WorldWideScience

Sample records for laser beam-planar target

  1. ORION laser target diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K.

    2012-01-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  2. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  3. Laser targets: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The laser target design group was engaged in three main tasks in 1984: (1) analyzing Novette implosion and hohlraum-scaling data, (2) planning for the first experiments on Nova, and (3) designing laboratory x-ray laser targets and experiments. The Novette implosion and hohlraum scaling data are mostly classified and are therefore not discussed in detail here. The authors achieved average final/initial pusher pr ratios of about 50, some 3 times higher than the value achieved in the best Shiva shots. These pr values imply a fuel compression to 100 times liquid density, although this figure and other aspects of the experiments are subject to further interpretation because of detailed questions of target symmetry and stability. Their main long-term goal for Nova is to produce a so-called hydrodynamically equivalent target (HET) - that is, a target whose hydrodynamic behavior (implosion velocity, convergence ratio, symmetry and stability requirements, etc.) is very much like that of a high-gain target, but one that is scaled down in size to match the energy available from Nova and is too small to achieve enough hot-spot pr to ignite the cold, near-Fermi-degenerate fuel around it. Their goal for Nova's first year is to do experiments that will teach them how to achieve the symmetry and stability conditions required by an HET

  4. Apparatus for producing laser targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Baker, W.R.

    1975-01-01

    This patent relates to an apparatus and method for producing deuterium targets or pellets of 25u to 75u diameter. The pellets are sliced from a continuously spun solid deuterium thread at a rate of up to 10 pellets/second. The pellets after being sliced from the continuous thread of deuterium are collimated and directed to a point of use, such as a laser activated combustion or explosion chamber wherein the pellets are imploded by laser energy or laser produced target plasmas for neutral beam injection

  5. Spinning targets for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, D.E.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1995-09-01

    Several techniques for spinning the ICF targets up prior to or in the course of their compression are suggested. Interference of the rotational shear flow with Rayleigh-Taylor instability is briefly discussed and possible consequences for the target performance are pointed out

  6. Multiple Target Laser Designator (MTLD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Optimized Liquid Crystal Scanning Element Optimize the Nonimaging Predictive Algorithm for Target Ranging, Tracking, and Position Estimation...commercial potential. 3.0 PROGRESS THIS QUARTER 3.1 Optimization of Nonimaging Holographic Antenna for Target Tracking and Position Estimation (Task 6) In

  7. Electrostatics, small particles, and laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1978-01-01

    The success of any Inertial Confinement Fusion system for the production of useful power depends critically on the production of suitable targets. This is true whether the arrangement is that proposed by Nuckolls et al. or some other arrangement. The target must have characteristics such as material composition, structure, and surface finish which are tailored to the laser pulse length, energy, peak and average power and pulse shape. To provide useful power on a continuous basis, it is likely that the repetition rate will be 1.0 to 10 per second. Thus, in a 24 hour running period 864,000 targets may be necessary and one must be placed at the focal point of the laser every tenth of a second. For economic operation it is necessary that the targets be produced at costs of less than $1.00 per target

  8. Characteristics of target polarization by laser ablation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krása, Josef; Delle Side, D.; Giuffreda, E.; Nassisi, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 4 (2015), 601-605 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0454; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant - others:LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Target current in laser-produced plasmas * positive and negative target polarization * space structure of ion front Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.649, year: 2015

  9. Repetitive output laser system and method using target reflectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.R.

    1978-01-01

    An improved laser system and method for implosion of a thermonuclear fuel pellet is described in which that portion of a laser pulse reflected by the target pellet is utilized in the laser system to initiate a succeeding target implosion, and in which the energy stored in the laser system to amplify the initial laser pulse, but not completely absorbed thereby, is used to amplify succeeding laser pulses initiated by target refγlection

  10. Ignition target and laser-plasma instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laffite, S.; Loiseau, P.

    2010-01-01

    For the first time indirect drive ignition targets have been designed with the constraint of limiting laser-plasma instabilities. The amplification of these instabilities is directly proportional to the luminous flux density, it means to the sizes of the focal spots too. This study shows that increasing the sizes of the focal spots does not reduce linear amplification gains in a proportional way because the global optimization of the target implies changes in hydrodynamical conditions that in turn have an impact on the value of the amplification gain. The design of the target is a 2-step approach: the first step aims at assuring a uniform irradiation and compression of the target. The first step requires information concerning the laser focusing spots, the dimensions of the hohlraum, the inert gas contained in it, the materials of the wall. The second step is an optimization approach whose aim is to reduce the risk of laser-plasmas instabilities. This optimization is made through simulations of the amplification gains of stimulated Raman and Brillouin backscattering. This method has allowed us to design an optimized target for a rugby-shaped hohlraum. (A.C.)

  11. Novel gas target for laser wakefield accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniculaesei, C.; Kim, Hyung Taek; Yoo, Byung Ju; Oh, Kyung Hwan; Nam, Chang Hee

    2018-02-01

    A novel gas target for interactions between high power lasers and gaseous medium, especially for laser wakefield accelerators, has been designed, manufactured, and characterized. The gas target has been designed to provide a uniform density profile along the central gas cell axis by combining a gas cell and slit nozzle. The gas density has been tuned from ˜1017 atoms/cm3 to ˜1019 atoms/cm3 and the gas target length can be varied from 0 to 10 cm; both changes can be made simultaneously while keeping the uniform gas profile. The gas density profile inside the gas cell has been measured using interferometry and validated using computational fluid dynamics.

  12. Interaction physics for megajoule laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruer, W.L.

    1992-02-01

    Some little-explored interaction phenomena for targets irradiated with megajoule lasers are considered. Simple estimates show that the laser plasma interaction then occurs in a hot (multi-keV) plasma with density much less than the critical density. In such plasmas, Raman and Brillouin scattering into the forward hemisphere are potentially significant. A simple model shows that Raman forward scattering can be saturated at low levels by ponderomotive detuning. Calculations also illustrate a suppression of ponderomotive filamentation by plasma-induced beam smoothing

  13. 3D DVH-based metric analysis versus per-beam planar analysis in IMRT pretreatment verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrasco, Pablo; Jornet, Núria; Latorre, Artur; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ruiz, Agustí; Ribas, Montserrat

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate methods of pretreatment IMRT analysis, using real measurements performed with a commercial 2D detector array, for clinical relevance and accuracy by comparing clinical DVH parameters. Methods: We divided the work into two parts. The first part consisted of six in-phantom tests aimed to study the sensitivity of the different analysis methods. Beam fluences, 3D dose distribution, and DVH of an unaltered original plan were compared to those of the delivered plan, in which an error had been intentionally introduced. The second part consisted of comparing gamma analysis with DVH metrics for 17 patient plans from various sites. Beam fluences were measured with the MapCHECK 2 detector, per-beam planar analysis was performed with the MapCHECK software, and 3D gamma analysis and the DVH evaluation were performed using 3DVH software. Results: In a per-beam gamma analysis some of the tests yielded false positives or false negatives. However, the 3DVH software correctly described the DVH of the plan which included the error. The measured DVH from the plan with controlled error agreed with the planned DVH within 2% dose or 2% volume. We also found that a gamma criterion of 3%/3 mm was too lax to detect some of the forced errors. Global analysis masked some problems, while local analysis magnified irrelevant errors at low doses. Small hotspots were missed for all metrics due to the spatial resolution of the detector panel. DVH analysis for patient plans revealed small differences between treatment plan calculations and 3DVH results, with the exception of very small volume structures such as the eyes and the lenses. Target coverage (D 98 and D 95 ) of the measured plan was systematically lower than that predicted by the treatment planning system, while other DVH characteristics varied depending on the parameter and organ. Conclusions: We found no correlation between the gamma index and the clinical impact of a discrepancy for any of the gamma index evaluation

  14. Method for mounting laser fusion targets for irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, R. Jay; Farnum, Eugene H.; McCall, Gene H.

    1977-07-26

    Methods for preparing laser fusion targets of the ball-and-disk type are disclosed. Such targets are suitable for irradiation with one or two laser beams to produce the requisite uniform compression of the fuel material.

  15. Per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates do not predict clinically relevant patient dose errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Zhen Heming; Tome, Wolfgang A. [Canis Lupus LLC and Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Departments of Human Oncology, Medical Physics, and Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to determine the statistical correlation between per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates and several clinically relevant, anatomy-based dose errors for per-patient IMRT QA. The intent is to assess the predictive power of a common conventional IMRT QA performance metric, the Gamma passing rate per beam. Methods: Ninety-six unique data sets were created by inducing four types of dose errors in 24 clinical head and neck IMRT plans, each planned with 6 MV Varian 120-leaf MLC linear accelerators using a commercial treatment planning system and step-and-shoot delivery. The error-free beams/plans were used as ''simulated measurements'' (for generating the IMRT QA dose planes and the anatomy dose metrics) to compare to the corresponding data calculated by the error-induced plans. The degree of the induced errors was tuned to mimic IMRT QA passing rates that are commonly achieved using conventional methods. Results: Analysis of clinical metrics (parotid mean doses, spinal cord max and D1cc, CTV D95, and larynx mean) vs IMRT QA Gamma analysis (3%/3 mm, 2/2, 1/1) showed that in all cases, there were only weak to moderate correlations (range of Pearson's r-values: -0.295 to 0.653). Moreover, the moderate correlations actually had positive Pearson's r-values (i.e., clinically relevant metric differences increased with increasing IMRT QA passing rate), indicating that some of the largest anatomy-based dose differences occurred in the cases of high IMRT QA passing rates, which may be called ''false negatives.'' The results also show numerous instances of false positives or cases where low IMRT QA passing rates do not imply large errors in anatomy dose metrics. In none of the cases was there correlation consistent with high predictive power of planar IMRT passing rates, i.e., in none of the cases did high IMRT QA Gamma passing rates predict low errors in anatomy dose metrics or vice versa

  16. Per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates do not predict clinically relevant patient dose errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Zhen Heming; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to determine the statistical correlation between per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates and several clinically relevant, anatomy-based dose errors for per-patient IMRT QA. The intent is to assess the predictive power of a common conventional IMRT QA performance metric, the Gamma passing rate per beam. Methods: Ninety-six unique data sets were created by inducing four types of dose errors in 24 clinical head and neck IMRT plans, each planned with 6 MV Varian 120-leaf MLC linear accelerators using a commercial treatment planning system and step-and-shoot delivery. The error-free beams/plans were used as ''simulated measurements'' (for generating the IMRT QA dose planes and the anatomy dose metrics) to compare to the corresponding data calculated by the error-induced plans. The degree of the induced errors was tuned to mimic IMRT QA passing rates that are commonly achieved using conventional methods. Results: Analysis of clinical metrics (parotid mean doses, spinal cord max and D1cc, CTV D95, and larynx mean) vs IMRT QA Gamma analysis (3%/3 mm, 2/2, 1/1) showed that in all cases, there were only weak to moderate correlations (range of Pearson's r-values: -0.295 to 0.653). Moreover, the moderate correlations actually had positive Pearson's r-values (i.e., clinically relevant metric differences increased with increasing IMRT QA passing rate), indicating that some of the largest anatomy-based dose differences occurred in the cases of high IMRT QA passing rates, which may be called ''false negatives.'' The results also show numerous instances of false positives or cases where low IMRT QA passing rates do not imply large errors in anatomy dose metrics. In none of the cases was there correlation consistent with high predictive power of planar IMRT passing rates, i.e., in none of the cases did high IMRT QA Gamma passing rates predict low errors in anatomy dose metrics or vice versa. Conclusions: There is a lack of correlation between

  17. Laser-fusion targets for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.H.; Thiessen, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a target having a centrally located substantially spherically configured quantity of solid fuel for implosion by a pulse of laser energy and having no material therein with a Z of over about 13. The improvement consists of: means in spaced apart and non-contiguous relationship surrounding the fuel for at least providing an atmosphere about the fuel for ensuring electron transport around the fuel and enhancing subsequent implosion symmetry of the fuel, the fuel being configured as a hollow shell; the means consisting of at least one outer layer of substantially solid atmosphere forming material having a Z of 1-13. The atmosphere forms material comprising a shell positioned about the fuel defining a space therebetween, the space being filled with He, the fuel and the shell of atmosphere forming material being each composed of DT, the layer of atmosphere forming material being impacted and at least partially exploded by at least one separate and distinct laser prepulse to produce the atmosphere about the fuel prior to implosion of the fuel by the pulse of laser energy

  18. Laser fusion target fabrication. Status report, 30 April 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fries, R.J.; Farnum, E.H.

    1974-11-01

    The laser fusion target fabrication effort at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory has been successful in producing targets of the general design requested by, and with a range of parameters acceptable to, the theoretical designers and to the laser/target interaction physics experimentalists. Many novel techniques for handling and measuring the properties of various types of hollow microballoons were developed. (U.S.)

  19. Review of laser mega joule target area: Design and processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geitzholz, M.; Lanternier, C.

    2006-01-01

    The Laser Mega Joule (LMJ) target area is currently designed to achieve ignition and significant fusion gain in laboratory. LMJ will be composed of 240 identical large 370 mm * 370 mm square laser beams. These beams will focus 2 mega-joules of energy at the wavelength of 351 nm on the center of an experiment chamber. Design studies for target equipment are well advanced, target chamber and target holder (concrete) works have already begun. A detailed overview of the target area equipment is presented: target chamber, frame, diagnostic inserter manipulator, final optic assembly, dual diagnostic and laser reference, non cryogenic target positioner. Recent technical and architectural choices are detailed including safety transfers and alignment processes (target, laser and diagnostic). All this target equipment allows us to optimize shot chrono-gram, from target metrology to the shot, including calibration process. (authors)

  20. Target fabrication using laser and spark erosion machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, X.; Coudeville, A.; Eyharts, P.; Perrine, J.P.; Rouillard, R.

    1982-01-01

    Fabrication of laser fusion targets requires a number of special techniques. We have developed both laser and spark erosion machining to produce minute parts of complex targets. A high repetition rate YAG laser at double frequency is used to etch various materials. For example, marks or patterns are often necessary on structured or advanced targets. The laser is also used to thin down plastic coated stalks. A spark erosion system has proved to be a versatile tool and we describe current fabrication processes like cutting, drilling, and ultra precise machining. Spark erosion has interesting features for target fabrication: it is a highly controllable and reproducible technique as well as relatively inexpensive

  1. Study of underwater laser propulsion using different target materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Hao; Chen, Jun; Han, Bing; Shen, Zhong-Hua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiao-Wu

    2014-07-14

    In order to investigate the influence of target materials, including aluminum (Al), titanium (Ti) and copper (Cu), on underwater laser propulsion, the analytical formula of the target momentum IT is deduced from the enhanced coupling theory of laser propulsion in atmosphere with transparent overlay metal target. The high-speed photography method and numerical simulation are employed to verify the IT model. It is shown that the enhanced coupling theory, which was developed originally for laser propulsion in atmosphere, is also applicable to underwater laser propulsion with metal targets.

  2. Plasma processed coating of laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.L.; Letts, S.A.; Myers, D.W.; Crane, J.K.; Illige, J.D.; Hatcher, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    Coatings for laser fusion targets have been deposited in an inductively coupled discharge device by plasma polymerization. Two feed gases were used: perfluoro-2-butene, which produced a fluorocarbon coating (CF 1 3 ) with a density of 1.8 g/cc, and trans-2-butene which produced a hydrocarbon coating (CH 1 3 ) with a density of 1.0 g/cc. Uniform pin-hole free films have been deposited to a thickness of up to 30 μm of fluorocarbon and up to 110 μm of hydrocarbon. The effect of process variables on surface smoothness has been investigated. The basic defect in the coating has been found to result from shadowing by a small surface irregularity in an anisotropic coating flux

  3. Stabilizing laser energy density on a target during pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowden, Paul C.; Jia, Quanxi

    2016-05-31

    A process for stabilizing laser energy density on a target surface during pulsed laser deposition of thin films controls the focused laser spot on the target. The process involves imaging an image-aperture positioned in the beamline. This eliminates changes in the beam dimensions of the laser. A continuously variable attenuator located in between the output of the laser and the imaged image-aperture adjusts the energy to a desired level by running the laser in a "constant voltage" mode. The process provides reproducibility and controllability for deposition of electronic thin films by pulsed laser deposition.

  4. Advanced laser fusion target fabrication research and development proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupin, D.M.; Fries, R.J.

    1979-05-01

    A research and development program is described that will enable the fabrication of 10 6 targets/day for a laser fusion prototype power reactor in 2007. We give personnel and cost estimates for a generalized laser fusion target that requires the development of several new technologies. The total cost of the program between 1979 and 2007 is $362 million in today's dollars

  5. Target isolation system, high power laser and laser peening method and system using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd A.; Harris, Fritz

    2007-11-06

    A system for applying a laser beam to work pieces, includes a laser system producing a high power output beam. Target delivery optics are arranged to deliver the output beam to a target work piece. A relay telescope having a telescope focal point is placed in the beam path between the laser system and the target delivery optics. The relay telescope relays an image between an image location near the output of the laser system and an image location near the target delivery optics. A baffle is placed at the telescope focal point between the target delivery optics and the laser system to block reflections from the target in the target delivery optics from returning to the laser system and causing damage.

  6. Laser plasma focus produced in a ring target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Hilaire, G.; Szili, Z.

    1976-01-01

    A new geometry for generating a laser-produced plasma is presented. A toroidal mirror is used to focus a CO 2 laser beam on the inside wall of a copper ring target. The plasma produced converges at the center of the ring where an axial plasma focus is formed. High-speed photography shows details of a plasma generated at a distance from the target surface. This new geometry could have important applications in the field of x-ray lasers

  7. The ''Dolphin'' power laser installation for spherical thermonuclear target heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basov, N.G.; Bykovskij, N.E.; Danilov, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    12-channel laser installation the ''Dolphin'' for thermonuclear target heating in the radiation spheric geometry has been developed to carry out series of physical investigations of laser-thermonuclear plasma system, optimization of target heating conditions and obtaining a comparatively large value of thermonuclear output in ratio to the energy of absorbed light radiation in the target. The description of installation main elements, consisting of the following components, is given: 1)neodymium laser with the maximum permissible radiation energy of 10kJ, with light pulse duration of 10 -10 /10 -9 c and radiation divergence of approximately 5x10 -4 rad; 2)vacuum chamber, where laser radiation interaction with plasma takes place; 3)diagnostic means of laser and plasma parameters and 4)focus system. The focus system provides a high degree of target spherical radiation symmetry at current maximum density on its surface of approximately 10 15 W/cm 2

  8. Laser driven detonation waves above a solid target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmony, D.C.

    1975-01-01

    The interaction of a TEA CO 2 laser pulse with a carbon target in an argon atmosphere (p approximately mmHg) is shown to produce a double detonation wave system. The laser driven detonation wave becomes the most important as the gas pressure is increased. Calculation of the energy in the detonation waves is in good agreement with the incident laser energy at different times during the main laser pulse and the long tail. The observation of the incident laser detonation wave accounts for the anomalous energies reported previously. (Auth.)

  9. Parametric study of a target factory for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherohman, J.W.; Meier, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of a target factory leading to the derivation of production rate equations has provided the basis for a parametric study. Rate equations describing the production of laser fusion targets have been developed for the purpose of identifying key parameters, attractive production techniques and cost scaling relationships for a commercial target factory

  10. High volume fabrication of laser targets using MEMS techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spindloe, C; Tomlinson, S; Green, J; Booth, N.; Tolley, M K; Arthur, G; Hall, F; Potter, R; Kar, S; Higginbotham, A

    2016-01-01

    The latest techniques for the fabrication of high power laser targets, using processes developed for the manufacture of Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) devices are discussed. These laser targets are designed to meet the needs of the increased shot numbers that are available in the latest design of laser facilities. Traditionally laser targets have been fabricated using conventional machining or coarse etching processes and have been produced in quantities of 10s to low 100s. Such targets can be used for high complexity experiments such as Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) studies and can have many complex components that need assembling and characterisation with high precision. Using the techniques that are common to MEMS devices and integrating these with an existing target fabrication capability we are able to manufacture and deliver targets to these systems. It also enables us to manufacture novel targets that have not been possible using other techniques. In addition, developments in the positioning systems that are required to deliver these targets to the laser focus are also required and a system to deliver the target to a focus of an F2 beam at 0.1Hz is discussed. (paper)

  11. Micromachining of laser fusion target parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir, J.T.; Hendricks, C.D.; Weinstein, B.W.; Willenborg, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    A 5W argon ion laser that operates CW is used. A broad band rear mirror is tuned to maximum power output. The beam is directed vertically by an adjustable turning prism, through a beam splitter, and then focused with an ordinary microscope objective lens onto the material to be cut. The beam splitter allows a telescope and television camera arranged to view the cutting through the same lens that is focusing the laser. The object to be cut is mounted on a micromanipulator which can move the object in two dimensions in the focal plane of the laser

  12. Prospects of target nanostructuring for laser proton acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübcke, Andrea; Andreev, Alexander A.; Höhm, Sandra; Grunwald, Ruediger; Ehrentraut, Lutz; Schnürer, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    In laser-based proton acceleration, nanostructured targets hold the promise to allow for significantly boosted proton energies due to strong increase of laser absorption. We used laser-induced periodic surface structures generated in-situ as a very fast and economic way to produce nanostructured targets capable of high-repetition rate applications. Both in experiment and theory, we investigate the impact of nanostructuring on the proton spectrum for different laser-plasma conditions. Our experimental data show that the nanostructures lead to a significant enhancement of absorption over the entire range of laser plasma conditions investigated. At conditions that do not allow for efficient laser absorption by plane targets, i.e. too steep plasma gradients, nanostructuring is found to significantly enhance the proton cutoff energy and conversion efficiency. In contrast, if the plasma gradient is optimized for laser absorption of the plane target, the nanostructure-induced absorption increase is not reflected in higher cutoff energies. Both, simulation and experiment point towards the energy transfer from the laser to the hot electrons as bottleneck.

  13. Subsurface overheating of targets in laser deposition on superconducting films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, D.L.; Liu, Z.D.; Li, X.; George, T.F.

    1994-01-01

    The possibility of internal explosion in the laser ablation of superconductor targets is investigated by calculating the temperature profile inside the target. The equation of heat conduction is employed and the temperature dependence of all characteristic parameters is determined empirically. It is found that, in general, a local overheated spot appears as long as the intensity of incident laser pulses is sufficiently high. Conditions to avoid such overheating are discussed. (orig.). Letter-to-the-editor

  14. Diffuse scattering from laser-irradiated plane targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessel, C.G.M. van; Olsen, J.N.; Sachsenmaier, P.; Sigel, R.; Eidmann, K.; Godwin, R.P.

    1976-11-01

    Optical calorimetry of the laser radiation scattered from plane targets irradiated by 0.3 Joule/30 ps Nd-laser pulses with intensities up to 10 16 W cm -2 has been performed with an emphasis on diffuse scattering. Diffuse scattering outside the solid angle of the focusing lens is found to be a major reflection loss from the target. A fraction of 0.3 to 0.5 of the incident pulse energy was absorbed in the target with only a very weak dependence on pulse energy and target material. (orig.) [de

  15. Non-LTE radiation in laser-disk target couply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Peijun; Fei Weibing; Feng Tinggui; Wu Changshu

    2004-11-01

    The coupling of laser-disk target has been studied by Multi-group radiation transfer code RDMGL. The results show that the X-ray spectra are strongly non-LTE and dependent on the atomic model. The plasma states, laser energy absorption and X-ray conversion rates are almost the same as those simulated by three-temperature model code, which fact shows that the three-temperature model is reasonable to describe the exchange of different kinds of energy and the hydrodynamic phenomena of plasmas in laser-target coupling. (authors)

  16. Ultra-Short Laser Absorption In Solid Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harfouche, A.; Bendib, A.

    2008-01-01

    With the rapid development and continuously improving technology of subpicosecond laser pulse generation, new interesting physical problems are now investigated. Among them the laser light absorption in solid targets. During the interaction with solid targets, high intensity laser pulses are absorbed by electrons in optical skin depths, leading to rapid ionization before that significant ablation of solid material takes place. The ultra-short laser is absorbed in the overdense plasma through the electron-ion collisions (normal skin effect) or collisionless mechanisms (anomalous skin effect or sheath inverse bremsstrahlung). These two regimes depend on the laser intensity, the plasma temperature and the ionization state Z. In this work we solve numerically the Fokker-Planck equation to compute the electron distribution function in the skin layer. In the second step we compute the surface impedance and we deduce the absorption coefficient.

  17. Automated laser fusion target production concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1977-01-01

    A target production concept is described for the production of multilayered cryogenic spherical inertial confinement fusion targets. The facility is to deliver targets to the reactor chamber at rates up to 10 per second and at costs consistent with economic production of power

  18. Laser-induced extreme magnetic field in nanorod targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lécz, Zsolt; Andreev, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    The application of nano-structured target surfaces in laser-solid interaction has attracted significant attention in the last few years. Their ability to absorb significantly more laser energy promises a possible route for advancing the currently established laser ion acceleration concepts. However, it is crucial to have a better understanding of field evolution and electron dynamics during laser-matter interactions before the employment of such exotic targets. This paper focuses on the magnetic field generation in nano-forest targets consisting of parallel nanorods grown on plane surfaces. A general scaling law for the self-generated quasi-static magnetic field amplitude is given and it is shown that amplitudes up to 1 MT field are achievable with current technology. Analytical results are supported by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Non-parallel arrangements of nanorods has also been considered which result in the generation of donut-shaped azimuthal magnetic fields in a larger volume.

  19. Target fabrication using laser and spark erosion machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, X.; Coudeville, A.; Eyharts, P.; Perrine , J.P.; Rouillard, R.

    1981-11-01

    Lasers and E.D.M. (electrical discharge machining) are both extremely useful tools for machining the small targets needed in inertial confinement studies. Lasers are currently used in a wide range of target problems and it appears that E.D.M. has a still wider range of applications for plane and spherical targets. The problems of material deformation and tool breaking are practically eliminated as the electrode and the machined part are not in mechanical contact. In comparison with laser micromachining E.D.M. offers: larger versatility with the possibility of new developments and applications; higher production speed for thin conducting materials; lower initial and operating costs; the processes are well controlled, reproducible and can be easily automated; the operation is safe without the dangers associted with lasers

  20. Polarization of plastic targets by laser ablation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giuffreda, E.; Delle Side, D.; Krása, Josef; Nassisi, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, May (2016), s. 1-6, č. článku C05004. ISSN 1748-0221 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : lasers * ion sources * wake-field acceleration Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  1. Neutron penumbral imaging of laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, R.A.; Ress, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Using a new technique, penumbral coded-aperture imaging, the first neutron images of laser-driven, inertial-confinement fusion targets were obtained. With these images the deuterium-tritium burn region within a compressed target can be measured directly. 4 references, 11 figures

  2. Fine-Grained Targets for Laser Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A mechanically robust, binder-free, inexpensive target for laser synthesis of carbon nanotubes and a method for making same, comprising the steps of mixing prismatic edge natural flake graphite with a metal powder catalyst and pressing the graphite and metal powder mixture into a mold having a desired target shape.

  3. Solid hydrogen target for laser driven proton acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, J. P.; Garcia, S.; Chatain, D.; Margarone, D.

    2015-05-01

    The development of very high power lasers opens up new horizons in various fields, such as laser plasma acceleration in Physics and innovative approaches for proton therapy in Medicine. Laser driven proton acceleration is commonly based on the so-called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanisms: a high power laser is focused onto a solid target (thin metallic or plastic foil) and interact with matter at very high intensity, thus generating a plasma; as a consequence "hot" electrons are produced and move into the forward direction through the target. Protons are generated at the target rear side, electrons try to escape from the target and an ultra-strong quasi-electrostatic field (~1TV/m) is generated. Such a field can accelerate protons with a wide energy spectrum (1-200 MeV) in a few tens of micrometers. The proton beam characteristics depend on the laser parameters and on the target geometry and nature. This technique has been validated experimentally in several high power laser facilities by accelerating protons coming from hydrogenated contaminant (mainly water) at the rear of metallic target, however, several research groups are investigating the possibility to perform experiments by using "pure" hydrogen targets. In this context, the low temperature laboratory at CEA-Grenoble has developed a cryostat able to continuously produce a thin hydrogen ribbon (from 40 to 100 microns thick). A new extrusion concept, without any moving part has been carried out, using only the thermodynamic properties of the fluid. First results and perspectives are presented in this paper.

  4. Technological aspects of cryogenic laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musinski, D.L.; Henderson, T.M.; Simms, R.J.; Pattinson, T.R.; Jacobs, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    Most current laser-fusion targets consist of hollow spherical glass shells which have been filled with a mixture of gaseous deuterium-tritium fuel. Theoretical considerations suggest that optimum yields can be obtained from these targets if the fuel is condensed as a uniform liquid or solid layer on the inner surface of the glass shell at the time it is irradiated. In principle, this can be accomplished in a straightforward way by cooling the target below the condensation or freezing point of the fuel. In practice, cryogenic targets can appear in routine laser experiments only when the necessary cryogenic technology is reliably integrated into experimental target chambers. Significant progress has been made recently in this field. The authors will discuss the scientific basis and the various technological features of a system which has allowed the successful irradiation of uniform solid-fuel-layer targets

  5. Laser target fabrication, structure and method for its fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnum, Eugene H.; Fries, R. Jay

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a laser target structure and its method of fabrication. The target structure comprises a target plate containing an orifice across which a pair of crosshairs are affixed. A microsphere is affixed to the crosshairs and enclosed by at least one hollow shell comprising two hemispheres attached together and to the crosshairs so that the microsphere is juxtapositioned at the center of the shell.

  6. Automatic target alignment of the Helios laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberman, I.; Viswanathan, V.K.; Klein, M.; Seery, B.D.

    1980-01-01

    An automatic target-alignment technique for the Helios laser facility is reported and verified experimentally. The desired alignment condition is completely described by an autocollimation test. A computer program examines the autocollimated return pattern from the surrogate target and correctly describes any changes required in mirror orientation to yield optimum targe alignment with either aberrated or misaligned beams. Automated on-line target alignment is thus shown to be feasible

  7. Integrated laser-target interaction experiments on the RAL petawatt laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, P K; Key, M H; Mackinnon, A J

    2005-01-01

    We review a recent experimental campaign to study the interaction physics of petawatt laser pulses incident at relativistic intensities on solid targets. The campaign was performed on the 500 J sub-picosecond petawatt laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. An extensive suite of optical, x-ray, and particle diagnostics was employed to characterise the processes of laser absorption, electron generation and transport, thermal and K-alpha x-ray generation, and proton acceleration

  8. High power laser interaction with single and double layer targets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borodziuk, S.; Demchenko, N. N.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Jungwirth, Karel; Kálal, M.; Kasperczuk, A.; Kondrashov, V. N.; Králiková, Božena; Krouský, Eduard; Limpouch, Jiří; Mašek, Karel; Pisarczyk, P.; Pisarczyk, T.; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Rohlena, Karel; Rozanov, V. B.; Skála, Jiří; Ullschmied, Jiří

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 2 (2005), s. 241-262 ISSN 0078-5466 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A100; GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK2043105 Grant - others:EU(XE) HPRI-CT-1999-00053; RFBR(RU) 02-02-16966; IAEA(XE) 11655/RBF; INTAS(XX) 01-0572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : laser produced plasma * three-frame interferometry * macroparticle * single and double targets * crater * shock wave * laser energy absorption Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.459, year: 2005

  9. Symmetric compression of 'laser greenhouse' targets by a few laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gus'kov, Sergei Yu; Demchenko, N N; Rozanov, Vladislav B; Stepanov, R V; Zmitrenko, N V; Caruso, A; Strangio, C

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of efficient and symmetric compression of a target with a low-density structured absorber by a few laser beams is considered. An equation of state is proposed for a porous medium, which takes into account the special features of the absorption of high-power nanosecond laser pulses. The open version of this target is shown to allow the use of ordinary Gaussian beams, requiring no special profiling of the absorber surface. The conditions are defined under which such targets can be compressed efficiently by only two laser beams (or beam clusters). Simulations show that for a 2.1-MJ laser pulse, a seven-fold gain for the target under study is achieved. (special issue devoted to the 80th anniversary of academician n g basov's birth)

  10. Novel target design for enhanced laser driven proton acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malay Dalui

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a simple method of preparing structured target for enhanced laser-driven proton acceleration under target-normal-sheath-acceleration scheme. A few layers of genetically modified, clinically grown micron sized E. Coli bacteria cell coated on a thin metal foil has resulted in an increase in the maximum proton energy by about 1.5 times and the total proton yield is enhanced by approximately 25 times compared to an unstructured reference foil at a laser intensity of 1019 W/cm2. Particle-in-cell simulations on the system shows that the structures on the target-foil facilitates anharmonic resonance, contributing to enhanced hot electron production which leads to stronger accelerating field. The effect is observed to grow as the number of structures is increased in the focal area of the laser pulse.

  11. X-ray spectroscopy of laser imploded targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaakobi, B.; Skupsky, S.; McCrory, R.L.; Hooper, C.F.; Deckman, H.; Bourke, P.; Soures, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy provides a variety of means for studying the interaction of lasers with plasmas, in particular the interaction with imploding targets in inertial confinement fusion. A typical fusion target is composed of materials other than the thermonuclear fuel which play a variety of roles (tamping, shielding, thermal isolation, etc.). These structural elements emit characteristic X-ray lines and continua, and through their spectral and spatial distributions can yield very valuable information on the interaction and implosion dynamics. Examples are the study of heat conductivity, the mixing of different target layers, and the determination of temperature and density at the compressed target core. Results will be shown for electron densities Nsub(e) approximately equal to 10 24 cm -3 and temperatures T approximately equal to 1 keV measured during compression of argon-filled targets with a six-beam laser of peak power 2 TW. (author)

  12. On the efficiency of conical targets for laser thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovskij, A.V.; Korobkin, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    Advantages and drawbacks of conical targets (CT) for laser fusion (LF) are discussed. Possibility of the laser power reduction, laser pulse lengthening and neutron yield increase are analyzed for an ideal conical target with absolutely rigid and heat-proof walls as compared to a spherical target of the same mass. A simple theory is suggested which makes it possible to take into account an effect of walls on the fusion process in the conical target with gaseous fuel and heavy shell. Energy losses due to wall deformations and heat conduction are estimated. An influence of these effects on the neutron yield is estimated. CT used in the LF experiments are found to have serious drawbacks in comparison with spherical ones. These drawbacks are connected with the effect of walls on the processes taking place in CT. Analysis of CT, for which the effect of walls is not significant, points up some definite advantages of CT as compared with spherical one. These advantages are the possibility of laser pulse lengthening and laser power reduction in comparison with the irradiation of a sphere of an equal mass. These two positive qualities are connected with the fact that CT has large linear dimensions [ru

  13. Hydrodynamic aspects of selenium X-ray laser targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charatis, G; Busch, G E; Shepard, C L; Campbell, P M; Rosen, M D

    1986-10-01

    Recent experiments at KMS have been performed to investigate parameter variations of target component thickness, laser pulse duration and intensity, and one-sided vs two-sided irradiation in order to optimize the performance of the Livermore exploding foil selenium x-ray laser experiments. Preliminary experiments with selenium double foil targets were also conducted as a means of prolonging the duration and enlarging the spatial extent of the lasing conditions. Four-frame holographic interferometry was used in determining the time-dependence of density profiles obtained by Abel inversion of the interferometric fringe field and comparisons were made to LASNEX code calculations.

  14. Laser-driven polarized H/D sources and targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clasie, B.; Crawford, C.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.; Seely, J.; Xu, W.

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, Atomic Beam Sources are used to produce targets of nuclear polarized hydrogen (H) or deuterium (D) for experiments using storage rings. Laser-Driven Sources (LDSs) offer a factor of 20-30 gain in the target thickness (however, with lower polarization) and may produce a higher overall figure of merit. The LDS is based on the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping where alkali vapor is polarized by absorbing circularly polarized laser photons. The H or D atoms are nuclear-polarized through spin-exchange collisions with the polarized alkali vapor and through subsequent hyperfine interactions during frequent H-H or D-D collisions

  15. Integrated Laser-Target Interaction Experiments on the RAL Petawatt Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, P. K.; Key, M. H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Akli, K.; Berry, R.; Borghesi, M.; Brummit, P. A.; Chambers, D.; Clarke, R. J.; Damian, C.; Chen, H.; Eagleton, R.; Freeman, R.; Glenzer, S.; Gregori, G.; Heathcote, R.; Izumi, N.; Kar, S.; King, J. A.; Kock, J.; Kuba, J.; May, M.; Moon, S.; Neely, D.; Neville, D. R.; Nikroo, A.; Niles, A.; Pasley, J.; Patel, N.; Park, H. S.; Romagnani, L.; Shepherd, R.; Snavely, R. A.; Stephens, R.; Stoeckl, C.; Storm, M.; Theobald, W.; Van Maren, R.; Wilks, S. C.; Zhang, B.

    2005-01-01

    We report on two recent experimental campaigns performed on the new Petawatt laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK.The laser has recently demonstrated performance characteristics of 400 J of laser energy being delivered on target in a sub 400 fs pulse, reaching a peak focal intensity on the order of 10''21 W/cm''2. The experiments covered multiplic areas of investigation including hot electron transport in planar foil and cone focus geometries, relativistic laser-solid interactions proton beam focusing and heating, and high energy K-alpha production and radiography. A somewhat novel approach was taken to the experiments in that all of the diagnostics required for the different areas of study were fielded simultaneously and operated on all shots. Thus, we were able to obtain extensive sets of measurements on a single-shot basis which provides significant benefit to our understanding of the laser-target interaction conditions and plasma properties. (Author)

  16. CO2 laser pulse shortening by laser ablation of a metal target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, T.; Mazoyer, M.; Lynch, A.; O'Sullivan, G.; O'Reilly, F.; Dunne, P.; Cummins, T.

    2012-01-01

    A repeatable and flexible technique for pulse shortening of laser pulses has been applied to transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO 2 laser pulses. The technique involves focusing the laser output onto a highly reflective metal target so that plasma is formed, which then operates as a shutter due to strong laser absorption and scattering. Precise control of the focused laser intensity allows for timing of the shutter so that different temporal portions of the pulse can be reflected from the target surface before plasma formation occurs. This type of shutter enables one to reduce the pulse duration down to ∼2 ns and to remove the low power, long duration tails that are present in TEA CO 2 pulses. The transmitted energy is reduced as the pulse duration is decreased but the reflected power is ∼10 MW for all pulse durations. A simple laser heating model verifies that the pulse shortening depends directly on the plasma formation time, which in turn is dependent on the applied laser intensity. It is envisaged that this plasma shutter will be used as a tool for pulse shaping in the search for laser pulse conditions to optimize conversion efficiency from laser energy to useable extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation for EUV source development.

  17. Laser driven compression and neutron generation with spherical shell targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, P.M.; Hammerling, P.; Johnson, R.R.; Kubis, J.J.; Mayer, F.J.

    1977-01-01

    Laser-driven implosion experiments using DT-gas-filled spherical glass-shell targets are described. Neutron yields to 5 x 10 7 are produced from implosions of small ( -- 55 μm-diameter) targets spherically illuminated with an on-target laser power of 0.4 terawatt. Nuclear reaction product diagnostics, X-ray pinhole photographs, fast-ion spectra and X-ray measurements are used in conjunction with hydrodynamic computer code simulations to investigate the implosion phenomenology as well as the target corona evolution. Simulations using completely classical effects are not able to describe the full range of experimental data. Electron or radiation preheating may be required to explain some implosion measurements. (auth.)

  18. Ion acceleration from relativistic laser nano-target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Daniel

    2012-01-06

    Laser-ion acceleration has been of particular interest over the last decade for fundamental as well as applied sciences. Remarkable progress has been made in realizing laser-driven accelerators that are cheap and very compact compared with conventional rf-accelerators. Proton and ion beams have been produced with particle energies of up to 50 MeV and several MeV/u, respectively, with outstanding properties in terms of transverse emittance and current. These beams typically exhibit an exponentially decaying energy distribution, but almost all advanced applications, such as oncology, proton imaging or fast ignition, require quasimonoenergetic beams with a low energy spread. The majority of the experiments investigated ion acceleration in the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) regime with comparably thick targets in the {mu}m range. In this thesis ion acceleration is investigated from nm-scaled targets, which are partially produced at the University of Munich with thickness as low as 3 nm. Experiments have been carried out at LANL's Trident high-power and high-contrast laser (80 J, 500 fs, {lambda}=1054 nm), where ion acceleration with these nano-targets occurs during the relativistic transparency of the target, in the so-called Breakout afterburner (BOA) regime. With a novel high resolution and high dispersion Thomson parabola and ion wide angle spectrometer, thickness dependencies of the ions angular distribution, particle number, average and maximum energy have been measured. Carbon C{sup 6+} energies reached 650 MeV and 1 GeV for unheated and heated targets, respectively, and proton energies peaked at 75 MeV and 120 MeV for diamond and CH{sub 2} targets. Experimental data is presented, where the conversion efficiency into carbon C{sup 6+} (protons) is investigated and found to have an up to 10fold (5fold) increase over the TNSA regime. With circularly polarized laser light, quasi-monoenergetic carbon ions have been generated from the same nm-scaled foil

  19. Ion acceleration from relativistic laser nano-target interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Laser-ion acceleration has been of particular interest over the last decade for fundamental as well as applied sciences. Remarkable progress has been made in realizing laser-driven accelerators that are cheap and very compact compared with conventional rf-accelerators. Proton and ion beams have been produced with particle energies of up to 50 MeV and several MeV/u, respectively, with outstanding properties in terms of transverse emittance and current. These beams typically exhibit an exponentially decaying energy distribution, but almost all advanced applications, such as oncology, proton imaging or fast ignition, require quasimonoenergetic beams with a low energy spread. The majority of the experiments investigated ion acceleration in the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) regime with comparably thick targets in the μm range. In this thesis ion acceleration is investigated from nm-scaled targets, which are partially produced at the University of Munich with thickness as low as 3 nm. Experiments have been carried out at LANL's Trident high-power and high-contrast laser (80 J, 500 fs, λ=1054 nm), where ion acceleration with these nano-targets occurs during the relativistic transparency of the target, in the so-called Breakout afterburner (BOA) regime. With a novel high resolution and high dispersion Thomson parabola and ion wide angle spectrometer, thickness dependencies of the ions angular distribution, particle number, average and maximum energy have been measured. Carbon C 6+ energies reached 650 MeV and 1 GeV for unheated and heated targets, respectively, and proton energies peaked at 75 MeV and 120 MeV for diamond and CH 2 targets. Experimental data is presented, where the conversion efficiency into carbon C 6+ (protons) is investigated and found to have an up to 10fold (5fold) increase over the TNSA regime. With circularly polarized laser light, quasi-monoenergetic carbon ions have been generated from the same nm-scaled foil targets at Trident with an

  20. Influence of laser-target interaction on the polarization of a CO2-laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, K.; Herziger, G.; Loosen, P.; Seelig, W.

    1988-01-01

    Laser materials processing shows a special peculiarity compared to other customary techniques: the generally reflecting target introduces optical feedback into the system. This feedback changes the mode properties of the laser radiation according to the targets dynamics. The authors report on one of these aspects of laser-target interaction resulting in the change of the polarization of the incident light. Based of rate equations, a theoretical model is presented in this paper that allows the calculation of this change with respect of the target properties, yielding a simple relation for the two orthogonal planes of polarization of a laser mode. This relation turns out to be linearly dependent of a function ψ (t) which describes the optical feedback. The relation holds for target reflexions of up to 10% and four times larger than τ 2 x τ 2 /τ 1 - τ 2 (where τ 1 , τ 2 are the time constants of the passive resonator for the two orthogonal planes of polarization). The model offers a method for the modulation for the modulation of laser radiation without change of frequency or intensity. It might also be of interest for high-power CO 2 laser cutting and welding of metals

  1. Attosecond pulse trains from long laser-gas interaction targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauri, C.P.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Varju, K.; Ruchon, T.; Gustafsson, E.; L'Huillier, A.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Many experiments in attosecond physics require high XUV photon flux as well as a clean attosecond pulse train (APT) temporal structure. Temporal characterization of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in long interaction targets is thus of high interest. HHG being a very inefficient process, a large effort has been made to increase the amount of XUV photons emitted per infrared laser pulse. Besides quasi phase-matching in a modulated capillary, loose driving laser focusing conditions and subsequent self-channeling have shown to significantly increase the conversion efficiency. We characterized the temporal structure of APTs generated during the self-channeling of an intense IR driving laser pulse. Our first results indicate, however, that the temporal structure of the APT generated during the HHG process might be affected by quantum path interference and spectral phase distortion due to the self-channeling process itself. In particular, our measurements show that the relative spectral phase between consecutive harmonics can strongly vary depending on the target length and the position of the laser focus with respect to the target. In general for short gas targets, no clean APT structure can be expected since the individual attosecond pulses carry significant chirp. For longer targets, however, we observe a flattening of the harmonic spectral phase, resulting in near-transform-limited attosecond pulse trains. A complete analysis of the process is complex and involves detailed knowledge of the spatial and temporal evolution of the self-channeling driver laser pulse throughout the gas target.

  2. Electrostatic levitation and transport of laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.L.; Hendricks, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    Several levitation concepts have been evaluated resulting in the electrostatic quadrupole being chosen as the most universal. A levitator has been constructed to handle laser fusion targets during and between the processing steps. The levitator is based on a quadrupole rail which is segmented to provide electrically controlled transport and confinement along the rail. This device has demonstrated transport both vertical and horizontal of targets with appropriate mass to size ratios and exhibits remarkably stable confinement at atmospheric pressure

  3. Ion tail filling in laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, D.B.

    1975-06-01

    Thermonuclear burn begins in laser-fusion targets with the collapse of the imploding fuel shell. At this instant the ion velocity distribution is non-Maxwellian, requiring correction to the commonly used computer simulation codes. This correction is computed and compared with that arising from the loss of fast ions in marginal (rho R less than 0.01 gm cm -2 ) targets. (U.S.)

  4. Laser spectroscopy of collisionally prepared target species: atomic caesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, J.-P.; Tremblay, Julien; Knystautas, E.J.; Laperriere, S.C.; Larzilliere, Michel

    1989-01-01

    Fast ion beam bombardment was used to collisionally prepare a target gas in excited states, to which conventional laser spectroscopy was then applied. The versatility of this method is demonstrated with atomic targets of caesium, for a state of Cs + that is 16 eV above the ground state, as well as for a short-lived state (38 ns) of the neutral atom. The local temperature in the caesium oven is also obtained. (Author)

  5. Recent developments in laser-fusion target coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fries, R.J.; Catlett, D.S.; Fossey, D.; Mayer, A.; McCreary, W.J.; Powell, B.W.; Simonsic, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    Techniques to fabricate hollow, spherical, multilayered laser-fusion targets are described. The first is a glow discharge polymerization process for plastic coating. A chemical vapor deposition process for depositing Mo/Re alloys is also discussed along with some new techniques for electrodeless plating and for electroplating a wide variety of metals

  6. Electroless or autocatalytic coating of microparticles for laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, A.; Catlett, D.S.

    1977-04-01

    Use of a novel device for applying uniform metallic coatings to spherical microparticles is described. The apparatus deposits electroless metal coatings on hollow, thin-walled metal or sensitized nonmetallic micromandrels. The apparatus and process were developed for fabrication of microsphere pressure vessels for use as targets in laser-initiated fusion research

  7. Electrolytic coating of microparticles for laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, A.; Catlett, D.S.

    1977-04-01

    An electroplating apparatus for applying uniform metallic coatings that have excellent surface finishes to discrete microparticles is described. The device is used to electrodeposit metals onto thin-walled metal, metallized glass, or plastic mandrels. The apparatus and process were developed for fabrication of microsphere pressure vessels to be used as targets in laser fusion research

  8. Fabrication of laser-target components by semiconductor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tindall, W.E.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a unique silicon substrate with which laser-target components can be mass produced. Different sizes and shapes of gold foils from 50 to 3000 microns in diameter and up to 25 microns thick have been produced with this process since 1976

  9. Dynamics of interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cang Yu; Wang Wei; Zhang Jie

    2001-01-01

    Using Saha equation, a simple model is proposed for the dynamics of interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and solid targets. An adiabatic expansion model is adopted to study the expansion phase after the heating phase. Temporal evolvement of the dynamics of the interaction is obtained, from which the electron temperature, density, ionization balances can be determined

  10. Study of shock coalescence in laser-irradiated targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coe, S.E.; Willi, O.; Afshar-Rad, T.; Rose, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    We report on the first direct experimental observation of the coalescence of two shocks induced by a shaped laser pulse. Optical streak photography of the rear surface of aluminum multiple step targets was used to study the breakout of these shocks and observe their behavior. The experimental results are compared with simulations by a one-dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamic code

  11. Petawatt laser and target irradiation system at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, D.M.; Perry, M.D.; Britten, J.A.; Brown, C.G.; Herman, S.; Homer, J.; Miller, J.L.; Stuart, B.C.; Tietbohl, G.; Van Lue, J.; Yanovsky, V.

    1997-01-01

    In May, 1996, we demonstrated the production over a petawatt of peak power in the Nova/Petawatt Laser Facility, generating 620 J in ∼ 430 fs. Results of the first focused irradiance tests, and recent deployment of a novel targeting system will be presented

  12. Preliminary analysis of a target factory for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherohman, J.W.; Hendricks, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of a target factory leading to the determination of production expressions has provided for the basis of a parametric study. Parameters involving the input and output rate of a process system, processing yield factors, and multiple processing steps and production lines have been used to develop an understanding of their dependence on the rate of target injection for laser fusion. Preliminary results have indicated that a parametric study of this type will be important in the selection of processing methods to be used in the final production scheme of a target factory

  13. Near spherical illumination of ion-beam and laser targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure is developed for reducing energy-deposition asymmetry in spherical targets driven directly by ion or laser beams. This work is part of a strategy for achieving illumination symmetry in such targets, which is proposed as an alternative to those in the literature. This strategy allows an axially symmetric placement of beamlets, which would be convenient for some driven or reactor scenarios. It also allows the use of beam currents or energy fluxes and beam transverse profiles to help reduce deposition asymmetry with fewer beamlets. In the ideal limit of thin deposition layers and controlled beam profiles, at most six beamlets are needed for target symmetry

  14. Simulation of laser-target interactions in a vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, S.R.; Gitomer, S.L.; Kopp, R.A.; Saltzman, J.S.; Dingus, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations for two problem classes. First we study (and compare against one-dimensional analogues) the two dimensional azimuthally symmetric interaction appropriate to a laser pulse energy of order 100 joules, flat-top pulse of width 50 nanoseconds, and wavelength of 0.25 μm, with intensities ranging from 2 x 10 9 W/cm 2 to 2 x 10 12 W/cm 2 . These conditions correspond to an experimental series shot on the Sprite laser at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory during the summer of 1985. Next we study the interaction, especially as concerns momentum coupling, for one-dimensional nondiverging geometry, at laser wavelengths of 0.25 μm and 10.6 μm and flat-topped pulsewidths of 1 μsec, with intensities ranging from 10 9 to 10 12 W/cm 2 . In all cases, calculations are for aluminum targets in vacuum

  15. Dynamics of Laser-Driven Shock Waves in Solid Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Grun, J.; Metzler, N.; Zalesak, S. T.; Gardner, J. H.; Oh, J.; Harding, E. C.

    2009-11-01

    Accurate shock timing is a key issue of both indirect- and direct-drive laser fusions. The experiments on the Nike laser at NRL presented here were made possible by improvements in the imaging capability of our monochromatic x-ray diagnostics based on Bragg reflection from spherically curved crystals. Side-on imaging implemented on Nike makes it possible to observe dynamics of the shock wave and ablation front in laser-driven solid targets. We can choose to observe a sequence of 2D images or a continuous time evolution of an image resolved in one spatial dimension. A sequence of 300 ps snapshots taken using vanadium backlighter at 5.2 keV reveals propagation of a shock wave in a solid plastic target. The shape of the shock wave reflects the intensity distribution in the Nike beam. The streak records with continuous time resolution show the x-t trajectory of a laser-driven shock wave in a 10% solid density DVB foam.

  16. Ultrasmooth plasma polymerized coatings for laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letts, S.A.; Myers, D.W.; Witt, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    Coatings for laser fusion targets were deposited up to 135 μm thick by plasma polymerization onto 140 μm diameter DT filled glass microspheres. Ultrasmooth surfaces (no defect higher than 0.1 μm) were achieved by eliminating particulate contamination. Process generated particles were eliminated by determining the optimum operating conditions of power, gas flow, and pressure, and maintaining these conditions through feedback control. From a study of coating defects grown over known surface irregularities, a quantitative relationship between irregularity size, film thickness, and defect size was determined. This relationship was used to set standards for the maximum microshell surface irregularity tolerable in the production of hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon coated laser fusion targets

  17. Metal coatings for laser fusion targets by electroplating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illige, J.D.; Yu, C.M.; Letts, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    Metal coated laser fusion targets must be dense, uniform spherically symmetric to within a few percent of their diameters and smooth to better than a few tenths of a micron. Electroplating offers some unique advantages including low temperature deposition, a wide choice of elements and substantial industrial plating technology. We have evaluatd electroless and electroplating systems for gold and copper, identified the factors responsible for small grain size, and plated glass microspheres with both metals to achieve smooth surfaces and highly symmetric coatings. We have developed plating cells which sustain the microspheres in continuous random motion during plating. We have established techniques for deposition of the initial conductive adherent layer on the glass microsphere surface. Coatings as thick as 15 μm have been made. The equipment is simple, relatively inexpensive and may be adopted for high volume production of laser fusion targets

  18. Thermal transport measurements of uv laser irradiated spherical targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaanimagi, P.A.; Delettrez, J.; Henke, B.L.; Richardson, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    New measurements are presented of thermal transport in spherical geometry using time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy. We determine the time dependence of the mass ablation rate m(dot) by following the progress of the ablation surface through thin layers of material embedded at various depths below the surface of the target. These measurements made with 6 and 12 uv (351 nm) beams from OMEGA are compared to previous thermal transport data and are in qualitative agreement with detailed LILAC hydrodynamic code simulations which predict a sharp decrease in m(dot) after the peak of the laser pulse. Non-uniform laser irradiation of the target results in the anomalously high values of m(dot) measured in these experiments

  19. Target life time of laser ion source for low charge state ion production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanesue,T.; Tamura, J.; Okamura, M.

    2008-06-23

    Laser ion source (LIS) produces ions by irradiating pulsed high power laser shots onto the solid state target. For the low charge state ion production, laser spot diameter on the target can be over several millimeters using a high power laser such as Nd:YAG laser. In this case, a damage to the target surface is small while there is a visible crater in case of the best focused laser shot for high charge state ion production (laser spot diameter can be several tens of micrometers). So the need of target displacement after each laser shot to use fresh surface to stabilize plasma is not required for low charge state ion production. We tested target lifetime using Nd:YAG laser with 5 Hz repetition rate. Also target temperature and vacuum condition were recorded during experiment. The feasibility of a long time operation was verified.

  20. Method for nondestructive fuel assay of laser fusion targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnum, Eugene H.; Fries, R. Jay

    1976-01-01

    A method for nondestructively determining the deuterium and tritium content of laser fusion targets by counting the x rays produced by the interaction of tritium beta particles with the walls of the microballoons used to contain the deuterium and tritium gas mixture under high pressure. The x rays provide a direct measure of the tritium content and a means for calculating the deuterium content using the initial known D-T ratio and the known deuterium and tritium diffusion rates.

  1. Method for nondestructive fuel assay of laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnum, E.H.; Fries, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for nondestructively determining the deuterium and tritium content of laser fusion targets by counting the x rays produced by the interaction of tritium beta particles with the walls of the microballoons used to contain the deuterium and tritium gas mixture under high pressure. The x rays provide a direct measure of the tritium content and a means for calculating the deuterium content using the initial known D-T ratio and the known deuterium and tritium diffusion rates

  2. Influence of micromachined targets on laser accelerated proton beam profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalui, Malay; Permogorov, Alexander; Pahl, Hannes; Persson, Anders; Wahlström, Claes-Göran

    2018-03-01

    High intensity laser-driven proton acceleration from micromachined targets is studied experimentally in the target-normal-sheath-acceleration regime. Conical pits are created on the front surface of flat aluminium foils of initial thickness 12.5 and 3 μm using series of low energy pulses (0.5-2.5 μJ). Proton acceleration from such micromachined targets is compared with flat foils of equivalent thickness at a laser intensity of 7 × 1019 W cm-2. The maximum proton energy obtained from targets machined from 12.5 μm thick foils is found to be slightly lower than that of flat foils of equivalent remaining thickness, and the angular divergence of the proton beam is observed to increase as the depth of the pit approaches the foil thickness. Targets machined from 3 μm thick foils, on the other hand, show evidence of increasing the maximum proton energy when the depths of the structures are small. Furthermore, shallow pits on 3 μm thick foils are found to be efficient in reducing the proton beam divergence by a factor of up to three compared to that obtained from flat foils, while maintaining the maximum proton energy.

  3. Cryogenic-laser-fusion target implosion studies performed with the OMEGA uv-laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, F.J.; Letzring, S.A.; Verdon, C.P.; Skupsky, S.; Keck, R.L.; Knauer, J.P.; Kremens, R.L.; Bradley, D.K.; Kessler, T.; Delettrez, J.; and others.

    1989-01-01

    A series of direct-drive laser-fusion implosion experiments was performed on cryogenically cooled, DT-filled glass microballoons with the OMEGA 24-beam uv (351-nm) laser system. The targets consisted of glass microballoons having radii of 100 to 150 μm, wall thicknesses of 3 to 7 μm, filled with DT gas at pressures of 75 to 100 atm. The targets were cooled to below the freezing point of DT, in situ, by a cryogenic target system. The targets were irradiated by approximately 1 to 1.2 kJ of uv light in 650-ps Gaussian pulses. The on-target irradiation uniformity was enhanced for these experiments by the use of distributed phase plates, which brought the estimated irradiation nonuniformities to ∼12% (σ rms ). Target performance was diagnosed by an array of x-ray, plasma, and nuclear instruments. The measured target performance showed ∼70% absorption, thermonuclear yields of 10 6 to 10 8 neutrons, and final fuel areal densities of 20 to 40 mg/cm 2 for the optimum targets examined in these experiments. Fuel densities at the time of thermonuclear neutron production, inferred from direct measurements of the fuel areal density, were in the range of 20 to 50 g/cm 3 (100 to 200 times the density of liquid DT) for the optimum targets

  4. Measurement of the target current by inductive probe during laser interaction on terawatt laser system PALS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cikhardt, Jakub; Krása, Josef; De Marco, Massimo; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Velyhan, Andriy; Krouský, Eduard; Cikhardtová, B.; Klír, Daniel; Řezáč, Karel; Ullschmied, Jiří; Skála, Jiří; Kubeš, P.; Kravárik, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 10 (2014), s. 103507-103507 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010014; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13029; GA ČR GAP205/12/0454; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant - others:LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser PALS * laser-target interaction * target current * inductive probe Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.614, year: 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4898016

  5. Influence of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser-irradiated metallic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ziyu; Li Jianfeng; Yu Yong; Li Xiaoya; Peng Qixian; Zhu Wenjun; Wang Jiaxiang

    2012-01-01

    The influences of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser interaction with metallic targets have been investigated. Particle-in-cell simulations at high laser intensities show that the yield of hot electrons tends to increase with lateral target size, because the larger surface area reduces the electrostatic field on the target, owing to its expansion along the target surface. At lower laser intensities and longer time scales, experimental data characterizing electromagnetic pulse emission as a function of lateral target size also show target-size effects. Charge separation and a larger target tending to have a lower target potential have both been observed. The increase in radiation strength and downshift in radiation frequency with increasing lateral target size can be interpreted using a simple model of the electrical capacity of the target.

  6. Influence of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser-irradiated metallic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ziyu; Li Jianfeng; Yu Yong; Li Xiaoya; Peng Qixian; Zhu Wenjun [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Wang Jiaxiang [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2012-11-15

    The influences of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser interaction with metallic targets have been investigated. Particle-in-cell simulations at high laser intensities show that the yield of hot electrons tends to increase with lateral target size, because the larger surface area reduces the electrostatic field on the target, owing to its expansion along the target surface. At lower laser intensities and longer time scales, experimental data characterizing electromagnetic pulse emission as a function of lateral target size also show target-size effects. Charge separation and a larger target tending to have a lower target potential have both been observed. The increase in radiation strength and downshift in radiation frequency with increasing lateral target size can be interpreted using a simple model of the electrical capacity of the target.

  7. Target plane imaging system for the Nova laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, C.D.; Bliss, E.S.; Jones, W.A.; Reeves, R.J.; Seppala, L.G.; Shelton, R.T.; VanArsdall, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Nova laser, in operation since December 1984, is capable of irradiating targets with light at 1.05 μm, 0.53 μm, and 0.35 μm. Correct alignment of these harmonic beams uses a system called a target plane imager (TPI). It is a large microscope (four meters long, weighing one thousand kilograms) that relays images from the target chamber center to a video optics module located on the outside of the chamber. Several modes of operation are possible including: near-field viewing and far-field viewing at three magnifications and three wavelengths. In addition, the entire instrument can be scanned in X,Y,Z to examine various planes near chamber center. Performance of this system and its computer controls will be described

  8. Exploding pusher targets for the SHIVA laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.D.; Larsen, J.T.; Nuckolls, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    The first targets for the 20 TW SHIVA laser system were designed. They are simple glass micro-balloons, approximately 300 μm in diameter and 2 μm thick, filled with D-T gas. Using LASNEX, whose model physics was utilized successfully for ARGUS targets, we optimize for both gain and yield. The target behaves as an exploding pusher. Different simple analytic models for the physics of this mode are presented, and are tested by comparing their scaling predictions, at constant absorbed power, with those demonstrated by LASNEX. Emphasis is placed on successful prediction of the basic quantities of peak ion temperature and compression, rather than neutron yield or n tau

  9. Repetitive laser fusion experiment and operation using a target injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yasuhiko; Komeda, Osamu; Mori, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-01

    Since 2008, a collaborative research project on laser fusion development based on a high-speed ignition method using repetitive laser has been carried out with several collaborative research institutes. This paper reports the current state of operation of high repetition laser fusion experiments, such as target introduction and control based on a target injection system that allows free falling under 1 Hz, using a high repetition laser driver that has been under research and development, as well as the measurement of targets that freely fall. The HAMA laser driver that enabled high repetition fusion experiments is a titanium sapphire laser using a diode-pumped solid-state laser KURE-I of green light output as a driver pump light source. In order to carry out high repetition laser fusion experiments, the target injection device allows free falling of deuterated polystyrene solid sphere targets of 1 mm in diameter under 1 Hz. The authors integrated the developed laser and injection system, and succeeded first in the world in making the nuclear fusion reaction continuously by hitting the target to be injected with laser, which is essential technology for future laser nuclear fusion reactor. In order to realize repetition laser fusion experiments, stable laser, target synchronization control, and target position measurement technologies are indispensable. (A.O.)

  10. On interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with cluster targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skobelev, I.Yu.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Magunov, A.I.

    2002-01-01

    The clusters heating through the femtosecond laser pulses is theoretically and experimentally studied. Both the process of the cluster target formation and results of the cluster plasma experimental studies through the emission X-ray spectroscopy methods are considered. The numerical model of clusters formation in the supersonic gaseous jet is proposed. It is shown that detailed studies on the two-phase gas-dynamic processes in the nozzle, forming the jet, make it possible to obtain spatial distributions of all cluster parameters, necessary for correct calculations of the clusters. The simple physical model of the plasma formation through the femtosecond laser method is proposed. It is shown that comparison of the observed X-ray spectra with the results of the detailed ion kinetics calculations, make it possible to determine the basic parameters of the formed plasma [ru

  11. Molecular emissions from laser--solid-target interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greig, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    When a high-power Nd/glass laser pulse is incident on a polyethylene target, a bright plasma plume is created. Subsequently, a cloud of un-ionized gas is formed which contains 10--100 times the amount of material in the plasma plume. This gas cloud is cold (expansion velocity approx.10 5 cm/sec) and dense (n> or approx. =10 19 ). It is shown to contain diatomic molecules of carbon C 2 by heating the core of the cloud with the pulse from a 1-kJ TEA CO 2 laser. Then, the C 2 molecules in the cold outer regions of the cloud are seen in absorption on the light emitted by the hot core

  12. Ultrasmooth plasma polymerized coatings for laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letts, S.A.; Myers, D.W.; Witt, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    Coatings for laser fusion were deposited up to 135μm thick by plasma polymerization onto 140 μm diameter DT filled glass microspheres. Ultrasmooth surfaces (no defect higher than 0.1 μm) were achieved by eliminating particulate contamination. Process generated particles were eliminated by determining the optimum operating conditions of power (20 watts), gas flow (0.3 sccm trans-2-butene, 10.0 sccm hydrogen), and pressure (75 millitorr), and maintaining these conditions through feedback control. From a study of coating defects grown over known surface irregularities, a quantitative relationship between irregularity size, film thickness, and defect size was determined. This relationship was used to set standards for the maximum microshell surface irregularity tolerable in the production of hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon coated laser fusion targets

  13. Laser-driven nuclear-polarized hydrogen internal gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, J.; Crawford, C.; Clasie, B.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-01-01

    We report the performance of a laser-driven polarized internal hydrogen gas target (LDT) in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. This target used the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping to produce nuclear spin polarized hydrogen gas that was fed into a cylindrical storage (target) cell. We present in this paper the performance of the target, methods that were tried to improve the figure-of-merit (FOM) of the target, and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results from the simulation. The best experimental result achieved was at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1x10 18 atoms/s, where the sample beam exiting the storage cell had 58.2% degree of dissociation and 50.5% polarization. Based on this measurement, the atomic fraction in the storage cell was 49.6% and the density averaged nuclear polarization was 25.0%. This represents the highest FOM for hydrogen from an LDT and is higher than the best FOM reported by atomic beam sources that used storage cells

  14. Study of compact X-ray laser pumped by pulse-train laser. Double-target experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Fujikawa, Chiemi; Hara, Tamio

    2000-01-01

    We have been developing a tabletop x-ray laser based on the recombination plasma scheme. An advanced experiment has been started to improve x-ray laser output substantially. Two 11-mm-long laser produced plasmas were produced so that their axis aligned into a line, the double-target configuration. X-ray intensity of the 15.47 nm transition line of the Li-like Al ion has been enhanced in the double-target configuration. (author)

  15. Double-shell target designs for the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory eight-beam laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindel, J.M.; Stroscio, M.A.

    1978-03-01

    We investigate two double-pusher laser fusion targets, one that incorporates an outer exploding pusher shell and another that uses velocity multiplication. Specific designs are presented for the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Eight-Beam Laser System

  16. Shock dynamics induced by double-spot laser irradiation of layered targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliverdiev Abutrab A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied the interaction of a double-spot laser beam with targets using the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS iodine laser working at 0.44 μm wavelength and intensity of about 1015 W/cm2. Shock breakout signals were recorder using time-resolved self-emission from target rear side of irradiated targets. We compared the behavior of pure Al targets and of targets with a foam layer on the laser side. Results have been simulated using hydrodynamic numerical codes.

  17. Tolerance of laser-driven microshell targets to fluorescence and prepulse energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, T.; Moncur, N.K.; Sullivan, D.

    1976-01-01

    Glass-shell targets currently being used for laser-fusion experiments are susceptible to damage by preenergy from the laser. This energy can result from amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) throughout the laser chain during the period of high-population inversion or it can take the form of a short prepulse nanoseconds before the main laser pulse. We point out the energy levels which a typical target can tolerate in the form of ASE and prepulses. These energies are low enough that special precautions must be taken to prevent significant perturbations of the target or its environment before the main laser pulse

  18. Picosecond KrF laser interaction with solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.A.; Barrow, V.; Edwards, J.; Kiehn, G.; Wark, J.; Willi, O.; Barr, J.; Everall, N.; Hooker, C.; Ross, T.; Shaw, M.; Turcu, E.

    1988-01-01

    The recently developed high power KrF system at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory has been used to heat solid targets with laser energies of up to 1 Joule in 3ps. Single shot irradiances of up to 10 17 Wcm -2 were achieved at the target surface. A number of diagnostics were used to investigate the plasmas produced. These included time integrated and time resolved X-ray and VUV spectroscopy. The plasma temperature was obtained from X-ray line ratios, and the plasma density from Stark broadening. When ASE background containing about 20% of the short pulse energy in a 10ns interval was present, the X0ray spectra indicated an electron temperature of about 400ev and a density of a few times 10 22 cm -2 . If however the prepulse level was kept to below 10 -3 of the main pulse, measurements indicated a plasmas with temperatures of 400ev at close to solid density. The production of hot electrons was investigated using titanium targets overcoated with CH, and observing the Ti Κα emission. These measurements also confirmed the low prepulse level, since Κα emission was weak when only 0.5 microns of plastic overcoat was used. These experimental results were simulated and observations and simulations are discussed

  19. Optical and plasma smoothing of laser imprinting in targets driven by lasers with SSD bandwidths up to 1 THz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehly, T.R.; Goncharov, V.N.; Gotchev, O.; Knauer, J.P.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Oron, D.; Regan, S.P.; Srebro, Y.; Seka, W.; Shvarts, D.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    The creation of a plasma atmosphere in laser-target interactions increases the distance between the regions of laser absorption and hydrodynamic instability (ablation front), thus allowing thermal smoothing and a reduction of laser-imprinted modulations that reach the unstable ablation region. The total laser imprinting is reduced with pulse shapes that produce a plasma atmosphere more rapidly and by the implementation of temporal beam smoothing. These effects are measured and found to be consistent with models for the hydrodynamics and optical smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). Imprinting is reduced as the laser bandwidth is increased from 0.2 to 1.0 THz

  20. The Nike KrF laser facility: Performance and initial target experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenschain, S. P.; Bodner, S. E.; Colombant, D.; Gerber, K.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E. A.; Mostovych, A. N.; Pronko, M. S.; Pawley, C. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Sethian, J. D.; Serlin, V.; Stamper, J. A.; Sullivan, C. A.; Dahlburg, J. P.; Gardner, J. H.; Chan, Y.; Deniz, A. V.; Hardgrove, J.; Lehecka, T.; Klapisch, M.

    1996-05-01

    Krypton-fluoride (KrF) lasers are of interest to laser fusion because they have both the large bandwidth capability (≳THz) desired for rapid beam smoothing and the short laser wavelength (1/4 μm) needed for good laser-target coupling. Nike is a recently completed 56-beam KrF laser and target facility at the Naval Research Laboratory. Because of its bandwidth of 1 THz FWHM (full width at half-maximum), Nike produces more uniform focal distributions than any other high-energy ultraviolet laser. Nike was designed to study the hydrodynamic instability of ablatively accelerated planar targets. First results show that Nike has spatially uniform ablation pressures (Δp/pNike laser in producing uniform illumination, and its performance in correspondingly uniform acceleration of targets.

  1. Techniques to control and position laser targets. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.B.

    1978-06-01

    The purpose of the work was to investigate the potential role of various electrohydrodynamic phenomena in the fabrication of small spherical particles and shells for laser target applications. A number of topics were considered. These included charged droplet levitation, specifically the combined effects of the Rayleigh limit and droplet elongation in the presence of electric fields. Two new levitation schemes for uncharged dielectric particles were studied. A dynamic dielectrophoretic levitation scheme was proposed and unsuccessful attempts were made to observe levitation with it. Another static dielectrophoretic levitation scheme was studied and used extensively. A theory was developed for this type of levitation, and a dielectric constant measurement scheme proposed. A charged droplet generator for the production of single droplets ( 4 /O 2 bubbles in Viscasil silicone fluid were conducted to learn about the possibility of using silane to form SiO 2 microballons from bubbles

  2. Absorption of the laser radiation by the laser plasma with gas microjet targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisevichus, D. A.; Zabrodskii, V. V.; Kalmykov, S. G.; Sasin, M. E.; Seisyan, R. P.

    2017-01-01

    An upper limit of absorption of the laser radiation in the plasma produced in a gas jet Xe target with the average density of (3-6) × 1018 cm-3 and the effective diameter of 0.7 mm is found. It is equal to ≈50% and remains constant under any variation in this range of densities. This result contradicts both theoretical assessments that have predicted virtually complete absorption and results of earlier experiments with the laser spark in an unlimited stationary Xe gas with the same density, where the upper limit of absorption was close to 100%. An analysis shows that nonlinearity of absorption and plasma nonequilibrium lead to the reduction of the absorption coefficient that, along with the limited size of plasma, can explain the experimental results.

  3. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy of cross-beam pulsed laser ablation on graphite targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangines, R.; Sanchez Ake, C.; Sobral, H.; Villagran-Muniz, M.

    2007-01-01

    Cross-beam pulsed laser ablation with two delayed lasers is performed on two perpendicular graphite targets. The time delay between lasers is varied by up to 5 μs, and physical changes on the second plasma, due to the interaction with the first generated one, are determined by time resolved optical emission spectroscopy

  4. Technology of solid-fuel-layer targets for laser-fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musinski, D.L.; Henderson, T.M.; Pattinson, T.R.; Tarvin, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus which produces uniform solid-fuel layers in glass-shell targets for laser irradiation is described. A low-power cw laser pulse is used to vaporize the fuel within a previously frozen target which is maintained in a cold-helium environment by a cryogenic shroud. The rapid refreezing that follows the pulse forms a uniform fuel layer on the inner surface of the glass shell. This apparatus and technique meet the restrictions imposed by the experimental target chamber. The method does not perturb the target position; nor does it preclude the usual diagnostic experimets since the shroud is retracted before the main laser pulse arrives. Successful laser irradiation and implosion of solid-fuel-layer targets at KMSF have confirmed the effectiveness and reliability of this system and extended the range of laser-target-interaction studies in the cryogenic regime

  5. Two-dimensional study of shock breakout at the rear face of laser irradiated metallic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottet, F.; Marty, L.; Hallouin, M.; Romain, J.P.; Virmont, J.; Fabbro, R.; Faral, B.

    1988-11-01

    The two-dimensional propagation dynamics of laser-driven shock waves in solids is studied through the analysis of the shock breakout at the rear face of the target for a set of materials and laser intensities. The laser shock simulations were carried out by means of a two-dimensional hydrodynamics code in which the laser-ablation pressure is replaced by an equivalent pressure pulse. It is shown that the two-dimensional code is a very useful tool to analyze laser-shock experiments where two-dimensional effects arise from a finite laser-spot size or a heterogeneous energy deposition.

  6. Two-dimensional study of shock breakout at the rear face of laser irradiated metallic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottet, F.; Marty, L.; Hallouin, M.; Romain, J.P.; Virmont, J.; Fabbro, R.; Faral, B.

    1988-01-01

    The two-dimensional propagation dynamics of laser-driven shock waves in solids is studied through the analysis of the shock breakout at the rear face of the target for a set of materials and laser intensities. The laser shock simulations were carried out by means of a two-dimensional hydrodynamics code in which the laser-ablation pressure is replaced by an equivalent pressure pulse. It is shown that the two-dimensional code is a very useful tool to analyze laser-shock experiments where two-dimensional effects arise from a finite laser-spot size or a heterogeneous energy deposition

  7. A 3 ps synchronised multi-frame photographic diagnostic for target experiments with the iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maaswinkel, A.G.M.; Sigel, R.; Baumhacker, H.; Brederlow, G.

    1982-10-01

    A laser system is described with which we obtain a sequence of 6 pictures (interferograms or shadowgrams) of the plasma produced by the iodine laser on solid targets. The system consists of a synchronously pumped dye laser amplified in dye cells pumped by an excimer laser. It delivers a pulse with an energy of 400 μJ and a length of 3 ps at a wavelength of 580 nm that is highly synchronous with the iodine pulse. (orig.)

  8. Soviet paper on laser target heating, symmetry of irradiation, and two-dimensional effects on compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahlin, H.L.

    1976-01-01

    Included is a paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Plasma Physics Division of the American Physical Society in San Francisco on November 19, 1976. The paper discusses some theoretical problems of laser target irradiation and compression investigated at the laboratory of quantum radiophysics of Lebedev Physical Institute. Of significant interest was the absorption and reflection of laser radiation in the corona plasma of a laser target

  9. Cannonball target experiment with the GEKKO laser system at ILE Osaka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, C.; Azechi, H.; Fujiwara, E.

    1985-01-01

    The GEKKO series glass laser systems are now in operation for the Cannonball target experiments. GEKKO XII is a twelve-beam 30 kJ, 50 TW laser provided with two target chambers. Three types of GEKKO lasers cover the UV, blue, green and red frequency ranges. The Cannonball target displays an excellent performance in implosion. Two kinds of Cannonball target are proposed: the plasma Cannonball and the radiation Cannonball. The neutron yield is 4x10 10 , and the DT fuel density attains 10 g.cm -3 . Laser-to-X-ray conversion has been investigated. Cryogenic target implosion has been performed by using a tailored laser pulse to produce the flush at the core. Various kinds of new diagnostics are being developed. (author)

  10. Role of laser contrast and foil thickness in target normal sheath acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizzi, L.A. [ILIL, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, CNR, Via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Altana, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Brandi, F. [ILIL, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, CNR, Via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa (Italy); Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Cirrone, P. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Cristoforetti, G. [ILIL, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, CNR, Via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa (Italy); Fazzi, A. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan, Milan (Italy); INFN, Milan (Italy); Ferrara, P.; Fulgentini, L. [ILIL, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, CNR, Via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa (Italy); Giove, D. [INFN-LASA, Via Fratelli Cervi 201, 20090 Segrate (Italy); Koester, P. [ILIL, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, CNR, Via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa (Italy); Labate, L. [ILIL, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, CNR, Via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Enna Kore, Via delle Olimpiadi, 94100 Enna (Italy); Londrillo, P. [INAF–Osservatorio astronomico Bologna (Italy); Mascali, D.; Muoio, A. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Palla, D. [ILIL, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, CNR, Via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa (Italy); Schillaci, F. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Sinigardi, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); INFN, Sez. di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); and others

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present an experimental investigation of laser driven light-ion acceleration using the ILIL laser at an intensity of 2×10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. In the experiment we focused our attention on the identification of the role of target thickness and resistivity in the fast electron transport and in the acceleration process. Here we describe the experimental results concerning the effect of laser contrast in the laser–target interaction regime. We also show preliminary results on ion acceleration which provide information about the role of bulk target ions and surface ions and target dielectric properties in the acceleration process.

  11. Target focusing configuration for X-ray laser experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppala, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray laser experiments imposed a new demand on the Novette focusing optics. These optics had to provide highly uniform, double-sided illumination on a target region 1.0 cm long by 100 to 200 μm wide. This line focus requirement had to be achieved without degrading the diagnostic reflection from the last surface of the focus lens and without potential ghost focus problems. The only optical configuration that preserves the diagnostic reflection is shown. A negative focal length cylinder lens is placed between the focus lens and the debris shield, with the concave surface facing toward the focus lens. Any ghost reflections from the cylinder lens or debris shield are degraded by astigmatism, making them less hazardous. In practice, the uniformity of illumination is probably about the same for a positive or a negative cylinder lens. The minimum Novette focused spot was approximately 50 to 75 μm in diameter, and the fabrication errors in the 80-cm-diam precision cylinder lens produced a line focus 25 μm wide. a negative cylinder lens design was chosen, however, to optimize the illumination uniformity in the case of line widths of several hundred microns

  12. Enhanced target normal sheath acceleration of protons from intense laser interaction with a cone-tube target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. D. Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser driven proton acceleration is proposed to be greatly enhanced by using a cone-tube target, which can be easily manufactured by current 3D-print technology. It is observed that energetic electron bunches are generated along the tube and accelerated to a much higher temperature by the combination of ponderomotive force and longitudinal electric field which is induced by the optical confinement of the laser field. As a result, a localized and enhanced sheath field is produced at the rear of the target and the maximum proton energy is about three-fold increased based on the two-dimentional particle-in-cell simulation results. It is demonstrated that by employing this advanced target scheme, the scaling of the proton energy versus the laser intensity is much beyond the normal target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA case.

  13. Effects of thin high-Z layers on the hydrodynamics of laser-accelerated plastic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenschain, S.P.; Colombant, D.G.; Karasik, M.; Pawley, C.J.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A.J.; Weaver, J.L.; Gardner, J.H.; Phillips, L.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Chan, Y.; Dahlburg, J.P.; Klapisch, M.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental results and simulations that study the effects of thin metallic layers with high atomic number (high-Z) on the hydrodynamics of laser accelerated plastic targets are presented. These experiments employ a laser pulse with a low-intensity foot that rises into a high-intensity main pulse. This pulse shape simulates the generic shape needed for high-gain fusion implosions. Imprint of laser nonuniformity during start up of the low intensity foot is a well-known seed for hydrodynamic instability. Large reductions are observed in hydrodynamic instability seeded by laser imprint when certain minimum thickness gold or palladium layers are applied to the laser-illuminated surface of the targets. The experiment indicates that the reduction in imprint is at least as large as that obtained by a 6 times improvement in the laser uniformity. Simulations supported by experiments are presented showing that during the low intensity foot the laser light can be nearly completely absorbed by the high-Z layer. X rays originating from the high-Z layer heat the underlying lower-Z plastic target material and cause large buffering plasma to form between the layer and the accelerated target. This long-scale plasma apparently isolates the target from laser nonuniformity and accounts for the observed large reduction in laser imprint. With onset of the higher intensity main pulse, the high-Z layer expands and the laser light is transmitted. This technique will be useful in reducing laser imprint in pellet implosions and thereby allow the design of more robust targets for high-gain laser fusion

  14. Generation of ten kilotesla longitudinal magnetic fields in ultraintense laser-solenoid target interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, K. D.; Zhou, C. T.; Zhang, H.; Huang, T. W.; Li, R.; Qiao, B.; Cao, J. M.; Cai, T. X.; Ruan, S. C.; He, X. T.

    2018-01-01

    Production of the huge longitudinal magnetic fields by using an ultraintense laser pulse irradiating a solenoid target is considered. Through three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, it is shown that the longitudinal magnetic field up to ten kilotesla can be observed in the ultraintense laser-solenoid target interactions. The finding is associated with both fast and return electron currents in the solenoid target. The huge longitudinal magnetic field is of interest for a number of impo...

  15. Application of Faraday rotator to suppression of target-reflected radiation in the optical path of a laser installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykovskiy, N.E.; Denus, S.; Dubik, A.; Ovsik, Y.; Lisunov, V.V.; Senatskiy, Y.V.; Fedotov, S.I.

    1988-01-01

    The interaction conditions between powerful laser radiation and a target are examined together with the Faraday rotators designed for suppressing target-reflected backward radiation in the neodymium glass laser optical path

  16. Study of laser plasma emission from doped targets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Velardi, L.; Krása, Josef; Velyhan, Andriy; Nassisi, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 2 (2012), , "02B911-1"-"02B911-3" ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E09092; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 228334 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : copper * excimer lasers * ion mobility * krypton compounds * laser ablation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.602, year: 2012

  17. Hydrodynamic modeling of laser interaction with micro-structured targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velechovsky, Jan; Limpouch, Jiri; Liska, Richard; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    A model is developed for numerical simulations of laser absorption in plasmas made of porous materials, with particular interest in low-density foams. Laser absorption is treated on two spatial scales simultaneously. At the microscale, the expansion of a thin solid pore wall is modeled in one dimension and the information obtained is used in the macroscale fluid simulations for the description of the plasma homogenization behind the ionization front. This two-scale laser absorption model is implemented in the arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian hydrocode PALE. In conclusion, the numerical simulations of laser penetration into low-density foams compare favorably with published experimental data.

  18. Evaluation of the effect of prepulses on HF laser-target interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzen, M.K.

    1979-06-01

    We have assessed the effect of multinanosecond, low-power-density prepulses on the interaction of multinanosecond, 10 14 W/cm 2 , approx. 3 -μm HF laser pulses with slab targets. The emphasis is on analyzing absorption and x-ray conversion efficiency. A survey of previous experiments gives no evidence that these prepulses will affect the total absorption. However, prepulses have been observed to cause qualitative changes in both the x-ray spectrum and conversion efficiency. Numerical simulations indicate that the laser-target interaction is effectively insensitive to low-power-density prepulses. These studies imply that basic laser-target experiments with multiplexed, HF laser pulses will provide an important characterization of the interaction of long pulse, multi-line, approx. 3 μm radiation with targets. Future wavelength comparison experiments will require prepulse suppression or target isolation

  19. Interaction of a laser-breakdown plasma with a charged metallic target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, B.I.; Grasyuk, A.Z.; Dyad'kin, A.P.; Sukhanov, A.N.

    1981-01-01

    A study was made of the influence of a laser plasma on the potential of an insulated conducting target. It was discovered that the target potential changed stepwise on illumination with a high-power TEA CO 2 laser. A step, ΔU, in the target potential was observed and the dependences of ΔU on the initial potential, laser radiation energy density, and geometrical dimensions of the illuminated region were determined. There was an optimal pressure of the surrounding air for which ΔU had the maximum value. The dependence of ΔU on the pressure was determined, when illuminating a target in air and in nitrogen. The temporal characteristics of the variation in ΔU were correlated with the time variation of the visible and ultraviolet luminescence from the plasma. A mechanism was proposed to explain the potential step accompanying the interaction of a laser-produced plasma with a charged metallic target

  20. Improved laser-to-proton conversion efficiency in isolated reduced mass targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morace, A. [Center for Energy Research, University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Bellei, C.; Patel, P. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bartal, T.; Kim, J.; Beg, F. N. [Center for Energy Research, University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Willingale, L.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K. [University of Michigan, 2200 Bonisteel Blvd. Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Wei, M. S. [Center for Energy Research, University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); General Atomics, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Batani, D. [Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Piovella, N. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Stephens, R. B. [General Atomics, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2013-07-29

    We present experimental results of laser-to-proton conversion efficiency as a function of lateral confinement of the refluxing electrons. Experiments were carried out using the T-Cubed laser at the Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan. We demonstrate that the laser-to-proton conversion efficiency increases by 50% with increased confinement of the target from surroundings with respect to a flat target of the same thickness. Three-dimensional hybrid particle-in-cell simulations using LSP code agree with the experimental data. The adopted target design is suitable for high repetition rate operation as well as for Inertial Confinement Fusion applications.

  1. Advanced targets preparation for TNSA laser irradiation and their characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ceccio, G.; Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, Mariapompea

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, APR (2016), C04017 ISSN 1748-0221. [Conference on Plasma Physics by Laser and Applications (PPLA). Frascati, 05.10.2015-07.10.2015] Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : TOF * ion sources * plasma diagnostics Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  2. The interactions of laser beam with high Z solid target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Huimin; Zhang Guoping; Sheng Jiatian

    1990-01-01

    The 1-D non-LTE radiative hydrodynamic laser irradiated code JB-19 is used to calculate the laser-produced plasma conditions of high z gold disk. Following physical processes are considered: bremsstrahlung effect, radiative ionization and recombination, collisional ionization by electrons and three-body recombination, collisional excitation and de-excitation by electrons, radiative line emission and absorption and Compton scattering. A gaussian laser pulse with wavelength 1.06 μm, FWHM 600 ps and peak intensity 3 x 10 14 W/cm 2 is used to irradiate 20 μm thick gold disk. The computational results for laser-produced plasma conditions and the absorption efficiency and laser-x-rays conversion efficiency for gold disk are shown

  3. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Influence of a target on operation of a pulsed CO2 laser emitting microsecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, V. Yu; Dolgov, V. A.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.; Semak, V. V.

    1987-12-01

    The profile of pulses emitted by a TEA CO2 laser with an unstable resonator changed as a result of interaction of laser radiation with the surface of a metal in the presence of a breakdown plasma. This influence of a target on laser operation and its possible applications in laser processing of materials are analyzed.

  4. Microwave radiation mechanism in a pulse-laser-irradiated Cu foil target revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ziyu; Li Jianfeng; Li Jun; Peng Qixian

    2011-01-01

    The microwave radiation mechanism in a Cu-based foil target irradiated by an intense laser pulse has been investigated. Microwave emission in the frequency range 0.5-4 GHz has been observed from a 200 ps laser pulse of intensity about 10 12 W cm -2 normally incident on the target surface. The total microwave power and energy emitted from the interaction were found to be about 0.4 W and 2 nJ, respectively, corresponding to an efficiency of coupling laser energy to microwave energy of 2x10 -8 . The result agrees well with quadrupole radiation calculated based on a circuit model of a laser plasma, which indicates that the radiative process can be explained by magnetic dipole or electric quadrupole radiation from the laser-produced symmetric poloidal current distribution at the plasma-target interface.

  5. Microwave radiation mechanism in a pulse-laser-irradiated Cu foil target revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ziyu; Li Jianfeng; Li Jun; Peng Qixian, E-mail: ziyuch@gmail.com [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2011-05-01

    The microwave radiation mechanism in a Cu-based foil target irradiated by an intense laser pulse has been investigated. Microwave emission in the frequency range 0.5-4 GHz has been observed from a 200 ps laser pulse of intensity about 10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2} normally incident on the target surface. The total microwave power and energy emitted from the interaction were found to be about 0.4 W and 2 nJ, respectively, corresponding to an efficiency of coupling laser energy to microwave energy of 2x10{sup -8}. The result agrees well with quadrupole radiation calculated based on a circuit model of a laser plasma, which indicates that the radiative process can be explained by magnetic dipole or electric quadrupole radiation from the laser-produced symmetric poloidal current distribution at the plasma-target interface.

  6. Monochromatic x-ray radiography of laser-driven spherical targets using high-energy, picoseconds LFEX laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Hiroshi; Fujioka, S.; Lee, S.; Arikawa, Y.; Shigemori, K.; Nagatomo, H.; Nishimura, H.; Sunahara, A.; Theobald, W.; Perez, F.; Patel, P. K.; Beg, F. N.

    2015-11-01

    Formation of a high density fusion fuel is essential in both conventional and advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) schemes for the self-sustaining fusion process. In cone-guided Fast Ignition (FI), a metal cone is attached to a spherical target to maintain the path for the injection of an intense short-pulse ignition laser from blow-off plasma created when nanoseconds compression lasers drive the target. We have measured a temporal evolution of a compressed deuterated carbon (CD) sphere using 4.5 keV K-alpha radiography with the Kilo-Joule, picosecond LFEX laser at the Institute of Laser Engineering. A 200 μm CD sphere attached to the tip of a Au cone was directly driven by 9 Gekko XII beams with 300 J/beam in a 1.3 ns Gaussian pulse. The LFEX laser irradiated on a Ti foil to generate 4.51 Ti K-alpha x-ray. By varying the delay between the compression and backlighter lasers, the measured radiograph images show an increase of the areal density of the imploded target. The detail of the quantitative analyses to infer the areal density and comparisons to hydrodynamics simulations will be presented. This work was performed with the support and under the auspices of the NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS13KUGK072). H.S. was supported by the UNR's International Activities Grant program.

  7. Efficient energy absorption of intense ps-laser pulse into nanowire target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habara, H.; Honda, S.; Katayama, M.; Tanaka, K. A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sakagami, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Nagai, K. [Laboratory for Chemistry and Life Science, Institute of Innovative Research, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuda 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    The interaction between ultra-intense laser light and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes is investigated to demonstrate efficient laser-energy absorption in the ps laser-pulse regime. Results indicate a clear enhancement of the energy conversion from laser to energetic electrons and a simultaneously small plasma expansion on the surface of the target. A two-dimensional plasma particle calculation exhibits a high absorption through laser propagation deep into the nanotube array, even for a dense array whose structure is much smaller than the laser wavelength. The propagation leads to the radial expansion of plasma perpendicular to the nanotubes rather than to the front side. These features may contribute to fast ignition in inertial confinement fusion and laser particle acceleration, both of which require high current and small surface plasma simultaneously.

  8. ANALYSIS AND MITIGATION OF X-RAY HAZARD GENERATED FROM HIGH INTENSITY LASER-TARGET INTERACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, R.; Liu, J.C.; Prinz, A.A.; Rokni, S.H.; Woods, M.; Xia, Z.; /SLAC

    2011-03-21

    Interaction of a high intensity laser with matter may generate an ionizing radiation hazard. Very limited studies have been made, however, on the laser-induced radiation protection issue. This work reviews available literature on the physics and characteristics of laser-induced X-ray hazards. Important aspects include the laser-to-electron energy conversion efficiency, electron angular distribution, electron energy spectrum and effective temperature, and bremsstrahlung production of X-rays in the target. The possible X-ray dose rates for several femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser systems used at SLAC, including the short pulse laser system for the Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument (peak power 4 TW and peak intensity 2.4 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) were analysed. A graded approach to mitigate the laser-induced X-ray hazard with a combination of engineered and administrative controls is also proposed.

  9. Laser polarization dependence of proton emission from a thin foil target irradiated by a 70 fs, intense laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumi, A.; Nishiuchi, M.; Daido, H.; Li, Z.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Orimo, S.; Kado, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Mori, M.; Bulanov, S.V.; Esirkepov, T.; Nemoto, K.; Oishi, Y.; Nayuki, T.; Fujii, T.; Noda, A.; Nakamura, S.

    2005-01-01

    A study of proton emission from a 3-μm-thick Ta foil target irradiated by p-, s-, and circularly polarized laser pulses with respect to the target plane has been carried out. Protons with energies up to 880 keV were observed in the target normal direction under the irradiation by the p-polarized laser pulse, which yielded the highest efficiency for proton emission. In contrast, s- and circularly polarized laser pulses gave the maximum energies of 610 and 680 keV, respectively. The difference in the maximum energy between the p- and s-polarized cases was associated with the difference between the sheath fields estimated from electron spectra

  10. Demonstration of a neonlike argon soft-x-ray laser with a picosecond-laser-irradiated gas puff target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedorowicz, H; Bartnik, A; Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Hunter, J; Nilsen, J; Osterheld, A L; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2001-09-15

    We demonstrate a neonlike argon-ion x-ray laser, using a short-pulse laser-irradiated gas puff target. The gas puff target was formed by pulsed injection of gas from a high-pressure solenoid valve through a nozzle in the form of a narrow slit and irradiated with a combination of long, 600-ps and short, 6-ps high-power laser pulses with a total of 10 J of energy in a traveling-wave excitation scheme. Lasing was observed on the 3p (1)S(0)?3s (1)P(1) transition at 46.9 nm and the 3d (1)P(1)?3p (1)P(1) transition at 45.1 nm. A gain of 11 cm(-1) was measured on these transitions for targets up to 0.9 cm long.

  11. Channels of energy redistribution in short-pulse laser interactions with metal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy S.

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics and channels of laser energy redistribution in a target irradiated by a short, 1 ps, laser pulse is investigated in computer simulations performed with a model that combines molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a continuum description of the laser excitation and relaxation of the conduction band electrons, based on the two-temperature model (TTM). The energy transferred from the excited electrons to the lattice splits into several parts, namely the energy of the thermal motion of the atoms, the energy of collective atomic motions associated with the relaxation of laser-induced stresses, the energy carried away from the surface region of the target by a stress wave, the energy of quasi-static anisotropic stresses, and, at laser fluences above the melting threshold, the energy transferred to the latent heat of melting and then released upon recrystallization. The presence of the non-thermal channels of energy redistribution (stress wave and quasi-static stresses), not accounted for in the conventional TTM model, can have important implications for interpretation of experimental results on the kinetics of thermal and mechanical relaxation of a target irradiated by a short laser pulse as well as on the characteristics of laser-induced phase transformations. The fraction of the non-thermal energy in the total laser energy partitioning increases with increasing laser fluence

  12. Coping with Atmospheric Turbulence in the Selection of Laser Hardening Technology for FCS Targeting Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pritchett, Timothy M

    2004-01-01

    ... by frequency-agile battlefield lasers at both long and short range. Evidently, the selection of sensor protection technologies for incorporation into the final targeting system will be based on their optical limiting performance under field conditions...

  13. Effect of vapor plasma on the coupling of laser radiation with aluminum targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, V H; Kivel, B; Weyl, G M

    1978-12-01

    The effect of vapor plasma on thermal and impulse coupling of laser radiation with aluminum targets is studied to understand and explain experimental data showing anomalously high coupling to 10.6-micron laser radiation. Heating of vapor by inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of laser radiation, subsequent reradiation in the uv and deep uv by ionized species, and vapor layer growth are modeled. A computer code has been developed to solve the governing equations. Major conclusions include the following: (1) vapor plasma radiative transport can be an important mechanism for laser/target coupling, (2) aluminum vapor (density times thickness) approximately equal to 10 to the 17th power/sq cm (corresponding to about 0.01 micron of target material) can result in thermal coupling coefficients of 20% or more, and (3) too much vapor reduces the net flux at the target.

  14. Investigations of ultrafast charge dynamics in laser-irradiated targets by a self probing technique employing laser driven protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, H. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Kar, S., E-mail: s.kar@qub.ac.uk [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Cantono, G. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Research Unit Adriano Gozzini, via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa 56124 (Italy); Nersisyan, G. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Brauckmann, S. [Institut für Laser-und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf (Germany); Doria, D.; Gwynne, D. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Macchi, A. [Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Research Unit Adriano Gozzini, via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa 56124 (Italy); Naughton, K. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Willi, O. [Institut für Laser-und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf (Germany); Lewis, C.L.S.; Borghesi, M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    The divergent and broadband proton beams produced by the target normal sheath acceleration mechanism provide the unique opportunity to probe, in a point-projection imaging scheme, the dynamics of the transient electric and magnetic fields produced during laser-plasma interactions. Commonly such experimental setup entails two intense laser beams, where the interaction produced by one beam is probed with the protons produced by the second. We present here experimental studies of the ultra-fast charge dynamics along a wire connected to laser irradiated target carried out by employing a ‘self’ proton probing arrangement – i.e. by connecting the wire to the target generating the probe protons. The experimental data shows that an electromagnetic pulse carrying a significant amount of charge is launched along the wire, which travels as a unified pulse of 10s of ps duration with a velocity close to speed of light. The experimental capabilities and the analysis procedure of this specific type of proton probing technique are discussed. - Highlights: • Prompt charging of laser irradiated target generates ultra-short EM pulses. • Its ultrafast propagation along a wire was studied by self-proton probing technique. • Self-proton probing technique is the proton probing with one laser pulse. • Pulse temporal profile and speed along the wire were measured with high resolution.

  15. Moving Target Detection With Compact Laser Doppler Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepp, G.; Breining, A.; Eisfeld, W.; Knopp, R.; Lill, E.; Wagner, D.

    1989-12-01

    This paper describes an experimental integrated optronic system for detection and tracking of moving objects. The system is based on a CO2 waveguide laser Doppler ra-dar with homodyne receiver and galvanometer mirror beam scanner. A "hot spot" seeker consisting of a thermal imager with image processor transmits the coordinates of IR-emitting, i.e. potentially powered, objects to the laser radar scanner. The scanner addresses these "hot" locations operating in a large field-of-view (FOV) random ac-cess mode. Hot spots exhibiting a Doppler shifted laser signal are indicated in the thermal image by velocity-to-colour encoded markers. After switching to a small FOV scanning mode, the laser Doppler radar is used to track fast moving objects. Labora-tory and field experiments with moving objects including rotating discs, automobiles and missiles are described.

  16. The Nike KrF laser facility: Performance and initial target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenschain, S.P.; Bodner, S.E.; Colombant, D.; Gerber, K.; Lehmberg, R.H.; McLean, E.A.; Mostovych, A.N.; Pronko, M.S.; Pawley, C.J.; Schmitt, A.J.; Sethian, J.D.; Serlin, V.; Stamper, J.A.; Sullivan, C.A.; Dahlburg, J.P.; Gardner, J.H.; Chan, Y.; Deniz, A.V.; Hardgrove, J.; Lehecka, T.; Klapisch, M.

    1996-01-01

    Krypton-fluoride (KrF) lasers are of interest to laser fusion because they have both the large bandwidth capability (approx-gt THz) desired for rapid beam smoothing and the short laser wavelength (1/4 μm) needed for good laser endash target coupling. Nike is a recently completed 56-beam KrF laser and target facility at the Naval Research Laboratory. Because of its bandwidth of 1 THz FWHM (full width at half-maximum), Nike produces more uniform focal distributions than any other high-energy ultraviolet laser. Nike was designed to study the hydrodynamic instability of ablatively accelerated planar targets. First results show that Nike has spatially uniform ablation pressures (Δp/p<2%). Targets have been accelerated for distances sufficient to study hydrodynamic instability while maintaining good planarity. In this review we present the performance of the Nike laser in producing uniform illumination, and its performance in correspondingly uniform acceleration of targets. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  17. Laser-Irradiated Gas Puff Target Plasma Modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrba, Pavel; Vrbová, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 10 (2014), s. 2600-2601 ISSN 0093-3813 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/2043 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0092 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Gas puff laser plasma * water window radiation source * RHMD code Z* Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.101, year: 2014 http://ieeexplore.ieee.org

  18. Maximum entropy restoration of laser fusion target x-ray photographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brolley, J.E.; Lazarus, R.B.; Suydam, B.R.

    1976-01-01

    Maximum entropy principles were used to analyze the microdensitometer traces of a laser-fusion target photograph. The object is a glowing laser-fusion target microsphere 0.95 cm from a pinhole of radius 2 x 10 -4 cm, the image is 7.2 cm from the pinhole and the photon wavelength is likely to be 6.2 x 10 -8 cm. Some computational aspects of the problem are also considered

  19. Study of the dynamic fragmentation of laser shock-loaded metallic target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lescoute, E.

    2010-01-01

    The irradiation of a metallic target by a high power laser pulse induces a shock wave in the material. Under some conditions, it leads to the production of high velocity ejecta which can damage the optical environment (lenses, mirrors, windows, etc.). With the ongoing development of high energy laser facilities designed to achieve inertial confinement fusion, such as the Laser MegaJoule in France or the National Ignition Facility in the USA, the question of debris ejection from metallic samples subjected to intense laser irradiation has become a key issue. It is necessary to understand fragmentation processes induced by laser shock, and to anticipate and quantify generated fragments, in order to design suitable protections and experiments, and to preserve laser facilities. The main fragmentation processes which can occur in a laser-shock-loaded metallic target and generate high velocity ejecta are: (i) micro-jetting, which occurs upon reflection of the incident compressive front from the free surface, (ii) spallation, which is due to the later interaction of the release wave reflected from that surface with the incident unloading wave and (iii) dynamic punching of thin targets. Experimental campaigns have been performed on high energy laser facilities in the Centre d'Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques d'Aquitaine (CESTA, CEA, Alise facility) and in the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, LULI 2000 facility). Gold and aluminium have been mainly studied because they are the two main metallic components of the target which will be used to achieved the inertial confinement fusion. Specific diagnostics have been developed and used during these experiments to study the dynamic fragmentation: transverse shadowgraphy, free surface velocity measurement and recovery of generated fragments. Experimental results have been compared with numerical predictions obtained with a bi-dimensional hydrodynamic code, where a specific numerical

  20. Target micro-displacement measurement by a "comb" structure of intensity distribution in laser plasma propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Z. Y.; Zhang, S. Q.; Gao, L.; Gao, H.

    2015-05-01

    A "comb" structure of beam intensity distribution is designed and achieved to measure a target displacement of micrometer level in laser plasma propulsion. Base on the "comb" structure, the target displacement generated by nanosecond laser ablation solid target is measured and discussed. It is found that the "comb" structure is more suitable for a thin film target with a velocity lower than tens of millimeters per second. Combing with a light-electric monitor, the `comb' structure can be used to measure a large range velocity.

  1. Ultraintense laser interaction with nanoscale target: a simple model for layer expansion and ion acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, Brian J.; Yin, Lin; Hegelich, Bjoorn M.; Bowers, Kevin J.; Huang, Chengkun; Fernandez, Juan C.; Flippo, Kirk A.; Gaillard, Sandrine; Kwan, Thomas J.T.; Henig, Andreas; Habs, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    A simple model has been derived for the expansion of a thin (up to 100s of nm thickness), solid-density target driven by an u.ltraintense laser. In this regime, new ion acceleration mechanisms, such as the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) (1), emerge with the potential to dramatically improve energy, efficiency, and energy spread of laser-driven ion beams. Such beams have been proposed (2) as drivers for fast ignition inertial confinement fusion (3). Analysis of kinetic simulations of the BOA shows two dislinct times that bound the period of enhanced acceleration: t 1 , when the target becomes relativistically transparent to the laser, and t 2 , when the target becomes classically underdense and the enhanced acceleration terminates. A silllple dynamical model for target expansion has been derived that contains both the early, one-dimensional (lD) expansion of the target as well as three-dimensional (3D) expansion of the plasma at late times, The model assumes that expansion is slab-like at the instantaneous ion sound speed and requires as input target composition, laser intensity, laser spot area, and the efficiency of laser absorption into electron thermal energy.

  2. Contributed Review: The novel gas puff targets for laser-matter interaction experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw W., E-mail: wachulak@gmail.com [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, Ul. Gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-09-15

    Various types of targetry are used nowadays in laser matter interaction experiments. Such targets are characterized using different methods capable of acquiring information about the targets such as density, spatial distribution, and temporal behavior. In this mini-review paper, a particular type of target will be presented. The targets under consideration are gas puff targets of various and novel geometries. Those targets were investigated using extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray (SXR) imaging techniques, such as shadowgraphy, tomography, and pinhole camera imaging. Details about characterization of those targets in the EUV and SXR spectral regions will be presented.

  3. Search for Rayleigh-Taylor instability in laser irradiated layered thin foil targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilkenny, J.D.; Hares, J.D.; Rumsby, P.T.

    1980-01-01

    An experiment to measure the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the vacuum-ablation surface of laser irradiated layered targets by time resolved x-ray spectroscopy is described. The time taken to burn through a layer of material is measured to be the same for massive targets as for thin foil accelerating targets. It is inferred that the thin foil targets might be Rayleigh-Taylor stable despite the values of γtauapproximately equal to15 calculated from classical theory. (author)

  4. Multi-pulse enhanced laser ion acceleration using plasma half cavity targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, G. G.; Brenner, C. M.; Neely, D.; Green, J. S.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Spindloe, C.; Bagnoud, V.; Brabetz, C.; Zielbauer, B.; Carroll, D. C.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P.; Roth, M.; Wagner, F.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a plasma half cavity target design for laser driven ion acceleration that enhances the laser to proton energy conversion efficiency and has been found to modify the low energy region of the proton spectrum. The target design utilizes the high fraction of laser energy reflected from an ionized surface and refocuses it such that a double pulse interaction is attained. We report on numerical simulations and experimental results demonstrating that conversion efficiencies can be doubled, compared to planar foil interactions, when the secondary pulse is delivered within picoseconds of the primary pulse.

  5. Multi-pulse enhanced laser ion acceleration using plasma half cavity targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, G. G.; Brenner, C. M.; Neely, D. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, OX11 0QX Didcot (United Kingdom); Department of Physics SUPA, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Green, J. S.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Spindloe, C. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, OX11 0QX Didcot (United Kingdom); Bagnoud, V.; Brabetz, C.; Zielbauer, B. [PHELIX Group, Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Carroll, D. C.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P. [Department of Physics SUPA, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Roth, M. [Fachbereich Physik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Wagner, F. [PHELIX Group, Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Fachbereich Physik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-07-09

    We report on a plasma half cavity target design for laser driven ion acceleration that enhances the laser to proton energy conversion efficiency and has been found to modify the low energy region of the proton spectrum. The target design utilizes the high fraction of laser energy reflected from an ionized surface and refocuses it such that a double pulse interaction is attained. We report on numerical simulations and experimental results demonstrating that conversion efficiencies can be doubled, compared to planar foil interactions, when the secondary pulse is delivered within picoseconds of the primary pulse.

  6. Effects of target shape and reflection on laser radar cross sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinvall, O

    2000-08-20

    Laser radar cross sections have been evaluated for a number of ideal targets such as cones, spheres, paraboloids, and cylinders by use of different reflection characteristics. The time-independent cross section is the ratio of the cross section of one of these forms to that of a plate with the same maximum radius. The time-dependent laser radar cross section involves the impulse response from the object shape multiplied by the beam's transverse profile and the surface bidirectional reflection distribution function. It can be clearly seen that knowledge of the combined effect of object shape and reflection characteristics is important for determining the shape and the magnitude of the laser radar return. The results of this study are of interest for many laser radar applications such as ranging, three-dimensional imaging-modeling, tracking, antisensor lasers, and target recognition.

  7. Ablation mass features in multi-pulses femtosecond laser ablate molybdenum target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongye; Gierse, Niels; Wegner, Julian; Pretzler, Georg; Oelmann, Jannis; Brezinsek, Sebastijan; Liang, Yunfeng; Neubauer, Olaf; Rasinski, Marcin; Linsmeier, Christian; Ding, Hongbin

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the ablation mass features related to reflectivity of bulk Molybdenum (Mo) were investigated by a Ti: Sa 6 fs laser pulse at central wavelength 790 nm. The ablated mass removal was determined using Confocal Microscopy (CM) technique. The surface reflectivity was calibrated and measured by a Lambda 950 spectrophotometer as well as a CCD camera during laser ablation. The ablation mass loss per pulse increase with the increasing of laser shots, meanwhile the surface reflectivity decrease. The multi-pulses (100 shots) ablation threshold of Mo was determined to be 0.15 J/cm2. The incubation coefficient was estimated as 0.835. The reflectivity change of the Mo target surface following multi-pulses laser ablation were studied as a function of laser ablation shots at various laser fluences from 1.07 J/cm2 to 36.23 J/cm2. The results of measured reflectivity indicate that surface reflectivity of Mo target has a significant decline in the first 3-laser pulses at the various fluences. These results are important for developing a quantitative analysis model for laser induced ablation and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the first wall diagnosis of EAST tokamak.

  8. XUV radiation from gaseous nitrogen and argon target laser plasmas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrba, Pavel; Vrbová, M.; Brůža, P.; Pánek, D.; Krejčí, F.; Kroupa, M.; Jakůbek, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 370, č. 1 (2012), s. 012049 ISSN 1742-6588. [Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2011)/14/. Mar del Plata, 20.11.2011-25.11.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08024; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Laser plasma source of XUV radiation in water window range * RHMD Z* engine code Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/370/1/012049/pdf/1742-6596_370_1_012049.pdf

  9. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, M., E-mail: maxence.gauthier@stanford.edu; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Propp, A.; Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Aurand, B.; Willi, O. [Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf (Germany); Goyon, C.; Hazi, A.; Pak, A.; Ruby, J.; Williams, G. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Kerr, S. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1R1 (Canada); Ramakrishna, B. [Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad (India); Rödel, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Jena (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    We report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  10. The use of an intermediate wavelength laser for alignment to inertial confinement fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, R.E. Jr.; Seppala, L.G.; Vann, C.S.; Bliss, E.S.

    1995-01-01

    The conceptual design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) 192 beam laser incorporates a low-power alignment beam injected in the pinhole plane of the final spatial filter with a wave length intermediate between the 1053 mn laser output and the 351 mn frequency-converted beam that illuminates the target Choosing the specific wavelength for which the spatial filter plane is reimaged in the same target chamber plane as the frequency-converted main laser pulse, achieves optimum accuracy without the need for additional means to insure precise overlap between the two beams. Insertion of the alignment beam after the last laser amplifier also allows alignment to the target while the amplifiers are still cooling from a previous shot

  11. Control of ion beam generation in intense short pulse laser target interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, T.; Izumiyama, T.; Barada, D.; Kawata, S.; Gu, Y.J.; Wang, W.M.; Ma, Y.Y.; Kong, Q.

    2013-01-01

    In intense laser plasma interaction, several issues still remain to be solved for future laser particle acceleration. In this paper we focus on a control of generation of high-energy ions. In this study, near-critical density plasmas are employed and are illuminated by high intensity short laser pulses; we have successfully generated high-energy ions, and also controlled ion energy and the ion energy spectrum by multiple-stages acceleration. We performed particle-in-cell simulations in this paper. The first near-critical plasma target is illuminated by a laser pulse, and the ions accelerated are transferred to the next target. The next identical target is also illuminated by another identical large pulse, and the ion beam introduced is further accelerated and controlled. In this study four stages are employed, and finally a few hundreds of MeV of protons are realized. A quasi-monoenergetic energy spectrum is also obtained. (author)

  12. Nonlinear evolution of broad-bandwidth, laser-imprinted nonuniformities in planar targets accelerated by 351-nm laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Boehly, T.R.; Bradley, D.K.; Goncharov, V.N.; Delettrez, J.A.; Knauer, J.P.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Oron, D.; Shvarts, D.; Srebro, Y.; Town, R.P.

    1999-01-01

    Planar, 20 and 40 μm thick CH targets have been accelerated by 351 nm laser beams of the OMEGA laser system [Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Different beam-smoothing techniques were employed including distributed phase plates, smoothing by spectral dispersion, and distributed polarization rotators. The Rayleigh - Taylor evolution of three-dimensional (3D) broadband planar-target perturbations seeded by laser nonuniformities was measured using x-ray radiography at ∼1.3 keV. Fourier analysis shows that the perturbations evolve to longer wavelengths and the shorter wavelengths saturate. The saturation amplitudes and rates of growth of these features are consistent with the predictions of Haan [Phys. Rev. A 39, 5812 (1989)]. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  13. Interaction of ultra-high intensity laser pulse with a mass limited targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, A.A.; Platonov, K.Yu.; Limpouch, J.; Psikal, J.; Kawata, S.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses may be produced now via CPA scheme by using very short laser pulses of a relatively low energy. Interaction of such pulses with massive target is not very efficient as the energy delivered to charged particles spreads out quickly over large distances and it is redistributed between many secondary particles. One possibility to limit this undesirable energy spread is to use mass limited targets (MLT), for example droplets, big clusters or small foil sections. This is an intermediate regime in target dimensions between bulk solid and nanometer-size atomic cluster targets. A few experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out on laser absorption, fast particle generation and induced nuclear fusion reactions in the interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with MLT plasma. We investigate here laser interactions with MLT via 2D3V relativistic electromagnetic PIC simulations. We assume spherical droplet as a typical MLT. However, the sphere is represented in 2D simulations by an infinite cylinder irradiated uniformly along its length. We assume that MLT is fully ionized before main pulse interaction either due to insufficient laser contrast or due to a prepulse. For simplicity, we assume homogeneous plasma of high initial temperature. We analyze the interaction of relativistic laser pulses of various polarizations with targets of different shapes, such as a foil, quadrant and sphere. The mechanisms of laser absorption, electron and ion acceleration are clarified for different laser and target parameters. When laser interacts with the target front side, kinetic energy of electrons rises rapidly with fast oscillations in the kinetic and field energy, caused by electron oscillations in the laser field. Small energy oscillations, observed later, are caused by the electron motion back and forth through the droplet. Approximately 40% of laser energy is transferred to the kinetic energy of electrons

  14. Laser-based target tracking using principal component descriptors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burke, Michael G

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available scans are pre-filtered using a median filter, in order to remove salt and pepper noise. Thereafter, scans are divided into segments through jump-distance classification. This in- volves a simple pass over the laser data, separating segments...

  15. Characterization of advanced polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) targets for TNSA laser irradiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, Mariapompea; Semián, Vladimír; Ceccio, G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 351, OCT (2015), s. 580-587 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : PMMA * TNSA * ion acceleration * laser-generating plasma Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.150, year: 2015

  16. Target technologies for laser inertial confinement fusion: state-of-the-art and future perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lin; Du Kai

    2013-01-01

    Targets are physical base of the laser inertial confinement fusion (ICF) researches. The quality of the targets has extremely important influences on the reliabilities and degree of precision of the ICF experimental results. The characteristics of the ICF targets, such as complexity and microscale, high precision, determine that the target fabrication process must be a system engineering. This paper presents progresses on the fabrication technologies of ICF targets. The existing problem and the future needs of ICF target fabrication technologies are also discussed. (authors)

  17. Ultraintense laser interaction with nanoscale targets: a simple model for layer expansion and ion acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, B J; Yin, L; Hegelich, B M; Bowers, K J; Huang, C; Fernandez, J C; Flippo, K A; Gaillard, S A; Kwan, T J T; Henig, A; Tajima, T; Habs, D; Yan, X Q

    2010-01-01

    A simple model has been derived for expansion of a thin (up to 100s of nm thickness) target initially of solid density irradiated by an ultraintense laser. In this regime, ion acceleration mechanisms, such as the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) [1], emerge with the potential for dramatically improved energy, efficiency, and energy spread. Ion beams have been proposed [2] as drivers for fast ignition inertial confinement fusion [3]. Analysis of kinetic simulations of the BOA shows the period of enhanced acceleration occurs between times t 1 , when the target becomes relativistically transparent to the laser, and t 2 , when the target becomes classically underdense and the enhanced acceleration terminates. A simple model for target expansion has been derived that contains early, one-dimensional (1D) expansion of the target and three-dimensional (3D) expansion at late times. The model assumes expansion is slab-like at the instantaneous ion sound speed and requires as input target composition, laser intensity, laser spot area, and the efficiency of laser absorption into electron thermal energy.

  18. The disintegration and vaporization of plastic targets irradiated by high-power laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greig, J.R.; Pechacek, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    We have studied the disintegration of polyethylene and polystyrene targets irradiated by 100-J 40-nsec Nd/glass laser pulses. At power densities of approximately-less-than10 12 W/cm 2 relatively massive targets (6 x 10 -5 to 5 x 10 -4 cm 3 ) are totally disintegrated to produce finely divided target material and un-ionized vapor. Both the size of the target and the presence or absence of a laser prepulse strongly influence the proportions of finely divided target material and un-ionized vapor, especially within the first few microseconds after peak laser power. This disintegration is always preceded by the emission of a hot fully ionized plasma, but only 1% of the target material is contained in the hot plasma. Typically, (1--3) x 10 19 atoms of un-ionized vapor are released as a slowly expanding (vapprox.10 5 cm/sec) cold dense gas cloud (n/sub o/>10 19 cm -3 ) surrounding the initial target position. This cloud of target material has subsequently been heated by absorption of a 300-J 100-nsec CO 2 laser pulse to produce an approximately fully ionized plasma

  19. Experimental studies of the effect target geometry on the evolution of laser produced plasma plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Cuyler; Anderson, Austin; Iratcabal, Jeremy; Dutra, Eric; Covington, Aaron

    2016-10-01

    The expansion of the laser plumes was shown to be dependent on the initial target geometry. A 16 channel framing camera was used to record the plume shape and propagation speeds were determined from analysis of the images. Plastic targets were manufactured using different methods including 3D printing, CNC machining and vacuum casting. Preliminary target designs were made using a 3D printer and ABS plastic material. These targets were then tested using a 3 J laser with a 5 ns duration pulse. Targets with a deep conical depression were shown to produce highly collimated plumes when compared to flat top targets. Preliminary results of these experiments will be discussed along with planned future experiments that will use the indented targets with a 30 J laser with a 0.8 ns duration pulse in preparation for pinched laser plume experiments at the Nevada Terawatt Facility. Other polymers that are readily available in a deuterated form will also be explored as part of an effort to develop a cost effective plasma plume target for follow on neutron production experiments. Dr. Austin Anderson.

  20. Interaction of a laser breakdown plasma with a charged metallic target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasil' ev, B I; Grasyuk, A Z; Dyad' kin, A P; Sukhanov, A N [AN SSSR, Moscow. Fizicheskij Inst.

    1981-11-01

    An effect has been studied of the laser plasma on potential of an insulated conducting target made of aluminium. Targets of 2.4 and 6 cm diameter were used. Spot sizes on the target changed by means of a diaphragm. A change has been found in the charged target potential upon exposure to the high-power TEA CO/sub 2/ laser radiation. Dependences are presented of the jump in the target potential ..delta..U on the initial target potential, laser radiation energy density, geometrical size of the exposed region. It has been established that there is an optimal pressure of the ambient air under which ..delta..U reaches maximum. A dependence is presented of ..delta..U on the pressure upon target exposure in the air and in nitrogen. Temporal characteristics of the ..delta..U variation correlate with those of plasma glow in the visible and ultraviolet bands. A mechanism is suggested which explains the potential jump under the interaction between the laser plasma and the charged metallic target.

  1. Monoenergetic and GeV ion acceleration from the laser breakout afterburner using ultrathin targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Hegelich, B. M.; Bowers, K. J.; Flippo, K. A.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Fernandez, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    A new laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism using ultrathin targets has been identified from particle-in-cell simulations. After a brief period of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) [S. P. Hatchett et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2076 (2000)], two distinct stages follow: first, a period of enhanced TNSA during which the cold electron background converts entirely to hot electrons, and second, the ''laser breakout afterburner'' (BOA) when the laser penetrates to the rear of the target where a localized longitudinal electric field is generated with the location of the peak field co-moving with the ions. During this process, a relativistic electron beam is produced by the ponderomotive drive of the laser. This beam is unstable to a relativistic Buneman instability, which rapidly converts the electron energy into ion energy. This mechanism accelerates ions to much higher energies using laser intensities comparable to earlier TNSA experiments. At a laser intensity of 10 21 W/cm 2 , the carbon ions accelerate as a quasimonoenergetic bunch to 100 s of MeV in the early stages of the BOA with conversion efficiency of order a few percent. Both are an order of magnitude higher than those realized from TNSA in recent experiments [Hegelich et al., Nature 441, 439 (2006)]. The laser-plasma interaction then evolves to produce a quasithermal energy distribution with maximum energy of ∼2 GeV

  2. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER AND OTHER LASER APPLICATIONS: Changes in the emission properties of metal targets during pulse-periodic laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konov, Vitalii I.; Pimenov, S. M.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Chapliev, N. I.

    1988-02-01

    A scanning electron microscope was used with a pulse-periodic CO2 laser to discover the laws governing the correlation of the modified microrelief of metal surfaces, subjected to the action of multiple laser pulses, with the emission of charged particles and the luminescence of the irradiated zone. It was established that the influence of sorption and laser-induced desorption on the emission signals may be manifested differently depending on the regime of current generation in the "target-vacuum chamber" circuit.

  3. Isochoric heating of reduced mass targets by ultra-intense laser produced relativistic electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumayer, P; Lee, H J; Offerman, D; Shipton, E; Kemp, A; Kritcher, A L; Doppner, T; Back, C A; Glenzer, S H

    2009-02-04

    We present measurements of the chlorine K-alpha emission from reduced mass targets, irradiated with ultra-high intensity laser pulses. Chlorinated plastic targets with diameters down to 50 micrometers and mass of a few 10{sup -8} g were irradiated with up to 7 J of laser energy focused to intensities of several 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The conversion of laser energy to K-alpha radiation is measured, as well as high resolution spectra that allow observation of line shifts, indicating isochoric heating of the target up to 18 eV. A zero-dimensional 2-temperature equilibration model, combined with electron impact K-shell ionization and post processed spectra from collisional radiative calculations reproduces the observed K-alpha yields and line shifts, and shows the importance of target expansion due to the hot electron pressure.

  4. Directional enhancement of selected high-order-harmonics from intense laser irradiated blazed grating targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guobo; Chen, Min; Liu, Feng; Yuan, Xiaohui; Weng, Suming; Zheng, Jun; Ma, Yanyun; Shao, Fuqiu; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2017-10-02

    Relativistically intense laser solid target interaction has been proved to be a promising way to generate high-order harmonics, which can be used to diagnose ultrafast phenomena. However, their emission direction and spectra still lack tunability. Based upon two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we show that directional enhancement of selected high-order-harmonics can be realized using blazed grating targets. Such targets can select harmonics with frequencies being integer times of the grating frequency. Meanwhile, the radiation intensity and emission area of the harmonics are increased. The emission direction is controlled by tailoring the local blazed structure. Theoretical and electron dynamics analysis for harmonics generation, selection and directional enhancement from the interaction between multi-cycle laser and grating target are carried out. These studies will benefit the generation and application of laser plasma-based high order harmonics.

  5. High-energy, twelve-channel laser facility (DEFIN) for spherical irradiation of thermonuclear targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basov, N.G.; Danilov, A.E.; Krokhin, O.N.; Kruglov, B.V.; Mikhailov, Yu.A.; Sklizkov, G.V.; Fedotov, S.I.; Fedorov, A.N.

    This paper describes a high-energy, twelve-channel laser facility (DELFIN) intended for high-temperature heating of thermonuclear targets with spherical symmetry. The facility includes a neodymium-glass laser with the ultimate radiation energy of 10 kJ, a pulse length of approximately 10 -10 to 10 -9 s, beam divergence of 5 x 10 -4 radians, a vacuum chamber in which laser radiation interacts with the plasma, and a system of diagnostic instrumentation for the observation of laser beam and plasma parameters. Described are the optical scheme and construction details of the laser facility. Presented is an analysis of focusing schemes for target irradiation and described is the focusing scheme of the DELFIN facility, which is capable of attaining a high degree of spherical symmetry in irradiating targets with maximum beam intensity at the target surface of approximately 10 15 W/cm 2 . This paper examines the most important problems connected with the physical investigations of thermonuclear laser plasma and the basic diagnostic problems involved in their solution

  6. Laser gated viewing : An enabler for Automatic Target Recognition?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovenkamp, E.G.P.; Schutte, K.

    2010-01-01

    For many decades attempts to accomplish Automatic Target Recognition have been made using both visual and FLIR camera systems. A recurring problem in these approaches is the segmentation problem, which is the separation between the target and its background. This paper describes an approach to

  7. First use of a laser-driven polarized H/D target at the IUCF cooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, K.; Brack, J.; Cadman, R. V.; Cummings, W. J.; Fedchak, J.; Fox, B.; Gao, H.; Grosshauser, C.; Holt, R. J.; Jones, C.; Kinney, E.; Kowalczyk, R.; Lu, Z.-T.; Miller, M. A.; Nagengast, W.; Owen, B.; Rith, K.; Schmidt, F.; Schulte, E.; Sowinski, J.; Sperisen, F.; Stenger, J.; Thorsland, E.; Williamson, S.

    1997-01-01

    The HERMES Laser-Driven Target Task Force (Argonne, Erlangen and Illinois) is charged with developing a polarized H/D target for use in the HERA ring at DESY. Rapid progress was made in the beginning of 1996, leading us to the decision to test the target in a realistic experimental environment. In particular, polarizations of 0.6 and flows above 10 18 atoms·s -1 have been achieved on the bench. The laser-driven target and a simple detector system are currently installed in Cooler storage ring at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility in order to test its applicability to nuclear physics experiments. Target polarizations are being measured using the rvec H(p, p) and rvec D(p, p) reactions. Initial tests were reasonably successful and the target is well along toward becoming viable for nuclear physics

  8. Low-density hydrocarbon foams for laser fusion targets: Progress report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haendler, B.L.; Buckley, S.R.; Chen, C.

    1988-06-01

    This report describes progress made in the development of direct-drive hydrocarbon foam targets for laser inertial confinement fusion during 1987. The foam materials are polystyrene, resorcinol-formaldehyde, carbonized resorcinol-formaldehyde, and cellulose acetate. The processes for making the foams, their properties, characterization techniques, and the relationship of their properties to target specifications are presented. Progress in the creation and testing of prototype targets is also described

  9. X-ray imaging of targets irradiated by the Nike KrF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.; Obenschain, S.; Bodner, S.; Pawley, C.; Gerber, K.; Serlin, V.; Sethian, J.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Lehecka, T.; Holland, G.

    1997-01-01

    Foil targets irradiated by the Naval Research Laboratory Nike KrF laser were imaged in the x-ray region with two-dimensional spatial resolution in the 2 endash 10 μm range. The images revealed the smoothness of the emission from target and backlighter foils, the acceleration of the target foils, and the growth of Rayleigh endash Taylor instabilities that were seeded by patterns on the irradiated sides of CH foils

  10. Uniform laser ablative acceleration of targets at 1014 W/cm2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenschain, S.P.; Whitlock, R.R.; McLean, E.A.; Ripin, B.H.; Price, R.H.; Phillion, D.W.; Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1982-01-01

    We present the first detailed investigations of the ablative acceleration of planar targets while simultaneously using high irradiance (10 14 W/cm 2 ), large focal diameters (1 mm) and long laser pulse duration (3 nsec). Included are measurements of target preheat, ablation pressures and uniformity achieved under these conditions. Targets were accelerated to high velocities with velocity profile uniformity approaching that required for high gain pellet implosions

  11. Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging of Electron Heated Targets in Petawatt Laser Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, T.; MacPhee, A.; Key, M.; Akli, K.; Mackinnon, A.; Chen, C.; Barbee, T.; Freeman, R.; King, J.; Link, A.; Offermann, D.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Patel, P.; Stephens, R.; VanWoerkom, L.; Zhang, B.; Beg, F.

    2007-01-01

    The study of the transport of electrons, and the flow of energy into a solid target or dense plasma, is instrumental in the development of fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. An extreme ultraviolet (XUV) imaging diagnostic at 256 eV and 68 eV provides information about heating and energy deposition within petawatt laser-irradiated targets. XUV images of several irradiated solid targets are presented

  12. Laser-produced plasma EUV source using a colloidal microjet target containing tin dioxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Dojyo, Naoto; Sasaki, Wataru; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2006-10-01

    We realized a low-debris laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source by use of a colloidal microjet target, which contained low-concentration (6 wt%) tin-dioxide nanoparticles. An Nd:YAG laser was used to produce a plasma at the intensity on the order of 10^11 W/cm^2. The use of low concentration nanoparticles in a microjet target with a diameter of 50 μm regulated the neutral debris emission from a target, which was monitored by a silicon witness plate placed 30 cm apart from the source in a vacuum chamber. No XPS signals of tin and/or oxygen atoms were observed on the plate after ten thousand laser exposures. The low concentration nature of the target was compensated and the conversion efficiency (CE) was improved by introducing double pulses of two Nd:YAG lasers operated at 532 and 1064 nm as a result of controlling the micro-plasma characteristics. The EUV CE reached its maximum of 1.2% at the delay time of approximately 100 ns with the main laser intensiy of 2 x10^11 W/cm^2. The CE value was comparable to that of a tin bulk target, which, however, produced a significant amount of neutral debris.

  13. Fusion energy research with lasers, direct drive targets, and dry wall chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethian, J.D.; Obenschain, S.P.; Myers, M.

    2003-01-01

    We are carrying out a coordinated, focused effort to develop Laser Inertial Fusion Energy. The key components are developed in concert with one another and the science and engineering issues are addressed concurrently. Significant progress has been made in this program: We are evaluating target designs that show it could be possible to achieve the high gains (>100) needed for a practical fusion system. These have a low density CH foam that is wicked with solid DT, and over coated with a thin high-Z layer. Significant advances have been made with the two types of laser are being developed: Krypton Fluoride (KrF) gas lasers and Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPPSL). Both have the potential to meet the fusion energy requirements for rep-rate, efficiency, durability and cost. This paper also presents the advances in development of chamber operating windows (target survival plus no wall erosion), final optics (aluminum at grazing incidence has high reflectivity and exceeds required laser damage threshold), target fabrication (advanced foams and high Z overcoats), and target injection (new facility for target injection and tracking studies). (author)

  14. Reliability analysis of minimum energy on target for laser facilities with more beam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guangyu

    2008-01-01

    Shot reliability performance measures of laser facilities with more beam lines pertain to three categories: minimum-energy-on-target, power balance, and shot diagnostics. Accounting for symmetry of NIF beam line design and similarity of subset reliability in a same partition, a fault tree of meeting minimum-energy-on-target for the large laser facility shot of type K and a simplified method are presented, which are used to analyze hypothetic reliability of partition subsets in order to get trends of influences increasing number of beam lines and diverse shot types of large laser facilities on their shot reliability. Finally, it finds that improving component reliability is more crucial for laser facilities with more beam lines in comparison with those with beam lines and functional diversity from design flexibility is greatly helpful for improving shot reliability. (authors)

  15. Spatial distribution of carbon species in laser ablation of graphite target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikegami, T.; Ishibashi, S.; Yamagata, Y.; Ebihara, K.; Thareja, R.K.; Narayan, J.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of C 2 and C 3 molecules produced by KrF laser ablation of a graphite target using laser induced fluorescence imaging and optical emission spectroscopy. Spatial density profiles of C 2 were measured using two-dimensional fluorescence in various pressures of different ambient (vacuum, nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, helium, and argon) gases at various ablation laser fluences and ablation area. A large yield of C 2 is observed in the central part of the plume and near the target surface and its density and distribution was affected by the laser fluence and ambient gas. Fluorescent C 3 was studied in Ar gas and the yield of C 3 is enhanced at higher gas pressure and longer delay times after ablation

  16. Splitter target for controlling magnetic reconnection in relativistic laser plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y. J.; Bulanov, S. S.; Korn, G.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2018-04-01

    The utilization of a conical target irradiated by a high power laser is proposed to study fast magnetic reconnection in relativistic plasma interactions. Such target, placed in front of the near critical density gas jet, splits the laser pulse, forming two parallel laser pulses in the 2D case and a donut shaped pulse in the 3D case. The magnetic annihilation and reconnection occur in the density downramp region of the subsequent gas jet. The magnetic field energy is converted into the particle kinetic energy. As a result, a backward accelerated electron beam is obtained as a signature of reconnection. The above mechanisms are demonstrated using particle-in-cell simulations in both 2D and 3D cases. Facilitating the synchronization of two laser beams, the proposed approach can be used in designing the corresponding experiments on studying fundamental problems of relativistic plasma physics.

  17. Experimental study on ablative stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability of laser-irradiated targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemori, Keisuke; Sakaiya, Tatsuhiko; Otani, Kazuto; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nakai, Mitsuo; Azechi, Hiroshi; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Tamari, Yohei; Okuno, Kazuki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Nagatomo, Hideo; Murakami, Masakatsu; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2004-09-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities are key issues of the physics of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. Among the instabilities, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is the most important because it gives the largest growth factor in the ICF targets. Perturbations on the laser irradiated surface grow exponentially, but the growth rate is reduced by ablation flow. The growth rate γ is written as Takabe-Betti formula: γ = [kg/(1+kL)]1/2-βkm/pa, where k is wave number of the perturbation, g is acceleration, L is density scale-length, β is a coefficient, m is mass ablation rate per unit surface, and ρa is density at the ablation front. We experimentally measured all the parameters in the formula for polystyrene (CH) targets. Experiments were done on the HIPER laser facility at Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. We found that the β value in the formula is ~ 1.7, which is in good agreements with the theoretical prediction, whereas the β for certain perturbation wavelengths are larger than the prediction. This disagreement between the experiment and the theory is mainly due to the deformation of the cutoff surface, which is created by non-uniform ablation flow from the ablation surface. We also found that high-Z doped plastic targets have multiablation structure, which can reduce the RT growth rate. When a low-Z target with high-Z dopant is irradiated by laser, radiation due to the high-Z dopant creates secondary ablation front deep inside the target. Since, the secondary ablation front is ablated by x-rays, the mass ablation rate is larger than the laser-irradiated ablation surface, that is, further reduction of the RT growth is expected. We measured the RT growth rate of Br-doped polystyrene targets. The experimental results indicate that of the CHBr targets show significantly small growth rate, which is very good news for the design of the ICF targets.

  18. A model for the acceleration of laser irradiated targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babonneau, D.; Di Bona, G.; Fortin, X.

    1986-11-01

    Starting from the self-similar propagation of an electronic conduction wave and the consequent ablation pressure, we describe, in a simplified way, the shock ahead of this wave, then the effects of the rarefaction and compression waves which follow the shock emergence at the target rear surface. So, we obtain the temporal evolution of the rear velocity which is compared with the experimental one. For thick targets, the shock alone is able to emerge during the experimental time and consequently gives the velocity vsub(min). For thin targets, besides the shock accumulation mechanism, it is necessary to take into account the electronic heat wave emergence that is to say the ''complete'' ablation of the target which gives the velocity vsub(max)

  19. Target Surface Area Effects on Hot Electron Dynamics from High Intensity Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-19

    Science, University ofMichigan, AnnArbor,MI 48109-2099, USA E-mail: czulick@umich.edu Keywords: laser- plasma ,mass-limited, fast electrons , sheath...New J. Phys. 18 (2016) 063020 doi:10.1088/1367-2630/18/6/063020 PAPER Target surface area effects on hot electron dynamics from high intensity laser... plasma interactions CZulick, ARaymond,AMcKelvey, VChvykov, AMaksimchuk, AGRThomas, LWillingale, VYanovsky andKKrushelnick Center forUltrafast Optical

  20. Successful treatment of laser induced hypopigmentation with narrowband ultraviolet B targeted phototherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkataram Mysore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Q-switched 1064 nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Qs 1064 nm Nd: YAG laser plays an important role in the treatment of pigmentary skin disorders, including tattoos. Although it has high efficacy and safety, adverse effect like hypopigmentation may occur causing anxiety to patients. We present a case report of Qs 1064 nm Nd: YAG laser induced hypopigmentation which was successfully treated with ultraviolet B targeted phototherapy, with rapid and satisfactory re-pigmentation.

  1. Electron emission from laser irradiating target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, Mariapompea

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 171, 9-10 (2016), s. 754-765 ISSN 1042-0150. [12th Workshop on European Collaboration for Higher Education and Research in Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Protection. Bologna, Catania, Milan, 30.05.2016-01.06.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : electron emission from plasma * TNSA * TOF * SiC * plastic scintillator * Thomson parabola spectrometer Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.443, year: 2016

  2. Ultra-High-Contrast Laser Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons in Solid Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higginson, Drew Pitney [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The cone-guided fast ignition approach to Inertial Con nement Fusion requires laser-accelerated relativistic electrons to deposit kilojoules of energy within an imploded fuel core to initiate fusion burn. One obstacle to coupling electron energy into the core is the ablation of material, known as preplasma, by laser energy proceeding nanoseconds prior to the main pulse. This causes the laser-absorption surface to be pushed back hundreds of microns from the initial target surface; thus increasing the distance that electrons must travel to reach the imploded core. Previous experiments have shown an order of magnitude decrease in coupling into surrogate targets when intentionally increasing the amount of preplasma. Additionally, for electrons to deposit energy within the core, they should have kinetic energies on the order of a few MeV, as less energetic electrons will be stopped prior to the core and more energetic electrons will pass through the core without depositing much energy. Thus a quantitative understanding of the electron energy spectrum and how it responds to varied laser parameters is paramount for fast ignition. For the rst time, this dissertation quantitatively investigates the acceleration of electrons using an ultra-high-contrast laser. Ultra-high-contrast lasers reduce the laser energy that reaches the target prior to the main pulse; drastically reducing the amount of preplasma. Experiments were performed in a cone-wire geometry relevant to fast ignition. These experiments irradiated the inner-tip of a Au cone with the laser and observed electrons that passed through a Cu wire attached to the outer-tip of the cone. The total emission of K x-rays is used as a diagnostic to infer the electron energy coupled into the wire. Imaging the x-ray emission allowed an e ective path-length of electrons within the wire to be determined, which constrained the electron energy spectrum. Experiments were carried out on the ultra-high-contrast Trident laser at Los

  3. On stimulated scattering of laser light in inertial fusion energy targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolic, Lj; Skoric, M.M.; Ishiguro, S.; Sato, T.

    2002-11-01

    Propagation of a laser light through regions of an underdense plasma is an active research topic in laser fusion. In particular, a large effort has been invested in studies of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) which can reflect laser energy and produce energetic particles to preheat a fusion energy target. Experiments, theory and simulations agree on a complex interplay between various laser-plasma instabilities. By particle-in-cell simulations of an underdense electron-plasma, we have found, apart from the standard SRS, a strong backscattering near the electron plasma frequency at densities beyond the quarter critical. This novel instability, recognized in recent experiments as stimulated laser scattering on a trapped electron-acoustic mode (SEAS), is absent from a classical theory of laser-parametric instabilities. A parametric excitation of SEAS instability, is explained by a three-wave resonant decay of the incident laser light into a standing backscattered wave and a slow trapped electron acoustic wave (ω p ). Large SEAS pulsations, eventually suppressed by relativistic heating of electrons, are observed in our simulations. This phenomenon seems relevant to future hohlraum target and fast ignition experiments. (author)

  4. Laser damage study of material of the first wall of target chamber of the future laser Megajoule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubern, Christelle

    1999-01-01

    Study on damage of carbon-like, boron carbide, and stainless steel materials by ultraviolet laser light, has been carried out at CEA/CESTA in France. This work was performed to help designing and dimensioning the target chamber of the future Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) facility to be used for Inertial Confinement Fusion research. The study revealed that depending the laser fluence, the considered materials were ablated in different manners. lt was demonstrated that at low fluence, damage of carbon-like and boron carbide occurs through a thermal-mechanical mechanism resulting in sputtering of material. At higher fluence, damage was driven by a thermal mechanism, dissipating heat inside material until phase change developed. For stainless steel material, failures were the result of heat absorption associated to physical changes only. To explain and validate the proposed mechanisms, theoretical and experimental works were performed and satisfactory results came out. (author) [fr

  5. Characterization of a plasma produced using a high power laser with a gas puff target for x-ray laser experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Gac, K.; Parys, P.; Szczurek, M.; Tyl, J.

    1995-01-01

    A high temperature, high density plasma can be produced by using a nanosecond, high-power laser with a gas puff target. The gas puff target is formed by puffing a small amount of gas from a high-pressure reservoir through a nozzle into a vacuum chamber. In this paper we present the gas puff target specially designed for x-ray laser experiments. The solenoid valve with the nozzle in the form of a slit 0.3-mm wide and up to 40-mm long, allows to form an elongated gas puff suitable for the creation of an x-ray laser active medium by its perpendicular irradiation with the use of a laser beam focused to a line. Preliminary results of the experiments on the laser irradiation of the gas puff targets, produced by the new valve, show that hot plasma suitable for x-ray lasers is created

  6. Laser coupling to reduced-scale targets at Nif Early Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinkel, D.E.; Schneider, M.B.; Young, B.K.; Holder, J.P.; Langdon, A.B.; Bonanno, G.; Bower, D.E.; Bruns, H.C.; Campbell, K.M.; Celeste, J.R.; Compton, S.; Costa, R.L.; Dewald, E.L.; Dixit, S.N.; Eckart, M.J.; Eder, D.C.; Edwards, M.J.; Ellis, A.D.; Emig, J.A.; Froula, D.H.; Glenzer, S.H.; Hargrove, D.; Haynam, C.A.; Heeter, R.F.; Henesian, M.A.; Holtmeier, G.; James, D.L.; Jancaitis, K.S.; Kalantar, K.H.; Kamperschroer, J.H.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kimbrough, J.; Kirkwood, R.K.; Koniges, A.E.; Landen, O.L.; Landon, M.; Lee, F.D.; MacGowan, B.J.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Manes, K.R.; Marshall, C.; May, M.J.; McDonald, J.W.; Menapace, J.; Moses, S.E.I.; Munro, D.H.; Murray, J.R.; Niemann, C.; Power, G.D.; Rekow, V.; Ruppe, J.A.; Schein, J.; Shepherd, R.; Singh, M.S.; Springer, P.T.; Still, C.H.; Suter, L.J.; Tietbohl, G.L.; Turner, R.E.; VanWonterghem, B.M.; Wallace, R.J.; Warrick, A.; Weber, F.; Wegner, P.J.; Williams, E.A.; Young, P.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Baldis, H.A. [California at Davis Univ., CA (United States); Pellinen, D.; Watts, P. [Bechtel Nevada Corporation, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Deposition of maximum laser energy into a small, high-Z enclosure in a short laser pulse creates a hot environment. Such targets were recently included in an experimental campaign using the first four of the 192 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These targets demonstrate good laser coupling, reaching a radiation temperature of 340 eV. In addition, the Raman backscatter spectrum contains features consistent with Brillouin backscatter of Raman forward scatter. Also, NIF Early Light diagnostics indicate that 20% of the direct backscatter from these reduced-scale targets is in the polarization orthogonal to that of the incident light. (authors)

  7. Laser coupling to reduced-scale targets at NIF Early Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkel, D E; Schneider, M B; Young, B K; Holder, J P; Langdon, A B; Baldis, H A; Bonanno, G; Bower, D E; Bruns, H C; Campbell, K M; Celeste, J R; Compton, S; Costa, R L; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Eckart, M J; Eder, D C; Edwards, M J; Ellis, A D; Emig, J A; Froula, D H; Glenzer, S H; Hargrove, D; Haynam, C A; Heeter, R F; Henesian, M A; Holtmeier, G; James, D L; Jancaitis, K S; Kalantar, D H; Kamperschroer, J H; Kauffman, R L; Kimbrough, J; Kirkwood, R K; Koniges, A E; Landen, O L; Landon, M; Lee, F D; MacGowan, B J; Mackinnon, A J; Manes, K R; Marshall, C; May, M J; McDonald, J W; Menapace, J; Moses, S I; Munro, D H; Murray, J R; Niemann, C; Pellinen, D; Power, G D; Rekow, V; Ruppe, J A; Schein, J; Shepherd, R; Singh, M S; Springer, P; Still, C H; Suter, L J; Tietbohl, G L; Turner, R E; VanWonterghem, B M; Wallace, R J; Warrick, A; Watts, P; Weber, F; Wegner, P J; Williams, E A; Young, P E

    2005-01-01

    Deposition of maximum laser energy into a small, high-Z enclosure in a short laser pulse creates a hot environment. Such targets were recently included in an experimental campaign using the first four of the 192 beams of the National Ignition Facility [J. A. Paisner, E. M. Campbell, and W. J. Hogan, Fusion Technology 26 26, 755 (1994)], under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These targets demonstrate good laser coupling, reaching a radiation temperature of 340 eV. In addition, the Raman backscatter spectrum contains features consistent with Brillouin backscatter of Raman forward scatter [A. B. Langdon and D. E. Hinkel, Physical Review Letters 89, 015003 (2002)]. Also, NIF Early Light diagnostics indicate that 20% of the direct backscatter from these reduced-scale targets is in the polarization orthogonal to that of the incident light

  8. Enhanced proton acceleration by intense laser interaction with an inverse cone target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Aimidula, Aimierding; Xiaerding, Fuerkaiti; Rashidin, Reyima

    2016-01-01

    The generation and control of high-quality proton bunches using focused intense laser pulse on an inverse cone target is investigated with a set of particle-in-cell simulations. The inverse cone is a high atomic number conical frustum with a thin solid top and open base, where the laser impinges onto the top surface directly, not down the open end of the cone. Results are compared with a simple planar target, where the proton angular distribution is very broad because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields behind the target. For a conical target, hot electrons along the cone wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field. This field can effectively suppress the spatial spreading of the protons, resulting in a high-quality small-emittance, low-divergence proton beam. A slightly lower proton beam peak energy than that of a conventional planar target was also found.

  9. Compression and heating of a cladding target by a partially profiled laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, A.A.; Samsonov, A.G.; Solov'ev, N.A.

    1990-01-01

    The CLADDING-T semiempirical model and numerical calculations in accordance with the SPHERE program have been employed to show that the action of a partially profiled pulse on a simple cladding target raises the fuel compession degree and reduces the fuel temperature as compared to the action of a rectangular pulse (or a polynomial-shaped pulse) with the same energy. From the standpoint of the flash criterion the system composed of the profiled pulse and the simple (cladding) target is shown to be equivalent to that composed of a simple pulse and a dual-cascade (profiled) target. An analysis of the system composed of the laser and the simple target shows that the use of the partially profiled pulse and the simple target makes it possible to reduce requirements to the energy of laser systems

  10. Enhanced proton acceleration by intense laser interaction with an inverse cone target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Aimidula, Aimierding, E-mail: amir@mail.bnu.edu.cn; Xiaerding, Fuerkaiti; Rashidin, Reyima [School of Physics Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046 (China)

    2016-08-15

    The generation and control of high-quality proton bunches using focused intense laser pulse on an inverse cone target is investigated with a set of particle-in-cell simulations. The inverse cone is a high atomic number conical frustum with a thin solid top and open base, where the laser impinges onto the top surface directly, not down the open end of the cone. Results are compared with a simple planar target, where the proton angular distribution is very broad because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields behind the target. For a conical target, hot electrons along the cone wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field. This field can effectively suppress the spatial spreading of the protons, resulting in a high-quality small-emittance, low-divergence proton beam. A slightly lower proton beam peak energy than that of a conventional planar target was also found.

  11. Physics of laser fusion. Volume II. Diagnostics of experiments on laser fusion targets at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLNL. There are two other volumes in this series: Vol. I, by C.E. Max, presents the theoretical laser-plasma interaction physics; Vol. III, by J.F. Holzrichter et al., presents the theory and design of high-power pulsed lasers. A fourth volume will present the theoretical implosion physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first, an introductory section, provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLNL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLNL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

  12. Physics of laser fusion. Volume II. Diagnostics of experiments on laser fusion targets at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLNL. There are two other volumes in this series: Vol. I, by C.E. Max, presents the theoretical laser-plasma interaction physics; Vol. III, by J.F. Holzrichter et al., presents the theory and design of high-power pulsed lasers. A fourth volume will present the theoretical implosion physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first, an introductory section, provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLNL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLNL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future

  13. Laser-driven shock-wave propagation in pure and layered targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzmann, D.; Eliezer, S.; Krumbein, A.D.; Gitter, L.

    1983-01-01

    The propagation properties of laser-driven shock waves in pure and layered polyethylene and aluminum slab targets are studied for a set of laser intensities and pulse widths. The laser-plasma simulations were carried out by means of our one-dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamic code. It is shown that the various parts of a laser-driven compression wave undergo different thermodynamic trajectories: The shock front portion is on the Hugoniot curve whereas the rear part is closer to an adiabat. It is found that the shock front is accelerated into the cold material till troughly-equal0.8tau (where tau is the laser pulse width) and only later is a constant velocity propagation attained. The scaling laws obtained for the pressure and temperature of the compression wave in pure targets are in good agreement with those published in other works. In layered targets, high compression and pressure were found to occur at the interface of CH 2 on Al targets due to impedance mismatch but were not found when the layers were reversed. The persistence time of the high pressure on the interface in the CH 2 on Al case is long enough relative to the characteristic times of the plasma to have an appreciable influence on the shock-wave propagation into the aluminum layer. This high pressure and compression on the interface can be optimized by adjusting the CH 2 layer thickness

  14. Study of laser-driven shock wave propagation in Plexiglas targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhareshwar, L.J.; Naik, P.A.; Pant, H.C.; Kaushik, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study of laser-driven shock wave propagation in a transparent material such as Plexiglas using a high-speed optical shadowgraphy technique is presented in this paper. A Nd: glass laser was used to produce laser intensity in the range 10 12 -10 14 W/cm 2 on the target. Optical shadowgrams of the propagating shock front were recorded with a second-harmonic (0.53-μm) optical probe beam. Shock pressures were measured at various laser intensities, and the scaling was found to agree with the theoretically predicted value. Shock pressure values have also been obtained from a one-dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamic simulation, and they match well with experimental results. Shadowgrams of shock fronts produced by nonuniform spatial laser beam irradiation profiles have shown complete smoothing when targets with a thin coating of a material of high atomic number such as gold were used. Shock pressures in such coated targets are also found to be considerably higher compared with those in uncoated targets. (Author)

  15. Method for selecting hollow microspheres for use in laser fusion targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnum, Eugene H.; Fries, R. Jay; Havenhill, Jerry W.; Smith, Maurice Lee; Stoltz, Daniel L.

    1976-01-01

    Hollow microspheres having thin and very uniform wall thickness are useful as containers for the deuterium and tritium gas mixture used as a fuel in laser fusion targets. Hollow microspheres are commercially available; however, in commercial lots only a very small number meet the rigid requirements for use in laser fusion targets. Those meeting these requirements may be separated from the unsuitable ones by subjecting the commercial lot to size and density separations and then by subjecting those hollow microspheres thus separated to an external pressurization at which those which are aspherical or which have nonuniform walls are broken and separating the sound hollow microspheres from the broken ones.

  16. Time-resolved x-ray spectra of laser irradiated high-Z targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.H.Y.; Attwood, D.T.; Boyle, M.J.; Campbell, E.M.; Coleman, L.C.; Kornblum, H.N.

    1977-01-01

    Recent results obtained by using the Livermore 15 psec x-ray streak camera to record x-ray emission from laser-irradiated high-z targets in the 1-20 keV range are reported. Nine to eleven K-edge filter channels were used for the measurements. In the lower energy channels, a dynamic range of x-ray emission intensity of better than three orders of magnitude have been recorded. Data will be presented which describe temporally and spectrally resolved x-ray spectra of gold disk targets irradiated by laser pulses from the Argus facility, including the temporal evolution of the superthermal x-ray tail

  17. New method for laser driven ion acceleration with isolated, mass-limited targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paasch-Colberg, T.; Sokollik, T.; Gorling, K.; Eichmann, U.; Steinke, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Nickles, P.V.; Andreev, A.; Sandner, W.

    2011-01-01

    A new technique to investigate laser driven ion acceleration with fully isolated, mass-limited glass spheres with a diameter down to 8μm is presented. A Paul trap was used to prepare a levitating glass sphere for the interaction with a laser pulse of relativistic intensity. Narrow-bandwidth energy spectra of protons and oxygen ions have been observed and were attributed to specific acceleration field dynamics in case of the spherical target geometry. A general limiting mechanism has been found that explains the experimentally observed ion energies for the mass-limited target.

  18. Lateral propagation of fast electrons at the laser-irradiated target surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y T; Lin, X X; Liu, B C; Du, F; Wang, S J; Li, C; Zhou, M L; Zhang, L; Liu, X; Wang, J; Liu, X L; Chen, L M; Wang, Z H; Ma, J L; Wei, Z Y; Zhang, J; Liu, F; Liu, F

    2010-01-01

    Lateral propagation of fast electrons at the target surfaces irradiated by femtosecond intense laser pulses is measured by k α x-ray imaging technique when a preplasma is presented. An annular halo surrounding a bright spot is observed in the x-ray images when the scale length of the electron density is large. For an incidence angle of 70 0 the x-ray images show a non-symmetrical distribution peaked to the laser propagation direction. The x-ray photons in the halo are mainly excited by the fast electrons that flow in the preplasma when their paths intersect the high density regions near the target surface.

  19. Basic features of electromagnetic pulse generated in a laser-target chamber at 3-TW laser facility PALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Marco, M; Pfeifer, M; Krousky, E; Krasa, J; Cikhardt, J; Klir, D; Nassisi, V

    2014-01-01

    We describe the radiofrequency emission taking place when 300 ps laser pulses irradiate various solid targets with an intensity of 10 16 W/cm 2 . The emission of intense electromagnetic pulses was observed outside the laser target chamber by two loop antennas up to 1 GHz. Electromagnetic pulses can be 800 MHz transients, which decay from a peak electromagnetic field of E 0 ≊ 7 kV/m and H 0 ≊ 15 A/m. The occurrence of these electromagnetic pulses is associated with generation of hard x-rays with photon energies extending beyond 1 MeV. This contribution reports the first observation of this effect at the PALS facility.

  20. Thermonuclear targets for direct-drive ignition by a megajoule laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bel’kov, S. A.; Bondarenko, S. V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, All-Russia Research Institute of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Vergunova, G. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Garanin, S. G. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, All-Russia Research Institute of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Gus’kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru; Demchenko, N. N.; Doskoch, I. Ya.; Kuchugov, P. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Zmitrenko, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Rozanov, V. B.; Stepanov, R. V.; Yakhin, R. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    Central ignition of a thin two-layer-shell fusion target that is directly driven by a 2-MJ profiled pulse of Nd laser second-harmonic radiation has been studied. The parameters of the target were selected so as to provide effective acceleration of the shell toward the center, which was sufficient for the onset of ignition under conditions of increased hydrodynamic stability of the ablator acceleration and compression. The aspect ratio of the inner deuterium-tritium layer of the shell does not exceed 15, provided that a major part (above 75%) of the outer layer (plastic ablator) is evaporated by the instant of maximum compression. The investigation is based on two series of numerical calculations that were performed using one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic codes. The first 1D code was used to calculate the absorption of the profiled laser-radiation pulse (including calculation of the total absorption coefficient with allowance for the inverse bremsstrahlung and resonance mechanisms) and the spatial distribution of target heating for a real geometry of irradiation using 192 laser beams in a scheme of focusing with a cubo-octahedral symmetry. The second 1D code was used for simulating the total cycle of target evolution under the action of absorbed laser radiation and for determining the thermonuclear gain that was achieved with a given target.

  1. Effect of advanced nanowire-based targets in nanosecond laser-matter interaction (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzalone, G., E-mail: Gaetano.Lanzalone@ct.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Enna “Kore,” Via delle Olimpiadi, 94100 Enna (Italy); Altana, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Mascali, D.; Tudisco, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Muoio, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Malferrari, L.; Odorici, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Malandrino, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche and INSTM UdR, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the effects of innovative nanostructured targets based on Ag nanowires on laser energy absorption in the ns time domain has been carried out at the Laser Energy for Nuclear Science laboratory of INFN-LNS in Catania. The tested targets were realized at INFN-Bologna by anodizing aluminium sheets in order to obtain layers of porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} of different thicknesses, on which nanowires of various metals are grown by electro-deposition with different heights. Targets were then irradiated by using a Nd:YAG laser at different pumping energies. Advanced diagnostic tools were used for characterizing the plasma plume and ion production. As compared with targets of pure Al, a huge enhancement (of almost two order of magnitude) of the X-ray flux emitted by the plasma has been observed when using the nanostructured targets, with a corresponding decrease of the “optical range” signal, pointing out that the energetic content of the laser produced plasma was remarkably increased. This analysis was furthermore confirmed from time-of-flight spectra.

  2. Effect of advanced nanowire-based targets in nanosecond laser-matter interaction (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzalone, G.; Altana, C.; Mascali, D.; Muoio, A.; Malferrari, L.; Odorici, F.; Malandrino, G.; Tudisco, S.

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the effects of innovative nanostructured targets based on Ag nanowires on laser energy absorption in the ns time domain has been carried out at the Laser Energy for Nuclear Science laboratory of INFN-LNS in Catania. The tested targets were realized at INFN-Bologna by anodizing aluminium sheets in order to obtain layers of porous Al2O3 of different thicknesses, on which nanowires of various metals are grown by electro-deposition with different heights. Targets were then irradiated by using a Nd:YAG laser at different pumping energies. Advanced diagnostic tools were used for characterizing the plasma plume and ion production. As compared with targets of pure Al, a huge enhancement (of almost two order of magnitude) of the X-ray flux emitted by the plasma has been observed when using the nanostructured targets, with a corresponding decrease of the "optical range" signal, pointing out that the energetic content of the laser produced plasma was remarkably increased. This analysis was furthermore confirmed from time-of-flight spectra.

  3. Temperature distribution in target tumor tissue and photothermal tissue destruction during laser immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Austin; Hasanjee, Aamr; Pettitt, Alex; Silk, Kegan; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.; Zhou, Feifan

    2016-03-01

    Laser Immunotherapy is a novel cancer treatment modality that has seen much success in treating many different types of cancer, both in animal studies and in clinical trials. The treatment consists of the synergistic interaction between photothermal laser irradiation and the local injection of an immunoadjuvant. As a result of the therapy, the host immune system launches a systemic antitumor response. The photothermal effect induced by the laser irradiation has multiple effects at different temperature elevations which are all required for optimal response. Therefore, determining the temperature distribution in the target tumor during the laser irradiation in laser immunotherapy is crucial to facilitate the treatment of cancers. To investigate the temperature distribution in the target tumor, female Wistar Furth rats were injected with metastatic mammary tumor cells and, upon sufficient tumor growth, underwent laser irradiation and were monitored using thermocouples connected to locally-inserted needle probes and infrared thermography. From the study, we determined that the maximum central tumor temperature was higher for tumors of less volume. Additionally, we determined that the temperature near the edge of the tumor as measured with a thermocouple had a strong correlation with the maximum temperature value in the infrared camera measurement.

  4. Uniform irradiation of adjustable target spots in high-power laser driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xiujuan; Li Jinghui; Li Huagang; Li Yang; Lin Zunqi

    2011-01-01

    For smoothing and shaping the on-target laser patterns flexibly in high-power laser drivers, a scheme has been developed that includes a zoom lens array and two-dimensional smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). The size of the target pattern can be controlled handily by adjusting the focal length of the zoom lens array, while the profile of the pattern can be shaped by fine tuning the distance between the target and the focal plane of the principal focusing lens. High-frequency stripes inside the pattern caused by beamlet interference are wiped off by spectral dispersion. Detailed simulations indicate that SSD works somewhat differently for spots of different sizes. For small spots, SSD mainly smooths the intensity modulation of low-to-middle spatial frequency, while for large spots, SSD sweeps the fine speckle structure to reduce nonuniformity of middle-to-high frequency. Spatial spectra of the target patterns are given and their uniformity is evaluated.

  5. Characterization of the fast electrons distribution produced in a high intensity laser target interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westover, B. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Chen, C. D.; Patel, P. K.; McLean, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Beg, F. N., E-mail: fbeg@ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on the Titan laser (∼150 J, 0.7 ps, 2 × 10{sup 20} W cm{sup −2}) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were carried out in order to study the properties of fast electrons produced by high-intensity, short pulse laser interacting with matter under conditions relevant to Fast Ignition. Bremsstrahlung x-rays produced by these fast electrons were measured by a set of compact filter-stack based x-ray detectors placed at three angles with respect to the target. The measured bremsstrahlung signal allows a characterization of the fast electron beam spectrum, conversion efficiency of laser energy into fast electron kinetic energy and angular distribution. A Monte Carlo code Integrated Tiger Series was used to model the bremsstrahlung signal and infer a laser to fast electron conversion efficiency of 30%, an electron slope temperature of about 2.2 MeV, and a mean divergence angle of 39°. Simulations were also performed with the hybrid transport code ZUMA which includes fields in the target. In this case, a conversion efficiency of laser energy to fast electron energy of 34% and a slope temperature between 1.5 MeV and 4 MeV depending on the angle between the target normal direction and the measuring spectrometer are found. The observed temperature of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, and therefore the inferred electron spectrum are found to be angle dependent.

  6. Design of an ignition target for the laser megajoule, mitigating parametric instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laffite, S.; Loiseau, P.

    2010-01-01

    Laser plasma interaction (LPI) is a critical issue in ignition target design. Based on both scaling laws and two-dimensional calculations, this article describes how we can constrain a laser megajoule (LMJ) [J. Ebrardt and J. M. Chaput, J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112, 032005 (2008)] target design by mitigating LPI. An ignition indirect drive target has been designed for the 2/3 LMJ step. It requires 0.9 MJ and 260 TW of laser energy and power, to achieve a temperature of 300 eV in a rugby-shaped Hohlraum and give a yield of about 20 MJ. The study focuses on the analysis of linear gain for stimulated Raman and Brillouin scatterings. Enlarging the focal spot is an obvious way to reduce linear gains. We show that this reduction is nonlinear with the focal spot size. For relatively small focal spot area, linear gains are significantly reduced by enlarging the focal spot. However, there is no benefit in too large focal spots because of necessary larger laser entrance holes, which require more laser energy. Furthermore, this leads to the existence, for a given design, of a minimum value for linear gains for which we cannot go below.

  7. Design of an ignition target for the laser megajoule, mitigating parametric instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffite, S.; Loiseau, P.

    2010-10-01

    Laser plasma interaction (LPI) is a critical issue in ignition target design. Based on both scaling laws and two-dimensional calculations, this article describes how we can constrain a laser megajoule (LMJ) [J. Ebrardt and J. M. Chaput, J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112, 032005 (2008)] target design by mitigating LPI. An ignition indirect drive target has been designed for the 2/3 LMJ step. It requires 0.9 MJ and 260 TW of laser energy and power, to achieve a temperature of 300 eV in a rugby-shaped Hohlraum and give a yield of about 20 MJ. The study focuses on the analysis of linear gain for stimulated Raman and Brillouin scatterings. Enlarging the focal spot is an obvious way to reduce linear gains. We show that this reduction is nonlinear with the focal spot size. For relatively small focal spot area, linear gains are significantly reduced by enlarging the focal spot. However, there is no benefit in too large focal spots because of necessary larger laser entrance holes, which require more laser energy. Furthermore, this leads to the existence, for a given design, of a minimum value for linear gains for which we cannot go below.

  8. Pulsed-laser-deposited YBCO thin films using modified MTG processed targets

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, C H; Kim, I T; Hahn, T S

    1999-01-01

    YBCO thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition from targets fabricated using the modified melt-textured growth (MTG) method and the solid-state sintering (SSS) method. All of the films showed c-axis orientations, but the films from the MTG targets had better crystallinity than those from the SSS targets. As the substrate temperature was increased, T sub c and J sub c of the films increased. The films from the MTG targets showed better superconducting properties than those from the SSS targets. From the composition analysis of the targets, the Y-richer vapor species arriving at the substrate from the MTG targets are thought to form a thermodynamically more stable YBCO phase with less cation disorder.

  9. Reduction of deposition asymmetries in directly driven ion-beam and laser targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have developed a procedure for reducing energy-dependent asymmetry in spherical targets driven directly by ion or laser beams. This work is part of a strategy for achieving illumination symmetry in such targets, which they propose as an alternative to those in the literature. This strategy allows an axially symmetric placement of beamlets, which would be convenient for some driver or reactor scenarios. It also allows the use of beam currents or energy fluxes to help reduce deposition asymmetry

  10. Low-density hydrocarbon foams for laser fusion targets: Progress report, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.; Cook, R.C.; Haendler, B.L.; Hair, L.M.; Kong, F.M.; Letts, S.A.

    1987-06-01

    We describe progress made during 1986 in the development of direct-drive hydrocarbon foam targets for laser fusion. The foam materials are polystyrene and resorcinolformaldehyde. The processes for making the foams, their properties, characterization techniques, and the relationships of their properties to target specifications are presented. In the final section, we discuss statistical experimental design techniques that are being used to optimize the foams. 12 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Conceptual design considerations and neutronics of lithium fall laser fusion target chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.; Thomson, W.B.

    1978-01-01

    Atomics International and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are involved in the conceptual design of a laser fusion power plant incorporating the lithium fall target chamber. In this paper we discuss some of the more important design considerations for the target chamber and evaluate its nuclear performance. Sizing and configuration of the fall, hydraulic effects, and mechanical design considerations are addressed. The nuclear aspects examined include tritium breeding, energy deposition, and radiation damage

  12. Conceptual design considerations and neutronics of lithium fall laser target chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.; Thomson, W.B.

    1978-01-01

    Atomics International and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are involved in the conceptual design of a laser fusion power plant incorporating the lithium fall target chamber. In this paper we discuss some of the more important design considerations for the target chamber and evaluate its nuclear performance. Sizing and configuration of the fall, hydraulic effects, and mechanical design considerations are addressed. The nuclear aspects examined include tritium breeding, energy deposition, and radiation damage

  13. Observation of the charge neutrality of the ions from target short-pulse laser interaction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuike, Kazuhito

    2003-01-01

    Intended to simulate the early stage of the plasma (preformed plasma) formation in the higher (10 20 W cm -2 ) intensity experiments (in which the plasma density profile rules laser absorption thus conversion efficiency from laser into hot electrons, ions and x-rays) experiments using solid target were done under a peak intensity (main laser pulse) of up to ∼10 15 W cm -2 and pre-pulse and pedestal intensity of ∼10 3 times lower than main pulse. With pedestal, significant enhancement of laser absorption was observed with pedestal condition. Charge neutralization of the ions from the plasma was measured by biased charge collectors. Earlier part of the ion were almost un-neutralized in with or without pedestal condition, and the later part of the ions (≤ few keV) were partially neutralized (≥40%). These not-perfect charge neutralization results is different from the longer nano-seconds pulse experimental results. (author)

  14. Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Solid Targets at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Taiee [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-25

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We found that these laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source’s (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Additionally, radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 1018 to 7.1x1019 W/cm2 are presented.

  15. High-speed photographic methods for compression dynamics investigation of laser irradiated shell target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basov, N.G.; Kologrivov, A.A.; Krokhin, O.N.; Rupasov, A.A.; Shikanov, A.S.

    1979-01-01

    Three methods are described for a high-speed diagnostics of compression dynamics of shell targets being spherically laser-heated on the installation ''Kal'mar''. The first method is based on the direct investigation of the space-time evolution of the critical-density region for Nd-laser emission (N sub(e) asymptotically equals 10 21 I/cm 3 ) by means of the streak photography of plasma image in the second-harmonic light. The second method involves investigation of time evolution of the second-harmonic spectral distribution by means of a spectrograph coupled with a streak camera. The use of a special laser pulse with two time-distributed intensity maxima for the irradiation of shell targets, and the analysis of the obtained X-ray pin-hole pictures constitute the basis of the third method. (author)

  16. Time resolved x-ray pinhole photography of compressed laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attwood, D.T.

    1976-01-01

    Use of the Livermore x-ray streak camera to temporally record x-ray pinhole images of laser compressed targets is described. Use is made of specially fabricated composite x-ray pinholes which are near diffraction limited for 6 A x-rays, but easily aligned with a He--Ne laser of 6328 A wavelength. With a 6 μm x-ray pinhole, the overall system can be aligned to 5 μm accuracy and provides implosion characteristics with space--time resolutions of approximately 6 μm and 15 psec. Acceptable criteria for pinhole alignment, requisite x-ray flux, and filter characteristics are discussed. Implosion characteristics are presented from our present experiments with 68 μm diameter glass microshell targets and 0.45 terawatt, 70 psec Nd laser pulses. Final implosion velocities in excess of 3 x 10 7 cm/sec are evident

  17. Enhancement of proton acceleration field in laser double-layer target interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Ma, Y. Y.

    2013-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed to enhance a proton acceleration field in laser plasma interaction. A double-layer plasma with different densities is illuminated by an intense short pulse. Electrons are accelerated to a high energy in the first layer by the wakefield. The electrons accelerated by the laser wakefield induce the enhanced target normal sheath (TNSA) and breakout afterburner (BOA) accelerations through the second layer. The maximum proton energy reaches about 1 GeV, and the total charge with an energy higher than 100 MeV is about several tens of μC/μm. Both the acceleration gradient and laser energy transfer efficiency are higher than those in single-target-based TNSA or BOA. The model has been verified by 2.5D-PIC simulations

  18. Numerical modeling of laser-driven ion acceleration from near-critical gas targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatomirescu, Dragos; Vizman, Daniel; d’Humières, Emmanuel

    2018-06-01

    In the past two decades, laser-accelerated ion sources and their applications have been intensely researched. Recently, it has been shown through experiments that proton beams with characteristics comparable to those obtained with solid targets can be obtained from gaseous targets. By means of particle-in-cell simulations, this paper studies in detail the effects of a near-critical density gradient on ion and electron acceleration after the interaction with ultra high intensity lasers. We can observe that the peak density of the gas jet has a significant influence on the spectrum features. As the gas jet density increases, so does the peak energy of the central quasi-monoenergetic ion bunch due to the increase in laser absorption while at the same time having a broadening effect on the electron angular distribution.

  19. Laser-driven polarized hydrogen and deuterium internal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.E.; Fedchak, J.A.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    After completing comprehensive tests of the performance of the source with both hydrogen and deuterium gas, we began tests of a realistic polarized deuterium internal target. These tests involve characterizing the atomic polarization and dissociation fraction of atoms in a storage cell as a function of flow and magnetic field, and making direct measurements of the average nuclear tensor polarization of deuterium atoms in the storage cell. Transfer of polarization from the atomic electron to the nucleus as a result of D-D spin-exchange collisions was observed in deuterium, verifying calculations suggesting that high vector polarization in both hydrogen and deuterium can be obtained in a gas in spin temperature equilibrium without inducing RF transitions between the magnetic substates. In order to improve the durability of the system, the source glassware was redesigned to simplify construction and installation and eliminate stress points that led to frequent breakage. Improvements made to the nuclear polarimeter, which used the low energy 3 H(d,n) 4 He reaction to analyze the tensor polarization of the deuterium, included installing acceleration lenses constructed of wire mesh to improve pumping conductance, construction of a new holding field coil, and elimination of the Wien filter from the setup. These changes substantially simplified operation of the polarimeter and should have reduced depolarization in collisions with the wall. However, when a number of tests failed to show an improvement of the nuclear polarization, it was discovered that extended operation of the system with a section of teflon as a getter for potassium caused the dissociation fraction to decline with time under realistic operating conditions, suggesting that teflon may not be a suitable material to eliminate potassium from the target. We are replacing the teflon surfaces with drifilm-coated ones and plan to continue tests of the polarized internal target in this configuration

  20. Numerical investigation on complex target geometries in the context of laser-accelerated proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deppert, O.; Harres, K.; Busold, S.; Schaumann, G.; Roth, M. [IKP, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Brabetz, C. [IAP, Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany); Schollmeier, M.; Geissel, M. [Sandia National Laboratories, NM (United States); Bagnoud, V. [GSI - Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Neely, D. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (United Kingdom); McKenna, P. [University of Strathclyde (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The irradiation of thin metal foils by an ultra-intense laser pulse leads to the generation of a highly laminar, intense proton beam accelerated from the target rear side by a mechanism called TNSA. This acceleration mechanism strongly depends on the geometry of the target. The acceleration originates from the formation of a Gaussian-like electron sheath leading to an electric field in the order of TV/m. This sheath field-ionizes the target rear side and is able to accelerate protons from a hydrogen contamination layer. The Gaussian-like sheath adds an energy dependent divergence to the spatial proton beam profile. For future applications it is essential to reduce the divergence already from the source of the acceleration process. Therefore different target geometries were studied numerically with the help of Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations. Both, the influence of the target geometry as well as the influence of the laser beam profile onto the proton trajectories are discussed. Furthermore, the first experimental results of a dedicated target geometry for laser-ion acceleration are presented.

  1. Pulsed laser deposited KY3F10: Ho3+ thin films: Influence of target to substrate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debelo, NG

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of target to substrate distance (dts) on the structural, morphological and photoluminescence (PL) properties of commercially obtained KY3F10 : Ho3+ phosphor thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition is investigated for dts values...

  2. Strong shock wave and areal mass oscillations associated with impulsive loading of planar laser targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velikovich, A.L.; Schmitt, A.J.; Metzler, N.; Gardner, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    When a rippled surface of a planar target is irradiated with a short (subnanosecond) laser pulse, the shock wave launched into the target and the mass distribution of the shocked plasma will oscillate. These oscillations are found to be surprisingly strong compared, for example, to the case when the laser radiation is not turned off but rather keeps pushing the shock wave into the target. Being stronger than the areal mass oscillations due to ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and feedout in planar targets, which have recently been observed at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) [Aglitskiy et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2264 (2002)], these oscillations should therefore be directly observable with the same diagnostic technique. Irradiation of a target with a short laser pulse represents a particular case of an impulsive loading, a fast release of finite energy in a thin layer near the surface of a target. Renewed interest to the impulsive loading in the area of direct-drive laser fusion is due to the recent proposals of using a short pulse prior to the drive pulse to make the target more resistant to laser imprint and Rayleigh-Taylor growth. Impulsive loading produces a shock wave that propagates into the target and is immediately followed by an expansion wave, which gradually reduces the shock strength. If the irradiated surface is rippled, then, while the shock wave propagates through the target, its modulation amplitude grows, exceeding the initial ripple amplitude by a factor of 2 or more. The oscillating areal mass reaches the peak values that exceed the initial mass modulation amplitude (density times ripple height) by a factor of 5-7 or more, and reverses its phase several times after the laser pulse is over. The oscillatory growth is more pronounced in fluids with higher shock compressibility and is probably related to the Vishniac's instability of a blast wave. Frequency of the oscillations is determined by the speed of sound in the shocked material, and

  3. Propagation velocities of laser-produced plasmas from copper wire targets and water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyo-Dong; Alexander, Dennis R.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the plasma propagation velocities resulting from KrF laser irradiation of copper wire target (75 microns diameter) and water droplets (75 microns diameter) at irradiance levels ranging from 25 to 150 GW/sq cm. Plasma propagation velocities were measured using a streak camera system oriented orthogonally to the high-energy laser propagation axis. Plasma velocities were studied as a function of position in the focused beam. Results show that both the shape of the plasma formation and material removal from the copper wire are different and depend on whether the targets are focused or slightly defocused (approximately = 0.5 mm movement in the beam axis). Plasma formation and its position relative to the target is an important factor in determining the practical focal point during high-energy laser interaction with materials. At irradiance of 100 GW/sq cm, the air plasma has two weak-velocity components which propagate toward and away from the incident laser while a strong-velocity component propagates away from the laser beam as a detonation wave. Comparison of the measured breakdown velocities (in the range of 2.22-2.27 x 10(exp 5) m/s) for air and the value calculated by the nonlinear breakdown wave theory at irradiance of 100 GW/sq cm showed a quantitative agreement within approximately 50% while the linear theory and Gaussian pulse theory failed. The detonation wave velocities of plasma generated from water droplets and copper wire targets for different focused cases were measured and analyzed theoretically. The propagation velocities of laser-induced plasma liquid droplets obtained by previous research are compared with current work.

  4. X-ray absorption in characterization of laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, X.; Coudeville, A.; Eyharts, P.; Perrine, J.P.; Rouillard, R.

    1982-11-01

    Many plastic or metal coated targets are opaque, so their thickness and thickness uniformity cannot be obtained by optical means. Therefore, we have built and tested a new system using monochromatic X-ray absorption measurements. This system is also able to perform non-destructive measurements of argon fill pressure in glass microballoons. The X-ray source is a diffraction tube with a chromium target and fine focus (0.4 x 0.8 mm 2 ). Since monochromatic calculations are involved in this method, we use electronic discrimination to isolate the chromium Kα line (5.4 keV) from the bremsstrahlung spectrum. The detectors are xenon-filled proportional counters. The system is composed of two beams (10 μm in diameter), one used as a reference and the other as the measurement arm. A PET desk computer is coupled ot the experiment. We achieved a precision better than 10% for gold layers in the range of 0.1 to 1 μm, and better than 20% for argon pressures in the range of 5 - 13 bars

  5. Ultrafast streak and framing technique for the observation of laser driven shock waves in transparent solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Kessel, C.G.M.; Sachsenmaier, P.; Sigel, R.

    1975-01-01

    Shock waves driven by laser ablation in plane transparent plexiglass and solid hydrogen targets have been observed with streak and framing techniques using a high speed image converter camera, and a dye laser as a light source. The framing pictures have been made by mode locking the dye laser and using a wide streak slit. In both materials a growing hemispherical shock wave is observed with the maximum velocity at the onset of laser radiation. (author)

  6. Studies on the robustness of shock-ignited laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atzeni, S; Schiavi, A; Marocchino, A

    2011-01-01

    Several aspects of the sensitivity of a shock-ignited inertial fusion target to variation of parameters and errors or imperfections are studied by means of one-dimensional and two-dimensional numerical simulations. The study refers to a simple all-DT target, initially proposed for fast ignition (Atzeni et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 7 052702) and subsequently shown to be also suitable for shock ignition (Ribeyre et al 2009 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 51 015013). It is shown that the growth of both Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at the ablation front is reduced by laser pulses with an adiabat-shaping picket. An operating window for the parameters of the ignition laser spike is described; the threshold power depends on beam focusing and synchronization with the compression pulse. The time window for spike launch widens with beam power, while the minimum spike energy is independent of spike power. A large parametric scan indicates good tolerance (at the level of a few percent) to target mass and laser power errors. 2D simulations indicate that the strong igniting shock wave plays an important role in reducing deceleration-phase RTI growth. Instead, the high hot-spot convergence ratio (ratio of initial target radius to hot-spot radius at ignition) makes ignition highly sensitive to target mispositioning.

  7. Simulations of bremsstrahlung emission in ultra-intense laser interactions with foil targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyskočil, Jiří; Klimo, Ondřej; Weber, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    Bremsstrahlung emission from interactions of short ultra-intense laser pulses with solid foils is studied using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. A module for simulating bremsstrahlung has been implemented in the PIC loop to self-consistently account for the dynamics of the laser–plasma interaction, plasma expansion, and the emission of gamma ray photons. This module made it possible to study emission from thin targets, where refluxing of hot electrons plays an important role. It is shown that the angular distribution of the emitted photons exhibits a four-directional structure with the angle of emission decreasing with the increase of the width of the target. Additionally, a collimated forward flash consisting of high energy photons has been identified in thin targets. The conversion efficiency of the energy of the laser pulse to the energy of the gamma rays rises with both the driving pulse intensity, and the thickness of the target. The amount of gamma rays also increases with the atomic number of the target material, despite a lower absorption of the driving laser pulse. The angular spectrum of the emitted gamma rays is directly related to the increase of hot electron divergence during their refluxing and its measurement can be used in experiments to study this process.

  8. Feasibility of laser-targeted photoocclusion of the choriocapillary layer in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrani, S; Zou, S; D'Anna, S; Lutty, G; Vinores, S A; Goldberg, M F; Zeimer, R

    1997-12-01

    A new method, laser-targeted photoocclusion, was developed to occlude choroidal neovascularization while minimizing damage to the overlying retina. The ability to occlude normal choriocapillary layer in rats was evaluated as a first test of the feasibility of treating choroidal neovascularization with this method. A photosensitive agent, aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate, encapsulated in heat-sensitive liposomes, was administered intravenously along with carboxyfluorescein liposomes. A low-power argon laser (retinal power density of 5.7 W/cm2) locally released a photosensitizer bolus, monitored by the simultaneous release of carboxyfluorescein. A diode laser (operating at 675 nm with a retinal power density of 0.27 W/cm2) activated the photosensitizer with its release. Vessels in the choriocapillary layer were occluded at day 3 after laser treatment and remained unchanged during the 30-day follow-up. Larger choroidal vessels and retinal capillaries remained perfused. Control experiments excluded possible effects of heat or activation of free photosensitizer. Pilot histologic studies showed no damage to the retinal pigment epithelium. Laser-targeted photoocclusion caused selective occlusion of normal choriocapillaries while sparing overlying retinal pigment epithelium and retinal vessels. The method has potential as a treatment of choroidal neovascularization that may minimize iatrogenic loss of vision.

  9. Calculation for laser-produced plasmas conditions of thin middle-Z targets: Pt.I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Huimin; Zhang Guoping; Sheng Jiatian; Shao Yunfeng; Zhang Yinchun

    1988-01-01

    An one-dimentional non-LTE laser irradiated code was used to simulate the laser-produced plasmas conditions of thin middle Z targets with high intensities (about 10 13 W/cm 2 ) irradiation. Following physical processes are considered: bremsstrahlung, radiative ionization, collisional ionization by electrons and their inverse processes, Compton scattering. Fokker-Planck approximtaion is used in Compton scattering; the thermal flux limits are taken for electrons and ions in the calculating, and the multigroup flux-limited diffusion approximation is taken for the radiative transport equations. The average-atom model is used to calculate the population probabilities of atoms. Laser absorption via inverse bremsstrahlung is considered to be the most important in the simulation. Using laser beams with intensities 5 x 10 13 W/cm 2 and 1 x 10 14 W/cm 2 , λ L = 0.53 μm, τ = 450 ps to irradiate thin Se target from single-side and double-sides separately, the computational results for laser-produced plasmas conditions are well agree with experimental results

  10. Experimental study of laser acceleration of planar targets at the wavelength 0. 26. mu. m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbro, R.; Faral, B.; Cottet, F.; Romain, J.P.

    1984-12-01

    The main characteristics of accelerated aluminum targets, which are the target velocity, the uniformity of the acceleration and the backside temperature have been studied in laser experiments performed at wavelength 0.26 ..mu..m with an absorbed flux of a few 10/sup 13/ W/cm/sup 2/, in 400-ps pulse duration by using the double-foil technique and an optical pyrometry diagnostic: The ablation pressure was inferred from the velocity measurements. The uniformity of the acceleration was shown to be controlled by the hot spots in the focal spot, and the importance of studying the smoothing of laser inhomogeneities for accelerated targets with large ablated fractions was emphasized. The observed dependence of the backside temperature as a function of the initial foil thickness is discussed in the light of shock wave heating and radiative heating.

  11. Spatially and temporally resolved x-ray emission from imploding laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attwood, D.T.; Coleman, L.W.; Boyle, M.J.; Phillion, D.W.; Swain, J.E.; Manes, K.R.; Larsen, J.T.

    1976-09-01

    The Livermore 15 psec x-ray streak camera has been used in conjunction with 6 μm diameter pinholes to record well resolved implosion histories of DT filled laser fusion targets. The space-time compression data provide clearly identified implosion velocities, typically 3 x 10 7 cm/sec for two-sided clamshell irradiation of a 70 μm/sup D/, .5 μm wall DT filled glass microshell. Single-sided irradiation results show hydrodynamic convergence at the target center, followed by an asymmetric but two-sided target disassembly. These experiments were performed at the two arm Janus Laser facility, which typically delivered a total of 0.4 TW in a 70 psec pulse for these experiments

  12. NIF pointing and centering systems and target alignment using a 351 nm laser source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boege, S.J.; Bliss, E.S.; Chocol, C.J.; Holdener, F.R.; Miller, J.L.; Toeppen, J.S.; Vann, C.S.; Zacharias, R.A.

    1996-10-01

    The operational requirements of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) place tight constraints upon its alignment system. In general, the alignment system must establish and maintain the correct relationships between beam position, beam angle, laser component clear apertures, and the target. At the target, this includes adjustment of beam focus to obtain the correct spot size. This must be accomplished for all beamlines in a time consistent with planned shot rates and yet, in the front end and main laser, beam control functions cannot be initiated until the amplifiers have sufficiently cooled so as to minimize dynamic thermal distortions during and after alignment and wavefront optimization. The scope of the task dictates an automated system that implements parallel processes. We describe reticle choices and other alignment references, insertion of alignment beams, principles of operation of the Chamber Center Reference System 2048 and Target Alignment Sensor, and the anticipated alignment sequence that will occur between shots

  13. Design and fabrication of foam-insulated cryogenic target for wet-wall laser fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norimatsu, T.; Takeda, T.; Nagai, K.; Mima, K.; Yamanaka, T.

    2003-01-01

    A foam insulated cryogenic target was proposed for use in a future laser fusion reactor with a wet wall. This scheme can protect the solid DT layer from melting due to surface heating by adsorption of metal vapor without significant reduction in the target gain. Design spaces for the injection velocity and the acceptable vapor pressure in the reactor are discussed. Basic technology to fabricate such structure was demonstrated by emulsion process. Concept of a cryogenic fast-ignition target with a gold guiding cone was proposed together with direct injection filling of liquid DT. (author)

  14. Manipulation of laser-accelerated proton beam profiles by nanostructured and microstructured targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Giuffrida

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured and microstructured thin foils have been fabricated and used experimentally as targets to manipulate the spatial profile of proton bunches accelerated through the interaction with high intensity laser pulses (6×10^{19}  W/cm^{2}. Monolayers of polystyrene nanospheres were placed on the rear surfaces of thin plastic targets to improve the spatial homogeneity of the accelerated proton beams. Moreover, thin targets with grating structures of various configurations on their rear sides were used to modify the proton beam divergence. Experimental results are presented, discussed, and supported by 3D particle-in-cell numerical simulations.

  15. Computational Magnetohydrodynamics of General Materials in Generalized Coordinates and Applications to Laser-Target Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGillivray, Jeff T.; Peterkin, Robert E., Jr.

    2003-10-01

    We have developed a multiblock arbitrary coordinate Hydromagnetics (MACH) code for computing the time-evolution of materials of arbitrary phase (solid, liquid, gas, and plasma) in response to forces that arise from material and magnetic pressures. MACH is a single-fluid, time-dependent, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation environment. The 2 1/2 -dimensional MACH2 and the parallel 3-D MACH3 are widely used in the MHD community to perform accurate simulation of the time evolution of electrically conducting materials in a wide variety of laboratory situations. In this presentation, we discuss simulations of the interaction of an intense laser beam with a solid target in an ambient gas. Of particular interest to us is a laser-supported detonation wave (blast wave) that originates near the surface of the target when the laser intensity is sufficiently large to vaporize target material within the focal spot of the beam. Because the MACH3 simulations are fully three-dimensional, we are able to simulate non-normal laser incidence. A magnetic field is also produced from plasma energy near the edge of the focal spot.

  16. Probing the onset of laser-induced relativistic transparency in massive targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wagner, Craig; Toncian, Toma; Dyer, Gilliss; Arefiev, Alexey; Ditmire, Todd

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated a novel approach of using harmonics of the laser frequency generated in the plasma to detect the onset of relativistic transparency induced by an intense laser pulse. The onset of the transparency is directly associated with a forward motion of a relativistically adjusted critical surface. The corresponding velocity is relativistic, so the harmonics generated at this critical surface are noticeably shifted. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we have confirmed that the resulting shift greatly exceeds the shift produced during a hole-boring process when the relativistic transparency plays no role, which allows us to clearly identify the onset of the relativistic transparency. Experiments that we have carried out at the Texas Petawatt laser showcase this approach. The 3rd harmonic signal detected in experiments with massive targets irradiated at laser intensities around 1020 W/cm2 has a pronounced shift associated with the relativistic transparency. The shift represents a recession of the relativistically adjusted critical surface with a velocity close to 0.2 c. This approach opens a new possibility of detecting changes in the optical properties of matter induced by intense laser pulses even when no transmission of the laser pulse takes place. This research was supported part by NSF (Grant No. 1632777) and NNSA (Cont. No. DE-NA0002008). Simulations were performed using HPC resources at TACC at the University of Texas.

  17. New target for high-intensity laser-matter interaction: Gravitational flow of micrometer-sized powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servol, M.; Quere, F.; Bougeard, M.; Monot, P.; Martin, Ph.; Faenov, A.Ya; Pikuz, T.A.; Audebert, P.; Francucci, M.; Petrocelli, G.

    2005-01-01

    The design of efficient targets for high-intensity laser-matter interaction is essential to fully exploit the advantages of laser-induced photons or particles sources. We present an advantageous kind of target, consisting in a free gravitational flow of micrometer-sized powder, and describe its main technical characteristics. We demonstrate a laser-induced keV x-ray source using this target, and show that the photon flux obtained for the Kα line of Si by irradiating different silica powders is comparable to the one obtained with a bulk silica target

  18. Laser ablation caused by geometrically constrained illumination and inventive target design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inogamov, N. A.; Zhakhovsky, V. V.; Khokhlov, V. A.

    2018-01-01

    Modern laser technologies use very sophisticated manipulations with (i) a photon cloud forming an irradiation beam and with (ii) disign of a target. E.g. high numerical aperture illumination at very small, diffraction limited conditions is employed for fabrication of the tiny solitary nanoformations on surface of specially prepared thin films deposited onto usually dielectric or semiconductor substrate. In the paper below we list such cases and consider an example with a free standing gold nanofilm modified by tightly focused femtosecond laser pulse.

  19. Measurement of pzz of the laser-driven polarized deuterium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.E.; Coulter, K.P.; Holt, R.J.; Poelker, M.; Potterveld, D.P.; Kowalczyk, R.S.; Buchholz, M.; Neal, J.; van den Brand, J.F.J.

    1993-01-01

    The question of whether nuclei are polarized as a result of H-H (D-D) spin-exchange collisions within the relatively dense gas of a laser-driven source of polarized hydrogen (deuterium) can be addressed directly by measuring the nuclear polarization of atoms from the source. The feasibility of using a polarimeter based on the D + T → n + 4 He reaction to measure the tensor polarization of deuterium in an internal target fed by the laser-driven source has been tested. The device and the measurements necessary to test the spin-exchange polarization theory are described

  20. Electron transport in solid targets and in the active mixture of a CO2 laser amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkowski, A.

    The paper examines the use of the NIKE code for the Monte Carlo computation of the deposited energy profile and other characteristics of the absorption process of an electron beam in a solid target and the spatial distribution of primary ionization in the active mixture of a CO2 laser amplifier. The problem is considered in connection with the generation of intense electron beams and the acceleration of thin metal foils, as well as in connection with the electric discharge pumping of a CO2 laser amplifier.

  1. Mono-energetic ions emission by nanosecond laser solid target irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muoio, A., E-mail: Annamaria.Muoio@lns.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Tudisco, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Altana, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Enna “Kore”, Via delle Olimpiadi, 94100 Enna (Italy); Mascali, D.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Schillaci, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Trifirò, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Sezione INFN, Catania (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the acceleration mechanisms through laser–matter interaction in nanosecond domain has been carried out at the LENS (Laser Energy for Nuclear Science) laboratory of INFN-LNS, Catania. Pure Al targets were irradiated by 6 ns laser pulses at different pumping energies, up to 2 J. Advanced diagnostics tools were used to characterize the plasma plume and ion production. We show the preliminary results of this experimental campaign, and especially the ones showing the production of multicharged ions having very narrow energy spreads.

  2. Structure and properties of optical-discharge plasma in CO2-laser beam near target surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danshchikov, Ye. V.; Dymshakov, V. A.; Lebedev, F. V.; Ryazanov, A. V.

    1986-05-01

    An experimental study of optical-discharge plasma in a CO2-laser beam at a target surface was made for the purpose of exploring the not yet understood role of this plasma in the laser-target interaction process. Such a plasma was produced by means of a quasi-continuous CO2-laser with an unstable resonator, its power being maintained constant for 1 ms periods. Its radiation was focused on the surfaces of thick and seeding thin Al, Ti, and Ta targets inclined at an approximately 70 deg. angle to the beam, inside a hermetic chamber containing air, argon, or helium under atmospheric pressure. The radiation intensity distribution over the focal plane and the nearest caustic surface in the laser beam was measured along with the plasma parameters, the latter by the methods of spectral analysis and photoelectric recording. The instrumentation for this purpose included an MDR-3 monochromator with an entrance slit, a double electron-optical converter, a memory oscillograph, and an SI-10-30 ribbon lamp as radiation reference standard. The results yielded integral diametral intensity distributions of the emission lines Ti-II (457.2 nm), Ti-I (464 nm), Ar-II (462 nm), radial and axial temperature profiles of optical discharge in metal vapor in surrounding gas, and the radial temperature profile of irradiated metal surface at successive instants of time. The results reveal marked differences between the structures and the properties of optical-discharge plasma in metal vapor and in surrounding gas, optical discharge in the former being characterized by localization within the laser beam and optical discharge in the latter being characterized by a drift away from the target.

  3. Electron beams accelerated with two TW class lasers. Preplasma effect of target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergaux, M.; Gobet, F.; Tarisien, M.; Hannachi, F.; Aleonard, M.M.; D'Humieres, E.; Nicolai, P.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Malka, G.; Debayle, A.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. It is well known that ultra short pulses of UH1 lasers in the TW domain can produce energetic electrons above 10 MeV. For nuclear physics purposes the range 10-100 MeV is well appropriate to explore (g,xn) reactions. These reactions are of interest, in particular, to study the production of isomers in plasma in relation with astrophysical problems. Meanwhile a careful study of the produced photons is of interest for the study of intense photon 'beams' (radiography, ignition in the Inertial Fusion physics). In both cases, the optimization of these photon beams as regards the number of photons as well as their angular dispersion is important. From previous experiments, with polypropylene targets, it has been shown that both the target thickness and the preplasma conditions influenced the distributions of the produced electrons. Here we investigate the effect of the target atomic number (Z) on the electron production. The experiments have been done with two TW class lasers, with fs pulses; targets of CH, Al, Cu, Au and Ta have been used. All the targets had the same thickness (10 μm). The energy distribution of the electrons and their angular distribution have been characterized. Both lasers had nearly the same energy, the pulse duration was respectively 40 and 80 fs, respectively at LOA (Palaiseau) and IOQ (Iena). The main differences of the lasers regarded the contrast (10 6 at LOA, 10 7 at IOQ) and the ASE duration (2 ns or 0.5 ns). In presence of a large ASE the number of electrons above 10 MeV were ∼ 10 9 , roughly 3 orders of magnitude higher than without ASE. As regards the angular dispersion of electrons above 10 MeV, measured at LOA, it was increasing progressively between CH targets and Au ones, ranging from 10 deg to 40 deg between these increasing atomic numbers. The explanation of such a flagrant difference in the results of these two apparently similar experimental campaigns is related to the size and form of

  4. A proton point source produced by laser interaction with cone-top-end target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Jinqing; Jin, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weimin; Zhao, Zongqing; Yan, Yonghong; Li, Bin; Hong, Wei; Gu, Yuqiu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a proton point source by the interaction of laser and cone-top-end target and investigate it by two-dimensional particle-in-cell (2D-PIC) simulations as the proton point sources are well known for higher spatial resolution of proton radiography. Our results show that the relativistic electrons are guided to the rear of the cone-top-end target by the electrostatic charge-separation field and self-generated magnetic field along the profile of the target. As a result, the peak magnitude of sheath field at the rear surface of cone-top-end target is higher compared to common cone target. We test this scheme by 2D-PIC simulation and find the result has a diameter of 0.79λ 0 , an average energy of 9.1 MeV and energy spread less than 35%.

  5. Target surface structure effects on x-ray generation from laser produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi; Uesugi, Naoshi [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, Atsugi, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    We demonstrated two different methods to increase the x-ray conversion efficiency of laser-produced plasma by modifying the target surface structure. One way is making a rectangular groove on a target surface and confining a laser-produced plasma in it. By the plasma collision process, a time and wavelength (4-10 nm) integrated soft x-ray fluence enhancement of 35 times was obtained at a groove width of 20 {mu}m and a groove depth of 100 {mu}m on a Nd-doped glass target. The other way is making an array of nanoholes on an alumina target and increasing the laser interaction depth with it. The x-ray fluence enhancement increases as the ionization level of Al becomes higher and the x-ray wavelength becomes shorter. Over 50-fold enhancement was obtained at a soft x-ray wavelength around 6 nm, which corresponds to the emission from Al{sup 8+,9+} ions. (author)

  6. Target surface structure effects on x-ray generation from laser produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi; Uesugi, Naoshi

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrated two different methods to increase the x-ray conversion efficiency of laser-produced plasma by modifying the target surface structure. One way is making a rectangular groove on a target surface and confining a laser-produced plasma in it. By the plasma collision process, a time and wavelength (4-10 nm) integrated soft x-ray fluence enhancement of 35 times was obtained at a groove width of 20 μm and a groove depth of 100 μm on a Nd-doped glass target. The other way is making an array of nanoholes on an alumina target and increasing the laser interaction depth with it. The x-ray fluence enhancement increases as the ionization level of Al becomes higher and the x-ray wavelength becomes shorter. Over 50-fold enhancement was obtained at a soft x-ray wavelength around 6 nm, which corresponds to the emission from Al 8+,9+ ions. (author)

  7. Tracking of buried layers during plasma-assisted femtosecond laser drilling of compound targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhvaniya, I. A., E-mail: irina.zhvaniya@physics.msu.ru; Garmatina, A. A.; Makarov, I. A.; Gordienko, V. M. [Faculty of Physics and International Laser Center, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991, GSP-1, 1-2 Leninskiye Gory, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-28

    It was shown that drilling of multi-layered target placed in the air by tightly focused femtosecond laser radiation with high fluence (up to 1000 J/cm{sup 2}) can be monitored online using plasma-induced X-ray emission and second harmonic of incident laser radiation. The technique based on X-rays registration is appeared to be more flexible than the method based on detection of second harmonic since its accuracy depends crucially on the target type. We demonstrated that the X-ray signal clearly indicates the transition from one layer to another during the microdrilling of targets consisting of 2–4 layers of titanium foil when a laser beam is focused beneath the target surface at a depth comparable to the layer thickness. The diagnostics of microchannel production in the chicken eggshell was performed for the first time. It was found that the presence of albumen beneath the shell accounts for longtime generation of X-ray pulses.

  8. Direct drive acceleration of planar targets with the Nike KrF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawley, C.J.; Sethian, J.D.; Bodner, S.E.

    1999-01-01

    Nike is a multi-kilojoule KrF laser with very high beam uniformity (ΔI/I<0.2% with all 36 overlapped beams), and the capability to accelerate relatively thick targets on a low adiabat under conditions scalable to direct drive ICF. In a first set of experiments we determined the effect of the imprinting by varying the uniformity of the foot of the laser pulse and measuring the growth of the subsequent Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We found that the lower the imprint, the longer the mass modulations take to reach a given level. This is in quantitative agreement with our 2-D hydrodynamics simulations. The results are promising for direct drive with a very uniform laser. (orig.)

  9. Direct drive acceleration of planar targets with the Nike KrF laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawley, C.J.; Sethian, J.D.; Bodner, S.E. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Plasma Physics Div.] [and others

    1999-02-01

    Nike is a multi-kilojoule KrF laser with very high beam uniformity ({Delta}I/I<0.2% with all 36 overlapped beams), and the capability to accelerate relatively thick targets on a low adiabat under conditions scalable to direct drive ICF. In a first set of experiments we determined the effect of the imprinting by varying the uniformity of the foot of the laser pulse and measuring the growth of the subsequent Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We found that the lower the imprint, the longer the mass modulations take to reach a given level. This is in quantitative agreement with our 2-D hydrodynamics simulations. The results are promising for direct drive with a very uniform laser. (orig.) 4 refs.

  10. Formation and damping of a shock wave induced by laser in a metallic target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottet, F.

    1981-01-01

    In the first part of this work, a numerical simulation of the formation and of the damping of the shock wave induced in a solid target by a laser impulse is developed. It allows to interpret the experimental obtained in the second part of the study. Two series of experiments have been realized. An iron target metallographic study is intended to verify if laser shocks produce effects comparable with conventional shocks, particularly a deformation by albite twinning the existence of which is related to the shock amplitude and its evolution during the propagation in the target. Macles observation become a possible mean to estimate the value of the induced pressures. Another experiment series has been realized to determine more directly the shock parameters. Piezoelectric cermets have been used to detect a shock-wave passage and to measure the time taken to go through targets of variable thickness. The numerical solution allows, afterwards, to deduce the maximum pressure of the induced shock. The most part of the tests have been done on copper targets, the behaviour of which is well known in a large pressure domain. Some tests have been realized on aluminium and iron targets [fr

  11. Recent Developments in Fabrication of Direct Drive Cylinder Targets for Hydrodynamics Experiments at the OMEGA Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobile, A.; Balkey, M.M.; Bartos, J.J.; Batha, S.H.; Day, R.D.; Elliott, J.E.; Elliott, N.E.; Gomez, V.M.; Hatch, D.J.; Lanier, N.E.; Fincke, J.R.; Manzanares, R.; Pierce, T.H.; Sandoval, D.L.; Schmidt, D.W.; Steckle, W.P.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental campaigns are being conducted at the 60 beam OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics to acquire data to validate hydrodynamic models in the high energy-density regime. This paper describes targets that have been developed and constructed for these experimental campaigns. Targets are 860 μm inner diameter by 2.2 mm length cylinders with 70 μm thick polymer ablator. On the ablator inner surface and located halfway along the axis of the cylinder is a 500 μm wide Al marker band. Band thicknesses in the range 8-16 microns are used. CH foam with densities in the range 30-90 mg/cc fills the inside of the cylinder. While these targets have been fabricated for years, several new improvements and features have recently been developed. Improvements include the use of epoxy instead of polystyrene for the ablator, and the use of electrodeposited Al for the marker band. A critical feature of the target is the surface feature that is placed on the marker band. Experiments are aimed at understanding the hydrodynamic behavior of imploding cylinders as a function of this surface feature. Recent development work has focused on production of engineered surface features on the target marker band. Using a fast tool servo on a diamond turning lathe, a wide range of specified surface features have been produced. This paper will address improvements to the cylinder targets as well as current development efforts

  12. Prototype high-speed tape target transport for a laser plasma soft-x-ray projection lithography source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haney, S.J.; Berger, K.W.; Kubiak, G.D.; Rockett, P.D.; Hunter, J.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype high-speed tape target transport is constructed for use in a high-repetition-rate laser plasma source. To reduce plasma debris, a 1000--5000-A-thick film of target material is supported by thin Mylar tape backing. Tape is transported to the laser focal volume at a maximum velocity of 356 cm/s, a rate sufficient to accommodate laser repetition rates of 1 kHz. The transport is fully vacuum compatible and can be retracted and then isolated from the laser plasma vacuum enclosure during tape reel replacement. The operating characteristics of the transport are described

  13. Three-Dimensional Dynamics of Breakout Afterburner Ion Acceleration Using High-Contrast Short-Pulse Laser and Nanoscale Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Fernandez, J. C.; Jung, D.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Breakout afterburner (BOA) laser-ion acceleration has been demonstrated for the first time in the laboratory. In the BOA, an initially solid-density target undergoes relativistically induced transparency, initiating a period of enhanced ion acceleration. First-ever kinetic simulations of the BOA in three dimensions show that the ion beam forms lobes in the direction orthogonal to laser polarization and propagation. Analytic theory presented for the electron dynamics in the laser ponderomotive field explains how azimuthal symmetry breaks even for a symmetric laser intensity profile; these results are consistent with recent experiments at the Trident laser facility.

  14. Target Plate Material Influence on Fullerene-C60 Laser Desorption/Ionization Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeegers, Guido P.; Günthardt, Barbara F.; Zenobi, Renato

    2016-04-01

    Systematic laser desorption/ionization (LDI) experiments of fullerene-C60 on a wide range of target plate materials were conducted to gain insight into the initial ion formation in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The positive and negative ion signal intensities of precursor, fragment, and cluster ions were monitored, varying both the laser fluence (0-3.53 Jcm-2) and the ion extraction delay time (0-950 ns). The resulting species-specific ion signal intensities are an indication for the ionization mechanisms that contribute to LDI and the time frames in which they operate, providing insight in the (MA)LDI primary ionization. An increasing electrical resistivity of the target plate material increases the fullerene-C60 precursor and fragment anion signal intensity. Inconel 625 and Ti90/Al6/V4, both highly electrically resistive, provide the highest anion signal intensities, exceeding the cation signal intensity by a factor ~1.4 for the latter. We present a mechanism based on transient electrical field strength reduction to explain this trend. Fullerene-C60 cluster anion formation is negligible, which could be due to the high extraction potential. Cluster cations, however, are readily formed, although for high laser fluences, the preferred channel is formation of precursor and fragment cations. Ion signal intensity depends greatly on the choice of substrate material, and careful substrate selection could, therefore, allow for more sensitive (MA)LDI measurements.

  15. Understanding Laser-Imprint Effects on Plastic-Target Implosions on OMEGA with New Physics Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S. X.; Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Betti, R.; Radha, P. B.; Campbell, E. M.; Froula, D. H.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-10-01

    Using the state-of-the-art physics models (nonlocal thermal transport, cross-beam energy transfer, and first-principles equation of state) recently implemented in our two-dimensional hydrocode DRACO, we have performed a systematic study of laser-imprint effects on plastic-target implosions on OMEGA by both simulations and experiments. Through varying the laser picket intensity, the imploding shells were set at different adiabats ranging from α = 2 to α = 6 . As the shell adiabat α decreases, we observed: (1) the measured shell thickness at the hot spot emission becomes larger than the uniform prediction; (2) the hot-spot core emits and neutron burn starts earlier than the corresponding 1-D prediction; and (3) the measured neutron yields are significantly reduced from their 1-D designs. Most of these experimental observations are well reproduced by our DRACO simulations with laser imprints. These studies clearly identify that laser imprint is the major cause for target performance degradation of OMEGA implosions of α ignition attempts. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  16. Water based suspensions of iron oxide obtained by laser target evaporation for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novoselova, I.P. [Ural Federal University, Department of Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Lenin Ave. 51, 620083 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Science and Technology Park “Fabrica”, Gaidara St. 6, 236022 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Safronov, A.P. [Ural Federal University, Department of Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Lenin Ave. 51, 620083 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Electrophysics UD RAS, Amundsena St. 106, 620016 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Samatov, O.M. [Institute of Electrophysics UD RAS, Amundsena St. 106, 620016 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Beketov, I.V.; Medvedev, A.I. [Ural Federal University, Department of Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Lenin Ave. 51, 620083 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Electrophysics UD RAS, Amundsena St. 106, 620016 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kurlyandskaya, G.V. [Ural Federal University, Department of Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Lenin Ave. 51, 620083 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Dpto. de Electricidad y Electrónica, P.O. Box 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain)

    2016-10-01

    In this work spherical magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) of iron oxide were obtained by laser target evaporation technique (LTE). Water based suspensions were prepared on the basis of obtained MNPs and their properties were also studied including inductive heat capacity. Their structure and properties were studied by a number of techniques including magnetometry and heat capacity measurements. Magnetic induction heating experiment show the specific loss power (SLP) value in the narrow range from 1.30 to 1.45 W/g for all samples under consideration when using alternating magnetic field of 1.7 kA/m and frequency of 210 kHz. These parameters insure that LTE MNPs are interesting materials promising for magnetic fluid hyperthermia. - Highlights: • Spheric oxide nanoparticles obtained by productive laser target evaporation method. • Experiment shows the specific loss power value in the narrow range for all samples. • Obtained results insure these objects as interesting material for hyperthermia.

  17. Water based suspensions of iron oxide obtained by laser target evaporation for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novoselova, I.P.; Safronov, A.P.; Samatov, O.M.; Beketov, I.V.; Medvedev, A.I.; Kurlyandskaya, G.V.

    2016-01-01

    In this work spherical magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) of iron oxide were obtained by laser target evaporation technique (LTE). Water based suspensions were prepared on the basis of obtained MNPs and their properties were also studied including inductive heat capacity. Their structure and properties were studied by a number of techniques including magnetometry and heat capacity measurements. Magnetic induction heating experiment show the specific loss power (SLP) value in the narrow range from 1.30 to 1.45 W/g for all samples under consideration when using alternating magnetic field of 1.7 kA/m and frequency of 210 kHz. These parameters insure that LTE MNPs are interesting materials promising for magnetic fluid hyperthermia. - Highlights: • Spheric oxide nanoparticles obtained by productive laser target evaporation method. • Experiment shows the specific loss power value in the narrow range for all samples. • Obtained results insure these objects as interesting material for hyperthermia.

  18. The Argonne laser-driven D target: Recent developments and progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedchak, J.A.; Bailey, K.; Cummings, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    The first direct measurements of nuclear tensor polarization p zz in a laser-driven polarized D target have been performed at Argonne. We present p zz and electron polarization P e data taken at a magnetic field of 600 G in the optical pumping cell. These results are highly indicative that spin-temperature equilibrium is achieved in the system. To prevent spin relaxation of D and K atoms as well as the molecular recombination of D atoms, the walls of the laser-driven D target are coated with organosilane compounds. We discuss a new coating technique, the open-quotes afterwashclose quotes, developed at Argonne which has yielded stable atomic fraction results when the coating is exposed to K. We also present new coating techniques for glass and Cu substrates

  19. OPTICAL correlation identification technology applied in underwater laser imaging target identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Guang-tao; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Ge, Wei-long

    2012-01-01

    The underwater laser imaging detection is an effective method of detecting short distance target underwater as an important complement of sonar detection. With the development of underwater laser imaging technology and underwater vehicle technology, the underwater automatic target identification has gotten more and more attention, and is a research difficulty in the area of underwater optical imaging information processing. Today, underwater automatic target identification based on optical imaging is usually realized with the method of digital circuit software programming. The algorithm realization and control of this method is very flexible. However, the optical imaging information is 2D image even 3D image, the amount of imaging processing information is abundant, so the electronic hardware with pure digital algorithm will need long identification time and is hard to meet the demands of real-time identification. If adopt computer parallel processing, the identification speed can be improved, but it will increase complexity, size and power consumption. This paper attempts to apply optical correlation identification technology to realize underwater automatic target identification. The optics correlation identification technology utilizes the Fourier transform characteristic of Fourier lens which can accomplish Fourier transform of image information in the level of nanosecond, and optical space interconnection calculation has the features of parallel, high speed, large capacity and high resolution, combines the flexibility of calculation and control of digital circuit method to realize optoelectronic hybrid identification mode. We reduce theoretical formulation of correlation identification and analyze the principle of optical correlation identification, and write MATLAB simulation program. We adopt single frame image obtained in underwater range gating laser imaging to identify, and through identifying and locating the different positions of target, we can improve

  20. Measurement of electromagnetic pulses generated during interactions of high power lasers with solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Marco, M.; Krása, J.; Margarone, D.; Giuffrida, L.; Vrana, R.; Velyhan, A.; Korn, G.; Weber, S.; Cikhardt, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Krouský, E.; Ullschmied, J.; Ahmed, H.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.; Limpouch, J.; Velardi, L.; Side, D. Delle; Nassisi, V.

    2016-01-01

    A target irradiated with a high power laser pulse, blows off a large amount of charge and as a consequence the target itself becomes a generator of electromagnetic pulses (EMP) owing to high return current flowing to the ground through the target holder. The first measurement of the magnetic field induced by the neutralizing current reaching a value of a few kA was performed with the use of an inductive target probe at the PALS Laser Facility (Cikhardt et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85 (2014) 103507). A full description of EMP generation should contain information on the spatial distribution and temporal variation of the electromagnetic field inside and outside of the interaction chamber. For this reason, we consider the interaction chamber as a resonant cavity in which different modes of EMP oscillate for hundreds of nanoseconds, until the EMP is transmitted outside through the glass windows and EM waves are attenuated. Since the experimental determination of the electromagnetic field distribution is limited by the number of employed antennas, a mapping of the electromagnetic field has to be integrated with numerical simulations. Thus, this work reports on a detailed numerical mapping of the electromagnetic field inside the interaction chamber at the PALS Laser Facility (covering a frequency spectrum from 100 MHz to 3 GHz) using the commercial code COMSOL Multiphysics 5.2. Moreover we carried out a comparison of the EMP generated in the parallelepiped-like interaction chamber used in the Vulcan Petawatt Laser Facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, against that produced in the spherical interaction chamber of PALS.

  1. Precise focusing and diagnosis technology for laser beams in ICF target chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Qixiang

    1999-01-01

    The precise focusing and diagnosis experimental system for laser beams in ICF target chamber is introduced. The system is controlled by computer. In process of focusing a series data of displacement in axial direction and relative area of focus spots are acquired. According to the functional curvature the accurate position of focal plane is determined. The construction of the system is simple, the system is controlled conveniently and runs quickly

  2. Shock pressure induced by 0.44 mu m laser radiation on aluminum targets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Batani, D.; Stabile, H.; Ravasio, A.; Desai, T.; Lucchini, G.; Strati, F.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Krouský, Eduard; Skála, Jiří; Králiková, Božena; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Kadlec, Christelle; Mocek, Tomáš; Präg R., Ansgar; Nishimura, H.; Ochi, Y.; Kilpio, A.; Shashkov, E.; Stuchebrukhov, I.; Vovchenko, V.; Krasuyk, I.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 4 (2003), s. 481-487 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A100 Grant - others:HPRI-CT(XX) 1999-00053 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : rear target luminosity, shock pressure, shock waves Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.646, year: 2003

  3. Determination of the pr of laser fusion targets using the α-particle TOF technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slivinsky, V.W.; Lent, E.; Shay, H.D.; Manes, K.R.

    1975-01-01

    A computer code was written to describe the alpha particle energy loss. The problem of a symmetric compression of the DT gas by an exploding microsphere is analyzed. The code calculates the energy spectrum of a Gaussian distribution of alpha particles after passing through the compressed gas and the exploded glass. The calculations are being used to determine design parameters for diagnostic instruments for measuring charged particle energy distributions from laser fusion targets

  4. Ultra-High-Contrast Laser Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons in Solid Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Drew Pitney

    The cone-guided fast ignition approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion requires laser-accelerated relativistic electrons to deposit kilojoules of energy within an imploded fuel core to initiate fusion burn. One obstacle to coupling electron energy into the core is the ablation of material, known as preplasma, by laser energy proceeding nanoseconds prior to the main pulse. This causes the laser-absorption surface to be pushed back hundreds of microns from the initial target surface; thus increasing the distance that electrons must travel to reach the imploded core. Previous experiments have shown an order of magnitude decrease in coupling into surrogate targets when intentionally increasing the amount of preplasma. Additionally, for electrons to deposit energy within the core, they should have kinetic energies on the order of a few MeV, as less energetic electrons will be stopped prior to the core and more energetic electrons will pass through the core without depositing much energy. Thus a quantitative understanding of the electron energy spectrum and how it responds to varied laser parameters is paramount for fast ignition. For the first time, this dissertation quantitatively investigates the acceleration of electrons using an ultra-high-contrast laser. Ultra-high-contrast lasers reduce the laser energy that reaches the target prior to the main pulse; drastically reducing the amount of preplasma. Experiments were performed in a cone-wire geometry relevant to fast ignition. These experiments irradiated the inner-tip of a Au cone with the laser and observed electrons that passed through a Cu wire attached to the outer-tip of the cone. The total emission of Kalpha x-rays is used as a diagnostic to infer the electron energy coupled into the wire. Imaging the x-ray emission allowed an effective path-length of electrons within the wire to be determined, which constrained the electron energy spectrum. Experiments were carried out on the ultra-high-contrast Trident laser

  5. Measurement of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in targets driven by optically smoothed laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desselberger, M.; Willi, O.; Savage, M.; Lamb, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Growth rates of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability were measured in targets with imposed sinusoidal modulations irradiated by optically smoothed 0.53-μm laser beams. A hybrid optical smoothing technique utilizing induced-spatial-incoherence and random-phase-plate technology was used for the first time. The wave-number dependence and the nonlinear behavior of Rayleigh-Taylor growth were investigated by using targets with a range of modulation periodicities and depths. The results are compared to 2D hydrodynamic-code simulations

  6. The Cryogenic Studying and Filling Facilities for the Laser Megajoule Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachelet, F.; Vincent-Viry, O.; Collier, R.; Fleury, E.; Jeannot, L.; Legaie, O.; Pascal, G. [CEA Valduc, DAM, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France); Perin, J. P.; Viargues, F. [CEA Grenoble, DSM INAC SBT, 38 (France)

    2009-04-15

    As part of the French Inertial Confinement Fusion program, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique has developed cryogenic target assemblies (CTAs) for the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) and a program in two stages for the permeation filling of these CTAs: (a) the permeation filling studies with the Study Filling Station cryostats and (b) the design and manufacturing of the whole operational chain of CTA filling facilities. This paper deals with the description of both the cryogenic studying and the filling facilities for the LMJ targets. (authors)

  7. System for automatic x-ray-image analysis, measurement, and sorting of laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleton, R.M.; Perkins, D.E.; Willenborg, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the Automatic X-Ray Image Analysis and Sorting (AXIAS) system which is designed to analyze and measure x-ray images of opaque hollow microspheres used as laser fusion targets. The x-ray images are first recorded on a high resolution film plate. The AXIAS system then digitizes and processes the images to accurately measure the target parameters and defects. The primary goals of the AXIAS system are: to provide extremely accurate and rapid measurements, to engineer a practical system for a routine production environment and to furnish the capability of automatically measuring an array of images for sorting and selection

  8. Influence of pulse width and target density on pulsed laser deposition of thin YBaCuO film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikram, S.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the effects of temporal pulse width and target density on the deposition of thin films of YBaCuO. A 248nm excimer laser and an 825nm Ti-sapphire laser were used to conduct the experiments with pulse widths of 27 ns, 16 ns, and 150 fs, and target densities of 80% and 90%. Scanning electron microscope photomicrographs and profilometer traces show a striking difference between nanosecond and femtosecond laser irradiation. Shortening the pulse width reduced particulate formation, provided stoichiometry, and improved the film properties. Decreasing the target density raised the ablation rate, produced thicker but nonuniform films, and reduced particulate formation

  9. Influence of pulse width and target density on pulsed laser deposition of thin YBaCuO film.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikram, S.

    1999-01-20

    We have studied the effects of temporal pulse width and target density on the deposition of thin films of YBaCuO. A 248nm excimer laser and an 825nm Ti-sapphire laser were used to conduct the experiments with pulse widths of 27 ns, 16 ns, and 150 fs, and target densities of 80% and 90%. Scanning electron microscope photomicrographs and profilometer traces show a striking difference between nanosecond and femtosecond laser irradiation. Shortening the pulse width reduced particulate formation, provided stoichiometry, and improved the film properties. Decreasing the target density raised the ablation rate, produced thicker but nonuniform films, and reduced particulate formation.

  10. [Experimental investigation of laser plasma soft X-ray source with gas target].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qi-liang; Gong, Yan; Lin, Jing-quan; Chen, Bo; Cao, Jian-lin

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes a debris-free laser plasma soft X-ray source with a gas target, which has high operating frequency and can produce strong soft X-ray radiation. The valve of this light source is drived by a piezoelectrical ceramic whose operating frequency is up to 400 Hz. In comparison with laser plasma soft X-ray sources using metal target, the light source is debris-free. And it has higher operating frequency than gas target soft X-ray sources whose nozzle is controlled by a solenoid valve. A channel electron multiplier (CEM) operating in analog mode is used to detect the soft X-ray generated by the laser plasma source, and the CEM's output is fed to to a charge-sensitive preamplifier for further amplification purpose. Output charges from the CEM are proportional to the amplitude of the preamplifier's output voltage. Spectra of CO2, Xe and Kr at 8-14 nm wavelength which can be used for soft X-ray projection lithography are measured. The spectrum for CO2 consists of separate spectral lines originate mainly from the transitions in Li-like and Be-like ions. The Xe spectrum originating mainly from 4d-5f, 4d-4f, 4d-6p and 4d-5p transitions in multiply charged xenon ions. The spectrum for Kr consists of separate spectral lines and continuous broad spectra originating mainly from the transitions in Cu-, Ni-, Co- and Fe-like ions.

  11. Synergistic effects of dendritic cell targeting and laser-microporation on enhancing epicutaneous skin vaccination efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Yoan; Duinkerken, Sanne; Hoepflinger, Veronika; Mayr, Melissa; Korotchenko, Evgeniia; Kurtaj, Almedina; Pablos, Isabel; Steiner, Markus; Stoecklinger, Angelika; Lübbers, Joyce; Schmid, Maximillian; Ritter, Uwe; Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Ablinger, Michael; Wally, Verena; Hochmann, Sarah; Raninger, Anna M; Strunk, Dirk; van Kooyk, Yvette; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2017-11-28

    Due to its unique immunological properties, the skin is an attractive target tissue for allergen-specific immunotherapy. In our current work, we combined a dendritic cell targeting approach with epicutaneous immunization using an ablative fractional laser to generate defined micropores in the upper layers of the skin. By coupling the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 to mannan from S. cerevisiae via mild periodate oxidation we generated hypoallergenic Bet-mannan neoglycoconjugates, which efficiently targeted CD14 + dendritic cells and Langerhans cells in human skin explants. Mannan conjugation resulted in sustained release from the skin and retention in secondary lymphoid organs, whereas unconjugated antigen showed fast renal clearance. In a mouse model, Bet-mannan neoglycoconjugates applied via laser-microporated skin synergistically elicited potent humoral and cellular immune responses, superior to intradermal injection. The induced antibody responses displayed IgE-blocking capacity, highlighting the therapeutic potential of the approach. Moreover, application via micropores, but not by intradermal injection, resulted in a mixed TH1/TH17-biased immune response. Our data clearly show that applying mannan-neoglycoconjugates to an organ rich in dendritic cells using laser-microporation is superior to intradermal injection. Due to their low IgE binding capacity and biodegradability, mannan neoglycoconjugates therefore represent an attractive formulation for allergen-specific epicutaneous immunotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeting doxorubicin encapsulated in stealth liposomes to solid tumors by non thermal diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannam, Magdy M; El Gebaly, Reem; Fadel, Maha

    2016-04-05

    The use of liposomes as drug delivery systems is the most promising technique for targeting drug especially for anticancer therapy. In this study sterically stabilized liposomes was prepared from DPPC/Cholesterol/PEG-PE encapsulated doxorubicin. The effect of lyophilization on liposomal stability and hence expiration date were studied. Moreover, the effect of diode laser on the drug released from liposomesin vitro and in vivo in mice carrying implanted solid tumor were also studied. The results indicated that lyophilization of the prepared liposomes encapsulating doxorubicin led to marked stability when stored at 5 °C and it is possible to use the re-hydrated lyophilized liposomes within 12 days post reconstitution. Moreover, the use of low energy diode laser for targeting anticancer drug to the tumor cells is a promising method in cancer therapy. We can conclude that lyophilization of the liposomes encapsulating doxorubicin lead to marked stability for the liposomes when stored at 5 °C. Moreover, the use of low energy diode laser for targeting anticancer drug to the tumor cells through the use of photosensitive sterically stabilized liposomes loaded with doxorubicin is a promising method. It proved to be applicable and successful for treatment of Ehrlich solid tumors implanted in mice and eliminated toxic side effects of doxorubicin.

  13. Development and characterization of plasma targets for controlled injection of electrons into laser-driven wakefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinwaechter, Tobias; Goldberg, Lars; Palmer, Charlotte; Schaper, Lucas; Schwinkendorf, Jan-Patrick; Osterhoff, Jens

    2012-10-01

    Laser-driven wakefield acceleration within capillary discharge waveguides has been used to generate high-quality electron bunches with GeV-scale energies. However, owing to fluctuations in laser and plasma conditions in combination with a difficult to control self-injection mechanism in the non-linear wakefield regime these bunches are often not reproducible and can feature large energy spreads. Specialized plasma targets with tailored density profiles offer the possibility to overcome these issues by controlling the injection and acceleration processes. This requires precise manipulation of the longitudinal density profile. Therefore our target concept is based on a capillary structure with multiple gas in- and outlets. Potential target designs are simulated using the fluid code OpenFOAM and those meeting the specified criteria are fabricated using femtosecond-laser machining of structures into sapphire plates. Density profiles are measured over a range of inlet pressures utilizing gas-density profilometry via Raman scattering and pressure calibration with longitudinal interferometry. In combination these allow absolute density mapping. Here we report the preliminary results.

  14. Surface Laser Scanning Measurements for the n_TOF spallation target

    CERN Document Server

    Vlachoudis, V; Cennini, P; Lebbos, E; Lettry, J

    2010-01-01

    The n_TOF spallation target is made of pure lead immersed into cooling water. The target was operating normally from 2001 until august 2004, when an increased transfer of radioactive products from the spallation target to the cooling circuit has been observed. The target was considered damaged by the safety commission (SC/RP), and an investigation campaign started to verify the actual status of the target. According to FLUKA and Ansys calculations the target was working in the elastoplastic regime of the lead material, therefore a deformation might be expected. The present paper describes a laser photographic method and the results of a possible such deformation. The target had a surface activity of the order of 20 mSv/h, therefore we were forced to perform the measurement from distance. The used method, is based on a linelaser and a high resolution digital camera for retrieving the 3D position of the surface of the lead target. Similar methods are used in the film industry and animation studios for scanning ...

  15. Laser stand for irradiation of targets by laser pulses from the Iskra-5 facility at a repetition rate of 100 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annenkov, V I; Garanin, Sergey G; Eroshenko, V A; Zhidkov, N V; Zubkov, A V; Kalipanov, S V; Kalmykov, N A; Kovalenko, V P; Krotov, V A; Lapin, S G; Martynenko, S P; Pankratov, V I; Faizullin, V S; Khrustalev, V A; Khudikov, N M; Chebotar, V S

    2009-01-01

    A train of a few tens of high-power subnanosecond laser pulses with a repetition period of 10 ns is generated in the Iskra-5 facility. The laser pulse train has an energy of up to 300 J and contains up to 40 pulses (by the 0.15 intensity level), the single pulse duration in the train being ∼0.5 ns. The results of experiments on conversion of a train of laser pulses to a train of X-ray pulses are presented. Upon irradiation of a tungsten target, a train of X-ray pulses is generated with the shape of an envelope in the spectral band from 0.18 to 0.28 keV similar to that of the envelope of the laser pulse train. The duration of a single X-ray pulse in the train is equal to that of a single laser pulse. (lasers)

  16. Targeted femtosecond laser driven drug delivery within HIV-1 infected cells: In-vitro studies [conference paper

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maphanga, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available of SPIE 10062, Optical Interactions with Tissue and Cells XXVIIISan Francisco, California, USA, 26 January - 03 February 2017 Targeted femtosecond laser driven drug delivery within HIV-1 infected cells: In-vitro studies Charles Maphanga 1, 2...

  17. Negative pressure and spallation in graphite targets under nano- and picosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belikov, R S; Khishchenko, K V [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Krasyuk, I K; Semenov, A Yu; Stuchebryukhov, I A [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rinecker, T; Schoenlein, A [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Rosmej, O N [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Germany, 64291 Darmstadt, Planckstraße, 1 (Germany); Tomut, M [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany, 64289 Darmstadt, Karolinenplatz, 5 (Germany)

    2015-05-31

    We present the results of experiments on the spallation phenomena in graphite targets under shock-wave nano- and picosecond irradiation, which have been performed on Kamerton-T (GPI, Moscow, Russia) and PHELIX (GSI, Darmstadt, Germany) laser facilities. In the range of the strain rates of 10{sup 6} – 10{sup 7} s{sup -1}, the data on the dynamic mechanical strength of the material at rapure (spallation) have been for the first time obtained. With a maximal strain rate of 1.4 × 10{sup 7} s{sup -1}, the spall strength of 2.1 GPa is obtained, which constitutes 64% of the theoretical ultimate tensile strength of graphite. The effect of spallation is observed not only on the rear side of the target, but also on its irradiated (front) surface. With the use of optical and scanning electron microscopes, the morphology of the front and rear surfaces of the targets is studied. By means of Raman scattering of light, the graphite structure both on the target front surface under laser exposure and on its rear side in the spall zone is investigated. A comparison of the dynamic strength of graphite and synthetic diamond is performed. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  18. Smooth silk fibroin nanofilm deposited by 1064-nm pulsed laser beam from an opaque target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, R.; Nakayama, S.; Senna, M.

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to prepare smooth nanostructured thin films of silk fibroin (SF) by near-infrared (NIR) pulsed laser deposition, an opaque target was prepared from an emulsified aqueous solution of SF. Upon irradiation of 1064-nm pulsed laser beam at its fluence 5 J/cm 2 , a thin film of SF was deposited on the Si(100) substrate with its root-mean-square surface roughness, 0.37 nm, smoother than those obtained from a compressed target of SF powders by approximately an order of magnitude. The attainment of an extra-smooth film from the opaque target was discussed in terms of multiple Mie scattering of the incident NIR beam, leading to an increase in the plasma density, intensified optical breakdown, ablation of better dispersed SF molecular units, and a film with more intensive intermolecular cross-linking. - Highlights: • Thin film of silk fibroin with its RMS surface roughness, R rms , 0.37 nm was obtained. • The use of a target from an emulsified solution of SF was the key issue. • Mechanism involved was elucidated in terms of enhanced Mie scattering

  19. Blast-Wave Generation and Propagation in Rapidly Heated Laser-Irradiated Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, S. T.; Stillman, C. R.; Nilson, P. M.; Solodov, A. A.; Froula, D. H.

    2017-10-01

    Time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectroscopy was used to study the creation and propagation of a >100-Mbar blast wave in a target irradiated by an intense (>1018WWcm2 cm2) laser pulse. Blast waves provide a platform to generate immense pressures in the laboratory. A temporal double flash of XUV radiation was observed when viewing the rear side of the target, which is attributed to the emergence of a blast wave following rapid heating by a fast-electron beam generated from the laser pulse. The time-history of XUV emission in the photon energy range of 50 to 200 eV was recorded with an x-ray streak camera with 7-ps temporal resolution. The heating and expansion of the target was simulated with an electron transport code coupled to 1-D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. The temporal delay between the two flashes measured in a systematic study of target thickness and composition was found to evolve in good agreement with a Sedov-Taylor blast-wave solution. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and Department of Energy Office of Science Award Number DE-SC-0012317.

  20. Melanosomes are a primary target of Q-switched ruby laser irradiation in guinea pig skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polla, L.L.; Margolis, R.J.; Dover, J.S.; Whitaker, D.; Murphy, G.F.; Jacques, S.L.; Anderson, R.R.

    1987-09-01

    The specific targeting of melanosomes may allow for laser therapy of pigmented cutaneous lesions. The mechanism of selective destruction of pigmented cells by various lasers, however, has not been fully clarified. Black, brown, and albino guinea pigs were exposed to optical pulses at various radiant exposure doses from a Q-switched, 40 nsec, 694 nm ruby laser. Biopsies were analyzed by light and electron microscopy (EM). Albino animals failed to develop clinical or microscopic evidence of cutaneous injury after irradiation. In both black and brown animals, the clinical threshold for gross change was 0.4 J/cm2, which produced an ash-white spot. By light microscopy, alterations appeared at 0.3 J/cm2 and included separation at the dermoepidermal junction, and the formation of vacuolated epidermal cells with a peripheral cytoplasmic condensation of pigment. By EM, enlarged melanosomes with a central lucent zone were observed within affected epidermal cells at 0.3 J/cm2. At 0.8 and 1.2 J/cm2, individual melanosomes were more intensely damaged and disruption of melanosomes deep in the hair papillae was observed. Dermal-epidermal blisters were formed precisely at the lamina lucida, leaving basal cell membranes and hemidesmosomes intact. Possible mechanisms for melanosomal injury are discussed. These observations show that the effects of the Q-switched ruby laser are melanin-specific and melanin-dependent, and may be useful in the selective destruction of pigmented as well as superficial cutaneous lesions.

  1. High-contrast laser acceleration of relativistic electrons in solid cone-wire targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higginson, D. P. [Univ. of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Link, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sawada, H. [Univ. of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chawla, S. R. [Univ. of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, C. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jarrott, L. C. [Univ. of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Flippo, K. A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McLean, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Patel, P. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Perez, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beg, F. N. [Univ. of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Bartal, T. [Univ. of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wei, M. S. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Optimization of electron coupling into small solid angles is of extreme importance to applications, such as Fast Ignition, that require maximum electron energy deposition within a small volume. To optimize this coupling, we use the ultra-high-contrast Trident laser, which remains below intensity of 1011 W/cm2 until < 0.1 ns before the main pulse, while still attaining high-energy, 75 J, and peak intensity of 5 x 1019 W/cm2. Using a cone-wire target, we find that the coupling into the 40 μm diameter wire is increased by a factor of 2.7x over the low-contrast Titan laser at similar peak intensity. Full-scale simulations are used to model the laser interaction and quantitatively reproduce the experimental results. These show that increase in coupling is due to both a closer interaction, as well as the reduction of laser filamentation and self-focusing.

  2. Explosive vaporization induced by high-power CO2-laser target interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugenschmidt, M.; Vollrath, K.

    1976-01-01

    The interactions of high-power laser pulses with targets such as metals or dielectric materials causes a series of optical, thermal, and mechanical processes. Thereby, heating, melting, and vaporization can take place in a short time. At power densities of about 10 7 to several 10 8 W/cm 2 this can even be produced explosively. As compared to continuous ablation, this type of interaction can remove greater masses from the bulk of material. The investigations are performed by using an electron-beam preionized CO 2 -laser acting on different target materials. The energy of the laser pulses is about 30 J, the pulse-half-widths of the long-tail pulses 4 to 6 μs. Optical measurements yield some information on threshold values for these processes, for the formation and expansion of plasmas, and for the ejection of material in form of greater particles. High speed photographic techniques include a rotating mirror- and an image converter camera. Starting from shock-wave theory, gas dynamic equations (in unidimensional approximation) allow for a quantitative determination of the specific internal energies and pressures in the case of optical detonation. (orig.) [de

  3. Pulsed laser ablation of borax target in vacuum and hydrogen DC glow discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, A. N.; Miotello, A.; Mosaner, P.

    2006-09-01

    The aim of our experiment was to produce a material with B sbnd H bonds for applications in hydrogen storage and generation. By using KrF excimer laser ( λ = 248 nm) ablation of borax (Na 2B 4O 7) target, thin films were deposited on KBr and silicon substrates. Ablation was performed both in vacuum and in hydrogen atmosphere. DC glow discharge technique was utilized to enhance hydrogen gas ionization. Experiments were performed using laser fluence from 5 to 20 J/cm 2. Films were deposited under gas pressure of 1 × 10 -5 to 5 × 10 -2 mbar and substrate temperatures of 130-450 °C. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of films showed presence of circular particulates. Film thickness, roughness and particulates number increased with increase in laser fluence. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis shows that sodium content in the particulates is higher than in the target. This effect is discussed in terms of atomic arrangements (both at surface and bulk) in systems where ionic and covalent bonds are present and by looking at the increased surface/bulk ratio of the particulates with respect to the deposited films. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements showed presence of B sbnd O stretching and B sbnd O sbnd B bending bonds. Possible reasons for absence of B sbnd H bonds are attributed to binding enthalpy of the competing molecules.

  4. Nanosecond laser ablation of target Al in a gaseous medium: explosive boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhukin, V. I.; Mazhukin, A. V.; Demin, M. M.; Shapranov, A. V.

    2018-03-01

    An approximate mathematical description of the processes of homogeneous nucleation and homogeneous evaporation (explosive boiling) of a metal target (Al) under the influence of ns laser radiation is proposed in the framework of the hydrodynamic model. Within the continuum approach, a multi-phase, multi-front hydrodynamic model and a computational algorithm are designed to simulate nanosecond laser ablation of the metal targets immersed in gaseous media. The proposed approach is intended for modeling and detailed analysis of the mechanisms of heterogeneous and homogeneous evaporation and their interaction with each other. It is shown that the proposed model and computational algorithm allow modeling of interrelated mechanisms of heterogeneous and homogeneous evaporation of metals, manifested in the form of pulsating explosive boiling. Modeling has shown that explosive evaporation in metals is due to the presence of a near-surface temperature maximum. It has been established that in nanosecond pulsed laser ablation, such exposure regimes can be implemented in which phase explosion is the main mechanism of material removal.

  5. Magnetic collimation of fast electrons in specially engineered targets irradiated by ultraintense laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Hongbo; Zhu Shaoping; Wu Sizhong; Chen Mo; Zhou Cangtao; He, X. T.; Yu Wei; Nagatomo, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    The efficient magnetic collimation of fast electron flow transporting in overdense plasmas is investigated with two-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell numerical simulations. It is found that the specially engineered targets exhibiting either high-resistivity-core-low-resistivity-cladding structure or low-density-core-high-density-cladding structure can collimate fast electrons. Two main mechanisms to generate collimating magnetic fields are found. In high-resistivity-core-low-resistivity-cladding structure targets, the magnetic field at the interfaces is generated by the gradients of the resistivity and fast electron current, while in low-density-core-high-density-cladding structure targets, the magnetic field is generated by the rapid changing of the flow velocity of the background electrons in transverse direction (perpendicular to the flow velocity) caused by the density jump. The dependences of the maximal magnetic field on the incident laser intensity and plasma density, which are studied by numerical simulations, are supported by our analytical calculations.

  6. Restoration of longitudinal laser tomography target image from inhomogeneous medium degradation under common conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, WenJun; Wang, Ping; Fu, MeiCheng; Tan, JiChun; Zhu, Jubo; Li, XiuJian

    2017-07-10

    In order to overcome the shortages of the target image restoration method for longitudinal laser tomography using self-calibration, a more general restoration method through backscattering medium images associated with prior parameters is developed for common conditions. The system parameters are extracted from pre-calibration, and the LIDAR ratio is estimated according to the medium types. Assisted by these prior parameters, the degradation caused by inhomogeneous turbid media can be established with the backscattering medium images, which can further be used for removal of the interferences of turbid media. The results of simulations and experiments demonstrate that the proposed image restoration method can effectively eliminate the inhomogeneous interferences of turbid media and achieve exactly the reflectivity distribution of targets behind inhomogeneous turbid media. Furthermore, the restoration method can work beyond the limitation of the previous method that only works well under the conditions of localized turbid attenuations and some types of targets with fairly uniform reflectivity distributions.

  7. Smoothing and instability with magnetic field in a non-uniformly laser-irradiated planar target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, A.R.; Epperlein, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    Calculations are presented of the magneto-hydrodynamic response of a planar target to non-uniformities in energy deposition by a laser. The amplitude of the non-uniformities are assumed small and the equations are linearised in small perturbations about the solution for steady planar ablation driven by uniform laser energy deposition. The grad(n)xgrad(T) magnetic field source is included, along with Nernst convection and the Righi-Leduc heat flow. The magnetic field is shown to give a small increase in smoothing. A source term for magnetic field is included to simulate the effects of the Weibel instability. The instability is not strong enough to overcome the smoothing processes under the present assumptions. (author)

  8. Model of two temperatures of the laser evaporation of solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolentino E, P.; Gutierrez T, C.; Camps C, E.

    2007-01-01

    The energy transmission in the evaporation process of a solid target by a laser pulse by means of the model of two temperatures which consists on two equations of heat conduction coupled by means of an electron-phonon coupling factor that means the energy transfer rate between the electrons and the net is described. This electron-phonon coupling factor is calculated for the particular case of the graphite, the obtaining of the analytic solutions in a space dimension of the system of non linear partial differential equations is shown considering two forms of the laser pulse (gaussian and delta function) and the electron temperature distributions of temperature and of the net are analyzed. (Author)

  9. Measurements of the divergence of fast electrons in laser-irradiated spherical targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaakobi, B.; Solodov, A. A.; Myatt, J. F.; Delettrez, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2013-01-01

    In recent experiments using directly driven spherical targets on the OMEGA laser system, the energy in fast electrons was found to reach ∼1% of the laser energy at an irradiance of ∼1.1 × 10 15 W/cm 2 . The fraction of these fast electrons absorbed in the compressed fuel shell depends on their angular divergence. This paper describes measurements of this divergence deduced from a series of shots where Mo-coated shells of increasing diameter (D) were suspended within an outer CH shell. The intensity of the Mo–Kα line and the hard x-ray radiation were found to increase approximately as ∼D 2 , indicating wide divergence of the fast electrons. Alternative interpretations of these results (electron scattering, radiation excitation of Kα, and an electric field due to return current) are shown to be unimportant

  10. Laser-Plasma Interactions in Drive Campaign targets on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkel, D E; Callahan, D A; Moody, J D; Amendt, P A; Lasinski, B F; MacGowan, B J; Meeker, D; Michel, P A; Ralph, J; Rosen, M D; Ross, J S; Schneider, M B; Storm, E; Strozzi, D J; Williams, E A

    2016-01-01

    The Drive campaign [D A Callahan et al., this conference] on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] has the focused goal of understanding and optimizing the hohlraum for ignition. Both the temperature and symmetry of the radiation drive depend on laser and hohlraum characteristics. The drive temperature depends on the coupling of laser energy to the hohlraum, and the symmetry of the drive depends on beam-to-beam interactions that result in energy transfer [P. A. Michel, S. H. Glenzer, L. Divol, et al, Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010).] within the hohlraum. To this end, hohlraums are being fielded where shape (rugby vs. cylindrical hohlraums), gas fill composition (neopentane at room temperature vs. cryogenic helium), and gas fill density (increase of ∼ 150%) are independently changed. Cylindrical hohlraums with higher gas fill density show improved inner beam propagation, as should rugby hohlraums, because of the larger radius over the capsule (7 mm vs. 5.75 mm in a cylindrical hohlraum). Energy coupling improves in room temperature neopentane targets, as well as in hohlraums at higher gas fill density. In addition cross-beam energy transfer is being addressed directly by using targets that mock up one end of a hohlraum, but allow observation of the laser beam uniformity after energy transfer. Ideas such as splitting quads into “doublets” by re-pointing the right and left half of quads are also being pursued. LPI results of the Drive campaign will be summarized, and analyses of future directions presented. (paper)

  11. Laser Guidestar Satellite for Ground-based Adaptive Optics Imaging of Geosynchronous Satellites and Astronomical Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, W. A.; Cahoy, K.; Males, J.; Carlton, A.; Yoon, H.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time observation and monitoring of geostationary (GEO) satellites with ground-based imaging systems would be an attractive alternative to fielding high cost, long lead, space-based imagers, but ground-based observations are inherently limited by atmospheric turbulence. Adaptive optics (AO) systems are used to help ground telescopes achieve diffraction-limited seeing. AO systems have historically relied on the use of bright natural guide stars or laser guide stars projected on a layer of the upper atmosphere by ground laser systems. There are several challenges with this approach such as the sidereal motion of GEO objects relative to natural guide stars and limitations of ground-based laser guide stars; they cannot be used to correct tip-tilt, they are not point sources, and have finite angular sizes when detected at the receiver. There is a difference between the wavefront error measured using the guide star compared with the target due to cone effect, which also makes it difficult to use a distributed aperture system with a larger baseline to improve resolution. Inspired by previous concepts proposed by A.H. Greenaway, we present using a space-based laser guide starprojected from a satellite orbiting the Earth. We show that a nanosatellite-based guide star system meets the needs for imaging GEO objects using a low power laser even from 36,000 km altitude. Satellite guide star (SGS) systemswould be well above atmospheric turbulence and could provide a small angular size reference source. CubeSatsoffer inexpensive, frequent access to space at a fraction of the cost of traditional systems, and are now being deployed to geostationary orbits and on interplanetary trajectories. The fundamental CubeSat bus unit of 10 cm cubed can be combined in multiple units and offers a common form factor allowing for easy integration as secondary payloads on traditional launches and rapid testing of new technologies on-orbit. We describe a 6U CubeSat SGS measuring 10 cm x 20 cm x

  12. Interaction of a laser beam with a target. Application to the fabrication of granular superconducting films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desserre, Jacques.

    1974-01-01

    The aim was to prepare a superconductor of high T(c). First are given the different simplified theories (BCS, Mac Millan) whereby the critical temperature of a superconductor can be calculated, with a view to its optimization. A material and a preparation technique were chosen on the basis of these theories. The method uses phenomena which occur during the interaction of a coherent pulsed light beam, emitted by a laser, with the surface of a metallic or nonmetallic target. Different theoretical models of this interaction are proposed. Special attention is paid to complex targets (alloys, compounds) and the construction of a model describing the vaporization of a compound is suggested. By a suitable choice of laser, based on the energy emission profile and the value of the energy supplied, congruent vaporization of the target is possible. The technique was applied to the preparation of thin layers by condensation onto a substrate of the vapor and the plasma emitted during the interaction. The deposits generally have the same structure as the bulk compound used as target while the atomic composition of the film may be slightly different. Thin layers of Ni 3 Mn, CdTe, ZnC, HfC were prepared in this way without treatment of the deposits after condensation. Simultaneous vaporization of the compound ReBe 22 in the bulk state gave filaments made up of small grains (20A), identical in composition with the target. The beryllium α phase (compact hexagonal) was identified but the electron diffraction study showed the existence of several other phases of unknown structure. The superconducting properties changed with time [fr

  13. Efficient extreme ultraviolet plasma source generated by a CO2 laser and a liquid xenon microjet target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Ariga, Tatsuya; Soumagne, George; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Kubodera, Shoichi; Pogorelsky, Igor; Pavlishin, Igor; Stolyarov, Daniil; Babzien, Marcus; Kusche, Karl; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2007-05-01

    We demonstrated efficacy of a CO2-laser-produced xenon plasma in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region at 13.5nm at variable laser pulse widths between 200ps and 25ns. The plasma target was a 30μm liquid xenon microjet. To ensure the optimum coupling of CO2 laser energy with the plasma, they applied a prepulse yttrium aluminum garnet laser. The authors measured the conversion efficiency (CE) of the 13.5nm EUV emission for different pulse widths of the CO2 laser. A maximum CE of 0.6% was obtained for a CO2 laser pulse width of 25ns at an intensity of 5×1010W/cm2.

  14. Efficient extreme ultraviolet plasma source generated by a CO2 laser and a liquid xenon microjet target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Ariga, Tatsuya; Soumagne, George; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Kubodera, Shoichi; Pogorelsky, Igor; Pavlishin, Igor; Stolyarov, Daniil; Babzien, Marcus; Kusche, Karl; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrated efficacy of a CO 2 -laser-produced xenon plasma in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region at 13.5 nm at variable laser pulse widths between 200 ps and 25 ns. The plasma target was a 30 μm liquid xenon microjet. To ensure the optimum coupling of CO 2 laser energy with the plasma, they applied a prepulse yttrium aluminum garnet laser. The authors measured the conversion efficiency (CE) of the 13.5 nm EUV emission for different pulse widths of the CO 2 laser. A maximum CE of 0.6% was obtained for a CO 2 laser pulse width of 25 ns at an intensity of 5x10 10 W/cm 2

  15. Control of laser absorbing efficiency and proton quality by a specific double target

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yu, Q.; Gu, Yanjun; Li, X.F.; Qu, J.F.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 8 (2016), 1-9, č. článku 083024. ISSN 1367-2630 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LQ1606; GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : improved proton beam quality * increased laser absorption efficiency * specific double-layer target Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.786, year: 2016

  16. Angular dependence of imprinting levels in laser-target interactions on planar CH foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Goncharov, V.N.; Boehly, T.R.; Delettrez, J.A.; Li, D.Y.; Marozas, J.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    Imprinting of laser-beam modulations at various angles of incidence is measured for the first time in planar CH foils. The imprinted target modulations were seeded by special probe beams at a spatial wavelength of 60 μm and subsequently amplified by five drive beams. The measured imprint efficiency decreases by a factor of 3 as the angle of incidence of the probe beam is increased from 20 deg. to 60 deg., as predicted by theoretical modeling. The imprinting is very sensitive to the relative arrival time of the probe and drive beams

  17. Gaseous laser targets and optical diagnostics for studying compressible hydrodynamic instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, J M; Robey, H; Mackinnon, A

    2001-01-01

    Explore the combination of optical diagnostics and gaseous targets to obtain important information about compressible turbulent flows that cannot be derived from traditional laser experiments for the purposes of V and V of hydrodynamics models and understanding scaling. First year objectives: Develop and characterize blast wave-gas jet test bed; Perform single pulse shadowgraphy of blast wave interaction with turbulent gas jet as a function of blast wave Mach number; Explore double pulse shadowgraphy and image correlation for extracting velocity spectra in the shock-turbulent flow interaction; and Explore the use/adaptation of advanced diagnostics

  18. Spectral and temporal characteristics of target current and electromagnetic pulse induced by nanosecond laser ablation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krása, Josef; De Marco, Massimo; Cikhardt, Jakub; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Velyhan, Andriy; Klír, Daniel; Řezáč, Karel; Limpouch, J.; Krouský, Eduard; Dostál, Jan; Ullschmied, Jiří; Dudžák, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 6 (2017), 1-8, č. článku 065007. ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA ČR GA16-07036S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 654148 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * target current * electromagnetic pulse Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.392, year: 2016

  19. Gamma-rays generated from plasmas in the interaction of solid targets with femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jingtang; Zhang Ping; Chen Duanbao; Li Zuhao; Tang Xiaowei; Zhang Ying; Wang Long; Feng Baohua; Zhang Xiulan; Wei Zhiyi; Li Zanliang; Zhang Jie

    1998-01-01

    The γ-rays with energies up to 300 keV have been observed from plasmas produced by femtosecond laser pulses at a focused intensity of 5 x 10 15 W·cm -2 ·μm 2 irradiating Ta, Mo and Cu targets. By introducing an 8% prepulse of 70 ps before the main pulse, the fraction of high energy γ-ray photons (hν>100 keV) was significantly enhanced relative to low energy photons (hν<100 keV)

  20. Energy distribution of the fast electron from Cu and CH targets irradiated with fs-laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Dafeng; Gu Yuqiu; Zheng Zhijian; Zhou Weimin; Jiao Chunye

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of target's material on fast electron energy distribution, the energy distribution of fast electrons from the front and the rear of Cu and CH targets have been measured during the interaction of femtosecond laser-foil targets. The results show that the fast electron spectrums from the front of Cu and CH targets are similar, which show energy distribution of fast electrons depends very little on material of targets. The fast electron spectrums from the rear of Cu and CH targets are obviously dissimilar, which indicate a mighty effect of target material on fast electron transport. The fast electron spectrums from the Cu target is 'soften', which is due to electron recirculation and self-magnetic field produced by electrons transported in the target. The fast electron spectrums from the CH target is a Maxwellian distribution, which is due to collision effect when electrons transport in the target. (authors)

  1. Characterization of a multi-keV x-ray source produced by nanosecond laser irradiation of a solid target: The influence of laser focus spot and target thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Guangyue; Zheng Jian; Shen Baifei; Lei Anle; Xu Zhizhan; Liu Shenye; Zhang Jiyan; Yang Jiamin; Ding Yongkun; Hu Xin; Huang Yixiang; Du Huabing; Yi Rongqing

    2008-01-01

    The influence of focus spot and target thickness on multi-keV x-ray sources generated by 2 ns duration laser heated solid targets are investigated on the Shenguang II laser facility. In the case of thick-foil targets, the experimental data and theoretical analysis show that the emission volume of the x-ray sources is sensitive to the laser focus spot and proportional to the 3 power of the focus spot size. The steady x-ray flux is proportional to the 5/3 power of the focus spot size of the given laser beam in our experimental condition. In the case of thin-foil targets, experimental data show that there is an optimal foil thickness corresponding to the given laser parameters. With the given laser beam, the optimal thin-foil thickness is proportional to the -2/3 power of the focus spot size, and the optimal x-ray energy of thin foil is independent of focus spot size

  2. Research on the underwater target imaging based on the streak tube laser lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zihao; Tian, Zhaoshuo; Zhang, Yanchao; Bi, Zongjie; Yang, Gang; Gu, Erdan

    2018-03-01

    A high frame rate streak tube imaging lidar (STIL) for real-time 3D imaging of underwater targets is presented in this paper. The system uses 532nm pulse laser as the light source, the maximum repetition rate is 120Hz, and the pulse width is 8ns. LabVIEW platform is used in the system, the system control, synchronous image acquisition, 3D data processing and display are realized through PC. 3D imaging experiment of underwater target is carried out in a flume with attenuation coefficient of 0.2, and the images of different depth and different material targets are obtained, the imaging frame rate is 100Hz, and the maximum detection depth is 31m. For an underwater target with a distance of 22m, the high resolution 3D image real-time acquisition is realized with range resolution of 1cm and space resolution of 0.3cm, the spatial relationship of the targets can be clearly identified by the image. The experimental results show that STIL has a good application prospect in underwater terrain detection, underwater search and rescue, and other fields.

  3. Use of Naturally Available Reference Targets to Calibrate Airborne Laser Scanning Intensity Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Litkey

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the possibility of calibrating airborne laser scanning (ALS intensity data, using land targets typically available in urban areas. For this purpose, a test area around Espoonlahti Harbor, Espoo, Finland, for which a long time series of ALS campaigns is available, was selected. Different target samples (beach sand, concrete, asphalt, different types of gravel were collected and measured in the laboratory. Using tarps, which have certain backscattering properties, the natural samples were calibrated and studied, taking into account the atmospheric effect, incidence angle and flying height. Using data from different flights and altitudes, a time series for the natural samples was generated. Studying the stability of the samples, we could obtain information on the most ideal types of natural targets for ALS radiometric calibration. Using the selected natural samples as reference, the ALS points of typical land targets were calibrated again and examined. Results showed the need for more accurate ground reference data, before using natural samples in ALS intensity data calibration. Also, the NIR camera-based field system was used for collecting ground reference data. This system proved to be a good means for collecting in situ reference data, especially for targets with inhomogeneous surface reflection properties.

  4. Plasma formation and target preheating by prepulse of PW laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Iwata, Natsumi; Koga, James; Dover, Nicholas; Nishiuchi, Mamiko

    2017-10-01

    An intense short pulse laser with intensity over 1021 W/cm2 has become available, i.e. J-KAREN-P at QST. Although the contrast of the short pulse is improved to be of the order of 10-11, there is an unavoidable prepulse, which has multiple spikes (ps) on top of an exponential profile with intensity greater than 1014 W/cm2 about 50 ps in front of the main pulse. The prepulse preheats the target and also produces tenuous plasmas in front of a target before the main pulse arrives. It is critical to understand such preheating of the target, where the nonlocal heat transport is essential at intensity >1014 W/cm2, since the target condition might totally change before the interaction with the main pulse. Using a hydro code, FLASH, and a collisional particle-in-cell code, PICLS, we study the preplasma formation and target preheating over tens of picoseconds timescale, and discuss the prepulse effects on the main pulse interaction. Work supported by the JSPS KAKENHI under Grant No. JP15K21767.

  5. Experimental and numerical study of the micro-spalling of metallic targets subjected to laser shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loison, D.

    2012-01-01

    Micro-spalling is a failure phenomenon consisting in dynamic fragmentation of a material after partial or full melting under intense shock wave loading. High power pulsed lasers are used as shock wave generators in laboratory for scientific and industrial purposes, such as research on inertial confinement fusion. In this context, the production of high velocity fragments can damage the facilities where shock experiments are conducted. This thesis, realized in collaboration with different teams from CEA, aims at understanding and modeling the different processes involved in micro-spalling phenomenon. Experiments to study micro-spalling of laser shock-loaded tin and aluminum targets have been performed. Various and complementary diagnostics (photonic Doppler velocimetry, soft recovery of debris and microtomography) have been used to characterize the ballistic properties (size distributions and velocities) of droplets constituting the micro-spalling cloud. In parallel, phase transition and fragmentation models have been adapted to simulate micro-spalling. These models have been implemented in a code to predict the sizes and velocities of debris. The combination of experimental and numerical results allows characterizing the successive stages of micro-spalling from laser-matter interaction to the ejection of droplets. (author)

  6. Laser ablation of a silicon target in chloroform: formation of multilayer graphite nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abderrafi, Kamal; García-Calzada, Raúl; Sanchez-Royo, Juan F.; Chirvony, Vladimir S.; Agouram, Saïd; Abargues, Rafael; Ibáñez, Rafael; Martínez-Pastor, Juan P.

    2013-04-01

    With the use of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy methods of analysis we show that the laser ablation of a Si target in chloroform (CHCl3) by nanosecond UV pulses (40 ns, 355 nm) results in the formation of about 50-80 nm core-shell nanoparticles with a polycrystalline core composed of small (5-10 nm) Si and SiC mono-crystallites, the core being coated by several layers of carbon with the structure of graphite (the shell). In addition, free carbon multilayer nanostructures (carbon nano-onions) are also found in the suspension. On the basis of a comparison with similar laser ablation experiments implemented in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), where only bare (uncoated) Si nanoparticles are produced, we suggest that a chemical (solvent decomposition giving rise to highly reactive CH-containing radicals) rather than a physical (solvent atomization followed by carbon nanostructure formation) mechanism is responsible for the formation of graphitic shells. The silicon carbonization process found for the case of laser ablation in chloroform may be promising for silicon surface protection and functionalization.

  7. Simulation of beam pointing stability on targeting plane of high power excimer laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dahui; Zhao Xueqing; Zhang Yongsheng; Zheng Guoxin; Hu Yun; Zhao Jun

    2011-01-01

    Based on characteristics of image-relaying structure in high power excimer MOPA laser system, simulation and analysis software of targeting beam's barycenter stability was designed by using LABVIEW and MATLAB. Simulation was made to measured results of every optical component in laboratory environment. Simulation and validation of budget values for optical components was and optimization of error budget of system was accomplished via post-allocation for several times. It is shown that targeting beam's barycenter stability in the condition of current laboratory environment can't satisfy needs and index of high demand optical components can be allotted to 1.7 μrad when index of low demand optical components have some stability margin. These results can provide a guide to construction of system and design and machining of optical components and optimization of system. Optical components of laboratory on work can satisfy optimized distributed index, which reduce the demand of structure to some extent. (authors)

  8. Copper-coated laser-fusion targets using molecular-beam levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocke, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    A series of diagnostic experiments at the Shiva laser fusion facility required targets of glass microspheres coated with 1.5 to 3.0 μm of copper. Previous batch coating efforts using vibration techniques gave poor results due to microsphere sticking and vacuum welding. Molecular Beam Levitation (MBL) represented a noncontact method to produce a sputtered copper coating on a single glassmicrosphere. The coating specifications that were achieved resulted in a copper layer up to 3 μm thick with the allowance of a maximum variation of 10 nm in surface finish and thickness. These techniques developed with the MBL may be applied to sputter coat many soft metals for fusion target applications

  9. INTERACTION OF RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Increase in the amplitude of hf currents during exposure of a neutral target to microsecond CO2 laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, A. A.; Losev, Leonid L.; Meshalkin, E. A.

    1988-09-01

    High-frequency electric currents were generated by irradiation of a metal target with CO2 laser pulses. It was found that the region where the ambient gas was photoionized had a decisive influence on the hf current amplitude. A method for increasing the amplitude of the current by creating an auxiliary laser jet on the target was proposed and used. An hf current of up to 1 A amplitude was observed at a frequency of 75 MHz and this current lasted for 1.5 μs.

  10. Experimental study for angular distribution of the hot electrons generated by femtosecond laser interaction with solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, D.F.; Gu, Y.Q.; Zheng, Z.J.; Wen, T.S.; Chunyu, S.T.; Wang, Z.B.; Yang, X.D.

    2003-01-01

    The experimental results of angular distribution of hot electrons in the interaction of a 60 fs, 125 mJ, 800 nm, ∼10 17 W cm -2 laser pulse with Al targets are reported. Three obvious peaks of hot electrons emission have been observed, as there is a weak normal component of the laser electric field. These emission peaks are located in the directions of the specular reflection of the laser, the target normal, and the backreflection of the laser, respectively. In the case of the P-polarized laser pulse, which has a strong normal component of the laser electric field, the peak in the backreflection of the laser disappeared, and only two obvious peaks of hot electron emissions existed. It shows that the different directions of hot electrons emission are dominated by different absorption or acceleration mechanisms. The experimental result of the hot electrons energy spectrum at the target normal shows that the effective temperature of hot electrons is about 190 keV, which is consistent with a scaling law of the resonance absorption

  11. Analysis of laser-induced evaporation of Al target under conditions of vapour plasma formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazhukin, V.I.; Nossov, V.V.; Smurov, I.

    2004-01-01

    The plasma-controlled evaporation of the Al target induced by the laser pulse with intensity of 10 9 W/cm 2 and wavelength of 1.06 μm is analysed with account for the two-dimensional effects. The self consistent model is applied, including the heat transfer equation in condensed medium, the equations of radiation gas dynamics in evaporated substance and the Knudsen layer model at the two media boundary. It is found that the phase transition at the target surface is controlled by the two factors: the surface temperature that depends on the transmitted radiation intensity, and the plasma pressure, governed by the expansion regime. The process comes through three characteristic stages, the sonic evaporation at the beginning, the condensation during the period of plasma formation and initial expansion, and finally, the re-start of evaporation in subsonic regime after the partial brightening of the plasma. During the subsonic evaporation stage the vapour flow and the mass removal rate are much higher near the beam boundaries than in the centre due to smaller plasma counter-pressure. The vapour plasma pattern is characterised by the dense hot zone near the surface where the absorption of laser energy occurs, and rapid decrease of density outside the zone due to three-dimensional expansion

  12. Monte Carlo simulation on hard X-ray dose produced in interaction between high intensity laser and solid target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Bo; Qiu Rui; Li Junli; Zhang Hui

    2014-01-01

    The X-ray dose produced in the interaction between high intensity laser and solid target was studied by simulation using Monte Carlo code. Compared with experimental results, the calculation model was verified. The calculation model was used to study the effect on X-ray dose with different electron temperatures, target materials (including Au, Cu and PE) and thicknesses. The results indicate that the X-ray dose is mainly determined by the electron temperature, and will be affected by the target parameters. X-ray dose of Au is about 1.2 times that of Cu, and is about 5 times that of PE (polyethylene). In addition, compared with other target thickness, when target thickness is the mean range of electron in the target, X-ray dose is relatively large. These results will provide references on evaluating the ionizing radiation dose for laser devices. (authors)

  13. Thin liquid sheet target capabilities for ultra-intense laser acceleration of ions at a kHz repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klim, Adam; Morrison, J.; Orban, C.; Chowdhury, E.; Frische, K.; Feister, S.; Roquemore, M.

    2017-10-01

    The success of laser-accelerated ion experiments depends crucially on a number of factors including how thin the targets can be created. We present experimental results demonstrating extremely thin (under 200 nm) glycol sheet targets that can be used for ultra-intense laser-accelerated ion experiments conducted at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Importantly, these experiments operate at a kHz repetition rate and the recovery time of the liquid targets is fast enough to allow the laser to interact with a refreshed, thin target on every shot. These thin targets can be used to produce energetic electrons, light ions, and neutrons as well as x-rays, we present results from liquid glycol targets which are useful for proton acceleration experiments via the mechanism of Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA). In future work, we will create thin sheets from deuterated water in order to perform laser-accelerated deuteron experiments. This research was sponsored by the Quantum and Non-Equilibrium Processes Division of the AFOSR, under the management of Dr. Enrique Parra, and support from the DOD HPCMP Internship Program.

  14. Spin-image surface matching based target recognition in laser radar range imagery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wang; Jian-Feng, Sun; Qi, Wang

    2010-01-01

    We explore the problem of in-plane rotation-invariance existing in the vertical detection of laser radar (Ladar) using the algorithm of spin-image surface matching. The method used to recognize the target in the range imagery of Ladar is time-consuming, owing to its complicated procedure, which violates the requirement of real-time target recognition in practical applications. To simplify the troublesome procedures, we improve the spin-image algorithm by introducing a statistical correlated coefficient into target recognition in range imagery of Ladar. The system performance is demonstrated on sixteen simulated noise range images with targets rotated through an arbitrary angle in plane. A high efficiency and an acceptable recognition rate obtained herein testify the validity of the improved algorithm for practical applications. The proposed algorithm not only solves the problem of in-plane rotation-invariance rationally, but also meets the real-time requirement. This paper ends with a comparison of the proposed method and the previous one. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  15. Increase in the temperature of a laser plasma formed by two-frequency UV - IR irradiation of metal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antipov, A A; Grasyuk, Arkadii Z; Efimovskii, S V; Kurbasov, Sergei V; Losev, Leonid L; Soskov, V I

    1998-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made of a laser plasma formed by successive irradiation of a metal target with 30-ps UV and IR laser pulses. The UV prepulse, of 266 nm wavelength, was of relatively low intensity (∼ 10 12 W cm -2 ), whereas the intensity of an IR pulse, of 10.6 μm wavelength, was considerably higher (∼3 x 10 14 W cm -2 ) and it was delayed by 0 - 6 ns (the optimal delay was 2 ns). Such two-frequency UV - IR irradiation produced a laser plasma with an electron temperature 5 times higher than that of a plasma created by singe-frequency IR pulses of the same (∼3 x 10 14 W cm -2 ) intensity. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  16. Interaction of ultra high intensity laser pulse with structured target and fast particle generation in a stable mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, A.A. [Max-Born Institute, Berlin (Germany); Platonov, K.Yu. [Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-15

    It is shown that the relief structure with optimum parameters can significantly increase the short-pulse laser absorption, which is connected with the enhancement of moving electrons between relief ledges. Analytical modeling and numerical simulations confirm this argumentation. In the considered cases, degradation of a structure by a laser pre-pulse is the most important factor and for this scheme to work, one needs a very high-contrast laser-pulse and a nanosecond laser pre-pulse duration. The limitation on laser pulse duration is not so strong because after destruction of a first relief a secondary dynamic structure of ion density appears. Thus, high absorption connected with a relief existence continues during a long time that gives a possibility for structure targets to be more efficient compared to a plane one. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Decay of a laser generated shock wave in an aluminium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werdiger, M.

    1993-09-01

    When a shock wave arrives at the near surface of a solid material, a radical and fast change occurs in the reflection properties of the material. The phenomenon is used in the present work in order to develop a new way to measure the transit time of a shock wave in a target. A 10 milliwatt He:Ne laser is directed toward the rear surface of the target. The reflected beam arrives at a photo-diode with a fast rise time of 150 psec which detects the instant of the change in the reflection. This technique, called 'continuous back lightning', is used in experiments with aluminium foil thickness in the range of 40μm ≤x≥ 1000μm. The shock wave is induced by a laser pulse of an intensity of 3*10 13 W/cm 2 . The results show two main physical regimes: in the first one 40μ ≤x≥ 210μm, there is a constant shock wave velocity which in our experiments was measured to be (12.81±0.67)km/s. In the second range of the thickness where 300μm there is a decay of the shock velocity. For x ≥ 210μm the geometry is one dimensional for our experimental conditions, while for x ≥ 300μm the 1-D geometry changes to 2 dimensional (2-D) geometry. The 2-D shock wave decay asymptotically (x→∞ to an acoustic wave. shock wave is described by a pressure scaling as x -n (n is a positive constant). The phenomenological equation of the state is taken to be P=A**u s + B*u s 2 +Bu s , where P is the pressure, u s - the shock velocity, A and B are constants. Applying our experimental results to the solution of the differential equation in this model A*x 2 ± B*x=C*x -n yields a value of n in the range 3.16 ≤n≥ 3.51. This pressure scaling law agrees with the self-similar solution of a concentrated impact on a surface between two media. This situation is well simulated by the laser deposition energy on a metal surface. In the experiment a 5% accuracy is achieved. Such a good accuracy has not been achieved so far in a laser induced shock-wave measurements in solids. (author). 52 refs

  18. Ablation of CdTe with 100 μs Nd:YAG laser pulses: dependence on target preparation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzeszutek, J.; Savchuk, V.; Oszwaldowski, M.

    2008-01-01

    The results of experimental studies of the ablation of CdTe with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1064 nm) performed with 100 μs pulses and repetition time of 35 Hz are presented for the pulse energy range from 0.13 to 0.25 J. The main goal is to elucidate the dependence of the ablation process on the target preparation method. The investigation of the vapour stream intensity and chemical composition and their evolution with time are performed with a quadrupole mass spectrometer synchronized with the laser pulses. These studies are performed for three kinds of targets: a target made of CdTe bulk crystal (BC target), a target made of CdTe fine powder pressed under the pressure of 700 atm (PP target), and a target made of loose CdTe powder (N-PP target). The applicability of these targets for obtaining high quality CdTe thin films is determined. The best chemical composition of the vapour stream can be obtained with the BC target. A major drawback of this target is the energetic threshold for ablation with Nd:YAG laser and resulting delay in the ablation process above the threshold. The advantage of powder targets over BC target is the lack of any ablation threshold or delay. Weaker angular dependence of the particle emission (associated with the surface roughness), if confirmed in further experiments, can be the most important advantage of PP and N-PP targets. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Suppression of suprathermal ions from a colloidal microjet target containing SnO2 nanoparticles by using double laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Kaku, Masanori; Katto, Masahito; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2007-01-01

    We have demonstrated suppression of suprathermal ions from a colloidal microjet target plasma containing tin-dioxide (SnO 2 ) nanoparticles irradiated by double laser pulses. We observed a significant decrease of the tin and oxygen ion signals in the charged-state-separated energy spectra when double laser pulses were irradiated. The peak energy of the singly ionized tin ions decreased from 9 to 3 keV when a preplasma was produced. The decrease in the ion energy, considered as debris suppression, is attributed to the interaction between an expanding low-density preplasma and a main laser pulse

  20. Suppression of suprathermal ions from a colloidal microjet target containing SnO2 nanoparticles by using double laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Kaku, Masanori; Katto, Masahito; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2007-10-01

    We have demonstrated suppression of suprathermal ions from a colloidal microjet target plasma containing tin-dioxide (SnO2) nanoparticles irradiated by double laser pulses. We observed a significant decrease of the tin and oxygen ion signals in the charged-state-separated energy spectra when double laser pulses were irradiated. The peak energy of the singly ionized tin ions decreased from 9to3keV when a preplasma was produced. The decrease in the ion energy, considered as debris suppression, is attributed to the interaction between an expanding low-density preplasma and a main laser pulse.

  1. Experimental study on energy distribution of the hot electrons generated by femtosecond laser interacting with solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Yuqiu; Zheng Zhijian; Zhou Weimin; Wen Tianshu; Chunyu Shutai; Cai Dafeng; Sichuan Univ., Chengdu; Neijiang Teachers College, Neijiang; Jiao Chunye; Chen Hao; Sichuan Univ., Chengdu; Yang Xiangdong

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the experiment of hot electron energy distribution during the femtosecond laser-solid target interaction. The hot electrons formed an anisotropic energy distribution. In the direction of the target normal, the energy spectrum of the hot electron was a Maxwellian-like distribution with an effective temperature of 206 keV, which was due to the resonance absorption. In the direction of the specular reflection of laser, there appeared a local plateau of hot electron energy spectrum at the beginning and then it was decreased gradually, which maybe produced by several acceleration mechanisms. The effective temperature and the yield of hot electrons in the direction of the target normal is larger than those in the direction of the specular reflection of laser, which proves that the resonance absorption mechanism is more effective than others. (authors)

  2. Prepulse and amplified spontaneous emission effects on the interaction of a petawatt class laser with thin solid targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esirkepov, Timur Zh. [QuBS, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Koga, James K., E-mail: koga.james@jaea.go.jp [QuBS, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, 2-6 Yamadaoka Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Morita, Toshimasa; Nishikino, Masaharu [QuBS, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Kageyama, Kei [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nagatomo, Hideo; Nishihara, Katsunobu [Institute of Laser Engineering, 2-6 Yamadaoka Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sagisaka, Akito; Kotaki, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Fukuda, Yuji; Okada, Hajime; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Yogo, Akifumi; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Kondo, Kiminori; Kando, Masaki [QuBS, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Bulanov, Sergei V. [QuBS, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); A.M. Prokhorov Institute of General Physics of RAS, Vavilova st. 38, Moscow 117942 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-01

    When a finite contrast petawatt laser pulse irradiates a micron-thick foil, a prepulse (including amplified spontaneous emission) creates a preplasma, where an ultrashort relativistically strong portion of the laser pulse (the main pulse) acquires higher intensity due to relativistic self-focusing and undergoes fast depletion transferring energy to fast electrons. If the preplasma thickness is optimal, the main pulse can reach the target accelerating fast ions more efficiently than an ideal, infinite contrast, laser pulse. A simple analytical model of a target with preplasma formation is developed and the radiation pressure dominant acceleration of ions in this target is predicted. The preplasma formation by a nanosecond prepulse is analyzed with dissipative hydrodynamic simulations. The main pulse interaction with the preplasma is studied with multi-parametric particle-in-cell simulations. The optimal conditions for hundreds of MeV ion acceleration are found with accompanying effects important for diagnostics, including high-order harmonics generation.

  3. Effects of laser wavelength and density scale length on absorption of ultrashort intense lasers on solid-density targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susumu, Kato; Eiichi, Takahashi; Tatsuya, Aota; Yuji, Matsumoto; Isao, Okuda; Yoshiro, Owadano [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    The interaction of intense laser pulses with overdense plasmas has attracted much interest for the fast igniter concept in inertial fusion energy. Hot electron temperatures and electron energy spectra in the course of interaction between intense laser pulse and overdense plasmas are reexamined from a viewpoint of the difference in laser wavelength. The hot electron temperature measured by a particle-in-cell simulation is scaled by I rather than I{lambda}{sup 2} at the interaction with overdense plasmas with fixed ions, where I and {lambda} are the laser intensity and wavelength, respectively. (authors)

  4. The influences of target properties and deposition times on pulsed laser deposited hydroxyapatite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Quanhe; Chen Chuanzhong; Wang Diangang; Liu Junming

    2008-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite films were produced by pulsed laser deposition from three kinds of hydroxyapatite targets and with different deposition times. A JXA-8800R electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) with a Link ISIS300 energy spectrum analyzer was used to give the secondary electron image (SE) and determine the element composition of the films. The phases of thin film were analyzed by a D/max-γc X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to characterize the hydroxyl, phosphate and other functional groups. The results show that deposited films were amorphous which mainly composed of droplet-like particles and vibration of PO 4 3- groups. With the target sintering temperature deposition times increasing, the density of droplets is decreased. While with deposition times increasing, the density of droplets is increased. With the target sintering temperature and deposition time increasing, the ratio of Ca/P is increasing and higher than that of theoretical value of HA

  5. Stoichiometry control of complex oxides by sequential pulsed-laser deposition from binary-oxide targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herklotz, A. [ORNL, Materials Science and Technology Division, Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6056 (United States); Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Institute for Physics, Von-Danckelmann-Platz 3, 06120 Halle (Germany); Dörr, K. [Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Institute for Physics, Von-Danckelmann-Platz 3, 06120 Halle (Germany); Ward, T. Z.; Eres, G. [ORNL, Materials Science and Technology Division, Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6056 (United States); Christen, H. M.; Biegalski, M. D. [ORNL, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6496 (United States)

    2015-03-30

    To have precise atomic layer control over interfaces, we examine the growth of complex oxides through the sequential deposition from binary targets by pulsed laser deposition. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is used to control the growth and achieve films with excellent structural quality. The growth from binary oxide targets is fundamentally different from single target growth modes and shows more similarities to shuttered growth by molecular beam epitaxy. The RHEED intensity oscillations of non-stoichiometric growth are consistent with a model of island growth and accumulation of excess material on the surface that can be utilized to determine the correct stoichiometry for growth. Correct monolayer doses can be determined through an envelope frequency in the RHEED intensity oscillations. In order to demonstrate the ability of this growth technique to create complex heterostructures, the artificial n = 2 and 3 Sr{sub n+1}Ti{sub n}O{sub 3n+1} Ruddlesden-Popper phases are grown with good long-range order. This method enables the precise unit-cell level control over the structure of perovskite-type oxides, and thus the growth of complex materials with improved structural quality and electronic functionality.

  6. X-ray spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma produced by femtosecond laser pulses at interaction with cluster target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skobelev, I.Yu.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Magunov, A.I.

    2002-01-01

    By means of X-ray spectroscopy one determined parameters of plasma produced at interaction of supershort laser pulses with cluster targets. One investigated into the effect of both initial properties of a cluster target and properties of a laser pulse on plasma characteristics. To diagnose plasma one applied a model of production of emitting spectra covering a whole number of free parameters. The conducted experimental investigations show that the investigated model of cluster heating by supershort pulses is the actual physical model, while the applied fitting parameters have a meaning of average values of plasma parameters [ru

  7. Rear surface light emission measurements from laser-produced shock waves in clear and Al-coated polystyrene targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, E. A.; Deniz, A. V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Stamper, J. A.; Obenschain, S. P.; Lehecka, T.; Mostovych, A. N.; Seely, J.

    1999-08-01

    The Nike KrF laser, with its very uniform focal distributions, has been used at intensities near 10 14 W/cm 2 to launch shock waves in polystyrene targets. The rear surface visible light emission differed between clear polystyrene (CH) targets and targets with a thin (125 nm) Al coating on the rear side. The uncoated CH targets showed a relatively slowly rising emission followed by a sudden fall when the shock emerges, while the Al-coated targets showed a rapid rise in emission when the shock emerges followed by a slower fall, allowing an unambiguous determination of the time the shock arrived at the rear surface. A half-aluminized target allowed us to observe this difference in a single shot. The brightness temperature of both the aluminized targets and the non-aluminized targets was slightly below but close to rear surface temperature predictions of a hydrodynamic code. A discussion of preheat effects is given.

  8. Optical diagnostics of CO2 laser-fusion targets using backscattered light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casperson, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    With the f/2.4 focusing optics on one of the eight Helios CO 2 laser beam lines, direct backscattered light from a variety of glass microballoon targets has been observed. The quantities that have been measured include: (1) the total backscattered energy; (2) relative amplitudes of the backscattered fundamental and low harmonics (n = 1, 2, 3) of the 10.6 μm incident light; (3) the 3/2 harmonic emission from a double pulse backscatter experiment; (4) the temporally resolved 10.6 μm light using a fast pyroelectric detector and a Los Alamos 5-GHz oscilloscope; and (5) the time-integrated spectrally resolved fundamental using a 3/4 meter spectrometer and a high resolution pyroelectric detector array (resolution approx. 40 A at 10.6 μm). The suitability of these diagnostics for evaluating the CO 2 laser plasma in terms of stimulated scattering processes, plasma density gradients, velocity of the critical surface, etc., is discussed

  9. Diagnostics of plasma produced by femtosecond laser pulse impact upon a target with an internal nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skobelev, I. Yu.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Gasilov, S. V.; Pikuz, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Magunov, A. I.; Boldarev, A. S.; Gasilov, V. A.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray diagnostics of the interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with intensities of 10 16 -10 18 W/cm 2 with CO 2 clusters and frozen nanosize water particles is carried out. The stage of cluster expansion and the formation of a plasma channel, which governs the parameters of the formed X-ray radiation source and accelerated ion flows, is studied. The measurements are based on recording spatially resolved X-ray spectra of H- and He-like oxygen ions. Utilization of Rydberg transitions for spectra diagnostics makes it possible to determine plasma parameters on a time scale of t ∼ 10 ps after the beginning of a femtosecond pulse. The role of the rear edge of the laser pulse in sustaining the plasma temperature at a level of ∼100 eV in the stage of a nonadiabatic cluster expansion is shown. The analysis of the profiles and relative intensities of spectral lines allows one to determine the temperature and density of plasma electrons and distinguish the populations of 'thermal' ions and ions that are accelerated up to energies of a few tens of kiloelectronvolts. It is shown that the use of solid clusters made of frozen nanoscale water droplets as targets leads to a substantial increase in the number of fast He-like ions. In this case, however, the efficiency of acceleration of H-like ions does not increase, because the time of their ionization in plasma exceeds the time of cluster expansion.

  10. The registration of non-cooperative moving targets laser point cloud in different view point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Sun, Huayan; Guo, Huichao

    2018-01-01

    Non-cooperative moving target multi-view cloud registration is the key technology of 3D reconstruction of laser threedimension imaging. The main problem is that the density changes greatly and noise exists under different acquisition conditions of point cloud. In this paper, firstly, the feature descriptor is used to find the most similar point cloud, and then based on the registration algorithm of region segmentation, the geometric structure of the point is extracted by the geometric similarity between point and point, The point cloud is divided into regions based on spectral clustering, feature descriptors are created for each region, searching to find the most similar regions in the most similar point of view cloud, and then aligning the pair of point clouds by aligning their minimum bounding boxes. Repeat the above steps again until registration of all point clouds is completed. Experiments show that this method is insensitive to the density of point clouds and performs well on the noise of laser three-dimension imaging.

  11. Confinement effects of shock waves on laser-induced plasma from a graphite target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Feiling; Liang, Peipei; Yang, Xu; Cai, Hua; Wu, Jiada; Xu, Ning; Ying, Zhifeng; Sun, Jian, E-mail: jsun@fudan.edu.cn [Shanghai Ultra-Precision Optical Manufacturing Engineering Center, Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2015-06-15

    The spatial confinement effects of shock waves on the laser-induced plasma (LIP) from a graphite target in air were studied by probe beam deflection (PBD) measurements and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). A clear relationship between the confinement of the LIP by the shock wave and the effects on the LIP emission was observed, and the underlying mechanisms are discussed. PBD monitoring revealed that the laser-ablation induced shock wave could be well analogized to the shock wave generated by a point explosion and would be reflected by a block. OES measurements indicated that the optical emission of the LIP exhibited significant variations with the block placement. A first enhancement and then a fast decay of CN molecular emission as well as a suppression of carbon atomic emission were observed in the presence of the block. The results revealed that the reflected shock wave spatially confined the expansion of the LIP and compressed the LIP after encountering it, pushing back the species of the LIP and changing the density of the LIP species including luminous carbon atoms and CN molecules. It is suggested that the change of the LIP emission is attributed to the density variation of the LIP species due to the compression of the LIP and the reactions occurring in the plasma.

  12. Laser-Driven Ion Acceleration from Plasma Micro-Channel Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, D. B.; Pukhov, A.; Yi, L. Q.; Zhou, H. B.; Yu, T. P.; Yin, Y.; Shao, F. Q.

    2017-02-01

    Efficient energy boost of the laser-accelerated ions is critical for their applications in biomedical and hadron research. Achiev-able energies continue to rise, with currently highest energies, allowing access to medical therapy energy windows. Here, a new regime of simultaneous acceleration of ~100 MeV protons and multi-100 MeV carbon-ions from plasma micro-channel targets is proposed by using a ~1020 W/cm2 modest intensity laser pulse. It is found that two trains of overdense electron bunches are dragged out from the micro-channel and effectively accelerated by the longitudinal electric-field excited in the plasma channel. With the optimized channel size, these “superponderomotive” energetic electrons can be focused on the front surface of the attached plastic substrate. The much intense sheath electric-field is formed on the rear side, leading to up to ~10-fold ionic energy increase compared to the simple planar geometry. The analytical prediction of the optimal channel size and ion maximum energies is derived, which shows good agreement with the particle-in-cell simulations.

  13. Experimental research on laser tracking system with galvanometer scanner for measuring spatial coordinates of moving target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Hu, Zhaohui; Liu, Yongdong; Liang, Jinwen

    2000-10-01

    The spatial position of industrial object, such as robot end- effector, is an important geometric parameter whose accuracy determines whether robot can perform accurately. Therefore, we have established a laser tracking and coordinate measuring system with galvanometer scanner for high accuracy, large range, non- contact, and spatial dynamic measurement. In this paper, the laser tracking system and its setup are illuminated at first. Then, the formulae for calculating coordinates are deduced, and the calibration method of the initial distance from tracking mirror to target is presented. After that, two preliminary experiments in different distances are described. One is on CMM; the other is with grating ruler as reference. In the former, the maximum measurement error of coordinates is 70micrometers and the maximum error of length is 35micrometers in the 85x100x100mm3 measurement volume, and in the 1m initial distance. In the later, the maximum error of length is 140micrometers in the range of 480mm, and in the 5m initial distance. At the end of the paper, the error sources are analyzed and simulated.

  14. Low-density carbonized composite foams for direct-drive laser ICF targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Fung-Ming.

    1989-03-01

    The design for a direct-drive, high-gain laser inertial confinement fusion target calls for the use of a low-density, low-atomic-number foam to confine and stabilize liquid deuterium-tritium (DT) in a spherical-shell configuration. Over the past two years, we have successfully developed polystyrene foams (PS) and carbonized resorcinol-formaldehyde foams (CRF) for that purpose. Both candidates are promising materials with unique characteristics. PS has superior mechanical strength and machinability, but its relatively large thermal contraction is a significant disadvantage. CRF has outstanding wettability and dimensional stability in liquid DT; yet it is much more fragile than PS. To combine the strengths of both materials, we have recently developed a polymer composite foam which exceeds PS in mechanical strength, but retains the wettability and dimension stability of CRF. This paper will discuss the preparation, structure, and properties of the polymer composite foams. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  15. Estimated refractive index and solid density of DT, with application to hollow-microsphere laser targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, C.K.; Tsugawa, R.T.; Hendricks, C.D.; Souers, P.C.

    1975-01-01

    The literature values for the 0.55-μm refractive index N of liquid and gaseous H 2 and D 2 are combined to yield the equation (N - 1) = [(3.15 +- 0.12) x 10 -6 ]rho, where rho is the density in moles per cubic meter. This equation can be extrapolated to 300 0 K for use on DT in solid, liquid, and gas phases. The equation is based on a review of solid-hydrogen densities measured in bulk and also by diffraction methods. By extrapolation, the estimated densities and 0.55-μm refractive indices for DT are given. Radiation-induced point defects could possibly cause optical absorption and a resulting increased refractive index in solid DT and T 2 . The effect of the DT refractive index in measuring glass and cryogenic DT laser targets is also described

  16. Laser irradiation of disk targets at 0.53 μm wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mead, W.C.; Campbell, E.M.; Estabrook, K.G.

    1981-01-01

    We present results and analysis for laser-irradiations of Be, CH, Ti, and Au disk targets with 0.53 μm light in 3 to 35 J, 600 ps pulses, at nominal intensities from 3 x 10 13 to approx. 4 x 10 15 W/cm 2 . The measured absorptions are higher than observed in similar 1.06 μm irradiations, and are largely consistent with modeling which shows the importance of inverse bremsstrahlung and Brillouin scattering. Observed red-shifted back-reflected light shows that Brillouin is operating at low to moderate levels. The measured fluxes of multi-keV x-rays indicate low hot-electron fractions, with temperatures which are consistent with resonance absorption. Measurements show efficient conversion of absorbed light into sub-keV x-rays, with time-, angular-, and spatial-emission distributions which are generally consistent with non-LTE modeling using inhibited thermal electron transport

  17. Kilotesla Magnetic Field due to a Capacitor-Coil Target Driven by High Power Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Zhang, Zhe; Ishihara, Kazuhiro; Shigemori, Keisuke; Hironaka, Youichiro; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki; Watanabe, Tsuguhiro; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory generation of strong magnetic fields opens new frontiers in plasma and beam physics, astro- and solar-physics, materials science, and atomic and molecular physics. Although kilotesla magnetic fields have already been produced by magnetic flux compression using an imploding metal tube or plasma shell, accessibility at multiple points and better controlled shapes of the field are desirable. Here we have generated kilotesla magnetic fields using a capacitor-coil target, in which two nickel disks are connected by a U-turn coil. A magnetic flux density of 1.5 kT was measured using the Faraday effect 650 μm away from the coil, when the capacitor was driven by two beams from the GEKKO-XII laser (at 1 kJ (total), 1.3 ns, 0.53 or 1 μm, and 5 × 1016 W/cm2). PMID:23378905

  18. Recent progress in particle acceleration from the interaction between thin-foil targets and J-KAREN laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Sakaki, Hironao; Ogura, Koichi; Esirkepov, Timur Zh; Tanimoto, Tsuyoshi; Yogo, Akifumi; Hori, Toshihiko; Sagisaka, Akito; Fukuda, Yuji; Kanasaki, Masato; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Shimomura, Takuya; Tanoue, Manabu; Nakai, Yoshiki; Sasao, Hajime; Sasao, Fumitaka; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Kondo, Shuji; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Seiji; Brenner, Ceri; Neely, David; Bulanov, Sergei V.; Kondo, Kiminori

    2012-07-01

    From the interaction between the high-contrast (˜more than 1010) 130 TW Ti:sapphire laser pulse and Stainless Steel-2.5 um-thick tape target, proton beam with energies up to 23 MeV with the conversion efficiency of ˜1% is obtained. After plasma mirror installation for contrast improvement, from the interaction between the 30 TW laser pulse and thin-foil target installed on the target holder with the hole whose shape is associated with the design of the well-known Wehnelt electrode of electron-gun, a 7 MeV intense proton beam is controlled dynamically and energy selected by the self-induced quasi-static electric field on the target holder. From the highly divergent beam having continuous spectrum, which are the typical features of the laser-driven proton beams from the interactions between the short-pulse laser and solid target, the spatial distribution of 7 MeV proton bunch is well manipulated to be focused to an small spots with an angular distribution of ˜10 mrad. The number of protons included in the bunch is >106.

  19. Target-plasma production by laser irradiation of a pellet in the Baseball II-T experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damm, C.C.; Foote, J.H.; Futch, A.H.; Goodman, R.K.; Hornady, R.S.; Osher, J.E.; Porter, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    One way to generate a plasma target that can be used in conjunction with an injected neutral beam to initiate a high-energy plasma in a steady-state, magnetic-mirror field is by the laser irradiation of a solid pellet located within the confinement region. In the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Baseball II-T experiment, a CO 2 laser was used to provide a two-sided irradiation of an ammonia pellet; the maximum laser intensity on the pellet was approximately 4 x 10 12 W/cm 2 . The 150-μm-dia pellets were guided to the laser focal spot in the Baseball II-T magnetic field using steering voltages controlled by a microcomputer-based system. Diagnostics showed complete ionization of the pellet, average ion energies in the keV range, synchronized triggering of the laser and the neutral beam, and rapid expansion of the plasma to a diameter that was a good match to the diameter of the neutral beam. Predictions obtained from the LASNEX code compared well with measured results. Although the laser-pellet approach was proven usable as a target-plasma startup system, it would be much more complicated and expensive than the method in which streaming plasma is used to trap the neutal beams

  20. 3D reconstruction of laser projective point with projection invariant generated from five points on 2D target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Yuan, Jing; Li, Xiaotao; Su, Jian

    2017-08-01

    Vision measurement on the basis of structured light plays a significant role in the optical inspection research. The 2D target fixed with a line laser projector is designed to realize the transformations among the world coordinate system, the camera coordinate system and the image coordinate system. The laser projective point and five non-collinear points that are randomly selected from the target are adopted to construct a projection invariant. The closed form solutions of the 3D laser points are solved by the homogeneous linear equations generated from the projection invariants. The optimization function is created by the parameterized re-projection errors of the laser points and the target points in the image coordinate system. Furthermore, the nonlinear optimization solutions of the world coordinates of the projection points, the camera parameters and the lens distortion coefficients are contributed by minimizing the optimization function. The accuracy of the 3D reconstruction is evaluated by comparing the displacements of the reconstructed laser points with the actual displacements. The effects of the image quantity, the lens distortion and the noises are investigated in the experiments, which demonstrate that the reconstruction approach is effective to contribute the accurate test in the measurement system.

  1. Investigation of ultrashort pulse laser ablation of solid targets by measuring the ablation-generated momentum using a torsion pendulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Wang, Wentao; Zhu, Xiaonong; Liu, Jiansheng; Xu, Kuanhong; Huang, Peng; Zhao, Jiefeng; Li, Ruxin; Wang, Mingwei

    2011-04-25

    50 fs - 12 ps laser pulses are employed to ablate aluminum, copper, iron, and graphite targets. The ablation-generated momentum is measured with a torsion pendulum. Corresponding time-resolved shadowgraphic measurements show that the ablation process at the optimal laser fluence achieving the maximal momentum is primarily dominated by the photomechanical mechanism. When laser pulses with specific laser fluence are used and the pulse duration is tuned from 50 fs to 12 ps, the generated momentum firstly increases and then remains almost constant, which could be attributed to the change of the ablation mechanism involved from atomization to phase explosion. The investigation of the ablation-generated momentum also reveals a nonlinear momentum-energy conversion scaling law, namely, as the pulse energy increases, the momentum obtained by the target increases nonlinearly. This may be caused by the effective reduction of the dissipated energy into the surrounding of the ablation zone as the pulse energy increases, which indicates that for femtosecond laser the dissipated energy into the surrounding target is still significant.

  2. A flexible calibration method for laser displacement sensors based on a stereo-target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jie; Sun, Junhua; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    Laser displacement sensors (LDSs) are widely used in online measurement owing to their characteristics of non-contact, high measurement speed, etc. However, existing calibration methods for LDSs based on the traditional triangulation measurement model are time-consuming and tedious to operate. In this paper, a calibration method for LDSs based on a vision measurement model of the LDS is presented. According to the constraint relationships of the model parameters, the calibration is implemented by freely moving a stereo-target at least twice in the field of view of the LDS. Both simulation analyses and real experiments were conducted. Experimental results demonstrate that the calibration method achieves an accuracy of 0.044 mm within the measurement range of about 150 mm. Compared to traditional calibration methods, the proposed method has no special limitation on the relative position of the LDS and the target. The linearity approximation of the measurement model in the calibration is not needed, and thus the measurement range is not limited in the linearity range. It is easy and quick to implement the calibration for the LDS. The method can be applied in wider fields. (paper)

  3. Miniature proportional counter for compression measurements of laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, S.M.; Dellis, J.H.; Bennett, C.K.; Campbell, E.M.

    1981-10-01

    Direct drive laser fusion targets consisting of DT gas encapsulated in glass microshells produce 14.1 MeV neutrons that can interact with silicon-28 nuclei in the glass to produce a 2.2 minute aluminum-28 activity. From the number of 28 Al nuclei created and the neutron yield, the compressed glass areal density can be found. To determine the number of activated atoms created, we collect approximately one-half of the target debris on a thin metal foil which is transferred to our beta-gamma coincidence detector. This detector consists of a 25 cm x 25 cm NaI(Tl) crystal having a 5 cm x 15 cm well. We have recently built a miniature proportional counter that fits into this well and is used to detect beta particles. It is constructed of .025 cm thick copper and has nine separate chambers through which methane flows. The coincidence background is 0.14 cpm and the measured beta efficiency is 45%. We are now building a .0125 cm thick counter made of aluminum having a predicted efficiency of > 90%

  4. Investigation of the compression of high-aspect targets irradiated with a laser pulse of the second harmonic of the Iskra-4 iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel'kov, S.A.; Bessarab, A.V.; Voronich, I.N.; Garanin, S.G.; Dolgoleva, G.V.; Zaretskii, A.I.; Izgorodin, V.M.; Ilyushechkin, B.N.; Kochemasov, G.G.; Kunin, A.V.; Martynenko, S.P.; Merkulov, S.G.; Rukavishnikov, N.N.; Ryadov, A.V.; Suslov, N.A.; Sukharev, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical modeling of experiments on the compression of targets under exploding pusher shell conditions, carried out at the Iskra-4 facility with the iodine laser pulsed at its fundamental frequency (λ= 1.315 μm) showed a correlation between the increase in the discrepancy between the calculated and experimental neutron yields and increase of the aspect ratio of the shell of the target used in the experiment. After conversion of the Iskra-4 facility to generate the second harmonic and improving the beam uniformity in the region of the target, a series of experiments was carried out on the compression of high-aspect targets A s > 300. In this series a record neutron yield for this installation, N = 6 x 10 7 , was obtained in experiments with glass-shell targets

  5. Correcting for variable laser-target distances of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements with ChemCam using emission lines of Martian dust spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melikechi, N.; Mezzacappa, A. [Optical Science Center for Applied Research, Delaware State University, Dover, DE (United States); Cousin, A.; Lanza, N.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lasue, J. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Clegg, S.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berger, G. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Wiens, R.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maurice, S. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Tokar, R.L.; Bender, S. [Planetary Science Institute, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Forni, O. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Breves, E.A.; Dyar, M.D. [Dept. of Astronomy, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA (United States); Frydenvang, J. [The Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Delapp, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gasnault, O. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Newsom, H.; Ollila, A.M. [Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Alburquerque, NM (United States); Lewin, E. [Institut des Sciences de la Terre, Universite Grenoble l-CNRS, Grenoble (France); and others

    2014-06-01

    As part of the Mars Science Laboratory, the ChemCam instrument acquires remote laser induced breakdown spectra at distances that vary between 1.56 m and 7 m. This variation in distance affects the intensities of the measured LIBS emission lines in non-trivial ways. To determine the behavior of a LIBS emission line with distance, it is necessary to separate the effects of many parameters such as laser energy, laser spot size, target homogeneity, and optical collection efficiency. These parameters may be controlled in a laboratory on Earth but for field applications or in space this is a challenge. In this paper, we show that carefully selected ChemCam LIBS emission lines acquired from the Martian dust can be used to build an internal proxy spectroscopic standard. This in turn, allows for a direct measurement of the effects of the distance of various LIBS emission lines and hence can be used to correct ChemCam LIBS spectra for distance variations. When tested on pre-launch LIBS calibration data acquired under Martian-like conditions and with controlled and well-calibrated targets, this approach yields much improved agreement between targets observed at various distances. This work lays the foundation for future implementation of automated routines to correct ChemCam spectra for differences caused by variable distance. - Highlights: • Selected Martian dust emission lines are used to correct for variable laser-target distances. • The correction model yields improved agreement between targets observed at various distances. • The impact of the model reduces the bias between predicted and actual compositions by as much as 70%. • When implemented, the model will yield spectral corrections for various ChemCam measurements. • This work is a foundation to perform novel stand-off LIBS measurements on Earth and other planets.

  6. New photon science and extreme field physics: volumetric interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with over-dense targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegelich, Bjorn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-24

    The constantly improving capabilities of ultra-high power lasers are enabling interactions of matter with ever extremer fields. As both the on target intensity and the laser contrast are increasing, new physics regimes are becoming accessible and new effects materialize, which in turn enable a host of applications. A first example is the realization of interactions in the transparent-overdense regime (TOR), which is reached by interacting a highly relativistic (a{sub 0} > 10), ultra high contrast laser pulse with a solid density, nanometer target. Here, a still overdense target is turned transparent to the laser by the relativistic mass increase of the electrons, increasing the skin depth beyond the target thickness and thus enabling volumetric interaction of the laser with the entire target instead of only a small interaction region at the critical density surface. This increases the energy coupling, enabling a range of effects, including relativistic optics and pulse shaping, mono-energetic electron acceleration, highly efficient ion acceleration in the break-out afterburner regime, the generation of relativistic and forward directed surface harmonics. In this talk we will show the theoretical framework for this regime, explored by multi-D, high resolution and high density PIC simulations as well as analytic theory and present measurements and experimental demonstrations of direct relativistic optics, relativistic HHG, electron acceleration, and BOA ion acceleration in the transparent overdense regime. These effects can in turn be used in a host of applications including laser pulse shaping, ICF diagnostics, coherent x-ray sources, and ion sources for fast ignition (IFI), homeland security applications and medical therapy. This host of applications already makes transparent-overdense regime one of general interest, a situation reinforced by the fact that the TOR target undergoes an extremely wide HEDP parameter space during interaction ranging from WDM conditions

  7. Excimer laser produced plasmas in copper wire targets and water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyo-Dong; Alexander, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Elastically scattered incident radiation (ESIR) from a copper wire target illuminated by a KrF laser pulse at lambda = 248 nm shows a dinstinct two-peak structure which is dependent on the incident energy. The time required to reach the critical electron density (n(sub c) approximately = 1.8 x 10(exp 22) electrons/cu cm) is estimated at 11 ns based on experimental results. Detailed ESIR characteristics for water have been reported previously by the authors. Initiation of the broadband emission for copper plasma begins at 6.5 +/- 1.45 ns after the arrival of the laser pulse. However, the broadband emission occurs at 11 +/- 0.36 ns for water. For a diatomic substance such as water, the electron energy rapidly dissipates due to dissociation of water molecules, which is absent in a monatomic species such as copper. When the energy falls below the excitation energy of the lowest electron state for water, it becomes a subexcitation electron. Lifetimes of the subexcited electrons to the vibrational states are estimated to be of the order of 10(exp -9) s. In addition, the ionization potential of copper (440-530 nm) is approximately 6 eV, which is about two times smaller than the 13 eV ionization potential reported for water. The higher ionization potential contributes to the longer observed delay time for plasma formation in water. After initiation, a longer time is required for copper plasma to reach its peak value. This time delay in reaching the maximum intensity is attributed to the energy loss during the interband transition in copper.

  8. Influence of the laser pulse repetition rate and scanning speed on the morphology of Ag nanostructures fabricated by pulsed laser ablation of solid target in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolov, A. S.; Balchev, I. I.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Kostadinov, I. K.; Karashanova, D. B.; Atanasova, G. B.

    2017-11-01

    Nanostructures of noble metal were produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquid. A solid Ag target was immersed in double distilled water and a CuBr laser in a master oscillator—power amplifier configuration oscillating at 511 nm and emitting pulses with duration of 30 ns at a repetition rate of up to 20 kHz was employed to produce different colloids. The impact was studied of the laser pulse repetition rate and the beam scanning speed on the morphology of the nanostructures formed. Further, the optical extinction spectra of the colloids in the UV/VIS range were measured and used to make an indirect assessment of the changes in the shape and size distribution of the nanostructures. The transmission values in the near UV range were used to estimate the efficiency of the ablation process under the different experimental conditions implemented. A visualization of the nanostructures was made possible by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structure and phase composition of the nanoparticles were studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), while the alteration of the target surface caused by the impact of the high-repetition-rate laser illumination was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The optimal conditions were determined yielding the highest efficiency in terms of amount of ablated material.

  9. Enhancement of EUV emission from a liquid microjet target by use of dual laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Rajyaguru, Chirag; Koga, Masato; Kawasaki, Keita; Sasaki, Wataru; Kubodera, Shoichi; Kikuchi, Takashi; Yugami, Noboru; Kawata, Shigeo; Andreev, Alexander A.

    2005-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation at the wavelength of around 13nm waws observed from a laser-produced plasma using continuous water-jet. Strong dependence of the conversion efficiency (CE) on the laser focal spot size and jet diameter was observed. The EUV CE at a given laser spot size and jet diameter was further enhanced using double laser pulses, where a pre-pulse was used for initial heating of the plasma.

  10. Effects of Relative Platform and Target Motion on Propagation of High Energy Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    is maintained. B. THE EFFECT OF THERMAL BLOOMING ON SPOT SIZE The effect of the thermal blooming on the laser beam propagation through the...micron] m, Bedford, MA: Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories, 1974. [9] H. Weichel, Laser Beam Propagation in the Atmosphere, Bellingham, WA...Atmospheric turbulence induced laser beam spread,” Appl. Opt., vol. 10, no. 12, p. 2771, 1971. 62 [14] C. R. Fussman, “High energy laser propagation in

  11. Investigation on fabrication and positioning of cryogenic shell laser fusion targets. Annual report, October 1, 1977--November 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.

    1978-01-01

    The research has been directed toward fabrication and positioning of cryogenic shell laser fusion targets, with particular emphasis on the development of a scheme which would allow for continuous fabrication, inspection, and delivery of the targets. Specifically, progress has been made in each of the following areas: (1) fabrication of a uniform layer of solid DT inside a glass microshell using a combination of helium gas jets and a heater wire; (2) levitation-freezing of a DT-filled glass microshell as a method for fabricating and positioning a cryogenic shell target; (3) a target fabrication system intended for continuous fabrication, inspection, and delivery of cryogenic targets; and (4) development of diagnostics for inspection, recording, and analysis of a solid DT layer inside a glass microshell, and for observing the parameters controlling the target freezing process

  12. Multi probes measurements at the PALS Facility Research Centre during high intense laser pulse interactions with various target materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Marco Massimo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During the interaction of high intense laser pulse with solid target, a large amount of hot electrons is produced and a giant Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP is generated due to the current flowing into the system target–target holder, as well as due to the escaping charged particles in vacuum. EMP production for different target materials is investigated inside and outside the target chamber, using monopole antenna, super wide-band microstrip antenna and Moebius antenna. The EMP consists in a fast transient magnetic field lasting hundreds of nanosecond with frequencies ranging from MHz to tens of GHz. Measurements of magnetic field and return target current in the range of kA were carried out by an inductive target probe (Cikhardt J. et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85 (2014 103507.

  13. Laser-driven acceleration of protons from hydrogenated annealed silicon targets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Picciotto, A.; Margarone, Daniele; Krása, Josef; Velyhan, Andriy; Serra, E.; Bellutti, P.; Scarduelli, G.; Calliari, L.; Krouský, Eduard; Rus, Bedřich; Dapor, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 3 (2010), 34008/1-34008/5 ISSN 0295-5075 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser-driven acceleration * laser ablation * plasma-material interactions * boundary layer effects Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.753, year: 2010

  14. Experimental study of ablation pressures and target velocities obtained in 0. 26. mu. m wavelength laser experiments in planar geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbro, R.; Faral, B.; Virmont, J.; Cottet, F.; Romain, J.P.; Pepin, H.

    1985-11-01

    In 0.26 ..mu..m wavelength laser experiments that were performed in planar geometry with irradiances between 10/sup 13/ and 10/sup 15/ W/cm/sup 2/, the ablation pressure and the target velocity have been measured using a shock-velocity measurement and the double foil technique, respectively. The conditions are discussed that must be satisfied if the double-foil technique is to give an accurate measurement of the velocity of the dense part of the target. The rocket model has also been improved using a time-dependent applied pressure pulse, in order to accurately describe the relation between ablation pressure, target velocity, and ablated fraction. Pressures up to 50 Mbar have been easily generated since lateral energy transport is rather low with a 0.26 ..mu..m wavelength laser.

  15. Experimental study of laser acceleration of planar targets at the wavelength 0.26 μm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbro, R.; Faral, B.; Cottet, F.; Romain, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    The main characteristics of accelerated aluminum targets, which are the target velocity, the uniformity of the acceleration and the backside temperature have been studied in laser experiments performed at wavelength 0.26 μm with an absorbed flux of a few 10 13 W/cm 2 , in 400-ps pulse duration by using the double-foil technique and an optical pyrometry diagnostic: The ablation pressure was inferred from the velocity measurements. The uniformity of the acceleration was shown to be controlled by the hot spots in the focal spot, and the importance of studying the smoothing of laser inhomogeneities for accelerated targets with large ablated fractions was emphasized. The observed dependence of the backside temperature as a function of the initial foil thickness is discussed in the light of shock wave heating and radiative heating

  16. Microjet formation and hard x-ray production from a liquid metal target irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lar' kin, A., E-mail: alexeylarkin@yandex.ru; Uryupina, D.; Ivanov, K.; Savel' ev, A., E-mail: abst@physics.msu.ru [International Laser Center and Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Bonnet, T.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M. [Centre d' Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, University of Bordeaux-CNRS-IN2P3, 33170 Gradignan (France); Spohr, K. [School of Engineering, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, Scotland PA1 2BE (United Kingdom); Breil, J.; Chimier, B.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Leguay, P.-M.; Tikhonchuk, V. T. [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, University of Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, Talence 33405 (France)

    2014-09-15

    By using a liquid metal as a target one may significantly enhance the yield of hard x-rays with a sequence of two intense femtosecond laser pulses. The influence of the time delay between the two pulses is studied experimentally and interpreted with numerical simulations. It was suggested that the first arbitrary weak pulse produces microjets from the target surface, while the second intense pulse provides an efficient electron heating and acceleration along the jet surface. These energetic electrons are the source of x-ray emission while striking the target surface. The microjet formation is explained based on the results given by both optical diagnostics and hydrodynamic modeling by a collision of shocks originated from two distinct zones of laser energy deposition.

  17. Microjet formation and hard x-ray production from a liquid metal target irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lar'kin, A.; Uryupina, D.; Ivanov, K.; Savel'ev, A.; Bonnet, T.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Spohr, K.; Breil, J.; Chimier, B.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Leguay, P.-M.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2014-01-01

    By using a liquid metal as a target one may significantly enhance the yield of hard x-rays with a sequence of two intense femtosecond laser pulses. The influence of the time delay between the two pulses is studied experimentally and interpreted with numerical simulations. It was suggested that the first arbitrary weak pulse produces microjets from the target surface, while the second intense pulse provides an efficient electron heating and acceleration along the jet surface. These energetic electrons are the source of x-ray emission while striking the target surface. The microjet formation is explained based on the results given by both optical diagnostics and hydrodynamic modeling by a collision of shocks originated from two distinct zones of laser energy deposition

  18. Microjet formation and hard x-ray production from a liquid metal target irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lar'kin, A.; Uryupina, D.; Ivanov, K.; Savel'ev, A.; Bonnet, T.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Spohr, K.; Breil, J.; Chimier, B.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Leguay, P.-M.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2014-09-01

    By using a liquid metal as a target one may significantly enhance the yield of hard x-rays with a sequence of two intense femtosecond laser pulses. The influence of the time delay between the two pulses is studied experimentally and interpreted with numerical simulations. It was suggested that the first arbitrary weak pulse produces microjets from the target surface, while the second intense pulse provides an efficient electron heating and acceleration along the jet surface. These energetic electrons are the source of x-ray emission while striking the target surface. The microjet formation is explained based on the results given by both optical diagnostics and hydrodynamic modeling by a collision of shocks originated from two distinct zones of laser energy deposition.

  19. Nike Experiment to Observe Strong Areal Mass Oscillations in a Rippled Target Hit by a Short Laser Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Kessler, T. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Metzler, N.; Oh, J.

    2010-11-01

    When a short (sub-ns) laser pulse deposits finite energy in a target, the shock wave launched into it is immediately followed by a rarefaction wave. If the irradiated surface is rippled, theory and simulations predict strong oscillations of the areal mass perturbation amplitude in the target [A. L. Velikovich et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 3270 (2003).] The first experiment designed to observe this effect has become possible by adding short-driving-pulse capability to the Nike laser, and has been scheduled for the fall of 2010. Simulations show that while the driving pulse of 0.3 ns is on, the areal mass perturbation amplitude grows by a factor ˜2 due to ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. It then decreases, reverses phase, and reaches another maximum, also about twice its initial value, shortly after the shock breakout at the rear target surface. This signature behavior is observable with the monochromatic x-ray imaging diagnostics fielded on Nike.

  20. Boron-Proton Nuclear-Fusion Enhancement Induced in Boron-Doped Silicon Targets by Low-Contrast Pulsed Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Picciotto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We show that a spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon target allows the production of a high yield of alpha particles of around 10^{9} per steradian using a nanosecond, low-contrast laser pulse with a nominal intensity of approximately 3×10^{16}  W cm^{−2}. This result can be ascribed to the nature of the long laser-pulse interaction with the target and with the expanding plasma, as well as to the optimal target geometry and composition. The possibility of an impact on future applications such as nuclear fusion without production of neutron-induced radioactivity and compact ion accelerators is anticipated.

  1. Observed transition from Richtmyer-Meshkov jet formation through feedout oscillations to Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a laser target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Kessler, T. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Nikitin, S. P.; Oh, J.; Metzler, N.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental study of hydrodynamic perturbation evolution triggered by a laser-driven shock wave breakout at the free rippled rear surface of a plastic target is reported. At sub-megabar shock pressure, planar jets manifesting the development of the Richtmyer-Meshkov-type instability in a non-accelerated target are observed. As the shock pressure exceeds 1 Mbar, an oscillatory rippled expansion wave is observed, followed by the “feedout” of the rear-surface perturbations to the ablation front and the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which breaks up the accelerated target.

  2. Development of a liquid tin microjet target for an efficient laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Hamada, Masaya; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2007-03-01

    A regenerative tin liquid microjet target was developed for a high average power extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source. The diameter of the target was smaller than 160 microm and good vacuum lower than 0.5 Pa was maintained during the operation. A maximum EUV conversion efficiency of 1.8% at the Nd:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser intensity of around 2 x 10(11) Wcm(2) with a spot diameter of 175 microm (full width at half maximum) was observed. The angular distribution of the EUV emission remained almost isotropic, whereas suprathermal ions mainly emerged toward the target normal.

  3. Development of a liquid tin microjet target for an efficient laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Hamada, Masaya; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2007-03-01

    A regenerative tin liquid microjet target was developed for a high average power extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source. The diameter of the target was smaller than 160 μm and good vacuum lower than 0.5 Pa was maintained during the operation. A maximum EUV conversion efficiency of 1.8% at the Nd:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser intensity of around 2×1011 W/cm2 with a spot diameter of 175 μm (full width at half maximum) was observed. The angular distribution of the EUV emission remained almost isotropic, whereas suprathermal ions mainly emerged toward the target normal.

  4. Development of a liquid tin microjet target for an efficient laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Hamada, Masaya; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2007-01-01

    A regenerative tin liquid microjet target was developed for a high average power extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source. The diameter of the target was smaller than 160 μm and good vacuum lower than 0.5 Pa was maintained during the operation. A maximum EUV conversion efficiency of 1.8% at the Nd:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser intensity of around 2x10 11 W/cm 2 with a spot diameter of 175 μm (full width at half maximum) was observed. The angular distribution of the EUV emission remained almost isotropic, whereas suprathermal ions mainly emerged toward the target normal

  5. Laser induced ablatively driven interfacial nonlinear fluid instabilities in multilayer targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manoranjan Khan; Gupta, M.R.; Mandal, L.K.; Roy, S.; Banerjee, R.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. High power laser driven shock waves in condensed matter have important application for studying equation of state (EOS) and high pressure physics. This is an important phenomenon in fuel compression for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments where multilayer targets of differing shock impedance are interacted by laser induced shocks. The interface between the two fluid becomes unstable when driven by the impulsive force (Richtmyer-Meshkov) due to such a shock wave or a continuously acting force e.g., gravity (Rayleigh-Taylor). In the nonlinear stage, the fluid interface is found to develop structures having finger-like shapes. The structures resemble a bubble (spike) accordingly as a lighter (heavier) fluid pushes in a heavier (lighter) fluid. These effects need to be mitigated for efficient compression in ICF experiment. We have studied the effect of density variation on R-T and R-M instability on the temporal development of nonlinear two fluid interfacial structures like bubble and spike. It is shown that the velocity of bubble or spike decreases leading to stabilization if the density of the fluids leads to lowering of the Atwood number. The Atwood number A = ρ a -ρ b / ρ a +ρ b changes to A* = ρ a *ρ b */ ρ a *ρ b * where ρ* m = ρ m (1-1/γ m ), m = [a,b], assuming ρ a > ρ b . It has been seen that the stabilization or destabilization (depending on the algebraic sign of the gradient) will be proportional to the pressure p 0 at the interface. The set of equation describing the dynamics of the bubbles and spikes in presence of fluid density variation are not analytically integrable in closed form. All the results are derived by numerical methods and are represented and interpreted. Analytical calculations are performed (not presented here) to modify the dynamical boundary condition between the two fluids and we have finally arrived at the following expression for the asymptotic bubble velocity ν b 2 = 2(r

  6. Quantitative study of the ionization-induced refraction of picosecond laser pulses in gas-jet targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackinnon, A.J.; Borghesi, M.; Iwase, A.; Jones, M.W.; Pert, G.J.; Rae, S.; Burnett, K.; Willi, O.

    1996-01-01

    A quantitative study of refractive whole beam defocusing and small scale breakup induced by optical ionization of subpicosecond and picosecond, 0.25 and 1 μm, laser pulses in gas-jet targets at densities above 1x10 19 cm -3 has been carried out. A significant reduction of the incident laser intensity was observed due to refraction from ionization-induced density gradients. The level of refraction measured with optical probing correlated well with the fraction of energy transmitted through the plasma. The numerical and analytical models were found to agree well with experimental observations. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  7. Analysis of mebendazole binding to its target biomolecule by laser flash photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jornet, Dolors; Bosca, Francisco; Andreu, Jose M; Domingo, Luis R; Tormos, Rosa; Miranda, Miguel A

    2016-02-01

    Mebendazole (MBZ) and related anticancer benzimidazoles act binding the β-subunit of Tubulin (TU) before dimerization with α-TU with subsequent blocking microtubule formation. Laser flash photolysis (LFP) is a new tool to investigate drug-albumin interactions and to determine binding parameters such as affinity constant or population of binding sites. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interactions between the nonfluorescent mebendazole (MBZ) and its target biomolecule TU using this technique. Before analyzing the MBZ@TU complex it was needed to determine the photophysical properties of MBZ triplet excited state ((3)MBZ(⁎)) in different media. Hence, (3)MBZ(⁎) showed a transient absorption spectrum with maxima at 520 and 375 nm and a lifetime much longer in acetonitrile (12.5 μs) than in water (260 ns). The binding of MBZ to TU produces a greater increase of the lifetime of (3)MBZ(⁎) (25 μs). This fact and the strong electron acceptor capability observed for (3)MBZ* evidence that MBZ must not be located close to any electron donor amino acid of TU such as its tryptophan or cysteine residues. Adding increasing amounts of MBZ to aqueous TU was determined the MBZ-TU binding constant (2.0 ± 0.5 × 10(5)M(-1) at 298K) which decreased with increasing temperature. The LFP technique has proven to be a powerful tool to analyze the binding of drug-TU systems when the drug has a detectable triplet excited state. Results indicate that LFP could be the technique of choice to study the interactions of non-fluorescent drugs with their target biomolecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Laser ``M'egajoule'' cryogenic target program: from target fabrication to conformation of the deuterium-tritium ice layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Rémy; Durut, Frédéric; Reneaume, Benoît; Chicane, Cédric; Théobald, Marc; Breton, Olivier; Martin, Michel; Fleury, Emmanuel; Vincent-Viry, Olivier; Bachelet, Franck; Jeannot, Laurent; Geoffray, Isabelle; Botrel, Ronan; Dauteuil, Christophe; Hermerel, Cyril; Choux, Alexandre; Bednarczyk, Sophie; Legaie, Olivier

    2008-11-01

    For the French inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, cryogenic target assemblies (CTAs) for the LMJ program are manufactured and filled at CEA Valduc (Dijon) in the cryogenic targets filling station (IRCC). They will be moved at about 20 K into a transport cryostat for cryogenic targets and will be driven from CEA/Valduc to CEA/CESTA (Bordeaux). Cryogenic targets will then be transferred by several cryogenic grippers on the cryogenic target positioner before shots. The CTA has to meet severe specifications and involves a lot of challenging tasks for its manufacture. To fill CTAs by permeation with deuterium-tritium (DT), the IRCC need to meet strict thermal, mechanical and dimensional specifications. To obtain a good combustion yield, a very homogenous DT ice layer and very smooth roughness at 1.5 K below the DT triple point are also required. This paper deals with the up to date main issues in the different fields of the LMJ cryogenic target program.

  9. Heating, Hydrodynamics, and Radiation From a Laser Heated Non-LTE High-Z Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, William; Foord, M. E.; Schneider, M. B.; Barrios, M. A.; Brown, G. V.; Heeter, R. F.; Jarrott, L. C.; Liedahl, D. A.; Marley, E. V.; Mauche, C. W.; Widmann, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present 2D R-z simulations that model the hydrodynamics and x-ray output of a laser heated, tamped foil, using the rad-hydro code LASNEX. The foil consists of a thin (2400 A) cylindrical disk of iron/vanadium/gold that is embedded in a thicker Be tamper. The simulations utilize a non-LTE detailed configuration (DCA) model, which generates the emission spectra. Simulated pinhole images are compared with data, finding qualitative agreement with the time-history of the face-on emission profiles, and exhibiting an interesting reduction in emission size over a few ns time period. Furthermore, we find that the simulations recover similar burn through times in both the target and Be tamper as measured by a time-dependent filtered x-ray detector (DANTE). Additional results and characterization of the experimental plasma will be presented. This work performed under the auspices of U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Targeted therapy of animal eyes with tumors by laser-generated focused ultrasound (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taehwa; Luo, Wei; Demirci, Hakan; Guo, L. Jay

    2016-03-01

    Cavitation therapy based on high-amplitude focused ultrasound (e.g., Histotripsy) has shown great promise in clinical trials. The technique realizes localized treatments of tissues and diseased cells by controlling cavitation zones, which can be even smaller than its acoustic spot sizes. Also, the short pressure pulse used in the technique can minimize the unwanted heat accumulation, which the conventional piezoelectric transducers suffer from due to low operating frequencies and relatively long acoustic pulses. However, this modality requires bulky system composed of array of piezoelectric elements and electric amplifiers in order to obtain high pressure amplitude. Moreover, especially when treating an area much smaller than the acoustic spot size, this approach may be vulnerable to nucleation sites within the focal volume, which can potentially induce cavitation and thus enlarge the total treatment area. Here, we show targeted cell-level therapy by using laser generated ultrasound. By employing a concave lens coated by a carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composite, high-amplitude acoustic pressure can be obtained at a tight focal spot (small focal spot, comparable to cavitation zone, lead to controlled cavitation treatment. Such feature can be exploited for treating intraocular tumors but without harming other parts of the eye (e.g. healthy retina and choroid) and therefore preserve the vision of the patients. We demonstrate that the localized disruption effects can be used for cell-level surgery to remove cells and to kill cells. Some experimental examples are shown using animal eyeballs.

  11. X-ray flux and X-ray burn through experiments on reduced-scale targets at the Nif and OMEGA lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.B.; Hinkel, D.E.; Young, B.K.; Holder, J.P.; Langdon, A.B.; Bower, D.E.; Bruns, H.C.; Campbell, K.M.; Celeste, J.R.; Compton, S.; Costa, R.L.; Dewald, E.L.; Dixit, S.N.; Eckart, M.J.; Eder, D.C.; Edwards, M.J.; Ellis, A.D.; Emig, J.A.; Froula, D.H.; Glebov, V.; Glenzer, S.H.; Hargrove, D.; Haynam, C.A.; Heeter, R.F.; Henesian, M.A.; Holtmeier, G.; James, D.L.; Jancaitis, K.S.; Kalantar, D.H.; Kamperschroer, J.H.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kimbrough, J.; Kirkwood, R.; Koniges, A.E.; Landen, O.L.; Landon, M.; Lee, F.D.; MacGowan, B.J.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Manes, K.R.; Marshall, C.; May, M.J.; McDonald, J.W.; Menapace, J.; Moon, S.J.; Moses, E.I.; Munro, D.H.; Murray, J.R.; Niemann, C.; Piston, K.; Power, G.D.; Rekow, V.; Ruppe, J.A.; Schein, J.; Shepherd, R.; Singh, M.S.; Sorce, C.; Springer, P.T.; Still, C.H.; Suter, L.J.; Tietbohl, G.L.; Turner, R.E.; Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Wallace, R.J.; Warrick, A.; Weber, F.; Wegner, P.J.; Williams, E.A.; Young, P.E.; Baldis, H.A.; Constantin, C.G.; Bahr, R.; Roberts, S.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Pellinen, D.; Watts, P.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental campaign to maximize radiation drive in small-scale hohlraums has been carried out at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore, USA) and at the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (Rochester, USA). The small-scale hohlraums, laser energy, laser pulse, and diagnostics were similar at both facilities but the geometries were very different. The NIF experiments used on-axis laser beams whereas the OMEGA experiments used 19 beams in three beam cones. In the cases when the lasers coupled well and produced similar radiation drive, images of X-ray burn-through and laser deposition indicate the pattern of plasma filling is very different. The OMEGA targets fill faster than the NIF targets, which helps explain the time behavior of the X-ray fluences. (authors)

  12. X-ray flux and X-ray burn through experiments on reduced-scale targets at the Nif and OMEGA lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.B.; Hinkel, D.E.; Young, B.K.; Holder, J.P.; Langdon, A.B.; Bower, D.E.; Bruns, H.C.; Campbell, K.M.; Celeste, J.R.; Compton, S.; Costa, R.L.; Dewald, E.L.; Dixit, S.N.; Eckart, M.J.; Eder, D.C.; Edwards, M.J.; Ellis, A.D.; Emig, J.A.; Froula, D.H.; Glebov, V.; Glenzer, S.H.; Hargrove, D.; Haynam, C.A.; Heeter, R.F.; Henesian, M.A.; Holtmeier, G.; James, D.L.; Jancaitis, K.S.; Kalantar, D.H.; Kamperschroer, J.H.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kimbrough, J.; Kirkwood, R.; Koniges, A.E.; Landen, O.L.; Landon, M.; Lee, F.D.; MacGowan, B.J.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Manes, K.R.; Marshall, C.; May, M.J.; McDonald, J.W.; Menapace, J.; Moon, S.J.; Moses, E.I.; Munro, D.H.; Murray, J.R.; Niemann, C.; Piston, K.; Power, G.D.; Rekow, V.; Ruppe, J.A.; Schein, J.; Shepherd, R.; Singh, M.S.; Sorce, C.; Springer, P.T.; Still, C.H.; Suter, L.J.; Tietbohl, G.L.; Turner, R.E.; Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Wallace, R.J.; Warrick, A.; Weber, F.; Wegner, P.J.; Williams, E.A.; Young, P.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Baldis, H.A.; Constantin, C.G. [California at Davis Univ., CA (United States); Bahr, R.; Roberts, S.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, NY (United States); Pellinen, D.; Watts, P. [Bechtel Nevada Corporation, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-06-15

    An experimental campaign to maximize radiation drive in small-scale hohlraums has been carried out at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore, USA) and at the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (Rochester, USA). The small-scale hohlraums, laser energy, laser pulse, and diagnostics were similar at both facilities but the geometries were very different. The NIF experiments used on-axis laser beams whereas the OMEGA experiments used 19 beams in three beam cones. In the cases when the lasers coupled well and produced similar radiation drive, images of X-ray burn-through and laser deposition indicate the pattern of plasma filling is very different. The OMEGA targets fill faster than the NIF targets, which helps explain the time behavior of the X-ray fluences. (authors)

  13. Electro-optic analysis of the influence of target geometry on electromagnetic pulses generated by petawatt laser-matter interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Timothy; Giltrap, Samuel; Eardley, Samuel; Consoli, Fabrizio; De Angelis, Riccardo; Ingenito, Francesco; Stuart, Nicholas; Verona, Claudio; Smith, Roland A.

    2018-01-01

    We present an analysis of strong laser-driven electromagnetic pulses using novel electro-optic diagnostic techniques. A range of targets were considered, including thin plastic foils (20-550 nm) and mass-limited, optically-levitated micro-targets. Results from foils indicate a dependence of EMP on target thickness, with larger peak electric fields observed with thinner targets. Spectral analysis suggests high repeatability between shots, with identified spectral features consistently detected with earth following ejection of hot electrons from the plasma, in contrast to predictions for pin-mounted foils in the Poyé EMP generation model. With levitated targets, no EMP was measurable above the noise threshold of any diagnostic, despite observation of protons accelerated to >30 MeV energies, suggesting the discharge current contribution to EMP is dominant.

  14. Electron-hydrogen collisions with dressed target and Volkov projectile states in a laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.H.G.; Flannery, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Cross sections for the 1S-2S and 1S-2P O transitions in laser-assisted e - -H(1S) collisions are calculated in both the multi-channel eikonal treatment and the Born wave approximation, as a function of impact energy and laser field intensity. The laser considered is a monotonic, plane-polarized CO 2 laser (photon energy = 0.117 eV) with the polarization direction parallel to the initial projectile velocity. The first part of this paper confines the laser perturbation to the bound electrons of the atom. The second part extends the laser perturbation to the projectile electron, and the familiar Volkov dressed states are used. (author)

  15. A comparative study of x-ray emission from laser spots in laser-heated hohlraums relative to spots on simple disk targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ze, F.; Langer, S.H.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Landen, O.; Ress, D.; Rosen, M.D.; Suter, L.J.; Wallace, R.J.; Wiedwald, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we report the results of experiments that compare the x-ray emission from a laser spot in a radiation-filled hohlraum to that from a similar laser spot on a simple disk target. The studies were done using the Nova laser facility [J. D. Lindl, Phys. Plasmas 2, 3933 (1995)] in its 0.35 μm wavelength, 1 ns square pulse configuration. Focal spot intensities were 2 endash 3.5x10 15 W/cm 2 . X-ray images measured x-ray conversion in a hohlraum and from an isolated disk simultaneously. A laser spot inside a hohlraum emitted more x rays, after subtracting the background emission from the hohlraum walls, than a spot on a disk. Numerical models suggest the enhanced spot emission inside the hohlraum is due to an increase in lateral transport relative to the disk. Filamentation in the hohlraum will also increase the spot size. The models agree fairly well with the results on spot spreading but do not explain the overall increase in conversion efficiency. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  16. Laser Range Profiling for Active Protection System Target Classification and Aim-Point Selection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Michael

    2004-01-01

    .... The attractiveness of smaller, faster interceptors precipitated the investigation of a laser radar sensor augmentation for CIAPS that could quickly resolve the range profile of an incoming projectile...

  17. Ion acceleration with a narrow energy spectrum by nanosecond laser-irradiation of solid target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altana, C., E-mail: altana@lns.infn.it [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Enna “Kore,” Via delle Olimpiadi, 94100 Enna (Italy); Mascali, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Tudisco, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Muoio, A. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    In laser-driven plasma, ion acceleration of aluminum with the production of a quasi-monoenergetic beam has occurred. A useful device to analyze the ions is the Thomson parabolas spectrometer, a well-known diagnostic that is able to obtain information on charge-to-mass ratio and energy distribution of the charged particles. At the LENS (Laser Energy for Nuclear Science) laboratory of INFN-LNS in Catania, experimental measures were carried out; the features of LENS are: Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with 2 J laser energy, 1064 nm fundamental wavelengths, and 6 ns pulse duration.

  18. Near-IR laser-triggered target cell collection using a carbon nanotube-based cell-cultured substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Takao; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Niidome, Yasuro; Nakazawa, Kohji; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2011-06-28

    Unique near-IR optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNTs) are of interest in many biological applications. Here we describe the selective cell detachment and collection from an SWNT-coated cell-culture dish triggered by near-IR pulse laser irradiation. First, HeLa cells were cultured on an SWNT-coated dish prepared by a spraying of an aqueous SWNT dispersion on a glass dish. The SWNT-coated dish was found to show a good cell adhesion behavior as well as a cellular proliferation rate similar to a conventional glass dish. We discovered, by near-IR pulse laser irradiation (at the laser power over 25 mW) to the cell under optical microscopic observation, a quick single-cell detachment from the SWNT-coated surface. Shockwave generation from the irradiated SWNTs is expected to play an important role for the cell detachment. Moreover, we have succeeded in catapulting the target single cell from the cultured medium when the depth of the medium was below 150 μm and the laser power was stronger than 40 mW. The captured cell maintained its original shape. The retention of the genetic information of the cell was confirmed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. A target single-cell collection from a culture medium under optical microscopic observation is significant in wide fields of single-cell studies in biological areas.

  19. Application of a high-density gas laser target to the physics of x-ray lasers and coronal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronko, J.G.; Kohler, D.

    1996-01-01

    An experiment has been proposed to investigate a photopumped x-ray laser approach using a novel, high-density, laser heated supersonic gas jet plasma to prepare the lasant plasma. The scheme uses the He- like sodium 1.10027 nm line to pump the He-like neon 1s-4p transition at 1.10003 nm with the lasing transitions between the n=4 to n=2,3 states and the n=3 to n=2 state at 5.8 nm, 23.0 nm, and 8.2 nm, respectively. The experiment had been proposed in 1990 and funding began Jan. 1991; however circumstances made it impossible to pursue the research over the past 5 years, and it was decided not to pursue the research any further

  20. Experimental reduction of laser imprinting and Rayleigh–Taylor growth in spherically compressed, medium-Z-doped plastic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiksel, G.; Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. A.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Yaakobi, B.; Bonino, M. J.; Jungquist, R.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of medium-Z doping of plastic ablators on laser imprinting and Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) instability growth was studied using spherical direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1977)]. The targets were spherical plastic (CH) shells, with an outer diameter of 860 μm and a thickness of 22 μm, volume doped with a varied concentration of Si (4.3% and 7.4%) and Ge (3.9%). The targets were imploded with 48 beams with a low-adiabat, triple-picket laser shape pulse with a peak intensity of 4×10 14 W/cm 2 , and a pulse duration of 2.5 ns. The shells were x-ray radiographed through a 400 -μm opening in the side of the target. The results show that volumetric impurity doping strongly reduces the shell density modulation and the instability growth rate. The amplitude of the initial imprint is reduced by a factor of 2.5 ± 0.5 for CH[4.3% Si] targets and by a factor of 3 ± 0.5 for CH[7.4% Si] and CH[3.9% Ge] targets. At the end of the acceleration phase, the reduction factor becomes 3 ± 0.5 and 5 ± 0.5, correspondingly. The RT instability growth rate in doped targets is reduced by a factor of 1.5 compared to undoped ones. Simulations using the two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamics code draco show good agreement with the measurements.

  1. Model of two temperatures of the laser evaporation of solid targets; Modelo de dos temperaturas de la evaporacion laser de blancos solidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolentino E, P. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, BUAP, Puebla (Mexico); Gutierrez T, C.; Camps C, E. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The energy transmission in the evaporation process of a solid target by a laser pulse by means of the model of two temperatures which consists on two equations of heat conduction coupled by means of an electron-phonon coupling factor that means the energy transfer rate between the electrons and the net is described. This electron-phonon coupling factor is calculated for the particular case of the graphite, the obtaining of the analytic solutions in a space dimension of the system of non linear partial differential equations is shown considering two forms of the laser pulse (gaussian and delta function) and the electron temperature distributions of temperature and of the net are analyzed. (Author)

  2. Effect of prepulse on fast electron lateral transport at the target surface irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, X. X.; Li, Y. T.; Liu, B. C.; Liu, F.; Du, F.; Wang, S. J.; Lu, X.; Chen, L. M.; Zhang, L.; Liu, X.; Wang, J.; Liu, F.; Liu, X. L.; Wang, Z. H.; Ma, J. L.; Wei, Z. Y.; Zhang, J.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of preplasma on lateral fast electron transport at front target surface, irradiated by ultraintense (>10 18 W/cm 2 ) laser pulses, are investigated by Kα imaging technique. A large annular Kα halo with a diameter of ∼560 μm surrounding a central spot is observed. A specially designed steplike target is used to identify the possible mechanisms. It is believed that the halos are mainly generated by the lateral diffusion of fast electrons due to the electrostatic and magnetic fields in the preplasma. This is illustrated by simulated electron trajectories using a numerical model.

  3. Laser irradiations of advanced targets promoting absorption resonance for ion acceleration in TNSA regime

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Calcagno, L.; Giulietti, D.; Cutroneo, Mariapompea; Zimbone, M.; Skála, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 355, JUL (2015), s. 221-226 ISSN 0168-583X Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : "p"-polarization * laser-generated plasma * TNSA regtime * ion acceleration in plasma Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.389, year: 2015

  4. Laser targets and experiments for the sake of science and energy in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laser fusion for energy and hybride schemes with laser application are original and highly tempting because they are ecofriendly, with almost unlimited resources. Though quite challenging, even development stage is fruitful in hi-tech and provides vast fundamental knowledge. The present paper discusses important ...

  5. Experimental investigation of hole boring and light sail regimes of RPA by varying laser and target parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, S; Kakolee, K F; Doria, D; Quinn, K; Ramakrishna, B; Sarri, G; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M; Cerchez, M; Osterholz, J; Willi, O; Macchi, A; McKenna, P; Yuan, X H; Neely, D

    2013-01-01

    Temporal evolution of plasma jets from micrometre-scale thick foils following the interaction of intense (3 × 10 20  W cm −2 ) laser pulses is studied systematically by time resolved optical interferometry. The fluid velocity in the plasma jets is determined by comparing the data with 2D hydrodynamic simulation, which agrees with the expected hole-boring (HB) velocity due to the laser radiation pressure. The homogeneity of the plasma density across the jets has been found to be improved substantially when irradiating the laser at circular polarization compared to linear polarization. While overdense plasma jets were formed efficiently for micrometre thick targets, decreasing the target areal density and/or increasing the irradiance on the target have provided indication of transition from the ‘HB’ to the ‘light sail (LS)’ regime of RPA, characterized by the appearance of narrow-band spectral features at several MeV/nucleon in proton and carbon spectra. (paper)

  6. Effect of H-wave polarization on laser radar detection of partially convex targets in random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ocla, Hosam

    2010-07-01

    A study on the performance of laser radar cross section (LRCS) of conducting targets with large sizes is investigated numerically in free space and random media. The LRCS is calculated using a boundary value method with beam wave incidence and H-wave polarization. Considered are those elements that contribute to the LRCS problem including random medium strength, target configuration, and beam width. The effect of the creeping waves, stimulated by H-polarization, on the LRCS behavior is manifested. Targets taking large sizes of up to five wavelengths are sufficiently larger than the beam width and are sufficient for considering fairly complex targets. Scatterers are assumed to have analytical partially convex contours with inflection points.

  7. What extent will small-scale laser-beam fluctuations seed the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in direct-drive targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skupsky, S.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1984-01-01

    The nonuniformity in laser energy deposition on a spherical target is calculated for multiple overlapping beams having small-scale fluctuations. Such nonuniformities can imprint themselves on the target surface and ''seed'' the Rayleigh-Taylor instability early in the pulse before an adequate, smoothing plasma-atmosphere has been established. The resulting growth of target deformation during the implosion is estimated

  8. Pulsed X-ray radiography of a gas jet target for laser-matter interaction experiments with the use of a CCD detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakowski, R.; Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; MikoIajczyk, J.; Szczurek, A.; Szczurek, M.; Foeldes, I.B.; Toth, Zs.

    2005-01-01

    Characterization of gas jet targets has been carried out using pulsed X-ray radiography. A laser-plasma X-ray source was applied for backlighting of the targets to obtain X-ray shadowgraphs registered with a CCD detector. From the shadowgraphs, characteristics of the targets were determined

  9. Small UAS Analysis of Laser Designation and Search and Target Acquisition Capabilities in an Urban Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harclerode, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Conclusions: -Small UAS has extreme difficulty lasing moving targets in high density urban environments -Lasing moving targets in medium density terrain is possible but not certain -Lasing of stationary targets...

  10. Stability of contamination-free gold and silver nanoparticles produced by nanosecond laser ablation of solid targets in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikov, R.G.; Nikolov, A.S.; Nedyalkov, N.N.; Dimitrov, I.G.; Atanasov, P.A.; Alexandrov, M.T.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Au and Ag colloids were prepared by nanosecond laser ablation of solids in water. ► The alteration of the produced colloids during one month was investigated. ► Optical transmission spectra of the samples were measured from 350 to 800 nm. ► TEM measurements were made of as-prepared colloids and on the 30-th day. ► Zeta potential measurements were performed of as-prepared samples. - Abstract: Preparation of noble metal nanoparticle (NPs) colloids using pulsed laser ablation in water has an inherent advantage compared to the different chemical methods used, especially when biological applications of the colloids are considered. The fabrication method is simple and the NPs prepared in this way are contamination free. The method of laser ablation of a solid target in water is applied in the present work in order to obtain gold and silver NP colloids. The experiment was preformed by using the fundamental wavelength (1064 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser system. The target immersed in double distilled water was irradiated for 20 min by laser pulses with duration of 15 ns and repetition rate of 10 Hz. The sedimentation and aggregation of NPs in the colloids, stored at constant temperature, as a function of the time after preparation were investigated. The analyses are based on optical transmission spectroscopy in UV and vis regions. The change of the plasmon resonance wavelength as a function of time was studied. Zeta potential measurement was also utilized to measure the charge of the NPs in the colloids. The size distribution of the NPs and its change in time was determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). On the basis of the results obtained, the optimal conditions of post fabrication manipulation with gold and silver colloids are defined in view of producing stable NPs with a narrow size distribution.

  11. Effect of a target on the stimulated emission of microsecond CO2-laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, V. Iu.; Dolgov, V. A.; Maliuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.; Semak, V. V.

    1987-12-01

    The paper reports a change in the pulse shape of a TEA CO2 laser with an unstable cavity under the interaction between the laser radiation and a metal surface in the presence of a breakdown plasma. It is shown that a continuous change in the phase difference between the wave reflected in the cavity and the principal cavity wave gives rise to changes in the pulse shape and the appearance of power fluctuations. The possible effect of these phenomena on the laser treatment of materials is considered.

  12. Inorganic nanocomposite films with polymer nanofillers made by the concurrent multi-beam multi-target pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Abdalla M.; Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Mele, Paolo; Saini, Shrikant; Moore, Shaelynn; Bastian, Tyler; Dorlus, Wydglif; Zhang, Xiaodong; Koplitz, Brent

    2017-08-01

    We report on the new class of inorganic nanocomposite films with the inorganic phase hosting the polymer nanofillers made by the concurrent multi-beam multi-target pulsed laser deposition of the inorganic target material and matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation of the polymer (MBMT-PLD/MAPLE). We used the exemplary nanocomposite thermoelectric films of aluminum-doped ZnO known as AZO with the nanofillers made of poly(methyl methacrylate) known as PMMA on various substrates such as SrTiO3, sapphire, fused silica, and polyimide. The AZO target was ablated with the second harmonic (532 nm) of the Nd:YAG Q-switched laser while PMMA was evaporated from its solution in chlorobenzene frozen in liquid nitrogen with the fundamental harmonic (1064 nm) of the same laser (50 Hz pulse repetition rate). The introduction of the polymer nanofillers increased the electrical conductivity of the nanocomposite films (possibly due to the carbonization of PMMA and the creation of additional channels of electric current) three times and reduced the thermal conductivity by 1.25 times as compared to the pure AZO films. Accordingly, the increase of the thermoelectric figure-of merit ZT would be 4 times. The best performance was observed for the sapphire substrates where the films were the most uniform. The results point to a huge potential of the optimization of a broad variety of optical, opto-electronic, and solar-power nanocomposite inorganic films by the controllable introduction of the polymer nanofillers using the MBMT-PLD/MAPLE method.

  13. Ultrasensitive detection of target analyte-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles using laser-induced nanoparticle Rayleigh scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-Hui; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Detection of salt- and analyte-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) mostly relies on costly and bulky analytical instruments. To response this drawback, a portable, miniaturized, sensitive, and cost-effective detection technique is urgently required for rapid field detection and monitoring of target analyte via the use of AuNP-based sensor. This study combined a miniaturized spectrometer with a 532-nm laser to develop a laser-induced Rayleigh scattering technique, allowing the sensitive and selective detection of Rayleigh scattering from the aggregated AuNPs. Three AuNP-based sensing systems, including salt-, thiol- and metal ion-induced aggregation of the AuNPs, were performed to examine the sensitivity of laser-induced Rayleigh scattering technique. Salt-, thiol-, and metal ion-promoted NP aggregation were exemplified by the use of aptamer-adsorbed, fluorosurfactant-stabilized, and gallic acid-capped AuNPs for probing K(+), S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase-induced hydrolysis of S-adenosylhomocysteine, and Pb(2+), in sequence. Compared to the reported methods for monitoring the aggregated AuNPs, the proposed system provided distinct advantages of sensitivity. Laser-induced Rayleigh scattering technique was improved to be convenient, cheap, and portable by replacing a diode laser and a miniaturized spectrometer with a laser pointer and a smart-phone. Using this smart-phone-based detection platform, we can determine whether or not the Pb(2+) concentration exceed the maximum allowable level of Pb(2+) in drinking water. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Laser imprint reduction with a shaping pulse, oscillatory Richtmyer-Meshkov to Rayleigh-Taylor transition and other coherent effects in plastic-foam targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzler, N.; Velikovich, A.L.; Schmitt, A.J.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Mostovych, A.N.; Obenschain, S.P.; Gardner, J.H.; Aglitskiy, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A substantial reduction of the laser imprint with a short, low-energy 'shaping' laser pulse incident upon a foam-plastic sandwich target prior to the main laser pulse has been demonstrated to be possible [Metzler et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 5050 (2002)]. Nonuniformity of this shaping pulse, however, produces standing sonic waves in the target. Laser-imprinted seeds for the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth then emerge from the interaction of these waves with the strong shock wave launched by the drive laser pulse. Such coherent interaction between different waves and modes perturbed at the same wavelength is shown to be important in a variety of situations relevant to the inertial confinement fusion studies. As an example, an oscillatory transition from the classical Richtmyer-Meshkov shock-interface instability development to the RT growth exhibiting a characteristic phase reversal in a target of finite thickness is described. Another example refers to the feedout mechanism of seeding the perturbations that come from the nonuniformities of the rear (inner) surface of the laser target. The coherent interaction between the strong shock wave from the main laser pulse and the rippled rarefaction wave produced by a low-intensity foot of the pulse produces observable effects, such as an extra phase reversal compared to the case of no foot. Some of these predictions are shown to be consistent with our new experimental results obtained in the feedout geometry on the Nike laser facility [S. P. Obenschain et al. Phys. Plasmas 3, 2098 (1996)

  15. A compact, quasi-monochromatic laser-plasma EUV source based on a double-stream gas-puff target at 13.8 nm wavelength

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wachulak, P.W.; Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Feigl, T.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Rudawski, P.; Sawicka, Magdalena; Szczurek, M.; Szczurek, A.; Zawadzki, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 3 (2010), 461-469 ISSN 0946-2171 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser-plasma * EUV source * gas puff target * elliptical multi- layer * mirror * table-top setup Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.239, year: 2010

  16. Low-debris, efficient laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source by use of a regenerative liquid microjet target containing tin dioxide (SnO2) nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Dojyo, Naoto; Hamada, Masaya; Sasaki, Wataru; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2006-05-01

    We demonstrated a low-debris, efficient laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source by use of a regenerative liquid microjet target containing tin-dioxide (SnO2) nanoparticles. By using a low SnO2 concentration (6%) solution and dual laser pulses for the plasma control, we observed the EUV conversion efficiency of 1.2% with undetectable debris.

  17. Low-debris, efficient laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source by use of a regenerative liquid microjet target containing tin dioxide (SnO2) nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Dojyo, Naoto; Hamada, Masaya; Sasaki, Wataru; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrated a low-debris, efficient laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source by use of a regenerative liquid microjet target containing tin-dioxide (SnO 2 ) nanoparticles. By using a low SnO 2 concentration (6%) solution and dual laser pulses for the plasma control, we observed the EUV conversion efficiency of 1.2% with undetectable debris

  18. Acceleration of protons in plasma produced from a thin plastic or aluminum target by a femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Parys, P.; Zaras-Szydlowska, A.; Ryc, L.; Makowski, J.; Torrisi, L.; Szydlowski, A.; Malinowska, A.; Kaczmarczyk, B.; Torrisi, A.

    2016-01-01

    The acceleration of protons in plasma produced from thin mylar (3.5 μ m) and aluminum (2 μm) targets by a 45-fs laser pulses with the energy of 400 mJ and the intensity of up to 10 19 W/cm 2 was investigated. Characteristics of forward-accelerated protons were measured by the time-of-flight method. In the measurements, special attention was paid to the dependence of proton beam parameters on the laser focus position (FP) in relation to the target surface which resulted in the intensity change within a factor of ∼ 10. It was observed that in the case of using the Mylar target, the dependence of both the maximum ( E pmax ) and the mean (( E p )) proton energy on |Δ x | is clearly non-symmetric with regard to the point where FP = 0 (the focal plane on the target surface) and highest proton energies are achieved when the focal plane is situated in front of the target. In particular, for the target with the thickness of 3.5 μ m E pmax reached 2.2 MeV for FP = +50 μm while for FP = 0 and FP = −100 μm the maximum proton energies reached only 1.6 MeV and 1.3 MeV, respectively. For the aluminum target of 2 μm thickness E p changed only within ∼ 40% and the highest proton energies reached 2.4 MeV.

  19. Real-time multi-target ranging based on chaotic polarization laser radars in the drive-response VCSELs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dongzhou; Xu, Geliang; Luo, Wei; Xiao, Zhenzhen

    2017-09-04

    According to the principle of complete chaos synchronization and the theory of Hilbert phase transformation, we propose a novel real-time multi-target ranging scheme by using chaotic polarization laser radar in the drive-response vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). In the scheme, to ensure each polarization component (PC) of the master VCSEL (MVCSEL) to be synchronized steadily with that of the slave VCSEL, the output x-PC and y-PC from the MVCSEL in the drive system and those in the response system are modulated by the linear electro-optic effect simultaneously. Under this condition, by simulating the influences of some key parameters of the system on the synchronization quality and the relative errors of the two-target ranging, related operating parameters can be optimized. The x-PC and the y-PC, as two chaotic radar sources, are used to implement the real-time ranging for two targets. It is found that the measured distances of the two targets at arbitrary position exhibit strong real-time stability and only slight jitter. Their resolutions are up to millimeters, and their relative errors are very small and less than 2.7%.

  20. Effects of Thin High-z Layers on the Hydrodynamics of Laser-Accelerated Plastic Targets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Obenschain, S. P; Colombant, D; Karasik, M; Pawley, C. J; Serlin, V; Schmitt, A. J; Gardner, J. H; Phillips, L; Aglitskly, Y; Chan, Y

    2002-01-01

    .... This pulse shape simulates the generic shape needed for high-gain fusion implosions. Imprint of laser nonuniformity during start up of the low intensity foot is a well-known seed for hydrodynamic instability...

  1. Investigation of the effect of laser parameters on the target, plume and plasma behavior during and after laser-solid interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancalie, A.; Ciobanu, S. S.; Sporea, D.

    2017-09-01

    A detailed theoretical and experimental analysis is performed for a wide range of laser operating conditions, typical for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation (LA) experiments on copper metallic target. The plasma parameters were experimentally estimated from the line intensities ratio which reflects the relative population of neutral excited species in the plasma. In the case of LA experiments the highest temperature observed was 8210 ± 370 K. In case of LIBS measurements, a maximum temperature of 8123 K has been determined. The experimental results are in good agreement with a stationary, hydrodynamic model. We have theoretically investigated the plasma emission based on the generalized collisional-radiative model as implemented in the ADAS interconnected set of computer codes and data collections. The ionic population density distribution over the ground and excited states into the cooper plasma is graphically displayed as output from the code. The theoretical line intensity ratios are in good agreement with experimental values for the electron density and temperature range measured in our experiments.

  2. Investigation on cryogenic laser fusion targets: fabrication, characterization, and transport. Annual report, December 1, 1978-November 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.

    1979-01-01

    The research has been directed toward fabrication, characterization, and positioning of cryogenic shell laser fusion targets, with particular emphasis on the development of a scheme which would allow for continuous fabrication, inspection, and delivery of the targets. Specifically, progress has been made in the following areas: (1) Fabrication of a uniform spherical shell of DT-condensate using a cold-wall target-freezing-cell. (2) Fabrication of a uniform spherical shell of liquid DT using a room-temperature wall target-freezing-cell. (3) Support-free cryogenic target fabrication using cold-gas-levitation. (4) Continuous fabrication of cryogenic targets using free-fall method. (5) Automatic characterization of DT-layer uniformity. (6) Sorting of DT-filled glass microshells using an interference microscope. (7) Development of an a-c interference microscope for accurate characterization of moving targets. (8) Development of a machine which is capable of producing a continuous stream of uniform DT spheres of controllable sizes. (9) Theoretical study on the behavior of liquid hydrogen contained in a spherical shell

  3. Characterization of extreme ultraviolet light-emitting plasmas from a laser-excited fluorine containing liquid polymer jet target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abel, B.; Assmann, J.; Faubel, M.; Gaebel, K.; Kranzusch, S.; Lugovoj, E.; Mann, K.; Missalla, T.; Peth, Ch.

    2004-01-01

    The operation of a liquid polymer jet laser-plasma target and the characterization of the absolute x-ray emission in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength window from 9-19 nm is reported. The target is a liquid polymer (perfluoro-polyether) that is exposed to pulsed and focused laser light at 532 nm in the form of a thin, liquid microjet (d=40 to 160 μm) in vacuum. The spectral brightness of the source in the 13 nm range is relatively high because a large fraction of radiative energy is emitted in one single line only, which is assigned to be the 2p-3d F VII doublet at 12.8 nm, with a laser energy conversion efficiency of 0.45% (2π sr, 2% bandwidth) in our initial experiment. A further increase of the relative emission has been found in the wavelength range between 7 and 17 nm when the jet diameter was increased from 40 to 160 μm. The two-dimensional spatial profile of the source plasma (d=40 to 50 μm) has been analyzed with a pinhole camera

  4. Time-resolved soft-x-ray studies of energy transport in layered and planar laser-driven targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stradling, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    New low-energy x-ray diagnostic techniques are used to explore energy-transport processes in laser heated plasmas. Streak cameras are used to provide 15-psec time-resolution measurements of subkeV x-ray emission. A very thin (50 μg/cm 2 ) carbon substrate provides a low-energy x-ray transparent window to the transmission photocathode of this soft x-ray streak camera. Active differential vacuum pumping of the instrument is required. The use of high-sensitivity, low secondary-electron energy-spread CsI photocathodes in x-ray streak cameras is also described. Significant increases in sensitivity with only a small and intermittant decrease in dynamic range were observed. These coherent, complementary advances in subkeV, time-resolved x-ray diagnostic capability are applied to energy-transport investigations of 1.06-μm laser plasmas. Both solid disk targets of a variety of Z's as well as Be-on-Al layered-disk targets were irradiated with 700-psec laser pulses of selected intensity between 3 x 10 14 W/cm 2 and 1 x 10 15 W/cm 2

  5. Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Milonni, Peter W

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive introduction to the operating principles and applications of lasers. Explains basic principles, including the necessary elements of classical and quantum physics. Provides concise discussions of various laser types including gas, solid state, semiconductor, and free electron lasers, as well as of laser resonators, diffraction, optical coherence, and many applications including holography, phase conjugation, wave mixing, and nonlinear optics. Incorporates many intuitive explanations and practical examples. Discussions are self-contained in a consistent notation and in a style that should appeal to physicists, chemists, optical scientists and engineers.

  6. Mirror position display equipment for the target chamber mirror mounts of the LASL HELIOS laser fusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, F.D.; Remington, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    Equipment has been fabricated which records the absolute positions of sixteen mirror mounts used to direct and focus eight high-energy laser beams for research in laser induced fusion. Each mirror mount is driven by three stepping motors, controlled to produce the motions of Focus, Tilt, and Rotate relative to the target. Stepping of the motors is sensed by incremental optical encoders coupled to the motor drive shafts. Outputs from the encoder tracks are multiplexed to a microprocessor which transmits motor step information via a fiber optical data link to a Mirror Position Display chassis. This unit accumulates the steps, stores the motor positions, displays mirror position data to the operator, and provides the equipment control functions. Standby battery power is included to retain the motor step data in the event of power failure

  7. First observation of density profile in directly laser-driven polystyrene targets for ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Nishikino, Masaharu; Shigemori, Keisuke; Sunahara, Atsushi; Nakai, Mitsuo; Azechi, Hiroshi; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko

    2003-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the density profile of a directly laser-driven polystyrene target was observed for the first time using an x-ray penumbral imaging technique coupled with side-on x-ray backlighting at the GEKKO XII [C. Yamanaka et al., IEEE J. Quantum Electron. QE-17, 1639 (1981)]-High Intensity Plasma Experimental Research laser facility (I L =0.7x10 14 W/cm 2 , λ L =0.35 μm). This density measurement makes it possible to experimentally confirm all physical parameters [γ(k),k,g,m,ρ a ,L m ] appearing in the modified Takabe formula for the growth rate of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The measured density profiles were well reproduced by a one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation code. The density measurement contributes toward fully understanding the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

  8. Interferometric investigation of shock waves induced by a TEA-CO2 laser produced plasma in air in front of a solid target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostol, D.; Apostol, I.; Cojocaru, E.; Draganescu, V.; Mihailescu, N.I.; Morjan, I.; Konov, I.V.

    1979-06-01

    The shock waves induced in the surrounding atmosphere by an air plasma were investigated by laser interferometry. The air breakdown plasma was produced by a TEA-CO 2 laser in front of a solid target. The results were compared to the predictions of theory of intense explosions in gases and a good agreement was inferred. It was also determined that the symmetry of the expansion of the initial shock wave is determined by the plasma source shape and, accordingly, depends on the laser power density incident on the target surface. However, for further stages all the shock waves expand spherically. (author)

  9. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements laser and target area building (LTAB) SSDR 1.2.2.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempel, P.; Hands, J.

    1996-01-01

    This Subsystem Design Requirements (SSDR) document establishes the performance, design, and verification requirements for the conventional building systems and subsystems of the Laser and Target Area Building (LTAB), including those that house and support the operation of high-energy laser equipment and the operational flow of personnel and materials throughout the facility. This SSDR addresses the following subsystems associated with the LTAB: Building structural systems for the Target Bay, Switchyards, Diagnostic Building, Decontamination Area, Laser Bays, Capacitor Bays and Operations Support Area, and the necessary space associated with building-support equipment; Architectural building features associated with housing the space and with the operational cleanliness of the functional operation of the facilities; Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems for maintaining a clean and thermally stable ambient environment within the facilities; Plumbing systems that provide potable water and sanitary facilities for the occupants, plus stormwater drainage for transporting rainwater; Fire Protection systems that guard against fire damage to the facilities and their contents; Material handling systems for transporting personnel and heavy materials within the building areas; Mechanical process piping systems for liquids and gases that provide cooling and other service to experimental laser equipment and components; Electrical power and grounding systems that provide service and standby power to building and experimental equipment, including lighting distribution and communications systems for the facilities; Instrumentation and control systems that ensure the safe operation of conventional facilities systems, such as those listed above. Detailed requirements for building subsystems that are not addressed in this document (such as specific sizes, locations, or capacities) are included in detail-level NIP Project Interface Control Documents (ICDS)

  10. Ponderomotive ion acceleration in dense magnetized laser-irradiated thick target plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Ujjwal; Kaw, Predhiman

    2012-03-01

    When a circularly polarized laser pulse falls on an overdense plasma, it displaces the electrons via ponderomotive force creating a double layer. The double layer constitutes of an ion and electron sheath with in which the electrostatic field present is responsible for ion acceleration. In this paper, we have analyzed the effect a static longitudinal magnetic field has over the ion acceleration mechanism. The longitudinal magnetic field changes the plasma dielectric constant due to cyclotron effects which in turn enhances or reduces the ponderomotive force exerted by the laser depending on whether the laser is left or right circularly polarized. Also, the analysis of the ion space charge region present behind the ion sheath of the laser piston that undergoes coulomb explosion has been explored for the first time. We have studied the interaction of an incoming ion beam with the laser piston and the ion space charge. It has been found that the exploding ion space charge has the ability to act as an energy amplifier for incoming ion beams.

  11. EUV emission stimulated by use of dual laser pulses from continus liquid microjet targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Rajyaguru, Chirag; Sasaki, Wataru; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2004-11-01

    A continuous water-jet or water-jet mixed with LiF with several tens μm diameter was formed in a vacuum chamber through a small capillary nozzle. Usage of two laser pulses is an efficient way to produce EUV emission, since a density and temperature of a plasma formed by the first laser pulse are regulated by the second laser pulse. By adjusting the delay of the second pulse, one could maximize the EUV emission. A subpicosecond Ti:Sapphire laser at a wavelength of 800 nm produced a maximum energy around 30 mJ. The beam was divided by a Michelson interferometer, which produced two laser pulses with energies of 5 mJ. The pulse duration was adjusted around 300 fs (FWHM). Both beams were focused on a micro-jet using a lens with a focal length of 15 cm. The delay time between the two pulses was varied from 100 to 800 ps by use of an optical delay line. Clear enhancement of the EUV emission yield was observed when the delay between the two pulses was around 500 ps. The experimentally observed delay agrees reasonably well with that of a plasma to expand to its critical density of 10^21 cm-3.

  12. Optical performance of thin films produced by the pulsed laser deposition of SiAlON and Er targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camps, I., E-mail: camps@io.cfmac.csic.es [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Óptica, CSIC, C/Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ramírez, J.M. [MIND-IN2UB, Departament d’Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, c/Martí i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Mariscal, A.; Serna, R. [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Óptica, CSIC, C/Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Garrido, B. [MIND-IN2UB, Departament d’Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, c/Martí i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Perálvarez, M.; Carreras, J. [IREC, Fundació Privada Institut de Recerca en Energia de Catalunya (Spain); Barradas, N.P.; Alves, L.C. [C" 2TN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10, 2695-066 Bobadela (Portugal); Alves, E. [IPFN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10, 2695-066 Bobadela (Portugal)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • PLD production of Er-doped thin films from a low cost commercial SiAlON target. • The role of the ablation fluence on the composition, optical properties as well as on the light emission performance at 1.5 μm. • The optimized performance is obtained for the samples deposited at the higher used ablation energy density. Further improvement was achieved through annealing. - Abstract: We report the preparation and optical performance of thin films produced by pulsed laser deposition in vacuum at room temperature, by focusing an ArF excimer laser onto two separate targets: a commercial ceramic SiAlON and a metallic Er target. As a result of the alternate deposition Er:SiAlON films were formed. The as grown films exhibited an Er-related emission peaking at 1532 nm. The role of the PLD energy density during deposition on the final matrix film was investigated, in order to achieve an optimized matrix composition with enhanced optical properties, and its effect on the light emission performance.

  13. Numerical simulations to model laser-driven coil-capacitor targets for generation of kilo-Tesla magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Schillaci

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A coil-capacitor target is modeled using FEM simulations and analytical calculations, which allow to explain the time evolution of such complex target during magnetic field production driven by the flow of an extremely high current generated through the interaction with a high power laser. The numerical model includes a detailed study of the magnetic field produced by the coil-capacitor target, both in the static and transient cases, as well as magnetic force and Joule heating. The model is validated by experimental data reported in literature and can be of interest for several applications. As an example, the combination of two synchronized nanosecond lasers with the purpose of producing a plasma responsible of the proton-boron (p+ + 11B → 8.5 MeV + 3α fusion reaction, and energizing two multi-turn coils with the main purpose of confining such a plasma could enhance the reaction rate. The preliminary conceptual design of a magnetic mirror configuration to be used for confining protons and boron ions up to a few MeV/u in a region of less than 1 mm2 is briefly reported.

  14. Numerical simulations to model laser-driven coil-capacitor targets for generation of kilo-Tesla magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, F.; De Marco, M.; Giuffrida, L.; Fujioka, S.; Zhang, Z.; Korn, G.; Margarone, D.

    2018-02-01

    A coil-capacitor target is modeled using FEM simulations and analytical calculations, which allow to explain the time evolution of such complex target during magnetic field production driven by the flow of an extremely high current generated through the interaction with a high power laser. The numerical model includes a detailed study of the magnetic field produced by the coil-capacitor target, both in the static and transient cases, as well as magnetic force and Joule heating. The model is validated by experimental data reported in literature and can be of interest for several applications. As an example, the combination of two synchronized nanosecond lasers with the purpose of producing a plasma responsible of the proton-boron (p+ + 11B → 8.5 MeV + 3α) fusion reaction, and energizing two multi-turn coils with the main purpose of confining such a plasma could enhance the reaction rate. The preliminary conceptual design of a magnetic mirror configuration to be used for confining protons and boron ions up to a few MeV/u in a region of less than 1 mm2 is briefly reported.

  15. 2D simulations of hohlraum targets for laser-plasma experiments and ion stopping measurement in hot plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basko, M.M. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany). ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI; Maruhn, J.; Tauschwitz, Anna [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany); Novikov, V.G.; Grushin, A.S. [Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    An attractive way to create uniform plasma states at high temperatures and densities is by using hohlraums - cavities with heavy-metal walls that are either directly or indirectly heated by intense laser pulses to x-ray temperatures of tens and hundreds electron volts. A sample material, whose plasma state is to be studied, can be placed inside such a hohlraum (usually in the form of a low-density foam) and uniformly heated to a high temperature. In this case a high-Z hohlraum enclosure serves a double purpose: it prevents the hot plasma from rapid disassembly due to hydrodynamic expansion and, at the same time, suppresses its rapid radiative cooling by providing high diffusive resistivity for X-rays. Of course, both the inertial and the thermal confinement of high-temperature plasmas can be achieved only for a limited period of time - on the order of nanoseconds for millimeter-scale hohlraums. Some time ago such hohlraum targets were proposed for measurements of the stopping power of hot dense plasmas for fast ions at GSI (Darmstadt). Theoretical modeling of hohlraum targets has always been a challenging task for computational physics because it should combine multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations with the solution of the spectral transfer equation for thermal radiation. In this work we report on our latest progress in this direction, namely, we present the results of 2D (two-dimensional) simulations with a newly developed radiation-hydrodynamics code RALEF-2D of two types of the hohlraum targets proposed for experiments on the PHELIX laser at GSI. The first configuration is a simple spherical hohlraum with gold walls and empty interior, which has two holes - one for laser beam entrance, and the other for diagnostics. The hohlraums of this type have already been used in several experimental sessions with the NHELIX and PHELIX lasers at GSI. The second type is a two-chamber cylindrical hohlraum with a characteristic {omega}-shaped cross-section of the enclosure

  16. Plasma ion emission from high intensity picosecond laser pulse interactions with solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fews, A.P.; Norreys, P.A.; Beg, F.N.; Bell, A.R.; Dangor, A.E.; Danson, C.N.; Lee, P.; Rose, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    The fast ion emission from high intensity, picosecond laser plasmas has been measured to give the characteristic ion energy and the amount of laser energy transferred to ions with energies ≥100 keV/nucleon as a function of incident intensity. The characteristic ion energy varies from 0.2 to 1.3 MeV over the range 2.0x10 17 --2.0x10 18 W cm -2 . Ten percent of the laser energy is transferred into MeV ions at 2.0x10 18 W cm -2 . Calculations of stopping power in high density materials are presented that show that fast ions cannot be ignored in modeling fast ignitor schemes

  17. Nano and micro structured targets to modulate the spatial profile of laser driven proton beams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giuffrida, Lorenzo; Svensson, K.; Pšikal, Jan; Margarone, Daniele; Lutoslawski, P.; Scuderi, Valentina; Milluzzo, G.; Kaufman, Jan; Wiste, Tuomas; Dalui, M.; Ekerfelt, H.; Gallardo Gonzalez, I.; Lundh, O.; Persson, A.; Picciotto, A.; Crivellari, M.; Bagolini, A.; Bellutti, P.; Magnusson, J.; Gonoskov, A.; Klimša, Ladislav; Kopeček, Jaromír; Laštovička, Tomáš; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Korn, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, Mar (2017), s. 1-6, č. článku C03040. ISSN 1748-0221. [Medical and Multidisciplinary Applications of Laser -Driven Ion Beams at Eli-Beamlines. Catania, 07.09.2016-10.09.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02964S; GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : accelerator Applications * Beam dynamics Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  18. Micron-size hydrogen cluster target for laser-driven proton acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, S.; Kanasaki, M.; Uno, M.; Matsui, R.; Uesaka, M.; Kishimoto, Y.; Fukuda, Y.

    2018-04-01

    As a new laser-driven ion acceleration technique, we proposed a way to produce impurity-free, highly reproducible, and robust proton beams exceeding 100 MeV using a Coulomb explosion of micron-size hydrogen clusters. In this study, micron-size hydrogen clusters were generated by expanding the cooled high-pressure hydrogen gas into a vacuum via a conical nozzle connected to a solenoid valve cooled by a mechanical cryostat. The size distributions of the hydrogen clusters were evaluated by measuring the angular distribution of laser light scattered from the clusters. The data were analyzed mathematically based on the Mie scattering theory combined with the Tikhonov regularization method. The maximum size of the hydrogen cluster at 25 K and 6 MPa in the stagnation state was recognized to be 2.15 ± 0.10 μm. The mean cluster size decreased with increasing temperature, and was found to be much larger than that given by Hagena’s formula. This discrepancy suggests that the micron-size hydrogen clusters were formed by the atomization (spallation) of the liquid or supercritical fluid phase of hydrogen. In addition, the density profiles of the gas phase were evaluated for 25 to 80 K at 6 MPa using a Nomarski interferometer. Based on the measurement results and the equation of state for hydrogen, the cluster mass fraction was obtained. 3D particles-in-cell (PIC) simulations concerning the interaction processes of micron-size hydrogen clusters with high power laser pulses predicted the generation of protons exceeding 100 MeV and accelerating in a laser propagation direction via an anisotropic Coulomb explosion mechanism, thus demonstrating a future candidate in laser-driven proton sources for upcoming multi-petawatt lasers.

  19. Influences on target irradiation symmetry in CO2 laser-fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carman, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The existence of very steep density profiles and high upper shelf densities imply that the CO 2 laser deposits its energy spatially quite close to the ablation surface where calculations indicate that a high degree of symmetry must exist in order to achieve the necessary high compression ratios. Thus, energy transport provides only limited improvement in the ablative symmetry over that achieved in the irradiation symmetry. Current data suggests that a balance between radiation pressure and hydrodynamic pressure underestimates the density to which the CO 2 laser light penetrates for early times

  20. Onboard calibration igneous targets for the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover and the Chemistry Camera laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabre, C., E-mail: cecile.fabre@g2r.uhp-nancy.fr [G2R, Nancy Universite (France); Maurice, S.; Cousin, A. [IRAP, Toulouse (France); Wiens, R.C. [LANL, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Forni, O. [IRAP, Toulouse (France); Sautter, V. [MNHN, Paris (France); Guillaume, D. [GET, Toulouse (France)

    2011-03-15

    Accurate characterization of the Chemistry Camera (ChemCam) laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) on-board composition targets is of prime importance for the ChemCam instrument. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) science and operations teams expect ChemCam to provide the first compositional results at remote distances (1.5-7 m) during the in situ analyses of the Martian surface starting in 2012. Thus, establishing LIBS reference spectra from appropriate calibration standards must be undertaken diligently. Considering the global mineralogy of the Martian surface, and the possible landing sites, three specific compositions of igneous targets have been determined. Picritic, noritic, and shergottic glasses have been produced, along with a Macusanite natural glass. A sample of each target will fly on the MSL Curiosity rover deck, 1.56 m from the ChemCam instrument, and duplicates are available on the ground. Duplicates are considered to be identical, as the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the composition dispersion is around 8%. Electronic microprobe and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA ICP-MS) analyses give evidence that the chemical composition of the four silicate targets is very homogeneous at microscopic scales larger than the instrument spot size, with RSD < 5% for concentration variations > 0.1 wt.% using electronic microprobe, and < 10% for concentration variations > 0.01 wt.% using LA ICP-MS. The LIBS campaign on the igneous targets performed under flight-like Mars conditions establishes reference spectra for the entire mission. The LIBS spectra between 240 and 900 nm are extremely rich, hundreds of lines with high signal-to-noise, and a dynamical range sufficient to identify unambiguously major, minor and trace elements. For instance, a first LIBS calibration curve has been established for strontium from [Sr] = 284 ppm to [Sr] = 1480 ppm, showing the potential for the future calibrations for other major or minor

  1. Onboard calibration igneous targets for the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover and the Chemistry Camera laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabre, C.; Maurice, S.; Cousin, A.; Wiens, R.C.; Forni, O.; Sautter, V.; Guillaume, D.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate characterization of the Chemistry Camera (ChemCam) laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) on-board composition targets is of prime importance for the ChemCam instrument. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) science and operations teams expect ChemCam to provide the first compositional results at remote distances (1.5-7 m) during the in situ analyses of the Martian surface starting in 2012. Thus, establishing LIBS reference spectra from appropriate calibration standards must be undertaken diligently. Considering the global mineralogy of the Martian surface, and the possible landing sites, three specific compositions of igneous targets have been determined. Picritic, noritic, and shergottic glasses have been produced, along with a Macusanite natural glass. A sample of each target will fly on the MSL Curiosity rover deck, 1.56 m from the ChemCam instrument, and duplicates are available on the ground. Duplicates are considered to be identical, as the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the composition dispersion is around 8%. Electronic microprobe and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA ICP-MS) analyses give evidence that the chemical composition of the four silicate targets is very homogeneous at microscopic scales larger than the instrument spot size, with RSD 0.1 wt.% using electronic microprobe, and 0.01 wt.% using LA ICP-MS. The LIBS campaign on the igneous targets performed under flight-like Mars conditions establishes reference spectra for the entire mission. The LIBS spectra between 240 and 900 nm are extremely rich, hundreds of lines with high signal-to-noise, and a dynamical range sufficient to identify unambiguously major, minor and trace elements. For instance, a first LIBS calibration curve has been established for strontium from [Sr] = 284 ppm to [Sr] = 1480 ppm, showing the potential for the future calibrations for other major or minor elements.

  2. Nonlocal heat transport and improved target design for x-ray heating studies at x-ray free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoidn, Oliver; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2018-01-01

    The extremely high-power densities and short durations of single pulses of x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) have opened new opportunities in atomic physics, where complex excitation-relaxation chains allow for high ionization states in atomic and molecular systems, and in dense plasma physics, where XFEL heating of solid-density targets can create unique dense states of matter having temperatures on the order of the Fermi energy. We focus here on the latter phenomena, with special emphasis on the problem of optimum target design to achieve high x-ray heating into the warm dense matter (WDM) state. We report fully three-dimensional simulations of the incident x-ray pulse and the resulting multielectron relaxation cascade to model the spatial energy density deposition in multicomponent targets, with particular focus on the effects of nonlocal heat transport due to the motion of high energy photoelectrons and Auger electrons. We find that nanoscale high-Z /low-Z multicomponent targets can give much improved energy density deposition in lower-Z materials, with enhancements reaching a factor of 100. This has three important benefits. First, it greatly enlarges the thermodynamic parameter space in XFEL x-ray heating studies of lower-Z materials. Second, it allows the use of higher probe photon energies, enabling higher-information content x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements such as in two-color XFEL operations. Third, while this is merely one step toward optimization of x-ray heating target design, the demonstration of the importance of nonlocal heat transport establishes important common ground between XFEL-based x-ray heating studies and more traditional laser plasma methods.

  3. Fast imaging of laser induced plasma emission of vanadium dioxide (VO2) target

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to fully optimise the synthesis of vanadium oxide nanostructures using pulsed laser deposition. We will attempt to realise this by studying the mechanism of the plasma formation and expansion during the pulsed...

  4. Reflectivity and energy balance in pulsed-laser deposition experiments from mono- and bi-atomic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, T.; Rohr, K.P.; Sinha, B. K.

    2002-01-01

    Reflectivity and complete energy balance from the planar targets of aluminum, copper, nickel, and molybdenum have been measured using a Nd: glass laser (λ=1060 nm,τ=5 ns) in the low intensity regime of laser plasma interaction as a function of focal spot size. The magnitude of partition of total incident laser energy into different channels is observed to decrease as the focal spot size increases. It is further observed that the magnitude of partition of the incident energy into these channels, in general, decreases as the atomic number increases for any given focal spot size, although, the reflectivity component of the partitioned energy increases with focal spot size for any given element. The reflectivities of copper and tungsten and their alloy were measured separately. The reflectivity from the alloy plasma was reduced by a factor of 6 compared to either element separately. This observation confirms the recent theory that in the multiion plasma the ion acoustic waves are additionally damped due to additional Joule, thermal diffusion, and viscous terms in the modified ion-fluid theory of the ion acoustic waves in a multiion species plasma

  5. X-ray emission spectra of the plasma produced by an ultrashort laser pulse in cluster targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenz, C; Bagnoud, V; Blasco, F; Roche, J R; Salin, F; Faenov, A Ya; Skobelev, I Yu; Magunov, A I; Pikuz, T A

    2000-01-01

    The first observation of x-ray emission spectra of multiply charged ions in the plasma produced by a 35-fs laser pulse with an intensity up to 10 17 W cm -2 in CO 2 and Kr gas jet targets is reported. The emission in the wavelength ranges of the 1snp-1s 2 (n=3-6) transitions of O VII ions and the Ly α line of O VIII ions, as well as of the (2s 1/2 2p 6 3p 3/2 ) 1 -2s 2 2p 6 1 S 0 and (2s 1/2 2p 6 3p 1/2 ) 1 -2s 2 2p 6 1 S 0 lines of Ne-like KrXXVII ions testifies that the highly ionised plasma is formed by collision processes in clusters. Modelling the shape of the spectral lines of oxygen ions by including the principal mechanisms of broadening and absorption in optically dense plasmas reveals that the main contribution to the time-integrated intensity is made by the plasma with the parameters N e =(2-20)x10 20 cm -3 and T e =100 - 115 eV. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  6. Advantageous use of metallic cobalt in the target for pulsed laser deposition of cobalt-doped ZnO films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, Minju, E-mail: mjying@bnu.edu.cn, E-mail: g.gehring@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Blythe, Harry J.; Gerriu, Fatma M.; Fox, A. Mark; Gehring, Gillian A., E-mail: mjying@bnu.edu.cn, E-mail: g.gehring@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Dizayee, Wala [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Department of Science, Salahaddin University, Erbil (Iraq); Heald, Steve M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We investigate the magnetic properties of ZnCoO thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) from targets made containing metallic Co or CoO precursors instead of the usual Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}. We find that the films grown from metallic Co precursors in an oxygen rich environment contain negligible amounts of Co metal and have a large magnetization at room temperature. Structural analysis by X-ray diffraction and magneto-optical measurements indicate that the enhanced magnetism is due, in part, from Zn vacancies that partially compensate the naturally occurring n-type defects. We conclude that strongly magnetic films of Zn{sub 0.95}Co{sub 0.05}O that do not contain metallic cobalt can be grown by PLD from Co-metal-precursor targets if the films are grown in an oxygen atmosphere.

  7. X-rays diagnostics of the hot electron energy distribution in the intense laser interaction with metal targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostenko, O. F.; Andreev, N. E.; Rosmej, O. N.

    2018-03-01

    A two-temperature hot electron energy distribution has been revealed by modeling of bremsstrahlung emission, measured by the radiation attenuation and half-shade methods, and Kα emission from a massive silver cylinder irradiated by a subpicosecond s-polarized laser pulse with a peak intensity of about 2 × 1019 W/cm2. To deduce parameters of the hot electron spectrum, we have developed semi-analytical models of generation and measurements of the x-rays. The models are based on analytical expressions and tabulated data on electron stopping power as well as cross-sections of generation and absorption of the x-rays. The Kα emission from thin silver foils deposited on low-Z substrates, both conducting and nonconducting, has been used to verify the developed models and obtained hot electron spectrum. The obtained temperatures of the colder and hotter electron components are in agreement with the values predicted by kinetic simulations of the cone-guided approach to fast ignition [Chrisman et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 056309 (2008)]. The temperature of the low-energy component of the accelerated electron spectrum is well below the ponderomotive scaling and Beg's law. We have obtained relatively low conversion efficiency of laser energy into the energy of hot electrons propagating through the solid target of about 2%. It is demonstrated that the assumption about a single-temperature hot electron energy distribution with the slope temperature described by the ponderomotive scaling relationship, without detailed analysis of the hot electron spectrum, can lead to strong overestimation of the laser-to-electron energy-conversion efficiency, in particular, the conversion efficiency of laser energy into the high-temperature component of the hot electron distribution.

  8. Selective Photothermolysis to target Sebaceous Glands: Theoretical Estimation of Parameters and Preliminary Results Using a Free Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernanda Sakamoto, Apostolos Doukas, William Farinelli, Zeina Tannous, Michelle D. Shinn, Stephen Benson, Gwyn P. Williams, H. Dylla, Richard Anderson

    2011-12-01

    The success of permanent laser hair removal suggests that selective photothermolysis (SP) of sebaceous glands, another part of hair follicles, may also have merit. About 30% of sebum consists of fats with copious CH2 bond content. SP was studied in vitro, using free electron laser (FEL) pulses at an infrared CH2 vibrational absorption wavelength band. Absorption spectra of natural and artificially prepared sebum were measured from 200 nm to 3000 nm, to determine wavelengths potentially able to target sebaceous glands. The Jefferson National Accelerator superconducting FEL was used to measure photothermal excitation of aqueous gels, artificial sebum, pig skin, human scalp and forehead skin (sebaceous sites). In vitro skin samples were exposed to FEL pulses from 1620 to 1720 nm, spot diameter 7-9.5 mm with exposure through a cold 4C sapphire window in contact with the skin. Exposed and control tissue samples were stained using H and E, and nitroblue tetrazolium chloride staining (NBTC) was used to detect thermal denaturation. Natural and artificial sebum both had absorption peaks near 1210, 1728, 1760, 2306 and 2346 nm. Laser-induced heating of artificial sebum was approximately twice that of water at 1710 and 1720 nm, and about 1.5x higher in human sebaceous glands than in water. Thermal camera imaging showed transient focal heating near sebaceous hair follicles. Histologically, skin samples exposed to {approx}1700 nm, {approx}100-125 ms pulses showed evidence of selective thermal damage to sebaceous glands. Sebaceous glands were positive for NBTC staining, without evidence of selective loss in samples exposed to the laser. Epidermis was undamaged in all samples. Conclusions: SP of sebaceous glands appears to be feasible. Potentially, optical pulses at {approx}1720 nm or {approx}1210 nm delivered with large beam diameter and appropriate skin cooling in approximately 0.1 s may provide an alternative treatment for acne.

  9. Structural characterization of ultrathin Cr-doped ITO layers deposited by double-target pulsed laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesaria, Maura; Caricato, Anna Paola; Leggieri, Gilberto; Luches, Armando; Martino, Maurizio; Maruccio, Giuseppe; Catalano, Massimo; Manera, Maria Grazia; Rella, Roberto; Taurino, Antonietta

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report on the growth and structural characterization of very thin (20 nm) Cr-doped ITO films, deposited at room temperature by double-target pulsed laser ablation on amorphous silica substrates. The role of Cr atoms in the ITO matrix is carefully investigated with increasing doping content by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Selected-area electron diffraction, conventional bright field and dark field as well as high-resolution TEM analyses, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy demonstrate that (i) crystallization features occur despite the low growth temperature and small thickness, (ii) no chromium or chromium oxide secondary phases are detectable, regardless of the film doping levels, (iii) the films crystallize as crystalline flakes forming large-angle grain boundaries; (iv) the observed flakes consist of crystalline planes with local bending of the crystal lattice. Thickness and compositional information about the films are obtained by Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry. Results are discussed by considering the combined effects of growth temperature, smaller ionic radius of the Cr cation compared with the trivalent In ion, doping level, film thickness, the double-target doping technique and peculiarities of the pulsed laser deposition method.

  10. Structural characterization of ultrathin Cr-doped ITO layers deposited by double-target pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaria, Maura; Caricato, Anna Paola; Leggieri, Gilberto; Luches, Armando; Martino, Maurizio; Maruccio, Giuseppe; Catalano, Massimo; Grazia Manera, Maria; Rella, Roberto; Taurino, Antonietta

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we report on the growth and structural characterization of very thin (20 nm) Cr-doped ITO films, deposited at room temperature by double-target pulsed laser ablation on amorphous silica substrates. The role of Cr atoms in the ITO matrix is carefully investigated with increasing doping content by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Selected-area electron diffraction, conventional bright field and dark field as well as high-resolution TEM analyses, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy demonstrate that (i) crystallization features occur despite the low growth temperature and small thickness, (ii) no chromium or chromium oxide secondary phases are detectable, regardless of the film doping levels, (iii) the films crystallize as crystalline flakes forming large-angle grain boundaries; (iv) the observed flakes consist of crystalline planes with local bending of the crystal lattice. Thickness and compositional information about the films are obtained by Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry. Results are discussed by considering the combined effects of growth temperature, smaller ionic radius of the Cr cation compared with the trivalent In ion, doping level, film thickness, the double-target doping technique and peculiarities of the pulsed laser deposition method.

  11. Simulations of tungsten, tungsten-coated and tungsten-doped targets at low KrF laser intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombant, D.; Klapisch, M.; Lehecka, T.; Seely, J.; Schmitt, A.; Obenschain, S.

    1998-11-01

    High-Z coatings can be used to create X-rays to preheat the ablator, thus reducing the laser imprint and the R-T instability. Targets with tungsten coated on the surface or mixed with CH have recently been irradiated using Nike at intensities of a few 10^12W/cm^2, typical of the foot of a laser fusion pulse. The present simulations in 1D have been carried out to provide an interpretation of these experiments and to validate the code for radiation-preheated target designs(S. E. Bodner et al., Phys. Plasmas, 5, 1901 (1998).). All computations were performed in non-LTE(M. Busquet, Phys. Fluids B, 5, 4191 (1993); M. Klapisch, A. Bar-Shalom, J. Oreg and D. Colombant, Phys. Plasmas, 5, 1919 (1998).). Low resolution X-ray spectra obtained from on-line computations are compared to time-integrated experimental spectra between 100 eV and 500 eV. Agreements and differences between computations and experiments will be discussed.

  12. Characterization of long-scale-length plasmas produced from plastic foam targets for laser plasma instability (LPI) research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2017-10-01

    We report on an experimental effort to produce plasmas with long scale lengths for the study of parametric instabilities, such as two plasmon decay (TPD) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), under conditions relevant to fusion plasma. In the current experiment, plasmas are formed from low density (10-100 mg/cc) CH foam targets irradiated by Nike krypton fluoride laser pulses (λ = 248 nm, 1 nsec FWHM) with energies up to 1 kJ. This experiment is conducted with two primary diagnostics: the grid image refractometer (Nike-GIR) to measure electron density and temperature profiles of the coronas, and time-resolved spectrometers with absolute intensity calibration to examine scattered light features of TPD or SRS. Nike-GIR was recently upgraded with a 5th harmonic probe laser (λ = 213 nm) to access plasma regions near quarter critical density of 248 nm light (4.5 ×1021 cm-3). The results will be discussed with data obtained from 120 μm scale-length plasmas created on solid CH targets in previous LPI experiments at Nike. Work supported by DoE/NNSA.

  13. Structural characterization of ultrathin Cr-doped ITO layers deposited by double-target pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesaria, Maura; Caricato, Anna Paola; Leggieri, Gilberto; Luches, Armando; Martino, Maurizio; Maruccio, Giuseppe [Physics Department, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Catalano, Massimo; Manera, Maria Grazia; Rella, Roberto; Taurino, Antonietta, E-mail: antonietta.taurino@le.imm.cnr.it [Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, IMM-CNR, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2011-09-14

    In this paper we report on the growth and structural characterization of very thin (20 nm) Cr-doped ITO films, deposited at room temperature by double-target pulsed laser ablation on amorphous silica substrates. The role of Cr atoms in the ITO matrix is carefully investigated with increasing doping content by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Selected-area electron diffraction, conventional bright field and dark field as well as high-resolution TEM analyses, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy demonstrate that (i) crystallization features occur despite the low growth temperature and small thickness, (ii) no chromium or chromium oxide secondary phases are detectable, regardless of the film doping levels, (iii) the films crystallize as crystalline flakes forming large-angle grain boundaries; (iv) the observed flakes consist of crystalline planes with local bending of the crystal lattice. Thickness and compositional information about the films are obtained by Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry. Results are discussed by considering the combined effects of growth temperature, smaller ionic radius of the Cr cation compared with the trivalent In ion, doping level, film thickness, the double-target doping technique and peculiarities of the pulsed laser deposition method.

  14. Efficient neutron production from sub-nanosecond laser pulse accelerating deuterons on target front side

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klír, Daniel; Krása, Josef; Cikhardt, Jakub; Dudžák, Roman; Krouský, Eduard; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Řezáč, Karel; Sila, O.; Skála, Jiří; Ullschmied, Jiří; Velyhan, Andriy

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 9 (2015), s. 093117-093117 ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0454; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13029; GA MŠk LM2010014; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant - others:LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : plasma * femtosecond laser * nuclear-fusion * ion-beams * hot-electrons Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics); Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) (FZU-D) Impact factor: 2.207, year: 2015 http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/pop/22/9/10.1063/1.4931460

  15. Fabrication of advanced targets for laser driven nuclear fusion reactions through standard microelectronics technology approaches.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Picciotto, A.; Crivellari, M.; Bellutti, P.; Barozzi, M.; Kucharik, M.; Krása, Josef; Swidlovsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Velyhan, Andriy; Ullschmied, Jiří; Margarone, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, October (2017), č. článku P10001. ISSN 1748-0221 Grant - others:OP VK 2 LaserGen(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0087; LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : Nuclear instruments and methods for hot plasma diagnostics * Plasma generation (laserproduced, RF, x ray-produced) * Plasma diagnostics - charged-particle spectroscopy Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: 2.11 Other engineering and technologies; 2.11 Other engineering and technologies (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-0221/12/10/P10001/meta

  16. X-ray spectroscopy of laser heated CF{sub 2}-targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geissel, M.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Pirzadeh, P.; Rosmej, F.B.; Roth, M.; Seelig, W.; Sub, W. [Technische Universitat Darmstadt (Germany); Faenov, A.; Pikuz, T. [VNIIFTRI Mendeleevo (Russian Federation); Tauschwitz, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    The scientific focus of plasma physics with heavy ions is to investigate the interaction of heavy ion beams with hot and dense plasmas. These plasmas are generated by a Nd:YAG/Nd:glass-laser system which can provide up to 100 J within 15 ns. Previous experiments showed, that there is an enhanced energy loss of the projectiles in carbon, when it is heated from the solid into the plasma state. To model and interpret the experiments more precisely, an exact knowledge of the plasma parameters, such as size, temperature, electron density and inhomogeneity are of fundamental necessity. Due to the high temperatures achieved in laser produced plasmas the soft X-ray emission of highly charged ions can be used for diagnostics. (authors)

  17. The study of metal-alloy targets and excimer laser deposition technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hua; Wu Weidong; Tang Xiaohong; Zhang Jicheng; Tang Yongjian

    2002-01-01

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technology is described. Design and manufacture of the PLD installation is illustrated in detail. The Cu films and Cu/Fe multi-layers are produced by PLD method. The production of the Mg/Si films using magnetron sputtering method is investigated in detail. The percent of Si on Mg/Si film surface is measured by using conductivity method

  18. Triple nuclear reactions (d, n) in laser-generated plasma from deuterated targets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, Mariapompea

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 6 (2017), č. článku 063102. ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : ion acceleration * pulsed laser * polyethylene Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.115, year: 2016

  19. Dominant role of dielectron satellites in emission spectra of laser plasma near target surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozmej, F.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that satellite structures of resonance lines may become more intensive than resonance lines themselves. The experimental and theoretical studies show that the conditions whereby the satellite structures become predominant in the plasma emission spectrum, are sufficiently easily realized in the experiment and moreover they obviously will present typical cases by studies on the plasma condensed areas in the experiments on inertial thermonuclear synthesis and by investigation of plasma, created through pico- and femtosecond laser pulses of high contrast

  20. Pulsed laser deposition of chalcogenide sulfides from multi- and single-component targets: the non-stoichiometric material transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Ganskukh, Mungunshagai; Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt

    2018-01-01

    The mass transfer from target to films is incongruent for chalcogenide sulfides in contrast to the expectations of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) as a stoichiometric film growth process. Films produced from a CZTS (Cu2ZnSnS4) multi-component target have no Cu below a fluence threshold of 0.2 J/cm2......, and the Cu content is also very low at low fluence from a single-component target. Above this threshold, the Cu content in the films increases almost linearly up to a value above the stoichiometric value, while the ratio of the concentration of the other metals Zn to Sn (Zn/Sn) remains constant. Films...... of a similar material CTS (Cu2SnS3) have been produced by PLD from a CTS target and exhibits a similar trend in the same fluence region. The results are discussed on the basis of solid-state data and the existing data from the literature....

  1. Thermal Studies of the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Target during Injection into the Fusion Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, R. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Havstad, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LeBlanc, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chang, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Golosker, I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosso, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-09

    The tests of the external heat transfer coefficient suggests that the values used in the numerical analysis for the temperature distribution within the fusion fuel target following flight into the target chamber are probably valid. The tests of the heat transfer phenomena occurring within the target due the rapid heating of the LEH window for the hot gasses within the fusion chamber show that the heat does indeed convect via the internal helium environment of the target towards the capsule and that the pressure in the front compartment of the target adjacent to the LEH window increases such that t bypass venting of the internal helium into the second chamber adjacent to the capsule is needed to prevent rupture of the membranes. The bypass flow is cooled by the hohlraum during this venting. However, the experiments suggest that our internal heat flow calculations may be low by about a factor of 2. Further studies need to be conducted to investigate the differences between the experiment and the numerical analysis. Future studies could also possibly bring the test conditions closer to those expected in the fusion chamber to better validate the results. A sacrificial layer will probably be required on the LEH window of the target and this can be used to mitigate any unexpected target heating.

  2. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2014-01-01

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target

  3. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R., E-mail: agrt@umich.edu [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-04-28

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target.

  4. 80 A/cm2 electron beams from metal targets irradiated by KrCl and XeCl excimer lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloglazov, A.; Martino, M.; Nassisi, V.

    1996-05-01

    Due to the growing demand for high-current and long-duration electron-beam devices, laser electron sources were investigated in our laboratory. Experiments on electron-beam generation and propagation from aluminium and copper targets illuminated by XeCl (308 nm) and KrCl (222 nm) excimer lasers, were carried out under plasma ignition due to laser irradiation. This plasma supplied a spontaneous accelerating electric field of about 370 kV/m without an external accelerating voltage. By applying the modified one-dimensional Poisson equation, we computed the expected current and we also estimated the plasma concentration during the accelerating process. At 40 kV of accelerating voltage, an output current pulse of about 80 A/cm2 was detected from an Al target irradiated by the shorter wavelength laser.

  5. Direct measurement of kilo-tesla level magnetic field generated with laser-driven capacitor-coil target by proton deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, K. F. F.; Bailly-Grandvaux, M.; Morace, A.; Sakata, S.; Matsuo, K.; Kojima, S.; Lee, S.; Vaisseau, X.; Arikawa, Y.; Yogo, A.; Kondo, K.; Zhang, Z.; Bellei, C.; Santos, J. J.; Fujioka, S.; Azechi, H.

    2016-02-01

    A kilo-tesla level, quasi-static magnetic field (B-field), which is generated with an intense laser-driven capacitor-coil target, was measured by proton deflectometry with a proper plasma shielding. Proton deflectometry is a direct and reliable method to diagnose strong, mm3-scale laser-produced B-field; however, this was not successful in the previous experiment. A target-normal-sheath-accelerated proton beam is deflected by Lorentz force in the laser-produced magnetic field with the resulting deflection pattern recorded on a radiochromic film stack. A 610 ± 30 T of B-field amplitude was inferred by comparing the experimental proton pattern with Monte-Carlo calculations. The amplitude and temporal evolutions of the laser-generated B-field were also measured by a differential magnetic probe, independently confirming the proton deflectometry measurement results.

  6. Efficient laser-induced 6-8 keV x-ray production from iron oxide aerogel and foil-lined cavity targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, F.; Kay, J. J.; Patterson, J. R.; Kane, J.; Villette, B.; Girard, F.; Reverdin, C.; May, M.; Emig, J.; Sorce, C.; Colvin, J.; Gammon, S.; Jaquez, J.; Satcher, J. H.; Fournier, K. B.

    2012-08-01

    The performance of new iron-based laser-driven x-ray sources has been tested at the OMEGA laser facility for production of x rays in the 6.5–8.5 keV range. Two types of targets were experimentally investigated: low-density iron oxide aerogels (density 6-16 mg/cm36-16 mg/cm3) and stainless steel foil-lined cavity targets (steel thickness 1-5 μm1-5 μm). The targets were irradiated by 40 beams of the OMEGA laser (500 J/beam, 1 ns pulse, wavelength 351 nm). All targets showed good coupling with the laser, with <5%<5% of the incident laser light backscattered by the resulting plasma in all cases (typically <2.5%<2.5%). The aerogel targets produced Te=2Te=2 to 3 keV, ne=0.12-0.2ne=0.12-0.2 critical density plasmas yielding a 40%–60% laser-to-x-ray total conversion efficiency (CE) (1.2%–3% in the Fe K-shell range). The foil cavity targets produced Te~2 keV, Te~2 keV, ne~0.15ne~0.15 critical density plasmas yielding a 60%–75% conversion efficiency (1.6%–2.2% in the Fe K-shell range). Time-resolved images illustrate that the volumetric heating of low-density aerogels allow them to emit a higher K-shell x-ray yield even though they contain fewer Fe atoms. However, their challenging fabrication process leads to a larger shot-to-shot variation than cavity targets.

  7. 1982 laser program annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Grow, G.R.

    1983-08-01

    This annual report covers the following eight sections: (1) laser program review, (2) laser systems and operation, (3) target design, (4) target fabrication, (5) fusion experiments program, (6) Zeus laser project, (7) laser research and development, and (8) energy applications

  8. Mechanism for the generation of 109 G magnetic fields in the interaction of ultraintense short laser pulse with an overdense plasma target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudan, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    The physical mechanism for the generation of very high ''dc'' magnetic fields in the interaction of ultraintense short laser pulse with an overdense plasma target originates in the spatial gradients and nonstationary character of the ponderomotive force. A set of model equations to determine the evolution of the ''dc'' fields is derived and it is shown that the ''dc'' magnetic field is of the same order of magnitude as the high frequency laser magnetic field

  9. Enhancement of conversion efficiency of extreme ultraviolet radiation from a liquid aqueous solution microjet target by use of dual laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Dojyo, Naoto; Hamada, Masaya; Kawasaki, Keita; Sasaki, Wataru; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2006-03-01

    We demonstrated a debris-free, efficient laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source by use of a regenerative liquid microjet target containing tin-dioxide (SnO II) nano-particles. By using a low SnO II concentration (6%) solution and dual laser pulses for the plasma control, we observed the EUV conversion efficiency of 1.2% with undetectable debris.

  10. Plasma conditions generated by interaction of a high brightness, prepulse free Raman amplified KrF laser pulse with solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, D.; Gizzi, L.A.; Khattak, F.Y.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Viana, S.M.; Willi, O.

    1992-01-01

    A high brightness, Raman amplified KrF laser has been used to irradiate solid targets with 12 ps laser pulses at intensities above 10 15 W/cm 2 without the presence of a preformed plasma caused by low level amplified spontaneous emission prepulse. Time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy of the K-shell emission from aluminum was used to infer electron densities in excess of 10 23 cm -3 at temperatures of several hundred electronvolts

  11. Interaction Of CO2 Laser Nanosecond Pulse Train With The Metallic Targets In Optical Breakdown Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollonov, V. V.; Firsov, K. N.; Konov, V. I.; Nikitin, P. I.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Silenok, A. S.; Sorochenko, V. R.

    1986-11-01

    In the present paper the electric field and currents in the air-breakdown plasma, produced by the train of nanosecond pulses of TEA-002 - regenerative amplifier near the un-charged targets are studied. The breakdown thresholds and the efficiency of plasma-target heat transmission are also measured. The results of numerical calculations made for increasing of the pulse train contrast with respect to the background in a regenerative amplifier are advanced.

  12. Generation of high-energy-density ion bunches by ultraintense laser-cone-target interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yang, X.H.; Yu, W.; Xu, H.; Zhuo, H.B.; Ma, Y.Y.; Zou, D.B.; Yu, T.P.; Ge, Z.Y.; Yin, Y.; Shao, F.Q.; Borghesi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 6 (2014), "0631053-1"-"0631053-7" ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : temporal contrast * proton-beams * driven * acceleration * enhancement Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.142, year: 2014

  13. Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in targets accelerated by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, M.H.; Gardner, J.H.; Boris, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    With use of the fast2d laser-shell model, the acceleration of a 20-μm-thick plastic foil up to 160 km/s has been simulated. It is possible to follow the Rayleigh-Taylor bubble-and-spike development far into the nonlinear regime and beyond the point of foil fragmentation. Strong shear flow develops which evolves into the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability causes the tips of the spikes to widen and as a result reduce their rate of ''fall.''

  14. Laser capture microdissection in the genomic and proteomic era: targeting the genetic basis of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domazet, Barbara; Maclennan, Gregory T; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Montironi, Rodolfo; Cheng, Liang

    2008-03-15

    The advent of new technologies has enabled deeper insight into processes at subcellular levels, which will ultimately improve diagnostic procedures and patient outcome. Thanks to cell enrichment methods, it is now possible to study cells in their native environment. This has greatly contributed to a rapid growth in several areas, such as gene expression analysis, proteomics, and metabolonomics. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) as a method of procuring subpopulations of cells under direct visual inspection is playing an important role in these areas. This review provides an overview of existing LCM technology and its downstream applications in genomics, proteomics, diagnostics and therapy.

  15. The Science and Technologies for Fusion Energy With Lasers and Direct-Drive Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    541, 1987. [12] S. Skupsky, R. W. Short, T. Kessler, R. S. Craxton, S. Letzring, and J. M. Soures , “Improved laser-beam uniformity using the angular...Technol., vol. 52, no. 3, pp. 383–387, Oct. 2007. [20] C. Ebbers, J. P. Armstrong, A. J. Bayramian, G. Beer , R. W. Campbell, D. C. Chen, R. R. Cross, A...Diego, CA, May 31–Jun. 5, 2009. [21] A. Bayramian, J. Armstrong, G. Beer , R. Campbell, R. Cross, A. Erlandson, B. Freitas, J. Menapace, W. Molander

  16. Effects of locally targeted heavy-ion and laser microbeam on root hydrotropism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazawa, Yutaka; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Funayama, Tomoo

    2008-01-01

    Classical studies on root hydrotropism have hypothesized the importance of columella cells as well as the de novo gene expression, such as auxin-inducible gene, at the elongation zone in hydrotropism; however, there has been no confirmation that columella cells or auxin-mediated signaling in the elongation zone are necessary for hydrotropism. We examined the role of root cap and elongation zone cells in root hydrotropism using heavy-ion and laser microbeam. Heavy-ion microbeam irradiation of the elongation zone, but not that of the columella cells, significantly and temporarily suppressed the development of hydrotropic curvature. However, laser ablation confirmed that columella cells are indispensable for hydrotropism. Systemic heavy-ion broad-beam irradiation suppressed de novo expression of INDOLE ACETIC ACID 5 gene, but not MIZU-KUSSEI1 gene. Our results indicate that both the root cap and elongation zone have indispensable and functionally distinct roles in root hydrotropism, and that de novo gene expression might be required for hydrotropism in the elongation zone, but not in columella cells. (author)

  17. High speed impact on fragile thin targets: application to the Megajoule laser project and to the issues of spatial debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, Y.

    2007-02-01

    This work is dedicated to the study of damages that appear in the optics components of high power laser lines. 3 research axis have been defined: first: the experimental identification of damage and matter ejection sustained by the target, secondly: the characterization of the behaviour of glass undergoing a shock, and thirdly: the improvement and validation of a method to simulate 3-dimensional damage and matter ejection. This document is organized into 4 parts. The first part presents the scientific basis of the 3 research axis previously quoted, first at the scale of the target with the changes and damages induced in the target by a high velocity impact, then at the scale of the material itself it means here the bulk of glass. The SPD method used to simulate the behaviour of fragile materials is presented. The second part deals with the experimental data collected for this study on various targets (LAE, EPA and solar cells). An important work has been the characterization of the ejected matter through the uses of high-speed cameras and of aerogels to collect the fragments. With the third part we pass at the scale of the material: we have studied molten silica and boro-float glass when undergoing shocks. Experimental data has been gathered and the model used to describe the behaviour has been improved and validated on various experimental cases. The last part merges the results obtained on the 2 previous parts to give a simulation of 3-dimensional impacts on thin targets. In each case we show the performance and the limits of the tool composed of the behaviour model and of the SPH numerical method. (A.C.)

  18. Above scaling short-pulse ion acceleration from flat foil and ``Pizza-top Cone'' targets at the Trident laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flippo, Kirk; Hegelich, B. Manuel; Cort Gautier, D.; Johnson, J. Randy; Kline, John L.; Shimada, Tsutomu; Fernández, Juan C.; Gaillard, Sandrine; Rassuchine, Jennifer; Le Galloudec, Nathalie; Cowan, Thomas E.; Malekos, Steve; Korgan, Grant

    2006-10-01

    Ion-driven Fast Ignition (IFI) has certain advantages over electron-driven FI due to a possible large reduction in the amount of energy required. Recent experiments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident facility have yielded ion energies and efficiencies many times in excess of recent published scaling laws, leading to even more potential advantages of IFI. Proton energies in excess of 35 MeV have been observed from targets produced by the University of Nevada, Reno - dubbed ``Pizza-top Cone'' targets - at intensities of only 1x10^19 W/cm^2 with 20 joules in 600 fs. Energies in excess of 24 MeV were observed from simple flat foil targets as well. The observed energies, above any published scaling laws, are attributed to target production, preparation, and shot to shot monitoring of many laser parameters, especially the laser ASE prepulse level and laser pulse duration. The laser parameters are monitored in real-time to keep the laser in optimal condition throughout the run providing high quality, reproducible shots.

  19. Assessing infrared intensity using the evaporation rate of liquid hydrogen inside a cryogenic integrating sphere for laser fusion targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwano, K.; Iwamoto, A.; Asahina, T.; Yamanoi, K.; Arikawa, Y.; Nagatomo, H.; Nakai, M.; Norimatsu, T.; Azechi, H.

    2017-07-01

    Infrared (IR) heating processes have been studied to form a deuterium layer in an inertial confinement fusion target. To understand the relationship between the IR intensity and the fuel layering time constant, we have developed a new method to assess the IR intensity during irradiation. In our method, a glass flask acting as a dummy target is filled with liquid hydrogen (LH2) and is then irradiated with 2-μm light. The IR intensity is subsequently calculated from the time constant of the LH2 evaporation rate. Although LH2 evaporation is also caused by the heat inflow from the surroundings and by the background heat, the evaporation rate due to IR heating can be accurately determined by acquiring the time constant with and without irradiation. The experimentally measured IR intensity is 0.66 mW/cm2, which agrees well with a value estimated by considering the IR photon energy balance. Our results suggest that the present method can be used to measure the IR intensity inside a cryogenic system during IR irradiation of laser fusion targets.

  20. Assessing infrared intensity using the evaporation rate of liquid hydrogen inside a cryogenic integrating sphere for laser fusion targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwano, K; Iwamoto, A; Asahina, T; Yamanoi, K; Arikawa, Y; Nagatomo, H; Nakai, M; Norimatsu, T; Azechi, H

    2017-07-01

    Infrared (IR) heating processes have been studied to form a deuterium layer in an inertial confinement fusion target. To understand the relationship between the IR intensity and the fuel layering time constant, we have developed a new method to assess the IR intensity during irradiation. In our method, a glass flask acting as a dummy target is filled with liquid hydrogen (LH 2 ) and is then irradiated with 2-μm light. The IR intensity is subsequently calculated from the time constant of the LH 2 evaporation rate. Although LH 2 evaporation is also caused by the heat inflow from the surroundings and by the background heat, the evaporation rate due to IR heating can be accurately determined by acquiring the time constant with and without irradiation. The experimentally measured IR intensity is 0.66 mW/cm 2 , which agrees well with a value estimated by considering the IR photon energy balance. Our results suggest that the present method can be used to measure the IR intensity inside a cryogenic system during IR irradiation of laser fusion targets.

  1. Interaction of 0.53 {mu}m laser pulse with millimeter-scale plasmas generated by gasbag target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhichao; Guo Liang [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics, and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Zheng Jian; Yuan Peng [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics, and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Jiang Xiaohua; Wang Zhebin; Yang Dong; Zhang Huan; Li Sanwei; Yin Qiang; Zhu Fanghua; Peng Xiaoshi; Wang Feng; Yuan Zheng; Chen Li; Liu Shenye; Jiang Shaoen; Ding Yongkun [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Shao Ping [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, CAS, Shanghai (China)

    2012-06-15

    Detailed research on the interaction of a 0.53 {mu}m laser pulse with millimeter-scale plasmas produced by a gasbag target on the Shengguang-II facility is presented. The x-ray pinhole images confirm that millimeter-scale plasmas are generated and the x-ray framing images show a temporal window of 0.6-1.1 ns during which the millimeter-scale plasmas exist. The electron temperature is measured with a collective Thomson scattering system, providing 0.64 keV for C{sub 5}H{sub 12} and 1.8 keV for Xe plasmas. The electron density is inferred from the stimulated Raman scattering spectra. The experimental spectra show large differences for C{sub 5}H{sub 12}- and Xe-filled gasbags. A one-dimensional code based upon steady-state, kinetic linear theory is applied to calculate the stimulated Raman scattering spectra. Excellent agreement between the calculated and experimental results shows that the plasma parameters, especially the electron density and the temperature, dominate the disruption behavior of stimulated Raman scattering. The results also indicate that stimulated Raman scattering is probably located within specific region of the gasbag. The time-integrated reflectivity of both the stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering is at a low level, even in the conditions of high laser intensity (1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) and no beam-smoothing. The experimental results are promising for future ignition experiments with a 0.53 {mu}m laser as the driver.

  2. Laser-fusion target fabrication: application of organic coatings to metallic and nonmetallic micropellets by the glow-discharge polymerization of p-xylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonsic, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    Laser-fusion targets require thin, uniform organic-film coatings. A coating technique involving glow-discharge polymerization is described for applying highly adherent, extremely uniform, thin films of a high-temperature polymer to a variety of microsubstrates. Polymeric coatings as thick as 10 μm have been successfully deposited on hollow, spherical, 40- to 250-μm-diam micropellets of glass, metal-coated glass, and nickel/manganese alloy. Experimental yields of coatings of a quality acceptable for laser-fusion targets are typically greater than 90 percent

  3. Structure and properties of nanoparticles fabricated by laser ablation of Zn metal targets in water and ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlichnyi, V. A.; Lapin, I. N.

    2013-10-01

    Size characteristics, structure, and spectral and luminescent properties of nanoparticles fabricated by laser ablation of zinc metal targets in water and ethanol are experimentally investigated upon excitation by Nd:YAG-laser radiation (1064 nm, 7 ns, and 15 Hz). It is demonstrated that zinc oxide nanoparticles with average sizes of 10 nm (in water) and 16 nm (in ethanol) are formed in the initial stage as a result of ablation. The kinetics of the absorption and luminescence spectra, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray structural analysis demonstrate that during long storage of water dispersions and their drying, nanoparticles efficiently interact with carbon dioxide gas of air that leads to the formation of water-soluble Zn(CO3)2(OH)6. In ethanol, Zn oxidation leads to the formation of stable dispersions of ZnO nanoparticles with 99% of the wurtzite phase; in this case, the fluorescence spectra of ZnO nanoparticles change with time, shifting toward longer wavelength region from 550 to 620 nm, which is caused by the changed nature of defects.

  4. Laser-induced carbon plasma emission spectroscopic measurements on solid targets and in gas-phase optical breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemes, Laszlo; Keszler, Anna M.; Hornkohl, James O.; Parigger, Christian

    2005-01-01

    We report measurements of time- and spatially averaged spontaneous-emission spectra following laser-induced breakdown on a solid graphite/ambient gas interface and on solid graphite in vacuum, and also emission spectra from gas-phase optical breakdown in allene C3H4 and helium, and in CO2 and helium mixtures. These emission spectra were dominated by CII (singly ionized carbon), CIII (doubly ionized carbon), hydrogen Balmer beta (H b eta), and Swan C2 band features. Using the local thermodynamic equilibrium and thin plasma assumptions, we derived electron number density and electron temperature estimates. The former was in the 1016 cm -3 range, while the latter was found to be near 20000 K. In addition, the vibration-rotation temperature of the Swan bands of the C2 radical was determined to be between 4500 and 7000 K, using an exact theoretical model for simulating diatomic emission spectra. This temperature range is probably caused by the spatial inhomogeneity of the laser-induced plasma plume. Differences are pointed out in the role of ambient CO2 in a solid graphite target and in gas-phase breakdown plasma

  5. Comparison of short-lived medical isotopes activation by laser thin target induced protons and conventional cyclotron proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Joseph; Dudnikova, Galina; Liu, Tung-Chang; Papadopoulos, Dennis; Sagdeev, Roald; Su, J. J.; UMD MicroPET Team

    2014-10-01

    Production diagnostic or therapeutic nuclear medicines are either by nuclear reactors or by ion accelerators. In general, diagnostic nuclear radioisotopes have a very short half-life varying from tens of minutes for PET tracers and few hours for SPECT tracers. Thus supplies of PET and SPECT radiotracers are limited by regional production facilities. For example 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is the most desired tracer for positron emission tomography because its 110 minutes half-life is sufficient long for transport from production facilities to nearby users. From nuclear activation to completing image taking must be done within 4 hours. Decentralized production of diagnostic radioisotopes will be idea to make high specific activity radiotracers available to researches and clinicians. 11 C, 13 N, 15 O and 18 F can be produced in the energy range from 10-20 MeV by protons. Protons of energies up to tens of MeV generated by intense laser interacting with hydrogen containing targets have been demonstrated by many groups in the past decade. We use 2D PIC code for proton acceleration, Geant4 Monte Carlo code for nuclei activation to compare the yields and specific activities of short-lived isotopes produced by cyclotron proton beams and laser driven protons.

  6. X-ray spectroscopic study of nonequilibrium laser produced plasma in porous targets of low average density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdonskiy, I.N.; Dimitrenko, V.V.; Fasakhov, I.K.; Gavrilov, V.V.; Goltsov, A.Y.; Kovalskii, N.G.; Mironov, B.N. [Science Research Center of Russian Federation Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, Troitsk, Moscow Reg. (Russian Federation); Faenov, A.Y.; Magunov, A.I.; Pikuz, T.A.; Skobelev, I.Y. [Multicharged Ions Spectra Data Center, VNIIFTRI, Mendeleevo (Russian Federation)

    2006-06-15

    New experimental results on laser irradiation (I {<=} 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}, {lambda} = 1.053 {mu}m) of low-density fibrous agar are presented. X-ray spectrometers with spherically bent mica crystals were used for measuring with high spectral resolution the line spectra of multicharged ions. Detailed analysis of the measured spectra made it possible to determine the temperature of electrons and ions in hot plasma created in laser irradiated low-density samples in dependence on average material density and average intensity within a focal spot. Both the ion and electron temperatures are found to decrease by a factor 1.5 - 2 following a factor of about 3 as increase of the target average density (5 mg/cm{sup 3} and 15 mg/cm{sup 3}) for I 5*10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}. In all cases the ion temperature exceeds the electron temperature by a factor of 2 - 3.

  7. Experimental characterization of a strongly coupled solid density plasma generated in a short-pulse laser target interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregori, G.; Hansen, S.B.; Key, M.H.; King, J.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Park, H.; Patel, P.K.; Shepard, R.; Snavely, R.A.; Wilks, S.C.; Glenzer, S.H.

    2005-01-01

    We have measured high resolution copper Kα spectra from a picosecond high intensity laser produced plasma. By fitting the shape of the experimental spectra with a self-consistent-field model which includes all the relevant line shifts from multiply ionized atoms, we are able to infer time and spatially averaged electron temperatures (T e ) and ionization state (Z) in the foil. Our results show increasing values for T e and Z when the overall mass of the target is reduced. In particular, we measure temperatures in excess of 200 eV with Z ∼ 13-14. For these conditions the ion-ion coupling constant is Λ ii ∼ 8-9, thus suggesting the achievement of a strongly coupled plasma regime

  8. High room-temperature figure of merit of thin layers prepared by laser ablation from Bi2Te3 target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walachova, J.; Zeipl, R.; Zelinka, J.; Malina, V.; Pavelka, M.; Jelinek, M.; Studnicka, V.; Lost'ak, P.

    2005-01-01

    The figure of merit ZT is measured by a Harman method on simple devices prepared on single thermoelectric layers of different thicknesses. The thermoelectric layers are prepared at different conditions by laser ablation from Bi 2 Te 3 target. The best measured figure of merit ZT is for our devices ZT=2.65. This result is comparable with the results obtained on superlattices. ZT oscillated with the thickness of the layers. On some devices the Seebeck coefficient is measured and using conductivity measurements along the thermoelectric layers the thermal conductivity is estimated from ZT. The low thermal conductivity of samples is explained by the quantum size effect and by existence of few phases of type Bi 2(m+n) Te 3n in the thermoelectric layers

  9. Experimental characterization of a strongly coupled solid density plasma generated in a short-pulse laser target interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, G; Hansen, S B; Key, M H; King, J; Mackinnon, A J; Park, H; Patel, P K; Shepard, R; Snavely, R A; Wilks, S C; Glenzer, S H

    2005-03-17

    We have measured high resolution copper K{alpha} spectra from a picosecond high intensity laser produced plasma. By fitting the shape of the experimental spectra with a self-consistent-field model which includes all the relevant line shifts from multiply ionized atoms, we are able to infer time and spatially averaged electron temperatures (T{sub e}) and ionization state (Z) in the foil. Our results show increasing values for T{sub e} and Z when the overall mass of the target is reduced. In particular, we measure temperatures in excess of 200 eV with Z {approx} 13-14. For these conditions the ion-ion coupling constant is {Lambda}{sub ii} {approx} 8-9, thus suggesting the achievement of a strongly coupled plasma regime.

  10. Nano and micro structured targets to modulate the spatial profile of laser driven proton beams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giuffrida, Lorenzo; Svensson, K.; Pšikal, Jan; Margarone, Daniele; Lutoslawski, P.; Scuderi, Valentina; Milluzzo, G.; Kaufman, Jan; Wiste, Tuomas; Dalui, M.; Ekerfelt, H.; Gonzalez, I.G.; Lundh, O.; Persson, A.; Picciotto, A.; Crivellari, M.; Bagolini, A.; Bellutti, P.; Magnusson, J.; Gonoskov, A.; Klimša, Ladislav; Kopeček, Jaromír; Laštovička, Tomáš; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Korn, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, Mar (2017), s. 1-6, č. článku C03040. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA MŠk LQ1606; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02964S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASER LAB-EUROPE Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : accelerator applications * beam dynamics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  11. Effect of deviations from the Maxwell distribution on neutron production in laser targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, D.B.; Petschek, A.G.

    1978-11-01

    Because of the brief duration of laser implosions and the small size of the pellets, one may be concerned that the ions never reach a Maxwell distribution or that the tail is lost by diffusion. This might have a large effect on , which depends heavily on the tail. We have calculated the ion distribution and the DT . Results are presented for the ratio of for a monoenergetic isotropic distribution to that for a Maxwell distribution, for the rate of approach of to the equilibrium value, and for the decay of due to fast ion losses. The main effect in the last case is due to energy losses, not to non-Maxwellian distribution. The effect is substantially different than previously reported

  12. Measurement of electromagnetic pulses generated during interactions of high power lasers with solid targets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Marco, Massimo; Krása, Josef; Cikhardt, Jakub; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Krouský, Eduard; Margarone, Daniele; Ahmed, H.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.; Giuffrida, Lorenzo; Vrána, Roman; Velyhan, Andriy; Limpouch, J.; Korn, Georg; Weber, Stefan A.; Velardi, L.; Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V.; Ullschmied, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, Jun (2016), 1-8, č. článku C06004. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LQ1606; GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02964S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14089; GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162; ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : lasers * pulsed power Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  13. Proton radiography of intense-laser-irradiated wire-attached cone targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabuuchi, T.; Sawada, H.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F.N.; Batani, D.; Gizzi, L.A.; Key, M.H.; Mackinnon, A.J.; McLean, H.S.; Patel, P.K.; Norreys, P.A.; Spindloe, C.; Stephens, R.B.; Wei, M.S.; Theobald, W.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of extreme electrostatic and magnetic fields are of interest for the study of high-energy-density plasmas. Results of proton deflectometry of cone-wire targets that are of interest to fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion are presented. (authors)

  14. Detection of small targets in a marine environment using laser radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Benoist, K.W.; Cohen, L.H.; Heuvel, J.C. van den; Putten, F.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Small maritime targets, e.g., periscope tubes, jet skies, swimmers and small boats, are potential threats for naval ships under many conditions, but are difficult to detect with current radar systems due to their limited radar cross section and the presence of sea clutter. On the other hand,

  15. Electrophoretic deposition on graphene of Au nanoparticles generated by laser ablation of a bulk Au target in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semaltianos, N G; Hendry, E; Chang, H; Wears, M L

    2015-01-01

    The characteristic property of nanoparticles generated by laser ablation of metallic targets in liquids to be surface electrically charged can be exploited for the deposition of the nanoparticles onto electrically conducting substrates directly from the synthesized colloidal solution by using the method of electrophoretic deposition (EPD). The method benefits from the high quality of the interface between the deposited nanoparticles and the substrate due to the ligand-free nanoparticle surfaces and thus providing hybrid materials with advanced and novel properties. In this letter, an Au bulk target was laser ablated in deionized (DI) water for the generation of an Au nanoparticle colloidal solution. Under the present conditions of ablation, nanoparticles with diameters from 4 and up to 67 nm are formed in the solution with 80% of the nanoparticles having diameters below ∼20 nm. Their size distribution follows a log-normal function with a median diameter of 8.6 nm. The nanoparticles were deposited onto graphene on a quartz surface by anodic EPD performed at 30 V for 20 min and a longer time of 1 h. A quite uniform surface distribution of the nanoparticles was achieved with surface densities ranging from ∼15 to ∼40 nanoparticles per μm 2 . The hybrid materials exhibit clearly the plasmon resonance absorption of the Au nanoparticles. Deposition for short times preserves the integrity of graphene while longer time deposition leads to the conversion of graphene to graphene oxide, which is attributed to the electrochemical oxidation of graphene. (letter)

  16. Atomistic simulation study of short pulse laser interactions with a metal target under conditions of spatial confinement by a transparent overlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, Eaman T.; Shugaev, Maxim; Wu, Chengping; Zhigilei, Leonid V., E-mail: lz2n@virginia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, 395 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904-4745 (United States); Lin, Zhibin; Hainsey, Robert F. [Electro Scientific Industries, Inc., 13900 NW Science Park Drive, Portland, Oregon 97229 (United States)

    2014-05-14

    The distinct characteristics of short pulse laser interactions with a metal target under conditions of spatial confinement by a solid transparent overlayer are investigated in a series of atomistic simulations. The simulations are performed with a computational model combining classical molecular dynamics (MD) technique with a continuum description of the laser excitation, electron-phonon equilibration, and electronic heat transfer based on two-temperature model (TTM). Two methods for incorporation of the description of a transparent overlayer into the TTM-MD model are designed and parameterized for Ag-silica system. The material response to the laser energy deposition is studied for a range of laser fluences that, in the absence of the transparent overlayer, covers the regimes of melting and resolidification, photomechanical spallation, and phase explosion of the overheated surface region. In contrast to the irradiation in vacuum, the spatial confinement by the overlayer facilitates generation of sustained high-temperature and high-pressure conditions near the metal-overlayer interface, suppresses the generation of unloading tensile wave, decreases the maximum depth of melting, and prevents the spallation and explosive disintegration of the surface region of the metal target. At high laser fluences, when the laser excitation brings the surface region of the metal target to supercritical conditions, the confinement prevents the expansion and phase decomposition characteristic for the vacuum conditions leading to a gradual cooling of the hot compressed supercritical fluid down to the liquid phase and eventual solidification. The target modification in this case is limited to the generation of crystal defects and the detachment of the metal target from the overlayer.

  17. Design of 1+ Ion Source Coupling First Design of the Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source For the Multi-Mega Watt Target Station

    CERN Document Server

    A. Olivier-Kaiser, F. Le Blanc, C. Lau

    The realisation of next-generation ion sources suitable for the EURISOL multi-mega-watt (MMW) target station needs exhaustive studies and developments. An exhaustive review was carried out to evaluate the capability of the ion-sources to operate under the irradiation conditions of the MMW target station. In addition, selectivity must be taken into account to avoid the spread of unwanted radioactivity out of the target-ion-source system (TIS).These studies led to consider RILIS (Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source) as the reference ion source for this target station.

  18. Suprathermal-electron generation, transport, and deposition in CO2-laser-irradiated targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauer, A.; Goldman, R.; Kristal, R.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments on both axial and lateral energy transport and deposition in spherical targets are described. A variety of diagnostics have been used to measure hot-electron transport and deposition including bremsstrahlung and inner-shell radiation and soft x-ray temperature measurements. Self-generated electric and magnetic fields play an important role in the transport and deposition of the hot electrons. In some cases distinct patterns of surface deposition consistent with magnetic-field configurations have been observed

  19. Study of the effect of low-power pulse laser on arc plasma and magnesium alloy target in hybrid welding by spectral diagnosis technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming; Hao, Xinfeng

    2008-10-01

    In order to study the effect of laser pulses on arc plasma and target metal in the hybrid welding process, the spectra of the plasmas in the welding process of magnesium alloys are analysed in this paper. The acquisition system of plasma spectra is set up and the spectral lines of welding plasma are acquired. Compared with tungsten-inert gas (TIG) welding, the intensities of the spectral lines of magnesium increase sharply while those of Ar decrease for strong evaporation and ionization of magnesium alloys in low-power laser/arc hybrid welding. The electron temperature and density are estimated by the Boltzmann plot method and the Stark broadening effect. The result shows that the electron temperature of arc plasma in the hybrid welding process is much lower than that in TIG welding, especially in the laser beam-affected zone. In contrast, the electron density of the plasma is enhanced. The influences of laser parameters on electron temperature are also studied. The changes in electron temperature and density indicate that the effect of laser pulse on the target metal is the dominant factor influencing the electron temperature and density in low-power laser/arc hybrid welding.

  20. Automated computer analysis of x-ray radiographs greatly facilitates measurement of coating-thickness variations in laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupin, D.M.; Moore, K.R.; Thomas, G.D.; Whitman, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    An automated system was built to analyze x-ray radiographs of laser fusion targets which greatly facilitates the detection of coating thickness variations. Many laser fusion targets reqire opaque coatings 1 to 20 μm thick which have been deposited on small glass balloons 100 to 500 μm in diameter. These coatings must be uniformly thick to 1% for the targets to perform optimally. Our system is designed to detect variations as small as 100 A in 1-μm-thick coatings by converting the optical density variations of contact x-ray radiographs into coating thickness variations. Radiographic images are recorded in HRP emulsions and magnified by an optical microscope, imaged onto television camera, digitized and processed on a Data General S/230 computer with a code by Whitman. After an initial set-up by the operator, as many as 200 targets will be automatically characterized

  1. Nanoshell-mediated targeted photothermal therapy of HER2 human breast cancer cells using pulsed and continuous wave lasers: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosroshahi, Mohammad E; Hassannejad, Zahra; Firouzi, Masoumeh; Arshi, Ahmad R

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we report the apoptosis induction in HER2 overexpressed breast cancer cells using pulsed, continuous wave lasers and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-stabilized magneto-plasmonic nanoshells (PVP-MPNS) delivered by immunoliposomes. The immunoliposomes containing PVP-MPNS were fabricated and characterized. Heating efficiency of the synthesized nanostructures was calculated. The effect of functionalization on cellular uptake of nanoparticles was assessed using two cell lines of BT-474 and Calu-6. The best uptake result was achieved by functionalized liposome (MPNS-LAb) and BT-474. Also, the interaction of 514 nm argon (Ar) and Nd/YAG second harmonic 532-nm lasers with nanoparticles was investigated based on the temperature rise of the nanoshell suspension and the release value of 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF) from CF/MPNS-loaded liposomes. The temperature increase of the suspensions after ten consecutive pulses of 532 nm and 5 min of irradiation by Ar laser were measured approximately 2 and 12 °C, respectively. The irradiation of CF/MPNS-loaded liposomes by Ar laser for 3 min resulted in 24.3 % release of CF, and in the case of 532 nm laser, the release was laser energy dependent. Furthermore, the comparison of CF release showed a higher efficiency for the Ar laser than by direct heating of nanoshell suspension using circulating water. The percentage of cell apoptosis after irradiation by Ar and 532 nm lasers were 44.6 and 42.6 %, respectively. The obtained results suggest that controlling the NP-laser interaction using optical properties of nanoshells and the laser parameters can be used to develop a new cancer therapy modality via targeted nanoshell and drug delivery.

  2. Mono-energetic ion beam acceleration in solitary waves during relativistic transparency using high-contrast circularly polarized short-pulse laser and nanoscale targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Shah, R. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Fernandez, J. C.; Jung, D.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    In recent experiments at the Trident laser facility, quasi-monoenergetic ion beams have been obtained from the interaction of an ultraintense, circularly polarized laser with a diamond-like carbon target of nm-scale thickness under conditions of ultrahigh laser pulse contrast. Kinetic simulations of this experiment under realistic laser and plasma conditions show that relativistic transparency occurs before significant radiation pressure acceleration and that the main ion acceleration occurs after the onset of relativistic transparency. Associated with this transition are a period of intense ion acceleration and the generation of a new class of ion solitons that naturally give rise to quasi-monoenergetic ion beams. An analytic theory has been derived for the properties of these solitons that reproduces the behavior observed in kinetic simulations and the experiments.

  3. Laser - Polarized HE-3 Target Used for a Precision Measurement of the Neutron Spin Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romalis, M

    2003-11-05

    This thesis describes a precision measurement of the deep inelastic neutron spin structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(x). The main motivation for the experiment is a test of the Bjorken sum rule. Because of smaller statistical errors and broader kinematic coverage than in previous experiments, we are able to study in detail the behavior of the spin structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) for low values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. We find that it has a strongly divergent behavior, in contradiction to the naive predictions of the Regge theory. This calls into question the methods commonly used for extrapolation of g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) to x = 0. The difference between the proton and the neutron spin structure functions is less divergent at low x, so a test of the Bjorken sum rule is possible. We confirm the sum rule with an accuracy of 8%. The experiment was performed at SLAC using a 50 GeV polarized electron beam and a polarized {sup 3}He target. In this thesis the polarized target is described in detail. We used the technique of Rb optical pumping and Rb-He spin exchange to polarize the {sup 3}He. Because of a novel mechanical design our target had the smallest dilution ever achieved for a high density gas target. Since this is a precision measurement, particular efforts were made to reduce the systematic errors due to the uncertainty in the target parameters. Most important parameters were measured by more than one method. We implemented novel techniques for measuring the thickness of the glass windows of the target, the {sup 3}He density, and the polarization. In particular, one of the methods for measuring the gas density relied on the broadening of the Rb optical absorption lines by collisions with {sup 3}He atoms. The calibration of this technique resulted in the most precise measurements of the pressure broadening parameters for {sup 3}He as well as several other gases, which are described in an Appendix. The polarization of the {sup 3}He was also measured by

  4. Spin-polarized 3He nuclear targets and metastable 4He atoms by optical pumping with a tunable, Nd:YAP laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohler, C.L.; Schearer, L.D.; Leduc, M.; Nacher, P.J.; Zachorowski, L.; Milner, R.G.; McKeown, R.D.; Woodward, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    Several Nd:YAP lasers were constructed which could be broadly tuned in the 1083-nm region which includes the helium 2 3 S-2 3 P transition, using a Lyot filter and thin, uncoated etalons within the laser cavity. 1 W of power could be extracted at 1083 nm through a 1% transmitting output coupler. This laser beam was used to optically pump metastable 4 He and 3 He 2 3 S helium atoms in a weak discharge cell, spin polarizing the metastable ensemble. In a 3 He cell the polarization is transferred to the nuclear spin system. A 3 He target cell at 0.3 Torr was polarized to 52% in a few minutes. We describe the application of this system to the design of polarized targets for experiments in nuclear physics

  5. Ionization of oriented targets by intense circularly polarized laser pulses: Imprints of orbital angular nodes in the two-dimensional momentum distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Christian; Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    We solve the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a few-cycle circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulse that interacts with an oriented target exemplified by an argon atom, initially in a 3px or 3py state. The photoelectron momentum distributions show distinct signatures o...

  6. Cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy for diagnostics of high harmonics of the extreme-ultraviolet free-electron laser light source at SPring-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X.-J.; Fukuzawa, H.; Pruemper, G.; Ueda, K.; Okunishi, M.; Shimada, K.; Motomura, K.; Saito, N.; Iwayama, H.; Nagaya, K.; Yao, M.; Rudenko, A.; Ullrich, J.; Foucar, L.; Czasch, A.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Doerner, R.; Nagasono, M.; Higashiya, A.; Yabashi, M.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy apparatus dedicated to the experiments using the extreme-ultraviolet light pulses at the free-electron laser facility, SPring-8 Compact SASE Source test accelerator, in Japan and used it to measure spatial distributions of fundamental, second, and third harmonics at the end station.

  7. Optical analysis of Cr-doped ITO films deposited by double-target laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesaria, M., E-mail: maura.cesaria@le.infn.it [Departiment of Mathematics and Physics ”Ennio De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Caricato, A.P. [Departiment of Mathematics and Physics ”Ennio De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Maruccio, G. [Departiment of Mathematics and Physics ”Ennio De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL) Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Martino, M. [Departiment of Mathematics and Physics ”Ennio De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    We investigate the optical properties of ITO and Cr-doped ITO films deposited at room temperature by pulsed laser deposition onto amorphous SiO{sub 2} substrates. Our analysis approach is based on the Tauc's plot method applied to the absorption coefficient estimated by a route realistically describing the film structural features and including the contribution of the non-measurable film–substrate interface. Going beyond the conventional application of the Tauc's plot method, we quote two different transition energies for ITO and Cr-doped ITO and discuss their origin in the framework of a band-structure picture as a function of film thickness, Cr changes of the host ITO dispersion and Cr-doping content. In contrast to the conventional optical ITO description, we account for the existence of direct dipole forbidden transitions between the ITO fundamental band edges, involving different electronic and optical band gaps. Our results and discussion demonstrate that disregarding this theoretically established picture, as occurs in the experimental literature, would lead to conclusions inconsistent with the Cr-induced band occupation and effects on ITO dispersions. Preliminary optical (based on transmittance and reflectance spectra as well as band-tailing effects), electrical and structural inspection of the samples are also considered to check reliability and consistency of our discussion. - Highlights: • Realistic absorption coefficient of very thin films. • Electronic and optical band gap: ITO dipole forbidden optical transitions. • Interpretative model combining realistic band structure and Tauc's plot approach. • Inconsistencies stemming from conventional application of the Tauc's plot. • General model applicable to In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-like systems.

  8. Optical analysis of Cr-doped ITO films deposited by double-target laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesaria, M.; Caricato, A.P.; Maruccio, G.; Martino, M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the optical properties of ITO and Cr-doped ITO films deposited at room temperature by pulsed laser deposition onto amorphous SiO 2 substrates. Our analysis approach is based on the Tauc's plot method applied to the absorption coefficient estimated by a route realistically describing the film structural features and including the contribution of the non-measurable film–substrate interface. Going beyond the conventional application of the Tauc's plot method, we quote two different transition energies for ITO and Cr-doped ITO and discuss their origin in the framework of a band-structure picture as a function of film thickness, Cr changes of the host ITO dispersion and Cr-doping content. In contrast to the conventional optical ITO description, we account for the existence of direct dipole forbidden transitions between the ITO fundamental band edges, involving different electronic and optical band gaps. Our results and discussion demonstrate that disregarding this theoretically established picture, as occurs in the experimental literature, would lead to conclusions inconsistent with the Cr-induced band occupation and effects on ITO dispersions. Preliminary optical (based on transmittance and reflectance spectra as well as band-tailing effects), electrical and structural inspection of the samples are also considered to check reliability and consistency of our discussion. - Highlights: • Realistic absorption coefficient of very thin films. • Electronic and optical band gap: ITO dipole forbidden optical transitions. • Interpretative model combining realistic band structure and Tauc's plot approach. • Inconsistencies stemming from conventional application of the Tauc's plot. • General model applicable to In 2 O 3 -like systems

  9. Effect of spatial nonuniformity of heating on compression and burning of a thermonuclear target under direct multibeam irradiation by a megajoule laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bel’kov, S. A.; Bondarenko, S. V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, All-Russia Research Institute of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Vergunova, G. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Garanin, S. G. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, All-Russia Research Institute of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Demchenko, N. N.; Doskoch, I. Ya. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Zmitrenko, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Kuchugov, P. A., E-mail: pkuchugov@gmail.com; Rozanov, V. B.; Stepanov, R. V.; Yakhin, R. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    Direct-drive fusion targets are considered at present as an alternative to targets of indirect compression at a laser energy level of about 2 MJ. In this approach, the symmetry of compression and ignition of thermonuclear fuel play the major role. We report on the results of theoretical investigation of compression and burning of spherical direct-drive targets in the conditions of spatial nonuniformity of heating associated with a shift of the target from the beam center of focusing and possible laser radiation energy disbalance in the beams. The investigation involves numerous calculations based on a complex of 1D and 2D codes RAPID, SEND (for determining the target illumination and the dynamics of absorption), DIANA, and NUT (1D and multidimensional hydrodynamics of compression and burning of targets). The target under investigation had the form of a two-layer shell (ablator made of inertial material CH and DT ice) filled with DT gas. We have determined the range of admissible variation of compression and combustion parameters of the target depending on the variation of the spatial nonuniformity of its heating by a multibeam laser system. It has been shown that low-mode (long-wavelength) perturbations deteriorate the characteristics of the central region due to less effective conversion of the kinetic energy of the target shell into the internal energy of the center. Local initiation of burning is also observed in off-center regions of the target in the case of substantial asymmetry of irradiation. In this case, burning is not spread over the entire volume of the DT fuel as a rule, which considerably reduces the thermonuclear yield as compared to that in the case of spherical symmetry and central ignition.

  10. Effect of laser beam focus position on ion emission from plasmas produced by picosecond and sub-nanosecond laser pulses from solid targets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Woryna, E.; Badziak, J.; Makowski, J.; Parys, P.; Wolowski, J.; Krása, Josef; Láska, Leoš; Rohlena, Karel; Vankov, A. B.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 4 (2001), s. 791-798 ISSN 0078-5466 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010105 Grant - others:KBN(PL) 2 P03B 082 19 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * laser beam focus position influence Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.298, year: 2001

  11. Laser fusion target illumination optimization with consideration of the beam divergence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grzanna, J.; Schoennagel, H.

    1982-09-01

    Using a focusing system with a great focal length it is demonstrated that the radiation divergence considerably influences the illumination optimization. If the channel beam is composed of several single beams, there are two optimum illumination variants: the channel beam tangent and the single beam tangent illumination. Further, it is shown that the illumination channel distribution function can vary in the central region without any effect on the illumination uniformity. The deviation at the periphery is more critical. The most homogeneous illumination and favourable energy transfer would be obtained by low radiation divergence and optimum lateral and axial defocusing of the single beam imaging a suitable near-field intensity pattern on the target surface. It is emphasized that the estimation was made without considering the plasma parameters and the dynamic variation in time. (author)

  12. Direct Observation of Strong Ion Coupling in Laser-Driven Shock-Compressed Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravasio, A.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Loupias, B.; Ozaki, N.; Rabec le Gloahec, M.; Koenig, M.; Gregori, G.; Daligault, J.; Delserieys, A.; Riley, D.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T. A.

    2007-01-01

    In this Letter we report on a near collective x-ray scattering experiment on shock-compressed targets. A highly coupled Al plasma was generated and probed by spectrally resolving an x-ray source forward scattered by the sample. A significant reduction in the intensity of the elastic scatter was observed, which we attribute to the formation of an incipient long-range order. This speculation is confirmed by x-ray scattering calculations accounting for both electron degeneracy and strong coupling effects. Measurements from rear side visible diagnostics are consistent with the plasma parameters inferred from x-ray scattering data. These results give the experimental evidence of the strongly coupled ionic dynamics in dense plasmas

  13. Laser Doppler line scanner for monitoring skin perfusion changes of port wine stains during vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Defu; Ren, Jie; Wang, Ying; Gu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (V-PDT) is known to be an effective therapeutic modality for the treatment of port wine stains (PWS). Monitoring the PWS microvascular response to the V-PDT is crucial for improving the effectiveness of PWS treatment. The objective of this study was to use laser Doppler technique to directly assess the skin perfusion in PWS before and during V-PDT. In this study, 30 patients with PWS were treated with V-PDT. A commercially laser Doppler line scanner (LDLS) was used to record the skin perfusion of PWS immediately before; and at 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15 and 20 minutes during V-PDT treatment. Our results showed that there was substantial inter- and intra-patient perfusion heterogeneity in PWS lesion. Before V-PDT, the comparison of skin perfusion in PWS and contralateral healthy control normal skin indicated that PWS skin perfusion could be larger than, or occasionally equivalent to, that of control normal skin. During V-PDT, the skin perfusion in PWS significantly increased after the initiation of V-PDT treatment, then reached a peak within 10 minutes, followed by a slowly decrease to a relatively lower level. Furthermore, the time for reaching peak and the subsequent magnitude of decrease in skin perfusion varied with different patients, as well as different PWS lesion locations. In conclusion, the LDLS system is capable of assessing skin perfusion changes in PWS during V-PDT, and has potential for elucidating the mechanisms of PWS microvascular response to V-PDT.

  14. Formation of a fine-dispersed liquid-metal target under the action of femto- and picosecond laser pulses for a laser-plasma radiation source in the extreme ultraviolet range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinokhodov, A Yu; Krivokorytov, M S [EUV Labs, Ltd., Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Koshelev, K N; Krivtsun, V M; Sidelnikov, Yu V; Medvedev, V V; Kompanets, V O; Melnikov, A A; Chekalin, S V [Institute of Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-31

    We report the results of studying the dynamics of deformation and fragmentation of liquid-metal droplets under the action of ultrashort laser pulses. The experiments have been performed to optimise the shape of the droplet target used in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation sources based on the laser-produced plasma using the pre-pulse technology. The pre-pulse is generated by a system incorporating a master Ti : sapphire oscillator and a regenerative amplifier, allowing one to vary the pulse duration from 50 fs to 50 ps. The power density of laser radiation at the droplet target, averaged over the pulse duration and spatial coordinates, has reached 3 × 10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}. The production of liquid-metal droplets has been implemented by means of a droplet generator based on a nozzle with a ring piezoceramic actuator. The droplet material is the eutectic indium – tin alloy. The droplet generator could operate in the droplet and jet regime with a maximal rate of stable operation 5 and 150 kHz, respectively. The spatial stability of droplet position σ = 1% – 2% of its diameter is achieved. The size of the droplets varied within 30 – 70 μm, their velocity was 2 – 8 m s{sup -1} depending on the operation regime. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  15. Influence of the distance between target surface and focal point on the expansion dynamics of a laser-induced silicon plasma with spatial confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan; Chen, Anmin; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Ying; Sui, Laizhi; Ke, Da; Li, Suyu; Jiang, Yuanfei; Jin, Mingxing

    2018-05-01

    Expansion dynamics of a laser-induced plasma plume, with spatial confinement, for various distances between the target surface and focal point were studied by the fast photography technique. A silicon wafer was ablated to induce the plasma with a Nd:YAG laser in an atmospheric environment. The expansion dynamics of the plasma plume depended on the distance between the target surface and focal point. In addition, spatially confined time-resolved images showed the different structures of the plasma plumes at different distances between the target surface and focal point. By analyzing the plume images, the optimal distance for emission enhancement was found to be approximately 6 mm away from the geometrical focus using a 10 cm focal length lens. This optimized distance resulted in the strongest compression ratio of the plasma plume by the reflected shock wave. Furthermore, the duration of the interaction between the reflected shock wave and the plasma plume was also prolonged.

  16. Prediction of hot electron production by ultraintense KrF laser-plasma interactions on solid-density targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Susumu; Takahashi, Eiichi; Miura, Eisuke; Owadano, Yoshiro; Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Kato, Tomokazu

    2002-01-01

    The scaling of hot electron temperature and the spectrum of electron energy by intense laser plasma interactions are reexamined from a viewpoint of the difference in laser wavelength. Laser plasma interaction such as parametric instabilities is usually determined by the Iλ2 scaling, where I and λ is the laser intensity and wavelength, respectively. However, the hot electron temperature is proportional to (ncr/ne0)1/2 [(1 + a 0 2 ) 1/2 - 1] rather than [(1 + a 0 2 ) 1/2 - 1] at the interaction with overdense plasmas, where ne0 is a electron density of overdense plasmas and a0 is a normalized laser intensity

  17. Improving beam spectral and spatial quality by double-foil target in laser ion acceleration for ion-driven fast ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chenkun; Albright, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    Mid-Z ion driven fast ignition inertial fusion requires ion beams of 100s of MeV energy and < 10% energy spread. An overdense run-scale foil target driven by a high intensity laser pulse can produce an ion beam that has attractive properties for this application. The Break Out Afterburner (BOA) is one laser-ion acceleration mechanism proposed to generate such beams, however the late stages of the BOA tend to produce too large of an energy spread. The spectral and spatial qualities of the beam quickly evolve as the ion beam and co-moving electrons continue to interact with the laser. Here we show how use of a second target foil placed behind a nm-scale foil can substantially reduce the temperature of the co-moving electrons and improve the ion beam energy spread. Particle-In-Cell simulations reveal the dynamics of the ion beam under control. Optimal conditions for improving the spectral and spatial spread of the ion beam is explored for current laser and target parameters, leading to generation of ion beams of energy 100s of MeV and 6% energy spread, a vital step for realizing ion-driven fast ignition.

  18. High quality β-FeSi2 thin films prepared on silicon (100) by using pulsed laser ablation of Fe target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, S.C.; Yang, C.; Liu, M.; Jiang, S.Z.; Ma, Y.Y.; Chen, C.S.; Gao, X.G.; Sun, Z.C.; Hu, B.; Wang, C.C.; Man, B.Y.

    2012-01-01

    High quality β-FeSi 2 thin films have been fabricated on silicon (100) substrate by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique with the Fe and sintered FeSi 2 targets. The crystalline quality and surface morphology of the samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. These results indicate that the samples prepared with a Fe target can acquire a better crystalline quality and a smoother surface than those with a sintered FeSi 2 target. The reasons were discussed with subsurface superheating mechanism. The intrinsic PL spectrum attributed to the interband transition of β-FeSi 2 for all the samples was compared, showing that the film prepared with Fe target can acquire a good PL property by optimizing experimental parameters. It is suggested that sputtering Fe on Si substrate by the pulsed laser offers a cheap and convenient way to prepare the β-FeSi 2 thin films. -- Highlights: ► β-FeSi 2 films were fabricated by PLD technique with the Fe and FeSi 2 targets. ► The films prepared with Fe target have good crystalline quality and smooth surface. ► The Fe target prepared film acquired a high PL intensity. ► Sputtering Fe on Si substrate offers a convenient way to prepare the β-FeSi 2 films.

  19. Determination of foreign broadening coefficients for Methane Lines Targeted by the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS) on the Mars Curiosity Rover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manne, Jagadeeshwari; Bui, Thinh Q.; Webster, Christopher R.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular line parameters of foreign- broadening by air, carbon dioxide, and helium gas have been experimentally determined for infrared ro-vibrational spectral lines of methane isotopologues ("1"2CH_4 and "1"3CH_4) at 3057 cm"−"1 targeted by the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS) in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover. From multi-spectrum analyses with the speed-dependent Voigt line profile with Rosenkrantz line-mixing, speed-dependence and line-mixing effects were quantified for methane spectra at total pressures up to 200 mbar. The fitted air-broadening coefficients deviated from 8–25% to those reported in the HITRAN-2012 database. - Highlights: • Measurements of foreign broadening coefficients for Mars-TLS specific methane lines. • Spectral parameters were deduced from Speed-dependent Voigt profile with line mixing effects taken into account. • A thorough comparison of different line profile fits for the Mars-TLS methane lines. The fitted broadening coefficients and areas deviated up to 30% and 4%, respectively, when comparing the speed-dependent Voigt profile (with Rosenkrantz line-mixing) with the simplest Voigt profile. • Foreign broadening coefficients were measured within a precision of 2.2%.

  20. Controlling the properties of ultraintense laser-proton sources using transverse refluxing of hot electrons in shaped mass-limited targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tresca, O; Carroll, D C; Yuan, X H; Brenner, C M; Coury, M; Gray, R J; Quinn, M N; McKenna, P; Aurand, B; Bagnoud, V; Fils, J; Kuehl, T; Zielbauer, B; Li, C; Li, Y T; Lin, X X; Evans, R G; Roth, M; Neely, D

    2011-01-01

    We report on the transverse refluxing of energetic electrons in mass-limited foil targets irradiated with high intensity (1 x 10 19 W cm -2 ), picosecond laser pulses. It is shown experimentally that the maximum energies of protons accelerated by sheath fields formed at the rear and at the edges of the target increase with decreasing target size. This is due to the modification of the sheath field by the energetic electrons which spread laterally along the target surface and reflect from the edges. In addition, it is shown that this transverse refluxing of energetic electrons can be used to tailor the spatial-intensity distribution of the proton beam by engineering the shape and size of the target.