WorldWideScience

Sample records for larger scale thermal

  1. Reliable Refuge: Two Sky Island Scorpion Species Select Larger, Thermally Stable Retreat Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jamie E; Brown, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    Sky island scorpions shelter under rocks and other surface debris, but, as with other scorpions, it is unclear whether these species select retreat sites randomly. Furthermore, little is known about the thermal preferences of scorpions, and no research has been done to identify whether reproductive condition might influence retreat site selection. The objectives were to (1) identify physical or thermal characteristics for retreat sites occupied by two sky island scorpions (Vaejovis cashi Graham 2007 and V. electrum Hughes 2011) and those not occupied; (2) determine whether retreat site selection differs between the two study species; and (3) identify whether thermal selection differs between species and between gravid and non-gravid females of the same species. Within each scorpion's habitat, maximum dimensions of rocks along a transect line were measured and compared to occupied rocks to determine whether retreat site selection occurred randomly. Temperature loggers were placed under a subset of occupied and unoccupied rocks for 48 hours to compare the thermal characteristics of these rocks. Thermal gradient trials were conducted before parturition and after dispersal of young in order to identify whether gravidity influences thermal preference. Vaejovis cashi and V. electrum both selected larger retreat sites that had more stable thermal profiles. Neither species appeared to have thermal preferences influenced by reproductive condition. However, while thermal selection did not differ among non-gravid individuals, gravid V. electrum selected warmer temperatures than its gravid congener. Sky island scorpions appear to select large retreat sites to maintain thermal stability, although biotic factors (e.g., competition) could also be involved in this choice. Future studies should focus on identifying the various biotic or abiotic factors that could influence retreat site selection in scorpions, as well as determining whether reproductive condition affects thermal

  2. Electrodialytic removal of cadmium from biomass combustion fly ash in larger scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Simonsen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Due to a high concentration of the toxic heavy metal cadmium (Cd), biomass combustion fly ash often fails to meet the Danish legislative requirements for recycling on agricultural fields. It has previously been shown that it is possible to reduce the concentration of Cd in different bio ashes...... significantly by using electrodialytic remediation, an electrochemically assisted extraction method. In this work the potential of the method was demonstrated in larger scale. Three different experimental set-ups were used, ranging from bench-scale (25 L ash suspension) to pilot scale (0.3 - 3 m3......). The experimental ash was a straw combustion fly ash suspended in water. Within 4 days of remediation, Cd concentrations below the limiting concentration of 5.0 mg Cd/kg DM for straw ash were reached. On the basis of these results, the energy costs for remediation of ash in industrial scale have been estimated...

  3. Scaling local species-habitat relations to the larger landscape with a hierarchical spatial count model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thogmartin, W.E.; Knutson, M.G.

    2007-01-01

    Much of what is known about avian species-habitat relations has been derived from studies of birds at local scales. It is entirely unclear whether the relations observed at these scales translate to the larger landscape in a predictable linear fashion. We derived habitat models and mapped predicted abundances for three forest bird species of eastern North America using bird counts, environmental variables, and hierarchical models applied at three spatial scales. Our purpose was to understand habitat associations at multiple spatial scales and create predictive abundance maps for purposes of conservation planning at a landscape scale given the constraint that the variables used in this exercise were derived from local-level studies. Our models indicated a substantial influence of landscape context for all species, many of which were counter to reported associations at finer spatial extents. We found land cover composition provided the greatest contribution to the relative explained variance in counts for all three species; spatial structure was second in importance. No single spatial scale dominated any model, indicating that these species are responding to factors at multiple spatial scales. For purposes of conservation planning, areas of predicted high abundance should be investigated to evaluate the conservation potential of the landscape in their general vicinity. In addition, the models and spatial patterns of abundance among species suggest locations where conservation actions may benefit more than one species. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  4. Persistent Homology fingerprinting of microstructural controls on larger-scale fluid flow in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, C.; Mitchell, S. A.; Callor, N.; Dewers, T. A.; Heath, J. E.; Yoon, H.; Conner, G. R.

    2017-12-01

    Traditional subsurface continuum multiphysics models include useful yet limiting geometrical assumptions: penny- or disc-shaped cracks, spherical or elliptical pores, bundles of capillary tubes, cubic law fracture permeability, etc. Each physics (flow, transport, mechanics) uses constitutive models with an increasing number of fit parameters that pertain to the microporous structure of the rock, but bear no inter-physics relationships or self-consistency. Recent advances in digital rock physics and pore-scale modeling link complex physics to detailed pore-level geometries, but measures for upscaling are somewhat unsatisfactory and come at a high computational cost. Continuum mechanics rely on a separation between small scale pore fluctuations and larger scale heterogeneity (and perhaps anisotropy), but this can break down (particularly for shales). Algebraic topology offers powerful mathematical tools for describing a local-to-global structure of shapes. Persistent homology, in particular, analyzes the dynamics of topological features and summarizes into numeric values. It offers a roadmap to both "fingerprint" topologies of pore structure and multiscale connectedness as well as links pore structure to physical behavior, thus potentially providing a means to relate the dependence of constitutive behaviors of pore structures in a self-consistent way. We present a persistence homology (PH) analysis framework of 3D image sets including a focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy data set of the Selma Chalk. We extract structural characteristics of sampling volumes via persistence homology and fit a statistical model using the summarized values to estimate porosity, permeability, and connectivity—Lattice Boltzmann methods for single phase flow modeling are used to obtain the relationships. These PH methods allow for prediction of geophysical properties based on the geometry and connectivity in a computationally efficient way. Sandia National Laboratories is a

  5. Lecture archiving on a larger scale at the University of Michigan and CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herr, Jeremy; Lougheed, Robert; Neal, Homer A, E-mail: herrj@umich.ed [University of Michigan, 450 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    The ATLAS Collaboratory Project at the University of Michigan has been a leader in the area of collaborative tools since 1999. Its activities include the development of standards, software and hardware tools for lecture archiving, and making recommendations for videoconferencing and remote teaching facilities. Starting in 2006 our group became involved in classroom recordings, and in early 2008 we spawned CARMA, a University-wide recording service. This service uses a new portable recording system that we developed. Capture, archiving and dissemination of rich multimedia content from lectures, tutorials and classes are increasingly widespread activities among universities and research institutes. A growing array of related commercial and open source technologies is becoming available, with several new products introduced in the last couple years. As the result of a new close partnership between U-M and CERN IT, a market survey of these products was conducted and a summary of the results are presented here. It is informing an ambitious effort in 2009 to equip many CERN rooms with automated lecture archiving systems, on a much larger scale than before. This new technology is being integrated with CERN's existing webcast, CDS, and Indico applications.

  6. Lecture archiving on a larger scale at the University of Michigan and CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, Jeremy; Lougheed, Robert; Neal, Homer A

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboratory Project at the University of Michigan has been a leader in the area of collaborative tools since 1999. Its activities include the development of standards, software and hardware tools for lecture archiving, and making recommendations for videoconferencing and remote teaching facilities. Starting in 2006 our group became involved in classroom recordings, and in early 2008 we spawned CARMA, a University-wide recording service. This service uses a new portable recording system that we developed. Capture, archiving and dissemination of rich multimedia content from lectures, tutorials and classes are increasingly widespread activities among universities and research institutes. A growing array of related commercial and open source technologies is becoming available, with several new products introduced in the last couple years. As the result of a new close partnership between U-M and CERN IT, a market survey of these products was conducted and a summary of the results are presented here. It is informing an ambitious effort in 2009 to equip many CERN rooms with automated lecture archiving systems, on a much larger scale than before. This new technology is being integrated with CERN's existing webcast, CDS, and Indico applications.

  7. Characteristics of the Residual Stress tensor when filter width is larger than the Ozmidov scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bragança Alves, Felipe Augusto; de Bruyn Kops, Stephen

    2017-11-01

    In stratified turbulence, the residual stress tensor is statistically anisotropic unless the smallest resolved length scale is smaller than the Ozmidov scale and the buoyancy Reynolds number is sufficiently high for there to exist a range of scales that is statistically isotropic. We present approximations to the residual stress tensor that are derived analytically. These approximations are evaluated by filtering data from direct numerical simulations of homogeneous stratified turbulence, with unity Prandtl number, resolved on up to 8192 × 8192 × 4096 grid points along with an isotropic homogeneous case resolved on 81923 grid points. It is found that the best possible scaling of the strain rate tensor yields a residual stress tensor (RST) that is less well statistically aligned with the exact RST than a randomly generated tensor. It is also found that, while a scaling of the strain rate tensor can dissipate the right amount of energy, it produces incorrect anisotropic dissipation, removing energy from the wrong components of the velocity vector. We find that a combination of the strain rate tensor and a tensor related to energy redistribution caused by a Newtonian fluid viscous stress yields an excellent tensorial basis for modelling the RST.

  8. Theoretical explanation of present mirror experiments and linear stability of larger scaled machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Baldwin, D.E.; Cutler, T.A.; Lodestro, L.L.; Maron, N.; Pearlstein, L.D.; Rognlien, T.D.; Stewart, J.J.; Watson, D.C.

    1976-01-01

    A quasilinear model for the evolution of the 2XIIB mirror experiment is presented and shown to reproduce the time evolution of the experiment. From quasilinear theory it follows that the energy lifetime is the Spitzer electron drag time for T/sub e/ approximately less than 0.1T/sub i/. By computing the stability boundary of the DCLC mode, with warm plasma stabilization, the electron temperature is predicted as a function of radial scale length. In addition, the effect of finite length corrections to the Alfven cyclotron mode is assessed

  9. Parameterization of cirrus microphysical and radiative properties in larger-scale models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heymsfield, A.J.; Coen, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    This study exploits measurements in clouds sampled during several field programs to develop and validate parameterizations that represent the physical and radiative properties of convectively generated cirrus clouds in intermediate and large-scale models. The focus is on cirrus anvils because they occur frequently, cover large areas, and play a large role in the radiation budget. Preliminary work focuses on understanding the microphysical, radiative, and dynamical processes that occur in these clouds. A detailed microphysical package has been constructed that considers the growth of the following hydrometer types: water drops, needles, plates, dendrites, columns, bullet rosettes, aggregates, graupel, and hail. Particle growth processes include diffusional and accretional growth, aggregation, sedimentation, and melting. This package is being implemented in a simple dynamical model that tracks the evolution and dispersion of hydrometers in a stratiform anvil cloud. Given the momentum, vapor, and ice fluxes into the stratiform region and the temperature and humidity structure in the anvil's environment, this model will suggest anvil properties and structure

  10. Challenging the assumptions for thermal sensation scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiker, Marcel; Fuchs, Xaver; Becker, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Scales are widely used to assess the personal experience of thermal conditions in built environments. Most commonly, thermal sensation is assessed, mainly to determine whether a particular thermal condition is comfortable for individuals. A seven-point thermal sensation scale has been used...... extensively, which is suitable for describing a one-dimensional relationship between physical parameters of indoor environments and subjective thermal sensation. However, human thermal comfort is not merely a physiological but also a psychological phenomenon. Thus, it should be investigated how scales for its...... assessment could benefit from a multidimensional conceptualization. The common assumptions related to the usage of thermal sensation scales are challenged, empirically supported by two analyses. These analyses show that the relationship between temperature and subjective thermal sensation is non...

  11. Mesoscopic scale thermal fatigue damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, C.; Fissolo, A.; Fivel, M.

    2001-01-01

    In an attempt to better understand damage accumulation mechanisms in thermal fatigue, dislocation substructures forming in 316L steel during one specific test were examined and simulated. Hence, thin foils taken out of massive, tested specimens were first observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These observations help in determining one initial dislocation configuration to be implemented in a 3-D model combining 3D discrete dislocation dynamics simulation (DDD) and finite element method computations (FEM). It was found that the simulated mechanical behaviour of the DDD microstructure is compatible with FEM and experimental data. The numerically generated dislocation microstructure is similar to ladder-like dislocation arrangements as found in many fatigued f.c.c. materials. Distinct mechanical behaviour for the two active slip systems was shown and deformation mechanisms were proposed. (authors)

  12. Mesoscopic scale thermal fatigue damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, C.; Fissolo, A. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire, DMN, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Fivel, M. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CNRS-GPM2, 38 - Saint Martin d' Heres (France)

    2001-07-01

    In an attempt to better understand damage accumulation mechanisms in thermal fatigue, dislocation substructures forming in 316L steel during one specific test were examined and simulated. Hence, thin foils taken out of massive, tested specimens were first observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These observations help in determining one initial dislocation configuration to be implemented in a 3-D model combining 3D discrete dislocation dynamics simulation (DDD) and finite element method computations (FEM). It was found that the simulated mechanical behaviour of the DDD microstructure is compatible with FEM and experimental data. The numerically generated dislocation microstructure is similar to ladder-like dislocation arrangements as found in many fatigued f.c.c. materials. Distinct mechanical behaviour for the two active slip systems was shown and deformation mechanisms were proposed. (authors)

  13. Marine pastures: a by-product of large (100 megawatt or larger) floating ocean-thermal power plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, S.; Roels, O.A.

    1976-08-31

    The potential biological productivity of an open-sea mariculture system utilizing the deep-sea water discharged from an ocean-thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant was investigated. In a series of land-based studies, surface water was used to inoculate deep water and the primary production of the resultant blooms was investigated. Each cubic meter of deep water can produce approximately 2.34 g of phytoplankton protein, and that an OTEC plant discharging deep water at a rate of 4.5 x 10/sup 4/ m/sup 3/ min/sup -1/ could produce 5.3 x 10/sup 7/ kg of phytoplankton protein per 350-day year. A series of land-based shellfish studies indicated that, when fed at a constant rate of 1.83 x 10/sup -3/ g of protein per second per 70-140 g of whole wet weight, the clam, Tapes japonica, could convert the phytoplankton protein-nitrogen into shellfish meat protein-nitrogen with an efficiency of about 33 per cent. Total potential wet meat weight production from an OTEC plant pumping 4.5 x 10/sup 4/ m/sup 3/ min/sup -1/ is approximately 4.14 x 10/sup 8/ kg for a 350-day year. Various factors affecting the feasibility of open-sea mariculture are discussed. It is recommended that future work concentrate on a technical and economic analysis. (WDM)

  14. Micro-Scale Avionics Thermal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2001-01-01

    Trends in the thermal management of avionics and commercial ground-based microelectronics are converging, and facing the same dilemma: a shortfall in technology to meet near-term maximum junction temperature and package power projections. Micro-scale devices hold the key to significant advances in thermal management, particularly micro-refrigerators/coolers that can drive cooling temperatures below ambient. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) Stirling cooler is currently under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this challenge with predicted efficiencies that are an order of magnitude better than current and future thermoelectric coolers.

  15. Canopy BRF simulation of forest with different crown shape and height in larger scale based on Radiosity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jinling; Qu, Yonghua; Wang, Jindi; Wan, Huawei; Liu, Xiaoqing

    2007-06-01

    Radiosity method is based on the computer simulation of 3D real structures of vegetations, such as leaves, branches and stems, which are composed by many facets. Using this method we can simulate the canopy reflectance and its bidirectional distribution of the vegetation canopy in visible and NIR regions. But with vegetations are more complex, more facets to compose them, so large memory and lots of time to calculate view factors are required, which are the choke points of using Radiosity method to calculate canopy BRF of lager scale vegetation scenes. We derived a new method to solve the problem, and the main idea is to abstract vegetation crown shapes and to simplify their structures, which can lessen the number of facets. The facets are given optical properties according to the reflectance, transmission and absorption of the real structure canopy. Based on the above work, we can simulate the canopy BRF of the mix scenes with different species vegetation in the large scale. In this study, taking broadleaf trees as an example, based on their structure characteristics, we abstracted their crowns as ellipsoid shells, and simulated the canopy BRF in visible and NIR regions of the large scale scene with different crown shape and different height ellipsoids. Form this study, we can conclude: LAI, LAD the probability gap, the sunlit and shaded surfaces are more important parameter to simulate the simplified vegetation canopy BRF. And the Radiosity method can apply us canopy BRF data in any conditions for our research.

  16. Size exclusion chromatography for semipreparative scale separation of Au38(SR)24 and Au40(SR)24 and larger clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoppe, Stefan; Boudon, Julien; Dolamic, Igor; Dass, Amala; Bürgi, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) on a semipreparative scale (10 mg and more) was used to size-select ultrasmall gold nanoclusters (<2 nm) from polydisperse mixtures. In particular, the ubiquitous byproducts of the etching process toward Au(38)(SR)(24) (SR, thiolate) clusters were separated and gained in high monodispersity (based on mass spectrometry). The isolated fractions were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, MALDI mass spectrometry, HPLC, and electron microscopy. Most notably, the separation of Au(38)(SR)(24) and Au(40)(SR)(24) clusters is demonstrated.

  17. A Survey of Precipitation-Induced Atmospheric Cold Pools over Oceans and Their Interactions with the Larger-Scale Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidema, Paquita; Torri, Giuseppe; Muller, Caroline; Chandra, Arunchandra

    2017-11-01

    Pools of air cooled by partial rain evaporation span up to several hundreds of kilometers in nature and typically last less than 1 day, ultimately losing their identity to the large-scale flow. These fundamentally differ in character from the radiatively-driven dry pools defining convective aggregation. Advancement in remote sensing and in computer capabilities has promoted exploration of how precipitation-induced cold pool processes modify the convective spectrum and life cycle. This contribution surveys current understanding of such cold pools over the tropical and subtropical oceans. In shallow convection with low rain rates, the cold pools moisten, preserving the near-surface equivalent potential temperature or increasing it if the surface moisture fluxes cannot ventilate beyond the new surface layer; both conditions indicate downdraft origin air from within the boundary layer. When rain rates exceed ˜ 2 mm h^{-1}, convective-scale downdrafts can bring down drier air of lower equivalent potential temperature from above the boundary layer. The resulting density currents facilitate the lifting of locally thermodynamically favorable air and can impose an arc-shaped mesoscale cloud organization. This organization allows clouds capable of reaching 4-5 km within otherwise dry environments. These are more commonly observed in the northern hemisphere trade wind regime, where the flow to the intertropical convergence zone is unimpeded by the equator. Their near-surface air properties share much with those shown from cold pools sampled in the equatorial Indian Ocean. Cold pools are most effective at influencing the mesoscale organization when the atmosphere is moist in the lower free troposphere and dry above, suggesting an optimal range of water vapor paths. Outstanding questions on the relationship between cold pools, their accompanying moisture distribution and cloud cover are detailed further. Near-surface water vapor rings are documented in one model inside but

  18. Hot Gas Conditioning: Recent Progress with Larger-Scale Biomass Gasification Systems; Update and Summary of Recent Progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, D. J.

    2001-09-01

    As a result of environmental and policy considerations, there is increasing interest in using renewable biomass resources as feedstock for power, fuels, and chemicals and hydrogen. Biomass gasification is seen as an important technology component for expanding the use of biomass. Advanced biomass gasification systems provide clean products that can be used as fuel or synthesis gases in a variety of environmentally friendly processes. Advanced end-use technologies such as gas turbines or synthesis gas systems require high quality gases with narrowly defined specifications. Other systems such as boilers may also have fuel quality requirements, but they will be substantially less demanding. The gas product from biomass gasifiers contains quantities of particulates, tars, and other constituents that may exceed these specified limits. As a result, gas cleaning and conditioning will be required in most systems. Over the past decade, significant research and development activities have been conducted on the topic of gas cleanup and conditioning. This report provides an update of efforts related to large-scale biomass gasification systems and summarizes recent progress. Remaining research and development issues are also summarized.

  19. Comparison of thermal comfort and sensation scales : a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vesely, Michal; Zeiler, Wim; Li, Rongling; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; te Kulve, M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal sensation is a conscious feeling that grades the thermal environment, while thermal comfort expresses satisfaction with this feeling. Multiple scales to quantify thermal sensation and comfort have been developed throughout the history of research on thermal comfort. In this paper, the most

  20. Surface heat flow and lithosphere thermal structure of the larger Luxembourg area as a basis for the evaluation of its geothermal potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schintgen, Tom; Förster, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    The evaluation of the geothermal potential and the type of geothermal use necessitates knowledge of the subsurface temperature distribution in combination with hydraulic properties (e.g. porosity, permeability and hydraulic conductivity). In the larger Luxembourg area, only a few subsurface temperature data are available restricted to shallow depth. This paucity in data required to assess the thermal regime to drillable depths by modeling. The thermal model was constrained by surface heat flow and the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) characterized by the 1300° C isotherm. A surface heat-flow value of 75 ± 7 (2σ) mW m-2 was determined in central Luxembourg, which corroborates most values known from adjacent areas. The conceptual geological model for thermal modeling has a high resolution in the upper 15 km due to a wealth of geological data, while refraction seismic data and xenoliths provide petrological constraints for the lower part of the model down to the crust/mantle boundary. Thermal rock properties assigned to geological units are based on a large set of laboratory data, complemented by some literature data for the lower parts of the crust. The thermal structure is investigated by calculating 2-D steady-state thermal models along three crustal cross sections developed for the study area assuming a purely conductive lithosphere. The location of the LAB at 100 km depth, as typical for the Ardennes, provides the best fit with the measured surface heat flow of about 75 mW m-2. This LAB model provides temperatures at 5 km of 115-118° C on average and of about 600° C at the Moho. The resulting mantle heat flow in this model is 39-40 mW m-2. A reduced lithosphere thickness of 50 km as typical for the Eifel area to the east results in an increase of surface heat flow to 97 mW m-2 and of the mantle heat flow to 65 mW m-2, respectively. If heating from the Eifel plume had reached the surface yet, temperatures at 5 km would be about 20° C higher (and

  1. Atomic-scale friction : thermal effects and capillary condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jinesh, Kochupurackal Balakrishna Pillai

    2006-01-01

    This work entitled as "Atomic-scale friction: thermal effects and capillary condensation" is a study on the fundamental aspects of the origin of friction from the atomic-scale. We study two realistic aspects of atomic-scale friction, namely the effect of temperature and the effect of relative

  2. Effects of thermal inflation on small scale density perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sungwook E. [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 85 Hoegiro, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyung-Joo; Lee, Young Jae; Stewart, Ewan D. [Department of Physics, KAIST, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Zoe, Heeseung, E-mail: swhong@kias.re.kr, E-mail: ohsk111@kaist.ac.kr, E-mail: noasac@kaist.ac.kr, E-mail: jcap@profstewart.org, E-mail: heezoe@dgist.ac.kr [School of Basic Science, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), 333 Techno jungang-daero, Daegu 711-873 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    In cosmological scenarios with thermal inflation, extra eras of moduli matter domination, thermal inflation and flaton matter domination exist between primordial inflation and the radiation domination of Big Bang nucleosynthesis. During these eras, cosmological perturbations on small scales can enter and re-exit the horizon, modifying the power spectrum on those scales. The largest modified scale, k{sub b}, touches the horizon size when the expansion changes from deflation to inflation at the transition from moduli domination to thermal inflation. We analytically calculate the evolution of perturbations from moduli domination through thermal inflation and evaluate the curvature perturbation on the constant radiation density hypersurface at the end of thermal inflation to determine the late time curvature perturbation. Our resulting transfer function suppresses the power spectrum by a factor 0∼ 5 at k >> k{sub b}, with k{sub b} corresponding to anywhere from megaparsec to subparsec scales depending on the parameters of thermal inflation. Thus, thermal inflation might be constrained or detected by small scale observations such as CMB distortions or 21cm hydrogen line observations.

  3. Density dependence of reactor performance with thermal confinement scalings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotler, D.P.

    1992-03-01

    Energy confinement scalings for the thermal component of the plasma published thus far have a different dependence on plasma density and input power than do scalings for the total plasma energy. With such thermal scalings, reactor performance (measured by Q, the ratio of the fusion power to the sum of the ohmic and auxiliary input powers) worsens with increasing density. This dependence is the opposite of that found using scalings based on the total plasma energy, indicating that reactor operation concepts may need to be altered if this density dependence is confirmed in future research

  4. Variations of the petrophysical properties of rocks with increasing hydrocarbons content and their implications at larger scale: insights from the Majella reservoir (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippetta, Fabio; Ruggieri, Roberta; Lipparini, Lorenzo

    2016-04-01

    porosity. Preliminary data also suggest a different behaviour at increasing confining pressure for clean and-oil bearing samples: almost perfectly elastic behaviour for oil-bearing samples and more inelastic behaviours for cleaner samples. Thus HC presence appears to contrast the increase of confining pressure acting as semi-fluids, reducing the rock inelastic compaction and enhancing its elastic behaviour. Trying to upscale our rock-physics results, we started from wells and laboratory data on stratigraphy, porosity and Vp in order to simulate the effect of the HC presence at larger scale, using Petrel® software. The developed synthetic model highlights that Vp, which is primarily controlled by porosity, changes significantly within oil-bearing portions, with a notable impact on the velocity model that should be adopted. Moreover we are currently performing laboratory tests in order to evaluate the changes in the elastic parameters with the aim of modelling the effects of the HC on the mechanical behaviour of the involved rocks at larger scale.

  5. Scaling in nuclear reactor system thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.; Galassi, G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Scaling is a reference 'key-word' in engineering and in physics. The relevance of scaling in the water cooled nuclear reactor technology constitutes the motivation for the present paper. The origin of the scaling-issue, i.e. the impossibility to get access to measured data in case of accident in nuclear reactors, is discussed at first. The so-called 'scaling-controversy' constitutes an outcome. Then, a critical survey (or 'scaling state-of-art';) is given of the attempts and of the approaches to provide a solution to the scaling-issue in the area of Nuclear Reactor System Thermal-Hydraulics (NRSTH): dimensionless design factors for Integral Test Facilities (ITF) are distinguished from scaling factors. The last part of the paper has a two-fold nature: (a) classifying the information about achievements in the area of thermal-hydraulics which are relevant to scaling: the concepts of 'scaling-pyramid' and the related 'scaling bridges' are introduced; (b) establishing a logical path across the scaling achievements (represented as a 'scaling puzzle'). In this context, the 'roadmap for scaling' is proposed: the objective is addressing the scaling issue when demonstrating the applicability of system codes in the licensing process of nuclear power plants. The code itself is referred hereafter as the 'key-to-scaling'. The database from the operation of properly scaled ITF and the availability of qualified system codes are identified as main achievements in NRSTH connected with scaling. The 'roadmap to scaling' constitutes a unified approach to scaling which aims at solving the 'scaling puzzle' created by researches performed during a half-a-century period.

  6. Scaling in nuclear reactor system thermal-hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Auria, F., E-mail: dauria@ing.unipi.i [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Galassi, G.M. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2010-10-15

    Scaling is a reference 'key-word' in engineering and in physics. The relevance of scaling in the water cooled nuclear reactor technology constitutes the motivation for the present paper. The origin of the scaling-issue, i.e. the impossibility to get access to measured data in case of accident in nuclear reactors, is discussed at first. The so-called 'scaling-controversy' constitutes an outcome. Then, a critical survey (or 'scaling state-of-art';) is given of the attempts and of the approaches to provide a solution to the scaling-issue in the area of Nuclear Reactor System Thermal-Hydraulics (NRSTH): dimensionless design factors for Integral Test Facilities (ITF) are distinguished from scaling factors. The last part of the paper has a two-fold nature: (a) classifying the information about achievements in the area of thermal-hydraulics which are relevant to scaling: the concepts of 'scaling-pyramid' and the related 'scaling bridges' are introduced; (b) establishing a logical path across the scaling achievements (represented as a 'scaling puzzle'). In this context, the 'roadmap for scaling' is proposed: the objective is addressing the scaling issue when demonstrating the applicability of system codes in the licensing process of nuclear power plants. The code itself is referred hereafter as the 'key-to-scaling'. The database from the operation of properly scaled ITF and the availability of qualified system codes are identified as main achievements in NRSTH connected with scaling. The 'roadmap to scaling' constitutes a unified approach to scaling which aims at solving the 'scaling puzzle' created by researches performed during a half-a-century period.

  7. Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications: analysis of electric power generating costs for systems larger than 10 MWe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Patton, W.P.; Williams, T.A.

    1980-11-01

    Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and one was analyzed with a Stirling-cycle engine. With these engine options, and the consideration of both thermal and electrical storage for the Brayton-cycle central receiver, 11 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptual designs developed for the 11 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. No attempt was made to perform a detailed optimization of each conceptual design. Rather, designs best suited for a comparative evaluation of the concepts were formulated. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 11 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size.

  8. GRAIN-SCALE FAILURE IN THERMAL SPALLATION DRILLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, S C; Lomov, I; Roberts, J J

    2012-01-19

    Geothermal power promises clean, renewable, reliable and potentially widely-available energy, but is limited by high initial capital costs. New drilling technologies are required to make geothermal power financially competitive with other energy sources. One potential solution is offered by Thermal Spallation Drilling (TSD) - a novel drilling technique in which small particles (spalls) are released from the rock surface by rapid heating. While TSD has the potential to improve drilling rates of brittle granitic rocks, the coupled thermomechanical processes involved in TSD are poorly described, making system control and optimization difficult for this drilling technology. In this paper, we discuss results from a new modeling effort investigating thermal spallation drilling. In particular, we describe an explicit model that simulates the grain-scale mechanics of thermal spallation and use this model to examine existing theories concerning spalling mechanisms. We will report how borehole conditions influence spall production, and discuss implications for macro-scale models of drilling systems.

  9. Scaling of Thermal-Hydraulic Phenomena and System Code Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfert, K.

    2008-01-01

    In the last five decades large efforts have been undertaken to provide reliable thermal-hydraulic system codes for the analyses of transients and accidents in nuclear power plants. Many separate effects tests and integral system tests were carried out to establish a data base for code development and code validation. In this context the question has to be answered, to what extent the results of down-scaled test facilities represent the thermal-hydraulic behaviour expected in a full-scale nuclear reactor under accidental conditions. Scaling principles, developed by many scientists and engineers, present a scientific technical basis and give a valuable orientation for the design of test facilities. However, it is impossible for a down-scaled facility to reproduce all physical phenomena in the correct temporal sequence and in the kind and strength of their occurrence. The designer needs to optimize a down-scaled facility for the processes of primary interest. This leads compulsorily to scaling distortions of other processes with less importance. Taking into account these weak points, a goal oriented code validation strategy is required, based on the analyses of separate effects tests and integral system tests as well as transients occurred in full-scale nuclear reactors. The CSNI validation matrices are an excellent basis for the fulfilling of this task. Separate effects tests in full scale play here an important role.

  10. The effect of allometric scaling in coral thermal microenvironments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H Ong

    Full Text Available A long-standing interest in marine science is in the degree to which environmental conditions of flow and irradiance, combined with optical, thermal and morphological characteristics of individual coral colonies, affects their sensitivity of thermal microenvironments and susceptibility to stress-induced bleaching within and/or among colonies. The physiological processes in Scleractinian corals tend to scale allometrically as a result of physical and geometric constraints on body size and shape. There is a direct relationship between scaling to thermal stress, thus, the relationship between allometric scaling and rates of heating and cooling in coral microenvironments is a subject of great interest. The primary aim of this study was to develop an approximation that predicts coral thermal microenvironments as a function of colony morphology (shape and size, light or irradiance, and flow velocity or regime. To do so, we provided intuitive interpretation of their energy budgets for both massive and branching colonies, and then quantified the heat-size exponent (b* and allometric constant (m using logarithmic linear regression. The data demonstrated a positive relationship between thermal rates and changes in irradiance, A/V ratio, and flow, with an interaction where turbulent regime had less influence on overall stress which may serve to ameliorate the effects of temperature rise compared to the laminar regime. These findings indicated that smaller corals have disproportionately higher stress, however they can reach thermal equilibrium quicker. Moreover, excellent agreements between the predicted and simulated microscale temperature values with no significant bias were observed for both the massive and branching colonies, indicating that the numerical approximation should be within the accuracy with which they could be measured. This study may assist in estimating the coral microscale temperature under known conditions of water flow and irradiance

  11. Deposit and scale prevention methods in thermal sea water desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, K.R.

    1977-01-01

    Introductory remarks deal with the 'fouling factor' and its influence on the overall heat transfer coefficient of msf evaporators. The composition of the matter dissolved in sea water and the thermal and chemical properties lead to formation of alkaline scale or even hard, sulphate scale on the heat exchanger tube walls and can hamper plant operation and economics seriously. Among the scale prevention methods are 1) pH control by acid dosing (decarbonation), 2) 'threshold treatment' by dosing of inhibitors of different kind, 3) mechanical cleaning by sponge rubber balls guided through the heat exchanger tubes, in general combined with methods no. 1 or 2, and 4) application of a scale crystals germ slurry (seeding). Mention is made of several other scale prevention proposals. The problems encountered with marine life (suspension, deposit, growth) in desalination plants are touched. (orig.) [de

  12. Brief Report: Theory of Mind, Relational Reasoning, and Social Responsiveness in Children With and Without Autism: Demonstration of Feasibility for a Larger-Scale Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, John R; Kandala, Sridhar; Petersen, Steven E; Povinelli, Daniel J

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the underpinnings of social responsiveness and theory of mind (ToM) will enhance our knowledge of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We hypothesize that higher-order relational reasoning (higher-order RR: reasoning necessitating integration of relationships among multiple variables) is necessary but not sufficient for ToM, and that social responsiveness varies independently of higher-order RR. A pilot experiment tested these hypotheses in n = 17 children, 3-14, with and without ASD. No child failing 2nd-order RR passed a false belief ToM test. Contrary to prediction, Social Responsiveness Scale scores did correlate with 2nd-order RR performance, likely due to sample characteristics. It is feasible to translate this comparative cognition-inspired line of inquiry for full-scale studies of ToM, higher-order RR, and social responsiveness in ASD.

  13. Stress determination in thermally grown alumina scales using ruby luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renusch, D.; Veal, B.W.; Koshelev, I.; Natesan, K.; Grimsditch [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hou, P.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    By exploiting the strain dependence of the ruby luminescence line, we have measured the strain in alumina scales thermally grown on Fe-Cr- Al alloys. Results are compared and found to be reasonably consistent with strains determined using x rays. Oxidation studies were carried out on alloys Fe - 5Cr - 28Al and Fe - 18Cr - 10Al (at.%). Significantly different levels of strain buildup were observed in scales on these alloys. Results on similar alloys containing a ``reactive element`` (Zr or Hf) in dilute quantity are also presented. Scales on alloys containing a reactive element (RE) can support significantly higher strains than scales on RE-free alloys. With the luminescence technique, strain relief associated with spallation thresholds is readily observed.

  14. Numerical assessment of the ion turbulent thermal transport scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottaviani, M.; Manfredi, G.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical simulations of ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence were carried out to investigate the parametric dependence of the ion thermal transport on the reduced gyroradius and on the local safety factor. Whereas the simulations show a clear proportionality of the conductivity to the gyroradius, the dependence on the safety factor cannot be represented as a simple power law like the one exhibited by the empirical scaling laws. (author)

  15. Scaling of Thermal Images at Different Spatial Resolution: The Mixed Pixel Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamlyn G. Jones

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of changes in spatial resolution for application of thermal imagery in plant phenotyping in the field are discussed. Where image pixels are significantly smaller than the objects of interest (e.g., leaves, accurate estimates of leaf temperature are possible, but when pixels reach the same scale or larger than the objects of interest, the observed temperatures become significantly biased by the background temperature as a result of the presence of mixed pixels. Approaches to the estimation of the true leaf temperature that apply both at the whole-pixel level and at the sub-pixel level are reviewed and discussed.

  16. Innovative measures to combat rare diseases in China: The national rare diseases registry system, larger-scale clinical cohort studies, and studies in combination with precision medicine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Peipei; He, Jiangjiang; Li, Fen; Jin, Chunlin

    2017-02-01

    China is facing the great challenge of treating the world's largest rare disease population, an estimated 16 million patients with rare diseases. One effort offering promise has been a pilot national project that was launched in 2013 and that focused on 20 representative rare diseases. Another government-supported special research program on rare diseases - the "Rare Diseases Clinical Cohort Study" - was launched in December 2016. According to the plan for this research project, the unified National Rare Diseases Registry System of China will be established as of 2020, and a large-scale cohort study will be conducted from 2016 to 2020. The project plans to develop 109 technical standards, to establish and improve 2 national databases of rare diseases - a multi-center clinical database and a biological sample library, and to conduct studies on more than 50,000 registered cases of 50 different rare diseases. More importantly, this study will be combined with the concept of precision medicine. Chinese population-specific basic information on rare diseases, clinical information, and genomic information will be integrated to create a comprehensive predictive model with a follow-up database system and a model to evaluate prognosis. This will provide the evidence for accurate classification, diagnosis, treatment, and estimation of prognosis for rare diseases in China. Numerous challenges including data standardization, protecting patient privacy, big data processing, and interpretation of genetic information still need to be overcome, but research prospects offer great promise.

  17. Separating foliar physiology from morphology reveals the relative roles of vertically structured transpiration factors within red maple crowns and limitations of larger scale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerle, William L.; Bowden, Joseph D.

    2011-01-01

    A spatially explicit mechanistic model, MAESTRA, was used to separate key parameters affecting transpiration to provide insights into the most influential parameters for accurate predictions of within-crown and within-canopy transpiration. Once validated among Acer rubrum L. genotypes, model responses to different parameterization scenarios were scaled up to stand transpiration (expressed per unit leaf area) to assess how transpiration might be affected by the spatial distribution of foliage properties. For example, when physiological differences were accounted for, differences in leaf width among A. rubrum L. genotypes resulted in a 25% difference in transpiration. An in silico within-canopy sensitivity analysis was conducted over the range of genotype parameter variation observed and under different climate forcing conditions. The analysis revealed that seven of 16 leaf traits had a ≥5% impact on transpiration predictions. Under sparse foliage conditions, comparisons of the present findings with previous studies were in agreement that parameters such as the maximum Rubisco-limited rate of photosynthesis can explain ∼20% of the variability in predicted transpiration. However, the spatial analysis shows how such parameters can decrease or change in importance below the uppermost canopy layer. Alternatively, model sensitivity to leaf width and minimum stomatal conductance was continuous along a vertical canopy depth profile. Foremost, transpiration sensitivity to an observed range of morphological and physiological parameters is examined and the spatial sensitivity of transpiration model predictions to vertical variations in microclimate and foliage density is identified to reduce the uncertainty of current transpiration predictions. PMID:21617246

  18. Thermal fluid-structure interaction - a few scaling considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, B.; Schwan, H.

    1984-01-01

    Scaling laws for modeling of nuclear reactor systems primarily consider relations between thermalhydraulic parameters in the control volumes for the model and the prototype. Usually the influence of structural heat is neglected. This report describes, how scaling criteria are improved by parameters concerning structural heat, because during thermal transients there is a strong coupling between the thermalhydraulic system and the surrounding structures. Volumetric scaling laws are applied to a straight pipe of the primary loop of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). For the prototype pipe data of a KWU standard PWR with four loops are chosen. Theoretical studies and RELAP 5/MOD 1 calculations regarding the influence of structural heat on thermalhydraulic response of the fluid are performed. Recommendations are given for minimization of distortions due to influence of structural heat between model and prototype. (orig.) [de

  19. LBM estimation of thermal conductivity in meso-scale modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grucelski, A

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there is a growing engineering interest in more rigorous prediction of effective transport coefficients for multicomponent, geometrically complex materials. We present main assumptions and constituents of the meso-scale model for the simulation of the coal or biomass devolatilisation with the Lattice Boltzmann method. For the results, the estimated values of the thermal conductivity coefficient of coal (solids), pyrolytic gases and air matrix are presented for a non-steady state with account for chemical reactions in fluid flow and heat transfer. (paper)

  20. Boundary layers and scaling relations in natural thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkina, Olga; Lohse, Detlef; Grossmann, Siegfried

    2017-11-01

    We analyse the boundary layer (BL) equations in natural thermal convection, which includes vertical convection (VC), where the fluid is confined between two differently heated vertical walls, horizontal convection (HC), where the fluid is heated at one part of the bottom plate and cooled at some other part, and Rayleigh-Benard convection (RBC). For BL dominated regimes we derive the scaling relations of the Nusselt and Reynolds numbers (Nu, Re) with the Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers (Ra, Pr). For VC the scaling relations are obtained directly from the BL equations, while for HC they are derived by applying the Grossmann-Lohse theory to the case of VC. In particular, for RBC with large Pr we derive Nu Pr0Ra1/3 and Re Pr-1Ra2/3. The work is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under the Grant Sh 405/4 - Heisenberg fellowship.

  1. CFD model development and data comparison for thermal-hydraulic analysis of HTO pilot scale reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochan, R.J.; Oh, C.H.

    1995-09-01

    The DOE Hydrothermal Oxidation (HTO) program is validating computational methods for use in scaling up small HTO systems to production scale. As part of that effort, the computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT is being used to calculate the integrated fluid dynamics and chemical reactions in an HTO vessel reactor designed by MODAR, Inc. Previous validation of the code used data from a benchscale reactor. This reports presents the validation of the code using pilotscale (10 times greater throughput than benchscale) data. The model for the pilotscale reactor has been improved based upon the benchscale data by including better fluid thermal properties, a better solution algorithm, addition of external heat transfer, investigation of the effects of turbulent flow, and, although not built into the computer model, a technique for using the calculated adiabatic oxidation temperatures for selecting initial conditions. Thermal results from this model show very good agreement with the limited test data from MODAR Run 920. In addition to the reactor temperatures, flowfield details, including chemical reaction distribution, and simulated salt particle transport were obtained. This model will be very beneficial in designing and evaluating larger commercial scale units. The results of these calculations indicate that for model validation, more accurate boundary conditions need to be measured in future test runs

  2. Thermal activation of dislocations in large scale obstacle bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobie, Cameron; Capolungo, Laurent; McDowell, David L.; Martinez, Enrique

    2017-08-01

    Dislocation dynamics simulations have been used extensively to predict hardening caused by dislocation-obstacle interactions, including irradiation defect hardening in the athermal case. Incorporating the role of thermal energy on these interactions is possible with a framework provided by harmonic transition state theory (HTST) enabling direct access to thermally activated reaction rates using the Arrhenius equation, including rates of dislocation-obstacle bypass processes. Moving beyond unit dislocation-defect reactions to a representative environment containing a large number of defects requires coarse-graining the activation energy barriers of a population of obstacles into an effective energy barrier that accurately represents the large scale collective process. The work presented here investigates the relationship between unit dislocation-defect bypass processes and the distribution of activation energy barriers calculated for ensemble bypass processes. A significant difference between these cases is observed, which is attributed to the inherent cooperative nature of dislocation bypass processes. In addition to the dislocation-defect interaction, the morphology of the dislocation segments pinned to the defects play an important role on the activation energies for bypass. A phenomenological model for activation energy stress dependence is shown to describe well the effect of a distribution of activation energies, and a probabilistic activation energy model incorporating the stress distribution in a material is presented.

  3. Preparation of Zr(Mo,W)2O8 with a larger negative thermal expansion by controlling the thermal decomposition of Zr(Mo,W)2(OH,Cl)2∙2H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrushina, Mariya Yu; Dedova, Elena S; Filatov, Eugeny Yu; Plyusnin, Pavel E; Korenev, Sergei V; Kulkov, Sergei N; Derevyannikova, Elizaveta A; Sharafutdinov, Marat R; Gubanov, Alexander I

    2018-03-28

    Solid solutions of Zr(Mo,W) 2 O 7 (OH,Cl) 2 ∙2H 2 O with a preset ratio of components were prepared by a hydrothermal method. The chemical composition of the solutions was determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). For all the samples of ZrMo x W 2-x O 7 (OH,Cl) 2 ∙2H 2 O (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8, and 2.0), TGA and in situ powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) studies (300-1100 K) were conducted. For each case, the boundaries of the transformations were determined: Zr(Mo,W) 2 O 7 (OH,Cl) 2 ∙2H 2 O → orthorhombic-ZrMo x W 2-x O 8 (425-525 K), orthorhombic-ZrMo x W 2-x O 8  → cubic-ZrMo x W 2-x O 8 (700-850 K), cubic-ZrMo x W 2-x O 8  → trigonal-ZrMo x W 2-x O 8 (800-1050 K for x > 1) and cubic-ZrMo x W 2-x O 8  → oxides (1000-1075 K for x ≤ 1). The cell parameters of the disordered cubic-ZrMo x W 2-x O 8 (space group Pa-3) were measured within 300-900 K, and the thermal expansion coefficients were calculated: -3.5∙10 -6  - -4.5∙10 -6  K -1 . For the ordered ZrMo 1.8 W 0.2 O 8 (space group P2 1 3), a negative thermal expansion (NTE) coefficient -9.6∙10 -6  K -1 (300-400 K) was calculated. Orthorhombic-ZrW2O 8 is formed upon the decomposition of ZrW 2 O 7 (OH,Cl) 2 ∙2H 2 O within 500-800 K.

  4. thermal analysis of a small scale solid waste-fired steam boiler

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Thermal analysis of a small scale solid waste-fired steam generator is presented in this paper. The analysis was based on the chosen design specifications which are operating steam ... include: wind, bio-energy, geothermal, solar thermal,.

  5. Thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite: A large scale waste treatment option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Abbie N.; Marsden, Barry J.

    2017-01-01

    This study has investigated the laboratory scale thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite, as a proof-of-concept for the treatment and decommissioning of reactor cores on a larger industrial scale. If showed to be effective, this technology could have promising international significance with a considerable impact on the nuclear waste management problem currently facing many countries worldwide. The use of thermal treatment of such graphite waste is seen as advantageous since it will decouple the need for an operational Geological Disposal Facility (GDF). Particulate samples of Magnox Reactor Pile Grade-A (PGA) graphite, were oxidised in both air and 60% O2, over the temperature range 400–1200°C. Oxidation rates were found to increase with temperature, with a particular rise between 700–800°C, suggesting a change in oxidation mechanism. A second increase in oxidation rate was observed between 1000–1200°C and was found to correspond to a large increase in the CO/CO2 ratio, as confirmed through gas analysis. Increasing the oxidant flow rate gave a linear increase in oxidation rate, up to a certain point, and maximum rates of 23.3 and 69.6 mg / min for air and 60% O2 respectively were achieved at a flow of 250 ml / min and temperature of 1000°C. These promising results show that large-scale thermal treatment could be a potential option for the decommissioning of graphite cores, although the design of the plant would need careful consideration in order to achieve optimum efficiency and throughput. PMID:28793326

  6. Thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite: A large scale waste treatment option.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Theodosiou

    Full Text Available This study has investigated the laboratory scale thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite, as a proof-of-concept for the treatment and decommissioning of reactor cores on a larger industrial scale. If showed to be effective, this technology could have promising international significance with a considerable impact on the nuclear waste management problem currently facing many countries worldwide. The use of thermal treatment of such graphite waste is seen as advantageous since it will decouple the need for an operational Geological Disposal Facility (GDF. Particulate samples of Magnox Reactor Pile Grade-A (PGA graphite, were oxidised in both air and 60% O2, over the temperature range 400-1200°C. Oxidation rates were found to increase with temperature, with a particular rise between 700-800°C, suggesting a change in oxidation mechanism. A second increase in oxidation rate was observed between 1000-1200°C and was found to correspond to a large increase in the CO/CO2 ratio, as confirmed through gas analysis. Increasing the oxidant flow rate gave a linear increase in oxidation rate, up to a certain point, and maximum rates of 23.3 and 69.6 mg / min for air and 60% O2 respectively were achieved at a flow of 250 ml / min and temperature of 1000°C. These promising results show that large-scale thermal treatment could be a potential option for the decommissioning of graphite cores, although the design of the plant would need careful consideration in order to achieve optimum efficiency and throughput.

  7. The Use of a Decision Support System for Sustainable Urbanization and Thermal Comfort in Adaptation to Climate Change Actions—The Case of the Wrocław Larger Urban Zone (Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan K. Kazak

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The increasing level of antropopression has a negative impact on environmental resources and has reached the level of our planetary boundaries. One limitation is land use change caused by urbanization. Global policies prove the need to undertake action in order to develop more sustainable human settlements, which would be adapted better to potential future climate change effects. Among such changes are the increase of average temperatures and extreme events like heat waves. Those changes are more severe in urban areas due to land use development, and result in the urban heat island effect (UHI, which has a negative impact on the thermal comfort of citizens. The paper presents a decision support system that can be used for the assessment of areas to the potential exposure to the UHI effect. The system integrates scenario analysis, land use modelling in cellular automata (Metronamica, and an indicator-based assessment in a geographic information system (ArcGIS. The applicability of the model is illustrated through developing scenarios for the future land use allocation of the Wrocław Larger Urban Zone (Poland. The results of the calculations show which scenario is the least vulnerable to UHI effects. Moreover, for each scenario, cores of urban areas were identified, in which certain urban design patterns accounting for adaptation to climate change could be implemented. The study provides a guideline for local authorities on where to focus actions in order to create more sustainable urban structures and to better adapt to climate change and environmental extremes.

  8. Energetic Materials Center Report--Small-Scale Safety and Thermal Testing Evaluation of Butyl Nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center; Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center

    2013-04-26

    Butyl Nitrate (BN) was examined by Small-Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) Testing techniques to determine its sensitivity to impact, friction, spark and thermal exposure simulating handling and storage conditions. Under the conditions tested, the BN exhibits thermal sensitivity above 150 °C, and does not exhibit sensitive to impact, friction or spark.

  9. Using Large-Scale Cooperative Control to Manage Operational Uncertainties for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaxa-Rozen, M.; Rostampour, V.; Kwakkel, J. H.; Bloemendal, M.

    2017-12-01

    Seasonal Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) technology can help reduce the demand of energy for heating and cooling in buildings, and has become a popular option for larger buildings in northern Europe. However, the larger-scale deployment of this technology has evidenced some issues of concern for policymakers; in particular, recent research shows that operational uncertainties contribute to inefficient outcomes under current planning methods for ATES. For instance, systems in the Netherlands typically use less than half of their permitted pumping volume on an annual basis. This overcapacity gives users more flexibility to operate their systems in response to the uncertainties which drive building energy demand; these include short-term operational factors such as weather and occupancy, and longer-term, deeply uncertain factors such as changes in climate and aquifer conditions over the lifespan of the buildings. However, as allocated subsurface volume remains unused, this situation limits the adoption of the technology in dense areas. Previous work using coupled agent-based/geohydrological simulation has shown that the cooperative operation of neighbouring ATES systems can support more efficient spatial planning, by dynamically managing thermal interactions in response to uncertain operating conditions. An idealized case study with centralized ATES control thus showed significant improvements in the energy savings which could obtained per unit of allocated subsurface volume, without degrading the recovery performance of systems. This work will extend this cooperative approach for a realistic case study of ATES planning in the city of Utrecht, in the Netherlands. This case was previously simulated under different scenarios for individual ATES operation. The poster will compare these results with a cooperative case under which neighbouring systems can coordinate their operation to manage interactions. Furthermore, a cooperative game-theoretical framework will be

  10. Large scale atomistic approaches to thermal transport and phonon scattering in nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Ivana

    2012-02-01

    Decreasing the thermal conductivity of bulk materials by nanostructuring and dimensionality reduction, or by introducing some amount of disorder represents a promising strategy in the search for efficient thermoelectric materials [1]. For example, considerable improvements of the thermoelectric efficiency in nanowires with surface roughness [2], superlattices [3] and nanocomposites [4] have been attributed to a significantly reduced thermal conductivity. In order to accurately describe thermal transport processes in complex nanostructured materials and directly compare with experiments, the development of theoretical and computational approaches that can account for both anharmonic and disorder effects in large samples is highly desirable. We will first summarize the strengths and weaknesses of the standard atomistic approaches to thermal transport (molecular dynamics [5], Boltzmann transport equation [6] and Green's function approach [7]) . We will then focus on the methods based on the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation, that are computationally too demanding, at present, to treat large scale systems and thus to investigate realistic materials. We will present a Monte Carlo method [8] to solve the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation [9], that enables computation of the thermal conductivity of ordered and disordered systems with a number of atoms up to an order of magnitude larger than feasible with straightforward integration. We will present a comparison between exact and Monte Carlo Boltzmann transport results for small SiGe nanostructures and then use the Monte Carlo method to analyze the thermal properties of realistic SiGe nanostructured materials. This work is done in collaboration with Davide Donadio, Francois Gygi, and Giulia Galli from UC Davis.[4pt] [1] See e.g. A. J. Minnich, M. S. Dresselhaus, Z. F. Ren, and G. Chen, Energy Environ. Sci. 2, 466 (2009).[0pt] [2] A. I. Hochbaum et al, Nature 451, 163 (2008).[0pt

  11. Thermal energy harvesting for application at MEMS scale

    CERN Document Server

    Percy, Steven; McGarry, Scott; Post, Alex; Moore, Tim; Cavanagh, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the history of thermal heat generators and focuses on the potential for these processes using micro-electrical mechanical systems (MEMS) technology for this application. The main focus is on the capture of waste thermal energy for example from industrial processes, transport systems or the human body to generate useable electrical power.  A wide range of technologies is discussed, including external combustion heat cycles at MEMS ( Brayton, Stirling and Rankine), Thermoacoustic, Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs), Multiferroics, Thermionics, Pyroelectric, Seebeck, Alkali Metal Thermal, Hydride Heat Engine, Johnson Thermo Electrochemical Converters, and the Johnson Electric Heat Pipe.

  12. Thermal evolution and small scale structure of Sommerfeld enhanced dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarssen, Laura Gusta van den

    2013-04-01

    Although the existence of Dark Matter (DM) has been confirmed by many independent observations on various scales, its nature still remains a mystery. Leading candidates for the cold, non-baryonic DM are Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), that are well motivated from particle physics and naturally explain the observed relic density by their thermal production mechanism. In this thesis we focus on a particular class of WIMP models in which the Sommerfeld effect has to be taken into account. This is a quantum mechanical phenomenon that can significantly enhance the annihilation cross section in the non-relativistic limit. To describe the non-perturbative effect, we use a non-relativistic effective field theory derived from the full quantum field theory. We include a detailed discussion of the calculation for the righthanded sneutrino, which is the superpartner of the neutrino and a viable DM candidate. The Sommerfeld enhancement can have a profound influence on the thermal evolution of the DM, which can no longer be described by the standard scenario. We introduce a framework to correctly take this effect into account and apply it to a simple leptophilic DM model. A new era of annihilations can decrease the DM density even after usual freeze-out, and in some cases where the Sommerfeld enhancement is especially large, even continue until after matter-radiation equality. The effect on the asymptotic WIMP temperature, which can be directly related to a small scale cutoff in the matter density fluctuations, causes the mass of the smallest gravitationally bound objects to be larger than expected from standard calculations. Furthermore we study the effect of velocity dependent DM self-scattering in relation to the small scale structure formation. Numerical simulations of ΛCDM have shown a remarkable agreement with the large scale structure of the Universe. However, the simulations are in tension with observed abundances, inner densities and velocity profiles of

  13. Thermal evolution and small scale structure of Sommerfeld enhanced dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarssen, Laura Gusta van den

    2013-04-15

    Although the existence of Dark Matter (DM) has been confirmed by many independent observations on various scales, its nature still remains a mystery. Leading candidates for the cold, non-baryonic DM are Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), that are well motivated from particle physics and naturally explain the observed relic density by their thermal production mechanism. In this thesis we focus on a particular class of WIMP models in which the Sommerfeld effect has to be taken into account. This is a quantum mechanical phenomenon that can significantly enhance the annihilation cross section in the non-relativistic limit. To describe the non-perturbative effect, we use a non-relativistic effective field theory derived from the full quantum field theory. We include a detailed discussion of the calculation for the righthanded sneutrino, which is the superpartner of the neutrino and a viable DM candidate. The Sommerfeld enhancement can have a profound influence on the thermal evolution of the DM, which can no longer be described by the standard scenario. We introduce a framework to correctly take this effect into account and apply it to a simple leptophilic DM model. A new era of annihilations can decrease the DM density even after usual freeze-out, and in some cases where the Sommerfeld enhancement is especially large, even continue until after matter-radiation equality. The effect on the asymptotic WIMP temperature, which can be directly related to a small scale cutoff in the matter density fluctuations, causes the mass of the smallest gravitationally bound objects to be larger than expected from standard calculations. Furthermore we study the effect of velocity dependent DM self-scattering in relation to the small scale structure formation. Numerical simulations of {Lambda}CDM have shown a remarkable agreement with the large scale structure of the Universe. However, the simulations are in tension with observed abundances, inner densities and velocity

  14. Why have microsaccades become larger?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dan Witzner; Nyström, Marcus; Andersson, Richard

    2014-01-01

    -trackers compared to the systems used in the classical studies, in combination with the lack of a systematic algorithmic treatment of the overshoot. We hope that awareness of these discrepancies in microsaccade dynamics across eye structures will lead to more generally accepted definitions of microsaccades....... experts. The main reason was that the overshoots were not systematically detected by the algorithm and therefore not accurately accounted for. We conclude that one reason to why the reported size of microsaccades has increased is due to the larger overshoots produced by the modern pupil-based eye...

  15. A central solar-industrial waste heat heating system with large scale borehole thermal storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, F.; Yang, X.; Xu, L.; Torrens, I.; Hensen, J.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new research of seasonal thermal storage is introduced. This study aims to maximize the utilization of renewable energy source and industrial waste heat (IWH) for urban district heating systems in both heating and non-heating seasons through the use of large-scale seasonal thermal

  16. Minimum scale controlled topology optimization and experimental test of a micro thermal actuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heo, S.; Yoon, Gil Ho; Kim, Y.Y.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the optimal topology design, fabrication and test of a micro thermal actuator. Because the minimum scale was controlled during the design optimization process, the production yield rate of the actuator was improved considerably; alternatively, the optimization design ...... tested. The test showed that control over the minimum length scale in the design process greatly improves the yield rate and reduces the performance deviation....... without scale control resulted in a very low yield rate. Using the minimum scale controlling topology design method developed earlier by the authors, micro thermal actuators were designed and fabricated through a MEMS process. Moreover, both their performance and production yield were experimentally...

  17. The gyro-radius scaling of ion thermal transport from global numerical simulations of ITG turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottaviani, M.; Manfredi, G.

    1998-12-01

    A three-dimensional, fluid code is used to study the scaling of ion thermal transport caused by Ion-Temperature-Gradient-Driven (ITG) turbulence. The code includes toroidal effects and is capable of simulating the whole torus. It is found that both close to the ITG threshold and well above threshold, the thermal transport and the turbulence structures exhibit a gyro-Bohm scaling, at least for plasmas with moderate poloidal flow. (author)

  18. Drift scale thermomechanical analysis for thermal loading and retrievability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, F.C.

    1995-01-01

    The repository portion of the Mined Geologic Disposal System for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste is currently in the advanced conceptual design stage. In support of systems studies, a numerical method was used to estimate the stability of emplacement drifts. Thermomechanical analyses, using the Discontinuous Deformation Analysis code, were performed using input data from Yucca Mountain documents. The analysis found that the stresses produced in the rock at thermal loads of 27.4 kilograms uranium per m2 (KgU/m2) would exceed stability criteria and could result in tunnel instability. At thermal loads between 20.5 KgU/m2, the drift is predicted to be stable and its structural integrity remains after thermal loading. In this case, the smaller diameter drift emplacement appears to have better stability. However, local rock spalling may occur. According to the numerical prediction, more rock fall may occur during the retrieval period due to the stress relaxation caused by the rapid cooling in the immediate drift area

  19. Thermal properties at Aespoe HRL. Analysis of distribution and scale factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundberg, Jan

    2003-04-01

    A thermal model for the Aespoe HRL as well as a general strategy for thermal modelling is under development. As a part of that work, thermal conductivities have been modelled from reference values of thermal conductivity of different minerals and from the mineral composition of all Aespoe samples in the Sicada database. The produced thermal conductivity database has been analysed in terms of frequency, type of distribution, spatial distribution, variogram etc. A correction factor has been estimated to compensate for discrepancies between measured and calculated values. The calculated values have been corrected according to measured values. The data has been analysed according to different rock types. However, there are uncertainties in the base material of rock classification, mainly due to problem to distinguish between Aespoe diorite and Aevroe granite, but also because of different classification systems. There is a relationship between thermal conductivity and density for the rock types at Aespoe. Equations of the relationship have been developed based on all thermal conductivity, heat capacity and density measurements. The equations have been tested on two bore holes at Aespoe with promising results. It may be possible to evaluate the spatial distribution of the thermal properties from density loggings. However, more work is needed to develop a complete model including the handling of high and low density zones. There is an insufficient knowledge in the variation of thermal properties at different scales. If the whole variation within a rock type is in the cm-m scale the thermal influence on the canister is small. This is due to the fact that the small-scale variation in thermal properties is mainly averaged out in the 5-10 m scale. If the main variation within rock types is in the 5-10 m scale there is probably a significant effect on the canister temperature. However, it is likely that the observed variation occurs in both these scales. Simulation has been

  20. European research school on large scale solar thermal – SHINE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bales, Chris; Forteza, Pau Joan Cortés; Furbo, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The Solar Heat Integration NEtwork (SHINE) is a European research school in which 13 PhD students in solar thermal technologies are funded by the EU Marie-Curie program. It has five PhD course modules as well as workshops and seminars dedicated to PhD students both within the project as well...... as outside of it. The SHINE research activities focus on large solar heating systems and new applications: on district heating, industrial processes and new storage systems. The scope of this paper is on systems for district heating for which there are five PhD students, three at universities and two...

  1. When the proton becomes larger

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC has just confirmed that, at high energy, protons behave as if they were becoming larger. In more technical terms, their total cross-section – a parameter linked to the proton-proton interaction probability – increases with energy. This phenomenon, expected from previous measurements performed at much lower energy, has now been confirmed for the first time at the LHC’s unprecedented energy.   One arm of a TOTEM T2 detector during its installation at interaction point 5. A composite particle like the proton is a complex system that in no way resembles a static Lego construction: sub-components move inside and interactions keep the whole thing together, but in a very dynamic way. This partly explains why even the very common proton can still be hiding secrets about its nature, decades after its discovery. One way of studying the inner properties of protons is to observe how they interact with each other, which, in technical terms, i...

  2. Inhomogeneous thermal expansion of metallic glasses in atomic-scale studied by in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taghvaei, Amir Hossein, E-mail: amirtaghvaei@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakur Shahabi, Hamed [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Bednarčik, Jozef [Photon Science DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Eckert, Jürgen [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institute of Materials Science, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-01-28

    Numerous investigations have demonstrated that the elastic strain in metallic glasses subjected to mechanical loading could be inhomogeneous in the atomic-scale and it increases with distance from an average atom and eventually reaches the macroscopic strain at larger inter-atomic distances. We have observed a similar behavior for the thermal strain imposed by heating of Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} glassy particles below the glass transition temperature by analysis of the scattering data obtained by in-situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results imply that the volumetric thermal strains calculated from the shift in position of the principal diffraction maximum and reduced pair correlation function (PDF) peaks are in good agreement for the length scales beyond 0.6 nm, corresponding to the atoms located over the third near-neighbor shell. However, smaller and even negative volumetric thermal strains have been calculated based on the shifts in the positions of the second and first PDF peaks, respectively. The structural changes of Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} glassy particles are accompanied by decreasing the average coordination number of the first near-neighbor shell, which manifests the occurrence of local changes in the short-range order upon heating. It is believed that the detected length-scale dependence of the volumetric thermal strain is correlated with the local atomic rearrangements taking place in the topologically unstable regions of the glass governed by variations in the atomic-level stresses.

  3. Note: Development of a microfabricated sensor to measure thermal conductivity of picoliter scale liquid samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byoung Kyoo; Yi, Namwoo; Park, Jaesung; Kim, Dongsik

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a thermal analysis device, which can measure thermal conductivity of picoliter scale liquid sample. We employ the three omega method with a microfabricated AC thermal sensor with nanometer width heater. The liquid sample is confined by a micro-well structure fabricated on the sensor surface. The performance of the instrument was verified by measuring the thermal conductivity of 27-picoliter samples of de-ionized (DI) water, ethanol, methanol, and DI water-ethanol mixtures with accuracies better than 3%. Furthermore, another analytical scheme allows real-time thermal conductivity measurement with 5% accuracy. To the best of our knowledge, this technique requires the smallest volume of sample to measure thermal property ever.

  4. Meter-scale thermal contraction crack polygons on the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, A.-T.; Groussin, O.; Jorda, L.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Bouley, S.; Séjourné, A.; Gaskell, R.; Capanna, C.; Davidsson, B.; Marchi, S.; Höfner, S.; Lamy, P. L.; Sierks, H.; Barbieri, C.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; Keller, H. U.; Agarwal, J.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Barucci, M. A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Bertini, I.; Cremonese, G.; Da Deppo, V.; Debei, S.; De Cecco, M.; Fornasier, S.; Fulle, M.; Gutiérrez, P. J.; Güttler, C.; Hviid, S.; Ip, W.-H.; Knollenberg, J.; Kramm, J.-R.; Kührt, E.; Küppers, M.; Lara, L. M.; Lazzarin, M.; Lopez Moreno, J. J.; Marzari, F.; Massironi, M.; Michalik, H.; Naletto, G.; Oklay, N.; Pommerol, A.; Sabau, L.; Thomas, N.; Tubiana, C.; Vincent, J.-B.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    2018-02-01

    We report on the detection and characterization of more than 6300 polygons on the surface of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, using images acquired by the OSIRIS camera onboard Rosetta between August 2014 and March 2015. They are found in consolidated terrains and grouped in localized networks. They are present at all latitudes (from North to South) and longitudes (head, neck, and body), sometimes on pit walls or following lineaments. About 1.5% of the observed surface is covered by polygons. Polygons have an homogeneous size across the nucleus, with 90% of them in the size range 1 - 5 m and a mean size of 3.0 ± 1.4 m. They show different morphologies, depending on the width and depth of their trough. They are found in networks with 3- or 4-crack intersection nodes. The polygons observed on 67P are consistent with thermal contraction crack polygons formed by the diurnal or seasonal temperature variations in a hard (MPa) and consolidated sintered layer of water ice, located a few centimeters below the surface. Our thermal analysis shows an evolution of thermal contraction crack polygons according to the local thermal environment, with more evolved polygons (i.e. deeper and larger troughs) where the temperature and the diurnal and seasonal temperature range are the highest. Thermal contraction crack polygons are young surface morphologies that probably formed after the injection of 67P in the inner solar system, typically 100,000 years ago, and could be as young as a few orbital periods, following the decreasing of its perihelion distance in 1959 from 2.7 to 1.3 a.u. Meter scale thermal contraction crack polygons should be common features on the nucleus of Jupiter family comets.

  5. A new approach to designing reduced scale thermal-hydraulic experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapa, Celso M.F.; Sampaio, Paulo A.B. de; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.

    2004-01-01

    Reduced scale experiments are often employed in engineering because they are much cheaper than real scale testing. Unfortunately, though, it is difficult to design a thermal-hydraulic circuit or equipment in reduced scale capable of reproducing, both accurately and simultaneously, all the physical phenomena that occur in real scale and operating conditions. This paper presents a methodology to designing thermal-hydraulic experiments in reduced scale based on setting up a constrained optimization problem that is solved using genetic algorithms (GAs). In order to demonstrate the application of the methodology proposed, we performed some investigations in the design of a heater aimed to simulate the transport of heat and momentum in the core of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) at 100% of nominal power and non-accident operating conditions. The results obtained show that the proposed methodology is a promising approach for designing reduced scale experiments

  6. Thermal stratification in a scaled-down suppression pool of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Byeongnam, E-mail: jo@vis.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Erkan, Nejdet [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Takahashi, Shinji [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Song, Daehun [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Hyundai and Kia Corporate R& D Division, Hyundai Motors, 772-1, Jangduk-dong, Hwaseong-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 445-706 (Korea, Republic of); Sagawa, Wataru; Okamoto, Koji [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Thermal stratification was reproduced in a scaled-down suppression pool of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants. • Horizontal temperature profiles were uniform in the toroidal suppression pool. • Subcooling-steam flow rate map of thermal stratification was obtained. • Steam bubble-induced flow model in suppression pool was suggested. • Bubble frequency strongly depends on the steam flow rate. - Abstract: Thermal stratification in the suppression pool of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants was experimentally investigated in sub-atmospheric pressure conditions using a 1/20 scale torus shaped setup. The thermal stratification was reproduced in the scaled-down suppression pool and the effect of the steam flow rate on different thermal stratification behaviors was examined for a wide range of steam flow rates. A sparger-type steam injection pipe that emulated Fukushima Daiichi Unit 3 (F1U3) was used. The steam was injected horizontally through 132 holes. The development (formation and disappearance) of thermal stratification was significantly affected by the steam flow rate. Interestingly, the thermal stratification in the suppression pool vanished when subcooling became lower than approximately 5 °C. This occurred because steam bubbles are not well condensed at low subcooling temperatures; therefore, those bubbles generate significant upward momentum, leading to mixing of the water in the suppression pool.

  7. Analysis of Thermal Structure of Arctic Lakes at Local and Regional Scales Using in Situ and Multidate Landsat-8 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Liu, Hongxing; Hinkel, Kenneth; Yu, Bailang; Beck, Richard; Wu, Jianping

    2017-11-01

    The Arctic coastal plain is covered with numerous thermokarst lakes. These lakes are closely linked to climate and environmental change through their heat and water budgets. We examined the intralake thermal structure at the local scale and investigated the water temperature pattern of lakes at the regional scale by utilizing extensive in situ measurements and multidate Landsat-8 remote sensing data. Our analysis indicates that the lake skin temperatures derived from satellite thermal sensors during most of the ice-free summer period effectively represent the lake bulk temperature because the lakes are typically well-mixed and without significant vertical stratification. With the relatively high-resolution Landsat-8 thermal data, we were able to quantitatively examine intralake lateral temperature differences and gradients in relation to geographical location, topography, meteorological factors, and lake morphometry for the first time. Our results suggest that wind speed and direction not only control the vertical stratification but also influences lateral differences and gradients of lake surface temperature. Wind can considerably reduce the intralake temperature gradient. Interestingly, we found that geographical location (latitude, longitude, distance to the ocean) and lake morphometry (surface size, depth, volume) not only control lake temperature regionally but also affect the lateral temperature gradient and homogeneity level within each individual lake. For the Arctic coastal plain, at regional scales, inland and southern lakes tend to have larger horizontal temperature differences and gradients compared to coastal and northern lakes. At local scales, large and shallow lakes tend to have large lateral temperature differences relative to small and deep lakes.

  8. Scaling for integral simulation of thermal-hydraulic phenomena in SBWR during LOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, M.; Revankar, S.T.; Dowlati, R [Purdue Univ., West Layfayette, IN (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    A scaling study has been conducted for simulation of thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) during a loss of coolant accident. The scaling method consists of a three-level scaling approach. The integral system scaling (global scaling or top down approach) consists of two levels, the integral response function scaling which forms the first level, and the control volume and boundary flow scaling which forms the second level. The bottom up approach is carried out by local phenomena scaling which forms the third level scaling. Based on this scaling study the design of the model facility called Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA) has been carried out. The PUMA facility has 1/4 height and 1/100 area ratio scaling, corresponding to the volume scaling of 1/400. The PUMA power scaling based on the integral scaling is 1/200. The present scaling method predicts that PUMA time scale will be one-half that of the SBWR. The system pressure for PUMA is full scale, therefore, a prototypic pressure is maintained. PUMA is designed to operate at and below 1.03 MPa (150 psi), which allows it to simulate the prototypic SBWR accident conditions below 1.03 MPa (150 psi). The facility includes models for all components of importance.

  9. Thermal conductivity of granular porous media: A pore scale modeling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Askari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pore scale modeling method has been widely used in the petrophysical studies to estimate macroscopic properties (e.g. porosity, permeability, and electrical resistivity of porous media with respect to their micro structures. Although there is a sumptuous literature about the application of the method to study flow in porous media, there are fewer studies regarding its application to thermal conduction characterization, and the estimation of effective thermal conductivity, which is a salient parameter in many engineering surveys (e.g. geothermal resources and heavy oil recovery. By considering thermal contact resistance, we demonstrate the robustness of the method for predicting the effective thermal conductivity. According to our results obtained from Utah oil sand samples simulations, the simulation of thermal contact resistance is pivotal to grant reliable estimates of effective thermal conductivity. Our estimated effective thermal conductivities exhibit a better compatibility with the experimental data in companion with some famous experimental and analytical equations for the calculation of the effective thermal conductivity. In addition, we reconstruct a porous medium for an Alberta oil sand sample. By increasing roughness, we observe the effect of thermal contact resistance in the decrease of the effective thermal conductivity. However, the roughness effect becomes more noticeable when there is a higher thermal conductivity of solid to fluid ratio. Moreover, by considering the thermal resistance in porous media with different grains sizes, we find that the effective thermal conductivity augments with increased grain size. Our observation is in a reasonable accordance with experimental results. This demonstrates the usefulness of our modeling approach for further computational studies of heat transfer in porous media.

  10. Thermal interaction in crusted melt jets with large-scale structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Ken-ichiro; Sotome, Fuminori; Ishikawa, Michio [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to experimentally observe thermal interaction which would be capable of triggering due to entrainment, or entrapment in crusted melt jets with `large-scale structure`. The present experiment was carried out by dropping molten zinc and molten tin of 100 grams, of which mass was sufficient to generate large-scale structures of melt jets. The experimental results show that the thermal interaction of entrapment type occurs in molten-zinc jets with rare probability, and the thermal interaction of entrainment type occurs in molten tin jets with high probability. The difference of thermal interaction between molten zinc and molten tin may attribute to differences of kinematic viscosity and melting point between them. (author)

  11. Fabrication and analysis of small-scale thermal energy storage with conductivity enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thapa, Suvhashis; Chukwu, Sam; Khaliq, Abdul; Weiss, Leland

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Useful thermal conductivity envelope established for small scale TES. • Paraffin conductivity enhanced from .5 to 3.8 W/m K via low-cost copper insert. • Conductivity increase beyond 5 W/m K shows diminished returns. • Storage with increased conductivity lengthened thermoelectric output up to 247 s. - Abstract: The operation and useful operating parameters of a small-scale Thermal Energy Storage (TES) device that collects and stores heat in a Phase Change Material (PCM) is explored. The PCM utilized is an icosane wax. A physical device is constructed on the millimeter scale to examine specific effects of low-cost thermal conductivity enhancements that include copper foams and other metallic inserts. Numerical methods are utilized to establish useful operating range of small-scale TES devices in general, and the limits of thermal conductivity enhancement on thermoelectric operation specifically. Specific attention is paid to the manufacturability of the various constructs as well as the resulting thermal conductivity enhancement. A maximum thermal conductivity of 3.8 W/m K is achieved in experimental testing via copper foam enhancement. A simplified copper matrix achieves conductivity of 3.7 W/m K and allows significantly reduced fabrication effort. These results compare favorably to baseline wax conductivity of .5 W/m K. Power absorption is recorded of about 900 W/m 2 . Modeling reveals diminishing returns beyond 4–6 W/m K for devices on this scale. Results show the system capable of extending thermoelectric operation several minutes through the use of thermal energy storage techniques within the effective conductivity ranges

  12. Spontaneous non-thermal leptogenesis in high-scale inflation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, M.; Takahashi, F.; Yanagida, T.T.; Tokyo Univ.

    2006-11-01

    We argue that a non-thermal leptogenesis occurs spontaneously, without direct couplings of the inflation with right-handed neutrinos, in a wide class of high-scale inflation models such as the chaotic and hybrid inflation. It is only a finite vacuum expectation value of the inflaton, of more precisely, a linear term in the Kaehler potential, that is a prerequisite for the spontaneous non-thermal leptogenesis. To exemplify how it works, we show that a chaotic inflation model in supergravity naturally produces a right amount of baryon asymmetry via the spontaneous non-thermal leptogenesis. We also discuss the gravitino production from the inflation. (orig.)

  13. Special Issue on the Second International Workshop on Micro- and Nano-Scale Thermal Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuomin; Liu, Linhua; Zhu, Qunzhi; Mengüç, M. Pinar

    2015-06-01

    Micro- and nano-scale thermal radiation has become one of the fastest growing research areas because of advances in nanotechnology and the development of novel materials. The related research and development includes near-field radiation transfer, spectral and directional selective emitters and receivers, plasmonics, metamaterials, and novel nano-scale fabrication techniques. With the advances in these areas, important applications in energy harvesting such as solar cells and thermophotovoltaics, nanomanufacturing, biomedical sensing, thermal imaging as well as data storage with the localized heating/cooling have been pushed to higher levels.

  14. Validity of thermally-driven small-scale ventilated filling box models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Jamie L.; Linden, P. F.

    2013-11-01

    The majority of previous work studying building ventilation flows at laboratory scale have used saline plumes in water. The production of buoyancy forces using salinity variations in water allows dynamic similarity between the small-scale models and the full-scale flows. However, in some situations, such as including the effects of non-adiabatic boundaries, the use of a thermal plume is desirable. The efficacy of using temperature differences to produce buoyancy-driven flows representing natural ventilation of a building in a small-scale model is examined here, with comparison between previous theoretical and new, heat-based, experiments.

  15. Study on Thermal Decomposition Characteristics of Ammonium Nitrate Emulsion Explosive in Different Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiujie; Tan, Liu; Xu, Sen; Liu, Dabin; Min, Li

    2018-04-01

    Numerous accidents of emulsion explosive (EE) are attributed to uncontrolled thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate emulsion (ANE, the intermediate of EE) and EE in large scale. In order to study the thermal decomposition characteristics of ANE and EE in different scales, a large-scale test of modified vented pipe test (MVPT), and two laboratory-scale tests of differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) were applied in the present study. The scale effect and water effect both play an important role in the thermal stability of ANE and EE. The measured decomposition temperatures of ANE and EE in MVPT are 146°C and 144°C, respectively, much lower than those in DSC and ARC. As the size of the same sample in DSC, ARC, and MVPT successively increases, the onset temperatures decrease. In the same test, the measured onset temperature value of ANE is higher than that of EE. The water composition of the sample stabilizes the sample. The large-scale test of MVPT can provide information for the real-life operations. The large-scale operations have more risks, and continuous overheating should be avoided.

  16. The efficiency of an open-cavity tubular solar receiver for a small-scale solar thermal Brayton cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, W.G.; Bello-Ochende, T.; Meyer, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Results show efficiencies of a low-cost stainless steel tubular cavity receiver. • Optimum ratio of 0.0035 is found for receiver aperture area to concentrator area. • Smaller receiver tube and higher mass flow rate increase receiver efficiency. • Larger tube and smaller mass flow rate increase second law efficiency. • Large-tube receiver performs better in the small-scale solar thermal Brayton cycle. - Abstract: The first law and second law efficiencies are determined for a stainless steel closed-tube open rectangular cavity solar receiver. It is to be used in a small-scale solar thermal Brayton cycle using a micro-turbine with low compressor pressure ratios. There are many different variables at play to model the air temperature increase of the air running through such a receiver. These variables include concentrator shape, concentrator diameter, concentrator rim angle, concentrator reflectivity, concentrator optical error, solar tracking error, receiver aperture area, receiver material, effect of wind, receiver tube diameter, inlet temperature and mass flow rate through the receiver. All these variables are considered in this paper. The Brayton cycle requires very high receiver surface temperatures in order to be successful. These high temperatures, however, have many disadvantages in terms of heat loss from the receiver, especially radiation heat loss. With the help of ray-tracing software, SolTrace, and receiver modelling techniques, an optimum receiver-to-concentrator-area ratio of A′ ≈ 0.0035 was found for a concentrator with 45° rim angle, 10 mrad optical error and 1° tracking error. A method to determine the temperature profile and net heat transfer rate along the length of the receiver tube is presented. Receiver efficiencies are shown in terms of mass flow rate, receiver tube diameter, pressure drop, maximum receiver surface temperature and inlet temperature of the working fluid. For a 4.8 m diameter parabolic dish, the

  17. Size Scales for Thermal Inhomogeneities in Mars' Atmosphere Surface Layer: Mars Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, John D.; Haberle, Robert M.; Seiff, Alvin; Murphy, James R.; Schofield, John T.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Atmospheric temperature measurement at three heights with thin wire thermocouples on the 1.1 m Mars Pathfinder meteorology must allow estimates of the integral scale of the atmospheric thermal turbulence during an 83 sol period that begins in the summer. The integral scale is a measure for regions of perturbations. In turbulent media that roughly characterizes locations where the perturbations are correlated. Excluding some to intervals with violent excursions of the mean temperatures, integral scale values are found that increase relatively rapidly from a few tenths meters or less near down to several meters by mid-morning. During mid-morning, the diurnal and shorter time scale wind direction variations often place the meteorology mast in the thermal wake of the Lander.

  18. Thermal anchoring of wires in large scale superconducting coil test experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Dipak; Sharma, A.N.; Prasad, Upendra; Khristi, Yohan; Varmora, Pankaj; Doshi, Kalpesh; Pradhan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We addressed how thermal anchoring in large scale coil test is different compare to small cryogenic apparatus? • We did precise estimation of thermal anchoring length at 77 K and 4.2 K heat sink in large scale superconducting coil test experiment. • We addressed, the quality of anchoring without covering entire wires using Kapton/Teflon tape. • We obtained excellent results in temperature measurement without using GE Varnish by doubling estimated anchoring length. -- Abstract: Effective and precise thermal anchoring of wires in cryogenic experiment is mandatory to measure temperature in milikelvin accuracy and to avoid unnecessary cooling power due to additional heat conduction from room temperature (RT) to operating temperature (OT) through potential, field, displacement and stress measurement instrumentation wires. Instrumentation wires used in large scale superconducting coil test experiments are different compare to cryogenic apparatus in terms of unique construction and overall diameter/area due to errorless measurement in large time-varying magnetic field compare to small cryogenic apparatus, often shielded wires are used. Hence, along with other variables, anchoring techniques and required thermal anchoring length are entirely different in this experiment compare to cryogenic apparatus. In present paper, estimation of thermal anchoring length of five different types of instrumentation wires used in coils test campaign at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India has been discussed and some temperature measurement results of coils test campaign have been presented

  19. Scaling influence on the thermal behavior of toward-THz SiGe:C HBTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Alessandro, V; Sasso, G; Rinaldi, N; Aufinger, K

    2014-01-01

    An extensive on-wafer experimental campaign is performed to extract the thermal resistance of state-of-the-art toward-THz silicon germanium bipolar transistors designed and developed within the European DOTFIVE project. The dependence of this critical parameter on scaling, as well as on the emitter layout, is carefully evaluated, and the resulting junction temperatures are determined.

  20. Thermal Stress FE Analysis of Large-scale Gas Holder Under Sunshine Temperature Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyu; Yang, Ranxia; Wang, Hehui

    2018-03-01

    The temperature field and thermal stress of Man type gas holder is simulated by using the theory of sunshine temperature field based on ASHRAE clear-sky model and the finite element method. The distribution of surface temperature and thermal stress of gas holder under the given sunshine condition is obtained. The results show that the thermal stress caused by sunshine can be identified as one of the important factors for the failure of local cracked oil leakage which happens on the sunny side before on the shady side. Therefore, it is of great importance to consider the sunshine thermal load in the stress analysis, design and operation of large-scale steel structures such as the gas holder.

  1. Evaluation of Thermal and Thermo-mechanical Behavior of Full-scale Energy Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kyle D.

    This study focuses on the thermo-mechanical and thermal behavior of full-scale energy foundations installed as part of two buildings recently constructed in Colorado. The soil stratigraphy at each of the sites differed, but both foundations were expected to function as primarily end-bearing elements with a tip socketed into rock. The heat exchanger configurations were also different amongst the foundations at both sites, permitting evaluation of the role of heat exchange. A common thread for both energy foundation case histories was the monitoring of the temperature and axial strain within the foundations during heat exchange operations. The first case study involves an evaluation of the long-term thermo-mechanical response of two full-scale energy foundations installed at the new Denver Housing Authority (DHA) Senior Living Facility at 1099 Osage St. in Denver, Colorado. Due to the construction schedule for this project, the thermal properties of the foundations and surrounding subsurface could not be assessed using thermal response tests. However, instrumentation was incorporated into the foundations to assess their long-term heat exchange response as well as the thermo-mechanical strains, stresses, and displacements that occurred during construction and operation of the ground-source heat pump system. The temperature changes within the foundations during heating and cooling operations over a period of approximately 600 days ranged from 9 to 32 °C, respectively. The thermal axial stresses in the foundations were calculated from the measured strains, and ranged from 3.1 MPa during heating to --1.0 MPa during cooling. These values are within reasonable limits for reinforced concrete structures. The maximum thermal axial stress was observed near the toe of both foundations, which is consistent with trends expected for end-bearing toe boundary conditions. The greatest thermal axial strains were observed near the top of the foundations (upward expansion during

  2. Hydraulic and thermal conduction phenomena in soils at the particle-scale: Towards realistic FEM simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narsilio, G A; Yun, T S; Kress, J; Evans, T M

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes a method to characterize conduction properties in soils at the particle-scale. The method set the bases for an alternative way to estimate conduction parameters such as thermal conductivity and hydraulic conductivity, with the potential application to hard-to-obtain samples, where traditional experimental testing on large enough specimens becomes much more expensive. The technique is exemplified using 3D synthetic grain packings generated with discrete element methods, from which 3D granular images are constructed. Images are then imported into the finite element analyses to solve the corresponding governing partial differential equations of hydraulic and thermal conduction. High performance computing is implemented to meet the demanding 3D numerical calculations of the complex geometrical domains. The effects of void ratio and inter-particle contacts in hydraulic and thermal conduction are explored. Laboratory measurements support the numerically obtained results and validate the viability of the new methods used herein. The integration of imaging with rigorous numerical simulations at the pore-scale also enables fundamental observation of particle-scale mechanisms of macro-scale manifestation.

  3. Thermal power generation projects ``Large Scale Solar Heating``; EU-Thermie-Projekte ``Large Scale Solar Heating``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuebler, R.; Fisch, M.N. [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum Energie-, Gebaeude- und Solartechnik, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The aim of this project is the preparation of the ``Large-Scale Solar Heating`` programme for an Europe-wide development of subject technology. The following demonstration programme was judged well by the experts but was not immediately (1996) accepted for financial subsidies. In November 1997 the EU-commission provided 1,5 million ECU which allowed the realisation of an updated project proposal. By mid 1997 a small project was approved, that had been requested under the lead of Chalmes Industriteteknik (CIT) in Sweden and is mainly carried out for the transfer of technology. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel dieses Vorhabens ist die Vorbereitung eines Schwerpunktprogramms `Large Scale Solar Heating`, mit dem die Technologie europaweit weiterentwickelt werden sollte. Das daraus entwickelte Demonstrationsprogramm wurde von den Gutachtern positiv bewertet, konnte jedoch nicht auf Anhieb (1996) in die Foerderung aufgenommen werden. Im November 1997 wurden von der EU-Kommission dann kurzfristig noch 1,5 Mio ECU an Foerderung bewilligt, mit denen ein aktualisierter Projektvorschlag realisiert werden kann. Bereits Mitte 1997 wurde ein kleineres Vorhaben bewilligt, das unter Federfuehrung von Chalmers Industriteknik (CIT) in Schweden beantragt worden war und das vor allem dem Technologietransfer dient. (orig.)

  4. Thermal comfort in residential buildings: Comfort values and scales for building energy simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeters, Leen; D' haeseleer, William [Division of Applied Mechanics and Energy Conversion, University of Leuven (K.U.Leuven), Celestijnenlaan 300 A, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Dear, Richard de [Division of Environmental and Life Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney (Australia); Hensen, Jan [Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Vertigo 6.18, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2009-05-15

    Building Energy Simulation (BES) programmes often use conventional thermal comfort theories to make decisions, whilst recent research in the field of thermal comfort clearly shows that important effects are not incorporated. The conventional theories of thermal comfort were set up based on steady state laboratory experiments. This, however, is not representing the real situation in buildings, especially not when focusing on residential buildings. Therefore, in present analysis, recent reviews and adaptations are considered to extract acceptable temperature ranges and comfort scales. They will be defined in an algorithm, easily implementable in any BES code. The focus is on comfortable temperature levels in the room, more than on the detailed temperature distribution within that room. (author)

  5. Mapping Thermal Expansion Coefficients in Freestanding 2D Materials at the Nanometer Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuan; Yasaei, Poya; Jokisaari, Jacob; Öǧüt, Serdar; Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Klie, Robert F.

    2018-02-01

    Two-dimensional materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and their heterostructures, exhibit great potential for a variety of applications, such as transistors, spintronics, and photovoltaics. While the miniaturization offers remarkable improvements in electrical performance, heat dissipation and thermal mismatch can be a problem in designing electronic devices based on two-dimensional materials. Quantifying the thermal expansion coefficient of 2D materials requires temperature measurements at nanometer scale. Here, we introduce a novel nanometer-scale thermometry approach to measure temperature and quantify the thermal expansion coefficients in 2D materials based on scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy to determine the energy shift of the plasmon resonance peak of 2D materials as a function of sample temperature. By combining these measurements with first-principles modeling, the thermal expansion coefficients (TECs) of single-layer and freestanding graphene and bulk, as well as monolayer MoS2 , MoSe2 , WS2 , or WSe2 , are directly determined and mapped.

  6. A practical view of the insights from scaling thermal-hydraulic tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, A.E.; McPherson, G.D.

    1995-09-01

    The authors review the broad concept of scaling of thermal-hydraulic test facilities designed to acquire data for application to modeling the behavior of nuclear power plants, especially as applied to the design certification of passive advanced light water reactors. Distortions and uncertainties in the scaling process are described, and the possible impact of these effects on the test data are discussed. A practical approach to the use of data from the facilities is proposed, with emphasis on the insights to be gained from the test results rather than direct application of test results to behavior of a large plant.

  7. Full scale mock-up tests for rod bundle thermal-hydraulics in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, S.

    1995-01-01

    This poster describes tests aimed at development and validation of principal design methodology of rod bundle thermal-hydraulics correlations. The works are based on domestic data base using the full-scale mock-up test facilities. The scope of the tests comprises DNB heat flux, transient DNB heat flux, post DNB heat transfer, pressure drop and void distribution. The works have been performed under collaboration among electric facilities, NPP vendors, universities, governmental corporations. 1 tab., 14 figs

  8. Fast Thermal Runaway Detection for Lithium-Ion Cells in Large Scale Traction Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Koch

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal runaway of single cells within a large scale lithium-ion battery is a well-known risk that can lead to critical situations if no counter measures are taken in today’s lithium-ion traction batteries for battery electric vehicles (BEVs, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs. The United Nations have published a draft global technical regulation on electric vehicle safety (GTR EVS describing a safety feature to warn passengers in case of a thermal runaway. Fast and reliable detection of faulty cells undergoing thermal runaway within the lithium-ion battery is therefore a key factor in battery designs for comprehensive passenger safety. A set of various possible sensors has been chosen based on the determined cell thermal runaway impact. These sensors have been tested in different sized battery setups and compared with respect to their ability of fast and reliable thermal runaway detection and their feasibility for traction batteries.

  9. Bench-scale experimental determination of the thermal diffusivity of crushed tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryder, E.E.; Finley, R.E.; George, J.T.; Ho, C.K.; Longenbaugh, R.S.; Connolly, J.R.

    1996-06-01

    A bench-scale experiment was designed and constructed to determine the effective thermal diffusivity of crushed tuff. Crushed tuff particles ranging from 12.5 mm to 37.5 mm (0.5 in. to 1.5 in.) were used to fill a cylindrical volume of 1.58 m 3 at an effective porosity of 0.48. Two iterations of the experiment were completed; the first spanning approximately 502 hours and the second 237 hours. Temperatures near the axial heater reached 700 degrees C, with a significant volume of the test bed exceeding 100 degrees C. Three post-test analysis techniques were used to estimate the thermal diffusivity of the crushed tuff. The first approach used nonlinear parameter estimation linked to a one dimensional radial conduction model to estimate thermal diffusivity from the first 6 hours of test data. The second method used the multiphase TOUGH2 code in conjunction with the first 20 hours of test data not only to estimate the crushed tuffs thermal diffusivity, but also to explore convective behavior within the test bed. Finally, the nonlinear conduction code COYOTE-II was used to determine thermal properties based on 111 hours of cool-down data. The post-test thermal diffusivity estimates of 5.0 x 10-7 m 2 /s to 6.6 x 10-7 m 2 /s were converted to effective thermal conductivities and compared to estimates obtained from published porosity-based relationships. No obvious match between the experimental data and published relationships was found to exist; however, additional data for other particle sizes and porosities are needed

  10. Treating high-mercury-containing lamps using full-scale thermal desorption technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T C; You, S J; Yu, B S; Chen, C M; Chiu, Y C

    2009-03-15

    The mercury content in high-mercury-containing lamps are always between 400 mg/kg and 200,000 mg/kg. This concentration is much higher than the 260 mg/kg lower boundary recommended for the thermal desorption process suggested by the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. According to a Taiwan EPA survey, about 4,833,000 cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFLs), 486,000 ultraviolet lamps and 25,000 super high pressure mercury lamps (SHPs) have been disposed of in the industrial waste treatment system, producing 80, 92 and 9 kg-mercury/year through domestic treatment, offshore treatment and air emissions, respectively. To deal with this problem we set up a full-scale thermal desorption process to treat and recover the mercury from SHPs, fluorescent tube tailpipes, fluorescent tubes containing mercury-fluorescent powder, and CCFLs containing mercury-fluorescent powder and monitor the use of different pre-heating temperatures and desorption times. The experimental results reveal that the average thermal desorption efficiency of SHPs and fluorescent tube tailpipe were both 99.95%, while the average thermal desorption efficiencies of fluorescent tubes containing mercury-fluorescent powder were between 97% and 99%. In addition, a thermal desorption efficiency of only 69.37-93.39% was obtained after treating the CCFLs containing mercury-fluorescent powder. These differences in thermal desorption efficiency might be due to the complexity of the mercury compounds contained in the lamps. In general, the thermal desorption efficiency of lamps containing mercury-complex compounds increased with higher temperatures.

  11. Small-Scale Flat Plate Collectors for Solar Thermal Scavenging in Low Conductivity Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Ogbonnaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is great opportunity to develop power supplies for autonomous application on the small scale. For example, remote environmental sensors may be powered through the harvesting of ambient thermal energy and heating of a thermoelectric generator. This work investigates a small-scale (centimeters solar thermal collector designed for this application. The absorber is coated with a unique selective coating and then studied in a low pressure environment to increase performance. A numerical model that is used to predict the performance of the collector plate is developed. This is validated based on benchtop testing of a fabricated collector plate in a low-pressure enclosure. Model results indicate that simulated solar input of about 800 W/m2 results in a collector plate temperature of 298 K in ambient conditions and up to 388 K in vacuum. The model also predicts the various losses in W/m2 K from the plate to the surroundings. Plate temperature is validated through the experimental work showing that the model is useful to the future design of these small-scale solar thermal energy collectors.

  12. Scaling behavior of the thermal conductivity of width-modulated nanowires and nanofilms for heat transfer control at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zianni, Xanthippi; Jean, Valentin; Termentzidis, Konstantinos; Lacroix, David

    2014-11-21

    We report on scaling behavior of the thermal conductivity of width-modulated nanowires and nanofilms that have been studied with the phonon Monte Carlo technique. It has been found that the reduction of the thermal conductivity scales with the nanostructure transmissivity, a property entirely determined by the modulation geometry, irrespectively of the material choice. Tuning of the thermal conductivity is possible by the nanostructure width-modulation without strict limitations for the modulation profile. In addition, a very significant constriction thermal resistance due to width-discontinuity has been identified, in analogy to the contact thermal resistance between two dissimilar materials. The constriction thermal resistance also scales with the modulated nanostructure transmissivity. Our conclusions are generic indicating that a wide range of materials can be used for the modulated nanostructures. Direct heat flow control can be provided by designing the nanostructure width-modulation.

  13. Multi-scale analysis of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics-first applications using the NEPTUNE platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guelfi, A.; Boucker, M.; Mimouni, S.; Bestion, D.; Boudier, P.

    2005-01-01

    The NEPTUNE project aims at building a new two-phase flow thermal-hydraulics platform for nuclear reactor simulation. EDF (Electricite de France) and CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) with the co-sponsorship of IRSN (Institut de Radioprotection et Surete Nucleaire) and FRAMATOME-ANP, are jointly developing the NEPTUNE multi-scale platform that includes new physical models and numerical methods for each of the computing scales. One usually distinguishes three different scales for industrial simulations: the 'system' scale, the 'component' scale (subchannel analysis) and CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics). In addition DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) can provide information at a smaller scale that can be useful for the development of the averaged scales. The NEPTUNE project also includes work on software architecture and research on new numerical methods for coupling codes since both are required to improve industrial calculations. All these R and D challenges have been defined in order to meet industrial needs and the underlying stakes (mainly the competitiveness and the safety of Nuclear Power Plants). This paper focuses on three high priority needs: DNB (Departure from Nucleate Boiling) prediction, directly linked to fuel performance; PTS (Pressurized Thermal Shock), a key issue when studying the lifespan of critical components and LBLOCA (Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident), a reference accident for safety studies. For each of these industrial applications, we provide a review of the last developments within the NEPTUNE platform and we present the first results. A particular attention is also given to physical validation and the needs for further experimental data. (authors)

  14. More 'altruistic' punishment in larger societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Frank W; Berbesque, J Colette

    2008-03-07

    If individuals will cooperate with cooperators, and punish non-cooperators even at a cost to themselves, then this strong reciprocity could minimize the cheating that undermines cooperation. Based upon numerous economic experiments, some have proposed that human cooperation is explained by strong reciprocity and norm enforcement. Second-party punishment is when you punish someone who defected on you; third-party punishment is when you punish someone who defected on someone else. Third-party punishment is an effective way to enforce the norms of strong reciprocity and promote cooperation. Here we present new results that expand on a previous report from a large cross-cultural project. This project has already shown that there is considerable cross-cultural variation in punishment and cooperation. Here we test the hypothesis that population size (and complexity) predicts the level of third-party punishment. Our results show that people in larger, more complex societies engage in significantly more third-party punishment than people in small-scale societies.

  15. Observing golden-mean universality class in the scaling of thermal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Daxing

    2018-02-01

    We address the issue of whether the golden-mean [ψ =(√{5 }+1 ) /2 ≃1.618 ] universality class, as predicted by several theoretical models, can be observed in the dynamical scaling of thermal transport. Remarkably, we show strong evidence that ψ appears to be the scaling exponent of heat mode correlation in a purely quartic anharmonic chain. This observation seems to somewhat deviate from the previous expectation and we explain it by the unusual slow decay of the cross correlation between heat and sound modes. Whenever the cubic anharmonicity is included, this cross correlation gradually dies out and another universality class with scaling exponent γ =5 /3 , as commonly predicted by theories, seems recovered. However, this recovery is accompanied by two interesting phase transition processes characterized by a change of symmetry of the potential and a clear variation of the dynamic structure factor, respectively. Due to these transitions, an additional exponent close to γ ≃1.580 emerges. All this evidence suggests that, to gain a full prediction of the scaling of thermal transport, more ingredients should be taken into account.

  16. INFLUENCE OF NANOFILTRATION PRETREATMENT ON SCALE DEPOSITION IN MULTI-STAGE FLASH THERMAL DESALINATION PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiman E Al-Rawajfeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Scale formation represents a major operational problem encountered in thermal desalination plants. In current installed plants, and to allow for a reasonable safety margin, sulfate scale deposition limits the top brine temperature (TBT in multi-stage flash (MSF distillers up to 110-112oC. This has significant effect on the unit capital, operational and water production cost. In this work, the influence of nanofiltration (NF pretreatment on the scale deposition potential and increasing TBT in MSF thermal desalination plants is modeled on the basis of mass transfer with chemical reaction of solutes in the brine. Full and partial NF-pretreatment of the feed water were investigated. TBT can be increased in MSF by increasing the percentage of NF-treated feed. Full NF pretreatment of the make-up allows TBT in the MSF plant to be raised up to 175oC in the case of di hybrid NF-MSF and up to 165oC in the case of tri hybrid NF-RO-MSF. The significant scale reduction is associated with increasing flashing range, unit recovery, unit performance, and will lead to reduction in heat transfer surface area, pumping power and therefore, water production cost.

  17. Scaling analysis and instantons for thermally assisted tunneling and quantum Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhang; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Isakov, Sergei V.; Boixo, Sergio; Mazzola, Guglielmo; Troyer, Matthias; Neven, Hartmut

    2017-01-01

    We develop an instantonic calculus to derive an analytical expression for the thermally assisted tunneling decay rate of a metastable state in a fully connected quantum spin model. The tunneling decay problem can be mapped onto the Kramers escape problem of a classical random dynamical field. This dynamical field is simulated efficiently by path-integral quantum Monte Carlo (QMC). We show analytically that the exponential scaling with the number of spins of the thermally assisted quantum tunneling rate and the escape rate of the QMC process are identical. We relate this effect to the existence of a dominant instantonic tunneling path. The instanton trajectory is described by nonlinear dynamical mean-field theory equations for a single-site magnetization vector, which we solve exactly. Finally, we derive scaling relations for the "spiky" barrier shape when the spin tunneling and QMC rates scale polynomially with the number of spins N while a purely classical over-the-barrier activation rate scales exponentially with N .

  18. Studies of thermal energy confinement scaling in PDX plasmas: D0 → H+ limiter discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, S.M.; Goldston, R.J.; Bell, M.

    1984-06-01

    Experiments were performed on the PDX tokamak to study plasma heating and β scaling with higher power, near-perpendicular neutral beam injection. The data taken during these experiments were analyzed using a time-dependent data interpretation code (TRANSP) to study the transport and thermal confinement scaling over a wide range of plasma parameters. This study focuses on results from experiments with D 0 injection into H + plasmas using graphite rail limiters, a = 40 to 44 cm, R = 143 cm, I/sub p/ = 200 to 480 kA, B/sub T/ = 0.7 to 2.2 T, and typically anti n/sub e/ = 2.5 to 4.2 x 10 13 cm -3 . The results of this study indicate that for both ohmic and neutral beam heated discharges the energy flow out of the plasma is dominated by anomalous electron losses, attributed to electron thermal conduction. The ion conduction losses are well described to electron thermal conduction. The ion conduction losses are well described by neoclassical theory; however, the total ion loss influences the power balance significantly only at high toroidal fields and high plasma currents

  19. Effective Thermal Conductivity For Drift-Scale Models Used In TSPA-SR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.D. Francis

    2001-01-25

    The objective of this calculation is to develop a time dependent in-drift effective thermal conductivity parameter that will approximate heat conduction, thermal radiation, and natural convection heat transfer using a single mode of heat transfer (heat conduction). In order to reduce the physical and numerical complexity of the heat transfer processes that occur (and must be modeled) as a result of the emplacement of heat generating wastes, a single parameter will be developed that approximates all forms of heat transfer from the waste package surface to the drift wall (or from one surface exchanging heat with another). Subsequently, with this single parameter, one heat transfer mechanism (e.g., conduction heat transfer) can be used in the models. The resulting parameter is to be used as input in the drift-scale process-level models applied in total system performance assessments for the site recommendation (TSPA-SR). The format of this parameter will be a time-dependent table for direct input into the thermal-hydrologic (TH) and the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) models.

  20. Effective Thermal Conductivity For Drift-Scale Models Used In TSPA-SR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.D. Francis

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to develop a time dependent in-drift effective thermal conductivity parameter that will approximate heat conduction, thermal radiation, and natural convection heat transfer using a single mode of heat transfer (heat conduction). In order to reduce the physical and numerical complexity of the heat transfer processes that occur (and must be modeled) as a result of the emplacement of heat generating wastes, a single parameter will be developed that approximates all forms of heat transfer from the waste package surface to the drift wall (or from one surface exchanging heat with another). Subsequently, with this single parameter, one heat transfer mechanism (e.g., conduction heat transfer) can be used in the models. The resulting parameter is to be used as input in the drift-scale process-level models applied in total system performance assessments for the site recommendation (TSPA-SR). The format of this parameter will be a time-dependent table for direct input into the thermal-hydrologic (TH) and the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) models

  1. Thermal and ultrasonic influence in the formation of nanometer scale hydroxyapatite bio-ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinern, GJE; Brundavanam, R; Le, X Thi; Djordjevic, S; Prokic, M; Fawcett, D

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) is a widely used biocompatible ceramic in many biomedical applications and devices. Currently nanometer-scale forms of HAP are being intensely investigated due to their close similarity to the inorganic mineral component of the natural bone matrix. In this study nano-HAP was prepared via a wet precipitation method using Ca(NO3)2 and KH2PO4 as the main reactants and NH4OH as the precipitator under ultrasonic irradiation. The Ca/P ratio was set at 1.67 and the pH was maintained at 9 during the synthesis process. The influence of the thermal treatment was investigated by using two thermal treatment processes to produce ultrafine nano-HAP powders. In the first heat treatment, a conventional radiant tube furnace was used to produce nano-particles with an average size of approximately 30 nm in diameter, while the second thermal treatment used a microwave-based technique to produce particles with an average diameter of 36 nm. The crystalline structure and morphology of all nanoparticle powders produced were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Both thermal techniques effectively produced ultrafine powders with similar crystalline structure, morphology and particle sizes. PMID:22114473

  2. Damage evaluation under thermal fatigue of a vertical target full scale component for the ITER divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missirlian, M.; Escourbiac, F.; Merola, M.; Durocher, A.; Bobin-Vastra, I.; Schedler, B.

    2007-01-01

    An extensive development programme has been carried out in the EU on high heat flux components within the ITER project. In this framework, a Full Scale Vertical Target (VTFS) prototype was manufactured with all the main features of the corresponding ITER divertor design. The fatigue cycling campaign on CFC and W armoured regions, proved the capability of such a component to meet the ITER requirements in terms of heat flux performances for the vertical target. This paper discusses thermographic examination and thermal fatigue testing results obtained on this component. The study includes thermal analysis, with a tentative proposal to evaluate with finite element approach the location/size of defects and the possible propagation during fatigue cycling

  3. Stage I surface crack formation in thermal fatigue: A predictive multi-scale approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterstock, S.; Robertson, C.; Sauzay, M.; Aubin, V.; Degallaix, S.

    2010-01-01

    A multi-scale numerical model is developed, predicting the formation of stage I cracks, in thermal fatigue loading conditions. The proposed approach comprises 2 distinct calculation steps. Firstly, the number of cycles to micro-crack initiation is determined, in individual grains. The adopted initiation model depends on local stress-strain conditions, relative to sub-grain plasticity, grain orientation and grain deformation incompatibilities. Secondly, 2-4 grains long surface cracks (stage I) is predicted, by accounting for micro-crack coalescence, in 3 dimensions. The method described in this paper is applied to a 500 grains aggregate, loaded in representative thermal fatigue conditions. Preliminary results provide quantitative insight regarding position, density, spacing and orientations of stage I surface cracks and subsequent formation of crack networks. The proposed method is fully deterministic, provided all grain crystallographic orientations and micro-crack linking thresholds are specified. (authors)

  4. Fracture appraisal of large scale glass block under various realistic thermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laude, F.; Vernaz, E.; Saint-Gaudens, M.

    1982-06-01

    Fracturing of nuclear waste glass caused primarily by thermal and residual stresses during cooling increases the potential leaching surface area and the number of small particles. A theoretical study shows that it is possible to calculate the stresses created but it is difficult to evaluate the state of fracture. Theoretical results are completed by an experimental study with inactive industrial scale glass blocks. The critical stages of its thermal history are simulated and the total surface area of the pieces is measured by comparison of leaching rate of the fractured glass with known samples in the same conditions. Quenching due to water impact, air cooling in a storage fit and experimental reassembly of fractured glass by re-heating are examined

  5. Large scale solar thermal power for the European Union{exclamation_point}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1997-06-01

    Southern Europe, on the edge of the sunbelt, represents the ideal location for solar thermal generated power. Last year. SAWIE reported on the THESEUS project, a proposed 50 MWe solar thermal power plant for Frangokastello, southern Crete, which was submitted for support under the European Union`s THERMIE Programme. Funding was approved for the design phase for this innovative power plant, the first large-scale SEGS-style plant on European soil, at the end of last year. However, the THERMIE Programme also provided support for another Southern European plant, proposed by Colon Solar for Huelva in Southern Spain. Whilst hurdles remain to be overcome before both plants are built and commissioned, there is an excellent chance that by the start of the new Millennium, the solar collectors from these two plants could be generating over half a million MWh of energy a year. SAWIE compares the two projects. (author)

  6. Tabulated In-Drift Geometric and Thermal Properties Used In Drift-Scale Models for TSPA-SR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.D. Francis

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to provide in-drift physical properties required by the drift-scale models (both two- and three-dimensional) used in total system performance assessments (TSPA). The physical properties include waste package geometry, waste package thermal properties, emplacement drift geometry including backfill and invert geometry and properties (both thermal and hydrologic), drip shield geometry and thermal properties, all tabulated in a single source

  7. Thermal fatigue of austenitic stainless steel: influence of surface conditions through a multi-scale approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le-Pecheur, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Some cases of cracking of 304L austenitic stainless steel components due to thermal fatigue were encountered in particular on the Residual Heat Removal Circuits (RHR) of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). EDF has initiated a R and D program to understand assess the risks of damage on nuclear plant mixing zones. The INTHERPOL test developed at EDF is designed in order to perform pure thermal fatigue test on tubular specimen under mono-frequency thermal load. These tests are carried out under various loadings, surface finish qualities and welding in order to give an account of these parameters on crack initiation. The main topic of this study is the research of a fatigue criterion using a micro:macro modelling approach. The first part of work deals with material characterization (stainless steel 304L) emphasising the specificities of the surface roughness link with a strong hardening gradient. The first results of the characterization on the surface show a strong work-hardening gradient on a 250 microns layer. This gradient does not evolved after thermal cycling. Micro hardness measurements and TEM observations were intensively used to characterize this gradient. The second part is the macroscopic modelling of INTHERPOL tests in order to determine the components of the stress and strain tensors due to thermal cycling. The third part of work is thus to evaluate the effect of surface roughness and hardening gradient using a calculation on a finer scale. This simulation is based on the variation of dislocation density. A goal for the future is the determination of the fatigue criterion mainly based on polycrystalline modelling. Stocked energy or critical plane being available that allows making a sound choice for the criteria. (author)

  8. Transport coefficients for the plasma thermal energy and empirical scaling ''laws''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppi, B.

    1989-01-01

    A set of transport coefficients has been identified for the electron and nuclei thermal energy of plasmas with temperatures in the multi-keV range, taking into account the available experimental information including the temperature spatial profiles and the inferred scaling ''laws'' for the measured energy replacement times. The specific form of these coefficients is suggested by the theory of a mode, so-called ''ubiquitous,'' that can be excited when a significant fraction of the electron population has magnetically trapped orbits. (author)

  9. Thermal Tides During the 2001 Martian Global-Scale Dust Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Wilson, R. John; McConnochie, Timothy H.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Bandfield, Donald J.; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The 2001 (Mars Year 25) global dust storm radically altered the dynamics of the Martian atmosphere. Using observations from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer onboard the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft and Mars WRF general circulation model simulations, we examine the changes to thermal tides and planetary waves caused by the storm. We find that the extratropical diurnal migrating tide is dramatically enhanced during the storm, particularly in the southern hemisphere, reaching amplitudes of more than 20 K. The tropical diurnal migrating tide is weakened to almost undetectable levels. The diurnal Kelvin waves are also significantly weakened, particularly during the period of global expansion at Ls=200deg-210deg. In contrast, the westward propagating diurnal wavenumber 2 tide strengthens to 4-8 K at altitudes above 30km. The wavenumber 1 stationary wave reaches amplitudes of 10-12 K at 50deg-70degN, far larger than is typically seen during this time of year. The phase of this stationary wave and the enhancement of the diurnal wavenumber 2 tide appear to be responses to the high-altitude westward propagating equatorial wavenumber 1 structure in dust mixing ratio observed during the storm in previous works. This work provides a global picture of dust storm wave dynamics that reveals the coupling between the tropics and high-latitude wave responses. We conclude that the zonal distribution of thermotidal forcing from atmospheric aerosol concentration is as important to understanding the atmospheric wave response as the total global mean aerosol optical depth.

  10. Thermal System Analysis and Optimization of Large-Scale Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongguang Fu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available As an important solution to issues regarding peak load and renewable energy resources on grids, large-scale compressed air energy storage (CAES power generation technology has recently become a popular research topic in the area of large-scale industrial energy storage. At present, the combination of high-expansion ratio turbines with advanced gas turbine technology is an important breakthrough in energy storage technology. In this study, a new gas turbine power generation system is coupled with current CAES technology. Moreover, a thermodynamic cycle system is optimized by calculating for the parameters of a thermodynamic system. Results show that the thermal efficiency of the new system increases by at least 5% over that of the existing system.

  11. Scaling-up permafrost thermal measurements in western Alaska using an ecotype approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. L. Cable

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Permafrost temperatures are increasing in Alaska due to climate change and in some cases permafrost is thawing and degrading. In areas where degradation has already occurred the effects can be dramatic, resulting in changing ecosystems, carbon release, and damage to infrastructure. However, in many areas we lack baseline data, such as subsurface temperatures, needed to assess future changes and potential risk areas. Besides climate, the physical properties of the vegetation cover and subsurface material have a major influence on the thermal state of permafrost. These properties are often directly related to the type of ecosystem overlaying permafrost. In this paper we demonstrate that classifying the landscape into general ecotypes is an effective way to scale up permafrost thermal data collected from field monitoring sites. Additionally, we find that within some ecotypes the absence of a moss layer is indicative of the absence of near-surface permafrost. As a proof of concept, we used the ground temperature data collected from the field sites to recode an ecotype land cover map into a map of mean annual ground temperature ranges at 1 m depth based on analysis and clustering of observed thermal regimes. The map should be useful for decision making with respect to land use and understanding how the landscape might change under future climate scenarios.

  12. Thermal performance of a small-scale loop heat pipe for terrestrial application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Won Bok; Boo, Joon Hong

    2004-01-01

    A small-scale loop heat pipe with polypropylene wick was fabricated and tested for its thermal performance. The container and tubing of the system was made of stainless steel and several working fluids were used to see the difference in performance including methanol, ethanol, acetone, R134a, and water. The heating area was 35 mm x 35 mm and there were nine axial grooves in the evaporator to provide a vapor passage. The pore size of the polypropylene wick inside the evaporator was varied from 0.5 m to 25 m. The size of condenser was 40 mm (W) x 50 mm (L) in which ten coolant paths were provided. The inner diameter of liquid and vapor transport lines were 2.0 mm and 4.0 mm, respectively and the length of which were 0.5 m. The PP wick LHP was operated with methanol, acetone, and ethanol normally. R134a was not compatible with PP wick and water was unsuitable within operating limit of 100 .deg. C. The minimum thermal load of 10 W (0.8 W/cm 2 ) and maximum thermal load of 80 W (6.5 W/cm 2 ) were achieved using methanol as working fluid with the condenser temperature of 20 .deg. C with horizontal position

  13. Pedestrian detection in thermal images: An automated scale based region extraction with curvelet space validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, A.; Faheema, A. G. J.; Deodhare, Dipti

    2016-05-01

    Pedestrian detection is a key problem in night vision processing with a dozen of applications that will positively impact the performance of autonomous systems. Despite significant progress, our study shows that performance of state-of-the-art thermal image pedestrian detectors still has much room for improvement. The purpose of this paper is to overcome the challenge faced by the thermal image pedestrian detectors, which employ intensity based Region Of Interest (ROI) extraction followed by feature based validation. The most striking disadvantage faced by the first module, ROI extraction, is the failed detection of cloth insulted parts. To overcome this setback, this paper employs an algorithm and a principle of region growing pursuit tuned to the scale of the pedestrian. The statistics subtended by the pedestrian drastically vary with the scale and deviation from normality approach facilitates scale detection. Further, the paper offers an adaptive mathematical threshold to resolve the problem of subtracting the background while extracting cloth insulated parts as well. The inherent false positives of the ROI extraction module are limited by the choice of good features in pedestrian validation step. One such feature is curvelet feature, which has found its use extensively in optical images, but has as yet no reported results in thermal images. This has been used to arrive at a pedestrian detector with a reduced false positive rate. This work is the first venture made to scrutinize the utility of curvelet for characterizing pedestrians in thermal images. Attempt has also been made to improve the speed of curvelet transform computation. The classification task is realized through the use of the well known methodology of Support Vector Machines (SVMs). The proposed method is substantiated with qualified evaluation methodologies that permits us to carry out probing and informative comparisons across state-of-the-art features, including deep learning methods, with six

  14. Basin scale permeability and thermal evolution of a magmatic hydrothermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taron, J.; Hickman, S. H.; Ingebritsen, S.; Williams, C.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale hydrothermal systems are potentially valuable energy resources and are of general scientific interest due to extreme conditions of stress, temperature, and reactive chemistry that can act to modify crustal rheology and composition. With many proposed sites for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) located on the margins of large-scale hydrothermal systems, understanding the temporal evolution of these systems contributes to site selection, characterization and design of EGS. This understanding is also needed to address the long-term sustainability of EGS once they are created. Many important insights into heat and mass transfer within natural hydrothermal systems can be obtained through hydrothermal modeling assuming that stress and permeability structure do not evolve over time. However, this is not fully representative of natural systems, where the effects of thermo-elastic stress changes, chemical fluid-rock interactions, and rock failure on fluid flow and thermal evolution can be significant. The quantitative importance of an evolving permeability field within the overall behavior of a large-scale hydrothermal system is somewhat untested, and providing such a parametric understanding is one of the goals of this study. We explore the thermal evolution of a sedimentary basin hydrothermal system following the emplacement of a magma body. The Salton Sea geothermal field and its associated magmatic system in southern California is utilized as a general backdrop to define the initial state. Working within the general framework of the open-source scientific computing initiative OpenGeoSys (www.opengeosys.org), we introduce full treatment of thermodynamic properties at the extreme conditions following magma emplacement. This treatment utilizes a combination of standard Galerkin and control-volume finite elements to balance fluid mass, mechanical deformation, and thermal energy with consideration of local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE) between fluids and solids

  15. The thermal environment of the human being on the global scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jendritzky, Gerd; Tinz, Birger

    2009-11-11

    The close relationship between human health, performance, well-being and the thermal environment is obvious. Nevertheless, most studies of climate and climate change impacts show amazing shortcomings in the assessment of the environment. Populations living in different climates have different susceptibilities, due to socio-economic reasons, and different customary behavioural adaptations. The global distribution of risks of hazardous thermal exposure has not been analysed before. To produce maps of the baseline and future bioclimate that allows a direct comparison of the differences in the vulnerability of populations to thermal stress across the world. The required climatological data fields are obtained from climate simulations with the global General Circulation Model ECHAM4 in T106-resolution. For the thermo-physiologically relevant assessment of these climate data a complete heat budget model of the human being, the 'Perceived Temperature' procedure has been applied which already comprises adaptation by clothing to a certain degree. Short-term physiological acclimatisation is considered via Health Related Assessment of the Thermal Environment. The global maps 1971-1980 (control run, assumed as baseline climate) show a pattern of thermal stress intensities as frequencies of heat. The heat load for people living in warm-humid climates is the highest. Climate change will lead to clear differences in health-related thermal stress between baseline climate and the future bioclimate 2041-2050 based on the 'business-as-usual' greenhouse gas scenario IS92a. The majority of the world's population will be faced with more frequent and more intense heat strain in spite of an assumed level of acclimatisation. Further adaptation measures are crucial in order to reduce the vulnerability of the populations. This bioclimatology analysis provides a tool for various questions in climate and climate change impact research. Considerations of regional or local scale require climate

  16. Scaling Relations for the Thermal Structure of Segmented Oceanic Transform Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson-Schwehr, M.; Boettcher, M. S.; Behn, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridge-transform faults (RTFs) are a natural laboratory for studying strike-slip earthquake behavior due to their relatively simple geometry, well-constrained slip rates, and quasi-periodic seismic cycles. However, deficiencies in our understanding of the limited size of the largest RTF earthquakes are due, in part, to not considering the effect of short intra-transform spreading centers (ITSCs) on fault thermal structure. We use COMSOL Multiphysics to run a series of 3D finite element simulations of segmented RTFs with visco-plastic rheology. The models test a range of RTF segment lengths (L = 10-150 km), ITSC offset lengths (O = 1-30 km), and spreading rates (V = 2-14 cm/yr). The lithosphere and upper mantle are approximated as steady-state, incompressible flow. Coulomb failure incorporates brittle processes in the lithosphere, and a temperature-dependent flow law for dislocation creep of olivine activates ductile deformation in the mantle. ITSC offsets as small as 2 km affect the thermal structure underlying many segmented RTFs, reducing the area above the 600˚C isotherm, A600, and thus the size of the largest expected earthquakes, Mc. We develop a scaling relation for the critical ITSC offset length, OC, which significantly reduces the thermal affect of adjacent fault segments of length L1 and L2. OC is defined as the ITSC offset that results in an area loss ratio of R = (Aunbroken - Acombined)/Aunbroken - Adecoupled) = 63%, where Aunbroken = C600(L1+L2)1.5V-0.6 is A600 for an RTF of length L1 + L2; Adecoupled = C600(L11.5+L21.5)V-0.6 is the combined A600 of RTFs of lengths L1 and L2, respectively; and Acombined = Aunbroken exp(-O/ OC) + Adecoupled (1-exp(-O/ OC)). C600 is a constant. We use OC and kinematic fault parameters (L1, L2, O, and V) to develop a scaling relation for the approximate seismogenic area, Aseg, for each segment of a RTF system composed of two fault segments. Finally, we estimate the size of Mc on a fault segment based on Aseg. We

  17. Removal of Iron Oxide Scale from Feed-water in Thermal Power Plant by Using Magnetic Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Motohiro; Shibatani, Saori; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2017-09-01

    One of the factors of deterioration in thermal power generation efficiency is adhesion of the scale to inner wall in feed-water system. Though thermal power plants have employed All Volatile Treatment (AVT) or Oxygen Treatment (OT) to prevent scale formation, these treatments cannot prevent it completely. In order to remove iron oxide scale, we proposed magnetic separation system using solenoidal superconducting magnet. Magnetic separation efficiency is influenced by component and morphology of scale which changes their property depending on the type of water treatment and temperature. In this study, we estimated component and morphology of iron oxide scale at each equipment in the feed-water system by analyzing simulated scale generated in the pressure vessel at 320 K to 550 K. Based on the results, we considered installation sites of the magnetic separation system.

  18. Is Parental Involvement Lower at Larger Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Parents who volunteer, or who lobby for improvements in school quality, are generally seen as providing a school-wide public good. If so, straightforward public-good theory predicts that free-riding will reduce average involvement at larger schools. This study uses longitudinal data to follow families over time, as their children move from middle…

  19. Small scale thermal-hydraulic experiment for stable operation of a pius-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, K.; Tamaki, M.; Imai, S.; Irianto, I.D.; Tsuji, Y.; Kukita, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic experiments using a small-scale atmospheric pressure test loop have been performed for the Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS)-type reactor to develop the new pump speed feedback control system. Three feedback control systems based on the measurement of flow rate, differential pressure, and fluid temperature distribution in the lower density lock have been proposed and confirmed by a series of experiments. Each of the feedback control systems had been verified in the simulation experiment such as a start-up simulation test. The automatic pump speed control based on the fluid temperature at the lower density lock was quite effective to maintain the stratified interface between primary water and borated pool water for stable operation of the reactor. (author)

  20. Small scale thermal violence experiments for combined insensitive high explosive and booster materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rae, Philip J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bauer, Clare L [AWE, UK; Stennett, C [DCMT SHRIVENHAM, UK; Flower, H M [AWE, UK

    2010-01-01

    A small scale cook-off experiment has been designed to provide a violence metric for both booster and IHE materials, singly and in combination. The experiment has a simple, axisymmetric geometry provided by a 10 mm internal diameter cylindrical steel confinement up to 80 mm in length. Heating is applied from one end of the sample length creating pseudo 1-D heating profile and a thermal gradient across the sample(s). At the opposite end of the confinement to the heating block, a machined groove provides a point of rupture that generates a cylindrical fragment. The displacement of the external face of the fragment is detected by Heterodyne Velocimetry. Proof of concept experiments are reported focusing on HMX and TATB formulations, and are described in relation to confinement, ullage and heating profile. The development of a violence metric, based upon fragment velocity records is discussed.

  1. Thermal stability of a thermonuclear plasma for different confinement scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johner, J.

    1985-10-01

    The thermal stability of the ignition curve is investigated using a simple OD model for a temperature dependent energy confinement time (tausub(E) is proportional to 1/Tsup(γ)). The stability limit in the (ntausub(E),T) plane is also calculated for a plasma with external heating. The degradation of confinement time with increasing temperature is found to be favourable for divergence temperature and minimum temperature for stable ignition. It also decreases the external power per unit volume necessary to reach divergence. On the contrary, it is extremely unfavourable for the required μsub(E) for divergence and ignition. Detailed results are given for the special case of the Kaye-Goldston scaling (γ=1.38)

  2. Efficient Geometry and Data Handling for Large-Scale Monte Carlo - Thermal-Hydraulics Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, J. Eduard

    2014-06-01

    Detailed coupling of thermal-hydraulics calculations to Monte Carlo reactor criticality calculations requires each axial layer of each fuel pin to be defined separately in the input to the Monte Carlo code in order to assign to each volume the temperature according to the result of the TH calculation, and if the volume contains coolant, also the density of the coolant. This leads to huge input files for even small systems. In this paper a methodology for dynamical assignment of temperatures with respect to cross section data is demonstrated to overcome this problem. The method is implemented in MCNP5. The method is verified for an infinite lattice with 3x3 BWR-type fuel pins with fuel, cladding and moderator/coolant explicitly modeled. For each pin 60 axial zones are considered with different temperatures and coolant densities. The results of the axial power distribution per fuel pin are compared to a standard MCNP5 run in which all 9x60 cells for fuel, cladding and coolant are explicitly defined and their respective temperatures determined from the TH calculation. Full agreement is obtained. For large-scale application the method is demonstrated for an infinite lattice with 17x17 PWR-type fuel assemblies with 25 rods replaced by guide tubes. Again all geometrical detailed is retained. The method was used in a procedure for coupled Monte Carlo and thermal-hydraulics iterations. Using an optimised iteration technique, convergence was obtained in 11 iteration steps.

  3. Comparison of organic emissions from laboratory and full-scale thermal degradation of sewage sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirey, D.A.; Striebich, R.C.; Dellinger, B.; Bostian, H.E.

    1991-01-01

    Samples of sewage sludge burned at one fluidized-bed and three multiple-hearth incinerators were subjected to laboratory flow reactor thermal decomposition testing in both pyrolytic and oxidative atmospheres. The time/temperature conditions of the laboratory testing were established to simulate as closely as possible full-scale incineration conditions so that a direct comparison of results could be made. The laboratory test results indicated that biomass decomposition products, not toxic industrial contaminants, comprised the majority of the emissions. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, acrylonitrile, and acetonitrile were consistently the most environmentally significant products of thermal degradation. Comparison of the results from this study with those obtained in field tests was complicated by an apparent loss of volatile chlorocarbons from the sludge samples received for laboratory testing. However, qualitative comparison of emission factors derived from lab and field results for those compounds observed in both studies, showed reasonably good correlation for the pyrolysis testing. Results suggested that the upper stages of multiple-hearth units may vaporize many volatile components of the sludge before they enter the combustion stages of the incinerator and thus represent a direct source of introduction of pollutants into the atmosphere

  4. Uncertainties in modeling and scaling in the prediction of fuel stored energy and thermal response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.

    1987-01-01

    The steady-state temperature distribution and the stored energy in nuclear fuel elements are computed by analytical methods and used to rank, in the order of importance, the effects on stored energy from statistical uncertainties in modeling parameters, in boundary and in operating conditions. An integral technique is used to calculate the transient fuel temperature and to estimate the uncertainties in predicting the fuel thermal response and the peak clad temperature during a large-break loss of coolant accident. The uncertainty analysis presented here is an important part of evaluating the applicability, the uncertainties and the scaling capabilities of computer codes for nuclear reactor safety analyses. The methods employed in this analysis merit general attention because of their simplicity. It is shown that the blowdown peak is dominated by fuel stored energy alone or, equivalently, by linear heating rate. Gap conductance, peaking factors and fuel thermal conductivity are the three most important fuel modeling parameters affecting peak clad temperature uncertainty. 26 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  5. THESEUS: the first-scale 50 MEw THErmal Solar EUropean power station for the Island of Crete, Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aringhof, Rainer [Pilkington Solar International (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The first solar power plant to receive funding from the European Union is to be constructed on the Island of Crete, Greece. This utility-scale 50 MWe plant is based on technology known as THERMIE (THErmal Solar European power station) and it represents a major breakthrough for Europe`s small solar thermal power community. The proposed THESEUS project uses an advanced parabolic trough collector field as the primary heat source and will be constructed between 1977 and 1999. (UK)

  6. Proportional and Integral Thermal Control System for Large Scale Heating Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Van Tran

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) Flight Loads Laboratory is a unique national laboratory that supports thermal, mechanical, thermal/mechanical, and structural dynamics research and testing. A Proportional Integral thermal control system was designed and implemented to support thermal tests. A thermal control algorithm supporting a quartz lamp heater was developed based on the Proportional Integral control concept and a linearized heating process. The thermal control equations were derived and expressed in terms of power levels, integral gain, proportional gain, and differences between thermal setpoints and skin temperatures. Besides the derived equations, user's predefined thermal test information generated in the form of thermal maps was used to implement the thermal control system capabilities. Graphite heater closed-loop thermal control and graphite heater open-loop power level were added later to fulfill the demand for higher temperature tests. Verification and validation tests were performed to ensure that the thermal control system requirements were achieved. This thermal control system has successfully supported many milestone thermal and thermal/mechanical tests for almost a decade with temperatures ranging from 50 F to 3000 F and temperature rise rates from -10 F/s to 70 F/s for a variety of test articles having unique thermal profiles and test setups.

  7. Combustion behaviour and deposition characteristics of Cynara Cardunculus/Greek lignite co-firing under various thermal shares in a thermal pilot-scale facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Aaron; Maier, Joerg; Scheffknecht, Guenter [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Combustion and Power Plant Technology; Pawlak-Kruczek, Halina [Wroclaw Univ. of Technology (Poland). Inst. of Heat Engineering and Fluid Mechanics; Karampinis, Emmanouil; Grammelis, Panagiotis; Kakaras, Emmanuel [Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, Ptolemais (Greece). Chemical Process and Energy Resources Inst.; National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece). Lab. of Steam Boilers and Thermal Plants

    2013-06-01

    The combustion of herbaceous biomass in industrial boilers, either as co-firing fuel or in dedicated combustion units, possess significant operating challenges due to increased risks for corrosion and slagging/fouling. The present work aims at investigating the combustion behaviour of Cynara Cardunculus (cardoon) in a range of thermal shares (0 to 100 %) with a Greek lignite. Combustion tests were performed in a 0.5 MW thermal input pulverised fuel pilot-scale test facility. Deposits were characterised in terms of morphological and ash fusion behaviour, and slagging/fouling tendencies were determined. (orig.)

  8. Analysis of Medium-Scale Solar Thermal Systems and Their Potential in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokas Valančius

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Medium-scale solar hot water systems with a total solar panel area varying from 60 to 166 m2 have been installed in Lithuania since 2002. However, the performance of these systems varies depending on the type of energy users, equipment and design of the systems, as well as their maintenance. The aim of this paper was to analyse operational SHW systems from the perspective of energy production and economic benefit as well as to outline the differences of their actual performance compared to the numerical simulation results. Three different medium-scale solar thermal systems in Lithuania were selected for the analysis varying in both equipment used (flat type solar collectors, evacuated tube collectors and type of energy user (swimming pool building, domestic hot water heating, district heating. The results of the analysis showed that in the analysed cases the gap between measured and modelled data of heat energy produced by SHW systems was approx. 11%. From the economical perspective, the system with flat type solar collectors used for domestic hot water production was proved to be most efficient. However, calculation of Internal Rate of Return showed that a grant of 35% is required for this project to be fully profitable.

  9. Less is more: Strategic scale site suitability for concentrated solar thermal power in Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, Lucas; Schlyter, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Concentrated Solar Thermal Power (CSP) represents a technology with a great deal of promise for low-emissions electricity generation. Several recent studies have identified large swathes of the world’s ‘sunbelt’ as technically suitable for the technology, but current estimates grossly overestimate site suitability for CSP. There is a need for more realistic suitability estimations in order to provide a more accurate basis for policy and investment decisions. This paper establishes a generally applicable GIS-based methodology to better enable identification of CSP-suitable sites at the continental scale. We test the methodology, identifying a large number of CSP suitable sites in Western Australia (WA). Our results indicate a 99.4% reduction from technically suitable areas to areas showing medium-to-very-high suitability in the current and near term in WA. The availability of infrastructure is critical to site suitability and the introduction of new major loads and infrastructure in currently under-developed regions is likely to open up further areas with medium to very high suitability. Despite the fact that current global/continental scale estimates of CSP potentials are likely overestimated by at least two orders of magnitude, truly CSP-suitable areas remain more than sufficient to motivate investment in utility-scale CSP and power potentials from this technology remain enormous. - Highlights: ► 1.78 million km 2 of Western Australia is identified as technically suitable. ► Hypothetical production potential of technically suitable area ≈908,000 TW h/year. ► Only 0.6% of technically suitable areas considered to be medium-very highly suitable. ► Site suitability highly dependent on availability of infrastructure and load. ► Suitable areas still more than sufficient to motivate CSP production.

  10. Modeling the small-scale dish-mounted solar thermal Brayton cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Willem G.; Meyer, Josua P.

    2016-05-01

    The small-scale dish-mounted solar thermal Brayton cycle (STBC) makes use of a sun-tracking dish reflector, solar receiver, recuperator and micro-turbine to generate power in the range of 1-20 kW. The modeling of such a system, using a turbocharger as micro-turbine, is required so that optimisation and further development of an experimental setup can be done. As a validation, an analytical model of the small-scale STBC in Matlab, where the net power output is determined from an exergy analysis, is compared with Flownex, an integrated systems CFD code. A 4.8 m diameter parabolic dish with open-cavity tubular receiver and plate-type counterflow recuperator is considered, based on previous work. A dish optical error of 10 mrad, a tracking error of 1° and a receiver aperture area of 0.25 m × 0.25 m are considered. Since the recuperator operates at a very high average temperature, the recuperator is modeled using an updated ɛ-NTU method which takes heat loss to the environment into consideration. Compressor and turbine maps from standard off-the-shelf Garrett turbochargers are used. The results show that for the calculation of the steady-state temperatures and pressures, there is good comparison between the Matlab and Flownex results (within 8%) except for the recuperator outlet temperature, which is due to the use of different ɛ-NTU methods. With the use of Matlab and Flownex, it is shown that the small-scale open STBC with an existing off-the-shelf turbocharger could generate a positive net power output with solar-to-mechanical efficiency of up to 12%, with much room for improvement.

  11. Evaluation of the flow at the contraction of a heat exchanger. Pt. 2. Effect of thermal-hydraulic factors on scale deposition at the contraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Kimitoshi; Yasuo, Akira; Inada, Fumio; Furuya, Masahiro

    2001-01-01

    In heat exchangers used in power plants, scale may deposit on the tube support plates of heat transfer tubes, especially at the leading edge where the flow passes a sudden contraction. This phenomenon can lead to flow path blockage, which in turn can affect plant performance. As a result, the mechanism of scale deposition and growth needs to be clarified. This phenomenon is assumed to be caused by a complex of thermal-hydraulic and electrochemical factors. In this study, flashing induced by pressure drop and turbulence at the leading edge of a contraction were assumed to be the main factors from the thermal-hydraulic point of view. And these factors in two different type of contractions were evaluated with a High Pressure / High Temperature steam-water two-phase flow experiment and 3D numerical analysis. Considerable differences in amount of steam caused by flashing and turbulence magnitude were observed between the two contractions which have same flow path area but different hydraulic diameter. It was also found that the size of bubbles passing the leading edge of contraction were smaller than 1 mm, while the bubbles in the upstream part were more than 10 times larger than those of the leading edge. (author)

  12. Solar thermal production of zinc - Final steps toward scale-up - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, A.

    2008-05-15

    A 10 kW receiver-reactor prototype (called ZIRRUS) was further improved and tested for the solar thermal de-composition of ZnO, which is the 1{sup st} step of the two-step water-splitting thermochemical ZnO/Zn cycle. The rotating cylindrical cavity was made of either sintered ZnO or sintered Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tiles placed on top of a multi-layer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based ceramics for thermal shock resistance, mechanical stability, gas diffusion barrier, and thermal insulation. Pre-heated Ar gas was injected for aerodynamic window protection and for minimizing recombination of product gases in the cavity. Experimentation was carried out at PSI's High-Flux Solar Simulator with the direct heating 10 kW reactor prototype subjected to peak radiative fluxes exceeding 5,800 suns. The reactor operated without incident for a total of more than 40 h at maximum temperatures - measured behind the ZnO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tiles - ranging from 1807-1907 K. Thermal dissociation of ZnO(s) near 2000 K was demonstrated for experimental runs over 4 h in transient ablation mode with up to nine semi-continuous feed cycles of ZnO particles. A working Zn/O{sub 2} separation device based on the rapid quenching of the Zn/O{sub 2} mixture is ready to be incorporated at the exit of the solar reactor. Zinc yields of up to 94% were obtained when using total Ar/Zn(g) dilution of 530 and a cooling rate of about 10{sup 5} K/s. The fully integrated solar reactor will be scaled up to the pilot scale of 100 kW. A newly developed reactor model that couples radiation, conduction, and convection heat transfer to the reaction kinetics will allow determining optimal operational conditions for matching the feeding rate to the reaction rate and for maximizing solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency. The 2{sup nd} step of the ZnO/Zn cycle has been experimentally demonstrated at ETH using an aerosol-flow reactor for in-situ formation and hydrolysis of Zn nanoparticles

  13. Micro- and nano-scale characterization to study the thermal degradation of cement-based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Seungmin; Mondal, Paramita

    2014-01-01

    The degradation of hydration products of cement is known to cause changes in the micro- and nano-structure, which ultimately drive thermo-mechanical degradation of cement-based composite materials at elevated temperatures. However, a detailed characterization of these changes is still incomplete. This paper presents results of an extensive experimental study carried out to investigate micro- and nano-structural changes that occur due to exposure of cement paste to high temperatures. Following heat treatment of cement paste up to 1000 °C, damage states were studied by compressive strength test, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM image analysis. Using experimental results and research from existing literature, new degradation processes that drive the loss of mechanical properties of cement paste are proposed. The development of micro-cracks at the interface between unhydrated cement particles and paste matrix, a change in C–S–H nano-structure and shrinkage of C–S–H, are considered as important factors that cause the thermal degradation of cement paste. - Highlights: • The thermal degradation of hydration products of cement is characterized at micro- and nano-scale using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). • The interface between unhydrated cement particles and the paste matrix is considered the origin of micro-cracks. • When cement paste is exposed to temperatures above 300 ºC, the nano-structure of C-S-H becomes a more loosely packed globular structure, which could be indicative of C-S-H shrinkage

  14. Thermal performance of a meso-scale liquid-fuel combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, V.; Gupta, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Demonstrated successful combustion of liquid fuel-air mixtures in a novel meso-scale combustor. → Flame quenching was eliminated using heat recirculation in a swiss roll type combustor that also extended the flammability limits. → Liquid fuel was rapidly vaporized with the use of hot narrow channel walls that eliminated the need of a fuel atomizer. → Maximum power density of the combustor was estimated to be about 8.5 GW/m3 and heat load in the range of 50-280W. → Overall efficiency of the combustor was estimated in the range of 12 to 20%. - Abstract: Combustion in small scale devices poses significant challenges due to the quenching of reactions from wall heat losses as well as the significantly reduced time available for mixing and combustion. In the case of liquid fuels there are additional challenges related to atomization, vaporization and mixing with the oxidant in the very short time-scale liquid-fuel combustor. The liquid fuel employed here is methanol with air as the oxidizer. The combustor was designed based on the heat recirculating concept wherein the incoming reactants are preheated by the combustion products through heat exchange occurring via combustor walls. The combustor was fabricated from Zirconium phosphate, a ceramic with very low thermal conductivity (0.8 W m -1 K -1 ). The combustor had rectangular shaped double spiral geometry with combustion chamber in the center of the spiral formed by inlet and exhaust channels. Methanol and air were introduced immediately upstream at inlet of the combustor. The preheated walls of the inlet channel also act as a pre-vaporizer for liquid fuel which vaporizes the liquid fuel and then mixes with air prior to the fuel-air mixture reaching the combustion chamber. Rapid pre-vaporization of the liquid fuel by the hot narrow channel walls eliminated the necessity for a fuel atomizer. Self-sustained combustion of methanol-air was achieved in a chamber volume as small as 32.6 mm 3

  15. Energy cascade with small-scale thermalization, counterflow metastability, and anomalous velocity of vortex rings in Fourier-truncated Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstulovic, Giorgio; Brachet, Marc

    2011-01-01

    The statistical equilibria of the (conservative) dynamics of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) with a finite range of spatial Fourier modes are characterized using a new algorithm, based on a stochastically forced Ginzburg-Landau equation (SGLE), that directly generates grand-canonical distributions. The SGLE-generated distributions are validated against finite-temperature GPE-thermalized states and exact (low-temperature) results obtained by steepest descent on the (grand-canonical) partition function. A standard finite-temperature second-order λ transition is exhibited. A mechanism of GPE thermalization through a direct cascade of energy is found using initial conditions with mass and energy distributed at large scales. A long transient with partial thermalization at small scales is observed before the system reaches equilibrium. Vortices are shown to disappear as a prelude to final thermalization and their annihilation is related to the contraction of vortex rings due to mutual friction. Increasing the amount of dispersion at the truncation wave number is shown to slow thermalization and vortex annihilation. A bottleneck that produces spontaneous effective self-truncation with partial thermalization is characterized in the limit of large dispersive effects. Metastable counterflow states, with nonzero values of momentum, are generated using the SGLE algorithm. Spontaneous nucleation of the vortex ring is observed and the corresponding Arrhenius law is characterized. Dynamical counterflow effects on vortex evolution are investigated using two exact solutions of the GPE: traveling vortex rings and a motionless crystal-like lattice of vortex lines. Longitudinal effects are produced and measured on the crystal lattice. A dilatation of vortex rings is obtained for counterflows larger than their translational velocity. The vortex ring translational velocity has a dependence on temperature that is an order of magnitude above that of the crystal lattice, an effect

  16. Thermal comfort in residential buildings: Comfort values and scales for building energy simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, L.F.R.; Dear, de R.; Hensen, J.L.M.; D'Haeseleer, W.

    2009-01-01

    Building Energy Simulation (BES) programmes often use conventional thermal comfort theories to make decisions, whilst recent research in the field of thermal comfort clearly shows that important effects are not incorporated. The conventional theories of thermal comfort were set up based on steady

  17. Micro- and Nano-Scale Electrically Driven Two-Phase Thermal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses ground based proof of concept hardware under development at NASA GSFC to address high heat flux thermal management in silicon substrates. The goal is to develop proof of concept hardware for space flight validation. The space flight hardware will provide gravity insensitive thermal management for electronics applications such as transmit receive modules that are severely limited by thermal concerns.

  18. On the ASR and ASR thermal residues characterization of full scale treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, G; Viotti, P; Luciano, A; Fino, D

    2014-02-01

    In order to obtain 85% recycling, several procedures on Automotive Shredder Residue (ASR) could be implemented, such as advanced metal and polymer recovery, mechanical recycling, pyrolysis, the direct use of ASR in the cement industry, and/or the direct use of ASR as a secondary raw material. However, many of these recovery options appear to be limited, due to the possible low acceptability of ASR based products on the market. The recovery of bottom ash and slag after an ASR thermal treatment is an option that is not usually considered in most countries (e.g. Italy) due to the excessive amount of contaminants, especially metals. The purpose of this paper is to provide information on the characteristics of ASR and its full-scale incineration residues. Experiments have been carried out, in two different experimental campaigns, in a full-scale tyre incineration plant specifically modified to treat ASR waste. Detailed analysis of ASR samples and combustion residues were carried out and compared with literature data. On the basis of the analytical results, the slag and bottom ash from the combustion process have been classified as non-hazardous wastes, according to the EU waste acceptance criteria (WAC), and therefore after further tests could be used in future in the construction industry. It has also been concluded that ASR bottom ash (EWC - European Waste Catalogue - code 19 01 12) could be landfilled in SNRHW (stabilized non-reactive hazardous waste) cells or used as raw material for road construction, with or without further treatment for the removal of heavy metals. In the case of fly ash from boiler or Air Pollution Control (APC) residues, it has been found that the Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations exceeded regulatory leaching test limits therefore their removal, or a stabilization process, would be essential prior to landfilling the use of these residues as construction material. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cessations and reversals of the large-scale circulation in turbulent thermal convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Heng-Dong; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2007-06-01

    We present an experimental study of cessations and reversals of the large-scale circulation (LSC) in turbulent thermal convection in a cylindrical cell of aspect ratio (Gamma) 1/2 . It is found that cessations and reversals of the LSC occur in Gamma = 1/2 geometry an order-of-magnitude more frequently than they do in Gamma=1 cells, and that after a cessation the LSC is most likely to restart in the opposite direction, i.e., reversals of the LSC are the most probable cessation events. This contrasts sharply to the finding in Gamma=1 geometry and implies that cessations in the two geometries are governed by different dynamics. It is found that the occurrence of reversals is a Poisson process and that a stronger rebound of the flow strength after a reversal or cessation leads to a longer period of stability of the LSC. Several properties of reversals and cessations in this system are found to be statistically similar to those of geomagnetic reversals. A direct measurement of the velocity field reveals that a cessation corresponds to a momentary decoherence of the LSC.

  20. Continuous thermal degradation of pyrolytic oil in a bench scale CSTR reaction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyong Hwan; Nam, Ki Yun [Climate Change Technology Research Division, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 102 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea)

    2010-05-15

    Continuous thermal degradation of two pyrolytic oils with low (LPO) and high boiling point distribution (HPO) was conducted in a constant stirrer tank reactor (CSTR) with bench scale. Raw pyrolytic oil as a reactant was obtained from the commercial rotary kiln pyrolysis plant for municipal plastic waste. The degradation experiment was conducted by temperature programming with 10 C/min of heating rate up to 450 C and then maintained with long lapse time at 450 C. Liquid product was sampled at initial reaction time with different degradation temperatures up to 450 C and then constant interval lapse time at 450 C. The product characteristics over two pyrolytic oils were compared by using a continuous reaction system. As a reactant, heavy pyrolytic oil (HPO) showed higher boiling point distribution than that of diesel and also light pyrolytic oil (LPO) was mainly consisting of a mixture of gasoline and kerosene range components. In the continuous reaction, LPO showed higher yield of liquid product and lower residue than those of HPO. The characteristics of liquid products were influenced by the type of raw pyrolytic oil. Also, the result obtained under degradation temperature programming was described. (author)

  1. DHS small-scale safety and thermal testing of improvised explosives-comparison of testing performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, J G; Hsu, P C; Sandstrom, M M; Brown, G W; Warner, K F; Phillips, J J; Shelley, T J; Reyes, J A

    2014-01-01

    One of the first steps in establishing safe handling procedures for explosives is small-scale safety and thermal (SSST) testing. To better understand the response of improvised materials or homemade explosives (HMEs) to SSST testing, 16 HME materials were compared to three standard military explosives in a proficiency-type round robin study among five laboratories-two DoD and three DOE-sponsored by DHS. The testing matrix has been designed to address problems encountered with improvised materials-powder mixtures, liquid suspensions, partially wetted solids, immiscible liquids, and reactive materials. More than 30 issues have been identified that indicate standard test methods may require modification when applied to HMEs to derive accurate sensitivity assessments needed for developing safe handling and storage practices. This paper presents a generalized comparison of the results among the testing participants, comparison of friction results from BAM (German Bundesanstalt für Materi-alprüfung) and ABL (Allegany Ballistics Laboratory) designed testing equipment, and an overview of the statistical results from the RDX (1,3,5-Trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine) standard tested throughout the proficiency test.

  2. Evaluation of subjective thermal strain in different kitchen working environments using subjective judgment scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, Yasuo; Muto, Takashi; Matsuzuki, Hiroe; Ito, Akiyoshi; Tomita, Shigeru; Muto, Shigeki; Haratani, Takashi; Seo, Akihiko; Ayabe, Makoto; Katamoto, Shizuo

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate the subjective thermal strain of workers in kitchen working environments, we performed a cross-sectional study involving 991 workers in 126 kitchen facilities in Japan, using a self-reporting questionnaire survey and subjective judgment scales (SJS). The ambient temperature, mean radiant temperature (MRT), and wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index were measured in 10 kitchen facilities of the 126 kitchens. The association of SJS with the types of kitchen was estimated by multiple logistic regression models. Of the 991 kitchen workers, 809 (81%) responded to the questionnaire survey. Compared with the electric kitchens, the proportion of workers who perceived the room temperature as hot to very hot was significantly higher, and the ambient temperature, MRT, and WBGT were significantly higher in the gas kitchens. Compared with the electric kitchens, workers in gas kitchens had a more than fivefold (males) and tenfold (females) higher SJS adjusted for confounding factors (male odds ratio (OR), 5.13; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.65-15.9; and female OR, 10.9; 95%CI, 3.89-30.5). Although SJS was affected by some confounding factors, our results suggest that workers in gas kitchens might be exposed to a higher heat strains than those in electric kitchens.

  3. Multi-scale thermal stability of a hard thermoplastic protein-based material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latza, Victoria; Guerette, Paul A.; Ding, Dawei; Amini, Shahrouz; Kumar, Akshita; Schmidt, Ingo; Keating, Steven; Oxman, Neri; Weaver, James C.; Fratzl, Peter; Miserez, Ali; Masic, Admir

    2015-09-01

    Although thermoplastic materials are mostly derived from petro-chemicals, it would be highly desirable, from a sustainability perspective, to produce them instead from renewable biopolymers. Unfortunately, biopolymers exhibiting thermoplastic behaviour and which preserve their mechanical properties post processing are essentially non-existent. The robust sucker ring teeth (SRT) from squid and cuttlefish are one notable exception of thermoplastic biopolymers. Here we describe thermoplastic processing of squid SRT via hot extrusion of fibres, demonstrating the potential suitability of these materials for large-scale thermal forming. Using high-resolution in situ X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy, we elucidate the molecular and nanoscale features responsible for this behaviour and show that SRT consist of semi-crystalline polymers, whereby heat-resistant, nanocrystalline β-sheets embedded within an amorphous matrix are organized into a hexagonally packed nanofibrillar lattice. This study provides key insights for the molecular design of biomimetic protein- and peptide-based thermoplastic structural biopolymers with potential biomedical and 3D printing applications.

  4. Auto-Thermal Reforming Using Mixed Ion-Electronic Conducting Ceramic Membranes for a Small-Scale H2 Production Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Spallina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The integration of mixed ionic electronic conducting (MIEC membranes for air separation in a small-to-medium scale unit for H2 production (in the range of 650–850 Nm3/h via auto-thermal reforming of methane has been investigated in the present study. Membranes based on mixed ionic electronic conducting oxides such as Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (BSCF give sufficiently high oxygen fluxes at temperatures above 800 °C with high purity (higher than 99%. Experimental results of membrane permeation tests are presented and used for the reactor design with a detailed reactor model. The assessment of the H2 plant has been carried out for different operating conditions and reactor geometry and an energy analysis has been carried out with the flowsheeting software Aspen Plus, including also the turbomachines required for a proper thermal integration. A micro-gas turbine is integrated in the system in order to supply part of the electricity required in the system. The analysis of the system shows that the reforming efficiency is in the range of 62%–70% in the case where the temperature at the auto-thermal reforming membrane reactor (ATR-MR is equal to 900 °C. When the electric consumption and the thermal export are included the efficiency of the plant approaches 74%–78%. The design of the reactor has been carried out using a reactor model linked to the Aspen flowsheet and the results show that with a larger reactor volume the performance of the system can be improved, especially because of the reduced electric consumption. From this analysis it has been found that for a production of about 790 Nm3/h pure H2, a reactor with a diameter of 1 m and length of 1.8 m with about 1500 membranes of 2 cm diameter is required.

  5. Final report from VFL technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils: LEFPC appendices, volume 1, appendix I-IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This document contains Appendix I-IV for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. Included are calibration records; quality assurance; soils characterization; pilot scale trial runs

  6. The Larger Linear N-Heteroacenes

    KAUST Repository

    Bunz, Uwe H. F.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. ConspectusThe close structural and chemical relationship of N-heteroacenes to pentacene suggests their broad applicability in organic electronic devices, such as thin-film transistors. The superb materials science properties of azaacenes result from their improved resistance toward oxidation and their potential for electron transport, both of which have been demonstrated recently. The introduction of nitrogen atoms into the aromatic perimeter of acenes stabilizes their frontier molecular orbitals and increases their electron affinity. The HOMO-LUMO gaps in azaacenes in which the nitrogen atoms are symmetrically placed are similar to those of the acenes. The judiciously placed nitrogen atoms induce an "umpolung" of the electronic behavior of these pentacene-like molecules, i.e., instead of hole mobility in thin-film transistors, azaacenes are electron-transporting materials. The fundamental synthetic approaches toward larger azaacenes are described and discussed. Several synthetic methodologies have been exploited, and some have been newly developed to assemble substituted azaacenes. The oldest methods are condensation-based. Aromatic o-diamines are coupled with o-dihydroxyarenes in the melt without solvent. This method works well for unsubstituted azaacenes only. The attachment of substituents to the starting materials renders these "fire and sword" methods less useful. The starting materials decompose under these conditions. The direct condensation of substituted o-diamines with o-quinones proceeds well in some cases. Fluorinated benzene rings next to a pyrazine unit are introduced by nucleophilic aromatic substitution employing hexafluorobenzene. However, with these well-established synthetic methodologies, a number of azaacene topologies cannot be synthesized. The Pd-catalyzed coupling of aromatic halides and aromatic diamines has therefore emerged as versatile tool for azaacene synthesis. Now substituted diaza- and

  7. The Larger Linear N-Heteroacenes

    KAUST Repository

    Bunz, Uwe H. F.

    2015-06-16

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. ConspectusThe close structural and chemical relationship of N-heteroacenes to pentacene suggests their broad applicability in organic electronic devices, such as thin-film transistors. The superb materials science properties of azaacenes result from their improved resistance toward oxidation and their potential for electron transport, both of which have been demonstrated recently. The introduction of nitrogen atoms into the aromatic perimeter of acenes stabilizes their frontier molecular orbitals and increases their electron affinity. The HOMO-LUMO gaps in azaacenes in which the nitrogen atoms are symmetrically placed are similar to those of the acenes. The judiciously placed nitrogen atoms induce an "umpolung" of the electronic behavior of these pentacene-like molecules, i.e., instead of hole mobility in thin-film transistors, azaacenes are electron-transporting materials. The fundamental synthetic approaches toward larger azaacenes are described and discussed. Several synthetic methodologies have been exploited, and some have been newly developed to assemble substituted azaacenes. The oldest methods are condensation-based. Aromatic o-diamines are coupled with o-dihydroxyarenes in the melt without solvent. This method works well for unsubstituted azaacenes only. The attachment of substituents to the starting materials renders these "fire and sword" methods less useful. The starting materials decompose under these conditions. The direct condensation of substituted o-diamines with o-quinones proceeds well in some cases. Fluorinated benzene rings next to a pyrazine unit are introduced by nucleophilic aromatic substitution employing hexafluorobenzene. However, with these well-established synthetic methodologies, a number of azaacene topologies cannot be synthesized. The Pd-catalyzed coupling of aromatic halides and aromatic diamines has therefore emerged as versatile tool for azaacene synthesis. Now substituted diaza- and

  8. From the direct numerical simulation to system codes-perspective for the multi-scale analysis of LWR thermal hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bestion, D.

    2010-01-01

    A multi-scale analysis of water-cooled reactor thermal hydraulics can be used to take advantage of increased computer power and improved simulation tools, including Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS), Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) (in both open and porous mediums), and system thermalhydraulic codes. This paper presents a general strategy for this procedure for various thermalhydraulic scales. A short state of the art is given for each scale, and the role of the scale in the overall multi-scale analysis process is defined. System thermalhydraulic codes will remain a privileged tool for many investigations related to safety. CFD in porous medium is already being frequently used for core thermal hydraulics, either in 3D modules of system codes or in component codes. CFD in open medium allows zooming on some reactor components in specific situations, and may be coupled to the system and component scales. Various modeling approaches exist in the domain from DNS to CFD which may be used to improve the understanding of flow processes, and as a basis for developing more physically based models for macroscopic tools. A few examples are given to illustrate the multi-scale approach. Perspectives for the future are drawn from the present state of the art and directions for future research and development are given

  9. Superimpose methods for uncooled infrared camera applied to the micro-scale thermal characterization of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Junko

    2015-05-01

    The mobile type apparatus for a quantitative micro-scale thermography using a micro-bolometer was developed based on our original techniques such as an achromatic lens design to capture a micro-scale image in long-wave infrared, a video signal superimposing for the real time emissivity correction, and a pseudo acceleration of a timeframe. The total size of the instrument was designed as it was put in the 17 cm x 28 cm x 26 cm size carrying box. The video signal synthesizer enabled to record a direct digital signal of monitoring temperature or positioning data. The encoded digital signal data embedded in each image was decoded to read out. The protocol to encode/decode the measured data was originally defined. The mixed signals of IR camera and the imposed data were applied to the pixel by pixel emissivity corrections and the pseudo-acceleration of the periodical thermal phenomena. Because the emissivity of industrial materials and biological tissues were usually inhomogeneous, it has the different temperature dependence on each pixel. The time-scale resolution for the periodic thermal event was improved with the algorithm for "pseudoacceleration". It contributes to reduce the noise by integrating the multiple image data, keeping a time resolution. The anisotropic thermal properties of some composite materials such as thermal insulating materials of cellular plastics and the biometric composite materials were analyzed using these techniques.

  10. Appraisal of thermal premium in green building practice at urban scale. Methodological preview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Barbalace

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Research objective is to conceive, design and experiment a strategy at wide city scale to contribute facing the global ecological and energy crises of the Planet. This should be done through structural cut-down of fossil fuel consumption for settlements, i.e. by adopting the lowest cost energy: the not-consumed one! According to the Green Building Practices there are goals that can be achieved mainly through building passivation connected to: application of state-of-the-art sustainable technologies; alternative energy sources; diffusion of zero-mile decentralized solar energy production; fostering-up of solar feeding for summer air-conditioning, i.e. one of the most demanding energy consumers of the world. Owners, investors, contractors, occupants, tenants ask for more information and better quantification of energy saving magnitude in Green Buildings, as well as further appraisal of pay-back period i.e the length of time required for the return or re-payment of the additional larger initial investment. Research tries to conceive a methodology to assess in physical and monetary terms the energy saving and to define in financial terms the initial investment pay-back period at a reasonable rate. Proposed methodology has been tested in a first Case Study set-up at urban level and performed on a urban blocks of a Mediterranean medium size town including real world prototype yard, i.e. chantier, integrating passivation with the adoption of key frontier technologies such as sun chiller and solar cooling.

  11. Electrochromic Radiator Coupon Level Testing and Full Scale Thermal Math Modeling for Use on Altair Lunar Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Erika T.; Bower, Chad E.; Sheth, Rubik; Stephan, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    In order to control system and component temperatures, many spacecraft thermal control systems use a radiator coupled with a pumped fluid loop to reject waste heat from the vehicle. Since heat loads and radiation environments can vary considerably according to mission phase, the thermal control system must be able to vary the heat rejection. The ability to "turn down" the heat rejected from the thermal control system is critically important when designing the system. Electrochromic technology as a radiator coating is being investigated to vary the amount of heat rejected by a radiator. Coupon level tests were performed to test the feasibility of this technology. Furthermore, thermal math models were developed to better understand the turndown ratios required by full scale radiator architectures to handle the various operation scenarios encountered during a mission profile for the Altair Lunar Lander. This paper summarizes results from coupon level tests as well as the thermal math models developed to investigate how electrochromics can be used to increase turn down ratios for a radiator. Data from the various design concepts of radiators and their architectures are outlined. Recommendations are made on which electrochromic radiator concept should be carried further for future thermal vacuum testing.

  12. Catalytic burners in larger boiler appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silversand, Fredrik; Persson, Mikael (Catator AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-02-15

    This project focuses on the scale up of a Catator's catalytic burner technology to enable retrofit installation in existing boilers and the design of new innovative combinations of catalytic burners and boilers. Different design approaches are discussed and evaluated in the report and suggestions are made concerning scale-up. Preliminary test data, extracted from a large boiler installation are discussed together with an accurate analysis of technical possibilities following an optimization of the boiler design to benefit from the advantages of catalytic combustion. The experimental work was conducted in close collaboration with ICI Caldaie (ICI), located in Verona, Italy. ICI is a leading European boiler manufacturer in the effect segment ranging from about 20 kWt to several MWt. The study shows that it is possibly to scale up the burner technology and to maintain low emissions. The boilers used in the study were designed around conventional combustion and were consequently not optimized for implementation of catalytic burners. From previous experiences it stands clear that the furnace volume can be dramatically decreased when applying catalytic combustion. In flame combustion, this volume is normally dimensioned to avoid flame impingement on cold surfaces and to facilitate completion of the gas-phase reactions. The emissions of nitrogen oxides can be reduced by decreasing the residence time in the furnace. Even with the over-dimensioned furnace used in this study, we easily reached emission values close to 35 mg/kWh. The emissions of carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons were negligible (less than 5 ppmv). It is possible to decrease the emissions of nitrogen oxides further by designing the furnace/boiler around the catalytic burner, as suggested in the report. Simultaneously, the size of the boiler installation can be reduced greatly, which also will result in material savings, i.e. the production cost can be reduced. It is suggested to optimize the

  13. Zone modelling of the thermal performances of a large-scale bloom reheating furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Chee-Keong; Jenkins, Joana; Ward, John; Broughton, Jonathan; Heeley, Andy

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development and comparison of a two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) mathematical models, based on the zone method of radiation analysis, to simulate the thermal performances of a large bloom reheating furnace. The modelling approach adopted in the current paper differs from previous work since it takes into account the net radiation interchanges between the top and bottom firing sections of the furnace and also allows for enthalpy exchange due to the flows of combustion products between these sections. The models were initially validated at two different furnace throughput rates using experimental and plant's model data supplied by Tata Steel. The results to-date demonstrated that the model predictions are in good agreement with measured heating profiles of the blooms encountered in the actual furnace. It was also found no significant differences between the predictions from the 2D and 3D models. Following the validation, the 2D model was then used to assess the impact of the furnace responses to changing throughput rate. It was found that the potential furnace response to changing throughput rate influences the settling time of the furnace to the next steady state operation. Overall the current work demonstrates the feasibility and practicality of zone modelling and its potential for incorporation into a model based furnace control system. - Highlights: ► 2D and 3D zone models of large-scale bloom reheating furnace. ► The models were validated with experimental and plant model data. ► Examine the transient furnace response to changing the furnace throughput rates. ► No significant differences found between the predictions from the 2D and 3D models.

  14. Characteristic length scale of the magnon accumulation in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Pt bilayer structures by incoherent thermal excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anadón, A., E-mail: anadonb@unizar.es; Lucas, I.; Morellón, L. [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Ramos, R. [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Spin Quantum Rectification Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Algarabel, P. A. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Ibarra, M. R.; Aguirre, M. H. [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio de Microscopías avanzadas, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2016-07-04

    The dependence of Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) with the thickness of the magnetic materials is studied by means of incoherent thermal excitation. The SSE voltage signal in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Pt bilayer structure increases with the magnetic material thickness up to 100 nm, approximately, showing signs of saturation for larger thickness. This dependence is well described in terms of a spin current pumped in the platinum film by the magnon accumulation in the magnetic material. The spin current is generated by a gradient of temperature in the system and detected by the Pt top contact by means of inverse spin Hall effect. Calculations in the frame of the linear response theory adjust with a high degree of accuracy the experimental data, giving a thermal length scale of the magnon accumulation (Λ) of 17 ± 3 nm at 300 K and Λ = 40 ± 10 nm at 70 K.

  15. Aroma: a larger than life experience?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine DE SWARDT

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aroma is today an essential part of our diet. Often used to reinforce the initial neutral taste of the food produced on an industrial scale, it is sometimes the main course, at the core of many edible products. First thought as accessory, it now takes the lead. From this observation and through the review of examples of the food industry, this article puts forward the hypothesis that the aroma supplants the food –in the relation of resemblance between the original model and its representation, which falls under the inculcation – and eclipses it. Potentially strong on the palate, it is a promise of intense experience. This is particularly true in the case of flavors without pre-established references. Pure abstract aromatic constructions allow greater freedom of projection, and foster discursive emphasis. In these cases, the taste alone, uncorrelated with prerogatives of nutrition, becomes the support of a hyperesthesic experience.

  16. Global warming may disproportionately affect larger adults in a predatory coral reef fish

    KAUST Repository

    Messmer, Vanessa

    2016-11-03

    Global warming is expected to reduce body sizes of ectothermic animals. Although the underlying mechanisms of size reductions remain poorly understood, effects appear stronger at latitudinal extremes (poles and tropics) and in aquatic rather than terrestrial systems. To shed light on this phenomenon, we examined the size dependence of critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and aerobic metabolism in a commercially important tropical reef fish, the leopard coral grouper (Plectropomus leopardus) following acclimation to current-day (28.5 °C) vs. projected end-of-century (33 °C) summer temperatures for the northern Great Barrier Reef (GBR). CTmax declined from 38.3 to 37.5 °C with increasing body mass in adult fish (0.45-2.82 kg), indicating that larger individuals are more thermally sensitive than smaller conspecifics. This may be explained by a restricted capacity for large fish to increase mass-specific maximum metabolic rate (MMR) at 33 °C compared with 28.5 °C. Indeed, temperature influenced the relationship between metabolism and body mass (0.02-2.38 kg), whereby the scaling exponent for MMR increased from 0.74 ± 0.02 at 28.5 °C to 0.79 ± 0.01 at 33 °C, and the corresponding exponents for standard metabolic rate (SMR) were 0.75 ± 0.04 and 0.80 ± 0.03. The increase in metabolic scaling exponents at higher temperatures suggests that energy budgets may be disproportionately impacted in larger fish and contribute to reduced maximum adult size. Such climate-induced reductions in body size would have important ramifications for fisheries productivity, but are also likely to have knock-on effects for trophodynamics and functioning of ecosystems.

  17. Global warming may disproportionately affect larger adults in a predatory coral reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, Vanessa; Pratchett, Morgan S; Hoey, Andrew S; Tobin, Andrew J; Coker, Darren J; Cooke, Steven J; Clark, Timothy D

    2017-06-01

    Global warming is expected to reduce body sizes of ectothermic animals. Although the underlying mechanisms of size reductions remain poorly understood, effects appear stronger at latitudinal extremes (poles and tropics) and in aquatic rather than terrestrial systems. To shed light on this phenomenon, we examined the size dependence of critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and aerobic metabolism in a commercially important tropical reef fish, the leopard coral grouper (Plectropomus leopardus) following acclimation to current-day (28.5 °C) vs. projected end-of-century (33 °C) summer temperatures for the northern Great Barrier Reef (GBR). CTmax declined from 38.3 to 37.5 °C with increasing body mass in adult fish (0.45-2.82 kg), indicating that larger individuals are more thermally sensitive than smaller conspecifics. This may be explained by a restricted capacity for large fish to increase mass-specific maximum metabolic rate (MMR) at 33 °C compared with 28.5 °C. Indeed, temperature influenced the relationship between metabolism and body mass (0.02-2.38 kg), whereby the scaling exponent for MMR increased from 0.74 ± 0.02 at 28.5 °C to 0.79 ± 0.01 at 33 °C, and the corresponding exponents for standard metabolic rate (SMR) were 0.75 ± 0.04 and 0.80 ± 0.03. The increase in metabolic scaling exponents at higher temperatures suggests that energy budgets may be disproportionately impacted in larger fish and contribute to reduced maximum adult size. Such climate-induced reductions in body size would have important ramifications for fisheries productivity, but are also likely to have knock-on effects for trophodynamics and functioning of ecosystems. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Global warming may disproportionately affect larger adults in a predatory coral reef fish

    KAUST Repository

    Messmer, Vanessa; Pratchett, Morgan S.; Hoey, Andrew S.; Tobin, Andrew J.; Coker, Darren James; Cooke, Steven J.; Clark, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is expected to reduce body sizes of ectothermic animals. Although the underlying mechanisms of size reductions remain poorly understood, effects appear stronger at latitudinal extremes (poles and tropics) and in aquatic rather than terrestrial systems. To shed light on this phenomenon, we examined the size dependence of critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and aerobic metabolism in a commercially important tropical reef fish, the leopard coral grouper (Plectropomus leopardus) following acclimation to current-day (28.5 °C) vs. projected end-of-century (33 °C) summer temperatures for the northern Great Barrier Reef (GBR). CTmax declined from 38.3 to 37.5 °C with increasing body mass in adult fish (0.45-2.82 kg), indicating that larger individuals are more thermally sensitive than smaller conspecifics. This may be explained by a restricted capacity for large fish to increase mass-specific maximum metabolic rate (MMR) at 33 °C compared with 28.5 °C. Indeed, temperature influenced the relationship between metabolism and body mass (0.02-2.38 kg), whereby the scaling exponent for MMR increased from 0.74 ± 0.02 at 28.5 °C to 0.79 ± 0.01 at 33 °C, and the corresponding exponents for standard metabolic rate (SMR) were 0.75 ± 0.04 and 0.80 ± 0.03. The increase in metabolic scaling exponents at higher temperatures suggests that energy budgets may be disproportionately impacted in larger fish and contribute to reduced maximum adult size. Such climate-induced reductions in body size would have important ramifications for fisheries productivity, but are also likely to have knock-on effects for trophodynamics and functioning of ecosystems.

  19. Multi-scale modelling of thermal shock damage in refractory materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özdemir, I.

    2009-01-01

    Refractories are high-temperature resistant materials used extensively in many engineering structures and assemblies in a wide spectrum of applications ranging from metallurgical furnace linings to thermal barrier coatings. Such structures are often exposed to severe thermal loading conditions in

  20. Evaluation of power block arrangements for 100MW scale concentrated solar thermal power generation using top-down design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Alexander; Beath, Andrew; Sauret, Emilie; Persky, Rodney

    2017-06-01

    Concentrated solar thermal power generation poses a unique situation for power block selection, in which a capital intensive heat source is subject to daily and seasonal fluctuations in intensity. In this study, a method is developed to easily evaluate the favourability of different power blocks for converting the heat supplied by a concentrated solar thermal plant into power at the 100MWe scale based on several key parameters. The method is then applied to a range of commercially available power cycles that operate over different temperatures and efficiencies, and with differing capital costs, each with performance and economic parameters selected to be typical of their technology type, as reported in literature. Using this method, the power cycle is identified among those examined that is most likely to result in a minimum levelised cost of energy of a solar thermal plant.

  1. E-SCAPE: A scale facility for liquid-metal, pool-type reactor thermal hydraulic investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Tichelen, Katrien, E-mail: kvtichel@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Mirelli, Fabio, E-mail: fmirelli@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Greco, Matteo, E-mail: mgreco@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Viviani, Giorgia, E-mail: giorgiaviviani@gmail.com [University of Pisa, Lungarno Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The E-SCAPE facility is a thermal hydraulic scale model of the MYRRHA fast reactor. • The focus is on mixing and stratification in liquid-metal pool-type reactors. • Forced convection, natural convection and the transition are investigated. • Extensive instrumentation allows validation of computational models. • System thermal hydraulic and CFD models have been used for facility design. - Abstract: MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a flexible fast-spectrum research reactor under design at SCK·CEN. MYRRHA is a pool-type reactor with lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) as primary coolant. The proper understanding of the thermal hydraulic phenomena occurring in the reactor pool is an important issue in the design and licensing of the MYRRHA system and liquid-metal cooled reactors by extension. Model experiments are necessary for understanding the physics, for validating experimental tools and to qualify the design for the licensing. The E-SCAPE (European SCAled Pool Experiment) facility at SCK·CEN is a thermal hydraulic 1/6-scale model of the MYRRHA reactor, with an electrical core simulator, cooled by LBE. It provides experimental feedback to the designers on the forced and natural circulation flow patterns. Moreover, it enables to validate the computational methods for their use with LBE. The paper will elaborate on the design of the E-SCAPE facility and its main parameters. Also the experimental matrix and the pre-test analysis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and system thermal hydraulics codes will be described.

  2. Multi-scale approach to radiation damage induced by ion beams: complex DNA damage and effects of thermal spikes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surdutovich, E.; Yakubovich, A.V.; Solov'yov, A.V.; Surdutovich, E.; Yakubovich, A.V.; Solov'yov, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    We present the latest advances of the multi-scale approach to radiation damage caused by irradiation of a tissue with energetic ions and report the calculations of complex DNA damage and the effects of thermal spikes on biomolecules. The multi-scale approach aims to quantify the most important physical, chemical, and biological phenomena taking place during and following irradiation with ions and provide a better means for clinically-necessary calculations with adequate accuracy. We suggest a way of quantifying the complex clustered damage, one of the most important features of the radiation damage caused by ions. This quantification allows the studying of how the clusterization of DNA lesions affects the lethality of damage. We discuss the first results of molecular dynamics simulations of ubiquitin in the environment of thermal spikes, predicted to occur in tissue for a short time after an ion's passage in the vicinity of the ions' tracks. (authors)

  3. The Importance of a Thermal Manikin as Source and Obstacle in Full-Scale Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    The thermal manikin is normally introduced at indoor environmental measurements to obtain detailed information on thermal comfort and air quality around a person. This paper deals with the opposite situation where manikins are introduced as sources and obstacles in order to obtain reasonable...... boundary conditions in experiments with the indoor environment. In other words, how will people influence the surroundings instead of how will the surroundings influence people? The use of thermal manikins in an experiment will of course take both situations into account, however, in some experiments...

  4. Thermal stability and filterability of jet fuels containing PDR additives in small-scale tests and realistic rig simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauldreay, J.M.; Clark, R.H.; Heins, R.J. [Shell Research, Ltd., Chester (United Kingdom)

    1995-05-01

    Specification, small-scale and realistic fuel simulation tests have addressed concerns about the impact of pipeline drag reducer (PDR) flow modifying additives on jet fuel handling and performance. A typical PDR additive tended to block filters which were similar to those used in the specification Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Tester (JFTOT) and other thermal stability test apparatus. Blockages reduced flow rates and PDR concentrations downstream of the filters. Consequently two PDR additives (A&B) were tested in JFTOT apparatus without the usual in-line pre-filters as part of a Ministry of Defense (MoD) co-ordinated Round Robin exercise. Some fuel/PDR additive combinations caused decreases in JFTOT breakpoints. Effects were additive- (type, concentration and degree of shear) and fuel-dependent; most failures were caused by filter blockages and not by a failing lacquer rating. In further work at Thornton, the thermal stability characteristics of similar fuel/additive combinations have been examined in non-specification tests. In Flask Oxidation Tests, PDR additives caused no significant increase in the liquid phase oxidation rates of the fuels. Additives were tested in the Single Tube Heat Transfer Rig (STHTR) which duplicates many of the conditions of a heat exchanger element in an engine`s fuel supply system. B produced an average two-fold decrease in thermal stability in a Merox fuel; A had no significant effect. In hydrotreated fuel, B reduced the thermal stability up to five-fold. A had little effect below 205{degrees}C, while at higher temperatures there may have been a marginal improvement in thermal stability. Again, certain jet fuel/PDR combinations were seen to reduce thermal stability.

  5. Initial Scaling Studies and Conceptual Thermal Fluids Experiments for the Prismatic NGNP Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. McEligot; G. E. McCreery

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this report is to document the initial high temperature gas reactor scaling studies and conceptual experiment design for gas flow and heat transfer. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/ATHENA/RELAP5-3D calculations for the same geometry. Two aspects of the complex flow in an NGNP are being addressed: (1) flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue) and (2) turbulence and resulting temperature distributions in reactor cooling channels ("hot channel" issue). Current prismatic NGNP concepts are being examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses are being applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. For normal operation, the flow in the coolant channels can be considered to be dominant forced convection with slight transverse property variation. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple buoyant jets into a confined density-stratified crossflow -- with obstructions. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other. Two heat transfer experiments are being considered. One addresses the "hot channel" problem, if necessary. The second experiment will treat heated jets entering a model plenum. Unheated MIR (Matched-Index-of-Refraction) experiments are first steps when the geometry is complicated. One does not want to use a computational technique which will not even handle constant properties properly. The MIR experiment will simulate flow features of the paths of jets

  6. Size Scaling and Bursting Activity in Thermally Activated Breakdown of Fiber Bundles

    KAUST Repository

    Yoshioka, Naoki

    2008-10-03

    We study subcritical fracture driven by thermally activated damage accumulation in the framework of fiber bundle models. We show that in the presence of stress inhomogeneities, thermally activated cracking results in an anomalous size effect; i.e., the average lifetime tf decreases as a power law of the system size tf ∼L-z, where the exponent z depends on the external load σ and on the temperature T in the form z∼f(σ/T3/2). We propose a modified form of the Arrhenius law which provides a comprehensive description of thermally activated breakdown. Thermal fluctuations trigger bursts of breakings which have a power law size distribution. © 2008 The American Physical Society.

  7. Thermal versus high pressure processing of carrots: A comparative pilot-scale study on equivalent basis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, L.; Plancken, Van der L.; Grauwet, T.; Verlinde, P.; Matser, A.M.; Hendrickx, M.; Loey, van A.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the first study comparing different high pressure (HP) and thermal treatments at intensities ranging from mild pasteurization to sterilization conditions. To allow a fair comparison, the processing conditions were selected based on the principles of equivalence. Moreover,

  8. The thermal environment of the human being on the global scale

    OpenAIRE

    Jendritzky, Gerd; Tinz, Birger

    2009-01-01

    Background: The close relationship between human health, performance, well-being and the thermal environment is obvious. Nevertheless, most studies of climate and climate change impacts show amazing shortcomings in the assessment of the environment. Populations living in different climates have different susceptibilities, due to socio-economic reasons, and different customary behavioural adaptations. The global distribution of risks of hazardous thermal exposure has not been analysed before. ...

  9. Thermalization time scales for WIMP capture by the Sun in effective theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmark, A., E-mail: axel.widmark@fysik.su.se [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-05-01

    I study the process of dark matter capture by the Sun, under the assumption of a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP), in the framework of non-relativistic effective field theory. Hypothetically, WIMPs from the galactic halo can scatter against atomic nuclei in the solar interior, settle to thermal equilibrium with the solar core and annihilate to produce an observable flux of neutrinos. In particular, I examine the thermalization process using Monte-Carlo integration of WIMP trajectories. I consider WIMPs in a mass range of 10–1000 GeV and WIMP-nucleon interaction operators with different dependence on spin and transferred momentum. I find that the density profiles of captured WIMPs are in accordance with a thermal profile described by the Sun's gravitational potential and core temperature. Depending on the operator that governs the interaction, the majority of the thermalization time is spent in either the solar interior or exterior. If normalizing the WIMP-nuclei interaction strength to a specific capture rate, I find that the thermalization time differs at most by 3 orders of magnitude between operators. In most cases of interest, the thermalization time is many orders of magnitude shorter than the age of the solar system.

  10. A new multi-scale platform for advanced nuclear thermal-hydraulics status and prospects of the Neptune project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bestion, D.; Boudier, P.; Hervieu, E.; Boucker, M.; Peturaud, P.; Guelfi, A.; Fillion, P.; Grandotto, M.; Herard, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Further to a thorough analysis of the industrial needs and of the limitations of current simulation tools, EDF (Electricite de France) and CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) launched in 2001 a new long-term joint development program for the next generation of nuclear reactors simulation tools. The NEPTUNE Project, which constitutes the Thermal-Hydraulics part of this comprehensive program, aims at building a new software platform for advanced two-phase flow thermal-hydraulics allowing easy multi-scale and multi-disciplinary calculations meeting the industrial needs. The NEPTUNE activities include software development, research in physical modeling and numerical methods, the development of advanced instrumentation techniques and performance of new experimental programs. The work focuses on the four different simulation scales: DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation), local CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics), component (subchannel-type analysis) and system scales. New physical models and numerical methods are being developed for each scale as well as for their coupling. This paper gives an overview of the NEPTUNE activities. It presents the main scientific and technical achievements obtained during Phase 1 (2002-2003) and at the beginning of Phase 2 (2004- 2006). Planned work for the future is also presented. (authors)

  11. Aquifer thermal energy storage - A feasibility study for large scale demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, W. V.; Supkow, D. J.

    Engineering procedures necessary for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), based on studies of the Magothy Aquifer on Long Island, NY, are presented, with chilled winter water pumped into the aquifer and reclaimed in summer months for air conditioning. The choice of aquifer involves necessary volume, flow rate, efficiency of thermal recovery, and avoidance of conflict with other users; utilization depends on choice of appropriate piping, heat exchangers, and well construction to prevent degradation of the aquifer. The methods employed to probe the Magothy for suitability are described, including drilling an asymmetric well cluster for observation, and 48 hr pumping and 8 hr recovery. Transmissivity was found to vary from 8,000 to 29,000 sq ft/day. A doublet well was then drilled and water withdrawn, chilled, and returned. Later withdrawal indicated a 46% thermal recovery, with computer models projecting 80% with additional cycling. The study verified the feasibility of ATES, which can be expanded with additional demand.

  12. Longitudinal thermal heterogeneity in rivers and refugia for coldwater species: Effects of scale and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, A.H.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Lawer, J.J.; Steel, E. A.; Ebersole, J.L.; Lee, S.Y.

    2018-01-01

    Climate-change driven increases in water temperature pose challenges for aquatic organisms. Predictions of impacts typically do not account for fine-grained spatiotemporal thermal patterns in rivers. Patches of cooler water could serve as refuges for anadromous species like salmon that migrate during summer. We used high-resolution remotely sensed water temperature data to characterize summer thermal heterogeneity patterns for 11,308 km of second–seventh-order rivers throughout the Pacific Northwest and northern California (USA). We evaluated (1) water temperature patterns at different spatial resolutions, (2) the frequency, size, and spacing of cool thermal patches suitable for Pacific salmon (i.e., contiguous stretches ≥ 0.25 km, ≤ 15 °C and ≥ 2 °C, aooler than adjacent water), and (3) potential influences of climate change on availability of cool patches. Thermal heterogeneity was nonlinearly related to the spatial resolution of water temperature data, and heterogeneity at fine resolution ( 2.7 and  5.7 and < 49.4 km. Thermal heterogeneity varied among rivers, some of which had long uninterrupted stretches of warm water ≥ 20 °C, and others had many smaller cool patches. Our models predicted little change in future thermal heterogeneity among rivers, but within-river patterns sometimes changed markedly compared to contemporary patterns. These results can inform long-term monitoring programs as well as near-term climate-adaptation strategies.

  13. Thermal specialization across large geographical scales predicts the resilience of mangrove crab populations to global warming

    KAUST Repository

    Fusi, Marco; Giomi, Folco; Babbini, Simone; Daffonchio, Daniele; Mcquaid, Christopher D.; Porri, Francesca; Cannicci, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The broad prediction that ectotherms will be more vulnerable to climate change in the tropics than in temperate regions includes assumptions about centre/edge population effects that can only be tested by within-species comparisons across wide latitudinal gradients. Here, we investigated the thermal vulnerability of two mangrove crab species, comparing populations at the centre (Kenya) and edge (South Africa) of their distributions. At the same time, we investigated the role of respiratory mode (water- versus air-breathing) in determining the thermal tolerance in amphibious organisms. To do this, we compared the vulnerability to acute temperature fluctuations of two sympatric species with two different lifestyle adaptations: the free living Perisesarma guttatum and the burrowing Uca urvillei, both pivotal to the ecosystem functioning of mangroves. The results revealed the air-breathing U. urvillei to be a thermal generalist with much higher thermal tolerances than P. guttatum. Importantly, however, we found that, while U. urvillei showed little difference between edge and centre populations, P. guttatum showed adaptation to local conditions. Equatorial populations had elevated tolerances to acute heat stress and mechanisms of partial thermoregulation, which make them less vulnerable to global warming than temperate conspecifics. The results reveal both the importance of respiratory mode to thermal tolerance and the unexpected potential for low latitude populations/species to endure a warming climate. The results also contribute to a conceptual model on the latitudinal thermal tolerance of these key species. This highlights the need for an integrated population-level approach to predict the consequences of climate change. © 2014 The Authors.

  14. Thermal specialization across large geographical scales predicts the resilience of mangrove crab populations to global warming

    KAUST Repository

    Fusi, Marco

    2014-11-18

    The broad prediction that ectotherms will be more vulnerable to climate change in the tropics than in temperate regions includes assumptions about centre/edge population effects that can only be tested by within-species comparisons across wide latitudinal gradients. Here, we investigated the thermal vulnerability of two mangrove crab species, comparing populations at the centre (Kenya) and edge (South Africa) of their distributions. At the same time, we investigated the role of respiratory mode (water- versus air-breathing) in determining the thermal tolerance in amphibious organisms. To do this, we compared the vulnerability to acute temperature fluctuations of two sympatric species with two different lifestyle adaptations: the free living Perisesarma guttatum and the burrowing Uca urvillei, both pivotal to the ecosystem functioning of mangroves. The results revealed the air-breathing U. urvillei to be a thermal generalist with much higher thermal tolerances than P. guttatum. Importantly, however, we found that, while U. urvillei showed little difference between edge and centre populations, P. guttatum showed adaptation to local conditions. Equatorial populations had elevated tolerances to acute heat stress and mechanisms of partial thermoregulation, which make them less vulnerable to global warming than temperate conspecifics. The results reveal both the importance of respiratory mode to thermal tolerance and the unexpected potential for low latitude populations/species to endure a warming climate. The results also contribute to a conceptual model on the latitudinal thermal tolerance of these key species. This highlights the need for an integrated population-level approach to predict the consequences of climate change. © 2014 The Authors.

  15. Thermal instability and current-voltage scaling in superconducting fault current limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimetz, B [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge University, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Tadinada, K [Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Trumpington Road, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Eves, D E [Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Trumpington Road, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Coombs, T A [Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Trumpington Road, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Evetts, J E [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge University, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Campbell, A M [Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Trumpington Road, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2004-04-01

    We have developed a computer model for the simulation of resistive superconducting fault current limiters in three dimensions. The program calculates the electromagnetic and thermal response of a superconductor to a time-dependent overload voltage, with different possible cooling conditions for the surfaces, and locally variable superconducting and thermal properties. We find that the cryogen boil-off parameters critically influence the stability of a limiter. The recovery time after a fault increases strongly with thickness. Above a critical thickness, the temperature is unstable even for a small applied AC voltage. The maximum voltage and maximum current during a short fault are correlated by a simple exponential law.

  16. Improved Thermally Grown Oxide Scale in Air Plasma Sprayed NiCrAlY/Nano-YSZ Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daroonparvar, M.; Yajid, M.A.M.; Yusof, N.M.; Hussain, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation has been considered as one of the principal disruptive factors in thermal barrier coating systems during service. So, oxidation behavior of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems with nano structured and micro structured YSZ coatings was investigated at 1000 degree c for 24 h, 48 h, and 120 h. Air plasma sprayed nano-YSZ coating exhibited a tri modal structure. Microstructural characterization also demonstrated an improved thermally grown oxide scale containing lower spinels in nano-TBC system after 120 h of oxidation. This phenomenon is mainly related to the unique structure of the nano-YSZ coating, which acted as a strong barrier for oxygen diffusion into the TBC system at elevated temperatures. Nearly continues but thinner Al 2 O 3 layer formation at the NiCrAlY/nano-YSZ interface was seen, due to lower oxygen infiltration into the system. Under this condition, spinels formation and growth on the Al 2 O 3 oxide scale were diminished in nano-TBC system compared to normal TBC system.

  17. Techno-economic optimization of a scaled-up solar concentrator combined with CSPonD thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musi, Richard; Grange, Benjamin; Diago, Miguel; Topel, Monika; Armstrong, Peter; Slocum, Alexander; Calvet, Nicolas

    2017-06-01

    A molten salt direct absorption receiver, CSPonD, used to simultaneously collect and store thermal energy is being tested by Masdar Institute and MIT in Abu Dhabi, UAE. Whilst a research-scale prototype has been combined with a beam-down tower in Abu Dhabi, the original design coupled the receiver with a hillside heliostat field. With respect to a conventional power-tower setup, a hillside solar field presents the advantages of eliminating tower costs, heat tracing equipment, and high-pressure pumps. This analysis considers the industrial viability of the CSPonD concept by modeling a 10 MWe up-scaled version of a molten salt direct absorption receiver combined with a hillside heliostat field. Five different slope angles are initially simulated to determine the optimum choice using a combination of lowest LCOE and highest IRR, and sensitivity analyses are carried out based on thermal energy storage duration, power output, and feed-in tariff price. Finally, multi-objective optimization is undertaken to determine a Pareto front representing optimum cases. The study indicates that a 40° slope and a combination of 14 h thermal energy storage with a 40-50 MWe power output provide the best techno-economic results. By selecting one simulated result and using a feed-in tariff of 0.25 /kWh, a competitive IRR of 15.01 % can be achieved.

  18. Big biology meets microclimatology: Defining thermal niches of ectotherms at landscape scales for conservation planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Isaak; Seth J. Wenger; Michael K. Young

    2017-01-01

    Temperature profoundly affects ecology, a fact ever more evident as the ability to measure thermal environments increases and global changes alter these environments. The spatial structure of thermalscapes is especially relevant to the distribution and abundance of ectothermic organisms but the ability to describe biothermal relationships at extents and grains relevant...

  19. Two-dimensional thermal analysis of radial heat transfer of monoliths in small-scale steam methane reforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cui, Xiaoti; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2018-01-01

    Monolithic catalysts have received increasing attention for application in the small-scale steam methane reforming process. The radial heat transfer behaviors of monolith reformers were analyzed by two-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling. A parameter study was conducted...... by a large number of simulations focusing on the thermal conductivity of the monolith substrate, washcoat layer, wall gap, radiation heat transfer and the geometric parameters (cell density, porosity and diameter of monolith). The effective radial thermal conductivity of the monolith structure, kr......,eff, showed good agreement with predictions made by the pseudo-continuous symmetric model. This influence of the radiation heat transfer is low for highly conductive monoliths. A simplified model has been developed to evaluate the importance of radiation for monolithic reformers under different conditions...

  20. Reduced scaling of thermal-hydraulic circuits for studies of PWR reactors natural circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Ishii et al. hydrodynamic similarity criteria for natural circulation were used for scaling reduced models of prototype passive residual heat removal system of a 600 M We PWR. The physical scales of the thermohydraulic parameters obtained presented a reasonable agreement when compared with simplified analytic models of the systems. (author)

  1. Two spatial scales in a bleaching event: Corals from the mildest and the most extreme thermal environments escape mortality

    KAUST Repository

    Pineda, Jesús

    2013-07-28

    In summer 2010, a bleaching event decimated the abundant reef flat coral Stylophora pistillata in some areas of the central Red Sea, where a series of coral reefs 100–300 m wide by several kilometers long extends from the coastline to about 20 km offshore. Mortality of corals along the exposed and protected sides of inner (inshore) and mid and outer (offshore) reefs and in situ and satellite sea surface temperatures (SSTs) revealed that the variability in the mortality event corresponded to two spatial scales of temperature variability: 300 m across the reef flat and 20 km across a series of reefs. However, the relationship between coral mortality and habitat thermal severity was opposite at the two scales. SSTs in summer 2010 were similar or increased modestly (0.5°C) in the outer and mid reefs relative to 2009. In the inner reef, 2010 temperatures were 1.4°C above the 2009 seasonal maximum for several weeks. We detected little or no coral mortality in mid and outer reefs. In the inner reef, mortality depended on exposure. Within the inner reef, mortality was modest on the protected (shoreward) side, the most severe thermal environment, with highest overall mean and maximum temperatures. In contrast, acute mortality was observed in the exposed (seaward) side, where temperature fluctuations and upper water temperature values were relatively less extreme. Refuges to thermally induced coral bleaching may include sites where extreme, high-frequency thermal variability may select for coral holobionts preadapted to, and physiologically condition corals to withstand, regional increases in water temperature.

  2. Effect of surface tension and coefficient of thermal expansion in 30 nm scale nanoimprinting with two flexible polymer molds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Kwan; Cho, Hye Sung; Jung, Ho-Sup; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Lim, Kipil; Kim, Ki-Bum; Choi, Dae-Geun; Jeong, Jun-Ho

    2012-01-01

    We report on nanoimprinting of polymer thin films at 30 nm scale resolution using two types of ultraviolet (UV)-curable, flexible polymer molds: perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and polyurethane acrylate (PUA). It was found that the quality of nanopatterning at the 30 nm scale is largely determined by the combined effects of surface tension and the coefficient of thermal expansion of the polymer mold. In particular, the polar component of surface tension may play a critical role in clean release of the mold, as evidenced by much reduced delamination or broken structures for the less polarized PFPE mold when patterning a relatively hydrophilic PMMA film. In contrast, such problems were not notably observed with a relatively hydrophobic PS film for both polymer molds. In addition, the demolding characteristic was also influenced by the coefficient of thermal expansion so that no delamination or uniformity problems were observed when patterning a UV-curable polymer film at room temperature. These results suggest that a proper polymeric mold material needs to be chosen for patterning polymer films under different surface properties and processing conditions, providing insights into how a clean demolding characteristic can be obtained at 30 nm scale nanopatterning. (paper)

  3. Thermal reaction norms and the scale of temperature variation: latitudinal vulnerability of intertidal nacellid limpets to climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon A Morley

    Full Text Available The thermal reaction norms of 4 closely related intertidal Nacellid limpets, Antarctic (Nacella concinna, New Zealand (Cellana ornata, Australia (C. tramoserica and Singapore (C. radiata, were compared across environments with different temperature magnitude, variability and predictability, to test their relative vulnerability to different scales of climate warming. Lethal limits were measured alongside a newly developed metric of "duration tenacity", which was tested at different temperatures to calculate the thermal reaction norm of limpet adductor muscle fatigue. Except in C. tramoserica which had a wide optimum range with two break points, duration tenacity did not follow a typical aerobic capacity curve but was best described by a single break point at an optimum temperature. Thermal reaction norms were shifted to warmer temperatures in warmer environments; the optimum temperature for tenacity (T(opt increased from 1.0°C (N. concinna to 14.3°C (C. ornata to 18.0°C (an average for the optimum range of C. tramoserica to 27.6°C (C. radiata. The temperature limits for duration tenacity of the 4 species were most consistently correlated with both maximum sea surface temperature and summer maximum in situ habitat logger temperature. Tropical C. radiata, which lives in the least variable and most predictable environment, generally had the lowest warming tolerance and thermal safety margin (WT and TSM; respectively the thermal buffer of CT(max and T(opt over habitat temperature. However, the two temperate species, C. ornata and C. tramoserica, which live in a variable and seasonally unpredictable microhabitat, had the lowest TSM relative to in situ logger temperature. N. concinna which lives in the most variable, but seasonally predictable microhabitat, generally had the highest TSMs. Intertidal animals live at the highly variable interface between terrestrial and marine biomes and even small changes in the magnitude and predictability of their

  4. Thermal reaction norms and the scale of temperature variation: latitudinal vulnerability of intertidal nacellid limpets to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Simon A; Martin, Stephanie M; Day, Robert W; Ericson, Jess; Lai, Chien-Houng; Lamare, Miles; Tan, Koh-Siang; Thorne, Michael A S; Peck, Lloyd S

    2012-01-01

    The thermal reaction norms of 4 closely related intertidal Nacellid limpets, Antarctic (Nacella concinna), New Zealand (Cellana ornata), Australia (C. tramoserica) and Singapore (C. radiata), were compared across environments with different temperature magnitude, variability and predictability, to test their relative vulnerability to different scales of climate warming. Lethal limits were measured alongside a newly developed metric of "duration tenacity", which was tested at different temperatures to calculate the thermal reaction norm of limpet adductor muscle fatigue. Except in C. tramoserica which had a wide optimum range with two break points, duration tenacity did not follow a typical aerobic capacity curve but was best described by a single break point at an optimum temperature. Thermal reaction norms were shifted to warmer temperatures in warmer environments; the optimum temperature for tenacity (T(opt)) increased from 1.0°C (N. concinna) to 14.3°C (C. ornata) to 18.0°C (an average for the optimum range of C. tramoserica) to 27.6°C (C. radiata). The temperature limits for duration tenacity of the 4 species were most consistently correlated with both maximum sea surface temperature and summer maximum in situ habitat logger temperature. Tropical C. radiata, which lives in the least variable and most predictable environment, generally had the lowest warming tolerance and thermal safety margin (WT and TSM; respectively the thermal buffer of CT(max) and T(opt) over habitat temperature). However, the two temperate species, C. ornata and C. tramoserica, which live in a variable and seasonally unpredictable microhabitat, had the lowest TSM relative to in situ logger temperature. N. concinna which lives in the most variable, but seasonally predictable microhabitat, generally had the highest TSMs. Intertidal animals live at the highly variable interface between terrestrial and marine biomes and even small changes in the magnitude and predictability of their

  5. HIGH RESOLUTION LANDCOVER MODELLING WITH PLÉIADES IMAGERY AND DEM DATA IN SUPPORT OF FINE SCALE LANDSCAPE THERMAL MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thompson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the evaluation of air-borne thermal infrared imaging sensors, the use of simulated spectral infrared scenery is a cost-effective way to provide input to the sensor. The benefit of simulated scenes includes control over parameters governing the spectral and related thermal behaviour of the terrain as well as atmospheric conditions. Such scenes need to have a high degree of radiometric and geometric accuracy, as well as high resolution to account for small objects having different spectral and associated thermal properties. In support of this, innovative use of tri-stereo, ultra-high resolution Pléiades satellite imagery is being used to generated high detail, small scale quantitative terrain surface data to compliment comparable optical data in order to produce detailed urban and rural landscape datasets representative of different landscape features, within which spectrally defined characteristics can be subsequently matched to thermal signatures. Pléiades tri-stereo mode, acquired from the same orbit during the same pass, is particularly favourable for reaching the required metric accuracy because images are radiometrically and geometrically very homogeneous, which allows a very good radiometric matching for relief computation. The tri-stereo approach reduces noise and allows significantly enhanced relief description in landscapes where simple stereo imaging cannot see features, such as in dense urban areas or valley bottoms in steep, mountainous areas. This paper describes the datasets that have been generated for DENEL over the Hartebeespoort Dam region, west of Pretoria, South Africa. The final terrain datasets are generated by integrated modelling of both height and spectral surface characteristics within an object-based modelling environment. This approach provides an operational framework for rapid and highly accurate mapping of building and vegetation structure of wide areas, as is required in support of the evaluation of thermal

  6. The Spatial Distribution of Thermal Emission from Baghdad Sulcus, Enceladus, at 100 meter Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John R.; Gorius, N. J. P.; Howett, C. J. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Albright, S. A.

    2012-10-01

    The Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has been observing endogenic thermal emission from the south pole of Enceladus since 2005. Best spatial resolution from conventional scans is about 1km, usually from distances > 2000 km. When Cassini is closer to Enceladus, the spacecraft cannot rotate fast enough to track the surface, and the 5 seconds required to obtain a CIRS spectrum produces many kilometers of smear. However, higher-resolution mapping can be done from much closer range by exploiting the 20 msec sampling of the CIRS raw interferograms. On April 14th 2012, Cassini made a gravity pass of Enceladus at a range of 74 km. Spacecraft orientation was inertially fixed, and chosen so that the active tiger stripe Baghdad Sulcus passed through the CIRS and VIMS fields of view during the flyby. In the 7 to 17 µm region, CIRS uses linear arrays of ten detectors with IFOV of 0.29 mrad, which were oriented roughly perpendicular to the groundtrack and operated in pairs, giving five cross-track spatial resolution elements, each 43 meters wide. Along-track spatial resolution, defined by the 20 msec interferogram sampling time and the flyby speed of 7.5 km/sec, was 150 meters. At longer wavelengths, CIRS obtained a single-detector scan with a spatial resolution of 300 meters. The brief passage of the intense tiger stripe thermal emission through the field of view produced complex spikes in the CIRS interferograms. Though spectra cannot be reconstructed, we can use knowledge of the interferogram temporal response to reconstruct the time history of the incoming radiation and thus its spatial distribution. The resulting image will map tiger stripe thermal emission along a small part of Baghdad Sulcus at about ten times the spatial resolution of the best previous Cassini thermal images.

  7. Big biology meets microclimatology: defining thermal niches of ectotherms at landscape scales for conservation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, Daniel J; Wenger, Seth J; Young, Michael K

    2017-04-01

    Temperature profoundly affects ecology, a fact ever more evident as the ability to measure thermal environments increases and global changes alter these environments. The spatial structure of thermalscapes is especially relevant to the distribution and abundance of ectothermic organisms, but the ability to describe biothermal relationships at extents and grains relevant to conservation planning has been limited by small or sparse data sets. Here, we combine a large occurrence database of >23 000 aquatic species surveys with stream microclimate scenarios supported by an equally large temperature database for a 149 000-km mountain stream network to describe thermal relationships for 14 fish and amphibian species. Species occurrence probabilities peaked across a wide range of temperatures (7.0-18.8°C) but distinct warm- or cold-edge distribution boundaries were apparent for all species and represented environments where populations may be most sensitive to thermal changes. Warm-edge boundary temperatures for a native species of conservation concern were used with geospatial data sets and a habitat occupancy model to highlight subsets of the network where conservation measures could benefit local populations by maintaining cool temperatures. Linking that strategic approach to local estimates of habitat impairment remains a key challenge but is also an opportunity to build relationships and develop synergies between the research, management, and regulatory communities. As with any data mining or species distribution modeling exercise, care is required in analysis and interpretation of results, but the use of large biological data sets with accurate microclimate scenarios can provide valuable information about the thermal ecology of many ectotherms and a spatially explicit way of guiding conservation investments. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  8. Larger men have larger prostates: Detection bias in epidemiologic studies of obesity and prostate cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundle, Andrew; Wang, Yun; Sadasivan, Sudha; Chitale, Dhananjay A; Gupta, Nilesh S; Tang, Deliang; Rybicki, Benjamin A

    2017-06-01

    Obesity is associated with risk of aggressive prostate cancer (PCa), but not with over-all PCa risk. However, obese men have larger prostates which may lower biopsy accuracy and cause a systematic bias toward the null in epidemiologic studies of over-all risk. Within a cohort of 6692 men followed-up after a biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) with benign findings, a nested case-control study was conducted of 495 prostate cancer cases and controls matched on age, race, follow-up duration, biopsy versus TURP, and procedure date. Data on body mass index and prostate volume at the time of the initial procedure were abstracted from medical records. Prior to consideration of differences in prostate volume, overweight (OR = 1.41; 95%CI 1.01, 1.97), and obese status (OR = 1.59; 95%CI 1.09, 2.33) at the time of the original benign biopsy or TURP were associated with PCa incidence during follow-up. Prostate volume did not significantly moderate the association between body-size and PCa, however it did act as an inverse confounder; adjustment for prostate volume increased the effect size for overweight by 22% (adjusted OR = 1.52; 95%CI 1.08, 2.14) and for obese status by 23% (adjusted OR = 1.77; 95%CI 1.20, 2.62). Larger prostate volume at the time of the original benign biopsy or TURP was inversely associated with PCa incidence during follow-up (OR = 0.92 per 10 cc difference in volume; 95%CI 0.88, 0.97). In analyses that stratified case-control pairs by tumor aggressiveness of the case, prostate volume acted as an inverse confounder in analyses of non-aggressive PCa but not in analyses of aggressive PCa. In studies of obesity and PCa, differences in prostate volume cause a bias toward the null, particularly in analyses of non-aggressive PCa. A pervasive underestimation of the association between obesity and overall PCa risk may exist in the literature. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Experimental study on the thermal performance of a small-scale loop heat pipe with polypropylene wick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boo, Joon Hong; Chung, Won Bok

    2005-01-01

    A small-scale Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) with polypropylene wick was fabricated and tested for investigation of its thermal performance. The container and tubing of the system were made of stainless steel and several working fluids were tested including methanol, ethanol, and acetone. The heating area was 35 mm x 35 mm and nine axial grooves were provided in the evaporator to provide vapor passages. The pore size of the polypropylene wick inside the evaporator was varied from 0.5 μm to 25 μm. The inner diameter of liquid and vapor transport lines were 2.0 mm and 4.0 mm, respectively and the length of which were 0.5 mm. The size of condenser was 40 mm (W) x 50 mm (L) in which ten coolant paths were provided. Start-up characteristics as well as steady-state performance was analyzed and discussed. The minimum thermal load of 10 W (0.8W/cam 2 ) and maximum thermal load of 80 W (6.5 W/cm 2 ) were achieved using methanol as working fluid with the condenser temperature of 20 deg. C with horizontal position

  10. Small scale model and underground laboratory study of engineered barrier thermal behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dardaine, M.; Beziat, A.; Gatabin, C.; Lefevre, I.; Plas, F.; Fontan, N.; Moyne, C.

    1991-01-01

    This is the final report of the contract CCE FI1W/0061, which had the objective of studying the thermal behaviour of the engineered barrier having the selected French clay Fo-Ca (natural calcic smectite) as its major constituent. After being installed this barrier was subjected simultaneously to the heat flux dissipated by the container and to a possible rehydration by contact with the host medium. It consists of three parts. The first part is devoted to R and D studies concerning detectors suitable for the point measurement of the water concentration. Among the techniques that can be envisaged, capacitor methods, which are very temperature sensitive, would require a great deal of effort to be satisfactory. On the other hand, the water concentration can, in principle, be derived from the measurement of the thermal conductivity in the transient regime. Although the carrying out of this measurement is somewhat critical, it can give good results under certain conditions. The second part reports experiments carried out in the laboratory concerning both the study of heat transfer during the so-called dry phase of the disposal (without any water being supplied externally) and the study of the phenomenon of fissuration. Finally, the third part describes the in situ experiment BACCHUS, carried out in the underground test facility at Mol (Belgium), in collaboration with the CEN/SCK. In the course of the five months of the thermal phase of this experiment a large variation in the amplitude of the temperature gradients was recorded, which may be explained, on one hand, by the convergence of the medium and, on the other hand, by a much more rapid rehydration than that predicted

  11. Large-scale thermal-shock experiments with clad and unclad steel cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Flaw behavior trends associated with pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) loading of pressurized-water-reactor pressure vessels have been under investigation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for nearly 20 years. During that time, twelve thermal-shock experiments with thick-walled (152 mm) steel cylinders were conducted as a part of the investigations. The first eight experiments were conducted with unclad cylinders initially containing shallow (8--19 mm) two-dimensional and semicircular inner-surface flaws. These experiments demonstrated, in good agreement with linear elastic fracture mechanics, crack initiation and arrest, a series of initiation/arrest events with deep penetration of the wall, long crack jumps, arrest with the stress intensity factor (K I ) increasing with crack depth, extensive surface extension of an initially short and shallow (semicircular) flaw, and warm prestressing with K I ≤ 0. The remaining four experiments were conducted with clad cylinders containing initially shallow (19--24 mm) semielliptical subclad and surface flaws at the inner surface. In the first of these experiments one of six equally spaced (60 degrees) open-quotes identicalclose quotes subclad flaws extended nearly the length of the cylinder (1,220 mm) beneath the cladding (no crack extension into the cladding) and nearly 50% of the wall, radially. For the final experiment, four of the semielliptical subclad flaws that had not propagated previously were converted to surface flaws, and they experienced extensive extension beneath the cladding with no cracking of the cladding. Information from this series of thermal-shock experiments is being used in the evaluation of the PTS issue

  12. Large-scale magnetic fields, curvature fluctuations, and the thermal history of the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    It is shown that gravitating magnetic fields affect the evolution of curvature perturbations in a way that is reminiscent of a pristine nonadiabatic pressure fluctuation. The gauge-invariant evolution of curvature perturbations is used to constrain the magnetic power spectrum. Depending on the essential features of the thermodynamic history of the Universe, the explicit derivation of the bound is modified. The theoretical uncertainty in the constraints on the magnetic energy spectrum is assessed by comparing the results obtained in the case of the conventional thermal history with the estimates stemming from less conventional (but phenomenologically allowed) post-inflationary evolutions

  13. Influence of PCMs on thermal behavior of building walls: experimental study using the walls of a reduced scale room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gounni Ayoub

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Phase-Change Materials (PCM for lightweight building applications can increase equivalent thermal mass and provide energy savings. In the present experimental work, the heat transfer performance testing of some building walls, with or without PCM, is carried out using a reduced-scale cubic room (the test-cell. The cubic cell is heated by an incandescent bulb placed on its centre, and it is housed in an air-conditioned large-scale room that allows to control the ambient air temperature. The effect of the double PCM layer and of its location relatively to the outside surface of the wall is tested and discussed in terms of overall transmitted heat flux and in terms of reduction of the inside and outside surface temperatures. Findings shows that the additional inertia introduced by the PCM leads to a reduced overall heat flux transmission by the wall and to a lesser daily temperature amplitude on the surface of the wall that enhances the thermal comfort inside the building. In the next step of this work, the case of sandwich walls with air gap, and with wood and PCM layers will be considered.

  14. Efficiency of the Needle Probe Test for Evaluation of Thermal Conductivity of Composite Materials: Two-Scale Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łydżba Dariusz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The needle probe test, as a thermal conductivity measurement method, has become very popular in recent years. In the present study, the efficiency of this methodology, for the case of composite materials, is investigated based on the numerical simulations. The material under study is a two-phase composite with periodic microstructure of “matrix-inclusion” type. Two-scale analysis, incorporating micromechanics approach, is performed. First, the effective thermal conductivity of the composite considered is found by the solution of the appropriate boundary value problem stated for the single unit cell. Next, numerical simulations of the needle probe test are carried out. In this case, two different locations of the measuring sensor are considered. It is shown that the “equivalent” conductivity, derived from the probe test, is strongly affected by the location of the sensor. Moreover, comparing the results obtained for different scales, one can notice that the “equivalent” conductivity cannot be interpreted as the effective one for the composites considered. Hence, a crude approximation of the effective property is proposed based on the volume fractions of constituents and the equivalent conductivities derived from different sensor locations.

  15. Influence of PCMs on thermal behavior of building walls: experimental study using the walls of a reduced scale room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounni, Ayoub; Tahar Mabrouk, Mohamed; Kheiri, Abdelhamid; El alami, Mustapha

    2017-11-01

    Using Phase-Change Materials (PCM) for lightweight building applications can increase equivalent thermal mass and provide energy savings. In the present experimental work, the heat transfer performance testing of some building walls, with or without PCM, is carried out using a reduced-scale cubic room (the test-cell). The cubic cell is heated by an incandescent bulb placed on its centre, and it is housed in an air-conditioned large-scale room that allows to control the ambient air temperature. The effect of the double PCM layer and of its location relatively to the outside surface of the wall is tested and discussed in terms of overall transmitted heat flux and in terms of reduction of the inside and outside surface temperatures. Findings shows that the additional inertia introduced by the PCM leads to a reduced overall heat flux transmission by the wall and to a lesser daily temperature amplitude on the surface of the wall that enhances the thermal comfort inside the building. In the next step of this work, the case of sandwich walls with air gap, and with wood and PCM layers will be considered.

  16. Multi scale analysis of thermal-hydraulics of nuclear reactors - the neptune project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bestion, D.

    2004-01-01

    Full text of publication follows:The NEPTUNE project aims at building a new two-phase thermalhydraulic platform for nuclear reactor simulation. It is jointly developed by CEA-DEN and EDF-DRD and also supported by IRSN and FRAMATOME-ANP. NEPTUNE is a new generation multi-scale platform. The system scale models the whole reactor circuit with 0D, 1D and 3D modules and is generally applied with a coarse meshing including about a thousand meshes. The component scale models components like the reactor Core or Steam Generators with a finer nodalization and is generally applied with 10 4 to 10 5 meshes. Since these components contain rod bundles or tube bundles the physical modelling uses a homogenization technique with a porosity. For some specific applications it was found necessary to add a two-phase CFD tool able to zoom on a portion of the circuit where small scale phenomena are of importance for design purpose or safety issues. Here the basic equations are still averaged like in RANS approach for single phase, but the space resolution is finer than in component codes and typical application may require 10 5 to 10 7 meshes. These three scales have to be coupled in order to simulate many reactor transients where both local effects and system effects play a role. In addition, two-phase Direct Numerical Simulation Tools with Interface Tracking Techniques can be used for even smaller scale investigations for a better understanding of basic physical processes and for developing closure relations for averaged models. The main challenges of this project are here presented and some first results are presented. (authors)

  17. Wafer-scale synthesis of monolayer and few-layer MoS2 via thermal vapor sulfurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, John; Liu, Xue; Yue, Chunlei; Escarra, Matthew; Wei, Jiang

    2017-12-01

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is an atomically thin, direct bandgap semiconductor crystal potentially capable of miniaturizing optoelectronic devices to an atomic scale. However, the development of 2D MoS2-based optoelectronic devices depends upon the existence of a high optical quality and large-area monolayer MoS2 synthesis technique. To address this need, we present a thermal vapor sulfurization (TVS) technique that uses powder MoS2 as a sulfur vapor source. The technique reduces and stabilizes the flow of sulfur vapor, enabling monolayer wafer-scale MoS2 growth. MoS2 thickness is also controlled with great precision; we demonstrate the ability to synthesize MoS2 sheets between 1 and 4 layers thick, while also showing the ability to create films with average thickness intermediate between integer layer numbers. The films exhibit wafer-scale coverage and uniformity, with electrical quality varying depending on the final thickness of the grown MoS2. The direct bandgap of grown monolayer MoS2 is analyzed using internal and external photoluminescence quantum efficiency. The photoluminescence quantum efficiency is shown to be competitive with untreated exfoliated MoS2 monolayer crystals. The ability to consistently grow wafer-scale monolayer MoS2 with high optical quality makes this technique a valuable tool for the development of 2D optoelectronic devices such as photovoltaics, detectors, and light emitters.

  18. Development of micro-scale joints in volcanic rocks under thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging Solutions)

    Petrographic studies of samples of the Rajmahal basalt reveal a variety of microscopic joints ... To study the micro-scale joints in rock systems, ..... fiber-like crystal habit of the material chosen for ... stress, Y is the numerical modification factor to.

  19. Increasing of prediction reliability of calcium carbonate scale formation in heat exchanger of secondary coolant circuits of thermal and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tret'yakov, O.V.; Kritskij, V.G.; Styazhkin, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    Calcium carbonate scale formation in the secondary circuit heat exchanger of thermal and nuclear power plants is investigated. A model of calcium-carbonate scale formation providing quite reliable prediction of process running and the possibility of its control affecting the parameters of hydrochemical regime (HCR) is developed. The results can be used when designing the automatic-control system of HCR

  20. Atomic scale study of thermal reduction of nano goethite coexisting with magnetite

    Science.gov (United States)

    singh, L. Herojit; Govindaraj, R.; Mythili, R.; Amarendra, G.; Sundar, C. S.

    2013-02-01

    Evolution of the local structure and magnetic properties of nano particles of goethite having magnetite as a composite due to controlled annealing treatments in vacuum has been studied using Mossbauer spectroscopy. Importance of size, defect associated with structural OH- for the observed structural and magnetic properties of goethite has been emphasized in this study. Present Mossbauer results show that thermal annealing at low temperatures (420-550 K) lead to a partial conversion / reduction of orthorhombic goethite to cubic spinel oxides such as maghemite and off-stochiometric magnetite. This study further establishes that annealing treatments beyond 650 K predominantly results in topotactic conversion of goethite to haematite. Underlying physics of the transitions of goethite to iron oxides and the important role of desorbed hydrogen for the orthorhombic to cubic structural transitions has been elucidated in this study.

  1. Atomic scale study of thermal reduction of nano goethite coexisting with magnetite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Herojit singh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of the local structure and magnetic properties of nano particles of goethite having magnetite as a composite due to controlled annealing treatments in vacuum has been studied using Mossbauer spectroscopy. Importance of size, defect associated with structural OH- for the observed structural and magnetic properties of goethite has been emphasized in this study. Present Mossbauer results show that thermal annealing at low temperatures (420-550 K lead to a partial conversion / reduction of orthorhombic goethite to cubic spinel oxides such as maghemite and off-stochiometric magnetite. This study further establishes that annealing treatments beyond 650 K predominantly results in topotactic conversion of goethite to haematite. Underlying physics of the transitions of goethite to iron oxides and the important role of desorbed hydrogen for the orthorhombic to cubic structural transitions has been elucidated in this study.

  2. Transient thermal analysis for radioactive liquid mixing operations in a large-scaled tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. Y.; Smith, F. G. III

    2014-01-01

    A transient heat balance model was developed to assess the impact of a Submersible Mixer Pump (SMP) on radioactive liquid temperature during the process of waste mixing and removal for the high-level radioactive materials stored in Savannah River Site (SRS) tanks. The model results will be mainly used to determine the SMP design impacts on the waste tank temperature during operations and to develop a specification for a new SMP design to replace existing longshaft mixer pumps used during waste removal. The present model was benchmarked against the test data obtained by the tank measurement to examine the quantitative thermal response of the tank and to establish the reference conditions of the operating variables under no SMP operation. The results showed that the model predictions agreed with the test data of the waste temperatures within about 10%

  3. Atomistic study of a nanometer-scale pump based on the thermal ratchet concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oyarzua, Elton; Walther, J. H.; Zambrano, Harvey

    In this study, a novel concept of nanoscale pump fabricated using Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) is presented. The development of nanofluidic systems provides unprecedented possibilities for the control of biology and chemistry at the molecular level with potential applications in low energy cost devices...... dynamics simulations, we explore the possibility to design thermophoretic pumping devices fabricated of CNTs for water transport in nanoconduits. The design of the nanopumps is based on the concept of the Feynman-Smoluchowski ratchet....... of great interest in nanofluidics. Thermophoresisis the phenomenon observed when a mixture of two or more types of motile objects experience a force induced by a thermal gradient and the different types of objects respond to it differently, inducing a motion and segregation of the objects. Using molecular...

  4. Uncertainty propagation applied to multi-scale thermal-hydraulics coupled codes. A step towards validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geffray, Clotaire Clement

    2017-03-20

    The work presented here constitutes an important step towards the validation of the use of coupled system thermal-hydraulics and computational fluid dynamics codes for the simulation of complex flows in liquid metal cooled pool-type facilities. First, a set of methods suited for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis and validation activities with regards to the specific constraints of the work with coupled and expensive-to-run codes is proposed. Then, these methods are applied to the ATHLET - ANSYS CFX model of the TALL-3D facility. Several transients performed at this latter facility are investigated. The results are presented, discussed and compared to the experimental data. Finally, assessments of the validity of the selected methods and of the quality of the model are offered.

  5. Thermal infrared imagery as a tool for analysing the variability of surface saturated areas at various temporal and spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Barbara; Antonelli, Marta; Pfister, Laurent; Klaus, Julian

    2017-04-01

    Surface saturated areas are important for the on- and offset of hydrological connectivity within the hillslope-riparian-stream continuum. This is reflected in concepts such as variable contributing areas or critical source areas. However, we still lack a standardized method for areal mapping of surface saturation and for observing its spatiotemporal variability. Proof-of-concept studies in recent years have shown the potential of thermal infrared (TIR) imagery to record surface saturation dynamics at various temporal and spatial scales. Thermal infrared imagery is thus a promising alternative to conventional approaches, such as the squishy boot method or the mapping of vegetation. In this study we use TIR images to investigate the variability of surface saturated areas at different temporal and spatial scales in the forested Weierbach catchment (0.45 km2) in western Luxembourg. We took TIR images of the riparian zone with a hand-held FLIR infrared camera at fortnightly intervals over 18 months at nine different locations distributed over the catchment. Not all of the acquired images were suitable for a derivation of the surface saturated areas, as various factors influence the usability of the TIR images (e.g. temperature contrasts, shadows, fog). Nonetheless, we obtained a large number of usable images that provided a good insight into the dynamic behaviour of surface saturated areas at different scales. The images revealed how diverse the evolution of surface saturated areas can be throughout the hydrologic year. For some locations with similar morphology or topography we identified diverging saturation dynamics, while other locations with different morphology / topography showed more similar behaviour. Moreover, we were able to assess the variability of the dynamics of expansion / contraction of saturated areas within the single locations, which can help to better understand the mechanisms behind surface saturation development.

  6. Thermal characteristics of various biomass fuels in a small-scale biomass combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shemmeri, T.T.; Yedla, R.; Wardle, D.

    2015-01-01

    Biomass combustion is a mature and reliable technology, which has been used for heating and cooking. In the UK, biomass currently qualifies for financial incentives such as the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI). Therefore, it is vital to select the right type of fuel for a small-scale combustor to address different types of heat energy needs. In this paper, the authors attempt to investigate the performance of a small-scale biomass combustor for heating, and the impact of burning different biomass fuels on useful output energy from the combustor. The test results of moisture content, calorific value and combustion products of various biomass samples were presented. Results from this study are in general agreement with published data as far as the calorific values and moisture contents are concerned. Six commonly available biomass fuels were tested in a small-scale combustion system, and the factors that affect the performance of the system were analysed. In addition, the study has extended to examine the magnitude and proportion of useful heat, dissipated by convection and radiation while burning different biomass fuels in the small-scale combustor. It is concluded that some crucial factors have to be carefully considered before selecting biomass fuels for any particular heating application. - Highlights: • Six biomass materials combustion performance in a small combustor was examined. • Fuel combustion rate and amount of heat release has varied between materials. • Heat release by radiation, convection and flue gasses varied between materials. • Study helps engineers and users of biomass systems to select right materials

  7. Large-Scale Nanophotonic Solar Selective Absorbers for High-Efficiency Solar Thermal Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Liu, Baoan; Ni, Yizhou; Liew, Kaiyang Kevin; Sze, Jeff; Chen, Shuo; Shen, Sheng

    2015-08-19

    An omnidirectional nanophotonic solar selective absorber is fabricated on a large scale using a template-stripping method. The nanopyramid nickel structure achieves an average absorptance of 95% at a wavelength range below 1.3 μm and a low emittance less than 10% at wavelength >2.5 μm. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Effect of scaling on the thermal hydraulics of the moderator of a CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarchami, Araz; Ashgriz, Nasser; Kwee, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Three dimensional numerical simulations are conducted on the CANDU Moderator Test Facility (MTF) and the actual size CANDU reactor. Moderator test facility is ¼ scale of the actual reactor. The heat input and other operating conditions are scaled down from the real reactor to the MTF using constant Archimedes number (as considered in MTF experiments performed by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.). The heat generations inside both tanks are applied through volumetric heating. In this method, heat is added to the fluid throughout the volume as it occurs in real reactor through fission heat generation and gamma rays from radioactive materials. The temperatures in actual reactor simulation are about 10 deg C greater than in MTF simulations. The separation between high and low temperature zones are more visible in real reactor simulation comparing to MTF simulation. The result indicates that the MTF has better mixing and weaker buoyancy forces comparing to real reactor. The velocity distribution in both cases seems similar with impingement point for inlet jets in both cases at the right hand side of the tank. Although the velocities are considerably higher (about 40%) in the case of real reactor, but as we go toward inner core of the tanks, the velocities are similar and very low. Several points inside the tank are monitored for their temperature and velocity with time. The results for these points show fluctuations in both temperature and velocity inside the tank. The fluctuations frequency seems higher in the case of real reactor while the amplitude of fluctuations is smaller in real reactor in most of the points. Here, in this research we have shown that Archimedes number alone cannot be a good scaling parameter (as used in MTF experiments) and it should be used along with Rayleigh number for scaling purposes. (author)

  9. The smallest thermal scales in a turbulent channel flow at Prandtl number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergant, R.; Tiselj, I.

    2004-01-01

    For describing the turbulent heat transfer from a wall to a fluid at low Reynolds (Re < 10000) and low Prandtl numbers (Pr < 20) a direct numerical simulation (DNS) can be used, which describes all the length and time scales of the phenomenon. The object of this paper is to find out the influence of the smallest temperature scales on the largest ones, which are responsible for the macro behavior of the near-wall heat transfer. Simulation, performed at Re = 2650 and Pr = 1, was calculated for velocity field with the DNS accuracy and for three different temperature fields. First temperature field, calculated with the DNS accuracy, was used as a reference to the second and third temperature fields where the highest Fourier coefficients in streamwise and spanwise directions were filtered and damped. It means, that the smallest temperature scales were not described with DNS accuracy anymore. New approach shows that results, for at least first and second order statistics, are comparable to the DNS ones without filtering and damping. (author)

  10. Development of a coupled neutronic/thermal-hydraulic tool with multi-scale capabilities and applications to HPLWR core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, Lanfranco; Starflinger, Joerg; Schulenberg, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Advanced analysis and design techniques for innovative reactors are addressed. → Detailed investigation of a 3 pass core design with a multi-physics-scales tool. → Coupled 40-group neutron transport/equivalent channels TH core analyses methods. → Multi-scale capabilities: from equivalent channels to sub-channel pin-by-pin study. → High fidelity approach: reduction of conservatism involved in core simulations. - Abstract: The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a thermal spectrum nuclear reactor cooled and moderated with light water operated at supercritical pressure. It is an innovative reactor concept, which requires developing and applying advanced analysis tools as described in the paper. The relevant water density reduction associated with the heat-up, together with the multi-pass core design, results in a pronounced coupling between neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analyses, which takes into account the strong natural influence of the in-core distribution of power generation and water properties. The neutron flux gradients within the multi-pass core, together with the pronounced dependence of water properties on the temperature, require to consider a fine spatial resolution in which the individual fuel pins are resolved to provide precise evaluation of the clad temperature, currently considered as one of the crucial design criteria. These goals have been achieved considering an advanced analysis method based on the usage of existing codes which have been coupled with developed interfaces. Initially neutronic and thermal-hydraulic full core calculations have been iterated until a consistent solution is found to determine the steady state full power condition of the HPLWR core. Results of few group neutronic analyses might be less reliable in case of HPLWR 3-pass core than for conventional LWRs because of considerable changes of the neutron spectrum within the core, hence 40 groups transport theory has been preferred to the

  11. Demonstrating the value of larger ensembles in forecasting physical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reason L. Machete

    2016-12-01

    its relative information content (in bits using a proper skill score. Doubling the ensemble size is demonstrated to yield a non-trivial increase in the information content (forecast skill for an ensemble with well over 16 members; this result stands in forecasting a mathematical system and a physical system. Indeed, even at the largest ensemble sizes considered (128 and 256, there are lead times where the forecast information is still increasing with ensemble size. Ultimately, model error will limit the value of ever larger ensembles. No support is found, however, for limiting design studies to the sizes commonly found in seasonal and climate studies. It is suggested that ensemble size be considered more explicitly in future design studies of forecast systems on all time scales.

  12. Application of multiple-point geostatistics to simulate the effect of small-scale aquifer heterogeneity on the efficiency of aquifer thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possemiers, Mathias; Huysmans, Marijke; Batelaan, Okke

    2015-08-01

    Adequate aquifer characterization and simulation using heat transport models are indispensible for determining the optimal design for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems and wells. Recent model studies indicate that meter-scale heterogeneities in the hydraulic conductivity field introduce a considerable uncertainty in the distribution of thermal energy around an ATES system and can lead to a reduction in the thermal recoverability. In a study site in Bierbeek, Belgium, the influence of centimeter-scale clay drapes on the efficiency of a doublet ATES system and the distribution of the thermal energy around the ATES wells are quantified. Multiple-point geostatistical simulation of edge properties is used to incorporate the clay drapes in the models. The results show that clay drapes have an influence both on the distribution of thermal energy in the subsurface and on the efficiency of the ATES system. The distribution of the thermal energy is determined by the strike of the clay drapes, with the major axis of anisotropy parallel to the clay drape strike. The clay drapes have a negative impact (3.3-3.6 %) on the energy output in the models without a hydraulic gradient. In the models with a hydraulic gradient, however, the presence of clay drapes has a positive influence (1.6-10.2 %) on the energy output of the ATES system. It is concluded that it is important to incorporate small-scale heterogeneities in heat transport models to get a better estimate on ATES efficiency and distribution of thermal energy.

  13. Application of multiple-point geostatistics to simulate the effect of small scale aquifer heterogeneity on the efficiency of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possemiers, Mathias; Huysmans, Marijke; Batelaan, Okke

    2015-04-01

    Adequate aquifer characterization and simulation using heat transport models are indispensible for determining the optimal design for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) systems and wells. Recent model studies indicate that meter scale heterogeneities in the hydraulic conductivity field introduce a considerable uncertainty in the distribution of thermal energy around an ATES system and can lead to a reduction in the thermal recoverability. In this paper, the influence of centimeter scale clay drapes on the efficiency of a doublet ATES system and the distribution of the thermal energy around the ATES wells are quantified. Multiple-point geostatistical simulation of edge properties is used to incorporate the clay drapes in the models. The results show that clay drapes have an influence both on the distribution of thermal energy in the subsurface and on the efficiency of the ATES system. The distribution of the thermal energy is determined by the strike of the clay drapes, with the major axis of anisotropy parallel to the clay drape strike. The clay drapes have a negative impact (3.3 - 3.6%) on the energy output in the models without a hydraulic gradient. In the models with a hydraulic gradient, however, the presence of clay drapes has a positive influence (1.6 - 10.2%) on the energy output of the ATES system. It is concluded that it is important to incorporate small scale heterogeneities in heat transport models to get a better estimate on ATES efficiency and distribution of thermal energy.

  14. Influence of MWCNTs addition on mechanical and thermal behaviour of epoxy/kenaf multi-scale nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, N. A. M.; Razak, J. A.; Ismail, S.; Mohamad, N.; Yaakob, M. Y.; Theng, T. H.

    2017-06-01

    This research was conducted to develop kenaf reinforced epoxy/MWCNTs multi-scale composite using kenaf fibre and MWCNTs as the reinforcement in epoxy as the hosted matrix. The composites were produced by using a combination of hand lay-up and vacuum bagging process. The selection of optimum composition of epoxy-MWCNTs is based on the MWCNTs loading and the resulted mixture viscosity. Lower resin viscosity is required to allow good wetting and interaction between matrix and filler, which will yielded superior final performance of the fabricated composites. Therefore, different loading of MWCNTs (0.0 wt. %, 0.5 wt. %, 1.0 wt. %, 3.0 wt. %, 5.0 wt. %, 7.0 wt. %) were used to investigate the mechanical and thermal properties of the composites. As a result, the epoxy/kenaf/MWCNTs multi-scale composite at 1.0 wt. % of MWCNTs addition had yielded substantial improvement by 15.54 % in tensile strength and 90.54 % in fracture toughness. Besides, the fracture surface morphology of the selected samples were analysed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation to further support the reinforcement characteristic of epoxy/kenaf/MWCNTs multi-scale composite.

  15. Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Examples of disorders that ...

  16. Experimental thermal hydraulics in support of FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmakumar, G.; Anand Babu, C.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Vaidyanathan, G.

    2009-01-01

    The thermal hydraulic design plays a crucial role for the safe and economical deployment of Liquid Metal Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR). Robust experimental programmes are required in support of LMFBR thermal hydraulics design. The philosophy of testing has been to construct small scale models to understand the physical behaviour and to build larger scale models to optimize the component design. The experiments are conducted either in sodium or using a simulant like water/air. The paper gives a brief account of the various thermal hydraulic experiments carried out in support of the design of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR). (author)

  17. Analysis of Medium-Scale Solar Thermal Systems and Their Potential in Lithuania

    OpenAIRE

    Valančius, Rokas; Jurelionis, Andrius; Jonynas, Rolandas; Katinas, Vladislovas; Perednis, Eugenijus

    2015-01-01

    Medium-scale solar hot water systems with a total solar panel area varying from 60 to 166 m 2 have been installed in Lithuania since 2002. However, the performance of these systems varies depending on the type of energy users, equipment and design of the systems, as well as their maintenance. The aim of this paper was to analyse operational SHW systems from the perspective of energy production and economic benefit as well as to outline the differences of their actual performance compared to t...

  18. Population bottleneck triggering millennial-scale morphospace shifts in endemic thermal-spring melanopsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Thomas A; Harzhauser, Mathias; Georgopoulou, Elisavet; Wrozyna, Claudia

    2014-11-15

    For more than hundred years the thermal spring-fed Lake Pețea near Oradea, Romania, was studied for its highly endemic subfossil and recent fauna and flora. One point of focus was the species lineage of the melanopsid gastropod Microcolpia parreyssii , which exhibited a tremendous diversity of shapes during the earlier Holocene. As a consequence many new species, subspecies, and variety-names have been introduced over time, trying to categorize this overwhelming variability. In contrast to the varied subfossil assemblage, only a single phenotype is present today. We critically review the apparent "speciation event" implied by the taxonomy, based on the presently available information and new data from morphometric analyses of shell outlines and oxygen and carbon isotope data. This synthesis shows that one turning point in morphological evolution coincides with high accumulation of peaty deposits during a short time interval of maximally a few thousand years. The formation of a small, highly eutrophic swamp with increased input of organic matter marginalized the melanopsids and reduced population size. The presented data make natural selection as the dominating force unlikely but rather indicates genetic drift following a bottleneck effect induced by the environmental changes. This claim contrasts the "obvious trend" and shows that great morphological variability has to be carefully and objectively evaluated in order to allow sound interpretations of the underlying mechanisms.

  19. Thermal behaviour of chlorine in nuclear graphite at a microscopic scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaudey, C.E., E-mail: vaudey@ipnl.in2p3.f [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Toulhoat, N., E-mail: nelly.toulhoat@univ-lyon1.f [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique CEA/DEN, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Moncoffre, N. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Bererd, N. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Universite de Lyon, UCBL-IUT A, departement chimie, 43 Bd du 11 novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Raimbault, L. [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Centre de Geosciences, 35 rue Saint Honore, F-77305 Fontainebleau cedex (France); Sainsot, P. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, LaMCoS, INSA-Lyon, CNRS UMR5259, F-69621 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Rouzaud, J.N. [Laboratoire de Geologie de l' Ecole Normale Superieure, UMR CNRS-ENS 8538, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris cedex 5 (France); Perrat-Mabilon, A. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2009-12-15

    In this paper, we present the study of thermal behaviour of {sup 36}Cl in nuclear graphite used in the St. Laurent A2 UNGG reactor (graphite moderated and CO{sub 2} cooled reactor). {sup 37}Cl, used to simulate {sup 36}Cl displaced from its original structural site by recoil, has been implanted into nuclear graphite samples (energy = 250 keV, fluence = 5 x 10{sup 13} at cm{sup -2}). The samples have been annealed in the 200-800 deg. C temperature range and analysed by SIMS. Structural modifications have been controlled by Raman microspectroscopy. This study shows that, in the considered temperature range and for a short annealing duration (4 h), chlorine is released almost athermally. At 500 deg. C, around 20% of the initial {sup 37}Cl content is released. At 800 deg. C, the release reaches a plateau and the loss of {sup 37}Cl is around 30%. Raman microspectroscopy shows that {sup 37}Cl implantation induces a structural disorder and that during annealing, the original structure is not completely recovered.

  20. Ground Testing a Nuclear Thermal Rocket: Design of a sub-scale demonstration experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Bedsun; Debra Lee; Margaret Townsend; Clay A. Cooper; Jennifer Chapman; Ronald Samborsky; Mel Bulman; Daniel Brasuell; Stanley K. Borowski

    2012-07-01

    In 2008, the NASA Mars Architecture Team found that the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) was the preferred propulsion system out of all the combinations of chemical propulsion, solar electric, nuclear electric, aerobrake, and NTR studied. Recently, the National Research Council committee reviewing the NASA Technology Roadmaps recommended the NTR as one of the top 16 technologies that should be pursued by NASA. One of the main issues with developing a NTR for future missions is the ability to economically test the full system on the ground. In the late 1990s, the Sub-surface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) concept was first proposed by Howe as a method to test NTRs at full power and full duration. The concept relied on firing the NTR into one of the test holes at the Nevada Test Site which had been constructed to test nuclear weapons. In 2011, the cost of testing a NTR and the cost of performing a proof of concept experiment were evaluated.

  1. Large-scale uniform ZnO tetrapods on catalyst free glass substrate by thermal evaporation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsultany, Forat H., E-mail: foratusm@gmail.com [School of Physics, USM, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Hassan, Z. [Institute of Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (INOR), USM, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Ahmed, Naser M. [School of Physics, USM, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Investigate the growth of ZnO-Ts on glass substrate by thermal evaporation method. • Glass substrate without any catalyst or a seed layer. • The morphology was controlled by adjusting the temperature of the material and the substrate. • Glass substrate was placed vertically in the quartz tube. - Abstract: Here, we report for the first time the catalyst-free growth of large-scale uniform shape and size ZnO tetrapods on a glass substrate via thermal evaporation method. Three-dimensional networks of ZnO tetrapods have needle–wire junctions, an average leg length of 2.1–2.6 μm, and a diameter of 35–240 nm. The morphology and structure of ZnO tetrapods were investigated by controlling the preparation temperature of each of the Zn powder and the glass substrate under O{sub 2} and Ar gases. Studies were carried out on ZnO tetrapods using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, UV–vis spectrophotometer, and a photoluminescence. The results showed that the sample grow in the hexagonal wurtzite structure with preferentially oriented along (002) direction, good crystallinity and high transmittance. The band gap value is about 3.27 eV. Photoluminescence spectrum exhibits a very sharp peak at 378 nm and a weak broad green emission.

  2. Steady state and transient thermal-hydraulic characterization of full-scale ITER divertor plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tincani, A.; Malavasi, A.; Ricapito, I.; Riccardi, B.; Di Maio, P.A.; Vella, G.

    2007-01-01

    In the frame of the activities related to ITER divertor R and D, ENEA CR Brasimone was charged by EFDA (European Fusion Design Agreement) to investigate the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of the full-scale divertor plasma facing components, i.e. Inner Vertical Target, Dome Liner and Outer Vertical Target, both in steady state and during draining and drying transient. More in detail, for each PFC, the first phase of the work is the steady state hydraulic characterization which consists of: - measurements of pressure drops at different temperatures; - determination of the velocity distribution in the internal channels; - check the possible insurgence of cavitation. The subsequent phase of the thermal-hydraulic characterization foresees a testing campaign of draining and drying procedure by means of a suitable gas flow. The objective of this experimental procedure is to eliminate in the most efficient way the residual amount of water after gravity discharge. In order to accomplish this experimental campaign a significant modification of CEF1 loop has been designed and realized. This paper presents, first of all, the experimental set-up, the agreed test matrix and the achieved results for both steady state and transient tests. Moreover, the level of the implementation of a predictive hydraulic model, based on RELAP 5 code, as well as its results are described, discussed and compared with the experimental ones. (orig.)

  3. Multi-Sensing system for outdoor thermal monitoring: Application to large scale civil engineering components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crinière, Antoine; Dumoulin, Jean; Manceau, Jean-Luc; Perez, Laetitia; Bourquin, Frederic

    2014-05-01

    Aging of transport infrastructures combined with traffic and climatic solicitations contribute to the reduction of their performances. To address and quantify the resilience of civil engineering structure, investigations on robust, fast and efficient methods are required. Among research works carried out at IFSTTAR, methods for long term monitoring face an increasing demand. Such works take benefits of this last decade technological progresses in ICT domain. The present study follows the ISTIMES European project [1], which aimed at demonstrate the ability of different electromagnetic sensing techniques, processing methods and ICT architecture, to be used for long term monitoring of critical transport infrastructures. Thanks to this project a multi-sensing techniques system, able to date and synchronize measurements carried out by infrared thermography coupled with various measurements data (i.e. weather parameters), have been designed, developed and implemented on real site [2]. Among experiments carried out on real transport infrastructure, it has been shown, for the "Musmesci" bridge deck (Italy), that by using infrared thermal image sequence with weather measurements during sevral days it was possible to develop analysis methods able to produce qualitative and quantitative data [3]. In the present study, added functionalities were designed and added to the "IrLAW" system in order to reach full autonomy in term of power supply, very long term measurement capability (at least 1 year) and automated data base feeding. The surveyed civil engineering structures consist in two concrete beams of 16 m long and 21 T weight each. One of the two beams was damage by high energy mechanical impact at the IFSTTAR falling rocks test station facilities located in the French Alpes [4]. The system is composed of one IR uncooled microbolometric camera (FLIR SC325) with a 320X240 Focal Plane Array detector in band III, a weather station VAISALA WXT520, a GPS, a failover power supply

  4. Thermal and volumetric properties of complex aqueous electrolyte solutions using the Pitzer formalism - The PhreeSCALE code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Adeline; Boulahya, Faïza; André, Laurent; Lassin, Arnault; Azaroual, Mohamed; Serin, Jean-Paul; Cézac, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    The thermal and volumetric properties of complex aqueous solutions are described according to the Pitzer equation, explicitly taking into account the speciation in the aqueous solutions. The thermal properties are the apparent relative molar enthalpy (Lϕ) and the apparent molar heat capacity (Cp,ϕ). The volumetric property is the apparent molar volume (Vϕ). Equations describing these properties are obtained from the temperature or pressure derivatives of the excess Gibbs energy and make it possible to calculate the dilution enthalpy (∆HD), the heat capacity (cp) and the density (ρ) of aqueous solutions up to high concentrations. Their implementation in PHREEQC V.3 (Parkhurst and Appelo, 2013) is described and has led to a new numerical tool, called PhreeSCALE. It was tested first, using a set of parameters (specific interaction parameters and standard properties) from the literature for two binary systems (Na2SO4-H2O and MgSO4-H2O), for the quaternary K-Na-Cl-SO4 system (heat capacity only) and for the Na-K-Ca-Mg-Cl-SO4-HCO3 system (density only). The results obtained with PhreeSCALE are in agreement with the literature data when the same standard solution heat capacity (Cp0) and volume (V0) values are used. For further applications of this improved computation tool, these standard solution properties were calculated independently, using the Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations. By using this kind of approach, most of the Pitzer interaction parameters coming from literature become obsolete since they are not coherent with the standard properties calculated according to the HKF formalism. Consequently a new set of interaction parameters must be determined. This approach was successfully applied to the Na2SO4-H2O and MgSO4-H2O binary systems, providing a new set of optimized interaction parameters, consistent with the standard solution properties derived from the HKF equations.

  5. More ‘altruistic’ punishment in larger societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Frank W; Berbesque, J. Colette; Barr, Abigail; Barrett, Clark; Bolyanatz, Alexander; Cardenas, Juan Camilo; Ensminger, Jean; Gurven, Michael; Gwako, Edwins; Henrich, Joseph; Henrich, Natalie; Lesorogol, Carolyn; McElreath, Richard; Tracer, David

    2007-01-01

    If individuals will cooperate with cooperators, and punish non-cooperators even at a cost to themselves, then this strong reciprocity could minimize the cheating that undermines cooperation. Based upon numerous economic experiments, some have proposed that human cooperation is explained by strong reciprocity and norm enforcement. Second-party punishment is when you punish someone who defected on you; third-party punishment is when you punish someone who defected on someone else. Third-party punishment is an effective way to enforce the norms of strong reciprocity and promote cooperation. Here we present new results that expand on a previous report from a large cross-cultural project. This project has already shown that there is considerable cross-cultural variation in punishment and cooperation. Here we test the hypothesis that population size (and complexity) predicts the level of third-party punishment. Our results show that people in larger, more complex societies engage in significantly more third-party punishment than people in small-scale societies. PMID:18089534

  6. Atmospheric-pressure small-scale thermal-hydraulic experiment of a PIUS-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, Kanji; Tamaki, Masayoshi; Imai, Satoshi; Kohketsu, Hideto; Anoda, Yoshinari; Murata, Hideo; Kukita, Yutaka.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental small-scale low-pressure setup of a PIUS (Process Inherent Ultimate Safety)-type reactor was used for the examination of the stability during normal operation such as startup and load following operation and of the safety during accidents such as loss-of-feedwater and pump runaway. Automatic feedback pump control system based on differential pressure at lower honeycomb density lock was quite effective to maintain the stratified interface between primary and pool water in the honeycomb density lock during normal operation. The process inherent ultimate safety characteristics of the PIUS-type reactor was confirmed with pump-trip scram at the pump speed limit for the various simulated accidents such as a loss-of-feedwater and pump runaway. (author)

  7. Experimental investigation of a small-scale thermally driven pressurized adsorption chiller

    KAUST Repository

    Loh, Waisoong; Ismail, Azhar Bin; Ng, Kim Choon; Chun, Wongee

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the successful operation of an adsorption cycle in a miniaturized adsorption chiller (AD). The experiments show that the bench-scale pressurized adsorption chiller (PAC) has been successfully designed, commissioned, and tested. Experimental results at various heat fl uxes, half-cycle operation time intervals, and a cooling load of up to 24 W are also presented. A COP ranging from 0.05 to 0.15 is achieved depending on the parameters of the experimental conditions. Most importantly, the cooling performance of the PAC is achieved at a low encasement temperature that is below ambient. Besides having a high cooling density, the PAC has almost no major moving parts except for the fan of the condenser and it permits quiet operation as compared to other active coolers.

  8. Solar thermal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.

    2006-01-01

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m 3 - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become increasingly important as

  9. Solar thermal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.

    2006-07-15

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m{sup 3} - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become

  10. Application of Thermal Network Model to Transient Thermal Analysis of Power Electronic Package Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Ishizuka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there is a growing demand to have smaller and lighter electronic circuits which have greater complexity, multifunctionality, and reliability. High-density multichip packaging technology has been used in order to meet these requirements. The higher the density scale is, the larger the power dissipation per unit area becomes. Therefore, in the designing process, it has become very important to carry out the thermal analysis. However, the heat transport model in multichip modules is very complex, and its treatment is tedious and time consuming. This paper describes an application of the thermal network method to the transient thermal analysis of multichip modules and proposes a simple model for the thermal analysis of multichip modules as a preliminary thermal design tool. On the basis of the result of transient thermal analysis, the validity of the thermal network method and the simple thermal analysis model is confirmed.

  11. The cause of larger local magnitude (Mj) in western Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, H.; Furumura, T.

    2017-12-01

    The local magnitude of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) scale (Mj) in Japan sometimes show a significant discrepancy between Mw. The Mj is calculated using the amplitude of the horizontal component of ground displacement recorded by seismometers with the natural period of T0=5 s using Katsumata et al. (2004). A typical example of such a discrepancy in estimating Mj was an overestimation of the 2000 Western Tottori earthquake (Mj=7.3, Mw=6.7; hereafter referred to as event T). In this study, we examined the discrepancy between Mj and Mw for recent large earthquakes occurring in Japan.We found that the most earthquakes with larger Mj (>Mw) occur in western Japan while the earthquakes in northern Japan show reasonable Mj (=Mw). To understand the cause of such larger Mj for western Japan earthquakes we examined the strong motion record from the K-NET and KiK-net network for the event T and other earthquakes for reference. The observed ground displacement record from the event T shows a distinctive Love wave packet in tangential motion with a dominant period of about T=5 s which propagates long distances without showing strong dispersions. On the other hand, the ground motions from the earthquakes in northeastern Japan do not have such surface wave packet, and attenuation of ground motion is significant. Therefore, the overestimation of the Mj for earthquakes in western Japan may be attributed to efficient generation and propagation properties of Love wave probably relating to the crustal structure of western Japan. To explain this, we then conducted a numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation using 3D sedimentary layer model (JIVSM; Koketsu et al., 2012) and the source model of the event T. The result demonstrated the efficient generation of Love wave from the shallow strike-slip source which propagates long distances in western Japan without significant dispersions. On the other hand, the generation of surface wave was not so efficient when using a

  12. Multi-Scale Drought Analysis using Thermal Remote Sensing: A Case Study in Georgia’s Altamaha River Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, J. M.; Bhat, S.; Choi, M.; Mecikalski, J. R.; Anderson, M. C.

    2009-12-01

    The unprecedented recent droughts in the Southeast US caused reservoir levels to drop dangerously low, elevated wildfire hazard risks, reduced hydropower generation and caused severe economic hardships. Most drought indices are based on recent rainfall or changes in vegetation condition. However in heterogeneous landscapes, soils and vegetation (type and cover) combine to differentially stress regions even under similar weather conditions. This is particularly true for the heterogeneous landscapes and highly variable rainfall in the Southeastern United States. This research examines the spatiotemperal evolution of watershed scale drought using a remotely sensed stress index. Using thermal-infrared imagery, a fully automated inverse model of Atmosphere-Land Exchange (ALEXI), GIS datasets and analysis tools, modeled daily surface moisture stress is examined at a 10-km resolution grid covering central to southern Georgia. Regional results are presented for the 2000-2008 period. The ALEXI evaporative stress index (ESI) is compared to existing regional drought products and validated using local hydrologic measurements in Georgia’s Altamaha River watershed at scales from 10 to 10,000 km2.

  13. Do people like to feel 'neutral'? Exploring the variation of the desired thermal sensation on the ASHRAE scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphreys, Michael A; Hancock, Mary [Oxford Institute for Sustainable Development, Oxford Brookes University, Headington Campus, Gipsy Lane, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-15

    This analysis explores the pattern of variation of the desired thermal sensation on the ASHRAE scale, applying the method of direct enquiry. Data are from studies of thermal comfort at university lectures and in selected dwellings. Respondents reported both their thermal sensation and the sensation they would have desired at that time. The data contain 868 comparisons of the actual and the desired sensation. On 57% of occasions the desired sensation was other than 'neutral'. The respondents did not always desire the same sensation, and the mean desired sensation differed systematically among the respondents. The mean desired sensation depended to some extent on the actual sensation, there being a positive correlation in the region from 'neutral' and 'warm' and a negative correlation outside this region. Sensations on the ASHRAE scale are shown to have more than one meaning. Adjusting the ASHRAE scale to allow for the desired sensation yields different distributions of thermal comfort and different group-optimum temperatures. The adjustment should therefore be applied whenever the ASHRAE scale is used. The implications for thermal simulation and for energy use in buildings are considered. (author)

  14. Thermal energy harvesting for large-scale applications using MWCNT-grafted glass fibers and polycarbonate-MWCNT nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzounis, L., E-mail: ltzounis@physics.auth.gr [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., IPF, Hohe Str. 6, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Helmholtzstraße 10, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrolo (Greece); Liebscher, M.; Stamm, M. [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., IPF, Hohe Str. 6, D-01069 Dresden, Germany and Technische Universität Dresden, Helmholtzstraße 10, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Mäder, E.; Pötschke, P. [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., IPF, Hohe Str. 6, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Logothetidis, S., E-mail: logot@auth.gr [Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrology (LTFN), Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-02-17

    The thermoelectric properties of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) -grafted glass fiber yarns (GF-CNT) and their epoxy model composites, as well as of polymer nanocomposites consisting of a polycarbonate (PC) matrix filled with differently functionalized MWCNTs have been examined. The GF-CNT hierarchical multi-scale structures were prepared by dip coating glass fiber yarns in a solution of carbonyl chloride modified MWCNTs; MWCNT-COCl (at a concentration of 0.5 mg/ml) under Ar atmosphere. The resulting GF-CNT exhibited high electrical conductivity (σ = 2.1×10{sup 3} S/m) due to the dense MWCNT deposited networks. The fiber surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The GF-CNT showed Seebeck coefficient (S); S = 16.8 μV/K, and power factor (P.F); P.F = 0.59 μW/mK−2. The high electrical conductivity of the GF-CNT is a key parameter for an optimum thermoelectric performance, since it can facilitate the flow of the thermally induced charge carriers upon being exposed to a temperature gradient. Polycarbonate/MWCNT nanocomposites were prepared by small-scale melt-mixing process using a microcompounder. Unfunctionalized, carboxyl (-COOH) and hydroxyl (-OH) modified MWCNTs were incorporated in PC at a constant amount of 2.5 wt.%, concentration above the electrical percolation threshold. The amount of MWCNTs was kept low to understand the fundamental aspects of their physical properties and their correlation to the composite morphology, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that different functional groups can affect the thermoelectric performance and the conductivity of the nanocomposites. Namely, the highest Seebeck coefficient (S) was found for the composite containing carboxyl functionalized MWCNTs (11.3 μV/K), due to the highest oxygen content of MWCNTs proven by X-Ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is believed that MWCNT-grafted glass fibers as reinforcements in composite structural

  15. Thermal energy harvesting for large-scale applications using MWCNT-grafted glass fibers and polycarbonate-MWCNT nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzounis, L.; Liebscher, M.; Stamm, M.; Mäder, E.; Pötschke, P.; Logothetidis, S.

    2015-01-01

    The thermoelectric properties of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) -grafted glass fiber yarns (GF-CNT) and their epoxy model composites, as well as of polymer nanocomposites consisting of a polycarbonate (PC) matrix filled with differently functionalized MWCNTs have been examined. The GF-CNT hierarchical multi-scale structures were prepared by dip coating glass fiber yarns in a solution of carbonyl chloride modified MWCNTs; MWCNT-COCl (at a concentration of 0.5 mg/ml) under Ar atmosphere. The resulting GF-CNT exhibited high electrical conductivity (σ = 2.1×10 3 S/m) due to the dense MWCNT deposited networks. The fiber surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The GF-CNT showed Seebeck coefficient (S); S = 16.8 μV/K, and power factor (P.F); P.F = 0.59 μW/mK−2. The high electrical conductivity of the GF-CNT is a key parameter for an optimum thermoelectric performance, since it can facilitate the flow of the thermally induced charge carriers upon being exposed to a temperature gradient. Polycarbonate/MWCNT nanocomposites were prepared by small-scale melt-mixing process using a microcompounder. Unfunctionalized, carboxyl (-COOH) and hydroxyl (-OH) modified MWCNTs were incorporated in PC at a constant amount of 2.5 wt.%, concentration above the electrical percolation threshold. The amount of MWCNTs was kept low to understand the fundamental aspects of their physical properties and their correlation to the composite morphology, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that different functional groups can affect the thermoelectric performance and the conductivity of the nanocomposites. Namely, the highest Seebeck coefficient (S) was found for the composite containing carboxyl functionalized MWCNTs (11.3 μV/K), due to the highest oxygen content of MWCNTs proven by X-Ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is believed that MWCNT-grafted glass fibers as reinforcements in composite structural materials

  16. Bench-scale arc melter for R ampersand D in thermal treatment of mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, P.C.; Grandy, J.D.; Watkins, A.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

    1993-05-01

    A small dc arc melter was designed and constructed to run bench-scale investigations on various aspects of development for high-temperature (1,500-1,800 degrees C) processing of simulated transuranic-contaminated waste and soil located at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Several recent system design and treatment studies have shown that high-temperature melting is the preferred treatment. The small arc melter is needed to establish techniques and procedures (with surrogates) prior to using a similar melter with the transuranic-contaminated wastes in appropriate facilities at the site. This report documents the design and construction, starting and heating procedures, and tests evaluating the melter's ability to process several waste types stored at the RWMC. It is found that a thin graphite strip provides reliable starting with initial high current capability for partially melting the soil/waste mixture. The heating procedure includes (1) the initial high current-low voltage mode, (2) a low current-high voltage mode that commences after some slag has formed and arcing dominates over the receding graphite conduction path, and (3) a predominantly Joule heating mode during which the current can be increased within the limits to maintain relatively quiescent operation. Several experiments involving the melting of simulated wastes are discussed. Energy balance, slag temperature, and electrode wear measurements are presented. Recommendations for further refinements to enhance its processing capabilities are identified. Future studies anticipated with the arc melter include waste form processing development; dissolution, retention, volatilization, and collection for transuranic and low-level radionuclides, as well as high vapor pressure metals; electrode material development to minimize corrosion and erosion; refractory corrosion and/or skull formation effects; crucible or melter geometry; metal oxidation; and melt reduction/oxidation (redox) conditions

  17. Bench-scale arc melter for R&D in thermal treatment of mixed wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, P.C.; Grandy, J.D.; Watkins, A.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

    1993-05-01

    A small dc arc melter was designed and constructed to run bench-scale investigations on various aspects of development for high-temperature (1,500-1,800{degrees}C) processing of simulated transuranic-contaminated waste and soil located at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Several recent system design and treatment studies have shown that high-temperature melting is the preferred treatment. The small arc melter is needed to establish techniques and procedures (with surrogates) prior to using a similar melter with the transuranic-contaminated wastes in appropriate facilities at the site. This report documents the design and construction, starting and heating procedures, and tests evaluating the melter`s ability to process several waste types stored at the RWMC. It is found that a thin graphite strip provides reliable starting with initial high current capability for partially melting the soil/waste mixture. The heating procedure includes (1) the initial high current-low voltage mode, (2) a low current-high voltage mode that commences after some slag has formed and arcing dominates over the receding graphite conduction path, and (3) a predominantly Joule heating mode during which the current can be increased within the limits to maintain relatively quiescent operation. Several experiments involving the melting of simulated wastes are discussed. Energy balance, slag temperature, and electrode wear measurements are presented. Recommendations for further refinements to enhance its processing capabilities are identified. Future studies anticipated with the arc melter include waste form processing development; dissolution, retention, volatilization, and collection for transuranic and low-level radionuclides, as well as high vapor pressure metals; electrode material development to minimize corrosion and erosion; refractory corrosion and/or skull formation effects; crucible or melter geometry; metal oxidation; and melt reduction/oxidation (redox) conditions.

  18. Assessing the effusion rate of lava flows from their thermal radiated energy: theoretical study and lab-scale experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garel, F.; Kaminski, E.; Tait, S.; Limare, A.

    2010-12-01

    A quantitative monitoring of lava flow is required to manage a volcanic crisis, in order to assess where the flow will go, and when will it stop. As the spreading of lava flows is mainly controlled by its rheology and the eruptive mass flux, the key question is how to evaluate them during the eruption (rather than afterwards.) A relationship between the lava flow temperature and the eruption rate is likely to exist, based on the first-order argument that higher eruption rates should correspond to larger energy radiated by a lava flow. The semi-empirical formula developed by Harris and co-workers (e.g. Harris et al., 2007) is used to estimate lava flow rate from satellite observations. However, the complete theoretical bases of this technique, especially its domain of validity, remain to be firmly established. Here we propose a theoretical study of the cooling of a viscous axisymmetric gravity current fed at constant flux rate to investigate whether or not this approach can and/or should be refined and/or modify to better assess flow rates. Our study focuses on the influence of boundary conditions at the surface of the flow, where cooling can occur both by radiation and convection, and at the base of the flow. Dimensionless numbers are introduced to quantify the relative interplay between the model parameters, such as the lava flow rate and the efficiency of the various cooling processes (conduction, convection, radiation.) We obtain that the thermal evolution of the flow can be described as a two-stage evolution. After a transient phase of dynamic cooling, the flow reaches a steady state, characterized by a balance between surface and base cooling and heat advection in the flow, in which the surface temperature structure is constant. The duration of the transient phase and the radiated energy in the steady regime are shown to be a function of the dimensionless numbers. In the case of lava flows, we obtain that the steady state regime is reached after a few days. In

  19. Multi-Scale Thermal Heat Tracer Tests for Characterizing Transport Processes and Flow Channelling in Fractured Media: Theory and Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Bernardie, J.; Klepikova, M.; Bour, O.; Le Borgne, T.; Dentz, M.; Guihéneuf, N.; Gerard, M. F.; Lavenant, N.

    2017-12-01

    The characterization of flow and transport in fractured media is particularly challenging because hydraulic conductivity and transport properties are often strongly dependent on the geometric structure of the fracture surfaces. Here we show how thermal tracer tests may be an excellent complement to conservative solute tracer tests to infer fracture geometry and flow channeling. We performed a series of thermal tracer tests at different scales in a crystalline rock aquifer at the experimental site of Ploemeur (H+ observatory network). The first type of thermal tracer tests are push-pull tracer tests at different scales. The temporal and spatial scaling of heat recovery, measured from thermal breakthrough curves, shows a clear signature of flow channeling. In particular, the late time tailing of heat recovery under channeled flow is shown to diverge from the T(t) α t-1,5 behavior expected for the classical parallel plate model and follow the scaling T(t) α 1/t(logt)2 for a simple channel modeled as a tube. Flow channeling is also manifested on the spatial scaling of heat recovery as flow channeling affects the decay of the thermal breakthrough peak amplitude and the increase of the peak time with scale. The second type of thermal tracer tests are flow-through tracer tests where a pulse of hot water was injected in a fracture isolated by a double straddle packer while pumping at the same flow rate in another fracture at a distance of about 10 meters to create a dipole flow field. Comparison with a solute tracer test performed under the same conditions also present a clear signature of flow channeling. We derive analytical expressions for the retardation and decay of the thermal breakthrough peak amplitude for different fracture geometries and show that the observed differences between thermal and solute breakthrough can be explained only by channelized flow. These results suggest that heat transport is much more sensitive to fracture heterogeneity and flow

  20. Uncertainties in coupled thermal-hydrological processes associated with the drift scale test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Y.W.

    2002-01-01

    Understanding thermally driven coupled hydrological, mechanical, and chemical processes in unsaturated fractured tuff is essential for evaluating the performance of the potential radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Drift Scale Test (DST), intended for acquiring such an understanding of these processes, has generated a huge volume of temperature and moisture redistribution data. Sophisticated thermal hydrological (TH) conceptual models have yielded a good fit between simulation results and those measured data. However, some uncertainties in understanding the TH processes associated with the DST still exist. This paper evaluates these uncertainties and provides quantitative estimates of the range of these uncertainties. Of particular interest for the DST are the uncertainties resulting from the unmonitored loss of vapor through an open bulkhead of the test. There was concern that the outcome from the test might have been significantly altered by these losses. Using alternative conceptual models, we illustrate that predicted mean temperatures from the DST are within 1 degree C of the measured mean temperatures through the first two years of heating. The simulated spatial and temporal evolution of drying and condensation fronts is found to be qualitatively consistent with measured saturation data. Energy and mass balance computation shows that no more than 13 percent of the input energy is lost because of vapor leaving the test domain through the bulkhead. The change in average saturation in fractures is also relatively small. For a hypothetical situation in which no vapor is allowed to exit through the bulkhead, the simulated average fracture saturation is not qualitatively different enough to be discerned by measured moisture redistribution data. This leads us to conclude that the DST, despite the uncertainties associated with open field testing, has provided an excellent understanding of the TH processes

  1. Magnetic properties of nanocrystalline CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} synthesized by thermal plasma in large scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawale, A.B.; Kanhe, N.S. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Patil, K.R. [Center for Materials Characterizations, National Chemical Laboratory, Dr. Hommi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India); Reddy, V.R.; Gupta, A. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Indore Centre, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India); Kale, B.B. [Center for Materials for Electronics Technology, Department of Information Technology, Government of India, Panchawati, Off Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India); Bhoraskar, S.V. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Mathe, V.L., E-mail: vlmathe@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Das, A.K. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2012-12-14

    The paper reports the large scale synthesis of nanoparticles of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} using thermal plasma reactor by gas phase condensation method. The yield of formation was found to be around 15 g h{sup -1}. The magnetic properties of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, synthesized at different reactor powers, were investigated in view of studying the effect of operating parameters of plasma reactor on the structural reorganization leading to the different cation distribution. The values of saturation magnetization, coercivity and remanent magnetization were found to be influenced by input power in thermal plasma. Although the increase in saturation magnetization was marginal (61 emu g{sup -1} to 70 emu g{sup -1}) with increasing plasma power; a significant increase in the coercivity (552 Oe to 849 Oe) and remanent magnetization (16 emu g{sup -1} to 26 emu g{sup -1}) were also noticed. The Moessbauer spectra showed mixed spinel structure and canted spin order for the as synthesized nanoparticles. The detailed analysis of cation distribution using the Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy leads to the conclusion that the sample synthesized at an optimized power shows the different site selective states. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A rapid synthesis method for synthesizing magnetic nanoparticles of cobalt ferrite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average particle size ranges between 25 and 40 nm; as revealed by the FESEM analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic properties are influenced by different operating parameters.

  2. Observation of scaling laws of ion confining potential versus thermal barrier depth and of axial particle confinement time in the tandem mirror GAMMA 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, T.; Inutake, M.; Ishii, K.

    1988-01-01

    In the thermal barrier tandem mirror GAMMA 10, the scaling law governing the enhancement of the ion confining potential, φ c , resulting from thermal barrier formation, is obtained experimentally, and is consistently interpreted in terms of the weak and strong ECH theories set up by Cohen and co-workers. The scaling law on the axial particle confinement time, τ pparallel , related to this φ c formation, is also demonstrated in detail; it is in good agreement with the Pastukhov theory as modified by Cohen and co-workers. This scaling is verified at any radial position in the core plasma region and at any time through the various stages of a discharge; this indicates a scaling with drastic improvement of τ pparallel , due to the potential formation in the tandem mirror plasma. (author). 41 refs, 12 figs

  3. Role of band 3 in the erythrocyte membrane structural changes under thermal fluctuations -multi scale modeling considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajic-Lijakovic, Ivana

    2015-12-01

    An attempt was made to discuss and connect various modeling approaches on various time and space scales which have been proposed in the literature in order to shed further light on the erythrocyte membrane rearrangement caused by the cortex-lipid bilayer coupling under thermal fluctuations. Roles of the main membrane constituents: (1) the actin-spectrin cortex, (2) the lipid bilayer, and (3) the trans membrane protein band 3 and their course-consequence relations were considered in the context of the cortex non linear stiffening and corresponding anomalous nature of energy dissipation. The fluctuations induce alternating expansion and compression of the membrane parts in order to ensure surface and volume conservation. The membrane structural changes were considered within two time regimes. The results indicate that the cortex non linear stiffening and corresponding anomalous nature of energy dissipation are related to the spectrin flexibility distribution and the rate of its changes. The spectrin flexibility varies from purely flexible to semi flexible. It is influenced by: (1) the number of band 3 molecules attached to single spectrin filaments, and (2) phosphorylation of the actin-junctions. The rate of spectrin flexibility changes depends on the band 3 molecules rearrangement.

  4. Annual spatiotemporal migration schedules in three larger insectivorous birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lars Bo; Jensen, Niels Odder; Willemoes, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of spatiotemporal migration patterns is important for our understanding of migration ecology and ultimately conservation of migratory species. We studied the annual migration schedules of European nightjar, a large nocturnal insectivore and compared it with two other larger ...

  5. Listing of nuclear power plant larger than 100 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, B.

    1976-03-01

    This report contains a list of all nuclear power plants larger than 100 MWe, printed out from the Argus Data Bank at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. The plants are listed by NSSS supply. (M.S.)

  6. Thermalized axion inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Z.; Notari, Alessio, E-mail: rferreira@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: notari@ub.edu [Departament de Física Quàntica i Astrofísica i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, 1, E-08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of inflationary models with a coupling of the inflaton φ to gauge fields of the form φ F F-tilde / f , as in the case of axions. It is known that this leads to an instability, with exponential amplification of gauge fields, controlled by the parameter ξ= φ-dot /(2 fH ), which can strongly affect the generation of cosmological perturbations and even the background. We show that scattering rates involving gauge fields can become larger than the expansion rate H , due to the very large occupation numbers, and create a thermal bath of particles of temperature T during inflation. In the thermal regime, energy is transferred to smaller scales, radically modifying the predictions of this scenario. We thus argue that previous constraints on ξ are alleviated. If the gauge fields have Standard Model interactions, which naturally provides reheating, they thermalize already at ξ∼>2.9, before perturbativity constraints and also before backreaction takes place. In absence of SM interactions (i.e. for a dark photon), we find that gauge fields and inflaton perturbations thermalize if ξ∼>3.4; however, observations require ξ∼>6, which is above the perturbativity and backreaction bounds and so a dedicated study is required. After thermalization, though, the system should evolve non-trivially due to the competition between the instability and the gauge field thermal mass. If the thermal mass and the instabilities equilibrate, we expect an equilibrium temperature of T {sub eq} ≅ ξ H / g-bar where g-bar is the effective gauge coupling. Finally, we estimate the spectrum of perturbations if φ is thermal and find that the tensor to scalar ratio is suppressed by H /(2 T ), if tensors do not thermalize.

  7. Thermalized axion inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Z.; Notari, Alessio

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of inflationary models with a coupling of the inflaton phi to gauge fields of the form phi F tilde F/f, as in the case of axions. It is known that this leads to an instability, with exponential amplification of gauge fields, controlled by the parameter ξ= dot phi/(2fH), which can strongly affect the generation of cosmological perturbations and even the background. We show that scattering rates involving gauge fields can become larger than the expansion rate H, due to the very large occupation numbers, and create a thermal bath of particles of temperature T during inflation. In the thermal regime, energy is transferred to smaller scales, radically modifying the predictions of this scenario. We thus argue that previous constraints on ξ are alleviated. If the gauge fields have Standard Model interactions, which naturally provides reheating, they thermalize already at ξgtrsim2.9, before perturbativity constraints and also before backreaction takes place. In absence of SM interactions (i.e. for a dark photon), we find that gauge fields and inflaton perturbations thermalize if ξgtrsim3.4 however, observations require ξgtrsim6, which is above the perturbativity and backreaction bounds and so a dedicated study is required. After thermalization, though, the system should evolve non-trivially due to the competition between the instability and the gauge field thermal mass. If the thermal mass and the instabilities equilibrate, we expect an equilibrium temperature of Teq simeq ξ H/bar g where bar g is the effective gauge coupling. Finally, we estimate the spectrum of perturbations if phi is thermal and find that the tensor to scalar ratio is suppressed by H/(2T), if tensors do not thermalize.

  8. Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-6 test data report: thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M.T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure? (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium (∼ φ 30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength is being addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus measures the fracture strength of the crust while it is either at room temperature or above, the latter state being achieved with a heating element placed below the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the sixth water ingression test, designated SSWICS-6. This test investigated

  9. A comparative scanning electron microscopy study between hand instrument, ultrasonic scaling and erbium doped:Yttirum aluminum garnet laser on root surface: A morphological and thermal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitul Kumar Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Scaling and root planing is one of the most commonly used procedures for the treatment of periodontal diseases. Removal of calculus using conventional hand instruments is incomplete and rather time consuming. In search of more efficient and less difficult instrumentation, investigators have proposed lasers as an alternative or as adjuncts to scaling and root planing. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of erbium doped: Yttirum aluminum garnet (Er:YAG laser scaling and root planing alone or as an adjunct to hand and ultrasonic instrumentation. Subjects and Methods: A total of 75 freshly extracted periodontally involved single rooted teeth were collected. Teeth were randomly divided into five treatment groups having 15 teeth each: Hand scaling only, ultrasonic scaling only, Er:YAG laser scaling only, hand scaling + Er:YAG laser scaling and ultrasonic scaling + Er:YAG laser scaling. Specimens were subjected to scanning electron microscopy and photographs were evaluated by three examiners who were blinded to the study. Parameters included were remaining calculus index, loss of tooth substance index, roughness loss of tooth substance index, presence or absence of smear layer, thermal damage and any other morphological damage. Results: Er:YAG laser treated specimens showed similar effectiveness in calculus removal to the other test groups whereas tooth substance loss and tooth surface roughness was more on comparison with other groups. Ultrasonic treated specimens showed better results as compared to other groups with different parameters. However, smear layer presence was seen more with hand and ultrasonic groups. Very few laser treated specimens showed thermal damage and morphological change. Interpretation and Conclusion: In our study, ultrasonic scaling specimen have shown root surface clean and practically unaltered. On the other hand, hand instrument have produced a plane surface

  10. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Hydrological Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2A Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, Robin N.

    2005-02-01

    lead to the conclusion that diffusion of vapor play an important role in flow and transport in the dry-out zone, since vapor mass fraction reaches its maximum in that region. Vapor flows by advection and by vapor diffusion/dispersion. Advection is very efficient in the high permeability fractured rock; however, diffusion is also a very efficient transport mechanism due to the high diffusivity of vapor in air. The NRC research team examined two grid block sizes of 04 m and 5.0 m as well as two infiltration rates and the dual permeability model (DKM) with and without the active fracture model (AFM). An increase in model block size allowed relatively large infiltration rates (3.0 mdyr) while maintaining a moderate ambient matrix saturation of 0.90. There was significant difference in the predicted matrix saturations between the small block model and the large block model as indicated by the larger dry-out zone in the small block model especially at four years after the start of heating. The sensors in borehole 160, located between two wing heaters, display a wide variety of responses depending on their location with respect to the heaters. The ones located directly above the wing heaters exhibit strong thermal perturbation. Both measured and simulated temperature results have relatively short heat-pipe signals, suggesting that pore water is boiled off in a relatively short time period because of close proximity to the heaters

  11. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Hydrological Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2A Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Robin N. [Bechtel SAlC Company, Las Vegas (US)] (comp.)

    2005-02-15

    cases lead to the conclusion that diffusion of vapor play an important role in flow and transport in the dry-out zone, since vapor mass fraction reaches its maximum in that region. Vapor flows by advection and by vapor diffusion/dispersion. Advection is very efficient in the high permeability fractured rock; however, diffusion is also a very efficient transport mechanism due to the high diffusivity of vapor in air. The NRC research team examined two grid block sizes of 04 m and 5.0 m as well as two infiltration rates and the dual permeability model (DKM) with and without the active fracture model (AFM). An increase in model block size allowed relatively large infiltration rates (3.0 mdyr) while maintaining a moderate ambient matrix saturation of 0.90. There was significant difference in the predicted matrix saturations between the small block model and the large block model as indicated by the larger dry-out zone in the small block model especially at four years after the start of heating. The sensors in borehole 160, located between two wing heaters, display a wide variety of responses depending on their location with respect to the heaters. The ones located directly above the wing heaters exhibit strong thermal perturbation. Both measured and simulated temperature results have relatively short heat-pipe signals, suggesting that pore water is boiled off in a relatively short time period because of close proximity to the heaters.

  12. Multi-method, multi-scale geophysical observations in the Obsidian Pool Thermal Area, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, W. S.; Carr, B.; Pasquet, S.; Sims, K. W. W.; Dickey, K.

    2016-12-01

    Despite the prominence of Yellowstone as the world's most active hydrothermal province, relatively little is known about the plumbing systems that link deeper hydrothermal fluids to the charismatic hot springs, geysers and mud pots at the surface. We present the results of a multi-method, multi-scale geophysical investigation of the Obsidian Pool Thermal Area (OPTA) in Yellowstone National Park. OPTA hosts acid-sulfate hot springs and mud pots with relatively low pH. We present the results of seismic refraction, electrical resistivity, time-domain EM (TEM), soil conductivity meter (EMI), and GPR data acquired in July 2016. There is a strong contrast in physical properties in the upper 50 m of the subsurface between the low-lying hydrothermal area and surrounding hills: the hydrothermal area has much lower seismic velocities ( 1 km/s vs 3 km/s) and electrical resistivity ( 20 ohm-m vs 300 ohm-m). A prominent zone of very low resistivity (<10 ohm-m) exists at about 20 m depth beneath all hydrothermal features. Poisson's ratio, calculated from P-wave refraction tomography and surface wave inversions, shows low values beneath the "frying pan," where gas is emerging in small fumaroles, suggesting that Poisson's ratio is an effective "gas detector" in hydrothermal areas. Near-surface resistivity mapped from EMI shows a strong correlation with hydrothermal areas previously mapped by heat flow, with areas of high heat flow generally having low resistivity near the surface. Two exceptions are (1) the "frying pan," which shows a central area of high resistivity (corresponding to escaping gas) surrounding by a halo of low resistivity, and (2) a broad area of low resistivity connecting the hydrothermal centers to the lake, which may be clay deposits. TEM data penetrate up to 200 m in depth and suggest that a reservoir of hydrothermal fluids may underlie the entire area, including beneath the forested hills, at depths greater than 100 m, but that they rise toward the surface in

  13. Multi-scale cellulose based new bio-aerogel composites with thermal super-insulating and tunable mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seantier, Bastien; Bendahou, Dounia; Bendahou, Abdelkader; Grohens, Yves; Kaddami, Hamid

    2016-03-15

    Bio-composite aerogels based on bleached cellulose fibers (BCF) and cellulose nanoparticles having various morphological and physico-chemical characteristics are prepared by a freeze-drying technique and characterized. The various composite aerogels obtained were compared to a BCF aerogel used as the reference. Severe changes in the material morphology were observed by SEM and AFM due to a variation of the cellulose nanoparticle properties such as the aspect ratio, the crystalline index and the surface charge density. BCF fibers form a 3D network and they are surrounded by the cellulose nanoparticle thin films inducing a significant reduction of the size of the pores in comparison with a neat BCF based aerogel. BET analyses confirm the appearance of a new organization structure with pores of nanometric sizes. As a consequence, a decrease of the thermal conductivities is observed from 28mWm(-1)K(-1) (BCF aerogel) to 23mWm(-1)K(-1) (bio-composite aerogel), which is below the air conductivity (25mWm(-1)K(-1)). This improvement of the insulation properties for composite materials is more pronounced for aerogels based on cellulose nanoparticles having a low crystalline index and high surface charge (NFC-2h). The significant improvement of their insulation properties allows the bio-composite aerogels to enter the super-insulating materials family. The characteristics of cellulose nanoparticles also influence the mechanical properties of the bio-composite aerogels. A significant improvement of the mechanical properties under compression is obtained by self-organization, yielding a multi-scale architecture of the cellulose nanoparticles in the bio-composite aerogels. In this case, the mechanical property is more dependent on the morphology of the composite aerogel rather than the intrinsic characteristics of the cellulose nanoparticles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dispersal, phenology and predicted abundance of the larger grain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The phenology and dispersal of the larger grain borer (LGB) in Africa is described, and comparisons are made between prediction of LGB numbers from laboratory studies and predictions from multiple linear models derived from trapping data in the field. The models were developed in Mexico and Kenya, using ...

  15. Listing of nuclear power plant larger than 100 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, B.

    1975-06-01

    This report contains a list of all nuclear power plants larger than 100 MWe, printed out from the Argus Data Bank at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. The plants are listed alphabetically. The report contains also a plant ranking list, where the plants are listed by the load factor (12 months) (M.S.)

  16. Listing of nuclear power plant larger than 100 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, B.

    1975-12-01

    This report contains a list of all nuclear power plants larger than 100 MWe, printed out from the Argus Data Bank at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. The plants are listed by country. The report contains also a plant ranking list, where the plants are listed by the load factor (12 months). (M.S.)

  17. The MUSIC of galaxy clusters - I. Baryon properties and scaling relations of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembolini, Federico; Yepes, Gustavo; De Petris, Marco; Gottlöber, Stefan; Lamagna, Luca; Comis, Barbara

    2013-02-01

    background matter density: we show that the latter definition is more successful in probing the same fraction of the virial radius at different redshifts, providing a more reliable derivation of the time evolution of integrated quantities. We also present in this paper a detailed analysis of the scaling relations of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect derived from MUSIC clusters. The integrated SZ brightness, Y, is related to the cluster total mass, M, as well as, the M - Y counterpart which is more suitable for observational applications. Both laws are consistent with predictions from the self-similar model, showing a very low scatter which is σlog Y ≃ 0.04 and even a smaller one (σlog M ≃ 0.03) for the inverse M-Y relation. The effects of the gas fraction on the Y-M scaling relation are also studied. At high overdensities, the dispersion of the gas fractions introduces non-negligible deviation from self-similarity, which is directly related to the fgas-M relation. The presence of a possible redshift dependence on the Y-M scaling relation is also explored. No significant evolution of the SZ relations is found at lower overdensities, regardless of the definition of overdensity used.

  18. Editorial Commentary: The Larger Holes or Larger Number of Holes We Drill in the Coracoid, the Weaker the Coracoid Becomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Paul

    2016-06-01

    The larger holes or larger number of holes we drill in the coracoid, the weaker the coracoid becomes. Thus, minimizing bone holes (both size and number) is required to lower risk of coracoid process fracture, in patients in whom transosseous shoulder acromioclavicular joint reconstruction is indicated. A single 2.4-mm-diameter tunnel drilled through both the clavicle and the coracoid lowers the risk of fracture, but the risk cannot be entirely eliminated. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Chemical Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2D Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, Robin N.

    2005-02-01

    Task 2D concerns numerical simulation of the coupled THC modeling of the DST test at Yucca mountain, with given results for geologic, thermal, hydrologic, mineralogic and petrologic characterization, as-built configuration of the test block of DST, including locations of various sensors and measuring instruments and the plans for heating and cooling, including expected heater powers at various times, and compared with geochemical measurements performed on gas, water, and mineral samples collected from the DST. Two teams of DOE/LBNL (USA) and JNC (Japan) participated the task with different approaches. The LBNL model represented the fractures and rock matrix by a dual-continuum concept, with the mineral-water-gas reactions treated by primarily kinetic and a few equilibrium reactions. The JNC model represented the fractures and matrix as a single effective continuum, with equilibrium mineral-water reactions controlling the chemical evolution (as well as considering aqueous species transport). The JNC team performed the coupled THC simulation of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test by the coupled THM code 'THAMES', mass transport code 'Dtransu' and geochemical code 'PHREEQE' under coupling system code 'COUPLYS'. The LBNL team simulated the THC processes include coupling between heat, water, and vapor flow; aqueous and gaseous species transport; kinetic and equilibrium mineral-water reactions; and feedback of mineral precipitation/dissolution on porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure, with the FDM code TOUGHREACT V3.0. In general, both models capture the temperature evolution in the rock fairly well, although the JNC model yielded a closer match to the initial temperature rise in the rock, probably due to the better site-specific thermal data. Both models showed the contrasting solubility effects of increasing temperature on calcite and silica solubility; yet the dual continuum approach better represented the effects of the boiling and condensation periods on

  20. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Chemical Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2D Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Robin N. [Bechtel SAlC Company, Las Vegas (US)] (comp.)

    2005-02-15

    Task 2D concerns numerical simulation of the coupled THC modeling of the DST test at Yucca mountain, with given results for geologic, thermal, hydrologic, mineralogic and petrologic characterization, as-built configuration of the test block of DST, including locations of various sensors and measuring instruments and the plans for heating and cooling, including expected heater powers at various times, and compared with geochemical measurements performed on gas, water, and mineral samples collected from the DST. Two teams of DOE/LBNL (USA) and JNC (Japan) participated the task with different approaches. The LBNL model represented the fractures and rock matrix by a dual-continuum concept, with the mineral-water-gas reactions treated by primarily kinetic and a few equilibrium reactions. The JNC model represented the fractures and matrix as a single effective continuum, with equilibrium mineral-water reactions controlling the chemical evolution (as well as considering aqueous species transport). The JNC team performed the coupled THC simulation of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test by the coupled THM code 'THAMES', mass transport code 'Dtransu' and geochemical code 'PHREEQE' under coupling system code 'COUPLYS'. The LBNL team simulated the THC processes include coupling between heat, water, and vapor flow; aqueous and gaseous species transport; kinetic and equilibrium mineral-water reactions; and feedback of mineral precipitation/dissolution on porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure, with the FDM code TOUGHREACT V3.0. In general, both models capture the temperature evolution in the rock fairly well, although the JNC model yielded a closer match to the initial temperature rise in the rock, probably due to the better site-specific thermal data. Both models showed the contrasting solubility effects of increasing temperature on calcite and silica solubility; yet the dual continuum approach better represented the effects of

  1. Design of a small scale stand-alone solar thermal co-generation plant for an isolated region in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelhady, Suzan; Borello, Domenico; Tortora, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • In the selected area, connection to the grid is very difficult and expensive. • The integrated unsteady CSP/ORC system, was modeled TRNSYS. • Assuming a CSP of 200,000 m 2 , 6 MW e and 21.5 MW th can be obtained. • The energy is sufficient to feed more than 3,300 rural users and two big factories. • PER = 1.43, LCOE = 1.25 USD/kW h and the GHG emissions are reduced of 7300 toe/year. - Abstract: Most of Egypt’s population is concentrated in the Nile Valley (5% of Egypt’s area), while the western desert occupies an area of 50% of the total area of Egypt with a small number of inhabitants. The New Valley is the largest governorates in Egypt which occupies 45.8% of the total area of the Country and 65% of the Western Desert and it is the least densely populated governorate in Egypt. However, New Valley has started to receive the migrated people from the Nile valley and Delta region and the demand for the energy is continuously increasing. However, the rural area in New Valley still suffers from lack of access to energy services. The very high transmission losses and costs are the main challenges for electrification in this area. Then, it is worth to investigate the opportunities for distributed energy generation. This area of Egypt receives some of the highest solar radiation in the world (up to 3000 kW h per square meters per year), making it a prime location for use of this resource. In this study, performance and economic assessment of a small scale stand-alone solar thermal co-generation plant using diathermic oil is presented. This configuration is considered as a promising and sustainable solution to provide electricity and heat to an isolated area satisfying the local loads. Parabolic trough plant has been modeled in TRNSYS simulation environment integrated with the Solar Thermal Electric Components (STEC) model library. Both solar and power cycle performances have been modeled based on the solar energy data of the plant site. The

  2. Final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC appendices. Volume 6. Appendix VI-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils dated September 1994 contains LEFPC Appendices, Volume 6, Appendix VI - X. These appendices cover the following areas: chain of custody, miscellaneous process calculations (residence time and orifice plate calculations), waste management (mercury and radiation confirmatory testing before and after final verification run), health and safety (training, respirator fit test and radiation work permits), and transportation (soil receipt documentation)

  3. Morphological study of polymer surfaces exposed to non-thermal plasma based on contact angle and the use of scaling laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, T., E-mail: tsfelix81@gmail.com [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Cassini, F.A.; Benetoli, L.O.B. [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Dotto, M.E.R. [Physics Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Debacher, N.A. [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Polymeric surfaces were etched using non-thermal plasma at different intensities. • Polymers of low mechanical hardness reached the saturation level faster. • A mathematical model based on scaling laws was proposed. - Abstract: The experiments presented in this communication have the purpose to elaborate an explanation for the morphological evolution of the growth of polymeric surfaces provided by the treatment of non-thermal plasma. According to the roughness analysis and the model proposed by scaling laws it is possible relate to a predictable or merely random effect. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and poly(etherether)ketone (PEEK) samples were exposed to a non-thermal plasma discharge and the resulting surfaces roughness were analyzed based on the measurements from contact angle, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy coupled with scaling laws analysis which can help to describe and understand the dynamic of formation of a wide variety of rough surfaces. The roughness, R{sub RMS} (RMS- Root Mean Square) values for polymer surface range between 19.8 nm and 110.9 nm. The contact angle and the AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) measurements as a function of the plasma exposure time were in agreement with both polar and dispersive components according to the surface roughness and also with the morphology evaluated described by Wolf-Villain model, with proximate values of α between 0.91{sub (PET)} and 0.88{sub (PEEK)}, β = 0.25{sub (PET)} and z = 3,64{sub (PET)}.

  4. Growth of wrinkle-free graphene on texture-controlled platinum films and thermal-assisted transfer of large-scale patterned graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Kyung; Kwak, Jinsung; Park, Soon-Dong; Yun, Hyung Duk; Kim, Se-Yang; Jung, Minbok; Kim, Sung Youb; Park, Kibog; Kang, Seoktae; Kim, Sung-Dae; Park, Dong-Yeon; Lee, Dong-Su; Hong, Suk-Kyoung; Shin, Hyung-Joon; Kwon, Soon-Yong

    2015-01-27

    Growth of large-scale patterned, wrinkle-free graphene and the gentle transfer technique without further damage are most important requirements for the practical use of graphene. Here we report the growth of wrinkle-free, strictly uniform monolayer graphene films by chemical vapor deposition on a platinum (Pt) substrate with texture-controlled giant grains and the thermal-assisted transfer of large-scale patterned graphene onto arbitrary substrates. The designed Pt surfaces with limited numbers of grain boundaries and improved surface perfectness as well as small thermal expansion coefficient difference to graphene provide a venue for uniform growth of monolayer graphene with wrinkle-free characteristic. The thermal-assisted transfer technique allows the complete transfer of large-scale patterned graphene films onto arbitrary substrates without any ripples, tears, or folds. The transferred graphene shows high crystalline quality with an average carrier mobility of ∼ 5500 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature. Furthermore, this transfer technique shows a high tolerance to variations in types and morphologies of underlying substrates.

  5. Analysis framework to calibrate a numerical model to simulate the thermal test of a 1:2 scale dual purpose cask under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Carlos A.J.; Libardi, Rosani M.P.; Marcelino, Sergio; Oliveira, Carlos Alberto de; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    This work describes thermal analysis framework including a 3D model and some 2D models to be performed in a 1:2 scale model of a dual-purpose cask to transport and to store spent fuel elements from research reactors to assess the behavior of the cask structure and materials when submitted to heating and drop tests. The analyses should consider all non-linearities involved like the lead phase change and thermal contacts, beside the variation of material properties with the temperature, the air inside it and the heat transfer phenomena (conduction, convection and irradiation) to reproduce the experimental results already obtained in a 1:2 model. A full 3D finite element model takes several hours to run just one analysis. To speed up the analyses to evaluate the significance of some parameters like the emissivity, contact resistance and heat transfer phenomena, among others, two 2D models are planned: one simulating a vertical cut by a diametral plane and another one simulating a horizontal cut by a plane at the cask half height. These 2D models are predicted to run fast enough to allow several analyses in a short period of time and to define options and the best parameters values to match the already obtained experimental results. As this thermal test can not be extrapolated to an 1:1 scale, these parameter values will be used in the final 3D model analysis and also in the full scale model. (author)

  6. SME routes for innovation collaboration with larger enterprises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Tove

    2017-01-01

    The research in this paper reveals how Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) can contribute to industry competiveness through collaboration with larger enterprises. The research is based on a longitudinal qualitative case study starting in 2011 with 10 SME offshore wind farm suppliers...... and follow-up interviews in 2013. The research continued with a second approach in 2014 within operation and maintenance (O&M) through focus group interviews and subsequent individual interviews with 20 enterprises and a seminar in May 2015. The findings reveal opportunities and challenges for SMEs according...... to three different routes for cooperation and collaboration with larger enterprises: demand-driven cooperation, supplier-driven cooperation and partnerdriven collaboration. The SME contribution to innovation and competiveness is different within the three routes and ranges from providing specific knowledge...

  7. Collision cascades and sputtering induced by larger cluster ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigmund, P.

    1988-01-01

    Recent experimental work on larger cluster impact on solid surfaces suggests large deviations from the standard case of additive sputter yields both in the nuclear and electronic stopping regime. The paper concentrates on elastic collision cascades. In addition to very pronounced spike effects, two phenomena are pointed out that are specific to cluster bombardment. Multiple hits of cluster atoms on one and the same target atom may result in recoil atoms that move faster than the maximum recoil speed for monomer bombardment at the same projectile speed. This effect is important when the atomic mass of a beam atom is less than that of a target atom, M 1 2 . In the opposite case, M 1 >> M 2 , collisions between beam particles may accelerate some beam particles and slow down others. Some consequences are mentioned. Remarks on the nuclear stopping power of larger clusters and on electronic sputtering by cluster bombardment conclude the paper. 38 refs., 2 figs

  8. How do environmental policies fit within larger strategic planning processes

    OpenAIRE

    Crowe, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explores how environmental policies fit within larger strategic processes relevant to sport management and development. It identifies key policy areas such as environmental impact assessment, sustainable land use planning, environmental protection and visitor impact management. Good practice and guidelines which will enable sport managers to integrate their work with these environmental policies are explored. Detailed guidance on design and longer term management and maintenance ...

  9. Base stock policies with degraded service to larger orders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Bisheng; Larsen, Christian

    We study an inventory system controlled by a base stock policy assuming a compound renewal demand process. We extend the base stock policy by incorporating rules for degrading the service of larger orders. Two specific rules are considered, denoted Postpone(q,t) and Split(q), respectively. The aim...... of using these rules is to achieve a given order fill rate of the regular orders (those of size less than or equal to the parameter q) having less inventory. We develop mathematical expressions for the performance measures order fill rate (of the regular orders) and average on-hand inventory level. Based...

  10. Behavior and Body Patterns of the Larger Pacific Striped Octopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy L Caldwell

    Full Text Available Over thirty years ago anecdotal accounts of the undescribed Larger Pacific Striped Octopus suggested behaviors previously unknown for octopuses. Beak-to-beak mating, dens shared by mating pairs, inking during mating and extended spawning were mentioned in publications, and enticed generations of cephalopod biologists. In 2012-2014 we were able to obtain several live specimens of this species, which remains without a formal description. All of the unique behaviors listed above were observed for animals in aquaria and are discussed here. We describe the behavior, body color patterns, and postures of 24 adults maintained in captivity. Chromatophore patterns of hatchlings are also shown.

  11. Behavior and Body Patterns of the Larger Pacific Striped Octopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Roy L; Ross, Richard; Rodaniche, Arcadio; Huffard, Christine L

    2015-01-01

    Over thirty years ago anecdotal accounts of the undescribed Larger Pacific Striped Octopus suggested behaviors previously unknown for octopuses. Beak-to-beak mating, dens shared by mating pairs, inking during mating and extended spawning were mentioned in publications, and enticed generations of cephalopod biologists. In 2012-2014 we were able to obtain several live specimens of this species, which remains without a formal description. All of the unique behaviors listed above were observed for animals in aquaria and are discussed here. We describe the behavior, body color patterns, and postures of 24 adults maintained in captivity. Chromatophore patterns of hatchlings are also shown.

  12. Mapping Thermal Habitat of Ectotherms Based on Behavioral Thermoregulation in a Controlled Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, T.; Skidmore, A.; Liu, Y.

    2012-07-01

    Thermal environment is especially important to ectotherm because a lot of physiological functions rely on the body temperature such as thermoregulation. The so-called behavioural thermoregulation function made use of the heterogeneity of the thermal properties within an individual's habitat to sustain the animal's physiological processes. This function links the spatial utilization and distribution of individual ectotherm with the thermal properties of habitat (thermal habitat). In this study we modelled the relationship between the two by a spatial explicit model that simulates the movements of a lizard in a controlled environment. The model incorporates a lizard's transient body temperatures with a cellular automaton algorithm as a way to link the physiology knowledge of the animal with the spatial utilization of its microhabitat. On a larger spatial scale, 'thermal roughness' of the habitat was defined and used to predict the habitat occupancy of the target species. The results showed the habitat occupancy can be modelled by the cellular automaton based algorithm at a smaller scale, and can be modelled by the thermal roughness index at a larger scale.

  13. Future distributed generation: An operational multi-objective optimization model for integrated small scale urban electrical, thermal and gas grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo Cascio, Ermanno; Borelli, Davide; Devia, Francesco; Schenone, Corrado

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Multi-objective optimization model for retrofitted and integrated natural gas pressure regulation stations. • Comparison of different incentive mechanisms for recovered energy based on the characteristics of preheating process. • Control strategies comparison: performances achieved with optimal control vs. ones obtained by thermal load tracking. - Abstract: A multi-objective optimization model for urban integrated electrical, thermal and gas grids is presented. The main system consists of a retrofitted natural gas pressure regulation station where a turbo-expander allows to recover energy from the process. Here, the natural gas must be preheated in order to avoid methane hydrates. The preheating phase could be based on fossil fuels, renewable or on a thermal mix. Depending on the system configuration, the proposed optimization model enables a proper differentiation based on how the natural gas preheating process is expected to be accomplished. This differentiation is addressed by weighting the electricity produced by the turbo-expander and linking it to proper remuneration tariffs. The effectiveness of the model has been tested on an existing plant located in the city of Genoa. Here, the thermal energy is provided by means of two redundant gas-fired boilers and a cogeneration unit. Furthermore, the whole system is thermally integrated with a district heating network. Numerical simulation results, obtained with the commercial proprietary software Honeywell UniSim Design Suite, have been compared with the optimal solutions achieved. The effectiveness of the model, in terms of economic and environmental performances, is finally quantified. For specific conditions, the model allows achieving an operational costs reduction of about 17% with the respect to thermal-load-tracking control logic.

  14. Gamma radiation inactivation of pathogens in sludge under larger-scale condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sermkiattipong, N; Pongpat, S

    1996-12-01

    The effect of gamma radiation on microorganisms in sludge from Huay Kwang Sewage Treatment Plant and Vajira Hospital showed that total bacterial counts were reduced to 2-3 log cycles and 1-2 log cycles at 5 kGy irradiation with and without aeration, respectively. Inactivation of coliform bacteria in sludge required irradiation with and without aeration at the dosages of 3-4.5 and 4-5 kGy, respectively. A dose of 2-3 kGy was sufficient to inactivate fecal coliform bacteria and E. coli. The doses used for inactivation these bacteria depend on the irradiation condition and solid content in sludge sample. Irradiation with aeration led to an increased microbial inactivation. According to our results, the frequency of occurrence of salmonella e contaminated in sludge from Huay Kwang Sewage Treatment Plant and Vajira Hospital was 50% and 75%, respectively. A dose of 2 kGy irradiation with or without aeration, salmonella e could not be detected in any sludge. Clostridium perfringens organisms were also detected in non-irradiated and irradiated sludge from both sources. Moreover, a dose of 5 kGy irradiation with or without aeration was not enough to eliminate C. perfringens. However, no shigella e were isolated from any treatment of sludge

  15. Performance of single carbon granules as perspective for larger scale capacitive bioanodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsje, Casper; Liu, Dandan; Sleutels, Tom H.J.A.; Buisman, Cees J.N.; Heijne, ter Annemiek

    2016-01-01

    The use of high surface area electrodes, like carbon-based felt or granules, in Bioelectrochemical Systems is crucial for high volumetric current production. In case activated carbon granules are used, charge can also be stored in the form of an electric double layer in the pores, which has been

  16. Small-Scale Design Experiments as Working Space for Larger Mobile Communication Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Sarah; Stuedahl, Dagny

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a design experiment using Instagram as a cultural probe is submitted as a method for analyzing the challenges that arise when considering the implementation of social media within a distributed communication space. It outlines how small, iterative investigations can reveal deeper research questions relevant to the education of…

  17. Gamma radiation inactivation of pathogens in sludge under larger-scale condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sermkiattipong, N.; Pongpat, S.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of gamma radiation on microorganisms in sludge from Huay Kwang Sewage Treatment Plant and Vajira Hospital showed that total bacterial counts were reduced to 2-3 log cycles and 1-2 log cycles at 5 kGy irradiation with and without aeration, respectively. Inactivation of coliform bacteria in sludge required irradiation with and without aeration at the dosages of 3-4.5 and 4-5 kGy, respectively. A dose of 2-3 kGy was sufficient to inactivate fecal coliform bacteria and E. coli. The doses used for inactivation these bacteria depend on the irradiation condition and solid content in sludge sample. Irradiation with aeration led to an increased microbial inactivation. According to our results, the frequency of occurrence of salmonella e contaminated in sludge from Huay Kwang Sewage Treatment Plant and Vajira Hospital was 50% and 75%, respectively. A dose of 2 kGy irradiation with or without aeration, salmonella e could not be detected in any sludge. Clostridium perfringens organisms were also detected in non-irradiated and irradiated sludge from both sources. Moreover, a dose of 5 kGy irradiation with or without aeration was not enough to eliminate C. perfringens. However, no shigella e were isolated from any treatment of sludge

  18. The Corporate Connection: Effective Company Research Is Just Like People Research--On a Larger Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourofsky, Carolyn E.

    1992-01-01

    To cultivate companies for fund raising, the college development officer should focus on appropriate people, understand giving trends, follow mergers and acquisitions, and note corporate differences in giving patterns. Annual reports can reveal company self-image, help identify individuals, and illuminate the company's fiscal situation. However,…

  19. THESEUS - the first utility-scale 50 MWe. THErmal Solar EUropean power Station for the island of Crete, Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobi, A. [PreussenElektra AG, Hannover (Germany); Tzatzanis, A.

    1997-12-31

    When the European Commission`s Directorate for Energy (DG XVII) opened the second application window for THERMIE proposals under the Fourth Framework Programme on September 15, 1995, Europe`s solar thermal power community discovered a remarkable modification to the previous call for proposals. For the first time since solar thermal electricity was introduced for THERMIE demonstration projects, it now became eligible for EU financial support. Right now, the European Commission committed funding for the design and engineering phase of the THESEUS project implementation. (orig.)

  20. A simplified, data-constrained approach to estimate the permafrost carbon-climate feedback: The PCN Incubation-Panarctic Thermal (PInc-PanTher) Scaling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koven, C. D.; Schuur, E.; Schaedel, C.; Bohn, T. J.; Burke, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, X.; Ciais, P.; Grosse, G.; Harden, J. W.; Hayes, D. J.; Hugelius, G.; Jafarov, E. E.; Krinner, G.; Kuhry, P.; Lawrence, D. M.; MacDougall, A.; Marchenko, S. S.; McGuire, A. D.; Natali, S.; Nicolsky, D.; Olefeldt, D.; Peng, S.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Schaefer, K. M.; Strauss, J.; Treat, C. C.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present an approach to estimate the feedback from large-scale thawing of permafrost soils using a simplified, data-constrained model that combines three elements: soil carbon (C) maps and profiles to identify the distribution and type of C in permafrost soils; incubation experiments to quantify the rates of C lost after thaw; and models of soil thermal dynamics in response to climate warming. We call the approach the Permafrost Carbon Network Incubation-Panarctic Thermal scaling approach (PInc-PanTher). The approach assumes that C stocks do not decompose at all when frozen, but once thawed follow set decomposition trajectories as a function of soil temperature. The trajectories are determined according to a 3-pool decomposition model fitted to incubation data using parameters specific to soil horizon types. We calculate litterfall C inputs required to maintain steady-state C balance for the current climate, and hold those inputs constant. Soil temperatures are taken from the soil thermal modules of ecosystem model simulations forced by a common set of future climate change anomalies under two warming scenarios over the period 2010 to 2100.

  1. Modeling two-phase flow in a micro-model with local thermal non-equilibrium on the Darcy scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuske, Philipp; Ronneberger, Olaf; Karadimitriou, Nikolaos K.; Helmig, Rainer; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    2015-01-01

    Loosening local equilibrium assumptions in two-phase flow in porous media gives rise to new, unknown variables. More specifically, when loosening the local thermal equilibrium assumption, one has to describe the heat transfer between multiple phases, present at the same mathematical point. In this

  2. HIPAA is larger and more complex than Y2K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempesco, J W

    2000-07-01

    The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) is a larger and more complex problem than Y2K ever was. According to the author, the costs associated with a project of such unending scope and in support of intrusion into both information and operational systems of every health care transaction will be incalculable. Some estimate that the administrative simplification policies implemented through HIPAA will save billions of dollars annually, but it remains to be seen whether the savings will outweigh implementation and ongoing expenses associated with systemwide application of the regulations. This article addresses the rules established for electronic data interchange, data set standards for diagnostic and procedure codes, unique identifiers, coordination of benefits, privacy of individual health care information, electronic signatures, and security requirements.

  3. Bench- and pilot-scale demonstration of thermal desorption for removal of mercury from the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, M.I.; Sams, R.J.; Gillis, G.; Helsel, R.W.; Alperin, E.S.; Geisler, T.J.; Groen, A.; Root, D.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal desorption is an innovative technology that has seen significant growth in applications to organically contaminated soils and sludges for the remediation of hazardous, radioactive and mixed waste sites. This paper will present the results of a bench and pilot-scale demonstration of this technology for the removal of mercury from the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soil. Results demonstrate that the mercury in this soil can be successfully removed to the target treatment levels of 10 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) and that all process residuals could be rendered RCRA-nonhazardous as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Sampling and analyses of the desorber off-gas before and after the air pollution control system demonstrated effective collection of mercury and organic constituents. Pilot-scale testing was also conducted to verify requirements for material handling of soil into and out of the process. This paper will also present a conceptual design and preliminary costs of a full-scale system, including feed preparation, thermal treatment, and residuals handling for the soil

  4. Development of Scaling Algorithms and Economic Evaluation for Non-Thermal Plasma Reactors - Adsorbant/Catalyzer Hybrid System for Control of NOx Released During Army and Related U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urashima, K

    1998-01-01

    Computer code (SUENTP-J) to predict scale-up and economic evaluation of several eligible non-thermal plasma processes for air pollution control - electron beam process, pulsed corona process, and corona radical shower...

  5. Morphological study of polymer surfaces exposed to non-thermal plasma based on contact angle and the use of scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felix, T.; Cassini, F.A.; Benetoli, L.O.B.; Dotto, M.E.R.; Debacher, N.A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Polymeric surfaces were etched using non-thermal plasma at different intensities. • Polymers of low mechanical hardness reached the saturation level faster. • A mathematical model based on scaling laws was proposed. - Abstract: The experiments presented in this communication have the purpose to elaborate an explanation for the morphological evolution of the growth of polymeric surfaces provided by the treatment of non-thermal plasma. According to the roughness analysis and the model proposed by scaling laws it is possible relate to a predictable or merely random effect. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and poly(etherether)ketone (PEEK) samples were exposed to a non-thermal plasma discharge and the resulting surfaces roughness were analyzed based on the measurements from contact angle, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy coupled with scaling laws analysis which can help to describe and understand the dynamic of formation of a wide variety of rough surfaces. The roughness, R_R_M_S (RMS- Root Mean Square) values for polymer surface range between 19.8 nm and 110.9 nm. The contact angle and the AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) measurements as a function of the plasma exposure time were in agreement with both polar and dispersive components according to the surface roughness and also with the morphology evaluated described by Wolf-Villain model, with proximate values of α between 0.91_(_P_E_T_) and 0.88_(_P_E_E_K_), β = 0.25_(_P_E_T_) and z = 3,64_(_P_E_T_).

  6. Final report from VFL technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) extends fourteen (14) miles through Oak Ridge, TN. The Creek sediments and surrounding floodplain soils are contaminated with mercury compounds. This project involved a comprehensive pilot demonstration on thermal desorption of these soils to validate the feasibility of the remedial technology which had been identified in previous studies. Thermal desorption is a technology that utilizes heating or drying of soils to induce volatilization of contaminants. These contaminants are then vaporized and either incinerated or condensed in the second stage of desorption. Mercury (Hg), which was the principal contaminate of concern, was collected by condensers in a vapor collection system. This type of system insured that the toxic mercury vapors did not escape to the atmosphere.

  7. Final report from VFL technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) extends fourteen (14) miles through Oak Ridge, TN. The Creek sediments and surrounding floodplain soils are contaminated with mercury compounds. This project involved a comprehensive pilot demonstration on thermal desorption of these soils to validate the feasibility of the remedial technology which had been identified in previous studies. Thermal desorption is a technology that utilizes heating or drying of soils to induce volatilization of contaminants. These contaminants are then vaporized and either incinerated or condensed in the second stage of desorption. Mercury (Hg), which was the principal contaminate of concern, was collected by condensers in a vapor collection system. This type of system insured that the toxic mercury vapors did not escape to the atmosphere

  8. Thermal Fluxes and Temperatures in Small Urban Headwater Streams of the BES LTER: Landscape Forest and Impervious Patches and the Importance of Spatial and Temporal Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Belt, K. T.; Welty, C.; Heisler, G.; Pouyat, R. V.; McGuire, M. P.; Stack, W. P.

    2006-05-01

    Water and material fluxes from urban landscape patches to small streams are modulated by extensive "engineered" drainage networks. Small urban headwater catchments are different in character and function from their larger receiving streams because of their extensive, direct connections to impervious surface cover (ISC) and their sometimes buried nature. They need to be studied as unique functional hydrologic units if impacts on biota are to be fully understood. As part of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study LTER project, continuous water temperature data are being collected at 2-minute intervals at over twenty small catchments representing various mixtures of forest and ISC. Suburban stream sites with greater ISC generally have higher summer water temperatures. Suburban catchments with most of their channel drainage contained within storm drain pipes show subdued diurnal variation and cool temperatures, but with very large spikes in summer runoff events. Conversely, high ISC urban piped streams have elevated "baseline" temperatures that stand well above all the other monitoring sites. There is a pronounced upstream-downstream effect; nested small headwater catchments experience more frequent, larger temperature spikes related to runoff events than downstream sites. Also, runoff-initiated temperature elevations at small stream sites unexpectedly last much longer than the storm runoff hydrographs. These observations suggest that for small headwater catchments, urban landscapes not only induce an ambient, "heat island" effect on stream temperatures, but also introduce thermal disturbance regimes and fluxes that are not trivial to aquatic biota.

  9. Groups have a larger cognitive capacity than individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Takao; Pratt, Stephen C

    2012-10-09

    Increasing the number of options can paradoxically lead to worse decisions, a phenomenon known as cognitive overload [1]. This happens when an individual decision-maker attempts to digest information exceeding its processing capacity. Highly integrated groups, such as social insect colonies, make consensus decisions that combine the efforts of many members, suggesting that these groups can overcome individual limitations [2-4]. Here we report that an ant colony choosing a new nest site is less vulnerable to cognitive overload than an isolated ant making this decision on her own. We traced this improvement to differences in individual behavior. In whole colonies, each ant assesses only a small subset of available sites, and the colony combines their efforts to thoroughly explore all options. An isolated ant, on the other hand, must personally assess a larger number of sites to approach the same level of option coverage. By sharing the burden of assessment, the colony avoids overtaxing the abilities of its members. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The cavity-nest ant Temnothorax crassispinus prefers larger nests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrus, S

    Colonies of the ant Temnothorax crassispinus inhabit mostly cavities in wood and hollow acorns. Typically in the field, nest sites that can be used by the ant are a limited resource. In a field experiment, it was investigated whether the ants prefer a specific size of nest, when different ones are available. In July 2011, a total of 160 artificial nests were placed in a beech-pine forest. Four artificial nests (pieces of wood with volume cavities, ca 415, 605, 730, and 980 mm 3 , respectively) were located on each square meter of the experimental plot. One year later, shortly before the emergence of new sexuals, the nests were collected. In July 2012, colonies inhabited more frequently bigger nests. Among queenright colonies, the ones which inhabited bigger nests had more workers. However, there was no relationship between volume of nest and number of workers for queenless colonies. Queenright colonies from bigger nests produced more sexual individuals, but there was no correlation between number of workers and sex allocation ratio, or between volume of nest and sex allocation ratio. In a laboratory experiment where ant colonies were kept in 470 and 860 mm 3 nests, larger colonies allocated more energy to produce sexual individuals. The results of this study show the selectivity of T. crassispinus ants regarding the size of nest cavity, and that the nest volume has an impact on life history parameters.

  11. Ecological tolerances of Miocene larger benthic foraminifera from Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Vibor; Renema, Willem

    2018-01-01

    To provide a comprehensive palaeoenvironmental reconstruction based on larger benthic foraminifera (LBF), a quantitative analysis of their assemblage composition is needed. Besides microfacies analysis which includes environmental preferences of foraminiferal taxa, statistical analyses should also be employed. Therefore, detrended correspondence analysis and cluster analysis were performed on relative abundance data of identified LBF assemblages deposited in mixed carbonate-siliciclastic (MCS) systems and blue-water (BW) settings. Studied MCS system localities include ten sections from the central part of the Kutai Basin in East Kalimantan, ranging from late Burdigalian to Serravallian age. The BW samples were collected from eleven sections of the Bulu Formation on Central Java, dated as Serravallian. Results from detrended correspondence analysis reveal significant differences between these two environmental settings. Cluster analysis produced five clusters of samples; clusters 1 and 2 comprise dominantly MCS samples, clusters 3 and 4 with dominance of BW samples, and cluster 5 showing a mixed composition with both MCS and BW samples. The results of cluster analysis were afterwards subjected to indicator species analysis resulting in the interpretation that generated three groups among LBF taxa: typical assemblage indicators, regularly occurring taxa and rare taxa. By interpreting the results of detrended correspondence analysis, cluster analysis and indicator species analysis, along with environmental preferences of identified LBF taxa, a palaeoenvironmental model is proposed for the distribution of LBF in Miocene MCS systems and adjacent BW settings of Indonesia.

  12. Males that drop a sexually selected weapon grow larger testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Paul N; Emberts, Zachary; Sasson, Daniel A; Miller, Christine W

    2018-01-01

    Costly sexually selected weapons are predicted to trade off with postcopulatory traits, such as testes. Although weapons can be important for achieving access to females, individuals of some species can permanently drop (i.e. autotomize) their weapons, without regeneration, to escape danger. We capitalized on this natural behavior to experimentally address whether the loss of a sexually selected weapon leads to increased testes investment in the leaf-footed cactus bug, Narnia femorata Stål (Hemiptera: Coreidae). In a second experiment, we measured offspring production for males that lost a weapon during development. As predicted, males that dropped a hind limb during development grew significantly larger testes than the control treatments. Hind-limb autotomy did not result in the enlargement of other nearby traits. Our results are the first to experimentally demonstrate that males compensate for natural weapon loss by investing more in testes. In a second experiment we found that females paired with males that lost a hind limb had 40% lower egg hatching success than females paired with intact males, perhaps because of lower mating receptivity to males with a lost limb. Importantly, in those cases where viable offspring were produced, males missing a hind limb produced 42% more offspring than males with intact limbs. These results suggest that the loss of a hind-limb weapon can, in some cases, lead to greater fertilization success. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  13. Human resource management and career planning in a larger library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelka Gazvoda

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Human resource management is presented as a managerial function which is used to develop potential abilities of the employees to achieve organizational goals.Different perception of the employees is essential - people working in the organization are treated as capital and not as an expenditure. In human resource management the most important view of the employees is their potential growth and professional development, training for acquiring new responsibilities and encouragement for innovation. Library management is becoming more and more complex as the result of introducing new technologies. For this reason libraries need well trained people with potentials to modernize library performance and to overcome the conflict between the traditional organizational culture and the requirements of the modem technologically developed environment. The author presents different techniques of active human resource management, which can be used in larger libraries where an appropriate number of employees exists to realize different programmes with. These are programmes for education, staffing,career planning, stimmulation and reward systems, job redefinition and enrichment,and other forms of internal segmentation.

  14. Multi-resolution and multi-scale simulation of the thermal hydraulics in fast neutron reactor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeli, P.-E.

    2011-01-01

    The present work is devoted to a multi-scale numerical simulation of an assembly of fast neutron reactor. In spite of the rapid growth of the computer power, the fine complete CFD of a such system remains out of reach in a context of research and development. After the determination of the thermalhydraulic behaviour of the assembly at the macroscopic scale, we propose to carry out a local reconstruction of the fine scale information. The complete approach will require a much lower CPU time than the CFD of the entire structure. The macro-scale description is obtained using either the volume averaging formalism in porous media, or an alternative modeling historically developed for the study of fast neutron reactor assemblies. It provides some information used as constraint of a down-scaling problem, through a penalization technique of the local conservation equations. This problem lean on the periodic nature of the structure by integrating periodic boundary conditions for the required microscale fields or their spatial deviation. After validating the methodologies on some model applications, we undertake to perform them on 'industrial' configurations which demonstrate the viability of this multi-scale approach. (author) [fr

  15. Turbulent Convection Insights from Small-Scale Thermal Forcing with Zero Net Heat Flux at a Horizontal Boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Ross W; Gayen, Bishakhdatta

    2015-11-13

    A large-scale circulation, a turbulent boundary layer, and a turbulent plume are noted features of convection at large Rayleigh numbers under differential heating on a single horizontal boundary. These might be attributed to the forcing, which in all studies has been limited to a unidirectional gradient over the domain scale. We instead apply forcing on a length scale smaller than the domain, and with variation in both horizontal directions. Direct numerical simulations show turbulence throughout the domain, a regime transition to a dominant domain-scale circulation, and a region of logarithmic velocity in the boundary layer, despite zero net heat flux. The results show significant similarities to Rayleigh-Bénard convection, demonstrate the significance of plume merging, support the hypothesis that the key driver of convection is the production of available potential energy without necessarily supplying total potential energy, and imply that contributions to domain-scale circulation in the oceans need not be solely from the large-scale gradients of forcing.

  16. Observation of ion confining potential enhancement due to thermal barrier potential formation and its scaling law in the tandem mirror GAMMA 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Teruji; Nakashima, Yousuke; Foote, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    In the tandem mirror GAMMA 10, (i) the enhancement of the ion confining potential, φ c , only during the period of the thermal barrier potential φ b -formation, has been observed first by using not only end-loss-analysers (ELA's) of GAMMA 10 but an end-loss-ion-spectrometer (ELIS) installed from TMX-U. This results in strong end-loss-ion plugging with increased central cell density. (ii) The first experimental observation of the φ c vs φ b -scaling law is obtained, where φ c increases with φ b . This scaling law is consistently interpreted by Cohen's theories of the weak-ECH and the strong-ECH in the plug region. (iii) Good agreement of the plug potential measured with the ELA's and the ELIS is achieved. (author)

  17. The thermal impact of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems: a case study in the Netherlands, combining monitoring and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Philip W.; Kooi, Henk; Stuyfzand, Pieter J.

    2015-05-01

    Results are presented of a comprehensive thermal impact study on an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system in Bilthoven, the Netherlands. The study involved monitoring of the thermal impact and modeling of the three-dimensional temperature evolution of the storage aquifer and over- and underlying units. Special attention was paid to non-uniformity of the background temperature, which varies laterally and vertically in the aquifer. Two models were applied with different levels of detail regarding initial conditions and heterogeneity of hydraulic and thermal properties: a fine-scale heterogeneity model which construed the lateral and vertical temperature distribution more realistically, and a simplified model which represented the aquifer system with only a limited number of homogeneous layers. Fine-scale heterogeneity was shown to be important to accurately model the ATES-impacted vertical temperature distribution and the maximum and minimum temperatures in the storage aquifer, and the spatial extent of the thermal plumes. The fine-scale heterogeneity model resulted in larger thermally impacted areas and larger temperature anomalies than the simplified model. The models showed that scattered and scarce monitoring data of ATES-induced temperatures can be interpreted in a useful way by groundwater and heat transport modeling, resulting in a realistic assessment of the thermal impact.

  18. Recombining overlapping BACs into a single larger BAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huxley Clare

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BAC clones containing entire mammalian genes including all the transcribed region and long range controlling elements are very useful for functional analysis. Sequenced BACs are available for most of the human and mouse genomes and in many cases these contain intact genes. However, large genes often span more than one BAC, and single BACs covering the entire region of interest are not available. Here we describe a system for linking two or more overlapping BACs into a single clone by homologous recombination. Results The method was used to link a 61-kb insert carrying the final 5 exons of the human CFTR gene onto a 160-kb BAC carrying the first 22 exons. Two rounds of homologous recombination were carried out in the EL350 strain of bacteria which can be induced for the Red genes. In the first round, the inserts of the two overlapping BACs were subcloned into modified BAC vectors using homologous recombination. In the second round, the BAC to be added was linearised with the very rare-cutting enzyme I-PpoI and electroporated into recombination efficient EL350 bacteria carrying the other BAC. Recombined BACs were identified by antibiotic selection and PCR screening and 10% of clones contained the correctly recombined 220-kb BAC. Conclusion The system can be used to link the inserts from any overlapping BAC or PAC clones. The original orientation of the inserts is not important and desired regions of the inserts can be selected. The size limit for the fragments recombined may be larger than the 61 kb used here and multiple BACs in a contig could be combined by alternating use of the two pBACLink vectors. This system should be of use to many investigators wishing to carry out functional analysis on large mammalian genes which are not available in single BAC clones.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Thermal Behaviors in Window Systems by Monitoring of Surface Condensation Using Full-Scale Measurements and Simulation Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goopyo Hong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the thermal performance of window systems using full-scale measurements and simulation tools. A chamber was installed on the balcony of an apartment to control the temperatures which can create condensation on the interior surfaces of window systems. The condensation process on the window was carefully scrutinized when outdoor and indoor temperature and indoor relative humidity ranged from −15 °C to −20 °C, 23 °C to 24 °C, and 50% to 65%, respectively. The results of these investigations were analyzed to determine how the moisture is influenced by changing temperatures. It appears that the glass-edge was highly susceptible to the temperature variations and the lowest temperature on the glass edge was caused by the heat transfer through the spacer, between the two glass panels of the window. The results from the simulation used in this study confirm that the thermal performance of window systems can be improved the use of super insulated or thermally broken spacers. If the values of the indoor humidity and temperature are given, then the outdoor temperature when condensation forms can be obtained by using Temperature Difference Ratio (TDR. This methodology can be employed to predict the possible occurrence of condensation.

  20. Large-scale thermal convection of viscous fluids in a faulted system: 3D test case for numerical codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Fabien; Cacace, Mauro; Fischer, Thomas; Kolditz, Olaf; Wang, Wenqing; Watanabe, Norihiro

    2017-04-01

    In contrast to simple homogeneous 1D and 2D systems, no appropriate analytical solutions exist to test onset of thermal convection against numerical models of complex 3D systems that account for variable fluid density and viscosity as well as permeability heterogeneity (e.g. presence of faults). Owing to the importance of thermal convection for the transport of energy and minerals, the development of a benchmark test for density/viscosity driven flow is crucial to ensure that the applied numerical models accurately simulate the physical processes at hands. The presented study proposes a 3D test case for the simulation of thermal convection in a faulted system that accounts for temperature dependent fluid density and viscosity. The linear stability analysis recently developed by Malkovsky and Magri (2016) is used to estimate the critical Rayleigh number above which thermal convection of viscous fluids is triggered. The numerical simulations are carried out using the finite element technique. OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al., 2012) and Moose (Gaston et al., 2009) results are compared to those obtained using the commercial software FEFLOW (Diersch, 2014) to test the ability of widely applied codes in matching both the critical Rayleigh number and the dynamical features of convective processes. The methodology and Rayleigh expressions given in this study can be applied to any numerical model that deals with 3D geothermal processes in faulted basins as by example the Tiberas Basin (Magri et al., 2016). References Kolditz, O., Bauer, S., Bilke, L., Böttcher, N., Delfs, J. O., Fischer, T., U. J. Görke, T. Kalbacher, G. Kosakowski, McDermott, C. I., Park, C. H., Radu, F., Rink, K., Shao, H., Shao, H.B., Sun, F., Sun, Y., Sun, A., Singh, K., Taron, J., Walther, M., Wang,W., Watanabe, N., Wu, Y., Xie, M., Xu, W., Zehner, B., 2012. OpenGeoSys: an open-source initiative for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical/chemical (THM/C) processes in porous media. Environmental

  1. Large scale permeability test of the granite in the stipa mine and thermal conductivity test. Technical project report No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundstroem, L.; Stills, H.

    1978-03-01

    The investigated properties of the granite bedrock at Stripa may be summarized as follows: The permeability is very low, 0.4 x 10 -10 m/s, and independent of the pressure gradient. The permeability is reduced by 50 percent at a temperature increase from +10 0 C to +35 0 C. The thermal conductivity was determined in situ to be about 4 W/m 0 C which largely agrees with laboratory determinations. The effective porosity was determined to be 0.012 percent. 12 figs

  2. Pore Scale Thermal Hydraulics Investigations of Molten Salt Cooled Pebble Bed High Temperature Reactor with BCC and FCC Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shixiong Song

    2014-01-01

    CFD results and empirical correlations’ predictions of pressure drop and local Nusselt numbers. Local pebble surface temperature distributions in several default conditions are investigated. Thermal removal capacities of molten salt are confirmed in the case of nominal condition; the pebble surface temperature under the condition of local power distortion shows the tolerance of pebble in extreme neutron dose exposure. The numerical experiments of local pebble insufficient cooling indicate that in the molten salt cooled pebble bed reactor, the pebble surface temperature is not very sensitive to loss of partial coolant. The methods and results of this paper would be useful for optimum designs and safety analysis of molten salt cooled pebble bed reactors.

  3. Morphological study of polymer surfaces exposed to non-thermal plasma based on contact angle and the use of scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, T.; Cassini, F. A.; Benetoli, L. O. B.; Dotto, M. E. R.; Debacher, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    The experiments presented in this communication have the purpose to elaborate an explanation for the morphological evolution of the growth of polymeric surfaces provided by the treatment of non-thermal plasma. According to the roughness analysis and the model proposed by scaling laws it is possible relate to a predictable or merely random effect. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and poly(etherether)ketone (PEEK) samples were exposed to a non-thermal plasma discharge and the resulting surfaces roughness were analyzed based on the measurements from contact angle, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy coupled with scaling laws analysis which can help to describe and understand the dynamic of formation of a wide variety of rough surfaces. The roughness, RRMS (RMS- Root Mean Square) values for polymer surface range between 19.8 nm and 110.9 nm. The contact angle and the AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) measurements as a function of the plasma exposure time were in agreement with both polar and dispersive components according to the surface roughness and also with the morphology evaluated described by Wolf-Villain model, with proximate values of α between 0.91(PET) and 0.88(PEEK), β = 0.25(PET) and z = 3,64(PET).

  4. Time-scales of assembly and thermal history of a composite felsic pluton: constraints from the Emerald Lake area, northern Canadian Cordillera, Yukon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Ian M.; Villeneuve, Mike E.; Dipple, Gregory M.; Duncan, Robert A.; Russell, James K.; Mortensen, James K.

    2002-05-01

    Knowledge of the time-scales of emplacement and thermal history during assembly of composite felsic plutons in the shallow crust are critical to deciphering the processes of crustal growth and magma chamber development. Detailed petrological and chemical study of the mid-Cretaceous, composite Emerald Lake pluton, from the northern Canadian Cordillera, Yukon Territory, coupled with U-Pb and 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology, indicates that this pluton was intruded as a series of magmatic pulses. Intrusion of these pulses produced a strong petrological zonation from augite syenite, hornblende quartz syenite and monzonite, to biotite granite. Our data further indicate that multiple phases were emplaced and cooled to below the mineral closure temperatures over a time-scale on the order of the resolution of the 40Ar/ 39Ar technique (˜1 Myr), and that emplacement occurred at 94.3 Ma. Simple thermal modelling and heat conduction calculations were used to further constrain the temporal relationships within the intrusion. These calculations are consistent with the geochronology and show that emplacement and cooling were complete in less than 100 kyr and probably 70±5 kyr. These results demonstrate that production, transport and emplacement of the different phases of the Emerald Lake pluton occurred essentially simultaneously, and that these processes must also have been closely related in time and space. By analogy, these results provide insights into the assembly and petrogenesis of other complex intrusions and ultimately lead to an understanding of the processes involved in crustal development.

  5. In vivo toxicologic study of larger silica nanoparticles in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan WT

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Wai-Tao Chan,1–3 Cheng-Che Liu,4 Jen-Shiu Chiang Chiau,5 Shang-Ting Tsai,6 Chih-Kai Liang,6 Mei-Lien Cheng,5 Hung-Chang Lee,7,8 Chun-Yun Yeung,1,3,9 Shao-Yi Hou2,6 1Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, MacKay Children’s Hospital, 2Graduate Institute of Engineering Technology, National Taipei University of Technology, 3Mackay Medicine, Nursing, and Management College, 4Institute of Preventive Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, 5Department of Medical Research, MacKay Memorial Hospital, Hsinchu, 6Graduate Institute of Biochemical and Biomedical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, 7Department of Pediatrics, MacKay Memorial Hospital, Hsinchu, 8Department of Pediatrics, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 9Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China Abstract: Silica nanoparticles (SiNPs are being studied and used for medical purposes. As nanotechnology grows rapidly, its biosafety and toxicity have frequently raised concerns. However, diverse results have been reported about the safety of SiNPs; several studies reported that smaller particles might exhibit toxic effects to some cell lines, and larger particles of 100 nm were reported to be genotoxic to the cocultured cells. Here, we investigated the in vivo toxicity of SiNPs of 150 nm in various dosages via intravenous administration in mice. The mice were observed for 14 days before blood examination and histopathological assay. All the mice survived and behaved normally after the administration of nanoparticles. No significant weight change was noted. Blood examinations showed no definite systemic dysfunction of organ systems. Histopathological studies of vital organs confirmed no SiNP-related adverse effects. We concluded that 150 nm SiNPs were biocompatible and safe for in vivo use in mice. Keywords: in vivo, mice, silica nanoparticle, nanotoxicity

  6. Full scale experimental study of a small natural draft dry cooling tower for concentrating solar thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaoxiao; Duniam, Sam; Gurgenci, Hal; Guan, Zhiqiang; Veeraragavan, Anand

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A 20 m high natural draft dry cooling tower is designed and tested. • The cooling tower model is refined and validated with the experimental data. • The performance of the cooling tower utilized in a CST power plant is investigated. • Ambient temperature effect on Rankine cycle and Brayton cycle is discussed. - Abstract: Concentrating solar thermal power system can provide low carbon, renewable energy resources in countries or regions with strong solar irradiation. For this kind of power plant which is likely to be located in the arid area, natural draft dry cooling tower is a promising choice. To develop the experimental studies on small cooling tower, a 20 m high natural draft dry cooling tower with fully instrumented measurement system was established by the Queensland Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence. The performance of this cooling tower was measured with the constant heat input of 600 kW and 840 kW and with ambient temperature ranging from 20 °C to 32 °C. The cooling tower numerical model was refined and validated with the experimental data. The model of 1 MW concentrating solar thermal supercritical CO_2 power cycle was developed and integrated with the cooling tower model. The influences of changing ambient temperature and the performance of the cooling tower on efficiency of the power system were simulated. The differences of the mechanism of the ambient temperature effect on Rankine cycle and supercritical CO_2 Brayton cycle were analysed and discussed.

  7. Larger aftershocks happen farther away: nonseparability of magnitude and spatial distributions of aftershocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Elst, Nicholas; Shaw, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Aftershocks may be driven by stress concentrations left by the main shock rupture or by elastic stress transfer to adjacent fault sections or strands. Aftershocks that occur within the initial rupture may be limited in size, because the scale of the stress concentrations should be smaller than the primary rupture itself. On the other hand, aftershocks that occur on adjacent fault segments outside the primary rupture may have no such size limitation. Here we use high-precision double-difference relocated earthquake catalogs to demonstrate that larger aftershocks occur farther away than smaller aftershocks, when measured from the centroid of early aftershock activity—a proxy for the initial rupture. Aftershocks as large as or larger than the initiating event nucleate almost exclusively in the outer regions of the aftershock zone. This observation is interpreted as a signature of elastic rebound in the earthquake catalog and can be used to improve forecasting of large aftershocks.

  8. Protecting the larger fish: an ecological, economical and evolutionary analysis using a demographic model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdiell, Nuria Calduch

    . Recently, there is increasing evidence that this size-selective fishing reduces the chances of maintaining populations at levels sufficient to produce maximum sustainable yields, the chances of recovery/rebuilding populations that have been depleted/collapsed and may causes rapid evolutionary changes...... and the consequent changes in yield. We attempt to evaluate the capability of the larger fish to mitigate the evolutionary change on life-history traits caused by fishing, while also maintaining a sustainable annual yield. This is achieved by calculating the expected selection response on three life-history traits......Many marine fish stocks are reported as overfished on a global scale. This overfishing not only removes fish biomass, but also causes dramatic changes in the age and size structure of fish stocks. In particular, targeting of the larger individuals truncates the age and size structure of stocks...

  9. Investigation of Larger Poly(α-Methylstyrene) Mandrels for High Gain Designs Using Microencapsulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Masaru; Cook, Robert; McQuillan, Barry; Gibson, Jane; Paguio, Sally

    2004-01-01

    In recent years we have demonstrated that 2-mm-diameter poly(α-methylstyrene) mandrels meeting indirect drive NIF surface symmetry specifications can be produced using microencapsulation methods. Recently higher gain target designs have been introduced that rely on frequency doubled (green) laser energy and require capsules up to 4 mm in diameter, nominally meeting the same surface finish and symmetry requirements as the existing 2-mm-diameter capsule designs. Direct drive on the NIF also requires larger capsules. In order to evaluate whether the current microencapsulation-based mandrel fabrication techniques will adequately scale to these larger capsules, we have explored extending the techniques to 4-mm-diameter capsules. We find that microencapsulated shells meeting NIF symmetry specifications can be produced, the processing changes necessary to accomplish this are presented here

  10. Subchannel Scale Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Rod Bundle Geometry under Single-phase Adiabatic Conditions Using CUPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Seok Jong; Park, Goon Cherl; Cho, Hyoung Kyu [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In Korea, subchannel analysis code, MATRA has been developed by KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). MATRA has been used for reactor core T/H design and DNBR (Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio) calculation. Also, the code has been successfully coupled with neutronics code and fuel analysis code. However, since major concern of the code is not the accident simulation, some features of the code are not optimized for the accident conditions, such as the homogeneous model for two-phase flow and spatial marching method for numerical scheme. For this reason, in the present study, application of CUPID for the subchannel scale T/H analysis in rod bundle geometry was conducted. CUPID is a component scale T/H analysis code which adopts three dimensional two-fluid three-field model developed by KAERI. In this paper, the validation results of the CUPID code for subchannel scale rod bundle analysis at single phase adiabatic conditions were presented. At first, the physical models required for a subchannel scale analysis were implemented to CUPID. In the future, the scope of validation tests will be extended to diabetic and two phase flow conditions and required models will be implemented into CUPID.

  11. The shared and unique values of optical, fluorescence, thermal and microwave satellite data for estimating large-scale crop yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large-scale crop monitoring and yield estimation are important for both scientific research and practical applications. Satellite remote sensing provides an effective means for regional and global cropland monitoring, particularly in data-sparse regions that lack reliable ground observations and rep...

  12. Experimental study on the influence of different thermal insulation materials on the fire dynamics in a reduced-scale enclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leisted, Rolff Ripke; Sørensen, Martin X.; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    Four scaled (1:5) fire experiments with two identically classified types of commercially available sandwich panels incorporating either stone wool (SW) or poly-isocyanurate (PIR) foam as cores were conducted using a modified version of the ISO 13784-1 (Reaction to fire tests for sandwich panel...

  13. Scale dependence of cirrus horizontal heterogeneity effects on TOA measurements – Part I: MODIS brightness temperatures in the thermal infrared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Fauchez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the impact of cirrus cloud heterogeneities on MODIS simulated thermal infrared (TIR brightness temperatures (BTs at the top of the atmosphere (TOA as a function of spatial resolution from 50 m to 10 km. A realistic 3-D cirrus field is generated by the 3DCLOUD model (average optical thickness of 1.4, cloud-top and base altitudes at 10 and 12 km, respectively, consisting of aggregate column crystals of Deff = 20 µm, and 3-D thermal infrared radiative transfer (RT is simulated with the 3DMCPOL code. According to previous studies, differences between 3-D BT computed from a heterogenous pixel and 1-D RT computed from a homogeneous pixel are considered dependent at nadir on two effects: (i the optical thickness horizontal heterogeneity leading to the plane-parallel homogeneous bias (PPHB and the (ii horizontal radiative transport (HRT leading to the independent pixel approximation error (IPAE. A single but realistic cirrus case is simulated and, as expected, the PPHB mainly impacts the low-spatial-resolution results (above ∼ 250 m with averaged values of up to 5–7 K, while the IPAE mainly impacts the high-spatial-resolution results (below ∼ 250 m with average values of up to 1–2 K. A sensitivity study has been performed in order to extend these results to various cirrus optical thicknesses and heterogeneities by sampling the cirrus in several ranges of parameters. For four optical thickness classes and four optical heterogeneity classes, we have found that, for nadir observations, the spatial resolution at which the combination of PPHB and HRT effects is the smallest, falls between 100 and 250 m. These spatial resolutions thus appear to be the best choice to retrieve cirrus optical properties with the smallest cloud heterogeneity-related total bias in the thermal infrared. For off-nadir observations, the average total effect is increased and the minimum is shifted to coarser spatial

  14. Monte Carlo simulation methods in moment-based scale-bridging algorithms for thermal radiative-transfer problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, J.D.; Park, H.; Wollaber, A.B.; Rauenzahn, R.M.; Knoll, D.A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a moment-based acceleration algorithm applied to Monte Carlo simulation of thermal radiative-transfer problems. Our acceleration algorithm employs a continuum system of moments to accelerate convergence of stiff absorption–emission physics. The combination of energy-conserving tallies and the use of an asymptotic approximation in optically thick regions remedy the difficulties of local energy conservation and mitigation of statistical noise in such regions. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the developed method. We also compare directly to the standard linearization-based method of Fleck and Cummings [1]. A factor of 40 reduction in total computational time is achieved with the new algorithm for an equivalent (or more accurate) solution as compared with the Fleck–Cummings algorithm

  15. Monte Carlo simulation methods in moment-based scale-bridging algorithms for thermal radiative-transfer problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Densmore, J.D., E-mail: jeffery.densmore@unnpp.gov [Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, P.O. Box 79, West Mifflin, PA 15122 (United States); Park, H., E-mail: hkpark@lanl.gov [Fluid Dynamics and Solid Mechanics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS B216, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wollaber, A.B., E-mail: wollaber@lanl.gov [Computational Physics and Methods Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS D409, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Rauenzahn, R.M., E-mail: rick@lanl.gov [Fluid Dynamics and Solid Mechanics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS B216, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Knoll, D.A., E-mail: nol@lanl.gov [Fluid Dynamics and Solid Mechanics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS B216, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    We present a moment-based acceleration algorithm applied to Monte Carlo simulation of thermal radiative-transfer problems. Our acceleration algorithm employs a continuum system of moments to accelerate convergence of stiff absorption–emission physics. The combination of energy-conserving tallies and the use of an asymptotic approximation in optically thick regions remedy the difficulties of local energy conservation and mitigation of statistical noise in such regions. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the developed method. We also compare directly to the standard linearization-based method of Fleck and Cummings [1]. A factor of 40 reduction in total computational time is achieved with the new algorithm for an equivalent (or more accurate) solution as compared with the Fleck–Cummings algorithm.

  16. Evaluation of uranium dioxide thermal conductivity using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woongkee; Kaviany, Massoud; Shim, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    It can be extended to larger space, time scale and even real reactor situation with fission product as multi-scale formalism. Uranium dioxide is a fluorite structure with Fm3m space group. Since it is insulator, dominant heat carrier is phonon, rather than electrons. So, using equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we present the appropriate calculation parameters in MD simulation by calculating thermal conductivity and application of it to the thermal conductivity of polycrystal. In this work, we investigate thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide and optimize the parameters related to its process. In this process, called Green Kubo formula, there are two parameters i.e correlation length and sampling interval, which effect on ensemble integration in order to obtain thermal conductivity. Through several comparisons, long correlation length and short sampling interval give better results. Using this strategy, thermal conductivity of poly crystal is obtained and comparison with that of pure crystal is made. Thermal conductivity of poly crystal show lower value that that of pure crystal. In further study, we broaden the study to transport coefficient of radiation damaged structures using molecular dynamics. Although molecular dynamics is tools for treating microscopic scale, most macroscopic issues related to nuclear materials such as voids in fuel materials and weakened mechanical properties by radiation are based on microscopic basis. Thus, research on microscopic scale would be expanded in this field and many hidden mechanism in atomic scales will be revealed via both atomic scale simulations and experiments

  17. Thermal-hydraulic model of the primary coolant circuits for the full-scale training facility with WWER-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroshilin, A.E.; Zhukavin, A.P.; Pryakhin, V.N.

    1992-01-01

    The mathematical model realized in the full-scale educational facility for NPP operator training is described. The RETACT computational complex providing real time process simulation for all regimes including the maximum credible accident is used for calculation of thermohydraulic parameters of the primary coolant circuits and steam generator under stationary and transient conditions. The two-velocity two-temperature model of one-dimensional steam-water flow containing uncondensed gases is realized in the program

  18. Effects of variable thermal diffusivity on the structure of convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcheritsa, O. V.; Getling, A. V.; Mazhorova, O. S.

    2018-03-01

    The structure of multiscale convection in a thermally stratified plane horizontal fluid layer is investigated by means of numerical simulations. The thermal diffusivity is assumed to produce a thin boundary sublayer convectively much more unstable than the bulk of the layer. The simulated flow is a superposition of cellular structures with three different characteristic scales. In contrast to the largest convection cells, the smaller ones are localised in the upper portion of the layer. The smallest cells are advected by the larger-scale convective flows. The simulated flow pattern qualitatively resembles that observed on the Sun.

  19. Conformal Ablative Thermal Protection System for Small and Large Scale Missions: Approaching TRL 6 for Planetary and Human Exploration Missions and TRL 9 for Small Probe Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R. A. S.; Gasch, M. J.; Milos, F. S.; Stackpoole, M. M.; Smith, B. P.; Switzer, M. R.; Venkatapathy, E.; Wilder, M. C.; Boghhozian, T.; Chavez-Garcia, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, NASAs Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) funded an effort to develop an ablative thermal protection system (TPS) material that would have improved properties when compared to Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) and AVCOAT. Their goal was a conformal material, processed with a flexible reinforcement that would result in similar or better thermal characteristics and higher strain-to-failure characteristics that would allow for easier integration on flight aeroshells than then-current rigid ablative TPS materials. In 2012, NASAs Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) began funding the maturation of the best formulation of the game changing conformal ablator, C-PICA. Progress has been reported at IPPW over the past three years, describing C-PICA with a density and recession rates similar to PICA, but with a higher strain-to-failure which allows for direct bonding and no gap fillers, and even more important, with thermal characteristics resulting in half the temperature rise of PICA. Overall, C-PICA should be able to replace PICA with a thinner, lighter weight, less complicated design. These characteristics should be particularly attractive for use as backshell TPS on high energy planetary entry vehicles. At the end of this year, the material should be ready for missions to consider including in their design, in fact, NASAs Science Mission Directorate (SMD) is considering incentivizing the use of C-PICA in the next Discovery Proposal call. This year both scale up of the material to large (1-m) sized pieces and the design and build of small probe heatshields for flight tests will be completed. NASA, with an industry partner, will build a 1-m long manufacturing demonstration unit (MDU) with a shape based on a mid LD lifting body. In addition, in an effort to fly as you test and test as you fly, NASA, with a second industry partner, will build a small probe to test in the Interactive Heating Facility (IHF) arc jet and, using nearly the

  20. Preliminary analysis of effects of thermal loading on gas and heat flow within the framework of the LBNL/USGS site-scale model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.S.; Chen, G.; Bodvarsson, G.

    1995-12-01

    The US Department of Energy is performing detailed site characterization studies at Yucca Mountain to determine its suitability as a geological repository site for high level nuclear wastes. As part of these research efforts, a three-dimensional, site-scale unsaturated-zone model has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in collaboration with the US Geological Survey (USGS). The primary objectives of developing the 3-D site-scale model are to predict the ambient hydrogeological conditions and the movement of moisture and gas within the unsaturated zone of the mountain. In addition, the model has the capability of modeling non-isothermal flow and transport phenomena at the mountain. Applications of such a site-scale model should include evaluation of effects of thermal loading on heated gas and heat flow through the mountain for long-term performance assessment of the repository. Emplacement of heat-generating, high-level nuclear wastes at Yucca Mountain would create complex multiphase fluid flow and heat transfer processes. The physical mechanisms include conductive and convective heat transfer, phase change phenomena (vaporization and condensation), flow of liquid and gas phases under variably-saturated condition, diffusion and dispersion of vapor and gas, vapor sorption, and vapor-pressure lowering effects. The heterogeneity of complicated geological setting at Yucca Mountain, such as alternating, layers of porous-fractured rocks, will significantly affect the processes of fluid and heat flow

  1. Advanced STEM/EDX investigation on an oxide scale thermally grown on a high-chromium iron–nickel alloy under very low oxygen partial pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latu-Romain, L.; Madi, Y.; Mathieu, S.; Robaut, F.; Petit, J.-P.; Wouters, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A scale grown on a high-chromium iron–nickel alloy under low oxygen partial pressure was studied. • STEM-EDX maps at high resolution on a transversal thin lamella have been conducted. • The real complexity of the oxide layer has been highlighted. • These results explain the elevated number of semiconducting contributions. - Abstract: A thermal oxide scale has been grown on a high-chromium iron-nickel alloy under very low oxygen partial pressure (1050 °C, 10"−"1"0 Pa). In this paper, a special attention has been paid to morphological and chemical characterizations of the scale by scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis at high resolution on a cross-section thin lamella beforehand prepared by using a combined focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope instrument. The complexity of the oxide layer is highlighted, and the correlation between the present results and the ones of a photoelectrochemical study is discussed.

  2. X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy characterization of intermetallics formed in Fe/Ti nanometer-scale multilayers during thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Z.L.; Peng, T.X.; Cao, B.S.; Lei, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Intermetallics formation in the Fe/Ti nanometer-scale multilayers magnetron-sputtering deposited on Si(100) substrate during thermal annealing at 623-873 K was investigated by using small and wide angle X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The Fe/Ti nanometer-scale multilayers were constructed with bilayer thickness of 16.2 nm and the sublayer thickness ratio of 1:1. At the annealing temperature of 623 K, intermetallics FeTi were formed by nucleation at the triple joins of α-Fe(Ti)/α-Ti interface and α-Ti grain boundary with an orientational correlation of FeTi(110)//α-Ti(100) and FeTi[001]//α-Ti[001] to adjacent α-Ti grains. The lateral growth of intermetallics FeTi which is dependent on the diffusion path of Ti led to a coalescence into an intermetallic layer. With an increase in the annealing temperature, intermetallics Fe 2 Ti were formed between the intermetallics FeTi and the excess Fe due to the limitation of Fe and Ti atomic concentrations, resulting in the coexistence of intermetallics FeTi and Fe 2 Ti. It was found that the low energy interface as well as the dominant diffusion path constrained the nucleation and growth of intermetallics during interfacial reaction in the nanometer-scale metallic multilayers.

  3. Inside the small-scale composting of kitchen and garden wastes: Thermal performance and stratification effect in vertical compost bins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, Juan Pablo; Paladino, Gabriela; Garibaldi, Lucas Alejandro; Laos, Francisca

    2018-06-01

    Decentralized composting has been proposed as a best available practice, with a highly positive impact on municipal solid wastes management plans. However, in cold climates, decentralized small-scale composting performance to reach thermophilic temperatures (required for the product sanitization) could be poor, due to a lack of critical mass to retain heat. In addition, in these systems the composting process is usually disturbed when new portions of fresh organic waste are combined with previous batches. This causes modifications in the well-known composting evolution pattern. The objective of this work was to improve the understanding of these technical aspects through a real-scale decentralized composting experience carried out under cold climate conditions, in order to assess sanitization performance and to study the effects of fresh feedstock additions in the process evolution. Kitchen and garden organic wastes were composted in 500 L-static compost bins (without turning) for 244 days under cold climate conditions (Bariloche, NW Patagonia, Argentina), using pine wood shavings in a ratio of 1.5:1 v: v (waste: bulking agent). Temperature profile, stability indicators (microbial activity, carbon and nitrogen contents and ratio) and other variables (pH and electrical conductivity), were monitored throughout the experience. Our results indicate that small-scale composting (average generation rate of 7 kg d -1 ) is viable under cold weather conditions, since thermophilic sanitization temperatures (> 55 °C) were maintained for 3 consecutive days in most of the composting mass, according to available USEPA regulations commonly used as a reference for pathogens control in sewage sludge. On the other hand, stability indicators showed a differentiated organic matter degradation process along the compost bins height. Particularly, in the bottommost composting mix layer the process took a longer period to achieve compost stability than the upper layers, suggesting

  4. Thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal expansion of fuel pellet is an important property which limits the lifetime of the fuels in reactors, because it affects both the pellet and cladding mechanical interaction and the gap conductivity. By fitting a number of available measured data, recommended equations have been presented and successfully used to estimate thermal expansion coefficient of the nuclear fuel pellet. However, due to large scatter of the measured data, non-consensus data have been omitted in formulating the equations. Also, the equation is strongly governed by the lack of appropriate experimental data. For those reasons, it is important to develop theoretical methodologies to better describe thermal expansion behaviour of nuclear fuel. In particular, first-principles and molecular dynamics simulations have been certainly contributed to predict reliable thermal expansion without fitting the measured data. Furthermore, the two theoretical techniques have improved on understanding the change of fuel dimension by describing the atomic-scale processes associated with lattice expansion in the fuels. (author)

  5. Improved numerical algorithm and experimental validation of a system thermal-hydraulic/CFD coupling method for multi-scale transient simulations of pool-type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toti, A.; Vierendeels, J.; Belloni, F.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A system thermal-hydraulic/CFD coupling methodology is proposed for high-fidelity transient flow analyses. • The method is based on domain decomposition and implicit numerical scheme. • A novel interface Quasi-Newton algorithm is implemented to improve stability and convergence rate. • Preliminary validation analyses on the TALL-3D experiment. - Abstract: The paper describes the development and validation of a coupling methodology between the best-estimate system thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5-3D and the CFD code FLUENT, conceived for high fidelity plant-scale safety analyses of pool-type reactors. The computational tool is developed to assess the impact of three-dimensional phenomena occurring in accidental transients such as loss of flow (LOF) in the research reactor MYRRHA, currently in the design phase at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK• CEN. A partitioned, implicit domain decomposition coupling algorithm is implemented, in which the coupled domains exchange thermal-hydraulics variables at coupling boundary interfaces. Numerical stability and interface convergence rates are improved by a novel interface Quasi-Newton algorithm, which is compared in this paper with previously tested numerical schemes. The developed computational method has been assessed for validation purposes against the experiment performed at the test facility TALL-3D, operated by the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Sweden. This paper details the results of the simulation of a loss of forced convection test, showing the capability of the developed methodology to predict transients influenced by local three-dimensional phenomena.

  6. Concept of a utility scale dispatch able solar thermal electricity plant with an indirect particle receiver in a single tower layout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaiger, Karl; Haider, Markus; Haemmerle, Martin; Steiner, Peter; Obermaier, Michael-Dario

    2016-05-01

    Flexible dispatch able solar thermal electricity plants applying state of the art power cycles have the potential of playing a vital role in modern electricity systems and even participating in the ancillary market. By replacing molten salt via particles, operation temperatures can be increased and plant efficiencies of over 45 % can be reached. In this work the concept for a utility scale plant using corundum as storage/heat transfer material is thermodynamically modeled and its key performance data are cited. A novel indirect fluidized bed particle receiver concept is presented, profiting from a near black body behavior being able to heat up large particle flows by realizing temperature cycles over 500°C. Specialized fluidized bed steam-generators are applied with negligible auxiliary power demand. The performance of the key components is discussed and a rough sketch of the plant is provided.

  7. Microbiological and environmental effects of aquifer thermal energy storage - studies at the Stuttgart man-made aquifer and a large-scale model system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adinolfi, M.; Ruck, W.

    1993-01-01

    The storage of thermal energy, either heat or cold, in natural or artificial aquifers creates local perturbations of the indigenous microflora and the environmental properties. Within an international working group of the International Energy Agency (IEA Annex VI) possible environmental impacts of ATES-systems were recognized and investigated. Investigations of storage systems on natural sites, man-made aquifers and large-scale models of impounded aquifers showed changes in microbial populations, but until now no adverse microbiological processes associated with ATES-systems could be documented. However, examinations with a model system indicate an increased risk of environmental impact. Therefore, the operation of ATES-systems should be accompanied by chemical and biological investigations. (orig.) [de

  8. Creep life prediction of super heater coils used in coal based thermal power plants subjected to fly ash erosion and oxide scale formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, P.; Kushwaha, Shashank

    2018-04-01

    Super heater coils of the coal based thermal power plants and subjected to severe operating conditions from both steam side and gas side. Formation of oxide scale due to prolonged service lead to temperature raise of the tube and erosion due to fly ash present in the combusted gases leads to tube thinning. Both these factors lead to creep rupture of the coils much before the designed service life. Failure of super heater coils during service of the boiler leads to power loss and huge monitory loss to the power plants. An attempt is made to model the creep damage caused to the super heater coils using heat transfer analysis tube thinning due to erosive wear of the tubes. Combined effects of these parameters are taken into consideration to predict the life of the super heater coils. This model may be used to estimate the life of the coils operating under the severe operating conditions to prevent the unexpected failure of the coils.

  9. A fast and mobile system for registration of low-altitude visual and thermal aerial images using multiple small-scale UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyanejad, Saeed; Rinner, Bernhard

    2015-06-01

    The use of multiple small-scale UAVs to support first responders in disaster management has become popular because of their speed and low deployment costs. We exploit such UAVs to perform real-time monitoring of target areas by fusing individual images captured from heterogeneous aerial sensors. Many approaches have already been presented to register images from homogeneous sensors. These methods have demonstrated robustness against scale, rotation and illumination variations and can also cope with limited overlap among individual images. In this paper we focus on thermal and visual image registration and propose different methods to improve the quality of interspectral registration for the purpose of real-time monitoring and mobile mapping. Images captured by low-altitude UAVs represent a very challenging scenario for interspectral registration due to the strong variations in overlap, scale, rotation, point of view and structure of such scenes. Furthermore, these small-scale UAVs have limited processing and communication power. The contributions of this paper include (i) the introduction of a feature descriptor for robustly identifying corresponding regions of images in different spectrums, (ii) the registration of image mosaics, and (iii) the registration of depth maps. We evaluated the first method using a test data set consisting of 84 image pairs. In all instances our approach combined with SIFT or SURF feature-based registration was superior to the standard versions. Although we focus mainly on aerial imagery, our evaluation shows that the presented approach would also be beneficial in other scenarios such as surveillance and human detection. Furthermore, we demonstrated the advantages of the other two methods in case of multiple image pairs.

  10. Transient simulation of a solar heating system for a small-scale ethanol-water distillation plant: Thermal, environmental and economic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas-Bautista, Juan Pablo; García-Cuéllar, Alejandro Javier; Pérez-García, Santiago L.; Rivera-Solorio, Carlos I.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal simulation of a small solar ethanol distillation plant is performed. • The optimum collector area is obtained for two different thermal collectors types. • Higher solar fraction was found for parabolic trough collectors. • Economic analysis is performed for different scenarios to evaluate feasibility. - Abstract: The thermal, environmental and economic performance of a small-scale ethanol distillation system, where solar energy is used as primary energy source, was studied. Two different concentrations of ethanol at the feed stream (5 wt.% and 10 wt.%) were analysed to obtain a distillate product of 95 wt.% ethanol (hydrous ethanol). Evacuated tube solar collectors (ETC) and parabolic trough collectors (PTC) were considered for the solar heating system. A case of study for a specific geographical place (Monterrey, México) was developed herein to evaluate the solar ethanol distillation system; the results can be extended to other locations, weather conditions and operational parameters. The thermal results from the simulation showed that through an adequate selection of the solar collector area and an appropriate sizing of the different equipment of the solar distillation system, PTC represents a better option where energy savings of 80% and 71% can be achieved for 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% ethanol at the feed stream, respectively. However, the economic feasibility of the solar distillation system is achieved using ETC for a price of hydrous ethanol of 1.75 USD/L and a feed stream of 10 wt.% ethanol, reaching an internal rate of return (IRR) of 18.8% and payback period of 5.2 years. As an important technical result, selected ETC presented advantages over PTC where an average distillate product of 3.6 and 3.4 ml at 95 wt.% ethanol can be obtained per unit of solar energy (kW h) captured per area (m"2) of solar collector using 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% ethanol at the feed stream, respectively (36% more than PTC). The reduction of greenhouse gases (GHG

  11. The Electronic Thermal Conductivity of Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Yun; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Marzari, Nicola

    2016-04-13

    Graphene, as a semimetal with the largest known thermal conductivity, is an ideal system to study the interplay between electronic and lattice contributions to thermal transport. While the total electrical and thermal conductivity have been extensively investigated, a detailed first-principles study of its electronic thermal conductivity is still missing. Here, we first characterize the electron-phonon intrinsic contribution to the electronic thermal resistivity of graphene as a function of doping using electronic and phonon dispersions and electron-phonon couplings calculated from first-principles at the level of density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory (GW). Then, we include extrinsic electron-impurity scattering using low-temperature experimental estimates. Under these conditions, we find that the in-plane electronic thermal conductivity κe of doped graphene is ∼300 W/mK at room temperature, independently of doping. This result is much larger than expected and comparable to the total thermal conductivity of typical metals, contributing ∼10% to the total thermal conductivity of bulk graphene. Notably, in samples whose physical or domain sizes are of the order of few micrometers or smaller, the relative contribution coming from the electronic thermal conductivity is more important than in the bulk limit, because lattice thermal conductivity is much more sensitive to sample or grain size at these scales. Last, when electron-impurity scattering effects are included we find that the electronic thermal conductivity is reduced by 30 to 70%. We also find that the Wiedemann-Franz law is broadly satisfied at low and high temperatures but with the largest deviations of 20-50% around room temperature.

  12. Developing Renewable Energy Projects Larger Than 10 MWs at Federal Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-03-01

    To accomplish Federal goals for renewable energy, sustainability, and energy security, large-scale renewable energy projects must be developed and constructed on Federal sites at a significant scale with significant private investment. For the purposes of this Guide, large-scale Federal renewable energy projects are defined as renewable energy facilities larger than 10 megawatts (MW) that are sited on Federal property and lands and typically financed and owned by third parties.1 The U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) helps Federal agencies meet these goals and assists agency personnel navigate the complexities of developing such projects and attract the necessary private capital to complete them. This Guide is intended to provide a general resource that will begin to develop the Federal employee’s awareness and understanding of the project developer’s operating environment and the private sector’s awareness and understanding of the Federal environment. Because the vast majority of the investment that is required to meet the goals for large-scale renewable energy projects will come from the private sector, this Guide has been organized to match Federal processes with typical phases of commercial project development. FEMP collaborated with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and professional project developers on this Guide to ensure that Federal projects have key elements recognizable to private sector developers and investors. The main purpose of this Guide is to provide a project development framework to allow the Federal Government, private developers, and investors to work in a coordinated fashion on large-scale renewable energy projects. The framework includes key elements that describe a successful, financially attractive large-scale renewable energy project. This framework begins the translation between the Federal and private sector operating environments. When viewing the overall

  13. The application of two-step linear temperature program to thermal analysis for monitoring the lipid induction of Nostoc sp. KNUA003 in large scale cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bongmun; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2015-02-01

    Recently, microalgae was considered as a renewable energy for fuel production because its production is nonseasonal and may take place on nonarable land. Despite all of these advantages, microalgal oil production is significantly affected by environmental factors. Furthermore, the large variability remains an important problem in measurement of algae productivity and compositional analysis, especially, the total lipid content. Thus, there is considerable interest in accurate determination of total lipid content during the biotechnological process. For these reason, various high-throughput technologies were suggested for accurate measurement of total lipids contained in the microorganisms, especially oleaginous microalgae. In addition, more advanced technologies were employed to quantify the total lipids of the microalgae without a pretreatment. However, these methods are difficult to measure total lipid content in wet form microalgae obtained from large-scale production. In present study, the thermal analysis performed with two-step linear temeperature program was applied to measure heat evolved in temperature range from 310 to 351 °C of Nostoc sp. KNUA003 obtained from large-scale cultivation. And then, we examined the relationship between the heat evolved in 310-351 °C (HE) and total lipid content of the wet Nostoc cell cultivated in raceway. As a result, the linear relationship was determined between HE value and total lipid content of Nostoc sp. KNUA003. Particularly, there was a linear relationship of 98% between the HE value and the total lipid content of the tested microorganism. Based on this relationship, the total lipid content converted from the heat evolved of wet Nostoc sp. KNUA003 could be used for monitoring its lipid induction in large-scale cultivation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Thermal plumes in ventilated rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Peter; Nielsen, Peter V.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a displacement ventilation system involves determination of the flow rate in the thermal plumes. The flow rate in the plumes and the vertical temperature gradient influence each other, and they are influenced by many factors. This paper shows some descriptions of these effects. Free...... above a point heat source cannot be used. This is caused either by the way of generating the plume including a long intermediate region or by the environmental conditions where vertical temperature gradients are present. The flow has a larger angle of spread and the entrainment factor is greather than...... turbulent plumes from different heated bodies are investigated. The measurements have taken place in a full-scale test room where the vertical temperature gradient have been changed. The velocity and the temperature distribution in the plume are measured. Large scale plume axis wandering is taken...

  15. OECD MCCI project Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-1 test data report: thermal hydraulic results. Rev. 0 September 20, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M.T.; Kilsdonk, D.J.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Basu, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium (∼φ30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the first water ingression test, designated SSWICS-1. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the

  16. OECD MCCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-3 test data report: thermal Hydraulic results, Rev. 0 February 19, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M.T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium (∼φ30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the third water ingression test, designated SSWICS-3. This test investigated the quenching behavior of a fully oxidized PWR

  17. Larger foraminifera of the Devil's Den and Blue Hole sinkholes, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Laura J.; Eder, Wolfgang; Floyd, James

    2018-03-01

    Shallow-water carbonate deposits are well-known from the Eocene of the US Gulf Coast and Caribbean. These deposits frequently contain abundant larger benthic foraminifera (LBF). However, whilst integrated stratigraphic studies have helped to refine the timing of LBF overturning events within the Tethys and Indo-Pacific regions with respect to global bio- and chemo-stratigraphic records, little recent work has been carried out in the Americas. The American LBF assemblages are distinctly different from those of Europe and the Indo-Pacific. It is therefore essential that the American bio-province is included in studies of LBF evolution, biodiversity and climate events to understand these processes on a global scale.Here we present the LBF ranges from two previously unpublished sections spanning 35 and 29 m of the upper Eocene Ocala limestone, as the early stages of a larger project addressing the taxonomy and biostratigraphy of the LBF of Florida. The study indicates that the lower member of the Ocala limestone may be Bartonian rather than Priabonian in age, with implications for the biostratigraphy of the region. In addition, the study highlights the need for multiple sites to assess the LBF assemblages and fully constrain ranges across Florida and the US Gulf and suggests potential LBF events for future integrated stratigraphic study.

  18. Thermally Optimized Paradigm of Thermal Management (TOP-M)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-18

    19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 18-07-2017 Final Technical Jul 2015 - Jul 2017 NICOP - Thermally Optimized Paradigm of Thermal Management ...The main goal of this research was to present a New Thermal Management Approach, which combines thermally aware Very/Ultra Large Scale Integration...SPAD) image sensors were used to demonstrate the new thermal management approach. Thermal management , integrated temperature sensors, Vt extractor

  19. Apollo telescope mount thermal systems unit thermal vacuum test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucks, H. F.; Hueter, U.; Wise, J. H.; Bachtel, F. D.

    1971-01-01

    The Apollo Telescope Mount's thermal systems unit was utilized to conduct a full-scale thermal vacuum test to verify the thermal design and the analytical techniques used to develop the thermal mathematical models. Thermal vacuum test philosophy, test objectives configuration, test monitoring, environment simulation, vehicle test performance, and data correlation are discussed. Emphasis is placed on planning and execution of the thermal vacuum test with particular attention on problems encountered in conducting a test of this maguitude.

  20. Thermal analysis of multi-MW two-level wind power converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Dao; Blaabjerg, Frede; Mogens, Lau

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the multi-MW wind turbine of partial-scale and full-scale two-level power converter with DFIG and direct-drive PMSG are designed and compared in terms of their thermal performance. Simulations of different configurations regarding loss distribution and junction temperature...... in the power device in the whole range of wind speed are presented and analyzed. It is concluded that in both partial-scale and full-scale power converter the most thermal stressed power device in the generator-side converter will have higher mean junction temperature and larger junction temperature...... fluctuation compared to grid-side converter at the rated wind speed. Moreover, the thermal performance of the generator-side converter in the partial-scale power converter becomes crucial around the synchronous operating point and should be considered carefully....

  1. Large-scale fabrication of linear low density polyethylene/layered double hydroxides composite films with enhanced heat retention, thermal, mechanical, optical and water vapor barrier properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Jiazhuo; Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Qinghua [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, 61 Daizong Street, Tai' an 271018 (China); Wang, Qingguo, E-mail: wqgyyy@126.com [College of Food Science and Engineering, Shandong Agricultural University, 61 Daizong Street, Tai' an 271018 (China); Xu, Jing, E-mail: jiaxu@sdau.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, 61 Daizong Street, Tai' an 271018 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Novel LDH intercalated with organic aliphatic long-chain anion was large-scale synthesized innovatively by high-energy ball milling in one pot. The linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE)/layered double hydroxides (LDH) composite films with enhanced heat retention, thermal, mechanical, optical and water vapor barrier properties were fabricated by melt blending and blowing process. FT IR, XRD, SEM results show that LDH particles were dispersed uniformly in the LLDPE composite films. Particularly, LLDPE composite film with 1% LDH exhibited the optimal performance among all the composite films with a 60.36% enhancement in the water vapor barrier property and a 45.73 °C increase in the temperature of maximum mass loss rate compared with pure LLDPE film. Furthermore, the improved infrared absorbance (1180–914 cm{sup −1}) of LLDPE/LDH films revealed the significant enhancement of heat retention. Therefore, this study prompts the application of LLDPE/LDH films as agricultural films with superior heat retention. - Graphical abstract: The fabrication process of LLDPE/LDH composite films. - Highlights: • LDH with basal spacing of 4.07 nm was synthesized by high-energy ball milling. • LLDPE composite films with homogeneous LDH dispersion were fabricated. • The properties of LLDPE/LDH composite films were improved. • LLDPE/LDH composite films show superior heat retention property.

  2. Large-scale fabrication of linear low density polyethylene/layered double hydroxides composite films with enhanced heat retention, thermal, mechanical, optical and water vapor barrier properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Jiazhuo; Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Qinghua; Wang, Qingguo; Xu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Novel LDH intercalated with organic aliphatic long-chain anion was large-scale synthesized innovatively by high-energy ball milling in one pot. The linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE)/layered double hydroxides (LDH) composite films with enhanced heat retention, thermal, mechanical, optical and water vapor barrier properties were fabricated by melt blending and blowing process. FT IR, XRD, SEM results show that LDH particles were dispersed uniformly in the LLDPE composite films. Particularly, LLDPE composite film with 1% LDH exhibited the optimal performance among all the composite films with a 60.36% enhancement in the water vapor barrier property and a 45.73 °C increase in the temperature of maximum mass loss rate compared with pure LLDPE film. Furthermore, the improved infrared absorbance (1180–914 cm −1 ) of LLDPE/LDH films revealed the significant enhancement of heat retention. Therefore, this study prompts the application of LLDPE/LDH films as agricultural films with superior heat retention. - Graphical abstract: The fabrication process of LLDPE/LDH composite films. - Highlights: • LDH with basal spacing of 4.07 nm was synthesized by high-energy ball milling. • LLDPE composite films with homogeneous LDH dispersion were fabricated. • The properties of LLDPE/LDH composite films were improved. • LLDPE/LDH composite films show superior heat retention property.

  3. Thermalization of mutual information in hyperscaling violating backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanhayi, M. Reza [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Science,Islamic Azad University Central Tehran Branch (IAUCTB),P.O. Box 14676-86831, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM),P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-03-31

    We study certain features of scaling behaviors of the mutual information during a process of thermalization, more precisely we extend the time scaling behavior of mutual information which has been discussed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP09(2015)165 to time-dependent hyperscaling violating geometries. We use the holographic description of entanglement entropy for two disjoint system consisting of two parallel strips whose widths are much larger than the separation between them. We show that during the thermalization process, the dynamical exponent plays a crucial rule in reading the general time scaling behavior of mutual information (e.g., at the pre-local-equilibration regime). It is shown that the scaling violating parameter can be employed to define an effective dimension.

  4. Thermal-chemical-mechanical feedback during fluid-rock interactions: Implications for chemical transport and scales of equilibria in the crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutrow, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Our research evaluates the hypothesis that feedback amongst thermal-chemical-mechanical processes operative in fluid-rock systems alters the fluid flow dynamics of the system which, in turn, affects chemical transport and temporal and spatial scales of equilibria, thus impacting the resultant mineral textural development of rocks. Our methods include computational experimentation and detailed analyses of fluid-infiltrated rocks from well-characterized terranes. This work focuses on metamorphic rocks and hydrothermal systems where minerals and their textures are utilized to evaluate pressure (P), temperature (T), and time (t) paths in the evolution of mountain belts and ore deposits, and to interpret tectonic events and the timing of these events. Our work on coupled processes also extends to other areas where subsurface flow and transport in porous media have consequences such as oil and gas movement, geothermal system development, transport of contaminants, nuclear waste disposal, and other systems rich in fluid-rock reactions. Fluid-rock systems are widespread in the geologic record. Correctly deciphering the products resulting from such systems is important to interpreting a number of geologic phenomena. These systems are characterized by complex interactions involving time-dependent, non-linear processes in heterogeneous materials. While many of these interactions have been studied in isolation, they are more appropriately analyzed in the context of a system with feedback. When one process impacts another process, time and space scales as well as the overall outcome of the interaction can be dramatically altered. Our goals to test this hypothesis are: to develop and incorporate algorithms into our 3D heat and mass transport code to allow the effects of feedback to be investigated numerically, to analyze fluid infiltrated rocks from a variety of terranes at differing P-T conditions, to identify subtle features of the infiltration of fluids and/or feedback, and

  5. Thermal relic dark matter beyond the unitarity limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harigaya, Keisuke [Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ibe, Masahiro [Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); ICRR, The University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kaneta, Kunio [Center for Theoretical Physics of the Universe, Institute for Basic Science (IBS),Daejeon 34051 (Korea, Republic of); Nakano, Wakutaka; Suzuki, Motoo [Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); ICRR, The University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2016-08-25

    We discuss a simple model of thermal relic dark matter whose mass can be much larger than the so-called unitarity limit on the mass of point-like particle dark matter. The model consists of new strong dynamics with one flavor of fermions in the fundamental representation which is much heavier than the dynamical scale of the new strong dynamics. Dark matter is identified with the lightest baryonic hadron of the new dynamics. The baryonic hadrons annihilate into the mesonic hadrons of the new strong dynamics when they have large radii. Resultantly, thermal relic dark matter with a mass in the PeV range is possible.

  6. Determination of in-situ thermal properties of Stripa granite from temperature measurements in the full-scale heater experiments: method and preliminary results. Technical information report No. 24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffry, J.A.; Chan, T.; Cook, N.G.W.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1979-05-01

    The in-situ thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of a granite rock mass at the Stripa mine, Sweden, have been extracted from the first 70 days of temperature data for the 5 kW full-scale heater experiment by means of least-squares fit to a finite-line source solution. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity have been determined to be 3.69 W/(m- 0 C) and 1.84 x 10 -6 m 2 /s, respectively, at an average rock temperature of 23 0 C (the average value of the actual temperature data used). These values are only slightly higher than the corresponding laboratory values, i.e., there is no significant size effect in the thermal properties of this rock mass. Since the size and shape of the heater canister used are similar to those considered for nuclear waste canisters and a substantial volume of rock is heated, the thermal properties obtained in this study are representative of in-situ rock mass properties under actual nuclear repository operating conditions

  7. Measurement of Thermal Conductivity of Porcine Liver in the Temperature Range of Cryotherapy and Hyperthermia (250~315k) by A Thermal Sensor Made of A Micron-Scale Enameled Copper Wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z D; Zhao, G; Lu, G R

      BACKGROUND: Cryotherapy and hyperthermia are effective treatments for several diseases, especially for liver cancers. Thermal conductivity is a significant thermal property for the prediction and guidance of surgical procedure. However, the thermal conductivities of organs and tissues, especially over the temperature range of both cryotherapy and hyperthermia are scarce. To provide comprehensive thermal conductivity of liver for both cryotherapy and hyperthermia. A hot probe made of stain steel needle and micron-sized copper wire is used for measurement. To verify data processing, both the least square method and the Monte Carlo inversion method are used to determine the hot probe constants, respectively, with reference materials of water and 29.9 % Ca 2 Cl aqueous solution. Then the thermal conductivities of Hanks solution and pork liver bathed in Hanks solution are measured. The effective length for two methods is nearly the same, but the heat capacity of probe calibrated by the Monte Carlo inversion is temperature dependent. Fairly comprehensive thermal conductivity of porcine liver measured with these two methods in the target temperature range is verified to be similar. We provide an integrated thermal conductivity of liver for cryotherapy and hyperthermia in two methods, and make more accurate predictions possible for surgery. The least square method and the Monte Carlo inversion method have their advantages and disadvantages. The least square method is available for measurement of liquids that not prone to convection or solids in a wide temperature range, while the Monte Carlo inversion method is available for accurate and rapid measurement.

  8. International training program: 3D S.UN.COP - Scaling, uncertainty and 3D thermal-hydraulics/neutron-kinetics coupled codes seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petruzzi, A.; D'Auria, F.; Bajs, T.; Reventos, F.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic system computer codes are extensively used worldwide for analysis of nuclear facilities by utilities, regulatory bodies, nuclear power plant designers and vendors, nuclear fuel companies, research organizations, consulting companies, and technical support organizations. The computer code user represents a source of uncertainty that can influence the results of system code calculations. This influence is commonly known as the 'user effect' and stems from the limitations embedded in the codes as well as from the limited capability of the analysts to use the codes. Code user training and qualification is an effective means for reducing the variation of results caused by the application of the codes by different users. This paper describes a systematic approach to training code users who, upon completion of the training, should be able to perform calculations making the best possible use of the capabilities of best estimate codes. In other words, the program aims at contributing towards solving the problem of user effect. The 3D S.UN.COP 2005 (Scaling, Uncertainty and 3D COuPled code calculations) seminar has been organized by University of Pisa and University of Zagreb as follow-up of the proposal to IAEA for the Permanent Training Course for System Code Users (D'Auria, 1998). It was recognized that such a course represented both a source of continuing education for current code users and a means for current code users to enter the formal training structure of a proposed 'permanent' stepwise approach to user training. The seminar-training was successfully held with the participation of 19 persons coming from 9 countries and 14 different institutions (universities, vendors, national laboratories and regulatory bodies). More than 15 scientists were involved in the organization of the seminar, presenting theoretical aspects of the proposed methodologies and holding the training and the final examination. A certificate (LA Code User grade) was released

  9. International training program in support of safety analysis. 3D S.UN.COP-scaling uncertainty and 3D thermal-hydraulics/neutron-kinetics coupled codes seminars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petruzzi, Alessandro; D'Auria, Francesco; Bajs, Tomislav; Reventos, Francesc; Hassan, Yassin

    2007-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic system computer codes are extensively used worldwide for analysis of nuclear facilities by utilities, regulatory bodies, nuclear power plant designers and vendors, nuclear fuel companies, research organizations, consulting companies, and technical support organizations. The computer code user represents a source of uncertainty that can influence the results of system code calculations. This influence is commonly known as the user effect' and stems from the limitations embedded in the codes as well as from the limited capability of the analysis to use the codes. Code user training and qualification is an effective means for reducing the variation of results caused by the application of the codes by different users. This paper describes a systematic approach to training code users who, upon completion of the training, should be able to perform calculations making the best possible use of the capabilities of best estimate codes. In other words, the program aims at contributing towards solving the problem of user effect. The 3D S.UN.COP (Scaling, Uncertainty and 3D COuPled code calculations) seminars have been organized as follow-up of the proposal to IAEA for the Permanent Training Course for System Code Users. Six seminars have been held at University of Pisa (2003, 2004), at The Pennsylvania State University (2004), at University of Zagreb (2005), at the School of Industrial Engineering of Barcelona (January-February 2006) and in Buenos Aires, Argentina (October 2006), being this last one requested by ARN (Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear), NA-SA (Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A) and CNEA (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica). It was recognized that such courses represented both a source of continuing education for current code users and a mean for current code users to enter the formal training structure of a proposed 'permanent' stepwise approach to user training. The 3D S.UN.COP 2006 in Barcelona was successfully held with the attendance of 33

  10. International Training Program in Support of Safety Analysis: 3D S.UN.COP-Scaling, Uncertainty and 3D Thermal-Hydraulics/Neutron-Kinetics Coupled Codes Seminars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petruzzi, Alessandro; D'Auria, Francesco; Bajs, Tomislav; Reventos, Francesc

    2006-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic system computer codes are extensively used worldwide for analysis of nuclear facilities by utilities, regulatory bodies, nuclear power plant designers and vendors, nuclear fuel companies, research organizations, consulting companies, and technical support organizations. The computer code user represents a source of uncertainty that can influence the results of system code calculations. This influence is commonly known as the 'user effect' and stems from the limitations embedded in the codes as well as from the limited capability of the analysts to use the codes. Code user training and qualification is an effective means for reducing the variation of results caused by the application of the codes by different users. This paper describes a systematic approach to training code users who, upon completion of the training, should be able to perform calculations making the best possible use of the capabilities of best estimate codes. In other words, the program aims at contributing towards solving the problem of user effect. The 3D S.UN.COP (Scaling, Uncertainty and 3D COuPled code calculations) seminars have been organized as follow-up of the proposal to IAEA for the Permanent Training Course for System Code Users [1]. Five seminars have been held at University of Pisa (2003, 2004), at The Pennsylvania State University (2004), at University of Zagreb (2005) and at the School of Industrial Engineering of Barcelona (2006). It was recognized that such courses represented both a source of continuing education for current code users and a mean for current code users to enter the formal training structure of a proposed 'permanent' stepwise approach to user training. The 3D S.UN.COP 2006 was successfully held with the attendance of 33 participants coming from 18 countries and 28 different institutions (universities, vendors, national laboratories and regulatory bodies). More than 30 scientists (coming from 13 countries and 23 different institutions) were

  11. International Training Program: 3D S. Un. Cop - Scaling, Uncertainty and 3D Thermal-Hydraulics/Neutron-Kinetics Coupled Codes Seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertuzzi, A.; D'Auria, F.; Bajs, T.; Reventos, F.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic system computer codes are extensively used worldwide for analysis of nuclear facilities by utilities, regulatory bodies, nuclear power plant designers and vendors, nuclear fuel companies, research organizations, consulting companies, and technical support organizations. The computer code user represents a source of uncertainty that can influence the results of system code calculations. This influence is commonly known as the 'user effect' and stems from the limitations embedded in the codes as well as from the limited capability of the analysts to use the codes. Code user training and qualification is an effective means for reducing the variation of results caused by the application of the codes by different users. This paper describes a systematic approach to training code users who, upon completion of the training, should be able to perform calculations making the best possible use of the capabilities of best estimate codes. In other words, the program aims at contributing towards solving the problem of user effect. The 3D S.UN.COP (Scaling, Uncertainty and 3D COuPled code calculations) seminars have been organized as follow-up of the proposal to IAEA for the Permanent Training Course for System Code Users (D'Auria, 1998). Four seminars have been held at University of Pisa (2003, 2004), at The Pennsylvania State University (2004) and at University of Zagreb (2005). It was recognized that such courses represented both a source of continuing education for current code users and a mean for current code users to enter the formal training structure of a proposed 'permanent' stepwise approach to user training. The 3D S.UN.COP 2005 was successfully held with the participation of 19 persons coming from 9 countries and 14 different institutions (universities, vendors, national laboratories and regulatory bodies). More than 15 scientists were involved in the organization of the seminar, presenting theoretical aspects of the proposed methodologies and

  12. Why borrowers pay premiums to larger lenders: Empirical evidence from sovereign syndicated loans

    OpenAIRE

    Hallak, Issam

    2002-01-01

    All other terms being equal (e.g. seniority), syndicated loan contracts provide larger lending compensations (in percentage points) to institutions funding larger amounts. This paper explores empirically the motivation for such a price design on a sample of sovereign syndicated loans in the period 1990-1997. I find strong evidence that a larger premium is associated with higher renegotiation probability and information asymmetries. It hardly has any impact on the number of lenders though. Thi...

  13. Extrapolation of contrail investigations by LIDAR to larger scale measurements. Analysis and calibration of CCD camera and satellite images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussmann, R.; Homburg, F.; Freudenthaler, V.; Jaeger, H. [Frauenhofer Inst. fuer Atmosphaerische Umweltforschung, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The CCD image of a persistent contrail and the coincident LIDAR measurement are presented. To extrapolate the LIDAR derived optical thickness to the video field of view an anisotropy correction and calibration has to be performed. Observed bright halo components result from highly regular oriented hexagonal crystals with sizes of 200 {mu}m-2 mm. This explained by measured ambient humidities below the formation threshold of natural cirrus. Optical thickness from LIDAR shows significant discrepancies to the result from coincident NOAA-14 data. Errors result from anisotropy correction and parameterized relations between AVHRR channels and optical properties. (author) 28 refs.

  14. The use of wire mesh reactors to characterise solid fuels and provide improved understanding of larger scale thermochemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Gao; Long Wu; Nigel Paterson; Denis Dugwell; Rafael Kandiyoti [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Most reaction products from the pyrolysis and the early stages of gasification of solid fuels are chemically reactive. Secondary reactions between primary products and with heated fuel particles tend to affect the final product distributions. The extents and pathways of these secondary reactions are determined mostly by the heating rate and the size and shape of the reaction zone and of the sample itself. The wire-mesh reactor (WMR) configuration discussed in this paper allows products to be separated from reactants and enables the rapid quenching of products, allowing suppression of secondary reactions. This paper presents an overview of the development of wire-mesh reactors, describing several diverse applications. The first of these involves an analysis of the behaviour of injectant coal particles in blast furnace tuyeres and raceways. The data has offered explanations for helping to understand why, at high coal injection rates, problems can be encountered in the operation of blast furnaces. Another project focused on determining the extents of pyrolysis and gasification reactivities of a suite of Chinese coals under intense reaction conditions. The results showed variations in coal reactivities that were related to the C content. In another project demonstrating the versatility of the WMR configuration, the high pressure version of the reactor is being used for developing the Zero Emission Coal Alliance (ZECA) concept. The work aims to examine and explain the chemical and transport mechanisms underlying the pyrolysis, hydropyrolysis and hydrogasification stages of the process. The results obtained till date have shown the effects of the operating conditions on the extent of hydropyrolysis/gasification of a bituminous coal and two lignites. The lignites were more reactive than the coal, and the data suggests that high levels of conversion will be achievable under the anticipated ZECA process conditions. 29 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Thinking outside the box: effects of modes larger than the survey on matter power spectrum covariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putter, Roland de; Wagner, Christian; Verde, Licia; Mena, Olga; Percival, Will J.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate power spectrum (or correlation function) covariance matrices are a crucial requirement for cosmological parameter estimation from large scale structure surveys. In order to minimize reliance on computationally expensive mock catalogs, it is important to have a solid analytic understanding of the different components that make up a covariance matrix. Considering the matter power spectrum covariance matrix, it has recently been found that there is a potentially dominant effect on mildly non-linear scales due to power in modes of size equal to and larger than the survey volume. This beat coupling effect has been derived analytically in perturbation theory and while it has been tested with simulations, some questions remain unanswered. Moreover, there is an additional effect of these large modes, which has so far not been included in analytic studies, namely the effect on the estimated average density which enters the power spectrum estimate. In this article, we work out analytic, perturbation theory based expressions including both the beat coupling and this local average effect and we show that while, when isolated, beat coupling indeed causes large excess covariance in agreement with the literature, in a realistic scenario this is compensated almost entirely by the local average effect, leaving only ∼ 10% of the excess. We test our analytic expressions by comparison to a suite of large N-body simulations, using both full simulation boxes and subboxes thereof to study cases without beat coupling, with beat coupling and with both beat coupling and the local average effect. For the variances, we find excellent agreement with the analytic expressions for k −1 at z = 0.5, while the correlation coefficients agree to beyond k = 0.4 hMpc −1 . As expected, the range of agreement increases towards higher redshift and decreases slightly towards z = 0. We finish by including the large-mode effects in a full covariance matrix description for arbitrary survey

  16. 29 CFR 779.232 - Franchise or other arrangements which create a larger enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Franchise or other arrangements which create a larger... Apply; Enterprise Coverage Leased Departments, Franchise and Other Business Arrangements § 779.232 Franchise or other arrangements which create a larger enterprise. (a) In other instances, franchise...

  17. Great tits provided with ad libitum food lay larger eggs when exposed to colder temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaper, S.V.; Visser, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    The amount of nutrients deposited into a bird egg varies both between and within clutches of the same female. Larger eggs enhance offspring traits, but as a tradeoff, laying large eggs also infers energetic costs to the female. Income breeders usually lay larger eggs later in the season, when

  18. Dynamical Dark Matter from thermal freeze-out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienes, Keith R.; Fennick, Jacob; Kumar, Jason; Thomas, Brooks

    2018-03-01

    In the Dynamical Dark-Matter (DDM) framework, the dark sector comprises a large number of constituent dark particles whose individual masses, lifetimes, and cosmological abundances obey specific scaling relations with respect to each other. In particular, the most natural versions of this framework tend to require a spectrum of cosmological abundances which scale inversely with mass, so that dark-sector states with larger masses have smaller abundances. Thus far, DDM model-building has primarily relied on nonthermal mechanisms for abundance generation such as misalignment production, since these mechanisms give rise to abundances that have this property. By contrast, the simplest versions of thermal freeze-out tend to produce abundances that increase, rather than decrease, with the mass of the dark-matter component. In this paper, we demonstrate that there exist relatively simple modifications of the traditional thermal freeze-out mechanism which "flip" the resulting abundance spectrum, producing abundances that scale inversely with mass. Moreover, we demonstrate that a far broader variety of scaling relations between lifetimes, abundances, and masses can emerge through thermal freeze-out than through the nonthermal mechanisms previously considered for DDM ensembles. The results of this paper thus extend the DDM framework into the thermal domain and essentially allow us to "design" our resulting DDM ensembles at will in order to realize a rich array of resulting dark-matter phenomenologies.

  19. Assessment of effective thermal conductivity in U–Mo metallic fuels with distributed gas bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shenyang; Casella, Andrew M.; Lavender, Curt A.; Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas E.

    2015-07-15

    This work presents a numerical method to assess the relative impact of various microstructural features including grain sizes, nanometer scale intragranular gas bubbles, and larger intergranular gas bubbles in irradiated U–Mo metallic fuels on the effective thermal conductivity. A phase-field model was employed to construct a three-dimensional polycrystalline U–Mo fuel alloy with a given crystal morphology and gas bubble microstructures. An effective thermal conductivity “concept” was taken to capture the effect of polycrystalline structures and gas bubble microstructures with significant size differences on the thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of inhomogeneous materials was calculated by solving the heat transport equation. The obtained results are in reasonably good agreement with experimental measurements made on irradiated U–Mo fuel samples containing similar microstructural features. The developed method can be used to predict the thermal conductivity degradation in operating nuclear fuels if the evolution of microstructures is known during operation of the fuel.

  20. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giebink, Noel C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This program set out to explore a scattering-based approach to concentrate sunlight with the aim of improving collector field reliability and of eliminating wind loading and gross mechanical movement through the use of a stationary collection optic. The approach is based on scattering sunlight from the focal point of a fixed collection optic into the confined modes of a sliding planar waveguide, where it is transported to stationary tubular heat transfer elements located at the edges. Optical design for the first stage of solar concentration, which entails focusing sunlight within a plane over a wide range of incidence angles (>120 degree full field of view) at fixed tilt, led to the development of a new, folded-path collection optic that dramatically out-performs the current state-of-the-art in scattering concentration. Rigorous optical simulation and experimental testing of this collection optic have validated its performance. In the course of this work, we also identified an opportunity for concentrating photovoltaics involving the use of high efficiency microcells made in collaboration with partners at the University of Illinois. This opportunity exploited the same collection optic design as used for the scattering solar thermal concentrator and was therefore pursued in parallel. This system was experimentally demonstrated to achieve >200x optical concentration with >70% optical efficiency over a full day by tracking with <1 cm of lateral movement at fixed latitude tilt. The entire scattering concentrator waveguide optical system has been simulated, tested, and assembled at small scale to verify ray tracing models. These models were subsequently used to predict the full system optical performance at larger, deployment scale ranging up to >1 meter aperture width. Simulations at an aperture widths less than approximately 0.5 m with geometric gains ~100x predict an overall optical efficiency in the range 60-70% for angles up to 50 degrees from normal. However, the

  1. Assessment of the Impact of Metropolitan-Scale Urban Planning Scenarios on the Moist Thermal Environment under Global Warming: A Study of the Tokyo Metropolitan Area Using Regional Climate Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuka Suzuki-Parker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a high-resolution regional climate model coupled with urban canopy model, the present study provides the first attempt in quantifying the impact of metropolitan-scale urban planning scenarios on moist thermal environment under global warming. Tokyo metropolitan area is selected as a test case. Three urban planning scenarios are considered: status quo, dispersed city, and compact city. Their impact on the moist thermal environment is assessed using wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT. Future projections for the 2070s show a 2–4°C increase in daytime mean WBGT relative to the current climate. The urban scenario impacts are shown to be small, with a −0.4 to +0.4°C range. Relative changes in temperature and humidity as the result of a given urban scenario are shown to be critical in determining the sign of the WBGT changes; however, such changes are not necessarily determined by local changes in urban land surface parameters. These findings indicate that urban land surface changes may improve or worsen the local moist thermal environment and that metropolitan-scale urban planning is inefficient in mitigating heat-related health risks for mature cities like Tokyo.

  2. Impact of probing volume from different mechanical measurement methods on elastic properties of thermally sprayed Ni-based coatings on a mesoscopic scale

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Margadant, N.; Neuenschwander, J.; Stauss, S.; Kaps, H.; Kulkarni, A.; Matějíček, Jiří; Rössler, G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 200, č. 8 (2006), s. 2805-2820 ISSN 0257-8972 Grant - others:Evropská unie Eureka 1973 “Thermetcoat” (EU) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Elastic Pro perties * Defects * Thermal spraying * Nickel alloy Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.559, year: 2006

  3. Remotely sensed soil temperatures beneath snow-free skin-surface using thermal observations from tandem polar-orbiting satellites: An analytical three-time-scale model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Wenfeng; Zhou, Ji; Ju, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    Subsurface soil temperature is a key variable of land surface processes and not only responds to but also modulates the interactions of energy fluxes at the Earth's surface. Thermal remote sensing has traditionally been regarded as incapable of detecting the soil temperature beneath the skin-surf...

  4. Application of the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) technique to the thermal-hydraulics project of a PWR reactor core in reduced scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Junior, Carlos Alberto de Souza

    2008-09-01

    The reduced scale models design have been employed by engineers from several different industries fields such as offshore, spatial, oil extraction, nuclear industries and others. Reduced scale models are used in experiments because they are economically attractive than its own prototype (real scale) because in many cases they are cheaper than a real scale one and most of time they are also easier to build providing a way to lead the real scale design allowing indirect investigations and analysis to the real scale system (prototype). A reduced scale model (or experiment) must be able to represent all physical phenomena that occurs and further will do in the real scale one under operational conditions, e.g., in this case the reduced scale model is called similar. There are some different methods to design a reduced scale model and from those two are basic: the empiric method based on the expert's skill to determine which physical measures are relevant to the desired model; and the differential equation method that is based on a mathematical description of the prototype (real scale system) to model. Applying a mathematical technique to the differential equation that describes the prototype then highlighting the relevant physical measures so the reduced scale model design problem may be treated as an optimization problem. Many optimization techniques as Genetic Algorithm (GA), for example, have been developed to solve this class of problems and have also been applied to the reduced scale model design problem as well. In this work, Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) technique is investigated as an alternative optimization tool for such problem. In this investigation a computational approach, based on particle swarm optimization technique (PSO), is used to perform a reduced scale two loop Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core, considering 100% of nominal power operation on a forced flow cooling circulation and non-accidental operating conditions. A performance comparison

  5. Session 4: Test of a reactor for water-gas-shift reaction on a 3 kW{sub el.} scale at direct combination with auto-thermal reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasel, J.; Cremer, P.; Peters, R.; Stolten, D. [Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Institute for Materials and Processes in Energy Systems (IWV 3), Julich (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The goal of the work described in this paper was to test a reactor for WGS reaction on a larger scale of approx. 3 kW{sub el.} and to demonstrate a successful direct combination of two important components of fuel processing, i.e. a combination of ATR with WGS reaction. The value for the electric power of 3 kW{sub el.} fulfils quite well the demands of a technical application of a fuel cell system if e.g. a so-called Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) is considered. An APU can be used in passenger cars, heavy duty vehicles, ships and air planes. (authors)

  6. Economic trends of tokamak power plants independent of physics scaling models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Steiner, D.

    1978-01-01

    This study examines the effects of plasma radius, field on axis, plasma impurity level, and aspect ratio on power level and unit capital cost, $/kW/sub e/, of tokamak power plants sized independent of plasma physics scaling models. It is noted that tokamaks sized in this manner are thermally unstable based on trapped particle scaling relationships. It is observed that there is an economic advantage for larger power level tokamaks achieved by physics independent sizing; however, the incentive for increased power levels is less than that for fission reactors. It is further observed that the economic advantage of these larger power level tokamaks is decreased when plasma thermal stability measures are incorporated, such as by increasing the plasma impurity concentration. This trend of economy with size obtained by physics independent sizing is opposite to that observed when the tokamak designs are constrained to obey the trapped particle and empirical scaling relationships

  7. Scenarios for solar thermal energy applications in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, F.R.; Abreu, S.L.; Pereira, E.B.

    2012-01-01

    The Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) database is used to prepare and discuss scenarios for solar thermal applications in Brazil. The paper discusses low temperature applications (small and large scale water heating) and solar power plants for electricity production (concentrated solar power plants and solar chimney plants) in Brazil. The results demonstrate the feasibility of large-scale application of solar energy for water heating and electricity generation in Brazil. Payback periods for water heating systems are typically below 4 years if they were used to replace residential electric showerheads in low-income families. Large-scale water heating systems also present high feasibility and many commercial companies are adopting this technology to reduce operational costs. The best sites to set up CSP plants are in the Brazilian semi-arid region where the annual energy achieves 2.2 MW h/m 2 and averages of daily solar irradiation are larger than 5.0 kW h/m 2 /day. The western area of Brazilian Northeastern region meets all technical requirements to exploit solar thermal energy for electricity generation based on solar chimney technology. Highlights: ► Scenarios for solar thermal applications are presented. ► Payback is typically below 4 years for small scale water heating systems. ► Large-scale water heating systems also present high feasibility. ► The Brazilian semi-arid region is the best sites for CSP and chimney tower plants.

  8. Larger amygdala volume in first-degree relatives of patients with major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Romanczuk-Seiferth

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Larger gray matter volume in healthy relatives of MDD patients point to a possible vulnerability mechanism in MDD etiology and therefore extend knowledge in the field of high-risk approaches in MDD.

  9. [Research progress of larger flexion gap than extension gap in total knee arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weisong; Hao, Dingjun

    2017-05-01

    To summarize the progress of larger flexion gap than extension gap in total knee arthro-plasty (TKA). The domestic and foreign related literature about larger flexion gap than extension gap in TKA, and its impact factors, biomechanical and kinematic features, and clinical results were summarized. During TKA, to adjust the relations of flexion gap and extension gap is one of the key factors of successful operation. The biomechanical, kinematic, and clinical researches show that properly larger flexion gap than extension gap can improve both the postoperative knee range of motion and the satisfaction of patients, but does not affect the stability of the knee joint. However, there are also contrary findings. So adjustment of flexion gap and extension gap during TKA is still in dispute. Larger flexion gap than extension gap in TKA is a new joint space theory, and long-term clinical efficacy, operation skills, and related complications still need further study.

  10. Purchasing innovations in the construction sector in the Netherlands : a comparison between SMEs and larger companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rijk, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Posterpresentatie Ondernemerschapsmiddag KCO, gehouden op 16 november 2015. Main research question: To what extend does the purchasing activity of incremental and radical innovations of SMEs differ from that of larger companies in the construction sector in the Netherlands?

  11. Low thermal conductivity skutterudites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleurial, J P; Caillat, T; Borshchevsky, A

    1997-07-01

    Recent experimental results on semiconductors with the skutterudite crystal structure show that these materials possess attractive transport properties and have a good potential for achieving ZT values substantially larger than for state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials. Both n-type and p-type conductivity samples have been obtained, using several preparation techniques. Associated with a low hole effective mass, very high carrier mobilities, low electrical resistivities and moderate Seebeck coefficients are obtained in p-type skutterudites. For a comparable doping level, the carrier mobilities of n-type samples are about an order of magnitude lower than the values achieved on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients make n-type skutterudite promising candidates as well. Unfortunately, the thermal conductivities of the binary skutterudites compounds are too large, particularly at low temperatures, to be useful for thermoelectric applications. Several approaches to the reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity in skutterudites are being pursued: heavy doping, formation of solid solutions and alloys, study of novel ternary and filled skutterudite compounds. All those approaches have already resulted in skutterudite compositions with substantially lower thermal conductivity values in these materials. Recently, superior thermoelectric properties in the moderate to high temperature range were achieved for compositions combining alloying and filling of the skutterudite structure. Experimental results and mechanisms responsible for low thermal conductivity in skutterudites are discussed.

  12. An investigation of heat transfer between a microcantilever and a substrate for improved thermal topography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somnath, Suhas; King, William P

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the numerical and experimental investigation of heat transfer from a heated microcantilever to a substrate and uses the resulting insights to improve thermal topography imaging. The cantilever sensitivity, defined as change in thermal signal due to changes in the topography height, is relatively constant for feature heights in the range 100–350 nm. Since the cantilever-substrate heat transfer is governed by thermal conduction through the air, the cantilever sensitivity is nearly constant across substrates of varying thermal conductivity. Surface features with lateral size larger than 2.5 μm can induce artifacts in the cantilever signal resulting in measurement errors as large as 28%. These artifacts arise from thermal conduction from the cantilever in the lateral direction, parallel to the surface. We show how these artifacts can be removed by accounting for this lateral conduction and removing it from the thermal signal. This technique reduces the measurement error by as much as 26%, can be applied to arbitrary substrate topographies, and can be scaled to arrays of heated cantilevers. These results could lead to improvements in nanometer-scale thermal measurements including scanning thermal microscopy and tip-based nanofabrication. (paper)

  13. NOx emissions and thermal efficiencies of small scale biomass-fuelled combustion plant with reference to process industries in a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, A.S.; Purvis, M.R.I.

    1996-01-01

    Solid biomass materials are an important industrial fuel in many developing countries and also show good potential for usage in Europe within a future mix of renewable energy resources. The sustainable use of wood fuels for combustion relies on operation of plant with acceptable thermal efficiency. There is a clear link between plant efficiency and environmental impacts due to air pollution and deforestation. To supplement a somewhat sparse literature on thermal efficiencies and nitrogen oxide emissions from biomass-fuelled plants in developing countries, this paper presents results for tests carried out on 14 combustion units obtained during field trials in Sri Lanka. The plants tested comprised steam boilers and process air heaters. Biomass fuels included: rubber-wood, fuelwood from natural forests; coconut shells; rice husks; and sugar can bagasse. Average NO x (NO and NO 2 ) emissions for the plants were found to be 47 gNO 2 GJ -1 with 18% conversion of fuel nitrogen. The former value is the range of NO x emission values quoted for combustion of coal in grate-fired systems; some oil-fired systems and systems operating on natural gas, but is less than the emission levels for the combustion of pulverized fuel and heavy fuel oil. This value is significantly within current European standards for NO x emission from large combustion plants. Average thermal efficiency of the plants was found to be 50%. Observations made on operational practices demonstrated that there is considerable scope for the improvement of this thermal efficiency value by plant supervisor training, drying of fuelwood and the use of simple instruments for monitoring plant performance. (Author)

  14. Chemical and nanometer-scale structure of kerogen and its change during thermal maturation investigated by advanced solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, J.; Fang, X.; Lan, Y.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Xu, L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have used advanced and quantitative solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to investigate structural changes in a series of type II kerogen samples from the New Albany Shale across a range of maturity (vitrinite reflectance R0 from 0.29% to 1.27%). Specific functional groups such as CH3, CH2, alkyl CH, aromatic CH, aromatic C-O, and other nonprotonated aromatics, as well as "oil prone" and "gas prone" carbons, have been quantified by 13C NMR; atomic H/C and O/C ratios calculated from the NMR data agree with elemental analysis. Relationships between NMR structural parameters and vitrinite reflectance, a proxy for thermal maturity, were evaluated. The aromatic cluster size is probed in terms of the fraction of aromatic carbons that are protonated (???30%) and the average distance of aromatic C from the nearest protons in long-range H-C dephasing, both of which do not increase much with maturation, in spite of a great increase in aromaticity. The aromatic clusters in the most mature sample consist of ???30 carbons, and of ???20 carbons in the least mature samples. Proof of many links between alkyl chains and aromatic rings is provided by short-range and long-range 1H-13C correlation NMR. The alkyl segments provide most H in the samples; even at a carbon aromaticity of 83%, the fraction of aromatic H is only 38%. While aromaticity increases with thermal maturity, most other NMR structural parameters, including the aromatic C-O fractions, decrease. Aromaticity is confirmed as an excellent NMR structural parameter for assessing thermal maturity. In this series of samples, thermal maturation mostly increases aromaticity by reducing the length of the alkyl chains attached to the aromatic cores, not by pronounced growth of the size of the fused aromatic ring clusters. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The deep thermal field of the Upper Rhine Graben

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymark, Jessica; Sippel, Judith; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Bär, Kristian; Stiller, Manfred; Fritsche, Johann-Gerhard; Kracht, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The Upper Rhine Graben has a significant socioeconomic relevance as it provides a great potential for geothermal energy production. The key for the utilisation of this energy resource is to understand the controlling factors of the thermal field in this area. We have therefore built a data-based lithospheric-scale 3D structural model of the Upper Rhine Graben and its adjacent areas. In addition, 3D gravity modelling was performed to constrain the internal structure of the crystalline crust consistent with seismic information. Based on this lithosphere scale 3D structural model the present-day conductive thermal field was calculated and compared to measured temperatures. Our results show that the regional thermal field is mainly controlled by the configuration of the upper crust, which has different thermal properties characteristic for the Variscan and Alpine domains. Temperature maxima are predicted for the Upper Rhine Graben where thick insulating Cenozoic sediments cause a thermal blanketing effect and where the underlying crustal units are characterised by high radiogenic heat production. The comparison of calculated and measured temperatures overall shows a reasonable fit, while locally occuring model deviations indicate where a larger influence of groundwater flow may be expected.

  16. Remotely monitoring evaporation rate and soil water status using thermal imaging and "three-temperatures model (3T Model)" under field-scale conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guo Yu; Zhao, Ming

    2010-03-01

    Remote monitoring of soil evaporation and soil water status is necessary for water resource and environment management. Ground based remote sensing can be the bridge between satellite remote sensing and ground-based point measurement. The primary object of this study is to provide an algorithm to estimate evaporation and soil water status by remote sensing and to verify its accuracy. Observations were carried out in a flat field with varied soil water content. High-resolution thermal images were taken with a thermal camera; soil evaporation was measured with a weighing lysimeter; weather data were recorded at a nearby meteorological station. Based on the thermal imaging and the three-temperatures model (3T model), we developed an algorithm to estimate soil evaporation and soil water status. The required parameters of the proposed method were soil surface temperature, air temperature, and solar radiation. By using the proposed method, daily variation in soil evaporation was estimated. Meanwhile, soil water status was remotely monitored by using the soil evaporation transfer coefficient. Results showed that the daily variation trends of measured and estimated evaporation agreed with each other, with a regression line of y = 0.92x and coefficient of determination R(2) = 0.69. The simplicity of the proposed method makes the 3T model a potentially valuable tool for remote sensing.

  17. Utility-Scale Solar 2013: An empirical analysis of project cost, performance, and pricing trends in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolinger, Mark [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Weaver, Samantha [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-09-17

    Other than the SEGS I-IX parabolic trough projects built in the 1980s, virtually no large-scale or "utility-scale" solar projects-defined here to include any ground-mounted photovoltaic ("PV"), concentrating photovoltaic ("CPV"), or concentrating solar power ("CSP" or solar thermal) project larger than 5 MWAC-existed in the United States prior to 2007.

  18. Thermal Conduction in Vertically Aligned Copper Nanowire Arrays and Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barako, Michael T; Roy-Panzer, Shilpi; English, Timothy S; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Kenny, Thomas W; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-09-02

    The ability to efficiently and reliably transfer heat between sources and sinks is often a bottleneck in the thermal management of modern energy conversion technologies ranging from microelectronics to thermoelectric power generation. These interfaces contribute parasitic thermal resistances that reduce device performance and are subjected to thermomechanical stresses that degrade device lifetime. Dense arrays of vertically aligned metal nanowires (NWs) offer the unique combination of thermal conductance from the constituent metal and mechanical compliance from the high aspect ratio geometry to increase interfacial heat transfer and device reliability. In the present work, we synthesize copper NW arrays directly onto substrates via templated electrodeposition and extend this technique through the use of a sacrificial overplating layer to achieve improved uniformity. Furthermore, we infiltrate the array with an organic phase change material and demonstrate the preservation of thermal properties. We use the 3ω method to measure the axial thermal conductivity of freestanding copper NW arrays to be as high as 70 W m(-1) K(-1), which is more than an order of magnitude larger than most commercial interface materials and enhanced-conductivity nanocomposites reported in the literature. These arrays are highly anisotropic, and the lateral thermal conductivity is found to be only 1-2 W m(-1) K(-1). We use these measured properties to elucidate the governing array-scale transport mechanisms, which include the effects of morphology and energy carrier scattering from size effects and grain boundaries.

  19. A Large-scale Finite Element Model on Micromechanical Damage and Failure of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composites Including Thermal Residual Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P. F.; Li, X. K.

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study micromechanical progressive failure properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites with thermal residual stress by finite element analysis (FEA). Composite microstructures with hexagonal fiber distribution are used for the representative volume element (RVE), where an initial fiber breakage is assumed. Fiber breakage with random fiber strength is predicted using Monte Carlo simulation, progressive matrix damage is predicted by proposing a continuum damage mechanics model and interface failure is simulated using Xu and Needleman's cohesive model. Temperature dependent thermal expansion coefficients for epoxy matrix are used. FEA by developing numerical codes using ANSYS finite element software is divided into two steps: 1. Thermal residual stresses due to mismatch between fiber and matrix are calculated; 2. Longitudinal tensile load is further exerted on the RVE to perform progressive failure analysis of carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Numerical convergence is solved by introducing the viscous damping effect properly. The extended Mori-Tanaka method that considers interface debonding is used to get homogenized mechanical responses of composites. Three main results by FEA are obtained: 1. the real-time matrix cracking, fiber breakage and interface debonding with increasing tensile strain is simulated. 2. the stress concentration coefficients on neighbouring fibers near the initial broken fiber and the axial fiber stress distribution along the broken fiber are predicted, compared with the results using the global and local load-sharing models based on the shear-lag theory. 3. the tensile strength of composite by FEA is compared with those by the shear-lag theory and experiments. Finally, the tensile stress-strain curve of composites by FEA is applied to the progressive failure analysis of composite pressure vessel.

  20. Possible Evolution of the Pulsar Braking Index from Larger than Three to About One

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, H.; Kou, F. F.

    2017-01-01

    The coupled evolution of pulsar rotation and inclination angle in the wind braking model is calculated. The oblique pulsar tends to align. The pulsar alignment affects its spin-down behavior. As a pulsar evolves from the magneto-dipole radiation dominated case to the particle wind dominated case, the braking index first increases and then decreases. In the early time, the braking index may be larger than three. During the following long time, the braking index is always smaller than three. The minimum braking index is about one. This can explain the existence of a high braking index larger than three and a low braking index simultaneously. The pulsar braking index is expected to evolve from larger than three to about one. The general trend is for the pulsar braking index to evolve from the Crab-like case to the Vela-like case.

  1. Possible Evolution of the Pulsar Braking Index from Larger than Three to About One

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, H. [School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Guangzhou University, 510006 Guangzhou (China); Kou, F. F., E-mail: htong_2005@163.com [Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830011 (China)

    2017-03-10

    The coupled evolution of pulsar rotation and inclination angle in the wind braking model is calculated. The oblique pulsar tends to align. The pulsar alignment affects its spin-down behavior. As a pulsar evolves from the magneto-dipole radiation dominated case to the particle wind dominated case, the braking index first increases and then decreases. In the early time, the braking index may be larger than three. During the following long time, the braking index is always smaller than three. The minimum braking index is about one. This can explain the existence of a high braking index larger than three and a low braking index simultaneously. The pulsar braking index is expected to evolve from larger than three to about one. The general trend is for the pulsar braking index to evolve from the Crab-like case to the Vela-like case.

  2. Activation of ion implanted Si for backside processing by Ultra-fast Laser Thermal Annealing: Energy homogeneity and micro-scale sheet resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huet, K.; Lin, Rong; Boniface, C

    2009-01-01

    In this paper ion activation of implanted silicon using ultra-fast laser thermal annealing (LTA) process was discussed. The results stated that there was high dopant activation using LTA process for over 70%, excellent within shot activation uniformity, and there was a possibility for overlap...... parameter optimization. It was observed that, for activation LTA process, shallow box-shaped profiles- high diffusivity of B in liquids and high-temperatures was observed only near the surface in a submicrosecond timescale. Possible solutions were suggested as to low-cost and high-end for overlap...

  3. Rayleigh- and Prandtl-number dependence of the large-scale flow-structure in weakly-rotating turbulent thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Stephan; Wei, Ping; Ahlers, Guenter

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent thermal convection under rotation shows a remarkable variety of different flow states. The Nusselt number (Nu) at slow rotation rates (expressed as the dimensionless inverse Rossby number 1/Ro), for example, is not a monotonic function of 1/Ro. Different 1/Ro-ranges can be observed with different slopes ∂Nu / ∂ (1 / Ro) . Some of these ranges are connected by sharp transitions where ∂Nu / ∂ (1 / Ro) changes discontinuously. We investigate different regimes in cylindrical samples of aspect ratio Γ = 1 by measuring temperatures at the sidewall of the sample for various Prandtl numbers in the range 3 Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  4. When larger brains do not have more neurons: Increased numbers of cells are compensated by decreased average cell size across mouse individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana eHerculano-Houzel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a strong trend toward increased brain size in mammalian evolution, with larger brains composed of more and larger neurons than smaller brains across species within each mammalian order. Does the evolution of increased numbers of brain neurons, and thus larger brain size, occur simply through the selection of individuals with more and larger neurons, and thus larger brains, within a population? That is, do individuals with larger brains also have more, and larger, neurons than individuals with smaller brains, such that allometric relationships across species are simply an extension of intraspecific scaling? Here we show that this is not the case across adult male mice of a similar age. Rather, increased numbers of neurons across individuals are accompanied by increased numbers of other cells and smaller average cell size of both types, in a trade-off that explains how increased brain mass does not necessarily ensue. Fundamental regulatory mechanisms thus must exist that tie numbers of neurons to numbers of other cells and to average cell size within individual brains. Finally, our results indicate that changes in brain size in evolution are not an extension of individual variation in numbers of neurons, but rather occur through step changes that must simultaneously increase numbers of neurons and cause cell size to increase, rather than decrease.

  5. Mechanisms and multi-scale modelling of the brittle fracture modifications induced by thermal ageing of a pressurised water reactor steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrieu, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    The use of some PWR components at a relatively high temperature generates a drop of their fracture properties. This embrittlement is generally attributed to the segregation of some impurities at grains boundaries. This work aims at correlating the kinetics of this segregation to the embrittlement kinetics through a multi-scale approach, combining thermodynamical and micro-mechanical analysis. (author)

  6. Framing the Discussion: Elections as Components of Larger Political and Cultural Geographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopp, Larry

    2016-01-01

    It is important to remember that elections are but one piece--albeit an important one--of much larger processes of politics and governance. Moreover, in the United States they are increasingly implicated in the construction of identities and places. What goes on in the course of electoral politics (creating electoral systems and voting districts,…

  7. Dust captures effectiveness of scrubber systems on mechanical miners operating in larger roadways.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hole, BJ

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The project was directed towards bord and pillar working by mechanised miners operating in larger section roadways, where the problem of scrubber capture tends to be greatest owing to the limited size of the zone of influence around exhaust...

  8. Larger Bowl Size Increases the Amount of Cereal Children Request, Consume, and Waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansink, Brian; van Ittersum, Koert; Payne, Collin R.

    Objective To examine whether larger bowls bias children toward requesting more food from the adults who serve them. Study design Study 1 was a between-subject design involving 69 preschool-age children who were randomized to receive either a small (8 oz) or large (16 oz) cereal bowl and were asked

  9. A specialist toxicity database (TRACE) is more effective than its larger, commercially available counterparts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, C.A.; Copestake, P.T.; Robinson, L.

    2000-01-01

    The retrieval precision and recall of a specialist bibliographic toxicity database (TRACE) and a range of widely available bibliographic databases used to identify toxicity papers were compared. The analysis indicated that the larger size and resources of the major bibliographic databases did not,

  10. Larger foraminifera distribution on a mesotrophic carbonate shelf in SW Sulawesi (Indonesia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renema, W.; Troelstra, S.R.

    2001-01-01

    Larger symbiont bearing foraminifera typically live in shallow tropical seas. In this study the fauna composition of patch reefs scattered over the Spermonde Shelf (SW Sulawesi, Indonesia), a mesotrophic carbonate shelf, is examined. The foraminiferal fauna of the Spermonde Shelf is characterised by

  11. Size selectivity of commercial (300 MC) and larger square mesh top ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study, size selectivity of a commercial (300 MC) and a larger square mesh top panel (LSMTPC) codend for blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) were tested on a commercial trawl net in the international waters between Turkey and Greece. Trawling, performed during daylight was carried out at depths ...

  12. Larger foraminifera from a relict structure off Karwar western Indian continental margin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    of such water masses having been present in the region. Among the larger forms, @iAmphistegina bicirculata, A. radiata@@ var. @ipapillosa@@ and @iOperculina ammonoides@@ indicate mixing, while @iNummulites cumingii@@ and @iBorelis schlumbergeri@@ were relict...

  13. 78 FR 18902 - Defining Larger Participants of the Student Loan Servicing Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION 12 CFR Part 1090 [Docket No. CFPB-2013-0005] RIN 3170-AA35... Protection. ACTION: Proposed rule; request for public comment. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (Bureau or CFPB) proposes to amend the regulation defining larger participants of certain consumer...

  14. Ventilation efficiency in a low-energy dwelling setting – a parameter study for larger rooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, D.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; Hensen, J.L.M.; Cremers, B.E. (Bart)

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical balanced ventilation systems typically is applied in new and renovated dwellings in The Netherlands. The application assumes an adequate ventilation efficiency but this has not been confirmed for larger rooms (e.g. living rooms with kitchen attached). This study investigates ventilation

  15. Effects of Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity in Magnetohydrodynamics Simulations of a Reversed-Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofri, M.; Malara, F.; Veltri, P.

    2010-01-01

    A compressible magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the reversed-field pinch is performed including anisotropic thermal conductivity. When the thermal conductivity is much larger in the direction parallel to the magnetic field than in the perpendicular direction, magnetic field lines become isothermal. As a consequence, as long as magnetic surfaces exist, a temperature distribution is observed displaying a hotter confined region, while an almost uniform temperature is produced when the magnetic field lines become chaotic. To include this effect in the numerical simulation, we use a multiple-time-scale analysis, which allows us to reproduce the effect of a large parallel thermal conductivity. The resulting temperature distribution is related to the existence of closed magnetic surfaces, as observed in experiments. The magnetic field is also affected by the presence of an anisotropic thermal conductivity.

  16. Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundaries in ZrB2: Structure, Energetics, and Thermal Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Daw, Murray S.; Squire, Thomas H.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    A combination of ab initio, atomistic and finite element methods (FEM) were used to investigate the structures, energetics and lattice thermal conductance of grain boundaries for the ultra high temperature ceramic ZrB2. Atomic models of idealized boundaries were relaxed using density functional theory. Information about bonding across the interfaces was determined from the electron localization function. The Kapitza conductance of larger scale versions of the boundary models were computed using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics. The interfacial thermal parameters together with single crystal thermal conductivities were used as parameters in microstructural computations. FEM meshes were constructed on top of microstructural images. From these computations, the effective thermal conductivity of the polycrystalline structure was determined.

  17. Modelling study, efficiency analysis and optimisation of large-scale Adiabatic Compressed Air Energy Storage systems with low-temperature thermal storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Xing; Wang, Jihong; Krupke, Christopher; Wang, Yue; Sheng, Yong; Li, Jian; Xu, Yujie; Wang, Dan; Miao, Shihong; Chen, Haisheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The paper presents an A-CAES system thermodynamic model with low temperature thermal energy storage integration. • The initial parameter value ranges for A-CAES system simulation are identified from the study of a CAES plant in operation. • The strategies of system efficiency improvement are investigated via a parametric study with a sensitivity analysis. • Various system configurations are discussed for analysing the efficiency improvement potentials. - Abstract: The key feature of Adiabatic Compressed Air Energy Storage (A-CAES) is the reuse of the heat generated from the air compression process at the stage of air expansion. This increases the complexity of the whole system since the heat exchange and thermal storage units must have the capacities and performance to match the air compression/expansion units. Thus it raises a strong demand in the whole system modelling and simulation tool for A-CAES system optimisation. The paper presents a new whole system mathematical model for A-CAES with simulation implementation and the model is developed with consideration of lowing capital cost of the system. The paper then focuses on the study of system efficiency improvement strategies via parametric analysis and system structure optimisation. The paper investigates how the system efficiency is affected by the system component performance and parameters. From the study, the key parameters are identified, which give dominant influences in improving the system efficiency. The study is extended onto optimal system configuration and the recommendations are made for achieving higher efficiency, which provides a useful guidance for A-CAES system design.

  18. Born-Infeld magnetars: larger than classical toroidal magnetic fields and implications for gravitational-wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jonas P.; Coelho, Jaziel G.; de Lima, Rafael C. R.

    2018-05-01

    Magnetars are neutron stars presenting bursts and outbursts of X- and soft-gamma rays that can be understood with the presence of very large magnetic fields. In this setting, nonlinear electrodynamics should be taken into account for a more accurate description of such compact systems. We study that in the context of ideal magnetohydrodynamics and make a realization of our analysis to the case of the well known Born-Infeld (BI) electromagnetism in order to come up with some of its astrophysical consequences. We focus here on toroidal magnetic fields as motivated by already known magnetars with low dipolar magnetic fields and their expected relevance in highly magnetized stars. We show that BI electrodynamics leads to larger toroidal magnetic fields when compared to Maxwell's electrodynamics. Hence, one should expect higher production of gravitational waves (GWs) and even more energetic giant flares from nonlinear stars. Given current constraints on BI's scale field, giant flare energetics and magnetic fields in magnetars, we also find that the maximum magnitude of magnetar ellipticities should be 10^{-6}-10^{-5}. Besides, BI electrodynamics may lead to a maximum increase of order 10-20% of the GW energy radiated from a magnetar when compared to Maxwell's, while much larger percentages may arise for other physically motivated scenarios. Thus, nonlinear theories of the electromagnetism might also be probed in the near future with the improvement of GW detectors.

  19. Thermal, Microchannel, and Immersed Boundary Extension Validation for the Lattice-Boltzmann Method: Report 2 in Discrete Nano Scale Mechanics and Simulations Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Lattice- Boltzmann Method Report 2 in “Discrete Nano-Scale Mechanics and Simulations” Series In fo rm at io n Te ch no lo gy L ab or at or y...William P. England and Jeffrey B. Allen July 2017 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The U.S. Army Engineer Research and...Development Center (ERDC) solves the nation’s toughest engineering and environmental challenges. ERDC develops innovative solutions in civil and

  20. High Thermal Conductivity Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Shinde, Subhash L

    2006-01-01

    Thermal management has become a ‘hot’ field in recent years due to a need to obtain high performance levels in many devices used in such diverse areas as space science, mainframe and desktop computers, optoelectronics and even Formula One racing cars! Thermal solutions require not just taking care of very high thermal flux, but also ‘hot spots’, where the flux densities can exceed 200 W/cm2. High thermal conductivity materials play an important role in addressing thermal management issues. This volume provides readers a basic understanding of the thermal conduction mechanisms in these materials and discusses how the thermal conductivity may be related to their crystal structures as well as microstructures developed as a result of their processing history. The techniques for accurate measurement of these properties on large as well as small scales have been reviewed. Detailed information on the thermal conductivity of diverse materials including aluminum nitride (AlN), silicon carbide (SiC), diamond, a...

  1. Thermal comfort

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort is influenced by environmental parameters as well as other influences including asymmetric heating and cooling conditions. Additionally, some aspects of thermal comfort may be exploited so as to enable a building to operate within a...

  2. New nonbinary quantum codes with larger distance constructed from BCH codes over 𝔽q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gen; Li, Ruihu; Fu, Qiang; Ma, Yuena; Guo, Luobin

    2017-03-01

    This paper concentrates on construction of new nonbinary quantum error-correcting codes (QECCs) from three classes of narrow-sense imprimitive BCH codes over finite field 𝔽q2 (q ≥ 3 is an odd prime power). By a careful analysis on properties of cyclotomic cosets in defining set T of these BCH codes, the improved maximal designed distance of these narrow-sense imprimitive Hermitian dual-containing BCH codes is determined to be much larger than the result given according to Aly et al. [S. A. Aly, A. Klappenecker and P. K. Sarvepalli, IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory 53, 1183 (2007)] for each different code length. Thus families of new nonbinary QECCs are constructed, and the newly obtained QECCs have larger distance than those in previous literature.

  3. Larger eggs in resident brown trout living in sympatry with anadromous brown trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olofsson, H.; Mosegaard, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    Freshwater resident brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) in the stream Jorlandaan (southwestern Sweden) had larger eggs (range of actual mean egg wet weights, 65.9-108.5 mg) than both sympatric migratory trout (76.8-84.2 mg) and trout from five other Swedish streams with allopatric resident (23.7-80.1 mg......) or migratory populations (44.5-121.9 mg), after accounting for differences in body size. In Jorlandaan, some resident females even had a larger absolute mean egg weight than any of the migratory females found in the stream Resident trout had low absolute fecundity, and our data suggest that resident females...... in Jorlandan produce large eggs at the expense of their fecundity The extremely large relative egg size in resident Jorlandaan females suggests that the production of large offspring enhances fitness, possibly through increased fry survival....

  4. A contribution to radiotherapy of the larger-celled bronchial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoubie, I.

    1982-01-01

    This work consists of a retrospective definition of disease courses of 859 patients with lung tumors and the definition of the survival curves in their dependence on histology, radiation dose and sex. With 721 larger-celled bronchial carcinomas the ratio of men to women was 12:1. The age peak lay between 60 and 70 years. The one/five year survival rate of all included larger-celled bronchial carcinomas (n=701) was, independent from the therapy form, 35.7, resp. 4.78%. The one year/five year survival rates were for the squamous epithelia 31.08/0.58%, for the undifferentiated carcinomas 25.34/3.41%, and for the lung tumors without histology 35.4/5.14%. Lobectomized patients with squamous epithelium carcinoma had in comparison to pneumonectomized patients a clearly higher survival chance. A clearly sex-dependent predisposition for a certain type of carcinoma was not present. (TRV) [de

  5. Action video game players and deaf observers have larger Goldmann visual fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, David; Codina, Charlotte; Bhardwaj, Palvi; Pascalis, Olivier

    2010-03-05

    We used Goldmann kinetic perimetry to compare how training and congenital auditory deprivation may affect the size of the visual field. We measured the ability of action video game players and deaf observers to detect small moving lights at various locations in the central (around 30 degrees from fixation) and peripheral (around 60 degrees ) visual fields. Experiment 1 found that 10 habitual video game players showed significantly larger central and peripheral field areas than 10 controls. In Experiment 2 we found that 13 congenitally deaf observers had significantly larger visual fields than 13 hearing controls for both the peripheral and central fields. Here the greatest differences were found in the lower parts of the fields. Comparison of the two groups showed that whereas VGP players have a more uniform increase in field size in both central and peripheral fields deaf observers show non-uniform increases with greatest increases in lower parts of the visual field.

  6. Impact of Alternative Inputs and Grooming Methods on Large-R Jet Reconstruction in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    During Run 1 of the LHC, the optimal reconstruction algorithm for large-$R$ jets in ATLAS, characterized in terms of the ability to discriminate signal from background and robust reconstruction in the presence of pileup, was found to be anti-$k_{t}$ jets with a radius parameter of 1.0, formed from locally calibrated topological calorimeter cell clusters and groomed with the trimming algorithm to remove contributions from pileup and underlying event. Since that time, much theoretical, phenomenological, and experimental work has been performed to improve both the reconstruction of the jet inputs as well as the grooming techniques applied to reconstructed jets. In this work, an inclusive survey of both pileup mitigation algorithms applied to calorimeter cell clusters and grooming algorithms is done to study their pileup stability and ability to identify hadronically decaying W bosons within the ATLAS experiment. It is found that compared to the conventional reconstruction algorithm of large-$R$ trimmed jets form...

  7. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Mechanical Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2B/2C Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, Robin N.

    2005-02-01

    Tasks 2B and 2C deal with the mechanical process in the DST during the heating and cooling phases of the test. To model mechanical processes in the test it is necessary to have the time-evolution of temperature distributions in the test block which are inputs in the calculation of the mechanical effects. The difference between task 2B and 2C is that in 2B the mechanical effects are simulated using modeled temperature distributions as inputs, while in 2C the mechanical effects are calculated using measured temperature distributions as inputs. The given data include the results of geologic, thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and mineralogic/petrologic characterization of the test block of the DST, the as-built configuration of the test block, including locations of various sensors and measuring instruments and the plans of heating and cooling, including expected heater powers at various times, respectively. The teams were required to predict the time-evolution of the displacements in the test block measured in the MPBX holes and the changes in the (fracture) permeability of the rock due to thermal mechanical processes, to be compared at certain time intervals. The research teams of ENRESA/UPC (Spain), DOE/LBNL (USA), CEA (France) and NRC/CNWRA (USA) participated the task 2B/2C with different numerical approaches and their reports are enclosed in the Attachments A-D, respectively. The DOE and ENRESA teams performed coupled THM analyses that included modeling of two-phase fluid flow (air and water), heat transfer (conduction and convection), and mechanical stress and strain, with dual-permeability and equivalent continuum approaches, respectively. CEA and NRC teams performed TM analyses in which the measured temperature field was imported to the numerical models. For simulation of rock-mechanical behavior, the DOE and ENRESA teams used elastic models, whereas CEA and NRC teams applied various elasto-plastic models. TM-induced permeability changes were modeled by DOE

  8. Larger-scale irradiation and marketing studies on onions. Part of a coordinated programme on pre-commercial scale radiation treatment of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalman, B.

    1982-08-01

    Seed grown onions of ''Alsogodi'' variety were harvested manually, partially defoliated, irradiated with a dose of 50 Gy at a throughput of 6 tons per hour in a pilot-irradiator specially designed for onions, and then stored at ambient conditions of temperature and humidity, together with non-irradiated onions. Texture, density, growth of inner bud, colour, storage losses and quality were determined. Results clearly demonstrated that irradiation for sprout inhibition has a favourable effect on maintaining good texture of onions during storage. By inhibiting the sprouting, no internal discolouration of the bud occurred during storage. This is important for the quality of fresh onions as well as for that of the final dried product, processed from fresh onions after various periods of storage. Due to sub-optimal initial quality of the onions and unsatisfactory control of storage conditions, total storage losses were too high, compared to the results of previous experiments. Yet, the beneficial effect of irradiation was demonstrated at the end of the considered storage period, since 55% of the irradiated and only 10% of the non-irradiated commodities were of acceptable marketing quality. Cost calculation based on 80% utilization of the pilot irradiator used in this study resulted in a treatment cost of 0.25 forint per kg, which is approximately 8% of the average purchasing price of onions in Hungary

  9. Larger groups of passerines are more efficient problem solvers in the wild

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morand-Ferron, Julie; Quinn, John L.

    2011-01-01

    Group living commonly helps organisms face challenging environmental conditions. Although a known phenomenon in humans, recent findings suggest that a benefit of group living in animals generally might be increased innovative problem-solving efficiency. This benefit has never been demonstrated in a natural context, however, and the mechanisms underlying improved efficiency are largely unknown. We examined the problem-solving performance of great and blue tits at automated devices and found that efficiency increased with flock size. This relationship held when restricting the analysis to naive individuals, demonstrating that larger groups increased innovation efficiency. In addition to this effect of naive flock size, the presence of at least one experienced bird increased the frequency of solving, and larger flocks were more likely to contain experienced birds. These findings provide empirical evidence for the “pool of competence” hypothesis in nonhuman animals. The probability of success also differed consistently between individuals, a necessary condition for the pool of competence hypothesis. Solvers had a higher probability of success when foraging with a larger number of companions and when using devices located near rather than further from protective tree cover, suggesting a role for reduced predation risk on problem-solving efficiency. In contrast to traditional group living theory, individuals joining larger flocks benefited from a higher seed intake, suggesting that group living facilitated exploitation of a novel food source through improved problem-solving efficiency. Together our results suggest that both ecological and social factors, through reduced predation risk and increased pool of competence, mediate innovation in natural populations. PMID:21930936

  10. Magnetic nanoparticles formed in glasses co-doped with iron and larger radius elements

    OpenAIRE

    Edelman , Irina; Ivanova , Oxana; Ivantsov , Ruslan; Velikanov , D.; Zabluda , V.; Zubavichus , Y.; Veligzhanin , A.; Zaikovskiy , V.; Stepanov , S.; Artemenko , Alla; Curély , Jacques; Kliava , Janis

    2012-01-01

    International audience; A new type of nanoparticle-containing glasses based on borate glasses co-doped with low contents of iron and larger radius elements, Dy, Tb, Gd, Ho, Er, Y, and Bi, is studied. Heat treatment of these glasses results in formation of magnetic nanoparticles, radically changing their physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation-based techniques: x-ray diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray absorption near-edge struct...

  11. Larger error signals in major depression are associated with better avoidance learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F eCavanagh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC is particularly reactive to signals of error, punishment, and conflict in the service of behavioral adaptation and it is consistently implicated in the etiology of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD. This association makes conceptual sense, given that MDD has been associated with hyper-reactivity in neural systems associated with punishment processing. Yet in practice, depression-related variance in measures of mPFC functioning often fails to relate to performance. For example, neuroelectric reflections of mediofrontal error signals are often found to be larger in MDD, but a deficit in post-error performance suggests that these error signals are not being used to rapidly adapt behavior. Thus, it remains unknown if depression-related variance in error signals reflects a meaningful alteration in the use of error or punishment information. However, larger mediofrontal error signals have also been related to another behavioral tendency: increased accuracy in avoidance learning. The integrity of this error-avoidance system remains untested in MDD. In this study, EEG was recorded as 21 symptomatic, drug-free participants with current or past MDD and 24 control participants performed a probabilistic reinforcement learning task. Depressed participants had larger mPFC EEG responses to error feedback than controls. The direct relationship between error signal amplitudes and avoidance learning accuracy was replicated. Crucially, this relationship was stronger in depressed participants for high conflict lose-lose situations, demonstrating a selective alteration of avoidance learning. This investigation provided evidence that larger error signal amplitudes in depression are associated with increased avoidance learning, identifying a candidate mechanistic model for hypersensitivity to negative outcomes in depression.

  12. When gains loom larger than losses: reversed loss aversion for small amounts of money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harinck, Fieke; Van Dijk, Eric; Van Beest, Ilja; Mersmann, Paul

    2007-12-01

    Previous research has generally shown that people are loss averse; that is, they weigh losses more heavily than gains. In a series of three experiments, we found that for small outcomes, this pattern is reversed, and gains loom larger than losses. We explain this reversal on the basis of (a) the hedonic principle, which states that individuals are motivated to maximize pleasure and to minimize pain, and (b) the assumption that small losses are more easily discounted cognitively than large losses are.

  13. Sequencing Larger Intact Proteins (30-70 kDa) with Activated Ion Electron Transfer Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Nicholas M.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2018-01-01

    The analysis of intact proteins via mass spectrometry can offer several benefits to proteome characterization, although the majority of top-down experiments focus on proteoforms in a relatively low mass range (AI-ETD) to proteins in the 30-70 kDa range. AI-ETD leverages infrared photo-activation concurrent to ETD reactions to improve sequence-informative product ion generation. This method generates more product ions and greater sequence coverage than conventional ETD, higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD), and ETD combined with supplemental HCD activation (EThcD). Importantly, AI-ETD provides the most thorough protein characterization for every precursor ion charge state investigated in this study, making it suitable as a universal fragmentation method in top-down experiments. Additionally, we highlight several acquisition strategies that can benefit characterization of larger proteins with AI-ETD, including combination of spectra from multiple ETD reaction times for a given precursor ion, multiple spectral acquisitions of the same precursor ion, and combination of spectra from two different dissociation methods (e.g., AI-ETD and HCD). In all, AI-ETD shows great promise as a method for dissociating larger intact protein ions as top-down proteomics continues to advance into larger mass ranges. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Stereotactic Radiosurgery with Neoadjuvant Embolization of Larger Arteriovenous Malformations: An Institutional Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Dalyai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study investigates the safety and efficacy of a multimodality approach combining staged endovascular embolizations with subsequent SRS for the management of larger AVMs. Methods. Ninety-five patients with larger AVMs were treated with staged endovascular embolization followed by SRS between 1996 and 2011. Results. The median volume of AVM in this series was 28 cm3 and 47 patients (48% were Spetzler-Martin grade IV or V. Twenty-seven patients initially presented with hemorrhage. Sixty-one patients underwent multiple embolizations while a single SRS session was performed in 64 patients. The median follow-up after SRS session was 32 months (range 9–136 months. Overall procedural complications occurred in 14 patients. There were 13 minor neurologic complications and 1 major complication (due to embolization while four patients had posttreatment hemorrhage. Thirty-eight patients (40% were cured radiographically. The postradiosurgery actuarial rate of obliteration was 45% at 5 years, 56% at 7 years, and 63% at 10 years. In multivariate analysis, larger AVM size, deep venous drainage, and the increasing number of embolization/SRS sessions were negative predictors of obliteration. The number of embolizations correlated positively with the number of stereotactic radiosurgeries (P<0.005. Conclusions. Multimodality endovascular and radiosurgical approach is an efficacious treatment strategy for large AVM.

  15. Historical Carbon Dioxide Emissions Caused by Land-Use Changes are Possibly Larger than Assumed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneth, A.; Sitch, S.; Pongratz, J.; Stocker, B. D.; Ciais, P.; Poulter, B.; Bayer, A. D.; Bondeau, A.; Calle, L.; Chini, L. P.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The terrestrial biosphere absorbs about 20% of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. The overall magnitude of this sink is constrained by the difference between emissions, the rate of increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and the ocean sink. However, the land sink is actually composed of two largely counteracting fluxes that are poorly quantified: fluxes from land-use change andCO2 uptake by terrestrial ecosystems. Dynamic global vegetation model simulations suggest that CO2 emissions from land-use change have been substantially underestimated because processes such as tree harvesting and land clearing from shifting cultivation have not been considered. As the overall terrestrial sink is constrained, a larger net flux as a result of land-use change implies that terrestrial uptake of CO2 is also larger, and that terrestrial ecosystems might have greater potential to sequester carbon in the future. Consequently, reforestation projects and efforts to avoid further deforestation could represent important mitigation pathways, with co-benefits for biodiversity. It is unclear whether a larger land carbon sink can be reconciled with our current understanding of terrestrial carbon cycling. Our possible underestimation of the historical residual terrestrial carbon sink adds further uncertainty to our capacity to predict the future of terrestrial carbon uptake and losses.

  16. Larger miliolids of the Late Cretaceous and Paleogene seen through space and time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasta Ćosović

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal occurrences of the larger (complex miliolids are discussed to give more light on biostratigraphy and paleobiogeographic provinces distribution. Seven generaand 47 species from the Late Cretaceous to Oligocene inhabited shallow marine settings in the Indo-Pacific, Tethyan and Caribbean regions. Of all genera only four (Idalina, Periloculina, Pseudolacazina, Lacazina widespread throughout Tethys in theLate Cretaceous and Paleogene. Single occurrence of Lacazina was recorded further to east (Moluccas. By now the Late Cretaceous genus Adrahentina is known only from the Spain. The newcomer’s Eocene genera were Fabularia and Lacazinella. Fabularia reachedhigh diversity in species term in the Central and Western Tethys and occured as unique genus in Caribbean realm, too. Conversely, during the same period, Lacazinella spread over the southern border of Neo-Tethys reaching New Guinea.On the Adriatic – Dinaric Carbonate Platform, larger miliolids occurred from the Late Cretaceous to Cuisian, having the same biostratigraphically trends and distribution as contemporaneous larger miliolids from the Tethys.

  17. Speaker Input Variability Does Not Explain Why Larger Populations Have Simpler Languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Mark; Kirby, Simon; Smith, Kenny

    2015-01-01

    A learner's linguistic input is more variable if it comes from a greater number of speakers. Higher speaker input variability has been shown to facilitate the acquisition of phonemic boundaries, since data drawn from multiple speakers provides more information about the distribution of phonemes in a speech community. It has also been proposed that speaker input variability may have a systematic influence on individual-level learning of morphology, which can in turn influence the group-level characteristics of a language. Languages spoken by larger groups of people have less complex morphology than those spoken in smaller communities. While a mechanism by which the number of speakers could have such an effect is yet to be convincingly identified, differences in speaker input variability, which is thought to be larger in larger groups, may provide an explanation. By hindering the acquisition, and hence faithful cross-generational transfer, of complex morphology, higher speaker input variability may result in structural simplification. We assess this claim in two experiments which investigate the effect of such variability on language learning, considering its influence on a learner's ability to segment a continuous speech stream and acquire a morphologically complex miniature language. We ultimately find no evidence to support the proposal that speaker input variability influences language learning and so cannot support the hypothesis that it explains how population size determines the structural properties of language.

  18. Analysis of a short beam with application to solder joints: could larger stand-off heights relieve stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhir, Ephraim

    2015-08-01

    Physically meaningful and easy-to-use analytical (mathematical) stress model is developed for a short beam with clamped and known-in-advance offset ends. The analysis is limited to elastic deformations. While the classical Timoshenko short-beam theory seeks the beam's deflection caused by the combined bending and shear deformations for the given loading, an inverse problem is considered here: the lateral force is sought for the given ends offset. In short beams this force is larger than in long beams, since, in order to achieve the given displacement (offset), the applied force has to overcome both bending and shear resistance of the beam. It is envisioned that short beams could adequately mimic the state of stress in solder joint interconnections, including ball-grid-array (BGA) systems, with large, compared to conventional joints, stand-off heights. When the package/printed-circuit-board (PCB) assembly is subjected to the change in temperature, the thermal expansion (contraction) mismatch of the package and the PCB results in an easily predictable relative displacement (offset) of the ends of the solder joint. This offset can be determined from the known external thermal mismatch strain (determined as the product of the difference in the coefficients of thermal expansion and the change in temperature) and the position of the joint with respect to the mid-cross-section of the assembly. The maximum normal and shearing stresses could be viewed as suitable criteria of the beam's (joint's) material long-term reliability. It is shown that these stresses can be brought down by employing beam-like joints, i.e., joints with an increased stand-off height compared to conventional joints. It is imperative, of course, that, if such joints are employed, there is still enough interfacial real estate, so that the BGA bonding strength is not compromised. On the other hand, owing to the lower stress level, reliability assurance might be much less of a challenge than in the case of

  19. Study on thermal wave based on the thermal mass theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The conservation equations for heat conduction are established based on the concept of thermal mass.We obtain a general heat conduction law which takes into account the spatial and temporal inertia of thermal mass.The general law introduces a damped thermal wave equation.It reduces to the well-known CV model when the spatial inertia of heat flux and temperature and the temporal inertia of temperature are neglected,which indicates that the CV model only considers the temporal inertia of heat flux.Numerical simulations on the propagation and superposition of thermal waves show that for small thermal perturbation the CV model agrees with the thermal wave equation based on the thermal mass theory.For larger thermal perturbation,however,the physically impossible phenomenon pre-dicted by CV model,i.e.the negative temperature induced by the thermal wave superposition,is eliminated by the general heat conduction law,which demonstrates that the present heat conduction law based on the thermal mass theory is more reasonable.

  20. Study on thermal wave based on the thermal mass theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU RuiFeng; CAO BingYang

    2009-01-01

    The conservation equations for heat conduction are established based on the concept of thermal mass. We obtain a general heat conduction law which takes into account the spatial and temporal inertia of thermal mass. The general law introduces a damped thermal wave equation. It reduces to the well-known CV model when the spatial inertia of heat flux and temperature and the temporal inertia of temperature are neglected, which indicates that the CV model only considers the temporal inertia of heat flux. Numerical simulations on the propagation and superposition of thermal waves show that for small thermal perturbation the CV model agrees with the thermal wave equation based on the thermal mass theory. For larger thermal perturbation, however, the physically impossible phenomenon pre-dicted by CV model, i.e. the negative temperature induced by the thermal wave superposition, is eliminated by the general heat conduction law, which demonstrates that the present heat conduction law based on the thermal mass theory is more reasonable.

  1. A full-scale study on thermal degradation of polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash and its secondary air pollution control in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xingbao; Ji, Bingjing; Yan, Dahai; Huang, Qifei; Zhu, Xuemei

    2017-04-01

    Degradation of polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash is beneficial to its risk control. Fly ash was treated in a full-scale thermal degradation system (capacity 1 t d -1 ) to remove polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans. Apart from the confirmation of the polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxin and dibenzofuran decomposition efficiency, we focused on two major issues that are the major obstacles for commercialising this decomposition technology in China, desorption and regeneration of dioxins and control of secondary air pollution. The toxic equivalent quantity values of polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans decreased to air pollution control system. The degradation furnace released relatively large amounts of cadmium, lead and polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans compared with the municipal solid waste incinerator, but the amounts emitted to the atmosphere did not exceed the Chinese national emission limits. Thermal degradation can therefore be used as a polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxin and dibenzofuran abatement method for municipal solid waste incinerator source in China.

  2. The erection of larger windmills in the open countryside - an investigation of the visual effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    The future use of larger windmills will result in new visual effects. The investigation points out that these effects will be dependent on the main characteristics of the landscape. Windmills with a height of 90 m will be taller than any other element found in the landscape with the exception of some chimneys, masts, etc. It is shown that very tall windmills should not be set up in large dominating groups, that it is important that the towers are slender and that the blades rotate slowly (in order to give a more peaceful effect), if the landscape should not be spoiled. Large windmills dominate an area of 1 - 3 kilometers, but at a distance of 10 - 12 km they can appear to fade away between woods and large buildings etc. Naturally, large windmills will be prominent on heaths and moors, and would not be welcome where there are buildings of cultural interest or where the landscape is under conservation. They could, it is stated, be placed amongst a group of smaller windmills, as this would help to lessen their dominance, but should not be positioned where one type of landscape merges into another, as here they would show up more. Local boundaries should also be taken into consideration. When planning where to locate windmills the overall visual effect over larger areas should be contemplated in addition to the preservation of views of buildings etc. of historical interest. Photographs should be taken of proposed sites so that paper models can be placed so as to produce an idea of the visual effects of erecting larger windmills in various positions in specified areas

  3. Thermal Properties Measurement Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, Jon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Braase, Lori [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Papesch, Cynthia [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hurley, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gofryk, Krzysztof [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fielding, Randy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Knight, Collin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Meyer, Mitch [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The Thermal Properties Measurement Report summarizes the research, development, installation, and initial use of significant experimental thermal property characterization capabilities at the INL in FY 2015. These new capabilities were used to characterize a U3Si2 (candidate Accident Tolerant) fuel sample fabricated at the INL. The ability to perform measurements at various length scales is important and provides additional data that is not currently in the literature. However, the real value of the data will be in accomplishing a phenomenological understanding of the thermal conductivity in fuels and the ties to predictive modeling. Thus, the MARMOT advanced modeling and simulation capability was utilized to illustrate how the microstructural data can be modeled and compared with bulk characterization data. A scientific method was established for thermal property measurement capability on irradiated nuclear fuel samples, which will be installed in the Irradiated Material Characterization Laboratory (IMCL).

  4. Collecting the neclected kingdom: Guidelines for the field mycologist with emphasis on the larger fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buyck, B.; Læssøe, Thomas; Meyer, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Guidelines are provided for collecting a group of organisms that has often been overlooked in earlier inventories: the kingdom Fungi and other groups that are traditionally collected by mycologists such as slime molds. After a short introduction on fungi and the feasibility of an ‘all fungal taxa......’ inventory, the authors divide the fungi in six ‘practical’ groups that require specific approaches: slime molds, lichens, parasitic fungi of plants and animals, larger mushrooms, microscopic fungi. Various topics are discussed in relation to three chronological stages (before, during and after...

  5. An improved permanent magnet quadrupole design with larger good field region for high intensity proton linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Jose V., E-mail: josev.mathew@gmail.com; Rao, S.V.L.S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2013-11-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA), being developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) will produce a 20 MeV, 30 mA, continuous wave (CW) proton beam. At these low velocities, space-charge forces dominate, and could lead to larger beam sizes and beam halos. Hence in the design of the focusing lattice of the LEHIPA drift tube linac (DTL) using permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQs), a larger good field region is preferred. Here we study, using the two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) simulation codes PANDIRA and RADIA, four different types of cylindrical PMQ designs: 16-segment trapezoidal Halbach configuration, bullet-nosed geometry and 8- and 16-segment rectangular geometries. The trapezoidal Halbach geometry is used in a variety of accelerators since it provides very high field gradients in small bores, while the bullet-nosed geometry, which is a combination of the trapezoidal and rectangular designs, is used in some DTLs. This study shows that a larger good field region is possible in the 16-segment rectangular design as compared to the Halbach and bullet-nosed designs, making it more attractive for high-intensity proton linacs. An improvement in good-field region by ∼16% over the Halbach design is obtained in the optimized 16-segment rectangular design, although the field gradient is lower by ∼20%. Tolerance studies show that the rectangular segment PMQ design is substantially less sensitive to the easy axis orientation errors and hence will be a better choice for DTLs. -- Highlights: • An improved permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) design with larger good field region is proposed. • We investigate four PMQ designs, including the widely used Halbach and bullet nosed designs. • Analytical calculations are backed by 2D as well as 3D numerical solvers, PANDIRA and RADIA. • The optimized 16 segment rectangular PMQ design is identified to exhibit the largest good field region. • The effect of easy axis orientation

  6. An improved permanent magnet quadrupole design with larger good field region for high intensity proton linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, Jose V.; Rao, S.V.L.S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2013-01-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA), being developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) will produce a 20 MeV, 30 mA, continuous wave (CW) proton beam. At these low velocities, space-charge forces dominate, and could lead to larger beam sizes and beam halos. Hence in the design of the focusing lattice of the LEHIPA drift tube linac (DTL) using permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQs), a larger good field region is preferred. Here we study, using the two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) simulation codes PANDIRA and RADIA, four different types of cylindrical PMQ designs: 16-segment trapezoidal Halbach configuration, bullet-nosed geometry and 8- and 16-segment rectangular geometries. The trapezoidal Halbach geometry is used in a variety of accelerators since it provides very high field gradients in small bores, while the bullet-nosed geometry, which is a combination of the trapezoidal and rectangular designs, is used in some DTLs. This study shows that a larger good field region is possible in the 16-segment rectangular design as compared to the Halbach and bullet-nosed designs, making it more attractive for high-intensity proton linacs. An improvement in good-field region by ∼16% over the Halbach design is obtained in the optimized 16-segment rectangular design, although the field gradient is lower by ∼20%. Tolerance studies show that the rectangular segment PMQ design is substantially less sensitive to the easy axis orientation errors and hence will be a better choice for DTLs. -- Highlights: • An improved permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) design with larger good field region is proposed. • We investigate four PMQ designs, including the widely used Halbach and bullet nosed designs. • Analytical calculations are backed by 2D as well as 3D numerical solvers, PANDIRA and RADIA. • The optimized 16 segment rectangular PMQ design is identified to exhibit the largest good field region. • The effect of easy axis orientation

  7. Laser-Induced Damage Growth on Larger-Aperture Fused Silica Optical Components at 351 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan-Qing, Huang; Wei, Han; Fang, Wang; Yong, Xiang; Fu-Quan, Li; Bin, Feng; Feng, Jing; Xiao-Feng, Wei; Wan-Guo, Zheng; Xiao-Min, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Laser-induced damage is a key lifetime limiter for optics in high-power laser facility. Damage initiation and growth under 351 nm high-fluence laser irradiation are observed on larger-aperture fused silica optics. The input surface of one fused silica component is damaged most severely and an explanation is presented. Obscurations and the area of a scratch on it are found to grow exponentially with the shot number. The area of damage site grows linearly. Micrographs of damage sites support the micro-explosion damage model which could be used to qualitatively explain the phenomena

  8. Examples of fatigue lifetime and reliability evaluation of larger wind turbine components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp-Johansen, N.J.

    2003-01-01

    This report is one out of several that constitute the final report on the ELSAM funded PSO project “Vindmøllekomponenters udmattelsesstyrke og levetid”, project no. 2079, which regards the lifetime distribution of larger wind turbine components in ageneric turbine that has real life dimensions....... Though it was the initial intention of the project to consider only the distribution of lifetimes the work reported in this document provides also calculations of reliabilities and partial load safetyfactors under specific assumptions about uncertainty sources, as reliabilities are considered...

  9. A study of different approaches for multi-scale sensitivity analysis of the TALL-3D experiment using thermal-hydraulic computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geffray, Clotaire; Macian-Juan, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the FP7 European THINS Project, complex thermal-hydraulic phenomena relevant for the Generation IV of nuclear reactors are investigated. KTH (Sweden) built the TALL-3D facility to investigate the transition from forced to natural circulation of the Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) in a pool connected to a 3-leg primary circuit with two heaters and a heat exchanger. The simulation of such 3D phenomena is a challenging task. GRS (Germany) developed the coupling between the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code ANSYS CFX and the System Analysis code ATHLET. Such coupled codes combine the advantages of CFD, which allow a fine resolution of 3D phenomena, and of System Analysis codes, which are fast running. TUM (Germany) is responsible for the Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis of the coupled ATHLET-CFX model in the THINS Project. The influence of modeling uncertainty on simulation results needs to be assessed to characterize and to improve the model and, eventually, to assess its performance against experimental data. TUM has developed a computational framework capable of propagating model input uncertainty through coupled codes. This framework can also be used to apply different approaches for the assessment of the influence of the uncertain input parameters on the model output (Sensitivity Analysis). The work reported in this paper focuses on three methods for the assessment of the sensitivity of the results to the modeling uncertainty. The first method (Morris) allows for the computation of the Elementary Effects resulting from the input parameters. This method is widely used to perform Screening Analysis. The second method (Spearman's rank correlation) relies on regression-based non-parametric measures. This method is suitable if the relation between the input and the output variables is at least monotonic, with the advantage of a low computational cost. The last method (Sobol') computes so-called total effect indices which account for

  10. Nano-scale study of phase separation in ferrite of long term thermally aged Mo-bearing duplex stainless steels - Atom probe tomography and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareige, C.; Emo, J.; Pareige, P.; Saillet, S.; Domain, C.

    2015-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS), used in primary circuit of Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR), are prone to thermal ageing at service temperature, typically between 286 and 323 C. degrees. This ageing is due to the ferrite decomposition via two kinds of phase transformations: spinodal decomposition into Fe rich α zones and Cr rich α' zones and precipitation of G-phase enriched in Ni, Si, Mn and Mo. It has been shown by atom probe tomography (APT) that the G-phase particles form at the interface between α and α' regions thereby demonstrating that α-α' decomposition and G-phase precipitation are highly dependent. The synergy between the two decomposition processes should be related to both the thermodynamics of the system and the diffusion mechanisms active during ageing. This can be studied by atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (AKMC) with a model that can reproduce the phase transformations which take place in ferrite of duplex stainless steels. This paper presents the first simulations of the kinetics of spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation occurring in ferrite of duplex stainless steels. The kinetics was simulated using a simple but effective atomic kinetic Monte Carlo model in a ternary alloy. The simulations reproduced the α/α' spinodal structure with precipitates at the α/α' interface. The comparison of simulated results with experiments shows that the simulations quantitatively reproduce the kinetics of phase transformation and the synergy observed experimentally between the spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation: the time evolution of the wavelength of the spinodal decomposition and the radius of G-phase precipitates were quantitatively reproduced. The simulations endorse the assumption that G-phase precipitation mainly results from the rejection of G-formers from α and α' domains. By following the vacancy pathway during simulation, we show that coarsening of the G-phase precipitates must proceed via

  11. Sintering and microstructure evolution in columnar thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, Ramanathan; Srolovitz, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Sintering of thermal barrier coatings changes their key properties, such as thermal conductivity and thermal shock resistance, thus adversely impacting their reliability. We present a novel modeling approach to study the evolution of coating structure during sintering. We model the sintering of individual columns using a thermodynamic principle, and incorporate the center-to-center approach rates for the columns calculated using this principle in a larger scale discrete dynamics model for the evolution of a large number of columns. Surface energies, grain boundary energies and strain energies associated with the deformation of the columns are all included in this framework, while sintering is assumed to occur by the concerted action of surface and grain boundary diffusion. Two sets of initial conditions corresponding to different extents of pre-sintering among neighboring columns are considered. When the extent of pre-sintering is small, we observe that small clusters containing 5-20 columns are formed. In contrast, where a larger amount of pre-sintering exists, we observe, especially at large column densities, that clusters containing 50-100 columns separated by large inter-cluster pores/channels that appear to organize themselves into a network are formed. These observations are in good agreement with recently published experimental observations. We also explain how these results can explain the development of a 'mud-crack'-like pattern

  12. EOCENE LARGER FORAMINIFERAL BIOSTRATIGRAPHY IN THE SOUTHERNMOST DAUPHINOIS DOMAIN (MARITIME ALPS, FRANCE-ITALY BORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DARIO VARRONE

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The Trucco Formation and the Nummulitic Limestone (Dauphinois Domain, Maritime Alps are characterized by abundant larger foraminifera, specifically nummulitids, orthophragminids and encrusting foraminifera. In the Maritime Alps, previous studies suggest a late Lutetian age for the Trucco Formation and a late Lutetian-Priabonian age for the Nummulitic Limestone.Biostratigraphic analysis of the nummulitids, in 11 stratigraphic sections, allowed us to distinguish 3 biozones:MALF1 Zone: defined by the presence of Nummulites brongniarti d’Archiac & Haime, N. puschi d’Archiac, N. perforatus de Montfort, N. striatus (Bruguière, N. cf. dufrenoyi d’Archiac & Haime, N. variolarius/incrassatus and Operculina schwageri Silvestri.MALF2 Zone: defined by the presence of Nummulites perforatus de Montfort, N. striatus (Bruguière, N. cf. dufrenoyi d’Archiac & Haime, N. variolarius/incrassatus and Operculina schwageri Silvestri.MALF 3 Zone: defined by the presence of gr. Nummulites variolarius/incrassatus, N. striatus (Bruguière and Operculina schwageri Silvestri.According to current larger foraminiferal biozonal schemes, the age of these local biozones corresponds to the Bartonian p.p.Moreover, the comparison with biostratigraphic schemes established for the Dauphinois Domain and for the Tethyan area evidences that several typical nummulitid species of the late Bartonian are lacking in the southern Dauphinois Domain, probably due to a paleogeographic control. 

  13. Juvenile exposure to predator cues induces a larger egg size in fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, Francisca H. I. D.; Taborsky, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    When females anticipate a hazardous environment for their offspring, they can increase offspring survival by producing larger young. Early environmental experience determines egg size in different animal taxa. We predicted that a higher perceived predation risk by juveniles would cause an increase in the sizes of eggs that they produce as adults. To test this, we exposed juveniles of the mouthbrooding cichlid Eretmodus cyanostictus in a split-brood experiment either to cues of a natural predator or to a control situation. After maturation, females that had been confronted with predators produced heavier eggs, whereas clutch size itself was not affected by the treatment. This effect cannot be explained by a differential female body size because the predator treatment did not influence growth trajectories. The observed increase of egg mass is likely to be adaptive, as heavier eggs gave rise to larger young and in fish, juvenile predation risk drops sharply with increasing body size. This study provides the first evidence that predator cues perceived by females early in life positively affect egg mass, suggesting that these cues allow her to predict the predation risk for her offspring. PMID:21976689

  14. Developing Renewable Energy Projects Larger Than 10 MWs at Federal Facilities (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-03-01

    To accomplish Federal goals for renewable energy, sustainability, and energy security, large-scale renewable energy projects must be developed and constructed on Federal sites at a significant scale with significant private investment. The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) helps Federal agencies meet these goals and assists agency personnel navigate the complexities of developing such projects and attract the necessary private capital to complete them. This guide is intended to provide a general resource that will begin to develop the Federal employee's awareness and understanding of the project developer's operating environment and the private sector's awareness and understanding of the Federal environment. Because the vast majority of the investment that is required to meet the goals for large-scale renewable energy projects will come from the private sector, this guide has been organized to match Federal processes with typical phases of commercial project development. The main purpose of this guide is to provide a project development framework to allow the Federal Government, private developers, and investors to work in a coordinated fashion on large-scale renewable energy projects. The framework includes key elements that describe a successful, financially attractive large-scale renewable energy project.

  15. Lunar nuclear power plant design for thermal-hydraulic cooling in nano-scale environment: Nuclear engineering-based interdisciplinary nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Tae Ho

    2015-01-01

    is due to the lunar environment where the radiation is the only heat transfer to the environment and this efficiency could be changeable by the combination of the length and diameter of the regolith flow. This means the future lunar NPP with the high thermal efficiency could be a prospective engineering design, which is a different merit from the Earth condition. There are the comparisons of conduction, convection, and radiation heat transfers in Table 3 where the particular characteristics are described in the three cases. The radiation depends on the surface area, which was explained above as the efficiency is related to the combination of the length and diameter of the regolith flow. It is very important to keep the stability of the coolant in the lunar NPP addition to the economic factor. So, the optimized coolant loop length is a critical issue

  16. Lunar nuclear power plant design for thermal-hydraulic cooling in nano-scale environment: Nuclear engineering-based interdisciplinary nanotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Tae Ho [Systemix Global Co. Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    is due to the lunar environment where the radiation is the only heat transfer to the environment and this efficiency could be changeable by the combination of the length and diameter of the regolith flow. This means the future lunar NPP with the high thermal efficiency could be a prospective engineering design, which is a different merit from the Earth condition. There are the comparisons of conduction, convection, and radiation heat transfers in Table 3 where the particular characteristics are described in the three cases. The radiation depends on the surface area, which was explained above as the efficiency is related to the combination of the length and diameter of the regolith flow. It is very important to keep the stability of the coolant in the lunar NPP addition to the economic factor. So, the optimized coolant loop length is a critical issue.

  17. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, G.J.; Howard, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The patent concerns high temperature thermal insulation of large vessels, such as the primary vessel of a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor. The thermal insulation consists of multilayered thermal insulation modules, and each module comprises a number of metal sheet layers sandwiched between a back and front plate. The layers are linked together by straps and clips to control the thickness of the module. (U.K.)

  18. Kinetic thermal structure in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Yin, Ze-Xia; She, Zhen-Su; Bao, Yun

    2017-11-01

    Plumes are believed to be the most important heat carrier in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC). However, a physically sound and clear definition of plume is still absent. We report here the investigation of a definition of plume called kinetic thermal structure (KTS), based on the analysis of vertical velocity gradient (Λ = ∂w / ∂z), using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of the three-dimensional RBC in a rectangular cell for Pr = 0.7 and Ra = 1 ×108 5 ×109 . It is shown that the conditional average of temperature on Λ exhibits such a behavior that when Λ is larger than a threshold, the volume carries a constant temperature of fluid, hence defines an unambiguous thermal structure, KTS. The DNS show that the KTS behaves in a sheet-like shape near the conducting plate, and becomes slender and smaller with increasing Ra . The heat flux carried by KTS displays a scaling law, with an exponent larger than the global- Nu - Ra scaling, indicating stronger heat transport than the turbulent background. An advantage of the KTS is its connection to the balance equation allowing, for the first time, a prediction of the Ra -dependence of its vertical velocity and the characteristic Λ threshold, validated by DNS. Supported by NSFC (11172006, 11221062, 11452002), and by MOST (China) 973 project (2009CB724100).

  19. 4π Noncoplanar Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Centrally Located or Larger Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Peng; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan; Long, Troy; Romeijn, Edwin; Low, Daniel A.; Kupelian, Patrick; Abraham, John; Yang, Yingli; Sheng, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric improvements in stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with larger or central lung tumors using a highly noncoplanar 4π planning system. Methods and Materials: This study involved 12 patients with centrally located or larger lung tumors previously treated with 7- to 9-field static beam intensity modulated radiation therapy to 50 Gy. They were replanned using volumetric modulated arc therapy and 4π plans, in which a column generation method was used to optimize the beam orientation and the fluence map. Maximum doses to the heart, esophagus, trachea/bronchus, and spinal cord, as well as the 50% isodose volume, the lung volumes receiving 20, 10, and 5 Gy were minimized and compared against the clinical plans. A dose escalation study was performed to determine whether a higher prescription dose to the tumor would be achievable using 4π without violating dose limits set by the clinical plans. The deliverability of 4π plans was preliminarily tested. Results: Using 4π plans, the maximum heart, esophagus, trachea, bronchus and spinal cord doses were reduced by 32%, 72%, 37%, 44%, and 53% (P≤.001), respectively, and R 50 was reduced by more than 50%. Lung V 20 , V 10 , and V 5 were reduced by 64%, 53%, and 32% (P≤.001), respectively. The improved sparing of organs at risk was achieved while also improving planning target volume (PTV) coverage. The minimal PTV doses were increased by the 4π plans by 12% (P=.002). Consequently, escalated PTV doses of 68 to 70 Gy were achieved in all patients. Conclusions: We have shown that there is a large potential for plan quality improvement and dose escalation for patients with larger or centrally located lung tumors using noncoplanar beams with sufficient quality and quantity. Compared against the clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy and static intensity modulated radiation therapy plans, the 4π plans yielded significantly and consistently improved tumor coverage and

  20. 4π Noncoplanar Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Centrally Located or Larger Lung Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Peng; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Long, Troy; Romeijn, Edwin [Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Low, Daniel A.; Kupelian, Patrick; Abraham, John; Yang, Yingli [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric improvements in stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with larger or central lung tumors using a highly noncoplanar 4π planning system. Methods and Materials: This study involved 12 patients with centrally located or larger lung tumors previously treated with 7- to 9-field static beam intensity modulated radiation therapy to 50 Gy. They were replanned using volumetric modulated arc therapy and 4π plans, in which a column generation method was used to optimize the beam orientation and the fluence map. Maximum doses to the heart, esophagus, trachea/bronchus, and spinal cord, as well as the 50% isodose volume, the lung volumes receiving 20, 10, and 5 Gy were minimized and compared against the clinical plans. A dose escalation study was performed to determine whether a higher prescription dose to the tumor would be achievable using 4π without violating dose limits set by the clinical plans. The deliverability of 4π plans was preliminarily tested. Results: Using 4π plans, the maximum heart, esophagus, trachea, bronchus and spinal cord doses were reduced by 32%, 72%, 37%, 44%, and 53% (P≤.001), respectively, and R{sub 50} was reduced by more than 50%. Lung V{sub 20}, V{sub 10}, and V{sub 5} were reduced by 64%, 53%, and 32% (P≤.001), respectively. The improved sparing of organs at risk was achieved while also improving planning target volume (PTV) coverage. The minimal PTV doses were increased by the 4π plans by 12% (P=.002). Consequently, escalated PTV doses of 68 to 70 Gy were achieved in all patients. Conclusions: We have shown that there is a large potential for plan quality improvement and dose escalation for patients with larger or centrally located lung tumors using noncoplanar beams with sufficient quality and quantity. Compared against the clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy and static intensity modulated radiation therapy plans, the 4π plans yielded significantly and consistently improved tumor

  1. Thermalization through parton transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bin

    2010-01-01

    A radiative transport model is used to study kinetic equilibration during the early stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision. The parton system is found to be able to overcome expansion and move toward thermalization via parton collisions. Scaling behaviors show up in both the pressure anisotropy and the energy density evolutions. In particular, the pressure anisotropy evolution shows an approximate α s scaling when radiative processes are included. It approaches an asymptotic time evolution on a time scale of 1 to 2 fm/c. The energy density evolution shows an asymptotic time evolution that decreases slower than the ideal hydro evolution. These observations indicate that partial thermalization can be achieved and viscosity is important for the evolution during the early longitudinal expansion stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision.

  2. Beyond Panglossian Optimism: Larger N2 Amplitudes Probably Signal a Bilingual Disadvantage in Conflict Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R. Paap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this special issue on the brain mechanisms that lead to cognitive benefits of bilingualism we discussed six reasons why it will be very difficult to discover those mechanisms. Many of these problems apply to the article by Fernandez, Acosta, Douglass, Doshi, and Tartar that also appears in the special issue. These concerns include the following: 1 an overly optimistic assessment of the replicability of bilingual advantages in behavioral studies, 2 reliance on risky small samples sizes, 3 failures to match the samples on demographic characteristics such as immigrant status, and 4 language group differences that occur in neural measures (i.e., N2 amplitude, but not in the behavioral data. Furthermore the N2 amplitude measure in general suffers from valence ambiguity: larger N2 amplitudes reported for bilinguals are more likely to reflect poorer conflict resolution rather than enhanced inhibitory control.

  3. Design of reactor internals in larger high-temperature reactors with spherical fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elter, C.

    1981-01-01

    In his paper, the author analyzes and summarizes the present state of the art with emphasis on the prototype reactor THTR 300 MWe, because in addition to spherical fuel elements, this type includes other features of future HTR design such as the same flow direction of cooland gas through the core. The paper on hand also elaborates design guidelines for reactor internals applicable with large HTR's of up to 1200 MWe. Proved designs will be altered so as to meet the special requirements of larger cores with spherical elements to be reloaded according to the OTTO principle. This paper is furthermore designed as a starting point for selective and swift development of reactor internals for large HTR's to be refuelled according to the OTTO principle. (orig./GL) [de

  4. Imaging samples larger than the field of view: the SLS experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzis Oikonomidis, Ioannis; Lovric, Goran; Cremona, Tiziana P.; Arcadu, Filippo; Patera, Alessandra; Schittny, Johannes C.; Stampanoni, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Volumetric datasets with micrometer spatial and sub-second temporal resolutions are nowadays routinely acquired using synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM). Although SRXTM technology allows the examination of multiple samples with short scan times, many specimens are larger than the field-of-view (FOV) provided by the detector. The extension of the FOV in the direction perpendicular to the rotation axis remains non-trivial. We present a method that can efficiently increase the FOV merging volumetric datasets obtained by region-of-interest tomographies in different 3D positions of the sample with a minimal amount of artefacts and with the ability to handle large amounts of data. The method has been successfully applied for the three-dimensional imaging of a small number of mouse lung acini of intact animals, where pixel sizes down to the micrometer range and short exposure times are required.

  5. Practical aspects of NMR signal assignment in larger and challenging proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frueh, Dominique P.

    2014-01-01

    NMR has matured into a technique routinely employed for studying proteins in near physiological conditions. However, applications to larger proteins are impeded by the complexity of the various correlation maps necessary to assign NMR signals. This article reviews the data analysis techniques traditionally employed for resonance assignment and describes alternative protocols necessary for overcoming challenges in large protein spectra. In particular, simultaneous analysis of multiple spectra may help overcome ambiguities or may reveal correlations in an indirect manner. Similarly, visualization of orthogonal planes in a multidimensional spectrum can provide alternative assignment procedures. We describe examples of such strategies for assignment of backbone, methyl, and nOe resonances. We describe experimental aspects of data acquisition for the related experiments and provide guidelines for preliminary studies. Focus is placed on large folded monomeric proteins and examples are provided for 37, 48, 53, and 81 kDa proteins. PMID:24534088

  6. Performance of large-R jets and jet substructure reconstruction with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the application of techniques to study jet substructure. The performance of modified jet algorithms for a variety of jet types and event topologies is investigated. Properties of jets subjected to the mass-drop filtering, trimming and pruning algorithms are found to have a reduced sensitivity to multiple proton-proton interactions and exhibit improved stability at high luminosity. Monte Carlo studies of the signal-background discrimination with jet grooming in new physics searches based on jet invariant mass and jet substructure properties are also presented. The application of jet trimming is shown to improve the robustness of large-R jet measurements, reduce sensitivity to the superfluous effects due to the intense environment of the high luminosity LHC, and improve the physics potential of searches for heavy boosted objects. The analyses presented in this note use the full 2011 ATLAS dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 \\pm 0.2 fb−1 .

  7. The Larger Bound on the Domination Number of Fibonacci Cubes and Lucas Cubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengzhang Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Let Γn and Λn be the n-dimensional Fibonacci cube and Lucas cube, respectively. Denote by Γ[un,k,z] the subgraph of Γn induced by the end-vertex un,k,z that has no up-neighbor. In this paper, the number of end-vertices and domination number γ of Γn and Λn are studied. The formula of calculating the number of end-vertices is given and it is proved that γ(Γ[un,k,z]≤2k-1+1. Using these results, the larger bound on the domination number γ of Γn and Λn is determined.

  8. Designing key-dependent chaotic S-box with larger key space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Ruming; Yuan Jian; Wang Jian; Shan Xiuming; Wang Xiqin

    2009-01-01

    The construction of cryptographically strong substitution boxes (S-boxes) is an important concern in designing secure cryptosystems. The key-dependent S-boxes designed using chaotic maps have received increasing attention in recent years. However, the key space of such S-boxes does not seem to be sufficiently large due to the limited parameter range of discretized chaotic maps. In this paper, we propose a new key-dependent S-box based on the iteration of continuous chaotic maps. We explore the continuous-valued state space of chaotic systems, and devise the discrete mapping between the input and the output of the S-box. A key-dependent S-box is constructed with the logistic map in this paper. We show that its key space could be much larger than the current key-dependent chaotic S-boxes.

  9. Nanoscale thermal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, David G.; Ford, Wayne K.; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Merlin, Roberto; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid progress in the synthesis and processing of materials with structure on nanometer length scales has created a demand for greater scientific understanding of thermal transport in nanoscale devices, individual nanostructures, and nanostructured materials. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation that have occurred in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces between materials become increasingly important on small length scales. The thermal conductance of many solid-solid interfaces have been studied experimentally but the range of observed interface properties is much smaller than predicted by simple theory. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are emerging as a powerful tool for calculations of thermal conductance and phonon scattering, and may provide for a lively interplay of experiment and theory in the near term. Fundamental issues remain concerning the correct definitions of temperature in nonequilibrium nanoscale systems. Modern Si microelectronics are now firmly in the nanoscale regime—experiments have demonstrated that the close proximity of interfaces and the extremely small volume of heat dissipation strongly modifies thermal transport, thereby aggravating problems of thermal management. Microelectronic devices are too large to yield to atomic-level simulation in the foreseeable future and, therefore, calculations of thermal transport must rely on solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation; microscopic phonon scattering rates needed for predictive models are, even for Si, poorly known. Low-dimensional nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, are predicted to have novel transport properties; the first quantitative experiments of the thermal conductivity of nanotubes have recently been achieved using microfabricated measurement systems. Nanoscale porosity decreases the permittivity of amorphous dielectrics but porosity also strongly decreases the thermal conductivity. The

  10. Smoking Topography among Korean Smokers: Intensive Smoking Behavior with Larger Puff Volume and Shorter Interpuff Interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungroul; Yu, Sol

    2018-05-18

    The difference of smoker's topography has been found to be a function many factors, including sex, personality, nicotine yield, cigarette type (i.e., flavored versus non-flavored) and ethnicity. We evaluated the puffing behaviors of Korean smokers and its association with smoking-related biomarker levels. A sample of 300 participants was randomly recruited from metropolitan areas in South Korea. Topography measures during a 24-hour period were obtained using a CReSS pocket device. Korean male smokers smoked two puffs less per cigarette compared to female smokers (15.0 (13.0⁻19.0) vs. 17.5 (15.0⁻21.0) as the median (Interquartile range)), but had a significantly larger puff volume (62.7 (52.7⁻75.5) mL vs. 53.5 (42.0⁻64.2) mL); p = 0.012). The interpuff interval was similar between men and women (8.9 (6.5⁻11.2) s vs. 8.3 (6.2⁻11.0) s; p = 0.122) but much shorter than other study results. A dose-response association ( p = 0.0011) was observed between daily total puff volumes and urinary cotinine concentrations, after controlling for sex, age, household income level and nicotine addiction level. An understanding of the difference of topography measures, particularly the larger puff volume and shorter interpuff interval of Korean smokers, may help to overcome a potential underestimation of internal doses of hazardous byproducts of smoking.

  11. Larger ATV engine size correlates with an increased rate of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, C Caleb; Rostas, Jack W; Lee, Y L; Gonzalez, Richard P; Brevard, Sidney B; Frotan, M Amin; Ahmed, Naveed; Simmons, Jon D

    2015-04-01

    Since the introduction of all-terrain vehicles (ATV) to the United States in 1971, injuries and mortalities related to their use have increased significantly. Furthermore, these vehicles have become larger and more powerful. As there are no helmet requirements or limitations on engine-size in the State of Alabama, we hypothesised that larger engine size would correlate with an increased incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in patients following an ATV crash. Patient and ATV data were prospectively collected on all ATV crashes presenting to a level one trauma centre from September 2010 to May 2013. Collected data included: demographics, age of driver, ATV engine size, presence of helmet, injuries, and outcomes. The data were grouped according to the ATV engine size in cubic centimetres (cc). For the purposes of this study, TBI was defined as any type of intracranial haemorrhage on the initial computed tomography scan. There were 61 patients identified during the study period. Two patients (3%) were wearing a helmet at the time of injury. Patients on an ATV with an engine size of 350 cc or greater had higher Injury Severity Scores (13.9 vs. 7.5, p ≤ 0.05) and an increased incidence of TBI (26% vs. 0%, p ≤ 0.05) when compared to patients on ATV's with an engine size less than 350 cc. Patients on an ATV with an engine size of 350 cc or greater were more likely to have a TBI. The use of a helmet was rarely present in this cohort. Legislative efforts to implement rider protection laws for ATVs are warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Larger fig wasps are more careful about which figs to enter--with good reason.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cong; Yang, Da-Rong; Compton, Stephen G; Peng, Yan-Qiong

    2013-01-01

    Floral longevity reflects a balance between gains in pollinator visitation and the costs of flower maintenance. Because rewards to pollinators change over time, older flowers may be less attractive, reducing the value of extended longevity. Un-pollinated figs, the inflorescences of Ficus species, can remain receptive for long periods, but figs that are older when entered by their host-specific fig wasp pollinators produce fewer seeds and fig wasp offspring. Our field experiments with Ficushispida, a dioecious fig tree, examined how the length of time that receptive figs have remained un-pollinated influences the behaviour and reproductive success of its short-lived fig wasp pollinator, Ceratosolensolmsi marchali. The results were consistent in three different seasons, and on male and female trees, although receptivity was greatly extended during colder months. Pollinators took longer to find the ostioles of older figs, and longer to penetrate them. They also became increasingly unwilling to enter figs as they aged, and increasing numbers of the wasps became trapped in the ostiolar bracts. Larger individuals were particularly unwilling to enter older figs, resulting in older figs being pollinated by smaller wasps. On female trees, where figs produce only seeds, seed production declined rapidly with fig age. On male trees, the numbers and size of fig wasp offspring declined, and a higher proportion were male. Older male figs are harder to enter, especially for larger individuals, and offer poorer quality oviposition opportunities. This study opens an interesting new perspective on the coevolution of figs and their pollinators, especially factors influencing pollinator body size and emphasises the subtleties of interactions between mutualists.

  13. Transmissible Plasmids and Integrons Shift Escherichia coli Population Toward Larger Multiple Drug Resistance Numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhartono, Suhartono; Savin, Mary C; Gbur, Edward E

    2018-04-01

    Transmissible plasmids and integrons may play important roles in the persistence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria throughout aquatic environment by accumulating antibiotic resistance genes (ARG). Class 1 and class 2 integron (intI), mobilization (mob), sulfamethoxazole resistance (sul), and trimethoprim resistance (dfr) genes were PCR-amplified and confirmed through DNA sequencing following plasmid extraction from 139 antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli. E. coli had previously been recovered from wastewater treatment plant effluent and receiving stream water in Northwest Arkansas and isolates had expressed resistance to one to six antibiotics. Almost half of the total isolates (47%) carried putatively transmissible plasmids with mob F12 gene as the most frequently detected mobilization gene. When two or three mob genes were detected per isolate, there was a significant shift in the population toward larger multiple drug resistance (MDR) number. Class 1 and/or 2 integrons were prevalent (46%), and the presence of integron significantly shifted the isolate population toward larger MDR number. More isolates carried single or coexistence of two or three sul genes (99.3%), and single or a combination up to five dfr genes (89.3%) than had exhibited in vitro resistance to the respective antibiotics. These findings indicate not only the role of the wastewater treatment effluent and the stream environment in coaccumulation of ARG with transmissible plasmids and integrons in multiple antibiotic-resistant E. coli populations but also suggest that density of sul and dfr resistance genes within an isolate may serve as a biomarker for mobile MDR in general.

  14. Introgression of a Rare Haplotype from Southeastern Africa to Breed California Blackeyes with Larger Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell R Lucas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Seed size distinguishes most crops from their wild relatives and is an important quality trait for the grain legume cowpea. In order to breed cowpea varieties with larger seeds we introgressed a rare haplotype associated with large seeds at the Css-1 locus from an African buff seed type cultivar, IT82E-18 (18.5g/100 seeds, into a blackeye seed type cultivar, CB27 (22g/100 seed. Four RILs derived from these two parents were chosen for marker-assisted breeding based on SNP genotyping with a goal of stacking large seed haplotypes into a CB27 background. Foreground and background selection were performed during two cycles of backcrossing based on genome-wide SNP markers. The average seed size of introgression lines homozygous for haplotypes associated with large seeds was 28.7g/100 seed and 24.8g/100 seed for cycles 1 and 2, respectively. One cycle 1 introgression line with desirable seed quality was selfed for two generations to make families with very large seeds (28-35g/100 seeds. Field-based performance trials helped identify breeding lines that not only have large seeds but are also desirable in terms of yield, maturity, and plant architecture when compared to industry standards. A principal component analysis was used to explore the relationships between the parents relative to a core set of landraces and improved varieties based on high-density SNP data. The geographic distribution of haplotypes at the Css-1 locus suggest the haplotype associated with large seeds is unique to accessions collected from Southeastern Africa. Therefore this QTL has a strong potential to develop larger seeded varieties for other growing regions which is demonstrated in this work using a California pedigree.

  15. Larger Neural Responses Produce BOLD Signals That Begin Earlier in Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena eThompson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI analyses commonly rely on the assumption that the temporal dynamics of hemodynamic response functions (HRFs are independent of the amplitude of the neural signals that give rise to them. The validity of this assumption is particularly important for techniques that use fMRI to resolve sub-second timing distinctions between responses, in order to make inferences about the ordering of neural processes. Whether or not the detailed shape of the HRF is independent of neural response amplitude remains an open question, however. We performed experiments in which we measured responses in primary visual cortex (V1 to large, contrast-reversing checkerboards at a range of contrast levels, which should produce varying amounts of neural activity. Ten subjects (ages 22-52 were studied in each of two experiments using 3 Tesla scanners. We used rapid, 250 msec, temporal sampling (repetition time, or TR and both short and long inter-stimulus interval (ISI stimulus presentations. We tested for a systematic relationship between the onset of the HRF and its amplitude across conditions, and found a strong negative correlation between the two measures when stimuli were separated in time (long- and medium-ISI experiments, but not the short-ISI experiment. Thus, stimuli that produce larger neural responses, as indexed by HRF amplitude, also produced HRFs with shorter onsets. The relationship between amplitude and latency was strongest in voxels with lowest mean-normalized variance (i.e., parenchymal voxels. The onset differences observed in the longer-ISI experiments are likely attributable to mechanisms of neurovascular coupling, since they are substantially larger than reported differences in the onset of action potentials in V1 as a function of response amplitude.

  16. Effect of nano-scaled styrene butadiene rubber based nucleating agent on the thermal, crystallization and physical properties of isotactic polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petchwattana, Nawadon [Division of Polymer Materials Technology, Faculty of Agricultural Product Innovation and Technology, Srinakharinwirot University, Sukhumvit 23, Wattana, Bangkok 10110 (Thailand); Covavisaruch, Sirijutaratana, E-mail: sirijutaratana.c@chula.ac.th [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Sripanya, Panjapong [Thai Oleochemicals Company Limited (A Subsidiary of PTT Global Chemical Public Company Limited), Mueang Rayong, Rayong 21150 (Thailand)

    2014-01-05

    Highlights: • The effect of a SBR based β-NA on the properties iPP was investigated. • The addition of β-NA led to higher population of nuclei and smaller spherulites. • β to α phase transformation was observed when re-extrusion process was applied. • Impact strength was increased when the β-NA was added from 0.10 to 0.20 wt%. -- Abstract: The influence of a specific nano-scaled styrene butadiene rubber based β-nucleating agent (β-NA) on the properties of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) was investigated in the current research. β-NA was applied at the concentration ranged from 0.05 to 0.50 wt%. Microscopic observation revealed that the neat iPP crystals grew very slowly; they ranged in size from 100 to 200 μm. The addition of β-NA led to higher population of nuclei and smaller spherulites than those found in neat iPP. The addition of only 0.05 wt% β-NA significantly decreased the sizes of the spherulites down to 5 μm; the crystal grew very rapidly, leading to extremely fine morphology. Analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that iPP/β-NA constituted mainly of β-crystal structure. The transformation of β to α phase was observed upon re-extrusion, it was verified by the lowered fraction of the β-crystalline phase (K{sub β}) although the total degree of crystallinity remained unchanged. A significant improvement in the impact strength of the iPP/β-NA was observed when the β-NA was employed from 0.10 to 0.20 wt%, leading to the formation of tough β-crystals in the β-NA nucleated iPP. The color measurement implied that the iPP nucleated with β-NA was superior in terms of whiteness but it was less transparent, as was evident by the increased haze.

  17. Thermal effects in shales: measurements and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinstry, H.A.

    1977-01-01

    Research is reported concerning thermal and physical measurements and theoretical modeling relevant to the storage of radioactive wastes in a shale. Reference thermal conductivity measurements are made at atmospheric pressure in a commercial apparatus; and equipment for permeability measurements has been developed, and is being extended with respect to measurement ranges. Thermal properties of shales are being determined as a function of temperature and pressures. Apparatus was developed to measure shales in two different experimental configurations. In the first, a disk 15 mm in diameter of the material is measured by a steady state technique using a reference material to measure the heat flow within the system. The sample is sandwiched between two disks of a reference material (single crystal quartz is being used initially as reference material). The heat flow is determined twice in order to determine that steady state conditions prevail; the temperature drop over the two references is measured. When these indicate an equal heat flow, the thermal conductivity of the sample can be calculated from the temperature difference of the two faces. The second technique is for determining effect of temperature in a water saturated shale on a larger scale. Cylindrical shale (or siltstone) specimens that are being studied (large for a laboratory sample) are to be heated electrically at the center, contained in a pressure vessel that will maintain a fixed water pressure around it. The temperature is monitored at many points within the shale sample. The sample dimensions are 25 cm diameter, 20 cm long. A micro computer system has been constructed to monitor 16 thermocouples to record variation of temperature distribution with time

  18. Thermodynamic comparison of three small-scale gas liquefaction systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Markussen, Wiebke Brix

    2017-01-01

    . The present work investigates three configurations suitable for small-scale applications because of their simplicity and compactness: the single-mixed refrigerant, single and dual reverse Brayton cycles. The impact of different feed compositions and refrigerant properties is analysed. A detailed assessment...... to be more efficient (1000-2000 kJ/kgLNG) than expander-based ones (2500-5000 kJ/kgLNG) over larger ranges of operating conditions, at the expense of a greater system complexity and higher thermal conductance (250-500kW/K against 80-160 kW/K). The results show that the use of different thermodynamic models...

  19. A Comparative Experimental Study of Fixed Temperature and Fixed Heat Flux Boundary Conditions in Turbulent Thermal Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Di; Wang, Fei; Xi, Heng-Dong; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2014-11-01

    We report an experimental study of the influences of thermal boundary condition in turbulent thermal convection. Two configurations were examined: one was fixed heat flux at the bottom boundary and fixed temperature at the top (HC cells); the other was fixed temperature at both boundaries (CC cells). It is found that the flow strength in the CC cells is on average 9% larger than that in the HC ones, which could be understood as change in plume emission ability under different boundary conditions. It is further found, rather surprisingly, that flow reversals of the large-scale circulation occur more frequently in the CC cell, despite a stronger large-scale flow and more uniform temperature distribution over the boundaries. These findings provide new insights into turbulent thermal convection and should stimulate further studies, especially experimental ones. This work is supported by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council under Grant No. CUHK 403712.

  20. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsky, G.P.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal insulation for vessels and piping within the reactor containment area of nuclear power plants is disclosed. The thermal insulation of this invention can be readily removed and replaced from the vessels and piping for inservice inspection, can withstand repeated wettings and dryings, and can resist high temperatures for long periods of time. 4 claims, 3 figures

  1. From hard thermal loops to Langevin dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boedeker, Dietrich

    1999-01-01

    In hot non-Abelian gauge theories, processes characterized by the momentum scale g 2 T (such as electroweak baryon number violation in the very early universe) are non-perturbative. An effective theory for the soft (vertical bar p vertical bar ∼ g 2 T) field modes is obtained by integrating out momenta larger than than g 2 T. Starting from the hard thermal loop effective theory, which is the result of integrating out the scale T, it is shown how to integrate out the scale gT in an expansion in the gauge coupling g. At leading order in g, one obtains Vlasov-Boltzmann equations for the soft field modes, which contain a Gaussian noise and a collision term. The 2-point function of the noise and the collision term are explicitly calculated in a leading logarithmic approximation. In this approximation the Boltzmann equation is solved. The resulting effective theory for the soft field modes is described by a Langevin equation. It determines the parametric form of the hot baryon number violation rate as Γ = κg 10 log(1/g)gT 4 , and it allows for a calculation for κ on the lattice

  2. Burdigalian turbid water patch reef environment revealed by larger benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, V.; Renema, W.; Throughflow-project

    2012-04-01

    Ancient isolated patch reefs outcropping from siliciclastic sediments are a trademark for the Miocene carbonate deposits occurring in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. They develop in transitional shelf sediments deposited between deltaic and deep marine deposits (Allen and Chambers, 1998). The Batu Putih Limestone (Wilson, 2005) and similar outcrops in adjacent areas have been characterized as shallow water carbonates influenced by high siliciclastic input, showing low relief patch reefs in turbid waters. Larger benthic foraminifera (LBF) are excellent markers for biochronology and paleoenvironmental reconstruction. This study aims to reveal age and paleoenvironment of a shallow water carbonate patch reef developed in mixed depositional system by using LBF and microfacies analysis. The studied section is located near Bontang, East Kalimantan, and is approximately 80 m long and 12 m high. It is placed within Miocene sediments in the central part of the Kutai Basin. Patch reef and capping sediments were logged through eight transects along section and divided into nine different lithological units from which samples were collected. Thin sections and isolated specimens of larger benthic foraminifera were analyzed and recognized to species level (where possible) providing age and environmental information. Microfacies analysis of thin sections included carbonate classification (textural scheme of Dunham, 1962) and assemblage composition of LBF, algae and corals relative abundance. Three environmentally indicative groups of LBF were separated based on test morphology, habitat or living relatives (Hallock and Glenn, 1986). Analysed foraminifera assemblage suggests Burdigalian age (Tf1). With use of microfacies analysis nine successive lithological units were grouped into five facies types. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of LBF fossil assemblage indicate two cycles of possible deepening recorded in the section. Based on high muddy matrix ratio in analyzed thin-sections we

  3. Application of chemical mutagens and radiation in breeding buckwheat for larger seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseeva, E.S.

    1988-01-01

    Full text: In 1974, seeds of the Viktoriya variety of buckwheat were treated with 20-30 krad gamma radiation and chemical mutagens in the Biophysics Department of the Kishinev Agricultural Institute. For the chemical mutagen treatment, we used N-ethylnitroso-urea NEH (0.025 and 0.012%), N-methylnitroso-urea NMH (0.01 and 0.005%), ethylenimine EI (0.01 and 0.005%), dimethyl sulphate DMS (0.01 and 0.005%) and 1.4-bis-diazoacetyl butane DAB (0.01 and 0.05%). Since some investigators think that different results are produced by changing the order of the treatment, we treated seeds with chemical mutagens before and after irradiation and this was followed by drying. A total of 2400 seeds were treated. Selection started with M 2 seeds produced by M 1 plants. The thousand seed weight of the best ones ranged from 40.7 to 47.8 g, which was 11.9-18.7 g heavier than the control. The large seed size thus selected was heritable. Since larger seeds are very important for the creation of high yielding varieties buckwheat, only families with these characteristics were selected for further work. We observed even some further increase in seed weight in the next generation. It was observed that when planting large seeds, after six days of growth the cotyledons were significantly larger than in the control plants. This characteristic was used in selecting for a high yielding large-seed variety of buckwheat. The plants were selected twice: once for development of large cotyledon leaves and the second time for plant yield. In the fourth generation, the families thus obtained continued to be studied in greenhouse experiments and the same time be propagated under field conditions. The seeds of these families were then combined and under the name Podolyanka in 1976 were subjected to competitive variety testing. Following the competitive variety testing the mutant variety Podolyanka was released in 1984. It is high yielding (2950 kg/ha), has a short vegetation period (matures 17-18 days

  4. Distribution of living larger benthic foraminifera in littoral environments of the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Flavia; Lokier, Stephen W.

    2015-04-01

    The distribution of larger benthic foraminifera in Recent littoral environment of the United Arab Emirates (Abu Dhabi and Western regions) was investigated with the aim of understanding the response of those foraminifera to an increase in water salinity. For this purpose, 100 sediment samples from nearshore shelf, beach-front, channel, lagoon, and intertidal environment were collected. Sampling was undertaken at a water depth shallower than 15 m in water with a temperature of 22 to 35˚C, a salinity ranging from 40 to 60‰ and a pH of 8. Samples were stained with rose Bengal at the moment of sample collection in order to identify living specimens. The most abundant epiphytic larger benthic foraminifera in the studied area were Peneroplis pertusus and P. planatus with less common Spirolina areatina, S. aciculate and Sorites marginalis. The living specimens of the above mentioned species with normal test growing were particularly abundant in the nearshore shelf and lagoonal samples collected on seaweed. Dead specimens were concentrated in the coarser sediments of the beach-front, probably transported from nearby environments. Shallow coastal ponds are located in the upper intertidal zone and have a maximum salinity of 60‰ and contain abundant detached seagrass. Samples collected from these ponds possess a living foraminifera assemblage dominated by Peneroplis pertusus and P. planatus. High percentages (up to 50% of the stained assemblage) of Peneroplis presented abnormality in test growth, such as the presence of multiple apertures with reduced size, deformation in the general shape of the test, irregular suture lines and abnormal coiling. The high percentage of abnormal tests reflects natural environmental stress mainly caused by high and variable salinity. The unique presence of living epiphytic species, suggests that epiphytic foraminifera may be transported into the pond together with seagrass and continued to live in the pond. This hypothesis is supported by

  5. Mud deposit formation on the open coast of the larger Patos Lagoon-Cassino Beach system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinzon, S. B.; Winterwerp, J. C.; Nogueira, R.; de Boer, G. J.

    2009-03-01

    This paper proposes an explanation of the mud deposits on the inner Shelf of Cassino Beach, South Brazil, by using computational modeling. These mud deposits are mainly formed by sediments delivered from Patos Lagoon, a coastal lagoon connected to the Shelf, next to Cassino Beach. The deposits are characterized by (soft) mud layers of about 1 m thick and are found between the -5 and -20 isobaths. Two hydrodynamic models of the larger Patos Lagoon-Cassino Beach system were calibrated against water elevation measured for a 5 months period, and against currents and salinity measured for a week period. The circulation patterns and water exchange through the mouth were analyzed as a function of local and remote wind effects, and river discharges. The remote wind effect mainly governs the quantity of water exchange with the Lagoon through its effect on mean sea level as a result of Ekman dynamics, while river discharges are important for the salinity of the exchanged water masses. Local winds augment the export-import rates by set-up and set-down within the Lagoon, but their effects are much smaller than those of the remote wind. Currents patterns on the inner Shelf during water outflow revealed a recirculation zone south of the Lagoon, induced by the local geometry and bathymetry of the system. This recirculation zone coincides with observed locations of mud deposition. Water, hence suspended sediment export occurs when remote and local winds are from the N-E, which explains why fine sediment deposits are mainly found south of the Lagoon's breakwater. A sensitivity analysis with the numerical model quantified the contribution of the various mechanisms driving the transport and fate of the fine suspended sediments, i.e. the effects of remote and local wind, of the astronomical tide, of river discharge and fresh-salt water-induced density currents, and of earth rotation. It is concluded that gravitational circulation and earth rotation affects the further dispersion of

  6. Ultrafast Thermal Transport at Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, David [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Murphy, Catherine [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Martin, Lane [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-10-21

    Our research program on Ultrafast Thermal Transport at Interfaces advanced understanding of the mesoscale science of heat conduction. At the length and time scales of atoms and atomic motions, energy is transported by interactions between single-particle and collective excitations. At macroscopic scales, entropy, temperature, and heat are the governing concepts. Key gaps in fundamental knowledge appear at the transitions between these two regimes. The transport of thermal energy at interfaces plays a pivotal role in these scientific issues. Measurements of heat transport with ultrafast time resolution are needed because picoseconds are the fundamental scales where the lack of equilibrium between various thermal excitations becomes a important factor in the transport physics. A critical aspect of our work has been the development of experimental methods and model systems that enabled more precise and sensitive investigations of nanoscale thermal transport.

  7. Thermal conductivity model for nanofiber networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinpeng; Huang, Congliang; Liu, Qingkun; Smalyukh, Ivan I.; Yang, Ronggui

    2018-02-01

    Understanding thermal transport in nanofiber networks is essential for their applications in thermal management, which are used extensively as mechanically sturdy thermal insulation or high thermal conductivity materials. In this study, using the statistical theory and Fourier's law of heat conduction while accounting for both the inter-fiber contact thermal resistance and the intrinsic thermal resistance of nanofibers, an analytical model is developed to predict the thermal conductivity of nanofiber networks as a function of their geometric and thermal properties. A scaling relation between the thermal conductivity and the geometric properties including volume fraction and nanofiber length of the network is revealed. This model agrees well with both numerical simulations and experimental measurements found in the literature. This model may prove useful in analyzing the experimental results and designing nanofiber networks for both high and low thermal conductivity applications.

  8. Thermal conductivity model for nanofiber networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xinpeng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Huang, Congliang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; School of Electrical and Power Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116, China; Liu, Qingkun [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Smalyukh, Ivan I. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Yang, Ronggui [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Buildings and Thermal Systems Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, USA

    2018-02-28

    Understanding thermal transport in nanofiber networks is essential for their applications in thermal management, which are used extensively as mechanically sturdy thermal insulation or high thermal conductivity materials. In this study, using the statistical theory and Fourier's law of heat conduction while accounting for both the inter-fiber contact thermal resistance and the intrinsic thermal resistance of nanofibers, an analytical model is developed to predict the thermal conductivity of nanofiber networks as a function of their geometric and thermal properties. A scaling relation between the thermal conductivity and the geometric properties including volume fraction and nanofiber length of the network is revealed. This model agrees well with both numerical simulations and experimental measurements found in the literature. This model may prove useful in analyzing the experimental results and designing nanofiber networks for both high and low thermal conductivity applications.

  9. Shyer and larger bird species show more reduced fear of humans when living in urban environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    delBarco-Trillo, Javier

    2018-04-01

    As the natural habitats of many species are degraded or disappear, there is scope for these species to be established in urban habitats. To ease the establishment and maintenance of urban populations of more species we need to better understand what degree of phenotypical change to expect as different species transition into urban environments. During the first stages of urban colonization, behavioural changes such as an increase in boldness are particularly important. A consistent response in urban populations is to decrease the distance at which individuals flee from an approaching human (flight initiation distance, or FID). Performing a phylogenetic generalized least-squares (PGLS) analysis on 130 avian species, I found that the largest changes in FID between rural and urban populations occur in species that are larger-bodied and naturally shy (higher rural FID), two phenotypic traits that are not normally associated with urban colonizers. More unlikely species may thus be able to colonize urban environments, especially if we design cities in ways that promote such urban colonizations. © 2018 The Author(s).

  10. Outcomes of multiple wire localization for larger breast cancers: when can mastectomy be avoided?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirstein, Laurie J; Rafferty, Elizabeth; Specht, Michelle C; Moore, Richard H; Taghian, Alphonse G; Hughes, Kevin S; Gadd, Michele A; Smith, Barbara L

    2008-09-01

    Mastectomy is often recommended when mammography shows a breast cancer with extensive calcifications. We wished to determine whether the use of multiple localizing wires to guide lumpectomy in this setting was associated with increased rates of breast conservation. We also wanted to identify factors that predicted a poor chance of successful lumpectomy, to avoid multiple lumpectomy attempts in a patient who would ultimately require mastectomy. Records of 153 women with breast cancer who underwent lumpectomy for larger lesions that required multiple wire localization and 196 controls who required only single wire localization were reviewed retrospectively. The number of localizing wires, specimen volume, largest specimen dimension, number of surgical procedures, and rates of breast conservation were scored. Seventy-seven percent of patients requiring multiple wire localization had successful breast conservation, compared with 90% of those needing only single wire localization. Only 28% of multiple wire patients required more than 1 excision to achieve clear margins, compared with 36% of single wire patients (p localizing wires for excision. The use of multiple wires can decrease the number of procedures required to obtain clear lumpectomy margins.

  11. Technique for Extension of Small Antenna Array Mutual-Coupling Data to Larger Antenna Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, M. C.

    1996-01-01

    A technique is presented whereby the mutual interaction between a small number of elements in a planar array can be interpolated and extrapolated to accurately predict the combined interactions in a much larger array of many elements. An approximate series expression is developed, based upon knowledge of the analytical characteristic behavior of the mutual admittance between small aperture antenna elements in a conducting ground plane. This expression is utilized to analytically extend known values for a few spacings and orientations to other element configurations, thus eliminating the need to numerically integrate a large number of highly oscillating and slowly converging functions. This paper shows that the technique can predict very accurately the mutual coupling between elements in a very large planar array with a knowledge of the self-admittance of an isolated element and the coupling between only two-elements arranged in eight different pair combinations. These eight pair combinations do not necessarily have to correspond to pairs in the large array, although all of the individual elements must be identical.

  12. Larger aggregates of mutant seipin in Celia's Encephalopathy, a new protein misfolding neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Riquelme, Alejandro; Sánchez-Iglesias, Sofía; Rábano, Alberto; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Domingo-Jiménez, Rosario; Ramos, Adriana; Rosa, Isaac; Senra, Ana; Nilsson, Peter; García, Ángel; Araújo-Vilar, David; Requena, Jesús R

    2015-11-01

    Celia's Encephalopathy (MIM #615924) is a recently discovered fatal neurodegenerative syndrome associated with a new BSCL2 mutation (c.985C>T) that results in an aberrant isoform of seipin (Celia seipin). This mutation is lethal in both homozygosity and compounded heterozygosity with a lipodystrophic BSCL2 mutation, resulting in a progressive encephalopathy with fatal outcomes at ages 6-8. Strikingly, heterozygous carriers are asymptomatic, conflicting with the gain of toxic function attributed to this mutation. Here we report new key insights about the molecular pathogenic mechanism of this new syndrome. Intranuclear inclusions containing mutant seipin were found in brain tissue from a homozygous patient suggesting a pathogenic mechanism similar to other neurodegenerative diseases featuring brain accumulation of aggregated, misfolded proteins. Sucrose gradient distribution showed that mutant seipin forms much larger aggregates as compared with wild type (wt) seipin, indicating an impaired oligomerization. On the other hand, the interaction between wt and Celia seipin confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP) assays, together with the identification of mixed oligomers in sucrose gradient fractionation experiments can explain the lack of symptoms in heterozygous carriers. We propose that the increased aggregation and subsequent impaired oligomerization of Celia seipin leads to cell death. In heterozygous carriers, wt seipin might prevent the damage caused by mutant seipin through its sequestration into harmless mixed oligomers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Working with and promoting early career scientists within a larger community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, K.

    2017-12-01

    For many scientific communities, engaging early career researchers is critical for success. These young scientists (graduate students, postdocs, and newly appointed professors) are actively forming collaborations and instigating new research programs. They also stand to benefit hugely from being part of a scientific community, gaining access to career development activities, becoming part of strong collaborator networks, and achieving recognition in their field of study — all of which will help their professional development. There are many ways community leaders can work proactively to support and engage early career scientists, and it it is often a community manager's job to work with leadership to implement such activities. In this presentation, I will outline ways of engaging early career scientists at events and tailored workshops, of promoting development of their leadership skills, and of creating opportunities for recognizing early career scientists within larger scientific communities. In this talk, I will draw from my experience working with the Deep Carbon Observatory Early Career Scientist Network, supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

  14. Assignment methodology for larger RNA oligonucleotides: Application to an ATP-binding RNA aptamer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieckmann, Thorsten; Feigon, Juli

    1997-01-01

    The use of uniform 13C, 15N labeling in the NMR spectroscopic study of RNA structures has greatly facilitated the assignment process in small RNA oligonucleotides. For ribose spinsystem assignments, exploitation of these labels has followed previously developed methods for the study of proteins. However, for sequential assignment of the exchangeable and nonexchangeable protons of the nucleotides, it has been necessary to develop a variety of new NMR experiments. Even these are of limited utility in the unambiguous assignment of larger RNAs due to the short carbon relaxation times and extensive spectral overlap for all nuclei.These problems can largely be overcome by the additional use of base-type selectively 13C, 15N-labeled RNA in combination with a judicious use of related RNAs with base substitutions. We report the application of this approach to a 36-nucleotide ATP-binding RNA aptamer in complex with AMP. Complete sequential 1H assignments, as well as the majority of 13C and 15N assignments, were obtained

  15. Flower-Visiting Butterflies Avoid Predatory Stimuli and Larger Resident Butterflies: Testing in a Butterfly Pavilion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Fukano

    Full Text Available The flower-visiting behaviors of pollinator species are affected not only by flower traits but also by cues of predators and resident pollinators. There is extensive research into the effects of predator cues and resident pollinators on the flower-visiting behaviors of bee pollinators. However, there is relatively little research into their effects on butterfly pollinators probably because of the difficulty in observing a large number of butterfly pollination events. We conducted a dual choice experiment using artificial flowers under semi-natural conditions in the butterfly pavilion at Tama Zoological Park to examine the effects of the presence of a dead mantis and resident butterflies have on the flower-visiting behavior of several butterfly species. From 173 hours of recorded video, we observed 3235 visitations by 16 butterfly species. Statistical analysis showed that (1 butterflies avoided visiting flowers occupied by a dead mantis, (2 butterflies avoided resident butterflies that were larger than the visitor, and (3 butterflies showed greater avoidance of a predator when the predator was present together with the resident butterfly than when the predator was located on the opposite flower of the resident. Finally, we discuss the similarities and differences in behavioral responses of butterfly pollinators and bees.

  16. Developmental reversals in risky decision making: intelligence agents show larger decision biases than college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyna, Valerie F; Chick, Christina F; Corbin, Jonathan C; Hsia, Andrew N

    2014-01-01

    Intelligence agents make risky decisions routinely, with serious consequences for national security. Although common sense and most theories imply that experienced intelligence professionals should be less prone to irrational inconsistencies than college students, we show the opposite. Moreover, the growth of experience-based intuition predicts this developmental reversal. We presented intelligence agents, college students, and postcollege adults with 30 risky-choice problems in gain and loss frames and then compared the three groups' decisions. The agents not only exhibited larger framing biases than the students, but also were more confident in their decisions. The postcollege adults (who were selected to be similar to the students) occupied an interesting middle ground, being generally as biased as the students (sometimes more biased) but less biased than the agents. An experimental manipulation testing an explanation for these effects, derived from fuzzy-trace theory, made the students look as biased as the agents. These results show that, although framing biases are irrational (because equivalent outcomes are treated differently), they are the ironical output of cognitively advanced mechanisms of meaning making.

  17. Why droplet dimension can be larger than, equal to, or smaller than the nanowire dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, S. Noor

    2009-11-01

    Droplets play central roles in the nanowire (NW) growth by vapor phase mechanisms. These mechanisms include vapor-liquid-solid (VLS), vapor-solid-solid or vapor-solid (VSS), vapor-quasisolid-solid or vapor-quasiliquid-solid (VQS), oxide-assisted growth (OAG), and self-catalytic growth (SCG) mechanisms. Fundamentals of the shape, size, characteristics, and dynamics of droplets and the impacts of them on the NW growth, have been studied. The influence of growth techniques, growth parameters (e.g., growth temperature, partial pressure, gas flow rates, etc.), thermodynamic conditions, surface and interface energy, molar volume, chemical potentials, etc. have been considered on the shapes and sizes of droplets. A model has been presented to explain why droplets can be larger than, equal to, or smaller than the associated NWs. Various growth techniques have been analyzed to understand defects created in NWs. Photoluminescence characteristics have been presented to quantify the roles of droplets in the creation of NW defects. The study highlights the importance of the purity of the droplet material. It attests to the superiority of the SCG mechanism, and clarifies the differences between the VSS, VQS, VLS, and SCG mechanisms. It explains why droplets produced by some mechanisms are visible but droplets produced by some other mechanisms are not visible. It elucidates the formation mechanisms of very large and very small droplets, and discusses the ground rules for droplets creating necked NWs. It puts forth reasons to demonstrate that very large droplets may not behave as droplets.

  18. Dynamics of Transformation from Platinum Icosahedral Nanoparticles to Larger FCC Crystal at Millisecond Time Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Wenpei [Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering and Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Lab.; Wu, Jianbo [Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Lab. and Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China). School of Materials Science and Engineering; Yoon, Aram [Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering and Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Lab.; Lu, Ping [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Qi, Liang [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Wen, Jianguo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials and Electron Microscopy Center; Miller, Dean J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials and Electron Microscopy Center; Mabon, James C. [Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Lab.; Wilson, William L. [Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering and Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Lab.; Yang, Hong [Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Zuo, Jian-Min [Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering and Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Lab.

    2017-12-08

    Atomic motion at grain boundaries is essential to microstructure development, growth and stability of catalysts and other nanostructured materials. However, boundary atomic motion is often too fast to observe in a conventional transmission electron microscope (TEM) and too slow for ultrafast electron microscopy. We report on the entire transformation process of strained Pt icosahedral nanoparticles (ICNPs) into larger FCC crystals, captured at 2.5 ms time resolution using a fast electron camera. Results show slow diffusive dislocation motion at nm/s inside ICNPs and fast surface transformation at μm/s. By characterizing nanoparticle strain, we show that the fast transformation is driven by inhomogeneous surface stress. And interaction with pre-existing defects led to the slowdown of the transformation front inside the nanoparticles. Particle coalescence, assisted by oxygen-induced surface migration at T ≥ 300°C, also played a critical role. Thus by studying transformation in the Pt ICNPs at high time and spatial resolution, we obtain critical insights into the transformation mechanisms in strained Pt nanoparticles.

  19. Patterns of species richness and the center of diversity in modern Indo-Pacific larger foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förderer, Meena; Rödder, Dennis; Langer, Martin R

    2018-05-29

    Symbiont-bearing Larger Benthic Foraminifera (LBF) are ubiquitous components of shallow tropical and subtropical environments and contribute substantially to carbonaceous reef and shelf sediments. Climate change is dramatically affecting carbonate producing organisms and threatens the diversity and structural integrity of coral reef ecosystems. Recent invertebrate and vertebrate surveys have identified the Coral Triangle as the planet's richest center of marine life delineating the region as a top priority for conservation. We compiled and analyzed extensive occurrence records for 68 validly recognized species of LBF from the Indian and Pacific Ocean, established individual range maps and applied Minimum Convex Polygon (MCP) and Species Distribution Model (SDM) methodologies to create the first ocean-wide species richness maps. SDM output was further used for visualizing latitudinal and longitudinal diversity gradients. Our findings provide strong support for assigning the tropical Central Indo-Pacific as the world's species-richest marine region with the Central Philippines emerging as the bullseye of LBF diversity. Sea surface temperature and nutrient content were identified as the most influential environmental constraints exerting control over the distribution of LBF. Our findings contribute to the completion of worldwide research on tropical marine biodiversity patterns and the identification of targeting centers for conservation efforts.

  20. Transport properties of a Kondo dot with a larger side-coupled noninteracting quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y S; Fan, X H; Xia, Y J; Yang, X F

    2008-01-01

    We investigate theoretically linear and nonlinear quantum transport through a smaller quantum dot in a Kondo regime connected to two leads in the presence of a larger side-coupled noninteracting quantum dot, without tunneling coupling to the leads. To do this we employ the slave boson mean field theory with the help of the Keldysh Green's function at zero temperature. The numerical results show that the Kondo conductance peak may develop multiple resonance peaks and multiple zero points in the conductance spectrum owing to constructive and destructive quantum interference effects when the energy levels of the large side-coupled noninteracting dot are located in the vicinity of the Fermi level in the leads. As the coupling strength between two quantum dots increases, the tunneling current through the quantum device as a function of gate voltage applied across the two leads is suppressed. The spin-dependent transport properties of two parallel coupled quantum dots connected to two ferromagnetic leads are also investigated. The numerical results show that, for the parallel configuration, the spin current or linear spin differential conductance are enhanced when the polarization strength in the two leads is increased

  1. Flower-Visiting Butterflies Avoid Predatory Stimuli and Larger Resident Butterflies: Testing in a Butterfly Pavilion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukano, Yuya; Tanaka, Yosuke; Farkhary, Sayed Ibrahim; Kurachi, Takuma

    2016-01-01

    The flower-visiting behaviors of pollinator species are affected not only by flower traits but also by cues of predators and resident pollinators. There is extensive research into the effects of predator cues and resident pollinators on the flower-visiting behaviors of bee pollinators. However, there is relatively little research into their effects on butterfly pollinators probably because of the difficulty in observing a large number of butterfly pollination events. We conducted a dual choice experiment using artificial flowers under semi-natural conditions in the butterfly pavilion at Tama Zoological Park to examine the effects of the presence of a dead mantis and resident butterflies have on the flower-visiting behavior of several butterfly species. From 173 hours of recorded video, we observed 3235 visitations by 16 butterfly species. Statistical analysis showed that (1) butterflies avoided visiting flowers occupied by a dead mantis, (2) butterflies avoided resident butterflies that were larger than the visitor, and (3) butterflies showed greater avoidance of a predator when the predator was present together with the resident butterfly than when the predator was located on the opposite flower of the resident. Finally, we discuss the similarities and differences in behavioral responses of butterfly pollinators and bees.

  2. The application of slip length models to larger textures in turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairhall, Chris; Garcia-Mayoral, Ricardo

    2017-11-01

    We present results from direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces. We assess the validity of simulations where the surface is modelled as homogeneous slip lengths, comparing them to simulations where the surface texture is resolved. Our results show that once the coherent flow induced by the texture is removed from the velocity fields, the remaining flow sees the surface as homogeneous. We then investigate how the overlying turbulence is modified by the presence of surface texture. For small textures, we show that turbulence is shifted closer to the wall due to the presence of slip, but otherwise remains essentially unmodified. For larger textures, the texture interacts with the turbulent lengthscales, thereby modifying the overlying turbulence. We also show that the saturation of the effect of the spanwise slip length (Fukagata et al. 2006, Busse & Sandham 2012, Seo & Mani 2016), which is drag increasing, is caused by the impermeability imposed at the surface. This work was supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  3. Stable isotope stratigraphy and larger benthic foraminiferal extinctions in the Melinau Limestone, Sarawak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Laura J.; Pearson, Paul N.; Renema, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Important long-ranging groups of larger benthic foraminifera (LBF) are known to have become extinct during a period of global cooling and climate disruption at the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT) but the precise timing and mechanisms are uncertain. Recent study showed unexpectedly that the LBF extinction in Tanzania occurs very close to the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, as recognised by the extinction of the planktonic foraminiferal Family Hantkeninidae, rather than at the later period of maximum global ice growth and sea-level fall, as previously thought. Here we investigate the same phase of extinction in the Melinau Limestone of Sarawak, on the island of Borneo, Malaysia one of the most complete carbonate successions spanning the Eocene to Lower Miocene. Assemblages of LBF from the Melinau Limestone were studied extensively by Geoffrey Adams during the 1960s-80s, confirming a major extinction during the EOT, but the section lacked independent means of correlation. By analysing rock samples originally studied by Adams and now in the Natural History Museum, London, we provide new bulk stable isotope (δ13C and δ18O) records. This enables us to identify, albeit tentatively, the level of maximum stable isotope excursion and show that the LBF extinction event in the Melinau Limestone occurs below this isotope excursion, supporting the results from Tanzania and indicating that the extinction of LBF close to the Eocene/Oligocene boundary may be a global phenomenon.

  4. Volcanism in slab tear faults is larger than in island-arcs and back-arcs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchi, Luca; Passaro, Salvatore; Tontini, Fabio Caratori; Ventura, Guido

    2017-11-13

    Subduction-transform edge propagators are lithospheric tears bounding slabs and back-arc basins. The volcanism at these edges is enigmatic because it is lacking comprehensive geological and geophysical data. Here we present bathymetric, potential-field data, and direct observations of the seafloor on the 90 km long Palinuro volcanic chain overlapping the E-W striking tear of the roll-backing Ionian slab in Southern Tyrrhenian Sea. The volcanic chain includes arc-type central volcanoes and fissural, spreading-type centers emplaced along second-order shears. The volume of the volcanic chain is larger than that of the neighbor island-arc edifices and back-arc spreading center. Such large volume of magma is associated to an upwelling of the isotherms due to mantle melts upraising from the rear of the slab along the tear fault. The subduction-transform edge volcanism focuses localized spreading processes and its magnitude is underestimated. This volcanism characterizes the subduction settings associated to volcanic arcs and back-arc spreading centers.

  5. Origami-inspired metamaterial absorbers for improving the larger-incident angle absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Yang; Pang, Yongqiang; Wang, Jiafu; Ma, Hua; Pei, Zhibin; Qu, Shaobo

    2015-01-01

    When a folded resistive patch array stands up on a metallic plane, it can exhibit more outstanding absorption performance. Our theoretical investigations and simulations demonstrated that the folded resistive patch arrays can enhance the absorption bandwidth progressively with the increase of the incident angle for the oblique transverse magnetic incidence, which is contrary to the conventional resistive frequency selective surface absorber. On illumination, we achieved a 3D structure metamaterial absorber with the folded resistive patches. The proposed absorber is obtained from the inspiration of the origami, and it has broadband and lager-incident angle absorption. Both the simulations and the measurements indicate that the proposed absorber achieves the larger-incident angle absorption until 75° in the frequency band of 3.6–11.4 GHz. In addition, the absorber is extremely lightweight. The areal density of the fabricated sample is about 0.023 g cm −2 . Due to the broadband and lager-incident angle absorption, it is expected that the absorbers may find potential applications such as stealth technologies and electromagnetic interference. (paper)

  6. Is a larger refuge always better? Dispersal and dose in pesticide resistance evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Yamanaka, Takehiko; Sudo, Masaaki; Andow, David A

    2017-06-01

    The evolution of resistance against pesticides is an important problem of modern agriculture. The high-dose/refuge strategy, which divides the landscape into treated and nontreated (refuge) patches, has proven effective at delaying resistance evolution. However, theoretical understanding is still incomplete, especially for combinations of limited dispersal and partially recessive resistance. We reformulate a two-patch model based on the Comins model and derive a simple quadratic approximation to analyze the effects of limited dispersal, refuge size, and dominance for high efficacy treatments on the rate of evolution. When a small but substantial number of heterozygotes can survive in the treated patch, a larger refuge always reduces the rate of resistance evolution. However, when dominance is small enough, the evolutionary dynamics in the refuge population, which is indirectly driven by migrants from the treated patch, mainly describes the resistance evolution in the landscape. In this case, for small refuges, increasing the refuge size will increase the rate of resistance evolution. Our analysis distils major driving forces from the model, and can provide a framework for understanding directional selection in source-sink environments. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  7. How to manage MTTF larger than 30,000hr on rotary cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauquil, Jean-Marc; Seguineau, Cédric; Martin, Jean-Yves; Van-Acker, Sébastien; Benschop, Tonny

    2017-05-01

    The cooled IR detectors are used in a wide range of applications. Most of the time, the cryocoolers are one of the components dimensioning the lifetime of the system. Indeed, Stirling coolers are mechanical systems where wear occurs on millimetric mechanisms. The exponential law classically used in electronics for Mean Time to Failure (MTTF) calculation cannot be directly used for mechanical devices. With new applications for thermal sensor like border surveillance, an increasing reliability has become mandatory for rotary cooler. The current needs are above several tens of thousands of continuous hour of cooling. Thales Cryogenics made specific development on that topic, for both linear and rotary applications. The time needed for validating changes in processes through suited experimental design is hardly affordable by following a robust and rigorous standard scientific approach. The targeted Mean Time to Failure (MTTF) led us to adopt an innovative approach to keep development phases in line with expected time to market. This innovative approach is today widespread on all of Thales Cryogenics rotary products and results in a proven increase of MTTF for RM2, RM3 and recently RM1. This paper will then focused on the cu