartition theorem method, where the mean square displacement was measured with high precision using time-lapse fluorescence imaging of the nanoparticles. After the trapped PLGA nanoparticle was brought in close vicinity of the PC3 cell membrane, displacement of the nanoparticle from trap center was measured as a function of time. In short time scale (30 sec) , whiletheforceofinteractionwaswithin 0.2 pN , theforceincreasedbeyond 1 pNatlongertimescales (~ 10 min). We will present the results of the time-varying force of interactions between PLGA nanoparticles with PC3 cells using optical tweezers.

  2. High-sensitivity time-resolved intracavity laser Fourier transform spectroscopy with vertical cavity surface emitting multiple quantum well lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Picqué, N; Kachanov, A A; Picqu\\'e, Nathalie; Guelachvili, Guy; Kachanov, Alexander A.

    2003-01-01

    Spectra comprised of hundreds of time-components for absorption path lengths up to 130 km have been recorded around 1050 nm by combining two recent techniques, intracavity laser spectroscopy with vertical external cavity surface emitting multiple-quantum-well lasers and time-resolved Fourier transform spectroscopy. A sensitivity of 1 10^{-10} cm^{-1}.Hz^{-1/2} is achieved, for simultaneously acquired 10^4 spectral elements, three orders of magnitude better than the sensitivity obtained in previous similar experiments. Specific advantages of the method, especially for frequency and intensity metrology of weak absorption transitions, are discussed.

  3. Recovery of acetylene absorption line profile basing on tunable diode laser spectroscopy with intensity modulation and photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Thursby, Graham; Stewart, George; Arsad, Norhana; Uttamchandani, Deepak; Culshaw, Brian; Wang, Yiding

    2010-04-01

    A novel and direct absorption line recovery technique based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy with intensity modulation is presented. Photoacoustic spectroscopy is applied for high sensitivity, zero background and efficient acoustic enhancement at a low modulation frequency. A micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) mirror driven by an electrothermal actuator is used for generating laser intensity modulation (without wavelength modulation) through the external reflection. The MEMS mirror with 10μm thick structure material layer and 100nm thick gold coating is formed as a circular mirror of 2mm diameter attached to an electrothermal actuator and is fabricated on a chip that is wire-bonded and placed on a PCB holder. Low modulation frequency is adopted (since the resonant frequencies of the photoacoustic gas cell and the electrothermal actuator are different) and intrinsic high signal amplitude characteristics in low frequency region achieved from measured frequency responses for the MEMS mirror and the gas cell. Based on the property of photoacoustic spectroscopy and Beer's law that detectable sensitivity is a function of input laser intensity in the case of constant gas concentration and laser path length, a Keopsys erbium doped fibre amplifier (EDFA) with opto-communication C band and high output power up to 1W is chosen to increase the laser power. High modulation depth is achieved through adjusting the MEMS mirror's reflection position and driving voltage. In order to scan through the target gas absorption line, the temperature swept method is adopted for the tunable distributed feed-back (DFB) diode laser working at 1535nm that accesses the near-infrared vibration-rotation spectrum of acetylene. The profile of acetylene P17 absorption line at 1535.39nm is recovered ideally for ~100 parts-per-million (ppm) acetylene balanced by nitrogen. The experimental signal to noise ratio (SNR) of absorption line recovery for 500mW laser power was ~80 and hence the

  4. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water based on graphite conch method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunlong; Liu, Jianguo; Zhao, Nanjing; Shi, Huan; Liu, Lituo; Ma, Mingjun; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Dong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Yujun; Liu, Wenqing

    2012-10-01

    The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emission characteristics of trace heavy metal lead in water is studied based on graphite conch method, with a 1064nm wavelength Nd: YAG laser as excitation source, the echelle spectrometer and ICCD detector are used for spectral separation and high sensitive detection with high resolution and wide spectral range. The delay time 900ns and gate time 1600ns are determined in the experiment. The calibration curve of Pb is plotted based on the different concentration measurement results, and a limit of detection of 0.0138mg / L is obtained for Pb in water. Graphite conch method effectively overcomes the current problems on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water. The detection limits and stability are improved. The reference data is provided for further study on the fast measurement of trace heavy metals in water by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique.

  5. Molecular clips and tweezers hosting neutral guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardouin-Lerouge, Marie; Hudhomme, Piétrick; Sallé, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Intense current interest in supramolecular chemistry is devoted to the construction of molecular assemblies displaying controlled molecular motion associated to recognition. On this ground, molecular clips and tweezers have focused an increasing attention. This tutorial review points out the recent advances in the construction of always more sophisticated molecular clips and tweezers, illustrating their remarkably broad structural variety and focusing on their binding ability towards neutral guests. A particular attention is brought to recent findings in dynamic molecular tweezers whose recognition ability can be regulated by external stimuli. Porphyrin-based systems will not be covered here as this very active field has been recently reviewed.

  6. Low-temperature micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy on laser-doped silicon with different surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Joon; Franklin, Evan; Fell, Andreas; Ernst, Marco; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Macdonald, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Low-temperature micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy (μ-PLS) is applied to investigate shallow layers of laser-processed silicon for solar cell applications. Micron-scale measurement (with spatial resolution down to 1 μm) enables investigation of the fundamental impact of laser processing on the electronic properties of silicon as a function of position within the laser-processed region, and in particular at specific positions such as at the boundary/edge of processed and unprocessed regions. Low-temperature μ-PLS enables qualitative analysis of laser-processed regions by identifying PLS signals corresponding to both laser-induced doping and laser-induced damage. We show that the position of particular luminescence peaks can be attributed to band-gap narrowing corresponding to different levels of subsurface laser doping, which is achieved via multiple 248 nm nanosecond excimer laser pulses with fluences in the range 1.5-4 J/cm2 and using commercially available boron-rich spin-on-dopant precursor films. We demonstrate that characteristic defect PL spectra can be observed subsequent to laser doping, providing evidence of laser-induced crystal damage. The impact of laser parameters such as fluence and number of repeat pulses on laser-induced damage is also analyzed by observing the relative level of defect PL spectra and absolute luminescence intensity. Luminescence owing to laser-induced damage is observed to be considerably larger at the boundaries of laser-doped regions than at the centers, highlighting the significant role of the edges of laser-doped region on laser doping quality. Furthermore, by comparing the damage signal observed after laser processing of two different substrate surface conditions (chemically-mechanically polished and tetramethylammonium hydroxide etched), we show that wafer preparation can be an important factor impacting the quality of laser-processed silicon and solar cells.

  7. Interferometer-Controlled Optical Tweezers Constructed for Nanotechnology and Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2002-01-01

    A new method to control microparticles was developed in-house at the NASA Glenn Research Center in support of the nanotechnology project under NASA's Aerospace Propulsion and Power Base Research Program. A prototype interferometer-controlled optical tweezers was constructed to manipulate scanning probe microscope (SPM) tips. A laser beam passed through a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and a microscope objective then produced an optical trap from the coaxial beams. The trap levitated and generated the coarse motion of a 10-mm polystyrene sphere used to simulate a SPM tip. The interference between the beams provided fine control of the forces and moments on the sphere. The interferometer included a piezoelectric-scanned mirror to modulate the interference pattern. The 10-mm sphere was observed to oscillate about 1 mm as the mirror and fringe pattern oscillated. The prototype tweezers proved the feasibility of constructing a more sophisticated interferometer tweezers to hold and manipulate SPM tips. The SPM tips are intended to interrogate and manipulate nanostructures. A more powerful laser will be used to generate multiple traps to hold nanostructures and SPM tips. The vibrating mirror in the interferometer will be replaced with a spatial light modulator. The modulator will allow the optical phase distribution in one leg of the interferometer to be programmed independently at 640 by 480 points for detailed control of the forces and moments. The interference patterns will be monitored to measure the motion of the SPM tips. Neuralnetwork technology will provide fast analysis of the interference patterns for diagnostic purposes and for local or remote feedback control of the tips. This effort also requires theoretical and modeling support in the form of scattering calculations for twin coherent beams from nonspherical particles.

  8. Light-induced rotations of chiral birefringent microparticles in optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, M. G.; Mazzulla, A.; Pagliusi, P.; Magazzù, A.; Hernandez, R. J.; Provenzano, C.; Gucciardi, P. G.; Maragò, O. M.; Cipparrone, G.

    2016-01-01

    We study the rotational dynamics of solid chiral and birefringent microparticles induced by elliptically polarized laser light in optical tweezers. We find that both reflection of left circularly polarized light and residual linear retardance affect the particle dynamics. The degree of ellipticity of laser light needed to induce rotations is found. The experimental results are compared with analytical calculations of the transfer of angular moment from elliptically polarized light to chiral birefringent particles. PMID:27601200

  9. A Laser System for the Spectroscopy of Highly-Charged Bismuth Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, S; Siegel, C; Herschbach, N; Birkl, G

    2011-01-01

    We present and characterize a laser system for the spectroscopy on highly-charged ^209Bi^82+ ions at a wavelength of 243.87 nm. For absolute frequency stabilization, the laser system is locked to a near-infra-red laser stabilized to a rubidium transition line using a transfer cavity based locking scheme. Tuning of the output frequency with high precision is achieved via a tunable rf offset lock. A sample-and-hold technique gives an extended tuning range of several THz in the UV. This scheme is universally applicable to the stabilization of laser systems at wavelengths not directly accessible to atomic or molecular resonances. We determine the frequency accuracy of the laser system using Doppler-free absorption spectroscopy of Te_2 vapour at 488 nm. Scaled to the target wavelength of 244 nm, we achieve a frequency uncertainty of \\sigma_{244nm} = 6.14 MHz (one standard deviation) over six days of operation.

  10. Laser Spectroscopy Based Multi-Gas Monitor Technology Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgett, Paul D.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    The timing was right in the “evolution” of low power tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) to design a spacecraft cabin air monitor around technology being developed at a small company funded by SBIR grants. NASA Centers had been monitoring their progress hoping that certain key gaps in the long term gas monitoring development roadmap could be filled by TDLS. The first iteration of a monitor for multiple gases called the Multi-Gas Monitor (MGM) which measures oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia and water vapor, as well as temperature and pressure. In January 2013, the ISS Program being particularly interested in ammonia funded a technology demonstration of MGM. The project was a joint effort between Vista Photonics for the sensor, NASA-JSC for project management and laboratory calibration, and Nanoracks for the enclosure and payload certification/integration. Nanoracks was selected in order to use their new experimental infrastructure located in an EXPRESS rack in the JEM. The MGM enclosure has multiple power supply options including 5VDC USB interface to the Nanoracks Frame, 28VDC Express Rack power and internal rechargeable batteries. MGM was calibrated at NASA-JSC in July 2013, delivered to ISS on 37 Soyuz in November 2013 and was installed and activated in February 2014. MGM resided in the Nanoracks Frame making continuous measurements the majority of the time, but also spent a day in Node 3 on battery power, and a month in the US Lab Module on 28VDC power, as part of the demonstration. Data was downloaded via Nanoracks on roughly a weekly basis. Comparisons were made with data from the Major Constituents Analyzer (MCA) which draws and analyzes air from JEM and other modules several times per hour. A crewmember challenged the carbon dioxide channel by breathing into the intake upon startup, and challenged the ammonia channel later using a commercial ammonia inhalant. Many interesting phenomena in the cabin atmosphere were detected during the tech demo

  11. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  12. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  13. Metastable Magnesium fluorescence spectroscopy using a frequency-stabilized 517 nm laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Ming; Jensen, Brian B; Therkildsen, Kasper T

    2009-01-01

    We present a laser operating at 517 nm for our Magnesium laser-cooling and atomic clock project. A two-stage Yb-doped fiber amplifier (YDFA) system generates more than 1.5 W of 1034 nm light when seeded with a 15 mW diode laser. Using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide, we...... obtained more than 40 mW of 517 nm output power by single pass frequency doubling. In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy of metastable magnesium atoms could be used to stabilize the 517 nm laser to an absolute frequency within 1 MHz....

  14. Steerable optical tweezers for ultracold atom studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, K O; McKellar, T; Fekete, J; Rakonjac, A; Deb, A B; Kjærgaard, N

    2014-04-01

    We report on the implementation of an optical tweezer system for controlled transport of ultracold atoms along a narrow, static confinement channel. The tweezer system is based on high-efficiency acousto-optic deflectors and offers two-dimensional control over beam position. This opens up the possibility for tracking the transport channel when shuttling atomic clouds along it, forestalling atom spilling. Multiple clouds can be tracked independently by time-shared tweezer beams addressing individual sites in the channel. The deflectors are controlled using a multichannel direct digital synthesizer, which receives instructions on a submicrosecond time scale from a field-programmable gate array. Using the tweezer system, we demonstrate sequential binary splitting of an ultracold 87Rb cloud into 2(5) clouds.

  15. A DNA tweezer-actuated enzyme nanoreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minghui; Fu, Jinglin; Hejesen, Christian; Yang, Yuhe; Woodbury, Neal W; Gothelf, Kurt; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The functions of regulatory enzymes are essential to modulating cellular pathways. Here we report a tweezer-like DNA nanodevice to actuate the activity of an enzyme/cofactor pair. A dehydrogenase and NAD(+) cofactor are attached to different arms of the DNA tweezer structure and actuation of enzymatic function is achieved by switching the tweezers between open and closed states. The enzyme/cofactor pair is spatially separated in the open state with inhibited enzyme function, whereas in the closed state, enzyme is activated by the close proximity of the two molecules. The conformational state of the DNA tweezer is controlled by the addition of specific oligonucleotides that serve as the thermodynamic driver (fuel) to trigger the change. Using this approach, several cycles of externally controlled enzyme inhibition and activation are successfully demonstrated. This principle of responsive enzyme nanodevices may be used to regulate other types of enzymes and to introduce feedback or feed-forward control loops.

  16. Investigation of Normalization Methods using Plasma Parameters for Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) under simulated Martian Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Vogt, David; Schröder, Susanne; Hübers, H.-W.

    2017-01-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy data need to be normalized, especially in the field of planetary exploration We investigated plasma parameters as temperature and electron density for this purpose.

  17. Comparing predictive ability of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy to Near Infrared Spectroscopy for soil texture and organic carbon determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knadel, Maria; Peng, Yi; Gislum, René;

    and texture was tested and compared with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique and traditional laboratory analysis. Calibration models were developed on 50 topsoil samples. For all properties except silt, higher predictive ability of LIBS than NIRS models was obtained. Successful calibrations indicate......Soil organic carbon (SOC) and texture have a practical value for agronomy and the environment. Thus, alternative techniques to supplement or substitute for the expensive conventional analysis of soil are developed. Here the feasibility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine SOC...

  18. Characterising Conical Refraction Optical Tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, Craig; Rafailov, Edik; McGloin, David

    2014-01-01

    Conical refraction occurs when a beam of light travels through an appropriately cut biaxial crystal. By focussing the conically refracted beam through a high numerical aperture microscope objective, conical refraction optical tweezers can be created, allowing for particle manipulation in both Raman spots and in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings. We present a thorough quantification of the trapping properties of such a beam, focussing on the trap stiffness and how this varies with trap power and trapped particle location. We show that the lower Raman spot can be thought of as a single-beam optical gradient force trap, while radiation pressure dominates in the upper Raman spot, leading to optical levitation rather than trapping. Particles in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings experience a lower trap stiffness than particles in the lower Raman spot but benefit from rotational control.

  19. Measurement of OH reactivity by laser flash photolysis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Daniel; Whalley, Lisa K.; Ingham, Trevor; Edwards, Peter M.; Cryer, Danny R.; Brumby, Charlotte A.; Seakins, Paul W.; Heard, Dwayne E.

    2016-07-01

    OH reactivity (k'OH) is the total pseudo-first-order loss rate coefficient describing the removal of OH radicals to all sinks in the atmosphere, and is the inverse of the chemical lifetime of OH. Measurements of ambient OH reactivity can be used to discover the extent to which measured OH sinks contribute to the total OH loss rate. Thus, OH reactivity measurements enable determination of the comprehensiveness of measurements used in models to predict air quality and ozone production, and, in conjunction with measurements of OH radical concentrations, to assess our understanding of OH production rates. In this work, we describe the design and characterisation of an instrument to measure OH reactivity using laser flash photolysis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (LFP-LIF) spectroscopy. The LFP-LIF technique produces OH radicals in isolation, and thus minimises potential interferences in OH reactivity measurements owing to the reaction of HO2 with NO which can occur if HO2 is co-produced with OH in the instrument. Capabilities of the instrument for ambient OH reactivity measurements are illustrated by data collected during field campaigns in London, UK, and York, UK. The instrumental limit of detection for k'OH was determined to be 1.0 s-1 for the campaign in London and 0.4 s-1 for the campaign in York. The precision, determined by laboratory experiment, is typically < 1 s-1 for most ambient measurements of OH reactivity. Total uncertainty in ambient measurements of OH reactivity is ˜ 6 %. We also present the coupling and characterisation of the LFP-LIF instrument to an atmospheric chamber for measurements of OH reactivity during simulated experiments, and provide suggestions for future improvements to OH reactivity LFP-LIF instruments.

  20. Developments towards in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy studies of actinium isotopes at LISOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeder, S., E-mail: s.raeder@gsi.de [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bastin, B. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 55027, 14076 Caen (France); Block, M. [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut für Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg Universität, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Creemers, P. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Delahaye, P. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 55027, 14076 Caen (France); Ferrer, R. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Fléchard, X. [LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, Caen (France); Franchoo, S. [Institute de Physique Nucléaire (IPN) d’Orsay, 91406 Orsay, Cedex (France); Ghys, L. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Center, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Gaffney, L.P.; Granados, C. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Heinke, R. [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universität, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Hijazi, L. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 55027, 14076 Caen (France); and others

    2016-06-01

    To study exotic nuclides at the borders of stability with laser ionization and spectroscopy techniques, highest efficiencies in combination with a high spectral resolution are required. These usually opposing requirements are reconciled by applying the in-gas-laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) technique in the supersonic gas jet produced by a de Laval nozzle installed at the exit of the stopping gas cell. Carrying out laser ionization in the low-temperature and low density supersonic gas jet eliminates pressure broadening, which will significantly improve the spectral resolution. This article presents the required modifications at the Leuven Isotope Separator On-Line (LISOL) facility that are needed for the first on-line studies of in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy. Different geometries for the gas outlet and extraction ion guides have been tested for their performance regarding the acceptance of laser ionized species as well as for their differential pumping capacities. The specifications and performance of the temporarily installed high repetition rate laser system, including a narrow bandwidth injection-locked Ti:sapphire laser, are discussed and first preliminary results on neutron-deficient actinium isotopes are presented indicating the high capability of this novel technique.

  1. [Research Progress on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Based on Resonance Excitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu-zhao; Hao, Zhong-qi; Guo, Lian-bo; Li, Xiang-you; Lu, Yong-feng; Zeng, Xiao-yan

    2015-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), a new kind of atomic spectrum analysis technology, has attracted much atterition of the researchers due to its characteristics of real-time, simultaneous multi-element analysis, and no sample preparation. However, the poor analytical sensitivity has been an important factor that restricts the development of this technology. LIBS based on resonance excitation combines atomic fluorescence spectroscopy and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and selectively excites the target elements. In this way, the analytical sensitivity of LIBS can be improved substantially and its application for trace elements detection is greatly expanded. In this paper, the research development of LIBS based on resonance excitation is summarized. The generation of atomic, fluorescence spectrum in laser-induced plasma, the typical classification and the basic principle of LIBS based on resonance. excitation are introduced. The influence of ablation laser energy, resonant laser energy and wavelength, delay between the ablation laser and the resonant laser, and the gate width on spectral enhancement are analyzed in detail. The application status and deficiencies of LIBS based on resonance excitation in the fields of metallurgy, environmental monitoring and isotope detection are elaborated. Future prospects of LIBS based on resonance excitation are also described.

  2. Analysis of plutonium oxide surrogate residue using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Hongbo [Department of Applied Physics, College of Science, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing (China); Yueh, F.Y.; Miller, Tracy [Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET), Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS 39759-7704 (United States); Singh, Jagdish P. [Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET), Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS 39759-7704 (United States)], E-mail: singh@icet.msstate.edu; Zeigler, Kristine E.; Marra, James C. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2008-09-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was used to determine the elemental composition of a CeO{sub 2} composite powder for process control verification during lanthanide borosilicate glass fabrication. Cerium oxide is used as a surrogate for plutonium oxide, which along with other canister contents will be combined with frit to make glass. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy data for the composition of the CeO{sub 2} batch containing concentrations of Ce, Cr, Si, Fe, Ta, Ni, Zn, Al Mg, Gd, and W were quantitatively determined from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy spectra of both pellet and powder samples. The results of both forms were compared and it was determined that the pellet data gave slightly better precision than the powder sample.

  3. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single living cells: principle and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jianliao; Wei, Qing; Wang, Yuzhu; Li, Yong Qing

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the principle and applications of the combination technique of optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy for real-time analysis of single living cells. We demonstrate that the information of each substance inside a captured cell can be retrieved by the Raman spectrum of the cell. The effect of alcohol solution on single human Red Blood Cell (RBC) is investigated using near-infrared laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS). The significant difference between the spectrum of fresh RBC and the spectrum of RBC exposed to alcohol is observed due to the degradation of RBC. We also present the preliminary study result on the diagnosis of colorectal cancer using LTRS system.

  4. Wideband laser locking to an atomic reference with modulation transfer spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negnevitsky, V; Turner, L D

    2013-02-11

    We demonstrate that conventional modulated spectroscopy apparatus, used for laser frequency stabilization in many atomic physics laboratories, can be enhanced to provide a wideband lock delivering deep suppression of frequency noise across the acoustic range. Using an acousto-optic modulator driven with an agile oscillator, we show that wideband frequency modulation of the pump laser in modulation transfer spectroscopy produces the unique single lock-point spectrum previously demonstrated with electro-optic phase modulation. We achieve a laser lock with 100 kHz feedback bandwidth, limited by our laser control electronics. This bandwidth is sufficient to reduce frequency noise by 30 dB across the acoustic range and narrows the imputed linewidth by a factor of five.

  5. Simultaneous laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and Pd-assisted methane decomposition at different pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyhani, A. [Phys. Dept., Faculty of Science, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin, 34149-16818 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, S.Z. [Phys. Dept., Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parvin, P., E-mail: parvin@aut.ac.ir [Phys. Dept., Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoudi, Z. [Phys. Dept., Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Methane decomposition is investigated during Pd-assisted laser induced plasma in the controlled chamber at various pressures using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Real time LIBS monitoring is applied to reveal the involved mechanisms during methane decomposition by inspecting the plasma parameters at mano-metric pressures of 1 to 10 mbar. The dependence of electron density and plasma temperature with pressure is also studied. It is shown that the plasma recreates higher hydrocarbons during the decomposition of methane. In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy are applied to support the findings. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous laser induced breakdown spectroscopy Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pd-assisted methane decomposition Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanosecond pulsed laser decomposition of methane Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Generation of higher hydrocarbon Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dependence of electron density and temperature of induced plasma with pressure.

  6. Time resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for calcium concentration detection in water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jiang-lai; LU Yuan; Li Ying; CHENG Kai; GUO Jin-jia; ZHENG Rong-er

    2011-01-01

    @@ The laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an element analysis technique with the advantages of real time detection, simultaneous multi-element identification, and in-situ and stand-off capacities.To evaluate its potential of ocean applications, in this paper, the time resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for calcium concentration detection in water is investigated.With the optimum experimental parameters, the plasma emission lifetime is determined to be about 500 ns with 532 nm laser excitation, and 1000 ns with 1064 nm laser excitation.The lowest detection concentration of 50ppm is achieved for calcium detection in CaC12 water solution using the 532 nm LIBS.Even better detection sensitivity is achieved using the 1064 nm LIBS, and the resulted lowest detection concentration of calcium is 25 ppm.The results suggest that it is feasible to develop LIBS as an on-line sensor for metal element monitoring in the sea.

  7. An all-solid state laser system for the laser ion sources RILIS and in-source laser spectroscopy of astatine at ISOLDE/CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, Sebastian

    2012-09-24

    This doctoral thesis describes the extension of the resonance ionization laser ion source RILIS at CERN/ISOLDE by the addition of an all-solid state tunable titanium:sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser system to complement the well-established system of dye lasers. Synchronous operation of the so called Dual RILIS system of Ti:Sa and dye lasers was investigated and the potential for increased ion beam intensity, reliability, and reduced setup time has been demonstrated. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy was performed at ISOLDE/CERN and at ISAC/TRIUMF radioactive ion beam facilities to develop an efficient and selective three-colour ionization scheme for the purely radioactive element astatine. A LabVIEW based monitoring, control and measurement system was conceived which enabled, in conjunction with Dual RILIS operation, the spectroscopy of high lying Rydberg states, from which the ionization potential of the astatine atom was determined for the first time experimentally.

  8. An all-solid state laser system for the laser ion source RILIS and in-source laser spectroscopy of astatine at ISOLDE, CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Rothe, Sebastian; Nörtershäuser, W

    This doctoral thesis describes the extension of the resonance ionization laser ion source RILIS at ISOLDE, CERN, by the addition of an all-solid state tuneable titanium: sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser system to complement the well-established system of dye lasers. Synchronous operation of the so called Dual RILIS system of Ti:Sa and dye lasers was investigated and the potential for increased ion beam intensity, reliability, and reduced setup time has been demonstrated. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy was performed at ISOLDE, CERN, and at ISAC, TRIUMF, radioactive ion beam facilities to develop an efficient and selective three-colour ionization scheme for the purely radioactive element astatine. A LabVIEW based monitoring, control and measurement system was conceived which enabled, in conjunction with Dual RILIS operation, the spectroscopy of high lying Rydberg states, from which the ionization potential of the astatine atom was determined for the first time experimentally.

  9. [Influence of laser power and incident angle as well as testing distance on laser inducted breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technology for spectroscopy diagnosis and multi-element analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yang; Zhu, Ri-Hong; Shen, Hua; Gu, Jin-Liang

    2011-10-01

    Laser inducted breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technology has been used widely for the multi-element analysis of different samples and also an effective way to realize the spectroscopy diagnosis applied to calculating the electron temperature and vibration-rotation temperature etc of some certain elements. It is a highly effective measurement for its non-contact and nondestructive on-line analysis with the help of a high-speed response CCD camera. In the present paper, the authors tested an alley though LIBS technology to determine its elements in terms of species and quantities and also discussed some influences of the incident angle and the power changes of the laser beam as well as the measurement distance changes on the experimental results and and gave appropriate theoretical explanation.

  10. Note: A novel technique for analysis of aqueous solutions by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusak, D A; Anthony, T P; Bell, Z T

    2015-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates typically consist of gold or silver nanoparticles deposited on a non-conductive substrate. In Raman spectroscopy, the nanoparticles produce an enhancement of the electromagnetic field which, in turn, leads to greater electronic excitation of molecules in the local environment. Here, we show that these same surfaces can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio obtained in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of aqueous solutions. In this case, the SERS substrates not only lower breakdown thresholds and lead to more efficient plasma initiation but also provide an appropriately wettable surface for the deposition of the liquid. We refer to this technique as surface-enhanced laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  11. Laser sources and techniques for spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, A.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program focuses on the development of novel laser and spectroscopic techniques in the IR, UV, and VUV regions for studying combustion related molecular dynamics at the microscopic level. Laser spectroscopic techniques have proven to be extremely powerful in the investigation of molecular processes which require very high sensitivity and selectivity. The authors approach is to use quantum electronic and non-linear optical techniques to extend the spectral coverage and to enhance the optical power of ultrahigh resolution laser sources so as to obtain and analyze photoionization, fluorescence, and photoelectron spectra of jet-cooled free radicals and of reaction products resulting from unimolecular and bimolecular dissociations. New spectroscopic techniques are developed with these sources for the detection of optically thin and often short-lived species. Recent activities center on regenerative amplification of high resolution solid-state lasers, development of tunable high power mid-IR lasers and short-pulse UV/VUV tunable lasers, and development of a multipurpose high-order suppressor crossed molecular beam apparatus for use with synchrotron radiation sources. This program also provides scientific and technical support within the Chemical Sciences Division to the development of LBL`s Combustion Dynamics Initiative.

  12. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopies of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast ellipsometry and transient absorption spectroscopies are used to measure material dynamics under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, and volumetric compression induced by shock wave loading with a chirped, spectrally clipped shock drive pulse.

  13. Cavity ringdown laser absorption spectroscopy detection of formyl (HCO) radical in a low pressure flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, J. J.; Rakestraw, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    The formyl radical has been detected via the ÖX˜ system in a low pressure CH 4/N 2/O 2 flame using cavity ringdown laser absorption spectroscopy. The direct absorption data obtained in these initial studies allows determination of the absolute HCO concentration in the flame of ca. 2.1(±0.9) × 10 13 mol cm -3, which is in excellent agreement with flame chemistry simulations. The extrapolated detection limit at 300 K of ≈ 1.4(±0.6) × 10 11 mol cm -3 is comparable to that of other methods, including intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy.

  14. [Application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to microdetection of Au film machining].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dong-qing; Zhou, Ming; Shen, Jian; Ren, Nai-fei; Cai, Lan

    2008-10-01

    Film micro-machining is a core in micro- and nano- technology, micro-electro-mechanical systems and photoelectron field. However, it is difficult to control the quality of machining in processing film. In the present paper the authors propose a method to solve this problem by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The authors investigated the relation between excitation condition and the quantity of plasma in the process of micro-machining by pulse laser. At low frequency (machining become true.

  15. Development of a gated optical multichannel analyser for laser-plasma spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Corcoran, Richard

    1990-01-01

    An Optical Multichannel Analyser (OMA) has been developed for the detection of radiation from laser-produced plasmas (LPPs). The system is based on a gated image - intensified photodiode array (PDA) Software for the control of, and data acquisition from, the OMA system has been developed. A high resolution (10ns) delay generator was also designed and constructed to permit timeresolved. optical spectroscopy. The system has been tested and operated with a laser plasma source m...

  16. Laser Optogalvanic Spectroscopy: Experimental Details and Potential Applications in R and D

    OpenAIRE

    M.N. Reddy

    1994-01-01

    Laser Optogalvanic Spectroscopy (LOGS) is an extremely sensitive detection technique based on the 'Optogalvanic Effect'. The impedance change of gaseous discharge following the absorption of resonant laser light by the discharge species has proved to be a powerful spectroscopic tool to investigate all kinds of matter in vapour phase in discharge plasmas and flames. LOGS does not require any optical detector and the signal-to-noise ratios are often greater than 10/sup 3/. The advent of...

  17. [Classification of results of studying blood plasma with laser correlation spectroscopy based on semiotics of preclinical and clinical states].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternovoĭ, K S; Kryzhanovskiĭ, G N; Musiĭchuk, Iu I; Noskin, L A; Klopov, N V; Noskin, V A; Starodub, N F

    1998-01-01

    The usage of laser correlation spectroscopy for verification of preclinical and clinical states is substantiated. Developed "semiotic" classifier for solving the problems of preclinical and clinical states is presented. The substantiation of biological algorithms as well as the mathematical support and software for the proposed classifier for the data of laser correlation spectroscopy of blood plasma are presented.

  18. The use of lasers for studying ultrahigh speed phenomena (picoseconds): equipement of a picosecond spectroscopy laboratory using synchronized mode lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goujon, P.; Pochon, E.; Clerc, M. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Section des Recherches et de l' Interaction du Rayonnement avec la Matiere)

    1975-07-01

    The spectroscopy laboratory is equipped with a dye laser and a neodymium glass laser. Detection in one case is made by means of a streak picosecond camera capable of a 5 ps time interval. A second detection method uses a CS/sub 2/ Kerr cell switch based on the Duguay principle. The first qualitative results concerning the fluorescence of DODCI and chlorophyll in vivo as well as the bleaching and recovering of the absorption of the electron solvated in liquid ammonia, have shown that this equipment could effectively enable the observation of physical-chemical processes as brief as 5 ps. (FR)

  19. High-resolution mirror temperature mapping in GaN-based diode lasers by thermoreflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierścińska, Dorota; Marona, Łucja; Pierściński, Kamil; Wiśniewski, Przemysław; Perlin, Piotr; Bugajski, Maciej

    2017-02-01

    In this paper accurate measurements of temperature distribution on the facet of GaN-based diode lasers are presented as well as development of the instrumentation for high-resolution thermal imaging based on thermoreflectance. It is shown that thermoreflectance can be successfully applied to provide information on heat dissipation in these devices. We demonstrate the quantitative measurements of the temperature profiles and high-resolution temperature maps on the front facet of nitride lasers and prove that thermoreflectance spectroscopy can be considered as the accurate and fast nondestructive tool for investigation of thermally induced degradation modes of GaN lasers.

  20. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for real time and online elemental analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Rai, V N; Yueh, Fang-Yu; Singh, J P

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a laser based diagnostics used to study atomic emission from the expanding plasma plume formed during the laser-matter interaction. It provides valuable information about the composition of the target material. LIBS has proved its potential application in the analysis of impurities, pollutants and toxic elements in various types of matrices of different samples (solid, liquid and gases), even those present under difficult and harsh environmental conditions. This article reviews some recent developments in the field, and its wide application in various fields of research and analysis.

  1. Non-gated laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in bulk water by position-selective detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Ye; Xue, Boyang; Song, Jiaojian; Lu, Yuan; Zheng, Ronger, E-mail: rzheng@ouc.edu.cn [Optics and Optoelectronics Laboratory, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2015-09-14

    Temporal and spatial evolutions of the laser-induced plasma in bulk water are investigated using fast imaging and emission spectroscopic techniques. By tightly focusing a single-pulse nanosecond Nd: YAG laser beam into the bulk water, we generate a strongly expanded plasma with high reproducibility. Such a strong expanding plasma enables us to obtain well-resolved spectral lines by means of position-selective detection; hence, the time-gated detector becomes abdicable. The present results suggest not only a possible non-gated approach for underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy but also give an insight into the plasma generation and expansion in bulk water.

  2. Single-order laser high harmonics in XUV for ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular wavepacket dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuho Fushitani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present applications of extreme ultraviolet (XUV single-order laser harmonics to gas-phase ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy. Ultrashort XUV pulses at 80 nm are obtained as the 5th order harmonics of the fundamental laser at 400 nm by using Xe or Kr as the nonlinear medium and separated from other harmonic orders by using an indium foil. The single-order laser harmonics is applied for real-time probing of vibrational wavepacket dynamics of I2 molecules in the bound and dissociating low-lying electronic states and electronic-vibrational wavepacket dynamics of highly excited Rydberg N2 molecules.

  3. Development of Advanced Seed Laser Modules for Lidar and Spectroscopy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Rosiewicz, Alex; Coleman, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on recent progress made in the development of highly compact, single mode, distributed feedback laser (DFB) seed laser modules for lidar and spectroscopy applications from space based platforms. One of the intended application of this technology is in the NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The DFB laser modules operating at 1571 nm and 1262 nm have advanced current and temperature drivers built into them. A combination of temperature and current tuning allows coarse and fine adjustment of the diode wavelengths.

  4. Fiber-Based Laser Transmitter for Oxygen A-Band Spectroscopy and Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Abshire, James B.

    2010-01-01

    A fiber-based laser transmitter has been designed for active remote-sensing spectroscopy. The transmitter uses a master-oscillator-power-amplifier (MOPA) configuration with a distributed feedback diode-laser master oscillator and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier. The output from the MOPA is frequency-doubled with a periodically poled nonlinear crystal. The utility of this single-frequency, wavelength-tunable, power-scalable laser has been demonstrated in a spectroscopic measurement of the diatomic oxygen A-band.

  5. Laser spectroscopy of rare earth ions in lead borate glasses and transparent glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarski, W. A.; Grobelny, Ł.; Pisarska, J.; Lisiecki, R.; Dominiak-Dzik, G.; Ryba-Romanowski, W.

    2010-03-01

    Rare earth doped lead borate glasses and transparent glass-ceramics have been studied using optical spectroscopy. Based on the absorption, emission and its decay and the Judd-Ofelt calculations, several radiative and laser parameters for Ln 3+ ( Ln = Pr, Nd, Eu, Dy, Er, Tm) were evaluated. The large values of luminescence lifetime, quantum efficiency of excited state and room temperature peak stimulated emission cross-section suggest efficient laser transitions of Ln 3+ ions in lead borate glasses. The obtained results indicate that lead borate glasses and glass-ceramics containing Ln 3+ ions are promising host matrices for solid-state laser applications.

  6. Photoacoustic overtone spectroscopy of liquids with continuous wave laser excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzares, Carlos; I

    1991-06-01

    To study overtone absorptions in condensed phases, a technique is presented which uses a piezoelectric detector, lock-in amplification and a cw dye laser modulated at frequencies from 10 to 120 kHz with an acousto-optic modulator. Acoustic resonance frequencies calculated for a cylindrical cell are observed experimentally using liquid Si(CH 3) 4 as the sample. The acoustic signal is found to be proportional to the laser power. The fifth overtone of the CH streching mode of Si(CH 3) 4 has been recorded pure and in solutions with CCl 4. With a 1% solution of Si(CH 3) 4 in CCl 4, an absorbance of approximately 1 × 10 -5 cm -1 is detected with a dye laser power of 55 mW.

  7. Laser spectroscopy and photochemistry on metal surfaces, pt.1

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, HL

    1995-01-01

    Using lasers to induce and probe surface processes has the advantages of quantum state specificity, species selectivity, surface sensitivity, fast time-resolution, high frequency resolution, and accessibility to full pressure ranges. These advantages make it highly desirable to use light to induce, control, or monitor surface chemical and physical processes. Recent applications of laser based techniques in studying surface processes have stimulated new developments and enabled the understanding of fundamental problems in energy transfer and reactions. This volume will include discussions on sp

  8. Laser spectroscopy and photochemistry on metal surfaces, pt.2

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, HL

    1995-01-01

    Using lasers to induce and probe surface processes has the advantages of quantum state specificity, species selectivity, surface sensitivity, fast time-resolution, high frequency resolution, and accessibility to full pressure ranges. These advantages make it highly desirable to use light to induce, control, or monitor surface chemical and physical processes. Recent applications of laser based techniques in studying surface processes have stimulated new developments and enabled the understanding of fundamental problems in energy transfer and reactions. This volume will include discussions on sp

  9. Laser synthesis and spectroscopy of acetonitrile/silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, S. T.; Liu, X.; Duncan, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    Silver nanoparticles with acetonitrile ligands are produced in a laser ablation flow reactor. Excimer laser ablation produces gas phase metal clusters which are thermalized with helium or argon collisions in the flowtube, and reactions with acetonitrile vapor coordinate this ligand to the particle surface. The gaseous mixture is captured in a cryogenic trap; warming produces a solution of excess ligand and coated particles. TEM images reveal particle sizes of 10-30 nm diameter. UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectra are compared to those of standard silver nanoparticles with surfactant coatings. Deep-UV ligand absorption is strongly enhanced by nanoparticle adsorption.

  10. Micro magnetic tweezers for nanomanipulation inside live cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. de Vries; G.E. Krenn; R. van Driel; J.S. Kanger

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the design, realization, and characterization of a multi-pole magnetic tweezers that enables us to maneuver small magnetic probes inside living cells. So far, magnetic tweezers can be divided into two categories: I), tweezers that allow the exertion of high forces but consist of o

  11. Micro Magnetic Tweezers for Nanomanipulation Inside Live Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Anthony H.B.; Krenn, Bea E.; Driel, van Roel; Kanger, Johannes S.

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the design, realization, and characterization of a multi-pole magnetic tweezers that enables us to maneuver small magnetic probes inside living cells. So far, magnetic tweezers can be divided into two categories: I), tweezers that allow the exertion of high forces but consist of o

  12. Theory of optical-tweezers forces near a plane interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutra, Rafael de Sousa; Neto, P. A. Maia; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Optical-tweezers experiments in molecular and cell biology often take place near the surface of the microscope slide that defines the bottom of the sample chamber. There, as elsewhere, force measurements require forcecalibrated tweezers. In bulk, one can calculate the tweezers force from first...

  13. Advancements in time-resolved x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; Widmann, K; Ao, T; Ping, Y; Hunter, J; Ng, A

    2005-07-28

    Time-resolved soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to probe the non-steady-state evolution of the valence band electronic structure of laser heated ultra-thin (50 nm) metal foils and bulk semiconductors. Single-shot soft x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy with picosecond time resolution was used in combination with optical measurements of the disassembly dynamics that have shown the existence of a metastable liquid phase in fs-laser heated metal foils persisting 4-5 ps. This metastable phase is studied using a 527 nm wavelength 400 fs laser pulse containing 0.3-2.5 mJ laser energy focused in a large 500 x 700 {micro}m{sup 2} spot to create heated conditions of 0.2-1.8 x 10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2} intensity. The unique LLNL COMET compact tabletop soft x-ray laser source provided the necessary high photon flux, highly monoenergetic, picosecond pulse duration, and coherence for observing the evolution of changes in the valence band electronic structure of laser heated metals and semiconductors with picosecond time resolution. This work demonstrates the continuing development of a powerful new technique for probing reaction dynamics and changes of local order on surfaces on their fundamental timescales including phenomena such as non-thermal melting, chemical bond formation, intermediate reaction steps, and the existence of transient reaction products.

  14. Determination of Different Metals in Steel Waste Samples Using laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Bakry

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Elemental analysis of waste samples collected from steel products manufacturing plant (SPS located at industrial city of Jeddah, Saudi-Arabia has been carried out using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS. The 1064 nm laser radiations from a Nd:YAG laser at an irradiance of 7.6  1010 W cm –2 were used. Atomic emission spectra of the elements present in the waste samples were recorded in the 200 – 620 nm region. Elements such as Fe, W, Ti, Al, Mg, Ca, S, Mn, and Na were detected in these samples. Quantitative determination of the elemental concentration was obtained for these metals against certified standard samples. Parametric dependences of LIBS signal intensity on incident laser energy and time delay between the laser pulse and data acquisition system were also carried out.

  15. Characterization of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (fsLIBS) and applications for biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ruby K; Knorr, Florian; Smith, Zachary J; Kahraman, Mehmet; Madsen, Dorte; Larsen, Delmar S; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    We characterize the femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (fsLIBS) signal for biological tissues as a function of different excitation parameters with femtosecond laser systems. These parameters include laser energy, depth of focus, and number of pulses per focal volume. We used femtosecond laser pulses of 800 nm and energy between 25 and 123 μJ to generate LIBS signals in biological tissues. As expected, we observed a linear increase in the fsLIBS intensity as a function of the laser energy. In addition, we show that moving the beam out of focus and the presence of overlapping pulses on the same focal area leads to a decrease in fsLIBS intensity due to changes in focal spot size. We also demonstrate that fsLIBS can distinguish between different biological tissue samples.

  16. Broadband spectroscopy with external cavity quantum cascade lasers beyond conventional absorption measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, Armin; Pfeifer, Marcel; Konz, Werner; Herbst, Johannes; Axtmann, Felix

    2014-05-07

    Laser spectroscopy is a powerful tool for analyzing small molecules, i.e. in the gas phase. In the mid-infrared spectral region quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have been established as the most frequently used laser radiation source. Spectroscopy of larger molecules in the gas phase, of complex mixtures, and analysis in the liquid phase requires a broader tuning range and is thus still the domain of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. However, the development of tunable external cavity (EC) QCLs is starting to change this situation. The main advantage of QCLs is their high spectral emission power that is enhanced by a factor of 10(4) compared with thermal light sources. Obviously, transmission measurements with EC-QCLs in strongly absorbing samples are feasible, which can hardly be measured by FTIR due to detector noise limitations. We show that the high power of EC-QCLs facilitates spectroscopy beyond simple absorption measurements. Starting from QCL experiments with liquid samples, we show results of fiber evanescent field analysis (FEFA) to detect pesticides in drinking water. FEFA is a special case of attenuated total reflection spectroscopy. Furthermore, powerful CW EC-QCLs enable fast vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy of chiral molecules in the liquid phase - a technique which is very time consuming with standard FTIR equipment. We present results obtained for the chiral compound 1,1'-bi-2-naphthol (BINOL). Finally, powerful CW EC-QCLs enable the application of laser photothermal emission spectroscopy (LPTES). We demonstrate this for a narrowband and broadband absorber in the gas phase. All three techniques have great potential for MIR process analytical applications.

  17. Multicomponent gas analysis using broadband quantum cascade laser spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyes Reyes, A.; Hou, Z.; Van Mastrigt, E.; Horsten, R.C.; De Jongste, J.C.; Pijnenburg, M.W.; Urbach, H.P.; Bhattacharya, N.

    2014-01-01

    We present a broadband quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopic system covering the region between 850 and 1250 cm−1. Its robust multipass cavity ensures a constant interaction length over the entire spectral region. The device enables the detection and identification of numerous molecules present

  18. Multicomponent gas analysis using broadband quantum cascade laser spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyes Reyes, A.; Hou, Z.; Van Mastrigt, E.; Horsten, R.C.; De Jongste, J.C.; Pijnenburg, M.W.; Urbach, H.P.; Bhattacharya, N.

    2014-01-01

    We present a broadband quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopic system covering the region between 850 and 1250 cm−1. Its robust multipass cavity ensures a constant interaction length over the entire spectral region. The device enables the detection and identification of numerous molecules present

  19. Cavity ring down spectroscopy with a free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engeln, R.; van den Berg, E.; Meijer, G.; Lin, L.; Knippels, G.M.H.; van der Meer, A. F. G.

    1997-01-01

    A cavity ring down (CRD) absorption experiment is performed with a free-electron laser (FEL) operating in the 10-11 mu m region. A short infrared pulse of approximately 20 ns, sliced from the much longer FEL pulse, is used to measure CRD spectra of ethylene in two different ways. First, ''

  20. Use of optical tweezers to probe epithelial mechanosensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Cellular mechanosensation mechanisms have been implicated in a variety of disease states. Specifically in renal tubules, the primary cilium and associated mechanosensitive ion channels are hypothesized to play a role in water and salt homeostasis, with relevant disease states including polycystic kidney disease and hypertension. Previous experiments investigating ciliary-mediated cellular mechanosensation have used either fluid flow chambers or micropipetting to elicit a biological response. The interpretation of these experiments in terms of the ``ciliary hypothesis'' has been difficult due the spatially distributed nature of the mechanical disturbance-several competing hypotheses regarding possible roles of primary cilium, glycocalyx, microvilli, cell junctions, and actin cytoskeleton exist. I report initial data using optical tweezers to manipulate individual primary cilia in an attempt to elicit a mechanotransduction response-specifically, the release of intracellular calcium. The advantage of using laser tweezers over previous work is that the applied disturbance is highly localized. I find that stimulation of a primary cilium elicits a response, while stimulation of the apical surface membrane does not. These results lend support to the hypothesis that the primary cilium mediates transduction of mechanical strain into a biochemical response in renal epithelia.

  1. Multiplying optical tweezers force using a micro-lever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Lin, Chin-Te; Liu, Yi-Jui; Hwang, Jiann-Lih; Chung, Tien-Tung; Baldeck, Patrice L

    2011-10-10

    This study presents a photo-driven micro-lever fabricated to multiply optical forces using the two-photon polymerization 3D-microfabrication technique. The micro-lever is a second class lever comprising an optical trapping sphere, a beam, and a pivot. A micro-spring is placed between the short and long arms to characterize the induced force. This design enables precise manipulation of the micro-lever by optical tweezers at the micron scale. Under optical dragging, the sphere placed on the lever beam moves, resulting in torque that induces related force on the spring. The optical force applied at the sphere is approximately 100 to 300 pN, with a laser power of 100 to 300 mW. In this study, the optical tweezers drives the micro-lever successfully. The relationship between the optical force and the spring constant can be determined by using the principle of leverage. The arm ratio design developed in this study multiplies the applied optical force by 9. The experimental results are in good agreement with the simulation of spring property.

  2. Study of gas exchange in insects by sensitive laser photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persijn, S.T.; Harren, F.J.M.; Wijkamp, I.; Mitrayana, L.

    2006-01-01

    Although quantifying gas exchange in small insect species is of great biological interest, the progress in this field of research is hampered by the inability of most gas detectors to monitor the low emission rates from these insects. Recently, laser based photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) has emerg

  3. Monitoring Cerebral perfusion using near infrared spectroscopy and laser doppler flowmetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaessens, J.H.G.M.; Kolkman, R.G.M.; Hopman, J.C.W.; Hondebrink, E.; Liem, K.D.; Steenbergen, W.; Mul, de F.F.M.; Thijssen, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the simultaneous use of two, noninvasive, near-infrared techniques near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and a continuous wave NIR laser Doppler flow system (LDF) to measure changes in the blood oxygenation, blood concentration and blood flow velocity in the brain. A piglet was used

  4. Monitoring cerebral perfusion using near-infrared spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaessens, J.H.G.M.; Kolkman, R.G.; Hopman, J.C.W.; Hondebrink, E.; Liem, K.D.; Steenbergen, W.; Mul, F.F. de; Thijssen, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the simultaneous use of two, noninvasive, near-infrared techniques near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and a continuous wave NIR laser Doppler flow system (LDF) to measure changes in the blood oxygenation, blood concentration and blood flow velocity in the brain. A piglet was used

  5. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for quantification of heavy metals in soils and sediments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ambushe, AA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) will be used to determine the contents of heavy metals in soils and sediments. LIBS results will be compared with the results obtained by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP...

  6. Study of gas exchange in insects by sensitive laser photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persijn, S.T.; Harren, F.J.M.; Wijkamp, I.; Mitrayana, L.

    2006-01-01

    Although quantifying gas exchange in small insect species is of great biological interest, the progress in this field of research is hampered by the inability of most gas detectors to monitor the low emission rates from these insects. Recently, laser based photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) has

  7. Laser correlation spectroscopy in the diagnosis of tumor diseases of the female reproductive system (preliminary results)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneeva, A. A.; Sekerskaya, M. N.; Zhordaniya, K. I.; Sapezhinskiy, V. S.; Golubtsova, N. V.; Barmashov, A. E.; Gonchukov, S. A.; Ivanov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The study of blood serum of cancer patients by laser correlation spectroscopy to determine the possibility of differentiation of benign and malignant tumors of the female reproductive system. We analyzed the data and assessed the applicability of the method mentioned above target.

  8. Prospects for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for biomedical applications: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vivek Kumar; Rai, Awadhesh Kumar

    2011-09-01

    We review the different spectroscopic techniques including the most recent laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the characterization of materials in any phase (solid, liquid or gas) including biological materials. A brief history of the laser and its application in bioscience is presented. The development of LIBS, its working principle and its instrumentation (different parts of the experimental set up) are briefly summarized. The generation of laser-induced plasma and detection of light emitted from this plasma are also discussed. The merit and demerits of LIBS are discussed in comparison with other conventional analytical techniques. The work done using the laser in the biomedical field is also summarized. The analysis of different tissues, mineral analysis in different organs of the human body, characterization of different types of stone formed in the human body, analysis of biological aerosols using the LIBS technique are also summarized. The unique abilities of LIBS including detection of molecular species and calibration-free LIBS are compared with those of other conventional techniques including atomic absorption spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy, and X-ray fluorescence.

  9. Quantification of metals in preservatively-treated lumber using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brad Gething; John Janowiak; Bob Falk

    2006-01-01

    The laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique was evaluated for its capability of quantifying CCA in preservative-treated wood. The results of the study reveal that the LIBS technique can be used to predict the amount of preservative based on chromium peak analysis, but further refinement of the process is necessary before the technique is practiced. The...

  10. Use of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the analysis of poultry products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy is evaluated as a potential method to characterize a wide range of poultry product quality and safety characteristics. In one part of this study, breast meat quality indices, including pH and water holding capacity, were treated as dependent variables for correla...

  11. North American Symposium on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (NASLIBS): introduction to feature issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jagdish P; Almirall, Jose; Sabsabi, Mohamad; Miziolek, Andrzej W

    2012-03-01

    This feature issue highlights the topics of the 2011 North American Symposium on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (NASLIBS). These include LIBS application to Security and Forensic, Biomedical and Environmental, Liquid Analysis and Fundamentals of LIBS, Instrumentation/Commercialization, Fusion with LIBS, and New Frontiers. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  12. Online sensor system based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in quality inspection of demolition concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, H.; Bakker, M.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    In the C2CA project, an online sensor system is required to measure and control the quality and homogeneity of demolition concrete continuously. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a candidate to fulfil the objective in several tasks. Investigated is the ability of LIBS as an online

  13. Assaying total carotenoids in flours of corn and sweet potato flours by laser photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luterotti, S.; Bicanic, D.D.; Kijak, K.; Grbesa, D.; Martinez, E.; Spruijt, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the application of the laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) for quantification of total carotenoids (TC) in corn flours and sweetpotato flours. Overall, thirty-three different corn flours and nine sweetpotato flours were investigated. All PAS measurements were performed at roo

  14. Fast single-photon avalanche diode arrays for laser Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blacksberg, J.; Maruyama, Y.; Charbon, E.; Rossman, G.R.

    2011-01-01

    We incorporate newly developed solid-state detector technology into time-resolved laser Raman spectroscopy, demonstrating the ability to distinguish spectra from Raman and fluorescence processes. As a proof of concept, we show fluorescence rejection on highly fluorescent mineral samples willemite an

  15. Calculation and optimization of sample identification by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy via correlation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentjes, M.; Dickmann, K.; Meijer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Linear correlation analysis may be used as a technique for the identification of samples with a very similar chemical composition by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The spectrum of the “unknown” sample is correlated with a library of reference spectra. The probability of identification by

  16. Fast single-photon avalanche diode arrays for laser Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blacksberg, J.; Maruyama, Y.; Charbon, E.; Rossman, G.R.

    2011-01-01

    We incorporate newly developed solid-state detector technology into time-resolved laser Raman spectroscopy, demonstrating the ability to distinguish spectra from Raman and fluorescence processes. As a proof of concept, we show fluorescence rejection on highly fluorescent mineral samples willemite an

  17. Femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of silver within surrogate high temperature gas reactor fuel coated particles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roberts, DE

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available been studied with femtosecond Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (femto-LIBS). The SiC layer of the TRISO coated particle is the main barrier to metallic and gaseous fission products of which 110mAg is of particular interest for direct cycle high...

  18. Ultra-short laser pulse ablation using shear-force feedback: Femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samek, Ota [ISAS-Institute for Analytical Sciences, Bunsen-Kirchhoff Str.11, 44139 Dortmund (Germany)]. E-mail: samek@ansci.de; Kurowski, Andre [ISAS-Institute for Analytical Sciences, Bunsen-Kirchhoff Str.11, 44139 Dortmund (Germany); Kittel, Silke [ISAS-Institute for Analytical Sciences, Bunsen-Kirchhoff Str.11, 44139 Dortmund (Germany); Kukhlevsky, Sergei [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Ifjusag u. 6, Pecs 7624 (Hungary); Hergenroeder, Roland [ISAS-Institute for Analytical Sciences, Bunsen-Kirchhoff Str.11, 44139 Dortmund (Germany)

    2005-08-31

    This work reports on a feasibility study of proximity ablation using femtosecond pulses. Ultra-short pulses were launched to a bare tapered optical fiber and delivered to the sample. The tip-sample distance was controlled by means of shear-force feedback. Consequently, ablation craters with submicrometer dimensions were obtained. Potential analytical applications for Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique, such as e.g. inclusions in steel or bio cells, are suggested.

  19. Laser Infrared Desorption Spectroscopy to Detect Complex Organic Molecules on Icy Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollit, Luke S.; Beegle, Luther W.

    2008-01-01

    Laser Desorption-Infrared Spectroscopy (LD-IR) uses an IR laser pulse to desorb surface materials while a spectrometer measures the emission spectrum of the desorbed materials (Figure 1). In this example, laser desorption operates by having the incident laser energy absorbed by near surface material (10 microns in depth). This desorption produces a plume that exists in an excited state at elevated temperatures. A natural analog for this phenomenon can be observed when comets approach the sun and become active and individual molecular emission spectra can be observed in the IR [1,2,3,4,5]. When this occurs in comets, the same species that initially emit radiation down to the ground state are free to absorb it, reducing the amount of detectable emission features. The nature of our technique results in absorption not occurring, because the laser pulse could easily be moved away form the initial desorption plume, and still have better spatial resolution then reflectance spectroscopy. In reflectance spectroscopy, trace components have a relatively weak signal when compared to the entire active nature of the surface. With LDIR, the emission spectrum is used to identify and analyze surface materials.

  20. Laser Infrared Desorption Spectroscopy to Detect Complex Organic Molecules on Icy Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollit, Luke S.; Beegle, Luther W.

    2008-01-01

    Laser Desorption-Infrared Spectroscopy (LD-IR) uses an IR laser pulse to desorb surface materials while a spectrometer measures the emission spectrum of the desorbed materials (Figure 1). In this example, laser desorption operates by having the incident laser energy absorbed by near surface material (10 microns in depth). This desorption produces a plume that exists in an excited state at elevated temperatures. A natural analog for this phenomenon can be observed when comets approach the sun and become active and individual molecular emission spectra can be observed in the IR [1,2,3,4,5]. When this occurs in comets, the same species that initially emit radiation down to the ground state are free to absorb it, reducing the amount of detectable emission features. The nature of our technique results in absorption not occurring, because the laser pulse could easily be moved away form the initial desorption plume, and still have better spatial resolution then reflectance spectroscopy. In reflectance spectroscopy, trace components have a relatively weak signal when compared to the entire active nature of the surface. With LDIR, the emission spectrum is used to identify and analyze surface materials.

  1. Heterodyne Phase-Sensitive Dispersion Spectroscopy in the Mid-Infrared with a Quantum Cascade Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Mateos, Pedro; Hayden, Jakob; Acedo, Pablo; Lendl, Bernhard

    2017-06-06

    Molecular dispersion spectroscopy encompasses a group of spectroscopic techniques for gas analysis that retrieve the characteristics of the sample from the measurement of the profile of its refractive index in the vicinity of molecular resonances. This approach, which is in clear contrast to traditional methods based on the detection of absorption, provides inherent immunity to power fluctuations, calibration-free operation, and an output that is linearly dependent on gas concentration. Heterodyne phase-sensitive dispersion spectroscopy (HPSDS) is a very recently proposed technique for molecular dispersion spectroscopy based on tunable lasers that is characterized by a very simple architecture in which data processing and concentration retrieval are straightforward. Different HPSDS implementations have been experimentally validated in the near-IR. Here, we present the first demonstration of HPSDS in the mid-IR using a directly modulated quantum cascade laser for the measurement of CO. The setup is put under test to characterize its response to changing concentrations, pressures, and levels of optical intensity on the detector, and the limit of detection is estimated. Besides this, an experimental comparison with wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection (2f-WMS) is performed and discussed in detail in order to offer a clear view of the benefits and drawbacks that HPSDS can provide over what we could consider the reference method for gas analysis based on tunable laser spectroscopy.

  2. Automated transportation of single cells using robot-tweezer manipulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Songyu; Sun, Dong

    2011-08-01

    Manipulation of biological cells becomes increasingly important in biomedical engineering to address challenge issues in cell-cell interaction, drug discovery, and tissue engineering. Significant demand for both accuracy and productivity in cell manipulation highlights the need for automated cell transportation with integrated robotics and micro/nano manipulation technologies. Optical tweezers, which use highly focused low-power laser beams to trap and manipulate particles at micro/nanoscale, have emerged as an essential tool for manipulating single cells. In this article, we propose to use a robot-tweezer manipulation system to solve the problem of automatic transportation of biological cells, where optical tweezers function as special robot end effectors. Dynamics equation of the cell in optical tweezers is analyzed. A closed-loop controller is designed for transporting and positioning cells. Experiments are performed on live cells to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in effective cell positioning. Copyright © 2011 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An effective method for trapping ion beams in superfluid helium for laser spectroscopy experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X.F

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel laser spectroscopy technique -“OROCHI” (Optical Radioisotopes Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion-catcher has been proposed. This method aimed to investigate the structure of exotic nuclei systematically by measuring nuclear spins and moments. For in-situ laser spectroscopy of atoms in He II, a method to trap atoms precisely at the observation region of laser is highly needed. In this work, a setup composed of a degrader, two plastic scintillators and a photon detection system is further tested and verified for adjusting and checking the stopping position of 84–87Rb beam. Details of the current setup, experimental results using this method are presented.

  4. Collinear laser spectroscopy of manganese isotopes using optical pumping in ISCOOL

    CERN Multimedia

    Marsh, B A; Neyens, G; Flanagan, K; Rajabali, M M; Reponen, M; Campbell, P; Procter, T J

    Recently, optical pumping of ions has been achieved inside an ion beam cooler-buncher. By illuminating the central axis of the cooler with laser light, subsequent decay populates selected ionic metastable states. This population enhancement is retained as the ion beam is delivered to an experimental station. In the case of collinear laser spectroscopy, transitions can then be excited from a preferred metastable level, rather than the ground-state. This proposal seeks to establish and develop the technique for ISCOOL. As a test of efficiency, this will be applied to the study of $^{55-66}$Mn isotopes using collinear laser spectroscopy-expanding an earlier study where the benefit of the technique was demonstrated. This will provide nuclear spins, magnetic-dipole and electric-quadrupole moments and changes in mean-square charge radii across N = 40 shell closure candidate and into a region where an onset of deformation, and a new "island of inversion" is predicted.

  5. Laser spectroscopy of sub-micrometre- and micrometre-thick caesium-vapour layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartaleva, S; Krasteva, A; Slavov, D; Todorov, P; Vaseva, K [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, boul. Tzarigradsko shosse 72, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Moi, L [CNISM and Physics Department, University of Siena, via Roma 56, 53100 Siena - Italy (Italy); Sargsyan, A; Sarkisyan, D [Institute for Physical Research, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia, Ashtarak-0203 (Armenia)

    2013-09-30

    We present high resolution laser spectroscopy of Cs vapours confined in a unique optical cell of sub-micrometric and micrometric thickness, where a strong spatial anisotropy is present for the time of interaction between the atoms and laser radiation. Similarly to the spectra of selective specular reflection, the Doppler-free spectra of absorption and fluorescence are observed, not revealing cross-over resonances that will be useful for frequency stabilisation, provided the cell is cheap and compact. A new resonance in the fluorescence of closed transition is studied, demonstrating its high sensitivity to elastic atom – atom and atom – dielectric surface collisions. The theoretical modelling performed is in agreement with the experimental observations. (laser spectroscopy)

  6. Identification of inks and structural characterization of contemporary artistic prints by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oujja, M. [Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Vila, A. [Departament de Pintura, Conservacio-Restauracio, Facultat de Belles Arts, Universitat de Barcelona, Pau Gargallo 4, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Rebollar, E. [Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Garcia, J.F. [Departament de Pintura, Conservacio-Restauracio, Facultat de Belles Arts, Universitat de Barcelona, Pau Gargallo 4, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Castillejo, M. [Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: marta.castillejo@iqfr.csic.es

    2005-08-31

    Identification of the inks used in artistic prints and the order in which different ink layers have been applied on a paper substrate are important factors to complement the classical stylistic aspects for the authentication of this type of objects. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is investigated to determine the chemical composition and structural distribution of the constituent materials of model prints made by applying one or two layers of several blue and black inks on an Arches paper substrate. By using suitable laser excitation conditions, identification of the inks was possible by virtue of emissions from key elements present in their composition. Analysis of successive spectra on the same spot allowed the identification of the order in which the inks were applied on the paper. The results show the potential of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the chemical and structural characterization of artistic prints.

  7. In situ characterization of few-cycle laser pulses in transient absorption spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Blättermann, Alexander; Kaldun, Andreas; Ding, Thomas; Stooß, Veit; Laux, Martin; Rebholz, Marc; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy has thus far been lacking the capability to simultaneously characterize the intense laser pulses at work within a time-resolved quantum-dynamics experiment. However, precise knowledge of these pulses is key to extracting quantitative information in strong-field highly nonlinear light-matter interactions. Here, we introduce and experimentally demonstrate an ultrafast metrology tool based on the time-delay-dependent phase shift imprinted on a strong-field driven resonance. Since we analyze the signature of the laser pulse interacting with the absorbing spectroscopy target, the laser pulse duration and intensity are determined in situ. As we also show, this approach allows for the quantification of time-dependent bound-state dynamics in one and the same experiment. In the future, such experimental data will facilitate more precise tests of strong-field dynamics theories.

  8. In situ characterization of few-cycle laser pulses in transient absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blättermann, Alexander; Ott, Christian; Kaldun, Andreas; Ding, Thomas; Stooß, Veit; Laux, Martin; Rebholz, Marc; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy has thus far been lacking the capability to simultaneously characterize the intense laser pulses at work within a time-resolved quantum-dynamics experiment. However, precise knowledge of these pulses is key to extracting quantitative information in strong-field highly nonlinear light-matter interactions. Here, we introduce and experimentally demonstrate an ultrafast metrology tool based on the time-delay-dependent phase shift imprinted on a strong-field-driven resonance. Since we analyze the signature of the laser pulse interacting with the absorbing spectroscopy target, the laser pulse duration and intensity are determined in situ. As we also show, this approach allows for the quantification of time-dependent bound-state dynamics in one and the same experiment. In the future, such experimental data will facilitate more precise tests of strong-field dynamics theories.

  9. Designing single-beam multitrapping acoustical tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Glauber T

    2014-01-01

    The concept of a single-beam acoustical tweezer device which can simultaneously trap microparticles at different points is proposed and demonstrated through computational simulations. The device employs an ultrasound beam produced by a circular focused transducer operating at 1 MHz in water medium. The ultrasound beam exerts a radiation force that may tweeze suspended microparticles in the medium. Simulations show that the acoustical tweezer can simultaneously trap microparticles in the pre-focal zone along the beam axis, i.e. between the transducer surface and its geometric focus. As acoustical tweezers are fast becoming a key instrument in microparticle handling, the development of acoustic multitrapping concept may turn into a useful tool in engineering these devices.

  10. Quantum limited particle sensing in optical tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Tay, Jian Wei; Bowen, Warwick P

    2009-01-01

    Particle sensing in optical tweezers systems provides information on the position, velocity and force of the specimen particles. The conventional quadrant detection scheme is applied ubiquitously in optical tweezers experiments to quantify these parameters. In this paper we show that quadrant detection is non-optimal for particle sensing in optical tweezers and propose an alternative optimal particle sensing scheme based on spatial homodyne detection. A formalism for particle sensing in terms of transverse spatial modes is developed and numerical simulations of the efficacy of both quadrant and spatial homodyne detection are shown. We demonstrate that an order of magnitude improvement in particle sensing sensitivity can be achieved using spatial homodyne over quadrant detection.

  11. Interrogating biology with force: single molecule high-resolution measurements with optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, Marco; Pavone, Francesco S

    2013-09-17

    Single molecule force spectroscopy methods, such as optical and magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy, have opened up the possibility to study biological processes regulated by force, dynamics of structural conformations of proteins and nucleic acids, and load-dependent kinetics of molecular interactions. Among the various tools available today, optical tweezers have recently seen great progress in terms of spatial resolution, which now allows the measurement of atomic-scale conformational changes, and temporal resolution, which has reached the limit of the microsecond-scale relaxation times of biological molecules bound to a force probe. Here, we review different strategies and experimental configurations recently developed to apply and measure force using optical tweezers. We present the latest progress that has pushed optical tweezers' spatial and temporal resolution down to today's values, discussing the experimental variables and constraints that are influencing measurement resolution and how these can be optimized depending on the biological molecule under study. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Next generation laser-based standoff spectroscopy techniques for Mars exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasda, Patrick J; Acosta-Maeda, Tayro E; Lucey, Paul G; Misra, Anupam K; Sharma, Shiv K; Taylor, G Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    In the recent Mars 2020 Rover Science Definition Team Report, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has sought the capability to detect and identify elements, minerals, and most importantly, biosignatures, at fine scales for the preparation of a retrievable cache of samples. The current Mars rover, the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity, has a remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument, a type of quantitative elemental analysis, called the Chemistry Camera (ChemCam) that has shown that laser-induced spectroscopy instruments are not only feasible for space exploration, but are reliable and complementary to traditional elemental analysis instruments such as the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer. The superb track record of ChemCam has paved the way for other laser-induced spectroscopy instruments, such as Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy. We have developed a prototype remote LIBS-Raman-fluorescence instrument, Q-switched laser-induced time-resolved spectroscopy (QuaLITy), which is approximately 70 000 times more efficient at recording signals than a commercially available LIBS instrument. The increase in detection limits and sensitivity is due to our development of a directly coupled system, the use of an intensified charge-coupled device image detector, and a pulsed laser that allows for time-resolved measurements. We compare the LIBS capabilities of our system with an Ocean Optics spectrometer instrument at 7 m and 5 m distance. An increase in signal-to-noise ratio of at least an order of magnitude allows for greater quantitative analysis of the elements in a LIBS spectrum with 200-300 μm spatial resolution at 7 m, a Raman instrument capable of 1 mm spatial resolution at 3 m, and bioorganic fluorescence detection at longer distances. Thus, the new QuaLITy instrument fulfills all of the NASA expectations for proposed instruments.

  13. [Study on CO2 measurement using tunable multi-mode diode laser absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guang-Zhen; Chen, Bao-Xue; Hu, Bo; Long, Xiu-Hui; Li, Ai-Ping; Li, Rong

    2013-12-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology is a kind of fast time response, large-range, continuous on-line monitoring gas detection technique. It is the mainstream technology of gas detection. In this paper the multimode laser diode was used as light source. Multi-mode laser combined with correlation spectroscopy can improve the test reliability and stability. It can also conquer the problem of the central wavelength change of the single mode diode laser due to thermal or mechanical fluctuations in durable working process. A FP laser was used as the light source in this research. A multi-mode diode laser system based on correlation spectroscopy and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (TMDL-COSPEC-WMS) was used to measure carbon dioxide in ambient air around 1 570 nm. The carbon dioxide concentrations were derived from the relationship between the normalized WMS-2f signal peak heights of the measurement and reference signals which selected based on high signal to noise ratio and correlation coefficient. All measurements were performed with controlled carbon dioxide and nitrogen mixtures in which carbon dioxide concentrations range from 0. 6% to 30%. The calculation results showed that there was a high linear relationship between the measured and actual carbon dioxide concentration, the linearity was 0. 998 7 and the fitted slope was 1. 061+/-0. 016 8 respectively over the tested range. A detection limit of 335 ppm m was achieved. The standard deviation of 0. 036 7% was achieved using 20 successive measurements with each measurement time taking approximately 10 s during 20 minutes, which demonstrated good stability of the system. Good agreements between the measurements of the system and actual values confirm the accuracy and potential utility of the system for carbon dioxide detection.

  14. Iron-Doped Zinc Selenide: Spectroscopy and Laser Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    3 PRF pulse repetition frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DPSS diode ...4800 300 2006 Akimov [24] SC ZnSe GS 370 µJ 3950–5050 300 2006 Gallian [25] PC ZnSe GS — 4450 300 2008 Il’ichev [26] PC ZnSe Superluminescence ∼ 1 mJ... diode -pumped solid-state (DPSS) Er:YAG laser modules emitting at 2937 nm with 1.5 W of CW output power are now available [32]. Using beam combination

  15. Applications of ultra-short pulsed laser ablation: thin films deposition and fs/ns dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teghil, R; De Bonis, A; Galasso, A [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita della Basilicata, Via N. Sauro 85, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Santagata, A; Albano, G; Villani, P; Spera, D; Parisi, G P [CNR-IMIP, Unita di Potenza, Via S. Loja, 85050 Tito Scalo (Italy)], E-mail: roberto.teghil@unibas.it

    2008-10-15

    In this paper, we report a survey of two of the large number of possible practical applications of the laser ablation performed by an ultra-short pulse laser, namely pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and fs/ns dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS). These applications differ from those using just longer pulsed lasers as a consequence of the distinctive characteristics of the plasma produced by ultra-short laser beams. The most important feature of this plasma is the large presence of particles with nanometric size which plays a fundamental role in both applications.

  16. Intracellular protein mass spectroscopy using mid-infrared laser ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awazu, K.; Suzuki, S.

    2007-07-01

    Large-scale analysis of proteins, which can be regarded as functional biomolecule, assumes an important role in the life science. A MALDI using an ultraviolet laser (UV-MALDI) is one of ionization methods without fragmentation and has achieved conformation analysis of proteins. Recently, protein analysis has shifted from conformation analysis to functional and direct one that reserves posttranslational modifications such as the sugar chain addition and phosphorylation. We have proposed a MALDI using a mid-infrared tunable laser (IR-MALDI) as a new ionization method. IR-MALDI is promising because most biomolecules have a specific absorption in mid-infrared range, and IR-MALDI is expected to offer; (1) use of various matrices, (2) use of biomolecules such as water and lipid as the matrix, and (3) super-soft ionization. First, we evaluated the wavelength dependence of ionization of different matrices using a difference frequency generation (DFG) laser, which can tune the wavelength within a range from 5.5 to 10.0 μm. As results, ionization was specifically occurred at 5.8 μm which the C=O vibration stretching bond in matrix material and mass spectrum was observed. Next, protein mass spectrum was observed in the culture cells, MIN6, which secrete insulin, without the conventional cell-preparation processes. We demonstrate that the IR-MALDI has an advantage over the conventional method (UV-MALDI) in direct analysis of intracellular proteins.

  17. Comparing predictive ability of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to visible near-infrared spectroscopy for soil property determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knadel, Maria; Gislum, René; Hermansen, Cecilie

    2017-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) and particle size fractions have a practical value for agronomy and the environment. Thus, alternative techniques to replace the expensive conventional analyses of soil are needed. Visible near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (viseNIRS) has already shown potential...... for becoming an alternative method for soil analysis since it is faster and cheaper than conventional methods. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is another cost-effective technique with potential for rapid analysis of elements present in the soil. In this study, the feasibility of using LIBS...... to determine SOC, clay, silt and sand contents of Danish agricultural soils was tested and compared with the viseNIRS method. First, country-scale Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression models on soils collected across Denmark (N ¼ 78) were built and validated using independent field samples (N ¼ 54). Secondly...

  18. NONLINEAR OPTICS: Coherent laser spectroscopy of matter utilizing waveguide structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaus, A. I.; Yashkir, Yu N.

    1990-07-01

    Some features of CARS spectroscopy in waveguide structures are investigated theoretically taking into account stimulated Raman amplification of a weak pump wave in the field of a strong wave and allowing for the phase matching. A four-photon intermode coupling which occurs under amplification conditions results in energy diffusion between different modes. General expressions for the intensities of the pump waves undergoing stimulated amplification and for the anti-Stokes signal are derived and analyzed.

  19. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  20. Emission enhancement using two orthogonal targets in double pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Ake, C. [Laboratorio de Fotofisica, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-186, Mexico D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico)], E-mail: citlali.sanchez@ccadet.unam.mx; Bolanos, Marduk [Laboratorio de Fotofisica, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-186, Mexico D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Ramirez, C.Z. [Colegio de Ciencias y Humanidades Plantel Sur, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    The enhancement of emission intensity resulting from the interaction between two laser-induced plasmas on two orthogonal targets was investigated using double pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) at 0.7 Pa, by means of time-resolved spectroscopy and fast photography. The results showed that the interaction between both plasmas improved carbon emission intensity in comparison to a single laser-induced plasma. For all the carbon lines of interest 477.2 nm (CI), 426.7 nm (CII), and 473.4 nm (C{sub 2} Swan band head), the intensity enhancement showed a maximum at a delay between lasers in the range from 2 to 5 {mu}s; moreover it increased with the fluence of the first laser. On the other hand, in the case of C{sub 2} the intensity enhancement reached a maximum at 5 mm from the target; however it decreased with increasing fluence of the second laser. The largest intensity enhancement found was twofold for atomic species and sixfold for molecular species.

  1. Origin and Future of Plasmonic Optical Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jer-Shing; Yang, Ya-Tang

    2015-06-12

    Plasmonic optical tweezers can overcome the diffraction limits of conventional optical tweezers and enable the trapping of nanoscale objects. Extension of the trapping and manipulation of nanoscale objects with nanometer position precision opens up unprecedented opportunities for applications in the fields of biology, chemistry and statistical and atomic physics. Potential applications include direct molecular manipulation, lab-on-a-chip applications for viruses and vesicles and the study of nanoscale transport. This paper reviews the recent research progress and development bottlenecks and provides an overview of possible future directions in this field.

  2. Origin and Future of Plasmonic Optical Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jer-Shing Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic optical tweezers can overcome the diffraction limits of conventional optical tweezers and enable the trapping of nanoscale objects. Extension of the trapping and manipulation of nanoscale objects with nanometer position precision opens up unprecedented opportunities for applications in the fields of biology, chemistry and statistical and atomic physics. Potential applications include direct molecular manipulation, lab-on-a-chip applications for viruses and vesicles and the study of nanoscale transport. This paper reviews the recent research progress and development bottlenecks and provides an overview of possible future directions in this field.

  3. A review of the development of portable laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakovský, J., E-mail: jozef.rakovsky@jh-inst.cas.cz [J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Dolejškova 3, 18223 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Čermák, P. [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); Musset, O. [Laboratoire interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS 6303, Université de Bourgogne, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Veis, P. [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2014-11-01

    In this review, we present person-transportable laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) devices that have previously been developed and reported in the literature as well as their applications. They are compared with X-ray fluorescent (XRF) devices, which represent their strongest competition. Although LIBS devices have advantages over XRF devices, such as sensitivity to the light elements, high spatial resolution and the possibility to distinguish between different layers of the sample, there are also disadvantages and both are discussed here. Furthermore, the essential portable LIBS instrumentation (laser, spectrograph and detector) is presented, and published results related to new laser sources (diode-pumped solid-state, microchip and fiber lasers) used in LIBS are overviewed. Compared to conventional compact flashlamp pumped solid-state lasers, the new laser sources provide higher repetition rates, higher efficiency (less power consumption) and higher beam quality, resulting in higher fluences, even for lower energies, and could potentially increase the figure of merit of portable LIBS instruments. Compact spectrometers used in portable LIBS devices and their parts (spectrograph, detector) are also discussed. - Highlights: • Overview of portable LIBS devices transportable by a person • Discussion and new trends about portable LIBS instrumentation: laser, spectrograph and detector • Overview of applications of DPSS, microchip and fiber lasers in LIBS.

  4. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy Diagnostic of Laser-Induced Optical Breakdown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian G. Parigger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient laser plasma is generated in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB. Here we report experiments conducted with 10.6-micron CO2 laser radiation, and with 1.064-micron fundamental, 0.532-micron frequency-doubled, 0.355-micron frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser radiation. Characterization of laser induced plasma utilizes laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS techniques. Atomic hydrogen Balmer series emissions show electron number density of 1017 cm−3 measured approximately 10 μs and 1 μs after optical breakdown for CO2 and Nd:YAG laser radiation, respectively. Recorded molecular recombination emission spectra of CN and C2 Swan bands indicate an equilibrium temperature in excess of 7000 Kelvin, inferred for these diatomic molecules. Reported are also graphite ablation experiments where we use unfocused laser radiation that is favorable for observation of neutral C3 emission due to reduced C3 cation formation. Our analysis is based on computation of diatomic molecular spectra that includes accurate determination of rotational line strengths, or Hönl-London factors.

  5. Red emitting monolithic dual wavelength DBR diode lasers for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumpf, B.; Maiwald, M.; Müller, A.; Bugge, F.; Fricke, J.; Ressel, P.; Pohl, J.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2014-02-01

    Raman lines are often obscured by background light or fluorescence especially when investigating biological samples or samples containing impurities. Shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) is a technique to overcome this. By exciting the sample with two slightly shifted wavelengths, it is possible to separate the Raman lines and distortions. In this paper, monolithic dual wavelength DBR diode lasers meeting the demands of Raman spectroscopy and SERDS will be presented. The wavelengths are stabilized and selected by using deeply-etched 10th order surface gratings with different periods manufactured using i-line wafer stepper lithography. Two possible resonator concepts, i.e. a mini-array of two parallel DBR RW-lasers and a Y-branch DBR laser, will be compared. Established excitation wavelengths for Raman spectroscopy at 671 nm and 785 nm are chosen. The total laser length is 3 mm; the ridge width is 2.2 μm for the 785 nm devices and 5 μm for the 671 nm lasers. The length of the DBR gratings is 500 μm. The devices at 671 nm reach output powers up to 100 mW having an emission width smaller than 12 pm (FWHM). The 785 nm lasers show output powers up to 200 mW and a narrow emission below 22 pm. For the dual wavelength lasers the spectral distance between the two excitation lines is about 0.5 nm as targeted. The power consumption at both wavelengths is below 1 W. These data proof that the devices are well suited for their application in portable Raman measurement systems such as handheld devices using SERDS.

  6. Investigation of radial temperature gradients in diode pumped alkali lasers using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Charles D.; Perram, Glen P.

    2012-03-01

    Heat loads in Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers (DPAL) have been investigated using a diode laser to probe the radial dependence of the absorbance. A TiS pump laser heats the medium in a T=50-100°C cesium heat pipe with 5 Torr nitrogen used for quenching. A tunable diode laser probes the spectral absorbance of the cesium cell. Local alkali concentration, temperature, and saturation broadening modify Voigt lineshapes in the wing of the hyperfine split lines. The temperature within the pumped volume exceeds the wall temperature by almost 200 C.

  7. SO2 Spectroscopy with A Tunable UV Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, W. W.; Penney, C. M.; Lapp, M.

    1973-01-01

    A portion of the fluorescence spectrum of SO2 has been studied using a narrow wavelength doubled dye laser as the exciting source. One purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of SO2 resonance re-emission as a probe of SO2 in the atmosphere. When the SO2 is excited by light at 300.2 nm, for example, a strong reemission peak is observed which is Stokes-shifted from the incident light wavelength by the usual Raman shift (the VI symmetric vibration frequency 1150.5/cm ). The intensity of this peak is sensitive to small changes (.01 nm) in the incident wavelength. Measurements of the N2 quenching and self quenching of this re-emission have been obtained. Preliminary analysis of this data indicates that the quenching is weak but not negligible. The dye laser in our system is pumped by a pulsed N2 laser. Tuning 'and spectral narrowing are accomplished using a telescope-echelle grating combination. In a high power configuration the resulting pulses have a spectral width of about 5 x 10(exp -3) nm and a time duration of about 6 nsec. The echelle grating is rotated by a digital stepping motor, such that each step shifts the wavelength by 6 x 10(exp -4) nm. In addition to the tunable, narrow wavelength uv source and spectral analysis of the consequent re-emission, the system also provides time resolution of the re-emitted light to 6 nsec resolution. This capability is being used to study the lifetime of low pressure S02 fluorescence at different wavelengths and pressures.

  8. Doppler-free spectroscopy on Cs D$_1$ line with a dual-frequency laser

    CERN Document Server

    Hafiz, Moustafa Abdel; De Clercq, Emeric; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2016-01-01

    We report on Doppler-free laser spectroscopy in a Cs vapor cell using a dual-frequency laser system tuned on the Cs D$_1$ line. Using counter-propagating beams with crossed linear polarizations, an original sign-reversal of the usual saturated absorption dip and large increase in Doppler-free atomic absorption is observed. This phenomenon is explained by coherent population trapping (CPT) effects. The impact of laser intensity and light polarization on absorption profiles is reported in both single-frequency and dual-frequency regimes. In the latter, frequency stabilization of two diode lasers was performed, yielding a beat-note fractional frequency stability at the level of $3 \\times 10^{-12}$ at 1 s averaging time. These performances are about an order of magnitude better than those obtained using a conventional single-frequency saturated absorption scheme.

  9. Quantitative Classification of Quartz by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in Conjunction with Discriminant Function Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A responsive laser induced breakdown spectroscopic system was developed and improved for utilizing it as a sensor for the classification of quartz samples on the basis of trace elements present in the acquired samples. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS in conjunction with discriminant function analysis (DFA was applied for the classification of five different types of quartz samples. The quartz plasmas were produced at ambient pressure using Nd:YAG laser at fundamental harmonic mode (1064 nm. We optimized the detection system by finding the suitable delay time of the laser excitation. This is the first study, where the developed technique (LIBS+DFA was successfully employed to probe and confirm the elemental composition of quartz samples.

  10. An approach of open-path gas sensor based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Xia; Wenqing Liu; Yujun Zhang; Ruifeng Kan; Min Wang; Ying He; Yiben Cui; Jun Ruan; Hui Geng

    2008-01-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is a new method to detect trace-gas qualitatively or quantificationally based on the scan characteristic of the diode laser to obtain the absorption spectroscopy in the characteristic absorption region. A time-sharing scanning open-path TDLAS system using two near infrared distributed feedback (DFB) tunable diode lasers is designed to detect CH4 and H2S in leakage of natural gas. A low-cost Fresnel lens is used in this system as receiving optics which receives the laser beam reflected by a solid corner cube reflector with a distance of up to about 60 m. High sensitivity is achieved by means of wavelength-modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection. The minimum detection limits of 1.1 ppm·m for CH4 and 15 ppm·m for H2S are demonstrated with a total optical path of 120 m. The simulation monitoring experiment of nature gas leakage was carried out with this system. According to the receiving light efficiency of optical system and detectable minimum light intensity of detection, the detectable optical path of the system can achieve 1 - 2 km. The sensor is suitable for natural gas leakage monitoring application.

  11. Fiber-based laser transmitter and laser spectroscopy of the oxygen A-band for remote detection of atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Mark Andrew

    The Author reports on the design and construction of an oxygen spectroscopy laser sounding instrument designed to measure atmospheric pressure. This instrument was conceived and designed with a satellite application in mind so we discuss the requirements this places on the instrument and specifically the laser transmitter. We have developed a novel, pulsed, frequency-doubled, fiber-based laser transmitter for use in the instrument. The instrument concept uses the collision broadening of spectroscopic lines of the diatomic oxygen A-band to deduce atmospheric pressure. We report on the spectroscopic and instrument theory. We discuss the development of a high-power, narrow-frequency, tunable, single spatial mode pulsed laser transmitter. The transmitter is a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) design. The master oscillator is a fiber coupled DFB laser with external acousto-optic modulation. The amplifier is a diode pumped, erbium-doped fiber. We discuss the non-linear optical effect of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and how it limits the transmitter performance. We review various methods for overcoming SBS in erbium fiber amplifiers and then demonstrate the performance of a high SBS threshold fiber amplifier. We demonstrate the efficacy of this transmitter by integrating it into a spectroscopic instrument and make atmospheric measurements at a test site at Goddard. We also discuss future improvements.

  12. Study of thymidylate synthetase-function by laser Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R K; Kisliuk, R L; Verma, S P; Wallach, D F

    1975-05-23

    The Laser-Raman spectra of thymidylate synthetase have been obtained with 488 nm excitation from an argon ion laser. Raman bands observed in the range 600-800 cm-minus-1 have been assigned to functional groups of constituent amino acids. The band positions and intensities in the Amide I (1600-1700 cm-minus-1) and Amide III (1200-1300 cm-minus-1) regions, suggest that the enzyme is a mixture of alpha-helical and unordered conformations. Low levels of beta-structure cannot be excluded. The spectra of the ternary complex formed by reacting thymidylate synthetase with (+)-L-methylenetetrahydrofolate and fluorodeoxyuridylate reveals a new band at 1618 cm-minus-1 assigned to the C=N stretching vibration. This band may be due to formation of dihydrofolate or an iminium ion. The overall secondary structure of thymidylate synthetase does not change on formation of the ternary complex. However, the spectrum of the complex indicates local changes in groups such as ionized carboxyl (1400 cm-minus-1), tryptophan (1003 cm-minus-1) and CH-3, CH-2 deformation modes (1440-1470 cm-minus-1).

  13. Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy on lutetium for the MEDICIS project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadelshin, V., E-mail: gadelshin@uni-mainz.de [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany); Cocolios, T. [KU Leuven, Institute for Nuclear and Radiation Physics (Belgium); Fedoseev, V. [CERN, EN Department (Switzerland); Heinke, R.; Kieck, T. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany); Marsh, B. [CERN, EN Department (Switzerland); Naubereit, P. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany); Rothe, S.; Stora, T. [CERN, EN Department (Switzerland); Studer, D. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany); Duppen, P. Van [KU Leuven, Institute for Nuclear and Radiation Physics (Belgium); Wendt, K. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The MEDICIS-PROMED Innovative Training Network under the Horizon 2020 EU program aims to establish a network of early stage researchers, involving scientific exchange and active cooperation between leading European research institutions, universities, hospitals, and industry. Primary scientific goal is the purpose of providing and testing novel radioisotopes for nuclear medical imaging and radionuclide therapy. Within a closely linked project at CERN, a dedicated electromagnetic mass separator system is presently under installation for production of innovative radiopharmaceutical isotopes at the new CERN-MEDICIS laboratory, directly adjacent to the existing CERN-ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility. It is planned to implement a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) to ensure high efficiency and unrivaled purity in the production of radioactive ions. To provide a highly efficient ionization process, identification and characterization of a specific multi-step laser ionization scheme for each individual element with isotopes of interest is required. The element lutetium is of primary relevance, and therefore was considered as first candidate. Three two-step excitation schemes for lutetium atoms are presented in this work, and spectroscopic results are compared with data of other authors.

  14. Spectroscopy and Laser-SNMS on stable and radioactive strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosco, Hauke; Walther, Clemens [Institut fuer Radiooekologie und Strahlenschutz, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover (Germany); Franzmann, Michael [Institut fuer Radiooekologie und Strahlenschutz, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Kron, Tobias; Wendt, Klaus [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear accidents as experienced e.g. in Chernobyl or Fukushima and nuclear weapon tests released considerable activity levels and a variety of medium to long-lived radionuclides into the environment. Strontium-90 appears as a significant share of the fission products in spent nuclear fuel and correspondingly in any possible release. Due to its chemical properties it is subject to long range transport through the environment and can cause considerable dose to man when entering the food chain. Correspondingly, the investigation of speciation and migration channels is of major relevance. A radioanalytical approach is severely hampered by the low beta energy of the strontium-90 decay and the need to separate strontium-90 from the secular equilibrated daughter yttrium-90. Hence, application of a mass spectrometric method without chemical separation of the elements is a promising alternative for low-level investigation of strontium-90. Application of the new Laser-SNMS system at IRS Hannover could well suit those needs. It applies three Ti:Sa lasers for resonant ionization of neutral atoms produced by primary ion sputtering in a SIMS together with a time-of-flight mass analysis which provides high spatial resolution. The analytical measurements are preceded by spectroscopic studies on the level structure of strontium to develop a most efficient ionization scheme.

  15. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of human deciduous teeth samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Arooj; Bashir, Shazia; Akram, Mahreen; Hayat, Asma

    2015-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of human deciduous teeth has been performed by employing Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns) for the evaluation of plasma parameters as well as elemental analysis. The plasma parameters, i.e., electron temperature and electron number density of laser-induced teeth plasma at various fluencies, have been evaluated. Both parameters show an increasing trend up to a certain value of laser fluence, i.e., 2.6 J/cm(2). With further increase in laser fluence up to a value of 3.9 J/cm(2), a decreasing trend is observed which is due to shielding effect. With further increase in laser fluence up to a maximum value of 10.5 J/cm(2), the insignificant changes in plasma parameters are observed which are attributed to saturation phenomenon governed by self-regulating regime. Emission spectroscopy results exhibit that laser fluence is the controlling factor for both plasma parameters. The elemental analysis was also performed at constant laser fluence of 2.6 J/cm(2) by evaluating the variation in detected elemental concentration of Ca, Fe, Sr, Zn, and Pb in three different parts of human teeth, i.e., enamel, dentine, and cementum. The lower concentration of Ca as compared to the standard values of CaCO3 (self-fabricated pellet) reveals that enamel is the most deciduous part of the human teeth. However, at the same time, it is also observed that the highest concentration of micro minerals is also found in enamel, then in dentine, and lowest in cementum. Carious or unhealthy tooth is identified by enhanced concentration of micro minerals (Pb, Sr, Zn, and Fe). The highest concentration of micro minerals as compared to other parts of teeth (dentine and root cementum) and lower concentration of Ca as compared to standard CaCO3 pellet in enamel confirm that enamel is the most deciduous part of the teeth.

  16. Collinear resonant ionization laser spectroscopy of rare francium isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Neyens, G; Flanagan, K; Rajabali, M M; Le blanc, F M; Ware, T; Procter, T J

    2008-01-01

    We propose a programme of collinear resonant ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) of the francium isotopes up to and including $^{201}$Fr and $^{218,219}$Fr. This work aims at answering questions on the ordering of quantum states, and effect of the ($\\pi s_{1/2}^{-1}$)1/2$^{+}$ intruder state, which is currently believed to be the ground state of $^{199}$Fr. This work will also study the edge of the region of reflection asymmetry through measurement of the moments and radii of $^{218,219}$Fr. This proposal forms the first part of a series of experiments that will study nuclei in this region of the nuclear chart. Based on the success of this initial proposal it is the intention of the collaboration to perform high resolution measurements on the isotopes of radium and radon that surround $^{201}$Fr and $^{218}$Fr and thus providing a comprehensive description of the ground state properties of this region of the nuclear chart. Recent in-source spectroscopy measurements of lead, bismuth and polonium have demonstrated a...

  17. Microrheology of concentrated DNA solutions using optical tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arun S Rajkumar; B M Jaffar Ali

    2008-06-01

    Semiflexible biopolymers play a vital role in shaping cellular structure and rigidity. In this work, we report the determination of microrheological properties of concentrated, double-stranded calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) solutions using passive, laser-scattering based particle-tracking methodology. From power spectral analysis, we obtain dynamic shear moduli of the polymer solutions stretching over three decades of frequency (100–103 Hz) and over concentration ranges spanning from very dilute to concentrated regime. We also study the effects of altered ionic strength and denaturation on the shear modulus. Our results indicate that (CT-DNA) exhibits predominantly elastic behaviour in the concentration range we probed. From the measurements of the plateau shear modulus, p, we conclude that DNA generally behaves like a semiflexible polymer in a good solvent even at low ionic strength. We have thus demonstrated application of passive microrheological method using optical tweezers to DNA solutions. Further extensions of the technique and its applications are discussed.

  18. Study on the influence of laser pulse duration in the long nanosecond regime on the laser induced plasma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnasharty, I. Y.

    2016-10-01

    By using a high power pulsed fiber laser, this study reports the experimental investigation of the laser-induced plasma characteristics for the laser pulse duration range extended from 40 ns to 200 ns. The experiments were performed with keeping the laser fluence constant at 64 J/cm2. The measurements show that, for the early phase of plasma formation, the spectral line intensities and the continuum emissions as well as the plasma characteristics decay to a certain extent with the increase of the pulse duration. On the other hand, as the plasma evolves in post laser pulse regime, the electron density and the degree of ionization increase slightly for the longer pulses, while the plume temperature is more or less independent from the pulse duration. Furthermore, the ablation characteristics, such as the ablation rate, coincide with the results of plasma characteristics for the different pulse durations. Eventually, with keeping the laser fluence constant at 64 J/cm2, the analytical performance of Laser-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (LIPS) for the corresponding pulse duration range is examined by using a temporal gating and non-gating analyses. The measurements show that, in the case of gating analysis, all pulse durations yield almost the same range of limits of detections LODs. On the other hand, for non-gating analysis, the longer pulse durations provide lower LODs (better) than the shorter ones by orders of magnitude. Moreover, the calculated absolute limit of detection (LODAbs) for the longest pulse duration (i.e. 200 ns) is lower by approximately factor 2 than that of the shortest one (i.e. 40 ns).

  19. High-speed high-sensitivity infrared spectroscopy using mid-infrared swept lasers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, David T. D.; Groom, Kristian M.; Hogg, Richard A.; Revin, Dmitry G.; Cockburn, John W.; Rehman, Ihtesham U.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is a highly attractive read-out technology for compositional analysis of biomedical specimens because of its unique combination of high molecular sensitivity without the need for exogenous labels. Traditional techniques such as FTIR and Raman have suffered from comparatively low speed and sensitivity however recent innovations are challenging this situation. Direct mid-IR spectroscopy is being speeded up by innovations such as MEMS-based FTIR instruments with very high mirror speeds and supercontinuum sources producing very high sample irradiation levels. Here we explore another possible method - external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL's) with high cavity tuning speeds (mid-IR swept lasers). Swept lasers have been heavily developed in the near-infrared where they are used for non-destructive low-coherence imaging (OCT). We adapt these concepts in two ways. Firstly by combining mid-IR quantum cascade gain chips with external cavity designs adapted from OCT we achieve spectral acquisition rates approaching 1 kHz and demonstrate potential to reach 100 kHz. Secondly we show that mid-IR swept lasers share a fundamental sensitivity advantage with near-IR OCT swept lasers. This makes them potentially able to achieve the same spectral SNR as an FTIR instrument in a time x N shorter (N being the number of spectral points) under otherwise matched conditions. This effect is demonstrated using measurements of a PDMS sample. The combination of potentially very high spectral acquisition rates, fundamental SNR advantage and the use of low-cost detector systems could make mid-IR swept lasers a powerful technology for high-throughput biomedical spectroscopy.

  20. Signal enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using fast square-pulse discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral, H.; Robledo-Martinez, A.

    2016-10-01

    A fast, high voltage square-shaped electrical pulse initiated by laser ablation was investigated as a means to enhance the analytical capabilities of laser Induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The electrical pulse is generated by the discharge of a charged coaxial cable into a matching impedance. The pulse duration and the stored charge are determined by the length of the cable. The ablation plasma was produced by hitting an aluminum target with a nanosecond 532-nm Nd:YAG laser beam under variable fluence 1.8-900 J cm- 2. An enhancement of up to one order of magnitude on the emission signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved with the spark discharge assisted laser ablation. Besides, this increment is larger for ionized species than for neutrals. LIBS signal is also increased with the discharge voltage with a tendency to saturate for high laser fluences. Electron density and temperature evolutions were determined from time delays of 100 ns after laser ablation plasma onset. Results suggest that the spark discharge mainly re-excites the laser produced plume.

  1. Structural changes in nanostructured catalytic oxides monitored by Raman spectroscopy: Effect of the laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alcemira C.; da Silva, Antonio N.; Junior, Jose Alves L.; Freire, Paulo T. C.; Oliveira, Alcineia C.; Filho, Josué M.

    2017-03-01

    The laser power effects on the structural properties of nanostructured oxides were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The nanostructured CeO2, ZrO2, SnO2, TiO2 and MnOx oxides were prepared by a nanocasting route and characterized through various physicochemical techniques. The structural features of the solids were accompanied by varying the incident laser power from 2.0 to 9.1 mW. The laser caused local heating on the surface of the nanostructured solids and influenced on their particle sizes. The CeO2, TiO2 and MnOx spectra exhibited particle size changes due to thermal effects. Elevated laser power up to 9.1 mW accelerated the sintering of CeO2, TiO2 and MnOx particles in contrast to SnO2 counterparts. Simultaneously, the creation of defects in the aforesaid oxide structures was suggested upon increasing the laser power from 2.0 to 9.1 mW. The phase transformation from MnOx-related phases to α-Mn2O3 and the oxidation of these phases were observed. Tetragonal ZrO2 showed a very stable structure under laser heating, envisaging further catalytic applications upon using mild laser power.

  2. Pilot study of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for tissue differentiation by monitoring the plume created during laser surgery — An approach on a feedback Laser control mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanawade, Rajesh; Mehari, Fanuel; Knipfer, Christian; Rohde, Maximilian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Schmidt, Michael; Stelzle, Florian

    2013-09-01

    This study focuses on tissue differentiation using 'Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy' (LIBS) by monitoring the plasma plume created during laser surgery processes. This technique is aimed at controlling a laser surgery feedback system in real time. An Excimer laser (Ar-F 193 nm) was used for the ablation of tissue samples. Fat, muscle, nerve and skin tissue samples of bisected ex-vivo pig heads were prepared as test objects for the ablation procedure. A single fiber was used to collect emissions and deliver them to a spectrometer. The obtained LIBS spectra in the measured emissions were analyzed to determine each tissue type according to their chemical composition. The elements found in the samples and their emission spectra were in agreement with those described in literature. The collected LIBS spectra were analyzed to differentiate the tissues using statistical data analysis: Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC). The obtained preliminary results suggest a successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity. The main goal of this study was to qualitatively identify tissue types during laser ablation, which will provide a real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications to significantly improve the accuracy and safety of laser surgery procedures.

  3. Determination of the Zinc Concentration in Human Fingernails Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riberdy, Vlora A; Frederickson, Christopher J; Rehse, Steven J

    2017-04-01

    The absolute concentration of Zn in human fingernail clippings was determined ex vivo using 1064 nm laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and confirmed by speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry. A nail testing protocol that sampled across the nail (perpendicular to the direction of growth) was developed and validated by scanning electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Using this protocol, a partial least squares (PLS) regression model predicted the Zn concentration in the fingernails of five people to within an average of 7 ppm. The variation in the Zn concentration with depth into the nail determined by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was studied and showed no systematic variation for up to 15 subsequent laser pulses in one location. The effects of nail hydration (dehydrated and over-hydrated) and nail surface roughness were investigated to explain an anomalously large scatter observed in the measurements. This scatter was attributed to the layered nature and fibrous structure of the fingernails, which resulted in non-uniform ablation as determined by scanning electron microscopy. This work demonstrates that a protocol consisting of low pulse energy (laser pulses incident on human fingernail clippings in an Ar environment can produce quantifiable Zn emission in the laser-induced plasma and that the measured Zn intensity can be used to accurately predict the Zn concentration in human fingernails.

  4. [Signal analysis and spectrum distortion correction for tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Wei-Yi; Zhu, Yong; Chen, Jun; Chen, Jun-Qing; Liang, Bo

    2011-04-01

    In the present paper, the signal of a tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) trace gas sensing system, which has a wavelength modulation with a wide range of modulation amplitudes, is studied based on Fourier analysis method. Theory explanation of spectrum distortion induced by laser intensity amplitude modulation is given. In order to rectify the spectrum distortion, a method of synchronous amplitude modulation suppression by a variable optical attenuator is proposed. To validate the method, an experimental setup is designed. Absorption spectrum measurement experiments on CO2 gas were carried out. The results show that the residual laser intensity modulation amplitude of the experimental system is reduced to -0.1% of its original value and the spectrum distortion improvement is 92% with the synchronous amplitude modulation suppression. The modulation amplitude of laser intensity can be effectively reduced and the spectrum distortion can be well corrected by using the given correction method and system. By using a variable optical attenuator in the TDLAS (tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy) system, the dynamic range requirements of photoelectric detector, digital to analog converter, filters and other aspects of the TDLAS system are reduced. This spectrum distortion correction method can be used for online trace gas analyzing in process industry.

  5. Quantum computation architecture using optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitenberg, Christof; Kuhr, Stefan; Mølmer, Klaus;

    2011-01-01

    We present a complete architecture for scalable quantum computation with ultracold atoms in optical lattices using optical tweezers focused to the size of a lattice spacing. We discuss three different two-qubit gates based on local collisional interactions. The gates between arbitrary qubits...... quantum computing....

  6. Ultrasensitive photoacoustic sensor based on quantum cascade laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Gautam, Surya; Kumar, Subodh; Gupta, Saurabh; Srivastava, Hari B.; Thakur, Surya N.; Sharma, Ramesh C.

    2017-04-01

    The paper focuses on development of ultra-sonic detection system based on laser photoacoustic spectroscopic technique and processing of signal for detection of very low quantity chemicals, explosive materials, and mixtures of these hazardous molecules. The detection system has been developed for the first time with specially designed one side open photo-acoustic cell having high quality factor. Explosive and Hazardous materials like RDX, DNT, PETN, Gun Powder, TATP (Tri acetone tri-peroxide) and their simulants like Acetone were detected in 7 to 9 μm wavelength band. Lock in amplifier electronic instrument was used for the detection of hazardous chemicals and mixture of explosives in very low quantity. Detection limit of the photoacoustic ultrasonic sensor was also carried out of powder, liquid and adsorbed on surfaces.

  7. Laser spectroscopy with an electrostatic ConeTrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, S., E-mail: sam.kelly@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Campbell, P. [University of Manchester, Nuclear Physics Group, Schuster Laboratory, Brunswick Street (United Kingdom); Cheal, B., E-mail: Bradley.Cheal@Liverpool.ac.uk [University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory (United Kingdom); Eronen, T.; Geldhof, S.; Jokinen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilä, H.; Pohjalainen, I.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Voss, A. [JYFL, University of Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2017-11-15

    A compact electrostatic trap has been designed and installed as part of the recent upgrades to the IGISOL IV facility. The ConeTrap provides an in vacuo optical pumping site for low energy (800 eV) ionic ensembles available for interaction periods of 10-100 ms. At present, 6.7(3) % of injected mass A=98 ions can be trapped, stored for 5 ms, extracted and transported to a laser-ion interaction region. This fraction represents those ions for which no perturbation to total energy or energy spread is observed. Proposed enhancements to the trap are designed to improve the trapping efficiency by up to a factor of 5. Differential pumping and reduction in background pressure below the present 10{sup −6} mbar will extend storage times beyond 100 ms.

  8. Dual-wavelength Raman spectroscopy approach for studying fluid-phase equilibria using a single laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Johannes

    2010-06-01

    A novel Raman spectroscopy setup for the investigation of multiphase fluid mixtures is proposed. The total output of a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser is separated into a strong 532 nm beam for generating Raman signals in the vapor phase and the weak residual of the fundamental 1064 nm radiation to be utilized as laser source for Raman scattering in the liquid phase. This approach will provide sufficient signal intensity from the gas (despite low density) for determination of mixture composition and at the same time it facilitates recording high-resolution spectra from the liquid in order to allow studying molecular physics phenomena together with concentration measurements.

  9. First measurement of radioisotopes by collinear laser spectroscopy at an ion-guide separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, J.L.; Cochrane, E.C.A.; Evans, D.E.; Griffith, J.A.R.; Persson, J.R.; Richardson, D.S.; Tungate, G.; Zybert, L. [School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Billowes, J.; Campbell, P.; Cooper, T.G.; Grant, I.S.; Levins, J.M.G.; Pearson, M.R.; Wheeler, P.D. [Schuster Laboratory, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dendooven, P.; Honkanen, A.; Huhta, M.; Oinonen, M.; Penttilae, H.; Aeystoe, J. [Accelerator Laboratory, University of Jyvaeskylae, PL 35, Jyvaeskylae SF - 403 51 (Finland)

    1997-11-01

    The first successful application of an ion-guide separator (IGISOL) for collinear laser spectroscopy of radioisotopes has achieved an efficiency comparable with the best obtained with catcher-ionizer facilities. The ion beam energy spread was determined to be less than 6 eV, allowing laser fluorescence resonance signals for the {sup 140,142,144}Ba radioisotopes to be detected with high resolution and sensitivity. Applications of this technique to measuring nuclear properties of refractory elements and short lived isomers promises to be particularly advantageous. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  10. Optical Autler-Townes spectroscopy in a heteronuclear mixture of laser-cooled atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, C.; Münchow, F.; Görlitz, A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on optical Autler-Townes spectroscopy in a heteronuclear mixture of {}^{87}Rb and {}^{176}Yb in a continuously loaded double-species magneto-optical trap. An excited vibrational level of Rb*Yb which is energetically close to the 5^2P_{1/2} state of Rb is coupled by a strong laser field to a vibrational level in the ground state of RbYb and probed by a weak probe laser field. The induced Autler-Townes splittings in the photoassociation spectra allow us to determine relative Franck-Condon factors of molecular transitions in RbYb.

  11. Laser spectroscopy and cooling of Yb+ ions on a deep-UV transition

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Hendrik M; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Zipkes, Christoph; Köhl, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We perform laser spectroscopy of Yb+ ions on the 4f14 6s 2S_{1/2} - 4f13 5d 6s 3D[3/2]_{1/2} transition at 297 nm. The frequency measurements for 170Yb+, 172Yb+, 174Yb+, and 176Yb+ reveal the specific mass shift as well as the field shifts. In addition, we demonstrate laser cooling of Yb+ ions using this transition and show that light at 297 nm can be used as the second step in the photoionization of neutral Yb atoms.

  12. Diode laser spectroscopy of methyl chloride overtones at 850-860 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchesini, A.; Gozzini, S.

    2016-01-01

    By using a tunable diode laser (TDL) spectrometer 156 CH3Cl overtone absorption lines have been detected in the range between 11,590 and 11,760 cm-1 (8500-8625 Å). Their strengths range around 10-26 -10-27 cm / molecule and have been measured by utilizing commercial AlGaAs/GaAs laser diodes through the wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) and the 2nd harmonic (2f) detection techniques. For one line the self-broadening coefficient has been obtained.

  13. Double-pulse standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for versatile hazardous materials detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, AMSRD-ARL-WM-BD, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21005-5069 (United States)], E-mail: jennifer.gottfried@arl.army.mil; De Lucia, Frank C.; Munson, Chase A.; Miziolek, Andrzej W. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, AMSRD-ARL-WM-BD, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21005-5069 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    We have developed a double-pulse standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (ST-LIBS) system capable of detecting a variety of hazardous materials at tens of meters. The use of a double-pulse laser improves the sensitivity and selectivity of ST-LIBS, especially for the detection of energetic materials. In addition to various metallic and plastic materials, the system has been used to detect bulk explosives RDX and Composition-B, explosive residues, biological species such as the anthrax surrogate Bacillus subtilis, and chemical warfare simulants at 20 m. We have also demonstrated the discrimination of explosive residues from various interferents on an aluminum substrate.

  14. A laser-generated plasma as a source of VUV continuum radiation for photoelectronic spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Heckenkamp, Ch.; Heinzmann, Ulrich; Schönhense, G.; BURGESS.D.D; Thorne, A. P.; Wheaton, J. E. G.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using laser-generated plasmas as VUV continuum sources for photoelectron spectroscopy has been demonstrated by measuring the spectral intensity distribution of the VUV continuum in the wavelength region from 79 to 43 nm by energy analysis of the photoelectrons ejected from argon atoms. The maximum photon flux obtained after reflection at a gold-coated spherical mirror was of the order of 10(11) photons nm(-1) per pulse at 50 nm for a laser energy of 830 mJ. The results show...

  15. Dual-Comb Coherent Raman Spectroscopy with Lasers of 1-GHz Pulse Repetition Frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Mohler, Kathrin J; Yan, Ming; Hänsch, Theodor W; Picqué, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    We extend the technique of multiplex coherent Raman spectroscopy with two femtosecond mode-locked lasers to oscillators of a pulse repetition frequency of 1 GHz. We demonstrate spectra of liquids, which span 1100 cm$^{-1}$ of Raman shifts. At a resolution of 6 cm$^{-1}$, their measurement time may be as short as 5 microseconds for a refresh rate of 2 kHz. The waiting period between acquisitions is improved ten-fold compared to previous experiments with two lasers of 100-MHz repetition frequencies.

  16. Laser Spectroscopy of Vinyl Alcohol Embedded in Helium Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, Hayley; Raston, Paul; Douberly, Gary E.

    2017-06-01

    Vinyl alcohol has two rotameric forms, known as syn- and anti-vinyl alcohol, where syn is the most stable. While both have been investigated by microwave and far-infrared spectroscopy, only the syn rotamer has been investigated by mid-infrared spectroscopy. This is due to the low anti rotamer population (15%) at room temperature, in addition to the closeness in proximity of the mid-infrared bands between the rotamers; this results in overlapping bands that are dominated by syn-vinyl alcohol absorptions. In this investigation we increase the anti-vinyl alcohol population to 40% by using a high temperature "pyrolysis" source, and eliminate the spectral overlap by recording the spectra at low temperature in helium nanodroplets. We observe a number of bands of both rotamers in the OH, CH, and CO stretching regions that display rotational substructure. A highlight of this work is the observation of a Fermi dyad in the OH stretching region of anti-vinyl alcohol. Anharmonic frequency calculations suggest that this is due to a near degeneracy of the OH stretching state (νb{1}) with a triple combination involving νb{7}, νb{8}, and νb{9}. M. Rodler, J. Mol. Spec. 114, 23 (1985);S. Saito, Chem. Phys. Lett. 42, 3 (1976) H. Bunn, R. Hudson, A. S. Gentleman, and P. L. Raston, ACS Earth Space Chem. DOI: 10.1021/acsearthspacechem.6b00008 (2017) D-L Joo, A. J. Merer, D. J. Clouthier, J. Mol. Spec. 197, 68 (1999)

  17. COMPLIS experiments: COllaboration for spectroscopy Measurements using a Pulsed Laser Ion Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauvage, J. [IN2P3-CNRS, Institut de Physique Nucleaire (France); Boos, N. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Cabaret, L. [Laboratoire AimeCotton (France); Crawford, J.E. [McGill University, Physics Department (Canada); Duong, H.T. [Laboratoire AimeCotton (France); Genevey, J. [IN2P3-CNRS, Institut des Sciences Nucleaires (France); Girod, M. [Commissariat al' Energie Atomique, Service de Physique Nucleaire (France); Huber, G. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Ibrahim, F. [IN2P3-CNRS, Institut de Physique Nucleaire (France); Krieg, M. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Le Blanc, F. [IN2P3-CNRS, Institut de Physique Nucleaire (France); Lee, J.K.P. [McGill University, Physics Department (Canada); Libert, J. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan (France); Lunney, D.; Obert, J.; Oms, J. [IN2P3-CNRS, Institut de Physique Nucleaire (France); Peru, S. [Commissariat al' Energie Atomique, Service de Physique Nucleaire (France); Pinard, J. [Laboratoire AimeCotton (France); Putaux, J.C.; Roussiere, B. [IN2P3-CNRS, Institut de Physique Nucleaire (France)] (and others)

    2000-12-15

    Laser spectroscopy measurements have been carried out on very neutron-deficient isotopes of Au, Pt and Ir, produced as daughter elements from a Hg ISOLDE beam. For these transitional region nuclides, the hyperfine structure (HFS) and isotope shift (IS) were measured by Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS). Magnetic moments {mu}, spectroscopic quadrupole moments Q{sub s} and changes of the nuclear mean square charge radius {delta}along isotopic series have been extracted. For some results, a detailed comparison with theoretical predictions is presented.

  18. Spectroscopy of the hydrogen 1 S -3 S transition with chirped laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, D. C.; Matveev, A.; Grinin, A.; Peters, E.; Maisenbacher, L.; Beyer, A.; Pohl, R.; Kolachevsky, N.; Khabarova, K.; Hänsch, T. W.; Udem, Th.

    2016-04-01

    We identify a systematic present in two-photon direct frequency comb spectroscopy (DFCS) which is a result of chirped laser pulses and is a manifestation of the first-order Doppler effect. We carefully analyze this systematic and propose methods for its mitigation within the context of our measurement of the hydrogen 1 S -3 S transition. We also report on our determination of the absolute frequency of this transition, which is comparable to a previous measurement using continuous-wave spectroscopy [O. Arnoult et al., Eur. Phys. J. D 60, 243 (2010), 10.1140/epjd/e2010-00249-6], but was obtained with a different experimental method.

  19. Laser Raman Spectroscopy with Different Excitation Sources and Extension to Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Wahadoszamen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dispersive Raman spectrometer was used with three different excitation sources (Argon-ion, He-Ne, and Diode lasers operating at 514.5 nm, 633 nm, and 782 nm, resp.. The system was employed to a variety of Raman active compounds. Many of the compounds exhibit very strong fluorescence while being excited with a laser emitting at UV-VIS region, hereby imposing severe limitation to the detection efficiency of the particular Raman system. The Raman system with variable excitation laser sources provided us with a desired flexibility toward the suppression of unwanted fluorescence signal. With this Raman system, we could detect and specify the different vibrational modes of various hazardous organic compounds and some typical dyes (both fluorescent and nonfluorescent. We then compared those results with the ones reported in literature and found the deviation within the range of ±2 cm−1, which indicates reasonable accuracy and usability of the Raman system. Then, the surface enhancement technique of Raman spectrum was employed to the present system. To this end, we used chemically prepared colloidal suspension of silver nanoparticles as substrate and Rhodamine 6G as probe. We could observe significant enhancement of Raman signal from Rhodamine 6G using the colloidal solution of silver nanoparticles the average magnitude of which is estimated to be 103.

  20. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  1. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Miaja-Avila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  2. $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with radioactive At beams

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and radioactive decay of the newly available pure beams of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich astatine (Z=85) isotopes. The fission probability and the fission fragment distribution of the even-even isotopes $^{194,196}$Po following the $\\beta$-decay of the isotopes $^{194,196}$At will be studied with the Windmill setup. In-source laser spectroscopy will be performed on the entire astatine isotopic chain, using a combination of the Windmill setup, ISOLTRAP MR-ToF and ISOLDE Faraday. Radioactive decay data will be acquired at the Windmill setup throughout those studies and contribute to the global understanding of the phenomenon of shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient lead region.

  3. RFQ beam cooler and buncher for collinear laser spectroscopy of rare isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquest, B. R.; Bollen, G.; Mantica, P. F.; Minamisono, K.; Ringle, R.; Schwarz, S.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.

    2017-09-01

    A radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) ion beam cooler and buncher has been developed to deliver bunched beams with low transverse emittance, energy spread, and time spread to the BECOLA collinear laser spectroscopy system at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University. The beam cooler and buncher contains new features which enhance performance, especially for high count rate beams, as well as simplifying construction, maintenance, and operation. The transverse emittance, energy spread, and time spread of the bunched beam, as well as buncher efficiency are reported, showcasing the capabilities of the BECOLA facility to perform collinear laser spectroscopy measurements with bunched rare isotope beams at NSCL and at the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB).

  4. Terahertz quantum-cascade lasers as high-power and wideband, gapless sources for spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röben, Benjamin; Lü, Xiang; Hempel, Martin; Biermann, Klaus; Schrottke, Lutz; Grahn, Holger T

    2017-07-10

    Terahertz (THz) quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) are powerful radiation sources for high-resolution and high-sensitivity spectroscopy with a discrete spectrum between 2 and 5 THz as well as a continuous coverage of several GHz. However, for many applications, a radiation source with a continuous coverage of a substantially larger frequency range is required. We employed a multi-mode THz QCL operated with a fast ramped injection current, which leads to a collective tuning of equally-spaced Fabry-Pérot laser modes exceeding their separation. A continuous coverage over 72 GHz at about 4.7 THz was achieved. We demonstrate that the QCL is superior to conventional sources used in Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio as well as the dynamic range by one to two orders of magnitude. Our results pave the way for versatile THz spectroscopic systems with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity across a wide frequency range.

  5. Towards high-resolution laser ionization spectroscopy of the heaviest elements in supersonic gas jet expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, R.; Barzakh, A.; Bastin, B.; Beerwerth, R.; Block, M.; Creemers, P.; Grawe, H.; de Groote, R.; Delahaye, P.; Fléchard, X.; Franchoo, S.; Fritzsche, S.; Gaffney, L. P.; Ghys, L.; Gins, W.; Granados, C.; Heinke, R.; Hijazi, L.; Huyse, M.; Kron, T.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lecesne, N.; Loiselet, M.; Lutton, F.; Moore, I. D.; Martínez, Y.; Mogilevskiy, E.; Naubereit, P.; Piot, J.; Raeder, S.; Rothe, S.; Savajols, H.; Sels, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Thomas, J-C; Traykov, E.; Van Beveren, C.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Wendt, K.; Zadvornaya, A.

    2017-01-01

    Resonant laser ionization and spectroscopy are widely used techniques at radioactive ion beam facilities to produce pure beams of exotic nuclei and measure the shape, size, spin and electromagnetic multipole moments of these nuclei. However, in such measurements it is difficult to combine a high efficiency with a high spectral resolution. Here we demonstrate the on-line application of atomic laser ionization spectroscopy in a supersonic gas jet, a technique suited for high-precision studies of the ground- and isomeric-state properties of nuclei located at the extremes of stability. The technique is characterized in a measurement on actinium isotopes around the N=126 neutron shell closure. A significant improvement in the spectral resolution by more than one order of magnitude is achieved in these experiments without loss in efficiency. PMID:28224987

  6. Laser Calorimetry Spectroscopy for ppm-level Dissolved Gas Detection and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K S, Nagapriya; Sinha, Shashank; R, Prashanth; Poonacha, Samhitha; Chaudhry, Gunaranjan; Bhattacharya, Anandaroop; Choudhury, Niloy; Mahalik, Saroj; Maity, Sandip

    2017-02-20

    In this paper we report a newly developed technique - laser calorimetry spectroscopy (LCS), which is a combination of laser absorption spectroscopy and calorimetry - for the detection of gases dissolved in liquids. The technique involves determination of concentration of a dissolved gas by irradiating the liquid with light of a wavelength where the gas absorbs, and measuring the temperature change caused by the absorbance. Conventionally, detection of dissolved gases with sufficient sensitivity and specificity was done by first extracting the gases from the liquid and then analyzing the gases using techniques such as gas chromatography. Using LCS, we have been able to detect ppm levels of dissolved gases without extracting them from the liquid. In this paper, we show the detection of dissolved acetylene in transformer oil in the mid infrared (MIR) wavelength (3021 nm) region.

  7. Laser Calorimetry Spectroscopy for ppm-level Dissolved Gas Detection and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. S., Nagapriya; Sinha, Shashank; Prashanth, R.; Poonacha, Samhitha; Chaudhry, Gunaranjan; Bhattacharya, Anandaroop; Choudhury, Niloy; Mahalik, Saroj; Maity, Sandip

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we report a newly developed technique - laser calorimetry spectroscopy (LCS), which is a combination of laser absorption spectroscopy and calorimetry - for the detection of gases dissolved in liquids. The technique involves determination of concentration of a dissolved gas by irradiating the liquid with light of a wavelength where the gas absorbs, and measuring the temperature change caused by the absorbance. Conventionally, detection of dissolved gases with sufficient sensitivity and specificity was done by first extracting the gases from the liquid and then analyzing the gases using techniques such as gas chromatography. Using LCS, we have been able to detect ppm levels of dissolved gases without extracting them from the liquid. In this paper, we show the detection of dissolved acetylene in transformer oil in the mid infrared (MIR) wavelength (3021 nm) region.

  8. Laser Calorimetry Spectroscopy for ppm-level Dissolved Gas Detection and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. S., Nagapriya; Sinha, Shashank; R., Prashanth; Poonacha, Samhitha; Chaudhry, Gunaranjan; Bhattacharya, Anandaroop; Choudhury, Niloy; Mahalik, Saroj; Maity, Sandip

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we report a newly developed technique – laser calorimetry spectroscopy (LCS), which is a combination of laser absorption spectroscopy and calorimetry - for the detection of gases dissolved in liquids. The technique involves determination of concentration of a dissolved gas by irradiating the liquid with light of a wavelength where the gas absorbs, and measuring the temperature change caused by the absorbance. Conventionally, detection of dissolved gases with sufficient sensitivity and specificity was done by first extracting the gases from the liquid and then analyzing the gases using techniques such as gas chromatography. Using LCS, we have been able to detect ppm levels of dissolved gases without extracting them from the liquid. In this paper, we show the detection of dissolved acetylene in transformer oil in the mid infrared (MIR) wavelength (3021 nm) region. PMID:28218304

  9. Consequences of Femtosecond Laser Filament Generation Conditions in Standoff Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-08-08

    We investigate the role of femtosecond laser focusing conditions on ablation properties and its implications on analytical merits and standoff detection applications. Femtosecond laser pulses can be used for ablation either by tightly focusing or by using filaments generated during its propagation. We evaluated the persistence of atomic, and molecular emission features as well as time evolution of the fundamental properties (temperature and density) of ablation plumes generated using different methods.

  10. In-source laser spectroscopy of mercury isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    This proposal follows on from the Letter of Intent, I-153. The neutron-deficient mercury isotopes are one of the prime examples of shape coexistence anywhere in the nuclear chart. Wide-ranging and complementary experimental and theoretical approaches have been used to investigate their structure over the last few years, however mean-square charge radii are unknown for isotopes with $\\textit{A}$ < 181. It is proposed to measure the isotope shift (IS) and hyperfine structure (HFS) of the 253-nm transition in $^{177-182}$Hg in an attempt to study the propagation of the famous odd-even staggering behaviour. At the other end of the chain, no information exists on the optical spectroscopy of Hg isotopes beyond the $\\textit{N}$ = 126 shell closure. There is a well-known "kink" in mean-square charge radii beyond this point in the even $\\textit{Z}$ $\\geq$ 82 elements. It is proposed to measure the IS of $^{207,208}$Hg in order to provide the first information on this effect below $\\textit{Z}$ = 82.

  11. Far infrared laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy of free radicals

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Y

    1996-01-01

    determine the vibrational dependence of all the major molecular parameters. Several v=1 parameters have been determined for the first time. The results constitute the definitive parameters for the v=1 state of CF. Finally, the FIR LMR spectra of CH sub 2 Br, the first high resolution spectra of this radical in the gas phase, are described in Chapter 6. Due to the complexity of the spectra and the lack of spectroscopic information from other high resolution techniques, the CH sub 2 Br spectra have not yet been completely assigned and analysed. However, this study did allow the determination of the (B+C) value of the radical. In this dissertation both theoretical and experimental aspects of FIR LMR spectroscopy are discussed with particular emphasis on the radicals CF and CH sub 2 Br. Chapter 1 reviews the development and salient features of LMR. After a discussion of the basic concepts and principles of LMR in Chapter 2, Chapter 3 gives a detailed description of the Cambridge FIR LMR spectrometer used to searc...

  12. Laser fluorescence spectroscopy of zinc neutrals originating from laser-irradiated and ion-bombarded zinc sulfide and zinc surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlinghaus, H. F.; Calaway, W. F.; Young, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Gruen, D. M.; Chase, L. L.

    Time-of-flight (TOF) measurements, employing high-resolution laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LFS) as a probe, have been used to measure the yield and velocity distribution of Zn atoms ejected from a ZnS single crystal under irradiation by 308 nm photons. By comparison with the known ion sputtering yield for pure zinc, the absolute yield was determined to be 10 to the 10th power atoms/pulse at a laser fluence of 30 mJ/sq cm. The velocity distribution of the Zn atoms could be fitted by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, having characteristic temperature of approx 2300 K. In addition, Doppler-shift techniques have been combined with TOF measurements in order to separate prompt from delayed emission of ablated atoms, as well as to probe possible molecular or cluster fragmentation. The results obtained suggest the possibility of molecular or cluster emission from ZnS.

  13. Self-absorption influence on the optical spectroscopy of zinc oxide laser produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Posada, E; Arronte, M A; Ponce, L; Rodriguez, E; Flores, T [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y TecnologIa Avanzada-Unidad Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Lunney, J G, E-mail: edeposada@ipn.mx [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland)

    2011-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy is used to study the laser ablation process of ZnO targets. It is demonstrated that even if Partial Local Thermal Equilibrium is present, self absorption process leads to a decrease of recorded lines emission intensities and have to be taken into account to obtain correct values of such parameters. It is presented a method that combines results of both Langmuir probe technique and Anisimov model to obtain correct values of plasma parameters.

  14. Quasi zero-background tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy employing a balanced Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zuguang; Lewander, Märta; Svanberg, Sune

    2008-12-22

    Tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) normally observes small fractional absorptive reductions in the light flux. We show, that instead a signal increase on a zero background can be obtained. A Michelson interferometer, which is initially balanced out in destructive interference, is perturbed by gas absorption in one of its arms. Both theoretical analysis and experimental demonstration show that the proposed zero-background TDLS can improve the achievable signal-to-noise ratio.

  15. Shell structure and level migrations in zinc studied using collinear laser spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Tungate, G; De rydt, M A E; Flanagan, K; Rajabali, M M; Hammen, M; Blaum, K; Froemmgen, N E; Kowalska, M; Campbell, P; Neugart, R; Kreim, K D; Stroke, H H; Krieger, A R; Procter, T J

    We propose to perform collinear laser spectroscopy of zinc isotopes to measure the nuclear spin, magnetic dipole moment, electric quadrupole moment and mean-square charge radius. The yield database indicates that measurements of the isotopes $^{60-81}$Zn will be feasible. These measurements will cross the N = 50 shell closure and provide nuclear moments in a region where an inversion of ground-state spin has been identified in neighbouring chains.

  16. Breath air measurement using wide-band frequency tuning IR laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistenev, Yury V.; Borisov, Alexey V.; Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Bulanova, Anna A.; Boyko, Andrey A.; Kostyukova, Nadezhda Y.; Karapuzikov, Alexey A.

    2016-03-01

    The results of measuring of biomarkers in breath air of patients with broncho-pulmonary diseases using wide-band frequency tuning IR laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy and the methods of data mining are presented. We will discuss experimental equipment and various methods of intellectual analysis of the experimental spectra in context of above task. The work was carried out with partial financial support of the FCPIR contract No 14.578.21.0082 (ID RFMEFI57814X0082).

  17. Laser assisted nuclear decay spectroscopy: A new method for studying neutron-deficient francium

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Kara Marie

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive decay studies of rare isotopes produced at radioactive ion beam facilities have often been hindered by the presence of isobaric and isomeric contamination. The Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at ISOLDE, CERN uses laser radiation to stepwise excite and ionize an atomic beam in a particular isomeric state. Deflection of this selectively ionized beam of exotic nuclei, from the remaining neutral contaminants, allows ultra-sensitive detection of rare isotopes and nuclear structure measurements in background-free conditions.\

  18. Determining spatial sodium distribution in fresh and aged bread using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtes-Timmerman, M.; Heddes, C.; Noort, M.W.J.; Veen, S. van

    2013-01-01

    A fast and easy-to-use method using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was set up to determine Na (sodium) distribution in baked bread. Standard bread was made using a standard recipe and the amount of salt added was 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 10, 15 and 20g corresponding to 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5

  19. Laser spectroscopy of tin and cadmium: across N=82 and closing in on N=50

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the isotopes of tin starting in proximity of N = 50 up to and beyond N = 82, as well as the "magic-plus-one" nuclei of cadmium at both shell closures. The objective is to determine model-independent properties of ground and isomeric states by high-resolution laser spectroscopy, which are essential for understanding the structure of nuclei and their astrophysical importance in this region of the nuclear chart.

  20. Determining spatial sodium distribution in fresh and aged bread using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtes-Timmerman, M.; Heddes, C.; Noort, M.W.J.; Veen, S. van

    2013-01-01

    A fast and easy-to-use method using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was set up to determine Na (sodium) distribution in baked bread. Standard bread was made using a standard recipe and the amount of salt added was 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 10, 15 and 20g corresponding to 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0,

  1. Quantitative analysis of pathological nails using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoui, S; Khleifia, R; Jaïdane, N; Ben Lakhdar, Z

    2011-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used as a potential method for simultaneous measurement of the elements Ca, Na, and K, for normal and pathological nails. We compared the measured LIBS spectra of these elements for normal and pathological nails. The B²∑+ --> X²∑+ violet band emission spectrum of CN was used for the estimation of the transient temperature of the plasma plume and consequently of the sample surface considering thermodynamic equilibrium.

  2. Improved algorithm for elemental analysis by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Subramanian, K P; Kumar, Ajai; Singh, R K

    2013-07-20

    We propose a calibration-free algorithm for retrieval of elemental concentrations using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. This is a simple and improved version of other ratio-based algorithms as it needs only one trial parameter to estimate all other concentrations. The present algorithm has been used to estimate the composition of a brass sample, and the results agree within 1% with electron probe microanalyzer measurements.

  3. Combined laser induced ignition and plasma spectroscopy: Fundamentals and application to a hydrogen-air combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, L. [Aeroengine Technology Center, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 7-44-1 Jindaiji-Higashi Chofu, 182-8522 Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: laurent.zimmer@em2c.ecp.fr; Okai, K. [Aeroengine Technology Center, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 7-44-1 Jindaiji-Higashi Chofu, 182-8522 Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: okai@chofu.jaxa.jp; Kurosawa, Y. [Clean engine team, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 7-44-1 Jindaiji-Higashi Chofu, 182-8522 Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: kuro@chofu.jaxa.jp

    2007-12-15

    Combined Laser Induced Ignition and Plasma Spectroscopy (LI2PS) has the potential to give the exact local composition of a mixture at the ignition point and at the ignition time. However, as different laser energies are required to ignite a particular mixture as function of space, the typical approach using two power meters to calibrate the plasma spectroscopy measurement is not well suited. Furthermore, LI2PS requires single shot measurements and therefore high accuracy. In this paper, a novel calibration scheme is presented for application of Laser Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (LIPS) to gaseous analyses. Numerical simulations of air spectra are used to show that species emission can be used directly from the broadband spectra to determine the plasma conditions. The ratio of nitrogen emission around 744 nm and around 870 nm is found to be a sensitive indication of temperature in the emission ranging from 700 to 890 nm. Comparisons with experimental spectra show identical tendencies and validate the findings of the simulations. This approach is used in a partially-premixed hydrogen-air burner. First, helium is used instead of hydrogen. After an explanation of timing issue related to LIPS, it is shown that the calibration required depends only on nitrogen excitation and nitrogen-hydrogen ratio, without the need to know the deposited power. Measurements of the fuel distribution as function of injection momentum and spatial localization are reported. To illustrate the use of such a single shot approach, combined laser ignition and plasma spectroscopy is proposed. In this case, the calibration is based on hydrogen excitation and hydrogen-oxygen and hydrogen-nitrogen ratio. Results obtained with LI2PS show that ignition is successful only for high power and relatively high hydrogen concentration compared to the local mean. It is expected that LI2PS will become an important tool when dealing with partially-premixed or diffusion flame ignition.

  4. Analysis Si/Al ratio in zeolites type FAU by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, W. A.; Cabanzo, R.; Mejía-Ospino, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is used to determine the Si/Al ratio of Zeolite type Y. The catalytic activity of zeolite is strongly dependent of the Si/Al ratio. We have used Si lines in the spectral region between 245-265 nm to determine temperature of the plasma generated on pelletized sample of zeolite, and stoichiometry relation between Si and Al.

  5. Pulsed-laser Pumped Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy for Liquid Thermal Diffusivity Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Liantuan; LI Changyong; ZHANG Linjie; ZHAO Yanting; JIA Suotang; ZHOU Guosheng

    2000-01-01

    The pulsed-laser pumped photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PPDS) is applied to measure liquid thermal diffusivity in a modified collinear configuration. Here the pulsed beam is regarded as in the form of a Dirac delta function. The experiment setup used is described. Measurement result for the thermal diffusivity of a liquid sample(magnta/ethanol saturated solution) is reported. The measurement error is less than 3%.

  6. Analysis of Frozen Sulfate and Chloride Salt Solutions Using Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Under Martian Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, S.; Pavlov, S. G.; Hübers, H.-W.; Rauschenbach, I.; Jessberger, E. K.

    2010-03-01

    We showed the feasibility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to analyze different frozen salt solutions under martian conditions. We focused on chloride and sulphate salts which were found on Mars and could lower the freezing point of water.

  7. Novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method using superfluid helium for measurement of spins and moments of exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Takeshi, E-mail: takeshi@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakui, Takashi [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Yang, Xiaofei [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); School of Physics, Peking University, Chengfu Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Fujita, Tomomi [Department of Physics, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Imamura, Kei; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tetsuka, Hiroki; Tsutsui, Yoshiki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501,Japan (Japan); Mitsuya, Yosuke [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Ichikawa, Yuichi [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ishibashi, Yoko [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Yoshida, Naoki; Shirai, Hazuki [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ebara, Yuta; Hayasaka, Miki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501,Japan (Japan); Arai, Shino; Muramoto, Sosuke [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Development of a novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method using superfluid helium. • Observation of the Zeeman resonance with the {sup 85}Rb beam introduced into helium. • Demonstration of deducing the nuclear spins from the observed resonance spectrum. -- Abstract: We have been developing a novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method “OROCHI” for determining spins and moments of exotic radioisotopes. In this method, we use superfluid helium as a stopping material of energetic radioisotope beams and then stopped radioisotope atoms are subjected to in situ laser spectroscopy in superfluid helium. To confirm the feasibility of this method for rare radioisotopes, we carried out a test experiment using a {sup 85}Rb beam. In this experiment, we have successfully measured the Zeeman resonance signals from the {sup 85}Rb atoms stopped in superfluid helium by laser-RF double resonance spectroscopy. This method is efficient for the measurement of spins and moments of more exotic nuclei.

  8. The differentiation of oral soft- and hard tissues using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy - a prospect for tissue specific laser surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Maximilian; Mehari, Fanuel; Klämpfl, Florian; Adler, Werner; Neukam, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Schmidt, Michael; Stelzle, Florian

    2016-11-22

    Compared to conventional techniques, Laser surgery procedures provide a number of advantages, but may be associated with an increased risk of iatrogenic damage to important anatomical structures. The type of tissue ablated in the focus spot is unknown. Laser-Induced Breakdown-Spectroscopy (LIBS) has the potential to gain information about the type of material that is being ablated by the laser beam. This may form the basis for tissue selective laser surgery. In the present study, 7 different porcine tissues (cortical and cancellous bone, nerve, mucosa, enamel, dentine and pulp) from 6 animals were analyzed for their qualitative and semiquantitative molecular composition using LIBS. The so gathered data was used to first differentiate between the soft- and hard-tissues using a Calcium-Carbon emission based classifier. The tissues were then further classified using emission-ratio based analysis, principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). The relatively higher concentration of Calcium in the hard tissues allows for an accurate first differentiation of soft- and hard tissues (100% sensitivity and specificity). The ratio based statistical differentiation approach yields results in the range from 65% (enamel-dentine pair) to 100% (nerve-pulp, cancellous bone-dentine, cancellous bone-enamel pairs) sensitivity and specificity. Experimental LIBS measuring setup. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Improving the Selectivity of the ISOLDE Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source and In-Source Laser Spectroscopy of Polonium

    CERN Document Server

    Fink, Daniel Andreas; Jochim, Selim

    Exotic atomic nuclei far away from stability are fascinating objects to be studied in many scientic elds such as atomic-, nuclear-, and astrophysics. Since these are often short-lived isotopes, it is necessary to couple their production with immediate extraction and delivery to an experiment. This is the purpose of the on-line isotope separator facility, ISOLDE, at CERN. An essential aspect of this laboratory is the Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) because it provides a fast and highly selective means of ionizing the reaction products. This technique is also a sensitive laser-spectroscopy tool for the development and improvement of electron excitation schemes for the resonant laser photoionization and the study of the nuclear structure or fundamental atomic physics. Each of these aspects of the RILIS applications are subjects of this thesis work: a new device for the suppression of unwanted surface ionized contaminants in RILIS ion beams, known as the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST), was impleme...

  10. Nanometer-film analysis by the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy method: the effects of laser focus to sample distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuxiang; Zhong, Shilei; Shan, Fukai; Lu, Yuan; Sun, Xin; Liu, Zhe; Sheng, Pengpeng

    2015-05-20

    In order to develop a method to analyze metal elements in thin-film samples rapidly, directly and without sample preparation, and to understand the mechanism of laser-film interaction and plasma formation and evolution, a laboratory laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy system was established recently for nanometer-film analysis. ZrO(2) films prepared on silicon chips by a sol-gel process were employed in the following experiment and their thickness was about 40 nm. By the initial investigation that we carried out, the stability of this system was verified and the relative standard deviation of the target peak was found to be lower than 1.6% with the help of a position system. The influences of different experimental parameters, such as laser energy, laser focus to sample distance (LFTSD) settings, and gate delay, were studied under conditions of room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The experimental results show that the LFTSD was one of the most important parameters for plasma formation and spectral collection in comparison with other parameters by means of plasma spectra and images. So the effects of the LFTSD on the spectra, plasma evolution, and craters are specially discussed in this paper. At last, we calculated the plasma temperature and electron density under optimal parameters for quantitative analysis. The result shows that the established system is available for qualitative and quantitative analysis of films under conditions of single pulse and low ablation energy.

  11. Boosting persistence time of laser-induced plasma by electric arc discharge for optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschlböck-Fuchs, S., E-mail: simon.eschlboeck-fuchs@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Kolmhofer, P.J.; Bodea, M.A.; Hechenberger, J.G.; Huber, N. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rössler, R. [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, A-4031 Linz (Austria); Pedarnig, J.D., E-mail: johannes.pedarnig@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2015-07-01

    Plasma induced by nanosecond laser ablation is re-excited by a pulsed electric discharge and the parameters and optical emission of the plasma are measured. The discharge is a low-voltage and high-current electric arc that is triggered by the laser-induced plasma and slowly decaying with time. The optical emission of such combined plasma lasts up to several milliseconds which is much longer than without re-excitation (μs range). The emission spectra of re-excited plasma measured on different sample materials show higher line intensities than spectra measured by conventional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Moreover, emission lines of fluorine (spectral range 683–691 nm) and sulfur (range 520–550 nm) not detected by conventional LIBS become easily detectable with the combined plasma. The concentration of major components in metallurgical slags, as determined by calibration-free LIBS, agrees very well to the reference data evaluating the spectra taken from re-excited plasma. - Highlights: • Persistence time of laser-induced plasma in air is increased from ~ 10 μs to ~ 1 ms. • Laser-induced plasma triggers an electric arc discharge that boosts the plasma. • The combined laser-arc plasma is in LTE state over very long time (ms range). • CF-LIBS method delivers accurate results evaluating spectra of combined plasma. • Emission from S and F, not detected by LIBS, is detected with combined plasma.

  12. Progress of laser ablation for accelerator mass spectroscopy at ATLAS utilizing an ECRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R.; Palchan, T.; Pardo, R.; Vondrasek, R.; Kondev, F.; Nusair, O.; Peters, C.; Paul, M.; Bauder, W.; Collon, P.

    2014-02-01

    Beams of ions from the laser ablation method of solid materials into an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasma have been used for the first time in experiments at ATLAS. Initial accelerator mass spectroscopy experiments using laser ablation for actinides and samarium have been performed. Initial results of coupling the laser system to the ECR source have guided us in making a number of changes to the original design. The point of laser impact has been moved off axis from the center of the ECR injection side. Motor control of the laser positioning mirror has been replaced with a faster and more reliable piezo-electric system, and different raster scan patterns have been tested. The use of the laser system in conjunction with a multi-sample changer has been implemented. Two major problems that are being confronted at this time are beam stability and total beam intensity. The status of the development will be presented and ideas for further improvements will be discussed.

  13. Approaching the ppb detection limits for copper in water using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Walid; Sawaf, Sausan

    2014-05-01

    Copper concentrations in drinking-water is very important to be monitored which can cause cancer if it exceed about 10 mg/liter. In the present work, we have developed a simple, low laser power method to improve the detection limits of laser induced plasma spectroscopy LIBS for copper in aqueous solutions with different concentrations. In this method a medium density fiberboard (MDF) wood have been used as a substrate that absorbs the liquid sample to transform laser liquid interaction to laser solid interaction. Using the fundamental wavelength of Nd:YAG laser, the constructed plasma emissions were monitored for elemental analysis. The signal-to-noise ratio SNR was optimized using low laser fluence of 32 J cm-2, and detector (CDD camera) gate delay of 0.5 μs. Both the electron temperature and density of the induced plasma were determined using Boltzmann plot and the FWHM of the Cu at 324.7 nm, respectively. The plasma temperature was found to be 1.197 eV, while the plasma density was about 1.66 x 1019 cm-3. The detection limits for Cu at 324.7 nm is found to be 131 ppb comparable to the results by others using complicated system.

  14. Laser speckle reduction techniques for mid-infrared microscopy and stand-off spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, Christopher A.; Breshike, Christopher J.; Nguyen, Viet; McGill, R. Andrew

    2017-05-01

    Due to their high brightness, infrared (IR) lasers (such as tunable quantum cascade lasers, QCLLs) are very attractive illumination sources in both stand-off spectroscopy and micro-spectroscopy. In fact, they are the enabling device for trace-level spectroscopy. However, due to their high coherence as laser beams, QCLLs can cause speckle, especially when illuminating a rough surface. This is highly detrimental to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of thee collected spectra and can easily negate the gains from using aa high brightness source. In most cases, speckle reduction is performed at the expense of optical power. In this paper, we examine several speckle reduction approaches and evaluate them for their ability to reduce speckle contrast while at the same time preserving aa high optical throughput. We analyze multi-mode fibers, integrating spheres, and stationary and moving diffusers for their speckle reduction potential. Speckle-contrast is measured directly by acquiring beam profiles of the illumination beam or, indirectly, by observing speckle formation from illuminating a rough surface (e.g. Infragold® coated surface) with an IR micro-bolometer camera. We also report on a novel speckle-reducing device with increased optical throughput. We characterize speckle contrast reduction from spatial, temporal and wavelength averaging for both CWW and pulsed QCLs. Examples of effect of speckle-reduction on hyperspectral images in both standoff and microscopy configurations are given.

  15. Picometer-resolution dual-comb spectroscopy with a free-running fibre laser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xin; Zhao, Bofeng; Li, Cui; Pan, Yingling; Liu, Ya; Yasui, Takeshi; Zheng, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Dual-comb spectroscopy utilizes two sets of comb lines with slightly different comb-tooth-spacings, and optical spectral information is acquired by measuring the radio-frequency beat notes between the sets of comb lines. It holds the promise as a real-time, high-resolution analytical spectroscopy tool for a range of important applications. However, the stringent requirement on the coherence between comb lines from two separate lasers and the sophisticated control system to achieve that have confined the technology to the top metrology laboratories. By replacing electronics with the law of physics in lasers, a much simpler, dual-comb spectroscopy scheme is demonstrated here using just one dual-wavelength, passively mode-locked fiber laser. Dual-comb pulses with a repetition-frequency difference determined by the intracavity dispersion are shown to be robust against common-mode cavity drifts and noises. As sufficiently low relative linewidth is maintained between two sets of comb lines, capability to resolve pi...

  16. Frequency Stabilization of a 369 nm Diode Laser by Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Ytterbium Ions in a Discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Michael W; Marciniak, Christian; Biercuk, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate stabilisation of an ultraviolet diode laser via Doppler free spectroscopy of Ytterbium ions in a discharge. Our technique employs polarization spectroscopy, which produces a natural dispersive lineshape whose zero-crossing is largely immune to environmental drifts, making this signal an ideal absolute frequency reference for Yb$^+$ ion trapping experiments. We stabilise an external-cavity diode laser near 369 nm for cooling Yb$^+$ ions, using amplitude-modulated polarisation spectroscopy and a commercial PID feedback system. We achieve stable, low-drift locking with a standard deviation of measured laser frequency ~400 kHz over 10 minutes, limited by the instantaneous linewidth of the diode laser. These results and the simplicity of our optical setup makes our approach attractive for stabilization of laser sources in atomic-physics applications.

  17. Excited states in DNA strands investigated by ultrafast laser spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinquan; Zhang, Yuyuan; Kohler, Bern

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser experiments on carefully selected DNA model compounds probe the effects of base stacking, base pairing, and structural disorder on excited electronic states formed by UV absorption in single and double DNA strands. Direct π-orbital overlap between two stacked bases in a dinucleotide or in a longer single strand creates new excited states that decay orders of magnitude more slowly than the generally subpicosecond excited states of monomeric bases. Half or more of all excited states in single strands decay in this manner. Ultrafast mid-IR transient absorption experiments reveal that the long-lived excited states in a number of model compounds are charge transfer states formed by interbase electron transfer, which subsequently decay by charge recombination. The lifetimes of the charge transfer states are surprisingly independent of how the stacked bases are oriented, but disruption of π-stacking, either by elevating temperature or by adding a denaturing co-solvent, completely eliminates this decay channel. Time-resolved emission measurements support the conclusion that these states are populated very rapidly from initial excitons. These experiments also reveal the existence of populations of emissive excited states that decay on the nanosecond time scale. The quantum yield of these states is very small for UVB/UVC excitation, but increases at UVA wavelengths. In double strands, hydrogen bonding between bases perturbs, but does not quench, the long-lived excited states. Kinetic isotope effects on the excited-state dynamics suggest that intrastrand electron transfer may couple to interstrand proton transfer. By revealing how structure and non-covalent interactions affect excited-state dynamics, on-going experimental and theoretical studies of excited states in DNA strands can advance understanding of fundamental photophysics in other nanoscale systems.

  18. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in open-path configuration for the analysis of distant objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallé, B.; Mauchien, P.; Maurice, S.

    2007-08-01

    A review of recent results on stand-off Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis and applications is presented. Stand-off LIBS was suggested for elemental analysis of materials located in environments where any physical access was not possible but optical access could be envisaged. This review only refers to the use of the open-path LIBS configuration in which the laser beam and the returning plasma light are transmitted through the atmosphere. It does not present the results obtained with a transportation of the laser pulses to the target through an optical fiber. Open-path stand-off LIBS has mainly been used with nanosecond laser pulses for solid sample analysis at distances of tens of meters. Liquid samples have also been analyzed at distances of a few meters. The distances achievable depend on many parameters including the laser characteristics (pulse energy and power, beam divergence, spatial profile) and the optical system used to focus the pulses at a distance. A large variety of laser focusing systems have been employed for stand-off analysis comprising refracting or reflecting telescope. Efficient collection of the plasma light is also needed to obtain analytically useful signals. For stand-off LIBS analysis, a lens or a mirror is required to increase the solid angle over which the plasma light can be collected. The light collection device can be either at an angle from the laser beam path or collinear with the optical axis of the system used to focus the laser pulses on the target surface. These different configurations have been used depending on the application such as rapid sorting of metal samples, identification of material in nuclear industry, process control and monitoring in metallurgical industry, applications in future planetary missions, detection of environmental contamination or cleaning of objects of cultural heritage. Recent stand-off analyses of metal samples have been reported using femtosecond laser pulses to extend LIBS

  19. Raman Tweezers as a Diagnostic Tool of Hemoglobin-Related Blood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Rusciano

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the development of a Raman Tweezers system for detecting hemoglobin-related blood disorders at a single cell level. The study demonstrates that the molecular fingerprint insight provided by Raman analysis holds great promise for distinguishing between healthy and diseased cells in the field of biomedicine. Herein a Raman Tweezers system has been applied to investigate the effects of thalassemia, a blood disease quite diffuse in the Mediterranean Sea region. By resonant excitation of hemoglobin Raman bands, we examined the oxygenation capability of normal, alpha- and beta-thalassemic erythrocytes. A reduction of this fundamental red blood cell function, particularly severe for beta-thalassemia, has been found. Raman spectroscopy was also used to draw hemoglobin distribution inside single erythrocytes; the results confirmed the characteristic anomaly (target shape, occurring in thalassemia and some other blood disorders. The success of resonance Raman spectroscopy for thalassemia detection reported in this review provide an interesting starting point to explore the application of a Raman Tweezers system in the analysis of several blood disorders.

  20. Peltier cooled PbSe double-heterostructure lasers for IR-gas spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preier, H.; Bleicher, M.; Riedel, W.; Pfeiffer, H.; Maier, H. (Allgemeine Elektricitaets-Gesellschaft AEG Telefunken, Frankfurt am Main (Germany, F.R.). Forschungsinstitut)

    1977-01-01

    PbS-PbSe-PbS double-heterostructure lasers have been pulse-operated at about 200 K mounted on 4 stage thermoelectric coolers. Emitting at a wavelength of about 5.5 ..mu..m they could be used for NO gas spectroscopy. Operation temperatures of up to 230 K have been achieved with structures consisting of n-type PbS substrates and epitaxial layers of n-type PbSe and Tl doped p-type PbS. The temperature dependence of the threshold current density and the emission wavelength of these DH-lasers was compared with PbSe-homojunction lasers. The use of a germanium etalon for a quick evaluation of the spectral quality of the emitted radiation is described.