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Sample records for laser ablation deposition

  1. Nanosecond laser ablation and deposition of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siew, Wee Ong; Tou, Teck Yong [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Seong Shan; Reenaas, Turid Worren [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Trondheim (Norway); Ladam, Cecile; Dahl, Oeystein [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, Trondheim (Norway)

    2011-09-15

    Nanosecond-pulsed KrF (248 nm, 25 ns) and Nd:YAG (1064 nm, 532 nm, 355 nm, 5 ns) lasers were used to ablate a polycrystalline Si target in a background pressure of <10{sup -4} Pa. Si films were deposited on Si and GaAs substrates at room temperature. The surface morphology of the films was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Round droplets from 20 nm to 5 {mu}m were detected on the deposited films. Raman Spectroscopy indicated that the micron-sized droplets were crystalline and the films were amorphous. The dependence of the properties of the films on laser wavelengths and fluence is discussed. (orig.)

  2. Pulsed laser ablation and deposition of niobium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, M.; De Bonis, A.; Santagata, A.; Rau, J. V.; Galasso, A.; Teghil, R.

    2016-06-01

    NbC crystalline films have been deposited in vacuum by ultra-short pulsed laser deposition technique. The films have been characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopies and by X-ray diffraction. To clarify the ablation-deposition mechanism, the plasma produced by the ablation process has been characterized by optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging. A comparison of the results with those obtained by ns pulsed deposition of the same target has been carried out.

  3. Pulsed laser ablation and deposition of niobium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansone, M.; De Bonis, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Santagata, A. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, UOS Tito Scalo, C.da Santa Loja, 85010 Tito, PZ (Italy); Rau, J.V. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Galasso, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Teghil, R., E-mail: roberto.teghil@unibas.it [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • We have deposited in vacuum niobium carbide films by fs and ns PLD. • We have compared PLD performed by ultra-short and short laser pulses. • The films deposited by fs PLD of NbC are formed by nanoparticles. • The structure of the films produced by fs PLD at 500 °C corresponds to NbC. - Abstract: NbC crystalline films have been deposited in vacuum by ultra-short pulsed laser deposition technique. The films have been characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopies and by X-ray diffraction. To clarify the ablation–deposition mechanism, the plasma produced by the ablation process has been characterized by optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging. A comparison of the results with those obtained by ns pulsed deposition of the same target has been carried out.

  4. Laser ablation deposition measurements from silver and nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Ellegaard, Ole; Schou, Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    The deposition rate for laser ablated metals has been studied in a standard geometry for fluences up to 20 J/cm(2). The rate for silver and nickel is a few percent of a monolayer per pulse at the laser wavelengths 532 nm and 355 nm. The rate for nickel is significantly higher than that for silver...... at 532 nm, whereas the rate for the two metals is similar at 355 nm. This behaviour disagrees with calculations based on the thermal properties at low intensities as well as predictions based on formation of an absorbing plasma at high intensities. The deposition rate falls strongly with increasing...

  5. Pulsed laser deposition: metal versus oxide ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, L.M.; Rijnders, G.; Blank, D.H.A.

    2004-01-01

    We present experimental results of pulsed laser interaction with metal (Ni, Fe, Nb) and oxide (TiO2, SrTiO3, BaTiO3) targets. The influence of the laser fluence and the number of laser pulses on the resulting target morphology are discussed. Although different responses for metal and oxide targets t

  6. Analysis and removal of ITER relevant materials and deposits by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qingmei; Huber, Alexander; Philipps, Volker; Sergienko, Gennady; Gierse, Niels; Mertens, Philippe; Hai, Ran; Ding, Hongbin

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of the deposition of eroded wall material on the plasma-facing materials in fusion devices is one of the crucial issues to maintain the plasma performance and to fulfill safety requirements with respect to tritium retention by co-deposition. Laser ablation with minimal damage to the plasma facing material is a promising method for in situ monitoring and removal of the deposition, especially for plasma-shadowed areas which are difficult to reach by other cleaning methods like plasma discharge. It requires the information of ablation process and the ablation threshold for quantitative analysis and effective removal of the different deposits. This paper presents systemic laboratory experimental analysis of the behavior of the ITER relevant materials, graphite, tungsten, aluminum (as a substitution of beryllium) and mixed deposits ablated by a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) with different energy densities (1-27 J/cm2, power density 0.3-3.9 GW/cm2). The mixed deposits consisted of W-Al-C layer were deposited on W substrate by magnetron sputtering and arc plasma deposition. The aim was to select the proper parameters for the quantitative analysis and for laser removal of the deposits by investigating the ablation efficiency and ablation threshold for the bulk materials and deposits. The comparison of the ablation and saturation energy thresholds for pure and mixed materials shows that the ablation threshold of the mixed layer depends on the concentration of the components. We propose laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for determination of the elemental composition of deposits and then we select the laser parameters for the layer removal. Comparison of quantitative analysis results from laboratory to that from TEXTOR shows reasonable agreements. The dependence of the spectra on plasma parameters and ambient gas pressure is investigated.

  7. Hyperthermal Pulsed-Laser Ablation Beams for Film Deposition and Surface Microstructural Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowndes, D.H.

    1999-11-08

    This paper presents an overview of pulsed-laser ablation for film deposition and surface microstructure formation. By changing the ambient gas pressure from high vacuum to several Torr (several hundred Pa) and by selecting the pulsed-laser wavelength, the kinetic energy of ablated atoms/ions can be varied from several hundred eV down to {approximately}0.1 eV and films ranging from superhard to nanocrystalline may be deposited. Furthermore, cumulative (multi-pulse) irradiation of a semiconductor surface (e.g. silicon) in an oxidizing gas (0{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}) et atmospheric pressure can produce dense, self-organized arrays of high-aspect-ratio microcolumns or microcones. Thus, a wide range of materials synthesis and processing opportunities result from the hyperthermal flux and reactive growth conditions provided by pulsed-laser ablation.

  8. Target-plane deposition of diamond-like carbon in pulsed laser ablation of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, S.S. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Tou, T.Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)], E-mail: tytou@mmu.edu.my

    2007-10-15

    In pulsed Nd:YAG laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) at 10{sup -6} Torr, diamond-like carbon (DLC) are deposited at laser wavelengths of 1064, 532, and 355 nm on substrates placed in the target-plane. These target-plane samples are found to contain varying sp{sup 3} content and composed of nanostructures of 40-200 nm in size depending on the laser wavelength and laser fluence. The material and origin of sp{sup 3} in the target-plane samples is closely correlated to that in the laser-modified HOPG surface layer, and hardly from the backward deposition of ablated carbon plume. The surface morphology of the target-plane samples shows the columnar growth and with a tendency for agglomeration between nanograins, in particular for long laser wavelength at 1064 nm. It is also proposed that DLC formation mechanism at the laser-ablated HOPG is possibly via the laser-induced subsurface melting and resolidification.

  9. Thin films deposited by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bonis, A.; Teghil, R.; Santagata, A.; Galasso, A.; Rau, J. V.

    2012-09-01

    Ultra-short Pulsed Laser Deposition has been applied to the production of thin films from a tungsten carbide target. The gaseous phase obtained by the laser ablation shows a very weak primary plume, in contrast with a very strong secondary one. The deposited films, investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffraction, present a mixture of WC and other phases with lower carbon content. All films are amorphous, independently from the substrate temperature. The characteristics of the deposits have been explained in terms of thermal evaporation and cooling rate of molten particles ejected from the target.

  10. Influence of dc bias on amorphous carbon deposited by pulse laser ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Amorphous carbon films were deposited on single-crystalline silicon and K9 glass by pulse laser ablation using different negative substrate bias. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe morphology of the surface. Thickness and refractive index of the film deposited on K9 glass were measured by ellipsometry. Micro-hardness of films was measured relatively to single crystal silicon. All films deposited on silicon were analyzed by Raman spectra. All spectra were deconvoluted to three peaks. Line-width ratios varied similarly with bias voltage when the laser energy was kept invariant.

  11. Surface modification of biomaterials by pulsed laser ablation deposition and plasma/gamma polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Kaustubh R.

    Surface modification of stainless-steel was carried out by two different methods: pulsed laser ablation deposition (PLAD) and a combined plasma/gamma process. A potential application was the surface modification of endovascular stents, to enhance biocompatibility. The pulsed laser ablation deposition process, had not been previously reported for modifying stents and represented a unique and potentially important method for surface modification of biomaterials. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elatomer was studied using the PLAD technique. Cross- linked PDMS was deemed important because of its general use for biomedical implants and devices as well as in other fields. Furthermore, PDMS deposition using PLAD had not been previously studied and any information gained on its ablation characteristics could be important scientifically and technologically. The studies reported here showed that the deposited silicone film properties had a dependence on the laser energy density incident on the target. Smooth, hydrophobic, silicone-like films were deposited at low energy densities (100-150 mJ/cm2). At high energy densities (>200 mJ/cm2), the films had an higher oxygen content than PDMS, were hydrophilic and tended to show a more particulate morphology. It was also determined that (1)the deposited films were stable and extremely adherent to the substrate, (2)silicone deposition exhibited an `incubation effect' which led to the film properties changing with laser pulse number and (3)films deposited under high vacuum were similar to films deposited at low vacuum levels. The mechanical properties of the PLAD films were determined by nanomechanical measurements which are based on the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). From these measurements, it was possible to determine the modulus of the films and also study their scratch resistance. Such measurement techniques represent a significant advance over current state-of-the-art thin film characterization methods. An empirical model for

  12. Monitoring of the morphologic reconstruction of deposited ablation products in laser irradiation of silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasova M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Using electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, and IR spectroscopy, it was established that, in the regime of continuous laser irradiation of silicon at P = 170 W in different gaseous atmospheres with an oxygen impurity, SiOx composite films with a complex morphology form. The main components of ablation products are clusters that form during flight of ablation products and as a result of separation of SiOx-clusters from the zone of the irradiation channel. The roughness and density of the films depend on the heating temperature of the target surface and the type of deposited clusters.

  13. Nanocomposite tantalum-carbon-based films deposited by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benchikh, N. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Garrelie, F. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Wolski, K. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Centre SMS - URA CNRS 5146, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne, Cedex 02 (France); Donnet, C. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France)]. E-mail: Christophe.Donnet@univ-st-etienne.fr; Fillit, R.Y. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Centre SMS - URA CNRS 5146, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne, Cedex 02 (France); Rogemond, F. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Subtil, J.L. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Rouzaud, J.N. [Laboratoire de Geologie de l' Ecole Normale Superieure de Paris 24, rue Lhomond 75231-Paris Cedex 5 (France); Laval, J.Y. [Laboratoire de Physique du Solide, UPR5 CNRS-ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin 75231-Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2006-01-03

    Nanostructured coatings of metal (tantalum) containing diamond-like carbon (a-C:Ta) have been prepared by femtosecond pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The films, containing 15 at.% tantalum, have been deposited by ablating sequentially graphite and metallic tantalum in vacuum conditions with an amplified Ti:sapphire laser. The coatings have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, grazing angle X-ray diffraction, energy filtered transmission electron microscopy, scanning and high resolution transmission electron microscopies. Evidence of metallic {alpha}-Ta and {beta}-Ta particles (diameter in the 100 nm range) and smaller quasi-amorphous tantalum clusters embedded in the carbonaceous matrix have been shown. A thin tantalum carbide interface between the carbon matrix and the top surface of the tantalum nodules has also been identified. The ability of femtosecond pulsed laser deposition to synthetize nanocomposite carbon-based films and to control their nanostructure is discussed.

  14. Bismuth Oxide Thin Films Deposited on Silicon Through Pulsed Laser Ablation, for Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condurache-Bota, Simona; Constantinescu, Catalin; Tigau, Nicolae; Praisler, Mirela

    2016-12-01

    Infrared detectors are used in many human activities, from industry to military, telecommunications, environmental studies and even medicine. Bismuth oxide thin films have proved their potential for optoelectronic applications, but their uses as infrared sensors have not been thoroughly studied so far. In this paper, pulsed laser ablation of pure bismuth targets within a controlled oxygen atmosphere is proposed for the deposition of bismuth oxide films on Si (100) substrates. Crystalline films were obtained, whose uniformity depends on the deposition conditions (number of laser pulses and the use of a radio-frequency (RF) discharge of the oxygen inside the deposition chamber). The optical analysis proved that the refractive index of the films is higher than 3 and that their optical bandgap is around 1eV, recommending them for infrared applications.

  15. Differences in Nanosecond Laser Ablation and Deposition of Tungsten, Boron, and WB2/B Composite due to Optical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Moscicki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first attempt to the deposition of WB3 films using nanosecond Nd:YAG laser demonstrated that deposited coatings are superhard. However, they have very high roughness. The deposited films consisted mainly of droplets. Therefore, in the present work, the explanation of this phenomenon is conducted. The interaction of Nd:YAG nanosecond laser pulse with tungsten, boron, and WB2/B target during ablation is investigated. The studies show the fundamental differences in ablation of those materials. The ablation of tungsten is thermal and occurs due to only evaporation. In the same conditions, during ablation of boron, the phase explosion and/or fragmentation due to recoil pressure is observed. The deposited films have a significant contribution of big debris with irregular shape. In the case of WB2/B composite, ablation is significantly different. The ablation seems to be the detonation in the liquid phase. The deposition mechanism is related mainly to the mechanical transport of the target material in the form of droplets, while the gaseous phase plays marginal role. The main origin of differences is optical properties of studied materials. A method estimating phase explosion occurrence based on material data such as critical temperature, thermal diffusivity, and optical properties is shown. Moreover, the effect of laser wavelength on the ablation process and the quality of the deposited films is discussed.

  16. Porous nanostructured ZnO films deposited by picosecond laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sima, Cornelia [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-11, 077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Laser Department, 409 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-36, 077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Grigoriu, Constantin, E-mail: grigoriu@ifin.nipne.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Laser Department, 409 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-36, 077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Besleaga, Cristina; Mitran, Tudor; Ion, Lucian; Antohe, Stefan [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-11, 077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2012-08-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We deposite porous nanostructured ZnO films by picoseconds laser ablation (PLA). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes of the films structure on the experimental parameter deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate PLA capability to produce ZnO nanostructured films free of particulates. - Abstract: Porous nanostructured polycrystalline ZnO films, free of large particulates, were deposited by picosecond laser ablation. Using a Zn target, zinc oxide films were deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates using a picosecond Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser (8 ps, 50 kHz, 532 nm, 0.17 J/cm{sup 2}) in an oxygen atmosphere at room temperature (RT). The morpho-structural characteristics of ZnO films deposited at different oxygen pressures (150-900 mTorr) and gas flow rates (0.25 and 10 sccm) were studied. The post-deposition influence of annealing (250-550 Degree-Sign C) in oxygen on the film characteristics was also investigated. At RT, a mixture of Zn and ZnO formed. At substrate temperatures above 350 Degree-Sign C, the films were completely oxidized, containing a ZnO wurtzite phase with crystallite sizes of 12.2-40.1 nm. At pressures of up to 450 mTorr, the porous films consisted of well-distinguished primary nanoparticles with average sizes of 45-58 nm, while at higher pressures, larger clusters (3.1-14.7 {mu}m) were dominant, leading to thicker films; higher flow rates favored clustering.

  17. Ultrashort Pulsed Laser Ablation of Magnesium Diboride: Plasma Characterization and Thin Films Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela De Bonis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A MgB2 target has been ablated by Nd:glass laser with a pulse duration of 250 fs. The plasma produced by the laser-target interaction, showing two temporal separated emissions, has been characterized by time and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy and ICCD fast imaging. The films, deposited on silicon substrates and formed by the coalescence of particles with nanometric size, have been analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The first steps of the films growth have been studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy. The films deposition has been studied by varying the substrate temperature from 25 to 500°C and the best results have been obtained at room temperature.

  18. Laser ablation source for formation and deposition of size-selected metal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucković, S; Svanqvist, M; Popok, V N

    2008-07-01

    This work describes construction of a source and optimisation of its parameters for production of cluster ion beams using material ablation by the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). The influence of different source parameters such as carrier gas pressure, laser power, delay time between gas, and laser pulses as well as nozzle configuration on the cluster formation are studied. For the current experiments the laser ablation cluster source was optimized for production of Con+ cluster ions. Clusters with n up to 150 atoms are registered by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Deposition of size-selected Co50+ clusters with kinetic energies in the interval of 250-4850 eV/cluster on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite is studied. At the highest impact energies the clusters are implanted. Craters and well-like structures can be seen by scanning tunneling microscopy at impact spots. A decrease in cluster kinetic energy leads to formation of bumplike structures which probably represent damaged graphite areas with incorporated Co atoms. Further decrease in the cluster impact energy to the level of 450-250 eV/cluster creates condition for so-called cluster pinning when the cluster constituents are intact but the energy transferred to the graphite is still enough to produce radiation defects to which the cluster is bound.

  19. Thin films of silver nanoparticles deposited in vacuum by pulsed laser ablation using a YAG:Nd laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.C., E-mail: alonso@servidor.unam.mx [Division de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col Vicentina, Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Diamant, R.; Castillo, P.; Acosta-Garcia, M.C.; Batina, N.; Haro-Poniatowski, E. [Division de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col Vicentina, Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-02-15

    We report the deposition of thin films of silver (Ag) nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation in vacuum using the third line (355 nm) of a YAG:Nd laser. The nanostructure and/or morphology of the films was investigated as a function of the number of ablation pulses, by means of transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Our results show that films deposited with a small number of ablation pulses (500 or less), are not continuous, but formed of isolated nearly spherical Ag nanoparticles with diameters in the range from 1 nm to 8 nm. The effect of increasing the number of pulses by one order of magnitude (5000) is to increase the mean diameter of the globular nanoparticles and also the Ag areal density. Further increase of the number of pulses, up to 10,000, produces the formation of larger and anisotropic nanoparticles, and for 15,000 pulses, quasi-percolated Ag films are obtained. The presence of Ag nanoparticles in the films was also evidenced from the appearance of a strong optical absorption band associated with surface plasmon resonance. This band was widened and its peak shifted from 425 nm to 700 nm as the number of laser pulses was increased from 500 to 15,000.

  20. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, E.; Cheng, G.; Guthrie, S.; Turner-Evans, D.; Broomfield, E.; Lei, B.; Li, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Reed, M. A.

    2006-06-01

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 °C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs.

  1. In situ electron spectroscopic identification of carbon species deposited by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samano, E.C.; Gamietea, A.; Cota, L. [IFUNAM, Ensenada (Mexico). Lab. de Ensenada; Soto, G. [IFUNAM, Ensenada (Mexico). Lab. de Ensenada]|[Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (Mexico). Programa de Posgrado en Fisica de Materiales

    1997-05-01

    Thin carbon films were grown on Si (111) substrates by ablating a graphite target utilizing an excimer pulsed laser in a UHV Riber {copyright} LDM-32 system. Two kinds of films were produced, a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) type and a diamond-like carbon (DLC) type. A relationship of the films microstructure with laser power density and substrate conditions was observed. The HOPG films were homogeneous but the DLC films were heterogeneous, as shown by micrographs. The thin films are monitored and analyzed in situ during the first stages of the deposition process. The monitoring was done by RHEED and the characterization by several surface spectroscopic techniques, AES, XPS and EELS. The formation of a SiC interface was observed for both films due to the reaction of the first carbon species with the substrate surface.

  2. Thin films deposited by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of tungsten carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bonis, A. [Dipartimento di Chimica ' A.M. Tamburro' , Universita della Basilicata, Via dell' Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali - INSTM, Via G. Giusti 9, 00121 Florence (Italy); Teghil, R., E-mail: roberto.teghil@unibas.it [Dipartimento di Chimica ' A.M. Tamburro' , Universita della Basilicata, Via dell' Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali - INSTM, Via G. Giusti 9, 00121 Florence (Italy); Santagata, A. [Istituto Metodologie Inorganiche e Plasmi, CNR, Unita di Potenza, via S. Loja, 85050 Tito Scalo PZ (Italy); Galasso, A. [Dipartimento di Chimica ' A.M. Tamburro' , Universita della Basilicata, Via dell' Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Rau, J.V. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, CNR, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have deposited amorphous tungsten carbide films by ultra-short PLD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the films different W-C phases are present. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The films are formed mainly by particles with nanometric size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose that the particles are directly ejected from the target. - Abstract: Ultra-short Pulsed Laser Deposition has been applied to the production of thin films from a tungsten carbide target. The gaseous phase obtained by the laser ablation shows a very weak primary plume, in contrast with a very strong secondary one. The deposited films, investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffraction, present a mixture of WC and other phases with lower carbon content. All films are amorphous, independently from the substrate temperature. The characteristics of the deposits have been explained in terms of thermal evaporation and cooling rate of molten particles ejected from the target.

  3. Deposition of NbC thin films by pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhalde, S.; Colaco, R.; Audebert, F.; Perrone, A.; Zocco, A.

    Niobium carbide thin films were prepared by pulsed laser ablation of a stoichiometric NbC target. XeCl (308 nm, 30 ns) and Nd:YAG (266 nm, 5 ns) lasers operating at a repetition rate of 10 Hz were used. Films were deposited on Si (100) substrates at room temperature either in vacuum or in an argon atmosphere (2×10-1 mbar). Different laser fluences (2, 4 and 6 J/cm2) and different numbers of pulses (1×104, 2×104 and 4×104) were tested. For the first time, NbC films were prepared through a clean procedure without the addition of a hydrocarbon atmosphere. The phase constitution of the films, unit cell size, mean crystallite dimensions and preferred orientation are determined as a function of deposition conditions by X-ray diffraction. Complementary morphological and structural analysis of the films were performed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy.

  4. RAPID COMMUNICATION: ? thin film bilayers grown by pulsed laser ablation deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S. K.; Palmer, S. B.; McK Paul, D.; Lees, M. R.

    1996-09-01

    We have grown superconducting thin films of 0022-3727/29/9/044/img2 (Y-123) on 0022-3727/29/9/044/img3 (PCMO) buffer layers and PCMO overlayers on Y-123 thin films using pulsed laser ablation deposition. For both sets of films below 50 K, the Y-123 layer is superconducting and the zero-field cooled PCMO layer is insulating. The application of a magnetic field of 8 T results in an insulator - metal transition in the PCMO layer. This field-induced conducting state is stable in zero magnetic field at low temperature. The PCMO layer can be returned to an insulating state by annealing above 100 K. This opens the way for the construction of devices incorporating these oxide materials in which the electronic properties of key components such as the substrate or the barrier layer can be switched in a controlled way by the application of a magnetic field.

  5. Study on pulsed laser ablation and deposition of ZnO thin films by L-MBE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    ZnO,as a wide-band gap semiconductor,has recently become a new research fo-cus in the field of ultraviolet optoelectronic semiconductors. Laser molecular beam epitaxy(L-MBE) is quite useful for the unit cell layer-by-layer epitaxial growth of zinc oxide thin films from the sintered ceramic target. The ZnO ceramic target with high purity was ablated by KrF laser pulses in an ultra high vacuum to deposit ZnO thin film during the process of L-MBE. It is found that the deposition rate of ZnO thin film by L-MBE is much lower than that by conventional pulsed laser deposition(PLD) . Based on the experimental phenomena in the ZnO thin film growth process and the thermal-controlling mechanism of the nanosecond(ns) pulsed laser abla-tion of ZnO ceramic target,the suggested effective ablating time during the pulse duration can explain the very low deposition rate of the ZnO film by L-MBE. The unique dynamic mechanism for growing ZnO thin film is analyzed. Both the high energy of the deposition species and the low growth rate of the film are really beneficial for the L-MBE growth of the ZnO thin film with high crystallinity at low temperature.

  6. Study on pulsed laser ablation and deposition of ZnO thin films by L-MBE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE YongNing; ZHANG JingWen; YANG XiaoDong; XU QingAn; ZHU ChangChun; HOU Xun

    2007-01-01

    ZnO, as a wide-band gap semiconductor, has recently become a new research focus in the field of ultraviolet optoelectronic semiconductors. Laser molecular beam epitaxy (L-MBE) is quite useful for the unit cell layer-by-layer epitaxial growth of zinc oxide thin films from the sintered ceramic target. The ZnO ceramic target with high purity was ablated by KrF laser pulses in an ultra high vacuum to deposit ZnO thin film during the process of L-MBE. It is found that the deposition rate of ZnO thin film by L-MBE is much lower than that by conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Based on the experimental phenomena in the ZnO thin film growth process and the thermal-controlling mechanism of the nanosecond (ns) pulsed laser ablation of ZnO ceramic target, the suggested effective ablating time during the pulse duration can explain the very low deposition rate of the ZnO film by L-MBE. The unique dynamic mechanism for growing ZnO thin film is analyzed. Both the high energy of the deposition species and the low growth rate of the film are really beneficial for the L-MBE growth of the ZnO thin film with high crystallinity at low temperature.

  7. Laser ablation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Laser Ablation provides a broad picture of the current understanding of laser ablation and its many applications, from the views of key contributors to the field. Discussed are in detail the electronic processes in laser ablation of semiconductors and insulators, the post-ionization of laser-desorbed biomolecules, Fourier-transform mass spectroscopy, the interaction of laser radiation with organic polymers, laser ablation and optical surface damage, laser desorption/ablation with laser detection, and laser ablation of superconducting thin films.

  8. Applications of ultra-short pulsed laser ablation: thin films deposition and fs/ns dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teghil, R; De Bonis, A; Galasso, A [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita della Basilicata, Via N. Sauro 85, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Santagata, A; Albano, G; Villani, P; Spera, D; Parisi, G P [CNR-IMIP, Unita di Potenza, Via S. Loja, 85050 Tito Scalo (Italy)], E-mail: roberto.teghil@unibas.it

    2008-10-15

    In this paper, we report a survey of two of the large number of possible practical applications of the laser ablation performed by an ultra-short pulse laser, namely pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and fs/ns dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS). These applications differ from those using just longer pulsed lasers as a consequence of the distinctive characteristics of the plasma produced by ultra-short laser beams. The most important feature of this plasma is the large presence of particles with nanometric size which plays a fundamental role in both applications.

  9. Deposition and characterization of ITO films produced by laser ablation at 355 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmelund, E.; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte; Schou, Jørgen;

    2002-01-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) films have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at 355 nm. Even though the absorption of laser light at the wavelength 355 nm is much smaller than that of the standard excimer lasers for PLD at 248 nm and 193 nm, high-quality films can be produced. At high fluenc...... light, about 0.9, is also comparable to values for films deposited by excimer lasers. The crystalline structure of films produced at 355 nm is similar to that of samples produced by these lasers....

  10. Observation of self-assembled periodic nano-structures induced by femtosecond laser in both ablation and deposition regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mingzhen; Zhang, Haitao; Her, Tsing-Hua

    2008-02-01

    We observed the spontaneous formation of periodic nano-structures in both femtosecond laser ablation and deposition. The former involved 400-nm femtosecond pulses from a 250-KHz regenerated amplified mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser and periodic nanocracks and the nano-structure are in the form of periodic nanocracks in the substrate, the latter applied an 80-MHz mode-locked Ti:sapphire oscillator with pulse energy less than half nanojoule in a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition configuration and tungsten nanogratings grow heterogeneously on top of the substrates. These two observed periodic nanostructures have opposite orientations respecting to laser polarization: the periodic nanocracks are perpendicular to, whereas the deposited tungsten nanogratings are parallel to laser polarization direction. By translating the substrate respecting to the laser focus, both the periodic nanocrack and tungsten nanograting extend to the whole scanning range. The deposited tungsten nanogratings possess excellent uniformity on both the grating period and tooth length. Both the attributes can be tuned precisely by controlling the laser power and scanning speed. Furthermore, we discovered that the teeth of transverse tungsten nanogratings are self aligned along their axial direction during multiple scanning with appropriate offset between scans. We demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating large-area one-dimensional grating by exploiting such unique property. These distinct phenomena of nanocracks and tungsten nanogratings indicate different responsible mechanisms.

  11. Nanosecond laser ablation and deposition of silver, copper, zinc and tin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzaniga, Andrea Carlo; Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt; Canulescu, Stela

    2014-01-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of different metals (Ag, Cu, Sn, Zn) has been studied in high vacuum at a laser wavelength of 355 nm and pulse length of 6 ns. The deposition rate is roughly similar for Sn, Cu and Ag, which have comparable cohesive energies, and much higher for the deposition o...... be explained by the continuous erosion by nanoparticles during deposition of the Sn films which appear to have a much rougher surface than those of the other metals studied in the present work....

  12. Structural characterization of thin films of titanium nitride deposited by laser ablation; Caracterizacion estructural de peliculas delgadas de nitruro de titanio depositadas por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro C, M.A.; Escobar A, L.; Camps C, E.; Mejia H, J.A. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Thin films of titanium nitride were deposited using the technique of laser ablation. It was studied the effect of the density of laser energy used for ablation the target as well as of the pressure of the work gas about the structure and the hardness of the deposited thin films. Depending on the pressure of the work gas films was obtained with preferential orientation in the directions (200) and (111). At a pressure of 1 x 10{sup -2} Torr only the direction (200) was observed. On the other hand to the pressure of 5 x 10{sup -3} Torr the deposited material this formed by a mixture of the orientation (200) and (111), being the direction (111) the predominant one. Thin films of Ti N were obtained with hardness of up to 24.0 GPa that makes to these attractive materials for mechanical applications. The hardness showed an approximately linear dependence with the energy density. (Author)

  13. Design of a chamber for deposit of thin films by laser ablation; Diseno de una camara para el deposito de peliculas delgadas por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chirino O, S

    2001-07-01

    The present work has as purpose to design a vacuum chamber, to the one that is denominated chamber of ablation, in which were carried out deposits of thin films using the well-known technique as laser ablation. To fulfill the purpose, the work has been distributed in the following way: in the chapter 1 there are discussed the generalities of the technique of ablation laser for the obtaining of materials in form of thin film, in the chapter 2 the basic concepts of the vacuum technology are mentioned that includes among other things, systems to produce vacuum and vacuum gages and in the chapter 3 the design of the chamber is presented with the accessories and specific systems. (Author)

  14. Residual energy deposition in dental enamel during IR laser ablation at 2.79, 2.94, 9.6, and 10.6 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragadio, Jerome N.; Lee, Christian K.; Fried, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the residual heat deposition during laser ablation at those IR laser wavelengths best suited for the removal of dental caries. The principal factor limiting the rate of laser ablation of dental hard tissue is the risk of excessive heat accumulation in the tooth, which has the potential for causing damage to the pulp. Optimal laser ablation systems minimize the residual energy deposition in the tooth by transferring deposited laser energy to kinetic and internal energy of ejected tissue components. The residual heat deposition in the tooth was measured at laser wavelengths of 2.79, 2.94, 9.6 and 10.6 micrometer and pulse widths of 150 ns - 150 microsecond(s) . The residual energy was at a minimum for fluences well above the ablation threshold where it saturates at values from 25 - 70% depending on pulse duration and wavelength for the systems investigated. The lowest values of the residual energy were measured for short (less than 20 microseconds) CO2 laser pulses at 9.6 micrometer and for Q-switched erbium laser pulses. This work was supported by NIH/NIDCR R29DE12091 and the Center for Laser Applications in Medicine, DOE DEFG0398ER62576.

  15. Power Laser Ablation Symposia

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Laser ablation describes the interaction of intense optical fields with matter, in which atoms are selectively driven off by thermal or nonthermal mechanisms. The field of laser ablation physics is advancing so rapidly that its principal results are seen only in specialized journals and conferences. This is the first book that combines the most recent results in this rapidly advancing field with authoritative treatment of laser ablation and its applications, including the physics of high-power laser-matter interaction. Many practical applications exist, ranging from inertial confinement fusion to propulsion of aerostats for pollution monitoring to laser ignition of hypersonic engines to laser cleaning nanoscale contaminants in high-volume computer hard drive manufacture to direct observation of the electronic or dissociative states in atoms and molecules, to studying the properties of materials during 200kbar shocks developed in 200fs. Selecting topics which are representative of such a broad field is difficu...

  16. femtosecond laser ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Margetic, Vanja

    2003-01-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation was investigated as a solid sampling method for elemental chemical analysis. In comparison to the sampling with longer laser pulses, two aspects could be improved by using ultrashort pulses: elimination of the elemental fractionation from the ablation crater, which is necessary for an accurate quantitative analysis, and better control of the material removal (especially for metals), which increases the spatial resolution of microanalysis. Basic aspects of ultrashort...

  17. Thermoluminescence of thin films deposited by laser ablation; Termoluminiscencia de peliculas delgadas depositadas por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar A, L.; Camps, E.; Arrieta, A.; Romero, S.; Gonzalez, P.R.; Olea M, O.; Diaz E, R. [Depto. de Fisica, ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    Materials in thin film form have received great attention in the last few years mainly because of their singular properties, which may differ significantly from their bulk attributes making them attractive for a wide variety of applications. In particular, thermoluminescence (Tl) properties of thin films have been studied recently owing to their potential applications in detection for both ionizing and non ionizing radiation. The aim of the present work is to report the synthesis and characterization of C Nx, aluminum oxide and titanium oxide thin films. Thermoluminescence response of the obtained thin films was studied after subject thin films to UV radiation (254 nm) as well as to gamma radiation (Co-60). Thermoluminescence glow curves exhibited a peak centered at 150 C for CN{sub x} whereas for titanium oxide the glow curve shows a maximum peaking at 171 C. Characterization of the physical properties of the deposited materials is presented. (Author)

  18. Investigations of ZnO thin films deposited by a reactive pulsed laser ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.; C.; SOO; H.; KANDEL; M.; A.; THOMAS; C.; P.; DAGHLIAN

    2009-01-01

    Highly transparent ZnO thin films were deposited at different substrate temperatures by pulsed laser deposition in an oxygen atmosphere. The thin films were characterized by various techniques including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption, and photoluminescence. We demonstrated that oriented wurtzite ZnO thin films could be deposited at room temperature using a high purity zinc target. Variable temperature photoluminescence revealed new characteristics in the band edge emission. The underlying mechanism for the observed phenomena was also discussed.

  19. Optical Properties Dependence with Gas Pressure in AlN Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, J A; Riascos, H [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira, Grupo plasma Laser y Aplicaciones A.A 097 (Colombia); Caicedo, J C [Grupo pelIculas delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Cabrera, G; Yate, L, E-mail: jcaicedoangulo@gmail.com [Department de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain)

    2011-01-01

    AlN films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique (PLD) using an Nd: YAG laser ({lambda} = 1064 nm). The films were deposited in a nitrogen atmosphere as working gas; the target was an aluminum high purity (99.99%). The films were deposited with a laser fluence of 7 J/cm2 for 10 minutes on silicon (100) substrates. The substrate temperature was 300 deg. C and the working pressure was varied from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr. The thickness measured by profilometer was 150 nm for all films. The crystallinity was observed via XRD pattern, the morphology and composition of the films were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), respectively. The optical reflectance spectra and color coordinates of the films were obtained by optical spectral reflectometry technique in the range of 400 cm-1- 900 cm-1 by an Ocean Optics 2000 spectrophotometer. In this work, a clear dependence of the reflectance, dominant wavelength and color purity was found in terms of the applied pressure to the AlN films. A reduction in reflectance of about 55% when the pressure was increased from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr was observed. This paper deals with the formation of AlN thin films as promising materials for the integration of SAW devices on Si substrates due to their good piezoelectric properties and the possibility of deposition at low temperature compatible with the manufacturing of Si integrated circuits.

  20. Femtosecond ultraviolet laser ablation of silver and comparison with nanosecond ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Doggett, B.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.

    2013-01-01

    The ablation plume dynamics arising from ablation of silver with a 500 fs, 248 nm laser at ~2 J cm-2 has been studied using angle-resolved Langmuir ion probe and thin film deposition techniques. For the same laser fluence, the time-of-flight ion signals from femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablat...

  1. Deposition of Y thin films by nanosecond UV pulsed laser ablation for photocathode application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorusso, A. [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Anni, M. [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Caricato, A.P. [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Gontad, F., E-mail: francisco.gontad@le.infn.it [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Perulli, A. [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Taurino, A. [National Research Council, Institute for Microelectronics & Microsystems, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Perrone, A. [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Chiadroni, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2016-03-31

    In this work, yttrium (Y) thin films have been deposited on Si (100) substrates by the pulsed laser deposition technique. Ex-situ morphological, structural and optical characterisations of such films have been performed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, atomic force microscopy and ellipsometry. Polycrystalline films with a thickness of 1.2 μm, homogenous with a root mean square roughness of about 2 nm, were obtained by optimised laser irradiation conditions. Despite the relatively high thickness, the films resulted very adherent to the substrates. The high quality of such thin films is important to the synthesis of metallic photocathodes based on Y thin film, which could be used as electron sources of high photoemission performance in radio-frequency guns. - Highlights: • Pulsed laser deposition of Yttrium thin films is investigated. • 1.2 μm thick films were deposited with very low RMS roughness. • The Y thin films were very adherent to the Si substrate • Optical characterisation showed a very high absorption coefficient for the films.

  2. Growth evolution of ZnO films deposited by pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, E.; Zaldo, C.; Vazquez, L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: lvb@icmm.csic.es

    2001-07-16

    We study the surface morphology evolution of ZnO films grown by pulsed laser deposition. Atomic force microscopy measurements show the existence of two growth regimes. Initially, the growth morphology is determined by shadowing effects due to the angular spreading of the plume in the 0.1 mbar oxygen working pressure. For longer deposition times a stepped pyramid-like structure is developed, whose roughening and coarsening behaviours are in agreement with those expected for growth systems with step-edge barriers. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of titanium dioxide thin films deposited by laser ablation; Sintesis y caracterizacion de peliculas delgadas de TiO{sub 2} depositadas por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar A, L.; Camps C, E.; Falcon B, T.; Carapia M, L.; Haro P, E.; Camacho L, M.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, C.P. 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    In this work are presented the results obtained when TiO{sub 2} thin films were deposited using the laser ablation technique. Thin films were deposited at different substrate temperatures, and different oxygen pressures, with the purpose of studying the influence of this deposit parameters in the structural characteristics of the films obtained. The structural characterization was realized through Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction (XRD), the surface morphology of the layers deposited was verified by Scanning Electron Microscopy (Sem). The results show that the films obtained are of TiO{sub 2} in rutile phase, getting this at low substrate temperatures, its morphology shows a soft surface with some spattered particles and good adherence. (Author)

  4. Studies on the Surface Morphology and Orientation of CeO2 Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Develos, Katherine; Kusunoki, Masanobu; Ohshima, Shigetoshi

    1998-11-01

    We studied the surface morphology and orientation of CeO2 films grown by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) on r-cut (1\\=102) Al2O3 substrates and evaluated the effects of predeposition annealing conditions of Al2O3 and film thickness of CeO2. The annealing of Al2O3 substrates improves the smoothness of the surface and performing this in high vacuum leads to better crystallinity and orientation of deposited CeO2 films compared to those annealed in oxygen. A critical value of the film thickness was found beyond which the surface roughness increases abruptly. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) study showed that the surface of CeO2 films is characterized by a mazelike pattern. Increasing the film thickness leads to the formation of larger islands which cause the increase in the surface roughness of the films. The areal density and height of these islands increased with film thickness.

  5. Room-temperature deposition of nanocrystalline PbWO 4 thin films by pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, J. H.; Yoon, J.-W.; Shim, K. B.; Koshizaki, N.

    2006-07-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) was applied to synthesize nanocrystalline PbWO4 thin films onto glass substrates. The effects of Ar background gas pressure on phase evolution, microstructures and optical characteristics of PbWO4 thin films were investigated in detail. The PLA processes were carried out at room temperature without substrate heating or post-annealing treatment. XRD and HR-TEM results revealed that the PbWO4 thin films are composed of nanocrystalline and amorphous phases. Moreover, the films contained a high density of lattice defects such as twin boundaries and edge dislocations. The crystallite size and crystallinity increased, which were associated with a change in surface morphology as the Ar pressure increased. Reduced tungsten states W5+ or W4+ induced by oxygen vacancies were observed at 10 Pa and the atomic concentration of all constituent element was almost stoichiometric, especially the [Pb]/[W] ratio, which was nearly unity above 50 Pa. The optical energy band-gap was 3.03 eV at 50 Pa and increased to 3.35 eV at 100 Pa, which are narrower than the reported value (4.20 eV). This optical band-gap narrowing could be attributed to localized band-tail states and new energy levels induced by the amorphous structure and inherent lattice defects.

  6. Effect of Ablation Rate on the Microstructure and Electrochromic Properties of Pulsed-Laser-Deposited Molybdenum Oxide Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, S; Mathankumar, M; Selva Chandrasekaran, S; Nanda Kumar, A K; Murugan, P; Subramanian, B

    2017-01-10

    Molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) is a well-known electrochromic material. In the present work, n-type α-MoO3 thin films with both direct and indirect band gaps were fabricated by varying the laser repetition (ablation) rate in a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) system at a constant reactive O2 pressure. The electrochromic properties of the films are compared and correlated to the microstructure and molecular-level coordination. Mixed amorphous and textured crystallites evolve at the microstructural level. At the molecular level, using NMR and EPR, we show that the change in the repetition rate results in a variation of the molybdenum coordination with oxygen: at low repetition rates (2 Hz), the larger the octahedral coordination, and greater the texture, whereas at 10 Hz, tetrahedral coordination is significant. The anion vacancies also introduce a large density of defect states into the band gap, as evidenced by XPS studies of the valence band and supported by DFT calculations. The electrochromic contrast improved remarkably by almost 100% at higher repetition rates whereas the switching speed decreased by almost 6-fold. Although the electrochromic contrast and coloration efficiency were better at higher repetition rates, the switching speed, reversibility, and stability were better at low repetition rates. This difference in the electrochromic properties of the two MoO3 films is attributed to the variation in the defect and molecular coordination states of the Mo cation.

  7. Nanostructured europium oxide thin films deposited by pulsed laser ablation of a metallic target in a He buffer atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, H.; Franceschini, D. F.; Prioli, R.; Guimaraes, R. B.; Sanchez, C. M.; Canal, G. P.; Barbosa, M. D. L.; Galvao, R. M. O. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cx. Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ 24210-346 (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente 225, 22453-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ 24210-346 (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Laboratorio de Plasmas Aplicados, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66328, 05315-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Laboratorio de Plasmas Aplicados, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-09-15

    Nanostrucured europium oxide and hydroxide films were obtained by pulsed Nd:YAG (532 nm) laser ablation of a europium metallic target, in the presence of a 1 mbar helium buffer atmosphere. Both the produced film and the ambient plasma were characterized. The plasma was monitored by an electrostatic probe, for plume expansion in vacuum or in the presence of the buffer atmosphere. The time evolution of the ion saturation current was obtained for several probe to substrate distances. The results show the splitting of the plume into two velocity groups, being the lower velocity profile associated with metal cluster formation within the plume. The films were obtained in the presence of helium atmosphere, for several target-to-substrate distances. They were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy, for as-deposited and 600 deg. C treated-in-air samples. The results show that the as-deposited samples are amorphous and have chemical composition compatible with europium hydroxide. The thermally treated samples show x-ray diffraction peaks of Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with chemical composition showing excess oxygen. Film nanostructuring was shown to be strongly correlated with cluster formation, as shown by velocity splitting in probe current versus time plots.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon deposited by laser ablation; Sintesis y caracterizacion de peliculas delgadas de carbono amorfo nitrurado, depositadas por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollo P, B

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this work is the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) and thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon (a-C-N) using the laser ablation technique for their deposit. For this purpose, the physical properties of the obtained films were studied as function of diverse parameters of deposit such as: nitrogen pressure, power density, substrate temperature and substrate-target distance. For the characterization of the properties of the deposited thin films the following techniques were used: a) Raman spectroscopy which has demonstrated being a sensitive technique to the sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} bonds content, b) Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy which allows to know semi-quantitatively way the presence of the elements which make up the deposited films, c) Spectrophotometry, for obtaining the absorption spectra and subsequently the optical energy gap of the deposited material, d) Ellipsometry for determining the refraction index, e) Scanning Electron Microscopy for studying the surface morphology of thin films and, f) Profilemetry, which allows the determination the thickness of the deposited thin films. (Author)

  9. Field enhancement induced laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    Sub-diffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures...

  10. Effect of boron incorporation on the structure and electrical properties of diamond-like carbon films deposited by femtosecond and nanosecond pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, A. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR 5516 CNRS, Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue Pr. Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Bourgeois, O. [Institut Neel, UPR 2940 CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Sanchez-Lopez, J.C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Avda. Americo Vespucio, 49 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Rouzaud, J.-N. [Laboratoire de Geologie, UMR 8538 CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure, 45 Rue d' Ulm, 75230 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Rojas, T.C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Avda. Americo Vespucio, 49 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Loir, A.-S. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR 5516 CNRS, Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue Pr. Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Garden, J.-L. [Institut Neel, UPR 2940 CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Garrelie, F. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR 5516 CNRS, Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue Pr. Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Donnet, C., E-mail: christophe.donnet@univ-st-etienne.f [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR 5516 CNRS, Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue Pr. Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2009-12-31

    The influence of the incorporation of boron in diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on the microstructure of the coatings has been investigated. The boron-containing DLC films (a-C:B) have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature in high vacuum conditions, by ablating graphite and boron targets either with a femtosecond pulsed laser (800 nm, 150 fs, fs-DLC) or with a nanosecond pulsed laser (248 nm, 20 ns, ns-DLC). Alternative ablation of the graphite and boron targets has been carried out to deposit the a-C:B films. The film structure and composition have been highlighted by coupling Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. Using the B K-edge, EELS characterization reveals the boron effect on the carbon bonding. Moreover, the plasmon energy reveals a tendency of graphitization associated to the boron doping. Pure boron particles have been characterized by HRTEM and reveal that those particles are amorphous or crystallized. The nanostructures of the boron-doped ns-DLC and the boron-doped fs-DLC are thus compared. In particular, the incorporation of boron in the DLC matrix is highlighted, depending on the laser used for deposition. Electrical measurements show that some of these films have potentialities to be used in low temperature thermometry, considering their conductivity and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) estimated within the temperature range 160-300 K.

  11. Deposit of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon using the laser ablation technique; Deposito de peliculas delgadas de carbono amorfo nitrurado utilizando la tecnica de ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollo, P.B.; Escobar A, L.; Camps C, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, C.P. 52045 Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Haro P, E.; Camacho L, M.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa (Mexico); Muhl S, S. [Instituto de Investigacion en Materiales, UNAM (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    It is reported the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) nitrided, deposited by laser ablation in a nitrogen atmosphere at pressures which are from 4.5 x 10 {sup -4} Torr until 7.5 x 10 {sup -2} Torr. The structural properties of the films are studied by Raman spectroscopy obtaining similar spectra at the reported for carbon films type diamond. The study of behavior of the energy gap and the ratio nitrogen/carbon (N/C) in the films, shows that the energy gap is reduced when the nitrogen incorporation is increased. It is showed that the refraction index of the thin films diminish as nitrogen pressure is increased, indicating the formation of graphitic material. (Author)

  12. Internal energy deposition and ion fragmentation in atmospheric-pressure mid-infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, Peter; Huang, Hehua; Vertes, Akos

    2012-02-21

    Mid-infrared laser ablation of water-rich targets at the maximum of the 2.94 μm absorption band is a two-step process initiated by phase explosion followed by recoil pressure induced material ejection. Particulates and/or droplets ejected by this high temperature high pressure process can be ionized for mass spectrometry by charged droplets from an electrospray. In order to gauge the internal energy introduced in this laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI®) process, we apply the survival yield method and compare the results with electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). The results indicate that LAESI yields ions with internal energies indistinguishable from those produced by ESI. This finding is consistent with the recoil pressure induced ejection of low micrometre droplets that does not significantly change the internal energy of solute molecules.

  13. Influence of plasma parameters and substrate temperature on the structural and optical properties of CdTe thin films deposited on glass by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiñones-Galván, J. G.; Santana-Aranda, M. A.; Pérez-Centeno, A. [Departamento de Física, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenierías, Universidad de Guadalajara, Boulevard Marcelino García Barragán 1421, Guadalajara, Jalisco C.P. 44430 (Mexico); Camps, Enrique [Departamento de Física, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027, D.F., C.P. 11801 (Mexico); Campos-González, E.; Guillén-Cervantes, A.; Santoyo-Salazar, J.; Zelaya-Angel, O. [Departamento de Física, CINVESTAV-IPN, Apartado Postal 14-740, D. F. C.P. 07360 (Mexico); Hernández-Hernández, A. [Escuela Superior de Apan, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Calle Ejido de Chimalpa Tlalayote s/n Colonia Chimalpa, Apan Hidalgo (Mexico); Moure-Flores, F. de [Facultad de Química, Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Querétaro C.P. 76010 (Mexico)

    2015-09-28

    In the pulsed laser deposition of thin films, plasma parameters such as energy and density of ions play an important role in the properties of materials. In the present work, cadmium telluride thin films were obtained by laser ablation of a stoichiometric CdTe target in vacuum, using two different values for: substrate temperature (RT and 200 °C) and plasma energy (120 and 200 eV). Structural characterization revealed that the crystalline phase can be changed by controlling both plasma energy and substrate temperature; which affects the corresponding band gap energy. All the thin films showed smooth surfaces and a Te rich composition.

  14. Barium Ferrite Films Grown by Laser Ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisfi, A.; Lodder, J.C.; Haan, de P.; Smithers, M.A.; Roesthuis, F.J.G.

    1998-01-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) has been used to grow barium ferrite films on Al2O3 single crystal substrates. When deposition occurs in an oxidising atmosphere at high temperatures, the films are single BaFe12O19 phase, very well oriented with (001) texture, and exhibit a large perpendicular magnetic a

  15. Optical emission spectroscopy study of the expansion dynamics of a laser generated plasma during the deposition of thin films by laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazio, Enza

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the expanding plasma produced by excimer laser ablation of different materials such as silicon, silicon carbide, graphite and tin powder were studied by means of time integrated, spatially resolved emission spectroscopy and fast photography imaging of the expanding plasma. Experiments were performed both in vacuum and in different pure background atmosphere (i.e. oxygen or nitrogen and, finally, in gaseous mixtures (i.e. in O2/Ar and N2/Ar mixtures. These investigations were performed to gather information on the nature of the chemical species present in the plasma and on the occurrence of chemical reactions during the interaction between the plasma and the background gas. Then, we tried to correlate the plasma expansion dynamics to the structural and physical properties of the deposited materials. Experimental results clearly indicate that there is a strong correlation between the plasma expansion dynamics and the structural properties of the deposited thin films. In this respect, the investigations performed by means of fast photography and of optical emission spectroscopy revealed themselves as powerful tools for an efficient control of the deposition process itself.

  16. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-02

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology.

  17. Excimer laser ablation of thin titanium oxide films on glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overschelde, O. van [Condensed Matter Physics Group, University of Mons-Hainaut, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Dinu, S. [University of ' Valahia' , Targoviste (Romania); Guisbiers, G. [Condensed Matter Physics Group, University of Mons-Hainaut, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Monteverde, F. [Materia Nova, Unit of Electronic Microscopy, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Nouvellon, C. [Materia Nova, Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Wautelet, M. [Condensed Matter Physics Group, University of Mons-Hainaut, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)]. E-mail: michel.wautelet@umh.ac.be

    2006-04-30

    Thin titanium dioxide films are deposited on glass substrates by magnetron sputter deposition. They are irradiated in air, by means of a KrF excimer laser. The ablation rate is measured as a function of the laser fluence per pulse, F, and of the number of pulses, N. Above a fluence threshold, the films are partially ablated. The ablated thickness does not vary linearly with N. This is the signature of a negative feedback between the film thickness and the ablation rate. The origin of this negative feedback is shown to be due to either thermal or electronic effects, or both. At high F, the film detachs from the substrate.

  18. Deposit of thin films of TiN, a-C, Ti/TiN/a-C by laser ablation; Deposito de peliculas delgadas de TiN, a-C, Ti/TiN/a-C por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, I.S.; Escobar A, L.; Camps, E.; Romero, S. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de mexico (Mexico); Muhl, S. [IIM, UNAM, A.P. 364, 01000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Thin films of titanium nitride (TiN), amorphous carbon (a-C), as well as bilayers of Ti/TiN/a-C were deposited by means of the laser ablation technique. It was investigated the effect that it has the laser fluence used to ablation the targets in the structure and mechanical properties of the TiN deposited films. The TiN obtained films have a preferential orientation in the direction (200). The results show that the hardness of this material is influenced by the laser fluence. It is observed that the hardness is increased in an approximately lineal way with the increment of the fluence up to 19 J/cm{sup 2}. The films of amorphous carbon present hardness of the order of 11.2 GPa. Likewise it was found that the multilayers of Ti/TiN/aC presented a bigger hardness that of its individual components. (Author)

  19. Laser ablation studies of nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg V. Mkrtychev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The first experimental measurements of the threshold energy density values for the laser ablation of glass nanocomposites with nanodimensional coatings have been carried out under the action of the YAG–Nd laser power pulse radiation. The coatings in question were of different compositions and had been created by the sol–gel technology. The procedure for determining the laser ablation threshold energy density values was worked out on the base of the breakdown probability level of 0.5. The statistical processing of the measurement data over all the samples allowed obtaining the dependence of the ablation destruction threshold energy parameters on the coating physical and chemical properties such as the sample transmission in the visible region of the spectrum, coating thickness, the chemical composition of the film-forming solution, and on the pulse duration of laser radiation.

  20. Laser ablation and optical surface damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, L. L.; Hamza, A. V.; Lee, H. W. H.

    Laser ablation usually accompanies optical surface damage to bare surfaces and coatings. Investigations of optical damage mechanisms by observation of ablation processes at laser fluences very close to the optical damage threshold are described. Several promising surface characterization methods for investigating damage mechanisms are also described. The possible role of laser ablation in initiating or promoting optical surface damage is discussed.

  1. Laser ablation mechanisms and optical surface damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, L. L.; Hamza, A. V.; Lee, H. W. H.

    1991-05-01

    Laser ablation usually accompanies optical surface damage to bare surfaces and coatings. Investigations of optical damage mechanisms by observation of ablation processes at laser fluences very close to the optical damage threshold are described. Several promising surface characterization methods for investigating damage mechanisms are also described. The possible role of laser ablation in initiating or promoting optical surface damage is discussed.

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  3. Design and fabrication of a chamber for the deposit of thin films by laser ablation; Diseno y fabricacion de una camara para el deposito de peliculas delgadas por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chirino O, S.; Escobar A, I.; Camps C, E.; Garcia E, J.I. [Departamento de Fisica, ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The laser ablation technique is an alternative for the obtention of thin films which is less expensive, more reliable, efficient and with some advantages with respect to conventional processes. On of the most important components which forms a laser ablation system is the vacuum chamber, that has as general purposes the following: a) To carry out studies about plasma such as optical emission spectroscopy and measurements by deflectometry. b) To carry out an In situ monitoring about the film growth through the reflectivity measurements of the combination substrate-film. c) To deposit thin films of different materials such as oxides, carbon, metals, etc. In this work it is showed how the vacuum chamber was designed and made to perform the store of thin films by laser ablation and for characterising the formed plasma as a result of the ablation process. The chamber design was enough versatile that will allow to add it more accessory just making it simple modifications. Its cost was very cheap more or less one twentieth of a commercial chamber. (Author)

  4. Laser ablation at the hydrodynamic regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gojani Ardian B.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser ablation of several metals and PVC polymer by high energy nanosecond laser pulses is investigated experimentaly. Visualization by shadowgraphy revealed the dynamics of the discontinuities in ambient air and ablation plume above the target surface, while surface profiling allowed for determination of the ablated mass.

  5. Laser ablation at the hydrodynamic regime

    OpenAIRE

    Gojani Ardian B.

    2013-01-01

    Laser ablation of several metals and PVC polymer by high energy nanosecond laser pulses is investigated experimentaly. Visualization by shadowgraphy revealed the dynamics of the discontinuities in ambient air and ablation plume above the target surface, while surface profiling allowed for determination of the ablated mass.

  6. Fundamental studies of pulsed laser ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Claeyssens, F

    2001-01-01

    dopant) have resulted in a coherent view of the resulting plume, which exhibits a multi-component structure correlated with different regimes of ablation, which are attributed to ejection from ZnO and ablation from a Zn melt. OES measurements show that the emitting Zn component within the plume accelerates during expansion in vacuum - an observation attributable to the presence of hot, fast electrons in the plume. The same acceleration behaviour is observed in the case of Al atomic emissions resulting from ablation of an Al target in vacuum. Deposition conditions, substrate temperature and background gas pressure were all varied in a quest for optimally aligned, high quality ZnO thin films. Initial ab initio calculations were performed also, to aid in understanding the stability of these c-axis aligned films. The pulsed ultraviolet (lambda = 193, 248 nm) laser ablation of graphite, polycrystalline diamond and ZnO targets has been investigated. Characteristics of the resulting plumes of ablated material have b...

  7. Room-temperature deposition of nanocrystalline PbWO{sub 4} thin films by pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, J.H.; Yoon, J.-W.; Shim, K.B. [Hanyang University, Department of Ceramic Engineering, Ceramic Processing Research Center (CPRC), Seoul (Korea); Koshizaki, N. [Nanoarchitectonics Research Center (NARC), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ibaraki (Japan)

    2006-07-15

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) was applied to synthesize nanocrystalline PbWO{sub 4} thin films onto glass substrates. The effects of Ar background gas pressure on phase evolution, microstructures and optical characteristics of PbWO{sub 4} thin films were investigated in detail. The PLA processes were carried out at room temperature without substrate heating or post-annealing treatment. XRD and HR-TEM results revealed that the PbWO{sub 4} thin films are composed of nanocrystalline and amorphous phases. Moreover, the films contained a high density of lattice defects such as twin boundaries and edge dislocations. The crystallite size and crystallinity increased, which were associated with a change in surface morphology as the Ar pressure increased. Reduced tungsten states W{sup 5+} or W{sup 4+} induced by oxygen vacancies were observed at 10 Pa and the atomic concentration of all constituent element was almost stoichiometric, especially the [Pb]/[W] ratio, which was nearly unity above 50 Pa. The optical energy band-gap was 3.03 eV at 50 Pa and increased to 3.35 eV at 100 Pa, which are narrower than the reported value (4.20 eV). This optical band-gap narrowing could be attributed to localized band-tail states and new energy levels induced by the amorphous structure and inherent lattice defects. (orig.)

  8. Laser Ablation Propulsion A Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, Sayed A.; Ugalatad, Akshata C.

    Laser Ablation Propulsion (LAP) will serve as an alternative propulsion system for development of microthrusters. The principle of LAP is that when a laser (pulsed or continuous wave) with sufficient energy (more than the vaporization threshold energy of material) is incident on material, ablation or vaporization takes place which leads to the generation of plasma. The generated plasma has the property to move away from the material hence pressure is generated which leads to the generation of thrust. Nowadays nano satellites are very common in different space and defence applications. It is important to build micro thruster which are useful for orienting and re-positioning small aircraft (like nano satellites) above the atmosphere. modelling of LAP using MATLAB and Mathematica. Schematic is made for the suitable optical configuration of LAP. Practical experiments with shadowgraphy and self emission techniques and the results obtained are analysed taking poly (vinyl-chloride) (PVC) as propellant to study the

  9. Effective temperatures of polymer laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furzikov, Nickolay P.

    1991-09-01

    Effective temperatures of laser ablation of certain polymers are extracted from experimental dependences of ablation depths on laser fluences. Dependence of these temperatures on laser pulse durations is established. Comparison with the known thermodestruction data shows that the effective temperature corresponds to transient thermodestruction proceeding by the statistically most probable way.

  10. Radial line-scans as representative sampling strategy in dried-droplet laser ablation of liquid samples deposited on pre-cut filter paper disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nischkauer, Winfried [Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Department of Analytical Chemistry, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Vanhaecke, Frank [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Bernacchi, Sébastien; Herwig, Christoph [Institute of Chemical Engineering, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Limbeck, Andreas, E-mail: Andreas.Limbeck@tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-11-01

    conventional liquid measurements, and by analyzing IAEA-153 reference material (Trace Elements in Milk Powder); a good agreement with the certified value for phosphorus was obtained. - Highlights: • Sample preparation via deposition of liquids on pre-cut filter disks. • Sample introduction via laser ablation of dried filters. • Representative sampling avoids bias. • Signal quantification via external calibration and aqueous standard solutions. • Alternative approach for quantifying P in challenging matrix.

  11. Gold upgrading in metamorphosed massive sulfide ore deposits: Direct evidence from laser-ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis of invisible gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Thomas; Klemd, Reiner; Wenzel, Thomas; Mattsson, Benny

    2007-09-01

    The metamorphosed Boliden volcanic-hosted massive sulfide (VHMS) ore deposit, northern Sweden, is characterized by an abundance of massive arsenopyrite ore and unusually high gold enrichments (up to 300-600 g/t) in crosscutting veins and fracture zones. The ore textures observed record progressive recrystallization and porphyroblast growth during meta morphism. We conducted a systematic laser-ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrom etry (LA-ICP-MS) study on the gold distribution in fine-grained massive arseno-pyrite and pyrite ore, partially recrystallized arsenopyrite ore, and both arsenopyrite and pyrite porphyroblasts found in gold-rich veins. The gold concentrations in massive arseno-pyrite are highest (30-50 ppm on average) and systematically decrease to 0-2.7 ppm with increasing degree of recrystallization. By contrast, gold concentrations in pyrite ore are much lower and do not exceed 0.2 ppm. The LA-ICP-MS data, coupled with textural data, provide the first direct conclusive evidence that gold is progressively liberated from massive sulfide ores during metamorphism and reprecipitated in veins and other low-strain sites. We suggest that such upgrading is the principal mechanism responsible for significant gold enrichment observed in many metamorphosed VHMS deposits worldwide.

  12. Ablation from metals induced by visible and UV laser irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Schou, Jørgen; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte

    1996-01-01

    The deposition rate of laser-ablated silver has been determined for fluences between 0.5 and 15 J/cm2 at the wavelengths 532 and 355 nm for a beam spot area of around 0.01 cm2. The ablated metal was collected on a quartz crystal microbalance. The rate at 5 J/cm2 was about 4 × 1013 Ag/cm2 per puls...

  13. VUV laser ablation of polymers. Photochemical aspect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castex, M. C.; Bityurin, N.; Olivero, C.; Muraviov, S.; Bronnikova, N.; Riedel, D.

    2000-12-01

    A photochemical theory of laser ablation owing to the direct chain scission process is considered in quite general form taking into account the modification of material. The formulas obtained can be used for estimating mechanisms of VUV laser ablation of polymers.

  14. Infrared Laser Ablation with Vacuum Capture for Fingermark Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Camp, Eden E.; Cao, Fan; Murray, Kermit K.

    2017-09-01

    Infrared laser ablation coupled to vacuum capture was employed to collect material from fingermarks deposited on surfaces of different porosity and roughness. Laser ablation at 3 μm was performed in reflection mode with subsequent capture of the ejecta with a filter connected to vacuum. Ablation and capture of standards from fingermarks was demonstrated on glass, plastic, aluminum, and cardboard surfaces. Using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), it was possible to detect caffeine after spiking with amounts as low as 1 ng. MALDI detection of condom lubricants and detection of antibacterial peptides from an antiseptic cream was demonstrated. Detection of explosives from fingermarks left on plastic surfaces as well as from direct deposition on the same surface using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was shown. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Hydrodynamic modeling of ns-laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Autrique

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Laser ablation is a versatile and widespread technique, applied in an increasing number of medical, industrial and analytical applications. A hydrodynamic multiphase model describing nanosecond-laser ablation (ns-LA is outlined. The model accounts for target heating and mass removal mechanisms as well as plume expansion and plasma formation. A copper target is placed in an ambient environment consisting of helium and irradiated by a nanosecond-laser pulse. The effect of variable laser settings on the ablation process is explored in 1-D numerical simulations.

  16. Subpicosecond and picosecond laser ablation of dental enamel: comparative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Andrei V.; Madsen, Nathan R.; Kolev, Vesselin Z.; Gamaly, Eugene G.; Luther-Davies, Barry; Dawes, Judith M.; Chan, A.

    2004-06-01

    We report the use of sub-picosecond near-IR and ps UV pulsed lasers for precision ablation of freshly extracted human teeth. The sub-picosecond laser wavelength was ~800nm, with pulsewidth 150 fs and pulse repetition rate of 1kHz; the UV laser produced 10 ps pulses at 266 nm with pulse rate of ~1.2x105 pulses/s; both lasers produced ~1 W of output energy, and the laser fluence was kept at the same level of 10-25 J/cm2. Laser radiation from both laser were effectively absorbed in the teeth enamel, but the mechanisms of absorption were radically different: the near-IR laser energy was absorbed in a plasma layer formed through the optical breakdown mechanism initiated by multiphoton absorption, while the UV-radiation was absorbed due to molecular photodissociation of the enamel and conventional thermal deposition. The rise in the intrapulpal temperature was monitored by embedded thermocouples, and was shown to remain low with subpicosecond laser pulses, but risen up to 30°C, well above the 5°C pain level with the UV-laser. This study demonstrates the potential for ultra-short-pulsed lasers to precision and painless ablation of dental enamel, and indicated the optimal combination of laser parameters in terms of pulse energy, duration, intensity, and repetition rate, required for the laser ablation rates comparable to that of mechanical drill.

  17. Fractional ablative erbium YAG laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, Elisabeth H; Haak, Christina S; Erlendsson, Andrés M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Treatment of a variety of skin disorders with ablative fractional lasers (AFXL) is driving the development of portable AFXLs. This study measures micropore dimensions produced by a small 2,940 nm AFXL using a variety of stacked pulses, and determines a model correlating...... laser parameters with tissue effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ex vivo pig skin was exposed to a miniaturized 2,940 nm AFXL, spot size 225 µm, density 5%, power levels 1.15-2.22 W, pulse durations 50-225 microseconds, pulse repetition rates 100-500 Hz, and 2, 20, or 50 stacked pulses, resulting in pulse...... 190 to 347 µm. CONCLUSIONS: Pulse stacking with a small, low power 2,940 nm AFXL created reproducible shallow to deep micropores, and influenced micropore configuration. Mathematical modeling established relations between laser settings and micropore dimensions, which assists in choosing laser...

  18. Direct trace-elemental analysis of urine samples by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after sample deposition on clinical filter papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramendía, Maite; Rello, Luis; Vanhaecke, Frank; Resano, Martín

    2012-10-16

    Collection of biological fluids on clinical filter papers shows important advantages from a logistic point of view, although analysis of these specimens is far from straightforward. Concerning urine analysis, and particularly when direct trace elemental analysis by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) is aimed at, several problems arise, such as lack of sensitivity or different distribution of the analytes on the filter paper, rendering obtaining reliable quantitative results quite difficult. In this paper, a novel approach for urine collection is proposed, which circumvents many of these problems. This methodology consists on the use of precut filter paper discs where large amounts of sample can be retained upon a single deposition. This provides higher amounts of the target analytes and, thus, sufficient sensitivity, and allows addition of an adequate internal standard at the clinical lab prior to analysis, therefore making it suitable for a strategy based on unsupervised sample collection and ulterior analysis at referral centers. On the basis of this sampling methodology, an analytical method was developed for the direct determination of several elements in urine (Be, Bi, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Sb, Sn, Tl, Pb, and V) at the low μg L(-1) level by means of LA-ICPMS. The method developed provides good results in terms of accuracy and LODs (≤1 μg L(-1) for most of the analytes tested), with a precision in the range of 15%, fit-for-purpose for clinical control analysis.

  19. Wavelength scaling of silicon laser ablation in picosecond regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, A.; Grojo, D.; Sentis, M.

    2017-07-01

    Single pulse laser ablation of silicon has been investigated at 343, 515, and 1030 nm using a laser pulse duration of 50 ps. In this large spectral range, ablation thresholds of silicon vary from 0.01 to 0.83 J/cm2, confirming a strong dependence on the wavelength. By solving the free-carrier density rate equation at threshold conditions, we show that band-to-band linear absorption dominates energy deposition at 343 and 515 nm, whereas at 1030 nm, the energy leading to ablation is primarily absorbed by the generated free-carriers. This allows us to determine the relevant criteria to derive a simple model predicting the wavelength dependence of the ablation threshold in this regime. We obtain an excellent agreement between experimental measurements and calculations by simply considering an averaged energy density required in the absorption depth for surface ablation and accounting for the laser-induced variations of the important thermophysical parameters. On the basis of this analysis, we discuss the optimal wavelength and fluence conditions for maximum removal rate, ablation efficiency, and accuracy. Despite the difference in mechanisms at the different wavelengths, we find that the maximal efficiency remains at around 7 times the ablation threshold fluence for all investigated wavelengths. This work provides guidelines for high-quality and efficient micromachining of silicon in the scarcely explored picosecond regime, while new picosecond sources offer numerous advantages for real throughput industrial applications.

  20. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  1. UV Laser Ablation of Electronically Conductive Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-16

    deionized water. The polymerization solution for polyaniline was prepared by mixing equal volumes of a solution that was 0.25 M in ammonium persulfate with a...rum2,0 vvcsL) TbeUV.layer ablation of thin polypyrrole and polyaniline films coated on an insulating substrate is described. UV laser ablation is used to...11liiii929. 6 1 2:- A ABSTRACT The UV laser ablation of thin polypyrrole and polyaniline films coated on an insulating substrate is described. UV laser

  2. Deposition by plasma-assisted laser ablation and maskless patterning of YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7-x] superconducting thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, P. (Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, CSIC, Madrid (Spain)); Cagigal, M. (Dept. de Fisica de Materiales, Univ. Complutense, Madrid (Spain)); Vicent, J.L. (Dept. de Fisica de Materiales, Univ. Complutense, Madrid (Spain)); Briones, F. (Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, CSIC, Madrid (Spain))

    1994-04-01

    YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7-x] superconducting thin films were deposited in situ by plasma-assisted laser ablation onto polycrystalline yttria-stabilized-zirconia (YSZ) substrates at 700 C in a low pressure (200-400 mTorr) O[sub 2] discharge (-300 V). The laser operated at 5-50 Hz repetition rate and was focused onto a superconducting target with a typical energy density of 2.5-4 J cm[sup -2]. An in situ annealing step in 1 Torr O[sub 2] atmosphere at 425 C for 1-2 h was followed by slow cooling of the films to room temperature. The YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7-x] films grew preferentially oriented with the c-axis normal to the substrate surface. They exhibited metallic behaviour in the normal state and superconducting transitions with typical onset of 91 K and zero resistance between 82 and 87 K. The transport critical current densities J[sub c] were 10[sup 2] A cm[sup -2] for 1 [mu]m thick films and two orders of magnitude higher, J[sub c] = 3 x 10[sup 4] A cm[sup -2], for 0.08 [mu]m thick films. Maskless patterning was achieved by utilizing the ArF laser beam to induce etching selectivity of the superconducting thin films. For this purpose, the central part of the beam was apertured by a slit and focused onto the sample by means of a 15 x Schwarzschild microscope objective to give an irradiated area on the sample of approximately 10 x 150 [mu]m[sup 2]. The laser energy density on the sample was typically 10[sup 3] J cm[sup -2], while the repetition rate was varied between 10 and 20 Hz. Microbridges of different geometries with a maximum resolution of 10 [mu]m and high edge definition were obtained at 20 [mu]m s[sup -1] scan rate using this technique. (orig.)

  3. PLASMA-OXYGEN INTERACTION DURING THIN FILMS DEPOSITION BY LASER ABLATION: DETERMINATION OF THE INTERACTION PRESSURE THRESHOLD AND EFFECT ON THE THIN FILMS PROPERTIESE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lafane

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we study the effect of the oxygen pressure on the plasma dynamics during the ablation of oxides materials into an oxygen gas. The study was done using fast imaging and ion probe techniques. Both techniques revealed that a threshold oxygen pressure is needed to initiate the plume oxygen interaction. This threshold oxygen pressure depends on the ablated material. A clear effect of this threshold pressure on the structural and phase composition of the deposited thin films is shown.

  4. Angular distributions and total yield of laser ablated silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Nordskov, A.; Schou, Jørgen;

    1997-01-01

    The angular distribution of laser ablated silver has been measured in situ with a newly constructed setup with an array of microbalances. The distribution is strongly peaked in the forward direction corresponding to cospθ, where p varies between 5 and 9 for laser fluences from 2 to 7 J/cm2 at 355...... nm for a beam spot of 0.015 cm2. The total deposited yield is of the order 1015 Ag-atoms per pulse....

  5. Plasma mediated ablation of biological tissues with ultrashort laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oraevsky, A.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; DaSilva, L.B.; Feit, M.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-08

    Plasma mediated ablation of collagen gels and porcine cornea was studied at various laser pulse durations in the range from 350 fs to 1 ns at 1,053 nm wavelength. A time resolved stress detection technique was employed to measure transient stress profiles and amplitudes. Optical microscopy was used to characterize ablation craters qualitatively, while a wide band acoustic transducer helped to quantify tissue mechanical response and the ablation threshold. The ablation threshold was measured as a function of laser pulse duration and linear absorption coefficient. For nanosecond pulses the ablation threshold was found to have a strong dependence on the linear absorption coefficient of the material. As the pulse length decreased into the subpicosecond regime the ablation threshold became insensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The ablation efficiency was found to be insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient. High quality ablation craters with no thermal or mechanical damage to surrounding material were obtained with 350 fs laser pulses. The mechanism of optical breakdown at the tissue surface was theoretically investigated. In the nanosecond regime, optical breakdown proceeds as an electron collisional avalanche ionization initiated by thermal seed electrons. These seed electrons are created by heating of the tissue by linear absorption. In the ultrashort pulse range, optical breakdown is initiated by the multiphoton ionization of the irradiated medium (6 photons in case of tissue irradiated at 1,053 nm wavelength), and becomes less sensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The energy deposition profile is insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient.

  6. Nanosecond laser ablation of bulk Al, Bronze, and Cu: ablation rate saturation and laserinduced oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    R. Maisterrena-Epstein; S. Camacho-López; L. Escobar-Alarcón; M. A. Camacho-López

    2007-01-01

    In this work we report about the characteristics of nanosecond laser ablation, in atmospheric air, of bulk Al, Bronze, and Cu. Average per pulse laser ablation rate and its dependence on ablation depth is presented for these three metals. We will demonstrate and discuss some distinctive features of the ablation saturation effect of the above metals. We will also present results on laser-induced oxidation of the metals which results off the ablation event. We studied the laser-induced oxidatio...

  7. Ablation of solids by femtosecond lasers ablation mechanism and ablation thresholds for metals and dielectrics

    CERN Document Server

    Gamaly, E G; Tikhonchuk, V T; Luther-Davies, B

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of ablation of solids by intense femtosecond laser pulses is described in an explicit analytical form. It is shown that at high intensities when the ionization of the target material is complete before the end of the pulse, the ablation mechanism is the same for both metals and dielectrics. The physics of this new ablation regime involves ion acceleration in the electrostatic field caused by charge separation created by energetic electrons escaping from the target. The formulae for ablation thresholds and ablation rates for metals and dielectrics, combining the laser and target parameters, are derived and compared to experimental data. The calculated dependence of the ablation thresholds on the pulse duration is in agreement with the experimental data in a femtosecond range, and it is linked to the dependence for nanosecond pulses.

  8. Ablation of solids by femtosecond lasers: ablation mechanism and ablation thresholds for metals and dielectrics

    OpenAIRE

    Gamaly, E. G.; Rode, A. V.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Luther-Davies, B.

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of ablation of solids by intense femtosecond laser pulses is described in an explicit analytical form. It is shown that at high intensities when the ionization of the target material is complete before the end of the pulse, the ablation mechanism is the same for both metals and dielectrics. The physics of this new ablation regime involves ion acceleration in the electrostatic field caused by charge separation created by energetic electrons escaping from the target. The formulae ...

  9. Laser ablation dynamics and production of thin films of lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Schou, Jørgen; Amoruso, S.;

    produced thin films of average thickness up to 300 nm, which not only contained a significant amount of intact molecules, but also maintained the bioactivity. These films were produced by a nanosecond laser in the UV regime at 355 nm with 2 J/cm2. The surprising fact that these molecules can be transferred....... This is the first time the ablation by fs-lasers of a protein has been recorded quantitatively. Films of lysozyme produced by fs-laser irradiation were analyzed by MALDI and a significant number of intact molecules in the films with fs-laser deposition was found as well....

  10. Analysis of infrared laser tissue ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Gordon P.; Timmerman, Brenda H.; Bryanston-Cross, Peter J.

    2005-04-01

    The mechanisms involved in infrared laser tissue ablation are studied using a free electron laser (FELIX) in order to clarify whether the increased ablation efficiency reported in literature for certain infrared wavelengths is due to a wavelength effect or to the specific pulse structure of the lasers that are generally used in these studies. Investigations are presented of ablation of vitreous from pigs" eyes using several techniques including protein gel electrophoresis and ablation plume visualization. The ablation effects of three different infrared wavelengths are compared: 3 mm, which is currently in clinical surgical use, and the wavelengths associated with the amide I and amide II bands, i.e. 6.2 mm and 6.45mm, respectively. The results suggest a different ablation mechanism to be in operation for each studied wavelength, thus indicating that the generally reported increased ablation efficiency in the 6-6.5 micron range is due to the wavelength rather than the typical free electron laser pulse structure.

  11. Physical properties and interface studies of YBa2Cu3O7 thin films deposited by laser ablation on S1 (111) with buffer layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blank, D.H.A.; Aarnink, W.A.M.; Flokstra, J.; Rogalla, H.; Silfhout, van A.

    1990-01-01

    The physical properties of laser-deposited YBaCuO on Si using a single buffer layer of ZrO2 and a double layer of NiSi2 and ZrO2 have been studied. The influence of the deposition temperature has been investigated. Interface studies were performed by RBS and SAM. SEM pictures, resistivity and critic

  12. PbTe quantum dots grown by femtosecond laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E.; Biggemann, D.; Moya, L.; Pippo, W. A.; Moreira, R. S.; Silva, D.; Cesar, C. L.; Barbosa, L. C.; Schrank, A.; Souza Filho, C. R.; de Oliveira, E. P.

    2008-02-01

    Laser ablation (LA) is a thin film fabrication technique which has generated a lot of interest in the past few years as one of the simplest and most versatile methods for the deposition of a wide variety of materials. With the rapid development experienced in the generation of ultra short laser pulses, new possibilities were opened for the laser ablation technique, using femtosecond lasers as ablation source. It is commonly believed that when the temporal length of the laser pulse became shorter than the several picoseconds required to couple the electronic energy to the lattice of the material, thermal effects could not play a significant role. Since the pulse width is too short for thermal effects to take place, with each laser pulse a few atom layers of material are direct vaporized away from the target surface and a better control in the quantum dots (QDs) fabrication could be achieved. In this work we report the fabrication of PbTe QDs by femtosecond laser ablation of a PbTe target in argon atmosphere. Experiments were carried out using a typical LA configuration comprising a deposition chamber and an ultra short pulsed laser (100 fs; 30 mJ) at a central wavelength of 800 nm. PbTe was chosen because its QDs absorption band can be controlled by its size to fall in the spectral window of interest for optical communications (1.3-1.5 μm). This, together with the QD high optical nonlinearity, makes this material an excellent candidate for development of photonic devices. It was investigated the influence of the number of laser pulses in the formation of the nanoparticles. The structural parameters and the surface density of the nanoparticles were studied by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

  13. Mechanism of Spatiotemporal Distribution of Laser Ablated Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Rong-Qing; CUI Yi-Ping; LU Jian; NI Xiao-Wu

    2009-01-01

    Interaction between subsequent laser and ablated materials in laser processing changes the laser spatiotemporal distribution and has influences on the efficiency and quality of laser processing. The theoretical and experimental researches on transportation behayiour of ablated materials are provided. It is shown that the velocity distribution of ablated materials is determined by ablation mechanism. The transportation behaviour of ablated materials is controlled by diffusion mechanism and light field force during laser pulse duration while it is only determined by diffusion mechanism when the laser pulse terminates. In addition, the spatiotemporal distribution of ablated materials is presented.

  14. Laser ablation dynamics and production of thin films of lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Matei, Andreea;

    at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) produced thin films of average thickness up to 300 nm, which not only contained a significant amount of intact molecules, but also maintained the bioactivity. These films were produced by a nanosecond laser in the UV regime at 355 nm with 2 J/cm2. The surprising fact......, there was a considerable ablation weight loss of lysozyme from each shot. This is the first time the ablation by fs-lasers of a protein has been recorded quantitatively. Films of lysozyme produced by fs-laser irradiation will be analysed by MALDI in order to explore if there also is a significant amount of intact...... molecules in the films for fs-laser deposition....

  15. Synthesis of selenium nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, M.; Haro-Poniatowski, E.; Morales, J.; Batina, N.

    2002-07-01

    The synthesis of selenium nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation using a YAG laser at 532 nm is reported. The nanoparticles were deposited on three different substrates: metallic gold films, silicon wafers and glass, and subsequently visualized and characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was found that the size, shape and population of the selenium nanoparticles are strongly dependent on the experimental conditions during the ablation process; in particular on the energy density, number of laser pulses and the nature of the substrate. Atomic force microscopy imaging allows recognition, quantitative and qualitative characterization of individual selenium nanoparticles and their aggregates as well. In most of the experiments just a few laser pulses (up to five), were sufficient to produce a noticeable amount of nanoparticles on the substrate surface.

  16. Diagnostics of laser ablated plasma plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, S.; Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen;

    2004-01-01

    The effect of an ambient gas on the expansion dynamics of laser ablated plasmas has been studied for two systems by exploiting different diagnostic techniques. First, the dynamics of a MgB2 laser produced plasma plume in an Ar atmosphere has been investigated by space-and time-resolved optical...

  17. Laser ablation and growth of Si and Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Seong Shan, E-mail: seong.yap@ntnu.no [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Siew, Wee Ong; Nee, Chen Hon [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Reenaas, Turid Worren [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Tou, Teck Yong [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we investigated the laser ablation and deposition of Si and Ge at room temperature in vacuum by employing nanosecond lasers of 248 nm, 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm. Time-integrated optical emission spectra were obtained for neutrals and ionized Ge and Si species in the plasma at laser fluences from 0.5 to 11 J/cm{sup 2}. The deposited films were characterized by using Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Amorphous Si and Ge films, micron-sized crystalline droplets and nano-sized particles were deposited. The results suggested that ionized species in the plasma promote the process of subsurface implantation for both Si and Ge films while large droplets were produced from the superheated and melted layer of the target. The dependence of the properties of the materials on laser wavelength and fluence were discussed.

  18. Nanosecond laser ablation of silver nanoparticle film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jaewon; Han, Sewoon; Lee, Daeho; Ahn, Sanghoon; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Moon, Jooho; Ko, Seung H.

    2013-02-01

    Nanosecond laser ablation of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) protected silver nanoparticle (20 nm diameter) film is studied using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG nanosecond laser (532 nm wavelength, 6 ns full width half maximum pulse width). In the sintered silver nanoparticle film, absorbed light energy conducts well through the sintered porous structure, resulting in ablation craters of a porous dome shape or crown shape depending on the irradiation fluence due to the sudden vaporization of the PVP. In the unsintered silver nanoparticle film, the ablation crater with a clean edge profile is formed and many coalesced nanoparticles of 50 to 100 nm in size are observed inside the ablation crater. These results and an order of magnitude analysis indicate that the absorbed thermal energy is confined within the nanoparticles, causing melting of nanoparticles and their coalescence to larger agglomerates, which are removed following melting and subsequent partial vaporization.

  19. Laser ablation of a polysilane material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S. G.; Robitaille, T. E.

    1987-08-01

    The laser ablation properties of a (50%)-isopropyl methyl-(50%)-n-propyl methyl silane copolymer are examined. Both 193- and 248-nm-pulsed excimer laser radiation cleanly and completely remove this material in vacuum above certain energy thresholds (30 and 50 mJ/cm2, respectively). Under these conditions the ablation properties are quite similar to those reported for typical organic polymers. Below threshold, ablation is less efficient and becomes increasingly inefficient as irradiation continues due to spectral bleaching. In the presence of air, material removal is incomplete even for high-energy densities and long exposures. The ablation rate is shown to be independent of substrate material both above and below threshold.

  20. UV laser ablation patterns in intraocular lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagiou, D. P.; Evangelatos, Ch.; Apostolopoulos, A.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of UV solid state laser radiation on intraocular lens (IOL) polymer surfaces as an alternative method to conventional surface shaping techniques for IOLs customization. Laser ablation experiments were performed on PMMA plates and commercially available hydrophobic and hydrophilic acrylic IOLs with the 5th harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ=213 nm). Circular arrays of holes were drilled on the polymer surface, covering the centre and the peripheries of the IOL. The morphology of the ablated IOL surface was examined with a conventional optical microscope (Leitz GMBH Wetzlar) and with a scanning electron microscope (SEM, Fei - Innova Nanoscope) at various laser parameters. Quantitative measurements of ablation rates were performed with a contact profilometer (Dektak-150), in which a mechanical stylus scanned across the surface of gold-coated IOLs (after SEM imaging) to measure variationsF in surface height. Laser interaction with IOLs depends on optical and mechanical material properties, in addition to laser radiation parameters. The exact ablation mechanism is discussed. Some polymer materials, depending on their properties, are more susceptible to the photothermal mechanism than the photochemical one or vice versa. In summary, every IOL polymer exhibits specific attributes in its interaction with the 5th harmonic of Nd:YAG laser.

  1. Effects of Confined Laser Ablation on Laser Plasma Propulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Zhi-Yuan; ZHANG Jie; LU Xin; HAO Zuo-Qiang; XU Miao-Hua; WANG Zhao-Hua; WEI Zhi-Yi

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the effects of confined laser ablation on laser plasma propulsion. Compared with planar ablation,the cavity ablation provides an effective way to obtain a large target momentum and a high coupling coefficient.When laser pukes are focused into a cavity with 1 mm diameter and 2mm depth, a high coupling coefficient is obtained. By using a glass layer to cover the cavity, the coupling coefficient is enhanced by 10 times. Meanwhile,it is found that with the increase of the target surface size, the target momentum presents a linear increase.

  2. Outpatient laser tonsillar ablation under local anaesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Peter J; Latif, Abdul

    2004-11-01

    Outpatient laser ablation of the palatine tonsils under local anaesthetic is an alternative technique to capsular tonsillectomy for recurrent tonsillitis under general anaesthetic. Laser tonsillotomy ablates up to 70% of the tonsillar tissue and is performed when patients choose not to have a conventional tonsillectomy, or are unfit for a general anaesthetic. The technique described here is an adaptation of Krespis' laser-assisted serial tonsillectomy (LAST) whereby only one sitting is required. Krespis' technique effectively eliminates recurrent tonsillitis in 96% of the cases over a 4-year follow-up period and represents the only substantial study looking at treating recurrent tonsillitis with outpatient laser ablation. This study is a retrospective postal survey of 19 patients who underwent laser tonsillar ablation under local anaesthetic for recurrent chronic tonsillitis from 1997 to 2001 and was performed in liaison with the clinical audit department at Basildon Hospital. We had a response rate of 74% and an admission rate of 0%, which compares favourably with day case tonsillectomy surgery. Of the patients, 75% did not experience further episodes of tonsillitis 12 months after the procedure and 77% of the patients were glad they had the operation. Although this technique does not completely eliminate tonsillitis, it offers an alternative for those patients who prefer a procedure that is done quickly in an outpatient setting without the additional problems of general anaesthesia, overnight hospital admission and long waiting lists.

  3. Energy distribution of ions produced by laser ablation of silver in vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela

    2013-01-01

    The ion energy in a silver ablation plume for fluence in the range of 0.6–2.4Jcm−2, typical for a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) experiment has been investigated. In this fluence range the ion fraction of the ablated particles becomes gradually dominant and can be utilized to characterize the abla...

  4. Laser ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma-A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A wide range of local thermal ablative therapies have been developed in the treatment of non resectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the last decade. Laser ablation (LA) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are the two most widely used of these. This article provides an up to date overview of the role of laser ablation in the local treatment of HCC. General principles, technique, image guidance and patient selection are discussed. A review of published data on treatment efficacy, long term outcome and complication rates of laser ablation is included and comparison with RFA made. The role of laser ablation in combination with transcatheter arterial chemoembolisation is also discussed.

  5. Tracing the plasma interactions for pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jikun; Stender, Dieter; Pichler, Markus; Pergolesi, Daniele; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.lippert@psi.ch [General Energy Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Döbeli, Max [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-10-28

    Pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation is an effective technique to govern the chemical activity of plasma species and background molecules during pulsed laser deposition. Instead of using a constant background pressure, a gas pulse with a reactive gas, synchronized with the laser beam, is injected into vacuum or a low background pressure near the ablated area of the target. It intercepts the initially generated plasma plume, thereby enhancing the physicochemical interactions between the gaseous environment and the plasma species. For this study, kinetic energy resolved mass-spectrometry and time-resolved plasma imaging were used to study the physicochemical processes occurring during the reactive crossed beam laser ablation of a partially {sup 18}O substituted La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3} target using oxygen as gas pulse. The characteristics of the ablated plasma are compared with those observed during pulsed laser deposition in different oxygen background pressures.

  6. Laser-induced back-ablation of aluminum thin films using picosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK, A B

    1999-05-26

    Experiments were performed to understand laser-induced back-ablation of Al film targets with picosecond laser pulses. Al films deposited on the back surface of BK-7 substrates are ablated by picosecond laser pulses propagating into the Al film through the substrate. The ablated Al plume is transversely probed by a time-delayed, two-color sub-picoseond (500 fs) pulse, and this probe is then used to produce self-referencing interferograms and shadowgraphs of the Al plume in flight. Optical emission from the Al target due to LIBA is directed into a time-integrated grating spectrometer, and a time-integrating CCD camera records images of the Al plume emission. Ablated Al plumes are also redeposited on to receiving substrates. A post-experimental study of the Al target and recollected deposit characteristics was also done using optical microscopy, interferometry, and profilometry. In this high laser intensity regime, laser-induced substrate ionization and damage strongly limits transmitted laser fluence through the substrate above a threshold fluence. The threshold fluence for this ionization-based transmission limit in the substrate is dependent on the duration of the incident pulse. The substrate ionization can be used as a dynamic control of both transmitted spatial pulse profile and ablated Al plume shape. The efficiency of laser energy transfer between the laser pulse incident on the Al film and the ablated Al plume is estimated to be of order 5% and is a weak function of laser pulsewidth. The Al plume is highly directed. Low plume divergence ({theta}{sub divergence} < 5{sup o}) shows the ablated plume temperature to be very low at long time delays ( T << 0.5 eV at delays of 255 ns). Spectroscopic observations and calculations indicate that, in early time (t < 100 ps), the Al film region near the substrate/metal interface is at temperatures of order 0.5 eV. Interferograms of Al plumes produced with 0.1 {micro}m films show these plumes to be of high neutral atom

  7. Deposit of bilayers of LiNiO{sub 2}/alumina by laser ablation; Deposito de bicapas de LiNiO{sub 2}/alumina por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez I, J.; Escobar A, L.; Camps, E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Camacho L, M.E. [UAEM, Facultad de Quimica, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Thin films of lithium nickel oxide (LiNiO{sub 2}) were deposited on silicon substrates at two substrate temperatures: ambient temperature and 165 C ; varying in each case the fluence from 3 up to 20 J/cm{sup 2}. The used target got ready starting from the solid state reaction between NiO and Li{sub 2}O this last in excess of 50% in weight, with the purpose of obtaining stoichiometric LiNiO{sub 2}. Later to the deposit it was carried out a thermal treatment to all the films at 300 C by 2 hours, with the purpose of improving the crystalline structure of the deposited material. The deposits were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, showing for all the films a wide band with a maximum approximately in 550 cm{sup -1} for the deposits not thermally treated and in 500 cm{sup -1} for the deposits with thermal treatment. Bilayers of LiNiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were deposited, to be used as cathode material in rechargeable micro batteries, those results of the Raman spectroscopy didn't show variation in the intensity, position and wide of the band shown for the LiNiO{sub 2}. On the other hand the deposits were also analyzed by infrared spectroscopy with the purpose of confirming the Raman results. (Author)

  8. Physical processes of laser tissue ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furzikov, Nickolay P.

    1991-05-01

    The revised ablation model applicable to homogeneous tissues is presented. It is based on the thermal mechanism and involves the instability of the laserinduced evaporation (thermodestruction) front the growth of the surface ripple structure the interference of the laser wave and of the surface wave arising by diffraction on the ripples Beer''s law violation the pulsed thermodestruction of the organic structural component the tissue water boiling and gas dynamic expansion of the resulting products into the surrounding medium which is followed by the shock wave formation. The UV and IR ablation schemes were implemented and compared to the corneal ablation experiments. The initial ablation pressure and temperature are given restored from the timeofflight measurements of the supersonic expansion of the product. 1.

  9. Laser Thermal Ablation of Thyroid Benign Nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrzad, Mohammad Karim

    2015-01-01

    Thermal ablation therapies for benign thyroid nodules have been introduced in recent years to avoid the complications of traditional methods such as surgery. Despite the little complications and the reportedly acceptable efficacy of thermal ablation methods, quite few medical centers have sought the potential benefits of employing them. This paper provides an introduction to the literature, principles and advances of Percutaneous Laser Ablation therapy of thyroid benign nodules, as well as a discussion on its efficacy, complications and future. Several clinical research papers evaluating the thermal effect of laser on the alleviation of thyroid nodules have been reviewed to illuminate the important points. The results of this research can help researchers to advance the approach and medical centers to decide on investing in these novel therapies.

  10. Bending diamonds by femtosecond laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Peter; Esberg, Jakob; Kirsebom, Kim;

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method based on femtosecond laser ablation for the fabrication of statically bent diamond crystals. Using this method, curvature radii of 1 m can easily be achieved, and the curvature obtained is very uniform. Since diamond is extremely tolerant to high radiation doses, partly due...

  11. Laser ablation synthesis of indium oxide nanoparticles in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acacia, N. [Dipartimento di Fisica della Materia e Ingegneria Elettronica, Universita di Messina, Salita Sperone 31, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Barreca, F., E-mail: process@anmresearch.it [Advanced and Nano Materials Research s.r.l., Salita Sperone 31, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Barletta, E.; Spadaro, D.; Curro, G. [Advanced and Nano Materials Research s.r.l., Salita Sperone 31, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Neri, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica della Materia e Ingegneria Elettronica, Universita di Messina, Salita Sperone 31, I-98166 Messina (Italy)

    2010-09-01

    Colloidal solutions of Indium oxide nanoparticles have been produced by means of laser ablation in liquids (LALs) technique by simply irradiating with a second harmonic (532 nm) Nd:YAG laser beam a metallic indium target immersed in distilled water and varying the laser fluence up to 10 J cm{sup -2} and the ablation time up to 120 min. At all the investigated fluences the vaporization process of the indium target is the dominant one. It produces a majority (>80%) of small size (<6 nm) nanoparticles, with a very limited content of larger ones (size between 10 and 20 nm). The amount of particles increases regularly with the ablation time, supporting the scalability of the production technique. The deposited nanoparticles stoichiometry has been verified by both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Optical bandgap values of 3.70 eV were determined by UV-vis absorption measurements. All these results confirm the complete oxidation of the ablated material.

  12. Analysis of laser energy deposition leading to damage and ablation of HfO{sub 2} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} single layers submitted to 500 fs pulses at 1030 and 343 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douti, Dam-Be; Begou, Thomas; Lemarchand, Fabien; Lumeau, Julien; Commandre, Mireille; Gallais, Laurent [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, Centrale Marseille, Institut Fresnel UMR 7249, Marseille (France)

    2016-07-15

    Laser- induced damage thresholds and morphologies of laser ablated sites on dielectric thin films are studied based on experiments and simulations. The films are single layers of hafnia and niobia deposited on fused silica substrates with a magnetron sputtering technique. Laser experiments are conducted with 500 fs pulses at 1030 and 343 nm, and the irradiated sites are characterized with optical profilometry and scanning electron microscopy. The results, i.e., LIDT and damage morphologies, are compared to simulations of energy deposition in the films based on the single rate equation for electron excitation, taking into account transient optical properties of the films during the pulse. The results suggest that a critical absorbed energy as a damage criterion gives consistent results both with the measured LIDT and the observed damage morphologies at fluences close to the damage threshold. Based on the numerical and experimental results, the determined LIDT evolution with the wavelength is described as nearly constant in the near-infrared region, and as rapidly decreasing with laser wavelength in the visible and near-ultraviolet regions. (orig.)

  13. Femtosecond and nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of silicon and germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reenaas, Turid Worren [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Lee, Yen Sian [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chowdhury, Fatema Rezwana; Gupta, Manisha; Tsui, Ying Yin [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta (Canada); Tou, Teck Yong [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Seong Ling [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Kok, Soon Yie [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Seong Shan, E-mail: seongshan@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Ge and Si were deposited by fs and ns laser at room temperature and at vacuum. • Ion of 10{sup 4} ms{sup −1} and 30–200 eV was obtained for ns ablation for Ge and Si. • Highly energetic ions of 10{sup 5} ms{sup −1} with 2–7 KeV were produced in fs laser ablation. • Nanocrystalline Si and Ge were deposited by using fs laser. • Nanoparticles < 10 nm haven been obtained by fs laser. - Abstract: 150 fs Ti:Sapphire laser pulsed laser deposition of Si and Ge were compared to a nanosecond KrF laser (25 ns). The ablation thresholds for ns lasers were about 2.5 J cm{sup −2} for Si and 2.1 J cm{sup −2} for Ge. The values were about 5–10 times lower when fs laser were used. The power densities were 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} W cm{sup −2} for ns but 10{sup 12} W cm{sup −2} for fs. By using an ion probe, the ions emission at different fluence were measured where the emitting ions achieving the velocity in the range of 7–40 km s{sup −1} and kinetic energy in the range of 30–200 eV for ns laser. The ion produced by fs laser was measured to be highly energetic, 90–200 km s{sup −1}, 2–10 KeV. Two ion peaks were detected above specific laser fluence for both ns and fs laser ablation. Under fs laser ablation, the films were dominated by nano-sized crystalline particles, drastically different from nanosecond pulsed laser deposition where amorphous films were obtained. The ions characteristics and effects of pulse length on the properties of the deposited films were discussed.

  14. Radial line-scans as representative sampling strategy in dried-droplet laser ablation of liquid samples deposited on pre-cut filter paper disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nischkauer, Winfried; Vanhaecke, Frank; Bernacchi, Sébastien; Herwig, Christoph; Limbeck, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Nebulising liquid samples and using the aerosol thus obtained for further analysis is the standard method in many current analytical techniques, also with inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-based devices. With such a set-up, quantification via external calibration is usually straightforward for samples with aqueous or close-to-aqueous matrix composition. However, there is a variety of more complex samples. Such samples can be found in medical, biological, technological and industrial contexts and can range from body fluids, like blood or urine, to fuel additives or fermentation broths. Specialized nebulizer systems or careful digestion and dilution are required to tackle such demanding sample matrices. One alternative approach is to convert the liquid into a dried solid and to use laser ablation for sample introduction. Up to now, this approach required the application of internal standards or matrix-adjusted calibration due to matrix effects. In this contribution, we show a way to circumvent these matrix effects while using simple external calibration for quantification. The principle of representative sampling that we propose uses radial line-scans across the dried residue. This compensates for centro-symmetric inhomogeneities typically observed in dried spots. The effectiveness of the proposed sampling strategy is exemplified via the determination of phosphorus in biochemical fermentation media. However, the universal viability of the presented measurement protocol is postulated. Detection limits using laser ablation-ICP-optical emission spectrometry were in the order of 40 μg mL- 1 with a reproducibility of 10 % relative standard deviation (n = 4, concentration = 10 times the quantification limit). The reported sensitivity is fit-for-purpose in the biochemical context described here, but could be improved using ICP-mass spectrometry, if future analytical tasks would require it. Trueness of the proposed method was investigated by cross-validation with

  15. Ablation of GaN Using a Femtosecond Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟民; 朱荣毅; 钱土雄; 袁述; 张国义

    2002-01-01

    We study the pulsed laser ablation of wurtzite gallium nitride (GaN) films grown on sapphire, using the fem tosecond laser beam at a central wavelength of 800nm as the source for the high-speed ablation of GaN films. By measuring the backscattered Raman spectrum of ablated samples, the dependence of the ablation depth on laser fluence with one pulse was obtained. The threshold laser fluence for the ablation of GaN films was determined to be about 0.25J/cm2. Laser ablation depth increases with the increasing laser fluence until the amount of removed material is not further increased. The ablated surface was investigated by an optical surface interference profile meter.

  16. Ultrafast laser ablation of transparent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Lara; Russ, Simone; Kaiser, Myriam; Kumkar, Malte; Faißt, Birgit; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The present work investigates the influence of the pulse duration and the temporal spacing between pulses on the ablation of aluminosilicate glass by comparing the results obtained with pulse durations of 0.4 ps and 6 ps. We found that surface modifications occur already at fluences below the single pulse ablation threshold and that laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) emerge as a result of those surface modifications. For 0.4 ps the ablation threshold fluences is lower than for 6 ps. Scanning electron micrographs of LIPSS generated with 0.4 ps exhibit a more periodic and less coarse structure as compared to structures generated with 6 ps. Furthermore we report on the influence of temporal spacing between the pulses on the occurrence of LIPSS and the impact on the quality of the cutting edge. Keywords: LIPSS,

  17. Application of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films deposited by laser ablation in micron batteries of solid state; Aplicacion de peliculas delgadas de V{sub 2}O{sub 5} depositadas por ablacion laser en micro-baterias de estado solido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar A, L.; Camps, E.; Haro P, E.; Camacho L, M.A.; Julien, C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    The obtained results from synthesizing V{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films by laser ablation are presented. Depending on the deposit conditions V{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films have been grown as amorphous as a crystalline ones with preferential orientation. The results of the electrochemical characterization of one of the synthesized layers are presented when being manufactured joint with it a micron battery. (Author)

  18. Ultraviolet laser ablation of polyimide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, R.; Braren, B.; Dreyfus, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Pulsed laser radiation at 193, 248, or 308 nm can etch films of polyimide (DuPont KaptonTM). The mechanism of this process has been examined by the chemical analysis of the condensible products, by laser-induced fluorescence analysis of the diatomic products, and by the measurement of the etch depth per pulse over a range of fluences of the laser pulse. The most important product as well as the only one condensible at room temperature is carbon. Laser-induced fluorescence analysis showed that C2 and CN were present in the ablation plume. At 248 nm, even well below the fluence threshold of 0.08 J/cm2 for significant ablation, these diatomic species are readily detected and are measured to leave the polymer surface with translational energy of ˜5 eV. These results, when combined with the photoacoustic studies of Dyer and Srinivasan [Appl. Phys. Lett. 48, 445 (1986)], show that a simple photochemical mechanism in which one photon or less (on average) is absorbed per monomer is inadequate. The ablation process must involve many photons per monomer unit to account for the production of predominantly small (<4 atoms) products and the ejection of these fragments at supersonic velocities.

  19. Femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in air and vacuum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zehua Wu; Nan Zhang; Mingwei Wang; Xiaonong Zhu

    2011-01-01

    Femtosecond (fs) pulse laser ablation of silicon targets in air and in vacuum is investigated using a time-resolved shadowgraphic method. The observed dynamic process of the fs laser ablation of silicon in air is significantly different from that in vacuum. Similar to the ablation of metallic targets, while the shock wave front and a series of nearly concentric and semicircular stripes, as well as the contact front, are clearly identifiable in the process of ablation under 1 x 105 Pa, these phenomena are no longer observed when the ablation takes place in vacuum. Although the ambient air around the target strongly affects the evolution of the ablation plume, the three rounds of material ejection clearly observed in the shadowgraphs of fs laser ablation in standard air can also be distinguished in the process of ablation in vacuum. It is proven that the three rounds of material ejection are caused by different ablation mechanisms.%@@ Femtosecond(fs)pulse laser ablation of silicon targets in air and in vacuum is investigated using a timeresolved shadowgraphic method.The observed dynamic process of the fs laser ablation of silicon in air is significantly different from that in vacuum.Similar to the ablation of metallic targets,while the shock wave front and a series of nearly concentric and semicircular stripes,as well as the contact front,are clearly identifiable in the process of ablation under 1 x 105 Pa,these phenomena are no longer observed when the ablation takes place in vacuum.Although the ambient air around the target strongly affects the evolution of the ablation plume,the three rounds of material ejection clearly observed in the shadowgraphs of fs laser ablation in standard air can also be distinguished in the process of ablation in vacuum.It is proven that the three rounds of material ejection are caused by different ablation mechanisms.

  20. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  1. Wavelength dependence of soft tissue ablation by using pulsed lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianzeng Zhang; Shusen Xie; Qing Ye; Zhenlin Zhan

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of soft biological tissue was studied at 10.6-, 2.94-, and 2.08-μm wavelengths. The ablation effects were assessed by means of optical microscope, the ablation crater depths were measured with reading microscope. It was shown that Er:YAG laser produced the highest quality ablation with clear,sharp cuts following closely the patial contour of the incident beam and the lowest fluence threshold. The pulsed CO2 laser presented the moderate quality ablation with the highest ablation efficiency. The craters drilled with Ho:YAG laser were generally larger than the incident laser beam spot, irregular in shape, and clearly dependent on the local morphology of biotissue. The blation characteristics, including fluence threshold and ablation efficiency, varied substantially with wavelength. It is not evident that water is the only dominant chromophore in tissue.

  2. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, D; de la Fuente, G F; Jansen, M

    2012-04-01

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 °C.

  3. Numerical simulation of copper ablation by ultrashort laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, PengJi; Li, YuHong

    2011-01-01

    Using a modified self-consistent one-dimensional hydrodynamic lagrangian fluid code, laser ablation of solid copper by ultrashort laser pulses in vacuum was simulated to study fundamental mechanisms and to provide a guide for drilling periodic microholes or microgratings on the metal surface. The simulated laser ablation threshold is a approximate constancy in femtosecond regime and increases as the square root of pulse duration in picosecond regime. The ablation depth as a function of pulse duration shows four different regimes and a minimum for a pulse duration of ~ 12ps for various laser fluences. The influence of laser-induced plasma shielding on ablation depth is also studied.

  4. PREFACE AND CONFERENCE INFORMATION: Eighth International Conference on Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Herman, Peter R.; Bäuerle, Dieter; Koinuma, Hideomi

    2007-04-01

    Laser ablation encompasses a wide range of delicate to extreme light interactions with matter that present considerably challenging problems for scientists to study and understand. At the same time, laser ablation also represents a basic process of significant commercial importance in laser material processing—defining a multi-billion dollar industry today. These topics were widely addressed at the 8th International Conference on Laser Ablation (COLA), held in Banff, Canada on 11-16 September 2005. The meeting took place amongst the majestic and natural beauty of the Canadian Rocky Mountains at The Banff Centre, where delegates enjoyed many inspiring presentations and discussions in a unique campus learning environment. The conference brought together world leading scientists, students and industry representatives to examine the basic science of laser ablation and improve our understanding of the many physical, chemical and/or biological processes driven by the laser. The multi-disciplinary research presented at the meeting underlies some of our most important trends at the forefront of science and technology today that are represented in the papers collected in this volume. Here you will find new processes that are producing novel types of nanostructures and nano-materials with unusual and promising properties. Laser processes are described for delicately manipulating living cells or modifying their internal structure with unprecedented degrees of control and precision. Learn about short-pulse lasers that are driving extreme physical processes on record-fast time scales and opening new directions from material processing applications. The conference papers further highlight forefront application areas in pulsed laser deposition, nanoscience, analytical methods, materials, and microprocessing applications. Laser ablation continues to grow and evolve, touching forefront areas in science and driving new technological trends in laser processing applications. Please

  5. Investigating Age Resolution in Laser Ablation Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstwood, Matt; Kosler, Jan; Jackson, Simon; Pearson, Norman; Sylvester, Paul

    2009-02-01

    Workshop on Data Handling in LA-ICP-MS U-Th-Pb Geochronology; Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, 12-13 July 2008; Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) uranium-thorium-lead (U-Th-Pb) dating is an increasingly popular approach for determining the age of mineral grains and the timing of geological events. The spatial resolution offered by this technique allows detailed investigations of complex igneous and metamorphic processes, and the speed of data capture allows vast amounts of information to be gathered rapidly. Laser ablation U-Th-Pb dating is therefore becoming an increasingly influential technique to the geochronology community, providing cost-effective and ready access to age data for laboratories and end users worldwide. However, complications in acquiring, processing, and interpreting data can lead to inaccurate age information entering the literature. With the numbers of practitioners expanding rapidly, the need to standardize approaches and resolve difficulties (particularly involving the subjectivity in processing laser ablation U-Th-Pb data) is becoming important.

  6. Tissue tearing caused by pulsed laser-induced ablation pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, J P; Walsh, J T

    1993-02-01

    Pressure induced by ablative pulses of laser radiation is shown to correlate with the mechanical disruption of tissue. The ablation pressure induced during Er:YSGG laser irradiation of skin, liver, and aorta was calculated from a ballistic pendulum-based measurement of recoil momentum. The ejected material and ablation crater were examined grossly and microscopically after ablation. A gas-dynamic model of laser-induced vaporization was used to understand the measured pressures. The results show that mechanical disruption of tissue occurs when the ablation pressure exceeds the strength of the irradiated tissue at sites of intrinsic weakness.

  7. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2015-07-21

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  8. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2014-07-22

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline materiat layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  9. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  10. The fabrication of vertically aligned and periodically distributed carbon nanotube bundles and periodically porous carbon nanotube films through a combination of laser interference ablation and metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dajun; Lin, Wei; Guo, Rui; Wong, C P; Das, Suman

    2012-06-01

    Scalable fabrication of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles is essential to future advances in several applications. Here, we report on the development of a simple, two-step method for fabricating vertically aligned and periodically distributed CNT bundles and periodically porous CNT films at the sub-micron scale. The method involves laser interference ablation (LIA) of an iron film followed by CNT growth via iron-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition. CNT bundles with square widths ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 µm in width, and 50-200 µm in length, are grown atop the patterned catalyst over areas spanning 8 cm(2). The CNT bundles exhibit a high degree of control over square width, orientation, uniformity, and periodicity. This simple scalable method of producing well-placed and oriented CNT bundles demonstrates a high application potential for wafer-scale integration of CNT structures into various device applications, including IC interconnects, field emitters, sensors, batteries, and optoelectronics, etc.

  11. Ablation dynamics in laser sclerotomy ab externo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Ralf; Droege, Gerit; Mohrenstecher, Dirk; Scheu, M.; Birngruber, Reginald

    1996-01-01

    Laser sclerostomy ab externo with flashlamp excited mid-IR laser systems emitting in the 2-3 micrometer spectral range is in phase II clinical trials. Although acutely high success rates were achieved, the restenosis rate after several months is about 40%. Laser pulses of several hundreds of microseconds, known to induce thermo-mechanical explosive evaporation were used for this procedure. We investigated the ablation dynamics in tissue and the cavitation bubble dynamics in water by means of an Er:YAG laser system to estimate the extent of mechanical damage zones in the sclera and in the anterior chamber, which may contribute to the clinical failure. We found substantial mechanical tissue deformation during the ablation process caused by the cavitation effects. Stress waves up to several bar generated by explosive evaporization were measured. The fast mechanical stretching and collapsing of the scleral tissue induced by cavitation resulted in tissue dissection as could be proved by flash photography and histology. The observed high restenosis might be a result of a subsequent enhanced wound healing process. Early fistula occlusions due to iris adherences, observed in about 20% of the clinical cases may be attributed to intraocular trauma induced by vapor bubble expansion through the anterior chamber after scleral perforation. An automatic feedback system minimizing adverse effects by steering and terminating the laser process during scleral fistulization is demonstrated. Moreover, a new approach in laser sclerostomy ab externo is presented using a cw-IR laser diode system emitting at the 1.94 micrometer mid-IR water absorption peak. This system was used in vitro and showed smaller damage zones compared to the pulsed laser radiation.

  12. Oxidation of uranium nanoparticles produced via pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trelenberg, T W; Glade, S C; Tobin, J G; Felter, T E; Hamza, A V

    2005-12-07

    An experimental apparatus designed for the synthesis, via pulsed laser deposition, and analysis of metallic nanoparticles and thin films of plutonium and other actinides was tested on depleted uranium samples. Five nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser produced films of {approx}1600 {angstrom} thickness that were deposited showing an angular distribution typical thermal ablation. The films remained contiguous for many months in vacuum but blistered due to induced tensile stresses several days after exposure to air. The films were allowed to oxidize from the residual water vapor within the chamber (2 x 10{sup -10} Torr base pressure). The oxidation was monitored by in-situ analysis techniques including x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and followed Langmuir kinetics.

  13. Reliable and well-controlled synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles by continuous wave laser ablation in different liquids for deposition of thin films with variable optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakelyan, S. M.; Veiko, V. P.; Kutrovskaya, S. V.; Kucherik, A. O.; Osipov, A. V.; Vartanyan, T. A.; Itina, T. E.

    2016-06-01

    We report the results of continuous wave laser interactions with both gold and silver targets in the presence of different liquids (deionized water, ethanol, and glycerol). Upon moderate laser irradiation at wavelength of 1.06 nm during 30 min, nanoparticle colloids are shown to be formed with surprisingly narrow size distributions and average dispersion as small as 15-20 nm. The average particle sizes range between 8 and 52 nm for gold and between 20 and 107 nm for silver. This parameter is shown to be stable and well-controlled by such laser parameters as intensity and effective irradiation time, as well as by the choice of the liquid phase. The possibilities of an efficient control over the proposed synthesis techniques are discussed, and the results of a bimetallic Au-Ag structure deposition from the obtained colloids are presented. The formation of the extended arrays of gold and silver nanoparticles with controlled morphology is examined. The changes in the optical properties of the obtained thin films are found to depend on their morphology, in particular, on the particle size, and distance between them.

  14. Effects of laser ablation on cemented tungsten carbide surface quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, J.L.; Butler, D.L.; Sim, L.M.; Jarfors, A.E.W. [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, Singapore (Singapore)

    2010-11-15

    Although laser micromachining has been touted as being the most promising way to fabricate micro tools, there has been no proper evaluation of the effects of laser ablation on bulk material properties. The current work demonstrates the effects of laser ablation on the properties of a cemented tungsten carbide surface. Of particular interest is the resultant increase in compressive residual stresses in the ablated surface. From this study it is seen that there are no adverse effects from laser ablation of cemented tungsten carbide that would preclude its use for the fabrication of micro-tools but a finishing process may not be avoidable. (orig.)

  15. Effects of laser ablation on cemented tungsten carbide surface quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J. L.; Butler, D. L.; Sim, L. M.; Jarfors, A. E. W.

    2010-11-01

    Although laser micromachining has been touted as being the most promising way to fabricate micro tools, there has been no proper evaluation of the effects of laser ablation on bulk material properties. The current work demonstrates the effects of laser ablation on the properties of a cemented tungsten carbide surface. Of particular interest is the resultant increase in compressive residual stresses in the ablated surface. From this study it is seen that there are no adverse effects from laser ablation of cemented tungsten carbide that would preclude its use for the fabrication of micro-tools but a finishing process may not be avoidable.

  16. Laser ablation cell sorting in scanning cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Feimo; Price, Jeffrey H.

    2001-05-01

    Flow cytometry has been an important tool for automated cells sorting. However, the lack of good sensitivity prevents it from being used for rare events sorting; furthermore, fragile cells, anchorage-dependent cells, and clump forming cells cannot be sorted this way. A fully automated, high-speed scanning cytometer with autofocus and image segmentation is capable of accurately locating contaminant cells in a monolayer cell population. A laser ablation system was incorporated into the cytometer to negatively sort out the unwanted cells by applying a focused, ultra-short laser pulse (sub-micron diameter, pulse duration = 4 nsec, wavelength - 500 nm) to each targeted cell. Due to the high power density (approximately 1010 W/cm2) that was present at the focal point, disruptive mechanical forces were generated and were responsible for the kill. Fluorescently stained NIH-3T3 fibroblast cells were used as a model contaminant target ells in an unstained NIH-3T3 population to determine the identification-kill effectiveness. The contaminant cells were stained with the fluorochrome CellTracker Blue CMAC, whereas the background cells were left intact. Ablation pulses were applied in frame-by-frame increment batches to the cell culture on the microscope. The negative sorting effectiveness was analyzed by automatically re-scanning the post-ablation cell culture in phase contrast and propidium iodide stained epi fluorescent fields to verify cell death.

  17. Pulsed laser ablation of solids basics, theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stafe, Mihai; Puscas, Niculae N

    2014-01-01

    The book introduces ‘the state of the art' of pulsed laser ablation and its applications. It is based on recent theoretical and experimental studies. The book reaches from the basics to advanced topics of pulsed laser ablation. Theoretical and experimental fundamental phenomena involved in pulsed laser ablation are discussed with respect to material properties, laser wavelength, fluence and intensity regime of the light absorbed linearly or non-linearly in the target material. The energy absorbed by the electrons leads to atom/molecule excitation, ionization and/or direct chemical bond breaking and is also transferred to the lattice leading to material heating and phase transitions. Experimental  non-invasive optical methods for analyzing these phenomena in real time are described. Theoretical models for pulsed laser ablation and phase transitions induced by laser beams and laser-vapour/plasma interaction during the plume expansion above the target are also presented. Calculations of the ablation speed and...

  18. Influence of deposition temperature on the structural and morphological properties of Be{sub 3}N{sub 2} thin films grown by reactive laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chale-Lara, F., E-mail: fabio_chale@yahoo.com.mx [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Apartado Postal 2681, Ensenada, Baja California, C.P. 22860 (Mexico); Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 14, Ensenada CP 22860, Baja California (Mexico); Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-IPN, Unidad Altamira, Km. 14.5 Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Farias, M.H.; De la Cruz, W. [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 14, Ensenada CP 22860, Baja California (Mexico); Zapata-Torres, M. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-IPN, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, Del. Miguel Hidalgo, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-10-01

    Be{sub 3}N{sub 2} thin films have been grown on Si(1 1 1) substrates using the pulsed laser deposition method at different substrate temperatures: room temperature (RT), 200 deg. C, 400 deg. C, 600 deg. C and 700 deg. C. Additionally, two samples were deposited at RT and were annealed after deposition in situ at 600 deg. C and 700 deg. C. In order to obtain the stoichiometry of the samples, they have been characterized in situ by X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS). The influence of the substrate temperature on the morphological and structural properties of the films was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that all prepared films presented the Be{sub 3}N{sub 2} stoichiometry. Formation of whiskers with diameters of 100-200 nm appears at the surface of the films prepared with a substrate temperature of 600 deg. C or 700 deg. C. However, the samples grown at RT and annealed at 600 deg. C or 700 deg. C do not show whiskers on the surface. The average root mean square (RMS) roughness and the average grain size of the samples grown with respect the substrate temperature is presented. The films grown with a substrate temperature between the room temperature to 400 deg. C, and the sample annealed in situ at 600 deg. C were amorphous; while the {alpha}Be{sub 3}N{sub 2} phase was presented on the samples with a substrate temperature of 600 deg. C, 700 deg. C and that deposited with the substrate at RT and annealed in situ at 700 deg. C.

  19. Superhydrophobic laser ablated PTFE substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falah Toosi, Salma; Moradi, Sona [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Kamal, Saeid [Laboratory for Advanced Spectroscopy and Imaging research (LASIR) Chemistry Department, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G., E-mail: savvas.hatzi@ubc.ca [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Uniaxial and biaxial patterns fabricated on PTFE surface are responsible for superhydrophobic behavior of the surface. • Biaxial scan artificially creates high level of dual scale roughness on the PTFE surface with high contact angles (CAs) and low contact angle hysteresis (CAH) similar in all directions. • Contact angle of biaxially scanned surfaces can be as high as 170° and their contact angle hysteresis can reach as low as 3°. - Abstract: The effect of femtosecond laser irradiation process parameters (fluence, scanning speed and beam overlap) on the wettability of the resulted micro/nano-patterned morphologies on polytetrafluoroethylene is studied in detail. Several distinctly different micro/nano-patterns were fabricated including uniaxial and biaxial patterns. In particular, using biaxial scanning well defined pillared morphology was fabricated. The wettability analysis of the biaxially scanned samples revealed enhanced superhydrophobicity exhibiting high contact angles and low contact angle hysteresis.

  20. Laser systems for ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Uwe; Haedersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    of a variety of skin conditions, primarily chronically photodamaged skin, but also acne and burn scars. In addition, it is anticipated that AFR can be utilized in the laser-assisted delivery of topical drugs. Clinical efficacy coupled with minimal downtime has driven the development of various fractional...... ablative laser systems. Fractionated CO(2) (10,600-nm), erbium yttrium aluminum garnet, 2940-nm and yttrium scandium gallium garnet, 2790-nm lasers are available. In this article, we present an overview of AFR technology, devices and histopathology, and we summarize the current clinical possibilities...... with AFR incorporating our personal experience. AFR is still in the exploratory era, and systematic investigations of clinical outcomes related to various system settings are needed....

  1. Plasmonic angular tunability of gold nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, M.L.; Guarnaccio, A.; Ranù, F. [CNR, ISM UOS Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo (PZ) 85050 (Italy); Trucchi, D. [CNR, ISM UOS Montelibretti, Via Salaria km 29.300, Monterotondo Scalo, (RM) 00015 (Italy); Orlando, S., E-mail: stefano.orlando@ism.cnr.it [CNR, ISM UOS Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo (PZ) 85050 (Italy); Mollica, D.; Parisi, G.P. [CNR, ISM UOS Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo (PZ) 85050 (Italy); Medici, L.; Lettino, A. [CNR, IMAA, Area della Ricerca di Potenza -Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo, (PZ) 85050 (Italy); De Bonis, A.; Teghil, R. [Dipart. di Scienze,Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, Potenza, 85100 (Italy); Santagata, A. [CNR, ISM UOS Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo (PZ) 85050 (Italy)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • fs pulsed laser ablation as a technique to produce nanoparticles. • Nanoparticle distribution as an evidence for plasmonic tunable resonances. • Correlation between angular distribution of deposited nanoparticles and specific plasmonic resonances. - Abstract: With the aim to study the influence of deposition parameters on the plasmonic properties of gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs) deposited by ultra-short ablation, we have focused our attention in evaluating how their size distribution can be varied. In this work, the role played by the NPs’ angular distribution, agglomeration and growth is related to the resulting optical properties. UV–vis-NIR absorption spectra together with Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray microdiffraction observations are presented in order to show how the angular distribution of fs laser ablation and deposition of Au NPs provides different plasmonic properties which can be beneficial for several aims, from optoelectronic to biosensor applications.

  2. Deflection of uncooperative targets using laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, Nicolas; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2015-09-01

    Owing to their ability to move a target in space without requiring propellant, laser-based deflection methods have gained attention among the research community in the recent years. With laser ablation, the vaporized material is used to push the target itself allowing for a significant reduction in the mass requirement for a space mission. Specifically, this paper addresses two important issues which are thought to limit seriously the potential efficiency of a laser-deflection method: the impact of the tumbling motion of the target as well as the impact of the finite thickness of the material ablated in the case of a space debris. In this paper, we developed a steady-state analytical model based on energetic considerations in order to predict the efficiency range theoretically allowed by a laser deflection system in absence of the two aforementioned issues. A numerical model was then implemented to solve the transient heat equation in presence of vaporization and melting and account for the tumbling rate of the target. This model was also translated to the case where the target is a space debris by considering material properties of an aluminium 6061-T6 alloy and adapting at every time-step the size of the computational domain along with the recession speed of the interface in order to account for the finite thickness of the debris component. The comparison between the numerical results and the analytical predictions allow us to draw interesting conclusions regarding the momentum coupling achievable by a given laser deflection system both for asteroids and space debris in function of the flux, the rotation rate of the target and its material properties. In the last section of this paper, we show how a reasonably small spacecraft could deflect a 56m asteroid with a laser system requiring less than 5kW of input power.

  3. Effect of annealing time on structural and magnetic properties of laser ablated oriented Fe3O4 thin films deposited on Si(100)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shahid M Ramay; Saadat A Siddiqi; M Sabieh Anwar; C Y Park; S-C Shin

    2012-08-01

    We have fabricated ∼143nm Fe3O4 thin films on Si(100) substrates at 450°C and then annealed them at the same temperature for 30, 60 and 90 min under a vacuum of 10-6 torr with pulsed laser deposition. We studied the effects on the structural and magnetic properties of Fe3O4 thin films. The films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). XRD studies showed pure single phase spinel cubic structure of Fe3O4 with a preferential [111] orientation, independent of substrate orientation at 90 min annealing. Higher magnetization was obtained up to 60 min annealing due to Fe phase but at 90 min, we obtained reduced magnetization of 335 emu/cc. This is attributed to the formation of antiphase boundaries between substrate and film.

  4. Morphological and spectroscopic characterization of laser-ablated tungsten at various laser irradiances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akram, Mahreen; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Dawood, Asadullah [Government College University, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Lahore (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [University of Engineering and Technology, Department of Physics, Lahore (Pakistan); Bashir, M.F. [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Physics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2015-06-15

    The variation in surface morphology and plasma parameters of laser irradiated tungsten has been investigated as a function of irradiance. For this purpose, Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz) is employed. Tungsten targets were exposed to various laser irradiances ranging from 6 to 50 GW/cm{sup 2} under ambient environment of argon at a pressure of 20 Torr. Scanning electron microscope analysis has been performed to analyze the surface modification of irradiated tungsten. It revealed the formation of micro- and nanoscale surface structures. In central ablated area, distinct grains and crack formation are observed, whereas peripheral ablated areas are dominated by cones and pinhole formation. It was observed that at irradiances exceeding a value of 13 GW/cm{sup 2}, the morphological trend of the observed structures has been changed from erosion to melting and re-deposition dominant phase. Ablation efficiency as a function of laser irradiance has also been investigated by measuring the crater depth using surface profilometry analysis. It is found to be maximum at an irradiance of 13 GW/cm{sup 2} and decreases at high laser irradiances. In order to correlate the accumulated effects of plasma parameters with the surface modification, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis has been performed. The electron temperature and number density of tungsten plasma have been evaluated at various laser irradiances. Initially with the increase of the laser irradiance up to 13 GW/cm{sup 2}, an increasing trend is observed for both plasma parameters due to enhanced energy deposition. Afterward, a decreasing trend is achieved which is attributed to the shielding effect. With further increase in irradiance, a saturation stage comes and insignificant changes are observed in plasma parameters. This saturation is explainable on the basis of the formation of a self-regulating regime near the target surface. Surface modifications of laser irradiated tungsten have been correlated with

  5. CT Guided Laser Ablation of Osteoid Osteoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manohar Kachare

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To present our experience of Computed Tomography (CT guided laser ablation of radiologically proven osteoid osteoma in the inter trochantric region of the femur. A19 year old female presented with severe pain in left upper thigh region since 6-7 months, which was exaggerated during nights and was relived on taking oral Non Steroid Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs. On CT scan hypodense lesion with surrounding dense sclerosis noted in intertrochanteric region in left femur. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI revealed small focal predominantly cortical, oval lytic lesion in the intertrochanteric region which appeared hypointense on T1 Weighted Image (T1WI and hyperintense on T2 Weighted Image (T2WI and Short Tau Inversion Recovery (STIR image. Diffuse extensive sclerosis and hyperostosis of bone was noted surrounding the lesion appearing hypointense on T1W and T2W images. Under local anesthesia the laser fibre was inserted in the nidus under CT guidance through bone biopsy needle and 1800 joules energy delivered in the lesion continuous mode. Complete relief of pain noted after 24 hours after the treatment. CT guided LASER ablation is a safe, simple and effective method of treatment for osteoid osteoma.

  6. Thermal Ablation for Benign Thyroid Nodules: Radiofrequency and Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Valcavi, Roberto [Endocrinology Division and Thyroid Disease Center, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Pacella, Claudio M. [Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology Department, Ospedale Regina Apostolorum, Albano Laziale-Rome (IT); Rhim, Hyun Chul [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, Dong Kyu [Human Medical Imaging and Intervention Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Although ethanol ablation has been successfully used to treat cystic thyroid nodules, this procedure is less effective when the thyroid nodules are solid. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation, a newer procedure used to treat malignant liver tumors, has been valuable in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules regardless of the extent of the solid component. This article reviews the basic physics, techniques, applications, results, and complications of thyroid RF ablation, in comparison to laser ablation.

  7. Thermal character in organic polymers with nanojoule femtosecond laser ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaochang Ni(倪晓昌); Ching-Yue Wang(王清月); Yanfeng Li(栗岩峰); Minglie Hu(胡明列); Zhuan Wang(王专); Lu Chai(柴路)

    2003-01-01

    Ablation experiments with femtosecond (fs) laser pulse (pulse duration 37 fs, wavelength 800 nm) on organic polymers have been performed in air. The ablation threshold is found to be only several nanojoules. The diameters of the dots ablated in the organic polymers are influenced by the laser fluence and the number of laser pulses. It is observed that heat is diffused in a threadlike manner in all directions around the central focus region. Explanations of the observed phenomena are presented. A one-dimensional waveguide is also ablated in the organic polymers.

  8. Evaluation of explosive sublimation as the mechanism of nanosecond laser ablation of tungsten under vacuum conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oderji, Hassan Yousefi; Farid, Nazar; Sun, Liying; Fu, Cailong; Ding, Hongbin

    2016-08-01

    A non-equilibrium mechanism for nanosecond laser ablation is suggested herein, and its predictions are compared to the results of W experiments performed under vacuum conditions. A mechanism of particle formation is explained via this model, with partial sublimation of the superheated irradiated zone of the target considered to be the mechanism of laser ablation. In this study, a mixture of vapor and particles was explosively generated and subsequently prevented the rest of a laser pulse from reaching its intended target. This mechanism was found to play an essential role in the ablation of W under vacuum conditions, and it provides a theoretical justification for particle formation. Moreover, special considerations were taken into account for the expansion of plasma into a vacuum. The model was evaluated by measuring the mass of ablated particles using a quartz crystal deposition monitor and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The results of this model were found to be in good agreement with experimental values.

  9. Reactive laser-induced ablation as approach to titanium oxycarbide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandova, V., E-mail: jandova@icpf.cas.cz; Fajgar, R.; Dytrych, P.; Kostejn, M.; Drinek, V.; Kupcik, J.

    2015-09-01

    The IR laser-induced reactive ablation of frozen titanium ethoxide target was studied. The method involves the laser ablation of titanium ethoxide at − 140 °C in gaseous methane (4–50 Pa) atmosphere. This process leads to reactions of the ablative species with hydrocarbon in the gaseous phase. During the ablation of the frozen target excited species interact with methane molecules. The reactive ablation process leads to the formation of a smooth thin film. The thickness of prepared films depends on the number of IR pulses and their composition depends on the pressure of gaseous methane. This reactive IR ablation proceeds as a carbidation process providing nanostructured films with good adhesion to various substrates (glass, metals, KBr) depending on the carbon content in prepared films. Particles are also stabilized by layer preventing their surface oxidation in the atmosphere. The described results are important in the general context for the synthesis of reactive particles in the gas phase. The final products are characterized by spectroscopic, microscopic and diffraction techniques: SEM/EDX, HRTEM, electron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and XPS. - Highlights: • IR laser ablation of frozen target of titanium ethoxide leads to a reduction in the gaseous methane (4-50 Pa). • Films deposited in methane have Ti/O/C stoichiometry and are oxidized in the atmosphere. • Layers deposited in methane are reduced and have less O in the topmost layers.

  10. Thin films deposited by laser ablation for the measurement of the ionizing and non-ionizing radiation; Peliculas delgadas depositadas por ablacion laser para la medicion de radiacion ionizante y no ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarreal B, J.E.; Escobar A, L.; Camps, E.; Romero, S.; Gonzalez, P.; Salinas, B. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    In this work the obtained results to synthesize thin films of amorphous carbon with incorporated nitrogen and hydrogen are presented, as well as thin films of aluminium oxide using the laser ablation technique. The thin films were exposed to ionizing radiation (gamma rays of a {sup 60} Co source, beta radiation of a {sup 90} Sr source) and a non-ionizing radiation (UV radiation). The obtained results show that it is possible to obtain materials in thin film form with thickness of hundreds of nanometers, which present thermoluminescent response when being irradiated with ionizing radiation and non-ionizing radiation. (Author)

  11. Laser Ablation with Vacuum Capture for MALDI Mass Spectrometry of Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Cao, Fan; Murray, Kermit K.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a laser ablation sampling technique for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analyses of in-situ digested tissue proteins. Infrared laser ablation was used to remove biomolecules from tissue sections for collection by vacuum capture and analysis by MALDI. Ablation and transfer of compounds from tissue removes biomolecules from the tissue and allows further analysis of the collected material to facilitate their identification. Laser ablated material was captured in a vacuum aspirated pipette-tip packed with C18 stationary phase and the captured material was dissolved, eluted, and analyzed by MALDI. Rat brain and lung tissue sections 10 μm thick were processed by in-situ trypsin digestion after lipid and salt removal. The tryptic peptides were ablated with a focused mid-infrared laser, vacuum captured, and eluted with an acetonitrile/water mixture. Eluted components were deposited on a MALDI target and mixed with matrix for mass spectrometry analysis. Initial experiments were conducted with peptide and protein standards for evaluation of transfer efficiency: a transfer efficiency of 16% was obtained using seven different standards. Laser ablation vacuum capture was applied to freshly digested tissue sections and compared with sections processed with conventional MALDI imaging. A greater signal intensity and lower background was observed in comparison with the conventional MALDI analysis. Tandem time-of-flight MALDI mass spectrometry was used for compound identification in the tissue.

  12. Synthesis of Ultra-Small Palladium Nanoparticles Deposited on CdS Nanorods by Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquid: Role of Metal Nanocrystal Size in the Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hanbit; Reddy, D Amaranatha; Kim, Yujin; Lee, Seunghee; Ma, Rory; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2017-09-21

    It is imperative to suppress the rate of recombination of photogenerated carriers to improve the semiconductor-catalyzed solar-driven production of hydrogen. To this end, photocatalysts comprising active sunlight-harvesting photo-absorbers and stable metal co-catalysts have attracted significant attention. However, the size, clean surface, and highly dispersed nature of the metal co-catalysts are crucial factors affecting catalyst performance and reaction rate. Nevertheless, most of the available metal nanocrystals have been synthesized by complex procedures using harmful organic templates and stabilizers, affording high-purity compounds with difficulty and high cost. To overcome these problems, in this study, the pulsed laser ablation in liquid approach was utilized to generate palladium and bimetallic palladium-platinum nanoparticles with an average size and distribution by adjusting the laser wavelength and fluence. A high rate of evolution of hydrogen of 130.33 mmol g(-1)  h(-1) was obtained by using the optimized CdS-PdPt catalyst under simulated sunlight irradiation. This value is 51.31 times greater than that observed for bare CdS nanostructures. Furthermore, the amount of hydrogen evolved was significantly better than that obtained by using several other noble-metal co-catalysts deposited on CdS. This proposed strategy is thought to open new avenues for the design of advanced photocatalytic materials for efficient solar-driven production of hydrogen. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Synthesis of Ag@Silica Nanoparticles by Assisted Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castillo, Jr.; Rodriguez, E.; Jimenez-Villar, E.; Rodríguez, D.; Salomon-García, I.; de Sá, Gilberto F.; García-Fernández, T.; Almeida, DB; Cesar, CL; Johnes, R.; Ibarra, Juana C.

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of silver nanoparticles coated with porous silica (Ag@Silica NPs) using an assisted laser ablation method. This method is a chemical synthesis where one of the reagents (the reducer agent) is introduced in nanometer form by laser ablation of a solid target submerged in an aqueous solution. In a first step, a silicon wafer immersed in water solution was laser ablated for several minutes. Subsequently, an AgNO3 aliquot was added to the aqueous solution. The redox reaction between the silver ions and ablation products leads to a colloidal suspension of core-shell Ag@Silica NPs. The influence of the laser pulse energy, laser wavelength, ablation time, and Ag+ concentration on the size and optical properties of the Ag@Silica NPs was investigated. Furthermore, the colloidal suspensions were studied by UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

  14. Production of silver nanoparticles by laser ablation in open air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutinguiza, M., E-mail: mohamed@uvigo.es [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9. Vigo, 36310 (Spain); Comesaña, R. [Materials Engineering, Applied Mechanics and Construction Dpt., University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, Vigo, 36310 (Spain); Lusquiños, F.; Riveiro, A.; Val, J. del; Pou, J. [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9. Vigo, 36310 (Spain)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Silver nanoparticles have been obtained by laser ablation of metallic Ag in open air using nanosecond laser. • The continuous process enables increasing the production yield. • The obtained particles are rounded shape with narrow size distribution. - Abstract: Silver nanoparticles have attracted much attention as a subject of investigation due to their well-known properties, such as good conductivity, antibacterial and catalytic effects, etc. They are used in many different areas, such as medicine, industrial applications, scientific investigation, etc. There are different techniques for producing Ag nanoparticles, chemical, electrochemical, sonochemical, etc. These methods often lead to impurities together with nanoparticles or colloidal solutions. In this work, laser ablation of solids in open air conditions (LASOA) is used to produce silver nanoparticles and collect them on glass substrates. Production and deposition of silver nanoparticles are integrated in the same step to reduce the process. The obtained particles are analysed and the nanoparticles formation mechanism is discussed. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy. The obtained nanoparticles consisted of Ag nanoparticles showing rounded shape with diameters ranging from few to 50 nm.

  15. Nanosecond laser ablation processes in aluminum-doped zinc-oxide for photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canteli, D., E-mail: david.canteli@ciemat.es [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, S. [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Molpeceres, C. [Centro Laser, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ctra. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Torres, I.; Gandia, J.J. [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A study of the ablation of AZO thin films deposited at different temperature conditions with nanosecond UV laser light for photovoltaic devices has been performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ablation threshold of AZO thin films was measured and related with the absorption coefficient of the films at the laser wavelength, showing a direct correspondence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A change in the material structure in the areas closest to the edges of laser grooves made in samples deposited at temperatures below 100 Degree-Sign C was observed and studied. - Abstract: Aiming to a future use in thin film solar modules, the processing of aluminum doped zinc oxide thin films with good optoelectronic properties with a nanosecond-pulsed ultraviolet laser has been studied. The ablation threshold fluence of the films has been determined and associated with the material properties. The ablation process has been optimized and grooves with good properties for photovoltaic devices have been obtained. The morphology of the ablated surfaces has been observed by confocal microscopy and its structure has been characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The influence of ablation parameters like focus distance, pulse energy and repetition frequency in the groove morphology has been studied with special attention to the thermal effects on the material structure.

  16. Ablation of steel using picosecond laser pulses in burst mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lickschat, Peter; Demba, Alexander; Weissmantel, Steffen

    2017-02-01

    Results obtained in picosecond laser processing of steel applying the burst mode are presented. Using the burst mode, pulse trains, i.e., bursts, consisting of a number of picosecond pulses with an inter-pulse delay of 12.5 ns and 10 ps pulse duration are applied for material processing. Small cavities with sizes in the range of the laser beam diameter made by single-burst ablation are compared to quadratic cavities of 0.5 × 0.5 mm² produced by multiburst ablation and simultaneous scanning of the laser beam across the steel sample surface. The ablated volume per pulse within the burst was calculated either from the ablated volume per burst or from the ablation depth of the quadratic cavities. With the second to fourth pulses in the bursts, a reduction of the ablated volume per pulse in comparison with the first pulse in the bursts (i.e., to the use of single pulses) was found for both single- and multiburst ablation, which is assumed to be due to plasma shielding. By contrast, the ablated volume per pulse within the bursts increases for the fifth to eighth pulses. Heat accumulation effect and the influence of the heated plasma can be assumed to be the reason for these higher ablation rates. SEM micrographs also show that there is a higher melt ejection out of the laser processed area. This is indicated by the formation of bulges about the ablated area.

  17. Laser Ablation for Cancer: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Fong, Yuman

    2017-01-01

    Laser ablation (LA) is gaining acceptance for the treatment of tumors as an alternative to surgical resection. This paper reviews the use of lasers for ablative and surgical applications. Also reviewed are solutions aimed at improving LA outcomes: hyperthermal treatment planning tools and thermometric techniques during LA, used to guide the surgeon in the choice and adjustment of the optimal laser settings, and the potential use of nanoparticles to allow biologic selectivity of ablative treatments. Promising technical solutions and a better knowledge of laser-tissue interaction should allow LA to be used in a safe and effective manner as a cancer treatment. PMID:28613248

  18. Effect of the ions energy in the physical properties of thin films of CN{sub x} deposited by laser ablation; Efecto de la energia de los iones en las propiedades fisicas de peliculas delgadas de CN{sub x} depositadas por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrieta C, A.; Escobar A, L.; Camps C, E.; Romero H, S.; Mejia H, J.A.; Gonzalez, P.R. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Camacho L, M.A. [UAEM, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Thin films of carbon nitride were deposited using the laser ablation technique starting from a carbon target in atmosphere of N{sub 2}, varying the fluence of the laser and maintaining fixed the distance target-substrate. It was diagnosed the formed plasma, being determined the average kinetic energy of the ions present in the plasma, as well as their density. The characterization of the deposited films includes composition, optical gap, chemical structure and microstructure. They were related the properties of the layers with the plasma parameters with the purpose of clarifying that paper plays in the growth of the layer. Additionally it was studied their thermoluminescent response to being excited with UV radiation. (Author)

  19. Laser ablation of molecular carbon nitride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D., E-mail: d.fischer@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Schwinghammer, K. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany); Sondermann, C. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Lau, V.W.; Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Lotsch, B.V. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We present a method for the preparation of thin films on sapphire substrates of the carbon nitride precursors dicyandiamide (C{sub 2}N{sub 4}H{sub 4}), melamine (C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6}), and melem (C{sub 6}N{sub 10}H{sub 6}), using the femtosecond-pulsed laser deposition technique (femto-PLD) at different temperatures. The depositions were carried out under high vacuum with a femtosecond-pulsed laser. The focused laser beam is scanned on the surface of a rotating target consisting of the pelletized compounds. The resulting polycrystalline, opaque films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, SEM, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry measurements. The crystal structures and optical/spectroscopic results of the obtained rough films largely match those of the bulk materials.

  20. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  1. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  2. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  3. Metal particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MSmeasurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Liu, Chunyi; Wen, Sy-Bor; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (266nm) was used to generate metal particles of Zn and Al alloys using femtosecond (150 fs) and nanosecond (4 ns) laser pulses with identical fluences of 50 J cm{sup -2}. Characterization of particles and correlation with Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) performance was investigated. Particles produced by nanosecond laser ablation were mainly primary particles with irregular shape and hard agglomerates (without internal voids). Particles produced by femtosecond laser ablation consisted of spherical primary particles and soft agglomerates formed from numerous small particles. Examination of the craters by white light interferometric microscopy showed that there is a rim of material surrounding the craters formed after nanosecond laser ablation. The determination of the crater volume by white light interferometric microscopy, considering the rim of material surrounding ablation craters, revealed that the volume ratio (fs/ns) of the craters on the selected samples was approximately 9 (Zn), 7 (NIST627 alloy) and 5 (NIST1711 alloy) times more ablated mass with femtosecond pulsed ablation compared to nanosecond pulsed ablation. In addition, an increase of Al concentration from 0 to 5% in Zn base alloys caused a large increase in the diameter of the particles, up to 65% while using nanosecond laser pulses. When the ablated particles were carried in argon into an ICP-MS, the Zn and Al signals intensities were greater by factors of {approx} 50 and {approx} 12 for fs vs. ns ablation. Femtosecond pulsed ablation also reduced temporal fluctuations in the {sup 66}Zn transient signal by a factor of ten compared to nanosecond laser pulses.

  4. UV laser ablation of parylene films from gold substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O. R. Musaev, P. Scott, J. M. Wrobel, and M. B. Kruger

    2009-11-19

    Parylene films, coating gold substrates, were removed by laser ablation using 248 nm light from an excimer laser. Each sample was processed by a different number of pulses in one of three different environments: air at atmospheric pressure, nitrogen at atmospheric pressure, and vacuum. The laser-induced craters were analyzed by optical microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Multi-pulse ablation thresholds of gold and parylene were estimated.

  5. Picosecond laser ablation of nano-sized WTi thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, S.; Gaković, B.; Peruško, D.; Desai, T.; Batani, D.; Čekada, M.; Radak, B.; Trtica, M.

    2009-08-01

    Interaction of an Nd:YAG laser, operating at 532 nm wavelength and pulse duration of 40 ps, with tungsten-titanium (WTi) thin film (thickness, 190 nm) deposited on single silicon (100) substrate was studied. Laser fluences of 10.5 and 13.4 J/cm2 were found to be sufficient for modification of the WTi/silicon target system. The energy absorbed from the Nd:YAG laser beam is partially converted to thermal energy, which generates a series of effects, such as melting, vaporization of the molten material, shock waves, etc. The following WTi/silicon surface morphological changes were observed: (i) ablation of the thin film during the first laser pulse. The boundary of damage area was relatively sharp after action of one pulse whereas it was quite diffuse after irradiation with more than 10 pulses; (ii) appearance of some nano-structures (e.g., nano-ripples) in the irradiated region; (iii) appearance of the micro-cracking. The process of the laser interaction with WTi/silicon target was accompanied by formation of plasma.

  6. Transparent conducting AZO and ITO films produced by pulsed laser ablation at 355 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thestrup, B.; Schou, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    Thin films of aluminium-doped zinc oxide (AZO) and indium tin oxide (ITO) were deposited on glass substrates by laser ablation in an oxygen environment. The electrical and optical properties of films grown at various oxygen pressures were compared. With no substrate heating, highly transparent...

  7. Investigations on laser hard tissue ablation under various environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, H W [American Medical Systems-ICSV, San Jose, CA (United States); Oh, J [Division of Mechanical Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Welch, A J [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)], E-mail: wook.kang@ammd.com

    2008-06-21

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of liquid environments upon laser bone ablation. A long-pulsed Er,Cr:YSGG laser was employed to ablate bovine bone tibia at various radiant exposures under dry, wet (using water or perfluorocarbon) and spray environmental conditions. Energy loss by the application of liquid during laser irradiation was evaluated, and ablation performance for all conditions was quantitatively measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Microscope images were also used to estimate thermal side effects in tissue after multiple-pulse ablation. Wet using water and spray conditions equally attenuated the 2.79 {mu}m wavelength laser beam. Higher transmission efficiency was obtained utilizing a layer of perfluorocarbon. Dry ablation exhibited severe carbonization due to excessive heat accumulation. Wet condition using water resulted in similar ablation volume to the dry case without carbonization. The perfluorocarbon layer produced the largest ablation volume but some carbonization due to the poor thermal conductivity. Spray induced clean cutting with slightly reduced efficiency. Liquid-assisted ablation provided significant beneficial effects such as augmented material removal and cooling/cleaning effects during laser osteotomy.

  8. Manufacturing of Er:ZBLAN ridge waveguides by pulsed laser deposition and ultrafast laser micromachining for green integrated lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottmann, Jens [Lehrstuhl fuer Lasertechnik, RWTH Aachen University, Steinbachstr. 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany)], E-mail: jens.gottmann@llt.rwth-aachen.de; Moiseev, Leonid; Vasilief, Ion; Wortmann, Dirk [Lehrstuhl fuer Lasertechnik, RWTH Aachen University, Steinbachstr. 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    Laser radiation is used both for the deposition of the laser active thin films and for the microstructuring to define wave guiding structures for the fabrication of waveguide lasers. Thin films of Er:ZBLAN (a fluoride glass consisting of ZrF{sub 4}, BaF{sub 2}, LaF{sub 3}, AlF{sub 3}, NaF, ErF{sub 3}) for green up-conversion lasers (545 nm) are produced by pulsed laser deposition using ArF excimer laser radiation (wavelength 193 nm). Manufacturing of the laser active waveguides by microstructuring is done using fs-laser ablation of the deposited films. The structural and optical properties of the films and the damping losses of the structured waveguides are determined in view of the design and the fabrication of compact and efficient diode pumped waveguide lasers. The resulting waveguides are polished, provided with resonator mirrors, pumped using diode lasers and characterized.

  9. Pulsed Tm:YAG laser ablation of knee joint tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei-Qiang; Vari, Sandor G.; Duffy, J. T.; Miller, J. M.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1992-06-01

    We investigated the effect of a free-running 2.01 micron pulsed Tm:YAG laser on bovine knee joint tissues. Ablation rates of fresh fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone were measured in saline as a function of laser fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and fiber core size (400 and 600 microns). All tissues could be effectively ablated and the ablation rate increased linearly with the increasing fluence. Use of fibers of different core sizes, while maintaining constant energy fluence, did not result in significant difference in ablation rate. Histology analyses of the ablated tissue samples reveal average Tm:YAG radiation induced thermal damage (denatunalization) zones ranging between 130 and 540 microns, depending on the laser parameters and the tissue type.

  10. In situ Diagnostics During Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    1999-01-01

    The preliminary results of spectral analysis of the reaction zone during the carbon nanotube production by laser ablation method indicate synergetic dependence on dual laser setup. The emission spectra recorded from different regions of the laser ablated plume at different delay times from the laser pulses are used to map the temperatures of C2 and C3. These are compared with Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectra also obtained during production to model the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes. Experiments conducted to correlate the spectral features with nanotube yields as a function of different production parameters will be discussed.

  11. Pulsed laser deposition of pepsin thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kecskemeti, G. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary)]. E-mail: kega@physx.u-szeged.hu; Kresz, N. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Smausz, T. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Szeged, Research Group on Laser Physics, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Hopp, B. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Szeged, Research Group on Laser Physics, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Nogradi, A. [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Szeged, H-6720, Szeged, Koranyi fasor 10-11 (Hungary)

    2005-07-15

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of organic and biological thin films has been extensively studied due to its importance in medical applications among others. Our investigations and results on PLD of a digestion catalyzing enzyme, pepsin, are presented. Targets pressed from pepsin powder were ablated with pulses of an ArF excimer laser ({lambda} = 193 nm, FWHM = 30 ns), the applied fluence was varied between 0.24 and 5.1 J/cm{sup 2}. The pressure in the PLD chamber was 2.7 x 10{sup -3} Pa. The thin layers were deposited onto glass and KBr substrates. Our IR spectroscopic measurements proved that the chemical composition of deposited thin films is similar to that of the target material deposited at 0.5 and 1.3 J/cm{sup 2}. The protein digesting capacity of the transferred pepsin was tested by adapting a modified 'protein cube' method. Dissolution of the ovalbumin sections proved that the deposited layers consisted of catalytically active pepsin.

  12. [Moist ablation of the corneal surface with the Er:YAG laser. Results of optimizing ablation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bende, T; Jean, B; Matallana, M; Seiler, T; Steiner, R

    1994-10-01

    The Er:YAG laser, emitting light at 2.94 microns, may be an alternative to the 193 nm excimer laser for photorefractive keratectomy. Compared to the excimer laser, the ablation rate is very high. Surface roughness is also more pronounced than for the excimer laser. Using a precorneal liquid film, these two factors can be reduced, as shown in ablation experiments performed on porcine corneas. Thermal damage of the remaining corneal tissue is another side effect. There is no significant decrease in the amount of thermal damage with this new technique,--not even when the pulse length is reduced.

  13. Histological evaluation of vertical laser channels from ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbølling Haak, Christina; Illes, Monica; Paasch, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) represents a new treatment potential for various skin conditions and new laser devices are being introduced. It is important to gain information about the impact of laser settings on the dimensions of the created laser channels for obtaining a safe and effici...

  14. Modification of narrow ablating capillaries under the influence of multiple femtosecond laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Gubin, K V; Trunov, V I; Pestryakov, E V

    2016-01-01

    Powerful femtosecond laser pulses that propagate through narrow ablating capillaries cause modification of capillary walls, which is studied experimentally and theoretically. At low intensities, laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and porous coating composed of sub-micron particles appear on the walls. At higher intensities, the surface is covered by deposited droplets of the size up to 10 $\\mu$m. In both cases, the ablated material forms a solid plug that completely blocks the capillary after several hundreds or thousands of pulses. The suggested theoretical model indicates that plug formation is a universal effect. It must take place in any narrow tube subject to ablation under the action of short laser pulses.

  15. Universal threshold for femtosecond laser ablation with oblique illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Long; Cheng, Weibo; Petrarca, Massimo; Polynkin, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    We quantify the dependence of the single-shot ablation threshold on the angle of incidence and polarization of a femtosecond laser beam, for three dissimilar solid-state materials: a metal, a dielectric, and a semiconductor. Using the constant, linear value of the index of refraction, we calculate the laser fluence transmitted through the air-material interface at the point of ablation threshold. We show that, in spite of the highly nonlinear ionization dynamics involved in the ablation process, the so defined transmitted threshold fluence is universally independent of the angle of incidence and polarization of the laser beam for all three material types. We suggest that angular dependence of ablation threshold can be utilized for profiling fluence distributions in ultra-intense femtosecond laser beams.

  16. Morphology Characterization of Uranium Particles From Laser Ablated Uranium Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In the study, metallic uranium and uranium dioxide material were ablated by laser beam in order to simulate the process of forming the uranium particles in pyrochemical process. The morphology characteristic of uranium particles and the surface of

  17. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Brian C; Eklund, Peter C; Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin C; Shinn, Michelle

    2012-11-27

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  18. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Brian C. (Inventor); Eklund, Peter C. (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Shinn, Michelle (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  19. Metal cathode patterning for OLED by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chen; ZHU Guang-xi; LIU De-ming

    2006-01-01

    In this paper,nanosecond pulsed laser is introduced to selectively ablate away indium tin oxide film and metal film without destroying the underlying layers for fabricating organic light-emitting diodes. By varying density of energy, pulse number and width of the laser, the influence on morphology of the laser trenches of indium tin oxide and metal films are investigated. It is presented that uniform ablation trench can be obtained with 16 laser pulses at 0.15 J/cm2 for aluminum film and 10 laser pulses at 0.65 J/cm2 for indium tin oxide film. It is found that the characteristics of the organic light-emitting diodes prepared with laser ablation are almost the same as those of that prepared with conventional patterning method.

  20. Edge isolation of transparent conductive polymer (TCP) thin films on flexible substrates using UV laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Tseng, Shih-Feng; Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Chiang, Donyau; Chen, Ming-Fei

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to directly use the writing techniques for the complex electrode edge isolation of transparent conductive polymer (TCP) thin films by a nanosecond pulsed UV laser processing system. The processing parameters including the laser pulse energy, the pulse repetition frequency, and the scan speed of galvanometers were examined to ablate the TCP films deposited on polyethylene terephtalate substrates of 188 microm thick. The thickness of TCP films was approximately 20 nm. The laser pulse repetition frequency and the scan speed of galvanometers were applied to calculate the overlapping rate of laser spots and to discuss the patterning region quality. Surface morphology, edge quality, and width and depth of edge isolated patterning structures after laser ablation process were measured by a three-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscope. In addition, the electrical conductivity of ablated TCP films was measured by a four-point probes instrument. After isolated line patterning was formed, the ablated TCP films with a better edge quality were obtained directly when the overlapping rate of laser spots, the scan speed, and the pulse repetition rate were 83.3%, 200 mm/s, and 40 kHz, respectively. The better surface morphology of electrode pattern structures was also obtained when the scan speed and the pulse repetition rate were 500 mm/s and 40 kHz, respectively.

  1. Enthalpy model for heating, melting, and vaporization in laser ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilios Alexiades; David Autrique

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation is used in a growing number of applications in various areas including medicine, archaeology, chemistry, environmental and materials sciences. In this work the heat transfer and phase change phenomena during nanosecond laser ablation of a copper (Cu) target in a helium (He) background gas at atmospheric pressure are presented. An enthalpy model is outlined, which accounts for heating, melting, and vaporization of the target. As far as we know, this is the first model th...

  2. Simulation of femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, R. V.; Antonov, V. I.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper a mathematical model for femtosecond laser ablation of metals is proposed, based on standard two-temperature model connected with 1D hydrodynamic equations. Wide-range equation of state has been developed. The simulation results are compared with experimental data for aluminium and copper. A good agreement for both metals with numerical results and experiment shows that this model can be employed for choosing laser parameters to better accuracy in nanoparticles production by ablation of metals.

  3. Development of laser ablation plasma by anisotropic self-radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohnishi Naofumi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed a method for reproducing an accurate solution of low-density ablation plasma by properly treating anisotropic radiation. Monte-Carlo method is employed for estimating Eddington tensor with limited number of photon samples in each fluid time step. Radiation field from ablation plasma is significantly affected by the anisotropic Eddington tensor. Electron temperature around the ablation surface changes with the radiation field and is responsible for the observed emission. An accurate prediction of the light emission from the laser ablation plasma requires a careful estimation of the anisotropic radiation field.

  4. Laser Ablation Increases PEM/Catalyst Interfacial Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitacre, Jay; Yalisove, Steve

    2009-01-01

    An investigational method of improving the performance of a fuel cell that contains a polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM) is based on the concept of roughening the surface of the PEM, prior to deposition of a thin layer of catalyst, in order to increase the PEM/catalyst interfacial area and thereby increase the degree of utilization of the catalyst. The roughening is done by means of laser ablation under carefully controlled conditions. Next, the roughened membrane surface is coated with the thin layer of catalyst (which is typically platinum), then sandwiched between two electrode/catalyst structures to form a membrane/ele c t - rode assembly. The feasibility of the roughening technique was demonstrated in experiments in which proton-conducting membranes made of a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, protonconducting polymer were ablated by use of femtosecond laser pulses. It was found that when proper combinations of the pulse intensity, pulse-repetition rate, and number of repetitions was chosen, the initially flat, smooth membrane surfaces became roughened to such an extent as to be converted to networks of nodules interconnected by filaments (see Figure 1). In further experiments, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was performed on a pristine (smooth) membrane and on two laser-roughened membranes after the membranes were coated with platinum on both sides. Some preliminary EIS data were interpreted as showing that notwithstanding the potential for laser-induced damage, the bulk conductivities of the membranes were not diminished in the roughening process. Other preliminary EIS data (see Figure 2) were interpreted as signifying that the surface areas of the laser-roughened membranes were significantly greater than those of the smooth membrane. Moreover, elemental analyses showed that the sulfur-containing molecular groups necessary for proton conduction remained intact, even near the laser-roughened surfaces. These preliminary results can be taken

  5. Dynamics of Laser Ablation in Superfluid ^4{He}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buelna, X.; Popov, E.; Eloranta, J.

    2017-02-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of metal targets immersed in superfluid ^4{He} is visualized by time-resolved shadowgraph photography and the products are analyzed by post-experiment atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. The expansion dynamics of the gaseous ablation half-bubble on the target surface appears underdamped and follows the predicted behavior for the thermally induced bubble growth mechanism. An inherent instability of the ablation bubble appears near its maximum radius and no tightly focused cavity collapse or rebound events are observed. During the ablation bubble retreat phase, the presence of sharp edges in the target introduces flow patterns that lead to the creation of large classical vortex rings. Furthermore, on the nanometer scale, AFM data reveal that the metal nanoparticles created by laser ablation are trapped in spherical vortex tangles and quantized vortex rings present in the non-equilibrium liquid.

  6. Laser ablation with applied magnetic field for electric propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batishcheva, Alla; Batishchev, Oleg; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2012-10-01

    Using ultrafast lasers with tera-watt-level power allows efficient ablation and ionization of solid-density materials [1], creating dense and hot (˜100eV) plasma. We propose ablating small droplets in the magnetic nozzle configurations similar to mini-helicon plasma source [2]. Such approach may improve the momentum coupling compared to ablation of solid surfaces and facilitate plasma detachment. Results of 2D modeling of solid wire ablation in the applied magnetic field are presented and discussed. [4pt] [1] O. Batishchev et al, Ultrafast Laser Ablation for Space Propulsion, AIAA technical paper 2008-5294, -16p, 44th JPC, Hartford, 2008.[0pt] [2] O. Batishchev and J.L. Cambier, Experimental Study of the Mini-Helicon Thruster, Air Force Research Laboratory Report, AFRL-RZ-ED-TR-2009-0020, 2009.

  7. Mechanisms of Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Smalley, Richard E.; Nocholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We will present possible mechanisms for nanotube production by laser oven process. Spectral emission of excited species during laser ablation of a composite graphite target is compared with that of laser irradiated C60 vapor. The similarities in the transient and spectral data suggest that fullerenes are intermediate precursors for nanotube formation. The confinement of the ablation products by means of a 25-mm diameter tube placed upstream of the target seems to improve the production and purity of nanotubes. Repeated laser pulses vaporize the amorphous/graphitic carbon and possibly catalyst particles, and dissociate fullerenes yielding additional feedstock for SWNT growth.

  8. Femtosecond laser ablation of Au film around single pulse threshold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaochang Ni; Ching-Yue Wang; Yinzhong Wu; Li Yang; Wei Jia; Lu Chai

    2006-01-01

    @@ Ablation process of 1-kHz femtosecond lasers (pulse duration of 148 fs, wavelength of 775 nm) of Au film on silica substrates is studied. The thresholds for single and multi pulses can be obtained directly from the relation between the squared diameter D2 of the ablated craters and the laser fluence φo. From the plot of the accumulated laser fluence Nφth(N) and the number of laser pulses N, incubation coefficient of Au film is obtained to be 0.765. Some experimental data obtained around the single pulse threshold are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation.

  9. Pulsed laser deposition: Prospects for commercial deposition of epitaxial films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenchausen, R.E.

    1999-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique for the deposition of thin films. The vapor source is induced by the flash evaporation that occurs when a laser pulse of sufficient intensity (about 100 MW/cm{sup 2}) is absorbed by a target. In this paper the author briefly defines pulsed laser deposition, current applications, research directed at gaining a better understanding of the pulsed laser deposition process, and suggests some future directions to enable commercial applications.

  10. Transient Newton rings in dielectrics upon fs laser ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Lechuga, Mario; Hernandez-Rueda, Javier; Solis, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We report the appearance of transient Newton rings in dielectrics (sapphire and lead-oxide glass) during ablation with single fs laser pulses. Employing femtosecond microscopy with 800 nm excitation and 400 nm illumination, we observe a characteristic ring pattern that dynamically changes for increasing delay times between pump and probe pulse. Such transient Newton rings have been previously observed in metals and semiconductors at fluences above the ablation threshold and were related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front surface of the ablating layer and at the interface of the non-ablating substrate. Yet, it had been generally assumed that this phenomenon cannot be (and has not been) observed in dielectrics due to the different ablation mechanism and optical properties of dielectrics. The fact that we are able to observe them has important consequences for the comprehension of the ablation mechanisms in dielectrics and provides a new method for investigating these mechanisms in ...

  11. Deposition of superconducting YBaCuO thin films by pseudospark ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoebel, M.; Geerk, J.; Linker, G.; Schultheiss, C. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Nukleare Festkoerperphysik (INFP), P.O. Box 3640, D-7500 Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany (DE))

    1990-03-05

    Thin YBaCuO films have been deposited on ZrO{sub 2}(Y) and SrTiO{sub 3} substrates by a novel ablation method, using a pulsed intense electron beam generated by a pseudospark source. Films with zero resistance around 85 K were grown at substrate temperatures of 820 {degree}C with high reproducibility. X-ray analysis indicates highly textured growth on both substrates. {ital J}{sub {ital c}} values were 6{times}10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} at 4.2 K and 1.1{times}10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K. Because of the high simplicity of the deposition system and the variety of changeable parameters it represents an interesting alternative to existing laser ablation methods.

  12. Improving Consistency in Laser Ablation Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstwood, Matt; Gehrels, George; Bowring, James

    2010-07-01

    Workshop on Data Handling in LA-ICP-MS U-Th-Pb Geochronology; San Francisco, California, 12-13 December 2009; The use of uranium-thorium-lead (U-Th-Pb) laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) geochronology involves rapid analysis of U-and Th-rich accessory minerals. It routinely achieves 1-2% precision for U-Th-Pb dates constituting detrital mineral age spectra and for dating igneous and metamorphic events. The speed and low setup and analysis cost of LA-ICP-MS U-Th-Pb geochronology has led to a proliferation of active laboratories. Tens of thousands of analyses are produced per month, but there is little agreement on how to transform these data into accurate U-Th-Pb dates. Recent interlaboratory blind comparisons of zircon samples indicate that resolvable biases exist among laboratories and the sources of bias are not fully understood. Common protocols of data reduction and reporting are essential for scientists to be able to compare and interpret these data accurately.

  13. Femtosecond laser ablation properties of transparent materials: impact of the laser process parameters on the machining throughput

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matylitsky, V. V.; Hendricks, F.; Aus der Au, J.

    2013-03-01

    High average power, high repetition rate femtosecond lasers with μJ pulse energies are increasingly used for bio-medical and material processing applications. With the introduction of femtosecond laser systems such as the SpiritTM platform developed by High Q Lasers and Spectra-Physics, micro-processing of solid targets with femtosecond laser pulses have obtained new perspectives for industrial applications [1]. The unique advantage of material processing with subpicosecond lasers is efficient, fast and localized energy deposition, which leads to high ablation efficiency and accuracy in nearly all kinds of solid materials. The study on the impact of the laser processing parameters on the removal rate for transparent substrate using femtosecond laser pulses will be presented. In particular, examples of micro-processing of poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) - bio-degradable polyester and XensationTM glass (Schott) machined with SpiritTM ultrafast laser will be shown.

  14. Ablation enhancement of silicon by ultrashort double-pulse laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xin; Shin, Yung C. [Center for Laser-Based Manufacturing, School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    In this study, the ultrashort double-pulse ablation of silicon is investigated. An atomistic simulation model is developed to analyze the underlying physics. It is revealed that the double-pulse ablation could significantly increase the ablation rate of silicon, compared with the single pulse ablation with the same total pulse energy, which is totally different from the case of metals. In the long pulse delay range (over 1 ps), the enhancement is caused by the metallic transition of melted silicon with the corresponding absorption efficiency. At ultrashort pulse delay (below 1 ps), the enhancement is due to the electron excitation by the first pulse. The enhancement only occurs at low and moderate laser fluence. The ablation is suppressed at high fluence due to the strong plasma shielding effect.

  15. Laser Plasmas : Plasma dynamics from laser ablated solid lithium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debarati Bhattacharya

    2000-11-01

    Emission plasma plume generated by pulsed laser ablation of a lithium solid target by a ruby laser (694 nm, 20 ns, 3 J) was subjected to optical emission spectroscopy: time and space resolved optical emission was characterised as a function of distance from the target surface. Propagation of the plume was studied through ambient background of argon gas. Spectroscopic observations can, in general, be used to analyse plume structure with respect to an appropriate theoretical plasma model. The plume expansion dynamics in this case could be explained through a shock wave propagation model wherein, the experimental observations made were seen to fit well with the theoretical predictions. Spectral information derived from measurement of peak intensity and line width determined the parameters, electron temperature (e) and electron number density e, typically used to characterise laser produced plasma plume emission. These measurements were also used to validate the assumptions underlying the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model, invoked for the high density laser plasma under study. Some interesting results pertaining to the analysis of plume structure and spatio-temporal behaviour of e and e along the plume length will be presented and discussed.

  16. Estimation of Al2O3 critical temperature using a Langmuir probe in laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiaoui, K.; Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Messaoud Aberkane, S.; Kellou, A.

    2016-11-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has demonstrated its capacity in thin films growing under the moderate laser intensity. But when the laser intensity increases, the presence of droplets on the thin film limits the PLD efficiency such that the process needs an optimization study. In this way, an experimental study has been conducted in order to correlate between the appearance of those droplets and the laser fluence. The comprehension of the physical mechanism during ablation and the control of the deposition parameters allowed to get a safe process. Our experiment consists in measuring the amount of ejected matter from polycrystalline alumina target as a function of the laser fluence when irradiated by a KrF laser. According to laser fluence, several kinds of ablation regimes have been identified. Below a threshold value found as 12 J/cm2, the mechanism of ablation was assigned to normal evaporation, desorption and nonthermal processes. While above this threshold value, the mechanism of ablation was assigned to phase explosion phenomenon which is responsible of droplets formation when the surface temperature approaches the critical temperature T tc. A negative charge collector was used to collect the positive ions in the plume. Their times of flight (TOF) signal were used to estimate the appropriate T tc for alumina target. Ions yield, current as well as kinetic energy were deduced from the TOF signal. Their evolutions show the occurrence of an optical breakdown in the vapor plume which is well correlated with the onset of the phase explosion phenomenon. At 10 J/cm2, the ions velocities collected by the probe have been compared to those obtained from optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic and were discussed. To prove the occurrence of phase explosion by the appearance of droplets, several thin films were elaborated on Si (100) substrate at different laser fluence into vacuum. They have been characterized by scanning electron microscope. The results were well

  17. Observation of fs-laser spallative ablation using soft X-ray laser probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikino, Masaharu; Hasegawa, Noboru; Tomita, Takuro; Minami, Yasuo; Eyama, Takashi; Kakimoto, Naoya; Izutsu, Rui; Baba, Motoyoshi; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Suemoto, Tohru

    2017-03-01

    The initial stages of femtosecond laser ablation of gold were observed by single-shot soft X-ray laser interferometer and reflectometer. The ablation front surface and the spallation shell dome structure were observed from the results of the soft X-ray interferogram, reflective image, and shadowgraph. The formation and evolution of soft X-ray Newton's rings (NRs) were found by reflective imaging at the early stages of the ablation dynamics. The soft X-ray NRs are caused by the interference between the bulk ablated surface and nanometer-scale thin spallation layer. The spallation layer was kept at the late timing of the ablation dynamics, and the height of that reached over 100 μm. The temporal evolution of the bulk ablated surface was observed in the ablation dynamics. From these results, we have succeeded in obtaining the temporal evolution of the ablation front exfoliated from the gold surface.

  18. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of molybdenum carbide: Nanoparticles and thin film characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bonis, A.; Santagata, A.; Sansone, M.; Rau, J. V.; Mori, T.; Teghil, R.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we have used pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique to ablate a Mo2C target in vacuum by using an ultra-short pulse laser, with a 250 fs pulse duration, carrying out the study of both plasma and film characteristics. The aim of the work is to connect the film structure and morphology to the characteristics of the nanoparticles found in the plasma produced by the target ablation. To analyze the plasma we have used ICCD fast imaging and optical emission spectroscopy while the films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force spectroscopy. The obtained results have been interpreted considering an ablation model which justifies the emission of molten nanoparticles directly from the target.

  19. Single-shot femtosecond laser ablation on the nanoscale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, H.

    2013-01-01

    The use of femtosecond lasers as a tool for precise machining of nano-structures in materials has been steadily growing in recent years. In particular, It has been demonstrated that direct femtosecond laser ablation can be used to rapidly prototype photonic waveguide devices operating at optical tel

  20. Direct laser interference ablating nanostructures on organic crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Hong-Hua; Ding, Ran; Lu, Shi-Yang; Wang, Lei; Feng, Jing; Chen, Qi-Dai; Sun, Hong-Bo; Fang, Honghua

    2012-01-01

    Two-beam interference ablation of 1,4-Bis(4-methylstyryl) benzene organic crystal by short laser pulses (10 ns, 355 nm) is presented. The influence of laser fluence, interference period, and pulse number on the morphology have been studied. The morphology is closely associated with the molecular int

  1. Formation of nanostructures under femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashitkov, S I; Romashevskii, S A; Komarov, P S; Burmistrov, A A; Agranat, M B [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhakhovskii, V V [All-Russian Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Inogamov, N A [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-30

    We present the results of studying the morphology of the modified surface of aluminium, nickel and tantalum after ablation of the surface layer by a femtosecond laser pulse. The sizes of characteristic elements of a cellular nanostructure are found to correlate with thermo-physical properties of the material and the intensity of laser radiation. (superstrong light fields)

  2. Single-shot femtosecond laser ablation on the nanoscale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, H.

    2013-01-01

    The use of femtosecond lasers as a tool for precise machining of nano-structures in materials has been steadily growing in recent years. In particular, It has been demonstrated that direct femtosecond laser ablation can be used to rapidly prototype photonic waveguide devices operating at optical

  3. UV solid state laser ablation of intraocular lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopoulos, A.; Lagiou, D. P.; Evangelatos, Ch.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    Commercially available intraocular lenses (IOLs) are manufactured from silicone and acrylic, both rigid (e.g. PMMA) and foldable (hydrophobic or hydrophilic acrylic biomaterials), behaving different mechanical and optical properties. Recently, the use of apodizing technology to design new diffractive-refractive multifocals improved the refractive outcome of these intraocular lenses, providing good distant and near vision. There is also a major ongoing effort to refine laser refractive surgery to correct other defects besides conventional refractive errors. Using phakic IOLs to treat high myopia potentially provides better predictability and optical quality than corneal-based refractive surgery. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of laser ablation on IOL surface shaping, by drilling circular arrays of holes, with a homemade motorized rotation stage, and scattered holes on the polymer surface. In material science, the most popular lasers used for polymer machining are the UV lasers, and, therefore, we tried in this work the 3rd and the 5th harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ=355 nm and λ=213 nm respectively). The morphology of the ablated IOL surface was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM, Fei - Innova Nanoscope) at various laser parameters. Quantitative measurements were performed with a contact profilometer (Dektak-150), in which a mechanical stylus scanned across the surface of gold-coated IOLs (after SEM imaging) to measure variations in surface height and, finally, the ablation rates were also mathematically simulated for depicting the possible laser ablation mechanism(s). The experimental results and the theoretical modelling of UV laser interaction with polymeric IOLs are discussed in relation with the physical (optical, mechanical and thermal) properties of the material, in addition to laser radiation parameters (laser energy fluence, number of pulses). The qualitative aspects of laser ablation at λ=213 nm reveal a

  4. Heat effects of metals ablated with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Yoichi; Obara, Minoru

    2002-09-01

    Heat effects of metallic bulk crystals of Au, Ag, Cu, and Fe ablated with femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulses is experimentally studied. As a result of X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, the XRD peak signal of the area ablated with Ti:sapphire laser is much smaller than that of the crystalline metal sample. While the crystal form of the metal sample is crystalline before laser ablation, the crystal form in the ablated area is partially changed into the amorphous form. The residual pulse energy that did not contribute to the ablation process remains, which leads to the formation of thin layer of melted phase. The melted layer is abruptly cooled down not to be re-crystallized, but to transform into amorphous form. It is evident that the area ablated with femtosecond laser is changed into amorphous metals. This mechanism would be the same as the melt-quenching generally used as the fabrication method of amorphous metals. This experimental result is consistent with the theoretical result.

  5. Laser systems for ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Uwe; Haedersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) creates microscopic vertical ablated channels that are surrounded by a thin layer of coagulated tissue, constituting the microscopic treatment zones (MTZs). AFR induces epidermal and dermal remodeling, which raises new possibilities for the treatment of a var...

  6. Structure and Electrical Properties of NdBa2Cu3Oy Thin Films by Laser Ablation at Low Oxygen Partial Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mozhaev, Peter B.; Mozhaeva, Julia; Khoryushin, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    A deposition process for NdBa2Cu3Oy thin films by laser ablation at decreased deposition temperature was developed using substitution of oxygen with argon in the chamber during deposition. A low deposition rate is the crucial factor to obtain high-quality NBCO films. The Nd/Ba cation disorder...

  7. Tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3-x}) nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser ablation in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreca, F., E-mail: process@anmresearch.it [Advanced, Nano Materials Research s.r.l, Viale F. Stagno d' Alcontres 31, I-98166, Messina (Italy); Acacia, N. [Dipartimento di Fisica della Materia e Ingegneria Elettronica, Universita di Messina, Viale F. Stagno d' Alcontres 31, I-98166, Messina (Italy); Spadaro, S.; Curro, G. [Advanced, Nano Materials Research s.r.l, Viale F. Stagno d' Alcontres 31, I-98166, Messina (Italy); Neri, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica della Materia e Ingegneria Elettronica, Universita di Messina, Viale F. Stagno d' Alcontres 31, I-98166, Messina (Italy)

    2011-05-16

    Research highlights: {yields} First time prepared, by laser ablation in water, WO{sub x} nanoparticles (NPs). {yields} Nearly 60% of almost stoichiometric (x = 2.9), small size (2-6 nm) NPs plus 80-100 nm aggregates. {yields} A plasma shielding effect occurs at high laser fluence. {yields} Modulation of optical gap with the NPs size. {yields} Potential scalability of the production technique. - Abstract: Tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 2.9}) nanoparticles were prepared, to our knowledge for the first time, by pulsed laser ablation in distilled water. The experiments were performed irradiating a tungsten target with a second harmonic (532 nm) Nd:YAG laser beam varying the operative fluence between 1 and 7 J cm{sup -2} and the ablation time up to 120 min. As evidenced by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), at all investigated fluences, small nanostructures of 2-6 nm were accompanied by larger particles with a diameter of about 10-20 nm and aggregates of about 80-100 nm. A plasma shielding effect was evidenced upon increasing the laser fluence, while if the ablation time is increased the amount of particles increases as well, supporting the scalability of the production technique. The deposited nanoparticles stoichiometry has been verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), while the optical bandgap values were determined by UV-vis optical absorption measurements.

  8. Controlled Contamination of Epoxy Composites with PDMS and Removal by Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Frank; Ledesma, Rodolfo; Cataldo, Daniel; Lin, Yi; Wohl, Christopher; Gupta, Mool; Connell, John

    2016-01-01

    Surface preparation is critical to the performance of adhesively bonded composites. During manufacturing, minute quantities of mold release compounds are inevitably deposited on faying surfaces and may compromise bond performance. To ensure safety, mechanical fasteners and other crack arrest features must be installed in the bondlines of primary structures, which negates some advantages of adhesively bonded construction. Laser ablation is an automated, repeatable, and scalable process with high potential for the surface preparation of metals and composites in critical applications such as primary airframe structures. In this study, laser ablation is evaluated on composite surfaces for the removal of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a common mold release material. Composite panels were contaminated uniformly with PDMS film thicknesses as low as 6.0 nm as measured by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. Bond performance was assessed by mechanical testing using a 250 F cure, epoxy adhesive and compared with pre-bond surface inspection results. Water contact angle, optically stimulated electron emission, and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy were used to characterize contaminated and laser ablated surfaces. The failure mode obtained from double cantilever beam tests correlated well with surface characterization data. The test results indicated that even low levels of PDMS were not completely removed by laser ablation.

  9. Pulsed laser deposition and characterization of Alnico5 magnetic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, M.Z., E-mail: mzbutt49@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Ali, Dilawar [Department of Physics, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Fayyaz [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan); Magnetophotonics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-01

    Alnico5 films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition on glass substrate at room temperature under a vacuum ∼10{sup −3} Torr in the absence and in the presence of 500 Oe external transverse magnetic field applied on the plasma plume during film deposition. For this purpose, Nd:YAG laser was employed to ablate the Alnico5 target. The ablated material was deposited on glass substrate placed at a distance of 2 cm from the target. The structural and magnetic properties of the film were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscope, and vibrating sample magnetometer. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the Alnico5 films were amorphous in nature. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the Alnico5 film deposited in absence of external magnetic field has larger root-mean-square roughness value (60.2 nm) than the magnetically deposited film (42.9 nm). Vibrating sample magnetometer measurements showed that the in-plane saturation magnetization of Alnico5 film deposited in the presence of external magnetic field increases by 32% as compared to that for the film deposited in the absence of external magnetic field. However, the out-of-plane saturation magnetization was almost independent of the external magnetic field. In magnetically deposited film, there is in-plane anisotropy parallel to the applied external magnetic field.

  10. Ultraviolet laser deposition of graphene thin films without catalytic layers

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.

    2013-01-09

    In this letter, the formation of nanostructured graphene by ultraviolet laser ablation of a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite target under optimized conditions is demonstrated, without a catalytic layer, and a model for the growth process is proposed. Previously, graphene film deposition by low-energy laser (2.3 eV) was explained by photo-thermal models, which implied that graphene films cannot be deposited by laser energies higher than the C-C bond energy in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (3.7 eV). Here, we show that nanostructured graphene films can in fact be deposited using ultraviolet laser (5 eV) directly over different substrates, without a catalytic layer. The formation of graphene is explained by bond-breaking assisted by photoelectronic excitation leading to formation of carbon clusters at the target and annealing out of defects at the substrate.

  11. Corneal surface morphology following excimer laser ablation with humidified gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, R R; Campos, M; Wang, X W; Lee, M; McDonnell, P J

    1993-08-01

    To compare the effects of blowing dry (nitrogen or helium) and humidified gases over the corneal surface during photorefractive keratectomy. Excimer laser myopic ablations were performed on porcine eyes (10 per group) using humidified and dry nitrogen and helium gas under ambient conditions. Surface smoothness was quantified with light and electron microscopy. Corneas that were ablated using humidified gas were smooth and equivalent to those ablated under ambient conditions. Dry nitrogen and helium blowing resulted in increased surface irregularity evident on light and electron microscopy (P excimer laser corneal ablation produces a smoother surface than does the blowing of dry gas and is comparable to that produced under ambient (no blowing) conditions. Maintaining corneal moisture is important in photorefractive keratectomy. If blowing gas is necessary to remove debris from the surface, the gas should be humidified.

  12. Thermal ablation of liver metastases from colorectal cancer: radiofrequency, microwave and laser ablation therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Thomas J; Farshid, Parviz; Naguib, Nagy N N; Darvishi, Abbas; Bazrafshan, Babak; Mbalisike, Emmanuel; Burkhard, Thorsten; Zangos, Stephan

    2014-07-01

    Surgery is currently considered the treatment of choice for patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) when resectable. The majority of these patients can also benefit from systemic chemotherapy. Recently, local or regional therapies such as thermal ablations have been used with acceptable outcomes. We searched the medical literature to identify studies and reviews relevant to radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave (MW) ablation and laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) in terms of local progression, survival indexes and major complications in patients with CRLM. Reviewed literature showed a local progression rate between 2.8 and 29.7 % of RF-ablated liver lesions at 12-49 months follow-up, 2.7-12.5 % of MW ablated lesions at 5-19 months follow-up and 5.2 % of lesions treated with LITT at 6-month follow-up. Major complications were observed in 4-33 % of patients treated with RF ablation, 0-19 % of patients treated with MW ablation and 0.1-3.5 % of lesions treated with LITT. Although not significantly different, the mean of 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates for RF-, MW- and laser ablated lesions was (92.6, 44.7, 31.1 %), (79, 38.6, 21 %) and (94.2, 61.5, 29.2 %), respectively. The median survival in these methods was 33.2, 29.5 and 33.7 months, respectively. Thermal ablation may be an appropriate alternative in patients with CRLM who have inoperable liver lesions or have operable lesions as an adjunct to resection. However, further competitive evaluation should clarify the efficacy and priority of these therapies in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases.

  13. Nanometer thickness laser ablation for spatial control of cell attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thissen, H.; Hayes, J. P.; Kingshott, P.; Johnson, G.; Harvey, E. C.; Griesser, H. J.

    2002-10-01

    We demonstrate here a new method to control the location of cells on surfaces in two dimensions, which can be applied to a number of biomedical applications including diagnostic tests and tissue engineered medical devices. Two-dimensional control over cell attachment is achieved by generation of a spatially controlled surface chemistry that allows control over protein adsorption, a process which mediates cell attachment. Here, we describe the deposition of thin allylamine plasma polymer coatings on silicon wafer and perfluorinated poly(ethylene-co-propylene) substrates, followed by grafting of a protein resistant layer of poly(ethylene oxide). Spatially controlled patterning of the surface chemistry was achieved in a fast, one-step procedure by nanometer thickness controlled laser ablation using a 248 nm excimer laser. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to confirm the production of surface chemistry patterns with a resolution of approximately 1 µm, which is significantly below the dimensions of a single mammalian cell. Subsequent adsorption of the extracellular matrix proteins collagen I and fibronectin followed by cell culture experiments using bovine corneal epithelial cells confirmed that cell attachment is controlled by the surface chemistry pattern. The method is an effective tool for use in a number of in vitro and in vivo applications.

  14. Langmuir probe study of plasma expansion in pulsed laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.N.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    Langmuir probes were used to monitor the asymptotic expansion of the plasma produced by the laser ablation of a silver target in a vacuum. The measured angular and temporal distributions of the ion flux and electron temperature were found to be in good agreement with the self-similar isentropic...... and adiabatic solution of the gas dynamics equations describing the expansion. The value of the adiabatic index gamma was about 1.25, consistent with the ablation plume being a low temperature plasma....

  15. Resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion in vacuum and argon gas backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindley, R.A. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This thesis discusses the following on resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion: Introduction to laser ablation; applications of laser ablation; The study of plume expansion; holographic interferometry; resonant holographic interferometry; accounting for finite laser bandwidth; The solution for doppler broadening and finite bandwidth; the main optical table; the lumonics laser spot shape; developing and reconstructing the holograms; plume expansion in RF/Plasma Environments; Determining {lambda}{sub o}; resonant refraction effects; fringe shift interpretation; shot-to-shot consistency; laser ablation in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; theoretically modeling plume expansion in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; and laser ablation in higher pressure, inert, background gas.

  16. Gold in the Brunswick No. 12 volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit, Bathurst Mining Camp, Canada: Evidence from bulk ore analysis and laser ablation ICP-MS data on sulfide phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenaghan, Sean H.; Lentz, David R.; Martin, Jillian; Diegor, Wilfredo G.

    2009-07-01

    The 329-Mt Brunswick No. 12 volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit (total resource of 163 Mt at 10.4% Zn, 4.2% Pb, 0.34% Cu, and 115 g/t Ag) is hosted within a Middle Ordovician bimodal volcanic and sedimentary sequence. Massive sulfides are for the most part syngenetic, and the bulk of the sulfide ore occurs as a Zn-Pb-rich banded sulfide facies that forms an intimate relationship with a laterally extensive Algoma-type iron formation and defines the Brunswick Horizon. Zone refining of stratiform sulfides is considered to have resulted in the development of a large replacement-style Cu-rich basal sulfide facies, which is generally confined between the banded sulfide facies and an underlying stringer sulfide zone. Complex polyphase deformation and associated lower- to upper-greenschist facies regional metamorphism is responsible for the present geometry of the deposit. Textural modification has resulted in a general increase in grain size through the development of pyrite and arsenopyrite porphyroblasts, which tend to overprint primary mineral assemblages. Despite the heterogeneous ductile deformation, primary features have locally been preserved, such as fine-grained colloform pyrite and base and precious metal zonation within the Main Zone. Base metal and trace element abundances in massive sulfides from the Brunswick No. 12 deposit indicate two distinct geochemical associations. The basal sulfide facies, characterized by a proximal high-temperature hydrothermal signature (Cu-Co-Bi-Se), contains generally low Au contents averaging 0.39 ppm ( n = 34). Conversely, Au is enriched in the banded sulfide facies, averaging 1.1 ppm Au ( n = 21), and is associated with an exhalative suite of elements (Zn-Pb-As-Sb-Ag-Sn). Finely laminated sulfide lenses hosted by iron formation at the north end of the Main Zone are further enriched in Au, averaging 1.7 ppm ( n = 41) and ranging up to 8.2 ppm. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analyses of

  17. Pulsed laser ablation of dental calculus in the near ultraviolet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenly, Joshua E; Seka, Wolf; Rechmann, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Pulsed lasers emitting wavelengths near 400 nm can selectively ablate dental calculus without damaging underlying and surrounding sound dental hard tissue. Our results indicate that calculus ablation at this wavelength relies on the absorption of porphyrins endogenous to oral bacteria commonly found in calculus. Sub- and supragingival calculus on extracted human teeth, irradiated with 400-nm, 60-ns laser pulses at ≤8  J/cm2, exhibits a photobleached surface layer. Blue-light microscopy indicates this layer highly scatters 400-nm photons, whereas fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that bacterial porphyrins are permanently photobleached. A modified blow-off model for ablation is proposed that is based upon these observations and also reproduces our calculus ablation rates measured from laser profilometry. Tissue scattering and a stratified layering of absorbers within the calculus medium explain the gradual decrease in ablation rate from successive pulses. Depending on the calculus thickness, ablation stalling may occur at <5  J/cm2 but has not been observed above this fluence.

  18. Influence of laser ablation parameters on trueness of imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaculovič, T.; Warchilová, T. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, Brno 61137 (Czech Republic); CEITEC, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, Brno 62500 (Czech Republic); Čadková, Z.; Száková, J.; Tlustoš, P. [Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcka 129, Praha 16521 (Czech Republic); Otruba, V. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, Brno 61137 (Czech Republic); Kanický, V., E-mail: viktork@chemi.muni.cz [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, Brno 61137 (Czech Republic); CEITEC, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, Brno 62500 (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Laser ablation conditions vs. quality of LA-ICP-MS imaging (resolution, detection). • Increase in laser spot size improves detection limit, while deteriorates resolution. • Decrease in scan speed improves resolution but prolongs time of analysis. • Compromise spot size and scan speed meet required quality of imaging. • Metal-enriched/depleted zones in tapeworm sections were resolved by LA-ICP-MS. - Abstract: Influence of laser ablation conditions on limit of detection, spatial resolution and time of analysis was studied for laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) applied to elemental mapping. Laser repetition rate and laser fluence were investigated in tapeworm thin section to attain optimum ablation rate, yielding appropriately low detection limit which complies with elemental contents in the tissue. Effect of combinations of laser spot size and scan speed on relative broadening (Δw{sub rel}) of image of the ablated pattern (line) was investigated with the aim to quantify the trueness of imaging. Ink lines printed on paper were employed for the study of influence of spot size and scan speed on limit of detection, relative broadening of elemental image and duration of elemental mapping. An uneven distribution of copper in a printed line (coffee stain effect) was observed. The Δw{sub rel} is strongly reduced (down to 2%) at low scan speed (10 μm s{sup −1}) and laser spot diameter of 10 μm but resulting in unacceptably long time of mapping (up to 3000 min). Finally, tapeworm thin-section elemental maps (4 mm × 5 mm) were obtained at the laser spot diameter of 65 μm and the scan speed of 65 μm s{sup −1} within 100 min. A dissimilar lateral distribution of Pb was observed in comparison with that of Cu or Zn due to different pathways of element uptake.

  19. Structure and morphology of laser-ablated WO{sub 3} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, O.M.; Swapnasmitha, A.S. [Sri Venkateswara University, Department of Physics, Tirupati (India); John, J.; Pinto, R. [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India)

    2005-11-01

    The structure and surface morphology of WO{sub 3} thin films deposited by a laser-ablation technique have been found to be strongly dependent on the deposition conditions and the nature of the substrate. By precisely controlling the substrate temperature and the oxygen partial pressure, amorphous, polycrystalline, nano-crystalline and iso-epitaxial WO{sub 3} thin films were successfully grown. The structure and surface morphological features of the films from X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy data are described in relation to the deposition conditions. (orig.)

  20. Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Measuring Uranium Isotopes in Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hartig, Kyle C.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-05-30

    We present the first two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy measurements of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plasmas. A new method of signal normalization is presented to reduce noise in absorption-based measurements of laser ablation.

  1. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing helps treat restrictive pediatric scar contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowski, Andrew C; Goldenberg, Alina; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Murray, Jill-Peck; Shumaker, Peter R

    2014-12-01

    Conventional management of debilitating pediatric scar contractures, including hand therapy and surgery, may often be beset by delayed treatment, suboptimal results, and additional surgical morbidity. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing is an emerging adjunctive procedural option for scar contractures because of its promising efficacy and safety profile. However, its use to improve function has not been studied in the pediatric population. Herein we report 2 pediatric patients with recalcitrant scar contractures, causing persistent functional deficits, treated with an ablative fractional laser protocol. Both patients experienced rapid and cumulative subjective and objective improvements in range of motion and function as measured by an independent occupational therapist without reported complications. We highlight ablative fractional laser resurfacing as a novel and promising tool in the management of function-limiting scar contractures in children and propose that the technique be incorporated into existing scar treatment paradigms, guided by future research.

  2. Near-field mapping by laser ablation of PMMA coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kostiucenko, Oksana

    The optical near-field of lithography-defined gold nanostructures, arranged into regular arrays on a gold film, is characterized via ablation of a polymer coating by laser illumination. The method utilizes femto-second laser pulses from a laser scanning microscope which induces electrical field...... that the different stages in the ablation process can be controlled and characterized making the technique suitable for characterizing optical near-fields of metal nanostructures....... enhancements on and around the gold nanostructures. At the positions of the enhancements, the ablation threshold of the polymer coating is significantly lowered creating subdiffractional topographic modifications on the surface which are quantified via scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy...

  3. Near-field mapping by laser ablation of PMMA coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kostiucenko, Oksana

    The optical near-field of lithography-defined gold nanostructures, arranged into regular arrays on a gold film, is characterized via ablation of a polymer coating by laser illumination. The method utilizes femto-second laser pulses from a laser scanning microscope which induces electrical field...... that the different stages in the ablation process can be controlled and characterized making the technique suitable for characterizing optical near-fields of metal nanostructures....... enhancements on and around the gold nanostructures. At the positions of the enhancements, the ablation threshold of the polymer coating is significantly lowered creating sub-diffractional topographic modifications on the surface which are quantified via scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy...

  4. UV-laser ablation of sensory cells in living insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhr, G.; Ronacher, B.; Krahe, R.; Fest, S.; Shirley, S. G.; Rogaschewski, S.

    An experimental set-up for applying pulsed UV-laser ablation to the integument of insects and the high precision of ablation is demonstrated. In order to test for possible detrimental effects on physiological responses, this technique was applied to the ears of migratory locust (Locusta migratoria L.). The handling of living insects, the survival, and physiological response after treatment are described. We selectively interrupted the d-receptor of the tympanal organ, which is the receptor system responsible for the locust's sensitivity in the high-frequency range (>10 kHz). The effects of the laser treatment were tested by determining hearing thresholds in electrophysiological recordings from the tympanal nerves. In agreement with the literature, the interruption of the d-receptors led to a significant shift towards higher values of the thresholds in the high-frequency range. Future perspectives and biological applications of UV-laser ablation are discussed.

  5. Glass particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MSmeasurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J.; Liu, C.; Wen, S.; Mao, X.; Russo, R.E.

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (266nm) was used to generate glass particles from two sets of standard reference materials using femtosecond (150fs) and nanosecond (4ns) laser pulses with identical fluences of 50 J cm{sup -2}. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the collected particles revealed that there are more and larger agglomerations of particles produced by nanosecond laser ablation. In contrast to the earlier findings for metal alloy samples, no correlation between the concentration of major elements and the median particle size was found. When the current data on glass were compared with the metal alloy data, there were clear differences in terms of particle size, crater depth, heat affected zone, and ICP-MS response. For example, glass particles were larger than metal alloy particles, the craters in glass were less deep than craters in metal alloys, and damage to the sample was less pronounced in glass compared to metal alloys samples. The femtosecond laser generated more intense ICP-MS signals compared to nanosecond laser ablation for both types of samples, although glass sample behavior was more similar between ns and fs-laser ablation than for metals alloys.

  6. Thermalization of a UV laser ablation plume in a background gas: From a directed to a diffusionlike flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, S.; Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    Combined diagnostic measurements of deposition rates and ion time-of-flight signals have been employed to study the expansion of a laser ablation plume into a background gas. With increasing gas pressure the angular distribution of the collected ablated atoms becomes broader, while the total....... In the high-pressure regime the expansion can be described by a simple model based on diffusion from a confined plume....

  7. Two-phase zirconium boride thin film obtained by ultra-short pulsed laser ablation of a ZrB{sub 12} target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bonis, A., E-mail: angela.debonis@unibas.it [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 10 -85100 Potenza (Italy); Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, U.O.S. di Potenza, C.da Santa Loja, 85010 Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy); Santagata, A. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, U.O.S. di Potenza, C.da Santa Loja, 85010 Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy); Rau, J.V. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Latini, A. [Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Dipartimento di Chimica, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5 -00185 Rome (Italy); Mori, T. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) WPI Materials Nanoarchitectonics Center (MANA), Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Medici, L. [Istituto di Metodologie per le Analisi Ambientali, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, U.O.S. di Potenza, C.da Santa Loja, 85010 Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy); Teghil, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 10 -85100 Potenza (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Two-phase zirconium boride thin films have been obtained by ultra-short pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of a zirconium dodecaboride (ZrB{sub 12}) target performed in vacuum. The ablation source was a frequency doubled (λ = 527 nm) Nd:glass laser with a pulse duration of 250 fs. Laser induced plasma has been studied by ICCD imaging and time and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES), whereas the deposited films have been characterized by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-Ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The film morphology and composition have been interpreted on the basis of the laser ablation mechanism.

  8. Aerospace Laser Ignition/Ablation Variable High Precision Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jonathan W. (Inventor); Edwards, David L. (Inventor); Campbell, Jason J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A laser ignition/ablation propulsion system that captures the advantages of both liquid and solid propulsion. A reel system is used to move a propellant tape containing a plurality of propellant material targets through an ignition chamber. When a propellant target is in the ignition chamber, a laser beam from a laser positioned above the ignition chamber strikes the propellant target, igniting the propellant material and resulting in a thrust impulse. The propellant tape is advanced, carrying another propellant target into the ignition chamber. The propellant tape and ignition chamber are designed to ensure that each ignition event is isolated from the remaining propellant targets. Thrust and specific impulse may by precisely controlled by varying the synchronized propellant tape/laser speed. The laser ignition/ablation propulsion system may be scaled for use in small and large applications.

  9. Pulsed laser ablation of polymers for display applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedder, James E. A.; Holmes, Andrew S.; Booth, Heather J.

    2008-02-01

    Laser micromachining by ablation is a well established technique used for the production of 2.5D and 3D features in a wide variety of materials. The fabrication of stepped, multi-level, structures can be achieved using a number of binary mask projection techniques using excimer lasers. Alternatively, direct-writing of complex 2.5D features can easily be achieved with solid-state lasers. Excimer laser ablation using half-tone masks allows almost continuous surface relief and the generation of features with low surface roughness. We have developed techniques to create large arrays of repeating micro-optical structures on polymer substrates. Here, we show our recent developments in laser structuring with the combination of half-tone and binary mask techniques.

  10. Pulsed laser deposition of metal films and nanoparticles in vacuum using subnanosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeev, R A; Chakravarty, U; Naik, P A; Srivastava, H; Mukherjee, C; Tiwari, M K; Nandedkar, R V; Gupta, P D

    2007-03-10

    A study of silver, chromium, stainless-steel, and indium thin films prepared by subnanosecond laser deposition in vacuum is reported. We compare the laser ablation in vacuum at the weak- and tight-focusing conditions of a Ti:sapphire laser beam and analyze the nanoparticles synthesized in the latter case using absorption spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Our results show that the nanoparticle formation can be accomplished using long laser pulses under tight-focusing conditions.

  11. Enthalpy model for heating, melting, and vaporization in laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilios Alexiades

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser ablation is used in a growing number of applications in various areas including medicine, archaeology, chemistry, environmental and materials sciences. In this work the heat transfer and phase change phenomena during nanosecond laser ablation of a copper (Cu target in a helium (He background gas at atmospheric pressure are presented. An enthalpy model is outlined, which accounts for heating, melting, and vaporization of the target. As far as we know, this is the first model that connects the thermodynamics and underlying kinetics of this challenging phase change problem in a self-consistent way.

  12. Femtosecond laser bone ablation with a high repetition rate fiber laser source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Luke J; Alt, Clemens; Turcotte, Raphaël; Masek, Marissa; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Côté, Daniel C; Xu, Chris; Intini, Giuseppe; Lin, Charles P

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to perform very precise cutting of material, including biological samples from subcellular organelles to large areas of bone, through plasma-mediated ablation. The use of a kilohertz regenerative amplifier is usually needed to obtain the pulse energy required for ablation. This work investigates a 5 megahertz compact fiber laser for near-video rate imaging and ablation in bone. After optimization of ablation efficiency and reduction in autofluorescence, the system is demonstrated for the in vivo study of bone regeneration. Image-guided creation of a bone defect and longitudinal evaluation of cellular injury response in the defect provides insight into the bone regeneration process.

  13. Thermal melting and ablation of silicon by femtosecond laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I., E-mail: sikudr@lebedev.ru; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Bunkin, A. F.; Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-15

    The space-time dynamics of thermal melting, subsurface cavitation, spallative ablation, and fragmentation ablation of the silicon surface excited by single IR femtosecond laser pulses is studied by timeresolved optical reflection microscopy. This dynamics is revealed by monitoring picosecond and (sub)nanosecond oscillations of probe pulse reflection, which is modulated by picosecond acoustic reverberations in the dynamically growing surface melt subjected to ablation and having another acoustic impedance, and by optical interference between the probe pulse replicas reflected by the spalled layer surface and the layer retained on the target surface. The acoustic reverberation periods change during the growth and ablation of the surface melt film, which makes it possible to quantitatively estimate the contributions of these processes to the thermal dynamics of the material surface. The results on the thermal dynamics of laser excitation are supported by dynamic measurements of the ablation parameters using noncontact ultrasonic diagnostics, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and optical interference microscopy of the modified regions appearing on the silicon surface after ablation.

  14. Photoluminescence from Silicon Nano-Particles Synthesized by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, V.; Thareja, R. K.

    We report on the synthesis and characterization of silicon nanoparticles by ablating silicon wafer in an ambient atmosphere of helium at 1 Torr. The mean cluster size ranging from 1.8 nm to 4.4 nm deposited on silicon substrate at room temperature is observed to depend on the laser fluence. The size of the nanoparticles decreases with laser fluence. Photoluminescence of the deposited films using Nd:YAG laser and Ar+ ion laser at 355 nm and 457.9 nm respectively shows emission peaks at 1.7, 2.2, and 2.7 eV. The luminescence peak at 2.2 eV and 2.7 eV are attributed to oxygen related impurities and the peak at 1.7 eV is attributed to quantum confinement.

  15. Silver nanoparticles generated by pulsed laser ablation in supercritical CO2 medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machmudah, Siti; Sato, Takayuki; Wahyudiono; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) has been widely employed in industrial and biological applications and in other fields. The environmental conditions in which PLA is conducted are important parameters that affect both the solid particle cloud and the deposition produced by the plume. In this work, the generation of nanoparticles (NPs) has been developed by performing PLA of silver (Ag) plates in a supercritical CO2 medium. Ag NPs were successfully generated by allowing the selective generation of clusters. Laser ablation was performed with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm under various pressures and temperatures of CO2 medium. On the basis of the experimental result, both surface of the irradiated Ag plate and structure of Ag NPs were significantly affected by the changes in supercritical CO2 pressure and temperature. With increasing irradiation pressure, plume deposited in the surrounding crater created by the ablation was clearly observed. In Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) the image of the generated Ag NPs on the silicon wafer and the morphology of Ag particles were basically a sphere-like structure. Ag particles contain NPs with large-varied diameter ranging from 5 nm to 1.2 μm. The bigger Ag NPs melted during the ablation process and then ejected smaller spherical Ag NPs, which formed nanoclusters attached on the molten Ag NPs. The smaller Ag NPs were also formed around the bigger Ag NPs. Based on the results, this new method can also be used to obtain advanced nano-structured materials.

  16. Solution Based Deposition of Polyimide Ablators for NIF Capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, R

    2002-07-11

    Between June 1997 and March 2002 Luxel Corporation was contracted to explore the possibility of preparing NIF scale capsules with polyimide ablators using solution-based techniques. This work offered a potential alternative to a vapor deposition approach talking place at LLNL. The motivation for pursuing the solution-based approach was primarily two-fold. First, it was expected that much higher strength capsules (relative to vapor deposition) could be prepared since the solution precursors were known to produce high strength films. Second, in applying the ablator as a fluid it was expected that surface tension effects would lead to very smooth surfaces. These potential advantages were offset by expected difficulties, primary among them that the capsules would need to be levitated in some fashion (for example acoustically) during coating and processing, and that application of the coating uniformly to thicknesses of 150 pm on levitated capsules would be difficult. Because of the expected problems with the coupling of levitation and coating, most of the initial effort was to develop coating and processing techniques on stalk-mounted capsules. The program had some success. Using atomizer spray techniques in which application of {approx}5 {micro}m fluid coatings were alternated with heating to remove solvent resulted in up to 70 {micro}m thick coatings that were reasonably smooth at short wavelengths, and showed only about a 1 {micro}m thickness variation over long wavelengths. More controlled deposition with an inkjet devise was also developed. However difficult technical problems remained, and these problems coupled with the relative success of the vapor deposition approach led to the termination of the solution-based work in 2002. What follows is a compilation of the progress reports submitted by Luxel for this work which spanned a number of separate contracts. The reports are arranged chronologically, the last report in the collection has a modest summary of what

  17. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Díaz, M.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  18. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena-Diaz, M; Ponce, L; Arronte, M; Flores, T [Laboratorio TecnologIa Laser, CICATA-IPN, Unidad Altamira, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Ind. Altamira, 89600, TAMPS (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  19. Production of nanoparticles from natural hydroxylapatite by laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutinguiza Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Laser ablation of solids in liquids technique has been used to obtain colloidal nanoparticles from biological hydroxylapatite using pulsed as well as a continuous wave (CW laser. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM measurements revealed the formation of spherical particles with size distribution ranging from few nanometers to hundred nanometers and irregular submicronic particles. High resolution TEM showed that particles obtained by the use of pulsed laser were crystalline, while those obtained by the use of CW laser were amorphous. The shape and size of particles are consistent with the explosive ejection as formation mechanism.

  20. Femtosecond laser surface ablation of transparent solids: understanding the bulk filamentation damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Joglekar, A.; Mourou, G.; Ionin, A. A.; Zvorykin, V. D.; Hunt, A. J.

    2007-06-01

    Direct SEM examination reveals a complex nanoscale structure of deep narrow central channels within shallow wide external craters produced by single-shot high-intensity femtosecond laser radiation on Corning 0211 glass and sapphire surfaces. These internal narrow channels are not expected from ordinary surface melt spallation and expulsion processes characteristic of the external surface nanocraters, but exhibit nearly the same appearance threshold. Surprisingly, the nanochannel radiuses rapidly saturate versus incident laser intensity indicating bulk rather than surface character of laser energy deposition, in contrast to the external craters extending versus laser intensity in a regular manner. These facts may be explained by channeling of electromagnetic radiation by near-surface ablative filamentary propagation of intense femtosecond laser pulses in the highly electronically excited dielectrics, by spherical aberrations in the surface layer, or deep drilling of the samples by short-wavelength Bremsstrahlung radiation of relatively hot surface electron-hole or electron-ion plasma. The double structure of ablated surface nano-features is consistent with similar structures observed for bulk damage features fabricated by femtosecond laser pulses at supercritical laser powers, but much lower laser intensities.

  1. Setup for functional cell ablation with lasers: coupling of a laser to a microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Sean T; Hidalgo, Alicia; de Belle, J Steven; Keshishian, Haig

    2012-06-01

    The selective removal of cells by ablation is a powerful tool in the study of eukaryotic developmental biology, providing much information about their origin, fate, or function in the developing organism. In Drosophila, three main methods have been used to ablate cells: chemical, genetic, and laser ablation. Each method has its own applicability with regard to developmental stage and the cells to be ablated, and its own limitations. The primary advantage of laser-based ablation is the flexibility provided by the method: The operations can be performed in any cell pattern and at any time in development. Laser-based techniques permit manipulation of structures within cells, even to the molecular level. They can also be used for gene activation. However, laser ablation can be expensive, labor-intensive, and time-consuming. Although live cells can be difficult to image in Drosophila embryos, the use of vital fluorescent imaging methods has made laser-mediated cell manipulation methods more appealing; the methods are relatively straightforward. This article provides the information necessary for setting up and using a laser microscope for lasesr ablation studies.

  2. Fast photography of plasma formed by laser ablation of aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedanovska, E.; Ivkovic, M.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present results of the temporal and spatial analysis of laser induced plasma performed by use of ICCD fast photography. The plasma is formed by excimer laser ablation of aluminum target in vacuum, air or different pressures of argon and helium. It is shown how the plasma luminous intensity and duration depends on gas pressure. The obtained time dependence of wave propagation distance is also compared with predictions given by the blast wave and drag-force theory also.

  3. Zinc nanoparticles in solution by laser ablation technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Singh; R Gopal

    2007-06-01

    Colloidal zinc metallic nanoparticles are synthesized using pulsed laser ablation of metal plate in an aqueous solution of suitable surfactant to prevent aggregation. UV-visible absorption, TEM, small angle X-ray diffraction and wide-angle X-ray diffraction are used for the characterization of colloidal zinc metallic nanoparticles. Colloidal nanoparticles are found highly stable for a long time.

  4. Laser ablation assisted adhesive bonding of automotive structural composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeman, R.G.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Warren, C.D.

    1999-07-03

    Laser ablation has been evaluated as a surface pretreatment prior to adhesive bonding. In prior experimental work, it was observed that when adhesively bonded, composite, single lap shear samples fail, the fracture often occurs at either the adhesive/adherend interface or in the resin rich surface layer of the composite. These two areas represent the weakest portion of the joint. Laser ablation pretreatment generates areas where the resin on the composite surface is selectively removed leaving behind exposed reinforcing fibers which are the major load bearing members of the composite. In a subsequent adhesive bonding operation, this allows portions of the fibers to be encapsulated in the adhesive while other portions of the fiber remain in the composite resin. This type of pretreatment permits fibers to bridge and reinforce the interface between adhesive and adherend. A secondary benefit is the removal of surface contaminantes by pyrolysis. Microscopic observation of laser ablated surfaces indicates a prominent, fiber rich area. Results of the mechanical evaluation indicated that the lap shear strength for laser ablated samples was significantly higher than specimens with no pretreatment or with solvent cleaning only, but were slightly lower than specimens that were mechanically roughened and cleaned with solvents prior to bonding.

  5. Ins and outs of endovenous laser ablation: Afterthoughts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A.M. Neumann (Martino); M.J.C. van Gemert (Martin)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPhysicists and medical doctors "speak" different languages. Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a good example in which technology is essential to guide the doctor to the final result: optimal treatment. However, for the doctor, it is by far insufficient just to turn on the knobs of the

  6. Ins and outs of endovenous laser ablation: Afterthoughts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A.M. Neumann (Martino); M.J.C. van Gemert (Martin)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPhysicists and medical doctors "speak" different languages. Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a good example in which technology is essential to guide the doctor to the final result: optimal treatment. However, for the doctor, it is by far insufficient just to turn on the knobs of the

  7. Femtosecond laser ablation of gold interdigitated electrodes for electronic tongues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoli, Alexandra; de Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Filho, José A.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Riul, Antonio; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Correa, Daniel S.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic tongue (e-tongue) sensors based on impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a potential technology to evaluate the quality and chemical composition of food, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. E-tongues usually employ transducers based on metal interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) coated with a thin layer of an active material, which is capable of interacting chemically with several types of analytes. IDEs are usually produced by photolithographic methods, which are time-consuming and costly, therefore, new fabrication technologies are required to make it more affordable. Here, we employed femtosecond laser ablation with pulse duration of 50 fs to microfabricate gold IDEs having finger width from 2.3 μm up to 3.2 μm. The parameters used in the laser ablation technique, such as light intensity, scan speed and beam spot size have been optimized to achieve uniform IDEs, which were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of gold IDEs fabricated by laser ablation were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, and compared to those produced by conventional photolithography. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation is a promising alternative to conventional photolithography for fabricating metal IDEs for e-tongue systems.

  8. Advances in the measurement of sulfur isotopes using laser ablation MC-ICP- MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, W. I.; Pribil, M. J.; Koenig, A. E.; Fayek, M.; Slack, J. F.

    2008-05-01

    Although sulfur is poorly ionized in an argon plasma, there are many applications for sulfur isotope analysis using an ICP source. Studies using a desolvation system (DSN) and an aqueous source of sulfur, where the sulfur is complexed with a cation to form a sulfur salt, e.g., calcium or sodium to provide a stable delivery of sulfur through the sample introduction system indicate that precision (~ 0.3 per mil) and accuracy are maintained at sulfur concentrations as low as 1 mg/L. Based on this data, solid sampling of sulfides and sulfates can provide an adequate amount supply of sulfur to an ICP source, even allowing for the relatively poor transport efficiency of laser ablation systems. The main limitations on accuracy and precision are the initial sampling volume, principally a function of spot size and laser fluence and the decreased instrument sensitivity resulting from the pseudo- medium or high resolution mode of analysis required to eliminate polyatomic isobaric interferences. These factors, in turn, determine the minimal grain size necessary for analysis. There are also fit-for-purpose considerations. For instance, many base metal sulfide systems have large variations in sulfur isotope composition, so that precision as poor as one per mil can still provide useful information. Here, we describe the methodology used at the USGS for laser ablation analysis of sulfides and sulfates using a second generation MC-ICP-MS and demonstrate the accuracy of the method based upon a grain-by-grain comparison of laser ablation and ion microprobe sulfur isotope data. A laser ablation MC-ICP-MS study of base metal mineralization at Dry Creek deposit, east-central Alaska demonstrates that the range in sulfur isotope composition of pyrite, sphalerite and galena, based on analysis of individual grains, is almost twice that reported for any other individual VMS deposit. Analysis on the microscopic scale thus provides additional insights into the potential sources of sulfur for

  9. Superhydrophobic/superoleophilic magnetic elastomers by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milionis, Athanasios, E-mail: am2vy@virginia.edu [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Fragouli, Despina; Brandi, Fernando; Liakos, Ioannis; Barroso, Suset [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Ruffilli, Roberta [Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Athanassiou, Athanassia, E-mail: athanassia.athanassiou@iit.it [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • We report the development of magnetic nanocomposite sheets. • Laser irradiation of the nanocomposites induces chemical and structural changes to the surface. • The laser-patterned surfaces exhibit superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity. • The particle contribution in altering the surface and bulk properties of the material is studied. - Abstract: We report the development of magnetic nanocomposite sheets with superhydrophobic and supeoleophilic surfaces generated by laser ablation. Polydimethylsiloxane elastomer free-standing films, loaded homogeneously with 2% wt. carbon coated iron nanoparticles, were ablated by UV (248 nm), nanosecond laser pulses. The laser irradiation induces chemical and structural changes (both in micro- and nano-scale) to the surfaces of the nanocomposites rendering them superhydrophobic. The use of nanoparticles increases the UV light absorption efficiency of the nanocomposite samples, and thus facilitates the ablation process, since the number of pulses and the laser fluence required are greatly reduced compared to the bare polymer. Additionally the magnetic nanoparticles enhance significantly the superhydrophobic and oleophilic properties of the PDMS sheets, and provide to PDMS magnetic properties making possible its actuation by a weak external magnetic field. These nanocomposite elastomers can be considered for applications requiring magnetic MEMS for the controlled separation of liquids.

  10. Laser deposition rates of thin films of selected metals and alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzaniga, Andrea Carlo; Canulescu, Stela; Schou, Jørgen

    . The experiments have been carried out at a laser wavelength of 355 nm in vacuum with a PLD chamber at DTU Fotonik, Risø Campus. The deposition rates have been measured by a quartz crystal microbalance. At a laser fluence of 2 J/cm2 the total ablated yield of copper is about 1x1015 atoms per pulse. The film...

  11. Three-dimensional defects in CdTe films obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagan, P; Virt, IS; Zawislak, J; Rudyj, IO; Kuzma, M

    2004-01-01

    The quality of Cd chalcodenides epitaxial films can be enhanced seriously by applying a pulsed (electron beam or laser beam) method for ablation of targets. The structure of laser deposited CdTe layers was investigated by transmission high energy electron diffraction. This method is very useful for

  12. Laser energy density, structure and properties of pulsed-laser deposited zinc oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoutsouva, M.G.; Panagopoulos, C.N. [Laboratory of Physical Metallurgy, National Technical University of Athens, Zografos, Athens 15780 (Greece); Kompitsas, M., E-mail: mcomp@eie.gr [National Hellenic Research Foundation, Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, Vasileos Konstantinou Ave. 48, Athens 11635 (Greece)

    2011-05-01

    Zinc oxide thin films were deposited on soda lime glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition in an oxygen-reactive atmosphere at 20 Pa and a constant substrate temperature at 300 deg. C. A pulsed KrF excimer laser, operated at 248 nm with pulse duration 10 ns, was used to ablate the ceramic zinc oxide target. The structure, the optical and electrical properties of the as-deposited films were studied in dependence of the laser energy density in the 1.2-2.8 J/cm{sup 2} range, with the aid of X-ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscope, Transmission Spectroscopy techniques, and the Van der Pauw method, respectively. The results indicated that the structural and optical properties of the zinc oxide films were improved by increasing the laser energy density of the ablating laser. The surface roughness of the zinc oxide film increased with the decrease of laser energy density and both the optical bang gap and the electrical resistivity of the film were significantly affected by the laser energy density.

  13. Characteristics of Plasma Shock Waves Generated in the Pulsed Laser Ablation Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李智华; 张端明; 郁伯铭; 关丽

    2002-01-01

    We modify the Sedov theory to describe plasma shock waves generated in a pulsed laser ablating process. We also study the propagation characteristics of plasma shock waves during the preparation process of functional thin films deposited by a pulsed laser. In particular, we discuss in detail the temporal behaviour of energy causing the difference of the propagation characteristics between the plasma shock wave and the ideal shock wave in the point explosion model. Under the same experimental conditions, the theoretical results calculated with our modified Sedov theory are in good agreement with the existing experimental data.

  14. Sand laser-ablation as source of elements laser isotope separation: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, N.A.S.; Destro, M.G.; Vasconcelos, G; Neri, J.W.; Silveira, C.A.B.; Riva, R. [Institute for Advanced Studies, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: nicolau@ieav.cta.br

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of emission spectroscopy experiments, performed with the aim to verify the presence of monoatomic neutral material in the jet produced by laser ablation of simple and complex targets. All studied materials (copper, graphite, alumina and beach sand) showed emission of single atoms, indicating the presence of monoatomic material in the ablated plume. (author)

  15. 脉冲激光沉积中高能量密度激光密度对Cu2Se热电薄膜成分与性能的影响%Congruent Growth of Cu2Se Thermoelectric Thin Films Enabled by Using High Ablation Fluence During Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕艳红; 陈吉堃; DÖBELI Max; 李宇龙; 史迅; 陈立东

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the laser ablation fluence in congruent growth of Cu2Se thermoelectric thin films during pulsed laser deposition was shown in this work. By using a larger laser ablation fluence, a more consistent composition between as-grown thin films and the target material has been realized in the pulsed laser deposition of Cu2Se films. This is associated with the enhanced plasma shielding effect, which weakens direct laser-solid interaction when in-creasing laser fluence. Reducing the ablation fluence can obviously increase the amount of the copper deficiencies, due to more effective laser ablation of Se (higher vapor pressure) than that of Cu when the laser direct lasser-solid interac-tion becomes more efficient. Apart from tuning the ablation fluence, thermoelectric performances of as-grown Cu2Se thin films are further optimized as a function of the used argon background gas pressures. The maximum thermoelec-tric performance of the Cu2Se thin film can be obtained when using the highest ablation fluence (~10 J/cm2) and a low argon background pressure(~10-1 Pa).%本工作提出了脉冲激光沉积法生长 Cu2Se 热电材料薄膜中维持较高的激光切削能量密度对于实现薄膜与靶材成分等比例传输的重要性。使用较高的脉冲激光能量生长的Cu2Se薄膜具有纯的a-相,并具有与靶材相近的化学组分。这主要是因为较高的激光能量可以更加有效地引起等离子体对激光-固体直接作用的屏蔽,这可以使得靶材中的铜和硒元素的激光切削量更加接近靶材的化学计量比。由于硒具有较高的蒸汽压,降低激光能量会加强激光与固体的直接作用,从而更有效地切削硒元素,导致所沉积薄膜中产生铜缺陷。进一步讨论了所使用的氩气背景气体压力对于所生长的 Cu2Se 薄膜热电性能的影响。当使用高激光能量低背景气体压力时,所生长的薄膜具有最佳的热电性能。

  16. Laser ablation of Al-Ni alloys and multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Johannes; Trebin, Hans-Rainer; Kiselev, Alexander; Rapp, Dennis-Michael

    2016-05-01

    Laser ablation of Al-Ni alloys and multilayers has been studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The method was combined with a two-temperature model to describe the interaction between the laser beam, the electrons, and the atoms. As a first step, electronic parameters for the alloys had to be found and the model developed originally for pure metals had to be generalized to multilayers. The modifications were verified by computing melting depths and ablation thresholds for pure Al and Ni. Here known data could be reproduced. The improved model was applied to the alloys Al_3Ni, AlNi and AlNi_3. While melting depths and ablation thresholds for AlNi behave unspectacular, sharp drops at high fluences are observed for Al_3Ni and AlNi_3. In both cases, the reason is a change in ablation mechanism from phase explosion to vaporization. Furthermore, a phase transition occurs in Al_3Ni. Finally, Al layers of various thicknesses on a Ni substrate have been simulated. Above threshold, 8 nm Al films are ablated as a whole while 24 nm Al films are only partially removed. Below threshold, alloying with a mixture gradient has been observed in the thin layer system.

  17. Percutaneous laser ablation of unresectable primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacella, Claudio M. [Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Via San Francesco 50, Albano Laziale, Rome 00041 (Italy)], E-mail: claudiomaurizio.pacella@fastwebnet.it; Stasi, Roberto; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Pacella, Sara; Graziano, Filomena Maria; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Papini, Enrico [Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Via San Francesco 50, Albano Laziale, Rome 00041 (Italy)

    2008-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical benefits of percutaneous laser ablation (PLA) in patients with unresectable primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Patients and methods: Four patients with hepatic metastases from ACC and a Cushing's syndrome underwent ultrasound-guided PLA. In one case the procedure was performed also on the primary tumor. Results: After three sessions of PLA, the primary tumor of 15 cm was ablated by 75%. After 1-4 (median 1) sessions of PLA, five liver metastases ranging from 2 to 5 cm were completely ablated, while the sixth tumor of 12 cm was ablated by 75%. There were no major complications. Treatment resulted in an improvement of performance status and a reduction of the daily dosage of mitotane in all patients. The three patients with liver metastases presented a marked decrease of 24-h urine cortisol levels, an improved control of hypertension and a mean weight loss of 2.8 kg. After a median follow-up after PLA of 27.0 months (range, 9-48 months), two patients have died of tumor progression, while two other patients remain alive and free of disease. Conclusions: Percutaneous laser ablation is a feasible, safe and well tolerated procedure for the palliative treatment of unresectable primary and metastatic ACC. Further study is required to evaluate the impact of PLA on survival.

  18. 308-nm excimer laser ablation of human cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodoehl, John A.; Rhodes, Anthony L.; Meller, Menachem M.; Sherk, Henry H.

    1993-07-01

    The XeCl excimer laser was investigated as an ablating tool for human fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. Quantitative measurements were made of tissue ablation rates as a function of fluence in meniscal fibrocartilage and articular hyaline cartilage. A force of 1.47 Newtons was applied to an 800 micrometers fiber with the laser delivering a range of fluences (40 to 190 mj/mm2) firing at a frequency of 5 Hz. To assess the effect of repetition rate on ablation rate, a set of measurements was made at a constant fluence of 60 mj/mm2, with the repetition rate varying from 10 to 40 Hz. Histologic and morphometric analysis was performed using light microscopy. The results of these studies revealed that the ablation rate was directly proportional to fluence over the range tested. Fibrocartilage was ablated at a rate 2.56 times faster than hyaline cartilage at the maximum fluence tested. Repetition rate had no effect on the penetration per pulse. Adjacent tissue damage was noted to be minimal (10 - 70 micrometers ).

  19. Modeling of multi-burst mode pico-second laser ablation for improved material removal rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wenqian; Shin, Yung C.; King, Galen [Purdue University, Center for Laser-based Manufacturing, School of Mechanical Engineering, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2010-02-15

    This paper deals with the unique phenomena occurring during the multi-burst mode picosecond (ps) laser ablation of metals through modeling and experimental studies. The two-temperature model (TTM) is used and expanded to calculate the ablation depth in the multi-burst mode. A nonlinear increment of ablation volume is found during the multi-burst laser ablation. The deactivation of ablated material and the application of temperature-dependent electron-phonon coupling are demonstrated to be important to provide reliable results. The simulation results based on this expanded laser ablation model are experimentally validated. A significant increase of ablation rate is found in the multi-burst mode, compared with the single-pulse mode under the same total fluence. This numerical model provides a physical perspective into the energy transport process during multi-burst laser ablation and can be used to study the pulse-to-pulse separation time effect on the ablation rate. (orig.)

  20. Modeling of multi-burst mode pico-second laser ablation for improved material removal rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenqian; Shin, Yung C.; King, Galen

    2010-02-01

    This paper deals with the unique phenomena occurring during the multi-burst mode picosecond (ps) laser ablation of metals through modeling and experimental studies. The two-temperature model (TTM) is used and expanded to calculate the ablation depth in the multi-burst mode. A nonlinear increment of ablation volume is found during the multi-burst laser ablation. The deactivation of ablated material and the application of temperature-dependent electron-phonon coupling are demonstrated to be important to provide reliable results. The simulation results based on this expanded laser ablation model are experimentally validated. A significant increase of ablation rate is found in the multi-burst mode, compared with the single-pulse mode under the same total fluence. This numerical model provides a physical perspective into the energy transport process during multi-burst laser ablation and can be used to study the pulse-to-pulse separation time effect on the ablation rate.

  1. Resonant Infrared Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Deposition of Polymers: Improving the Morphology of As-Deposited Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubb, Daniel; Papantonakis, Michael; Collins, Brian; Brookes, Elijah; Wood, Joshua; Gurudas, Ullas

    2008-03-01

    Resonant infrared matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition has been used to deposit thin films of PMMA, a widely used industrial polymer. This technique is similar to conventional pulsed laser deposition, except that the polymer to be deposited is dissolved in a solvent and the solution is frozen before ablation in a vacuum chamber. The laser wavelength is absorbed by a vibrational band in the frozen matrix. The polymer lands on the substrate to form a film, while the solvent is pumped away. Our preliminary results show that the surface roughness of the as-deposited films depends strongly on the differential solubility radius, as defined by Hansen solubility parameters of the solvent and the solubility radius of the polymer. Our results will be compared with computational and experimental studies of the same polymer using a KrF (248 nm) laser. The ejection mechanism will be discussed as well as the implications of these results for the deposition of smooth high quality films.

  2. Numerical analysis of laser ablation and damage in glass with multiple picosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingying; Eppelt, Urs; Russ, Simone; Hartmann, Claudia; Siebert, Christof; Zhu, Jianqiang; Schulz, Wolfgang

    2013-04-08

    This study presents a novel numerical model for laser ablation and laser damage in glass including beam propagation and nonlinear absorption of multiple incident ultrashort laser pulses. The laser ablation and damage in the glass cutting process with a picosecond pulsed laser was studied. The numerical results were in good agreement with our experimental observations, thereby revealing the damage mechanism induced by laser ablation. Beam propagation effects such as interference, diffraction and refraction, play a major role in the evolution of the crater structure and the damage region. There are three different damage regions, a thin layer and two different kinds of spikes. Moreover, the electronic damage mechanism was verified and distinguished from heat modification using the experimental results with different pulse spatial overlaps.

  3. A unified model in the pulsed laser ablation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU De-zhi

    2008-01-01

    In this unified model, we introduce the electron-phonon coupling time (t) and laser pulse width (t). For long pulses, it can substitute for the traditional thermal conduction model; while for ultrashort pulses, it can substitute for the standard two-temperature model. As an example of the gold target, we get the dependence of the electron and ion temperature evolvement on the time and position by solving the thermal conduction equation using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method.It is in good agreement with experimental data. We obtain the critical temperature of the onset of ablation using the Saha equation and then obtain the theoretical value of the laser ablation threshold when the laser pulse width ranges from nanosecond to femtosecond timescale, which consists well with the experimental data.

  4. Frequency mixing in boron carbide laser ablation plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oujja, M.; Benítez-Cañete, A.; Sanz, M.; Lopez-Quintas, I.; Martín, M.; de Nalda, R.; Castillejo, M.

    2015-05-01

    Nonlinear frequency mixing induced by a bichromatic field (1064 nm + 532 nm obtained from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser) in a boron carbide (B4C) plasma generated through laser ablation under vacuum is explored. A UV beam at the frequency of the fourth harmonic of the fundamental frequency (266 nm) was generated. The dependence of the efficiency of the process as function of the intensities of the driving lasers differs from the expected behavior for four-wave mixing, and point toward a six-wave mixing process. The frequency mixing process was strongly favored for parallel polarizations of the two driving beams. Through spatiotemporal mapping, the conditions for maximum efficiency were found for a significant delay from the ablation event (200 ns), when the medium is expected to be a low-ionized plasma. No late components of the harmonic signal were detected, indicating a largely atomized medium.

  5. Thrust Measurements in Ballistic Pendulum Ablative Laser Propulsion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazolin, H.; Rodrigues, N. A. S.; Minucci, M. A. S.

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes a setup for thrust measurement in ablative laser propulsion experiments, based on a simple ballistic pendulum associated to an imaging system, which is being assembled at IEAv. A light aluminium pendulum holding samples is placed inside a 100 liters vacuum chamber with two optical windows: the first (in ZnSe) for the laser beam and the second (in fused quartz) for the pendulum visualization. A TEA-CO2 laser beam is focused to the samples providing ablation and transferring linear moment to the pendulum as a whole. A CCD video camera captures the oscillatory movement of the pendulum and the its trajectory is obtained by image processing. By fitting the trajectory of the pendulum to a dumped sinusoidal curve is possible to obtain the amplitude of the movement which is directly related to the momentum transfered to the sample.

  6. Laser ablation mass spectroscopy of nineteenth century daguerreotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Danel L. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Golovlev, Valerie V. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Gresalfi, Michael J. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Chaney, John A. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Feigerle, Charles S. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Miller, John C. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Romer, Grant [International Museum of Photography and Film, George Eastman House, 900 East Ave., Rochester, New York 14607-2298 (United States); Messier, Paul [Boston Art Conservation, 60 Oak Square Ave., Boston, Massachusetts 02135 (United States)

    1999-10-01

    Laser desorption mass spectroscopy has been used to characterize both modern and {approx}150-year-old daguerreotypes. Such investigations are a necessary prelude to attempts to clean them of tarnish and other contaminants by laser ablation of the surface layers. Both positive- and negative-ion time-of-flight spectra were obtained following YAG laser ablation/desorption at 1064, 532, and 355 nm. Major peaks obtained from several daguerreotypes reveal expected elements from the substrate (Ag, Cu) as well as the developing (Hg) and gilding (Au) processes. Silver clusters (Ag{sub n}) may reflect surface desorption of molecules or, alternatively, aggregates formed in the ejection process. Silver sulfide molecules observed from old daguerreotypes are the signature of the tarnishing process. (c) 2000 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  7. Ablation of Submicrometer Holes Using an Extreme-Ultraviolet Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossall, Andrew K.; Aslanyan, Valentin; Tallents, Greg J.; Kuznetsov, Ilya; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2015-06-01

    Simulations and experiments are used to study extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) laser drilling of submicrometer holes. The ablation process is studied with a 2D Eulerian hydrodynamic code that includes bound-free absorption processes relevant to the interaction of EUV lasers with a solid material. Good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured ablated depths for on-target irradiances of up to 1×10 10 W cm-2 . An increase in the irradiance to 1×10 12 W cm-2 is predicted to ablate material to a depth of 3.8 μ m from a single pulse with a hole diameter 3 to 4 times larger than the focal spot size. The model allows for the simulation of the interaction of a laser pulse with the crater created by a previous shot. Multiple-pulse lower-fluence irradiation configurations under optimized focusing conditions, i.e., approaching the diffraction limit, are shown to be advantageous for applications requiring mesoscale [(100 nm )- (1 μ m ) ] features and a high level of control over the ablation profile.

  8. Laser ablation of titanium in liquid in external electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkov, A.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, “Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University)”, 9 Institutskiy per., 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Barmina, E.V., E-mail: barminaev@gmail.com [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shafeev, G.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 31, Kashirskoye Highway, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Voronov, V.V. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-01

    Highlights: • Ablation of a bulk Ti target by 10 ps laser pulses in liquid is experimentally studied in external DC electric field. • Applied cathodic bias leads to increase in average size of self-organized nanostructures formed upon ablation of titanium target. • Laser ablation of Ti target in external electric field results in generation of elongated titanium oxide nanoparticles. - Abstract: Ablation of a bulk Ti target by 10 ps laser pulses in water is experimentally studied in external DC electric field. It is demonstrated that both lateral size of nanostructures (NS) on Ti surface and their density depend on the electric field applied to the target. Scanning Electron Microscopy of NS reveals the shift of their size distribution function toward larger sizes with applied field (cathodic bias, 25 V DC). Density of mushroom-like NS with applied electric field amounts to 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}. X-ray diffraction of generated nanoparticles (NPs) shows difference in the crystallographic structure of NPs of non-stoichiometric Ti oxides generated with and without electric field. This conclusion is corroborated with the optical absorption spectroscopy of obtained colloids. Transmission Electron Microscopy of NPs also shows difference in morphology of particles produced with and without cathodic bias. The results are interpreted on the basis of instability of the melt on Ti surface in the electric field.

  9. Fabrication of 250-nm-hole arrays in glass and fused silica by UV laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstens, R.; Gödecke, A.; Prießner, A.; Ihlemann, J.

    2016-09-01

    Parallel nanohole drilling in glass using an ArF excimer laser (193 nm) is demonstrated. For the first time, hole arrays with 500 nm pitch and individual holes with 250 nm diameter and more than 100 nm depth are fabricated by phase mask imaging using a Schwarzschild objective. Holes in soda lime glass are drilled by direct ablation; fused silica is processed by depositing a SiOx-film on SiO2, patterning the SiOx by ablation, and finally oxidizing the remaining SiOx to SiO2. Thermally induced ordered dewetting of noble metal films deposited on such templates may be used for the fabrication of plasmonic devices.

  10. Topically applied methotrexate is rapidly delivered into skin by fractional laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, Elisabeth Hjardem; Lerche, Catharina; Vissing, Anne-Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Methotrexate (MTX) is a chemotherapeutic and anti-inflammatory drug that may cause systemic adverse effects. This study investigated kinetics and biodistribution of MTX delivered topically by ablative fractional laser (AFXL). Methods: In vitro passive diffusion of 10 mg/ml MTX (1 w...... of 690 µm ablation depth, lined by the 47 µm thermal coagulation zone (CZ). Quantitatively, MTX was detectable by HPLC in mid-dermis after 15 min, significantly exceeded deposition in intact skin after 1.5 h, and saturated skin after 7 h at a 10-fold increased MTX-deposition versus intact skin (3.08 vs 0.......30 mg/cm3, p = 0.002). Transdermal permeation was saturation, and increased up to 8.0% after 24 h. Qualitatively, MTX distributed into CZ within 15 min (p = 0.015) and further into surrounding dermal tissue after 1.5 h (p = 0.004). After skin saturation at 7 h, MTX...

  11. Laser ablative decoration of micro-diamonds by gold nanoparticles for fabrication of hybrid plasmonic-dielectric antennae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, A. K.; Ionin, A. A.; Khmelnitskii, R. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Levchenko, A. O.; Mel'nik, N. N.; Rudenko, A. A.; Saraeva, I. N.; Umanskaya, S. P.; Zayarny, D. A.; Nguyen, L. V.; Nguyen, T. T. H.; Pham, M. H.; Pham, D. V.; Do, T. H.

    2017-06-01

    Hybrid plasmonic-dielectric antennae are fabricated by laser ablation of gold in water sols of micro-diamonds. Electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy of their deposits on a silicon wafer surface indicate close proximity of gold nanoparticles and micro-diamonds, which is supported by photoluminescence studies demonstrating strong (eight-fold) damping of micro-diamond luminescence owing to the attachment of the gold nanoparticles. UV-near-IR spectroscopy of their sols reveals a considerable plasmonic effect, related to red spectral shifts of surface plasmon resonance for the gold nanoparticles in the laser-ablation-fabricated antennae.

  12. 3D plasmonic transducer based on gold nanoparticles produced by laser ablation on silica nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontad, F.; Caricato, A. P.; Manera, M. G.; Colombelli, A.; Resta, V.; Taurino, A.; Cesaria, M.; Leo, C.; Convertino, A.; Klini, A.; Perrone, A.; Rella, R.; Martino, M.

    2016-05-01

    Silica two-dimensional substrates and nanowires (NWs) forests have been successfully decorated with Au nanoparticles (NPs) through laser ablation by using a pulsed ArF excimer laser, for sensor applications. A uniform coverage of both substrate surfaces with NPs has been achieved controlling the number of laser pulses. The annealing of the as-deposited particles resulted in a uniform well-defined distribution of spherical NPs with an increased average diameter up to 25 nm. The deposited samples on silica NWs forest present a very good plasmonic resonance which resulted to be very sensitive to the changes of the environment (ethanol/water solutions with increasing concentration of ethanol) allowing the detection of changes on the second decimal digit of the refractive index, demonstrating its potentiality for further biosensing functionalities.

  13. Thermal-mechanical modeling of laser ablation hybrid machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matin, Mohammad Kaiser

    2001-08-01

    Hard, brittle and wear-resistant materials like ceramics pose a problem when being machined using conventional machining processes. Machining ceramics even with a diamond cutting tool is very difficult and costly. Near net-shape processes, like laser evaporation, produce micro-cracks that require extra finishing. Thus it is anticipated that ceramic machining will have to continue to be explored with new-sprung techniques before ceramic materials become commonplace. This numerical investigation results from the numerical simulations of the thermal and mechanical modeling of simultaneous material removal from hard-to-machine materials using both laser ablation and conventional tool cutting utilizing the finite element method. The model is formulated using a two dimensional, planar, computational domain. The process simulation acronymed, LAHM (Laser Ablation Hybrid Machining), uses laser energy for two purposes. The first purpose is to remove the material by ablation. The second purpose is to heat the unremoved material that lies below the ablated material in order to ``soften'' it. The softened material is then simultaneously removed by conventional machining processes. The complete solution determines the temperature distribution and stress contours within the material and tracks the moving boundary that occurs due to material ablation. The temperature distribution is used to determine the distance below the phase change surface where sufficient ``softening'' has occurred, so that a cutting tool may be used to remove additional material. The model incorporated for tracking the ablative surface does not assume an isothermal melt phase (e.g. Stefan problem) for laser ablation. Both surface absorption and volume absorption of laser energy as function of depth have been considered in the models. LAHM, from the thermal and mechanical point of view is a complex machining process involving large deformations at high strain rates, thermal effects of the laser, removal of

  14. Sputter-deposited Be ablators for NIF target capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEachern, R.; Clford, C.; Cook, R.; Makowiecki, E.; Wallace, R.

    1997-03-26

    We have performed a series of preliminary experiments to determine whether sputter deposition of doped Be is a practical route to producing NIF target capsules with Be ablators. Films ranging in thickness from 7 to {approximately} 120 {micro}m have been deposited on spherical polymer mandrels using a bounce pan to ensure uniform coating. With no voltage bias applied to the pan, relatively porous coatings were formed that were highly permeable to hydrogen. The surface finish of these films ranged from {approximately}250 nm rms for 13-{micro}m-thick films to a minimum of {approximately}75 nm rms for an 80-{micro}m-thick film. Application of a voltage bias was found to significantly modify the film morphology. At a bias of 120 V, 7-{micro}m-thick films with a dense, fine-grained microstructure were produced. These capsules had a reflective surface with a 50 nm rms roughness. Finally, to demonstrate the ability to produce a graded dopant profile, a coating was produced in which the concentration of added Cu was varied from 2.5 atom % at the beginning to zero after 40 {micro}m of deposition.

  15. Laser deposition of sulfonated phthalocyanines for gas sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitl, Premysl, E-mail: fitlp@vscht.cz [Department of Physics and Measurements, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technicka 5, Prague 6 CZ-166 28 (Czech Republic); Department of Analysis of Functional Materials, Institute of Physics AS CR v.v.i, Na Slovance 1999/2, Prague 8 CZ-182 21 (Czech Republic); Vrnata, Martin; Kopecky, Dusan; Vlcek, Jan; Skodova, Jitka [Department of Physics and Measurements, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technicka 5, Prague 6 CZ-166 28 (Czech Republic); Bulir, Jiri; Novotny, Michal; Pokorny, Petr [Department of Analysis of Functional Materials, Institute of Physics AS CR v.v.i, Na Slovance 1999/2, Prague 8 CZ-182 21 (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-01

    Thin layers of nickel and copper tetrasulfonated phthalocyanines (NiPcTS and CuPcTS) were prepared by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation method. The depositions were carried out with KrF excimer laser (energy density of laser radiation E{sub L} = 0.1–0.5 J cm{sup −2}) from dimethylsulfoxide matrix. For both materials the ablation threshold E{sub L-th} was determined. The following properties of deposited layers were characterized: (a) chemical composition (FTIR spectra); (b) morphology (SEM and AFM portraits); and (c) impedance of gas sensors based on NiPcTS and CuPcTS layers in the presence of two analytes – hydrogen and ozone. The prepared sensors exhibit response to 1000 ppm of hydrogen and 100 ppb of ozone even at laboratory temperature.

  16. Laser deposition of sulfonated phthalocyanines for gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitl, Premysl; Vrnata, Martin; Kopecky, Dusan; Vlcek, Jan; Skodova, Jitka; Bulir, Jiri; Novotny, Michal; Pokorny, Petr

    2014-05-01

    Thin layers of nickel and copper tetrasulfonated phthalocyanines (NiPcTS and CuPcTS) were prepared by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation method. The depositions were carried out with KrF excimer laser (energy density of laser radiation EL = 0.1-0.5 J cm-2) from dimethylsulfoxide matrix. For both materials the ablation threshold EL-th was determined. The following properties of deposited layers were characterized: (a) chemical composition (FTIR spectra); (b) morphology (SEM and AFM portraits); and (c) impedance of gas sensors based on NiPcTS and CuPcTS layers in the presence of two analytes - hydrogen and ozone. The prepared sensors exhibit response to 1000 ppm of hydrogen and 100 ppb of ozone even at laboratory temperature.

  17. 25 years of pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Michael; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    It is our pleasure to introduce this special issue appearing on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of pulsed laser deposition (PLD), which is today one of the most versatile growth techniques for oxide thin films and nanostructures. Ever since its invention, PLD has revolutionized the research on advanced functional oxides due to its ability to yield high-quality thin films, multilayers and heterostructures of a variety of multi-element material systems with rather simple technical means. We appreciate that the use of lasers to deposit films via ablation (now termed PLD) has been known since the 1960s after the invention of the first ruby laser. However, in the first two decades, PLD was something of a 'sleeping beauty' with only a few publications per year, as shown below. This state of hibernation ended abruptly with the advent of high T c superconductor research when scientists needed to grow high-quality thin films of multi-component high T c oxide systems. When most of the conventional growth techniques failed, the invention of PLD by T (Venky) Venkatesan clearly demonstrated that the newly discovered high-T c superconductor, YBa2Cu3O7-δ , could be stoichiometrically deposited as a high-quality nm-thin film with PLD [1]. As a remarkable highlight of this special issue, Venkatesan gives us his very personal reminiscence on these particularly innovative years of PLD beginning in 1986 [2]. After Venky's first paper [1], the importance of this invention was realized worldwide and the number of publications on PLD increased exponentially, as shown in figure 1. Figure 1. Figure 1. Published items per year with title or topic PLD. Data from Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge in September 2013. After publication of Venky's famous paper in 1987 [1], the story of PLD's success began with a sudden jump in the number of publications, about 25 years ago. A first PLD textbook covering its basic understanding was soon published, in 1994, by Chrisey and Hubler [3]. Within a

  18. Pulsed laser deposition for the synthesis of monolayer WSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, A.; Nakamura, H.; Wochner, P.; Ibrahimkutty, S.; Schulz, A.; Müller, K.; Starke, U.; Stuhlhofer, B.; Cristiani, G.; Logvenov, G.; Takagi, H.

    2017-08-01

    Atomically thin films of WSe2 from one monolayer up to 8 layers were deposited on an Al2O3 r-cut ( 1 1 ¯ 02 ) substrate using a hybrid-Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) system where a laser ablation of pure W is combined with a flux of Se. Specular X-ray reflectivities of films were analysed and were consistent with the expected thickness. Raman measurement and atomic force microscopy confirmed the formation of a WSe2 monolayer and its spatial homogeneity over the substrate. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction uncovered an in-plane texture in which WSe2 [ 10 1 ¯ 0 ] preferentially aligned with Al2O3 [ 11 2 ¯ 0 ]. These results present a potential to create 2D transition metal dichalcogenides by PLD, where the growth kinetics can be steered in contrast to common growth techniques like chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy.

  19. Histological evaluation of vertical laser channels from ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbølling Haak, Christina; Illes, Monica; Paasch, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) represents a new treatment potential for various skin conditions and new laser devices are being introduced. It is important to gain information about the impact of laser settings on the dimensions of the created laser channels for obtaining a safe...... and efficient treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to establish a standard model to document the histological tissue damage profiles after AFR and to test a new laser device at diverse settings. Ex vivo abdominal pig skin was treated with a MedArt 620, prototype fractional carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser...... measurements for each laser setting (n¿=¿28). AFR created cone-shaped laser channels. Ablation depths varied from reaching the superficial dermis (2 mJ, median 41 µm) to approaching the subcutaneous fat (144 mJ, median 1,943 µm) and correlated to the applied energy levels in an approximate linear relation (r(2...

  20. Synthesis of oxidation resistant lead nanoparticle films by modified pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Eunsung; Murray, P. Terrence; Subramanyam, Guru; Malik, Hans K.; Schwartz, Kenneth L. [Research Institute, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469-0170 (United States); Research Institute, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469-0170, USA and Graduate Materials Engineering, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469-0240 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469-0232 (United States); Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems, Linthicum, MD 21090 (United States)

    2012-07-30

    Thin layers of lead nanoparticles have been produced by a modified pulsed laser ablation (PLA) process in which smaller nanoparticles were swept out of the ablation chamber by a stream of flowing Ar. Large ({mu}m-sized) particles, which are usually deposited during the standard PLA process, were successfully eliminated from the deposit. The nanoparticles deposited on room temperature substrates were well distributed, and the most probable particle diameter was in the order of 30 nm. Since lead is highly reactive, the nanoparticles formed in Ar were quickly oxidized upon exposure to air. A small partial pressure of H{sub 2}S gas was subsequently added to the effluent, downstream from the ablation chamber, and this resulted in the formation of nanoparticle deposits that were surprisingly oxidation resistant. The properties of the nanoparticle films (as determined by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and conductivity measurements) are reported, and the mechanism of the oxidation retardation process is discussed.

  1. Measurement of ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov evolution from laser imprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Delorme, B.; Casner, A.; Masse, L.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.

    2017-10-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability in plastic (CH2) foils. The two-dimensional (2-D) perturbations were created by laser imprinting using a special phase plate with a 2-D single mode, ˜70 μm wavelength sinusoidal intensity pattern on the plastic foil. The growth of imprinted perturbations was measured by face-on, X-ray radiography using Sm and Ta backlighters in 30-μm and 50-μm thick plastic foils, respectively. After the initial imprinting phase, the 2-D perturbations grew due to ablative RM instability before the onset of foil acceleration when they were further amplified by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Experimental results agree reasonably well with 2-D hydrodynamic simulations and analytic models showing that the modulation growth in areal density is due to ablative RM instability.

  2. Ablation of silicon with bursts of femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiuso, Caterina; Kämmer, Helena; Dreisow, Felix; Ancona, Antonio; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of ultrafast laser ablation of silicon with bursts of pulses. The pristine 1030nm-wavelength 200-fs pulses were split into bursts of up to 16 sub-pulses with time separation ranging from 0.5ps to 4080ps. The total ablation threshold fluence was measured depending on the burst features, finding that it strongly increases with the number of sub-pulses for longer sub-pulse delays, while a slowly increasing trend is observed for shorter separation time. The ablation depth per burst follows two different trends according to the time separation between the sub-pulses, as well as the total threshold fluence. For delays shorter than 4ps it decreases with the number of pulses, while for time separations longer than 510ps, deeper craters were achieved by increasing the number of subpulses in the burst, probably due to a change of the effective penetration depth.

  3. Femtosecond laser for cavity preparation in enamel and dentin: ablation efficiency related factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Li, H.; Sun, Yc.; Wang, Y.; Lü, Pj.

    2016-02-01

    To study the effects of laser fluence (laser energy density), scanning line spacing and ablation depth on the efficiency of a femtosecond laser for three-dimensional ablation of enamel and dentin. A diode-pumped, thin-disk femtosecond laser (wavelength 1025 nm, pulse width 400 fs) was used for the ablation of enamel and dentin. The laser spot was guided in a series of overlapping parallel lines on enamel and dentin surfaces to form a three-dimensional cavity. The depth and volume of the ablated cavity was then measured under a 3D measurement microscope to determine the ablation efficiency. Different values of fluence, scanning line spacing and ablation depth were used to assess the effects of each variable on ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiencies for enamel and dentin were maximized at different laser fluences and number of scanning lines and decreased with increases in laser fluence or with increases in scanning line spacing beyond spot diameter or with increases in ablation depth. Laser fluence, scanning line spacing and ablation depth all significantly affected femtosecond laser ablation efficiency. Use of a reasonable control for each of these parameters will improve future clinical application.

  4. Evolution of energy deposition during glass cutting with pulsed femtosecond laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalupka, C.; Großmann, D.; Reininghaus, M.

    2017-05-01

    We report on investigations of the energy deposition in the volume of thin glass during an ablation cutting process with pulsed femtosecond laser radiation by time-resolved pump-probe shadowgraphy. For a single laser pulse, the temporal evolution of the transient electronic excitation of the glass volume is imaged up to 10 ps after initial excitation. For an increasing number of laser pulses, the spatial excitation of the glass volume significantly changes compared to single pulse irradiation. Sharp spikes are observed, which reduce the transmission of the illuminating probe pulse. This indicates local maxima of the absorption and, therefore, energy deposition of the pump pulse energy in the glass volume. Furthermore, for an increasing number of pulses, different shapes of the surface ablation crater are observed. To study the correlation between the shape of the surface ablation crater and the energy deposition in the glass volume, simulations of the spatial intensity distribution of the pump pulse are executed by means of linear beam propagation method. We show that the transient excitation spikes observed by pump-probe shadowgraphy can be explained by refraction and diffraction of the laser radiation at the surface ablation crater. Our results provide an experimental validation for the physical reason of an ablation stop for an ablation cutting process. Moreover, the simulations allow for the prediction of damage inside the glass volume.

  5. Frequency mixing in boron carbide laser ablation plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oujja, M.; Benítez-Cañete, A.; Sanz, M.; Lopez-Quintas, I.; Martín, M.; Nalda, R. de, E-mail: r.nalda@iqfr.csic.es; Castillejo, M.

    2015-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two-color frequency mixing has been studied in a laser ablation boron carbide plasma. • A space- and time-resolved study mapped the nonlinear optical species in the plasma. • The nonlinear process maximizes when charge recombination is expected to be completed. • Neutral atoms and small molecules are the main nonlinear species in this medium. • Evidence points to six-wave mixing as the most likely process. - Abstract: Nonlinear frequency mixing induced by a bichromatic field (1064 nm + 532 nm obtained from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser) in a boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) plasma generated through laser ablation under vacuum is explored. A UV beam at the frequency of the fourth harmonic of the fundamental frequency (266 nm) was generated. The dependence of the efficiency of the process as function of the intensities of the driving lasers differs from the expected behavior for four-wave mixing, and point toward a six-wave mixing process. The frequency mixing process was strongly favored for parallel polarizations of the two driving beams. Through spatiotemporal mapping, the conditions for maximum efficiency were found for a significant delay from the ablation event (200 ns), when the medium is expected to be a low-ionized plasma. No late components of the harmonic signal were detected, indicating a largely atomized medium.

  6. Renaissance of laser interstitial thermal ablation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon; Barnett, Gene H

    2015-01-01

    .... The development of magnetic resonance thermography and its application to LITT have allowed for real-time thermal imaging and feedback control during laser energy delivery, allowing for precise...

  7. Laser wavelength effect on nanosecond laser light reflection in ablation of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, O.; de la Cruz May, L.; Mejia, E. B.; Ruz Hernandez, J. A.; Flores Gil, A.

    2016-12-01

    Reflection of nanosecond laser pulses with different wavelengths (1.06 and 0.69 µm) in ablation of titanium in air is studied experimentally. The laser wavelength effect on reflection is essential at low laser fluence values. However, it becomes negligible for laser fluence values by about an order of magnitude higher than the plasma ignition threshold. We speculate that the disappearance of the wavelength effect is explained by counter-acting processes of the laser light absorption in plasma, which increases with laser wavelength, and absorption in the surface layer, which decreases with increasing laser wavelength.

  8. Laser Ablation ICP-MS Titanite U-Th-Pb Dating of the Tonglushan Cu-Fe-Au Skarn Deposit, Southeastern Hubei Province%Laser Ablation ICP-MS Titanite U-Th-Pb Dating of the Tonglushan Cu-Fe-Au Skarn Deposit,Southeastern Hubei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian-wei; DENG Xiao-dong; ZHOU Mei-fu; LIU Yong-sheng

    2009-01-01

    @@ Titanite (CaTi_2SiO_5) is an important accessory mineral not only in magnatic and metamorphic rocks,but also commonly in hydrothermal mineral deposits.It incorporates appreciable amounts (usually 10 ×10~(-6) s to 100 × 10~(-6) s) of U and Th into its structure and has a closure temperature of Pb diffusion higher than 660 ~ 700 ℃ (Scott and St-Onge, 1995),making it an ideal U-Th-Pb geochronometer.

  9. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Tian Long; Liu, Zhu; Li, Lin; Zhong, Xiang Li

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser-material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 0.087 J/cm2) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 1.576 J/cm2), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α-1 = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α-1 = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the Cdbnd C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas Cdbnd C bond is partially eliminated through the femtosecond laser treatment due to the difference in photon energy of the two laser beams. A reduction in the Cdbnd C bond through the chain scission process creates free radical carbons which then form crosslinks with each other or react with oxygen, nitrogen and water in air producing oxygen-rich (Csbnd O and Cdbnd O bond) and nitrogen-rich (Csbnd N) functional groups.

  10. Surface Finish after Laser Metal Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombouts, M.; Maes, G.; Hendrix, W.; Delarbre, E.; Motmans, F.

    Laser metal deposition (LMD) is an additive manufacturing technology for the fabrication of metal parts through layerwise deposition and laser induced melting of metal powder. The poor surface finish presents a major limitation in LMD. This study focuses on the effects of surface inclination angle and strategies to improve the surface finish of LMD components. A substantial improvement in surface quality of both the side and top surfaces has been obtained by laser remelting after powder deposition.

  11. Ablation of dentin by irradiation of violet diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatayama, H.; Kato, J.; Akashi, G.; Hirai, Y.; Inoue, A.

    2006-02-01

    Several lasers have been used for clinical treatment in dentistry. Among them, diode lasers are attractive because of their compactness compared with other laser sources. Near-infrared diode lasers have been practically used for cutting soft tissues. Because they penetrate deep to soft tissues, they cause sufficiently thick coagulation layer. However, they aren't suitable for removal of carious dentin because absorption by components in dentin is low. Recently, a violet diode laser with a wavelength of 405nm has been developed. It will be effective for cavity preparation because dentin contains about 20% of collagen whose absorption coefficient at a violet wavelength is larger than that at a near-infrared wavelength. In this paper, we examined cutting performance of the violet diode laser for dentin. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports on application of a violet laser to dentin ablation. Bovine teeth were irradiated by continuous wave violet diode laser with output powers in a range from 0.4W to 2.4W. The beam diameter on the sample was about 270μm and an irradiation time was one second. We obtained the crater ablated at more than an output power of 0.8W. The depth of crater ranged from 20μm at 0.8W to 90μm at 2.4W. Furthermore, the beam spot with an output power of 1.7W was scanned at a speed of 1mm/second corresponding to movement of a dentist's hand in clinical treatment. Grooves with the depth of more than 50μm were also obtained. From these findings, the violet diode laser has good potential for cavity preparation. Therefore, the violet diode laser may become an effective tool for cavity preparation.

  12. Analysis of fabric materials cut using ultraviolet laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Chih-Chung; Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Andrew Yeh, J.

    2016-04-01

    Laser ablation technology has widely been applied in the clothing industry in recent years. However, the laser mechanism would affect the quality of fabric contours and its components. Hence, this study examined carbonization and oxidation conditions and contour variation in nonwoven, cotton, and composite leather fabrics cut by using an ultraviolet laser at a wavelength of 355 nm. Processing parameters such as laser power, pulse frequency, scanning speed, and number of pulses per spot were adjusted to investigate component variation of the materials and to determine suitable cutting parameters for the fabrics. The experimental results showed that the weights of the component changed substantially by pulse frequency but slightly by laser power, so pulse frequency of 100 kHz and laser power of 14 W were the approximate parameters for three fabrics for the smaller carbonization and a sufficient energy for rapidly cutting, which the pulse duration of laser system was fixed at 300 μs and laser irradiance was 0.98 J/mm2 simultaneously. In addition, the etiolate phenomenon of nonwoven was reduced, and the component weight of cotton and composite leather was closed to the value of knife-cut fabric as the scanning speed increased. The approximate scanning speed for nonwoven and composite leather was 200 mm/s, and one for cotton was 150 mm/s, respectively. The sharper and firmer edge is obtained by laser ablation mechanism in comparison with traditional knife cutting. Experimental results can serve as the reference for laser cutting in the clothing industry, for rapidly providing smoother patterns with lower carbonization and oxidation edge in the fashion industry.

  13. Carbon nanotubes/laser ablation gold nanoparticles composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascialfari, Luisa [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy); Marsili, Paolo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Caporali, Stefano [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy); Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Margheri, Giancarlo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Serafini, Andrea; Brandi, Alberto [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Giorgetti, Emilia, E-mail: emilia.giorgetti@fi.isc.cnr.it [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Cicchi, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.cicchi@unifi.it [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy)

    2014-10-31

    The production of nanohybrids formed by oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nanoparticles, produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids process, is described. The use of linkers, obtained by transformation of pyrene-1-butanol, is mandatory to generate an efficient and stable interaction between the two components. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed the obtainment of the efficient coverage of the MWCNTs by nanoparticles composed by metal gold and, partially, by oxides. - Highlights: • Laser ablation is a used for the production of gold nanoparticle colloids • An efficient decoration of carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles is obtained through the use of a linker • This method allows an efficient and tunable preparation of carbon nanotube hybrids.

  14. Nanostructured films of metal particles obtained by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz-Miranda, M., E-mail: muniz@unifi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica “U. Schiff”, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Gellini, C. [Dipartimento di Chimica “U. Schiff”, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Giorgetti, E.; Margheri, G.; Marsili, P. [Istituto Sistemi Complessi (CNR), Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Lascialfari, L.; Becucci, L. [Dipartimento di Chimica “U. Schiff”, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Trigari, S. [Istituto Sistemi Complessi (CNR), Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Giammanco, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica “E. Fermi”, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-09-30

    Colloidal dispersions of silver and gold nanoparticles were obtained in pure water by ablation with nanosecond pulsed laser. Then, by filtration of the metal particles on alumina, we fabricated nanostructured films, whose surface morphology was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and related to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) after adsorption of adenine. - Highlights: • Ag and Au colloidal nanoparticles were obtained by laser ablation. • Nanostructured Ag and Au films were fabricated by filtration of metal nanoparticles. • Surface morphology of metal films was investigated by atomic force microscopy. • Surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of adenine on metal films were obtained. • SERS enhancements were related to the surface roughness of the metal films.

  15. Ablation and nanostructuring of metals by femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashitkov, S I; Komarov, P S; Ovchinnikov, A V; Struleva, E V; Agranat, M B [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhakhovskii, V V [All-Russian Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Inogamov, N A [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-30

    Using an interferometric continuous monitoring technique, we have investigated the motion of the surface of an aluminium target in the case of femtosecond laser ablation at picosecond time delays relative to the instant of laser exposure. Measurements of the temporal target dispersion dynamics, molecular dynamics simulation results and the morphology of the ablation crater have demonstrated a thermomechanical (spall) nature of the disruption of the condensed phase due to the cavitation-driven formation and growth of vapour phase nuclei upon melt expansion, followed by the formation of surface nanostructures upon melt solidification. The tensile strength of heated aluminium in a condensed state has been determined experimentally at an expansion rate of ∼10{sup 9} s{sup -1}. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  16. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    See, Tian Long, E-mail: tianlong.see@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The Mill, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Liu, Zhu [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The Mill, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Li, Lin [Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Zhong, Xiang Li [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The Mill, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-28

    Highlights: • Ablation threshold for excimer laser is lower compared to femtosecond laser. • Effective optical penetration depth for excimer laser is lower compared to femtosecond laser. • Two ablation characteristic regimes are observed for femtosecond laser ablation. • Reduction of C=C bond following excimer or fs laser ablation is observed. • Addition of oxygen- and nitrogen-rich functional groups is observed. - Abstract: This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser–material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (F{sub th} = 0.087 J/cm{sup 2}) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (F{sub th} = 1.576 J/cm{sup 2}), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α{sup −1} = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α{sup −1} = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the C=C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas

  17. Laser ablation of the protein lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Amoruso, Salvatore

    Lysozyme is a well-known protein, which is used in food processing because of its bactericidal properties. The mass (14307 amu) is in the range in which it easily can be monitored by mass spectrometric methods, for example by MALDI (Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization). We have recently...... produced thin films of average thickness up to 300 nm, which not only contained a significant amount of intact molecules, but also maintained the bioactivity. These films were produced by a nanosecond laser in the UV regime at 355 nm with 2 J/cm2. The surprising fact that these molecules can be transferred...... to a substrate as intact molecules by the violent laser impact ( up to 50 mJ/pulse) has not yet been understood. One issue is that up to 150 ng/pulse is removed by the laser, and much of the material is ejected from the target in relatively large chunks. We have explored as well the excitation mechanics by laser...

  18. SnO2/Pt Thin Film Laser Ablated Gas Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Wagiran

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A gas sensor array was developed in a 10 × 10 mm2 space using Screen Printing and Pulse Laser Ablation Deposition (PLAD techniques. Heater, electrode, and an insulator interlayer were printed using the screen printing method on an alumina substrate, while tin oxide and platinum films, as sensing and catalyst layers, were deposited on the electrode at room temperature using the PLAD method, respectively. To ablate SnO2 and Pt targets, depositions were achieved by using a 1,064 nm Nd-YAG laser, with a power of 0.7 J/s, at different deposition times of 2, 5 and 10 min, in an atmosphere containing 0.04 mbar (4 kPa of O2. A range of spectroscopic diffraction and real space imaging techniques, SEM, EDX, XRD, and AFM were used in order to characterize the surface morphology, structure, and composition of the films. Measurement on the array shows sensitivity to some solvent and wood smoke can be achieved with short response and recovery times.

  19. SnO2/Pt thin film laser ablated gas sensor array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrokh Abadi, Mohammad Hadi; Hamidon, Mohd Nizar; Shaari, Abdul Halim; Abdullah, Norhafizah; Wagiran, Rahman

    2011-01-01

    A gas sensor array was developed in a 10 × 10 mm(2) space using Screen Printing and Pulse Laser Ablation Deposition (PLAD) techniques. Heater, electrode, and an insulator interlayer were printed using the screen printing method on an alumina substrate, while tin oxide and platinum films, as sensing and catalyst layers, were deposited on the electrode at room temperature using the PLAD method, respectively. To ablate SnO(2) and Pt targets, depositions were achieved by using a 1,064 nm Nd-YAG laser, with a power of 0.7 J/s, at different deposition times of 2, 5 and 10 min, in an atmosphere containing 0.04 mbar (4 kPa) of O(2). A range of spectroscopic diffraction and real space imaging techniques, SEM, EDX, XRD, and AFM were used in order to characterize the surface morphology, structure, and composition of the films. Measurement on the array shows sensitivity to some solvent and wood smoke can be achieved with short response and recovery times.

  20. Optical feedback signal for ultrashort laser pulse ablation of tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B.-M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Mammini, B.M.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1997-07-01

    An optical feedback system for controlled precise tissue ablation is discussed. Our setup includes an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL), and a diagnostic system using analysis of either tissue fluorescence or plasma emission luminescence. Current research is focused on discriminating hard and soft tissues such as bone and spinal cord during surgery using either technique. Our experimental observations exhibit considerable spectroscopic contrast between hard and soft tissue, and both techniques offer promise for a practical diagnostic system.

  1. Laser ablation method for production of surface acoustic wave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, Dmitry; Shevchenko, Sergey; Kukaev, Alexander; Safronov, Daniil

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors are produced using a photolithography method. In case of inertial sensors it suffers several disadvantages, such as difficulty in matching topologies produced on opposite sides of the wafer, expensive in small series production, not allowing further topology correction. In this case a laser ablation method seems promising. Details of a proposed technique are described in the paper along with results of its experimental test and discussion.

  2. Negative ion production by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Motoi [Doshisha Univ., Tanabe, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Sasao, Mamiko

    1997-02-01

    The status of the development of Li{sup -} production by generating a neutral Li flux with an intense radiation of a laser beam onto the surface of Li metal has been reported. The experimental apparatus was arranged to detect a mass separated Li{sup +} and Li{sup -} ion beams. A Li sputtering probe, immersed in the extraction region of a compact (6cm diam. 7cm long) magnetic multipole ion source was irradiated with a Nd-YAG laser of 0.4 J/pulse. The production of mass-separated positive ions of Li by laser irradiation has been confirmed, but the production of Li{sup -} has not been confirmed yet due to the noise caused by a temporal discharge. (author)

  3. Surface modulation of silicon surface by excimer laser at laser fluence below ablation threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P. [Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit (CPMU), Bangalore, Jakkur PO (India)

    2010-04-15

    Controlled single step fabrication of silicon conical surface modulations on [311] silicon surface is reported utilizing KrF excimer laser [{lambda}=248 nm] at laser fluence below ablation threshold laser fluence. When laser fluence was increased gradually from 0 to 0.2 J/cm{sup 2} for fixed 200 numbers of shots; first nanopores are observed to form at 0.1 J/cm{sup 2}, then very shallow nanocones evolve as a function of laser fluence. At 0.2 J/cm{sup 2}, nanoparticles are observed to form. Up to 0.15 J/cm{sup 2} the very shallow nanocone volume is smaller but increases at a fast rate with laser fluence thereafter. It is observed that the net material volume before and after the laser irradiation remains the same, a sign of the melting and resolidification without any ablation. (orig.)

  4. Precise femtosecond laser ablation of dental hard tissue: preliminary investigation on adequate laser parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikov, Todor; Pecheva, Emilia; Montgomery, Paul; Antoni, Frederic; Leong-Hoi, Audrey; Petrov, Todor

    2017-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the possibility of introducing state-of-the-art commercial femtosecond laser system in restorative dentistry by maintaining well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also in overcoming disadvantages such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. Femtosecond ablation of dental hard tissue is investigated by changing the irradiation parameters (pulsed laser energy, scanning speed and pulse repetition rate), assessed for enamel and dentin. The femtosecond laser system used in this work may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, due to the expected effective ablation and low temperature increase when using ultra short laser pulses. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this system seems to be promising for promoting a laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach in restorative dentistry.

  5. Micropatterned polysaccharide surfaces via laser ablation for cell guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbucci, Rolando; Lamponi, Stefania; Pasqui, Daniela; Rossi, Antonella; Weber, Elisabetta

    2003-03-03

    Micropatterned materials were obtained by a controlled laser ablation of a photoimmobilised homogeneous layer of hyaluronic acid (Hyal) and its sulphated derivative (HyalS). The photoimmobilisation was performed by coating the polysaccharide, adequately functionalised with a photoreactive group, on aminosilanised glass substrate and immobilising it on the surface under UV light. Hyal or HyalS photoimmobilised samples were then subjected to laser ablation with wavelengths in the UV regions in order to drill the pattern. Four different patterns with stripes of 100, 50, 25 and 10 {mu}m were generated. A chemical characterisation by attenuated total reflection/Fourier transform infrared (ATR/FT-IR) and time of flight-secondary ions mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) confirmed the success of the laser ablation procedure and the presence of alternating stripes of polysaccharide and native glass. The exact dimensions of the stripes were determined by atomic force microscopy. The analysis of cell behaviour in terms of adhesion, proliferation and movement using mouse fibroblasts (3T3 line) and bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) was also performed.

  6. Laser ablation loading of a radiofrequency ion trap

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, K; Herrera-Sancho, O A; Peik, E

    2012-01-01

    The production of ions via laser ablation for the loading of radiofrequency (RF) ion traps is investigated using a nitrogen laser with a maximum pulse energy of 0.17 mJ and a peak intensity of about 250 MW/cm^2. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is used to measure the ion yield and the distribution of the charge states. Singly charged ions of elements that are presently considered for the use in optical clocks or quantum logic applications could be produced from metallic samples at a rate of the order of magnitude 10^5 ions per pulse. A linear Paul trap was loaded with Th+ ions produced by laser ablation. An overall ion production and trapping efficiency of 10^-7 to 10^-6 was attained. For ions injected individually, a dependence of the capture probability on the phase of the RF field has been predicted. In the experiment this was not observed, presumably because of collective effects within the ablation plume.

  7. XUV-laser induced ablation of PMMA with nano-, pico-, and femtosecond pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juha, L. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: juha@fzu.cz; Bittner, M. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Chvostova, D. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)] (and others)

    2005-06-15

    For conventional wavelength (UV-vis-IR) lasers delivering radiation energy to the surface of materials, ablation thresholds, etch (ablation) rates, and the quality of ablated structures often differ dramatically between short (typically nanosecond) and ultrashort (typically femtosecond) pulses. Various very short-wavelength ({lambda} < 100 nm) lasers, emitting pulses with durations ranging from {approx}10 fs to {approx}1 ns, have recently been placed into routine operation. This has facilitated the investigation of how ablation characteristics depend on the pulse duration in the XUV spectral region. Ablation of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) induced by three particular short-wavelength lasers emitting pulses of various durations, is reported in this contribution.

  8. Laser deposition and structuring of laser active planar waveguides of Er:ZBLAN, Nd:YAG and Nd:GGG for integrated waveguide lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottmann, Jens; Moiseev, Leonid; Wortmann, Dirk; Vasilief, Ion; Starovoytova, Larisa; Ganser, Dimitri; Wagner, Ralph

    2007-02-01

    Laser radiation is used both for the deposition of the laser active thin films and for the micro structuring to define wave guiding structures for the fabrication of waveguide lasers. Thin films of Er:ZBLAN (a glass consisting of ZrF 4, BaF II, LaF 3, AlF 3, NaF, ErF 3) for green upconversion lasers (545 nm), Nd:YAG (Y 3Al 5O 12) and Nd:GGG (Gd 3Ga 5O 12) for infrared lasers (1064 nm) are produced. Manufacturing of the laser active waveguides by micro-structuring is done using fs laser ablation of the deposited films. The structural and optical properties of the films and the damping losses of the structured waveguides are determined in view of the design and the fabrication of compact and efficient diode pumped waveguide lasers. The resulting waveguides are polished, provided with resonator mirrors, pumped using diode lasers and characterized. Laser operation of a ridge waveguide structure grown by pulsed laser deposition and structured by fs laser ablation is demonstrated. A 1 μm thick, 100 μm wide and 3 mm long structured waveguide consisting of amorphous neodymium doped Gd 3Ga 5O 12 has shown laser activity at 1.068 μm when pumped by a diode laser at 808 nm.

  9. Plasma Diagnostic in laser ablation plumes for isotope separation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, Juliana B. de [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: juliana@ieav.cta.br; Rodrigues, Nicolau A.S.; Neri, Jose W.; Silveira, Carlos A.B. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/EFO), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Fotonica

    2008-07-01

    The plasma plume produced in vacuum by ablation of copper, aluminum and tungsten samples, illuminated by copper laser pulses, was investigated. A Langmuir probe was used to study the macroscopic parameters electron number density (Ne) and electron temperature (Te). Plasma expansion velocity (Vp) was also investigated and it was studied the dependence of these parameters with the laser irradiance. Typical values are respectively N{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9}/cm{sup 3}, T{sub e} {approx} 15 eV and Vp {approx} 10 km/s. (author)

  10. Tactile Sensing From Laser-Ablated Metallized PET Films

    KAUST Repository

    Nag, Anindya

    2016-10-17

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and implementation of a novel sensor patch developed from commercial polyethylene terephthalate films metallized with aluminum on one side. The aluminum was ablated with laser to form interdigitated electrodes to make sensor prototypes. The interdigitated electrodes were patterned on the substrate with a laser cutter. Characterization of the prototypes was done to determine their operating frequency followed by experimentation. The prototypes have been used as a tactile sensor showing promising results for using these patches in applications with contact pressures considerably lesser than normal human contact pressure.

  11. Laser ablation of hard tissue: correlation between the laser beam parameters and the post-ablative tissue characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafetinides, Alexandros A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan

    2003-11-01

    Hard dental tissue laser applications, such as preventive treatment, laser diagnosis of caries, laser etching of enamel, laser decay removal and cavity preparation, and more recently use of the laser light to enlarge the root canal during the endodontic therapy, have been investigated for in vitro and in vivo applications. Post-ablative surface characteristics, e.g. degree of charring, cracks and other surface deformation, can be evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The experimental data are discussed in relevance with the laser beam characteristics, e.g. pulse duration, beam profile, and the beam delivery systems employed. Techniques based on the laser illumination of the dental tissues and the subsequent evaluation of the scattered fluorescent light will be a valuable tool in early diagnosis of tooth diseases, as carious dentin or enamel. The laser induced autofluorescence signal of healthy dentin is much stronger than that of the carious dentin. However, a better understanding of the transmission patterns of laser light in teeth, for both diagnosis and therapy is needed, before the laser procedures can be used in a clinical environment.

  12. Ablation of biological tissues by radiation of strontium vapor laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldatov, A. N., E-mail: general@tic.tsu.ru; Vasilieva, A. V., E-mail: anita-tomsk@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Lenin ave., 36, 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    A two-stage laser system consisting of a master oscillator and a power amplifier based on sources of self- contained transitions in pairs SrI and SrII has been developed. The radiation spectrum contains 8 laser lines generating in the range of 1 – 6.45 μm, with a generation pulse length of 50 – 150 ns, and pulse energy of ∼ 2.5 mJ. The divergence of the output beam was close to the diffraction and did not exceed 0.5 mrad. The control range of the laser pulse repetition rate varied from 10 to 15 000 Hz. The given laser system has allowed to perform ablation of bone tissue samples without visible thermal damage.

  13. Periodic patterning of silicon by direct nanosecond laser interference ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavera, T. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Paseo Manuel Lardizabal, 15 20018, San Sebastian (Spain); Perez, N., E-mail: nperez@ceit.es [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Paseo Manuel Lardizabal, 15 20018, San Sebastian (Spain); Rodriguez, A. [CIC Microgune Paseo Mikeletegi 48, 20009 San Sebastian (Spain); Yurrita, P.; Olaizola, S.M.; Castano, E. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Paseo Manuel Lardizabal, 15 20018, San Sebastian (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    The production of periodic structures in silicon wafers by four-beam is presented. Because laser interference ablation is a single-step and cost-effective process, there is a great technological interest in the fabrication of these structures for their use as antireflection surfaces. Three different laser fluences are used to modify the silicon surface (0.8 J cm{sup -2}, 1.3 J cm{sup -2}, 2.0 J cm{sup -2}) creating bumps in the rim of the irradiated area. Laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), in particular micro and nano-ripples, are also observed. Measurements of the reflectivity show a decrease in the reflectance for the samples processed with a laser fluence of 2.0 J cm{sup -2}, probably caused by the appearance of the nano-ripples in the structured area, while bumps start to deteriorate.

  14. Femtosecond-laser ablation dynamics of dielectrics: basics and applications for thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, P.; Schou, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Laser ablation of dielectrics by ultrashort laser pulses is reviewed. The basic interaction between ultrashort light pulses and the dielectric material is described, and different approaches to the modeling of the femtosecond ablation dynamics are reviewed. Material excitation by ultrashort laser...

  15. Fabrication of CVD graphene-based devices via laser ablation for wafer-scale characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackenzie, David; Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Whelan, Patrick Rebsdorf;

    2015-01-01

    Selective laser ablation of a wafer-scale graphene film is shown to provide flexible, high speed (1 wafer/hour) device fabrication while avoiding the degradation of electrical properties associated with traditional lithographic methods. Picosecond laser pulses with single pulse peak fluences of 140......-effect mobility, doping level, on–off ratio, and conductance minimum before and after laser ablation fabrication....

  16. Measurements of nanoparticle size distribution produced by laser ablation of tungsten and boron-carbide in N 2 ambient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereznai, Miklós; Heszler, Péter; Tóth, Zsolt; Wilhelmsson, Ola; Boman, Mats

    2006-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) were produced by ablating tungsten and boron-carbide (B 4C) target materials in atmospheric pressure nitrogen ambient using ArF excimer laser pulses. The size distributions of the NPs formed during the ablation were monitored—within a 7-133 nm size window—by a condensation particle counter connected to a differential mobility analyzer. The laser repetition rate was varied between 1-50 Hz, and the fluence was systematically changed in the range of 0.5-15 J/cm 2, for both materials, allowing a comparative study in an extended laser parameter regime. The multishot ablation threshold ( Φth) of B 4C was determined to be ˜1.9 J/cm 2 for the laser used (ArF excimer, λ = 193 nm). Similarly to earlier studies, it was shown that the size distributions consist of mainly small nanoparticles (<˜20 nm) attributed to a non-thermal ablation mechanism below Φth. An additional broad peak appears (between 20 and 40 nm) above Φth as a consequence of the thermally induced macroscopic ablation. Chemical composition of deposited polydisperse nanoparticles was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showing nitrogen incorporation into the boron-carbide.

  17. Cavitation dynamics of laser ablation of bulk and wire-shaped metals in water during nanoparticles production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giacomo, A; Dell'Aglio, M; Santagata, A; Gaudiuso, R; De Pascale, O; Wagener, P; Messina, G C; Compagnini, G; Barcikowski, S

    2013-03-07

    Although the first nanoseconds to microseconds rule the resulting process yield of laser ablation in liquid, a comprehensive view involving combination of time-resolved measurement techniques is still lacking. In this paper, fundamental aspects of laser ablation of metals in water during the production of nanoparticles are discussed. Three fast diagnostic methods have been applied simultaneously. These are Optical Emission Spectroscopy for the plasma characterization, fast shadowgraph for plasma and cavitation bubble dynamics and laser scattering for the mechanisms of delivery of the produced materials in the liquid. Moreover, in order to validate the discussion, the effect on cavitation dynamics of the ablation of bulk and wire-shaped targets has been investigated together with the relative nanoparticles production yield. Unusual arrow-bow ejection phenomena between the cavitation bubble and the wire result in suppressed material back-deposition, causing efficient ejection of ablated matter into the liquid. The presented nanosecond and microsecond-resolved analysis allows estimating the timescale and role of the basic mechanisms involved in laser ablation in liquids as well as the thermodynamic characteristics of the processes.

  18. Laser ablation of a platinum target in water. III. Laser-induced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, William T.; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2006-12-01

    This is the third paper in our series studying the laser-target-liquid interactions occurring in laser ablation in liquids (LAL). Here, laser ablation of a platinum target in pure water at 355nm wavelength is studied as a function of laser energy. We describe three distinct reaction regimes between the ablated target species and water at different laser focusing conditions. At low laser fluence (removal is caused by laser heating of the platinum surface and the primary products are small clusters with a large percentage of platinum atoms in a nonzero oxidation state. At intermediate fluences (10-70J/cm2), platinum nanoparticles are the primary products. Our previous studies demonstrated that in this fluence regime ablation occurs through both thermal vaporization and explosive ejection of molten droplets. In both cases reactivity is small due to the low reactivity of platinum with water. At high fluences (>70J/cm2), we find large, faceted particles that are attributed to the drying of PtOx gels formed by reactive plasma etching of the target. Taken together these results demonstrate that significant tunability in the target-liquid interaction is possible during nanomaterial synthesis by LAL.

  19. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Huifeng; Yuan Hong [Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-101, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Tang Zhiping [CAS Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Mechanics and Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2013-01-28

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  20. Obtention of high hardness multilayer systems by laser ablation; Obtencion de sistemas multicapa de alta dureza por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia T, I.S

    2007-07-01

    In this thesis work the synthesis of thin films of titanium nitride (TiN), amorphous carbon nitride (CN{sub x}) amorphous carbon (a-C) and Ti/TiN/CNx multilayers and Ti/TiN/a-C by means of the laser ablation technique, with the objective of obtaining films of high hardness is studied, as well as to produce multilayer coatings with superior properties to the individual layers. The effect that has the laser fluence used for ablationing the targets in the structure and mechanical properties of the films deposited of TiN was investigated. It was found that the hardness is increased in lineal way approximately with the fluence increment up to 19 J/cm{sup 2}. Thin films of a-C with hardness of the order of 12 GPa. likewise CN{sub x} films with high hardness (18.4 GPa) were obtained. The hardness of the deposited films was analyzed and it was related with its microstructure and deposit conditions. It was concluded that the Ti/TiN/CNx and Ti/TiN/a-C systems presented bigger hardness that of its individual components. (Author)

  1. A study of particle generation during laser ablation with applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chunyi [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A study has been made of the generation of particles during laser ablation and has included size distribution measurements and observation of the formation processes. The particle size distribution with respect to different laser parameters was obtained in-line using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and a particle counter. The experimental results show that the particle size varies with laser energy, laser pulsewidth, ambient gas flow rate and sample properties. The results serve as a basis for controlling the size of nanoparticles generated by laser ablation. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to study mass ejection processes and mechanisms. At higher laser irradiance, some particles were ejected in the liquid and even in the solid phase. Time-resolved images show the propagation of the shockwaves: external shockwaves propagate outward and decelerate, and internal shockwaves reflect back and forth between the gas contact surface and the sample surface. The internal shockwave is proposed to cause the ejection of liquid particles when the internal shockwave strikes the liquid molten layer. A simulation based on vapor plume expansion was carried out and provides satisfactory agreement with experimental results. Different material properties result in different particle ejection behavior:particle ejection for most materials including metals result in a conically shaped envelope for the ejected material while ejection for silicon resembles a liquid jet. The difference in density change when the materials melt was proposed to be an important factor in the different ejection behavior. The characteristics of particles generated by laser ablation have a strong influence on the chemical analysis of the irradiated sample. Large particles are more difficult to completely vaporize and ionize, and induced preferential vaporization causes fractionation (i.e. a detected chemical composition that differs from the sample material). Large particles also result in spikes in

  2. Laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin; Park, Cheol

    2010-03-02

    An improved method for the production of single walled carbon nanotubes that utilizes an RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of such. Such a method, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently permits the use of a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization. The method of the present invention utilizes a free electron laser operating at high average and peak fluence to illuminate a rotating and translating graphite/catalyst target to obtain high yields of SWNTs without the use of a vacuum chamber.

  3. Laser ablation of borosilicate glass with high power shaped UV nanosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Witzendorff, Philipp; Bordin, Andrea; Suttmann, Oliver; Patel, Rajesh S.; Bovatsek, James; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2016-03-01

    The application of thin borosilicate glass as interposer material requires methods for separation and drilling of this material. Laser processing with short and ultra-short laser pulses have proven to enable high quality cuts by either direct ablation or internal glass modification and cleavage. A recently developed high power UV nanosecond laser source allows for pulse shaping of individual laser pulses. Thus, the pulse duration, pulse bursts and the repetition rate can be set individually at a maximum output power of up to 60 W. This opens a completely new process window, which could not be entered with conventional Q-switched pulsed laser sources. In this study, the novel pulsed UV laser system was used to study the laser ablation process on 400 μm thin borosilicate glass at different pulse durations ranging from 2 - 10 ns and a pulse burst with two 10 ns laser pulses with a separation of 10 ns. Single line scan experiments were performed to correlate the process parameters and the laser pulse shape with the ablation depth and cutting edge chipping. Increasing the pulse duration within the single pulse experiments from 2 ns to longer pulse durations led to a moderate increase in ablation depth and a significant increase in chipping. The highest material removal was achieved with the 2x10 ns pulse burst. Experimental data also suggest that chipping could be reduced, while maintaining a high ablation depth by selecting an adequate pulse overlap. We also demonstrate that real-time combination of different pulse patterns during drilling a thin borosilicate glass produced holes with low overall chipping at a high throughput rate.

  4. Laser ablation in a running hall effect thruster for space propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balika, L.; Focsa, C.; Gurlui, S.; Pellerin, S.; Pellerin, N.; Pagnon, D.; Dudeck, M.

    2013-07-01

    Hall Effect Thrusters (HETs) are promising electric propulsion devices for the station-keeping of geostationary satellites (more than 120 in orbit to date). Moreover, they can offer a cost-effective solution for interplanetary journey, as proved by the recent ESA SMART-1 mission to the Moon. The main limiting factor of the HETs lifetime is the erosion of the annular channel ceramics walls. In order to provide a better understanding of the energy deposition on the insulated walls, a laser irradiation study has been carried out on a PPS100-ML thruster during its run in the PIVOINE-2G ground test facility (CNRS Orléans, France). Two distinct approaches have been followed: continuous wave fiber laser irradiation (generation of thermal defects) and nanosecond pulsed laser ablation (generation of topological defects). The irradiated zones have been monitored in situ by IR thermography and optical emission spectroscopy and further investigated ex situ by scanning electron microscopy and profilometry.

  5. Pulsed laser deposition of lysozyme: the dependence on shot numbers and the angular distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Constantinescu, C.; Matei, A.; Schou, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    . This was verified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) spectrometry of thin films deposited on silicon substrates. The deposition rate of lysozyme was found to decrease with the number of shots and was correlated with increasing thermal damage of the lysozyme. This was monitored by measurements...... of the optical reflectivity of dry lysozyme. The angular distribution of the mass deposition can be fitted well by Anisimov’s hydrodynamic model. The total deposited yield over the entire hemisphere from direct laser ablation of lysozyme was estimated from this model and found to be three orders of magnitude...

  6. Investigation of excimer laser ablation threshold of polymers using a microphone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, Joerg; Niino, Hiroyuki; Yabe, Akira

    2002-09-30

    KrF excimer laser ablation of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyimide (PI) and polycarbonate (PC) in air was studied by an in situ monitoring technique using a microphone. The microphone signal generated by a short acoustic pulse represented the etch rate of laser ablation depending on the laser fluence, i.e., the ablation 'strength'. From a linear relationship between the microphone output voltage and the laser fluence, the single-pulse ablation thresholds were found to be 30 mJ cm{sup -2} for PET, 37 mJ cm{sup -2} for PI and 51 mJ cm{sup -2} for PC (20-pulses threshold). The ablation thresholds of PET and PI were not influenced by the number of pulses per spot, while PC showed an incubation phenomenon. A microphone technique provides a simple method to determine the excimer laser ablation threshold of polymer films.

  7. Investigation of excimer laser ablation threshold of polymers using a microphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Jörg; Niino, Hiroyuki; Yabe, Akira

    2002-09-01

    KrF excimer laser ablation of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyimide (PI) and polycarbonate (PC) in air was studied by an in situ monitoring technique using a microphone. The microphone signal generated by a short acoustic pulse represented the etch rate of laser ablation depending on the laser fluence, i.e., the ablation "strength". From a linear relationship between the microphone output voltage and the laser fluence, the single-pulse ablation thresholds were found to be 30 mJ cm -2 for PET, 37 mJ cm -2 for PI and 51 mJ cm -2 for PC (20-pulses threshold). The ablation thresholds of PET and PI were not influenced by the number of pulses per spot, while PC showed an incubation phenomenon. A microphone technique provides a simple method to determine the excimer laser ablation threshold of polymer films.

  8. The Combination of Direct and Confined Laser Ablation Mechanisms for the Selective Structuring of Thin Silicon Nitride Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Stephan; Heinrich, Gerrit; Domke, Matthias; Huber, Heinz P.

    In the production process of microelectronic devices and high efficiency solar cells, local openings in thin dielectric layers are required. Instead of photolithographic, laser based processing enables to open these dielectric layers locally in a low-cost mass production step. In this work, thin silicon nitride layers deposited on planar silicon wafers are processed by single infrared Gaussian shaped 660 fs laser pulses. The transparent silicon nitride layer, becoming absorptive at fluences higher than 0.3 J/cm2, is selectively removed by confined ablation at fluences below that value. At pulse peak fluences exceeding 1.0 J/cm2 a "SiNx island"is created by direct ablation in the spot center. In this article, theselective SiNx ablation by a combination of confined and direct laser ablation at the medium pulse peak fluence of 0.5 J/cm2 is investigated. To clarify the influence of the nonlinear absorption in the pulse center, the ablation behavior is investigated by time- and space-resolved pump-probe microscopy experiments. The results showphase changes in the silicon and in the silicon nitride in the first picoseconds after excitation, the ablation onset at around 10 ps and the subsequent mechanical materialmotion after a few nanoseconds. The actual silicon nitride layer removal starts after around 10 ns, whereas confined ablation processes are the driving mechanisms even in the nonlinearly absorbing spot center. A comparison of the energetic ablation efficiency of the SiNx layer system to further dielectric thin films shows no detrimental influence of the nonlinear absorbance.

  9. Laser ablation of lysozyme with UV, visible and infrared femto- and nanosecond pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Matei, Andreea

    industry. Lysozyme molecules do not absorb energy for wavelengths above 310 nm, but nevertheless there is a strong mass loss by ablation for laser irradiation in the visible regime. The total ablation yield of lysozyme at 355 nm and at 2 J/cm2 is about 155 µg/pulse, possibly one of the highest ablation...

  10. Is the VUV laser ablation of polymers a pure photochemical process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castex, M. C.; Bityurin, N.

    2002-09-01

    Within the pure photochemical model of laser ablation of polymers, developed in our previous publications, we estimate the value of the surface temperature at the ablation front for several important examples. Derived formulas allow probing physical self-consistency of the pure photochemical ablation model.

  11. Double-pulse laser ablation coupled to laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaus, Reto, E-mail: reglaus@ufl.edu; Hahn, David W.

    2014-08-01

    Laser ablation coupled to laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LA-LIBS) is an analytical method, which minimizes sample matrix effects typically found in quantitative LIBS-based direct solid analyses. This paper reports the application of double-pulse laser ablation (DP-LA) to improve the analyte response and the achievable precisions of LA-LIBS. Two coaxial laser beams were applied at the ablation site and the analytical signals were then collected from a second free-standing LIBS plasma downstream of the ablation site. Signal improvements of up to one order of magnitude were observed compared to single-pulse LA-LIBS. The effect of the interpulse delay on the observed signal-to-noise ratios was studied and the quantification capabilities of the optimized DP-LA-LIBS setup were investigated for manganese and iron in a broad range of different alloy types. A linear response was observed for manganese across the different matrices, allowing for nonmatrix-matched calibrations. Matrix effects were observed when analyzing aluminum samples, which, however, could be compensated for by applying iron as internal standard. Size distributions of the ablated material and electron density measurements provide additional insight into the double-pulse process, with additional future work suggested. - Highlights: • Double-pulse laser ablation was coupled to laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. • Nonmatrix-matched calibration of manganese in various alloys was performed. • Improved sensitivities and precisions compared to single-pulse LA were demonstrated. • Remaining matrix effects and internal standardization are discussed.

  12. Microfabrication of Fresnel zone plates by laser induced solid ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Vanessa R. M.; Thomas, John; Santhosh, Chidangil; Ramachandran, Hema; Mathur, Deepak

    2016-07-01

    A novel and simple single-step method of inscribing optical elements on metal-coated transparent substrates is demonstrated. Laser induced solid ablation (LISA) demands very low laser energies (nJ), as can be amply provided by a femtosecond laser oscillator. Here, LISA is used to write Fresnel zone plates on indium and tungsten coated glass. With up to 100 zones, remarkable agreement is obtained between measured and expected values of the focal length. LISA has enabled attainment of focal spot sizes that are 38% smaller than what would be obtained using conventional lenses of the same numerical aperture. The simplicity with which a high degree of automation can readily be achieved using LISA makes this cost-effective method amenable to a wide variety of applications related to microfabrication of optical elements.

  13. Characterization of material ablation driven by laser generated intense extreme ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Nozomi, E-mail: tanaka-n@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Masuda, Masaya; Deguchi, Ryo; Murakami, Masakatsu; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Yogo, Akifumi; Nishimura, Hiroaki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, 2-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2015-09-14

    We present a comparative study on the hydrodynamic behaviour of plasmas generated by material ablation by the irradiation of nanosecond extreme ultraviolet (EUV or XUV) or infrared laser pulses on solid samples. It was clarified that the difference in the photon energy deposition and following material heating mechanism between these two lights result in the difference in the plasma parameters and plasma expansion characteristics. Silicon plate was ablated by either focused intense EUV pulse (λ = 9–25 nm, 10 ns) or laser pulse (λ = 1064 nm, 10 ns), both with an intensity of ∼10{sup 9 }W/cm{sup 2}. Both the angular distributions and energy spectra of the expanding ions revealed that the photoionized plasma generated by the EUV light differs significantly from that produced by the laser. The laser-generated plasma undergoes spherical expansion, whereas the EUV-generated plasma undergoes planar expansion in a comparatively narrow angular range. It is presumed that the EUV radiation is transmitted through the expanding plasma and directly photoionizes the samples in the solid phase, consequently forming a high-density and high-pressure plasma. Due to a steep pressure gradient along the direction of the target normal, the EUV plasma expands straightforward resulting in the narrower angular distribution observed.

  14. Photopolymers designed for high resolution laser ablation at a specific irradiation wavelength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippert, T.; Bennett, L.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kunz, T.; Hahn, C. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Dept. of General Energy Research] [and others

    1997-04-01

    We have developed novel photopolymers based on the triazeno chromophore group. The absorption properties can be tailored for a specific irradiation wavelength (e.g. 308 nm XeCl laser). With the introduction of a photolabile group into the main chain of the polymer we expected a mechanism which is mainly photochemical. This should result in high resolution etching with no thermal damage or chemical / physical modification to the material. The gaseous products of the photochemical decomposition were thought to assist the material removal, and to prevent the re-deposition of solid products which would contaminate the surface. We confirmed (SEM/AFM) that the irradiation of the polymer at 308 mn resulted in high resolution etching. No debris has been found around the etched comers. Maximum ablation rates of about 3 {mu}m / pulse were achieved due to the dynamic absorption behavior (bleaching during the pulse). No physical or chemical modifications of the polymer surface could be detected after irradiation at the tailored absorption wavelength, whereas irradiation at different wavelengths resulted in modified (physical and chemical) surfaces. The etching mechanism can be described as a laser induced microexplosion, revealed by ns-imaging. The etching of the polymer starts and ends with the laser pulse, shown by ns-interferometry, confirming that the acting mechanism is mainly photochemical at high fluences for our polymers. Our results demonstrate that the mechanism of ablation can be controlled by designing special polymers, which can be used as high resolution laser dry etching resists.

  15. X-ray microtomography and laser ablation in the analysis of ink distribution in coated paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myllys, M., E-mail: markko.myllys@jyu.fi [Department of Physics and Nanoscience Center, University of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaskyla (Finland); Häkkänen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J. [Department of Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, University of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaskyla (Finland); Backfolk, K. [Imatra Research Centre, Stora Enso Oyj, Tainionkoskentie 115, 55800 Imatra (Finland); Laboratory of Packaging Technology, Lappeenranta University of Technology, P.O. Box 20, 53851 Lappeenranta (Finland); Sirviö, P. [Imatra Research Centre, Stora Enso Oyj, Tainionkoskentie 115, 55800 Imatra (Finland); Timonen, J. [Department of Physics and Nanoscience Center, University of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaskyla (Finland); ITMO University, Kronverkskii ave. 49, 197101 Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-14

    A novel method was developed for studying the ink-paper interface and the structural variations of a deposited layer of ink. Combining high-resolution x-ray tomography with laser ablation, the depth profile of ink (toner), i.e., its varying thickness, could be determined in a paper substrate. X-ray tomography was used to produce the 3D structure of paper with about 1 μm spatial resolution. Laser ablation combined with optical imaging was used to produce the 3D structure of the printed layer of ink on top of that paper with about 70 nm depth resolution. Ablation depth was calibrated with an optical profilometer. It can be concluded that a toner layer on a light-weight-coated paper substrate was strongly perturbed by protruding fibers of the base paper. Such fibers together with the surface topography of the base paper seem to be the major factors that control the leveling of toner and its penetration into a thinly coated paper substrate.

  16. Analysis of tungsten carbide coatings by UV laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanicky, V.; Otruba, V.; Mermet, J.-M.

    2000-06-01

    Tungsten carbide coatings (thickness 0.1-0.2 mm) containing 8.0, 12.2, 17.2 and 22.9% Co were studied with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-AES). Composition of these plasma sprayed deposits on steel disks was determined using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and electron microprobe energy/wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The coatings were ablated by means of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm (10 Hz, 10 mJ per shot) coupled to an ICP echelle-based spectrometer equipped with a segmented charge-coupled device detector. Non-linear dependences of cobalt lines intensities on the Co percentage were observed both at a single spot ablation and at a sample translation. This behaviour could be attributed to a complex phase composition of the system W-C-Co. However, employing tungsten as internal standard the linear calibration was obtained for studied analytical lines Co II 228.616 nm, Co II 230.786 nm, Co II 236.379 nm and Co II 238.892 nm.

  17. Matrix-Matched Iron-Oxide Laser Ablation ICP-MS U–Pb Geochronology Using Mixed Solution Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Liam Courtney-Davies; Zhiyong Zhu; Cristiana L. Ciobanu; Benjamin P. Wade; Nigel J. Cook; Kathy Ehrig; Cabral, Alexandre R.; Allen Kennedy

    2016-01-01

    U–Pb dating of the common iron-oxide hematite (α-Fe2O3), using laser-ablation inductively-coupled-plasma mass-spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), provides unparalleled insight into the timing and processes of mineral deposit formation. Until now, the full potential of this method has been negatively impacted by the lack of suitable matrix-matched standards. To achieve matrix-matching, we report an approach in which a U–Pb solution and ablated material from 99.99% synthetic hematite are simultaneously m...

  18. Evaluation of the analytical capability of NIR femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Takafumi; Kon, Yoshiaki

    2008-03-01

    A laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric (LA-ICPMS) technique utilizing a titanium-sapphire (TiS) femtosecond laser (fs-laser) has been developed for elemental and isotopic analysis. The signal intensity profile, depth of the ablation pit and level of elemental fractionation were investigated in order to evaluate the analytical capability of the present fs-laser ablation-ICPMS technique. The signal intensity profile of (57)Fe, obtained from iron sulfide (FeS(2)), demonstrated that the resulting signal intensity of (57)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation was almost 4-times higher than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation under a similar energy fluence (5 J/cm(2)). In fs-laser ablation, there is no significant difference in a depth of the ablation pit between glass and zircon material, while in ArF laser ablation, the resulting crater depth on the zircon crystal was almost half the level than that obtained for glass material. Both the thermal-induced and particle size-related elemental fractionations, which have been thought to be main sources of analytical error in the LA-ICPMS analysis, were measured on a Harvard 91500 zircon crystal. The resulting fractionation indexes on the (206)Pb/(238)U (f(Pb/U)) and (238)U/(232)Th (f(U/Th)) ratios obtained by the present fs-laser ablation system were significantly smaller than those obtained by a conventional ArF excimer laser ablation system, demonstrative of smaller elemental fractionation. Using the present fs-laser ablation technique, the time profile of the signal intensity of (56)Fe and the isotopic ratios ((57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe) have been measured on a natural pyrite (FeS(2)) sample. Repeatability in signal intensity of (56)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation system was significantly better than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation. Moreover, the resulting precision in (57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe ratio measurements could be improved by the fs-laser ablation system

  19. A neuro-fuzzy approach to failure detection and diagnosis of excimer laser ablation in microvia formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Ronald; May, Gary S.

    2006-02-01

    Excimer laser ablation is used for microvia formation in the microelectronics packaging industry. With continuing advancement of laser systems, there is an increasing need to offset capital equipment investment and lower equipment downtime. This paper presents a neuro-fuzzy methodology for in-line failure detection and diagnosis of the excimer laser ablation process. Response data originating directly from laser tool sensors and the characterization of microvias were used as failure symptoms for potential deviations in four laser system parameters from their corresponding baseline values. The response characteristics consist of via diameter, via wall angle, and via resistance. Resistance measurements on copper deposited in the ablated vias were performed to characterize the degree to which debris remaining inside the vias affected quality. The laser system parameters include laser fluence, shot frequency, number of pulses, and helium pressure flow. The adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was trained and subsequently validated for its capability in evidential reasoning using the data collected. Results indicated only a single false alarm occurred in 19 possible failure detection scenarios. In failure diagnosis, a single false alarm and a single missed alarm occurred.

  20. Fabrication of pillared PLGA microvessel scaffold using femtosecond laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang GJ

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Hsiao-Wei Wang1, Chung-Wei Cheng2, Ching-Wen Li3, Han-Wei Chang4, Ping-Han Wu2, Gou-Jen Wang 1Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan, 2Laser Application Technology Center, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Tainan County, Taiwan, 3Department of Mechanical Engineering, 4Department of Chemical Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: One of the persistent challenges confronting tissue engineering is the lack of intrinsic microvessels for the transportation of nutrients and metabolites. An artificial microvascular system could be a feasible solution to this problem. In this study, the femtosecond laser ablation technique was implemented for the fabrication of pillared microvessel scaffolds of polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA. This novel scaffold facilitates implementation of the conventional cell seeding process. The progress of cell growth can be observed in vitro by optical microscopy. The problems of becoming milky or completely opaque with the conventional PLGA scaffold after cell seeding can be resolved. In this study, PLGA microvessel scaffolds consisting of 47 µm × 80 µm pillared branches were produced. Results of cell culturing of bovine endothelial cells demonstrate that the cells adhere well and grow to surround each branch of the proposed pillared microvessel networks.Keywords: femtosecond laser ablation, pillared microvessel scaffold, polylactic-co-glycolic acid, bovine endothelial cells

  1. Multidiagnostic analysis of ultrafast laser ablation of metals with pulse pair

    OpenAIRE

    LUNNEY, JAMES

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED Copper targets are irradiated in the ablation regime by pairs of equal, time-delayed collinear laser pulses separated on a timescale going from 2 ps to 2 ns. The ablation plume is characterized by ion probe diagnostic, fast imaging, and temporally and spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The variation in the ablation efficiency with the delay between the pulses is analyzed by measuring the ablation crater profile with a contact profilometer. The second ...

  2. Laser ablative cutting of ceramics for electronics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, B. E., LLNL

    1996-03-01

    Pulsed, high-beam quality lasers offer unique materials processing characteristics. In processing metals, copper vapor and pulsed Nd:YAG lasers have produced micron-scale cuts and holes with submicron heat-affected zones. Since the cost of laser photons is high and average material removal rates can be slow with ablation, high value-added applications are necessary to justify processing costs. Ceramics present a special challenge for manufacturing because of their high hardness, relatively low thermal conductivity, and brittle nature. Surface damage typically limits the strength of a ceramic part to a small fraction of its bulk strength. This work investigates the use of copper vapor and pulsed diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers to cut precision features in ceramic substrates. Variations in laser wavelength and power, processing speed, ceramic type, and assist gas were investigated with the goal of producing <100-{mu}m wide by 600-{mu}m deep cuts through silicon-carbide and alumina/titanium-carbide substrates for potential use in electronics. Silicon-carbide bars 250-{mu}m wide by 600-{mu}m high by 2.5-cm long were laser cut from substrates without fracture.

  3. Measurements of Ablation Pressure and Mass Ablation Rate Using a Target Pendulum and a Thin Foil Target at 10 μm Laser Wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daido, Hiroyuki; Tateyama, Ryuzi; Ogura, Kazuki; Mima, Kunioki; Nakai, Sadao; Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    1983-04-01

    The ablation pressure and the mass ablation rate for a 10 μm CO2 laser were measured using two methods: a ballistic target pendulum and shifted X-ray emission images which are equivalent to X-ray back-lighting. The measured ablation pressure was 10 Mbar and the mass ablation rate was 106 g/cm2\\cdotsec at the absorbed laser intensity of 5× 1013 W/cm2. Comparing the ablation mass rate measured by the pendulum with that derived from the penetration depth of the hot electrons using K_α line emission, we could identify the hot electron driven ablation as the dominant process.

  4. Ins and outs of endovenous laser ablation: afterthoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, H A Martino; van Gemert, Martin J C

    2014-03-01

    Physicists and medical doctors "speak" different languages. Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a good example in which technology is essential to guide the doctor to the final result: optimal treatment. However, for the doctor, it is by far insufficient just to turn on the knobs of the laser. He should understand what is going on in the varicose vein. On the other hand, the physicist is usually not aware what problems the doctor finds on his road towards improving a new technique. We have tried to bring both languages together in the special on Ins and outs of endovenous laser ablation published in this issue of Lasers in Medical Science. The 13 articles include endovenous related clinical (de Roos 2014; Kockaert and Nijsten 2014; van den Bos and Proebstle 2014) and socioeconomical articles (Kelleher et al 2014), the first paper on the molecular pathophysiologic mechanisms (Heger et al 2014), fiber tips (Stokbroekx et al 2014), the future of EVLA (Rabe 2014), a review of EVLA with some important issues for debate (Malskat et al 2014), an excellent paper on transcutaneous laser therapies of spider and small varicose veins (Meesters et al 2014), as well as several scientific modeling articles, varying from a mathematical model of EVLA that includes the carbonized blood layer on the fiber tip (van Ruijven et al 2014) and its application to the simulation of clinical conditions (Poluektova et al 2014) via experimental measurements of temperature profiles in response to EVLA, radiofrequency waves, and steam injections (Malskat et al 2014) to a literature review and novel physics approach of the absorption and particularly scattering properties of whole blood also including the infrared wavelengths used by EVLA (Bosschaart et al 2014). The aim of our afterthoughts, the 14th article in this special, is to try to amalgamate the clinical and physical contents of these contributions, providing the reader with the bridge that overlaps these different backgrounds.

  5. Pulsed laser deposition of fluoride glass thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganser, Dimitri; Gottmann, Jens; Mackens, Uwe; Weichmann, Ulrich

    2010-11-01

    The development of integrated waveguide lasers for different applications such as marking, illumination or medical technology has become highly desirable. Diode pumped planar waveguide lasers emitting in the green visible spectral range, e.g. thin films from praseodymium doped fluorozirconate glass matrix (called ZBLAN, owing to the main components ZrF 4, BaF 2, LaF 3, AlF 3 and NaF) as the active material pumped by a blue laser diode, have aroused great interest. In this work we have investigated the deposition of Pr:ZBLAN thin films using pulsed laser radiation of λ = 193 and λ = 248 nm. The deposition has been carried out on MgF 2 single crystal substrates in a vacuum chamber by varying both processing gas pressure and energy fluence. The existence of an absorption line at 210 nm in Pr:ZBLAN leads to absorption and radiative relaxation of the absorbed laser energy of λ = 193 nm preventing the evaporation of target material. The deposited thin films consist of solidified and molten droplets and irregular particulates only. Furthermore, X-ray radiation has been applied to fluoride glass targets to enhance the absorption in the UV spectral region and to investigate the deposition of X-ray treated targets applying laser radiation of λ = 248 nm. It has been shown that induced F-centres near the target surface are not thermally stable and can be easily ablated. Therefore, λ = 248 nm is not suitable for evaporation of Pr:ZBLAN.

  6. Pulsed laser deposition of fluoride glass thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganser, Dimitri, E-mail: dimitri.ganser@llt.rwth-aachen.de [Chair for Laser Technology LLT, RWTH Aachen University, Steinbachstr. 15, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Gottmann, Jens [Chair for Laser Technology LLT, RWTH Aachen University, Steinbachstr. 15, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Mackens, Uwe; Weichmann, Ulrich [Philips Research Laboratories, Weisshausstrasse 2, D-52066 Aachen (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    The development of integrated waveguide lasers for different applications such as marking, illumination or medical technology has become highly desirable. Diode pumped planar waveguide lasers emitting in the green visible spectral range, e.g. thin films from praseodymium doped fluorozirconate glass matrix (called ZBLAN, owing to the main components ZrF{sub 4}, BaF{sub 2}, LaF{sub 3}, AlF{sub 3} and NaF) as the active material pumped by a blue laser diode, have aroused great interest. In this work we have investigated the deposition of Pr:ZBLAN thin films using pulsed laser radiation of {lambda} = 193 and {lambda} = 248 nm. The deposition has been carried out on MgF{sub 2} single crystal substrates in a vacuum chamber by varying both processing gas pressure and energy fluence. The existence of an absorption line at 210 nm in Pr:ZBLAN leads to absorption and radiative relaxation of the absorbed laser energy of {lambda} = 193 nm preventing the evaporation of target material. The deposited thin films consist of solidified and molten droplets and irregular particulates only. Furthermore, X-ray radiation has been applied to fluoride glass targets to enhance the absorption in the UV spectral region and to investigate the deposition of X-ray treated targets applying laser radiation of {lambda} 248 nm. It has been shown that induced F-centres near the target surface are not thermally stable and can be easily ablated. Therefore, {lambda} = 248 nm is not suitable for evaporation of Pr:ZBLAN.

  7. Determining Optimum Propellants, Pulse Lengths, and Laser Intensity for Ablative Laser Propulsion Using the Pals Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boody, Frederick P.

    2004-10-01

    Ablative Laser Propulsion (ALP) can potentially reduce the cost of launching payloads into near earth orbit by a factor of 100. Preliminary experiments have demonstrated high efficiency, coupling coefficient, and specific impulse that would be suitable for applications. These experiments, however, were performed at wavelengths not usable in the atmosphere and at pulse energies and spot sizes much smaller than will be required for application. The parameters of the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) high-energy iodine laser, other than wavelength: pulse energy, pulse length, and beam diameter, are equal to those required for application. While its wavelength is a little shorter than required, it is closer than any other laser available and, due to PALS' 2ω and 3ω capability, the wavelength dependence can be studied and the results extrapolated to application values. In fact, PALS is probably the only laser in the world with parameters suitable for definitive ALP studies. PALS also has a suitable infrastructure for measuring plasma parameters already and only an instrument for measuring momentum transfer, such as a ballistic pendulum, would have to be added.

  8. Process and structures for fabrication of solar cells with laser ablation steps to form contact holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D; Dennis, Tim; Waldhauer, Ann; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2013-11-19

    Contact holes of solar cells are formed by laser ablation to accomodate various solar cell designs. Use of a laser to form the contact holes is facilitated by replacing films formed on the diffusion regions with a film that has substantially uniform thickness. Contact holes may be formed to deep diffusion regions to increase the laser ablation process margins. The laser configuration may be tailored to form contact holes through dielectric films of varying thickness.

  9. Gold nanoshell/polysaccharide nanofilm for controlled laser-assisted tissue thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redolfi Riva, Eugenio; Desii, Andrea; Sinibaldi, Edoardo; Ciofani, Gianni; Piazza, Vincenzo; Mazzolai, Barbara; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2014-06-24

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a freestanding ultrathin, mucoadhesive gold nanoshell/polysaccharide multilayer nanocomposite (thermonanofilm, TNF), that can be used for controlled photothermal ablation of tissues through irradiation with near-infrared radiation (NIR) laser. The aim of this work is to provide a new strategy to precisely control particle concentration during photothermalization of cancerous lesions, since unpredictable and aspecific biodistributions still remains the central issue of inorganic nanoparticle-assisted photothermal ablation. Gold nanoshell encapsulation in polysaccharide matrix is achieved by drop casting deposition method combined with spin-assisted layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. Submicrometric thickness of films ensures tissue adhesion. Basic laser-induced heating functionality has been demonstrated by in vitro TNF-mediated thermal ablation of human neuroblastoma cancer cells, evidenced by irreversible damage to cell membranes and nuclei. Ex vivo localized vaporization and carbonization of animal muscular tissue is also demonstrated by applying TNF onto tissue surface. Thermal distribution in the tissue reaches a steady state in a few seconds, with significant increases in temperature (ΔT > 50) occurring across an 1 mm span, ensuring control of local photothermalization and providing more safety and predictability with respect to traditional laser surgery. A steady-state model of tissue thermalization mediated by TNFs is also introduced, predicting the temperature distribution being known the absorbance of TNFs, the laser power, and the tissue thermal conductivity, thus providing useful guidelines in the development of TNFs. Thermonanofilms can find applications for local photothermal treatment of cancerous lesions and wherever high precision and control of heat treatment is required.

  10. Endobronchial laser ablation in the management of epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma of the trachea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David McCracken

    2015-01-01

    We present the first documented case to be treated with endobronchial laser ablation therapy with discussion of the incidence, presentation and characteristics of these tumours including the treatment options, as well as the use of laser ablation in the management of benign and malignant endobronchial lesions.

  11. Approximate theory of highly absorbing polymer ablation by nanosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furzikov, N. P.

    1990-04-01

    Surface interference, nonlinearly saturated instability of laser-induced thermodestruction, and subsequent oscillation of absorption mode permit the description of analytical ablation thresholds and depths per pulse of polymers having high absorption at laser wavelengths, e.g., polyimide and poly(ethylene terephtalate). Inverse problem solution for polycarbonate and ablation invariant designing are also realized.

  12. Effect of nanosecond pulse laser ablation on the surface morphology of Zr-based metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yunhu; Fu, Jie; Zheng, Chao; Ji, Zhong

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the ripple patterns formation on the surface of Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 (vit1) bulk metallic glass using a nanosecond pulse laser ablation in air with a wavelength of 1064 nm. The strong thermal ablation phenomenon could be observed on vit1 BMG surface at laser energy of 200 mJ as a result of the adhibition of confining overlay. Many periodic ripples had formed on the edge of the ablated area at laser energy of 400 mJ because of the high intensity pulsed laser beam. The underlying mechanism of the periodic ripples formation could be explained by the K-H hydrodynamic instability theory. It had been shown that laser ablation with 600 mJ and 200 pulses results in the formation of many micro-cracks on the ablated area. Further analysis showed that the spatial occupation of the laser ablated area and the spacing between two adjacent ripples increased as the laser energy and the number of incident laser pulses increasing. The surface ripples feature on the edge of ablated area became more obvious with increasing laser pulses, but it was not correlated closely with the laser energies variation.

  13. Picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide: Effect of crystallinity on the material response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, Rocio; Quintana, Iban; Etxarri, Jon [Manufacturing Processes Department, Fundacion TEKNIKER, Av. Otaola 20, 20600, Eibar, Guipuzcoa (Spain); Lejardi, Ainhoa; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon [Department of Mining and Metallurgy Engineering and Materials Science, School of Engineering, University of the Basque Country (EHU-UPV), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-11-01

    The picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide (PLLA) as a function of laser fluence and degree of crystallinity was examined. The ablation parameters and the surface modifications were analyzed under various irradiation conditions using laser wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet through the visible. When processing the amorphous PLLA, both energy threshold and topography varied considerably depending on laser wavelength. Laser irradiation showed a reduction in the energy ablation threshold as the degree of crystallinity increased, probably related to photomechanical effects involved in laser ablation with ultra-short pulses and the lower stress accommodation behavior of semicrystalline polymers. In particular, cooperative chain motions are impeded by the higher degree of crystallinity, showing fragile mechanical behavior and lower energy dissipation. The experimental results on ablation rate versus laser energy showed that UV laser ablation on semicrystalline PLLA was more efficient than the visible ablation, i.e., it exhibits higher etch rates over a wide range of pulse energy conditions. These results were interpreted in terms of photo-thermal and photo-chemical response of polymers as a function of material micro-structure and incident laser wavelength. High quality micro-grooves were produced in amorphous PLLA, reveling the potential of ultra-fast laser processing technique in the field of micro-structuring biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications.

  14. Ablation experiment and threshold calculation of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buxiang Zheng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between an ultra-fast pulse laser and a material's surface has become a research hotspot in recent years. Micromachining of titanium alloy with an ultra-fast pulse laser is a very important research direction, and it has very important theoretical significance and application value in investigating the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse lasers. Irradiated by a picosecond pulse laser with wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm, the surface morphology and feature sizes, including ablation crater width (i.e. diameter, ablation depth, ablation area, ablation volume, single pulse ablation rate, and so forth, of the titanium alloy were studied, and their ablation distributions were obtained. The experimental results show that titanium alloy irradiated by a picosecond pulse infrared laser with a 1064 nm wavelength has better ablation morphology than that of the green picosecond pulse laser with a 532 nm wavelength. The feature sizes are approximately linearly dependent on the laser pulse energy density at low energy density and the monotonic increase in laser pulse energy density. With the increase in energy density, the ablation feature sizes are increased. The rate of increase in the feature sizes slows down gradually once the energy density reaches a certain value, and gradually saturated trends occur at a relatively high energy density. Based on the linear relation between the laser pulse energy density and the crater area of the titanium alloy surface, and the Gaussian distribution of the laser intensity on the cross section, the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by an ultra-fast pulse laser was calculated to be about 0.109 J/cm2.

  15. Heat-affected zone of metals ablated with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Yoichi; Obara, Minoru

    2003-07-01

    The melted area is found on the surface ablated by nanosecond and picosecond laser pulses. However, the heat effect is little on the ablated surface in the case of femtosecond laser due to non-thermal ablation process. Heat-affected zone of metallic bulk crystal ablated with femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulses is experimentally studied. As a result of XRD (X-ray diffraction) measurements, the XRD peak signal of the area ablated with Ti:sapphire laser becomes smaller than that of the crystalline metal sample. While the crystallinity of the metal sample is crystalline before the laser ablation, the crystallinity in the ablated area is partially changed into the amorphous form. Because the residual pulse energy that is not used for the ablation process remains, leading to the formation of thin layer of melt phase. The melt layer is abruptly cooled down not to be re-crystallized, but to transform into the amorphous form. It is evident that the area ablated with femtosecond laser is changed into the amorphous metal. Additionally XRD measurements and AR+ etching are performed alternately to measure the thickness of the amorphous layer. In the case of iron, the thickness is measured to be 1 μm approximately, therefore heat-affected zone is quite small.

  16. MR guided percutaneous laser lumbar disk hernia ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Takuo; Terao, Tohru; Ishibashi, Toshihiro; Yuhki, Ichiro; Harada, Junta; Tashima, Michiko [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital; Abe, Toshiaki

    1998-03-01

    An MRI unit for interventional procedure is very useful for minimally invasive surgery of the brain and spine. Percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) utilizing X-ray fluoroscopy is a relatively new less invasive procedure for treatment of lumbar disc herniation. MR guided laser surgery is applied to patients with disc herniation at our department. Approaching the target of the disc protrusion was easily conducted and vaporizing the disc hernia directly using a laser was possible under MR fluoroscopy. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the usefulness of MR guided percutaneous laser disc hernia ablation (MR-guided PLDHA). As subjects, 36 patients with lumbar disc herniation, including 23 cases with L4/5 involvement and 13 cases with L5/S1 involvement were studied. Among these, 26 were males and 10 were females, age ranging from 24 to 62. We used an open type MR system (Hitachi, Airis 0.3T), a permanent, open configuration MR system. A YAG laser (LaserScope, USA) was used for PLDHA. An MR compatible 18G titanium needle 15 cm in length was used to puncture the herniated discs. The MR compatible needle was clearly visualized, and used to safely and accurately puncture the target herniated disc in each case with multidimensional guidance. Application of the laser was performed with MR guidance. The energy dose from the laser ranged from 800 to 2100 joules. In most cases, signs and symptoms improved in the patients immediately after disc vaporization. The overall success rate was 88.9%. The complication rate was 2.8%, including one case of discitis after PLDHA. MR fluoroscopy sequence permits near real time imaging and provides an easy approach to the therapeutic target of disc herniation. MR guided PLDHA is a minimally invasive procedure and is very useful for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusion. (author)

  17. EUV nanosecond laser ablation of silicon carbide, tungsten and molybdenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Oleksandr; Kolacek, Karel; Schmidt, Jiri; Straus, Jaroslav; Choukourov, Andrei; Kasuya, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present results of study interaction of nanosecond EUV laser pulses at wavelength of 46.9 nm with silicon carbide (SiC), tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo). As a source of laser radiation was used discharge-plasma driver CAPEX (CAPillary EXperiment) based on high current capillary discharge in argon. The laser beam is focused with a spherical Si/Sc multilayer-coated mirror on samples. Experimental study has been performed with 1, 5, 10, 20 and 50 laser pulses ablation of SiC, W and Mo at various fluence values. Firstly, sample surface modification in the nanosecond time scale have been registered by optical microscope. And the secondly, laser beam footprints on the samples have been analyzed by atomic-force microscope (AFM). This work supported by the Czech Science Foundation under Contract GA14-29772S and by the Grant Agency of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic under Contract LG13029.

  18. Laser ablation initiated fast discharge for spectrochemical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinić Milica L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of an experimental study of the optical emission enhancement possibilities during the single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of the aluminum alloy are presented. This study is performed in air, argon and helium at different pressures with and without the additional fast electric discharge. The discharge was initiated by plasma plume created by laser ablation of target. The influences of various capacitors and discharge voltages on enhancement of the studied spectral line intensities were also studied. The application of the fast discharge through optical emission enhancement enables lowering of detection limits thus making this spectrochemical method comparable with the other analytical techniques. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 171014

  19. Dynamics of Molecular Emission Features from Nanosecond, Femtosecond Laser and Filament Ablation Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-06-15

    The evolutionary paths of molecular species and nanoparticles in laser ablation plumes are not well understood due to the complexity of numerous physical processes that occur simultaneously in a transient laser-plasma system. It is well known that the emission features of ions, atoms, molecules and nanoparticles in a laser ablation plume strongly depend on the laser irradiation conditions. In this letter we report the temporal emission features of AlO molecules in plasmas generated using a nanosecond laser, a femtosecond laser and filaments generated from a femtosecond laser. Our results show that, at a fixed laser energy, the persistence of AlO is found to be highest and lowest in ns and filament laser plasmas respectively while molecular species are formed at early times for both ultrashort pulse (fs and filament) generated plasmas. Analysis of the AlO emission band features show that the vibrational temperature of AlO decays rapidly in filament assisted laser ablation plumes.

  20. Endoscopic laser ablation of clival chordoma with magnetic resonance-guided laser induced thermal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Barrese

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The endoscopic endonasal approach to MRI-guided laser ablation is both technically feasible and safe. As a result, this therapy may be a useful alternative in hard-to-reach chordomas, or in recurrent cases that have failed other conventional treatment modalities.

  1. Noncontact Er:YAG laser ablation: clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostálová, T; Jelínková, H; Kucerová, H; Krejsa, O; Hamal, K; Kubelka, J; Procházka, S

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of laser ablation in comparison with the classical drilling preparation. For the experiment, the Er:YAG laser drilling machine was used. The system had a laser head, water cooler, and power supply with automatic control. Spot size of 300-350 microns was used for the preparation. Repetition rate of 1-4 Hz, and pulse energies of 100-400 mJ with water spray were chosen. Cavity shape in comparison with classical drill, time of preparation, and influence of cavity shape on filling materials retention in accordance with the U.S. Public Health Service System were used. The evaluation criteria for noncontact Er:YAG ablation were done. The cavity shape is irregular, but spot surface has larger area and microretentive appearance. Caries of enamel and dentin were treated with a noncontact preparation. It was possible to remove the old insufficient fillings, except for amalgam or metal alloys. The average number of pulses was 111.22 (SE 67.57). Vibrations of microexplosions during preparation were felt by patients on 14 cavities; however, nobody felt unpleasant pain. The qualities of filling materials in laser cavities were very stable; however, cavo surface margin discoloration of 82-86% of Alfa rating could be a problem. Changes of the color and anatomic form of the tooth were observed in 4-8%. In comparison with the classical treatment, it could be said that the retention and quality of filling materials is the same or very similar.

  2. Laser ablation of basal cell carcinomas guided by confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Heidy; Cordova, Miguel; Nehal, Kishwer; Rossi, Anthony; Chen, Chih-Shan Jason; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-02-01

    Laser ablation offers precise and fast removal of superficial and early nodular types of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). Nevertheless, the lack of histological confirmation has been a limitation. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging combined with a contrast agent can offer cellular-level histology-like feedback to detect the presence (or absence) of residual BCC directly on the patient. We conducted an ex vivo bench-top study to provide a set of effective ablation parameters (fluence, number of passes) to remove superficial BCCs while also controlling thermal coagulation post-ablation to allow uptake of contrast agent. The results for an Er:YAG laser (2.9 um and pulse duration 250us) show that with 6 passes of 25 J/cm2, thermal coagulation can be effectively controlled, to allow both the uptake of acetic acid (contrast agent) and detection of residual (or absence) BCCs. Confirmation was provided with histological examination. An initial in vivo study on 35 patients shows that the uptake of contrast agent aluminum chloride) and imaging quality is similar to that observed in the ex vivo study. The detection of the presence of residual tumor or complete clearance was confirmed in 10 wounds with (additional) histology and in 25 lesions with follow-up imaging. Our results indicate that resolution is sufficient but further development and use of appropriate contrast agent are necessary to improve sensitivity and specificity. Advances in RCM technology for imaging of lateral and deep margins directly on the patient may provide less invasive, faster and less expensive image-guided approaches for treatment of BCCs.

  3. Photonic Doppler velocimetry of laser-ablated ultrathin metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, A R; Rodriguez, G; Clarke, S A; Thomas, K A

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining velocity information from the interaction of a laser pulse on a metal layer provides insight into the rapid dynamics of material removal and plasma plume physics during ablation. A traditional approach involves using a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) on a reflective metal surface. However, when the target is a thin metal layer, the cohesion of the surface is quickly lost resulting in a large spread of particle velocities that cannot be easily resolved by VISAR. This is due to material ejection"confusing" the VISAR measurement surface, effectively washing out the spatial fringe visibility in the VISAR interferometer. A new heterodyne-based optical velocimeter method is the photonic Doppler velocimeter (PDV). Because PDV tracks motion in a frequency encoded temporal electro-optical signal, velocity information is preserved and allows for multiple velocity components to be recorded simultaneously. The challenge lies in extracting PDV velocity information at short (nanosecond) laser ablation time scales with rapidly varying heterodyne beats by using electronic, optical, and analytical techniques to recover the velocity information from a fleeting signal. Here we show how we have been able to obtain velocity information on the nanosecond time scale and are able to compare it to hydrodynamic simulations. Also, we examine refinements to our PDV system by increasing the bandwidth, utilizing different probes, and sampling different analysis techniques.

  4. Growth and thermoelectric properties of FeSb2 films produced by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Ye; Canulescu, Stela; Sun, Peijie

    2011-01-01

    by ablating specifically prepared compound targets made of Fe and Sb powders in atomic ratio of 1:4. The thermoelectric transport properties of FeSb2 films were investigated. Pulsed laser deposition was demonstrated as a method for production of good-quality FeSb2 films.......Thermoelectric FeSb2 films were produced by pulsed laser deposition on silica substrates in a low-pressure Ar environment. The growth conditions for near phase-pure FeSb2 films were confirmed to be optimized at a substrate temperature of 425°C, an Ar pressure of 2 Pa, and deposition time of 3 h...

  5. Hard tissue ablation with a spray-assisted mid-IR laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, H W [American Medical Systems, Minnetonka, MN (United States); Rizoiu, I [BioLase Technology, Irvine, CA (United States); Welch, A J [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

    2007-12-21

    The objective of this study was to understand the dominant mechanism(s) for dental enamel ablation with the application of water spray. A free-running Er,Cr:YSGG (yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser was used to ablate human enamel tissue at various radiant exposures. During dental ablation, distilled water was sprayed on the sample surface, and these results were compared to ablation without a spray (dry ablation). In order to identify dominant ablation mechanisms, transient acoustic waves were compared to ablation thresholds and the volume of material removed. The ablation profile and depth were measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Irregular surface modification, charring and peripheral cracks were associated with dry ablation, whereas craters for spray samples were relatively clean without thermal damage. In spite of a 60% higher ablation threshold for spray associated irradiations owing to water absorption, acoustic peak pressures were six times higher and ablation volume was up to a factor of 2 larger compared to dry ablation. The enhanced pressure and ablation performance of the spray-assisted process was the result of rapid water vaporization, material ejection with recoil stress, interstitial water explosion and possibly liquid-jet formation. With water cooling and abrasive/disruptive mechanical effects, the spray ablation can be a safe and efficient modality for dental treatment.

  6. Evidence of diffusive fractal aggregation of TiO2 nanoparticles by femtosecond laser ablation at ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celardo, G. L.; Archetti, D.; Ferrini, G.; Gavioli, L.; Pingue, P.; Cavaliere, E.

    2017-01-01

    The specific mechanisms which lead to the formation of fractal nanostructures by pulsed laser deposition remain elusive despite intense research efforts, motivated mainly by the technological interest in obtaining tailored nanostructures with simple and scalable production methods. Here we focus on fractal nanostructures of titanium dioxide, TiO2, a strategic material for many applications, obtained by femtosecond laser ablation at ambient conditions. We compare a theoretical model of fractal formation with experimental data. The comparison of theory and experiment confirms that fractal aggregates are formed after landing of the ablated material on the substrate surface by a simple diffusive mechanism. We model the fractal formation through extensive Monte Carlo simulations based on a set of minimal assumptions: TiO2 nanoparticles arrive already formed on the substrate, then they diffuse in a size/mass independent way and stick irreversibly upon touching, thus forming fractal clusters. Despite its simplicity, our model explains the main features of the fractal structures arising from the complex interaction of large TiO2 nanoparticles with different substrates. Indeed our model is able to reproduce both the fractal dimensions and the area distributions of the nanostructures for different densities of the ablated material. Finally we discuss the role of the thermal conductivity of the substrate and the laser fluence on the properties of the fractal nanostructures. Our results represent an advancement towards controlling the production of fractal nanostructures by pulsed laser deposition.

  7. ns or fs pulsed laser ablation of a bulk InSb target in liquids for nanoparticles synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaltianos, N G; Hendry, E; Chang, H; Wears, M L; Monteil, G; Assoul, M; Malkhasyan, V; Blondeau-Patissier, V; Gauthier-Manuel, B; Moutarlier, V

    2016-05-01

    Laser ablation of bulk target materials in liquids has been established as an alternative method for the synthesis of nanoparticles colloidal solutions mainly due to the fact that the synthesized nanoparticles have bare, ligand-free surfaces since no chemical precursors are used for their synthesis. InSb is a narrow band gap semiconductor which has the highest carrier mobility of any known semiconductor and nanoparticles of this material are useful in optoelectronic device fabrication. In this paper a bulk InSb target was ablated in deionized (DI) water or ethanol using a nanosecond (20 ns) or a femtosecond (90 fs) pulsed laser source, for nanoparticles synthesis. In all four cases the largest percentage of the nanoparticles are of InSb in the zincblende crystal structure with fcc lattice. Oxides of either In or Sb are also formed in the nanoparticles ensembles in the case of ns or fs ablation, respectively. Formation of an oxide of either element from the two elements of the binary bulk alloy is explained based on the difference in the ablation mechanism of the material in the case of ns or fs pulsed laser irradiation in which the slow or fast deposition of energy into the material results to mainly melting or vaporization, respectively under the present conditions of ablation, in combination with the lower melting point but higher vaporization enthalpy of In as compared to Sb. InSb in the metastable phase with orthorhombic lattice is also formed in the nanoparticles ensembles in the case of fs ablation in DI water (as well as oxide of InSb) which indicates that the synthesized nanoparticles exhibit polymorphism controlled by the type of the laser source used for their synthesis. The nanoparticles exhibit absorption which is observed to be extended in the infrared region of the spectrum.

  8. Particle Generation by Pulsed Excimer Laser Ablation in Liquid: Hollow Structures and Laser-Induced Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zijie

    2011-12-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of solid targets in liquid media is a powerful method to fabricate micro-/nanoparticles, which has attracted much interest in the past decade. It represents a combinatorial library of constituents and interactions, and one can explore disparate regions of parameter space with outcomes that are impossible to envision a priori. In this work, a pulsed excimer laser (wavelength 248 nm, pulse width 30 ns) has been used to ablate targets in liquid media with varying laser fluences, frequencies, ablation times and surfactants. It is observed that hollow particles could be fabricated by excimer laser ablation of Al, Pt, Zn, Mg, Ag, Si, TiO2, and Nb2O5 in water or aqueous solutions. The hollow particles, with sizes from tens of nanometers to micrometers, may have smooth and continuous shells or have morphologies demonstrating that they were assembled from nanoparticles. A new mechanism has been proposed to explain the formation of these novel particle geometries. They were formed on laser-produced bubbles through bubble interface pinning by laser-produced solid species. Considering the bubble dynamics, thermodynamic and kinetic requirements have been discussed in the mechanism that can explain some phenomena associated with the formation of hollow particles, especially (1) larger particles are more likely to be hollow particles; (2) Mg and Al targets have stronger tendency to generate hollow particles; and (3) the 248 nm excimer laser is more beneficial to fabricate hollow particles in water than other lasers with longer wavelengths. The work has also demonstrated the possiblities to fabricate novel nanostructures through laser-induced reactions. Zn(OH)2/dodecyl sulfate flower-like nanostructures, AgCl cubes, and Ag2O cubes, pyramids, triangular plates, pentagonal rods and bars have been obtained via reactions between laser-produced species with water, electrolyes, or surfactant molecules. The underlying mechanisms of forming these structures have been

  9. Laser ablation plume expansion into an ambient gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, S.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    The use of an ambient gas is a well-established method employed in pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with nanosecond pulses and has been extensively studied in this context. Most of the existing treatments of the plume expansion are tackled by using complex numerical modeling involving specific target...

  10. Laser ablation plume expansion into an ambient gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, S.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    The use of an ambient gas is a well-established method employed in pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with nanosecond pulses and has been extensively studied in this context. Most of the existing treatments of the plume expansion are tackled by using complex numerical modeling involving specific target...

  11. ZnO(101) films by pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Angappane; N R Selvi; G U Kulkarni

    2009-06-01

    We have employed pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation (PRCLA) to deposit a (101) oriented ZnO film. In this method, a supersonic jet of oxygen pulse is made to cross the laser plume from a zinc metal target while being carried to the Si(111) substrate. The obtained deposit was nanocrystalline ZnO as confirmed by a host of characterization techniques. When the substrate was held at varying temperatures, from room temperature to 900°C, the crystallinity of the obtained films increased as expected, but importantly, the crystallographic orientation of the films was varied. High substrate temperatures produced the usual (001) oriented films, while lower substrate temperatures gave rise to increasingly (101) oriented films. The substrate held at room temperature contained only the (101) orientation. The film morphology also varied with the substrate temperature, from being nanoparticulate to rod-like deposits for higher deposition temperatures. Surprisingly, the (101) orientation showed reactivity with acetone forming carbonaceous nanostructures on the surface.

  12. Laser ablation of FOX-7: proposed mechanism of decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civis, Martin; Civis, Svatopluk; Sovová, Kristýna; Dryahina, Kseniya; Spanel, Patrik; Kyncl, Martin

    2011-02-01

    A novel high-energy explosive material, FOX-7 (1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene), was studied using a combination of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS). The LIBS technique uses short laser pulses (an ArF excimer laser) as the energy source to convert small quantities of a sample into plasma and to induce the emission of its molecular fragments or atoms. SIFT-MS is a novel method for absolute quantification based on chemical ionization using three reagent ions, with the ability to determine concentrations of trace gases and vapors of volatile organic compounds in real time. SIFT-MS was used to study the release of NO, NO(2), HCN, HONO, HCHO, CH(3)CH(2)OH, and C(2)H(2) after laser ablation of the explosive compound FOX-7 in solid crystalline form. The radiation emitted after excitation was analyzed using a time-resolved UV-vis spectrometer with an ICCD detector. The electronic bands of CN (388 nm), OH (308.4 nm), and NO (237.1 nm) radicals and the atomic lines of C, N, and H were identified.

  13. Femtosecond laser ablation of cemented carbides: properties and tribological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, G.; Romano, V.; Weber, H. P.; Gerbig, Y.; Haefke, H.; Bruneau, S.; Hermann, J.; Sentis, M.

    Laser ablation with fs laser pulses was performed in air on cobalt cemented tungsten carbide by means of a Ti : sapphire laser (800 nm, 100 fs). Small and moderate fluences (2, 5, 10 J/cm2) and up to 5×104 pulses per irradiated spot were used to drill holes with aspect ratios up to 10. Cross-section cuts from laser-irradiated samples were produced and they were analysed with optical microscopy and SEM. EDX analyses were carried out on selected zones. Quasi-cylindrical holes were found for 2 J/cm2, whereas for 5 and 10 J/cm2 irregular shapes (lobes, bottoms wider than hole entrances) were found to occur after a given number of incident pulses. Layers with modified structure were evidenced at pore walls. SEM revealed a denser structure, while EDX analyses showed uniform and almost similar contents of W, C, and Co in these layers. As a direct application, patterning of coated WC-Co was carried out with 2 J/cm2 and 100 pulses per pore. The resulted surfaces were tribologically tested and these tests revealed an improved friction and wear behaviour.

  14. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Al-Hadeethi

    Full Text Available Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX. The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased.

  15. A new sealed RF-excited CO2 laser for enamel ablation operating at 9.4μm with pulse duration of 26 μs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kenneth H.; Jew, Jamison M.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Several studies over the past 20 years have identified that carbon dioxide lasers operating at wavelengths between 9.3 and 9.6-μm with pulse durations near 20-µs are ideal for hard tissue ablation. Those wavelengths are coincident with the peak absorption of the mineral phase and the pulse duration is close to the thermal relaxation time of the deposited energy of a few microseconds to minimize peripheral thermal damage and long enough to minimize plasma shielding effects to allow efficient ablation at practical rates. The desired pulse duration near 20-μs has been difficult to achieve since it is too long for TEA lasers and too short for RF-excited lasers for efficient operation. Recently, Coherent Inc. (Santa Clara, CA) developed the J5-V laser for microvia drilling which can produce laser pulses greater than 100 mJ in energy at 9.4-μm with a pulse duration of 26-µs and it can achieve pulse repetition rates of 3 KHz. We report the first results using this laser to ablate enamel and dentin. The onset of plasma shielding does not occur until the fluence exceeds 100 J/cm2 allowing efficient ablation at rates exceeding 50-μm per pulse. This laser is ideally suited for the selective ablation of carious lesions.

  16. Picosecond and subpicosecond pulsed laser deposition of Pb thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gontad

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pb thin films were deposited on Nb substrates by means of pulsed laser deposition (PLD with UV radiation (248 nm, in two different ablation regimes: picosecond (5 ps and subpicosecond (0.5 ps. Granular films with grain size on the micron scale have been obtained, with no evidence of large droplet formation. All films presented a polycrystalline character with preferential orientation along the (111 crystalline planes. A maximum quantum efficiency (QE of 7.3×10^{-5} (at 266 nm and 7 ns pulse duration was measured, after laser cleaning, demonstrating good photoemission performance for Pb thin films deposited by ultrashort PLD. Moreover, Pb thin film photocathodes have maintained their QE for days, providing excellent chemical stability and durability. These results suggest that Pb thin films deposited on Nb by ultrashort PLD are a noteworthy alternative for the fabrication of photocathodes for superconductive radio-frequency electron guns. Finally, a comparison with the characteristics of Pb films prepared by ns PLD is illustrated and discussed.

  17. Corneal morphology after ex-vivo UV and mid-infrared laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyratou, E.; Voloudakis, G. E.; Moutsouris, K.; Asproudis, I.; Baltatzis, S.; Makropoulou, M.; Bacharis, C.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2008-12-01

    In this work, ablation experiments of ex vivo porcine cornea tissue were conducted with two solid state lasers (an Er:YAG laser and the 4th harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser, both in the ns pulse width range) emitting in mid infrared and ultraviolet part of the spectrum respectively, at moderate laser fluences. The cornea epithelium of each porcine eye was manually removed before the ablation. Histology analysis of the specimens was performed, in order to examine the microscopic appearance of the ablated craters and the existence of any thermal or mechanical damage caused by the midinfrared and the UV laser irradiation. For a detailed and complete examination of the morphology of the laser ablated corneal tissue, the surface roughness was investigated by scanning electron microscopy.

  18. The study of laser plasma plume radiation produced by laser ablation of silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qingju

    2014-12-01

    In order to study the laser plasma plume radiation mechanisms induced by the interaction between Nd: YAG plused laser and silicon, the radiation model of silicon laser plasma plume is established. Laser plasma plume radiation includes atom characteristic lines, ion lines and continuous background. It can reflect the characteristics of laser plasma plume radiation, reveal the mechanism of laser ablation on silicon. Time-resolved measurment of laser plasma plume radiation produced by pulsed Nd: YAG laser ablation of silicon in different ambient gas is thoroughly studied. The experimental ambient gas are N2 and O2.The pulse width of Nd: YAG plused laser adopted in the experiment is 20ns, the pulse energy is 60mJ, the laser pulsing frequency is 10Hz, and the emitted laser wavelength is 1064nm, The silicon target purity is 99.99%, The target is rotating at a speed of 240r/min. The focusing area of the laser on the Si target has a diameter of around 0.8mm.The pressure of ambient gas is tunable between 13Pa and 101.3kPa in the induced chamber, the number of points used in averaging is 15. The experimental results show that the ambient gas has obvious enhancement effect on the radiation intensity of silicon laser plasma plume. With the increase of the ambient gas pressure, the silicon laser plasma plume radiation intensity will first be increased and then be decreased, and the ambient gas has an obvious compression effect on the scope of silicon laser plasma plume radiation. For the two different ambient gases, the maximum silicon laser plasma plume radiation intensity and maximum pressure for they are different, for oxygen at 35kPa, for nitrogen at 50kPa. The silicon laser plasma plume radiation intensity in oxygen is bigger than that in nitrogen.The main excition mechanisms of laser plasma plume radiation induced by Nd:YAG plused laser induced silicon is analyzed, The plused laser can makes part molecules in the ambient gas and silicon atoms ionized at the surface of

  19. Growth of arrays of Al-doped ZnO nanocones by pulsed laser deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ye; Addison, Katherine E; Ashfold, Michael N R

    2007-12-12

    Arrays of aligned Al-doped ZnO nanocones have been synthesized by pulsed laser deposition following excimer laser ablation of a ceramic ZnO target containing 2% Al(2)O(3) (by weight). The elemental composition, microstructural and optical properties of the products were examined by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and room temperature photoluminescence measurements. The incident laser fluence was identified as a key parameter in nanocone formation. Their tapered morphologies and small tip diameters (approximately 5 nm) suggest that Al-doped ZnO nanocones could find application as field emitters and as a gas sensing material.

  20. ["Skin rejuvenation" by non-ablative laser and light systems. Literature research and overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grema, H; Raulin, C; Greve, B

    2002-06-01

    Currently, ablative laser therapy (with CO2/Er:YAG lasers) and deep chemical peeling are effective and promising methods of skin rejuvenation. The induction of collagen synthesis was observed after peelings with trichloroacetic acid or phenol as well as after treatments with the CO2 laser. In past years, the undesirable side effects and risks of these methods have led to intensified research in the fields of non-ablative facial rejuvenation and subsurfacing by means of ablative laser systems and intense pulsed light systems. The objective is to achieve selective, heat-induced denaturalisation of dermal collagen that leads to subsequent reactive synthesis but does not damage the epidermis. Recently, the results of numerous clinical and histological studies have indicated that these new technologies are successful. After critical review and assessment of current literature, we can say that in terms of their efficacy, non-ablative methods are not a comparable alternative to ablative skin resurfacing.

  1. Fabrication of gold nanoparticles in water by laser ablation technique and their characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haider, A.F.M.Y.; Sengupta, S.; Abedin, K.M.; Talukder, Aminul I. [University of Dhaka, Physics Department and Non-linear Optics and Laser Spectroscopy Laboratory, Centre of Advanced Research in Sciences, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2011-11-15

    A colloidal solution of gold nanoparticles in deionized nanopure water was produced by laser ablation technique without the use of any chemical/surfactant. Spectral characterization and morphological studies of these nanoparticles were carried out by UV-Vis Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy, respectively. A number of variables of the ablating laser pulse have been used to control the size of the fabricated nanoparticles. Excellent correlation between ablating laser pulse parameter and optical and morphological parameters of the gold colloids were obtained. The peak of the extinction spectra shows a monotonic blue shift for laser fluence of 410 J/cm{sup 2} and above. Below this the extinction peak remains fairly constant in wavelength. Blue shifts of the extinction spectra were also observed with increasing re-ablation time of previously ablated gold colloids. Possible explanations of all these observations are discussed. (orig.)

  2. Ultrafast properties of femtosecond-laser-ablated GaAs and its application to terahertz optoelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madéo, Julien; Margiolakis, Athanasios; Zhao, Zhen-Yu; Hale, Peter J; Man, Michael K L; Zhao, Quan-Zhong; Peng, Wei; Shi, Wang-Zhou; Dani, Keshav M

    2015-07-15

    We report on the first terahertz (THz) emitter based on femtosecond-laser-ablated gallium arsenide (GaAs), demonstrating a 65% enhancement in THz emission at high optical power compared to the nonablated device. Counter-intuitively, the ablated device shows significantly lower photocurrent and carrier mobility. We understand this behavior in terms of n-doping, shorter carrier lifetime, and enhanced photoabsorption arising from the ablation process. Our results show that laser ablation allows for efficient and cost-effective optoelectronic THz devices via the manipulation of fundamental properties of materials.

  3. Experimental investigation and 3D-simulation of the ablated morphology of titanium surface using femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Chen, Chuansong; Man, Baoyuan; Meng, Xue; Sun, Yanna; Li, Feifei

    2015-12-01

    The femtosecond laser ablated morphology on titanium surface is investigated theoretically and experimentally. A three dimensional two temperature model (3D-TTM) is used to simulate the surface morphology of titanium sample which is irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses. The electron heat capacity and electron-phonon coupling coefficient of titanium (transition metal) are complex temperature dependent, so the two parameters are corrected based on the theory of electron density of states (DOS). The model is solved by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The 3D temperature field near the target surface is achieved. The radius and depth of the ablated crater are obtained based on the temperature field. The evolutions of the crate's radius and depth with laser fluence are discussed and compared with the experimental results. It is found that the back-flow of the molten material and the deposition of the material vapor should be responsible for the little discrepancy between the simulated and experimental results. The present work makes a better understanding of the thermodynamic process of femtosecond laser ablating metal and meanwhile provides an effective method tool to predict the micro manufacturing process on metals with femtosecond laser.

  4. Characterization of laser ablation of copper in the irradiance regime of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picard, J., E-mail: jessica.picard@cea.fr [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DAM, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Sirven, J.-B.; Lacour, J.-L. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DPC/SEARS/LANIE, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Musset, O. [Université de Bourgogne, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS 5209, F-21000 Dijon (France); Cardona, D.; Hubinois, J.-C. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DAM, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Mauchien, P. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DPC/SEARS/LANIE, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2014-11-01

    The LIBS signal depends both on the ablated mass and on the plasma excitation temperature. These fundamental parameters depend in a complex manner on laser ablation and on laser–plasma coupling. As several works in the literature suggest that laser ablation processes play a predominant role compared to plasma heating phenomena in the LIBS signal variations, this paper focuses on the study of laser ablation. The objective was to determine an interaction regime enabling to maximally control the laser ablation. Nanosecond laser ablation of copper at 266 nm was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry analysis, in air at 1 bar and in the vacuum. The laser beam spatial profile at the sample surface was characterized in order to give realistic values of the irradiance. The effect of the number of accumulated laser shots on the crater volume was studied. Then, the ablation crater morphology, volume, depth and diameter were measured as a function of irradiance between 0.35 and 96 GW/cm². Results show that in the vacuum, a regular trend is observed over the whole irradiance range. In air at 1 bar, below a certain irradiance, laser ablation is very similar to the vacuum case, and the ablation efficiency of copper was estimated at 0.15 ± 0.03 atom/photon. Beyond this irradiance, the laser beam propagation is strongly disrupted by the expansion of the dense plasma, and plasma shielding appears. The fraction of laser energy used for laser ablation and for plasma heating is estimated in the different irradiance regimes. - Highlights: • The morphology of copper's craters was studied as a function of the pulse energy. • Correlation at low energy and two pressures between crater volume and pulse energy • The ablation efficiency of copper at 1 bar is equal to 0.15 atom/photon. • Ablation efficiency in the vacuum is not limited by laser–plasma interaction. • Physical mechanisms of laser ablation at both pressures are discussed.

  5. Measurements of erbium laser-ablation efficiency in hard dental tissues under different water cooling conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuščer, Lovro; Diaci, Janez

    2013-10-01

    Laser triangulation measurements of Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser-ablated volumes in hard dental tissues are made, in order to verify the possible existence of a "hydrokinetic" effect that has been proposed as an alternative to the "subsurface water expansion" mechanism for hard-tissue laser ablation. No evidence of the hydrokinetic effect could be observed under a broad range of tested laser parameters and water cooling conditions. On the contrary, the application of water spray during laser exposure of hard dental material is observed to diminish the laser-ablation efficiency (AE) in comparison with laser exposure under the absence of water spray. Our findings are in agreement with the generally accepted principle of action for erbium laser ablation, which is based on fast subsurface expansion of laser-heated water trapped within the interstitial structure of hard dental tissues. Our measurements also show that the well-known phenomenon of ablation stalling, during a series of consecutive laser pulses, can primarily be attributed to the blocking of laser light by the loosely bound and recondensed desiccated minerals that collect on the tooth surface during and following laser ablation. In addition to the prevention of tooth bulk temperature buildup, a positive function of the water spray that is typically used with erbium dental lasers is to rehydrate these minerals, and thus sustaining the subsurface expansion ablation process. A negative side effect of using a continuous water spray is that the AE gets reduced due to the laser light being partially absorbed in the water-spray particles above the tooth and in the collected water pool on the tooth surface. Finally, no evidence of the influence of the water absorption shift on the hypothesized increase in the AE of the Er,Cr:YSGG wavelength is observed.

  6. Incongruent transfer in laser deposition of FeSiGaRu thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Riet, E.; Kools, J. C. S.; Dieleman, J.

    1993-06-01

    The laser ablation and deposition of FeSiGaRu is studied. The deposited thin films are analyzed with Auger electron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. It is found that the gallium and ruthenium content of the thin films is strongly dependent on the laser fluence. At high laser fluences (6 J/cm2) the thin films are depleted of gallium due to preferential sputtering of the gallium atoms from the thin film. Near the threshold fluence (1.9 J/cm2) the films contain an excess of gallium due to preferential evaporation of gallium from the target. The latter conclusions are based on time-of-flight studies of ablated atoms and ions and on measurements of the atoms that are sputtered from the substrate by the incoming flux.

  7. Investigation of droplet formation in pulsed Nd:YAG laser deposition of metals and silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siew, Wee-Ong; Lee, Wai-Keat; Wong, Hin-Yong; Tou, Teck-Yong [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yong, Thian-Khok [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yap, Seong-Shan [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Institute of Physics, Trondheim (Norway)

    2010-12-15

    In the process of pulsed laser deposition of nickel (Ni) and ruthenium (Ru) thin films, the occurrence of phase explosion in ablation was found to affect the deposition rate and enhance the optical emissions from the plasma plume. Faster thin-film growth rates coincide with the onset of phase explosion as a result of superheating and/or sub-surface boiling which also increased the particulates found on the thin-film surface. These particulates were predominantly droplets which may not be round but flattened and also debris for the case of silicon (Si) ablation. The droplets from Ni and Ru thin films were compared in terms of size distribution and number density for different laser fluences. The origins of these particulates were correlated to the bubble and ripple formations on the targets while the transfer to the thin film surface was attributed to the laser-induced ejection from the targets. (orig.)

  8. Precise ablation of dental hard tissues with ultra-short pulsed lasers. Preliminary exploratory investigation on adequate laser parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; Wehner, Martin; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Lampert, Friedrich; Poprawe, Reinhart; Hermans, Martin; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of introducing ultra-short pulsed lasers (USPL) in restorative dentistry by maintaining the well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also overcoming disadvantages, such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. USPL ablation of dental hard tissues was investigated in two phases. Phase 1--different wavelengths (355, 532, 1,045, and 1,064 nm), pulse durations (picoseconds and femtoseconds) and irradiation parameters (scanning speed, output power, and pulse repetition rate) were assessed for enamel and dentin. Ablation rate was determined, and the temperature increase measured in real time. Phase 2--the most favorable laser parameters were evaluated to correlate temperature increase to ablation rate and ablation efficiency. The influence of cooling methods (air, air-water spray) on ablation process was further analyzed. All parameters tested provided precise and selective tissue ablation. For all lasers, faster scanning speeds resulted in better interaction and reduced temperature increase. The most adequate results were observed for the 1064-nm ps-laser and the 1045-nm fs-laser. Forced cooling caused moderate changes in temperature increase, but reduced ablation, being considered unnecessary during irradiation with USPL. For dentin, the correlation between temperature increase and ablation efficiency was satisfactory for both pulse durations, while for enamel, the best correlation was observed for fs-laser, independently of the power used. USPL may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, since effective ablation and low temperature increase were observed. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this technique seems to be promising for promoting the laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach.

  9. Physical mechanisms of SiN{sub x} layer structuring with ultrafast lasers by direct and confined laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, S., E-mail: rapp@hm.edu [Faculty of Applied Sciences and Mechatronics, Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstraße 34, 80335 Munich (Germany); Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Straße 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Heinrich, G. [Technische Universität Ilmenau, Institut für Physik, Weimarer Straße 25., 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Straße 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany); Wollgarten, M. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Huber, H. P. [Faculty of Applied Sciences and Mechatronics, Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstraße 34, 80335 Munich (Germany); Schmidt, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Lehrstuhl für Photonische Technologien, Konrad-Zuse-Straße 3-5, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-03-14

    In the production process of silicon microelectronic devices and high efficiency silicon solar cells, local contact openings in thin dielectric layers are required. Instead of photolithography, these openings can be selectively structured with ultra-short laser pulses by confined laser ablation in a fast and efficient lift off production step. Thereby, the ultrafast laser pulse is transmitted by the dielectric layer and absorbed at the substrate surface leading to a selective layer removal in the nanosecond time domain. Thermal damage in the substrate due to absorption is an unwanted side effect. The aim of this work is to obtain a deeper understanding of the physical laser-material interaction with the goal of finding a damage-free ablation mechanism. For this, thin silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) layers on planar silicon (Si) wafers are processed with infrared fs-laser pulses. Two ablation types can be distinguished: The known confined ablation at fluences below 300 mJ/cm{sup 2} and a combined partial confined and partial direct ablation at higher fluences. The partial direct ablation process is caused by nonlinear absorption in the SiN{sub x} layer in the center of the applied Gaussian shaped laser pulses. Pump-probe investigations of the central area show ultra-fast reflectivity changes typical for direct laser ablation. Transmission electron microscopy results demonstrate that the Si surface under the remaining SiN{sub x} island is not damaged by the laser ablation process. At optimized process parameters, the method of direct laser ablation could be a good candidate for damage-free selective structuring of dielectric layers on absorbing substrates.

  10. Impact of different vehicles for laser-assisted drug permeation via skin: full-surface versus fractional ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Li, Yi-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to assess impact of different vehicles for laser-assisted skin drug delivery. We also tried to uncover the mechanisms by which different vehicles affect laser-aided skin permeation. Full-surface ablative (conventional) and fractional lasers were used to irradiate nude mouse skin. Imiquimod and 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) were used as lipophilic and hydrophilic permeants. Vehicles employed included water with 40% polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG 400), propylene glycol (PG), and ethanol. Lipid nanoparticles were also utilized as carriers. In vitro permeation profiles showed improvement in imiquimod flux with conventional laser (2.5 J/cm2) producing a 12-, 9-, and 5-fold increase when loading imiquimod in 40% PEG400, PG, and ethanol, respectively, as compared with intact skin. Nanoparticulate delivery by laser produced a 6-fold enhancement in permeation. Fractional laser produced less enhancement of imiquimod delivery than conventional laser. Laser exposure increased follicular imiquimod accumulation from 0.80 to 5.81 μg/cm2. ALA permeation from aqueous buffer, PEG 400, and PG with conventional laser treatment was 641-, 445-, and 104-fold superior to passive control. In vivo skin deposition of topically applied ALA examined by confocal microscopy indicated the same trend as the in vitro experiment, with aqueous buffer showing the greatest proporphyllin IX signaling. Diffusion of cosolvent molecules into ablated skin and drug partitioning from vehicle to skin are two predominant factors controlling laser-assisted delivery. In contrast to conventional laser, lateral drug diffusion was anticipated for fractional laser. Our results suggest that different drug delivery vehicles substantially influence drug penetration enhanced by lasers.

  11. Co:MgF2 laser ablation of tissue: effect of wavelength on ablation threshold and thermal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomacker, K T; Domankevitz, Y; Flotte, T J; Deutsch, T F

    1991-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of the ablation threshold of a variety of tissues has been studied by using a tunable pulsed Co:MgF2 laser to determine how closely it tracks the optical absorption length of water. The Co:MgF2 laser was tuned between 1.81 and 2.14 microns, a wavelength region in which the absorption length varies by a decade. For soft tissues the ablation threshold tracks the optical absorption length; for bone there is little wavelength dependence, consistent with the low water content of bone. Thermal damage vs. wavelength was also studied for cornea and bone. Thermal damage to cornea has a weak wavelength dependence, while that to bone shows little wavelength dependence. Framing-camera pictures of the ablation of both cornea and liver show explosive removal of material, but differ as to the nature of the explosion.

  12. Water content contribution in calculus phantom ablation during Q-switched Tm:YAG laser lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian J; Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Xuan, Jason Rongwei; Wang, Hui; Chia, Ray W J; Hasenberg, Tom; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Q-switched (QS) Tm:YAG laser ablation mechanisms on urinary calculi are still unclear to researchers. Here, dependence of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance was investigated. White gypsum cement was used as a calculus phantom model. The calculus phantoms were ablated by a total 3-J laser pulse exposure (20 mJ, 100 Hz, 1.5 s) and contact mode with N=15 sample size. Ablation volume was obtained on average 0.079, 0.122, and 0.391  mm3 in dry calculus in air, wet calculus in air, and wet calculus in-water groups, respectively. There were three proposed ablation mechanisms that could explain the effect of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance, including shock wave due to laser pulse injection and bubble collapse, spallation, and microexplosion. Increased absorption coefficient of wet calculus can cause stronger spallation process compared with that caused by dry calculus; as a result, higher calculus ablation was observed in both wet calculus in air and wet calculus in water. The test result also indicates that the shock waves generated by short laser pulse under the in-water condition have great impact on the ablation volume by Tm:YAG QS laser.

  13. Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and ablation threshold analysis using a megahertz Yb fiber laser oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Gregory J.; Parker, Daniel E.; Nie, Bai; Lozovoy, Vadim [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Dantus, Marcos, E-mail: dantus@msu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    A LIBS system is demonstrated using a 100 m cavity Yb fiber oscillator producing ~ 70 ps, 320 nJ clusters of 50–100 fs sub-pulses at 2 MHz. A new empirical model for femtosecond ablation is presented to explain the LIBS signal intensity's non-linear dependence on pulse fluence by accounting for the Gaussian beam's spatial distribution. This model is compared to experimental data and found to be superior to linear threshold fits. This model is then used to measure the ablation threshold of Cu using a typical amplified Ti:sapphire system, and found to reproduce previously reported values to within ~ 20%. The ablation threshold of Cu using the Yb fiber oscillator system was measured to be five times lower than on the amplified Ti:sapphire system. This effect is attributed to the formation of nanostructures on the surface, which have previously been shown to decrease the ablation threshold. The plasma lifetime is found to be ~ 1 ns, much shorter than that of nanosecond ablation, further indicating that the decreased threshold results from surface effects rather than laser–plasma interaction. The low threshold and high pulse energy of the Yb fiber oscillator allows the acquisition of LIBS spectra at megahertz repetition rates. This system could potentially be developed into a compact, fiber-based portable LIBS device taking advantage of the benefits of ultrafast pulses and high repetition rates. - Highlights: • We performed LIBS using a unique ultrafast fiber laser oscillator producing clusters of femtosecond pulses at 2 MHz. • We found the LIBS threshold to be lower than the ablation threshold for single femtosecond laser pulses. • We introduce a model for the LIBS threshold that leads to more accurate determination of threshold values. • We provide results for a number of different solid samples. • The new setup could lead to the design of very compact (portable) and femtosecond-LIBS setups.

  14. Spallative ablation of dielectrics by X-ray laser

    CERN Document Server

    Inogamov, N A; Faenov, A Ya; Khokhlov, V A; Shepelev, V V; Skobelev, I Yu; Kato, Y; Tanaka, M; Pikuz, T A; Kishimoto, M; Ishino, M; Nishikino, M; Fukuda, Y; Bulanov, S V; Kawachi, T; Petrov, Yu V; Anisimov, S I; Fortov, V E

    2009-01-01

    Short laser pulse in wide range of wavelengths, from infrared to X-ray, disturbs electron-ion equilibrium and rises pressure in a heated layer. The case where pulse duration $\\tau_L$ is shorter than acoustic relaxation time $t_s$ is considered in the paper. It is shown that this short pulse may cause thermomechanical phenomena such as spallative ablation regardless to wavelength. While the physics of electron-ion relaxation on wavelength and various electron spectra of substances: there are spectra with an energy gap in semiconductors and dielectrics opposed to gapless continuous spectra in metals. The paper describes entire sequence of thermomechanical processes from expansion, nucleation, foaming, and nanostructuring to spallation with particular attention to spallation by X-ray pulse.

  15. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of gold nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caricato, A.P. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Fernandez, M. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Leggieri, G. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy)]. E-mail: leggieri@le.infn.it; Luches, A. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Martino, M. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Romano, F. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Tunno, T. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Valerini, D. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Verdyan, A. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Soifer, Y.M. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Azoulay, J. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Meda, L. [IGD Polimeri Europa S.p.A, Novara (Italy)

    2007-07-31

    We report on the growth and characterization of gold nitride thin films on Si <1 0 0> substrates at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation. A pure (99.95%) Au target was ablated with KrF excimer laser pulses in nitrogen containing atmosphere (N{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}). The gas ambient pressure was varied in the range 0.1-100 Pa. The morphology of the films was studied by using optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, evidencing compact films with RMS roughness in the range 3.6-35.1 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) were used to detect the nitrogen concentration into the films. The EDS nitrogen peak does not decrease in intensity after 2 h annealing at 250 deg. C. Film resistivity was measured using a four-point probe and resulted in the (4-20) x 10{sup -8} {omega} m range, depending on the ambient pressure, to be compared with the value 2.6 x 10{sup -8} {omega} m of a pure gold film. Indentation and scratch measurements gave microhardness values of 2-3 GPa and the Young's modulus close to 100 GPa. X-ray photoemission spectra clearly showed the N 1s peak around 400 eV and displaced with respect to N{sub 2} phase. All these measurements point to the formation of the gold nitride phase.

  16. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of gold nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricato, A. P.; Fernàndez, M.; Leggieri, G.; Luches, A.; Martino, M.; Romano, F.; Tunno, T.; Valerini, D.; Verdyan, A.; Soifer, Y. M.; Azoulay, J.; Meda, L.

    2007-07-01

    We report on the growth and characterization of gold nitride thin films on Si substrates at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation. A pure (99.95%) Au target was ablated with KrF excimer laser pulses in nitrogen containing atmosphere (N 2 or NH 3). The gas ambient pressure was varied in the range 0.1-100 Pa. The morphology of the films was studied by using optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, evidencing compact films with RMS roughness in the range 3.6-35.1 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) were used to detect the nitrogen concentration into the films. The EDS nitrogen peak does not decrease in intensity after 2 h annealing at 250 °C. Film resistivity was measured using a four-point probe and resulted in the (4-20) × 10 -8 Ω m range, depending on the ambient pressure, to be compared with the value 2.6 × 10 -8 Ω m of a pure gold film. Indentation and scratch measurements gave microhardness values of 2-3 GPa and the Young's modulus close to 100 GPa. X-ray photoemission spectra clearly showed the N 1s peak around 400 eV and displaced with respect to N 2 phase. All these measurements point to the formation of the gold nitride phase.

  17. Reactions of Laser Ablation-magnesium Plasma with Methanol Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The laser ablation-molecular beam(LA-MB) method is useful for studying the reactions of metal ions with molecular clusters. Reactions of magnesium plasma with methanol clusters were studied by using this method. A specially designed reaction cell was used as a fast flow reactor operated under thermal conditions, and the reaction products were measured with a time-of-flight(TOF) mass spectrometer. Surprisingly, several series of cluster ions with complex sizes and intensity distributions were obtained when the laser ablating was applied to different parts of the molecular beam. In the front part of the molecular beam, strong Mg+ (CH3OH)n ( n = 0-5 ) and weak H+ (CH3OH)n (n = 0-5) cluster ions were observed with relatively small cluster sizes; in the middle part of the molecular beam,the main cluster ions were H+(CH3OH)n(n =6-17) and H+(H2O)2(CH3OH)n(n =6-17) with a relatively large cluster size and a weak intensity; in the back part of the molecular beam, two new series of cluster ions,MgO+ (H2O) (CH3OH) n ( n = 6-10) and MgOCH3+ (CH3OH)n ( n = 6-10), were obtained and accompanied by weak H+ (CH3OH)n(n = 4-7) and H+ (H2O)2 (CH3OH)n (n= 3-6). The formation mechanisms and speed characteristics of the cluster ions are discussed in this article.

  18. [A comparative analysis of tonsillectomy and ablation of the palatine tonsils with CO2 laser].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbyshko, Ia B

    2007-01-01

    Efficacy and toletance of two methods were compared: ablation of the palatine tonsils with CO2 laser and tonsillectomy. 270 case histories (118 after tonsillectomy and 152 after laser ablation of the palatine tonsils) have been analysed and 50 patients from each group have been examined. The comparison of the methods leads to conclusion that laser ablation of the palatine tonsils prevents intraoperative and postoperative complications; makes postoperative hemostatic therapy unnecessary; allows conduction of the operations in outpatient clinics or day hospitals; causes minimal pain in the postoperative period; shortens duration of disability.

  19. Demonstration of periodic nanostructure formation with less ablation by double-pulse laser irradiation on titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yuki; Sakata, Ryoichi; Konishi, Kazuki; Ono, Koki; Matsuoka, Shusaku; Watanabe, Kota; Inoue, Shunsuke; Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji

    2016-06-01

    By pairing femtosecond laser pulses (duration ˜40 fs and central wavelength ˜810 nm) at an appropriate time interval, a laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is formed with much less ablation than one formed with a single pulse. On a titanium plate, a pair of laser pulses with fluences of 70 and 140 mJ/cm2 and a rather large time interval (>10 ps) creates a LIPSS with an interspace of 600 nm, the same as that formed by a single pulse of 210 mJ/cm2, while the double pulse ablates only 4 nm, a quarter of the ablation depth of a single pulse.

  20. Percutaneous laser ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with liver cirrhosis awaiting liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pompili, Maurizio, E-mail: mpompili@rm.unicatt.i [Department of Internal Medicine, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, 00168 Roma (Italy); Pacella, Claudio Maurizio, E-mail: claudiomauriziopacella@gmail.co [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Ospedale Regina Apostolorum, Via S. Francesco D' Assisi, 50, 00041 Albano Laziale (RM) (Italy); Francica, Giampiero, E-mail: giampierofrancica@tin.i [Department of Interventional Ultrasound, Presidio Ospedaliero Camilliani, S. Maria della Pieta, Via S. Rocco, 9, 80026 Casoria (Namibia) (Italy); Angelico, Mario, E-mail: angelico@med.uniroma2.i [Hepatology Unit, Universita di Tor Vergata, Viale Oxford, 81, 00133 Rome (Italy); Tisone, Giuseppe, E-mail: tisone@med.uniroma2.i [Transplant and General Surgery Unit, Universita di Tor Vergata, Ospedale S. Eugenio, Piazzale dell' Umanesimo 10-00144 Rome (Italy); Craboledda, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.craboledda@virgilio.i [Department of Pathology, Ospedale S. Eugenio, Piazzale dell' Umanesimo, 10-00144 Rome (Italy); Nicolardi, Erica; Rapaccini, Gian Ludovico; Gasbarrini, Giovanni [Department of Internal Medicine, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, 00168 Roma (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness and safety of percutaneous laser ablation for the treatment of cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma awaiting liver transplantation. Materials and methods: The data of 9 male cirrhotic patients (mean age 50 years, range 45-60 years) with 12 biopsy proven nodules of hepatocellular carcinoma (mean diameter 2.0 cm, range 1.0-3.0 cm) treated by laser ablation before liver transplantation between June 2000 and January 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Laser ablation was carried out by inserting 300 nm optical fibers through 21-Gauge needles (from two to four) positioned under ultrasound guidance into the target lesions. A continuous wave Neodymium:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet laser was used. Transarterial chemoembolization prior to liver transplantation was performed in two incompletely ablated tumors. Results: No procedure-related major complications were recorded. During the waiting time to liver transplantation local tumor progression after ablation occurred in 3 nodules (25%). At histological examination of the explanted livers complete necrosis was found in 8 nodules (66.7%, all treated exclusively with laser ablation), partial necrosis >50% in 3 nodules (25%), and partial necrosis <50% in 1 nodule. Conclusion: In patients with cirrhotic livers awaiting liver transplantation, percutaneous laser ablation is safe and effective for the management of small hepatocellular carcinoma.

  1. Developing laser ablation in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source for actinide detection with AMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauder, W. [Argonne National Laboratory, Physics Division, 9600 S. Cass Ave, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); University of Notre Dame, Nuclear Science Laboratory, 124 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Pardo, R.C.; Kondev, F.G.; Kondrashev, S.; Nair, C.; Nusair, O. [Argonne National Laboratory, Physics Division, 9600 S. Cass Ave, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Palchan, T. [Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Scott, R.; Seweryniak, D.; Vondrasek, R. [Argonne National Laboratory, Physics Division, 9600 S. Cass Ave, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Collon, P. [University of Notre Dame, Nuclear Science Laboratory, 124 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Paul, M. [Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2015-10-15

    A laser ablation material injection system has been developed at the ATLAS electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for use in accelerator mass spectrometry experiments. Beam production with laser ablation initially suffered from instabilities due to fluctuations in laser energy and cratering on the sample surface by the laser. However, these instabilities were rectified by applying feedback correction for the laser energy and rastering the laser across the sample surface. An initial experiment successfully produced and accelerated low intensity actinide beams with up to 1000 counts per second. With continued development, laser ablation shows promise as an alternative material injection scheme for ECR ion sources and may help substantially reduce cross talk in the source.

  2. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering activity of Ag/graphene/polymer nanocomposite films synthesized by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petreska, Gordana Siljanovska; Blazevska-Gilev, Jadranka [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy (FTM), University St. Cyril and Methodius, Ruger Boskovic 16, 1000 Skopje, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Fajgar, Radek, E-mail: fajgar@icpf.cas.cz [Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the AS CR, Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Prague (Czech Republic); Tomovska, Radmila, E-mail: radmila.tomovska@ehu.es [POLYMAT and Departamento de Química Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Joxe Mari Korta zentroa, Tolosa etorbidea 72, Donostia-San Sebastián 20018 (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-08-01

    Nanocomposites composed of poly(butylacrylate-co-methyl methacrylate) and graphene were ablated with a transversely excited atmosphere CO{sub 2} laser using an incident fluence of up to 7.3 J cm{sup −2}. This resulted in a deposition of thin composite films with graphene sheets that were very well distributed in the polymer matrix. The active substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) were prepared by subsequent depositions of silver nanoparticles on the surface of the composite films, with an ArF excimer laser ablation of elemental silver. The deposits were characterized by means of spectroscopy, microscopy, and diffraction techniques. The SERS substrate performance was tested using Rhodamine 6G as a probe substance. The probe substance was detected at low concentrations and a highly enhanced Raman signal was achieved. - Highlight: • Deposition of graphene nanosheet s-polymer nanocomposites was achieved. • Nanocomposites were decorated by deposited Ag nanoparticles on the film surface. • Ag/GNS/polymer thin films were tested as SERS substrate using Rhodamine 6G. • The enhancement factor of Ag/GNS/polymer substrate was calculated to be around 22. • Both chemical and electromagnetic mechanisms contribute to the SERS enhancement.

  3. Endoscopic laser ablation of clival chordoma with magnetic resonance-guided laser induced thermal therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chordomas are rare malignant tumors that are difficult to treat and have high recurrence rates despite aggressive therapy. Objectives: We present the first case of a patient with a clival chordoma in which complete tumor ablation was achieved using Magnetic Resonance guided Laser Induced Thermal Therapy (LITT) delivered via an endoscopic endonasal approach. We analyzed the safety and feasibility of this approach and quantified the response of this pathology to thermal energy. T...

  4. Ablation characteristics of electrospun core-shell nanofiber by femtosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, ChangKyoo; Xue, Ruipeng; Lannutti, John J; Farson, Dave F

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the femtosecond laser ablation properties of core and shell polymers their relationship to the ablation characteristics of core-shell nanofibers. The single-pulse ablation threshold of bulk polycaprolactone (PCL) was measured to be 2.12J/cm(2) and that of bulk polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was 4.07J/cm(2). The incubation coefficients were measured to be 0.82±0.02 for PCL and 0.53±0.03 for PDMS. PDMS-PCL core-shell and pure PCL nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning. The energy/volume of pure PCL and PDMS-PCL core-shell nanofiber ablation was investigated by measuring linear ablation grooves made at different scanning speeds. At large scanning speed, higher energy/volume was required for machining PDMS-PCL nanofiber than for PCL nanofiber. However, at small scanning speed, comparable energy/volume was measured for PDMS-PCL and PCL nanofiber ablation. Additionally, in linear scanned ablation of PDMS-PCL fibers at small laser pulse energy and large scanning speed, there were partially ablated fibers where the shell was ablated but the core remained. This was attributed to the lower ablation threshold of the shell material.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of heat-affected zone of copper metal ablated with femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Yoichi; Obara, Minoru

    2005-03-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation of materials with high thermal conductivity is of paramount importance, because the chemical composition and properties of the area ablated with femtosecond laser are kept unchanged. The material processing by femtosecond laser can well control the heat-affected zone, compared to nanosecond laser ablation. We report on the heat-affected zone of crystalline copper (Cu) by use of femtosecond laser experimentally and theoretically. Laser ablation of Cu is investigated theoretically by two temperature model and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The MD simulation takes into account of electron temperature and thermal diffusion length calculated by two temperature model. The dependence of lattice temperature on time and depth is calculated by the MD simulation and two temperature model. The heat-affected zone estimated from the temperature is mainly studied and calculated to be 3 nm at 0.02 J/cm2 which is below the threshold fluence of 0.137 J/cm2. In addition, the thickness of heat-affected zone of copper crystal ablated with femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser is experimentally studied. As a result of X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the ablated surface, the surface crystallinity is partially changed into disordered structure from crystal form. The residual energy left in the metal, which is not used for ablation, will induce liquid phase, leading to the amorphous phase of the metal during resolidification. The thickness of heat-affected zone depends on laser fluence and is experimentally measured to be less than 1 μm at higher laser fluences than the ablation threshold.

  6. Laser Velocimetry of Chemical Vapor Deposition Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) is being used to measure the gas flows in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors. These gas flow measurements can be used to improve industrial processes in semiconductor and optical layer deposition and to validate numerical models. Visible in the center of the picture is the graphite susceptor glowing orange-hot at 600 degrees C. It is inductively heated via the copper cool surrounding the glass reactor.

  7. Pulsed laser deposition of rare earth compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, L A

    2001-01-01

    Magnetostrictive thin films have been deposited using various techniques such as sputtering and evaporation but the use of laser deposition has been limited. This research presents the results from pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of TbFe sub 2 , DyFe sub 2 and Terfenol-D thin films using an infra red Transversely Excited Atmospheric (TEA) CO sub 2 laser at lambda approx 10.6 mu m and an ultra violet Argon-Fluoride (ArF) excimer laser at lambda approx 193 nm. Results have showed that the TEA CO sub 2 laser under the range of conditions studied is not suitable for the production of magnetostrictive films. The problems experienced are a mixture of mostly fracture debris at low fluences (F approx 20 Jcm sup - sup 2) and melt droplets at high fluences (F approx 60 Jcm sup - sup 2). In all cases the destruction of the target is a major problem, with the Terfenol-D targets being the worst affected. Thin films produced were all iron rich. The use of an excimer laser has proved more successful in providing stoichiometri...

  8. All-optical histology using two photon laser scanning microscopy and ablation with ultrashort pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Philbert S.

    This dissertation discusses the use of ultrashort laser pulses to image and manipulate tissue for the purpose of three-dimensional histological reconstruction of extended brain structures. Two photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) and ultrashort pulsed laser ablation are used to provide in situ three-dimensional imaging through thick preparations of fixed tissue. Surface regions of fixed tissue are first imaged using TPLSM. The imaged regions are then removed by ablation with amplified, ultrashort laser pulses, thereby exposing a previously underlying tissue region for imaging. This process of imaging and ablation proceeds iteratively until the desired tissue volume has been processed. First, the principles, design, and construction of a two photon laser scanning microscope are discussed, followed by a discussion of the physical mechanisms of tissue ablation with ultrashort laser pulses. The compatibility of tissue ablation using ultrashort pulses with subsequent histological analysis, particularly with fluorescent microscopy, is evaluated. Tissue ablation with ultrashort laser pulses is found to produce ablated tissue surfaces that are smooth to within a micrometer. Intrinsic fluorescence as well as immunoreactivity are found to be resilient to the ablation process. The all-optical histological technique is demonstrated on brain tissue from rats and mice, including tissue from embryonic mouse as early at E15. The ablation process is shown to preserve both macroscopic and microscopic structures within tissue. To facilitate the all-optical histological analysis of neuronal vasculature and its relative distribution to surrounding neuronal tissue, a fluorescent gel perfusion technique is developed that provides a temperature-stabilized fluorescent label of the neuronal vasculature. The use of immunohistochemistry to label specific cell populations throughout an 800 micrometer-thick tissue section is demonstrated. Additionally, the immersion of fixed tissue in high

  9. Laser ablation of powdered samples and analysis by means of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ctvrtnickova, T.; Cabalin, L.; Laserna, J.; Kanicky, V.; Nicolas, G.

    2009-03-01

    The presented work proves the capacities of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a fast, universal, and versatile technique for analysis of complex materials as ceramics. This paper reports on the analysis of ceramic raw materials (brick clays and kaolin) submitted to laser ablation in the form of pressed pellets. Spectrographic study was provided by standard single-pulse LIBS technique and orthogonal reheating double-pulse LIBS. It was found that both methods are comparable in terms of analytical performance, if adequate experimental parameters and signal detection systems are used.

  10. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Laser Ablation Plumes Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2017-02-06

    We used a CW laser as a narrow-band (~50kHz) tunable LIF excitation source to probe absorption from selected atomic transitions (Al, U etc. ) in a ns laser ablation plume. A comparison of fluorescence signal with respect to emission spectroscopy show significant increase in the magnitude and persistence from selected Al and U transitions in a LIBS plume. The high spectral resolution provided by the LIF measurement allows peaks to be easily separated even if they overlap in the emission spectra.

  11. Laser Ablation Plasma Injection into the Frankfurt 14 GHz ECRIS

    CERN Document Server

    Mironov, V; Runkel, S; Schmidt, L; Shirkov, G D; Stiebing, K E; Schmidt-Böcking, H; Schempp, A

    1999-01-01

    A Q-switched YAG:Nd3+ laser was used to evaporate a metal (Cd) target mounted close to a biased disk in the vacuum chamber of the 14 GHz Frankfurt ECRIS. The formation of the laser ablation plasma and the pulsed injection of neutral particles into ECR plasma resulting from the evaporation were studied in order to optimise the production of metal-ion beams and to perform diagnostics of the ECR plasma. The pulsed highly charged Cadmium ion beams were detected under the injection of neutral atoms of Cadmium into an Argon ECR discharge. The ionisation and confinements times for these ions were determined by using time-resolved spectroscopy of the charge state spectra. At the moment of the Cadmium injection, a pulsed increase of the Argon beam currents was detected, which is attributed to changes of the plasma potential. The amplitudes of these pulses are comparable with afterglow currents. Further investigations may provide a chance to use this effect for the injection of ion beams into the pulsed accelerators.

  12. A novel laser ablation plasma thruster with electromagnetic acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; He, Zhen; Zhang, Hua

    2016-10-01

    A novel laser ablation plasma thruster accelerated by electromagnetic means was proposed and investigated. The discharge characteristics and thrust performance were tested with different charged energy, structural parameters and propellants. The thrust performance was proven to be improved by electromagnetic acceleration. In contrast with the pure laser propulsion mode, the thrust performance in electromagnetic acceleration modes was much better. The effects of electrodes distance and the off-axis distance between ceramic tube and cathode were tested, and it's found that there were optimal structural parameters for achieving optimal thrust performance. It's indicated that the impulse bit and specific impulse increased with increasing charged energy. In our experiments, the thrust performance of the thruster was optimal in large charged energy modes. With the charged energy 25 J and the use of metal aluminum, a maximal impulse bit of 600 μNs, a specific impulse of approximate 8000 s and thrust efficiency of about 90% were obtained. For the PTFE propellant, a maximal impulse bit of about 350 μNs, a specific impulse of about 2400 s, and thrust efficiency of about 16% were obtained. Besides, the metal aluminum was proven to be the better propellant than PTFE for the thruster.

  13. Femtosecond laser ablation profile near an interface: Analysis based on the correlation with superficial properties of individual materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolodelli, Gustavo, E-mail: nicolodelli@ursa.ifsc.usp.br [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Grupo de Optica, Av. Trabalhador Sancarlense 400, P.O. Box 369, CEP 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Grupo de Optica, Av. Trabalhador Sancarlense 400, P.O. Box 369, CEP 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-01-15

    Femtosecond laser ablation of materials is turning to be an important tool for micromachining as well as for selective removal of biological tissues. In a great number of applications, laser ablation has to process through interfaces separating media of different properties. The investigation of the ablation behavior within materials and passing through interfaces is the main aim of this study. Especially, the analysis of the discontinuity in the ablation profile close to interfaces between distinct materials can reveal some of the phenomena involved in the formation of an ablated microcavity geometry. We have used a method that correlates the ablation cross sectional area with the local laser intensity. The effective intensity ablation properties were obtained from surface ablation data of distinct materials. The application of this method allows the prediction of the occurrence of a size discontinuity in the ablation geometry at the interface of distinct media, a fact which becomes important when planning applications in different media.

  14. A Simple Method for Improving the Spatial Resolution in Infrared Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieta, Juha-Pekka; Vaikkinen, Anu; Auno, Samuli; Räikkönen, Heikki; Haapala, Markus; Scotti, Gianmario; Kopra, Jaakko; Piepponen, Petteri; Kauppila, Tiina J.

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry imaging of tissues, the size of structures that can be distinguished is determined by the spatial resolution of the imaging technique. Here, the spatial resolution of IR laser ablation is markedly improved by increasing the distance between the laser and the focusing lens. As the distance between the laser and the lens is increased from 1 to 18 m, the ablation spot size decreases from 440 to 44 μm. This way, only the collimated center of the divergent laser beam is directed on the focusing lens, which results in better focusing of the beam. Part of the laser energy is lost at longer distance, but this is compensated by focusing of the radiation to a smaller area on the sample surface. The long distance can also be achieved by a set of mirrors, between which the radiation travels before it is directed to the focusing lens and the sample. This method for improving the spatial resolution can be utilized in mass spectrometry imaging of tissues by techniques that utilize IR laser ablation, such as laser ablation electrospray ionization, laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization, and matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization.

  15. Fluence dependent electrical conductivity in aluminium thin films grown by infrared pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollar, Esther, E-mail: e.rebollar@csic.es [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, IQFR-CSIC, Serrano 19, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Martínez-Tong, Daniel E. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Sanz, Mikel; Oujja, Mohamed; Marco, José F. [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, IQFR-CSIC, Serrano 19, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ezquerra, Tiberio A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Castillejo, Marta [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, IQFR-CSIC, Serrano 19, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • IR pulsed laser ablation of aluminium gives rise to smooth layers of several tens of nanometers. • Irradiation at fluences around 2.7 J/cm{sup 2} and above 7 J/cm{sup 2} resulted in deposition of amorphous aluminium oxide films and metallic aluminium films respectively. • Highly ionized species are more abundant in the ablation plumes generated at higher fluences. • It is possible to control by PLD the metal or dielectric character of the films. - Abstract: We studied the effect of laser fluence on the morphology, composition, structure and electric conductivity of deposits generated by pulsed laser ablation of a metallic aluminium target in vacuum using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 15 ns). Upon irradiation for one hour at a repetition rate of 10 Hz, a smooth layer of several tens of nanometres, as revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was deposited on glass. Surface chemical composition was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and to study the conductivity of deposits both I–V curves and conductive-AFM measurements were performed. Irradiation at fluences around 2.7 J/cm{sup 2} resulted in deposition of amorphous aluminium oxide films. Differently, at higher fluences above 7 J/cm{sup 2}, the films are constituted by metallic aluminium. Optical emission spectroscopy revealed that highly ionized species are more abundant in the ablation plumes generated at higher fluences. The results demonstrate the possibility to control by PLD the metal or dielectric character of the films.

  16. INFRARED PHOTOLUMINESCENCE SPECTRA OF PBS NANOPARTICLES PREPARED BY LANGMUIR–BLODGETT AND LASER ABLATION METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Remes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We optimized the optical setup originally designed for the photoluminescence measurements in the spectral range 400‒1100 nm. New design extends the spectral range into the near infrared region 900‒1700 nm and allows the colloidal solutions measurements in cuvettes as well as the measurements of nanoparticles deposited in the form of thin films on glass substrates. The infrared photoluminescence spectra of the PbS nanoparticles prepared by the Langmuir–Blodgett technique show the higher photoluminescence intensity and the shift to the shorter wavelengths compared to the infrared photoluminescence spectra of the PbS nanoparticles prepared by the laser ablation from PbS target. We aslo proved the high stability of PbS nanoparticles prepared in the form of thin layers.

  17. Spectroscopic modeling and characterization of a collisionally confined laser-ablated plasma plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, M E; Mancini, R C; Bailey, J; Filuk, A; Clark, B; Lake, P; Abdallah, J

    2007-11-01

    Plasma plumes produced by laser ablation are an established method for manufacturing the high quality stoichiometrically complex thin films used for a variety of optical, photoelectric, and superconducting applications. The state and reproducibility of the plasma close to the surface of the irradiated target plays a critical role in producing high quality thin films. Unfortunately, this dense plasma has historically eluded quantifiable characterization. The difficulty in modeling the plume formation arises in the accounting for the small amount of energy deposited into the target when physical properties of these exotic target materials are not known. In this work we obtain the high density state of the plasma plume through the use of an experimental spectroscopic technique and a custom spectroscopic model. In addition to obtaining detailed temperature and density profiles, issues regarding line broadening and opacity for spectroscopic characterization will be addressed for this unique environment.

  18. Precise ablation milling with ultrashort pulsed Nd:YAG lasers by optical and acoustical process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Volker; Weber, Patricia

    2010-02-01

    Laser ablation milling with ultra short pulsed Nd:YAG lasers enables micro structuring in nearly all kinds of solid materials like metals, ceramics and polymers. A precise machining result with high surface quality requires a defined ablation process. Problems arise through the scatter in the resulting ablation depth of the laser beam machining process where material is removed in layers. Since the ablated volume may change due to varying absorption properties in single layers and inhomogeneities in the material, the focal plane might deviate from the surface of the work piece when the next layer is machined. Thus the focal plane has to be adjusted after each layer. A newly developed optical and acoustical process control enables an in-process adjustment of the focal plane that leads to defined process conditions and thus to better ablation results. The optical process control is realized by assistance of a confocal white light sensor. It enables an automated work piece orientation before machining and an inline ablation depth monitoring. The optical device can be integrated for an online or offline process control. Both variants will be presented and discussed. A further approach for adjustment of the focal plane is the acoustical process control. Acoustic emissions are detected while laser beam machining. A signal analysis of the airborne sound spectrum emitted by the process enables conclusions about the focal position of the laser beam. Based on this correlation an acoustic focus positioning is built up. The focal plane can then be adjusted automatically before ablation.

  19. Laser ablation of polymer coatings allows for electromagnetic field enhancement mapping around nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Subdiffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures. The acc......Subdiffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures....... The accompanying field enhancement substantially lowers the ablation threshold of the polymer film and thus creates local ablation spots and corresponding topographic modifications of the polymer film. Such modifications are quantified straightforwardly via scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy...

  20. Dendrimer-capped nanoparticles prepared by picosecond laser ablation in liquid environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giorgetti, Emilia; Giusti, Anna; Giammanco, Francesco; Marsili, Paolo; Laza, Simona

    2009-01-01

    Fifth generation ethylendiamine-core poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM G5) is presented as an efficient capping agent for the preparation of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles by ps laser ablation in water...

  1. The theory study of Metal absorptivity in femtosecond pulsed laser ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; ZHANG Duan-ming; LI Zhi-hua; TAN Xin-yu; FANG Ran-ran

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,the effect of the absorptivity of metal on femtosecond pulsed laser ablation is investigated.The formulas for the absorptivity depending on target temperature are derived from Maxwell Equations and the Lambert-Beer's law.Based on this,a new two-temperature model is proposed to describe the femtosecond pulsed laser ablation with metal.Then,using Au as an example,a finite difference method is employed to simulate the space-dependent and time-dependent absorptivity and the target temperature.The temperature evolution of our model is compared with the result obtained form the heat conduction model taking the absorptivity as constant.It is shown that the absorptivity plays an important role in the femtosecond pulsed laser ablation.The results of this paper are helpful in choosing the best technical parameters in femtosecond pulsed laser ablation.

  2. PALS — The optimal laser for determining optimal ablative laser propulsion parameters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boody, Frederick P.

    2005-04-01

    Ablative laser propulsion (ALP) could revolutionize space travel by reducing the 30:1 propellant/payload ratio needed for near-earth orbit 50-fold. To date, experiments have demonstrated the necessary efficiency, coupling coefficient, and specific impulse for application, but were performed at pulse energies and spot sizes much smaller than required and at wavelengths not usable in the atmosphere. Also, most experiments have not simultaneously measured the properties of the ions produced or of the ablated surface, properties that would allow full understanding of the propulsion properties in terms of ion characteristics. Realistic measurement of laser propulsion parameters is proposed using PALS (Prague Asterix Laser System), whose parameters, except for pulse rate and wavelength — pulse energy (˜1kJ), pulse length (400ps), beam diameter (˜29cm), and flat beam profile — equal those required for application. PALS wavelength is a little short (1.3μm vs. >1.5μm) but is closer than any other laser available and, due to PALS 2ω / 3ω capability, wavelength dependence can be studied and results extrapolated to application values. PALS' proven infrastructure for measuring laser-driven ion properties means that only an instrument for measuring momentum transfer, such as a ballistic pendulum, will have to be added.

  3. Flow speed of the ablation vapors generated during laser drilling of CFRP with a continuous-wave laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faas, S.; Freitag, C.; Boley, S.; Berger, P.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.

    2017-03-01

    The hot plume of ablation products generated during the laser drilling process of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) with a continuous-wave laser beam was analyzed by means of high-speed imaging. The formation of compression shocks was observed within the flow of the evaporated material, which is an indication of flow speeds well above the local speed of sound. The flow speed of the hot ablation products can be estimated by analyzing the position of these compression shocks. We investigated the temporal evolution of the flow speed during the drilling process and the influence of the average laser power on the flow speed. The flow speed increases with increasing average laser powers. The moment of drilling through the material changes the conditions for the drilling process and was confirmed to influence the flow speed of the ablated material. Compression shocks can also be observed during laser cutting of CFRP with a moving laser beam.

  4. Effects of an external magnetic field in pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, T. [Universidad Autonoma de la Ciudad de Mexico (UACM), Prolongacion San Isidro 151, Col. San Lorenzo Tezonco, C.P. 09790, Mexico DF (Mexico)], E-mail: tupacgarcia@yahoo.com; Posada, E. de [CINVESTAV-IPN Unidad Merida, Applied Physics Department, A.P. 73, Cordemex, C.P. 97130 Merida, Yuc. (Mexico); Villagran, M. [CCADET, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), A.P. 70-186, C.P. 04510, Mexico DF (Mexico); Ll, J.L. Sanchez [Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Facultad de Fisica-IMRE, Universidad de La Habana, La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Bartolo-Perez, P.; Pena, J.L. [CINVESTAV-IPN Unidad Merida, Applied Physics Department, A.P. 73, Cordemex, C.P. 97130 Merida, Yuc. (Mexico)

    2008-12-30

    Thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition, PLD, on Si (1 0 0) substrates by the ablation of a sintered ceramic SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} target with and without the presence of a nonhomogeneous magnetic field of {mu}{sub 0}H = 0.4 T perpendicular to substrate plane and parallel to the plasma expansion axis. The field was produced by a rectangular-shaped Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet and the substrate was just placed on the magnet surface (Aurora method). An appreciable increment of optical emission due to the presence of the magnetic field was observed, but no film composition change or thickness increment was obtained. It suggests that the increment of the optical emission is due mainly to the electron confinement rather than confinement of ionic species.

  5. Spin-offs from laser ablation in art conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, J.; Elford, J.; Parfenov, V.

    2013-05-01

    In 1973 The Center for Art Conservation Studies (CASS) was established at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). This was in response to demonstrations that were conducted during January-March 1972 in Venice for UNESCO, Venice in Peril, International Fund for Monuments, and the Italian Petroleum Institute (ENI). The feasibility investigation explored in-situ pulsed holography, holographic interferometry, and laser ablation divestment for applications in art conservation practice. During subsequent decades scores of UCSD graduate and undergraduate students as well as conservators, conservation scientists, academics, and engineers who resided in CASS as "Visiting Scholars" contributed to advancing the understanding and performance of radiation technologies in the arts. Several technologies in addition to those involving optical wavelengths were also investigated to aid in art conservation and conservation science. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) were employed to detect and map moisture within masonry. Lead isotopic analyses revealed authenticity and provenance of Benin bronzes. Inside-out x-ray radiography facilitated the detection of defects in stone. Ultrasonic imaging was introduced for the mapping of fresco strata. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PAS) was used to characterize varnish layers on paintings. Digital image processing was introduced in order to detect and visualize pentimenti within paintings as well as to perform virtual restoration and provide interactive museum displays. Holographic images were employed as imaginary theater sets. In the years that followed the graduation of students and the visits of professional collaborators, numerous other applications of radiation ablation began appearing in a wide variety of other fields such as aircraft maintenance, ship maintenance, toxic chemical remediation, biological sterilization, food processing, industrial fabrication, industrial maintenance, nuclear

  6. Experimental verification of the ablation pressure dependence upon the laser intensity at pulsed irradiation of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasyuk, I. K.; Semenov, A. Yu; Stuchebryukhov, I. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    Experiments for verification of a functional dependence of the ablation pressure on the irradiated surface of a target upon the laser intensity in a range from 1.2 to 350 TW/cm2 have been carried out. For that, at some intensities of the laser irradiation, time intervals between the laser pulse maximum and the moment of the shock-wave front arrival to the rear surface of the target were measured, which are dependent on the ablation pressure. Two schemes of the measurements were used. At the first scheme, at higher laser intensities, the front arrival moment is determined via an electron-optical camera when the rear surface begins glowing. At the second scheme, the front arrival moment is recorded when a probe laser pulse changes the character of the reflection by the rear surface of the irradiated target. Results of measurements are in agreement with the ablation pressure dependence upon the laser pulse intensity within 20%.

  7. Visualization of liquid-assisted hard tissue ablation with a pulsed CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. W.; Chen, C. G.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhan, Z. L.; Xie, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of liquid-mediated hard tissue ablation induced by a pulsed CO2 laser with a wavelength of 10.6 μm, a high speed camera was used to monitor the interaction between water, tissue and laser irradiation. The results showed that laser irradiation can directly impact on tissue through a vapor channel formed by the leading part of the laser pulse. The ablation debris plays a key role in liquid-assisted laser ablation, having the ability to keep the vapor channel open to extend actuation time. The runoff effect induced by vortex convection liquid flow can remove the tissue that obstructs the effect of the next laser pulse.

  8. Regularly arranged indium islands on glass/molybdenum substrates upon femtosecond laser and physical vapor deposition processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringleb, F.; Eylers, K.; Teubner, Th.; Boeck, T., E-mail: torsten.boeck@ikz-berlin.de [Leibniz-Institute for Crystal Growth, Max-Born-Straße 2, Berlin 12489 (Germany); Symietz, C.; Bonse, J.; Andree, S.; Krüger, J. [Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, Berlin 12205 (Germany); Heidmann, B.; Schmid, M. [Department of Physics, Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimalle 14, Berlin 14195 (Germany); Nanooptical Concepts for PV, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, Berlin 14109 (Germany); Lux-Steiner, M. [Nanooptical Concepts for PV, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, Berlin 14109 (Germany); Heterogeneous Material Systems, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, Berlin 14109 (Germany)

    2016-03-14

    A bottom-up approach is presented for the production of arrays of indium islands on a molybdenum layer on glass, which can serve as micro-sized precursors for indium compounds such as copper-indium-gallium-diselenide used in photovoltaics. Femtosecond laser ablation of glass and a subsequent deposition of a molybdenum film or direct laser processing of the molybdenum film both allow the preferential nucleation and growth of indium islands at the predefined locations in a following indium-based physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. A proper choice of laser and deposition parameters ensures the controlled growth of indium islands exclusively at the laser ablated spots. Based on a statistical analysis, these results are compared to the non-structured molybdenum surface, leading to randomly grown indium islands after PVD.

  9. Topically applied methotrexate is rapidly delivered into skin by fractional laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taudorf, Elisabeth Hjardem; Lerche, Catharina Margrethe; Vissing, Anne-Cathrine; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Hannibal, Jens; D'Alvise, Janina; Hansen, Steen Honore; Janfelt, Christian; Paasch, Uwe; Anderson, Richard Rox; Haedersdal, Merete

    2015-07-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a chemotherapeutic and anti-inflammatory drug that may cause systemic adverse effects. This study investigated kinetics and biodistribution of MTX delivered topically by ablative fractional laser (AFXL). In vitro passive diffusion of 10 mg/ml MTX (1 w/v%) was measured from 0.25 to 24 h through AFXL-processed and intact porcine skin in Franz Cells (n = 46). A 2,940 nm fractional Erbium Yttrium Aluminium Garnet laser generated mid-dermal microchannels at 2.4% density, and 256 mJ/microchannel. HPLC quantified MTX-concentrations in extracts from mid-dermal skin sections, donor and receiver compartments. Fluorescence microscopy of UVC-activated MTX-fluorescence and desorption electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) evaluated MTX biodistribution. AFXL-processed skin facilitated rapid MTX delivery through cone-shaped microchannels of 690 µm ablation depth, lined by the 47 µm thermal coagulation zone (CZ). Quantitatively, MTX was detectable by HPLC in mid-dermis after 15 min, significantly exceeded deposition in intact skin after 1.5 h, and saturated skin after 7 h at a 10-fold increased MTX-deposition versus intact skin (3.08 vs 0.30 mg/cm(3), p = 0.002). Transdermal permeation was < 1.5% of applied MTX before skin saturation, and increased up to 8.0% after 24 h. Qualitatively, MTX distributed into CZ within 15 min (p = 0.015) and further into surrounding dermal tissue after 1.5 h (p = 0.004). After skin saturation at 7 h, MTX fluorescence intensities in CZ and tissue were similar and DESI-MSI confirmed MTX biodistribution throughout the mid-dermal skin section. MTX absorbs rapidly into mid-dermis of AFXL-processed skin with minimal transdermal permeation until skin saturation, suggesting a possible alternative to systemic MTX for some skin disorders.

  10. Biomolecular papain thin films grown by matrix assisted and conventional pulsed laser deposition: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    György, E.; Pérez del Pino, A.; Sauthier, G.; Figueras, A.

    2009-12-01

    Biomolecular papain thin films were grown both by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) and conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD) techniques with the aid of an UV KrF∗ (λ =248 nm, τFWHM≅20 ns) excimer laser source. For the MAPLE experiments the targets submitted to laser radiation consisted on frozen composites obtained by dissolving the biomaterial powder in distilled water at 10 wt % concentration. Conventional pressed biomaterial powder targets were used in the PLD experiments. The surface morphology of the obtained thin films was studied by atomic force microscopy and their structure and composition were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The possible physical mechanisms implied in the ablation processes of the two techniques, under comparable experimental conditions were identified. The results showed that the growth mode, surface morphology as well as structure of the deposited biomaterial thin films are determined both by the incident laser fluence value as well as target preparation procedure.

  11. Diamond nanospherulite: A novel material produced at carbon-water interface by pulsed-laser ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王育煌; 黄群健; 陈忠; 黄荣彬; 郑兰荪

    1997-01-01

    Formation of carbon nanoparticles with perfectly spherical.shape and diamond structure (diamond nanospherulite) by laser-ablating a variety of carbon samples in water is reported for the first time The studies reveal that molten carbon nanoparticles generated by laser ablation are quenched directly by water and end up as diamond nanospherulites,possibly due to the high pressure arising from surface tension and the high stability resulting from termination of dangling bonds with hydrogen atoms.

  12. Laser ablation production of Ba, Ca, Dy, Er, La, Lu, and Yb ions

    CERN Document Server

    Olmschenk, S

    2016-01-01

    We use a pulsed nitrogen laser to produce atomic ions by laser ablation, measuring the relative ion yield for several elements, including some that have only recently been proposed for use in cold trapped ion experiments. For barium, we monitor the ion yield as a function of the number of applied ablation pulses for different substrates. We also investigate the ion production as a function of the pulse energy, and the efficiency of loading an ion trap as a function of radiofrequency voltage.

  13. Ablation studies using a diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 micro-laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervolaraki, M.; Dyer, P. E.; Monk, P.

    We report an investigation of ablating several materials using a nanosecond pulse duration Nd:YVO4 micro-laser operating at wavelengths of 1064 and 532 nm and high pulse-repetition rate (ballistic pendulum measurements and scanning electron microscopy are used to characterise the interaction. It is shown that good-quality micro-scale features can be produced in polyimide, gold foils and silicon targets by ablation using this laser.

  14. Non-thermal ablation of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene with an intense femtosecond-pulse laser

    OpenAIRE

    Hashida, M.; Mishima, H.; Tokita, S.; Sakabe, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ablation of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene without disruption of the fine porous structure is demonstrated using an intense femtosecond-pulse laser. As a result of laser-matter interactions near ablation threshold fluence, high-energy ions are emitted, which cannot be produced by thermal dissociation of the molecules. The ion energy is produced by Coulomb explosion of the elements of (-CF_{2}-CF_{2-})n and the energy spectra of the ions show contributions from the Coulomb explosions of the ...

  15. Characterization of the Morphology of RDX Particles Formed by Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    laser-ablated particle sizes. ...................4 Figure 3. SEM images of laser-ablated M43 propellant grain at (a) 150× magnification and (b) 500...Experimental Method 2.1 Materials The energetic materials studied included an M43 propellant grain that consists of ~76% RDX, 12% cellulose acetate...butyrate (CAB), 8% plasticizer, and 4% nitrocellulose (NC) (26). Class-1 ( m) and class-5 (ឝ m) military-grade and research-grade (i.e

  16. Emission characteristics of laser ablation-hollow cathode glow discharge spectral source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karatodorov Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The emission characteristics of a scheme combining laser ablation as sample introduction source and hollow cathode discharge as excitation source are presented. The spatial separation of the sample material introduction by laser ablation and hollow cathode excitation is achieved by optimizing the gas pressure and the sample-cathode gap length. At these conditions the discharge current is maximized to enhance the analytical lines intensity.

  17. Integration of multimode waveguides and micromirror couplers in printed circuit boards using laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Steenberge, Geert; Geerinck, Peter; Van Put, Steven; Van Daele, Peter

    2004-09-01

    Integration of optical interconnections on a Printed Circuit Board (PCB) is very challenging, as it should remain compatible with existing PCB manufacturing technology based on laminated FR4-substrates and making use of solder-reflow and well-known placement and assembly techniques. In this paper we will describe different technologies being used for integration of such optical interconnections in PCB's. As we will demonstrate, the use of laser ablation, already used in PCB manufacturing for microvia's, is a suitable technique for the fabrication of multimode waveguides and micromirrors to provide optical coupling. Laser ablation is a very flexible technology that is particularly well suited for structuring of polymers because of their excellent UV-absorption properties and highly non-thermal ablation behavior. One of the most critical problems on the integration of optical interconnections in PCB's is coupling the light in and out of the optical plane. Because in our set-up the excimer laser beam can be tilted, the 45 degrees micromirrors can be easily fabricated using laser ablation. The focus is on ablation of waveguides using a frequency tripled Nd-YAG laser and on ablation of 45 degrees facets using a KrF excimer laser. It is shown that these structures can be defined in one single processing step, resulting in a very accurate alignment.

  18. Preparation and Characterization of Alumina Nanoparticles in Deionized Water Using Laser Ablation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeradate Piriyawong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Al2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized using laser ablation of an aluminum (Al target in deionized water. Nd:YAG laser, emitted the light at a wavelength of 1064 nm, was used as a light source. The laser ablation was carried out at different energies of 1, 3, and 5 J. The structure of ablated Al particles suspended in deionized water was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD. The XRD patterns revealed that the ablated Al particles transformed into γ-Al2O3. The morphology of nanoparticles was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM. The FE-SEM images showed that most of the nanoparticles obtained from all the ablated laser energies have spherical shape with a particle size of less than 100 nm. Furthermore, it was observed that the particle size increased with increasing the laser energy. The absorption spectra of Al2O3 nanoparticles suspended in deionized water were recorded at room temperature using UV-visible spectroscopy. The absorption spectra show a strong peak at 210 nmarising from the presence of Al2O3 nanoparticles. The results on absorption spectra are in good agreement with those investigated by XRD which confirmed the formation of Al2O3 nanoparticles during the laser ablation of Al target in deionized water.

  19. Confocal Microscopy–Guided Laser Ablation for Superficial and Early Nodular Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Shan Jason; Sierra, Heidy; Cordova, Miguel; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2014-01-01

    Importance Laser ablation is a rapid and minimally invasive approach for the treatment of superficial skin cancers, but efficacy and reliability vary owing to lack of histologic margin control. High-resolution reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) may offer a means for examining margins directly on the patient. Observations We report successful elimination of superficial and early nodular basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in 2 cases-, using RCM imaging to guide Er-:YAG laser ablation. Three-dimensional (3-D) mapping is feasible with RCM-, to delineate the lateral border and thickness of the tumor. Thus, the surgeon may deliver laser fluence and passes with localized control—ie, by varying the ablation parameters in sub-lesional areas with specificity that is governed by the 3-D topography of the BCC. We further demonstrate intra-operative detection of residual BCC after initial laser ablation and complete removal of remaining tumor by additional passes. Both RCM imaging and histologic sections confirm the final clearance of BCC. Conclusions and Relevance Confocal microscopy may enhance the efficacy and reliability of laser tumor ablation. This report represents a new translational application for RCM imaging, which, when combined with an ablative laser, may one day provide an efficient and cost-effective treatment for BCC. PMID:24827701

  20. A method for rapid measurement of laser ablation rate of hard dental tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perhavec, T.; Gorkič, A.; Bračun, D.; Diaci, J.

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the study reported here is the development of a new method which allows rapid and accurate in-vitro measurements of three-dimensional (3D) shape of laser ablated craters in hard dental tissues and the determination of crater volume, ablation rate and speed. The method is based on the optical triangulation principle. A laser sheet projector illuminates the surface of a tooth, mounted on a linear translation stage. As the tooth is moved by the translation stage a fast digital video camera captures series of images of the illuminated surface. The images are analyzed to determine a 3D model of the surface. Custom software is employed to analyze the 3D model and to determine the volume of the ablated craters. Key characteristics of the method are discussed as well as some practical aspects pertinent to its use. The method has been employed in an in-vitro study to examine the ablation rates and speeds of the two main laser types currently employed in dentistry, Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG. Ten samples of extracted human molar teeth were irradiated with laser pulse energies from 80 mJ to the maximum available energy (970 mJ with the Er:YAG, and 260 mJ with the Er,Cr:YSGG). About 2000 images of each ablated tooth surface have been acquired along a translation range of 10 mm, taking about 10 s and providing close to 1 million surface measurement points. Volumes of 170 ablated craters (half of them in dentine and the other half in enamel) were determined from this data and used to examine the ablated volume per pulse energy and ablation speed. The results show that, under the same conditions, the ablated volume per pulse energy achieved by the Er:YAG laser exceeds that of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser in almost all regimes for dentine and enamel. The maximum Er:YAG laser ablation speeds (1.2 mm 3/s in dentine and 0.7 mm 3/s in enamel) exceed those obtained by the Er,Cr:YSGG laser (0.39 mm 3/s in dentine and 0.12 mm 3/s in enamel). Since the presented method proves to be easy to

  1. High-resolution monitoring of the hole depth during ultrafast laser ablation drilling by diode laser self-mixing interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzapesa, Francesco P; Ancona, Antonio; Sibillano, Teresa; De Lucia, Francesco; Dabbicco, Maurizio; Lugarà, Pietro Mario; Scamarcio, Gaetano

    2011-03-15

    We demonstrate that diode laser self-mixing interferometry can be exploited to instantaneously measure the ablation front displacement and the laser ablation rate during ultrafast microdrilling of metals. The proof of concept was obtained using a 50-μm-thick stainless steel plate as the target, a 120 ps/110 kHz microchip fiber laser as the machining source, and an 823 nm diode laser with an integrated photodiode as the probe. The time dependence of the hole penetration depth was measured with a 0.41 µm resolution.

  2. Research on laser direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongzhong; Shi, Likai

    2003-03-01

    Laser direct deposition of metallic parts is a new manufacturing technology, which combines with computer-aided design, laser cladding and rapid prototyping. Fully dense metallic parts can be directly obtained through melting the coaxially fed powders with a high-power laser in a layer-by-layer manner. The process characteristics, system composition as well as some research and advancement on laser direct deposition are presented here. The microstructure and properties observation of laser direct formed 663 copper alloy, 316L stainless steel and Rene'95 nickel super alloy samples indicate that, the as-deposited microstructure is similar to rapidly solidified materials, with homogenous composition and free of defects. Under certain conditions, directionally solidified microstructure can be obtained. The as-formed mechanical properties are equal to or exceed those for casting and wrought annealed materials. At the same time, some sample parts with complicate shape are presented for technology demonstration. The formed parts show good surface quality and dimensional accuracy.

  3. Human cornea wound healing in organ culture after Er:YAG laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jin-Hui; Joos, Karen M.; Robinson, Richard D.; Shetlar, Debra J.; O'Day, Denis M.

    1998-06-01

    Purpose: To study the healing process in cultured human corneas after Er:YAG laser ablation. Methods: Human cadaver corneas within 24 hours post mortem were ablated with a Q- switched Er:YAG laser at 2.94 micrometer wavelength. The radiant exposure was 500 mJ/cm2. The cornea was cultured on a tissue supporting frame immediately after the ablation. Culture media consisted of 92% minimum essential media, 8% fetal bovine serum, 0.125% HEPES buffer solution, 0.125% gentamicin, and 0.05% fungizone. The entire tissue frame and media container were kept in an incubator at 37 degrees Celsius and 5% CO2. Serial macroscopic photographs of the cultured corneas were taken during the healing process. Histology was performed after 30 days of culture. Results: A clear ablated crater into the stroma was observed immediately after the ablation. The thickness of thermal damage ranges between 1 and 25 micrometer. Haze development within the crater varies from the third day to the fourteenth day according to the depth and the roughness of the crater. Histologic sections of the cultured cornea showed complete re- epithelization of the lased area. Loose fibrous tissue is observed filling the ablated space beneath the epithelium. The endothelium appeared unaffected. Conclusions: The intensity and time of haze development appears dependent upon the depth of the ablation. Cultured human corneas may provide useful information regarding the healing process following laser ablation.

  4. Selective Ablation of thin Nickel-chromium-alloy Films Using Ultrashort Pulsed Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, Linda; Ebert, Robby; Exner, Horst

    The selective ablation of 100nm thin Nickel-Chromium-alloy films on glass substrate was investigated using femtosecond laser pulses (λ=1030nm, τp=170 fs, Ep,max=7μJ). The influence of the processing parameters such as fluence, pulse number and pulse repetition rate on the ablation process was examined. Single and multiple pulses ablation thresholds of the Nickel-Chromium-alloy film were determined and the incubation coefficient calculated. Optical and electron microscopy were employed to characterize the patterned area. As a result, different irradiation morphologies were observed, dependent from the processing parameters. A processing window for film side ablation of the Nickel-Chromium-alloy film without damaging the underlying glass substrate was found, however, the edge of the ablation craters were covered with laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS).

  5. Ablation plasma transport using multicusp magnetic field for laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K.; Umezawa, M.; Uchino, T.; Ikegami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Harada, N.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a plasma guiding method using multicusp magnetic field to transport the ablation plasma keeping the density for developing laser ion sources. To investigate the effect of guiding using the magnetic field on the ablation plasma, we demonstrated the transport of the laser ablation plasma in the multicusp magnetic field. The magnetic field was formed with eight permanent magnets and arranged to limit the plasma expansion in the radial direction. We investigated the variation of the plasma ion current density and charge distribution during transport in the magnetic field. The results indicate that the plasma is confined in the radial direction during the transport in the multicusp magnetic field.

  6. Ablation and ultrafast dynamics of zinc selenide under femtosecond laser irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Wang; Tianqing Jia; Xiaoxi Li; Chengbin Li; Donghai Feng; Haiyi Sun; Shizhen Xu; Zhizhan Xu

    2005-01-01

    The ablation in zinc selenide (ZnSe) crystal is studied by using 150-fs, 800-nm laser system. The images of the ablation pit measured by scanning electronic microscope (SEM) show no thermal stress and melting dynamics. The threshold fluence is measured to be 0.7 J/cm2. The ultrafast ablation dynamics is studied by using pump and probe method. The result suggests that optical breakdown and ultrafast melting take place in ZnSe irradiated under femtosecond laser pulses.

  7. Ultrafast laser ablation and machining large-size structures on porcine bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ran; Khadar, Ghadeer W; Wilk, Emilia I; Emigh, Brent; Haugen, Harold K; Wohl, Gregory R; Dunlop, Brett; Anvari, Mehran; Hayward, Joseph E; Fang, Qiyin

    2013-07-01

    When using ultrafast laser ablation in some orthopedic applications where precise cutting/drilling is required with minimal damage to collateral tissue, it is challenging to produce large-sized and deep holes using a tightly focused laser beam. The feasibility of producing deep, millimeter-size structures under different ablation strategies is investigated. X-ray computed microtomography was employed to analyze the morphology of these structures. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of producing holes with sizes required in clinical applications using concentric and helical ablation protocols.

  8. Deviation from threshold model in ultrafast laser ablation of graphene at sub-micron scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil-Villalba, A.; Xie, C.; Salut, R.; Furfaro, L.; Giust, R.; Jacquot, M.; Lacourt, P. A.; Dudley, J. M.; Courvoisier, F., E-mail: francois.courvoisier@femto-st.fr [Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR 6174 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne Franche-Comte, 25030 Besançon Cedex (France)

    2015-08-10

    We investigate a method to measure ultrafast laser ablation threshold with respect to spot size. We use structured complex beams to generate a pattern of craters in CVD graphene with a single laser pulse. A direct comparison between beam profile and SEM characterization allows us to determine the dependence of ablation probability on spot-size, for crater diameters ranging between 700 nm and 2.5 μm. We report a drastic decrease of ablation probability when the crater diameter is below 1 μm which we interpret in terms of free-carrier diffusion.

  9. Effect of oblique force source induced by laser ablation on ultrasonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuning; Yang, Dexing; Chang, Ying; Gao, Wei

    2014-01-13

    The effect of asymmetry caused by oblique line-shaped laser ablation on the generation of ultrasonic waves in metal, especially the effect of transverse component of the ablation force source on the ultrasonic waves is analyzed. Due to the oblique force source, the displacements of shear wave increase obviously by the enhanced shear force, the energy concentration area of longitudinal wave deflects to the small range centered on the incident direction while that of shear wave is approximately perpendicular to incident direction. In addition, surface wave enhances in the direction of transverse power flow. Furthermore, some ultrasonic characteristics under vortex laser ablation condition are inferred.

  10. Heat accumulation in ultra-short pulsed scanning laser ablation of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Franziska; Michalowski, Andreas; Kiedrowski, Thomas; Nolte, Stefan

    2015-01-26

    High average laser powers can have a serious adverse impact on the ablation quality in ultra-short pulsed laser material processing of metals. With respect to the scanning speed, a sharp transition between a smooth, reflective and an uneven, dark ablated surface is observed. Investigating the influence of the sample temperature, it is experimentally shown that this effect stems from heat accumulation. In a numerical heat flow simulation, the critical scanning speed indicating the change in ablation quality is determined in good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Monte Carlo Simulation of Laser-Ablated Particle Splitting Dynamic in a Low Pressure Inert Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xuecheng; Zhang, Zicai; Liang, Weihua; Chu, Lizhi; Deng, Zechao; Wang, Yinglong

    2016-06-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation method with an instantaneous density dependent mean-free-path of the ablated particles and the Ar gas is developed for investigating the transport dynamics of the laser-ablated particles in a low pressure inert gas. The ablated-particle density and velocity distributions are analyzed. The force distributions acting on the ablated particles are investigated. The influence of the substrate on the ablated-particle velocity distribution and the force distribution acting on the ablated particles are discussed. The Monte Carlo simulation results approximately agree with the experimental data at the pressure of 8 Pa to 17 Pa. This is helpful to investigate the gas phase nucleation and growth mechanism of nanoparticles. supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (No. A2015201166) and the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei University, China (No. 2013-252)

  12. Research on ablation process of constant elastic alloy with femtosecond laser in solution medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Guilin; Su, Wenyi; Duan, Ji'an; Fan, Nannan; Sun, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Jianying; Wang, Cong; Yin, Kai; Dong, Xinran; Hu, Youwang

    2016-09-01

    Constant elastic alloy is widely used material with high applied performance. In order to develop the application of constant elastic alloy, laser ablation of constant elastic alloy in different ablation mediums was investigated with different femtosecond lasers. Constant elastic alloy was ablated in solution with different ethanol contents and different thicknesses of the liquid layer above the target material and for comparison, in air. Also, the effects of laser energy and laser pulses of femtosecond laser on the morphology are studied. The effects of the position of the laser focus relative to the target surface were also discussed. The experimental results indicate that larger laser-induced area and smaller depth of craters tend to be obtained in solution than in air. The laser-induced area firstly increases and then decreases, and depths of craters decrease at first and increase later with the increase in ethanol content. Furthermore, the larger were energy of laser pulses, the larger were laser-induced area and deeper craters made in all different ablation solutions.

  13. Treatment planning for prostate focal laser ablation in the face of needle placement uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepek, Jeremy; Lindner, Uri; Davidson, Sean R H; Haider, Masoom A; Ghai, Sangeet; Trachtenberg, John; Fenster, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    To study the effect of needle placement uncertainty on the expected probability of achieving complete focal target destruction in focal laser ablation (FLA) of prostate cancer. Using a simplified model of prostate cancer focal target, and focal laser ablation region shapes, Monte Carlo simulations of needle placement error were performed to estimate the probability of completely ablating a region of target tissue. Graphs of the probability of complete focal target ablation are presented over clinically relevant ranges of focal target sizes and shapes, ablation region sizes, and levels of needle placement uncertainty. In addition, a table is provided for estimating the maximum target size that is treatable. The results predict that targets whose length is at least 5 mm smaller than the diameter of each ablation region can be confidently ablated using, at most, four laser fibers if the standard deviation in each component of needle placement error is less than 3 mm. However, targets larger than this (i.e., near to or exceeding the diameter of each ablation region) require more careful planning. This process is facilitated by using the table provided. The probability of completely ablating a focal target using FLA is sensitive to the level of needle placement uncertainty, especially as the target length approaches and becomes greater than the diameter of ablated tissue that each individual laser fiber can achieve. The results of this work can be used to help determine individual patient eligibility for prostate FLA, to guide the planning of prostate FLA, and to quantify the clinical benefit of using advanced systems for accurate needle delivery for this treatment modality.

  14. Treatment planning for prostate focal laser ablation in the face of needle placement uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cepek, Jeremy, E-mail: jcepek@robarts.ca; Fenster, Aaron [Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8, Canada and Biomedical Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Lindner, Uri; Trachtenberg, John [Department of Surgical Oncology, Division of Urology, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4 (Canada); Davidson, Sean R. H. [Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Haider, Masoom A. [Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2J7 (Canada); Ghai, Sangeet [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To study the effect of needle placement uncertainty on the expected probability of achieving complete focal target destruction in focal laser ablation (FLA) of prostate cancer. Methods: Using a simplified model of prostate cancer focal target, and focal laser ablation region shapes, Monte Carlo simulations of needle placement error were performed to estimate the probability of completely ablating a region of target tissue. Results: Graphs of the probability of complete focal target ablation are presented over clinically relevant ranges of focal target sizes and shapes, ablation region sizes, and levels of needle placement uncertainty. In addition, a table is provided for estimating the maximum target size that is treatable. The results predict that targets whose length is at least 5 mm smaller than the diameter of each ablation region can be confidently ablated using, at most, four laser fibers if the standard deviation in each component of needle placement error is less than 3 mm. However, targets larger than this (i.e., near to or exceeding the diameter of each ablation region) require more careful planning. This process is facilitated by using the table provided. Conclusions: The probability of completely ablating a focal target using FLA is sensitive to the level of needle placement uncertainty, especially as the target length approaches and becomes greater than the diameter of ablated tissue that each individual laser fiber can achieve. The results of this work can be used to help determine individual patient eligibility for prostate FLA, to guide the planning of prostate FLA, and to quantify the clinical benefit of using advanced systems for accurate needle delivery for this treatment modality.

  15. Increasing the penetration depth for ultrafast laser tissue ablation using glycerol based optical clearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabay, Ilan; Subramanian, Kaushik G.; Martin, Chris; Yildirim, Murat; Tuchin, Valery V.; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2016-03-01

    Background: Deep tissue ablation is the next challenge in ultrafast laser microsurgery. By focusing ultrafast pulses below the tissue surface one can create an ablation void confined to the focal volume. However, as the ablation depth increases in a scattering tissue, increase in the required power can trigger undesired nonlinear phenomena out of focus that restricts our ability to ablate beyond a maximum ablation depth of few scattering lengths. Optical clearing (OC) might reduce the intensity and increase the maximal ablation depth by lowering the refractive index mismatch, and therefore reducing scattering. Some efforts to ablate deeper showed out of focus damage, while others used brutal mechanical methods for clearing. Our clinical goal is to create voids in the scarred vocal folds and inject a biomaterial to bring back the tissue elasticity and restore phonation. Materials and methods: Fresh porcine vocal folds were excised and applied a biocompatible OC agent (75% glycerol). Collimated transmittance was monitored. The tissue was optically cleared and put under the microscope for ablation threshold measurements at different depths. Results: The time after which the tissue was optically cleared was roughly two hours. Fitting the threshold measurements to an exponential decay graph indicated that the scattering length of the tissue increased to 83+/-16 μm, which is more than doubling the known scattering length for normal tissue. Conclusion: Optical clearing with Glycerol increases the tissue scattering length and therefore reduces the energy for ablation and increases the maximal ablation depth. This technique can potentially improve clinical microsurgery.

  16. Characterization of particulates accompanying laser ablation of pressed polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitz, J.; Dickinson, J. T.

    We present observations of sub-micron- to micron-sized particles generated by high fluence ( 2 J/cm2) 248-nm laser ablation of pressed polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) targets in air at atmospheric pressure. The original target material was hydrostatically compressed 7 μm PTFE powder, sintered at 275 °C. Collected ejecta due to laser irradiation consists of four basic particle morphologies ranging from small particles 50-200 nm in diameter to larger particles 10 μm in diameter. Many particles formed in air carry electric charge. Using charged electrodes we are able to collect charged particles to determine relative numbers of +/- charge. We observe roughly equal numbers of positively and negatively charged particles except for the largest particles which were predominantly negative. For a range of particle sizes we are able to measure the sign and magnitude of this charge with a Millikan-oil-drop technique and determine surface charge densities. The implications of these observations with respect to pulsed laser deposition of PTFE thin films and coatings are discussed.

  17. Metal nanoparticles and IR laser applications in medicine for biotissue ablation and welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalayan, A. A.; Israelyan, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    We report the possibility of laser welding and ablation of biotissue by using metal and hybrid metal nanoparticles (NPs) and infrared laser irradiation spectrally located far from plasmon resonances. A nanosecond YAG:Nd laser of wavelength 1064 nm has been used for synthesis of metal NPs. The Ag, Au, Cu, Ti and Ni, as well as Au-Ag and Au-Cu hybrid metal colloidal NPs were formed in a liquid medium. The diagnostic technique of second harmonic generation (SHG) has been applied to determine the biotissue ablation area after IR laser irradiation. The effectiveness of biotissue ablation was 4-5 times larger in the case of a tissue sample colored with metal NPs than for an uncolored sample. IR laser welding has been demonstrated for deep-located biotissue layers colored by metal NPs.

  18. Ablation and analysis of small cell populations and single cells by consecutive laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Bindesh; Nemes, Peter; Vertes, Akos

    2010-10-01

    Laser ablation of single cells through a sharpened optical fiber is used for the detection of metabolites by laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) mass spectrometry (MS). Ablation of the same Allium cepa epidermal cell by consecutive pulses indicates the rupture of the cell wall by the second shot. Intracellular sucrose heterogeneity is detected by subsequent laser pulses pointing to rupturing the vacuolar membrane by the third exposure. Ion production by bursts of laser pulses shows that the drying of ruptured A. cepa cells occurs in ˜50 s at low pulse rates (10 pulses/s bursts) and significantly faster at high pulse rates (100 pulses/s bursts). These results point to the competing role of cytoplasm ejection and evaporative drying in diminishing the LAESI-MS signal in ˜50 s or 100 laser pulses, whichever occurs first.

  19. Wavelength effect on hole shapes and morphology evolution during ablation by picosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wanqin; Wang, Wenjun; Li, Ben Q.; Jiang, Gedong; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-10-01

    An experimental study is presented of the effect of wavelength on the shape and morphology evolution of micro holes ablated on stainless steel surface by a 10 ps Q-switched Nd:VAN pulsed laser. Two routes of hole development are associated with the visible (532 nm) and near-infrared (1064 nm) laser beams, respectively. The evolution of various geometric shapes and morphological characteristics of the micro holes ablated with the two different wavelengths is comparatively studied for other given processing conditions such as a laser power levels and the number of pulses applied. Plausible explanations, based on the light-materials interaction associated with laser micromachining, are also provided for the discernable paths of geometric and morphological development of holes under laser ablation.

  20. Laser-assisted fabrication and size distribution modification of colloidal gold nanostructures by nanosecond laser ablation in different liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikov, R. G.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Atanasov, P. A.; Karashanova, D. B.

    2017-07-01

    This study presents results on pulsed laser ablation of gold target immersed in different liquids. In the experiments chloroform, toluene and ethanol are used as liquid media for the laser ablation. Two different wavelengths: the fundamental (1064 nm) and second harmonic (532 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser, are utilized to produce various colloids. The optical properties of the colloids were evaluated by optical transmittance measurements in the UV-Vis spectral range. The morphology of the colloidal nanoparticles created and the evaluation of their size distribution are investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The selected area electron diffraction is employed for chemical phase identification of the created nanostructures. Ablation in chloroform resulted in formation of spherical and spheroidal gold nanoparticles with the similar mean size at both laser wavelengths used—11.5 nm at 1064 and 9.3 nm at 532 nm. Nanoparticles with smaller mean size (below 5 nm) in the case of ablation in toluene were observed. Spherical nanoparticles with mean diameter of 7.7 nm produced by 1064 nm and thin elongated nanostructures with thickness of about 5 nm using 532 nm are observed in the case of ablation in ethanol. An additional laser irradiation of the colloids demonstrated the changing of the optical properties and size distribution of the nanostructures produced by ablation in ethanol and chloroform. The irradiation of toluene-based colloid does not induce observable change of the colloid properties.

  1. Comparison of transcatheter laser and direct-current shock ablation of endocardium near tricuspid anulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Zhen; Wang, Shi-Wen; Li, Junheng

    1993-03-01

    Forty to eighty percent of the patients with accessory pathways (APs) manifest themselves by tachyarrhythmias. Many of these patients needed either life-long medical therapy or surgery. In order to avoid the discomfort and expenses in surgical procedures, closed chest percutaneous catheter ablation of APs became a potentially desirable therapeutic approach. Many investigations indicated that ablation of right APs by transcatheter direct current (dc) shock could cause life-threatening arrhythmias, right coronary arterical (RCA) spasm, etc. With the development of transcatheter laser technique, it has been used in drug-incurable arrhythmias. The results show that laser ablation is much safer than surgery and electric shock therapy. The purpose of this study is to explore the effectiveness, advantages, and complications with transcatheter Nd:YAG laser and dc shock in the ablation of right atrioventricular accessory pathways in the atrium near the tricuspid annulus (TA) in 20 dogs.

  2. Nanograting formation in air through plasmonic near-field ablation induced by femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Godai; Miyazaki, Kenzo

    2017-02-01

    Superimposed multiple shots of low-fluence femtosecond (fs) laser pulses form a periodic nanostructure on solid surfaces through ablation. We have demonstrated that the self-organization process of nanostructuring can be regulated to fabricate a homogeneous nanograting on the target surface in air. A simple two-step ablation process and an ablation technique using interfering fs laser beams were developed to control plasmonic near-fields generated by fs laser pulses. The results have shown the nature of a single spatial standing wave mode of surface plasmon polaritons of which periodically enhanced near-fields ablate the target surface, to fabricate the nanograting on gallium nitride (GaN) and metals such as stainless steel (SUS) and titanium (Ti).

  3. Real-time near IR (1310 nm) imaging of CO2 laser ablation of enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Cynthia L; Fried, Daniel

    2008-02-18

    The high-transparency of dental enamel in the near-IR (NIR) can be exploited for real-time imaging of ablation crater formation during drilling with lasers. NIR images were acquired with an InGaAs focal plane array and a NIR zoom microscope during drilling incisions in human enamel samples with a lambda=9.3-microm CO(2) laser operating at repetition rates of 50-300-Hz with and without a water spray. Crack formation, dehydration and thermal changes were observed during ablation. These initial images demonstrate the potential of NIR imaging to monitor laser-ablation events in real-time to provide information about the mechanism of ablation and to evaluate the potential for peripheral thermal and mechanical damage.

  4. Pulsed laser deposition of nano-glassy carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ossi, P.M. [Dip. Ingegneria Nucleare and Centre of Excellence, NanoEngineered Materials and Surfaces (NEMAS), Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio, 34-3, 20133 Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: paolo.ossi@polimi.it; Bottani, C.E. [Dip. Ingegneria Nucleare and Centre of Excellence, NanoEngineered Materials and Surfaces (NEMAS), Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio, 34-3, 20133 Milan (Italy); Miotello, A. [Dip. Fisica, Universita di Trento, 38050 Povo (TN) (Italy)

    2005-07-30

    Carbon films have been deposited at room temperature on (1 0 0) Si substrates by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) from a highly oriented pyrolitic graphite source. Changing the laser power density from 8.5 to 19 MW mm{sup -2} and using various ambient atmospheres (helium, argon from 0.6 Pa to 2 kPa), nano-sized cluster-assembled films were obtained. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the film morphology, changes with increasing ambient gas pressure. We observed in the sequence: dense columns, node-like morphology, platelets (only in argon) and an open dendritic structure. By atomic force microscopy, on representative films, we evaluated the size distribution and relative abundancy of aggregates of carbon clusters, as well as film roughness. Raman spectroscopy shows that all the films are sp{sup 2} coordinated, structurally disordered and belong to the family of carbon nano-glasses. The estimated film coherence length gives an average size of about 5 nm for the agglomerated carbon clusters in the films. The average number of carbon atoms per cluster depends on ambient gas pressure, but is nearly independent of laser intensity.

  5. Fully Automated Laser Ablation Liquid Capture Sample Analysis using NanoElectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Laser ablation provides for the possibility of sampling a large variety of surfaces with high spatial resolution. This type of sampling when employed in conjunction with liquid capture followed by nanoelectrospray ionization provides the opportunity for sensitive and prolonged interrogation of samples by mass spectrometry as well as the ability to analyze surfaces not amenable to direct liquid extraction. METHODS: A fully automated, reflection geometry, laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling system was achieved by incorporating appropriate laser fiber optics and a focusing lens into a commercially available, liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA ) ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate system. RESULTS: Under optimized conditions about 10% of laser ablated material could be captured in a droplet positioned vertically over the ablation region using the NanoMate robot controlled pipette. The sampling spot size area with this laser ablation liquid capture surface analysis (LA/LCSA) mode of operation (typically about 120 m x 160 m) was approximately 50 times smaller than that achievable by direct liquid extraction using LESA (ca. 1 mm diameter liquid extraction spot). The set-up was successfully applied for the analysis of ink on glass and paper as well as the endogenous components in Alstroemeria Yellow King flower petals. In a second mode of operation with a comparable sampling spot size, termed laser ablation/LESA , the laser system was used to drill through, penetrate, or otherwise expose material beneath a solvent resistant surface. Once drilled, LESA was effective in sampling soluble material exposed at that location on the surface. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating the capability for different laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling modes of operation into a LESA ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate enhanced the spot sampling spatial resolution of this device and broadened the surface types amenable to analysis to include absorbent and solvent resistant

  6. Effects of picosecond laser repetition rate on ablation of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baoye; Deng, Leimin; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Fei; Duan, Jun; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the effects of pulse repetition rate on ablation efficiency and quality of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel have been studied using a picosecond (ps) pulse Nd:YVO4 laser system at λ= 1064 nm. The experimental results of area ablation on target surface reveal that laser repetition rate plays a significant role in controlling ablation efficiency and quality. Increasing the laser repetition rate, while keeping a constant mean power improves the ablation efficiency and quality. For each laser mean power, there is an optimal repetition rate to achieve a higher laser ablation efficiency with low surface roughness. A high ablation efficiency of 42.29, 44.11 and 47.52 μm3/mJ, with surface roughness of 0.476, 0.463 and 0.706 μm could be achieved at laser repetition rate of 10 MHz, for laser mean power of 15, 17 and 19 W, respectively. Scanning electron microcopy images revels that the surface morphology evolves from rough with numerous craters, to flat without pores when we increased the laser repetition rate. The effects of laser repetition rate on the heat accumulation, plasma shield and ablation threshold were analyzed by numerical simulation, spectral analysis and multi-laser shot, respectively. The synergetic effects of laser repetition rate on laser ablation rate and machining quality were analyzed and discussed systemically in this paper.

  7. Optimization of silver nanoparticles production by laser ablation in water using a 150-ps laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stašić, J.; Živković, Lj.; Trtica, M.

    2016-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles were synthesized by laser ablation in liquid (water) using a 150-ps Nd:YAG laser. Due to their extraordinary characteristics, especially when obtained by this method providing high purity and high stability of colloids, silver NPs are nowadays highly important in various applications. The objective of this study was to optimize the process parameters in order to achieve the highest possible yield while retaining small particle size. Yield/mass concentration of the obtained particles was measured depending on different parameters: time of irradiation, pulse energy, position regarding the focus, and number of irradiation locations. The conditions providing relatively high yield, small particle size, highest production rate, and highest efficiency are 7 mJ, 15-min irradiation time (9000 pulses), and target position ˜4 mm in front of the lens focus. The results are compared with the results obtained by the longer nanosecond as well as the ultrashort pulsed lasers. A possible physical explanation is given.

  8. Measurements of nanoparticle size distribution produced by laser ablation of tungsten and boron-carbide in N{sub 2} ambient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bereznai, Miklos [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, Dom ter 9, 6720 Szeged (Hungary) and Department of Materials Chemistry, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, PO Box 538, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)]. E-mail: bereznai@physx.u-szeged.hu; Heszler, Peter [Department of Engineering Sciences, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, PO Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Research Group on Laser Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Dom ter 9, 6720 Szeged (Hungary); Toth, Zsolt [Research Group on Laser Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Dom ter 9, 6720 Szeged (Hungary); Wilhelmsson, Ola [Department of Materials Chemistry, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, PO Box 538, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Boman, Mats [Department of Materials Chemistry, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, PO Box 538, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2006-04-30

    Nanoparticles (NPs) were produced by ablating tungsten and boron-carbide (B{sub 4}C) target materials in atmospheric pressure nitrogen ambient using ArF excimer laser pulses. The size distributions of the NPs formed during the ablation were monitored-within a 7-133 nm size window-by a condensation particle counter connected to a differential mobility analyzer. The laser repetition rate was varied between 1-50 Hz, and the fluence was systematically changed in the range of 0.5-15 J/cm{sup 2}, for both materials, allowing a comparative study in an extended laser parameter regime. The multishot ablation threshold ({phi} {sub th}) of B{sub 4}C was determined to be {approx}1.9 J/cm{sup 2} for the laser used (ArF excimer, {lambda} = 193 nm). Similarly to earlier studies, it was shown that the size distributions consist of mainly small nanoparticles (<{approx}20 nm) attributed to a non-thermal ablation mechanism below {phi} {sub th}. An additional broad peak appears (between 20 and 40 nm) above {phi} {sub th} as a consequence of the thermally induced macroscopic ablation. Chemical composition of deposited polydisperse nanoparticles was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showing nitrogen incorporation into the boron-carbide.

  9. Colloidal Metal Nanoparticles Prepared by Laser Ablation and their Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianming; Claverie, Jerome; Chaker, Mohamed; Ma, Dongling

    2017-05-05

    This review article highlights the recent advances of the synthesis and application of metal nanoparticles (NPs) fabricated via pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) phase and also introduces relevant NP formation mechanisms. Although wet-chemical approaches have been well established to synthesize colloidal metal NPs with various components and structures, some inherent drawbacks, such as reaction residuals and/or contaminations, largely limit some of their applications. The PLAL method has recently been developed as an alternative approach and received increasing attention for colloidal NP preparation, without involving complicated chemical reactions. In certain cases, by using PLAL, ligand-free and surface-clean NPs can be obtained and well dispersed in liquid, leading to the formation of a "surface-clean" NP dispersion. This unique feature renders PLAL-synthesised metal NPs attractive candidates for many interesting applications in catalysis, biology, sensing, and clean energy generation and storage. We conclude this review by proposing several interesting research directions and future challenges, from PLAL fabrication to applications. We hope this review can serve as a good reference and help with the further development of PLAL-NPs and their diverse applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Antibacterial effect of bismuth subsalicylate nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores-Castañeda, Mariela [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico); Vega-Jiménez, Alejandro L., E-mail: argelia.almaguer@mac.com; Almaguer-Flores, Argelia [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Facultad de Odontología, DEPeI, I (Mexico); Camps, Enrique; Pérez, Mario [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico); Silva-Bermudez, Phaedra [Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Unidad de Ingeniería de Tejidos, Terapia Celular y Medicina Regenerativa (Mexico); Berea, Edgardo [FarmaQuimia SA de CV. (Mexico); Rodil, Sandra E. [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales (Mexico)

    2015-11-15

    The antimicrobial properties of bismuth subsalicylate (BSS) nanoparticles against four opportunistic pathogens; E. coli, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis were determined. BSS nanoparticles were synthesized by pulse laser ablation of a solid target in distilled water under different conditions. The nanoparticles were characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and absorption spectra and small angle X-ray scattering. The analysis shows that the colloids maintained the BSS structure and presented average particle size between 20 and 60 nm, while the concentration ranges from 95 to 195 mg/L. The antibacterial effect was reported as the inhibition ratio of the bacterial growth after 24 h and the cell viability was measured using the XTT assay. The results showed that the inhibition ratio of E. coli and S. epidermidis was dependant on the NPs size and/or concentration, meanwhile P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were more sensitive to the BSS nanoparticles independently of both the size and the concentration. In general, the BSS colloids with average particle size of 20 nm were the most effective, attaining inhibition ratios >80 %, similar or larger than those obtained with the antibiotic used as control. The results suggest that the BSS colloids could be used as effective antibacterial agents with potential applications in the medical area.

  11. Laser ablation ICP-MS: Application in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussulini, Alessandra; Becker, Julia Susanne; Becker, Johanna Sabine

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, the development of diverse bioanalytical methodologies based on mass spectrometry imaging has increased, as has their application in biomedical questions. The distribution analysis of elements (metals, semimetals, and non-metals) in biological samples is a point of interest in life sciences, especially within the context of metallomics, which is the scientific field that encompasses the global analysis of the entirety of elemental species inside a cell or tissue. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) has been efficiently employed to generate qualitative and quantitative maps of elemental distribution in thin tissue sections of a variety of biological samples, for example, brain, cartilage, spinal cord, etc. The combination of elemental with molecular mass spectrometry allows obtaining information about the elements bound to proteins, when they are previously separated by gel electrophoresis (metalloproteomics), and also adding a new dimension to molecular mass spectrometry imaging by the correlation of molecular and elemental distribution maps in definite regions in a biological tissue. In the present review, recent biomedical applications in LA-ICP-MS imaging as a stand-alone technique and in combination with molecular mass spectrometry imaging techniques are discussed. Applications of LA-ICP-MS in the study of neurodegenerative diseases, distribution of contrast agents and metallodrugs, and metalloproteomics will be focused in this review. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 36:47-57, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Anaesthesia for foetoscopic Laser ablation- a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Kumbhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Twin pregnancy with monochorionic placenta may be associated with arteriovenous vascular anastomosis of the placental vessels resulting in twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS and twin reversed arterial perfusion syndrome (TRAP. Foetoscopic LASER ablation (FLA is the treatment of choice in reducing foetal mortality related to this. Methods: A retrospective review of medical records of 41 FLA procedures for TTTS and TRAP were analysed for anaesthetic management. Thirty-four patients received subarachnoid block, three combined spinal-epidural block, three general anaesthesia and one local anaesthesia with sedation. Nitroglycerine 5 mg patch was used for tocolysis 1 h before the procedure and continued for 24-48 h postoperatively. Results: Bupivacaine was used in 34 patients, and ropivacaine in three patients. Mean dose of bupivacaine 0.5% was 2.43 ± 0.32 ml and ropivacaine 0.75% was 2.85 ± 0.19 ml. The mean duration of surgery was 117.07 ± 28 min. Mild hypotension occurred in all patients under spinal anaesthesia and was treated with vasopressors. The foetal outcome among all 41 patients were 13 delivered live twins, 15 had a single live baby with intrauterine death of other twin baby. In 12 patients, both babies were intrauterine death. One patient was lost for follow-up. Conclusion: Foetoscopic procedures can be done under central neuraxial block, however occasionally general anaesthesia may be required.

  13. Anaesthesia for foetoscopic Laser ablation- a retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhar, Vaishali; Radhika, M; Gundappa, Parameswara; Simha, Jayashree; Radhakrishnan, Prathima

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Twin pregnancy with monochorionic placenta may be associated with arteriovenous vascular anastomosis of the placental vessels resulting in twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) and twin reversed arterial perfusion syndrome (TRAP). Foetoscopic LASER ablation (FLA) is the treatment of choice in reducing foetal mortality related to this. Methods: A retrospective review of medical records of 41 FLA procedures for TTTS and TRAP were analysed for anaesthetic management. Thirty-four patients received subarachnoid block, three combined spinal-epidural block, three general anaesthesia and one local anaesthesia with sedation. Nitroglycerine 5 mg patch was used for tocolysis 1 h before the procedure and continued for 24–48 h postoperatively. Results: Bupivacaine was used in 34 patients, and ropivacaine in three patients. Mean dose of bupivacaine 0.5% was 2.43 ± 0.32 ml and ropivacaine 0.75% was 2.85 ± 0.19 ml. The mean duration of surgery was 117.07 ± 28 min. Mild hypotension occurred in all patients under spinal anaesthesia and was treated with vasopressors. The foetal outcome among all 41 patients were 13 delivered live twins, 15 had a single live baby with intrauterine death of other twin baby. In 12 patients, both babies were intrauterine death. One patient was lost for follow-up. Conclusion: Foetoscopic procedures can be done under central neuraxial block, however occasionally general anaesthesia may be required. PMID:28003695

  14. Ablation characteristics and reaction mechanism of insulation materials under slag deposition condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yiwen; Li, Jiang; Liu, Yang

    2017-07-01

    Current understanding of the physical and chemical processes involved in the ablation of insulation materials by highly aluminized solid propellants is limited. The study on the heat transfer and ablation principle of ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) materials under slag deposition condition is essential for future design or modification of large solid rocket motors (SRMs) for launch application. In this paper, the alumina liquid flow pattern and the deposition principle in full-scale SRM engines are discussed. The interaction mechanism between the alumina droplets and the wall are analyzed. Then, an experimental method was developed to simulate the insulation material ablation under slag deposition condition. Experimental study was conducted based on a laboratory-scale device. Meanwhile, from the analysis of the cross-sectional morphology and chemical composition of the charring layer after ablation, the reaction mechanism of the charring layer under deposition condition was discussed, and the main reaction equation was derived. The numerical simulation and experimental results show the following. (i) The alumina droplet flow in the deposition section of the laboratory-scale device is similar to that of a full-scale SRM. (ii) The charring layer of the EPDM insulator displays a porous tight/loose structure under high-temperature slag deposition condition. (iii) A seven-step carbothermal reduction in the alumina is derived and established under high-pressure and high-temperature environment in the SRM combustion chamber. (iv) The analysis using thermodynamic software indicates that the reaction of the alumina and charring layer initially forms Al4C3 during the operation. Then, Al element and Al2OC compound are subsequently produced with the reduction in the release of gas CO as well with continuous environmental heating.

  15. Elemental fractionation in 785 nm picosecond and femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaheen, M.E., E-mail: mshaheen73@science.tanta.edu.eg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); Gagnon, J.E.; Fryer, B.J. [Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research (GLIER), University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4 (Canada); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4 (Canada)

    2015-05-01

    Elemental fractionation and ICP-MS signal response were investigated for two different pulse width laser beams originating from the same laser system. Femtosecond and picosecond laser beams at pulse widths of 130 fs and 110 ps, respectively, and wavelength of 785 nm were used to ablate NIST 610 synthetic glass and SRM 1107 Naval Brass B at the same spot for 800 to 1000 laser pulses at different repetition rates (5 to 50 Hz). Elemental fractionation was found to depend on repetition rate and showed a trend with femtosecond laser ablation that is opposite to that observed in picosecond laser ablation for most measured isotopes. ICP-MS signal intensity was higher in femtosecond than picosecond LA-ICP-MS in both NIST 610 and naval brass when ablation was conducted under the same fluence and repetition rate. The differences in signal intensity were partly related to differences in particle size distribution between particles generated by femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses and the consequent differences in transport and ionization efficiencies. The main reason for the higher signal intensity resulting from femtosecond laser pulses was related to the larger crater sizes compared to those created during picosecond laser ablation. Elemental ratios measured using {sup 66}Zn/{sup 63}Cu, {sup 208}Pb/{sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th/{sup 238}U, {sup 66}Zn/{sup 232}Th and {sup 66}Zn/{sup 208}Pb were found to change with the number of laser pulses with data points being more scattered in picosecond than femtosecond laser pulses. Reproducibility of replicate measurements of signal intensities, fractionation and elemental ratios was better for fs-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 3 to 6%) than ps-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 7 to 11%). - Highlights: • Fractionation and ICP-MS signal response were investigated for two different pulse widths using NIST 610 and Naval Brass. • Dependence of fractionation indices on repetition rate and pulse width. • Higher ablation rate was observed in picosecond compared to

  16. Towards fast femtosecond laser micromachining of fused silica: The effect of deposited energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Sheeba; Bellouard, Yves

    2010-09-27

    Femtosecond laser micromachining of glass material using low-energy, sub-ablation threshold pulses find numerous applications in the fields of integrated optics, lab-on-a-chips and microsystems in general. In this paper, we study the influence of the laser-deposited energy on the performance of the micromachining process. In particular, we show that the energy deposited in the substrate affects its etching rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate the existence of an optimal energy deposition value. These results are not only important from an industrial point-of-view but also provide new evidences supporting the essential role of densification and consequently stress-generation as the main driving factor promoting enhanced etching rate following laser exposure.

  17. LASER DEPOSITION. THE AREA THERMAL FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin CIOFU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available By laser direct deposition, the parts are manufactured by injecting powder in a melt metal bath with the help of the laser. During the manufacture it is deployed a complex “ thermic history” in the different built regions. This includes re-melting and many thermic cycles at low temperatures (of hundreds of degrees. The phenomena of thermic transmission are variable in time, being by excellence reversible phenomena, too, as the temperature difference which intervenes cannot be ever small infinite. In the most general case, the temperature is a function of space coordinates, and of the time ح

  18. Human dermis separation via ultra-short pulsed laser plasma-mediated ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Huan; Guo Zhixiong, E-mail: guo@jove.rutgers.ed [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2009-08-21

    In vitro layer separation of human dermal tissues via laser plasma-mediated ablation was successfully conducted for the first time. The ablation of wet dermis was generated using a 900 fs ultra-short pulsed laser with the wavelength centred at 1552 nm. The ablation and separation results were imaged and measured by scanning electron microscopy. The dermis ablation threshold was determined as 9.65 {+-} 1.21 J cm{sup -2} and the incubation factor was found as 0.46 {+-} 0.03. Histological examinations were performed to find proper laser parameters for dermis ablation and separation with minimal thermal damage. No thermal damage was found in the single line ablation results when the pulse overlap rate was not over 5 pulses {mu}m{sup -1}. Even in the multi-line ablation, thermal damage was insignificant and the lateral damage zone was generally within 5 {mu}m in the results with 100 continuously repeated line scans. The separation of a whole piece of wet dermal tissue into two thin layers was presented. Several separation tests with different layer thicknesses from 200 to 600 {mu}m were completed. The unevenness of the separated layers was generally under 10%. The cohesion and morphology of the separated tissue layers were not altered.

  19. Measurement of in situ sulfur isotopes by laser ablation multi-collector ICPMS: opening Pandora’s Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, William I.; Pribil, Michael; Koenig, Alan E.; Slack, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Laser ablation multi-collector ICPMS is a modern tool for in situ measurement of S isotopes. Advantages of the technique are speed of analysis and relatively minor matrix effects combined with spatial resolution sufficient for many applications. The main disadvantage is a more destructive sampling mechanism relative to the ion microprobe technique. Recent advances in instrumentation allow precise measurement with spatial resolutions down to 25 microns. We describe specific examples from economic geology where increased spatial resolution has greatly expanded insights into the sources and evolution of fluids that cause mineralization and illuminated genetic relations between individual deposits in single mineral districts.

  20. Myocardium tissue ablation with hollow-waveguide-delivered near-infrared nanosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shunichi; Arai, Tsunenori; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Ashida, Hiroshi

    2001-06-01

    With 1064-nm, nanosecond laser pulses delivered from hollow waveguide, ablation characteristics of porcine myocardium tissue have been investigated in vitro. For the hollow waveguide a vacuum-cored scheme was introduced to suppress the laser-induced air breakdown that limited the available transmitted laser energy/power. The delivered laser pulse beam was focused with a collimation lens and a focusing lens, and it was shown that higher efficiency ablation was obtained when a focusing lens with a shorter focal length was used. Waveguide bending (bending angle 90 degree(s)C, bending radius approximately 50 cm) caused no deteriorating effect on the ablation characteristics for ablation energies up to approximately 60 mJ/pulse. It was demonstrated that deep and sharp ablated holes with aspect ratios > 8 was obtained with the hollow-waveguide-delivered laser pulses. It may be a realistic option to aim at using the present hollow waveguide system for trocar-based applications or replacing articulated mirror-based laser delivery systems. It is an important part of the future works to downsize the waveguide output unit for catheter-based applications.

  1. Pulsed laser deposition of silicon dioxide thin films with silicone targets for fabricating waveguide devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoshi, Masayuki; Kuramatsu, Masaaki; Inoue, Narumi

    2002-06-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) thin films were deposited at room temperature by 193-nm ArF excimer laser ablation of silicone in oxygen atmosphere. Only the side chains of the target were photo-dissociated during ablation to deposit Si-O bonds on a substrate in high laser fluence at about 10 J/cm2. Oxygen gas worked to oxidize the Si-O bonds ejected from the target to from SiO2 thin films at the gas pressure of 4.4 X 10-2 Torr, in addition to reducing the isolated carbon mixed into the films. We also found that the deposited rate could control refractive index of the films. The refractive index of the film deposited at 0.05 nm/pulse is greater than that of the film at 0.1 nm/pulse. Thus, a 0.2-micrometers thick SiO2 cladding film deposited at 0.1 nm/pulse was firstly formed on the whole surface of a 100- micrometers -thick polyester film, and then a 0.6 micrometers -thick SiO2 core film at 0.05 nm/pulse was fabricated in a line on the sample. The sample functioned as a waveguide device for a 633-nm line of He-Ne laser.

  2. Atomic force microscopic characterization of films grown by inverse pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egerhazi, L. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Geretovszky, Zs. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Csako, T. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Szoerenyi, T. [Research Group on Laser Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)]. E-mail: t.szorenyi@physx.u-szeged.hu

    2006-04-30

    Carbon nitride films have been deposited by KrF excimer laser ablation of a rotating graphite target in 5 Pa nitrogen ambient in an inverse pulsed laser deposition configuration, where the backward motion of the ablated species is utilised for film growth on substrates lying in the target plane. Topometric AFM scans of the films, exhibiting elliptical thickness distribution, have been recorded along the axes of symmetry of the deposition area. High resolution AFM scans revealed the existence of disk-like, or somewhat elongated rice-like features of 5-10 nm average thickness and {approx}100 nm largest dimension, densely packed over the whole, approximately 14 x 10 cm{sup 2} deposition area. The RMS roughness of the film decreased from 9 nm near to the laser spot down to 2 nm in the outer regions. Even the highest RMS value obtained for IPLD films was less than half of the typical, 25 nm roughness measured on simultaneously deposited PLD films.

  3. Characterising Complex Ice-Tephra Spatial Feedbacks of Post-Volcanic Eruption Glacial Ablation Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vircavs, L.; Nield, J. M.; Chiverrell, R. C.; Darby, S. E.; Leyland, J.; Jacobs, B.

    2012-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions in glacio-volcanic regions regularly deposit significant quantities of volcanic ash (tephra) over nearby glaciers. This ash debris can remain for decades as it is transported through the system and has the ability to alter surface albedo, thermal insulation and ultimately surface roughness which can significantly modify the glacial response to climate perturbations. We used terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to measure daily ice-ash surface interactions for a week in July 2011 following tephra fallout from the May 2011 Grímsvötn eruption onto Svínafellsjökull, Iceland. TLS is well suited to process studies and enabled repeat measurements to be collected of ice surface topography and signal absorption at high spatial resolution in three dimensions rather than traditional transect type studies. Our data confirm ablation rates either reduce or increase under thick (insulating) and thin (reduced albedo) ash deposits, respectively. Fourier transform analysis of the TLS data identified that a three-fold increase in aerodynamic roughness was attributable to an increase in larger (>0.2m) surface features. These surface features include micro cryoconite holes, debris cones and meltwater channels. Moreover, the temporal sequence of TLS measurements revealed the importance of ash redistribution by meltwater in generating differential melting which then modifies roughness and ash patchiness, such that the net effect of these spatial ash-ice feedbacks was to reduce ablation rates by up to 59%. This reduction in ablation rates despite increases in temperature and solar radiation was confirmed by manual stake measurements and is the reverse of modelled ablation trends without surficial ash. The modulating effects of these previously undocumented ash-ice feedbacks on ablation rates are, therefore, significant and must be correctly parameterized if ash-covered glacier mass balances are to be predicted correctly.

  4. Obtention of Ti nanoparticles by laser ablation; Obtencion de nanoparticulas de Ti por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz E, J.R.; Escobar A, L.; Camps, E.; Santiago, P.; Ascencio, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The obtention of Ti nanoparticles around 5-30 nm diameter through the laser ablation technique is reported. The formation of nanoparticles is carried out in He atmosphere to different pressures, placing directly in Si substrates (100) and in Cu grids. The results show that the work pressure is an important parameter that allows to control the nanoparticles size. Also the plasma characterization results are presented where the Ti II is the predominant specie with an average kinetic energy of 1824 eV. (Author)

  5. Emission spectroscopy of laser-ablated Si plasma related to nanoparticle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, V.; Thareja, R. K.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the laser ablation of Si in vacuum, and in the presence of helium ambient at 1 and 10 Torr, respectively. The silicon nanoparticles were deposited on silicon substrate at room temperature by ablating silicon wafer in ambient atmosphere of helium at 1 Torr. The mean cluster size ranging from 1.8 to 4.4 nm is observed depending on the laser intensity. Optical emission spectroscopy and images of the plume are used to study the spatial and temporal variation of the silicon plasma. The electron density, measured by the Stark-broadening of Si I transition 3 p2 1S-4 s 1P0 at 390.55 nm and temperature, assuming thermal equilibrium, were found to be 1.2×10 18 cm -3 and 2 eV, respectively. The temporal variation of Si I transition 3 p2 1S-4 s 1P0 at 390.55 nm showed a shift in peak position attributed to collisions at an early stage of plasma formation. The relative concentration of Si II/Si I estimated by using the Saha-Boltzmann relation showed abundance of Si I. Time resolved images of the plume were used to investigate the dynamics of the expanding plasma plume, estimating the vapor pressure, vapor temperature, velocity, and stopping distance of the plume. The photoluminescent spectra of the Si thin films showed three distinct emission bands at 2.7, 2.2 and 1.69 eV, the origin of these bands is attributed to defects and quantum confinement.

  6. Rapid revelation of radiocarbon records with laser ablation Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münsterer, Caroline; Wacker, Lukas; Hattendorf, Bodo; Christl, Marcus; Koch, Joachim; Dietiker, Rolf; Synal, Hans-Arno; Günther, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    By focusing high-intensity laser pulses on carbonate samples carbon dioxide is generated and can be directly introduced into the gas ion source (GIS) of an Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS). This new technique allows rapid radiocarbon analyses at high spatial resolution. The design of the deignated laser ablation cell as well as first results on a stalagmite sample are presented.

  7. Doping He droplets by laser ablation with a pulsed supersonic jet source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzy, R.; Singer, M.; Izadnia, S.; LaForge, A. C., E-mail: aaron.laforge@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Stienkemeier, F. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Laser ablation offers the possibility to study a rich number of atoms, molecules, and clusters in the gas phase. By attaching laser ablated materials to helium nanodroplets, one can gain highly resolved spectra of isolated species in a cold, weakly perturbed system. Here, we present a new setup for doping pulsed helium nanodroplet beams by means of laser ablation. In comparison to more well-established techniques using a continuous nozzle, pulsed nozzles show significant differences in the doping efficiency depending on certain experimental parameters (e.g., position of the ablation plume with respect to the droplet formation, nozzle design, and expansion conditions). In particular, we demonstrate that when the ablation region overlaps with the droplet formation region, one also creates a supersonic beam of helium atoms seeded with the sample material. The processes are characterized using a surface ionization detector. The overall doping signal is compared to that of conventional oven cell doping showing very similar dependence on helium stagnation conditions, indicating a comparable doping process. Finally, the ablated material was spectroscopically studied via laser induced fluorescence.

  8. Determination of ablation threshold for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, A. Z.; Freschi, L. R.; Samad, R. E.; Zezell, D. M.; Gouw-Soares, S. C.; Vieira, N. D., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    The use of laser for caries removal and cavity preparation is already a reality in the dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to consider the viability of ultrashort laser pulses for restorative material selective removal, by determining the ablation threshold fluence for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. Lasers pulses centered at 830 nm with 50 fs of duration and 1 kHz of repetition rate, with energies in the range of 300 to 770 μJ were used to irradiate the samples. The samples were irradiated using two different geometrical methods for ablation threshold fluence determinations and the volume ablation was measured by optical coherence tomography. The shape of the ablated surfaces were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The determined ablation threshold fluence is 0.35 J/cm2 for the composite resins Z-100 and Z-350, and 0.25 J/cm2 for the amalgam. These values are half of the value for enamel in this temporal regime. Thermal damages were not observed in the samples. Using the OCT technique (optical coherence tomography) was possible to determine the ablated volume and the total mass removed.

  9. Fabrication of uniform nanogrooves on 6H-SiC by femtosecond laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Jeong, Sungho [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Mechatronics, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Ik-Bu [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Advanced Photonics Research Institute, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    The fabrication of parallel deep nanogrooves on 6H-SiC by femtosecond laser ablation ({lambda}=785 nm) is reported. The periodicity of the nanogrooves was measured to be about 200{+-}20 nm and the depth exceeded 15 {mu}m. The nanogrooves have high uniformity in size and pattern over the entire depth. Laser fluence is found to be the critical parameter to obtain these deep and regular nanogrooves. The feasibility for large area fabrication of nanogrooves by femtosecond laser ablation is demonstrated. (orig.)

  10. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Brumfield, Brian E.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hartig, Kyle C.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-06-19

    We demonstrate measurement of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plumes using two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2DFS). The high-resolution, tunable CW-laser spectroscopy technique clearly distinguishes atomic absorption from 235U and 238U in natural and highly enriched uranium metal samples. We present analysis of spectral resolution and analytical performance of 2DFS as a function of ambient pressure. Simultaneous measurement using time-resolved absorption spectroscopy provides information on temporal dynamics of the laser ablation plume and saturation behavior of fluorescence signals. The rapid, non-contact measurement is promising for in-field, standoff measurements of uranium enrichment for nuclear safety and security applications.

  11. Production of fullerene ions by combining of plasma sputtering with laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, K., E-mail: yamada.keisuke@jaea.go.jp; Saitoh, Y.; Yokota, W. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    We have produced C{sub 60} ion beams by combining plasma sputtering and laser ablation. A C{sub 60} sample was placed in an electron cyclotron resonance type ion source, negatively biased and sputtered by argon plasma. The beam current of C{sub 60}{sup +} decreased rapidly, but it was transiently recovered by a single laser shot that ablates the thin sample surface on the sputtered area. Temporal variations in beam current are reported in response to laser shots repeated at intervals of a few minutes.

  12. Pulsed laser deposition of nanostructured Ag films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Tony [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Doggett, Brendan [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Lunney, James G. [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)]. E-mail: jlunney@tcd.ie

    2006-04-30

    Ultra-thin (0.5-5 nm) films of Ag have been prepared by pulsed laser deposition in vacuum using a 26 ns KrF excimer laser at 1 J cm{sup -2}. The deposition was controlled using a Langmuir ion probe and a quartz crystal thickness monitor. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the films are not continuous, but are structured on nanometer size scales. Optical absorption spectra showed the expected surface plasmon resonance feature, which shifted to longer wavelength and increased in strength as the equivalent film thickness was increased. It is shown that Maxwell Garnett effective medium theory can be used to calculate the main features of optical absorption spectra.

  13. Development of double-pulse lasers ablation system for generating gold ion source under applying an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, A. A. I.

    2015-12-01

    Double-pulse lasers ablation (DPLA) technique was developed to generate gold (Au) ion source and produce high current under applying an electric potential in an argon ambient gas environment. Two Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers operating at 1064 and 266 nm wavelengths are combined in an unconventional orthogonal (crossed-beam) double-pulse configuration with 45° angle to focus on a gold target along with a spectrometer for spectral analysis of gold plasma. The properties of gold plasma produced under double-pulse lasers excitation were studied. The velocity distribution function (VDF) of the emitted plasma was studied using a dedicated Faraday-cup ion probe (FCIP) under argon gas discharge. The experimental parameters were optimized to attain the best signal to noise (S/N) ratio. The results depicted that the VDF and current signals depend on the discharge applied voltage, laser intensity, laser wavelength and ambient argon gas pressure. A seven-fold increases in the current signal by increasing the discharge applied voltage and ion velocity under applying double-pulse lasers field. The plasma parameters (electron temperature and density) were also studied and their dependence on the delay (times between the excitation laser pulse and the opening of camera shutter) was investigated as well. This study could provide significant reference data for the optimization and design of DPLA systems engaged in laser induced plasma deposition thin films and facing components diagnostics.

  14. Dentin ablation-rate measurements in endodontics witj HF and CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.; Khabbaz, Marouan; Sykaras, Sotirios; Tsikrikas, G. N.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies focused on the ability of the laser light to enlarge the root canal during the endodontic therapy. The aim of this research is the experimental and theoretical study of the ablation rate of two infrared laser wavelengths on dentin. Thirty freshly extracted human teeth were longitudinally sectioned at thicknesses ranged from 0.5 to 2 mm, and irradiated on the root canal dentin. The measured ablation rates in dentinal wall of the root canal showed that the HF laser at 2.9 micrometer can more effectively penetrate into the tissue, whereas the carbon dioxide laser at 10.6 micrometer leads to high thermal damage of the ablation crater surroundings.

  15. Mechanisms of nanoparticle formation by ultra-short laser ablation of metals in liquid environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E; Itina, Tatiana E; Levashov, Pavel R; Khishchenko, Konstantin V

    2013-03-07

    Laser ablation in liquids is now commonly used to produce colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) that have found numerous applications in different areas. In experiments, NPs of different materials can be rather easily obtained by using laser systems with various pulse durations, shapes, wavelengths, and fluences. In this paper, we focus our attention on metal (gold) NPs produced by ultra-short laser pulses. To better understand the mechanisms of the NPs formation, we perform modeling of femtosecond laser interactions with a gold target in the presence of liquid (water). Simulation of the ablation process over several nanoseconds shows that most of the primary NPs originate from the ablated metastable liquid layer, whereas only a minority is formed by condensation inside the cavitation bubble. These particles will further grow/evaporate, and coagulate during a much longer collision stage in the liquid colloid.

  16. Laser deposition of bimetallic island films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherik, A. O.; Arakelyan, S. M.; Kutrovskaya, S. V.; Osipov, A. V.; Istratov, A. V.; Vartanyan, T. A.; Itina, T. E.

    2016-08-01

    In this work the results of a bimetallic Au-Ag structure deposition from the colloidal system by nanosecond laser radiation are presented. The formation of the extended arrays of gold and silver nanoparticles with controlled morphology is examined. We report the results of formation bimetallic islands films with various electrical and optical properties. The changes in the optical properties of the obtained thin films are found to depend on their morphology.

  17. Comparative study of excimer and erbium:YAG lasers for ablation of structural components of the knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Shi, Wei-Qiang; van der Veen, Maurits J.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Miller, J. M.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1991-05-01

    This study was designed to compare the efficiency and thermal effect of a 135 ns pulsed-stretched XeCl excimer laser (308 nm) and a free-running Erbium:YAG laser (2940 nm) with 200 microsecond(s) pulse duration for ablation of knee joint structures (hyaline and fibrous cartilage, tendon and bone). The radiant exposure used for tissue ablation ranged from 2 to 15 J/cm2 for the XeCl excimer and from 33 to 120 J/cm2 for Er:YAG. The excimer and Er:YAG lasers were operated at 4 and 5 Hz respectively. The ablative laser energy was delivered to tissue through fibers. Ablation rates of soft tissues (hyaline and fibrous cartilage, tendon) varied from 8.5 to 203 micrometers /pulse for excimer and from 8.2 to 273 micrometers /pulse for Er:YAG lasers. Ablation rates of soft tissues are linearly dependent on the radiant exposure. Within the range of parameters tested all the tissues except the bone could be rapidly ablated by both lasers. Bone ablation was much less efficient, requiring 15 J/cm2 and 110 J/cm2 radiant exposure for excimer and Er:YAG lasers to ablate 9.5 and 8.2 micrometers tissue per pulse. However, excimer laser ablation produced less thermal damage in the tissues studied compared to Er:YAG at the same laser parameters. The authors conclude that both lasers are capable of efficient knee joint tissue ablation. XeCl excimer laser requires an order of magnitude less energy than Er:YAG laser for comparable tissue ablation.

  18. Femtosecond laser ablation of dielectric materials in the optical breakdown regime: Expansion of a transparent shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Siegel, J., E-mail: j.siegel@io.cfmac.csic.es; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Solis, J. [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    Phase transition pathways of matter upon ablation with ultrashort laser pulses have been considered to be understood long-since for metals and semiconductors. We provide evidence that also certain dielectrics follow the same pathway, even at high pulse energies triggering optical breakdown. Employing femtosecond microscopy, we observe a characteristic ring pattern within the ablating region that dynamically changes for increasing time delays between pump and probe pulse. These transient Newton rings are related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front surface of the ablating layer with the reflection at the interface of the non-ablating substrate. Analysis of the ring structure shows that the ablation mechanism is initiated by a rarefaction wave leading within a few tens of picoseconds to the formation of a transparent thin shell of reduced density and refractive index, featuring optically sharp interfaces. The shell expands and eventually detaches from the solid material at delays of the order of 100 ps.

  19. Pulsed Laser Deposition of YBa2Cu3Ox with Scanning Beam: Target to Substrate Composition Transfer and Film Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mozhaev, Peter; Khoryushin, Alexey; Mozhaeva, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition is often considered a process providing congruent transfer of target composition to the growing film. In fact, many different processes affect compositional preservation, starting from incongruent target ablation, to scattering on the way to the substrate, and to processes...... of the film formation on the substrate surface. We developed a pulsed laser deposition process trying to minimize the compositional deviations due to the scattering by the ambient gas by applying laser beam scanning across the target surface and substitution of oxygen with argon in the chamber during...

  20. Nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of TiO{sub 2}: nanostructure and morphology of deposits and pl