WorldWideScience

Sample records for large water droplets

  1. Leidenfrost boiling of water droplet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orzechowski Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigations concerned a large water droplet at the heating surface temperature above the Leidenfrost point. The heating cylinder was the main component of experimental stand on which investigations were performed. The measurement system was placed on the high-sensitivity scales. Data transmission was performed through RS232 interface. The author-designed program, with extended functions to control the system, was applied. The present paper examines the behaviour of a large single drop levitating over a hot surface, unsteady mass of the drop, and heat transfer. In computations, the dependence, available in the literature, for the orthogonal droplet projection on the heating surface as a function of time was employed. It was confirmed that the local value of the heat transfer coefficient is a power function of the area of the droplet surface projection. Also, a linear relationship between the flux of mass evaporated from the droplet and the droplet orthogonal projection was observed.

  2. Leidenfrost boiling of water droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzechowski, Tadeusz

    The investigations concerned a large water droplet at the heating surface temperature above the Leidenfrost point. The heating cylinder was the main component of experimental stand on which investigations were performed. The measurement system was placed on the high-sensitivity scales. Data transmission was performed through RS232 interface. The author-designed program, with extended functions to control the system, was applied. The present paper examines the behaviour of a large single drop levitating over a hot surface, unsteady mass of the drop, and heat transfer. In computations, the dependence, available in the literature, for the orthogonal droplet projection on the heating surface as a function of time was employed. It was confirmed that the local value of the heat transfer coefficient is a power function of the area of the droplet surface projection. Also, a linear relationship between the flux of mass evaporated from the droplet and the droplet orthogonal projection was observed.

  3. Evaporation of inclined water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-01-01

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets. PMID:28205642

  4. Impinging Water Droplets on Inclined Glass Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lance, Blake [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ho, Clifford K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Multiphase computational models and tests of falling water droplets on inclined glass surfaces were developed to investigate the physics of impingement and potential of these droplets to self-clean glass surfaces for photovoltaic modules and heliostats. A multiphase volume-of-fluid model was developed in ANSYS Fluent to simulate the impinging droplets. The simulations considered different droplet sizes (1 mm and 3 mm), tilt angles (0°, 10°, and 45°), droplet velocities (1 m/s and 3 m/s), and wetting characteristics (wetting=47° contact angle and non-wetting = 93° contact angle). Results showed that the spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) decreased with increasing inclination angle due to the reduced normal force on the surface. The hydrophilic surface yielded greater spread factors than the hydrophobic surface in all cases. With regard to impact forces, the greater surface tilt angles yielded lower normal forces, but higher shear forces. Experiments showed that the experimentally observed spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) was significantly larger than the simulated spread factor. Observed spread factors were on the order of 5 - 6 for droplet velocities of ~3 m/s, whereas the simulated spread factors were on the order of 2. Droplets were observed to be mobile following impact only for the cases with 45° tilt angle, which matched the simulations. An interesting phenomenon that was observed was that shortly after being released from the nozzle, the water droplet oscillated (like a trampoline) due to the "snapback" caused by the surface tension of the water droplet being released from the nozzle. This oscillation impacted the velocity immediately after the release. Future work should evaluate the impact of parameters such as tilt angle and surface wettability on the impact of particle/soiling uptake and removal to investigate ways that

  5. Freezing of Water Droplet due to Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Isao; Fushinobu, Kazuyoshi; Hashimoto, Yu

    In this study, the feasibility of cooling/freezing of phase change.. materials(PCMs) due to evaporation for cold storage systems was experimentally examined. A pure water was used as the test PCM, since the latent heat due to evaporation of water is about 7 times larger than that due to freezing. A water droplet, the diameter of which was 1-4 mm, was suspended in a test cell by a fine metal wire (O. D.= 100μm),and the cell was suddenly evacuated up to the pressure lower than the triple-point pressure of water, so as to enhance the evaporation from the water surface. Temperature of the droplet was measured by a thermocouple, and the cooling/freezing behavior and the temperature profile of the droplet surface were captured by using a video camera and an IR thermo-camera, respectively. The obtained results showed that the water droplet in the evacuated cell is effectively cooled by the evaporation of water itself, and is frozen within a few seconds through remarkable supercooling state. When the initial temperature of the droplet is slightly higher than the room temperature, boiling phenomena occur in the droplet simultaneously with the freezing due to evaporation. Under such conditions, it was shown that the degree of supercooling of the droplet is reduced by the bubbles generated in the droplet.

  6. A Computational Study of Internal Flows in a Heated Water-Oil Emulsion Droplet

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2015-01-05

    The vaporization characteristics of water-oil emulsion droplets are investigated by high fidelity computational simulations. One of the key objectives is to identify the physical mechanism for the experimentally observed behavior that the component in the dispersed micro-droplets always vaporizes first, for both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsion droplets. The mechanism of this phenomenon has not been clearly understood. In this study, an Eulerian-Lagrangian method was implemented with a temperature-dependent surface tension model and a dynamic adaptive mesh refinement in order to effectively capture the thermo-capillary effect of a micro-droplet in an emulsion droplet efficiently. It is found that the temperature difference in an emulsion droplet creates a surface tension gradient along the micro-droplet surface, inducing surface movement. Subsequently, the outer shear flow and internal flow circulation inside the droplet, referred to as the Marangoni convection, are created. The present study confirms that the Marangoni effect can be sufficiently large to drive the micro-droplets to the emulsion droplet surface at higher temperature, for both water-in-oil and oil-and-water emulsion droplets. A further parametric study with different micro-droplet sizes and temperature gradients demonstrates that larger micro-droplets move faster with larger temperature gradient. The oil micro-droplet in oil-in-water emulsion droplets moves faster due to large temperature gradients by smaller thermal conductivity.

  7. Water Entry by a Train of Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Huang, Xin; Chan, Chon U.; Frommhold, Philipp Erhard; Lippert, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    The impact of single droplets on a deep pool is a well-studied phenomenon which reveals reach fluid mechanics. Lesser studied is the impact of a train of droplet and the accompanied formation of largely elongated cavities, in particular for well controlled droplets. The droplets with diameters of 20-40 μm and velocities of approx. 20 m/s are generated with a piezo-actuated nozzle at rates of 200-300 kHz. Individual droplets are selected by electric charging and deflection and the impact is visualized with stroboscopic photography and high-speed videos. We study in particular the formation and shape of the cavity as by varying the number of droplets from one to 64. The cavities reach centimetres in length with lateral diameters of the order of 100 of micrometres.

  8. CFD Model of Water Droplet Transport for ISS Hygiene Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Chang H.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the study is to assess the impacts of free water propagation in the Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC). Free water can be generated inside the WHC in small quantities due to crew hygiene activity. To mitigate potential impact of free water in Node 3 cabin the WHC doorway is enclosed by a waterproof bump-out, Kabin, with openings at the top and bottom. At the overhead side of the rack, there is a screen that prevents large drops of water from exiting. However, as the avionics fan in the WHC causes airflow toward the deck side of the rack, small quantities of free water may exit at the bottom of the Kabin. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of Node 3 cabin airflow made possible to identify the paths of water transport. The Node 3 airflow was computed for several ventilation scenarios. To simulate the droplet transport the Lagrangian discrete phase approach was used. Various initial droplet distributions were considered in the study. The droplet diameter was varied in the range of 2-20 mm. The results of the computations showed that most of the drops fall to the rack surface not far from the WHC curtain. The probability of the droplet transport to the adjacent rack surface with electronic equipment was predicted.

  9. Thermophoretically driven water droplets on graphene and boron nitride surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajegowda, Rakesh; Kannam, Sridhar Kumar; Hartkamp, Remco; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate thermally driven water droplet transport on graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) surfaces using molecular dynamics simulations. The two surfaces considered here have different wettabilities with a significant difference in the mode of droplet transport. The water droplet travels along a straighter path on the h-BN sheet than on graphene. The h-BN surface produced a higher driving force on the droplet than the graphene surface. The water droplet is found to move faster on h-BN surface compared to graphene surface. The instantaneous contact angle was monitored as a measure of droplet deformation during thermal transport. The characteristics of the droplet motion on both surfaces is determined through the moment scaling spectrum. The water droplet on h-BN surface showed the attributes of the super-diffusive process, whereas it was sub-diffusive on the graphene surface.

  10. Water droplet evaporation from sticky superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moonchan; Kim, Wuseok; Lee, Sanghee; Baek, Seunghyeon; Yong, Kijung; Jeon, Sangmin

    2017-07-01

    The evaporation dynamics of water from sticky superhydrophobic surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microresonator and an optical microscope. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) layers with different pore sizes were directly fabricated onto quartz crystal substrates and hydrophobized via chemical modification. The resulting AAO layers exhibited hydrophobic or superhydrophobic characteristics with strong adhesion to water due to the presence of sealed air pockets inside the nanopores. After placing a water droplet on the AAO membranes, variations in the resonance frequency and Q-factor were measured throughout the evaporation process, which were related to changes in mass and viscous damping, respectively. It was found that droplet evaporation from a sticky superhydrophobic surface followed a constant contact radius (CCR) mode in the early stage of evaporation and a combination of CCR and constant contact angle modes without a Cassie-Wenzel transition in the final stage. Furthermore, AAO membranes with larger pore sizes exhibited longer evaporation times, which were attributed to evaporative cooling at the droplet interface.

  11. Trace of a water droplet exerted by coulomb force. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, Hideaki; Murakami, Takuro; Nakazawa, Takeshi; Nakasako, Makoto; Yoshimura, Takuma; Osarakawa, Toshihiro

    2002-01-01

    The movement of water droplets in the air-water separator is based on the principle of the electrostatic precipitator with positive and negative poles. The mechanism of separation is that the water droplets charged negative ions or electrons by corona discharge are collected on the positive pole by Coulomb force operating between the both poles. This paper describes the theoretical analyses that how the movement of a water droplet is affected by Coulomb force in the air-water separator. (author)

  12. Evaporation kinetics of sessile water droplets on micropillared superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Leeladhar, Rajesh; Kang, Yong Tae; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2013-05-21

    Evaporation modes and kinetics of sessile droplets of water on micropillared superhydrophobic surfaces are experimentally investigated. The results show that a constant contact radius (CCR) mode and a constant contact angle (CCA) mode are two dominating evaporation modes during droplet evaporation on the superhydrophobic surfaces. With the decrease in the solid fraction of the superhydrophobic surfaces, the duration of a CCR mode is reduced and that of a CCA mode is increased. Compared to Rowan's kinetic model, which is based on the vapor diffusion across the droplet boundary, the change in a contact angle in a CCR (pinned) mode shows a remarkable deviation, decreasing at a slower rate on the superhydrophobic surfaces with less-solid fractions. In a CCA (receding) mode, the change in a contact radius agrees well with the theoretical expectation, and the receding speed is slower on the superhydrophobic surfaces with lower solid fractions. The discrepancy between experimental results and Rowan's model is attributed to the initial large contact angle of a droplet on superhydrophobic surfaces. The droplet geometry with a large contact angle results in a narrow wedge region of air along the contact boundary, where the liquid-vapor diffusion is significantly restricted. Such an effect becomes minor as the evaporation proceeds with the decrease in a contact angle. In both the CCR and CCA modes, the evaporative mass transfer shows the linear relationship between mass(2/3) and evaporation time. However, the evaporation rate is slower on the superhydrophobic surfaces, which is more significant on the surfaces with lower solid fractions. As a result, the superhydrophobic surfaces slow down the drying process of a sessile droplet on them.

  13. Direct numerical simulation of water droplet coalescence in the oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Mehdi; Shahhosseini, Shahrokh; Bayat, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► VOF computational technique has been used to simulate coalescence of two water droplets in oil. ► The model was validated with the experimental data for binary droplet coalescence. ► Based on the CFD simulation results a correlation has been proposed to predict the coalescence time. - Abstract: Coalescence of two water droplets in the oil was simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. The finite volume numerical method was applied to solve the Navier–Stokes equations in conjunction with the Volume of Fluid (VOF) approach for interface tracking. The effects of some parameters consisting of the collision velocity, off-center collision parameter, oil viscosity and water–oil interfacial tension on the coalescence time were investigated. The simulation results were validated against the experimental data available in the literature. The results revealed that quicker coalescence could be achieved if the head-on collisions occur or the droplets approach each other with a high velocity. In addition, low oil viscosities or large water–oil interfacial tensions cause less coalescence time. Moreover, a correlation was developed to predict coalescence efficiency as a function of the mentioned parameters.

  14. Variable focus microscopy using a suspended water droplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, F A; Chau, K J

    2012-01-01

    We explore a low-technology methodology to dispense and shape water droplets for application as the magnifying element in a microscope using either reflection-mode or transmission-mode illumination. A water droplet is created at the end of a syringe and then coated with a thin layer of silicone oil to mitigate evaporation. By applying mechanical pressure to the water droplet using a metal tip, the shape of the droplet is tuned to yield focusing properties amenable for microscopy. Images captured using the microscope demonstrate micron-scale resolution, variable magnification and imaging quality comparable to that obtained by a conventional, laboratory-grade microscope. (paper)

  15. Prediction of water droplet evaporation on zircaloy surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chi Young; In, Wang Kee

    2014-01-01

    In the present experimental study, the prediction of water droplet evaporation on a zircaloy surface was investigated using various initial droplet sizes. To the best of our knowledge, this may be the first valuable effort for understanding the details of water droplet evaporation on a zircaloy surface. The initial contact diameters of the water droplets tested ranged from 1.76 to 3.41 mm. The behavior (i.e., time-dependent droplet volume, contact angle, droplet height, and contact diameter) and mode-transition time of the water droplet evaporation were strongly influenced by the initial droplet size. Using the normalized contact angle (θ*) and contact diameter (d*), the transitions between evaporation modes were successfully expressed by a single curve, and their criteria were proposed. To predict the temporal droplet volume change and evaporation rate, the range of θ* > 0.25 and d* > 0.9, which mostly covered the whole evaporation period and the initial contact diameter remained almost constant during evaporation, was targeted. In this range, the previous contact angle functions for the evaporation model underpredicted the experimental data. A new contact angle function of a zircaloy surface was empirically proposed, which represented the present experimental data within a reasonable degree of accuracy. (author)

  16. Ice and water droplets on graphite: A comparison of quantum and classical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramírez, Rafael; Singh, Jayant K.; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Böhm, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Ice and water droplets on graphite have been studied by quantum path integral and classical molecular dynamics simulations. The point-charge q-TIP4P/F potential was used to model the interaction between flexible water molecules, while the water-graphite interaction was described by a Lennard-Jones potential previously used to reproduce the macroscopic contact angle of water droplets on graphite. Several energetic and structural properties of water droplets with sizes between 10 2 and 10 3 molecules were analyzed in a temperature interval of 50–350 K. The vibrational density of states of crystalline and amorphous ice drops was correlated to the one of ice Ih to assess the influence of the droplet interface and molecular disorder on the vibrational properties. The average distance of covalent OH bonds is found 0.01 Å larger in the quantum limit than in the classical one. The OO distances are elongated by 0.03 Å in the quantum simulations at 50 K. Bond distance fluctuations are large as a consequence of the zero-point vibrations. The analysis of the H-bond network shows that the liquid droplet is more structured in the classical limit than in the quantum case. The average kinetic and potential energy of the ice and water droplets on graphite has been compared with the values of ice Ih and liquid water as a function of temperature. The droplet kinetic energy shows a temperature dependence similar to the one of liquid water, without apparent discontinuity at temperatures where the droplet is solid. However, the droplet potential energy becomes significantly larger than the one of ice or water at the same temperature. In the quantum limit, the ice droplet is more expanded than in a classical description. Liquid droplets display identical density profiles and liquid-vapor interfaces in the quantum and classical limits. The value of the contact angle is not influenced by quantum effects. Contact angles of droplets decrease as the size of the water droplet increases

  17. Evaluation method for radiative heat transfer in polydisperse water droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Shigenao; Nakai, Hirotaka; Sakurai, Atsushi; Komiya, Atsuki

    2008-01-01

    Simplifications of the model for nongray radiative heat transfer analysis in participating media comprised of polydisperse water droplets are presented. Databases of the radiative properties for a water droplet over a wide range of wavelengths and diameters are constructed using rigorous Mie theory. The accuracy of the radiative properties obtained from the database interpolation is validated by comparing them with those obtained from the Mie calculations. The radiative properties of polydisperse water droplets are compared with those of monodisperse water droplets with equivalent mean diameters. Nongray radiative heat transfer in the anisotropic scattering fog layer, including direct and diffuse solar irradiations and infrared sky flux, is analyzed using REM 2 . The radiative heat fluxes within the fog layer containing polydisperse water droplets are compared with those in the layer containing monodisperse water droplets. Through numerical simulation of the radiative heat transfer, polydisperse water droplets can be approximated by using the Sauter diameter, a technique that can be useful in several research fields, such as engineering and atmospheric science. Although this approximation is valid in the case of pure radiative transfer problems, the Sauter diameter is reconfirmed to be the appropriate diameter for approximating problems in radiative heat transfer, although volume-length mean diameter shows better accordance in some cases. The CPU time for nongray radiative heat transfer analysis with a fog model is evaluated. It is proved that the CPU time is decreased by using the databases and the approximation method for polydisperse particulate media

  18. Growth Kinetics of the Homogeneously Nucleated Water Droplets: Simulation Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokshin, Anatolii V; Galimzyanov, Bulat N

    2012-01-01

    The growth of homogeneously nucleated droplets in water vapor at the fixed temperatures T = 273, 283, 293, 303, 313, 323, 333, 343, 353, 363 and 373 K (the pressure p = 1 atm.) is investigated on the basis of the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation data with the mW-model. The treatment of simulation results is performed by means of the statistical method within the mean-first-passage-time approach, where the reaction coordinate is associated with the largest droplet size. It is found that the water droplet growth is characterized by the next features: (i) the rescaled growth law is unified at all the considered temperatures and (ii) the droplet growth evolves with acceleration and follows the power law.

  19. Surface characterization of polymethylmetacrylate bombarded by charged water droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Kenzo; Takaishi, Riou; Asakawa, Daiki; Sakai, Yuji; Iijima, Yoshitoki

    2009-01-01

    The electrospray droplet impact (EDI), in which the charged electrospray water droplets are introduced in vacuum, accelerated, and allowed to impact the sample, is applied to polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA). The secondary ions generated were measured by an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. In EDI mass spectra for PMMA, fragment ions originating from PMMA could not be detected. This is due to the fact that the proton affinities of fragments formed from PMMA are smaller than those from acetic acid contained in the charged droplet. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra of PMMA irradiated by water droplets did not change with prolonged cluster irradiation, i.e., EDI is capable of shallow surface etching for PMMA with a little damage of the sample underneath the surface.

  20. Patterned gradient surface for spontaneous droplet transportation and water collection: simulation and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Xianhua; Zhu, Yiying; Shi, Tielin; Tang, Zirong; Liao, Guanglan

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate spontaneous droplet transportation and water collection on wedge-shaped gradient surfaces consisting of alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. Droplets on the surfaces are modeled and simulated to analyze the Gibbs free energy and free energy gradient distributions. Big half-apex angle and great wettability difference result in considerable free energy gradient, corresponding to large driving force for spontaneous droplet transportation, thus causing the droplets to move towards the open end of the wedge-shaped hydrophilic regions, where the Gibbs free energy is low. Gradient surfaces are then fabricated and tested. Filmwise condensation begins on the hydrophilic regions, forming wedge-shaped tracks for water collection. Dropwise condensation occurs on the hydrophobic regions, where the droplet size distribution and departure diameters are controlled by the width of the regions. Condensate water from both the hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are collected directionally to the open end of the wedge-shaped hydrophilic regions, agreeing with the simulations. Directional droplet transport and controllable departure diameters make the branched gradient surfaces more efficient than smooth surfaces for water collection, which proves that gradient surfaces are potential in water collection, microfluidic devices, anti-fogging and self-cleaning. (paper)

  1. Internal flow and evaporation characteristic inside a water droplet on a vertical vibrating hydrophobic surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Hun; Lim, Hee Chang

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to understand the internal flow and the evaporation characteristics of a deionized water droplet subjected to vertical forced vibrations. To predict and evaluate its resonance frequency, the theories of Lamb, Strani, and Sabetta have been applied. To visualize the precise mode, shape, and internal flow inside a droplet, the experiment utilizes a combination of a high-speed camera, macro lens, and continuous laser. As a result, a water droplet on a hydrophobic surface has its typical shape at each mode, and complicated vortices are observed inside the droplet. In particular, large symmetrical flow streams are generated along the vertical axis at each mode, with a large circulating movement from the bottom to the top and then to the triple contact line along the droplet surface. In addition, a bifurcation-shaped flow pattern is formed at modes 2 and 4, whereas a large ellipsoid-shape flow pattern forms at modes 6 and 8. Mode 4 has the fastest internal flow speed and evaporation rate, followed by modes 8 then 6, with 2 having the slowest of these properties. Each mode has the fastest evaporation rate amongst its neighboring frequencies. Finally, the droplet evaporation under vertical vibration would lead to more rapid evaporation, particularly for mode 4

  2. Internal flow and evaporation characteristic inside a water droplet on a vertical vibrating hydrophobic surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim Hun; Lim, Hee Chang [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    This study aims to understand the internal flow and the evaporation characteristics of a deionized water droplet subjected to vertical forced vibrations. To predict and evaluate its resonance frequency, the theories of Lamb, Strani, and Sabetta have been applied. To visualize the precise mode, shape, and internal flow inside a droplet, the experiment utilizes a combination of a high-speed camera, macro lens, and continuous laser. As a result, a water droplet on a hydrophobic surface has its typical shape at each mode, and complicated vortices are observed inside the droplet. In particular, large symmetrical flow streams are generated along the vertical axis at each mode, with a large circulating movement from the bottom to the top and then to the triple contact line along the droplet surface. In addition, a bifurcation-shaped flow pattern is formed at modes 2 and 4, whereas a large ellipsoid-shape flow pattern forms at modes 6 and 8. Mode 4 has the fastest internal flow speed and evaporation rate, followed by modes 8 then 6, with 2 having the slowest of these properties. Each mode has the fastest evaporation rate amongst its neighboring frequencies. Finally, the droplet evaporation under vertical vibration would lead to more rapid evaporation, particularly for mode 4.

  3. Experiments on melt droplets falling into a water pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okkonen, T.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data and analysis related to melt droplets falling into a water pool. A binary CaO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} melt mixture is used to study the influence of melt superheat and water subcooling on droplet deformation and fragmentation. For the conditions studied (We {<=} 1000), the surface tension of the melt droplet and the film boiling stability greatly affect the fragmentation behaviour. If the melt temperature is between the liquidus and solidus point (mushy zone) or if the film boiling is stable due to a relatively low subcooling, the droplet deformation and fragmentation are mitigated. This behaviour can be related to the effective Weber number (We) of the melt droplet upon entry into the water pool. Similar phenomena can be expected also for interactions of corium (UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}) and water, which are characterized by a potentially fast transformation of melt into the mushy zone and by particularly stable film boiling. (author)

  4. Maximum Evaporation Rates of Water Droplets Approaching Obstacles in the Atmosphere Under Icing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, H. H.

    1953-01-01

    When a closed body or a duct envelope moves through the atmosphere, air pressure and temperature rises occur ahead of the body or, under ram conditions, within the duct. If cloud water droplets are encountered, droplet evaporation will result because of the air-temperature rise and the relative velocity between the droplet and stagnating air. It is shown that the solution of the steady-state psychrometric equation provides evaporation rates which are the maximum possible when droplets are entrained in air moving along stagnation lines under such conditions. Calculations are made for a wide variety of water droplet diameters, ambient conditions, and flight Mach numbers. Droplet diameter, body size, and Mach number effects are found to predominate, whereas wide variation in ambient conditions are of relatively small significance in the determination of evaporation rates. The results are essentially exact for the case of movement of droplets having diameters smaller than about 30 microns along relatively long ducts (length at least several feet) or toward large obstacles (wings), since disequilibrium effects are then of little significance. Mass losses in the case of movement within ducts will often be significant fractions (one-fifth to one-half) of original droplet masses, while very small droplets within ducts will often disappear even though the entraining air is not fully stagnated. Wing-approach evaporation losses will usually be of the order of several percent of original droplet masses. Two numerical examples are given of the determination of local evaporation rates and total mass losses in cases involving cloud droplets approaching circular cylinders along stagnation lines. The cylinders chosen were of 3.95-inch (10.0+ cm) diameter and 39.5-inch 100+ cm) diameter. The smaller is representative of icing-rate measurement cylinders, while with the larger will be associated an air-flow field similar to that ahead of an airfoil having a leading-edge radius

  5. Water droplet condensation and evaporation in turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; van der Geld, C.W.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    We propose a point-particle model for two-way coupling of water droplets dispersed in the turbulent flow of a carrier gas consisting of air and water vapour. We adopt an Euler–Lagrangian formulation based on conservation laws for the mass, momentum and energy of the continuous phase and on empirical

  6. Motion behavior of water droplets driven by triboelectric nanogenerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jinhui; Jiang, Tao; Shao, Jiajia; Ren, Zewei; Bai, Yu; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa; Chen, Xiangyu; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2018-04-01

    By integrating a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) and a simple circuit board, the motion of water droplets can be controlled by the output of the TENG, which demonstrates a self-powered microfluidic system toward various practical applications in the fields of microfluidic system and soft robotics. This paper describes a method to construct a physical model for this self-powered system on the basis of electrostatic induction theory. The model can precisely simulate the detailed motion behavior of the droplet under driving of TENG, and it can also reveal the influences of surface hydrophobicity on the motion of the droplet, which can help us to better understand the key parameters that decide the performance of the system. The experimental observation of the dynamic performance of the droplet has also been done with a high speed camera system. A comparison between simulation results and real measurements confirms that the proposed model can predict the velocity and position of the water droplet driven by high voltage source as well as TENG. Hence, the proposed model in this work could serve as a guidance for optimizing the self-powered systems in future studies.

  7. Metamaterial Absorber for Electromagnetic Waves in Periodic Water Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Young Joon; Ju, Sanghyun; Park, Sang Yoon; Ju Kim, Young; Bong, Jihye; Lim, Taekyung; Kim, Ki Won; Rhee, Joo Yull; Lee, YoungPak

    2015-09-10

    Perfect metamaterial absorber (PMA) can intercept electromagnetic wave harmful for body in Wi-Fi, cell phones and home appliances that we are daily using and provide stealth function that military fighter, tank and warship can avoid radar detection. We reported new concept of water droplet-based PMA absorbing perfectly electromagnetic wave with water, an eco-friendly material which is very plentiful on the earth. If arranging water droplets with particular height and diameter on material surface through the wettability of material surface, meta-properties absorbing electromagnetic wave perfectly in GHz wide-band were shown. It was possible to control absorption ratio and absorption wavelength band of electromagnetic wave according to the shape of water droplet-height and diameter- and apply to various flexible and/or transparent substrates such as plastic, glass and paper. In addition, this research examined how electromagnetic wave can be well absorbed in water droplets with low electrical conductivity unlike metal-based metamaterials inquiring highly electrical conductivity. Those results are judged to lead broad applications to variously civilian and military products in the future by providing perfect absorber of broadband in all products including transparent and bendable materials.

  8. Mode pattern of internal flow in a water droplet on a vibrating hydrophobic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hun; Lim, Hee-Chang

    2015-06-04

    The objective of this study is to understand the mode pattern of the internal flow in a water droplet placed on a hydrophobic surface that periodically and vertically vibrates. As a result, a water droplet on a vibrating hydrophobic surface has a typical shape that depends on each resonance mode, and, additionally, we observed a diversified lobe size and internal flows in the water droplet. The size of each lobe at the resonance frequency was relatively greater than that at the neighboring frequencies, and the internal flow of the nth order mode was also observed in the flow visualization. In general, large symmetrical flow streams were generated along the vertical axis in each mode, with a large circulating movement from the bottom to the top, and then to the triple contact line along the droplet surface. In contrast, modes 2 and 4 generated a Y-shaped flow pattern, in which the flow moved to the node point in the lower part of the droplet, but modes 6 and 8 had similar patterns, with only a little difference. In addition, as a result of the PIV measurement, while the flow velocity of mode 4 was faster than that of model 2, those of modes 6 and 8 were almost similar.

  9. Influence of fine water droplets to temperature and humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafidzal, M. H. M.; Hamzah, A.; Manaf, M. Z. A.; Saadun, M. N. A.; Zakaria, M. S.; Roslizar, A.; Jumaidin, R.

    2015-05-01

    Excessively dry air can cause dry skin, dry eyes and exacerbation of medical conditions. Therefore, many researches have been done in order to increase humidity in our environment. One of the ways is by using water droplets. Nowadays, it is well known in market stand fan equipped with water mister in order to increase the humidity of certain area. In this study, the same concept is applied to the ceiling fan. This study uses a model that combines a humidifier which functions as cooler, ceiling fan and scaled down model of house. The objective of this study is to analyze the influence of ceiling fan humidifier to the temperature and humidity in a house. The mechanism of this small model uses batteries as the power source, connected to the fan and the humidifier. The small water tank's function is to store and supply water to the humidifier. The humidifier is used to cool the room by changing water phase to fine water droplets. Fine water droplets are created from mechanism of the humidifier, which is by increasing the kinetic energy of water molecule using high frequency vibration that overcome the holding force between water molecules. Thus, the molecule of water will change to state of gas or mist. The fan is used to spread out the mist of water to surrounding of the room in order to enhance the humidity. Thermocouple and humidity meter are used to measure temperature and humidity in some period of times. The result shows that humidity increases and temperature decreases with time. This application of water droplet can be applied in the vehicles and engine in order to decrease the temperature.

  10. Water Evaporation from Acoustically Levitated Aqueous Solution Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Nicole A; Donaldson, D James

    2017-09-28

    We present a systematic study of the effect of solutes on the evaporation rate of acoustically levitated aqueous solution droplets by suspending individual droplets in a zero-relative humidity environment and measuring their size as a function of time. The ratios of the early time evaporation rates of six simple salts (NaCl, NaBr, NaNO 3 , KCl, MgCl 2 , CaCl 2 ) and malonic acid to that of water are in excellent agreement with predictions made by modifying the Maxwell equation to include the time-dependent water activity of the evaporating aqueous salt solution droplets. However, the early time evaporation rates of three ammonium salt solutions (NH 4 Cl, NH 4 NO 3 , (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 ) are not significantly different from the evaporation rate of pure water. This finding is in accord with a previous report that ammonium sulfate does not depress the evaporation rate of its solutions, despite reducing its water vapor pressure, perhaps due to specific surface effects. At longer evaporation times, as the droplets approach crystallization, all but one (MgCl 2 ) of the solution evaporation rates are well described by the modified Maxwell equation.

  11. The interaction of radio frequency electromagnetic fields with atmospheric water droplets and applications to aircraft ice prevention. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of computerized simulation of the physics of advanced microwave anti-icing systems, which preheat impinging supercooled water droplets prior to impact, was investigated. Theoretical and experimental work performed to create a physically realistic simulation is described. The behavior of the absorption cross section for melting ice particles was measured by a resonant cavity technique and found to agree with theoretical predictions. Values of the dielectric parameters of supercooled water were measured by a similar technique at lambda = 2.82 cm down to -17 C. The hydrodynamic behavior of accelerated water droplets was studied photograhically in a wind tunnel. Droplets were found to initially deform as oblate spheroids and to eventually become unstable and break up in Bessel function modes for large values of acceleration or droplet size. This confirms the theory as to the maximum stable droplet size in the atmosphere. A computer code which predicts droplet trajectories in an arbitrary flow field was written and confirmed experimentally. The results were consolidated into a simulation to study the heating by electromagnetic fields of droplets impinging onto an object such as an airfoil. It was determined that there is sufficient time to heat droplets prior to impact for typical parameter values. Design curves for such a system are presented.

  12. Droplet phase characteristics in liquid-dominated steam--water nozzle flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alger, T.W.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to determine the droplet size distribution, the droplet spatial distribution and the mean droplet velocity in low-quality, steam-water flow from a rectangular cross-section, converging-diverging nozzle. A unique forward light scattering technique was developed for droplet size distribution measurements. Droplet spatial variations were investigated using light transmission measurements, and droplet velocities were measured with a laser-Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system incorporating a confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer. Nozzle throat radius of curvature and height were varied to investigte their effects on droplet size. Droplet size distribution measurements yielded a nominal Sauter mean droplet diameter of 1.7 μm and a nominal mass-mean droplet diameter of 2.4 μm. Neither the throat radius of curvature nor the throat height were found to have a significant effect upon the nozzle exit droplet size. The light transmission and LDV measurement results confirmed both the droplet size measurements and demonstrated high spatial uniformity of the droplet phase within the nozzle jet flow. One-dimensional numerical calculations indicated that both the dynamic breakup (thermal equilibrium based on a critical Weber number of 6.0) and the boiling breakup (thermal nonequilibrium based on average droplet temperature) models predicted droplet diameters on the order of 7.5 μm, which are approximately equal to the maximum stable droplet diameters within the nozzle jet flow

  13. Water droplets' internal fluidity during horizontal motion on a superhydrophobic surface with an external electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Munetoshi; Kono, Hiroki; Nakajima, Akira; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Fujishima, Akira

    2010-02-02

    On a superhydrophobic surface, the internal fluidity of water droplets with different volumes (15, 30 microL) and their horizontal motion in an external electric field were evaluated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). For driving of water droplets on a superhydrophobic coating between parallel electrodes, it was important to place them at appropriate positions. Droplets moved with slipping. Small droplets showed deformation that is more remarkable. Results show that the dielectrophoretic force induced the initial droplet motion and that the surface potential gradient drove the droplets after reaching the middle point between electrodes.

  14. Suspension of Water Droplets on Individual Pillars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tóth, T.; Ferraro, D.; Chiarello, E.

    2011-01-01

    We report results of extensive experimental and numerical studies on the suspension of water drops deposited on cylindrical pillars having circular and square cross sections and different wettabilities. In the case of circular pillars, the drop contact line is pinned to the whole edge contour unt...

  15. Wetting of doped carbon nanotubes by water droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsalis, E. M.; Demosthenous, E.; Walther, Jens Honore

    2005-01-01

    We study the wetting of doped single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes by water droplets using molecular dynamics simulations. Chemisorbed hydrogen is considered as a model of surface impurities. We study systems with varying densities of surface impurities and we observe increased wetting......, as compared to the pristine nanotube case, attributed to the surface dipole moment that changes the orientation of the interfacial water. We demonstrate that the nature of the impurity is important as here hydrogen induces the formation of an extended hydrogen bond network between the water molecules...

  16. Modeling study of droplet behavior during blowdown period of large break LOCA based on experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaba, Hiroshi; Umezawa, Shigemitsu; Teramae, Tetsuya; Furukawa, Yuji

    2004-01-01

    During LOCA (Loss Of Coolant Accident) in PWR, droplets behavior during blowdown period is one of the important phenomena. For example, the spattering from falling liquid film that flows from upper plenum generates those droplets in core region. The behavior of droplets in such flow has strong effect for cladding temperature behavior because these droplets are able to remove heat from a reactor core by its direct contact on fuel rods and its evaporation at the surface. For safety analysis of LOCA in PWR, it is necessary to evaluate droplet diameter precisely in order to predict fuel cladding temperature changing by the calculation code. Based on the test results, a new droplet behavior model was developed for the MCOBRA/TRC code that predicts the droplet behavior during such LOCA events. Furthermore, the verification calculations that simulated some blowdown tests were performed using by the MCOBRA/TRAC code. These results indicated the validity of this droplet model during blow down cooling period. The experiment was focused on investigating the Weber number of steady droplet in the blow down phenomenon of large break LOCA. (author)

  17. Shock wave-induced evaporation of water droplets in a gas-droplet mixture 646

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, H.W.J.; Cleijne, J.W.; Smolders, H.J.; Dongen, van M.E.H.

    1988-01-01

    A model is presented for the droplet evaporation process induced by a shock wave propagating in a fog. The model is based on the existence of a quasi-steady wet bulb state of the droplets during evaporation. It is shown that for moderate shock strength, Ma = <2,=" and=" droplet=" radii=" in=" the="

  18. Electrostatic Model Applied to ISS Charged Water Droplet Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Daan; Schaub, Hanspeter; Pettit, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    The electrostatic force can be used to create novel relative motion between charged bodies if it can be isolated from the stronger gravitational and dissipative forces. Recently, Coulomb orbital motion was demonstrated on the International Space Station by releasing charged water droplets in the vicinity of a charged knitting needle. In this investigation, the Multi-Sphere Method, an electrostatic model developed to study active spacecraft position control by Coulomb charging, is used to simulate the complex orbital motion of the droplets. When atmospheric drag is introduced, the simulated motion closely mimics that seen in the video footage of the experiment. The electrostatic force's inverse dependency on separation distance near the center of the needle lends itself to analytic predictions of the radial motion.

  19. A detection of the coarse water droplets in steam turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartoš Ondřej

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce a novel method for the detection of coarse water droplets in a low pressure part of steam turbines. The photogrammetry method has been applied for the measurement of coarse droplets in the low-pressure part of a steam turbine. A new probe based on this measurement technique was developed and tested in the laboratory and in a steam turbine in the Počerady power-plant. The probe was equipped with state-of-the-art instrumentation. The paper contains results from laboratory tests and the first preliminary measurements in a steam turbine. Possible applications of this method have been examined.

  20. Absorption of gaseous iodine by water droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, M.F.

    1985-07-01

    A new model has been developed for predicting the rate at which gaseous molecular iodine is absorbed by water sprays. The model is a quasi-steady state mass transfer model that includes the iodine hydrolysis reactions. The parameters of the model are spray drop size, initial concentration of the gas and liquid phases, temperature, pressure, buffered or unbuffered spray solution, spray flow rate, containment diameter and drop fall height. The results of the model were studied under many values of these parameters. Plots of concentration of iodine species in the drop versus time have been produced by varying the initial gas phase concentration of molecular iodine over the range of 1 x 10 -5 moles/liter to 1 x 10 -10 moles/liter and a drop size of 1000 microns. Results from the model are compared to results available from Containment Systems Experiments at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The difference between the model predictions and the experimental data ranges from -120.5% to 68.0% with the closest agreement 7.7%. The new spray model is also compared to previously existing spray models. At high concentrations of gaseous molecular iodine, the new spray model is considered to be less accurate but at low concentrations, the new model predicts results that are closer to the experimental data than the model called the realistic model from WASH-1329. Inclusion of the iodine hydrolysis reaction is shown to be a feature important to a model intended for determining the removal of molecular iodine over a wide range of conditions

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water Droplets On Hydrophilic Silica Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    and DNA microarrays technologies.Although extensive experimental, theoretical and computational work has been devoted to study the nature of the interaction between silica and water, at the molecular level a complete understanding of silica-water systems has not been reached. Contact angle computations...... dynamics (MD) simulations of a hydrophilic air-water-silica system using the MD package FASTTUBE. We employ quantum chemistry calculation to obtain air-silica interaction parameters for the simulations. Our simulations are based in the following force fields: i) The silica-silica interaction is based...... of water droplets on silica surfaces offers a useful fundamental and quantitative measurement in order to study chemical and physical properties of water-silica systems. For hydrophobic systems the static and dynamic properties of the fluid-solid interface are influenced by the presence of air. Hence...

  2. CFD Lagrangian Modeling of Water Droplet Transport for ISS Hygiene Activity Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Chang H.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the impacts of free water propagation in the Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) installed in Node 3. Free water can be generated inside the WHC in small quantities due to crew hygiene activity. To mitigate potential impact of free water in Node 3 cabin the WHC doorway is enclosed by a waterproof bump-out, Kabin, with openings at the top and bottom. At the overhead side of the rack, there is a screen that prevents large drops of water from exiting. However, as the avionics fan in the WHC causes airflow toward the deck side of the rack, small quantities of free water may exit at the bottom of the Kabin. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of Node 3 cabin airflow enable identifying the paths of water transport. To simulate the droplet transport the Lagrangian discrete phase approach was used. Various initial droplet distributions were considered in the study. The droplet diameter was varied in the range of 5-20 mm. The results of the computations showed that most of the drops fall to the rack surface not far from the WHC curtain.

  3. Wetting kinetics of water nano-droplet containing non-surfactant nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Gui; Hu, Han; Sun, Ying; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    In this Letter, dynamic wetting of water nano-droplets containing non-surfactant gold nanoparticles on a gold substrate is examined via molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the addition of non-surfactant nanoparticles hinders the nano-second droplet wetting process, attributed to the increases in both surface tension of the nanofluid and friction between nanofluid and substrate. The droplet wetting kinetics decreases with increasing nanoparticle loading and water-particle interaction energy. The observed wetting suppression and the absence of nanoparticle ordering near the contact line of nano-sized droplets differ from the wetting behaviors reported from nanofluid droplets of micron size or larger

  4. Investigation on the liquid water droplet instability in a simulated flow channel of PEM fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Tae Hun; Kim, Bok Yung; Kim, Han Sang; Min, Kyoung Doug

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of water droplets on the gas diffusion layer from both top-view and side-view of the flow channel, a rig test apparatus was designed and fabricated with prism attached plate. This experimental device was used to simulate the growth of a single liquid water droplet and its transport process with various air flow velocity and channel height. Not only dry condition but also fully humidified condition was also simulated by using a water absorbing sponge. The detachment height of the water droplet with dry and wet conditions was measured and analyzed. It was found that the droplet tends towards becoming unstable by decreased channel height, increased flow velocity or making a gas diffusion layer (GDL) dryer. Also, peculiar behavior of the water droplet in the channel was presented like attachment to hydrophilic wall or sudden breaking of droplet in case of fully hydrated condition. The simplified force balance model matches with experimental data as well

  5. Raman Thermometry Measurements of Free Evaporation from Liquid Water Droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Jared D.; Cappa, Christopher D.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies of evaporation have suggested that on average, molecules in the higher-energy tail of the Boltzmann distribution are more readily transferred into the vapor during evaporation. To test these conclusions, the evaporative cooling rates of a droplet train of liquid water injected into vacuum have been studied via Raman thermometry. The resulting cooling rates are fit to an evaporative cooling model based on Knudsen's maximum rate of evaporation, in which we explicitly account for surface cooling. We have determined that the value of the evaporation coefficient (γ e ) of liquid water is 0.62 ± 0.09, confirming that a rate-limiting barrier impedes the evaporation rate. Such insight will facilitate the formulation of a microscopic mechanism for the evaporation of liquid water

  6. Droplet Breakup in Asymmetric T-Junctions at Intermediate to Large Capillary Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Reza; Cheng, Way Lee

    2017-11-01

    Splitting of a parent droplet into multiple daughter droplets of desired sizes is usually desired to enhance production and investigational efficiency in microfluidic devices. This can be done in an active or passive mode depending on whether an external power sources is used or not. In this study, three-dimensional simulations were done using the Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) method to analyze droplet splitting in asymmetric T-junctions with different outlet lengths. The parent droplet is divided into two uneven portions the volumetric ratio of the daughter droplets, in theory, depends on the length ratios of the outlet branches. The study identified various breakup modes such as primary, transition, bubble and non-breakup under various flow conditions and the configuration of the T-junctions. In addition, an analysis with the primary breakup regimes were conducted to study the breakup mechanisms. The results show that the way the droplet splits in an asymmetric T-junction is different than the process in a symmetric T-junction. A model for the asymmetric breakup criteria at intermediate or large Capillary number is presented. The proposed model is an expanded version to a theoretically derived model for the symmetric droplet breakup under similar flow conditions.

  7. Stick-Jump (SJ) Evaporation of Strongly Pinned Nanoliter Volume Sessile Water Droplets on Quick Drying, Micropatterned Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debuisson, Damien; Merlen, Alain; Senez, Vincent; Arscott, Steve

    2016-03-22

    We present an experimental study of stick-jump (SJ) evaporation of strongly pinned nanoliter volume sessile water droplets drying on micropatterned surfaces. The evaporation is studied on surfaces composed of photolithographically micropatterned negative photoresist (SU-8). The micropatterning of the SU-8 enables circular, smooth, trough-like features to be formed which causes a very strong pinning of the three phase (liquid-vapor-solid) contact line of an evaporating droplet. This is ideal for studying SJ evaporation as it contains sequential constant contact radius (CCR) evaporation phases during droplet evaporation. The evaporation was studied in nonconfined conditions, and forced convection was not used. Micropatterned concentric circles were defined having an initial radius of 1000 μm decreasing by a spacing ranging from 500 to 50 μm. The droplet evaporates, successively pinning and depinning from circle to circle. For each pinning radius, the droplet contact angle and volume are observed to decrease quasi-linearly with time. The experimental average evaporation rates were found to decrease with decreasing pining radii. In contrast, the experimental average evaporation flux is found to increase with decreasing droplet radii. The data also demonstrate the influence of the initial contact angle on evaporation rate and flux. The data indicate that the total evaporation time of a droplet depends on the specific micropattern spacing and that the total evaporation time on micropatterned surfaces is always less than on flat, homogeneous surfaces. Although the surface patterning is observed to have little effect on the average droplet flux-indicating that the underlying evaporation physics is not significantly changed by the patterning-the total evaporation time is considerably modified by patterning, up to a factor or almost 2 compared to evaporation on a flat, homogeneous surface. The closely spaced concentric circle pinning maintains a large droplet radius and

  8. Contact angle of water droplet on apatite single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takaomi; Hirose, Go; Oishi, Shuji

    2004-01-01

    Contact angles of water droplets on well-formed crystals of strontium and barium chlorapatites, Sr 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 and Ba 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 , were observed. The contact angles of water on (1 0 1-bar 0) and (1 0 1-bar 1) faces of Sr 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 were 74±8 deg. and 53±5 deg. and those on (1 0 1-bar 0) and (1 0 1-bar 1) faces of Ba 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 were 52±5 deg. and 33±1 deg., respectively. The surface tensions of the crystals were calculated using Neumann's equation. They were 39.2±50 and 52.0±3.0 mJ m -2 for (1 0 1-bar 0) and (1 0 1-bar 1) faces of Sr 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 , 52.5±2.9 and 63.0±0.5 mJ m -2 for (1 0 1-bar 0) and (1 0 1-bar 1) faces of Ba 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 , respectively. The (1 0 1-bar 1) face has larger surface tension than (1 0 1-bar 0) face for both crystals. The chlorapatite crystals have tendency to elongate in directions during the crystal growth process, indicating that (1 0 1-bar 0) face is more stable than (1 0 1-bar 1) face. This nature of crystal morphology is consistent with the surface tensions estimated from the water contact angles. The higher density of Ba 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 than Sr 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 is considered to cause the smaller contact angles of water droplet on Ba 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 crystal than that on Sr 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 crystal because the attractive force between the heavier atoms brings the larger surface tension of solid

  9. Mechanism of Supercooled Water Droplet Breakup near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veras-Alba, Belen; Palacios, Jose; Vargas, Mario; Ruggeri, Charles; Bartkus, Tadas P.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study on supercooled droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The results are compared to prior room temperature droplet deformation results to explore the effects of droplet supercooling. The experiments were conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) at The Pennsylvania State University. An airfoil model placed at the end of the rotor blades mounted onto the hub in the AERTS chamber was moved at speeds ranging between 50 and 80 m/sec. The temperature of the chamber was set at -20°C. A monotonic droplet generator was used to produce droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The supercooled state of the droplets was determined by measurement of the temperature of the drops at various locations below the droplet generator exit. A temperature prediction code was also used to estimate the temperature of the droplets based on vertical velocity and the distance traveled by droplets from the droplet generator to the airfoil stagnation line. High speed imaging was employed to observe the interaction between the droplets and the airfoil. The high speed imaging provided droplet deformation information as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. A tracking software program was used to measure the horizontal and vertical displacement of the droplet against time. It was demonstrated that to compare the effects of water supercooling on droplet deformation, the ratio of the slip velocity and the initial droplet velocity must be equal. A case with equal slip velocity to initial velocity ratios was selected for room temperature and supercooled droplet conditions. The airfoil velocity was 60 m/s and the slip velocity for both sets of data was 40 m/s. In these cases, the deformation of the weakly supercooled and warm droplets did not present different trends. The similar behavior for both environmental conditions indicates that water

  10. Simulation of water vapor condensation on LOX droplet surface using liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Eugene A.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of ice or water layers on liquid oxygen (LOX) droplets in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) environment was investigated. Formulation of such ice/water layers is indicated by phase-equilibrium considerations under conditions of high partial pressure of water vapor (steam) and low LOX droplet temperature prevailing in the SSME preburner or main chamber. An experimental investigation was begun using liquid nitrogen as a LOX simulant. A monodisperse liquid nitrogen droplet generator was developed which uses an acoustic driver to force the stream of liquid emerging from a capillary tube to break up into a stream of regularly space uniformly sized spherical droplets. The atmospheric pressure liquid nitrogen in the droplet generator reservoir was cooled below its boiling point to prevent two phase flow from occurring in the capillary tube. An existing steam chamber was modified for injection of liquid nitrogen droplets into atmospheric pressure superheated steam. The droplets were imaged using a stroboscopic video system and a laser shadowgraphy system. Several tests were conducted in which liquid nitrogen droplets were injected into the steam chamber. Under conditions of periodic droplet formation, images of 600 micron diameter liquid nitrogen droplets were obtained with the stroboscopic video systems.

  11. Assessment of water droplet evaporation mechanisms on hydrophobic and superhydrophobic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhenhai; Dash, Susmita; Weibel, Justin A; Garimella, Suresh V

    2013-12-23

    Evaporation rates are predicted and important transport mechanisms identified for evaporation of water droplets on hydrophobic (contact angle ~110°) and superhydrophobic (contact angle ~160°) substrates. Analytical models for droplet evaporation in the literature are usually simplified to include only vapor diffusion in the gas domain, and the system is assumed to be isothermal. In the comprehensive model developed in this study, evaporative cooling of the interface is accounted for, and vapor concentration is coupled to local temperature at the interface. Conjugate heat and mass transfer are solved in the solid substrate, liquid droplet, and surrounding gas. Buoyancy-driven convective flows in the droplet and vapor domains are also simulated. The influences of evaporative cooling and convection on the evaporation characteristics are determined quantitatively. The liquid-vapor interface temperature drop induced by evaporative cooling suppresses evaporation, while gas-phase natural convection acts to enhance evaporation. While the effects of these competing transport mechanisms are observed to counterbalance for evaporation on a hydrophobic surface, the stronger influence of evaporative cooling on a superhydrophobic surface accounts for an overprediction of experimental evaporation rates by ~20% with vapor diffusion-based models. The local evaporation fluxes along the liquid-vapor interface for both hydrophobic and superhydrophobic substrates are investigated. The highest local evaporation flux occurs at the three-phase contact line region due to proximity to the higher temperature substrate, rather than at the relatively colder droplet top; vapor diffusion-based models predict the opposite. The numerically calculated evaporation rates agree with experimental results to within 2% for superhydrophobic substrates and 3% for hydrophobic substrates. The large deviations between past analytical models and the experimental data are therefore reconciled with the

  12. Supercooling release of micro-size water droplets on microporous surfaces with cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chun Wan; Kang, Chae Dong [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    The gas diffusion layer (GDL) of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells plays a key role in controlling moisture in these cells. When the GDL is exposed to a cold environment, the water droplets or water nets in the GDL freeze. This work observed the supercooling and freezing behaviors of water droplets under low temperature. A GDL made of carbon fiber was coated with a waterproof material with 0%, 40%, and 60% PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) contents. The cooling process was investigated according to temperature, and the water droplets on the GDL were supercooled and frozen. Delay in the supercooling release was correlated with the size of water droplets on the GDL and the coating rate of the layer. Moreover, the supercooling degree of the droplets decreased as the number of freeze thaw cycles in the GDL increased.

  13. Wetting and motion behaviors of water droplet on graphene under thermal-electric coupling field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong-Qiang; Dong, Xin; Ye, Hong-Fei; Cheng, Guang-Gui; Ding, Jian-Ning; Ling, Zhi-Yong

    2015-02-01

    Wetting dynamics and motion behaviors of a water droplet on graphene are characterized under the electric-thermal coupling field using classical molecular dynamics simulation method. The water droplet on graphene can be driven by the temperature gradient, while the moving direction is dependent on the electric field intensity. Concretely, the water droplet on graphene moves from the low temperature region to the high temperature region for the relatively weak electric field intensity. The motion acceleration increases with the electric field intensity on graphene, whereas the moving direction switches when the electric field intensity increases up to a threshold. The essence is the change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic for the water droplet on graphene at a threshold of the electric field intensity. Moreover, the driven force of the water droplet caused by the overall oscillation of graphene has important influence on the motion behaviors. The results are helpful to control the wettability of graphene and further develop the graphene-based fluidic nanodevices.

  14. Quantitative Raman microspectroscopy for water permeability parameters at a droplet interface bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braziel, S; Sullivan, K; Lee, S

    2018-01-29

    Using confocal Raman microspectroscopy, we derive parameters for bilayer water transport across an isolated nanoliter aqueous droplet pair. For a bilayer formed with two osmotically imbalanced and adherent nanoliter aqueous droplets in a surrounding oil solvent, a droplet interface bilayer (DIB), the water permeability coefficient across the lipid bilayer was determined from monitoring the Raman scattering from the C[triple bond, length as m-dash]N stretching mode of K 3 Fe(CN) 6 as a measure of water uptake into the swelling droplet of a DIB pair. We also derive passive diffusional permeability coefficient for D 2 O transport across a droplet bilayer using O-D Raman signal. This method provides a significant methodological advance in determining water permeability coefficients in a convenient and reliable way.

  15. Droplet Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Michael Paolo

    When a mixture of two materials, such as aluminum and tin, or alcohol and water, is cooled below a certain temperature, the two components begin to separate. If one component is dilute in the other, it may separate out in the form of small spheres, and these will begin to enlarge, depleting the supersaturated material around them. If the dynamics is sufficiently slow, thermodynamics gives one considerable information about how the droplets grow. Two types of experiment have explored this behavior and given puzzling results. Nucleation experiments measure the rate at which droplets initially appear from a seemingly homogeneous mixture. Near the critical point in binary liquids, experiments conducted in the 1960's and early 1970's showed that nucleation was vastly slower than theory seemed to predict. The resolution of this problem arises by considering in detail the dynamics of growing droplets and comparing it with what experiments actually measure. Here will be presented a more detailed comparison of theory and experiment than has before been completed, obtaining satisfactory agreement with no free parameters needed. A second type of experiment measures droplet size distributions after long times. In the late stage, droplets compete with each other for material, a few growing at the expense of others. A theory first proposed by Lifshitz and Slyozov claims that this distribution, properly scaled, should be universal, and independent of properties of materials. Yet experimental measurements consistently find distributions that are more broad and squat than the theory would predict. Satisfactory agreement with experiment can be achieved by considering two points. First, one must study the complete time development of droplet size distributions, to understand when the asymptotic regime obtains. Second, droplet size distributions are spread by correlations between droplets. If one finds a small droplet, it is small because large droplets nearby are competing with it

  16. Discussion on numerical simulation techniques for patterns of water vapor rise and droplet deposition at NPP cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Dongpeng; Yao Rentai

    2010-01-01

    Based on the working principle of cooling tower, analysis and comparison are made of both advantages and disadvantages of the numerical simulation models, such as ORFAD, KUMULUS, ISCST:A, ANL/UI, CFD etc., which predict the rise and droplet deposition pattern of cooling tower water vapor. The results showed that, CFD model is currently a better model that is used of three-dimensional Renault fluid flow equations predicting the rise and droplet deposition pattern of cooling tower water vapor. The impact of the line trajectory deviation and the speed change inn plume rising is not considered in any other models, and they can not be used for prediction of particle rise and droplet deposition when a larger particle or large buildings in the direction of cooling tower. (authors)

  17. Hydrophobic polymer covered by a grating electrode for converting the mechanical energy of water droplets into electrical energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helseth, L. E.; Guo, X. D.

    2016-04-01

    Water contact electric harvesting has a great potential as a new energy technology for powering small-scale electronics, but a better understanding of the dynamics governing the conversion from mechanical to electrical energy on the polymer surfaces is needed. Important questions are how current correlates with droplet kinetic energy and what happens to the charge dynamics when a large number of droplets are incident on the polymer simultaneously. Here we address these questions by studying the current that is generated in an external electrical circuit when water droplets impinge on hydrophobic fluorinated ethylene propylene film containing a grating electrode on the back side. Droplets moving down an inclined polymer plane exhibit a characteristic periodic current time trace, and it is found that the peak current scales with sine of the inclination angle. For single droplets in free fall impinging onto the polymer, it is found that the initial peak current scales with the height of the free fall. The transition from individual droplets to a nearly continuous stream was investigated using the spectral density of the current signal. In both regimes, the high frequency content of the spectral density scales as f -2. For low frequencies, the low frequency content at low volume rates was noisy but nearly constant, whereas for high volume rates an increase with frequency is observed. It is demonstrated that the output signal from the system exposed to water droplets from a garden hose can be rectified and harvested by a 33 μF capacitor, where the stored energy increases at a rate of about 20 μJ in 100 s.

  18. Water droplet deformation under the motion in gas area with subsonic velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuibin Pavel A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental investigation of water droplet deformation (characteristic dimensions 3 ÷ 6 mm when moving through the gas area (air with 1÷ 5 m/s velocities was carried out. The high-speed (delay time between the frames is less than 100 ns tools of cross-correlation videorecording were used. A cyclic change nature of the droplet shapes (from close to spherical to conditionally ellipsoidal was found. The characteristic times of “deformation cycles” and the maximal deviations of droplet dimensions relative to initial dimensions were determined. The influence of droplet velocities and its dimensions on the deformation characteristics was determined.

  19. Flow within an evaporating glycerol-water binary droplet: Segregation by gravitational effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaxing; Lv, Pengyu; Diddens, Christian; Wijshoff, Herman; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2017-11-01

    The flow within an evaporating glycerol-water binary droplet with Bond number Bo PIV for both sessile and pendant droplets during evaporation process, which surprisingly show opposite radial flow directions - inward and outward, respectively. This observation clearly reveals that gravitational effects play a crucial role in controlling flow fields within the evaporating droplets. We theoretically analyse that this gravity-driven effect is caused by density gradients due to the local concentration difference of glycerol within the droplet triggered by different volatilities of the two components during evaporation. Finally, for confirmation, we numerically simulate the process, revealing a good agreement with experimental results.

  20. Precious Droplets: The Value of Water. Water in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Kristi Rennebohm

    The Water in Africa Project was realized over a 2-year period by a team of Peace Corps volunteers, World Wise Schools (WWS) classroom teachers, and WWS staff members. As part of an expanded, detailed design, resources were collected from over 90 volunteers serving in African countries, photos and stories were prepared, and standards-based learning…

  1. Direct current dielectrophoretic manipulation of the ionic liquid droplets in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Li, Dongqing

    2018-07-13

    The ionic liquids (ILs) as the environmentally benign solvents show great potentials in microemulsion carrier systems and have been widely used in the biochemical and pharmaceutical fields. In the work, the ionic liquid-in-water microemulsions were fabricated by using two kinds of hydrophobic ionic liquid, 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [Bmim][PF 6 ] and 1-Hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [Hmim][PF 6 ] with Tween 20. The ionic liquid droplets in water experience the dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces induced by applying electrical field via a nano-orifice and a micron orifice on the opposite channel walls of a microchannel. The dielectrophoretic behaviors of the ionic liquid-in-water emulsion droplets were investigated under direct current (DC) electric field. The positive and negative DEP behaviors of the ionic liquid-in-water droplets varying with the electrical conductivity of the suspending medium were investigated and two kinds of the ionic liquid droplets of similar sizes were separated by their different DEP behaviors. In addition, the separation of the ionic liquid-in-water droplets by size was conducted. This paper, for the first time to our knowledge, presents the DC-DEP manipulation of the ionic liquid-in-water emulsion droplets by size and by type. This method provides a platform to manipulate the ionic liquid droplets individually. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ignition of an organic water-coal fuel droplet floating in a heated-air flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiullin, T. R.; Strizhak, P. A.; Shevyrev, S. A.; Bogomolov, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    Ignition of an organic water-coal fuel (CWSP) droplet floating in a heated-air flow has been studied experimentally. Rank B2 brown-coal particles with a size of 100 μm, used crankcase Total oil, water, and a plasticizer were used as the main CWSP components. A dedicated quartz-glass chamber has been designed with inlet and outlet elements made as truncated cones connected via a cylindrical ring. The cones were used to shape an oxidizer flow with a temperature of 500-830 K and a flow velocity of 0.5-5.0 m/s. A technique that uses a coordinate-positioning gear, a nichrome thread, and a cutter element has been developed for discharging CWSP droplets into the working zone of the chamber. Droplets with an initial size of 0.4 to 2.0 mm were used. Conditions have been determined for a droplet to float in the oxidizer flow long enough for the sustainable droplet burning to be initiated. Typical stages and integral ignition characteristics have been established. The integral parameters (ignition-delay times) of the examined processes have been compared to the results of experiments with CWSP droplets suspended on the junction of a quick-response thermocouple. It has been shown that floating fuel droplets ignite much quicker than the ones that sit still on the thermocouple due to rotation of an CWSP droplet in the oxidizer flow, more uniform heating of the droplet, and lack of heat drainage towards the droplet center. High-speed video recording of the peculiarities of floatation of a burning fuel droplet makes it possible to complement the existing models of water-coal fuel burning. The results can be used for a more substantiated modeling of furnace CWSP burning with the ANSYS, Fluent, and Sigma-Flow software packages.

  3. Water and Ethanol Droplet Wetting Transition during Evaporation on Omniphobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuemei; Weibel, Justin A.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2015-01-01

    Omniphobic surfaces with reentrant microstructures have been investigated for a range of applications, but the evaporation of high- and low-surface-tension liquid droplets placed on such surfaces has not been rigorously studied. In this work, we develop a technique to fabricate omniphobic surfaces on copper substrates to allow for a systematic examination of the effects of surface topography on the evaporation dynamics of water and ethanol droplets. Compared to a water droplet, the ethanol droplet not only evaporates faster, but also inhibits Cassie-to-Wenzel wetting transitions on surfaces with certain geometries. We use an interfacial energy-based description of the system, including the transition energy barrier and triple line energy, to explain the underlying transition mechanism and behaviour observed. Suppression of the wetting transition during evaporation of droplets provides an important metric for evaluating the robustness of omniphobic surfaces requiring such functionality. PMID:26603940

  4. Large Scale Behavior and Droplet Size Distributions in Crude Oil Jets and Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Joseph; Murphy, David; Morra, David

    2013-11-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout introduced several million barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Injected initially as a turbulent jet containing crude oil and gas, the spill caused formation of a subsurface plume stretching for tens of miles. The behavior of such buoyant multiphase plumes depends on several factors, such as the oil droplet and bubble size distributions, current speed, and ambient stratification. While large droplets quickly rise to the surface, fine ones together with entrained seawater form intrusion layers. Many elements of the physics of droplet formation by an immiscible turbulent jet and their resulting size distribution have not been elucidated, but are known to be significantly influenced by the addition of dispersants, which vary the Weber Number by orders of magnitude. We present experimental high speed visualizations of turbulent jets of sweet petroleum crude oil (MC 252) premixed with Corexit 9500A dispersant at various dispersant to oil ratios. Observations were conducted in a 0.9 m × 0.9 m × 2.5 m towing tank, where large-scale behavior of the jet, both stationary and towed at various speeds to simulate cross-flow, have been recorded at high speed. Preliminary data on oil droplet size and spatial distributions were also measured using a videoscope and pulsed light sheet. Sponsored by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  5. Experimental study of water droplets on over-heated nano/microstructured zirconium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seol Ha [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Ho Seon [Division of Mechanical System Engineering, Incheon National University, 406-772 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joonwon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hwan [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Sun, E-mail: hejsunny@postech.ac.kr [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Heat transfer performance of a droplet on a modified zirconium surface is evaluated. • Modified (nano/micro-) surfaces enhanced heat transfer rate and Leidenfrost point. • A highly wettable condition of the modified surface contributes the enhancement. • Nano-scaled modification indicates the higher performance of droplet cooling. • Investigation via visualization of the droplet support the heat transfer experimental data. - Abstract: In this study, we observed the behavior of water droplets near the Leidenfrost point (LFP) on zirconium alloy surfaces with anodizing treatment and investigated the droplet cooling performance. The anodized zirconium surface, which consists of bundles of nanotubes (∼10–100 nm) or micro-mountain-like structures, improved the wetting characteristics of the surface. A deionized water droplet (6 μL) was dropped onto test surfaces heated to temperatures ranging from 250 °C to the LFP. The droplet dynamics were investigated through high-speed visualization, and the cooling performance was discussed in terms of the droplet evaporation time. The modified surface provided vigorous, intensive nucleate boiling in comparison with a clean, bare surface. Additionally, we observed that the structured surface had a delayed LFP due to the high wetting condition induced by strong capillary wicking forces on the structured surface.

  6. Motion of water droplets in the counter flow of high-temperature combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, R. S.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental studies of the deceleration, reversal, and entrainment of water droplets sprayed in counter current flow to a rising stream of high-temperature (1100 K) combustion gases. The initial droplets velocities 0.5-2.5 m/s, radii 10-230 μm, relative volume concentrations 0.2·10-4-1.8·10-4 (m3 of water)/(m3 of gas) vary in the ranges corresponding to promising high-temperature (over 1000 K) gas-vapor-droplet applications (for example, polydisperse fire extinguishing using water mist, fog, or appropriate water vapor-droplet veils, thermal or flame treatment of liquids in the flow of combustion products or high-temperature air; creating coolants based on flue gas, vapor and water droplets; unfreezing of granular media and processing of the drossed surfaces of thermal-power equipment; ignition of liquid and slurry fuel droplets). A hardware-software cross-correlation complex, high-speed (up to 105 fps) video recording tools, panoramic optical techniques (Particle Image Velocimetry, Particle Tracking Velocimetry, Interferometric Particle Imagine, Shadow Photography), and the Tema Automotive software with the function of continuous monitoring have been applied to examine the characteristics of the processes under study. The scale of the influence of initial droplets concentration in the gas flow on the conditions and features of their entrainment by high-temperature gases has been specified. The dependencies Red = f(Reg) and Red' = f(Reg) have been obtained to predict the characteristics of the deceleration of droplets by gases at different droplets concentrations.

  7. Design of negative refractive index metamaterial with water droplets using 3D-printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhaoyang; Yang, Helin; Huang, Xiaojun; Yu, Zetai

    2017-11-01

    We numerically and experimentally demonstrate a negative refractive index (NRI) behavior in combined water droplets and photosensitive resin materials operating in the microwave regime. The NRI is achieved over a very wide frequency range in 10.27-15 GHz with bandwidth of 4.63 GHz. The simulated results approximately agree with the experimental results. The negative index band can be controlled by water droplet radius. The proposed metamaterial production process is simple and may have potential applications in broadband tunable devices.

  8. Charging and coagulation of water aerosols with negligible addition of high-radioactive droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, N.L.; Sedova, G.L.; Chernyj, L.T.

    1994-01-01

    The mechanics of electrocoagulation of water aerosols with negligible admixture of high-radioactive droplets is considered. A corresponding mathematical model has been worked out which describes the processes of ionization, electrification and coagulation of radioactive aerosols. Numerical studies are carried out for a series of typical aerosols on the time dependence of ion concentrations, charge and pure droplet concentrations, as well as the charge and radius of radioactive droplets. It is shown that coagulation can give rise to the growth of droplet radius from 5-10 μm up to 30-40 μm for a 10 4 s period f time, and therefore it can play a considerable role in the development of aerosols with droplet radius up to 20 μm when gravitational coagulation is insignificant

  9. 3-Dimensional Microorifice Fabricated Utilizing Single Undercut Etching Process for Producing Ultrasmall Water and Chitosan Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Hsin Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research reports a microfluidic device for producing small droplets via a microorifice and a T-junction structure. The orifice is fabricated using an isotropic undercut etching process of amorphous glass materials. Since the equivalent hydraulic diameter of the produced microorifice can be as small as 1.1 μm, the microdevice can easily produce droplets of the size smaller than 10 μm in diameter. In addition, a permanent hydrophobic coating technique is also applied to modify the main channel to be hydrophobic to enhance the formation of water-based droplets. Experimental results show that the developed microfluidic chip with the ultrasmall orifice can steadily produce water-in-oil droplets with different sizes. Uniform water-in-oil droplets with the size from 60 μm to 6.5 μm in diameter can be formed by adjusting the flow rate ratio of the continuous phase and the disperse phases from 1 to 7. Moreover, curable linear polymer of chitosan droplets with the size smaller than 100 μm can also be successfully produced using the developed microchip device. The microfluidic T-junction with a micro-orifice developed in the present study provides a simple yet efficient way to produce various droplets of different sizes.

  10. A thermomechanical model for the fragmentation of a liquid metal droplet cooled by water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivochkin, Yu P.; Monastyrskiy, V. P.

    2017-11-01

    A thermo mechanical aspect of the fragmentation of a liquid metal droplet, solidified as it falls into cold water, is considered in the presented model. The formation of a solid phase in the form of continuous, fluid-tight and relatively rigid casting skin results in a pressure decrease inside the droplet due to the difference between liquid and solid metal density. Because of the high compression modulus of the melt, the pressure in the droplet becomes negative when the thickness of the solid skin achieves several microns. The tensile stress in the melt results in the deformation of the casting skin or the melt’s continuity violation in the form of a shrinkage pore. The rupture of the deformed solid crust results in the penetration of steam jets into the liquid part of the drop. Due to the difference in pressure in the surrounding steam and in the droplet, the casting skin is crushed and the melt is blown out. Both scenarios contribute to the hydrodynamic destruction of the droplet. The suggested thermo mechanical model gives a qualitative explanation for experimental data. In the experimental part of the work, droplets of molten Sn were solidified in water. The solidified pieces of the droplets usually include deformed, thin-walled shells and dispersed particles. On a qualitative level the composition and shape of the solid fragments can be explained within the bounds of the suggested thermo mechanical model.

  11. Evaporation of Water Droplets on “Lock-and-Key” Structures with Nanoscale Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Xiaohan

    2012-01-01

    Highly ordered poly(dimethylsiloxane) microbowl arrays (MBAs) and microcap arrays (MCAs) with “lock-and-key” properties are successfully fabricated by self-assembly and electrochemical deposition. The wetting properties and evaporation dynamics of water droplets for both cases have been...... investigated. For the MBAs case, the wetting radius of the droplets remains unchanged until the portion of the droplet completely dries out at the end of the evaporation process. The pinning state extends for more than 99.5% of the total evaporation time, and the pinning–shrinking transition is essentially...

  12. Numerical fluid dynamics calculations of nonequilibrium steam-water flows with entrained droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    The present work has developed a computational fluid dynamics formulation that efficiently solves the conservation laws for a vapor field, a continuous liquid field, and two dispersed droplet fields. The thermal-hydraulic effects resulting from the exchange of mass, momentum and energy between the vapor and the dispersed droplet phases has been accurately modeled. This work is an advancement of the state-of-the-art for engineering analyses of nonequilibrium steam-water-droplet flows in heated channels. It is particularly applicable for boiling steam-water flows in which it is important to represent the effects of significant thermal nonequilibrium between the vapor and the liquid phases. This work was shown to be in good agreement with unique experimental measurements of significant thermal nonequilibrium between the vapor and dispersed droplets. The tests analyzed covered a range of mass fluxes and wall heating rates, and were all at low pressures where nonequilibrium effects are most pronounced

  13. Experimental and Computational Analysis of Water-Droplet Formation and Ejection Process Using Hollow Microneedle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Norihisa; Oka, Ryotaro; Sakai, Takahiro; Shibata, Takayuki; Kawashima, Takahiro; Nagai, Moeto; Mineta, Takashi; Makino, Eiji

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we present the possibility of liquid delivery using fabricated hollow silicon dioxide microneedles of approximately 2 µm in diameter. As a fundamental study, the water-droplet formation and ejection process was examined via dynamic observations during water ejection tests and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. The experimental results indicated that fluid flow in a microneedle follows the Hagen-Poiseuille law, i.e., the flow rate is approximately directly proportional to the fourth power of the inner diameter. Moreover, the ejection pressure and maximum droplet curvature obtained using the proposed microfluid ejection model were in good agreement with the experimental results. The resulting ejection pressure is equal to the theoretical pressure difference of a spherical droplet, which is determined using the Young-Laplace equation. The maximum curvature of a droplet formed at the tip of a microneedle can be estimated on the basis of the contact angle theory expressed by the Young equation.

  14. On the growth of homogeneously nucleated water droplets in nitrogen: an experimental study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fransen, M. A. L. J.; Sachteleben, E.; Hrubý, Jan; Smeulders, D. M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 7 (2014), s. 1780-1780 ISSN 0723-4864 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/1593 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : droplet nucleation * droplet growth * water Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.670, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00348-014-1780-y

  15. Cloud Liquid Water, Mean Droplet Radius and Number Density Measurements Using a Raman Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for measuring cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius and droplet number density is outlined. The technique is based on simultaneously measuring Raman and Mie scattering from cloud liquid droplets using a Raman lidar. Laboratory experiments on liquid micro-spheres have shown that the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the amount of liquid present in the spheres. This fact is used as a constraint on calculated Mie intensity assuming a gamma function particle size distribution. The resulting retrieval technique is shown to give stable solutions with no false minima. It is tested using Raman lidar data where the liquid water signal was seen as an enhancement to the water vapor signal. The general relationship of retrieved average radius and number density is consistent with traditional cloud physics models. Sensitivity to the assumed maximum cloud liquid water amount and the water vapor mixing ratio calibration are tested. Improvements to the technique are suggested.

  16. Droplet deposition above a quench front during reflood after a large break LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.

    1982-01-01

    Droplet deposition or migration towards the wall in a dispersed flow has been the subject of many investigations due to its industrial applications such as combustion of sprays of liquid fuel, evaporators, spray cooling, nuclear reactors, etc. Dispersed flow is characterized by high void and hence low droplet concentration and the theoretical study of droplet deposition is the treatment of a single droplet trajectory in the dispersed. As the droplet is travelling towards the wall, whether it will eventually be deposited on the wall or not, will be determined by the competing forces acting on it and by the boundary layer it is traversing through towards the wall. The mechanism of droplet deposition will be examined. The prediction of the boundary layer thickness will take into account the droplet size and density difference between the fluid and the droplet. Given the condition above the quench front, the minimum lateral velocity required for droplet deposition could be determined as a function of droplet diameter

  17. Soft colloidal probes for AFM force measurements between water droplets in oil

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev; Li, Erqiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2014-01-01

    Here we introduce an extension of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe technique, as a simple and reliable experimental approach to measure the interaction forces between small water droplets (~80-160. μm) dispersed in oil. Small water droplets are formed by capillary breakup of a microscale water jet in air, which is forced out of a fine capillary nozzle, and deposited on a superhydrophobic substrate immersed in tetradecane oil medium. In these conditions the water droplets are very loosely attached to the superhydrophobic substrate and are easily picked up with a hydrophobic AFM cantilever to form a soft colloidal probe. Sample force measurements are conducted to demonstrate the capability of the technique.

  18. Soft colloidal probes for AFM force measurements between water droplets in oil

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2014-11-01

    Here we introduce an extension of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe technique, as a simple and reliable experimental approach to measure the interaction forces between small water droplets (~80-160. μm) dispersed in oil. Small water droplets are formed by capillary breakup of a microscale water jet in air, which is forced out of a fine capillary nozzle, and deposited on a superhydrophobic substrate immersed in tetradecane oil medium. In these conditions the water droplets are very loosely attached to the superhydrophobic substrate and are easily picked up with a hydrophobic AFM cantilever to form a soft colloidal probe. Sample force measurements are conducted to demonstrate the capability of the technique.

  19. Modeling water droplet condensation and evaporation in DNS of turbulent channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, E; Kuerten, J G M; Geld, C W M van der [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Geurts, B J, E-mail: e.russo@tue.nl [Faculty EEMCS, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2011-12-22

    In this paper a point particle model for two-way coupling in water droplet-laden incompressible turbulent flow of air is proposed. The model is based on conservation laws and semi-empirical correlations. It has been implemented and tested in a DNS code based for turbulent channel flow with an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. The two-way coupling is investigated in terms of the effects of mass and heat transfer on the droplets distributions along the channel wall-normal direction and by comparison of the droplet temperature statistics with respect to the case without evaporation and condensation. A remarkable conclusion is that the presence of evaporating and condensing droplets results in an increase in the non-dimensional heat transfer coefficient of the channel flow represented by the Nusselt number.

  20. Relative spectral absorption of solar radiation by water vapor and cloud droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, R.; Ridgway, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    A moderate (20/cm) spectral resolution model which accounts for both the highly variable spectral transmission of solar radiation through water vapor within and above cloud, as well as the more slowly varying features of absorption and anisotropic multiple scattering by the cloud droplets, is presented. Results from this model as applied to the case of a typical 1 km thick stratus cloud in a standard atmosphere, with cloud top altitude of 2 km and overhead sun, are discussed, showing the relative importance of water vapor above the cloud, water vapor within the cloud, and cloud droplets on the spectral absorption of solar radiation.

  1. Water circulation in non-isothermal droplet-laden turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; van der Geld, C.W.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.; Simos, T.; Psihoyios, G.; Tsitouras, Ch.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a point-particle model for two-way coupling of water droplets dispersed in turbulent flow of a carrier gas consisting of air and water vapor. An incompressible flow formulation is applied for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flow with a warm and a cold wall. Compared

  2. Water droplet behavior on superhydrophobic SiO2 nanocomposite films during icing/deicing cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazauskas, A.; Guobiene, A.; Prosycevas, I.; Baltrusaitis, V.; Grigaliunas, V.; Narmontas, P.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates water droplet behavior on superhydrophobic (water contact angle value of 162 ± 1°) SiO2 nanocomposite films subjected to repetitive icing/deicing treatments, changes in SiO2 nanocomposite film surface morphology and their non-wetting characteristics. During the experiment,

  3. Dynamics of Water Absorption and Evaporation During Methanol Droplet Combustion in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Nayagam, Vedha; Williams, Forman A.

    2012-01-01

    The combustion of methanol droplets is profoundly influenced by the absorption and evaporation of water, generated in the gas phase as a part of the combustion products. Initially there is a water-absorption period of combustion during which the latent heat of condensation of water vapor, released into the droplet, enhances its burning rate, whereas later there is a water-evaporation period, during which the water vapor reduces the flame temperature suffciently to extinguish the flame. Recent methanol droplet-combustion experiments in ambient environments diluted with carbon dioxide, conducted in the Combustion Integrated Rack on the International Space Station (ISS), as a part of the FLEX project, provided a method to delineate the water-absorption period from the water-evaporation period using video images of flame intensity. These were obtained using an ultra-violet camera that captures the OH* radical emission at 310 nm wavelength and a color camera that captures visible flame emission. These results are compared with results of ground-based tests in the Zero Gravity Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center which employed smaller droplets in argon-diluted environments. A simplified theoretical model developed earlier correlates the transition time at which water absorption ends and evaporation starts. The model results are shown to agree reasonably well with experiment.

  4. First Dark Matter Limits from a Large-Mass, Low-Background Superheated Droplet Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Collar, J.I.; Girard, T.A.; Limagne, D.; Miley, H.S.; Waysand, G.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the fabrication aspects and calibration of the first large active mass ($\\sim15$ g) modules of SIMPLE, a search for particle dark matter using Superheated Droplet Detectors (SDDs). While still limited by the statistical uncertainty of the small data sample on hand, the first weeks of operation in the new underground laboratory of Rustrel-Pays d'Apt already provide a sensitivity to axially-coupled Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) competitive with leading experiments, confirming SDDs as a convenient, low-cost alternative for WIMP detection.

  5. A Numerical and Experimental Investigation of the Internal Flow of a Freezing Water Droplet

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Linn

    2015-01-01

    The overarching aim of this work is to study the freezing process of a single water droplet freezing on a cold surface, which is an interesting and important phenomenon with possible applications in many areas. Understanding the freezing process of a single water droplet is for example an important step when preventing unwanted icing, e.g. in the case of airplane wings and propellers, wind turbine rotor blades, and road surfaces.As a step in understanding the freezing process, the study speci...

  6. Water droplet excess free energy determined by cluster mitosis using guided molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Gabriel V.; Hunt, Patricia A.; Müller, Erich A.; Jackson, George; Ford, Ian J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a vital role in affecting climate by influencing the properties and lifetimes of clouds and precipitation. Understanding the underlying microscopic mechanisms involved in the nucleation of aerosol droplets from the vapour phase is therefore of great interest. One key thermodynamic quantity in nucleation is the excess free energy of cluster formation relative to that of the saturated vapour. In our current study, the excess free energy is extracted for clusters of pure water modelled with the TIP4P/2005 intermolecular potential using a method based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and the Jarzynski relation. The change in free energy associated with the "mitosis" or division of a cluster of N water molecules into two N/2 sub-clusters is evaluated. This methodology is an extension of the disassembly procedure used recently to calculate the excess free energy of argon clusters [H. Y. Tang and I. J. Ford, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023308 (2015)]. Our findings are compared to the corresponding excess free energies obtained from classical nucleation theory (CNT) as well as internally consistent classical theory (ICCT). The values of the excess free energy that we obtain with the mitosis method are consistent with CNT for large cluster sizes but for the smallest clusters, the results tend towards ICCT; for intermediate sized clusters, we obtain values between the ICCT and CNT predictions. Furthermore, the curvature-dependent surface tension which can be obtained by regarding the clusters as spherical droplets of bulk density is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cluster size for the studied range. The data are compared to other values reported in the literature, agreeing qualitatively with some but disagreeing with the values determined by Joswiak et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4267 (2013)] using a biased mitosis approach; an assessment of the differences is the main motivation for our current study.

  7. Water droplet excess free energy determined by cluster mitosis using guided molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Gabriel V.; Müller, Erich A.; Jackson, George [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hunt, Patricia A. [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Ford, Ian J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-28

    Atmospheric aerosols play a vital role in affecting climate by influencing the properties and lifetimes of clouds and precipitation. Understanding the underlying microscopic mechanisms involved in the nucleation of aerosol droplets from the vapour phase is therefore of great interest. One key thermodynamic quantity in nucleation is the excess free energy of cluster formation relative to that of the saturated vapour. In our current study, the excess free energy is extracted for clusters of pure water modelled with the TIP4P/2005 intermolecular potential using a method based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and the Jarzynski relation. The change in free energy associated with the “mitosis” or division of a cluster of N water molecules into two N/2 sub-clusters is evaluated. This methodology is an extension of the disassembly procedure used recently to calculate the excess free energy of argon clusters [H. Y. Tang and I. J. Ford, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023308 (2015)]. Our findings are compared to the corresponding excess free energies obtained from classical nucleation theory (CNT) as well as internally consistent classical theory (ICCT). The values of the excess free energy that we obtain with the mitosis method are consistent with CNT for large cluster sizes but for the smallest clusters, the results tend towards ICCT; for intermediate sized clusters, we obtain values between the ICCT and CNT predictions. Furthermore, the curvature-dependent surface tension which can be obtained by regarding the clusters as spherical droplets of bulk density is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cluster size for the studied range. The data are compared to other values reported in the literature, agreeing qualitatively with some but disagreeing with the values determined by Joswiak et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4267 (2013)] using a biased mitosis approach; an assessment of the differences is the main motivation for our current study.

  8. A study on the contact angles of a water droplet on smooth and rough solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ju Young; Ha, Man Yeong; Choi, Ho Jin; Hong, Seung Do; Yoon, Hyun Sik

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the wetting characteristics such as contact angle, wetting radius and topography of water droplets on smooth and random solid surfaces. Molecular dynamic simulation is employed to analyze the wetting behavior of water droplets on smooth and rough surfaces by considering different potential energy models of bond, angle, Lennard-Jones and Coulomb to calculate the interacting forces between water molecules. The Lennard-Jones potential energy model is adopted as an interaction model between water molecules and solid surface atoms. The randomly rough surface is generated by changing the standard deviation of roughness height from 1 A to 3 A with the fixed autocorrelation length. The size of water droplet considered is in the range from 2,000 to 5,000 molecules. The contact angles increase generally with increasing number of water molecules. For a hydrophobic surface whose characteristic energy is 0.1 kcal/mol, the contact angles depend rarely on the standard deviation of the roughness height. However, when the surface energy is 0.5 and 1.0 kcal/mol, the contact angles depend on both the roughness height of surfaces and droplet size

  9. Method for Measuring Cooling Efficiency of Water Droplets Impinging onto Hot Metal Discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Søreng Bjørge

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work outlines a method for measuring the cooling efficiency of droplets impinging onto hot metal discs in the temperature range of 85 °C to 400 °C, i.e., covering the boiling regimes experienced when applying water to heated objects in fires. Stainless steel and aluminum test discs (with 50-mm diameter, 10-mm thickness, and a surface roughness of Ra 0.4 or Ra 3 were suspended horizontally by four thermocouples that were used to record disc temperatures. The discs were heated by a laboratory burner prior to the experiments, and left to cool with and without applying 2.4-mm diameter water droplets to the discs while the disc temperatures were recorded. The droplets were generated by the acceleration of gravity from a hypodermic injection needle, and hit the disc center at a speed of 2.2 m/s and a rate of 0.02 g/s, i.e., about three droplets per second. Based on the recorded rate of the temperature change, as well as disc mass and disc heat capacity, the absolute droplet cooling effect and the relative cooling efficiency relative to complete droplet evaporation were obtained. There were significant differences in the cooling efficiency as a function of temperature for the two metals investigated, but there was no statistically significant difference with respect to whether the surface roughness was Ra 0.4 or Ra 3. Aluminum showed a higher cooling efficiency in the temperature range of 110 °C to 140 °C, and a lower cooling efficiency in the temperature range of 180 °C to 300 °C compared to stainless steel. Both metals gave a maximum cooling efficiency in the range of 75% to 85%. A minimum of 5% cooling efficiency was experienced for the aluminum disc at 235 °C, i.e., the observed Leidenfrost point. However, stainless steel did not give a clear minimum in cooling efficiency, which was about 12–14% for disc temperatures above 300 °C. This simple and straightforward technique is well suited for assessing the cooling efficiency of

  10. An infrared scattering by evaporating droplets at the initial stage of a pool fire suppression by water sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrovsky, Leonid A.; Dembele, Siaka; Wen, Jennifer X.

    2018-06-01

    The computational analysis of downward motion and evaporation of water droplets used to suppress a typical transient pool fire shows local regions of a high volume fraction of relatively small droplets. These droplets are comparable in size with the infrared wavelength in the range of intense flame radiation. The estimated scattering of the radiation by these droplets is considerable throughout the entire spectrum except for a narrow region in the vicinity of the main absorption peak of water where the anomalous refraction takes place. The calculations of infrared radiation field in the model pool fire indicate the strong effect of scattering which can be observed experimentally to validate the fire computational model.

  11. Large and Small Droplet Impingement Data on Airfoils and Two Simulated Ice Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Michael; Wong, See-Cheuk; Rachman, Arief; Hung, Kuohsing E.; Vu, Giao T.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    2007-01-01

    Water droplet impingement data were obtained at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) for four wings and one wing with two simulated ice shapes. The wings tested include three 36-in. chord wings (MS(1)-317, GLC-305, and a NACA 652-415) and a 57-in. chord Twin Otter horizontal tail section. The simulated ice shapes were 22.5- and 45-min glaze ice shapes for the Twin Otter horizontal tail section generated using the LEWICE 2.2 ice accretion program. The impingement experiments were performed with spray clouds having median volumetric diameters of 11, 21, 79, 137, and 168 mm. Comparisons to the experimental data were generated which showed good agreement for the clean wings and ice shapes at lower drop sizes. For larger drop sizes LEWICE 2.2 over predicted the collection efficiencies due to droplet splashing effects which were not modeled in the program. Also for the more complex glaze ice shapes interpolation errors resulted in the over prediction of collection efficiencies in cove and shadow regions of ice shapes.

  12. Explosive Breakup of a Water Droplet with a Nontransparent Solid Inclusion Heated in a High-Temperature Gaseous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrienko Margarita A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the evaporation of a water droplet with a comparably sized solid nontransparent inclusion in a high-temperature (500–800 K gas medium. Water evaporates from the free surface of the inclusion. During this process, intensive vapor formation occurs on the inner interface “water droplet – solid inclusion” with the subsequent explosive decay of the droplet. Experiments have been conducted using high-speed (up to 105 fps video cameras “Phantom” and software “Phantom Camera Control”. The conditions of the explosive vapor formation of the heterogeneous water droplet were found. The typical phase change mechanisms of the heterogeneous water droplet under the conditions of intensive heat exchange were determined.

  13. Modeling water droplet condensation and evaporation in DNS of turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E.; Kuerten, J.G.M.; Geld, van der C.W.M.; Geurts, B.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a point particle model for two-way coupling in water droplet-laden incompressible turbulent flow of air is proposed. The model is based on conservation laws and semi-empirical correlations. It has been implemented and tested in a DNS code based for turbulent channel flow with an

  14. Modeling water droplet condensation and evaporation in DNS of turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; van der Geld, C.W.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    In this paper a point particle model for two-way coupling in water droplet-laden incompressible turbulent flow of air is proposed. The model is based on conservation laws and semi-empirical correlations. It has been implemented and tested in a DNS code based for turbulent channel flow with an

  15. Emulsion droplet spreading at air/water interfaces: mechanisms and relevance to the whipping of cream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hotrum, N.E.

    2004-01-01

    Keywords:emulsion, spreading coefficient, surface tension, emulsifier, whipped cream, dairy foam, partial coalescence In this thesis, the interaction between emulsion droplets and expanding air/water interfaces was investigated. The

  16. Water Transport and Removal in PEMFC Gas Flow Channel with Various Water Droplet Locations and Channel Surface Wettability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhou Qin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Water transport and removal in the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC is critically important to fuel cell performance, stability, and durability. Water emerging locations on the membrane-electrode assembly (MEA surface and the channel surface wettability significantly influence the water transport and removal in PEMFC. In most simulations of water transport and removal in the PEMFC flow channel, liquid water is usually introduced at the center of the MEA surface, which is fortuitous, since water droplet can emerge randomly on the MEA surface in PEMFC. In addition, the commonly used no-slip wall boundary condition greatly confines the water sliding features on hydrophobic MEA/channel surfaces, degrading the simulation accuracy. In this study, water droplet is introduced with various locations along the channel width direction on the MEA surface, and water transport and removal is investigated numerically using an improved model incorporating the sliding flow property by using the shear wall boundary condition. It is found that the water droplet can be driven to the channel sidewall by aerodynamics when the initial water location deviates from the MEA center to a certain amount, forming the water corner flow in the flow channel. The channel surface wettability on the water transport is also studied and is shown to have a significant impact on the water corner flow in the flow channel.

  17. Atmospheric oxidation of N-PAC and nitro substituted N-PAC in water droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feilberg, A.; Holcman, J.; Nielsen, T.

    1999-01-01

    A pulse radiolysis technique was used to study the formation of OH-adducts of quinoline (Q) and 5-nitroquinoline (5NQ) and the subsequent reactions of the OH-adducts with O-2 in both acidic and alkaline aqueous solution. The rate constants in alkaline solution were: k(Q+OH) = (9.0+/-1.0)lozenge 10...... with OH in water droplets in the atmosphere is less than 1 hour. It is estimated that the degradation of Q is accelerated in the presence of aqueous droplets with comparable contributions from aqueous and gas phase chemistry at neutral pH. Under acidic conditions the aqueous phase degradation is predicted...

  18. Femtosecond vibrational dynamics in water nano-droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, Gheorghe Dan

    2008-01-01

    Water is probably the most researched substance on Earth. The interest in water, and redominantly in liquid water, is due to its importance on both macro- and microscopic scales. Although people have been trying to understand water for centuries, this ubiquitous liquid is still surrounded by mystery

  19. Surfactant-adsorption-induced initial depinning behavior in evaporating water and nanofluid sessile droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xin; Duan, Fei

    2015-05-19

    A surfactant-induced autophobic effect has been observed to initiate an intense depinning behavior at the initial stage of evaporation in both pure water and nanofluid sessile droplets. The cationic surfactant adsorbing to the negatively charged silicon wafer makes the solid surface more hydrophobic. The autophobing-induced depinning behavior, leading to an enlarged contact angle and a shortened base diameter, takes place only when the surfactant concentration is below its critical micelle concentration (cmc). The initial spreading degree right before the droplet retraction, the retracting velocity of the contact line, and the duration of the initial droplet retraction are shown to depend negatively on the surfactant concentration below the cmc. An unexpected enhancement in the initial depinning has been found in the nanofluid droplets, possibly resulting from the hydrophilic interplay between the graphite nanoparticle deposition and the surfactant molecules. Such promotion of the initial depinning due to the nanoparticle deposition makes the droplet retract even at a surfactant concentration higher than the cmc (1.5 cmc). The resulting deposition formed in the presence of the depinning behavior has great enhancement for coffee-ring formation as compared to the one free of surfactant, implying that the formation of a coffee ring does not require the pinning of the contact line during the entire drying process.

  20. Thermal management of metallic surfaces: evaporation of sessile water droplets on polished and patterned stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwiec, T.; Tsareva, S.; Andrieux, A.; Bortolini, G. A.; Bolzan, P. H.; Castanet, G.; Gradeck, M.; Marcos, G.

    2017-10-01

    This communication focus on the evaporation of sessile water droplets on different states of austenitic stainless steel surfaces: mirror polished, mirror polished and aged and patterned by sputtering. The evolution of the contact angle and of the droplet diameter is presented as a function of time at room temperature. For all the surface states, a constant diameter regime (CCR) is observed. An important aging effect on the contact angle is measured on polished surfaces due to atmospheric contamination. The experimental observations are compared to a quasi-static evaporation model assuming spherical caps. The evolution of the droplet volume as a function of time is almost linear with the evaporation time for all the observed surfaces. This is in accordance with the model prediction for the CCR mode for small initial contact angles. In our experiments, the evaporation time is found to be linearly dependent on the initial contact angle. This dependence is not correctly described by the evaporation model

  1. A comparative study of the mass and heat transfer dynamics of evaporating ethanol/water, methanol/water, and 1-propanol/water aerosol droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Rebecca J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2006-02-23

    The mass and heat transfer dynamics of evaporating multicomponent alcohol/water droplets have been probed experimentally by examining changes in the near surface droplet composition and average droplet temperature using cavity-enhanced Raman scattering (CERS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The CERS technique provides a sensitive measure of the concentration of the volatile alcohol component in the outer shell of the droplet, due to the exponential relationship between CERS intensity and species concentration. Such volatile droplets, which are probed on a millisecond time scale, evaporate nonisothermally, resulting in both temperature and concentration gradients, as confirmed by comparisons between experimental measurements and quasi-steady state model calculations. An excellent agreement between the experimental evaporation trends and quasi-steady state model predictions is observed. An unexpectedly slow evaporation rate is observed for the evaporation of 1-propanol from a multicomponent droplet when compared to the model; possible explanations for this observation are discussed. In addition, the propagation depth of the CERS signal, and, therefore, the region of the droplet from which compositional measurements are made, can be estimated. Such measurements, when considered in conjunction with quasi-steady state theory, can allow droplet temperature gradients to be measured and vapor pressures and activity coefficients of components within the droplet to be determined.

  2. Determine spray droplets on water sensitive paper (WSP) for low pressure deflector nozzle using image J

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sies, M. F.; Madzlan, N. F.; Asmuin, N.; Sadikin, A.; Zakaria, H.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, determine of spray droplets size (SMD) using water sensitive paper (WSP) at low fluid pressure with deflector nozzle or tangential flow nozzle model Delavan AL75 and New Design Nozzle with two different type of swirl (ND2.5 A1.0 & ND2.5 B1.0). These three deflected flat sprays have used at different liquid mixing ratio. These liquid mixture ratios are pure water, 10% of lime juice + 90% of water (L10W90) and 30% of lime juice + 70% of water (L30W70). WSP is used to collect the spray droplets from nozzles. The operational liquid pressure of each nozzle is 3 bar, while air operational pressures are 3 bar and 6 bar. Then, the WSP were scanned using scanner then it was analyzed using ImageJ software. ImageJ can be used for determining the diameter of droplets size on the WSP. As the results from an experiment, the AL75 nozzle recorded the lowest Sauter mean diameter which is 193.69μm at 6 bar of pressurized air while ND2.5 A1.0 recorded the highest Sauter mean diameter which is 353.61µm at 3 bar of pressurized air. Summary from the experiment shows that the higher of droplet size is because of the lower air pressure (3 Bar). Then, increasing of liquid viscosity also increase the SMD. The orifice diameter for New Design nozzle (ND-2.5) is smaller than AL75, which are 2.5mm and 2.8mm respectively. The different nozzle design also gives effect the SMD. WSP is an alternative method to determine SMD for spray droplets with the low cost if compared to Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA).

  3. Modelling the impact, spreading and freezing of a water droplet on horizontal and inclined superhydrophobic cooled surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yina; Li, Cong; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Rui

    2017-10-01

    It is quite important to clearly understand the dynamic and freezing process of water droplets impacting a cold substrate for the prevention of ice accretion. In this study, a three-dimensional model including an extended phase change method was developed on OpenFOAM platform to simulate the impact, spreading and freezing of a water droplet on a cooled solid substrate. Both normal and oblique impact conditions were studied numerically. The evolution of the droplet shape and dynamic characteristics such as area ratio and spread factor were compared between numerical and experimental results. Good agreements were obtained. The effects of Weber number and Ohnersorge number on the oblique impact and freezing process were investigated. A regime map which depicts the different responses of droplets as a function of normal Weber number and Ohnesorge number was obtained. Moreover, the impact, spreading and freezing behaviour of water droplets were analyzed in detail from the numerical results.

  4. Droplet size effects on film drainage between droplet and substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Benjamin; Spicer, Patrick T; Shen, Amy Q

    2006-06-06

    When a droplet approaches a solid surface, the thin liquid film between the droplet and the surface drains until an instability forms and then ruptures. In this study, we utilize microfluidics to investigate the effects of film thickness on the time to film rupture for water droplets in a flowing continuous phase of silicone oil deposited on solid poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surfaces. The water droplets ranged in size from millimeters to micrometers, resulting in estimated values of the film thickness at rupture ranging from 600 nm down to 6 nm. The Stefan-Reynolds equation is used to model film drainage beneath both millimeter- and micrometer-scale droplets. For millimeter-scale droplets, the experimental and analytical film rupture times agree well, whereas large differences are observed for micrometer-scale droplets. We speculate that the differences in the micrometer-scale data result from the increases in the local thin film viscosity due to confinement-induced molecular structure changes in the silicone oil. A modified Stefan-Reynolds equation is used to account for the increased thin film viscosity of the micrometer-scale droplet drainage case.

  5. Experimental investigation on the droplet entrainment from interfacial waves in air-water horizontal stratified flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Byeong Geon; Yun, Byong Jo; Kim, Kyoung Du

    2014-01-01

    It was mainly due to the fact that droplet entrainment affects the Peak Cladding Temperature (PCT) of the nuclear fuel rod in the Postulated accident conditions of NPP. Recently, droplet entrainment in the horizontally arranged primary piping system for the NPP is of interest because it affects directly the steam binding phenomena in the steam generators. Pan and Hanratty correlation is the only applicable one for the droplet entrainment rate model for horizontal flow. Moreover, there are no efforts for the model development on the basis of the droplet entrainment principal and physics phenomena. More recently, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) proposed a new mechanistic droplet generation model applicable in the horizontal pipe for the SPACE code. However, constitutive relations in this new model require three model coefficients which have not yet been decided. The purpose of present work is determining three model coefficients by visualization experiment. For these model coefficients, the major physical parameters regarding the interfacial disturbance wave should be measured in this experiments. There are the wave slope, liquid fraction, wave hypotenuse length, wave velocity, wave frequency, and wavelength in the major physical parameters. The experiment was conducted at an air water horizontal rectangular channel with the PIV system. In this study, the experimental conditions were stratified-way flow during the droplet generation. Three coefficients were determined based on several data related to the interfacial wave. Additionally, we manufactured the parallel wire conductance probe to measure the fluctuating water level over time, and compared the wave height measured by the parallel wire conductance probe and image processing from images taken by high speed camera. Experimental investigation was performed for droplet entrainment from phase interface wave in an air-water stratified flow. In the experiments, we measured major physical parameters

  6. Ignition of a floating droplet of organic coal-water fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakoryakov, V. E.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-06-01

    The results of experimental investigations are presented for the ignition of droplets (particles) of organic coal-water fuels (OCWFs) floating in a flow of an oxidizer using a special combustion chamber from high-temperature quartz glass. The temperature and the velocity of motion of the oxidizer vary in the ranges of 500-900 K and 0.5-3 m/s. The initial sizes (radii) of fuel droplets amounted to 0.3-1.5 mm. As the basic OCWF components, particles (of 80-100 µm in size) of brown coal "B2," water, mazut, and waste castor and compressor oils are used. With use of the system of high-velocity video registration, the conditions providing for floating of OCWF particles without initiation of burning and with the subsequent steady ignition are established. Four modes of OCWF-droplet ignition with different trajectories of their motion in the combustion chamber are singled out. The times of the OCWF-ignition delay in dependence on the size of fuel particles and oxidizer temperatures are determined. The deviations of the OCWF-ignition-delay times obtained under conditions of suspension of a droplet on the thermocouple junction and while floating in the oxidizer flow are established.

  7. Non-isothermal desorption and nucleate boiling in a water-salt droplet LiBr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misyura Sergey Ya.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental data on desorption and nucleate boiling in a droplet of LiBr-water solution were obtained. An increase in salt concentration in a liquid-layer leads to a considerable decrease in the rate of desorption. The significant decrease in desorption intensity with a rise of initial mass concentration of salt has been observed. Evaporation rate of distillate droplet is constant for a long time period. At nucleate boiling of a water-salt solution of droplet several characteristic regimes occur: heating, nucleate boiling, desorption without bubble formation, formation of the solid, thin crystalline-hydrate film on the upper droplet surface, and formation of the ordered crystalline-hydrate structures during the longer time periods. For the final stage of desorption there is a big difference in desorption rate for initial salt concentration, C0, 11% and 51%. This great difference in the rate of desorption is associated with significantly more thin solution film for C0 = 11% and higher heat flux.

  8. Fusion of microlitre water-in-oil droplets for simple, fast and green chemical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, S-H; Urban, P L

    2015-08-07

    A simple format for microscale chemical assays is proposed. It does not require the use of test tubes, microchips or microtiter plates. Microlitre-range (ca. 0.7-5.0 μL) aqueous droplets are generated by a commercial micropipette in a non-polar matrix inside a Petri dish. When two droplets are pipetted nearby, they spontaneously coalesce within seconds, priming a chemical reaction. Detection of the reaction product is accomplished by colorimetry, spectrophotometry, or fluorimetry using simple light-emitting diode (LED) arrays as the sources of monochromatic light, while chemiluminescence detection of the analytes present in single droplets is conducted in the dark. A smartphone camera is used as the detector. The limits of detection obtained for the developed in-droplet assays are estimated to be: 1.4 nmol (potassium permanganate by colorimetry), 1.4 pmol (fluorescein by fluorimetry), and 580 fmol (sodium hypochlorite by chemiluminescence detection). The format has successfully been used to monitor the progress of chemical and biochemical reactions over time with sub-second resolution. A semi-quantitative analysis of ascorbic acid using Tillman's reagent is presented. A few tens of individual droplets can be scanned in parallel. Rapid switching of the LED light sources with different wavelengths enables a spectral analysis of multiple droplets. Very little solid waste is produced. The assay matrix is readily recycled, thus the volume of liquid waste produced each time is also very small (typically, 1-10 μL per analysis). Various water-immiscible translucent liquids can be used as the reaction matrix: including silicone oil, 1-octanol as well as soybean cooking oil.

  9. Experimental Measurement of Frozen and Partially Melted Water Droplet Impact Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Jose; Yan, Sihong; Tan, Jason; Kreeger, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    High-speed video of single frozen water droplets impacting a surface was acquired. The droplets diameter ranged from 0.4 mm to 0.9 mm and impacted at velocities ranging from 140 m/sec to 309 m/sec. The techniques used to freeze the droplets and launch the particles against the surfaces is described in this paper. High-speed video was used to quantify the ice accretion area to the surface for varying impact angles (30 deg, 45 deg, 60 deg), impacting velocities, and break-up angles. An oxygen /acetylene cross-flow flame used to ensure partial melting of the traveling frozen droplets is also discussed. A linear relationship between impact angle and ice accretion is identified for fully frozen particles. The slope of the relationship is affected by impact speed. Perpendicular impacts, i.e. 30 deg, exhibited small differences in ice accretion for varying velocities, while an increase of 60% in velocity from 161 m/sec to 259 m/sec, provided an increase on ice accretion area of 96% at an impact angle of 60 deg. The increase accretion area highlights the importance of impact angle and velocity on the ice accretion process of ice crystals. It was experimentally observed that partial melting was not required for ice accretion at the tested velocities when high impact angles were used (45 and 60 deg). Partially melted droplets doubled the ice accretion areas on the impacting surface when 0.0023 Joules were applied to the particle. The partially melted state of the droplets and a method to quantify the percentage increase in ice accretion area is also described in the paper.

  10. Experimentation, modelling and simulation of water droplets impact on ballooned sheath of PWR core fuel assemblies in a LOCA situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelong, Franck

    2010-01-01

    In a pressurized water reactor (PWR), during a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA), liquid water evaporates and the fuel assemblies are not cooled anymore; as a consequence, the temperature rises to such an extent that some parts of the fuel assemblies can be deformed resulting in 'ballooned regions'. When reflooding occurs, the cooling of these partially blocked parts of the fuel assemblies will depend on the coolant flow that is a mixture of overheated vapour and under-saturated droplets. The aim of this thesis is to study the heat transfer between droplets and hot walls of the fuel rods. In this purpose, an experimental device has been designed in accordance with droplets and wall features (droplet velocity and diameter, wall temperature) representative of LOCA conditions. The cooling of a hot Nickel disk, previously heated by induction, is cooled down by a stream of monodispersed droplet. The rear face temperature profiles are measured by infrared thermography. Then, the estimation of wall heat flux is performed by an inverse conduction technique from these infrared images. The effect of droplet dynamical properties (diameter, velocity) on the heat flux is studied. These experimental data allow us to validate an analytical model of heat exchange between droplet and hot slab. This model is based on combined dynamical and thermal considerations. On the one hand, the droplet dynamics is considered through a spring analogy in order to evaluate the evolution of droplet features such as the spreading diameter when the droplet is squeezed over the hot surface. On the other hand, thermal parameters, such as the thickness of the vapour cushion beneath the droplet, are determined from an energy balance. In the short term, this model will be integrated in a CFD code (named NEPTUNE-CFD) to simulate the cooling of a reactor core during a LOCA, taking into account the droplet/wall heat exchange. (author)

  11. Dancing droplets: Contact angle, drag, and confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    When deposited on a clean glass slide, a mixture of water and propylene glycol forms a droplet of given contact angle, when both pure liquids spread. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). The droplet is stabilized by a gradient of surface tension due to evaporation that induces a Marangoni flow from the border to the apex of the droplets. The apparent contact angle of the droplets depends on both their composition and the external humidity as captured by simple models. These droplets present remarkable properties such as lack of a large pinning force. We discuss the drag on these droplets as a function of various parameters. We show theoretical and experimental results of how various confinement geometries change the vapor gradient and the dynamics of droplet attraction.

  12. Water droplet spreading and recoiling upon contact with thick-compact maltodextrin agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraz-Torres, Lesvia Sofía; Quintanilla-Carvajal, María Ximena; Téllez-Medina, Darío I; Hernández-Sánchez, Humberto; Alamilla-Beltrán, Liliana; Gutiérrez-López, Gustavo F

    2011-11-01

    The food and pharmaceutical industries handle a number of compounds in the form of agglomerates which must be put into contact with water for rehydration purposes. In this work, liquid-solid interaction between water and maltodextrin thick-compact agglomerates was studied at different constituent particle sizes for two compression forces (75 and 225 MPa). Rapid droplet spreading was observed which was similar in radius to the expected one for ideal, flat surfaces. Contact angle determinations reported oscillations of this parameter throughout the experiments, being indicative of droplet recoiling on top of the agglomerate. Recoiling was more frequent in samples obtained at 225 MPa for agglomerate formation. Agglomerates obtained at 75 MPa exhibited more penetration of the water. Competition between dissolution of maltodextrin and penetration of the water was, probably, the main mechanism involved in droplet recoiling. Micrographs of the wetting marks were characterized by means of image analysis and the measurements suggested more symmetry of the wetting mark at higher compression force. Differences found in the evaluated parameters for agglomerates were mainly due to compaction force used. No significant effect of particle size in recoiling, penetration of water into the agglomerate, surface texture and symmetry was observed. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Water droplet accumulation and motion in PEM (Proton Exchange Membrane) fuel cell mini-channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carton, J.G.; Lawlor, V.; Olabi, A.G.; Hochenauer, C.; Zauner, G.

    2012-01-01

    Effective water management is one of the key strategies for improving low temperature PEM (Proton Exchange Membrane) fuel cell performance and durability. Phenomena such as membrane dehydration, catalyst layer flooding, mass transport and fluid flow regimes can be affected by the interaction, distribution and movement of water in flow plate channels. In this paper a literature review is completed in relation to PEM fuel cell water flooding. It is clear that droplet formation, movement and interaction with the GDL (Gas Diffusion Layer) have been studied extensively. However slug formation and droplet accumulation in the flow channels has not been analysed in detail. In this study, a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamic) model and VOF (Volume of Fluid) method is used to simulate water droplet movement and slug formation in PEM fuel cell mini-channels. In addition, water slug visualisation is recorded in ex situ PEM fuel cell mini-channels. Observation and simulation results are discussed with relation to slug formation and the implications to PEM fuel cell performance. -- Highlights: ► Excess water in mini-channels from the collision and coalescence of droplets can directly form slugs in PEM fuel cells. ► Slugs can form at low flow rates so increasing the flow rate can reduce the size and frequency of slugs. ► One channel of a double serpentine mini-channel may become blocked due to the redistribution of airflow and pressure caused by slug formation. ► Correct GDL and mini-channel surface coatings are essential to reduce slug formation and stagnation. ► Having geometry changes (bends and steps) in the flow fields can disrupt slug movement and avoid channel blockages.

  14. Contact angle hysteresis and motion behaviors of a water nano-droplet on suspended graphene under temperature gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroutan, Masumeh; Fatemi, S. Mahmood; Esmaeilian, Farshad; Fadaei Naeini, Vahid; Baniassadi, Majid

    2018-05-01

    In the present work, the effect of temperature gradient on the behavior of a water nano-droplet resting on a suspended graphene was studied based on a non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. The acquired results indicate that the applied temperature gradient to the suspended graphene drives the water nano-droplet to the colder region. The droplet accelerates its motion toward the cold reservoir as the temperature gradient is increased. In addition to the translational motion of the nano-droplet, the vortical motion of the water molecules was also observed. Contact angle analysis was also utilized to describe the directional motion of the nano-droplet. The translational motion of the droplet leads to the estimation of contact angle hysteresis through advancing and receding contact angles while the rotational motion resulted in the advancing and receding fronts being switched with one another through the simulation. The average displacement vector of the water molecules shows that parts of the droplet seem to stagnate while other parts rotate around them. The reason behind this particular behavior was studied based on interaction energy contours between a water molecule and the suspended graphene. The obtained data indicate that the rotational motion is in agreement with the migration of the water molecules to low interaction energy regions in order to avoid high interaction energy areas.

  15. Droplet-Sizing Liquid Water Content Sensor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Icing is one of the most significant hazards to aircraft. A sizing supercooled liquid water content (SSLWC) sonde is being developed to meet a directly related need...

  16. Amine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for removal of oil droplets from produced water and accelerated magnetic separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Saebom, E-mail: saebomko@austin.utexas.edu [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Kim, Eun Song [University of Texas, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Park, Siman [University of Texas, Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering (United States); Daigle, Hugh [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Milner, Thomas E. [University of Texas, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Huh, Chun [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Bennetzen, Martin V. [Maersk Oil Corporate (Denmark); Geremia, Giuliano A. [Maersk Oil Research and Technology Centre (Qatar)

    2017-04-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with surface coatings designed for water treatment, in particular for targeted removal of contaminants from produced water in oil fields, have drawn considerable attention due to their environmental merit. The goal of this study was to develop an efficient method of removing very stable, micron-scale oil droplets dispersed in oilfield produced water. We synthesized MNPs in the laboratory with a prescribed surface coating. The MNPs were superparamagnetic magnetite, and the hydrodynamic size of amine functionalized MNPs ranges from 21 to 255 nm with an average size of 66 nm. The initial oil content of 0.25 wt.% was reduced by as much as 99.9% in separated water. The electrostatic attraction between negatively charged oil-in-water emulsions and positively charged MNPs controls, the attachment of MNPs to the droplet surface, and the subsequent aggregation of the electrically neutral oil droplets with attached MNPs (MNPs-oils) play a critical role in accelerated and efficient magnetic separation. The total magnetic separation time was dramatically reduced to as short as 1 s after MNPs, and oil droplets were mixed, in contrast with the case of free, individual MNPs with which separation took about 36∼72 h, depending on the MNP concentrations. Model calculations of magnetic separation velocity, accounting for the MNP magnetization and viscous drag, show that the total magnetic separation time will be approximately 5 min or less, when the size of the MNPs-oils is greater than 360 nm, which can be used as an optimum operating condition.

  17. High-Speed Imaging of a Water Droplet Impacting a Super Cold Surface

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Narimane

    2016-08-01

    Frost formation is of a major research interest as it can affect many industrial processes. Frost appears as a thin deposit of ice crystals when the temperature of the surface is below the freezing point of the liquid. The objective of this research is to study icing with hope to propose new anti-icing and deicing methods. In the beginning of the research, cracking of the ice layer was observed when a deionized water droplet impacts a ?50 oC cooled sphere surface that is in contact with dry ice. To further investigate the cracks occurrence, multiple experiments were conducted. It was observed that the sphere surface temperature and droplet temperature (ranges from 10-80 oC) have no effect on the crack formation. On the other hand, it was observed that formation of a thin layer of frost on the sphere before the drop impact leads the lateral cracking of the ice. Thus, attempts to reproduce the cracks on clean super cold sphere surfaces were made using scratched and sandblasted spheres as well as superhydrophobized and polymer particle coated spheres. Furthermore, innovative methods were tried to initiate the cracks by placing epoxy glue bumps and ice-islands coatings on the surface of the spheres. All of these attempts to reproduce the crack formation without the presence of frost, failed. Nonetheless, the adding of isolated frost on the sphere surfaces always leads to the crack formation. Generally, frost forms on the small spheres faster than it does on the bigger ones. Additionally, the cold water droplet produces thicker water and ice layer compared to a hot water droplet; and the smaller the sphere the larger its water and ice layer thicknesses.

  18. Dynamic Impacts of Water Droplets onto Icephobic Soft Surfaces at High Weber Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liqun; Liu, Yang; Hu, Hui; Wang, Wei; Kota, Arun

    2017-11-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to examine the effects of the stiffness of icephobic soft PDMS materials on the impact dynamics of water drops at high weber numbers pertinent to aircraft icing phenomena. The experimental study was performed in the Icing Research Tunnel available at Iowa State University (ISU-IRT). During the experiments, both the shear modulus of the soft PDMS surface and the Weber numbers of the impinging water droplets are controlled for the comparative study. While the shear modulus of the soft PDMS surface was changed by tuning the recipes to make the PDMS materials, the Weber number of the impinging water droplets was altered by adjusting the airflow speed in the wind tunnel. A suite of advanced flow diagnostic techniques, which include high-speed photographic imaging, digital image projection (DIP), and infrared (IR) imaging thermometry, were used to quantify the transient behavior of water droplet impingement, unsteady heat transfer and dynamic ice accreting process over the icephobic soft airfoil surfaces. The findings derived from the icing physics studies can be used to improve current icing accretion models for more accurate prediction of ice formation and accretion on aircraft wings and to develop effective anti-/deicing strategies for safer and more efficient operation of aircraft in cold weather.

  19. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation by Soufriere Hills Volcanic Ash Immersed in Water Droplets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T P Mangan

    Full Text Available Fine particles of ash emitted during volcanic eruptions may sporadically influence cloud properties on a regional or global scale as well as influencing the dynamics of volcanic clouds and the subsequent dispersion of volcanic aerosol and gases. It has been shown that volcanic ash can trigger ice nucleation, but ash from relatively few volcanoes has been studied for its ice nucleating ability. In this study we quantify the efficiency with which ash from the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat nucleates ice when immersed in supercooled water droplets. Using an ash sample from the 11th February 2010 eruption, we report ice nucleating efficiencies from 246 to 265 K. This wide range of temperatures was achieved using two separate droplet freezing instruments, one employing nanolitre droplets, the other using microlitre droplets. Soufriere Hills volcanic ash was significantly more efficient than all other ash samples that have been previously examined. At present the reasons for these differences are not understood, but may be related to mineralogy, amorphous content and surface chemistry.

  20. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation by Soufriere Hills Volcanic Ash Immersed in Water Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, T P; Atkinson, J D; Neuberg, J W; O'Sullivan, D; Wilson, T W; Whale, T F; Neve, L; Umo, N S; Malkin, T L; Murray, B J

    2017-01-01

    Fine particles of ash emitted during volcanic eruptions may sporadically influence cloud properties on a regional or global scale as well as influencing the dynamics of volcanic clouds and the subsequent dispersion of volcanic aerosol and gases. It has been shown that volcanic ash can trigger ice nucleation, but ash from relatively few volcanoes has been studied for its ice nucleating ability. In this study we quantify the efficiency with which ash from the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat nucleates ice when immersed in supercooled water droplets. Using an ash sample from the 11th February 2010 eruption, we report ice nucleating efficiencies from 246 to 265 K. This wide range of temperatures was achieved using two separate droplet freezing instruments, one employing nanolitre droplets, the other using microlitre droplets. Soufriere Hills volcanic ash was significantly more efficient than all other ash samples that have been previously examined. At present the reasons for these differences are not understood, but may be related to mineralogy, amorphous content and surface chemistry.

  1. Theoretic analysis for gravity separation of water droplets in PWR steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shixun

    1995-10-01

    Gravity separation space of water droplets in the PWR steam generator is one of three important separating mechanisms and provides a link between primary (vane) separator and chevron dryer. The design of steam generator should not only have highly efficient and compact separator and dryer, but also an adequate height of gravity separation space. Too short a gravity separation space will not sufficiently separate the moisture and adversely affect the performance of the dryer; too long a gravity separation space will add additional costs for steam generator and nuclear island installation. The droplet entrainment in the process of gravity separation space was theoretically studied and droplet trajectory was analytically modelled. A general expression for the height required by gravity separation, diameter and velocity of those droplets carried over was also obtained. In the analysis, the slip between two phases was considered and a combined term of diameter and viscosity was introduced. The modelling can provide a theoretical basis for determining the height of the gravity separation space. (2 refs., 2 figs.)

  2. Probing the evaporation of ternary ethanol-methanol-water droplets by cavity enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howle, Chris R; Homer, Chris J; Hopkins, Rebecca J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2007-10-21

    Cavity enhanced Raman scattering is used to characterise the evolving composition of ternary aerosol droplets containing methanol, ethanol and water during evaporation into a dry nitrogen atmosphere. Measurements made using non-linear stimulated Raman scattering from these ternary alcohol-water droplets allow the in situ determination of the concentration of the two alcohol components with high accuracy. The overlapping spontaneous Raman bands of the two alcohol components, arising from C-H stretching vibrational modes, are spectrally-resolved in stimulated Raman scattering measurements. We also demonstrate that the evaporation measurements are consistent with a quasi-steady state evaporation model, which can be used to interpret the evaporation dynamics occurring at a range of pressures at a particular evaporation time.

  3. Dispersed droplet dynamics during produced water treatment in oil industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijkeren, D.F.

    2016-01-01

    For Lagrangian particle tracking applied to swirling flow produced water treatment the influence of the history force is investigated. In the expression for the history force an existing Reynolds number dependent kernel is adapted and validated for a range of experimental data for settling spheres.

  4. Experimental study of detonation of large-scale powder-droplet-vapor mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, C.-H.; Wang, Y.; Xue, K.; Wang, L.-F.

    2018-05-01

    Large-scale experiments were carried out to investigate the detonation performance of a 1600-m3 ternary cloud consisting of aluminum powder, fuel droplets, and vapor, which were dispersed by a central explosive in a cylindrically stratified configuration. High-frame-rate video cameras and pressure gauges were used to analyze the large-scale explosive dispersal of the mixture and the ensuing blast wave generated by the detonation of the cloud. Special attention was focused on the effect of the descending motion of the charge on the detonation performance of the dispersed ternary cloud. The charge was parachuted by an ensemble of apparatus from the designated height in order to achieve the required terminal velocity when the central explosive was detonated. A descending charge with a terminal velocity of 32 m/s produced a cloud with discernably increased concentration compared with that dispersed from a stationary charge, the detonation of which hence generates a significantly enhanced blast wave beyond the scaled distance of 6 m/kg^{1/3}. The results also show the influence of the descending motion of the charge on the jetting phenomenon and the distorted shock front.

  5. Stable water isotopologue ratios in fog and cloud droplets of liquid clouds are not size-dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, J.K.; Aemisegger, F.; Scholl, M.; Wienhold, F.G.; Collett, J.L.; Lee, T.; van Pinxteren, D.; Mertes, S.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.; Werner, Roland A.; Buchmann, N.; Eugster, W.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present the first observations of stable water isotopologue ratios in cloud droplets of different sizes collected simultaneously. We address the question whether the isotope ratio of droplets in a liquid cloud varies as a function of droplet size. Samples were collected from a ground intercepted cloud (= fog) during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010 campaign (HCCT-2010) using a three-stage Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC). An instrument test revealed that no artificial isotopic fractionation occurs during sample collection with the CASCC. Furthermore, we could experimentally confirm the hypothesis that the δ values of cloud droplets of the relevant droplet sizes (μm-range) were not significantly different and thus can be assumed to be in isotopic equilibrium immediately with the surrounding water vapor. However, during the dissolution period of the cloud, when the supersaturation inside the cloud decreased and the cloud began to clear, differences in isotope ratios of the different droplet sizes tended to be larger. This is likely to result from the cloud's heterogeneity, implying that larger and smaller cloud droplets have been collected at different moments in time, delivering isotope ratios from different collection times.

  6. Stable water isotopologue ratios in fog and cloud droplets of liquid clouds are not size-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Spiegel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the first observations of stable water isotopologue ratios in cloud droplets of different sizes collected simultaneously. We address the question whether the isotope ratio of droplets in a liquid cloud varies as a function of droplet size. Samples were collected from a ground intercepted cloud (= fog during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010 campaign (HCCT-2010 using a three-stage Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC. An instrument test revealed that no artificial isotopic fractionation occurs during sample collection with the CASCC. Furthermore, we could experimentally confirm the hypothesis that the δ values of cloud droplets of the relevant droplet sizes (μm-range were not significantly different and thus can be assumed to be in isotopic equilibrium immediately with the surrounding water vapor. However, during the dissolution period of the cloud, when the supersaturation inside the cloud decreased and the cloud began to clear, differences in isotope ratios of the different droplet sizes tended to be larger. This is likely to result from the cloud's heterogeneity, implying that larger and smaller cloud droplets have been collected at different moments in time, delivering isotope ratios from different collection times.

  7. Behavior of the polygonal HEPA filter exposed to water droplets carried by the offgas flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannakos, K.; Potgeter, G.; Legner, W.

    1991-01-01

    A polygonal high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter element has been developed and tested with a view to cleaning the dissolver offgas from reprocessing plants. It is likewise suited to filter process offgases generated in other plants. Due to its high dew point (about 30 degree C) the dissolver offgas, before being directed into the HEPA filter, is heated with a gas heater to approx. 100 degree C so that condensation in the pipework upstream of the filter and in the filter proper is avoided. In case of failure of the heater the offgas may undergo condensation upstream of the HEPA filter until it is bypassed to a standby heater or a standby filter system. Consequently, the filter may be loaded with water droplets. therefore, experiments have been performed with a view to estimating the behavior of the polygonal filter element when exposed to condensate droplets in a real plant. According to the experiments performed so far it can be anticipated that in case of failure of the heater the amount of condensate produced until bypassing to a standby system will not damage a new or little loaded polygonal filter element. The experiments will be carried on with the goal of investigating the behavior of a heavily loaded polygonal filter element exposed to water droplets

  8. Vertical motion and elastic light-scattering of a laser-levitated water droplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, C. W.; Lee, W. K.

    2001-01-01

    We report the vertical motion and elastic scattered light of a single laser-levitated water microdroplet as it slowly evaporated. The vertical displacement as a function of time exhibited peaks of a variety of widths. Morphology-dependent resonances (MDRs) that induced the displacement peaks were identified. We found that the Stokes equation is adequate to describe the vertical motions driven by broad MDRs. For motions driven by relatively narrow MDRs, significant deviations from results predicted by the Stokes equation were found. The elastic scattered light intensity as a function of the size of the droplet showed sudden increases attributable to deformations of the droplet as its size parameter scanned through narrow MDRs. Copyright 2001 Optical Society of America

  9. Extraction of tributyltin and triphenyltin across a single oil droplet/water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikama, Katsumi; Negishi, Takayuki; Nakatani, Kiyoharu

    2004-01-01

    Tributyltin (TBT + ) and triphenyltin (TPT + ) were extracted with merocyanine 540 (MC - ) from water into a 1,6-dichlorohexane droplet with the radius of 40 μm and the absorption spectra of MC - were measured by a single microdroplet manipulation and microabsorption technique. The mass transfer rate and the partitioning ratio of MC - were characteristically influenced by the TBT + , TPT + , MC - , and Cl - concentrations in water. The ion pair extraction processes of the organotin compounds with the anions were discussed in terms of the ion transfer and adsorption-desorption of the solutes

  10. Extraction of tributyltin and triphenyltin across a single oil droplet/water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikama, Katsumi; Negishi, Takayuki; Nakatani, Kiyoharu

    2004-07-01

    Tributyltin (TBT{sup +}) and triphenyltin (TPT{sup +}) were extracted with merocyanine 540 (MC{sup -}) from water into a 1,6-dichlorohexane droplet with the radius of 40 {mu}m and the absorption spectra of MC{sup -} were measured by a single microdroplet manipulation and microabsorption technique. The mass transfer rate and the partitioning ratio of MC{sup -} were characteristically influenced by the TBT{sup +}, TPT{sup +}, MC{sup -}, and Cl{sup -} concentrations in water. The ion pair extraction processes of the organotin compounds with the anions were discussed in terms of the ion transfer and adsorption-desorption of the solutes.

  11. Behaviour of Water Droplets Under the Influence of a Uniform Electric Field in Nanocomposite Samples of Epoxy Resin/TiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Α. Bairaktari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper nanocomposite samples of epoxy resin and TiO2 nanoparticles were investigated with water droplets on their surface. A uniform electric field was applied and the behaviour of the water droplets was observed. Parameters that were studied were the water conductivity, the droplet volume, the number of droplets and the droplet positioning with respect to (w.r.t. the electrodes. All above mentioned parameters influence the flashover voltage of the samples. It is to be noted that – at least in some cases – the water droplet positioning w.r.t. the electrodes was more important in determining the flashover voltage than the droplet volume.

  12. Saturated fatty acid in the phospholipid monolayer contributes to the formation of large lipid droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arisawa, Kotoko; Mitsudome, Haruka; Yoshida, Konomi; Sugimoto, Shizuka; Ishikawa, Tomoko; Fujiwara, Yoko; Ichi, Ikuyo

    2016-01-01

    The degree of saturation of fatty acid chains in the bilayer membrane structure is known to control membrane fluidity and packing density. However, the significance of fatty acid composition in the monolayers of lipid droplets (LDs) has not been elucidated. In this study, we noted a relationship between the size of LDs and the fatty acid composition of the monolayer. To obtain large LDs, we generated NIH3T3 cells overexpressing fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27). This induced the fusion of LDs, resulting in larger LDs in FSP27-overexpressing cells compared with LDs in control cells. Moreover, the lipid extracts of LDs from FSP27-overexpressing cells reconstituted large-droplet emulsions in vitro, implying that the lipid properties of LDs might affect the size of LDs. FSP27-overexpressing cells had more saturated fatty acids in the phospholipid monolayer of the LDs compared with control cells. To further investigate the effects of the degree of phospholipid unsaturation on the size of LDs, we synthesized artificial emulsions of a lipid mixed with distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC, diC18:0-PC) and with dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC, diC18:1n-9-PC) and compared the sizes of the resulting LDs. The emulsions prepared from saturated PC had larger droplets than those prepared from unsaturated PC. Our results suggest that saturated fatty acid chains in phospholipid monolayers might establish the form and/or stability of large LDs. - Highlights: • The lipid extracts of larger LDs from FSP27 cells reconstructed large-droplet emulsions. • Isolated LDs from FSP27 cells had more saturated fatty acids in the phospholipid monolayer compared with the control. • Saturated fatty acids in the phospholipid monolayer are a factor in the formation of large emulsions.

  13. Impingement of water droplets on wedges and diamond airfoils at supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, John S

    1953-01-01

    An analytical solution has been obtained for the equations of motion of water droplets impinging on a wedge in a two-dimensional supersonic flow field with a shock wave attached to the wedge. The closed-form solution yields analytical expressions for the equation of the droplet trajectory, the local rate of impingement and the impingement velocity at any point on the wedge surface, and the total rate of impingement. The analytical expressions are utilized to determine the impingement on the forward surfaces of diamond airfoils in supersonic flow fields with attached shock waves. The results presented include the following conditions: droplet diameters from 2 to 100 microns, pressure altitudes from sea level to 30,000 feet, free-stream static temperatures from 420 degrees to 460 degrees R. Also, free-stream Mach numbers from 1.1 to 2.0, semi-apex angles for the wedge from 1.14 degrees to 7.97 degrees, thickness-to-chord ratios for the diamond airfoil from 0.02 to 0.14, chord lengths from 1 to 20 feet, and angles of attack from zero to the inverse tangent of the airfoil thickness-to-chord ratio.

  14. Effects of water chemistry on flow accelerated corrosion and liquid droplet impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Lister, Derek H.

    2009-01-01

    Overlapping effects of flow dynamics and corrosion are important issues to determine reliability and lifetime of major structures and components in light water reactor plants. Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) and liquid droplet impingement (LDI) are typical phenomena due to both interactions. In order to evaluation local wall thinning due to FAC and LDI, 6 step evaluation procedures have been proposed. (1) Flow pattern along the flow path was obtained with 1D computational flow dynamics (CFD) codes, (2) Corrosive conditions, e.g., oxygen concentration along the flow path were calculated with a hydrazine oxygen reaction code for FAC evaluation, while flow pattern of liquid droplets in high velocity steam and possibility of their collision to pipe inner surface were evaluated for LDI evaluation. (3) Mass transfer coefficient at the structure surface was calculated with 3D CFD codes for FAC evaluation, while frequency of oxide film rupture due to droplet collision was calculated for LDI evaluation. (4) High risk zones for FAC/LDI occurrence were evaluated by coupling major parameters, and then, (5) Wall thinning rates were calculated with the coupled model of static electrochemical analysis and dynamic double oxide layer analysis at the identified high FAC/LDI risk zone. (author)

  15. A Fast Algorithm to Simulate Droplet Motions in Oil/Water Two Phase Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tao

    2017-06-09

    To improve the research methods in petroleum industry, we develop a fast algorithm to simulate droplet motions in oil and water two phase flow, using phase field model to describe the phase distribution in the flow process. An efficient partial difference equation solver—Shift-Matrix method is applied here, to speed up the calculation coding in high-level language, i.e. Matlab and R. An analytical solution of order parameter is derived, to define the initial condition of phase distribution. The upwind scheme is applied in our algorithm, to make it energy decay stable, which results in the fast speed of calculation. To make it more clear and understandable, we provide the specific code for forming the coefficient matrix used in Shift-Matrix Method. Our algorithm is compared with other methods in different scales, including Front Tracking and VOSET method in macroscopic and LBM method using RK model in mesoscopic scale. In addition, we compare the result of droplet motion under gravity using our algorithm with the empirical formula common used in industry. The result proves the high efficiency and robustness of our algorithm and it’s then used to simulate the motions of multiple droplets under gravity and cross-direction forces, which is more practical in industry and can be extended to wider application.

  16. The precise and accurate production of millimetric water droplets using a superhydrophobic generating apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michael J.; Aristizabal, Felipe; Coady, Matthew; Nielson, Kent; Ragogna, Paul J.; Kietzig, Anne-Marie

    2018-02-01

    The production of millimetric liquid droplets has importance in a wide range of applications both in the laboratory and industrially. As such, much effort has been put forth to devise methods to generate these droplets on command in a manner which results in high diameter accuracy and precision, well-defined trajectories followed by successive droplets and low oscillations in droplet shape throughout their descents. None of the currently employed methods of millimetric droplet generation described in the literature adequately addresses all of these desired droplet characteristics. The reported methods invariably involve the cohesive separation of the desired volume of liquid from the bulk supply in the same step that separates the single droplet from the solid generator. We have devised a droplet generation device which separates the desired volume of liquid within a tee-apparatus in a step prior to the generation of the droplet which has yielded both high accuracy and precision of the diameters of the final droplets produced. Further, we have engineered a generating tip with extreme antiwetting properties which has resulted in reduced adhesion forces between the liquid droplet and the solid tip. This has yielded the ability to produce droplets of low mass without necessitating different diameter generating tips or the addition of surfactants to the liquid, well-defined droplet trajectories, and low oscillations in droplet volume. The trajectories and oscillations of the droplets produced have been assessed and presented quantitatively in a manner that has been lacking in the current literature.

  17. Sodium leakage and combustion tests. Measurement and distribution of droplet size using various spray nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Keiichi; Hirabayashi, Masaru; Onojima, T.; Gunji, Minoru; Ara, Kuniaki; Oki, Yoshihisa

    1999-04-01

    In order to develop a numerical code simulating sodium fires initiated frame dispersion of droplets, measured data of droplet diameter as well as its distribution are needed. In the present experiment the distribution of droplet diameter was measured using water, oil and sodium. The tests elucidated the influential factors with respect to the droplet diameter. In addition, we sought to develop a similarity law between water and sodium. The droplet size distribution of sodium using the large diameter droplet (Elnozzle) was predicted. (J.P.N.)

  18. Self-alignment of RFID dies on four-pad patterns with water droplet for sparse self-assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Bo; Routa, Iiris; Sariola, Veikko; Zhou, Quan

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports an in-depth study of a water-droplet-assisted self-alignment technique that self-aligns radio frequency identification (RFID) dies on four-pad patterns. The segmented structure of four hydrophilic pads on a hydrophobic substrate brings freedom to the design of the electrical functionality and the surface functionality. The paper investigates the influence of the key parameters that may affect the self-alignment in theory and experiment. The theoretical model justifies that RFID dies can be reliably aligned on the segmented four-pad pattern even when the initial placement error is as large as 50% of the size of the die and the gap between the four pads is about 10% of the size of the die. A method has been introduced to estimate the sufficient droplet volume for self-alignment. A series of experiments have been carried out to verify the results of the model. The experiments indicate that the self-alignment between the 730 × 730 µm RFID dies and the pattern occurs reliably when the releasing bias between the RFID die and antenna is less than 400 µm for patterns with 50 and 100 µm gaps, and successful self-alignment is possible even with greater bias of 500 µm

  19. Optics of Water Cloud Droplets Mixed with Black-Carbon Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Liu, Li; Cairns, Brian; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    We use the recently extended superposition T-matrix method to calculate scattering and absorption properties of micrometer-sized water droplets contaminated by black carbon. Our numerically exact results reveal that, depending on the mode of soot-water mixing, the soot specific absorption can vary by a factor exceeding 6.5. The specific absorption is maximized when the soot material is quasi-uniformly distributed throughout the droplet interior in the form of numerous small monomers. The range of mixing scenarios captured by our computations implies a wide range of remote sensing and radiation budget implications of the presence of black carbon in liquid-water clouds. We show that the popular Maxwell-Garnett effective-medium approximation can be used to calculate the optical cross sections, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter for the quasi-uniform mixing scenario, but is likely to fail in application to other mixing scenarios and in computations of the elements of the scattering matrix.

  20. Heterogeneous freezing of super cooled water droplets in micrometre range- freezing on a chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, Thomas; Witek, Lorenz; Felgitsch, Laura; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2017-04-01

    A new setup to analyse the freezing behaviour of ice nucleation particles (INPs) dispersed in aqueous droplets has been developed with the aim to analyse ensembles of droplets with sizes in the micrometre range, in which INPs are immersed. Major disadvantages of conventional drop-freezing experiments like varying drop sizes or interactions between the water- oil mixture and the INP, were solved by introducing a unique freezing- chip consisting of an etched and sputtered 15x15x1 mm gold-plated silicon or pure gold film (Pummer et al., 2012; Zolles et al., 2015). Using this chip, isolated micrometre-sized droplets can be generated with sizes similar to droplets in real world clouds. The experimental set-up for drop-freezing experiments was revised and improved by establishing automated process control and image evaluation. We were able to show the efficiency and accuracy of our setup by comparing measured freezing temperatures of different INPs (Snomax®, K- feldspar, birch pollen (Betula pendula) washing water, juniper pollen suspension (Juniperus communis) and ultrapure water) with already published results (Atkinson et al., 2013; Augustin et al., 2013; Pruppacher and Klett, 1997; Pummer et al., 2012; Wex et al., 2015; Zolles et al., 2015). Comparison of our measurements with literature data show the important impact of droplet size, INP concentration and number of active sites on the T50 values. Here, the new set-up exhibits its strength in reproducibility and accuracy which is due to the defined and isolated droplets. Finally, it opens a temperature window down to -37˚ C for freezing experiments which was not accessible with former traditional approaches .Atkinson, J. D., Murray, B. J., Woodhouse, M. T., Whale, T. F., Baustian, K. J., Carslaw, K. S., Dobbie, S., O'Sullivan, D., and Malkin, T. L.: The importance of feldspar for ice nucleation by mineral dust in mixed-phase clouds (vol 498, pg 355, 2013), Nature, 500, 491-491, 2013. Augustin, S., Wex, H

  1. NASA/FAA/NCAR Supercooled Large Droplet Icing Flight Research: Summary of Winter 1996-1997 Flight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dean; Ratvasky, Thomas; Bernstein, Ben; McDonough, Frank; Strapp, J. Walter

    1998-01-01

    During the winter of 1996-1997, a flight research program was conducted at the NASA-Lewis Research Center to study the characteristics of Supercooled Large Droplets (SLD) within the Great Lakes region. This flight program was a joint effort between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Based on weather forecasts and real-time in-flight guidance provided by NCAR, the NASA-Lewis Icing Research Aircraft was flown to locations where conditions were believed to be conducive to the formation of Supercooled Large Droplets aloft. Onboard instrumentation was then used to record meteorological, ice accretion, and aero-performance characteristics encountered during the flight. A total of 29 icing research flights were conducted, during which "conventional" small droplet icing, SLD, and mixed phase conditions were encountered aloft. This paper will describe how flight operations were conducted, provide an operational summary of the flights, present selected experimental results from one typical research flight, and conclude with practical "lessons learned" from this first year of operation.

  2. Propagation velocities of laser-produced plasmas from copper wire targets and water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyo-Dong; Alexander, Dennis R.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the plasma propagation velocities resulting from KrF laser irradiation of copper wire target (75 microns diameter) and water droplets (75 microns diameter) at irradiance levels ranging from 25 to 150 GW/sq cm. Plasma propagation velocities were measured using a streak camera system oriented orthogonally to the high-energy laser propagation axis. Plasma velocities were studied as a function of position in the focused beam. Results show that both the shape of the plasma formation and material removal from the copper wire are different and depend on whether the targets are focused or slightly defocused (approximately = 0.5 mm movement in the beam axis). Plasma formation and its position relative to the target is an important factor in determining the practical focal point during high-energy laser interaction with materials. At irradiance of 100 GW/sq cm, the air plasma has two weak-velocity components which propagate toward and away from the incident laser while a strong-velocity component propagates away from the laser beam as a detonation wave. Comparison of the measured breakdown velocities (in the range of 2.22-2.27 x 10(exp 5) m/s) for air and the value calculated by the nonlinear breakdown wave theory at irradiance of 100 GW/sq cm showed a quantitative agreement within approximately 50% while the linear theory and Gaussian pulse theory failed. The detonation wave velocities of plasma generated from water droplets and copper wire targets for different focused cases were measured and analyzed theoretically. The propagation velocities of laser-induced plasma liquid droplets obtained by previous research are compared with current work.

  3. Free energy study of H2O, N2O5, SO2, and O3 gas sorption by water droplets/slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wentao; Pak, Chi Yuen; Tse, Ying-Lung Steve

    2018-04-01

    Understanding gas sorption by water in the atmosphere is an active research area because the gases can significantly alter the radiation and chemical properties of the atmosphere. We attempt to elucidate the molecular details of the gas sorption of water and three common atmospheric gases (N2O5, SO2, and O3) by water droplets/slabs in molecular dynamics simulations. The system size effects are investigated, and we show that the calculated solvation free energy decreases linearly as a function of the reciprocal of the number of water molecules from 1/215 to 1/1000 in both the slab and the droplet systems. By analyzing the infinitely large system size limit by extrapolation, we find that all our droplet results are more accurate than the slab results when compared to the experimental values. We also show how the choice of restraints in umbrella sampling can affect the sampling efficiency for the droplet systems. The free energy changes were decomposed into the energetic ΔU and entropic -TΔS contributions to reveal the molecular details of the gas sorption processes. By further decomposing ΔU into Lennard-Jones and Coulombic interactions, we observe that the ΔU trends are primarily determined by local effects due to the size of the gas molecule, charge distribution, and solvation structure around the gas molecule. Moreover, we find that there is a strong correlation between the change in the entropic contribution and the mean residence time of water, which is spatially nonlocal and related to the mobility of water.

  4. Redistribution of charged aluminum nanoparticles on oil droplets in water in response to applied electrical field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mengqi; Li, Dongqing, E-mail: dongqing@mme.uwaterloo.ca [University of Waterloo, Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering (Canada)

    2016-05-15

    Janus droplets with two opposite faces of different physical or chemical properties have great potentials in many fields. This paper reports a new method for making Janus droplets by covering one side of the droplet with charged nanoparticles in an externally applied DC electric field. In this paper, aluminum oxide nanoparticles on micro-sized and macro-sized oil droplets were studied. In order to control the surface area covered by the nanoparticles on the oil droplets, the effects of the concentration of nanoparticle suspension, the droplet size as well as the strength of electric field on the final accumulation area of the nanoparticles are studied.Graphical abstract.

  5. Mechanism of Water Droplet Breakup Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida, Garcia

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. The airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Droplet deformation is defined and studied against main parameters. The high speed imaging allowed observation of the actual mechanism of breakup and identification of the sequence of configurations from the initiation of the breakup to the disintegration of the droplet. Results and comparisons are presented for droplets of diameters in the range of 500 to 1800 microns, and airfoil velocities of 70 and 90 m/sec.

  6. Efficacy of oligodynamic metals in the control of bacteria growth in humidifier water tanks and mist droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collart, David; Mehrabi, Sharifeh; Robinson, Liah; Kepner, Bryan; Mintz, Eric A

    2006-06-01

    Antimicrobial capsules were evaluated for their effectiveness to control bacterial contamination of cool mist humidifiers. These capsules contain a mixture of silver and copper promoted alumina beads designed to release low concentrations of these oligodynamic metals into the reservoir water for bacteria control. The reservoir water and mist droplets from the humidifier units were tested for the presence of bacteria over a three-week period. A control unit (without capsule) showed significant bacterial contamination by day three, which increased throughout the three-week test period, in both the reservoir and mist droplets, whereas the antimicrobial capsules reduced contamination during the first week, and minimized the presence of bacteria, in both the reservoir water and mist droplets, to less than 2% of the control unit throughout the three-week test period. It was also observed that, after each inactive weekend, the initial discharge of bacteria via the mist droplets in the control unit was significantly higher than during daily use. However, initial bacterial discharge from the test unit following weekend inactivity never exceeded 0.5% of the control unit. In conclusion, these capsules containing oligodynamic metals are effective in controlling bacteria growth in humidifier water tanks and mist droplets.

  7. Numerical Study for a Large Volume Droplet on the Dual-rough Surface: Apparent Contact Angle, Contact Angle Hysteresis and Transition Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jian; Jin, Yanli; Dong, He; Liu, Jiawei; Ye, Senbin

    2018-06-14

    The profile, apparent contact angle (ACA), contact angle hysteresis (CAH) and wetting state transmission energy barrier (WSTEB) are important static and dynamic properties of a large volume droplet on the hierarchical surface. Understanding them can provide us with important insights to functional surfaces and promote the application in corresponding areas. In this paper, we established three theoretical models (Model 1, Model 2 and Model 3) and corresponding numerical methods, which were obtained by the free energy minimization and the nonlinear optimization algorithm, to predict the profile, ACA, CAH and WSTEB of a large volume droplet on the horizontal regular dual-rough surface. In consideration of the gravity, the energy barrier on the contact circle, the dual heterogenous structures and their roughness on the surface, the models are more universal and accurate than previous models. It showed that the predictions of the models were in good agreement with the results from the experiment or literature. The models are promising to become novel design approaches of functional surfaces, which are frequently applied in microfluidic chips, water self-catchment system and dropwise condensation heat transfer system.

  8. Drag Coefficient of Water Droplets Approaching the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida Garcia

    2013-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Results are presented and discussed for drag coefficients of droplets with diameters in the range of 300 to 1800 micrometers, and airfoil velocities of 50, 70 and 90 meters/second. The effect of droplet oscillation on the drag coefficient is discussed.

  9. Influence of surface wettability on transport mechanisms governing water droplet evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhenhai; Weibel, Justin A; Garimella, Suresh V

    2014-08-19

    Prediction and manipulation of the evaporation of small droplets is a fundamental problem with importance in a variety of microfluidic, microfabrication, and biomedical applications. A vapor-diffusion-based model has been widely employed to predict the interfacial evaporation rate; however, its scope of applicability is limited due to incorporation of a number of simplifying assumptions of the physical behavior. Two key transport mechanisms besides vapor diffusion-evaporative cooling and natural convection in the surrounding gas-are investigated here as a function of the substrate wettability using an augmented droplet evaporation model. Three regimes are distinguished by the instantaneous contact angle (CA). In Regime I (CA ≲ 60°), the flat droplet shape results in a small thermal resistance between the liquid-vapor interface and substrate, which mitigates the effect of evaporative cooling; upward gas-phase natural convection enhances evaporation. In Regime II (60 ≲ CA ≲ 90°), evaporative cooling at the interface suppresses evaporation with increasing contact angle and counterbalances the gas-phase convection enhancement. Because effects of the evaporative cooling and gas-phase convection mechanisms largely neutralize each other, the vapor-diffusion-based model can predict the overall evaporation rates in this regime. In Regime III (CA ≳ 90°), evaporative cooling suppresses the evaporation rate significantly and reverses entirely the direction of natural convection induced by vapor concentration gradients in the gas phase. Delineation of these counteracting mechanisms reconciles previous debate (founded on single-surface experiments or models that consider only a subset of the governing transport mechanisms) regarding the applicability of the classic vapor-diffusion model. The vapor diffusion-based model cannot predict the local evaporation flux along the interface for high contact angle (CA ≥ 90°) when evaporative cooling is strong and the

  10. Core/Shell Microstructure Induced Synergistic Effect for Efficient Water-Droplet Formation and Cloud-Seeding Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yanlong; Liang, Haoran; Zaki, Abdelali; El Hadri, Nabil; Abshaev, Ali M; Huchunaev, Buzgigit M; Griffiths, Steve; Jouiad, Mustapha; Zou, Linda

    2017-12-26

    Cloud-seeding materials as a promising water-augmentation technology have drawn more attention recently. We designed and synthesized a type of core/shell NaCl/TiO 2 (CSNT) particle with controlled particle size, which successfully adsorbed more water vapor (∼295 times at low relative humidity, 20% RH) than that of pure NaCl, deliquesced at a lower environmental RH of 62-66% than the hygroscopic point (h g.p ., 75% RH) of NaCl, and formed larger water droplets ∼6-10 times its original measured size area, whereas the pure NaCl still remained as a crystal at the same conditions. The enhanced performance was attributed to the synergistic effect of the hydrophilic TiO 2 shell and hygroscopic NaCl core microstructure, which attracted a large amount of water vapor and turned it into a liquid faster. Moreover, the critical particle size of the CSNT particles (0.4-10 μm) as cloud-seeding materials was predicted via the classical Kelvin equation based on their surface hydrophilicity. Finally, the benefits of CSNT particles for cloud-seeding applications were determined visually through in situ observation under an environmental scanning electron microscope on the microscale and cloud chamber experiments on the macroscale, respectively. These excellent and consistent performances positively confirmed that CSNT particles could be promising cloud-seeding materials.

  11. A study of the evaporation of heterogeneous water droplets under active heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, Maxim; Legros, Jean Claude; Strizhak, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    Using high-speed video registration tools with a sample rate of 102-104 frames per second (fps), we studied the patterns in the evaporation of water droplets containing 1 and 2 mm individual metallic inclusions in a high-temperature gas environment. The materials of choice for the inclusions were steels (AISI 1080 carbon steel and AISI type 316L stainless steel) and pure nickel. We established the lifetimes τh of the liquid droplets under study with a controlled increase in the gas environment temperature up to 900 K. We also considered the physical aspects behind the τh distribution in the experiments conducted and specified the conditions for more effective cooling of metallic inclusions. Following the experimental research findings, a method was devised for effective reactor vessel cooling to avoid a meltdown at a nuclear power plant. The optimization of heat and mass transfer modes was performed within the framework of the strategic plan for the development of National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University as one of the world-leading universities.

  12. Washout study of fission products under aerosol form by a droplets pulverization of PWR water spray containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, Denis

    2008-05-01

    The study investigated the physical phenomena involved in the aerosols washout by water droplets for thermal hydraulic conditions representative of a severe accident in a PWR simulated into the TOSQAN vessel. A aerosols characterization (WELAS, turbidity-meter) coupled with the spray characteristics measurements (PDA, PIV), provided detailed information allowing to obtain reproducible results showing that aerosols collection dynamics has two phases characterized by two distinct removal rates. The average elementary collection efficiency per aerosols class was estimated according to the water flow rates and the droplets temperature injection. The comparison between the numerical approach (ASTEC's code) and the experimental results on the collected mass by the droplets showed a good agreement at the test beginning, then a light dissension after a certain time related on the experimental limits of measurement and the limits of the code. (author)

  13. A water activity based model of heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics for freezing of water and aqueous solution droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, Daniel A; Alpert, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Immersion freezing of water and aqueous solutions by particles acting as ice nuclei (IN) is a common process of heterogeneous ice nucleation which occurs in many environments, especially in the atmosphere where it results in the glaciation of clouds. Here we experimentally show, using a variety of IN types suspended in various aqueous solutions, that immersion freezing temperatures and kinetics can be described solely by temperature, T, and solution water activity, a(w), which is the ratio of the vapour pressure of the solution and the saturation water vapour pressure under the same conditions and, in equilibrium, equivalent to relative humidity (RH). This allows the freezing point and corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient, J(het), to be uniquely expressed by T and a(w), a result we term the a(w) based immersion freezing model (ABIFM). This method is independent of the nature of the solute and accounts for several varying parameters, including cooling rate and IN surface area, while providing a holistic description of immersion freezing and allowing prediction of freezing temperatures, J(het), frozen fractions, ice particle production rates and numbers. Our findings are based on experimental freezing data collected for various IN surface areas, A, and cooling rates, r, of droplets variously containing marine biogenic material, two soil humic acids, four mineral dusts, and one organic monolayer acting as IN. For all investigated IN types we demonstrate that droplet freezing temperatures increase as A increases. Similarly, droplet freezing temperatures increase as the cooling rate decreases. The log10(J(het)) values for the various IN types derived exclusively by Tand a(w), provide a complete description of the heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics. Thus, the ABIFM can be applied over the entire range of T, RH, total particulate surface area, and cloud activation timescales typical of atmospheric conditions. Lastly, we demonstrate that ABIFM can

  14. Low temperature combustion of organic coal-water fuel droplets containing petrochemicals while soaring in a combustion chamber model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiullin Timur R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the integral characteristics (minimum temperature, ignition delay times of stable combustion initiation of organic coal-water fuel droplets (initial radius is 0.3-1.5 mm in the oxidizer flow (the temperature and velocity varied in ranges 500-900 K, 0.5-3 m/s. The main components of organic coal-water fuel were: brown coal particles, filter-cakes obtained in coal processing, waste engine, and turbine oils. The different modes of soaring and ignition of organic coal-water fuel have been established. The conditions have been set under which it is possible to implement the sustainable soaring and ignition of organic coal-water fuel droplets. We have compared the ignition characteristics with those defined in the traditional approach (based on placing the droplets on a low-inertia thermocouple junction into the combustion chamber. The paper shows the scale of the influence of heat sink over the thermocouple junction on ignition inertia. An original technique for releasing organic coal-water fuel droplets to the combustion chamber was proposed and tested. The limitations of this technique and the prospects of experimental results for the optimization of energy equipment operation were also formulated.

  15. Electro-suppression of water nano-droplets' solidification in no man's land: Electromagnetic fields' entropic trapping of supercooled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Prithwish K.; Burnham, Christian J.; English, Niall J.

    2018-01-01

    Understanding water solidification, especially in "No Man's Land" (NML) (150 K < T < 235 K) is crucially important (e.g., upper-troposphere cloud processes) and challenging. A rather neglected aspect of tropospheric ice-crystallite formation is inevitably present electromagnetic fields' role. Here, we employ non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of aggressively quenched supercooled water nano-droplets in the gas phase under NML conditions, in externally applied electromagnetic (e/m) fields, elucidating significant differences between effects of static and oscillating fields: although static fields induce "electro-freezing," e/m fields exhibit the contrary - solidification inhibition. This anti-freeze action extends not only to crystal-ice formation but also restricts amorphisation, i.e., suppression of low-density amorphous ice which forms otherwise in zero-field NML environments. E/m-field applications maintain water in the deeply supercooled state in an "entropic trap," which is ripe for industrial impacts in cryo-freezing, etc.

  16. Three-axis acoustic device for levitation of droplets in an open gas stream and its application to examine sulfur dioxide absorption by water droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Terrance L; Budwig, Ralph S

    2007-01-01

    Two acoustic devices to stabilize a droplet in an open gas stream (single-axis and three-axis levitators) have been designed and tested. The gas stream was provided by a jet apparatus with a 64 mm exit diameter and a uniform velocity profile. The acoustic source used was a Langevin vibrator with a concave reflector. The single-axis levitator relied primarily on the radial force from the acoustic field and was shown to be limited because of significant droplet wandering. The three-axis levitator relied on a combination of the axial and radial forces. The three-axis levitator was applied to examine droplet deformation and circulation and to investigate the uptake of SO(2) from the gas stream to the droplet. Droplets ranging in diameters from 2 to 5 mm were levitated in gas streams with velocities up to 9 ms. Droplet wandering was on the order of a half droplet diameter for a 3 mm diameter droplet. Droplet circulation ranged from the predicted Hadamard-Rybczynski pattern to a rotating droplet pattern. Droplet pH over a central volume of the droplet was measured by planar laser induced fluorescence. The results for the decay of droplet pH versus time are in general agreement with published theory and experiments.

  17. A new approach to solvent extraction: Electronic pulses shatter water droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers in the Chemical Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have invented a device that represents a significant improvement in the area of solvent extraction, which is a widely used technique to recover valuable materials from a liquid stream. Known as the Emulsion Phase Contactor (EPC), the technology uses a pulsed electrical field to enhance recovery of chemicals (either valuable products or pollutants) that are dissolved in water. Because of its higher efficiency, the recovery method can be accomplished in much smaller vessels than those used in conventional solvent extractors, which use mechanical processes to recover chemicals. When water droplets carrying the substance to be extracted are introduced into the EPC, they are shattered by electronic pulses that produce water particles in the 1- to 5-micron size range. These water particles are up to 100 times smaller than those created by mechanical agitation. These tiny particles produce a much greater surface area than can be achieved using chemical agitators, enabling the chemical solvent to extract more material from the water base. In addition, the EPC uses much less power than mechanical methods and has no moving parts; therefore, servicing requirements for the extraction apparatus are expected to be significantly reduced. ORNL researchers initially tested the technology at a very small scale, and evaluated its capabilities in extracting high-value substances such as isotopes, pharmaceuticals, and precious metals. Further work has indicated that the EPC can be applied on a much larger scale to handle more common chemical substances

  18. Impacts of cloud water droplets on the OH production rate from peroxide photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Costa, M T C; Anglada, J M; Francisco, J S; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2017-12-06

    Understanding the difference between observed and modeled concentrations of HO x radicals in the troposphere is a current major issue in atmospheric chemistry. It is widely believed that existing atmospheric models miss a source of such radicals and several potential new sources have been proposed. In recent years, interest has increased on the role played by cloud droplets and organic aerosols. Computer modeling of ozone photolysis, for instance, has shown that atmospheric aqueous interfaces accelerate the associated OH production rate by as much as 3-4 orders of magnitude. Since methylhydroperoxide is a main source and sink of HO x radicals, especially at low NO x concentrations, it is fundamental to assess what is the influence of clouds on its chemistry and photochemistry. In this study, computer simulations for the photolysis of methylhydroperoxide at the air-water interface have been carried out showing that the OH production rate is severely enhanced, reaching a comparable level to ozone photolysis.

  19. Temporal evolution of stable water isotopologues in cloud droplets in a hill cap cloud in central Europe (HCCT-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Spiegel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the first study resolving the temporal evolution of δ2H and δ18O values in cloud droplets during 13 different cloud events. The cloud events were probed on a 937 m high mountain chain in Germany in the framework of the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010 campaign (HCCT-2010 in September and October 2010. The δ values of cloud droplets ranged from −77‰ to −15‰ (δ2H and from −12.1‰ to −3.9‰ (δ18O over the whole campaign. The cloud water line of the measured δ values was δ2H=7.8×δ18O+13×10−3, which is of similar slope, but with higher deuterium excess than other Central European Meteoric Water Lines. Decreasing δ values in the course of the campaign agree with seasonal trends observed in rain in central Europe. The deuterium excess was higher in clouds developing after recent precipitation revealing episodes of regional moisture recycling. The variations in δ values during one cloud event could either result from changes in meteorological conditions during condensation or from variations in the δ values of the water vapor feeding the cloud. To test which of both aspects dominated during the investigated cloud events, we modeled the variation in δ values in cloud water using a closed box model. We could show that the variation in δ values of two cloud events was mainly due to changes in local temperature conditions. For the other eleven cloud events, the variation was most likely caused by changes in the isotopic composition of the advected and entrained vapor. Frontal passages during two of the latter cloud events led to the strongest temporal changes in both δ2H (≈ 6‰ per hour and δ18O (≈ 0.6‰ per hour. Moreover, a detailed trajectory analysis for the two longest cloud events revealed that variations in the entrained vapor were most likely related to rain out or changes in relative

  20. Temporal evolution of stable water isotopologues in cloud droplets in a hill cap cloud in central Europe (HCCT-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, J.K.; Aemisegger, F.; Scholl, M.; Wienhold, F.G.; Collett, J.L.; Lee, T.; van Pinxteren, D.; Mertes, S.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.; Werner, Roland A.; Buchmann, N.; Eugster, W.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present the first study resolving the temporal evolution of δ2H and δ18O values in cloud droplets during 13 different cloud events. The cloud events were probed on a 937 m high mountain chain in Germany in the framework of the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010 campaign (HCCT-2010) in September and October 2010. The δ values of cloud droplets ranged from −77‰ to −15‰ (δ2H) and from −12.1‰ to −3.9‰ (δ18O) over the whole campaign. The cloud water line of the measured δ values was δ2H=7.8×δ18O+13×10−3, which is of similar slope, but with higher deuterium excess than other Central European Meteoric Water Lines. Decreasing δ values in the course of the campaign agree with seasonal trends observed in rain in central Europe. The deuterium excess was higher in clouds developing after recent precipitation revealing episodes of regional moisture recycling. The variations in δ values during one cloud event could either result from changes in meteorological conditions during condensation or from variations in the δ values of the water vapor feeding the cloud. To test which of both aspects dominated during the investigated cloud events, we modeled the variation in δ values in cloud water using a closed box model. We could show that the variation in δ values of two cloud events was mainly due to changes in local temperature conditions. For the other eleven cloud events, the variation was most likely caused by changes in the isotopic composition of the advected and entrained vapor. Frontal passages during two of the latter cloud events led to the strongest temporal changes in both δ2H (≈ 6‰ per hour) and δ18O (≈ 0.6‰ per hour). Moreover, a detailed trajectory analysis for the two longest cloud events revealed that variations in the entrained vapor were most likely related to rain out or changes in relative humidity and temperature at the moisture source region or both. This study illustrates the sensitivity of stable isotope

  1. Experimental validation of a local dehumidification system based on cold water droplets and air-to-air heat exchanger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, E.G.O.N.; Hammink, H.A.J.; Hendriksen, L.J.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive humidity is a problem in Dutch growing circumstances. A traditional solution is heating and natural ventilation. To save energy a number of energy efficient dehumidification methods are developed, like mechanical ventilation with dry outside air or a curtain of cold water droplets. In this

  2. Asymmetric membranes for destabilization of oil droplets in produced water from alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlee, Azierah; Chiam, Chel-Ken; Sarbatly, Rosalam

    2018-05-01

    This work presents a study of destabilization of oil droplets in the produced water from alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) flooding by using four types of laboratory-fabricated polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes. The PVDF membranes were fabricated via immersion precipitation method with ethanol (0 - 30 %, v/v) as the coagulant. The membranes with the effective area of 17.35 cm2 were tested with synthesized ASP solution as the feed in cross-flow microfiltration process. The ASP feed solution initially contained the oil droplets with radius ranged from 40 to 100 nm and the mean radius was 61 nm. Results have shown that the concentration of the ethanol in the coagulation bath affects the formation of the membrane structure and the corresponding porosity, while no significance influence on the membrane thickness. Coalescence of the oil droplets was occurred when the ASP solution permeated through the asymmetric PVDF membranes. Through the coalescence process, the oil droplets were destabilized where the radius of the oil droplets in the permeates increased to 1.5-4 µm with the corresponding mean radius ranged from 2.4 to 2.7 µm.

  3. Non-isothermal effects on SO2 absorption by water droplets. I - Model development. II - Results and discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, M.; Carmichael, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    An analytic model of SO2 absorption in a falling water droplet is developed and a simulation of SO2 washout is performed. Nonisothermic effects on drop growth, droplet physical parameters, reaction rates, and multicomponent diffusion are treated in the model. The gas-liquid interface is assumed to be at equilibrium, and interfacial resistance is negligible. Raindrops are simulated as falling from a 2 km height through an atmospheric region containing SO2. The droplets decrease in size from evaporation and cooling, and their slightly basic pH aids SO2 absorption. The simulation indicates higher SO2 absorption at higher altitudes, and desorption may occur at ground level. Isothermal effects are concluded to be significant, and quantification of effects will depend on further modelling.

  4. Relation between Raman backscattering from droplets and bulk water: Effect of refractive index dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakhotnik, Taras; Reichardt, Jens

    2018-03-01

    A theoretical framework is presented that permits investigations of the relation between inelastic backscattering from microparticles and bulk samples of Raman-active materials. It is based on the Lorentz reciprocity theorem and no fundamental restrictions concerning the microparticle shape apply. The approach provides a simple and intuitive explanation for the enhancement of the differential backscattering cross-section in particles in comparison to bulk. The enhancement factor for scattering of water droplets in the diameter range from 0 to 60 μm (vitally important for the a priori measurement of liquid water content of warm clouds with spectroscopic Raman lidars) is about a factor of 1.2-1.6 larger (depending on the size of the sphere) than an earlier study has shown. The numerical calculations are extended to 1000 μm and demonstrate that dispersion of the refractive index of water becomes an important factor for spheres larger than 100 μm. The physics of the oscillatory phenomena predicted by the simulations is explained.

  5. Mean droplet size and local velocity in horizontal isothermal free jets of air and water, respectively, viscous liquid in quiescent ambient air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Rabadi, S.; Friedel, L. [Fluid Mechanics Institute, Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg (Germany); Al Salaymeh, A. [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Jordan (Jordan)

    2007-01-15

    Measurements using two-dimensional Phase Doppler Anemometry as well as high speed cinematography in free jets at several nozzle exit pressures and mass flow rates, show that the Sauter mean droplet diameter decreases with increasing air and liquid-phase mass flow ratio due to the increase of the air stream impact on the liquid phase. This leads to substantial liquid fragmentation, respectively primary droplet breakup, and hence, satellite droplet formation with small sizes. This trend is also significant in the case of a liquid viscosity higher than that of water. The increased liquid viscosity stabilizes the droplet formation and breakup by reducing the rate of surface perturbations and consequently droplet distortions, ultimately also leading, in total, to the formation of smaller droplets. The droplet velocity decreases with the nozzle downstream distance, basically due to the continual air entrainment and due to the collisions between the droplets. The droplet collisions may induce further liquid fragmentation and, hence, formation of a number of relatively smaller droplets respectively secondary breakup, or may induce agglomeration to comparatively larger liquid fragments that may rain out of the free jet. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Freezing on a Chip—A New Approach to Determine Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation of Micrometer-Sized Water Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Häusler

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We are presenting a new approach to analyze the freezing behavior of aqueous droplets containing ice nucleating particles. The freezing chip consists of an etched and sputtered (15 × 15 × 1 mm gold-plated silicon or pure gold chip, enabling the formation of droplets with defined diameters between 20 and 80 µm. Several applications like an automated process control and an automated image evaluation were implemented to improve the quality of heterogeneous freezing experiments. To show the functionality of the setup, we compared freezing temperatures of aqueous droplets containing ice nucleating particles (i.e., microcline, birch pollen washing water, juniper pollen, and Snomax® solution measured with our setup, with literature data. The ice nucleation active surface/mass site density (ns/m of microcline, juniper pollen, and birch pollen washing water are shown to be in good agreement with literature data. Minor variations can be explained by slight differences in composition and droplet generation technique. The nm values of Snomax® differ by up to one order of magnitude at higher subzero temperatures when compared with fresh samples but are in agreement when compared with reported data of aged Snomax® samples.

  7. Temperature distribution of a water droplet moving on a heated super-hydrophobic surface under the icing condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Masafumi; Sumino, Yutaka; Morita, Katsuaki

    2017-11-01

    In the aviation industry, ice accretion on the airfoil has been a hazardous issue since it greatly declines the aerodynamic performance. Electric heaters and bleed air, which utilizes a part of gas emissions from engines, are used to prevent the icing. Nowadays, a new de-icing system combining electric heaters and super hydrophobic coatings have been developed to reduce the energy consumption. In the system, the heating temperature and the coating area need to be adjusted. Otherwise, the heater excessively consumes energy when it is set too high and when the coating area is not properly located, water droplets which are once dissolved possibly adhere again to the rear part of the airfoil as runback ice In order to deal with these problems, the physical phenomena of water droplets on the hydrophobic surface demand to be figured out. However, not many investigations focused on the behavior of droplets under the icing condition have been conducted. In this research, the temperature profiling of the rolling droplet on a heated super-hydrophobic surface is experimentally observed by the dual luminescent imaging.

  8. Evaporation of impact water droplets in interception processes: Historical precedence of the hypothesis and a brief literature overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkerley, David L.

    2009-10-01

    SummaryIntra-storm evaporation depths exceed post-storm evaporation depths in the interception of rainfall on plant canopies. An important fraction of the intra-storm evaporation may involve the small impact (or splash) droplets produced when raindrops, and perhaps gravity drops (drips released from plant parts), collide with wet plant surfaces. This idea has been presented as a new conception by Murakami [Murakami, S., 2006. A proposal for a new forest canopy interception mechanism: splash droplet evaporation. Journal of Hydrology 319, 72-82; Murakami, S., 2007a. Application of three canopy interception models to a young stand of Japanese cypress and interpretation in terms of interception mechanism. Journal of Hydrology 342, 305-319; Murakami, S., 2007b. A follow-up for the splash droplet evaporation hypothesis of canopy interception and remaining problems: why is humidity unsaturated during rainfall? In: Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference. Japan Society of Hydrology and Water Resources (in Japanese). ] but was in fact advanced by Dunin [Dunin, F.X., O'Loughlin, E.M., Reyenga, W., 1988. Interception loss from eucalypt forest: lysimeter determination of hourly rates for long term evaluation. Hydrological Processes 2, 315-329] more than 20 years ago. In addition, Dunin et al. considered that canopy ventilation might be enhanced in intense rain. This note draws attention to the historical precedence of the work of Dunin et al. and also presents a short review of literature on impact droplet production, highlighting areas where data are still required for the full exploration of the role of droplet evaporation in canopy interception. Droplet production needs to be properly parameterised and included in models of interception processes and landsurface-atmosphere interactions.

  9. Improvement of stability of oil-in-water emulsions containing caseinate-coated droplets by addition of sodium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallandre, S; Decker, E A; McClements, D J

    2007-11-01

    The potential of sodium alginate for improving the stability of emulsions containing caseinate-coated droplets was investigated. One wt% corn oil-in-water emulsions containing anionic caseinate-coated droplets (0.15 wt% sodium caseinate) and anionic sodium alginate (0 to 1 wt%) were prepared at pH 7. The pH of these emulsions was then adjusted to 3.5, so that the anionic alginate molecules adsorbed to the cationic caseinate-coated droplets. Extensive droplet aggregation occurred when there was insufficient alginate to completely saturate the droplet surfaces due to bridging flocculation, and when the nonadsorbed alginate concentration was high enough to induce depletion flocculation. Emulsions with relatively small particle sizes could be formed over a range of alginate concentrations (0.1 to 0.4 wt%). The influence of pHs (3 to 7) and sodium chloride (0 to 500 mM) on the properties of primary (0 wt% alginate) and secondary (0.15 wt% alginate) emulsions was studied. Alginate adsorbed to the droplet surfaces at pHs 3, 4, and 5, but not at pHs 6 and 7, due to electrostatic attraction between anionic groups on the alginate and cationic groups on the adsorbed caseinate. Secondary emulsions had better stability than primary emulsions at pH values near caseinate's isoelectric point (pHs 4 and 5). In addition, secondary emulsions were stable up to higher ionic strengths (< 300 mM) than primary emulsions (<50 mM). The controlled electrostatic deposition method utilized in this study could be used to extend the range of application of dairy protein emulsifiers in the food industry.

  10. Chip-based droplet sorting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2017-11-21

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  11. Milk fat globule membrane coating of large lipid droplets in the diet of young mice prevents body fat accumulation in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Annemarie; Oosting, Annemarie; Engels, Eefje; Kegler, Diane; Kodde, Andrea; Schipper, Lidewij; Verkade, Henkjan J; van der Beek, Eline M

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated protective effects of breast-feeding on childhood obesity. Differences between human milk and infant milk formula (IMF) in dietary lipid structure may contribute to this effect. In our mouse model, feeding a diet containing large lipid droplets coated with phospholipids (PL) (Nuturis®; PL of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) fraction origin) in early life protected against excessive body fat accumulation following a diet challenge in adult life. We now set out to determine the relevance of increased droplet size and/or MFGM lipid droplet coating to the observed anti-obesogenic effects in adult life. From day 16 to 42, male mouse pups were exposed to diets with small (S) or large (L) lipid droplets (0·3 v. 2·9 µm average mode diameter, respectively), either without MFGM or with MFGM coating around the lipid droplet, resulting in four groups: S (control diet), L, Scoating and Lcoating (Nuturis® IMF diet). Mice were subsequently challenged with a Western-style diet until dissection at postnatal day 98. A non-challenged group served as reference (REF). We repeatedly determined body composition between postnatal day 42 and 98. At day 98 plasma and gene expression measurements were performed. Only the Nuturis® IMF diet (Lcoating) in early life containing MFGM-coated large lipid droplets reduced body fat mass to a level comparable with the REF group. These data support the notion that the structural aspects of lipids in human milk, for example, both lipid droplet size as well as the MFGM coating, may contribute to its reported protective effect against obesity in later life.

  12. Investigation of vortex clouds and droplet sizes in heated water spray patterns generated by axisymmetric full cone nozzles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, M Y; Sulaiman, S A; Ariwahjoedi, B; Ku Shaari, Ku Zilati

    2013-01-01

    The hot water sprays are an important part of many industrial processes, where the detailed knowledge of physical phenomena involved in jet transportation, interaction, secondary breakup, evaporation, and coalescence of droplets is important to reach more efficient processes. The objective of the work was to study the water spray jet breakup dynamics, vortex cloud formation, and droplet size distribution under varying temperature and load pressure. Using a high speed camera, the spray patterns generated by axisymmetric full cone nozzles were visualized as a function water temperature and load pressure. The image analysis confirmed that the spray cone angle and width do not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases leading to increased macroscopic spray propagation. The formation and decay of semitorus like vortex clouds were also noticed in spray structures generated at near water boiling point temperature. For the nozzle with smallest orifice diameter (1.19 mm), these vortex clouds were very clear at 90°C heating temperature and 1 bar water load pressure. In addition, the sauter mean diameter (SMD) of the spray droplets was also measured by using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) at different locations downstream of the nozzle exit. It was noticed that SMD varies slightly w.r.t. position when measured at room temperature whereas at higher temperature values, it became almost constant at distance of 55 mm downstream of the nozzle exit.

  13. Investigation of Vortex Clouds and Droplet Sizes in Heated Water Spray Patterns Generated by Axisymmetric Full Cone Nozzles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Naz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The hot water sprays are an important part of many industrial processes, where the detailed knowledge of physical phenomena involved in jet transportation, interaction, secondary breakup, evaporation, and coalescence of droplets is important to reach more efficient processes. The objective of the work was to study the water spray jet breakup dynamics, vortex cloud formation, and droplet size distribution under varying temperature and load pressure. Using a high speed camera, the spray patterns generated by axisymmetric full cone nozzles were visualized as a function water temperature and load pressure. The image analysis confirmed that the spray cone angle and width do not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases leading to increased macroscopic spray propagation. The formation and decay of semitorus like vortex clouds were also noticed in spray structures generated at near water boiling point temperature. For the nozzle with smallest orifice diameter (1.19 mm, these vortex clouds were very clear at 90°C heating temperature and 1 bar water load pressure. In addition, the sauter mean diameter (SMD of the spray droplets was also measured by using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA at different locations downstream of the nozzle exit. It was noticed that SMD varies slightly w.r.t. position when measured at room temperature whereas at higher temperature values, it became almost constant at distance of 55 mm downstream of the nozzle exit.

  14. Prospects for SIMPLE 2000: a large-mass, low-background superheated droplet detector for WIMP searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collar, J.I.; Girard, T.A.; Miley, H.S.; Waysand, G.

    2000-01-01

    The Superheated Instrument for Massive Particle searches (SIMPLE 2000) will consist of an array of 8-16 large active mass (approx. 15 g) superheated droplet detectors (SDDs) to be installed in the new underground laboratory of Rustrel-Pays d'Apt. Several factors make the use of SDDs an attractive approach for the detection of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), namely their intrinsic insensitivity to minimally ionizing particles, high fluorine content, low cost and operation at near ambient pressure and temperature. We comment here on the fabrication, calibration and already-competitive first limits from prototype SDDs for SIMPLE, as well as on the expected immediate increase in sensitivity of the programme, which aims at an exposure of > 25 kg day during 2000. The ability of modest-mass fluorine-rich detectors to investigate regions of neutralino parameter space beyond the reach of the most ambitious cryogenic projects is pointed out. (author)

  15. Prospects for SIMPLE 2000: a large-mass, low-background superheated droplet detector for WIMP searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collar, J I; Puibasset, J; Girard, T A; Limagne, D; Miley, H S; Waysand, G

    2000-01-01

    The Superheated Instrument for Massive Particle searches (SIMPLE 2000) will consist of an array of 8-16 large active mass (≅15 g) superheated droplet detectors (SDDs) to be installed in the new underground laboratory of Rustrel-Pays d'Apt. Several factors make the use of SDDs an attractive approach for the detection of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), namely their intrinsic insensitivity to minimally ionizing particles, high fluorine content, low cost and operation at near ambient pressure and temperature. We comment here on the fabrication, calibration and already-competitive first limits from prototype SDDs for SIMPLE, as well as on the expected immediate increase in sensitivity of the programme, which aims at an exposure of > 25 kg day during 2000. The ability of modest-mass fluorine-rich detectors to investigate regions of neutralino parameter space beyond the reach of the most ambitious cryogenic projects is pointed out

  16. [Dynamics of Irreversible Evaporation of a Water-Protein Droplet and a Problem of Structural and Dynamical Experiments with Single Molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaitan, K V; Armeev, G A; Shaytan, A K

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the effect of isothermal and adiabatic evaporation of water on the state of a water-protein droplet. The discussed problem is of current importance due to development of techniques to perform single molecule experiments using free electron lasers. In such structure-dynamic experiments the delivery of a sample into the X-ray beam is performed using the microdroplet injector. The time between the injection and delivery is in the order of microseconds. In this paper we developed a specialized variant of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for the study of irreversible isothermal evaporation of the droplet. Using in silico experiments we determined the parameters of isothermal evaporation of the water-protein droplet with the sodium and chloride ions in the concentration range of 0.3 M at different temperatures. The energy of irreversible evaporation determined from in silico experiments at the initial stages of evaporation virtually coincides with the specific heat of evaporation for water. For the kinetics of irreversible adiabatic evaporation an exact analytical solution was obtained in the limit of high thermal conductivity of the droplet (or up to the droplet size of -100 Å). This analytical solution incorporates parameters that are determined using in silico. experiments on isothermal droplet evaporation. We show that the kinetics of adiabatic evaporation and cooling of the droplet scales with the droplet size. Our estimates of the water-protemi droplet. freezing rate in the adiabatic regime in a vacuum chamber show that additional techniques for stabilizing the temperature inside the droplet should be used in order to study the conformational transitions of the protein in single molecules. Isothermal and quasi-isothermal conditions are most suitable for studying the conformational transitions upon object functioning. However, in this case it is necessary to take into account the effects of dehydration and rapid increase of ionic strength in an

  17. Experimental investigation of droplet separation in a horizontal counter-current air/water stratified flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, Stephan Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    A stratified counter-current two-phase gas/liquid flow can occur in various technical systems. In the past investigations have mainly been motivated by the possible occurrence of these flows in accident scenarios of nuclear light water-reactors and in numerous applications in process engineering. However, the precise forecast of flow parameters, is still challenging, for instance due to their strong dependency on the geometric boundary conditions. A new approach which uses CFD methods (Computational Fluid Dynamics) promises a better understanding of the flow phenomena and simultaneously a higher scalability of the findings. RANS methods (Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes) are preferred in order to compute industrial processes and geometries. A very deep understanding of the flow behavior and equation systems based on real physics are necessary preconditions to develop the equation system for a reliable RANS approach with predictive power. Therefore, local highly resolved, experimental data is needed in order to provide and validate the required turbulence and phase interaction models. The central objective of this work is to provide the data needed for the code development for these unsteady, turbulent and three-dimensional flows. Experiments were carried out at the WENKA facility (Water Entrainment Channel Karlsruhe) at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The work consists of a detailed description of the test-facility including a new bended channel, the measurement techniques and the experimental results. The characterization of the new channel was done by flow maps. A high-speed imaging study gives an impression of the occurring flow regimes, and different flow phenomena like droplet separation. The velocity distributions as well as various turbulence values were investigated by particle image velocimetry (PIV). In the liquid phase fluorescent tracer-particles were used to suppress optical reflections from the phase surface (fluorescent PIV, FPIV

  18. Butschli Dynamic Droplet System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armstrong, R.; Hanczyc, M.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical oil-water systems such as droplets display lifelike properties and may lend themselves to chemical programming to perform useful work, specifically with respect to the built environment. We present Butschli water-in-oil droplets as a model for further investigation into the development...... reconstructed the Butschli system and observed its life span under a light microscope, observing chemical patterns and droplet behaviors in nearly three hundred replicate experiments. Self-organizing patterns were observed, and during this dynamic, embodied phase the droplets provided a means of introducing...... temporal and spatial order in the system with the potential for chemical programmability. The authors propose that the discrete formation of dynamic droplets, characterized by their lifelike behavior patterns, during a variable window of time (from 30 s to 30 min after the addition of alkaline water...

  19. Slow relaxation mode in concentrated oil-in-water microemulsions consisting of repulsive droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Y.; Ushiki, H.; Courbin, L.; Panizza, P.

    2007-02-01

    The present contribution reports on the observation of two diffusive relaxation modes in a concentrated microemulsion made of repulsive droplets. These two modes can be interpreted in the frame of Weissman’s and Pusey’s theoretical pioneering works. The fast mode is associated to the collective diffusion of droplets whereas the slow one corresponds to the relaxation of droplet concentration fluctuations associated with composition and/or size. We show that (i) repulsive interactions considerably slow down the latter and (ii) a generalized Stokes Einstein relationship between its coefficient of diffusion and the Newtonian viscosity of the solutions, similar to the Walden’s rule for electrolytes, holds for concentrated microemulsion systems made of repulsive droplets.

  20. Dynamics and Suppression Effectiveness of Monodisperse Water Droplets in Non-Premixed Counterflow Flames

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zegers, E. J; Williams, B. A; Sheinson, R. S; Fleming, J. W

    2000-01-01

    ...-premixed propane/air counterflow flames are reported. Droplets were generated piezoelectrically, and the size and velocity distributions and the number density were determined by phase-Doppler particle anemometry...

  1. Skylab fluid mechanics simulations: Oscillation, rotation, collision and coalescence of water droplets under low-gravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, O. H., Jr.; Hung, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Skylab 4 crew members performed a series of demonstrations showing the oscillations, rotations, as well as collision coalescence of water droplets which simulate various physical models of fluids under low gravity environment. The results from Skylab demonstrations provide information and illustrate the potential of an orbiting space-oriented research laboratory for the study of more sophisticated fluid mechanic experiments. Experiments and results are discussed.

  2. Food gels filled with emulsion droplets : linking large deformation properties to sensory perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sala, G.

    2007-01-01

    Key words: polymer gels, particle gels, emulsion, large deformation, friction, sensory This thesis reports studies on the large deformation and lubrication properties of emulsion-filled gels and the way these properties are related to the sensory perception of the gels. The design of the studies

  3. Multiple scattering of light by water cloud droplets with external and internal mixing of black carbon aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hai-Hua; Sun Xian-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The mixture of water cloud droplets with black carbon impurities is modeled by external and internal mixing models. The internal mixing model is modeled with a two-layered sphere (water cloud droplets containing black carbon (BC) inclusions), and the single scattering and absorption characteristics are calculated at the visible wavelength of 0.55 μm by using the Lorenz—Mie theory. The external mixing model is developed assuming that the same amount of BC particles are mixed with the water droplets externally. The multiple scattering characteristics are computed by using the Monte Carlo method. The results show that when the size of the BC aerosol is small, the reflection intensity of the internal mixing model is bigger than that of the external mixing model. However, if the size of the BC aerosol is big, the absorption of the internal mixing model will be larger than that of the external mixing model. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  4. On the enrichment of hydrophobic organic compounds in fog droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsaraj, K. T.; Thoma, G. J.; Reible, D. D.; Thibodeaux, L. J.

    The unusual degree of enrichment of hydrophobic organics in fogwater droplets reported by several investigators can be interpreted as a result of (a) the effects of temperature correction on the reported enrichment factors, (b) the effects of colloidal organic matter (both filterable and non-filterable) in fog water and (c) the effects of the large air-water interfacial adsorption of neutral hydrophobic organics on the tiny fog droplets. The enrichment factor was directly correlated to the hydrophobicity (or the activity coefficient in water) of the compounds, as indicated by their octanol-water partition constants. Compounds with large octanol-water partition coefficients (high activity coefficients in water) showed the largest enrichment. Available experimental data on the adsorption of hydrophobic compounds at the air-water interface and on colloidal organic carbon were used to show that the large specific air-water interfacial areas of fog droplets contribute significantly to the enrichment factor.

  5. Droplet collisions in turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenziel, G.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid droplets occur in many natural phenomena and play an important role in a large number of industrial applications. One of the distinct properties of droplets as opposed to solid particles is their ability to merge, or coalesce upon collision. Coalescence of liquid drops is of importance in for

  6. Lotus-like effect for metal filings recovery and particle removal on heated metal surfaces using Leidenfrost water droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cher Lin Clara; Sapiha, Kostantyn; Leong, Yoke Fun Hannah; Choi, Siwon; Anariba, Franklin; Thio, Beng Joo Reginald

    2015-07-21

    A "lotus-like" effect is applied to demonstrate the ability of the Leidenfrost water droplets to recover Cu particles on a heated Al substrate. Cu particles on the heated surface adhere to the rim of the Leidenfrost droplets and eventually coat the droplets' surface to form an aggregation. When Fe filings are added to the Cu particles, the aggregated mixture can then be collected using a strong rare earth magnet (NdFeB) upon evaporation of the water. We also show that the Leidenfrost effect can be effectively utilized to recover both hydrophobic (dust and activated carbon) and hydrophilic (SiO2 and MgO) particles from heated Al surfaces without any topographical modification or surfactant addition. Our results show that hydrophobic and hydrophilic materials can be collected with >92% and >96% effectiveness on grooved and smooth Al surfaces, respectively. Furthermore, we observed no significant differences in the amount of material collected above the Leidenfrost point within the tested temperature range (240 °C vs. 340 °C) as well as when the Al sheet was replaced with a Cu sheet as the substrate. However, we did observe that the Leidenfrost droplets were able to collect a greater amount of material when the working liquid was water than when it was ethanol. Our findings show promise in the development of an effective precious coinage metal filings recovery technology for application in the mint industry, as well as the self-cleaning of metallic and semiconductor surfaces where manual cleaning is not amenable.

  7. Milk fat globule membrane coating of large lipid droplets in the diet of young mice prevents body fat accumulation in adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, Annemarie; Oosting, Annemarie; Engels, Eefje; Kegler, Diane; Kodde, Andrea; Schipper, Lidewij; Verkade, Henkjan J.; van der Beek, Eline M.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated protective effects of breast-feeding on childhood obesity. Differences between human milk and infant milk formula (IMF) in dietary lipid structure may contribute to this effect. In our mouse model, feeding a diet containing large lipid droplets coated with

  8. Heterofibrins: inhibitors of lipid droplet formation from a deep-water southern Australian marine sponge, Spongia (Heterofibria) sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Angela A; Rae, James; Fontaine, Frank; Conte, Melissa M; Khalil, Zeinab; Martin, Sally; Parton, Robert G; Capon, Robert J

    2010-07-21

    A bioassay-guided search for inhibitors of lipid droplet formation in a deep-water southern Australian marine sponge, Spongia (Heterofibria) sp., yielded six new compounds, fatty acids heterofibrins A1 (1) and B1 (4), along with related monolactyl and dilactyl esters, heterofibrins A2 (2), B2 (5), A3 (3) and B3 (6). Heterofibrin structures were assigned on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analysis, with comparison to chiral synthetic model compounds. All heterofibrins possess a diyne-ene moiety, while the monolactyl and dilactyl moiety featured in selected heterofibrins is unprecedented in the natural products literature. SAR by co-metabolite studies on the heterofibrins confirmed them to be non-cytotoxic, with the carboxylic acids 1 and 4 inhibiting lipid droplet formation in A431 fibroblast cell lines. Such inhibitors have potential application in the management of obesity, diabetes and atherosclerosis

  9. Simulation of droplet impact onto a deep pool for large Froude numbers in different open-source codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchagova, V. N.; Kraposhin, M. V.; Marchevsky, I. K.; Smirnova, E. V.

    2017-11-01

    A droplet impact on a deep pool can induce macro-scale or micro-scale effects like a crown splash, a high-speed jet, formation of secondary droplets or thin liquid films, etc. It depends on the diameter and velocity of the droplet, liquid properties, effects of external forces and other factors that a ratio of dimensionless criteria can account for. In the present research, we considered the droplet and the pool consist of the same viscous incompressible liquid. We took surface tension into account but neglected gravity forces. We used two open-source codes (OpenFOAM and Gerris) for our computations. We review the possibility of using these codes for simulation of processes in free-surface flows that may take place after a droplet impact on the pool. Both codes simulated several modes of droplet impact. We estimated the effect of liquid properties with respect to the Reynolds number and Weber number. Numerical simulation enabled us to find boundaries between different modes of droplet impact on a deep pool and to plot corresponding mode maps. The ratio of liquid density to that of the surrounding gas induces several changes in mode maps. Increasing this density ratio suppresses the crown splash.

  10. Communication: energy benchmarking with quantum Monte Carlo for water nano-droplets and bulk liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfè, D; Bartók, A P; Csányi, G; Gillan, M J

    2013-06-14

    We show the feasibility of using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) to compute benchmark energies for configuration samples of thermal-equilibrium water clusters and the bulk liquid containing up to 64 molecules. Evidence that the accuracy of these benchmarks approaches that of basis-set converged coupled-cluster calculations is noted. We illustrate the usefulness of the benchmarks by using them to analyze the errors of the popular BLYP approximation of density functional theory (DFT). The results indicate the possibility of using QMC as a routine tool for analyzing DFT errors for non-covalent bonding in many types of condensed-phase molecular system.

  11. Prospects for SIMPLE 2000 A large-mass, low-background Superheated Droplet Detector for WIMP searches

    CERN Document Server

    Collar, J I; Girard, T A; Limagne, D; Miley, H S; Waysand, G

    2000-01-01

    SIMPLE 2000 ({\\underline S}uperheated {\\underline I}nstrument for {\\underline M}assive {\\underline P}artic{\\underline {LE}} searches) will consist of an array of eight to sixteen large active mass ($\\sim15$ g) Superheated Droplet Detectors(SDDs) to be installed in the new underground laboratory of Rustrel-Pays d'Apt. Several factors make of SDDs an attractive approach for the detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), namely their intrinsic insensitivity to minimum ionizing particles, high fluorine content, low cost and operation near ambient pressure and temperature. We comment here on the fabrication, calibration and already-competitive first limits from SIMPLE prototype SDDs, as well as on the expected immediate increase in sensitivity of the program, which aims at an exposure of $>$25 kg-day during the year 2000. The ability of modest-mass fluorine-rich detectors to explore regions of neutralino parameter space beyond the reach of the most ambitious cryogenic projects is pointed out.

  12. Droplet interface bilayer reconstitution and activity measurement of the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Hanna M G; Booth, Paula; Haylock, Stuart; Bazin, Richard; Templer, Richard H; Ces, Oscar

    2014-09-06

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) provide an exciting new platform for the study of membrane proteins in stable bilayers of controlled composition. To date, the successful reconstitution and activity measurement of membrane proteins in DIBs has relied on the use of the synthetic lipid 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC). We report the functional reconstitution of the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) into DIBs composed of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), a lipid of significantly greater biological relevance than DPhPC. MscL functionality has been demonstrated using a fluorescence-based assay, showing that dye flow occurs across the DIB when MscL is gated by the cysteine reactive chemical 2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl methane thiosulfonate bromide (MTSET). MscL has already been the subject of a number of studies investigating its interaction with the membrane. We propose that this method will pave the way for future MscL studies looking in detail at the effects of controlled composition or membrane asymmetry on MscL activity using biologically relevant lipids and will also be applicable to other lipid-protein systems, paving the way for the study of membrane proteins in DIBs with biologically relevant lipids.

  13. Evaporation of Ventilated Water Droplet: Connection Between Heat and Mass Transfer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smolík, Jiří; Ondráčková, Lucie; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Kulmala, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 6 (2001), s. 739-748 ISSN 0021-8502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : droplet evaporation * heat and mass transfer Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.605, year: 2001

  14. The dynamics of the water droplet impacting onto hot solid surfaces at medium Weber numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrakusuma, Windy H.; Kamal, Samsul; Indarto; Dyan Susila, M.; Hermawan; Deendarlianto

    2017-10-01

    The effects of the wettability of a droplet impacting onto a hot solid surface under medium Weber numbers were studied experimentally. The Weber numbers used in the present experiment were 52.1, 57.6, and 63.1. Three kinds of solid surfaces with different wettability were used. These were normal stainless steel (NSS), TiO2 coated NSS, and TiO2 coated NSS radiated with ultraviolet rays. The surface temperatures were varied from 60 to 200 °C. The image of side the view and 30° from horizontal were taken to explain the spreading and the interfacial behavior of a single droplet during impact the hot solid surfaces. It was found that under medium Weber numbers, the surface wettability plays an important role on the droplet spreading and evaporation time during the impact on the hot solid surfaces. The higher the wettability, the larger the droplet spreading on the hot surface, and the lower the evaporation time.

  15. Suppression of NaNO3 crystal nucleation by glycerol: micro-Raman observation on the efflorescence process of mixed glycerol/NaNO3/water droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun-Ying; Zhang, Yun; Zeng, Guang; Zheng, Chuan-Ming; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2012-02-09

    Although the hygroscopicity of a NaNO(3)/water microdroplet and a polyalcohol/water microdroplet, two of the most important aerosols in atmosphere, has been widely studied, little is known about the relationship between the hygroscopic behavior of mixed NaNO(3)/polyalcohol/water droplets and their structures on the molecular level. In this study, the hygroscopicity of mixed glycerol/NaNO(3)/water droplets deposited on a hydrophobic substrate was studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy with organic-to-inorganic molar ratios (OIRs) of 0.5, 1, and 2. In the mixed glycerol/NaNO(3)/water droplets, glycerol molecules tended to combine with Na(+) and NO(3)(-) ions by electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding, respectively. On the basis of the analyses of the changes of symmetric stretching (v(s)-CH(2)), asymmetric stretching (v(a)-CH(2)), their area ratio (Av(a)-CH(2)/Av(s)-CH(2)) of glycerol, and symmetric stretching band of NO(3)(-) (ν(1)-NO(3)(-)) with relative humidity (RH), it was found that the conformation of glycerol was transformed from αα mainly to γγ and partly to αγ with a decreasing RH in the mixed droplets, contrary to the case in the glycerol/water droplet. In addition, the glycerol with γγ and αγ conformation had strong interaction with Na(+) and NO(3)(-) respectively, which suppressed the formation of contact of ions and delayed the efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) for the mixed droplets compared to the NaNO(3)/water droplet. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  16. Experimental characterization of a silicone oil-in-water droplet generator based on a micro T-junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, B.; Pulvirenti, B.; Puccetti, G.; Morini, G. L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper deals with the emulsion of two immiscible fluids in a micro T-junction. An opposed-flow micro T-junction obtained by means of square microchannels (with a side of 300 µm) fabricated in a pure fused glass chip has been used for the formation of silicone oil-in-water (O/W) droplets. The experimental results have been obtained by considering both pure deionized water and a mixture of deionized water and surfactant (Tween 20) as the continuous flow. The results shown in this paper highlight that the presence of surfactant, also in very small concentrations, is able to change drastically the flow patterns of the two-phase flow generated by the T-junction. Concentration in weight of Tween 20 between 1 and 2% in the continuous flow is able to promote highly monodispersed emulsions with low polydispersity, especially for low flow rate ratios between the dispersed and continuous phase flows. On the contrary, by avoiding the use of surfactant, a stratified flow is obtained. The experimental results obtained in this work have been used in order to link the depth ratio of the stratified flow and the non-dimensional length of the plugs in droplet-based flow to the flow rate ratio between the dispersed and continuous flows.

  17. Numerical Investigation of the Main Characteristics of Heat and Mass Transfer while Heating the Heterogeneous Water Droplet in the Hot Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piskunov Maxim V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes of heat and evaporation of heterogeneous water droplet with solid (by the example of carbon inclusion in hot (from 800 K to 1500 K gases were investigated by the developed models of heat and mass transfer. We defined the limited conditions, characteristics of the droplet and the gas medium which are sufficient for implementing the “explosive” destruction of heterogeneous droplet due to intensive vaporization on an inner interface, and intensive evaporation of liquid from an external (free droplet surface. The values of the main characteristic of the process (period from start of heating to “explosive” destruction obtained in response to using various heat and mass transfer models were compared.

  18. Dynamic behaviour of natural oil droplets through the water column in deep-water environment: the case of the Lower Congo Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatiault, R.; Dhont, D.; Loncke, L.; Durrieu De Madron, X.; Dubucq, D.; Channelliere, C.; Bourrin, F.

    2017-12-01

    Key words: Hydrocarbon seepage, Oil Slick, Lower Congo Basin, Underwater deflection, Deep-water Pockmark, Ascent speedThe space-borne imagery provides a significant means to locate active oil seeps and to estimate the expelled volume in the marine environment. The analysis of numerous overlapping satellite images revealed an abundant volume of 4400 m3 of oil naturally reaching the sea surface per year, expelled from more than a hundred seep sites through the Lower Congo Basin. The active seepage area is located in the distal compressional province of the basin where salt napes and squeezed diapirs. The integration of current data was used to link accurately sea surface manifestations of natural oil leakages with active fluid flow features on the seafloor. A mooring with ADCPs (Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers) distributed throughout the water column provided an efficient calibration tool to evaluate the horizontal deflection of oil droplets. Using a Eulerian propagation model that considered a range of probable ascent speeds, we estimated the oil migration pathways through the water column using two different approaches. The first approach consisted in simulating the backwards trajectory of oil droplets using sea surface oil slicks locations and concomitant current measurements. The second method analyzed the spatial spreading of the surfacing signatures of natural oil slicks based on 21 years of satellite observations. The location of the surfacing points of oil droplets at the sea surface is restricted to a circle of 2.5 km radius around the release point at the seafloor. Both approaches provided a range of ascent speeds of oil droplets between 3 to 8 cm.s-1. The low deflection values validate the near-vertical links between the average surfacing area of oil slicks at the sea surface with specific seafloor disturbances (i.e. pockmarks or mounds) known to expel fluids.

  19. Cold Heat Release Characteristics of Solidified Oil Droplet-Water Solution Latent Heat Emulsion by Air Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shin-Ichi

    The present work investigates the cold heat-release characteristics of the solidified oil droplets (tetradecane, C14H30, freezing point 278.9 K)/water solution emulsion as a latent heat-storage material having a low melting point. An air bubbles-emulsion direct-contact heat exchange method is selected for the cold heat-results from the solidified oil droplet-emulsion layer. This type of direct-contact method results in the high thermal efficiency. The diameter of air bubbles in the emulsion increases as compared with that in the pure water. The air bubbles blown from a nozzle show a strong mixing behavior during rising in the emulsion. The temperature effectiveness, the sensible heat release time and the latent heat release time have been measured as experimental parameters. The useful nondimensional emulsion level equations for these parameters have been derived in terms of the nondimensional emalsion level expressed the emulsion layer dimensions, Reynolds number for air flow, Stefan number and heat capacity ratio.

  20. Influence of radiative heat and mass transfer mechanism in system “water droplet-high-temperature gases” on integral characteristics of liquid evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glushkov Dmitrii O.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical and mathematical (system of differential equations in private derivatives models of heat and mass transfer were developed to investigate the evaporation processes of water droplets and emulsions on its base moving in high-temperature (more than 1000 K gas flow. The model takes into account a conductive and radiative heat transfer in water droplet and also a convective, conductive and radiative heat exchange with high-temperature gas area. Water vapors characteristic temperature and concentration in small wall-adjacent area and trace of the droplet, numerical values of evaporation velocities at different surface temperature, the characteristic time of complete droplet evaporation were determined. Experiments for confidence estimation of calculated integral characteristics of processes under investigation - mass liquid evaporation velocities were conducted with use of cross-correlation recording video equipment. Their satisfactory fit (deviations of experimental and theoretical velocities were less than 15% was obtained. The influence of radiative heat and mass transfer mechanism on characteristics of endothermal phase transformations in a wide temperature variation range was established by comparison of obtained results of numerical simulation with known theoretical data for “diffusion” mechanisms of water droplets and other liquids evaporation in gas.

  1. Enzyme kinetics in acoustically levitated droplets of supercooled water: a novel approach to cryoenzymology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, David D; Nardozzi, Jonathan D

    2005-04-15

    The rate of the alkaline phosphatase-catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferone phosphate was measured in acoustically levitated droplets of aqueous tris (50 mM) at pH 8.5 at 22 +/- 2 degrees C and in supercooled solution at -6 +/- 2 degrees C. At 22 degrees C, the rate of product formation was in excellent agreement with the rate observed in bulk solution in a cuvette, indicating that the acoustic levitation process does not alter the enzyme activity. The rate of the reaction decreased 6-fold in supercooled solution at -6 +/- 2 degrees C. The acoustic levitator apparatus is described in detail.

  2. Effect of particle size on droplet infiltration into hydrophobic porous media as a model of water repellent soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlett, Christopher A E; Shirtcliffe, Neil J; McHale, Glen; Ahn, Sujung; Bryant, Robert; Doerr, Stefan H; Newton, Michael I

    2011-11-15

    The wettability of soil is of great importance for plants and soil biota, and in determining the risk for preferential flow, surface runoff, flooding,and soil erosion. The molarity of ethanol droplet (MED) test is widely used for quantifying the severity of water repellency in soils that show reduced wettability and is assumed to be independent of soil particle size. The minimum ethanol concentration at which droplet penetration occurs within a short time (≤ 10 s) provides an estimate of the initial advancing contact angle at which spontaneous wetting is expected. In this study, we test the assumption of particle size independence using a simple model of soil, represented by layers of small (~0.2-2 mm) diameter beads that predict the effect of changing bead radius in the top layer on capillary driven imbibition. Experimental results using a three-layer bead system show broad agreement with the model and demonstrate a dependence of the MED test on particle size. The results show that the critical initial advancing contact angle for penetration can be considerably less than 90° and varies with particle size, demonstrating that a key assumption currently used in the MED testing of soil is not necessarily valid.

  3. Radiation characteristics of water droplets in a fire-inspired environment: A Monte Carlo ray tracing study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bifen; Zhao, Xinyu

    2018-06-01

    The effects of radiation of water mists in a fire-inspired environment are numerically investigated for different complexities of radiative media in a three-dimensional cubic enclosure. A Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) method is employed to solve the radiative transfer equation (RTE). The anisotropic scattering behaviors of water mists are modeled by a combination of the Mie theory and the Henyey-Greestein relation. A tabulation method considering the size and wavelength dependencies is established for water droplets, to reduce the computational cost associated with the evaluation of the nongray spectral properties of water mists. Validation and verification of the coupled MCRT solver are performed using a one-dimensional slab with gray gas in comparison with the analytical solutions. Parametric studies are then performed using a three-dimensional cubic box to examine radiation of two monodispersed and one polydispersed water mist systems. The tabulation method can reduce the computational cost by a factor of one hundred. Results obtained without any scattering model better conform with results obtained from the anisotropic model than the isotropic scattering model, when a highly directional emissive source is applied. For isotropic emissive sources, isotropic and anisotropic scattering models predict comparable results. The addition of different volume fractions of soot shows that soot may have a negative impact on the effectiveness of water mists in absorbing radiation when its volume fraction exceeds certain threshold.

  4. Large Bandgap Semiconductors for Solar Water Splitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malizia, Mauro

    Photoelectrochemical water splitting represents an eco-friendly technology that could enable the production of hydrogen using water as reactant and solar energy as primary energy source. The exploitation of solar energy for the production of hydrogen would help modern society to reduce the reliance...... on fossil fuels as primary feedstock for hydrogen production and diminish the emission of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, weakening the global warming phenomenon.The dissertation reports the development of GaP (gallium phosphide) photocathodes as a large bandgap semiconductor for photoelectrochemical...... water splitting devices having tandem design. The increase of the photovoltage produced by GaP under illumination was the main goal of this work. GaP has a bandgap of 2.25 eV and could in theory produce a photovoltage of approximately 1.7 V. Instead, the photovoltage produced by the semiconductor...

  5. Water droplet dynamic behavior during removal from a proton exchange membrane fuel cell gas diffusion layer by Lattice-Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molaeimanesh, Golamreza; Akbari, Mohammad Hadi [Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    A major challenge in the application of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is water management, with the flooding of electrodes as the main issue. The Lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is a relatively new technique that is superior in modeling the dynamic interface of multiphase fluid flow in complex microstructures such as non-homogeneous and anisotropic porous media of PEMFC electrodes. In this study, the dynamic behavior of a water droplet during removal from gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a PEMFC electrode with interdigitated flow field is simulated using LBM. The effects of GDL wettability and its spanwise and transverse gradients on the removal process are investigated. The results demonstrate great influence of wettability and its spanwise and transverse gradients on the dynamic behavior of droplets during the removal process. Although increasing the hydrophobicity of GDL results in better droplet removal, its increase beyond a critical value does not show a significant effect.

  6. Performance of droplet generator and droplet collector in liquid droplet radiator under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totani, T.; Itami, M.; Nagata, H.; Kudo, I.; Iwasaki, A.; Hosokawa, S.

    2002-06-01

    The Liquid Droplet Radiator (LDR) has an advantage over comparable conventional radiators in terms of the rejected heat power-weight ratio. Therefore, the LDR has attracted attention as an advanced radiator for high-power space systems that will be prerequisite for large space structures. The performance of the LDR under microgravity condition has been studied from the viewpoint of operational space use of the LDR in the future. In this study, the performances of a droplet generator and a droplet collector in the LDR are investigated using drop shafts in Japan: MGLAB and JAMIC. As a result, it is considered that (1) the droplet generator can produce uniform droplet streams in the droplet diameter range from 200 to 280 [µm] and the spacing range from 400 to 950 [µm] under microgravity condition, (2) the droplet collector with the incidence angle of 35 degrees can prevent a uniform droplet stream, in which droplet diameter is 250 [µm] and the velocity is 16 [m/s], from splashing under microgravity condition, whereas splashes may occur at the surface of the droplet collector in the event that a nonuniform droplet stream collides against it.

  7. Dependence of the Internal Structure on Water/Particle Volume Ratio in an Amphiphilic Janus Particle-Water-Oil Ternary System: From Micelle-like Clusters to Emulsions of Spherical Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Tomohiro G; Iwashita, Yasutaka; Kimura, Yasuyuki

    2017-01-31

    Amphiphilic Janus particles (AJP), composed of hydrophilic and hydrophobic hemispheres, are one of the simplest anisotropic colloids, and they exhibit higher surface activities than particles with homogeneous surface properties. Consequently, a ternary system of AJP, water, and oil can form extremely stable Pickering emulsions, with internal structures that depend on the Janus structure of the particles and the system composition. However, the detail of these structures has not been fully explored, especially for the composition range where the amount of the minority liquid phase and AJP are comparable, where one would expect the Janus characteristics to be directly reflected. In this study, we varied the volume ratio of the particles and the minority liquid phase, water, by 2 orders of magnitude around the comparable composition range, and observed the resultant structures at the resolution of the individual particle dimensions by optical microscopy. When the volume ratio of water is smaller than that of the Janus particles, capillary interactions between the hydrophilic hemispheres of the particles induce micelle-like clusters in which the hydrophilic sides of the particles face inward. With increasing water content, these clusters grow into a rodlike morphology. When the water volume exceeds that of the particles, the structure transforms into an emulsion state composed of spherical droplets, colloidosomes, because of the surface activity of particles at the liquid-liquid interface. Thus, we found that a change in volume fraction alters the mechanism of structure formation in the ternary system, and large resulting morphological changes in the self-assembled structures reflect the anisotropy of the particles. The self-assembly shows essential commonalities with that in microemulsions of surfactant molecules, however the AJP system is stabilized only kinetically. Analysis of the dependence of the emulsion droplet size on composition shows that almost all the

  8. Retrievals and Comparisons of Various MODIS-Spectrum Inferred Water Cloud Droplet Effective Radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu-Lung, Chang; Minnis, Patrick; Lin, Bin; Sunny, Sun-Mack; Khaiyer, Mandana M.

    2007-01-01

    Cloud droplet effective radius retrievals from different Aqua MODIS nearinfrared channels (2.1- micrometer, 3.7- micrometer, and 1.6- micrometer) show considerable differences even among most confident QC pixels. Both Collection 004 and Collection 005 MOD06 show smaller mean effective radii at 3.7- micrometer wavelength than at 2.1- micrometer and 1.6- micrometer wavelengths. Differences in effective radius retrievals between Collection 004 and Collection 005 may be affected by cloud top height/temperature differences, which mainly occur for optically thin clouds. Changes in cloud top height and temperature for thin clouds have different impacts on the effective radius retrievals from 2.1- micrometer, 3.7- micrometer, and 1.6- micrometer channels. Independent retrievals (this study) show, on average, more consistency in the three effective radius retrievals. This study is for Aqua MODIS only.

  9. A theoretical investigation of gaseous absorption by water droplets from SO2-HNO3-NH3-CO2-HCl mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewuyi, Y. G.; Carmichael, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    A physical-chemical model is developed and used to investigate gaseous absorption by water droplets from trace gas mixtures. The model is an extension of that of Carmichael and Peters (1979) and includes the simultaneous absorption of SO2, NH3, HNO3, CO2, and HCl. Gas phase depletion is also considered. Presented results demonstrate that the absorption behavior of raindrops is strongly dependent on drop size, fall distance, trace gas concentrations, and the chemical and physical properties of the constituents of the mixture. In addition, when gas phase depletion is considered, the absorption rates and equilibrium values are also dependent on the precipitation rate itself. Also, the trace constituents liquid phase concentrations may be a factor of six or more lower when gas depletion is considered then when the depletion is ignored. However, the hydrogen ion concentration may be insensitive to the gas phase depletion.

  10. Large capacity water and air bath calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, S.J.; Kasperski, P.W.; Renz, D.P.; Wetzel, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    EG and G Mound Applied Technologies has developed an 11 in. x 17 in. sample size water bath and an 11 in. x 17 in. sample size air bath calorimeter which both function under servo control mode of operation. The water bath calorimeter has four air bath preconditioners to increase sample throughput and the air bath calorimeter has two air bath preconditioners. The large capacity calorimeters and preconditioners were unique to Mound design which brought about unique design challenges. Both large capacity systems calculate the optimum set temperature for each preconditioner which is available to the operator. Each system is controlled by a personal computer under DOS which allows the operator to download data to commercial software packages when the calorimeter is idle. Qualification testing yielded a one standard deviation of 0.6% for 0.2W to 3.0W Pu-238 heat standard range in the water bath calorimeter and a one standard deviation of 0.3% for the 6.0W to 20.0W Pu-238 heat standard range in the air bath calorimeter

  11. Single-droplet evaporation kinetics and particle formation in an acoustic levitator. Part 1: evaporation of water microdroplets assessed using boundary-layer and acoustic levitation theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffter, Heiko; Lee, Geoffrey

    2007-09-01

    The suitability of a single droplet drying acoustic levitator as a model for the spray drying of aqueous, pharmaceutically-relevant solutes used to produce protein-loaded particles has been examined. The acoustic levitator was initially evaluated by measuring the drying rates of droplets of pure water in dependence of drying-air temperature and flow rate. The measured drying rates were higher than those predicted by boundary layer theory because of the effects of primary acoustic streaming. Sherwood numbers of 2.6, 3.6, and 4.4 at drying-air temperatures of 25 degrees C, 40 degrees C, and 60 degrees C were determined, respectively. Acoustic levitation theory could predict the measured drying rates and Sherwood numbers only when a forced-convection drying-air stream was used to neuralize the retarding effect of secondary acoustic streaming on evaporation rate. At still higher drying-air flow rates, the Ranz-Marshall correlation accurately predicts Sherwood number, provided a stable droplet position in the standing acoustic wave is maintained. The measured Sherwood numbers and droplet Reynolds numbers show that experiments performed in the levitator in still air are taking place effectively under conditions of substantial forced convection. The similitude of these values to those occurring in spray dryers is fortuitous for the suitability of the acoustic levitator as a droplet evaporation model for spray drying. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  12. Experimental evidence supporting the insensitivity of cloud droplet formation to the mass accommodation coefficient for condensation of water vapor to liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langridge, Justin M.; Richardson, Mathews S.; Lack, Daniel A.; Murphy, Daniel M.

    2016-06-01

    The mass accommodation coefficient for uptake of water vapor to liquid water, αM, has been constrained using photoacoustic measurements of aqueous absorbing aerosol. Measurements performed over a range of relative humidities and pressures were compared to detailed model calculations treating coupled heat and mass transfer occurring during photoacoustic laser heating cycles. The strengths and weaknesses of this technique are very different to those for droplet growth/evaporation experiments that have typically been applied to these measurements, making this a useful complement to existing studies. Our measurements provide robust evidence that αM is greater than 0.1 for all humidities tested and greater than 0.3 for data obtained at relative humidities greater than 88% where the aerosol surface was most like pure water. These values of αM are above the threshold at which kinetic limitations are expected to impact the activation and growth of aerosol particles in warm cloud formation.

  13. Experimental Observations on the Deformation and Breakup of Water Droplets Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Feo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model placed at the end of the rotating arm was moved at speeds of 50 to 90 m/sec. A monosize droplet generator was employed to produce droplets that were allowed to fall from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil at a given location. High speed imaging was employed to observe the interaction between the droplets and the airfoil. The high speed imaging allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. A tracking software program was used to measure from the high speed movies the horizontal and vertical displacement of the droplet against time. The velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of a given droplet from beginning of deformation to breakup and/or hitting the airfoil. Results are presented for droplets with a diameter of 490 micrometers at airfoil speeds of 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 m/sec

  14. Dual-Functional Superhydrophobic Textiles with Asymmetric Roll-Down/Pinned States for Water Droplet Transportation and Oil-Water Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaojing; Li, Hongqiang; Lai, Xuejun; Zhang, Lin; Liao, Xiaofeng; Wang, Jing; Chen, Zhonghua; He, Jie; Zeng, Xingrong

    2018-01-31

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with tunable adhesion from lotus-leaf to rose-petal states have generated much attention for their potential applications in self-cleaning, anti-icing, oil-water separation, microdroplet transportation, and microfluidic devices. Herein we report a facile magnetic-field-manipulation strategy to fabricate dual-functional superhydrophobic textiles with asymmetric roll-down/pinned states on the two surfaces of the textile simultaneously. Upon exposure to a static magnetic field, fluoroalkylsilane-modified iron oxide (F-Fe 3 O 4 ) nanoparticles in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) moved along the magnetic field to construct discrepant hierarchical structures and roughnesses on the two sides of the textile. The positive surface (closer to the magnet, or P-surface) showed a water contact angle up to 165°, and the opposite surface (or O-surface) had a water contact angle of 152.5°. The P-surface where water droplets easily slid off with a sliding angle of 7.5° appeared in the "roll-down" state as Cassie mode, while the O-surface was in the "pinned" state as Wenzel mode, where water droplets firmly adhered even at vertical (90°) and inverted (180°) angles. The surface morphology and wetting mode were adjustable by varying the ratios of F-Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles and PDMS. By taking advantage of the asymmetric adhesion behaviors, the as-fabricated superhydrophobic textile was successfully applied in no-loss microdroplet transportation and oil-water separation. Our method is simple and cost-effective. The fabricated textile has the characteristics of superhydrophobicity, magnetic responsiveness, excellent chemical stability, adjustable surface morphology, and controllable adhesion. Our findings conceivably stand out as a new tool to fabricate functional superhydrophobic materials with asymmetric surface properties for various potential applications.

  15. Advancement of In-Flight Alumina Powder Spheroidization Process with Water Droplet Injection Using a Small Power DC-RF Hybrid Plasma Flow System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Juyong; Takana, Hidemasa; Park, Sangkyu; Nishiyama, Hideya

    2012-09-01

    The correlation between plasma thermofluid characteristics and alumina powder spheroidization processes with water droplet injection using a small power DC-RF hybrid plasma flow system was experimentally clarified. Micro-sized water droplets with a low water flow rate were injected into the tail of thermal plasma flow so as not to disturb the plasma flow directly. Injected water droplets were vaporized in the thermal plasma flow and were transported upstream in the plasma flow to the torch by the backflow. After dissociation of water, the production of hydrogen was detected by the optical emission spectroscopy in the downstream RF plasma flow. The emission area of the DC plasma jet expanded and elongated in the vicinity of the RF coils. Additionally, the emission area of RF plasma flow enlarged and was visible as red emission in the downstream RF plasma flow in the vicinity below the RF coils due to hydrogen production. Therefore, the plasma flow mixed with produced hydrogen increased the plasma enthalpy and the highest spheroidization rate of 97% was obtained at a water flow rate of 15 Sm l/min and an atomizing gas flow rate of 8 S l/min using a small power DC-RF hybrid plasma flow system.

  16. Confinement Effects on Chemical Equilibria: Pentacyano(PyrazineFerrate(II Stability Changes within Nanosized Droplets of Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teofilo Borunda

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale confinement is known to impact properties of molecules and we observed changes in the reactivity of an iron coordination complex, pentacyano(pyrazineferrate(II. The confinement of two coordination complexes in a sodium AOT/isooctane reverse micellar (RM water droplet was found to dramatically increase the hydrolysis rate of [Fe(CN5pyz]3− and change the monomer-dimer equilibria between [Fe(CN5pyz]3− and [Fe2(CN10pyz]6−. Combined UV-Vis and 1H-NMR spectra of these complexes in RMs were analyzed and the position of the monomer-dimer equilibrium and the relative reaction times were determined at three different RM sizes. The data show that the hydrolysis rates (loss of pyrazine are dramatically enhanced in RMs over bulk water and increase as the size of the RM decreases. Likewise, the monomer-dimer equilibrium changes to favor the formation of dimer as the RM size decreases. We conclude that the effects of the [Fe(CN5pyz]3− stability is related to its solvation within the RM.

  17. A Postnatal Diet Containing Phospholipids, Processed to Yield Large, Phospholipid-Coated Lipid Droplets, Affects Specific Cognitive Behaviors in Healthy Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Lidewij; van Dijk, Gertjan; Broersen, Laus M; Loos, Maarten; Bartke, Nana; Scheurink, Anton Jw; van der Beek, Eline M

    2016-06-01

    Infant cognitive development can be positively influenced by breastfeeding rather than formula feeding. The composition of breast milk, especially lipid quality, and the duration of breastfeeding have been linked to this effect. We investigated whether the physical properties and composition of lipid droplets in milk may contribute to cognitive development. From postnatal day (P) 16 to P44, healthy male C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice were fed either a control or a concept rodent diet, in which the dietary lipid droplets were large and coated with milk phospholipids, resembling more closely the physical properties and composition of breast milk lipids. Thereafter, all mice were fed an AIN-93M semisynthetic rodent diet. The mice were subjected to various cognitive tests during adolescence (P35-P44) and adulthood (P70-P101). On P102, mice were killed and brain phospholipids were analyzed. The concept diet improved performance in short-term memory tasks that rely on novelty exploration during adolescence (T-maze; spontaneous alternation 87% in concept-fed mice compared with 74% in mice fed control diet; P diet. Brain phospholipid composition at P102 was not different between diet groups. Exposure to a diet with lipids mimicking more closely the structure and composition of lipids in breast milk improved specific cognitive behaviors in mice. These data suggest that lipid structure should be considered as a relevant target to improve dietary lipid quality in infant milk formulas. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. Excimer laser produced plasmas in copper wire targets and water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyo-Dong; Alexander, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Elastically scattered incident radiation (ESIR) from a copper wire target illuminated by a KrF laser pulse at lambda = 248 nm shows a dinstinct two-peak structure which is dependent on the incident energy. The time required to reach the critical electron density (n(sub c) approximately = 1.8 x 10(exp 22) electrons/cu cm) is estimated at 11 ns based on experimental results. Detailed ESIR characteristics for water have been reported previously by the authors. Initiation of the broadband emission for copper plasma begins at 6.5 +/- 1.45 ns after the arrival of the laser pulse. However, the broadband emission occurs at 11 +/- 0.36 ns for water. For a diatomic substance such as water, the electron energy rapidly dissipates due to dissociation of water molecules, which is absent in a monatomic species such as copper. When the energy falls below the excitation energy of the lowest electron state for water, it becomes a subexcitation electron. Lifetimes of the subexcited electrons to the vibrational states are estimated to be of the order of 10(exp -9) s. In addition, the ionization potential of copper (440-530 nm) is approximately 6 eV, which is about two times smaller than the 13 eV ionization potential reported for water. The higher ionization potential contributes to the longer observed delay time for plasma formation in water. After initiation, a longer time is required for copper plasma to reach its peak value. This time delay in reaching the maximum intensity is attributed to the energy loss during the interband transition in copper.

  19. Investigation of cloud condensation nuclei properties and droplet growth kinetics of the water-soluble aerosol fraction in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padró, Luz T.; Tkacik, Daniel; Lathem, Terry; Hennigan, Chris J.; Sullivan, Amy P.; Weber, Rodney J.; Huey, L. Greg; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-05-01

    We present hygroscopic and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) relevant properties of the water-soluble fraction of Mexico City aerosol collected upon filters during the 2006 Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. Application of κ-Köhler theory to the observed CCN activity gave a fairly constant hygroscopicity parameter (κ = 0.28 ± 0.06) regardless of location and organic fraction. Köhler theory analysis was used to understand this invariance by separating the molar volume and surfactant contributions to the CCN activity. Organics were found to depress surface tension (10-15%) from that of pure water. Daytime samples exhibited lower molar mass (˜200 amu) and surface tension depression than nighttime samples (˜400 amu); this is consistent with fresh hygroscopic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) condensing onto particles during peak photochemical hours, subsequently aging during nighttime periods of high relative humidity. Changes in surface tension partially compensate for shifts in average molar volume to give the constant hygroscopicity observed, which implies the amount (volume fraction) of soluble material in the parent aerosol is the key composition parameter required for CCN predictions. This finding, if applicable elsewhere, may explain why CCN predictions are often found to be insensitive to assumptions of chemical composition and provides a very simple way to parameterize organic hygroscopicity in atmospheric models (i.e., κorg = 0.28ɛWSOC). Special care should be given, however, to surface tension depression from organic surfactants, as its nonlinear dependence with organic fraction may introduce biases in observed (and predicted) hygroscopicity. Finally, threshold droplet growth analysis suggests the water-soluble organics do not affect activation kinetics.

  20. Ceramic membrane fouling during ultrafiltration of oil/water emulsions: Roles played by stabilization surfactants of oil droplets

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Dongwei

    2015-04-07

    Oil/water (O/W) emulsion stabilized by surfactants is the part of oily wastewater that is most difficult to handle. Ceramic membrane ultrafiltration presently is an ideal process to treat O/W emulsions. However, little is known about the fouling mechanism of the ceramic membrane during O/W emulsion treatment. This paper investigated how stabilization surfactants of O/W emulsions influence the irreversible fouling of ceramic membranes during ultrafiltration. An unexpected phenomenon observed was that irreversible fouling was much less when the charge of the stabilization surfactant of O/W emulsions is opposite to the membrane. The less ceramic membrane fouling in this case was proposed to be due to a synergetic steric effect and demulsification effect which prevented the penetration of oil droplets into membrane pores and led to less pore blockage. This proposed mechanism was supported by cross section images of fouled and virgin ceramic membranes taken with scanning electron microscopy, regression results of classical fouling models, and analysis of organic components rejected by the membrane. Furthermore, this mechanism was also verified by the existence of a steric effect and demulsification effect. Our finding suggests that ceramic membrane oppositely charged to the stabilization surfactant should be applied in ultrafiltration of O/W emulsions to alleviate irreversible membrane fouling. It could be a useful rule for ceramic membrane ultrafiltration of oily wastewater. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  1. Ceramic membrane fouling during ultrafiltration of oil/water emulsions: roles played by stabilization surfactants of oil droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dongwei; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Jun

    2015-04-07

    Oil/water (O/W) emulsion stabilized by surfactants is the part of oily wastewater that is most difficult to handle. Ceramic membrane ultrafiltration presently is an ideal process to treat O/W emulsions. However, little is known about the fouling mechanism of the ceramic membrane during O/W emulsion treatment. This paper investigated how stabilization surfactants of O/W emulsions influence the irreversible fouling of ceramic membranes during ultrafiltration. An unexpected phenomenon observed was that irreversible fouling was much less when the charge of the stabilization surfactant of O/W emulsions is opposite to the membrane. The less ceramic membrane fouling in this case was proposed to be due to a synergetic steric effect and demulsification effect which prevented the penetration of oil droplets into membrane pores and led to less pore blockage. This proposed mechanism was supported by cross section images of fouled and virgin ceramic membranes taken with scanning electron microscopy, regression results of classical fouling models, and analysis of organic components rejected by the membrane. Furthermore, this mechanism was also verified by the existence of a steric effect and demulsification effect. Our finding suggests that ceramic membrane oppositely charged to the stabilization surfactant should be applied in ultrafiltration of O/W emulsions to alleviate irreversible membrane fouling. It could be a useful rule for ceramic membrane ultrafiltration of oily wastewater.

  2. Effects of Water Hardness on Spray Droplet Size Under Aerial Application Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Nonimaging Light‐Scattering Instruments (ASTM, 2003). Table 1. Spray formulations for water hardness levels. Hardness (ppm) Tank, L (gal) Kocide, kg (lb...characteristics in a spray using optical nonimaging light‐scattering instruments. W. Conshohocken, Pa.: ASTM Intl. ASTM. 2004. E1620‐97. Standard

  3. Dual-nozzle microfluidic droplet generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Wook; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Tae Hyun; Ha, Jang Ho; Ahrberg, Christian D.; Chung, Bong Geun

    2018-05-01

    The droplet-generating microfluidics has become an important technique for a variety of applications ranging from single cell analysis to nanoparticle synthesis. Although there are a large number of methods for generating and experimenting with droplets on microfluidic devices, the dispensing of droplets from these microfluidic devices is a challenge due to aggregation and merging of droplets at the interface of microfluidic devices. Here, we present a microfluidic dual-nozzle device for the generation and dispensing of uniform-sized droplets. The first nozzle of the microfluidic device is used for the generation of the droplets, while the second nozzle can accelerate the droplets and increase the spacing between them, allowing for facile dispensing of droplets. Computational fluid dynamic simulations were conducted to optimize the design parameters of the microfluidic device.

  4. Validation of CTF Droplet Entrainment and Annular/Mist Closure Models using Riso Steam/Water Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wysocki, Aaron J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Salko, Robert K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This report summarizes the work done to validate the droplet entrainment and de-entrainment models as well as two-phase closure models in the CTF code by comparison with experimental data obtained at Riso National Laboratory. The Riso data included a series of over 250 steam/water experiments that were performed in both tube and annulus geometries over a range of various pressures and outlet qualities. Experimental conditions were set so that the majority of cases were in the annular/mist ow regime. Measurements included liquid lm ow rate, droplet ow rate, lm thickness, and two-phase pressure drop. CTF was used to model 180 of the tubular geometry cases, matching experimental geometry, outlet pressure, and outlet ow quality to experimental values. CTF results were compared to the experimental data at the outlet of the test section in terms of vapor and entrained liquid ow fractions, pressure drop per unit length, and liquid lm thickness. The entire process of generating CTF input decks, running cases, extracting data, and generating comparison plots was scripted using Python and Matplotlib for a completely automated validation process. All test cases and scripting tools have been committed to the COBRA-TF master repository and selected cases have been added to the continuous testing system to serve as regression tests. The dierences between the CTF- and experimentally-calculated ow fraction values were con- sistent with previous calculations by Wurtz, who applied the same entrainment correlation to the same data. It has been found that CTF's entrainment/de-entrainment predictive capability in the annular/mist ow regime for this particular facility is comparable to the licensed industry code, COBRAG. While lm and droplet predictions are generally good, it has been found that accuracy is diminished at lower ow qualities. This nding is consistent with the noted deciencies in the Wurtz entrainment model employed by CTF. The CTF predicted two-phase pressure drop in

  5. Janus droplets: liquid marbles coated with dielectric/semiconductor particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Bormashenko, Yelena; Pogreb, Roman; Gendelman, Oleg

    2011-01-04

    The manufacturing of water droplets wrapped with two different powders, carbon black (semiconductor) and polytetrafluoroethylene (dielectric), is presented. Droplets composed of two hemispheres (Janus droplets) characterized by various physical and chemical properties are reported first. Watermelon-like striped liquid marbles are reported. Janus droplets remained stable on solid and liquid supports and could be activated with an electric field.

  6. Liquid droplet radiator technology issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattick, A.T.; Hertzberg, A.

    1985-01-01

    The operation of the liquid droplet radiator (LDR) is analyzed to establish design constraints for the LDR components and to predict the performance of an integrated LDR system. The design constraints largely result from mass loss considerations: fluid choice is governed by evaporation loss; droplet generation techniques must be capable of precise aiming of >10 5 droplet streams; and collection losses must be less than 1 droplet in 10 7 . Concepts for droplet generation and collection components are discussed and incorporated into a mass model for an LDR system. This model predicts that LDR's using lithium, Dow 705 silicone fluid, or NaK may be several times lighter than heat pipe radiators. 13 refs

  7. Partitioning of semi-soluble organic compounds between the water phase and oil droplets in produced water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faksness, Liv-Guri; Grini, Per Gerhard; Daling, Per S

    2004-04-01

    When selecting produced water treatment technologies, one should focus on reducing the major contributors to the total environmental impact. These are dispersed oil and semi-soluble hydrocarbons, alkylated phenols, and added chemicals. Experiments with produced water have been performed offshore on the Statoil operated platforms Gullfaks C and Statfjord B. These experiments were designed to find how much of the environmentally relevant compounds were dissolved in the water phase and not associated to the dispersed oil in the produced water. Results show that the distribution between the dispersed oil and the water phase varies highly for the different components groups. For example the concentration of PAHs and the C6-C9 alkylated phenols is strongly correlated to the content of dispersed oil. Therefore, the technologies enhancing the removal of dispersed oil have a higher potential for reducing the environmental impact of the produced water than previously considered.

  8. Partitioning of semi-soluble organic compounds between the water phase and oil droplets in produced water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faksness, Liv-Guri; Grini, Per Gerhard; Daling, Per S.

    2004-01-01

    When selecting produced water treatment technologies, one should focus on reducing the major contributors to the total environmental impact. These are dispersed oil and semi-soluble hydrocarbons, alkylated phenols, and added chemicals. Experiments with produced water have been performed offshore on the Statoil operated platforms Gullfaks C and Statfjord B. These experiments were designed to find how much of the environmentally relevant compounds were dissolved in the water phase and not associated to the dispersed oil in the produced water. Results show that the distribution between the dispersed oil and the water phase varies highly for the different components groups. For example the concentration of PAHs and the C6-C9 alkylated phenols is strongly correlated to the content of dispersed oil. Therefore, the technologies enhancing the removal of dispersed oil have a higher potential for reducing the environmental impact of the produced water than previously considered

  9. Drag of evaporating or condensing droplets in low Reynolds number flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukowicz, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    The steady-state drag of evaporating or condensing droplets in low Reynolds number flow is computed. Droplet drag in air is obtained for five representative liquids (water, methanol, benzene, heptane, octane) for a range of ambient temperatures, pressures, and vapor concentrations. The drag is in general increased for a condensing droplet, and decreased for an evaporating droplet. The changes in drag can be quite large and depend in detail on the degree of evaporation or condensation, and on the individual liquid and vapor properties. The present results are used to test the existing experimentally derived correlations of Eisenklam and Yuen and Chen in the low Reynolds number regime. The Yuen and Chen correlation is found to be quite successful, but only in the case of condensation or mild evaporation. An improved correlation is suggested for evaporating droplets

  10. Optimized broad-histogram simulations for strong first-order phase transitions: droplet transitions in the large-Q Potts model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Bela; Gull, Emanuel; Trebst, Simon; Troyer, Matthias; Huse, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The numerical simulation of strongly first-order phase transitions has remained a notoriously difficult problem even for classical systems due to the exponentially suppressed (thermal) equilibration in the vicinity of such a transition. In the absence of efficient update techniques, a common approach for improving equilibration in Monte Carlo simulations is broadening the sampled statistical ensemble beyond the bimodal distribution of the canonical ensemble. Here we show how a recently developed feedback algorithm can systematically optimize such broad-histogram ensembles and significantly speed up equilibration in comparison with other extended ensemble techniques such as flat-histogram, multicanonical and Wang-Landau sampling. We simulate, as a prototypical example of a strong first-order transition, the two-dimensional Potts model with up to Q = 250 different states in large systems. The optimized histogram develops a distinct multi-peak structure, thereby resolving entropic barriers and their associated phase transitions in the phase coexistence region—such as droplet nucleation and annihilation, and droplet-strip transitions for systems with periodic boundary conditions. We characterize the efficiency of the optimized histogram sampling by measuring round-trip times τ(N, Q) across the phase transition for samples comprised of N spins. While we find power-law scaling of τ versus N for small Q \\lesssim 50 and N \\lesssim 40^2 , we observe a crossover to exponential scaling for larger Q. These results demonstrate that despite the ensemble optimization, broad-histogram simulations cannot fully eliminate the supercritical slowing down at strongly first-order transitions.

  11. Large Water Cherenkov Detectors - Technical Issues -

    CERN Document Server

    Aihara, H

    2010-01-01

    We address technical issues and challenges to construct a one-megaton scale water Cherenkov detector for neutrino detection. Studies presented here are mostly based on preliminary work for Hyper Kamiokande project.

  12. Study of the Internal Flow and Evaporation Characteristic Inside a Water Droplet on a Vertical Vibrating Hydrophobic Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang-Seok; Lim, Hee-Chang [Pusan Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Thermal Marangoni flow has been observed inside droplets on heated surfaces, finally resulting in a coffee stain effect. This study aims to visualize and control the thermal Marangoni flow by employing periodic vertical vibration. The variations in the contact angle and internal volume of the droplet as it evaporates is observed by using a combination of continuous light and a still camera. With regard to the internal velocity, the particle image velocimetry system is applied to visualize the internal thermal Marangoni flow. In order to estimate the internal temperature gradient and surface tension on the surface of a droplet, the theoretical model based on the conduction and convection theory of heat transfer is applied. Thus, the internal velocity increases with an increase in plate temperature. The flow directions of the Marangoni and gravitational flows are opposite, and hence, it may be possible to control the coffee stain effect.

  13. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of acetone inside evaporating and burning fuel droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shringi, D. S.; Shaw, B. D.; Dwyer, H. A.

    2009-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence was used to visualize acetone fields inside individual droplets of pure acetone as well as droplets composed of methanol or 1-propanol initially mixed with acetone. Droplets were supported on a horizontal wire and two vaporization conditions were investigated: (1) slow evaporation in room air and (2) droplet combustion, which leads to substantially faster droplet surface regression rates. Acetone was preferentially gasified, causing its concentration in droplets to drop in time with resultant decreases in acetone fluorescence intensities. Slowly vaporizing droplets did not exhibit large spatial variations of fluorescence within droplets, indicating that these droplets were relatively well mixed. Ignition of droplets led to significant variations in fluorescence intensities within droplets, indicating that these droplets were not well mixed. Ignited droplets composed of mixtures of 1-propanol and acetone showed large time-varying changes in shapes for higher acetone concentrations, suggesting that bubble formation was occurring in these droplets.

  14. Immersion freezing of water and aqueous ammonium sulfate droplets initiated by humic-like substances as a function of water activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. J. Rigg

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Immersion freezing of water and aqueous (NH42SO4 droplets containing leonardite (LEO and Pahokee peat (PP serving as surrogates for humic-like substances (HULIS has been investigated. Organic aerosol containing HULIS are ubiquitous in the atmosphere; however, their potential for ice cloud formation is uncertain. Immersion freezing has been studied for temperatures as low as 215 K and solution water activity, aw, from 0.85 to 1.0. The freezing temperatures of water and aqueous solution droplets containing LEO and PP are 5–15 K warmer than homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures. Heterogeneous freezing temperatures can be represented by a horizontal shift of the ice melting curve as a function of solution aw by Δaw = 0.2703 and 0.2466, respectively. Corresponding hetrogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients, Jhet, are (9.6 ± 2.5×104 and (5.4 ± 1.4×104 cm−2 s−1 for LEO and PP containing droplets, respectively, and remain constant along freezing curves characterized by Δaw. Consequently predictions of freezing temperatures and kinetics can be made without knowledge of the solute type when relative humidity and ice nuclei (IN surface areas are known. The acquired ice nucleation data are applied to evaluate different approaches to fit and reproduce experimentally derived frozen fractions. In addition, we apply a basic formulation of classical nucleation theory (α(T-model to calculate contact angles and frozen fractions. Contact angles calculated for each ice nucleus as a function of temperature, α(T-model, reproduce exactly experimentally derived frozen fractions without involving free-fit parameters. However, assigning the IN a single contact angle for the entire population (single-α model is not suited to represent the frozen fractions. Application of α-PDF, active sites, and deterministic model approaches to measured frozen fractions yield similar good representations. Furthermore, when using a single parameterization of α-PDF or

  15. Effect of surface free energies on the heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet: A molecular dynamics simulation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, W.; Lan, Z.; Peng, B. L.; Wen, R. F.; Ma, X. H., E-mail: xuehuma@dlut.edu.cn [Liaoning Provincial Key Laboratory of Clean Utilization of Chemical Resources, Institute of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2015-02-07

    Heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet on surfaces with different solid-liquid interaction intensities is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The interaction potentials between surface atoms and vapor molecules are adjusted to obtain various surface free energies, and the nucleation process and wetting state of nuclei on surfaces are investigated. The results indicate that near-constant contact angles are already established for nano-scale nuclei on various surfaces, with the contact angle decreasing with solid-liquid interaction intensities linearly. Meanwhile, noticeable fluctuation of vapor-liquid interfaces can be observed for the nuclei that deposited on surfaces, which is caused by the asymmetric forces from vapor molecules. The formation and growth rate of nuclei are increasing with the solid-liquid interaction intensities. For low energy surface, the attraction of surface atoms to water molecules is comparably weak, and the pre-existing clusters can depart from the surface and enter into the bulk vapor phase. The distribution of clusters within the bulk vapor phase becomes competitive as compared with that absorbed on surface. For moderate energy surfaces, heterogeneous nucleation predominates and the formation of clusters within bulk vapor phase is suppressed. The effect of high energy particles that embedded in low energy surface is also discussed under the same simulation system. The nucleation preferably initiates on the high energy particles, and the clusters that formed on the heterogeneous particles are trapped around their original positions instead of migrating around as that observed on smooth surfaces. This feature makes it possible for the heterogeneous particles to act as fixed nucleation sites, and simulation results also suggest that the number of nuclei increases monotonously with the number of high energy particles. The growth of nuclei on high energy particles can be divided into three sub-stages, beginning with the formation

  16. LDA measurement of droplet behavior across tie plate during dispersed flow portion of loca reflood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.L.; Srinivasan, J.; Cho, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    The flow of an air-water droplet dispersion in a simulated 3-D test section in the reflood portion of LOCA was studied. For this purpose, a new scheme of Laser-Doppler Anemometry for the simultaneous measurement of size and velocity of large-size [0.5 mm-6 mm] droplets was developed and utilized. It was observed that the size distribution of the reentrained droplets depends mainly on the flow regimes and is essentially independent of that of the incoming dispersion below the tie plate. 8 refs

  17. On the application of the classic Kessler and Berry schemes in Large Eddy Simulation models with a particular emphasis on cloud autoconversion, the onset time of precipitation and droplet evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ghosh

    Full Text Available Many Large Eddy Simulation (LES models use the classic Kessler parameterisation either as it is or in a modified form to model the process of cloud water autoconversion into precipitation. The Kessler scheme, being linear, is particularly useful and is computationally straightforward to implement. However, a major limitation with this scheme lies in its inability to predict different autoconversion rates for maritime and continental clouds. In contrast, the Berry formulation overcomes this difficulty, although it is cubic. Due to their different forms, it is difficult to match the two solutions to each other. In this paper we single out the processes of cloud conversion and accretion operating in a deep model cloud and neglect the advection terms for simplicity. This facilitates exact analytical integration and we are able to derive new expressions for the time of onset of precipitation using both the Kessler and Berry formulations. We then discuss the conditions when the two schemes are equivalent. Finally, we also critically examine the process of droplet evaporation within the framework of the classic Kessler scheme. We improve the existing parameterisation with an accurate estimation of the diffusional mass transport of water vapour. We then demonstrate the overall robustness of our calculations by comparing our results with the experimental observations of Beard and Pruppacher, and find excellent agreement.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure · Cloud physics and chemistry · Pollution · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics · Precipitation

  18. On the application of the classic Kessler and Berry schemes in Large Eddy Simulation models with a particular emphasis on cloud autoconversion, the onset time of precipitation and droplet evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ghosh

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Many Large Eddy Simulation (LES models use the classic Kessler parameterisation either as it is or in a modified form to model the process of cloud water autoconversion into precipitation. The Kessler scheme, being linear, is particularly useful and is computationally straightforward to implement. However, a major limitation with this scheme lies in its inability to predict different autoconversion rates for maritime and continental clouds. In contrast, the Berry formulation overcomes this difficulty, although it is cubic. Due to their different forms, it is difficult to match the two solutions to each other. In this paper we single out the processes of cloud conversion and accretion operating in a deep model cloud and neglect the advection terms for simplicity. This facilitates exact analytical integration and we are able to derive new expressions for the time of onset of precipitation using both the Kessler and Berry formulations. We then discuss the conditions when the two schemes are equivalent. Finally, we also critically examine the process of droplet evaporation within the framework of the classic Kessler scheme. We improve the existing parameterisation with an accurate estimation of the diffusional mass transport of water vapour. We then demonstrate the overall robustness of our calculations by comparing our results with the experimental observations of Beard and Pruppacher, and find excellent agreement.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure · Cloud physics and chemistry · Pollution · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics · Precipitation

  19. Reentrainment of droplet from grid spacer in mist flow portion of LOCA reflood of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.L.; Cho, S.K.; Sheen, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation is made on the influence of a quenched grid spacer on the greatly enhanced heat transfer from heated fuel rods during the mist flow phase of emergency reflood of loss of coolant accident (LOCA) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The situation for the case of a dry grid spacer before its quenching has not been covered in this study. The experimental technique used is a relatively simple optical scheme which combines the reference-mode laser-Doppler anemometry making use of the scattering of a light beam from a droplet. The results reveal that the large droplets in the mist flow, which are intercepted by the grid spacer, are responsible for the creation of a large number of smaller droplets. These small droplets, due to their large surface area to mass ratios, can serve as superb evaporative cooling agents to heat transfer downstream of the grid spacer

  20. Evaporation of sessile droplets affected by graphite nanoparticles and binary base fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xin; Duan, Fei

    2014-11-26

    The effects of ethanol component and nanoparticle concentration on evaporation dynamics of graphite-water nanofluid droplets have been studied experimentally. The results show that the formed deposition patterns vary greatly with an increase in ethanol concentration from 0 to 50 vol %. Nanoparticles have been observed to be carried to the droplet surface and form a large piece of aggregate. The volume evaporation rate on average increases as the ethanol concentration increases from 0 to 50 vol % in the binary mixture nanofluid droplets. The evaporation rate at the initial stage is more rapid than that at the late stage to dry, revealing a deviation from a linear fitting line, standing for a constant evaporation rate. The deviation is more intense with a higher ethanol concentration. The ethanol-induced smaller liquid-vapor surface tension leads to higher wettability of the nanofluid droplets. The graphite nanoparticles in ethanol-water droplets reinforce the pinning effect in the drying process, and the droplets with more ethanol demonstrate the depinning behavior only at the late stage. The addition of graphite nanoparticles in water enhances a droplet baseline spreading at the beginning of evaporation, a pinning effect during evaporation, and the evaporation rate. However, with a relatively high nanoparticle concentration, the enhancement is attenuated.

  1. Contact freezing of supercooled cloud droplets on collision with mineral dust particles: effect of particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Nadine; Duft, Denis; Kiselev, Alexei; Leisner, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The contact freezing of supercooled cloud droplets is one of the potentially important and the least investigated heterogeneous mechanism of ice formation in the tropospheric clouds [1]. On the time scales of cloud lifetime the freezing of supercooled water droplets via contact mechanism may occur at higher temperature compared to the same IN immersed in the droplet. However, the laboratory experiments of contact freezing are very challenging due to the number of factors affecting the probability of ice formation. In our experiment we study single water droplets freely levitated in the laminar flow of mineral dust particles acting as the contact freezing nuclei. By repeating the freezing experiment sufficient number of times we are able to reproduce statistical freezing behavior of large ensembles of supercooled droplets and measure the average rate of freezing events. We show that the rate of freezing at given temperature is governed only by the rate of droplet -particle collision and by the properties of the contact ice nuclei. In this contribution we investigate the relationship between the freezing probability and the size of mineral dust particle (represented by illite) and show that their IN efficiency scales with the particle size. Based on this observation, we discuss the similarity between the freezing of supercooled water droplets in immersion and contact modes and possible mechanisms of apparent enhancement of the contact freezing efficiency. [1] - K.C. Young, The role of contact nucleation in ice phase initiation in clouds, Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences 31, 1974

  2. Heat transfer in droplet-laden turbulent channel flow with phase transition in the presence of a thin film of water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukhvostova, A.; Kuerten, J.G.M.; Geurts, B.J.; Grigoriadis, D.G.E.; Geurts, B.J.; Kuerten, H.; Fröhlich, J.; Armenio, V.

    2018-01-01

    In the field of multiphase systems droplet-laden channel flow presents a challenging topic not only because of how turbulent flow influences the mass and heat transfer properties of droplets but also how droplets modulate the flow. In this contribution we focus on droplet-laden turbulent channel

  3. Cloud Droplet Size and Liquid Water Path Retrievals From Zenith Radiance Measurements: Examples From the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program and the Aerosol Robotic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, J. C.; Marshak, A.; Huang, C.-H.; Varnai, T.; Hogan, R. J.; Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Knyazikhin, Y.; O'Connor, E. J.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    The ground-based Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) and NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) routinely monitor clouds using zenith radiances at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Using the transmittance calculated from such measurements, we have developed a new retrieval method for cloud effective droplet size and conducted extensive tests for non-precipitating liquid water clouds. The underlying principle is to combine a water-absorbing wavelength (i.e. 1640 nm) with a nonwater-absorbing wavelength for acquiring information on cloud droplet size and optical depth. For simulated stratocumulus clouds with liquid water path less than 300 g/sq m and horizontal resolution of 201m, the retrieval method underestimates the mean effective radius by 0.8 m, with a root-mean-squared error of 1.7 m and a relative deviation of 13 %. For actual observations with a liquid water path less than 450 gm.2 at the ARM Oklahoma site during 2007-2008, our 1.5 min-averaged retrievals are generally larger by around 1 m than those from combined ground-based cloud radar and microwave radiometer at a 5min temporal resolution. We also compared our retrievals to those from combined shortwave flux and microwave observations for relatively homogeneous clouds, showing that the bias between these two retrieval sets is negligible, but the error of 2.6 m and the relative deviation of 22% are larger than those found in our simulation case. Finally, the transmittance-based cloud effective droplet radii agree to better than 11% with satellite observations and have a negative bias of 1 m. Overall, the retrieval method provides reasonable cloud effective radius estimates, which can enhance the cloud products of both ARM and AERONET.

  4. The dynamics of droplets in moist Rayleigh-Benard turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; van der Voort, Dennis; Kinney, Greg; Cantrell, Will; Shaw, Raymond

    2017-11-01

    Clouds are an intricate part of the climate, and strongly influence atmospheric dynamics and radiative balances. While properties such as cloud albedo and precipitation rate are large scale effects, these properties are determined by dynamics on the microscale, such droplet sizes, liquid water content, etc. The growth of droplets from condensation is dependent on a multitude of parameters, such as aerosol concentration (nucleation sites) and turbulence (scalar fluctuations and coalescence). However, the precise mechanism behind droplet growth and clustering in a cloud environment is still unclear. In this investigation we use a facility called the Pi Chamber to generate a (miniature) cloud in a laboratory setting with known boundary conditions, such as aerosol concentration, temperature, and humidity. Through the use of particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) on the droplets generated in the cloud, we can investigate the dynamics of these cloud droplets in the convective (Rayleigh-Benard) turbulence generated through an induced temperature gradient. We show the influence of the temperature gradient and Froude number (gravity forces) on the changing turbulence anisotropy, large scale circulation, and small-scale dissipation rates. This work was supported by National Science Foundation Grant AGS-1623429.

  5. Fast electric control of the droplet size in a microfluidic T-junction droplet generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaeian, Mostafa; Hardt, Steffen

    2018-05-01

    The effect of DC electric fields on the generation of droplets of water and xanthan gum solutions in sunflower oil at a microfluidic T-junction is experimentally studied. The electric field leads to a significant reduction of the droplet diameter, by about a factor of 2 in the case of water droplets. The droplet size can be tuned by varying the electric field strength, an effect that can be employed to produce a stream of droplets with a tailor-made size sequence. Compared to the case of purely hydrodynamic droplet production without electric fields, the electric control has about the same effect on the droplet size if the electric stress at the liquid/liquid interface is the same as the hydrodynamic stress.

  6. Ultra-large scale AFM of lipid droplet arrays: investigating the ink transfer volume in dip pen nanolithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Förste, Alexander; Pfirrmann, Marco; Sachs, Johannes; Gröger, Roland; Walheim, Stefan; Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Fuchs, Harald; Schimmel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    There are only few quantitative studies commenting on the writing process in dip-pen nanolithography with lipids. Lipids are important carrier ink molecules for the delivery of bio-functional patters in bio-nanotechnology. In order to better understand and control the writing process, more information on the transfer of lipid material from the tip to the substrate is needed. The dependence of the transferred ink volume on the dwell time of the tip on the substrate was investigated by topography measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM) that is characterized by an ultra-large scan range of 800 × 800 μm 2 . For this purpose arrays of dots of the phospholipid1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were written onto planar glass substrates and the resulting pattern was imaged by large scan area AFM. Two writing regimes were identified, characterized of either a steady decline or a constant ink volume transfer per dot feature. For the steady state ink transfer, a linear relationship between the dwell time and the dot volume was determined, which is characterized by a flow rate of about 16 femtoliters per second. A dependence of the ink transport from the length of pauses before and in between writing the structures was observed and should be taken into account during pattern design when aiming at best writing homogeneity. The ultra-large scan range of the utilized AFM allowed for a simultaneous study of the entire preparation area of almost 1 mm 2 , yielding good statistic results. (paper)

  7. Ultra-large scale AFM of lipid droplet arrays: investigating the ink transfer volume in dip pen nanolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förste, Alexander; Pfirrmann, Marco; Sachs, Johannes; Gröger, Roland; Walheim, Stefan; Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Fuchs, Harald; Schimmel, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    There are only few quantitative studies commenting on the writing process in dip-pen nanolithography with lipids. Lipids are important carrier ink molecules for the delivery of bio-functional patters in bio-nanotechnology. In order to better understand and control the writing process, more information on the transfer of lipid material from the tip to the substrate is needed. The dependence of the transferred ink volume on the dwell time of the tip on the substrate was investigated by topography measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM) that is characterized by an ultra-large scan range of 800 × 800 μm2. For this purpose arrays of dots of the phospholipid1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were written onto planar glass substrates and the resulting pattern was imaged by large scan area AFM. Two writing regimes were identified, characterized of either a steady decline or a constant ink volume transfer per dot feature. For the steady state ink transfer, a linear relationship between the dwell time and the dot volume was determined, which is characterized by a flow rate of about 16 femtoliters per second. A dependence of the ink transport from the length of pauses before and in between writing the structures was observed and should be taken into account during pattern design when aiming at best writing homogeneity. The ultra-large scan range of the utilized AFM allowed for a simultaneous study of the entire preparation area of almost 1 mm2, yielding good statistic results.

  8. The dynamics of milk droplet-droplet collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotello, Giulia; Kooiman, Roeland F.; Padding, Johan T.; Buist, Kay A.; Jongsma, Alfred; Innings, Fredrik; Kuipers, J. A. M.

    2018-01-01

    Spray drying is an important industrial process to produce powdered milk, in which concentrated milk is atomized into small droplets and dried with hot gas. The characteristics of the produced milk powder are largely affected by agglomeration, combination of dry and partially dry particles, which in turn depends on the outcome of a collision between droplets. The high total solids (TS) content and the presence of milk proteins cause a relatively high viscosity of the fed milk concentrates, which is expected to largely influence the collision outcomes of drops inside the spray. It is therefore of paramount importance to predict and control the outcomes of binary droplet collisions. Only a few studies report on droplet collisions of high viscous liquids and no work is available on droplet collisions of milk concentrates. The current study therefore aims to obtain insight into the effect of viscosity on the outcome of binary collisions between droplets of milk concentrates. To cover a wide range of viscosity values, three milk concentrates (20, 30 and 46% TS content) are investigated. An experimental set-up is used to generate two colliding droplet streams with consistent droplet size and spacing. A high-speed camera is used to record the trajectories of the droplets. The recordings are processed by Droplet Image Analysis in MATLAB to determine the relative velocities and the impact geometries for each individual collision. The collision outcomes are presented in a regime map dependent on the dimensionless impact parameter and Weber ( We) number. The Ohnesorge ( Oh) number is introduced to describe the effect of viscosity from one liquid to another and is maintained constant for each regime map by using a constant droplet diameter ( d ˜ 700 μ m). In this work, a phenomenological model is proposed to describe the boundaries demarcating the coalescence-separation regimes. The collision dynamics and outcome of milk concentrates are compared with aqueous glycerol

  9. Capacitive sensor for continuous monitoring of high-volume droplet microfluidic generation

    KAUST Repository

    Conchouso Gonzalez, David

    2016-12-19

    This paper presents a capacitive sensor for monitoring parallel microfluidic droplet generation. The great electric permittivity difference between common droplet microfluidic fluids such as air, oil and water (ϵoil ≈ 2–3 and ϵwater ≈ 80.4), allows for accurate detection of water in oil concentration changes. Capacitance variations as large as 10 pF between a channel filled with water or dodecane, are used to continuously monitor the output of a parallelization system producing 150 µl/min of water in dodecane emulsions. We also discuss a low cost fabrication process to manufacture these capacitive sensors, which can be integrated to different substrates.

  10. Optimized broad-histogram simulations for strong first-order phase transitions: droplet transitions in the large-Q Potts model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Bela; Troyer, Matthias; Gull, Emanuel; Trebst, Simon; Huse, David A

    2010-01-01

    The numerical simulation of strongly first-order phase transitions has remained a notoriously difficult problem even for classical systems due to the exponentially suppressed (thermal) equilibration in the vicinity of such a transition. In the absence of efficient update techniques, a common approach for improving equilibration in Monte Carlo simulations is broadening the sampled statistical ensemble beyond the bimodal distribution of the canonical ensemble. Here we show how a recently developed feedback algorithm can systematically optimize such broad-histogram ensembles and significantly speed up equilibration in comparison with other extended ensemble techniques such as flat-histogram, multicanonical and Wang–Landau sampling. We simulate, as a prototypical example of a strong first-order transition, the two-dimensional Potts model with up to Q = 250 different states in large systems. The optimized histogram develops a distinct multi-peak structure, thereby resolving entropic barriers and their associated phase transitions in the phase coexistence region—such as droplet nucleation and annihilation, and droplet–strip transitions for systems with periodic boundary conditions. We characterize the efficiency of the optimized histogram sampling by measuring round-trip times τ(N, Q) across the phase transition for samples comprised of N spins. While we find power-law scaling of τ versus N for small Q∼ 2 , we observe a crossover to exponential scaling for larger Q. These results demonstrate that despite the ensemble optimization, broad-histogram simulations cannot fully eliminate the supercritical slowing down at strongly first-order transitions

  11. Evaporation of nanofluid droplet on heated surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeung Chan Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an experiment on the evaporation of nanofluid sessile droplet on a heated surface was conducted. A nanofluid of 0.5% volumetric concentration mixed with 80-nm-sized CuO powder and pure water were used for experiment. Droplet was applied to the heated surface, and images of the evaporation process were obtained. The recorded images were analyzed to find the volume, diameter, and contact angle of the droplet. In addition, the evaporative heat transfer coefficient was calculated from experimental result. The results of this study are summarized as follows: the base diameter of the droplet was maintained stably during the evaporation. The measured temperature of the droplet was increased rapidly for a very short time, then maintained constantly. The nanofluid droplet was evaporated faster than the pure water droplet under the experimental conditions of the same initial volume and temperature, and the average evaporative heat transfer coefficient of the nanofluid droplet was higher than that of pure water. We can consider the effects of the initial contact angle and thermal conductivity of nanofluid as the reason for this experimental result. However, the effect of surface roughness on the evaporative heat transfer of nanofluid droplet appeared unclear.

  12. One-way-coupling simulation of cavitation accompanied by high-speed droplet impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Tomoki; Ando, Keita, E-mail: kando@mech.keio.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Erosion due to high-speed droplet impact is a crucial issue in industrial applications. The erosion is caused by the water-hammer loading on material surfaces and possibly by the reloading from collapsing cavitation bubbles that appear within the droplet. Here, we simulate the dynamics of cavitation bubbles accompanied by high-speed droplet impact against a deformable wall in order to see whether the bubble collapse is violent enough to give rise to cavitation erosion on the wall. The evolution of pressure waves in a single water (or gelatin) droplet to collide with a deformable wall at speed up to 110 m/s is inferred from simulations of multicomponent Euler flow where phase changes are not permitted. Then, we examine the dynamics of cavitation bubbles nucleated from micron/submicron-sized gas bubble nuclei that are supposed to exist inside the droplet. For simplicity, we perform Rayleigh–Plesset-type calculations in a one-way-coupling manner, namely, the bubble dynamics are determined according to the pressure variation obtained from the Euler flow simulation. In the simulation, the preexisting bubble nuclei whose size is either micron or submicron show large growth to submillimeters because tension inside the droplet is obtained through interaction of the pressure waves and the droplet interface; this supports the possibility of having cavitation due to the droplet impact. It is also found, in particular, for the case of cavitation arising from very small nuclei such as nanobubbles, that radiated pressure from the cavitation bubble collapse can overwhelm the water-hammer pressure directly created by the impact. Hence, cavitation may need to be accounted for when it comes to discussing erosion in the droplet impact problem.

  13. A parameterization of cloud droplet nucleation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghan, S.J.; Chuang, C.; Penner, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Droplet nucleation is a fundamental cloud process. The number of aerosols activated to form cloud droplets influences not only the number of aerosols scavenged by clouds but also the size of the cloud droplets. Cloud droplet size influences the cloud albedo and the conversion of cloud water to precipitation. Global aerosol models are presently being developed with the intention of coupling with global atmospheric circulation models to evaluate the influence of aerosols and aerosol-cloud interactions on climate. If these and other coupled models are to address issues of aerosol-cloud interactions, the droplet nucleation process must be adequately represented. Here we introduce a droplet nucleation parametrization that offers certain advantages over the popular Twomey (1959) parameterization

  14. Experimental test of liquid droplet radiator performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattick, A. T.; Simon, M. A.

    The liquid droplet radiator (LDR) is a heat rejection system for space power systems wherein an array of heated liquid droplets radiates energy directly to space. The use of submillimeter droplets provides large radiating area-to-mass ratio, resulting in radiator systems which are several times lighter than conventional solid surface radiators. An experiment is described in which the power radiated by an array of 2300 streams of silicone oil droplets is measured to test a previously developed theory of the LDR radiation process. This system would be capable of rejecting several kW of heat in space. Furthermore, it would be suitable as a modular unit of an LDR designed for 100-kW power levels. The experiment provided confirmation of the theoretical dependence of droplet array emissivity on optical depth. It also demonstrated the ability to create an array of more than 1000 droplet streams having a divergence less than 1 degree.

  15. Calculation and measurement of fog droplet size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laali, A.R.; Courant, J.J.; Kleitz, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper outlines the elements involved in calculation and measurement of fog droplet size in steam turbines. The condensation calculations are performed for a 600 MW LP fossil fired, and for a 900 MW LP nuclear turbine. A simplified method based on classical condensation theory is used for these calculations. The fog droplet size measurement are carried out downstream of the last moving blades of these turbines in order to validate the program. The comparison between the results could lead to a better understanding of the condensation process in steam turbines. Some large droplet (re-entrained droplet) measurements are also taken using a microvideo probe

  16. Water-energy-food nexus in Large Asian River Basins

    OpenAIRE

    Keskinen, Marko; Varis, Olli

    2016-01-01

    The water-energy-food nexus ("nexus") is promoted as an approach to look at the linkages between water, energy and food. The articles of Water's Special Issue "Water-Energy-Food Nexus in Large Asian River Basins" look at the applicability of the nexus approach in different regions and rivers basins in Asia. The articles provide practical examples of the various roles and importance of water-energy-food linkages, but also discuss the theoretical aspects related to the nexus. While it is eviden...

  17. Global rainbow refractometry for droplet temperature measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascal Lemaitre; Emmanuel Porcheron; Amandine Nuboer; Philippe Brun; Pierre Cornet; Jeanne Malet; Jacques Vendel; Laurent Bouilloux; Gerard Grehan

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In order to establish an accurate database to characterize the heat and mass transfers between a spray and the atmosphere with thermal-hydraulic conditions representative of a hypothetical nuclear reactor accident in the containment enclosure of a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the French Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN) has developed the TOSQAN experimental facility. This experiment is highly instrumented with non-intrusive diagnostics allowing to measure droplet size and velocity and gas concentrations [1]. The aim of this work is to present the Global Rainbow Thermometry (GRT), which is an advanced non-intrusive optical diagnostic, developed to measure the mean temperature of a set of falling droplets, in a measurement volume of 1 cm 3 . The final paper will be divided in three parts. In the first one, we will explain the principle of the rainbow formation and how droplet temperature can be deduced from the rainbow analysis [2]. This part will be illustrated with the theoretical background on the rainbow and numerical simulations of the global rainbow. The second part will be devoted to present the global rainbow experimental set-up we have developed on optical table, its experimental qualification and finally its implementation on the TOSQAN facility [3]. Finally, we will present the temperature measurements achieved in TOSQAN for thermal-hydraulic conditions representative of a hypothetical nuclear reactor accident. These measurements are useful to characterize the heat and mass transfers between the spraying droplets and the air-steam mixture composing the atmosphere. This analysis will be exposed in a two companion papers. References: [1] E. Porcheron, P. Brun, P. Cornet, J. Malet, J. Vendel. Optical diagnostics applied for single and multi-phase flow characterization in the TOSQAN facility dedicated for thermal hydraulic containment studies. NURETH-10 Seoul, Korea, October 5-9, 2003. [2] P

  18. Global rainbow refractometry for droplet temperature measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascal Lemaitre; Emmanuel Porcheron; Amandine Nuboer; Philippe Brun; Pierre Cornet; Jeanne Malet; Jacques Vendel; Laurent Bouilloux [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire DSU/SERAC, BP 68, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Gerard Grehan [UMR 6614 CORIA, Laboratoire d' Electromagnetisme et Systemes Particulaires Site Universitaire du Madrillet, Avenue de l' universite BP 12, 76 801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray Cedex, (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In order to establish an accurate database to characterize the heat and mass transfers between a spray and the atmosphere with thermal-hydraulic conditions representative of a hypothetical nuclear reactor accident in the containment enclosure of a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the French Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN) has developed the TOSQAN experimental facility. This experiment is highly instrumented with non-intrusive diagnostics allowing to measure droplet size and velocity and gas concentrations [1]. The aim of this work is to present the Global Rainbow Thermometry (GRT), which is an advanced non-intrusive optical diagnostic, developed to measure the mean temperature of a set of falling droplets, in a measurement volume of 1 cm{sup 3}. The final paper will be divided in three parts. In the first one, we will explain the principle of the rainbow formation and how droplet temperature can be deduced from the rainbow analysis [2]. This part will be illustrated with the theoretical background on the rainbow and numerical simulations of the global rainbow. The second part will be devoted to present the global rainbow experimental set-up we have developed on optical table, its experimental qualification and finally its implementation on the TOSQAN facility [3]. Finally, we will present the temperature measurements achieved in TOSQAN for thermal-hydraulic conditions representative of a hypothetical nuclear reactor accident. These measurements are useful to characterize the heat and mass transfers between the spraying droplets and the air-steam mixture composing the atmosphere. This analysis will be exposed in a two companion papers. References: [1] E. Porcheron, P. Brun, P. Cornet, J. Malet, J. Vendel. Optical diagnostics applied for single and multi-phase flow characterization in the TOSQAN facility dedicated for thermal hydraulic containment studies. NURETH-10 Seoul, Korea, October 5-9, 2003. [2] P

  19. Flashing liquid jets and two-phase droplet dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleary, Vincent; Bowen, Phil; Witlox, Henk

    2007-01-01

    The large-scale release of a liquid contained at upstream conditions above its local atmospheric boiling point is a scenario often given consideration in process industry risk analysis. Current-hazard quantification software often employs simplistic equilibrium two-phase approaches. Scaled water experiments have been carried out measuring droplet velocity and droplet size distributions for a range of exit orifice aspect ratios (L/d) and conditions representing low to high superheat. 2D Phase-Doppler Anemometry has been utilised to characterise droplet kinematics and spray quality. Droplet size correlations have been developed for non-flashing, the transition between non-flashing and flashing, and fully flashing jets. Using high-speed shadowography, transition between regimes is defined in terms of criteria identified in the external flow structure. An overview companion paper provides a wider overview of the problem and reports implementation of these correlations into consequence models and subsequent validation. The fluid utilised throughout is water, hence droplet correlations are developed in non-dimensional form to allow extrapolation to other fluids through similarity scaling, although verification of model performance for other fluids is required in future studies. Data is reduced via non-dimensionalisation in terms of the Weber number and Jakob number, essentially representing the fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of the system, respectively. A droplet-size distribution correlation has also been developed, conveniently presented as a volume undersize distribution based on the Rosin-Rammler distribution. Separate correlations are provided for sub-cooled mechanical break-up and fully flashing jets. This form of correlation facilitates rapid estimates of likely mass rainout quantities, as well as full distribution information for more rigorous two-phase thermodynamic modelling in the future

  20. DNS of droplet-vortex interaction with a Karman vortex street

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, M.; Schmehl, R.; Koch, R.; Wittig, S.; Bauer, H.-J.

    2006-01-01

    Predicting fuel spray interaction with large scale vortex structures still is a major challenge for state-of-the-art CFD codes. In order to elucidate the mechanisms involved, a fundamental study has been carried out in which the interaction of water droplets with a Karman vortex street is investigated. The disperse two-phase flow around a cylinder has been computed taking into account the mass, momentum and heat transfer between both phases. Flow conditions are chosen such that large scale vortices are generated by periodic flow separations of the well known Karman vortex street. A homogeneous distribution of water droplets is injected into the hot air up-stream of the computational domain. The mixing process as well as the impact of the droplets on the gas phase instabilities is analyzed in the downstream region where large scale vortex structures are present

  1. Flashing liquid jets and two-phase droplet dispersion I. Experiments for derivation of droplet atomisation correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Vincent; Bowen, Phil; Witlox, Henk

    2007-04-11

    The large-scale release of a liquid contained at upstream conditions above its local atmospheric boiling point is a scenario often given consideration in process industry risk analysis. Current-hazard quantification software often employs simplistic equilibrium two-phase approaches. Scaled water experiments have been carried out measuring droplet velocity and droplet size distributions for a range of exit orifice aspect ratios (L/d) and conditions representing low to high superheat. 2D Phase-Doppler Anemometry has been utilised to characterise droplet kinematics and spray quality. Droplet size correlations have been developed for non-flashing, the transition between non-flashing and flashing, and fully flashing jets. Using high-speed shadowography, transition between regimes is defined in terms of criteria identified in the external flow structure. An overview companion paper provides a wider overview of the problem and reports implementation of these correlations into consequence models and subsequent validation. The fluid utilised throughout is water, hence droplet correlations are developed in non-dimensional form to allow extrapolation to other fluids through similarity scaling, although verification of model performance for other fluids is required in future studies. Data is reduced via non-dimensionalisation in terms of the Weber number and Jakob number, essentially representing the fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of the system, respectively. A droplet-size distribution correlation has also been developed, conveniently presented as a volume undersize distribution based on the Rosin-Rammler distribution. Separate correlations are provided for sub-cooled mechanical break-up and fully flashing jets. This form of correlation facilitates rapid estimates of likely mass rainout quantities, as well as full distribution information for more rigorous two-phase thermodynamic modelling in the future.

  2. Uniform-droplet spray forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, C.A.; Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chun, Jung-Hoon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ando, T. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The uniform-droplet process is a new method of liquid-metal atomization that results in single droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on to substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructure. The mono-sized powder-production capability of the uniform-droplet process also has the potential of permitting engineered powder blends to produce components of controlled porosity. Metal and alloy powders are commercially produced by at least three different methods: gas atomization, water atomization, and rotating disk. All three methods produce powders of a broad range in size with a very small yield of fine powders with single-sized droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructures. The economical analysis has shown the process to have the potential of reducing capital cost by 50% and operating cost by 37.5% when applied to powder making. For the spray-forming process, a 25% savings is expected in both the capital and operating costs. The project is jointly carried out at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Tuffs University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Preliminary interactions with both finished parts and powder producers have shown a strong interest in the uniform-droplet process. Systematic studies are being conducted to optimize the process parameters, understand the solidification of droplets and spray deposits, and develop a uniform-droplet-system (UDS) apparatus appropriate for processing engineering alloys.

  3. Ferrofluid of magnetic clay and menthol based deep eutectic solvent: Application in directly suspended droplet microextraction for enrichment of some emerging contaminant explosives in water and soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Ali Reza; Nedaei, Maryam; Ghorbanian, Sohrab Ali

    2018-06-08

    In this work, for the first time, ferrofluid of magnetic montmorillonite nanoclay and deep eutectic solvent was prepared and coupled with directly suspended droplet microextraction. Incorporation of ferrofluid in a miniaturized sample preparation technique resulted in achieving high extraction efficiency while developing a green analytical method. The prepared ferrofluid has strong sorbing properties and hydrophobic characteristics. In this method, a micro-droplet of ferrofluid was suspended into the vortex of a stirring aqueous solution and after completing the extraction process, was easily separated from the solution by a magnetic rod without any operational problems. The predominant experimental variables affecting the extraction efficiency of explosives were evaluated. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection were in the range 0.22-0.91 μg L -1 . The enrichment factors were between 23 and 93 and the relative standard deviations were <10%. The relative recoveries were ranged from 88 to 104%. This method was successfully applied for the extraction and preconcentration of explosives in water and soil samples, followed their determination by high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Vapor-droplet flow equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, C.T.

    1975-01-01

    General features of a vapor-droplet flow are discussed and the equations expressing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy for the vapor, liquid, and mixture using the control volume approach are derived. The phenomenological laws describing the exchange of mass, momentum, and energy between phases are also reviewed. The results have application to development of water-dominated geothermal resources

  5. Capacitive sensing of droplets for microfluidic devices based on thermocapillary actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian Z; Darhuber, Anton A; Troian, Sandra M; Wagner, Sigurd

    2004-10-01

    The design and performance of a miniaturized coplanar capacitive sensor is presented whose electrode arrays can also function as resistive microheaters for thermocapillary actuation of liquid films and droplets. Optimal compromise between large capacitive signal and high spatial resolution is obtained for electrode widths comparable to the liquid film thickness measured, in agreement with supporting numerical simulations which include mutual capacitance effects. An interdigitated, variable width design, allowing for wider central electrodes, increases the capacitive signal for liquid structures with non-uniform height profiles. The capacitive resolution and time response of the current design is approximately 0.03 pF and 10 ms, respectively, which makes possible a number of sensing functions for nanoliter droplets. These include detection of droplet position, size, composition or percentage water uptake for hygroscopic liquids. Its rapid response time allows measurements of the rate of mass loss in evaporating droplets.

  6. Monodisperse Water-in-Oil-in-Water (W/O/W Double Emulsion Droplets as Uniform Compartments for High-Throughput Analysis via Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the application of monodisperse double emulsion droplets, produced in a single step within partially hydrophilic/partially hydrophobic microfluidic devices, as defined containers for quantitative flow cytometric analysis. Samples with varying fluorophore concentrations were generated, and a clear correlation between dye concentration and fluorescence signals was observed.

  7. Instability of expanding bacterial droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Rubio, Leonardo Dominguez; Brady, John F; Aranson, Igor S

    2018-04-03

    Suspensions of motile bacteria or synthetic microswimmers, termed active matter, manifest a remarkable propensity for self-organization, and formation of large-scale coherent structures. Most active matter research deals with almost homogeneous in space systems and little is known about the dynamics of strongly heterogeneous active matter. Here we report on experimental and theoretical studies on the expansion of highly concentrated bacterial droplets into an ambient bacteria-free fluid. The droplet is formed beneath a rapidly rotating solid macroscopic particle inserted in the suspension. We observe vigorous instability of the droplet reminiscent of a violent explosion. The phenomenon is explained in terms of continuum first-principle theory based on the swim pressure concept. Our findings provide insights into the dynamics of active matter with strong density gradients and significantly expand the scope of experimental and analytic tools for control and manipulation of active systems.

  8. Ultrasound-air-assisted demulsified liquid-liquid microextraction by solidification of a floating organic droplet for determination of three antifungal drugs in water and biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezoddin, Maryam; Shojaie, Mehran; Abdi, Khosrou; Karimi, Mohammad Ali

    2017-03-01

    A novel ultrasound-air-assisted demulsified liquid-liquid microextraction by solidification of a floating organic droplet (UAAD-LLM-SFO) followed by HPLC-UV detection was developed for the analysis of three antifungal drugs in water and biological samples. In this method, 1-dodecanol was used as the extraction solvent. The emulsion was rapidly formed by pulling in and pushing out the mixture of sample solution and extraction solvent for 5 times repeatedly using a 10-mL glass syringe while sonication was performed. Therefore, an organic dispersive solvent required in common microextraction methods was not used in the proposed method. After dispersing, an aliquot of acetonitrile was introduced as a demulsifier solvent into the sample solution to separate two phases. Therefore, some additional steps, such as the centrifugation, ultrasonication, or agitation of the sample solution, are not needed. Parameters influencing the extraction recovery were investigated. The proposed method showed a good linearity for the three antifungal drugs studied with the correlation coefficients (R 2  > 0.9995). The limits of detection (LODs) and the limits of the quantification (LOQs) were between 0.01-0.03 μg L -1 and 0.03-0.08 μg L -1 , respectively. The preconcentration factors (PFs) were in the range of 107-116, respectively. The precisions, as the relative standard deviations (RSDs) (n = 5), for inter-day and intra-day analysis were in the range of 2.1-4.5% and 6.5-8.5%, respectively. This method was successfully applied to determine the three antifungal drugs in tap water and biological samples. The recoveries of antifungal drugs in these samples were 92.4-98.5%. Graphical abstract Ultrasound-air-assisted demulsified liquid-liquid microextraction by solidification of a floating organic droplet for the analysis of three antifungal drugs prior HPLC-UV.

  9. Relationship between concentration of surfactant and pressure for droplet creation, and effect on droplet size in microchannel O/W emulsification; Maikurochaneru ni yoru O/W nyukaho ni okeru kaimen kasseizai nodo to ekiteki seisei atsuryoku no kankei, oyobi koreraga ekitekikei ni oyobosu eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakatsu, T.; Komori, H.; Oda, N.; Yonemoto, T. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering

    1998-03-01

    O/W (oil in water) emulsion is produced by micro-channel emulsification method, and the effects of surfactant concentration on the pressures at which droplet generation starts and stops are evaluated in connection with the water phase and oil phase interfacial tension. In addition, the effects of surfactant concentration and operational pressure on the droplet size are investigated by measuring the generated droplet distribution, mean droplet size, standard deviation, geometrical standard deviation, and the possibility of producing mono-dispersion emulsion whose droplet size is large than 10 micron. The breakthrough pressure and the minimum pressure for droplet generation become low with the increase of SDS (sodium lauryl sulfate) concentration. The surfactant concentration, however, is found to have no effect on the breakthrough pressure and the minimum pressure for droplet generation when the SDS concentration exceeds the critical micelle concentration. It is true also for a system added with NaCl. As regards droplet size, uniform 20{mu}m droplet is obtained irrespective of the surfactant concentration and pressure. 13 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Experimental study of evaporation of distilled water and 10% NaCl and СaCl2 aqueous salt solutions droplets under their free falling on a heated surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feoktistov D.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the experimental results of evaporation of distilled water and 10% aqueous salt solutions of NaCl and СaCl2 droplets under their free falling on a heated surface. It is proved that it is more expedient to conduct the experimental research in this field according to classical multifactorial experiment. Laser treatment of surfaces is found to increase the evaporation rate and to biases the point of boiling crisis in the region of lower surface temperatures. In this case, in the conditions of boiling crisis the frequency of contact of a droplet with a heated surface will decrease.

  11. Interface-Resolving Simulation of Collision Efficiency of Cloud Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lian-Ping; Peng, Cheng; Rosa, Bodgan; Onishi, Ryo

    2017-11-01

    Small-scale air turbulence could enhance the geometric collision rate of cloud droplets while large-scale air turbulence could augment the diffusional growth of cloud droplets. Air turbulence could also enhance the collision efficiency of cloud droplets. Accurate simulation of collision efficiency, however, requires capture of the multi-scale droplet-turbulence and droplet-droplet interactions, which has only been partially achieved in the recent past using the hybrid direct numerical simulation (HDNS) approach. % where Stokes disturbance flow is assumed. The HDNS approach has two major drawbacks: (1) the short-range droplet-droplet interaction is not treated rigorously; (2) the finite-Reynolds number correction to the collision efficiency is not included. In this talk, using two independent numerical methods, we will develop an interface-resolved simulation approach in which the disturbance flows are directly resolved numerically, combined with a rigorous lubrication correction model for near-field droplet-droplet interaction. This multi-scale approach is first used to study the effect of finite flow Reynolds numbers on the droplet collision efficiency in still air. Our simulation results show a significant finite-Re effect on collision efficiency when the droplets are of similar sizes. Preliminary results on integrating this approach in a turbulent flow laden with droplets will also be presented. This work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation.

  12. Droplet ejection and sliding on a flapping film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Water recovery and subsequent reuse are required for human consumption as well as industrial, and agriculture applications. Moist air streams, such as cooling tower plumes and fog, represent opportunities for water harvesting. In this work, we investigate a flapping mechanism to increase droplet shedding on thin, hydrophobic films for two vibrational cases (e.g., ± 9 mm and 11 Hz; ± 2 mm and 100 Hz. Two main mechanisms removed water droplets from the flapping film: vibrational-induced coalescence/sliding and droplet ejection from the surface. Vibrations mobilized droplets on the flapping film, increasing the probability of coalescence with neighboring droplets leading to faster droplet growth. Droplet departure sizes of 1–2 mm were observed for flapping films, compared to 3–4 mm on stationary films, which solely relied on gravity for droplet removal. Additionally, flapping films exhibited lower percentage area coverage by water after a few seconds. The second removal mechanism, droplet ejection was analyzed with respect to surface wave formation and inertia. Smaller droplets (e.g., 1-mm diameter were ejected at a higher frequency which is associated with a higher acceleration. Kinetic energy of the water was the largest contributor to energy required to flap the film, and low energy inputs (i.e., 3.3 W/m2 were possible. Additionally, self-flapping films could enable novel water collection and condensation with minimal energy input.

  13. Charge Transfer into Aqueous Droplets via Kilovolt Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, B. S.; Rosenberg, E. R.; Ristenpart, W. D.

    2012-11-01

    When an aqueous droplet immersed in an insulating oil contacts an electrified surface, the droplet acquires net charge. For sufficiently large field strengths, the charged droplet is driven back and forth electrophoretically between the electrodes, in essence ``bouncing'' between them. Although it is clear that the droplet acquires charge, the underlying mechanism controlling the charge transfer process has been unclear. Here we demonstrate that the chemical species present in the droplet strongly affect the charge transfer process into the drop. Using two independent charge measurement techniques, high speed video velocimetry and direct current measurement, we show that the charge acquired during contact is strongly influenced by the droplet pH. We also provide physical evidence that the electrodes undergo electroplating or corrosion for droplets with appropriate chemical species present. Together, the observations strongly suggest that electrochemical reactions govern the charge transfer process into the droplet.

  14. Microfluidic droplet generator with controlled break-up mechanism

    KAUST Repository

    Gonzalez, David Conchouso

    2017-04-13

    Droplet generation devices and systems that parallelize droplet generation devices are provided. The droplet generation devices can include a symmetric block-and-break system and a tapered droplet generation zone. The symmetric block-and-break system can include a pair of break channels and a pair of bypass channels symmetrically arranged with respect to the dispersed-phase input channel and the output channel. The droplet generation devices can generate monodisperse droplets with a predefined volume over a range of flow rates, pressures, and fluid properties. The droplet generation devices are therefore capable of parallelization to achieve large-capacity droplet generation, e.g. greater than 1 L/hr, with small overall coefficients of variation.

  15. Large sodium water reaction calculations in a LMFBR steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finck, P.; Lepareux, M.; Schwab, B.; Blanchet, Y.

    1986-05-01

    The French approach to the analysis of large and violent sodium water reactions is presented. The basis for choosing the Design Basis Accident is discussed. An energetical analysis of the physical phenomena involved stresses the specific needs for computing tools. The feature of these tools are then described, and a validation test is presented. Finally, industrial applications are described. 8 refs

  16. Settling of fixed erythrocyte suspension droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omenyi, S. N.; Snyder, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that when particles behave collectively rather than individually, the fractionation of micron-size particles on the basis of size, density, and surface characteristics by centrifugation and electrophoresis is hindered. The formation and sedimentation of droplets containing particles represent an extreme example of collective behavior and pose a major problem for these separation methods when large quantities of particles need to be fractionated. Experiments are described that measure droplet sizes and settling rates for a variety of particles and droplets. Expressions relating the particle concentration in a drop to measurable quantities of the fluids and particles are developed. The number of particles in each droplet is then estimated, together with the effective droplet density. Red blood cells from different animals fixed in glutaraldehyde provide model particle groups.

  17. Experimental test of liquid droplet radiator performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattick, A.T.; Simon, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    This liquid droplet radiator (LDR) is evolving rapidly as a lightweight system for heat rejection in space power systems. By using recirculating free streams of submillimeter droplets to radiate waste energy directly to space, the LDR can potentially be an order of magnitude lighter than conventional radiator systems which radiate from solid surfaces. The LDR is also less vulnerable to micrometeoroid damage than are conventional radiators, and it has a low transport volume. Three major development issues of this new heat rejection system are the ability to direct the droplet streams with sufficient precision to avoid fluid loss, radiative performance of the array of droplet streams which comprise the radiating elements of the LDR, and the efficacy of the droplet stream collector, again with respect to fluid loss. This paper reports experimental results bearing on the first two issues - droplet aiming in a multikilowatt-sized system, and radiated power from a large droplet array. Parallel efforts on droplet collection and LDR system design are being pursued by several research groups

  18. Measurement of contact-angle hysteresis for droplets on nanopillared surface and in the Cassie and Wenzel states: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koishi, Takahiro; Yasuoka, Kenji; Fujikawa, Shigenori; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2011-09-27

    We perform large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to measure the contact-angle hysteresis for a nanodroplet of water placed on a nanopillared surface. The water droplet can be in either the Cassie state (droplet being on top of the nanopillared surface) or the Wenzel state (droplet being in contact with the bottom of nanopillar grooves). To measure the contact-angle hysteresis in a quantitative fashion, the molecular dynamics simulation is designed such that the number of water molecules in the droplets can be systematically varied, but the number of base nanopillars that are in direct contact with the droplets is fixed. We find that the contact-angle hysteresis for the droplet in the Cassie state is weaker than that in the Wenzel state. This conclusion is consistent with the experimental observation. We also test a different definition of the contact-angle hysteresis, which can be extended to estimate hysteresis between the Cassie and Wenzel state. The idea is motivated from the appearance of the hysteresis loop typically seen in computer simulation of the first-order phase transition, which stems from the metastability of a system in different thermodynamic states. Since the initial shape of the droplet can be controlled arbitrarily in the computer simulation, the number of base nanopillars that are in contact with the droplet can be controlled as well. We show that the measured contact-angle hysteresis according to the second definition is indeed very sensitive to the initial shape of the droplet. Nevertheless, the contact-angle hystereses measured based on the conventional and new definition seem converging in the large droplet limit. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  19. Spontaneous droplet trampolining on rigid superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutzius, Thomas M.; Jung, Stefan; Maitra, Tanmoy; Graeber, Gustav; Köhme, Moritz; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous removal of condensed matter from surfaces is exploited in nature and in a broad range of technologies to achieve self-cleaning, anti-icing and condensation control. But despite much progress, our understanding of the phenomena leading to such behaviour remains incomplete, which makes it challenging to rationally design surfaces that benefit from its manifestation. Here we show that water droplets resting on superhydrophobic textured surfaces in a low-pressure environment can self-remove through sudden spontaneous levitation and subsequent trampoline-like bouncing behaviour, in which sequential collisions with the surface accelerate the droplets. These collisions have restitution coefficients (ratios of relative speeds after and before collision) greater than unity despite complete rigidity of the surface, and thus seemingly violate the second law of thermodynamics. However, these restitution coefficients result from an overpressure beneath the droplet produced by fast droplet vaporization while substrate adhesion and surface texture restrict vapour flow. We also show that the high vaporization rates experienced by the droplets and the associated cooling can result in freezing from a supercooled state that triggers a sudden increase in vaporization, which in turn boosts the levitation process. This effect can spontaneously remove surface icing by lifting away icy drops the moment they freeze. Although these observations are relevant only to systems in a low-pressure environment, they show how surface texturing can produce droplet-surface interactions that prohibit liquid and freezing water-droplet retention on surfaces.

  20. Transport mechanism of an initially spherical droplet on a combined hydrophilic/hydrophobic surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myong, Hyon Kook; Kwon, Young Hoo [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Fluid transport is a key issue in the development of microfluidic systems. Recently, Myong (2014) has proposed a new concept for droplet transport without external power sources, and numerically validated the results for a hypothetical 2D shape, initially having a hemicylindrical droplet shape. Myong and Kwon (2015) have also examined the transport mechanism for an actual water droplet, initially having a 3D hemispherical shape, on a horizontal hydrophilic/hydrophobic surface, based on the numerical results of the time evolution of the droplet shape, as well as the total kinetic, gravitational, pressure and surface free energies inside the droplet. In this study, a 3D numerical analysis of an initially spherical droplet is carried out to establish a new concept for droplet transport. Further, the transport mechanism of an actual water droplet is examined in detail from the viewpoint of the capillarity force imbalance through the numerical results of droplet shape and various energies inside the droplet.

  1. Study on water boiling noises in a large volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masagutov, R.F.; Krivtsov, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Presented are the results of measurement of the noise spectra during boiling of water in a large volume at the pressure of 1 at. Boiling of the distilled water has been accomplished with the use of the heaters made of the Kh18N10T steel, 50 mm in length, 2 mm in the outside diameter, with the wall thickness of 0.1 mm. The degree of water under heating changed during the experiments from 0 to 80 deg C, and the magnitude of the specific heat flux varied from o to 0.7 - 0.9 qsup(x), where qsup(x) was the specific heat flux of the tube burn-out. The noise spectrum of the boiling water was analyzed at frequencies of 0.5 to 200 kHz. The submerge-type pressure-electric transmitters were used for measurements. At underheating boiling during the experiment the standing waves have formed which determine the structure of the measured spectra. During saturated boiling of water no standing waves were revealed. At underheating over 15 - 20 deg C the water boiling process is accompanied by the noises within the ultrasonic frequency range. The maximum upper boundary of the noise in the experiments amounts to 90 - 100 kHz

  2. Influence of film dimensions on film droplet formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Helene; Ljungström, Evert

    2012-02-01

    Aerosol particles may be generated from rupturing liquid films through a droplet formation mechanism. The present work was undertaken with the aim to throw some light on the influence of film dimensions on droplet formation with possible consequences for exhaled breath aerosol formation. The film droplet formation process was mimicked by using a purpose-built device, where fluid films were spanned across holes of known diameters. As the films burst, droplets were formed and the number and size distributions of the resulting droplets were determined. No general relation could be found between hole diameter and the number of droplets generated per unit surface area of fluid film. Averaged over all film sizes, a higher surface tension yielded higher concentrations of droplets. Surface tension did not influence the resulting droplet diameter, but it was found that smaller films generated smaller droplets. This study shows that small fluid films generate droplets as efficiently as large films, and that droplets may well be generated from films with diameters below 1 mm. This has implications for the formation of film droplets from reopening of closed airways because human terminal bronchioles are of similar dimensions. Thus, the results provide support for the earlier proposed mechanism where reopening of closed airways is one origin of exhaled particles.

  3. Entrapment investigations of water-droplet behavior in a hot tin melt with varying discharge velocities and orifices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehlich, G.; Mueller, K.

    1983-10-01

    Experiments were performed in which water was pressed through a thermally isolated tube into a clyindrical crucible (diameter 5 cm, height 7,5 cm both measured inside) filled with molten tin (600 K). The diameter of the circular water outlet was varied from 0.5 up to 10 mm and the discharge velocity of the water was in the range of 0.05 up to 20 m/s. In the tin melt the water divides into single drops, which emerged on the melt surface, if an interaction between water and tin melt did not occur. The probability for an interaction increased in experiments with higher discharge velocities of the water and smaller diameters of the water outlet. In experiments with discharge velocities ≥ 5 m/s and outlet diameters ≤ 2 mm one or more interactions occured in each case. At these interactions of water drops entrapped in the tin melt (called entrapment interactions) a portion of the melt was ejected from the crucible. The moment of the interaction and the pulse of the force toward the crucible bottom were recorded. (orig.) [de

  4. Adsorption of transuranic elements from large volume sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, E.; Ballestra, S.

    1976-01-01

    Some years ago a sampler for concentrating radionuclides from large volumes of sea water was developed by Silker et al. of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories. They used pure A1 2 O 3 as the adsorbent. The device has been applied successfully to the determination of 238 Pu and 239 Pu in several sea water samples. Our experience on the application of an identical system for the determination of transuranics in Mediterranean sea water was not quite as satisfactory as we had hoped. The chemistry involved in leaching up to 1 kg Al 2 O 3 . with acid, followed by removal of dissolved aluminium from the transuranic fraction, is rather tedious and time-consuming for routine use. The adsorption efficiency of transuranics, checked by dual-bed adsorption did not give consistent results. However, since the principle of the device is attractive enough for handling large volume water samples, it was felt that it was worthwhile to test other types of adsorbents which are easier to handle than Al 2 O 3 . For this purpose, chitosan and manganese dioxide were chosen and series of experiments were conducted in order to examine the suitability of these materials as an adsorbent in the system

  5. Droplet and multiphase effects in a shock-driven hydrodynamic instability with reshock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrooks, John B.; Avgoustopoulos, Constantine G.; Black, Wolfgang J.; Allen, Roy C.; McFarland, Jacob A.

    2018-06-01

    Shock-driven multiphase instabilities (SDMI) are unique physical phenomena that have far-reaching applications in engineering and science such as high energy explosions, scramjet combustors, and supernovae events. The SDMI arises when a multiphase field is impulsively accelerated by a shock wave and evolves as a result of gradients in particle-gas momentum transfer. A new shock tube facility has been constructed to study the SDMI. Experiments were conducted to investigate liquid particle and multiphase effects in the SDMI. A multiphase cylindrical interface was created with water droplet laden air in our horizontal shock tube facility. The interface was accelerated by a Mach 1.66 shock wave, and its reflection from the end wall. The interface development was captured using laser illumination and a high-resolution CCD camera. Laser interferometry was used to determine the droplet size distribution. A particle filtration technique was used to determine mass loading within an interface and verify particle size distribution. The effects of particle number density, particle size, and a secondary acceleration (reshock) of the interface were noted. Particle number density effects were found comparable to Atwood number effects in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for small (˜ 1.7 {μ }m) droplets. Evaporation was observed to alter droplet sizes and number density, markedly after reshock. For large diameter droplets (˜ 10.7 {μ }m), diminished development was observed with larger droplets lagging far behind the interface. These lagging droplets were also observed to breakup after reshock into structured clusters of smaller droplets. Mixing width values were reported to quantify mixing effects seen in images.

  6. Flexible Slippery Surface to Manipulate Droplet Coalescence and Sliding, and Its Practicability in Wind-Resistant Water Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanfeng; Qian, Baitai; Lai, Chuilin; Wang, Xiaowen; Ma, Kaikai; Guo, Yujuan; Zhu, Xingli; Fei, Bin; Xin, John H

    2017-07-26

    A flexible slippery membrane (FSM) with tunable morphology and high elastic deformability has been developed by infusing perfluoropolyether (PFPE) into a fluorinated-copolymer-modified thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanofiberous membrane. To immobilize PFPE in TPU matrix, we synthesized a fluorinated-copolymer poly(DFMA-co-IBOA-co-LMA) with low surface energy, high chemical affinity to PFPE, adequate flexibility, and strong physical adhesion on TPU. Upon external tensile stress, the as-prepared FSM can realize a real-time manipulation of water sliding and coalescence on it. Furthermore, it exhibits the ability to preserve the captured water from being blown away by strong wind, which ensures the water collection efficiency in windy regions.

  7. Binary particle separation in droplet microfluidics using acoustophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornell, Anna; Cushing, Kevin; Nilsson, Johan; Tenje, Maria

    2018-02-01

    We show a method for separation of two particle species with different acoustic contrasts originally encapsulated in the same droplet in a continuous two-phase system. This was realized by using bulk acoustic standing waves in a 380 μm wide silicon-glass microfluidic channel. Polystyrene particles (positive acoustic contrast particles) and in-house synthesized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) particles (negative acoustic contrast particles) were encapsulated inside water-in-oil droplets either individually or in a mixture. At acoustic actuation of the system at the fundamental resonance frequency, the polystyrene particles were moved to the center of the droplet (pressure node), while the PDMS particles were moved to the sides of the droplet (pressure anti-nodes). The acoustic particle manipulation step was combined in series with a trifurcation droplet splitter, and as the original droplet passed through the splitter and was divided into three daughter droplets, the polystyrene particles were directed into the center daughter droplet, while the PDMS particles were directed into the two side daughter droplets. The presented method expands the droplet microfluidics tool-box and offers new possibilities to perform binary particle separation in droplet microfluidic systems.

  8. Levitated droplet dye laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzouz, H.; Alkafadiji, L.; Balslev, Søren

    2006-01-01

    a high quality optical resonator. Our 750 nL lasing droplets consist of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethylene glycol, at a concentration of 0.02 M. The droplets are optically pumped at 532 nm light from a pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, and the dye laser emission is analyzed by a fixed grating...

  9. Lithium-lead/water interaction. Large break experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savatteri, C.; Gemelli, A.

    1991-01-01

    One current concept in fusion blanket module design is to utilize water as coolant and liquid lithium-lead as breeding/neutron-multiplier material. Considering the possibility of certain off-normal events, it is possible that water leakage into the liquid metal may occur due to a tube rupture. The lithium-lead/water contact can lead to a thermal and chemical reaction which should provoke an intolerable pressure increase in the blanket module. For realistic simulation of such in-blanket events, the Blanket Safety Test (BLAST) facility has been built. It simulates the transient event by injecting subcooled water under high pressure into a stagnant pool of about 500 kg liquid Pb-17Li. Eight fully instrumented large break tests were carried out under different conditions. The aim of the experiments is to study the chemical and thermal process and particularly: The pressurization history of the reaction vessel, the formation and deposition of the reaction products, the identification and propagation of the reaction zones and the temperature transient in the liquid metal. In this paper the results of all tests performed are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  10. Investigation of the physical scaling of sea spray spume droplet production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairall, C. W.; Banner, M. L.; Peirson, W. L.; Asher, W.; Morison, R. P.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we report on a laboratory study, the Spray Production and Dynamics Experiment (SPANDEX), conducted at the University of New South Wales Water Research Laboratory in Australia. The goals of SPANDEX were to illuminate physical aspects of spume droplet production and dispersion; verify theoretical simplifications used to estimate the source function from ambient droplet concentration measurements; and examine the relationship between the implied source strength and forcing parameters such as wind speed, surface turbulent stress, and wave properties. Observations of droplet profiles give reasonable confirmation of the basic power law profile relationship that is commonly used to relate droplet concentrations to the surface source strength. This essentially confirms that, even in a wind tunnel, there is a near balance between droplet production and removal by gravitational settling. The observations also indicate considerable droplet mass may be present for sizes larger than 1.5 mm diameter. Phase Doppler Anemometry observations revealed significant mean horizontal and vertical slip velocities that were larger closer to the surface. The magnitude seems too large to be an acceleration time scale effect. Scaling of the droplet production surface source strength proved to be difficult. The wind speed forcing varied only 23% and the stress increased a factor of 2.2. Yet, the source strength increased by about a factor of 7. We related this to an estimate of surface wave energy flux through calculations of the standard deviation of small-scale water surface disturbance, a wave-stress parameterization, and numerical wave model simulations. This energy index only increased by a factor of 2.3 with the wind forcing. Nonetheless, a graph of spray mass surface flux versus surface disturbance energy is quasi-linear with a substantial threshold.

  11. Substrate curvature gradient drives rapid droplet motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Cunjing; Chen, Chao; Chuang, Yin-Chuan; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Yin, Yajun; Grey, Francois; Zheng, Quanshui

    2014-07-11

    Making small liquid droplets move spontaneously on solid surfaces is a key challenge in lab-on-chip and heat exchanger technologies. Here, we report that a substrate curvature gradient can accelerate micro- and nanodroplets to high speeds on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. Experiments for microscale water droplets on tapered surfaces show a maximum speed of 0.42  m/s, 2 orders of magnitude higher than with a wettability gradient. We show that the total free energy and driving force exerted on a droplet are determined by the substrate curvature and substrate curvature gradient, respectively. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we predict nanoscale droplets moving spontaneously at over 100  m/s on tapered surfaces.

  12. Identification of water quality degradation hotspots in developing countries by applying large scale water quality modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malsy, Marcus; Reder, Klara; Flörke, Martina

    2014-05-01

    Decreasing water quality is one of the main global issues which poses risks to food security, economy, and public health and is consequently crucial for ensuring environmental sustainability. During the last decades access to clean drinking water increased, but 2.5 billion people still do not have access to basic sanitation, especially in Africa and parts of Asia. In this context not only connection to sewage system is of high importance, but also treatment, as an increasing connection rate will lead to higher loadings and therefore higher pressure on water resources. Furthermore, poor people in developing countries use local surface waters for daily activities, e.g. bathing and washing. It is thus clear that water utilization and water sewerage are indispensable connected. In this study, large scale water quality modelling is used to point out hotspots of water pollution to get an insight on potential environmental impacts, in particular, in regions with a low observation density and data gaps in measured water quality parameters. We applied the global water quality model WorldQual to calculate biological oxygen demand (BOD) loadings from point and diffuse sources, as well as in-stream concentrations. Regional focus in this study is on developing countries i.e. Africa, Asia, and South America, as they are most affected by water pollution. Hereby, model runs were conducted for the year 2010 to draw a picture of recent status of surface waters quality and to figure out hotspots and main causes of pollution. First results show that hotspots mainly occur in highly agglomerated regions where population density is high. Large urban areas are initially loading hotspots and pollution prevention and control become increasingly important as point sources are subject to connection rates and treatment levels. Furthermore, river discharge plays a crucial role due to dilution potential, especially in terms of seasonal variability. Highly varying shares of BOD sources across

  13. The thermal evolution of large water-rich asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, B. E.; Castillo, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    Water and heat played a significant role in the formation and evolution of large main belt asteroids, including 1 Ceres, 2 Pallas, and 24 Themis, for which there is now evidence of surficial water ice (Rivkin & Emery, ACM 2008). Shape measurements indicate some differentiation of Ceres’ interior, which, in combination with geophysical modeling, may indicate compositional layering in a core made up of anhydrous and hydrated silicate and a water ice mantle (Castillo-Rogez & McCord, in press, Icarus). We extend these interior models now to other large, possibly water-rich main belt asteroids, namely Pallas, at mean radius 272 km, and the Themis family parent body, at mean radius 150 km. The purpose of this study is to compare geophysical models against available constraints on the physical properties of these objects and to offer constraints on the origin of these objects. Pallas is the largest B-type asteroid. Its surface of hydrated minerals and recent constraint on its density, 2.4-2.8 g/cm3, seems to imply that water strongly affected its evolution (Schmidt et al., in press, Science). 24 Themis is the largest member of the Themis family that now counts about 580 members, including some of the main belt comets. The large member 90 Antiope has a density of about 1.2 g/cm3, while 24 Themis has a density of about 2.7 +/-1.3 g/cm3. The apparent contrast in the densities and spectral properties of the Themis family members may reflect a compositional layering in the original parent body. In the absence of tidal heating and with little accretional heat, the evolution of these small water-rich objects is a function of their initial composition and temperature. The latter depends on the location of formation (in the inner or outer solar system) and most importantly on the time and duration of accretion, which determines the amount of short-lived radioisotopes available for early internal activity. New accretional models suggest that planetesimals grew rapidly throughout

  14. Radioactive droplet moisture transfer from nuclear power plant spray pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elokhin, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    Problem on transfer of radioactive droplet moisture with an account of its evaporation from the nuclear power plant spray pool (NPP coolant) is considered. Formulae enabling evaluation of droplet and radioactive water admixture lifetime as a whole, as well as the maximum distance (by wind), over which it can extend, are obtained. Recommendations for decrease in the droplet dispersed composition and reduction in scale of radioactive contamination of underlying surface are given. 10 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  15. Hot Surface Ignition of A Composite Fuel Droplet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glushkov Dmitrii O.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the characteristics of conductive heating (up to ignition temperature of a composite fuel droplet based on coal, liquid petroleum products, and water. In this paper, we have established the difference between heat transfer from a heat source to a fuel droplet in case of conductive (hot surface and convective (hot gas heat supply. The Leidenfrost effect influences on heat transfer characteristics significantly due to the gas gap between a composite fuel droplet and a hot surface.

  16. Analyses of hydrodynamic effects of large sodium-water reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakano, K.; Shindo, Y.; Koishikawa, A.; Maekawa, I.

    1977-01-01

    Large leak sodium-water reactions that would occur in a steam generator of LMFBR causes abrupt changes of pressure and velocity of fluid in a secondary sodium system and relief system. This paper describes SOWACS-III together with its model and method. Results of analyses are also given, the comparison with experimental results of initial pressure spike being included. SOWACS-III treats the system which consists of the steam generator, vessel, valve, pump and pipe, and uses the following models and methods. (1) Components are assumed to be one-dimensional. (2) Pressure wave propagation near a reaction zone, where hydrogen is generated, is analyzed with the spherical co-ordinate (sphere-cylinder model). (3) A moving boundary is formed by contact of sodium with other fluid such as hydrogen and nitrogen. The boundary travels without mixing of sodium and another fluid through the boundary (boundary tracking model). The boundary can be treated not to move from the original place (fixed boundary model). (4) Pressure wave propagation is analyzed by the explicit method of characteristics in one-dimensional Eulerian co-ordinate. (5) Flow-induced force is analyzed by momentum balance. (6) The lateral motion of relief piping caused by the force is analyzed by NASTRAN code. Analyses were carried out for large sodium-water reaction experiments in SWAT-3 rig of PNC by using the sphere-cylinder model. The calculated pressure spike in the reaction vessel was compared with the measured one for a few milliseconds after water injection. The calculated value and measured one were 6.4 ata and 6.7 ata for peak pressure and 0.6 ms and 2.8 ms for rising time, respectively

  17. Synchronized droplet size measurements for Coal-Water-Slurry (CWS) diesel sprays of an electronically-controlled fuel injection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihm, K. D.; Terracina, D. P.; Payne, S. E.; Caton, J. A.

    Experiments were completed to study intermittent coal-water slurry (CWS) fuel sprays injected from an electronically-controlled accumulator injector system. A laser diffraction particle analyzing (LDPA) technique was used to measure the spray diameters (Sauter mean diameter, SMD) assuming the Rosin-Rammler two parameter model. In order to ensure an accurate synchronization of the measurement with the intermittent sprays, a new synchronization technique was developed using the light extinction signal as a triggering source for the data taking initiation. This technique allowed measurement of SMD's near the spray tip where the light extinction was low and the data were free from the multiscattering bias. Coal-water slurry fuel with 50% coal loading in mass containing 5 (mu)m mass median diameter coal particulates was considered. Injection pressures ranging from 28 to 110 MPa, two different nozzle orifice diameters, 0.2 ad 0.4 mm, and four axial measurement locations from 60 to 120 mm from the nozzle orifice were studied. Measurements were made for pressurized (2.0 MPa in gauge) and for ambient chamber conditions. The spray SMD showed an increase with the distance of the axial measurement location and with the ambient gas density, and showed a decrease with increasing injection pressure. A correlation of the Sauter mean diameter with the injection conditions was determined. The results were also compared with previous SMD correlations that were available only for diesel fuel sprays.

  18. Measurement and interpretation of growth and evaporation of monodispersed droplets in a shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, F.; Paikert, B.

    1994-01-01

    A special gasdynamic shock tube process in combination with a Mie light scattering method is used to study growth and subsequent evaporation of monodispersed droplets carried in argon or air. The droplets are generated by homogeneous nucleation and observed in the micrometer range (0.15-6 micrometer radius). Droplet concentrations range from 10-1000/cu mm. Four different substances, i.e. water, n-propanol, methanol and n-hexane are tested for a wide range of properties. A model covering the entire range between large (Kn much greater than 1) and small Knudsen numbers (K much less than 1) is applied to interpret the experimental data. Excellent agreement is found.

  19. Stochastic growth of cloud droplets by collisions during settling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madival, Deepak G.

    2018-04-01

    In the last stage of droplet growth in clouds which leads to drizzle formation, larger droplets begin to settle under gravity and collide and coalesce with smaller droplets in their path. In this article, we shall deal with the simplified problem of a large drop settling amidst a population of identical smaller droplets. We present an expression for the probability that a given large drop suffers a given number of collisions, for a general statistically homogeneous distribution of droplets. We hope that our approach will serve as a valuable tool in dealing with droplet distribution in real clouds, which has been found to deviate from the idealized Poisson distribution due to mechanisms such as inertial clustering.

  20. Collisions of droplets on spherical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampous, Georgios; Hardalupas, Yannis

    2017-10-01

    Head-on collisions between droplets and spherical particles are examined for water droplets in the diameter range between 170 μm and 280 μm and spherical particles in the diameter range between 500 μm and 2000 μm. The droplet velocities range between 6 m/s and 11 m/s, while the spherical particles are fixed in space. The Weber and Ohnesorge numbers and ratio of droplet to particle diameter were between 92 deposition and splashing regimes, a regime is observed in the intermediate region, where the droplet forms a stable crown, which does not breakup but propagates along the particle surface and passes around the particle. This regime is prevalent when the droplets collide on small particles. The characteristics of the collision at the onset of rim instability are also described in terms of the location of the film on the particle surface and the orientation and length of the ejected crown. Proper orthogonal decomposition identified that the first 2 modes are enough to capture the overall morphology of the crown at the splashing threshold.

  1. The study of water droplets electrical charging effect on spray tower scrubber efficiency for feldspar particles removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Golmohammadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: One of the modern ways introduced nowadays for increasing the collection efficiency of particulate, is the use of electric charge in wet scrubbers. These systems can be used in places in which scrubbers are suitable for contaminant collection. In fact, this system only increases the collection efficiency, and it is not a new technology for contaminant collection.   Methods: First, according to ACGIH recommendation for pilot study a ventilation system was designed and installed. Later, water was charged by using an DC electric exchanger (1275 Volt, DC& product 3×1014 electron on system. Air velocity in the duct was determined by Pitot tube, pressure drop and speed equations, and sampling prop diameter was calculated considering isokenetic conditions. Sampling was performed at two flow rates of 20.3 and 11.4 liter per minute and in overall 72 samples were collected. Sample analysis was performed using gravimetric method and data analysis was performed using SPSS software.      Results: The collection efficiency of inhalable particles in the flow rate of 20.3 liter per minute in a non-electric intervention, and electric intervention with positive and negative charge was 66, 77.67 and 73 percent and in the flow rate of 11.4 liters per minute 60, 69.43 and 68.32 percent respectively. For non-inhalable particles the efficiency in the flow rate 20.3 liter per minute in a non-electric intervention and electric intervention with positive and negative charge was 94.67, 98.33 and 97.67 percent, and in the flow charge of 11/4 liter per minute the flow charge was 91.33, 95, and 97.33 percent respectively.  Conclusion: The results obtained from the experiments, showed that in a certain flow rate, electric intervention increases the efficiency of inhalable particle collection. By the way, this electric intervention has no significant effect on non-inhalable particle collection. Also, the effect of electric intervention with

  2. Air-water oxygen exchange in a large whitewater river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Robert O.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J.

    2012-01-01

    Air-water gas exchange governs fluxes of gas into and out of aquatic ecosystems. Knowing this flux is necessary to calculate gas budgets (i.e., O2) to estimate whole-ecosystem metabolism and basin-scale carbon budgets. Empirical data on rates of gas exchange for streams, estuaries, and oceans are readily available. However, there are few data from large rivers and no data from whitewater rapids. We measured gas transfer velocity in the Colorado River, Grand Canyon, as decline in O2 saturation deficit, 7 times in a 28-km segment spanning 7 rapids. The O2 saturation deficit exists because of hypolimnetic discharge from Glen Canyon Dam, located 25 km upriver from Lees Ferry. Gas transfer velocity (k600) increased with slope of the immediate reach. k600 was -1 in flat reaches, while k600 for the steepest rapid ranged 3600-7700 cm h-1, an extremely high value of k600. Using the rate of gas exchange per unit length of water surface elevation (Kdrop, m-1), segment-integrated k600 varied between 74 and 101 cm h-1. Using Kdrop we scaled k600 to the remainder of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. At the scale corresponding to the segment length where 80% of the O2 exchanged with the atmosphere (mean length = 26.1 km), k600 varied 4.5-fold between 56 and 272 cm h-1 with a mean of 113 cm h-1. Gas transfer velocity for the Colorado River was higher than those from other aquatic ecosystems because of large rapids. Our approach of scaling k600 based on Kdrop allows comparing gas transfer velocity across rivers with spatially heterogeneous morphology.

  3. Bioprinting: Functional droplet networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-06-01

    Tissue-mimicking printed networks of droplets separated by lipid bilayers that can be functionalized with membrane proteins are able to spontaneously fold and transmit electrical currents along predefined paths.

  4. Dynamic Wetting Behavior of Vibrated Droplets on a Micropillared Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-hai Jia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamical wetting behavior has been observed under vertical vibration of a water droplet placed on a micropillared surface. The wetting transition takes place under the different processes. In compression process, the droplet is transited from Cassie state to Wenzel state. The droplet undergoes a Wenzel-Cassie wetting transition in restoring process and the droplet bounces off from the surface in bouncing process. Meanwhile, the wetting and dewetting models during vibration are proposed. The wetting transition is confirmed by the model calculation. This study has potential to be used to control the wetting state.

  5. Controlling Active Liquid Crystal Droplets with Temperature and Surfactant Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, Jake; Milas, Peker; Ross, Jennifer

    Active matter is the study of driven many-body systems that span length scales from flocking birds to molecular motors. A previously described self-propelled particle system was made from liquid crystal (LC) droplets in water with high surfactant concentration to move particles via asymmetric surface instabilities. Using a similar system, we investigate the driving activity as a function of SDS surfactant concentration and temperature. We then use an optical tweezer to trap and locally heat the droplets to cause hydrodynamic flow and coupling between multiple droplets. This system will be the basis for a triggerable assembly system to build and couple LC droplets. DOD AROMURI 67455-CH-MUR.

  6. Multiple and high-throughput droplet reactions via combination of microsampling technique and microfluidic chip

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Jinbo; Zhang, Mengying; Li, Xiaolin; Wen, Weijia

    2012-01-01

    Microdroplets offer unique compartments for accommodating a large number of chemical and biological reactions in tiny volume with precise control. A major concern in droplet-based microfluidics is the difficulty to address droplets individually

  7. Droplet networks with incorporated protein diodes show collective properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglia, Giovanni; Heron, Andrew J.; Hwang, William L.; Holden, Matthew A.; Mikhailova, Ellina; Li, Qiuhong; Cheley, Stephen; Bayley, Hagan

    2009-07-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that submicrolitre aqueous droplets submerged in an apolar liquid containing lipid can be tightly connected by means of lipid bilayers to form networks. Droplet interface bilayers have been used for rapid screening of membrane proteins and to form asymmetric bilayers with which to examine the fundamental properties of channels and pores. Networks, meanwhile, have been used to form microscale batteries and to detect light. Here, we develop an engineered protein pore with diode-like properties that can be incorporated into droplet interface bilayers in droplet networks to form devices with electrical properties including those of a current limiter, a half-wave rectifier and a full-wave rectifier. The droplet approach, which uses unsophisticated components (oil, lipid, salt water and a simple pore), can therefore be used to create multidroplet networks with collective properties that cannot be produced by droplet pairs.

  8. Droplet based microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin; Pfohl, Thomas; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Droplet based microfluidics is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of research combining soft matter physics, biochemistry and microsystems engineering. Its applications range from fast analytical systems or the synthesis of advanced materials to protein crystallization and biological assays for living cells. Precise control of droplet volumes and reliable manipulation of individual droplets such as coalescence, mixing of their contents, and sorting in combination with fast analysis tools allow us to perform chemical reactions inside the droplets under defined conditions. In this paper, we will review available drop generation and manipulation techniques. The main focus of this review is not to be comprehensive and explain all techniques in great detail but to identify and shed light on similarities and underlying physical principles. Since geometry and wetting properties of the microfluidic channels are crucial factors for droplet generation, we also briefly describe typical device fabrication methods in droplet based microfluidics. Examples of applications and reaction schemes which rely on the discussed manipulation techniques are also presented, such as the fabrication of special materials and biophysical experiments.

  9. OCS in He droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grebenev, V.

    2000-06-01

    Phenomenon of superfluidity of para-hydrogen (pH{sub 2}){sub 1-17} and helium {sup 4}He{sub 1-7000} systems doped with an OCS chromophore molecule was investigated in this work. The study of such systems became possible after the development of the depletion spectroscopy technique in helium droplets. The droplets can be easily created and doped with up to 100 particles such as OCS, para-hydrogen or ortho-hydrogen molecules and {sup 4}He atoms. The measured infrared depletion spectra give the information about the temperature of the droplets and their aggregate state. The depletion spectrum of OCS in pure {sup 4}He droplets was comprehensively studied. The rovibrational OCS spectrum shows well resolved narrow lines. The spectrum is shifted to the red relative to the corresponding gas phase spectrum and the rotational constant of OCS in {sup 4}He droplet is three times smaller than that for free molecule. Different models of OCS rotation in the helium environment were discussed. It was shown that the shapes of the rovibrational lines are defined mainly by inhomogeneous broadening due to the droplet size distribution. The sub-rotational structure of the OCS rovibrational lines was revealed in microwave-infrared double resonance experiments. This structure arises due to the interaction of the OCS with the He environment. However, the information obtained in the experiments was not enough to understand the nature of this interaction. (orig.)

  10. Assessment of economically optimal water management and geospatial potential for large-scale water storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasinghe, Harshi; Schneider, Uwe A.

    2010-05-01

    Assessment of economically optimal water management and geospatial potential for large-scale water storage Weerasinghe, Harshi; Schneider, Uwe A Water is an essential but limited and vulnerable resource for all socio-economic development and for maintaining healthy ecosystems. Water scarcity accelerated due to population expansion, improved living standards, and rapid growth in economic activities, has profound environmental and social implications. These include severe environmental degradation, declining groundwater levels, and increasing problems of water conflicts. Water scarcity is predicted to be one of the key factors limiting development in the 21st century. Climate scientists have projected spatial and temporal changes in precipitation and changes in the probability of intense floods and droughts in the future. As scarcity of accessible and usable water increases, demand for efficient water management and adaptation strategies increases as well. Addressing water scarcity requires an intersectoral and multidisciplinary approach in managing water resources. This would in return safeguard the social welfare and the economical benefit to be at their optimal balance without compromising the sustainability of ecosystems. This paper presents a geographically explicit method to assess the potential for water storage with reservoirs and a dynamic model that identifies the dimensions and material requirements under an economically optimal water management plan. The methodology is applied to the Elbe and Nile river basins. Input data for geospatial analysis at watershed level are taken from global data repositories and include data on elevation, rainfall, soil texture, soil depth, drainage, land use and land cover; which are then downscaled to 1km spatial resolution. Runoff potential for different combinations of land use and hydraulic soil groups and for mean annual precipitation levels are derived by the SCS-CN method. Using the overlay and decision tree algorithms

  11. Spray From a Rolling Tire: Mechanics of Droplet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plocher, Dennis; Browand, Fred

    2010-11-01

    The spray pattern immediately behind a single-groove tire rolling on a wet surface is produced in the laboratory using a specially designed tire spray simulator. The spray development is examined using high speed video. Water from the groove forms a liquid sheet as the tire-tread lifts away from the surface. The sheet is not of uniform thickness, but it remains attached to the tread. The thinner portions of the sheet become even thinner as the tire rotates, and eventually break to produce holes near the tire surface. The holes grow as the sheet margins surrounding the holes retract into the thicker portions of the sheet which become roughly cylindrical "ligaments" aligned at right angles to the direction of spray motion. The ligaments break into large droplets via a Rayleigh instability. The smallest droplets form when the margins of two holes collide. As Weber number, We = ρU^2w/2σ , based on tire groove half width, w/2, varies by a factor of 25, the sheet-ligament structure persists, but ligaments become less organized, and more small droplets appear in the pattern.

  12. Effect of solvent on the charging mechanisms of poly(ethylene glycol) in droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Sepideh; Oh, Myong In; Consta, Styliani

    2015-03-01

    We examine the effect of solvent on the charging mechanisms of a macromolecule in a droplet by using molecular dynamics simulations. The droplet contains excess charge that is carried by sodium ions. To investigate the principles of the charging mechanisms of a macromolecule in a droplet, we simulate aqueous and methanol droplets that contain a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecule. We find that the solvent plays a critical role in the charging mechanism and in the manner that the sodiated PEG emerges from a droplet. In the aqueous droplets, the sodiated PEG is released from the droplet while it is being charged at a droplet charge state below the Rayleigh limit. The charging of PEG occurs on the surface of the droplet. In contrast to the aqueous droplets, in the methanol droplet, the sodiated PEG resides in the interior of the droplet and it may become charged at any location in the droplet, interior or surface. The sodiated PEG emerges from the droplet by drying-out of the solvent. Even though these two mechanisms appear to be phenomenologically similar to the widely accepted ion-evaporation and charge-residue mechanisms, they have fundamental differences from those. An integral part of the mechanism that the macromolecular ions emerge from droplets is the droplet morphology. Droplet morphologies give rise to different solvation interactions between the solvent and the macromolecule. In the water-sodiated PEG system, we find the extrusion of the PEG morphology, while in methanol-sodiated droplet, we find the "pearl-on-the-necklace" morphology and the extrusion of the sodiated PEG in the last stage of the desolvation process. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms that macromolecules acquire their charge in droplets produced in electrospray ionization experiments.

  13. Short-range airborne transmission of expiratory droplets between two people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Li, Yuguo; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2017-01-01

    , ventilation, and breathing mode. Under the specific set of conditions studied, we found a substantial increase in airborne exposure to droplet nuclei exhaled by the source manikin when a susceptible manikin is within about 1.5 m of the source manikin, referred to as the proximity effect. The threshold...... distance of about 1.5 m distinguishes the two basic transmission processes of droplets and droplet nuclei, that is, short-range modes and the long-range airborne route. The short-range modes include both the conventional large droplet route and the newly defined short-range airborne transmission. We thus...... reveal that transmission occurring in close proximity to the source patient includes both droplet-borne (large droplet) and short-range airborne routes, in addition to the direct deposition of large droplets on other body surfaces. The mechanisms of the droplet-borne and short-range airborne routes...

  14. Oxidation of SO2 and formation of water droplets under irradiation of 20MeV protons in N2/H2O/SO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomita, Shigeo; Nakai, Yoichi; Funada, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    We have performed an experiment on charged droplet formation in a humidified N2 gas with trace SO2 concentration and induced by 20MeV proton irradiation. It is thought that SO2 reacts with the chemical species, such as OH radicals, generated through the reactions triggered by N2+ production. Both...

  15. Rheological properties of soybean protein isolate gels containing emulsion droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, K.H.; Renkema, J.M.S.; Vliet, van T.

    2001-01-01

    Rheological properties of soybean protein gels containing various volume fractions oil droplets have been studied at small and large deformations. Dynamic viscoelastic properties of soybean protein isolate gels were determined as a function of the volume fraction of oil droplets stabilised by the

  16. Large-eddy simulations of unidirectional water flow over dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriadis, D. G. E.; Balaras, E.; Dimas, A. A.

    2009-06-01

    The unidirectional, subcritical flow over fixed dunes is studied numerically using large-eddy simulation, while the immersed boundary method is implemented to incorporate the bed geometry. Results are presented for a typical dune shape and two Reynolds numbers, Re = 17,500 and Re = 93,500, on the basis of bulk velocity and water depth. The numerical predictions of velocity statistics at the low Reynolds number are in very good agreement with available experimental data. A primary recirculation region develops downstream of the dune crest at both Reynolds numbers, while a secondary region develops at the toe of the dune crest only for the low Reynolds number. Downstream of the reattachment point, on the dune stoss, the turbulence intensity in the developing boundary layer is weaker than in comparable equilibrium boundary layers. Coherent vortical structures are identified using the fluctuating pressure field and the second invariant of the velocity gradient tensor. Vorticity is primarily generated at the dune crest in the form of spanwise "roller" structures. Roller structures dominate the flow dynamics near the crest, and are responsible for perturbing the boundary layer downstream of the reattachment point, which leads to the formation of "horseshoe" structures. Horseshoe structures dominate the near-wall dynamics after the reattachment point, do not rise to the free surface, and are distorted by the shear layer of the next crest. The occasional interaction between roller and horseshoe structures generates tube-like "kolk" structures, which rise to the free surface and persist for a long time before attenuating.

  17. Modelling of decay heat removal using large water pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munther, R.; Raussi, P.; Kalli, H.

    1992-01-01

    The main task for investigating of passive safety systems typical for ALWRs (Advanced Light Water Reactors) has been reviewing decay heat removal systems. The reference system for calculations has been represented in Hitachi's SBWR-concept. The calculations for energy transfer to the suppression pool were made using two different fluid mechanics codes, namely FIDAP and PHOENICS. FIDAP is based on finite element methodology and PHOENICS uses finite differences. The reason choosing these codes has been to compare their modelling and calculating abilities. The thermal stratification behaviour and the natural circulation was modelled with several turbulent flow models. Also, energy transport to the suppression pool was calculated for laminar flow conditions. These calculations required a large amount of computer resources and so the CRAY-supercomputer of the state computing centre was used. The results of the calculations indicated that the capabilities of these codes for modelling the turbulent flow regime are limited. Output from these codes should be considered carefully, and whenever possible, experimentally determined parameters should be used as input to enhance the code reliability. (orig.). (31 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.)

  18. Sustainability of small reservoirs and large scale water availability under current conditions and climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, Martinus S.; de Vries, Marjella J.; van Oel, Pieter R.; Carlos de Araújo, José

    2011-01-01

    Semi-arid river basins often rely on reservoirs for water supply. Small reservoirs may impact on large-scale water availability both by enhancing availability in a distributed sense and by subtracting water for large downstream user communities, e.g. served by large reservoirs. Both of these impacts

  19. An interfacial mechanism for cloud droplet formation on organic aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruehl, Christopher R; Davies, James F; Wilson, Kevin R

    2016-03-25

    Accurate predictions of aerosol/cloud interactions require simple, physically accurate parameterizations of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of aerosols. Current models assume that organic aerosol species contribute to CCN activity by lowering water activity. We measured droplet diameters at the point of CCN activation for particles composed of dicarboxylic acids or secondary organic aerosol and ammonium sulfate. Droplet activation diameters were 40 to 60% larger than predicted if the organic was assumed to be dissolved within the bulk droplet, suggesting that a new mechanism is needed to explain cloud droplet formation. A compressed film model explains how surface tension depression by interfacial organic molecules can alter the relationship between water vapor supersaturation and droplet size (i.e., the Köhler curve), leading to the larger diameters observed at activation. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. A new kind of droplet space distribution measuring method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Chao; Bo Hanliang

    2012-01-01

    A new kind of droplet space distribution measuring technique was introduced mainly, and the experimental device which was designed for the measuring the space distribution and traces of the flying film droplet produced by the bubble breaking up near the free surface of the water. This experiment was designed with a kind of water-sensitivity test paper (rice paper) which could record the position and size of the colored scattering droplets precisely. The rice papers were rolled into cylinders with different diameters by using tools. The bubbles broke up exactly in the center of the cylinder, and the space distribution and the traces of the droplets would be received by analysing all the positions of the droplets produced by the same size bubble on the rice papers. (authors)

  1. Large Scale Evapotranspiration Estimates: An Important Component in Regional Water Balances to Assess Water Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garatuza-Payan, J.; Yepez, E. A.; Watts, C.; Rodriguez, J. C.; Valdez-Torres, L. C.; Robles-Morua, A.

    2013-05-01

    Water security, can be defined as the reliable supply in quantity and quality of water to help sustain future populations and maintaining ecosystem health and productivity. Water security is rapidly declining in many parts of the world due to population growth, drought, climate change, salinity, pollution, land use change, over-allocation and over-utilization, among other issues. Governmental offices (such as the Comision Nacional del Agua in Mexico, CONAGUA) require and conduct studies to estimate reliable water balances at regional or continental scales in order to provide reasonable assessments of the amount of water that can be provided (from surface or ground water sources) to supply all the human needs while maintaining natural vegetation, on an operational basis and, more important, under disturbances, such as droughts. Large scale estimates of evapotranspiration (ET), a critical component of the water cycle, are needed for a better comprehension of the hydrological cycle at large scales, which, in most water balances is left as the residual. For operational purposes, such water balance estimates can not rely on ET measurements since they do not exist, should be simple and require the least ground information possible, information that is often scarce or does not exist at all. Given this limitation, the use of remotely sensed data to estimate ET could supplement the lack of ground information, particularly in remote regions In this study, a simple method, based on the Makkink equation is used to estimate ET for large areas at high spatial resolutions (1 km). The Makkink model used here is forced using three remotely sensed datasets. First, the model uses solar radiation estimates obtained from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES); Second, the model uses an Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) obtained from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) normalized to get an estimate for vegetation amount and land use which was

  2. Evaluating the capabilities and uncertainties of droplet measurements for the fog droplet spectrometer (FM-100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Spiegel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Droplet size spectra measurements are crucial to obtain a quantitative microphysical description of clouds and fog. However, cloud droplet size measurements are subject to various uncertainties. This work focuses on the error analysis of two key measurement uncertainties arising during cloud droplet size measurements with a conventional droplet size spectrometer (FM-100: first, we addressed the precision with which droplets can be sized with the FM-100 on the basis of the Mie theory. We deduced error assumptions and proposed a new method on how to correct measured size distributions for these errors by redistributing the measured droplet size distribution using a stochastic approach. Second, based on a literature study, we summarized corrections for particle losses during sampling with the FM-100. We applied both corrections to cloud droplet size spectra measured at the high alpine site Jungfraujoch for a temperature range from 0 °C to 11 °C. We showed that Mie scattering led to spikes in the droplet size distributions using the default sizing procedure, while the new stochastic approach reproduced the ambient size distribution adequately. A detailed analysis of the FM-100 sampling efficiency revealed that particle losses were typically below 10% for droplet diameters up to 10 μm. For larger droplets, particle losses can increase up to 90% for the largest droplets of 50 μm at ambient wind speeds below 4.4 m s−1 and even to >90% for larger angles between the instrument orientation and the wind vector (sampling angle at higher wind speeds. Comparisons of the FM-100 to other reference instruments revealed that the total liquid water content (LWC measured by the FM-100 was more sensitive to particle losses than to re-sizing based on Mie scattering, while the total number concentration was only marginally influenced by particle losses. Consequently, for further LWC measurements with the FM-100 we strongly recommend to consider (1 the

  3. Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol as a Modulator of Droplet Number in the Southern Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacarab, M.; Howell, S. G.; Small Griswold, J. D.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Wood, R.; Redemann, J.; Nenes, A.

    2017-12-01

    Aerosols play a significant yet highly variable role in local and global air quality and climate. They act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and both scatter and absorb radiation, lending a large source of uncertainty to climate predictions. Biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) can drastically elevate CCN concentrations, but the response in cloud droplet number may be suppressed or even reversed due to low supersaturations that develop from strong competition for water vapor. Constraining droplet response to BBOA is a key factor to understanding aerosol-cloud interactions. The southeastern Atlantic (SEA) cloud deck off the west coast of central Africa is a prime opportunity to study these cloud-BBOA interactions for marine stratocumulus as during winter in the southern hemisphere the SEA cloud deck is overlain by a large, optically thick BBOA plume. The NASA ObseRvations of Aerosols above Clouds and their intEractionS (ORACLES) study focuses on increasing the understanding of how these BBOA affect the SEA cloud deck. Measurements of CCN concentration, aerosol size distribution and composition, updraft velocities, and cloud droplet number in and around the SEA cloud deck and associated BBOA plume were taken aboard the NASA P-3 aircraft during the first two years of the ORACLES campaign in September 2016 and August 2017. Here we evaluate the predicted and observed droplet number sensitivity to the aerosol fluctuations and quantify, using the data, the drivers of droplet number variability (vertical velocity or aerosol properties) as a function of biomass burning plume characteristics. Over the course of the campaign, different levels of BBOA influence in the marine boundary layer (MBL) were observed, allowing for comparison of cloud droplet number, hygroscopicity parameter (κ), and maximum in-cloud supersaturation over a range of "clean" and "dirty" conditions. Droplet number sensitivity to aerosol concentration, κ, and vertical updraft velocities are also

  4. Moving droplets : The measurement of contact lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelma, C.; Franken, M.J.Z.; Kim, H.; Westerweel, J.

    2014-01-01

    Contact lines are the locations where a gas, liquid and a solid meet. From everyday experience we know that such contact lines can be mobile, for example in the case of a water droplet sliding over a glass surface. However, the continuum description of the flow towards or away from a contact line

  5. Effect of Latent Heat Released by Freezing Droplets during Frost Wave Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Shreyas; Park, Deokgeun; Singla, Nitish; Sokalski, Peter; Boyina, Kalyan; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2018-05-21

    Frost spreads on nonwetting surfaces during condensation frosting via an interdroplet frost wave. When a supercooled condensate water droplet freezes on a hydrophobic or superhydrophobic surface, neighboring droplets still in the liquid phase begin to evaporate. Two possible mechanisms govern the evaporation of neighboring water droplets: (1) The difference in saturation pressure of the water vapor surrounding the liquid and frozen droplets induces a vapor pressure gradient, and (2) the latent heat released by freezing droplets locally heats the substrate, leading to evaporation of nearby droplets. The relative significance of these two mechanisms is still not understood. Here, we study the significance of the latent heat released into the substrate by freezing droplets, and its effect on adjacent droplet evaporation, by studying the dynamics of individual water droplet freezing on aluminum-, copper-, and glass-based hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces. The latent heat flux released into the substrate was calculated from the measured droplet sizes and the respective freezing times ( t f ), defined as the time from initial ice nucleation within the droplet to complete droplet freezing. To probe the effect of latent heat release, we performed three-dimensional transient finite element simulations showing that the transfer of latent heat to neighboring droplets is insignificant and accounts for a negligible fraction of evaporation during microscale frost wave propagation. Furthermore, we studied the effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the transfer of latent heat transfer to neighboring droplets by investigating the velocity of ice bridge formation. The velocity of the ice bridge was independent of the substrate thermal conductivity, indicating that adjacent droplet evaporation during condensation frosting is governed solely by vapor pressure gradients. This study not only provides key insights into the individual droplet freezing process but also

  6. Plan for support of large-plant (post-CRBR) needs in large-leak sodium-water reaction area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whipple, J.C.

    1980-03-01

    Work in the large leak test and analysis area of steam generator development has been carried out at GE-ARSD under 189a SG037 since 1973. The currently planned master schedule for the SG037 program is shown. Principal activities are the large leak testing program being carried out at the Large Leak Test Rig and the analysis methods development. The plan for supporting the large plant (post-CRBR) needs in the large leak sodium-water reaction area is outlined. Most of the needs will be answered in the current SG037 large leak program

  7. Large-eddy simulation and Lagrangian stochastic modelling of solid particle and droplet dispersion and mixing. Application to atmospheric pollution; Dispersion et melange turbulents de particules solides et de gouttelettes par une simulation des grandes echelles et une modelisation stochastique lagrangienne. Application a la pollution de l'atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinkovic, I.

    2005-07-15

    In order to study atmospheric pollution and the dispersion of industrial stack emissions, a large eddy simulation with the dynamic Smagorinsky-Germano sub-grid-scale model is coupled with Lagrangian tracking of fluid particles containing scalar, solid particles and droplets. The movement of fluid particles at a sub-grid level is given by a three-dimensional Langevin model. The stochastic model is written in terms of sub-grid-scale statistics at a mesh level. By introducing a diffusion model, the coupling between the large-eddy simulation and the modified three-dimensional Langevin model is applied to passive scalar dispersion. The results are validated by comparison with the wind-tunnel experiments of Fackrell and Robins (1982). The equation of motion of a small rigid sphere in a turbulent flow is introduced. Solid particles and droplets are tracked in a Lagrangian way. The velocity of solid particles and droplets is considered to have a large scale component (directly computed by the large-eddy simulation) and a sub-grid scale part. Because of inertia and gravity effects, solid particles and droplets, deviate from the trajectories of the surrounding fluid particles. Therefore, a modified Lagrangian correlation timescale is introduced into the Langevin model previously developed for the sub-grid velocity of fluid particles. Two-way coupling and collisions are taken into account. The results of the large-eddy simulation with solid particles are compared with the wind-tunnel experiments of Nalpanis et al. (1993) and of Taniere et al. (1997) on sand particles in saltation and in modified saltation, respectively. A model for droplet coalescence and breakup is implemented which allows to predict droplet interactions under turbulent flow conditions in the frame of the Euler/Lagrange approach. Coalescence and breakup are considered as a stochastic process with simple scaling symmetry assumption for the droplet radius, initially proposed by Kolmogorov (1941). At high

  8. Statistical steady states in turbulent droplet condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bec, Jeremie; Krstulovic, Giorgio; Siewert, Christoph

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the general problem of turbulent condensation. Using direct numerical simulations we show that the fluctuations of the supersaturation field offer different conditions for the growth of droplets which evolve in time due to turbulent transport and mixing. This leads to propose a Lagrangian stochastic model consisting of a set of integro-differential equations for the joint evolution of the squared radius and the supersaturation along droplet trajectories. The model has two parameters fixed by the total amount of water and the thermodynamic properties, as well as the Lagrangian integral timescale of the turbulent supersaturation. The model reproduces very well the droplet size distributions obtained from direct numerical simulations and their time evolution. A noticeable result is that, after a stage where the squared radius simply diffuses, the system converges exponentially fast to a statistical steady state independent of the initial conditions. The main mechanism involved in this convergence is a loss of memory induced by a significant number of droplets undergoing a complete evaporation before growing again. The statistical steady state is characterised by an exponential tail in the droplet mass distribution.

  9. The behavior of volatile droplets in a controlled atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrault, Gerard

    1971-01-01

    A technique permitting constant temperature and atmospheric composition to be obtained in a few minutes in a closed container allowed the equilibrium, evaporation and growth of several types of droplets to be studied. A critical review is presented on the thermodynamics of equilibria and the kinetics of evaporation and growth in the different cases. Fair agreement was reached between theory and experiment. Coefficients of evaporation, condensation, and accommodation were calculated for water and water-ClNa droplets; the theory is extended to a few particular cases of droplets containing two volatile constituents. (author) [fr

  10. Hydrodynamics of a quark droplet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, Johan J.; Mishustin, Igor N.; Døssing, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple model of a multi-quark droplet evolution based on the hydrodynamical description. This model includes collective expansion of the droplet, effects of the vacuum pressure and surface tension. The hadron emission from the droplet is described following Weisskopf's statistical...

  11. Selfbound quantum droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langen, Tim; Wenzel, Matthias; Schmitt, Matthias; Boettcher, Fabian; Buehner, Carl; Ferrier-Barbut, Igor; Pfau, Tilman

    2017-04-01

    Self-bound many-body systems are formed through a balance of attractive and repulsive forces and occur in many physical scenarios. Liquid droplets are an example of a self-bound system, formed by a balance of the mutual attractive and repulsive forces that derive from different components of the inter-particle potential. On the basis of the recent finding that an unstable bosonic dipolar gas can be stabilized by a repulsive many-body term, it was predicted that three-dimensional self-bound quantum droplets of magnetic atoms should exist. Here we report on the observation of such droplets using dysprosium atoms, with densities 108 times lower than a helium droplet, in a trap-free levitation field. We find that this dilute magnetic quantum liquid requires a minimum, critical number of atoms, below which the liquid evaporates into an expanding gas as a result of the quantum pressure of the individual constituents. Consequently, around this critical atom number we observe an interaction-driven phase transition between a gas and a self-bound liquid in the quantum degenerate regime with ultracold atoms.

  12. Effect of high-pressure homogenization preparation on mean globule size and large-diameter tail of oil-in-water injectable emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jie; Dong, Wu-Jun; Li, Ling; Xu, Jia-Ming; Jin, Du-Jia; Xia, Xue-Jun; Liu, Yu-Ling

    2015-12-01

    The effect of different high pressure homogenization energy input parameters on mean diameter droplet size (MDS) and droplets with > 5 μm of lipid injectable emulsions were evaluated. All emulsions were prepared at different water bath temperatures or at different rotation speeds and rotor-stator system times, and using different homogenization pressures and numbers of high-pressure system recirculations. The MDS and polydispersity index (PI) value of the emulsions were determined using the dynamic light scattering (DLS) method, and large-diameter tail assessments were performed using the light-obscuration/single particle optical sensing (LO/SPOS) method. Using 1000 bar homogenization pressure and seven recirculations, the energy input parameters related to the rotor-stator system will not have an effect on the final particle size results. When rotor-stator system energy input parameters are fixed, homogenization pressure and recirculation will affect mean particle size and large diameter droplet. Particle size will decrease with increasing homogenization pressure from 400 bar to 1300 bar when homogenization recirculation is fixed; when the homogenization pressure is fixed at 1000 bar, the particle size of both MDS and percent of fat droplets exceeding 5 μm (PFAT 5 ) will decrease with increasing homogenization recirculations, MDS dropped to 173 nm after five cycles and maintained this level, volume-weighted PFAT 5 will drop to 0.038% after three cycles, so the "plateau" of MDS will come up later than that of PFAT 5 , and the optimal particle size is produced when both of them remained at plateau. Excess homogenization recirculation such as nine times under the 1000 bar may lead to PFAT 5 increase to 0.060% rather than a decrease; therefore, the high-pressure homogenization procedure is the key factor affecting the particle size distribution of emulsions. Varying storage conditions (4-25°C) also influenced particle size, especially the PFAT 5 . Copyright

  13. Control of the droplet generation by an infrared laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the control of the droplet generation by a focused infrared (IR laser with a wavelength of 1550 nm was studied, in which the liquid water and the oil with the surfactant of Span 80 were employed as the disperse and continuous phases, respectively. The characteristics of the droplet generation controlled by the laser was explored under various flow rates, laser powers and spot positions and the comparison between the cases with/without the laser was also performed. The results showed that when the laser was focused on the region away from the outlet of the liquid water inflow channel, the droplet shedding was blocked due to the IR laser heating induced thermocapillary flow, leading to the increase of the droplet volume and the cycle time of the droplet generation as compared to the case without the laser. Decreasing the continuous phase flow rate led to the increase of the droplet volume, cycle time of the droplet generation and the volume increase ratio, while increasing the disperse phase flow rate led to the increase of the droplet volume and the decrease of the cycle time and volume increase ratio. For a given flow rate ratio between the continuous and disperse phases, the increase of the flow rates decreased the volume increase ratio. In addition, it is also found that the droplet volume, the cycle time and the volume increase ratio all increased with the laser power. When the laser was focused at the inlet of the downstream channel, the droplet volume, the cycle time and the volume increase ratio were the largest. Moving the laser spot to the downstream or upstream led to the decrease of them. When the laser was focused on the outlet of the liquid water inflow channel, the generated droplet volume and cycle time of the droplet generation were even lower than the case without the laser because of the lowered viscosity. This works provides a comprehensive understanding of the characteristics of the droplet generation controlled

  14. Response of two-phase droplets to intense electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, James F.; Maloney, Daniel J.; Lawson, William F.; Casleton, Kent H.

    1993-01-01

    The response of two-phase droplets to intense radiant heating is studied to determine the incident power that is required for causing explosive boiling in the liquid phase. The droplets studied consist of strongly absorbing coal particles dispersed in a weakly absorbing water medium. Experiments are performed by confining droplets (radii of 37, 55, and 80 microns) electrodynamically and irradiating them from two sides with pulsed laser beams. Emphasis is placed on the transition region from accelerated droplet vaporization to droplet superheating and explosive boiling. The time scale observed for explosive boiling is more than 2 orders of magnitude longer than published values for pure liquids. The delayed response is the result of energy transfer limitations between the absorbing solid phase and the surrounding liquid.

  15. METHANE GAS STABILIZES SUPERCOOLED ETHANE DROPLETS IN TITAN'S CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chia C.; Lang, E. Kathrin; Signorell, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Strong evidence for ethane clouds in various regions of Titan's atmosphere has recently been found. Ethane is usually assumed to exist as ice particles in these clouds, although the possible role of liquid and supercooled liquid ethane droplets has been recognized. Here, we report on infrared spectroscopic measurements of ethane aerosols performed in the laboratory under conditions mimicking Titan's lower atmosphere. The results clearly show that liquid ethane droplets are significantly stabilized by methane gas which is ubiquitous in Titan's nitrogen atmosphere-a phenomenon that does not have a counterpart for water droplets in Earth's atmosphere. Our data imply that supercooled ethane droplets are much more abundant in Titan's clouds than previously anticipated. Possibly, these liquid droplets are even more important for cloud processes and the formation of lakes than ethane ice particles.

  16. Role of cavitation in high-speed droplet impact problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Tomoki; Ando, Keita

    2014-11-01

    High-speed droplet impact is found in physical cleaning using liquid jets, but its mechanisms for particle removal from target surfaces are yet unclear. In this study, we explore the possibility of having cavitation inside the droplet. The pressure evolution within a droplet colliding with a flat surface of deformable materials is determined by multicomponent Euler equations. Dynamics of cavitation bubbles heterogeneously nucleated from preexisting nuclei are determined from Rayleigh-Plesset calculations according to the pressure evolution within the droplet in one-way-coupling manner. The simulation shows that cavitation indeed occurs due to tension that arises from the water hammer shock reflection at the droplet interface. The role of cavitation including pressure emission from its collapse is to be discussed based on the one-way-coupling computations.

  17. Pressure loadings of Soviet-designed VVER [Water-Cooled, Water-Moderated Energy Reactor] reactor release mitigation structures from large-break LOCAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Horak, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    Analyses have been carried out of the pressurization of the accident release mitigation structures of Soviet-designed VVER (Water-Cooled, Water-Moderated Energy Reactor) pressurized water reactors following large-break loss-of-coolant accidents. Specific VVER systems for which calculations were performed are the VVER-440 model V230, VVER-440 model V213, and VVER-1000 model V320. Descriptions of the designs of these and other VVER models are contained in the report DOE/NE-0084. The principal objective of the current analyses is to calculate the time dependent pressure loadings inside the accident localization or containment structures immediately following the double-ended guillotine rupture of a primary coolant pipe. In addition, the pressures are compared with the results of calculations of the response of the structures to overpressure. Primary coolant system thermal hydraulic conditions and the fluid conditions at the break location were calculated with the RETRAN-02 Mod2 computer code (Agee, 1984). Pressures and temperatures inside the building accident release mitigation structures were obtained from the PACER (Pressurization Accompanying Coolant Escape from Ruptures) multicompartment containment analysis code developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The analyses were carried out using best estimate models and conditions rather than conservative, bounding-type assumptions. In particular, condensation upon structure and equipment was calculated using correlations based upon analyses of the HDR, Marviken, and Battelle Frankfurt containment loading experiments. The intercompartment flow rates incorporate an effective discharge coefficient and liquid droplet carryover fraction given by expressions of Schwan determined from analyses of the Battelle Frankfurt and Marviken tests. 5 refs., 4 figs

  18. Electrical actuation of dielectric droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, N; Bahadur, V; Garimella, S V

    2008-01-01

    Electrical actuation of liquid droplets at the microscale offers promising applications in the fields of microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip devices. Much prior research has targeted the electrical actuation of electrically conducting liquid droplets; however, the actuation of dielectric droplets has remained relatively unexplored, despite the advantages associated with the use of a dielectric droplet. This paper presents modeling and experimental results on the electrical actuation of dielectric droplets between two flat plates. A first-order analytical model, based on the energy-minimization principle, is developed to estimate the electrical actuation force on a dielectric droplet as it moves between two flat plates. Two versions of this analytical model are benchmarked for their suitability and accuracy against a detailed numerical model. The actuation force prediction is then combined with available semi-analytical expressions for predicting the forces opposing droplet motion to develop a model that predicts transient droplet motion under electrical actuation. Electrical actuation of dielectric droplets is experimentally demonstrated by moving transformer oil droplets between two flat plates under the influence of an actuation voltage. Droplet velocities and their dependence on the plate spacing and the applied voltage are experimentally measured and showed reasonable agreement with predictions from the models developed

  19. Active Mesogenic Droplets: Impact of Liquid Crystallinity and Collective Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Christian

    Droplets of common mesogenic compounds show a self-propelled motion when immersed in aqueous solutions containing ionic surfactants at concentrations well above the critical micelle concentration. After introducing some general properties of this type of artificial microswimmer, we focus on two topics: the influence of liquid crystallinity on the swimming behavior and the collective behavior of ensembles of a larger number of droplets. The mesogenic properties are not essential for the basic mechanism of self-propulsion, nevertheless they considerably influence the swimming behavior of the droplets. For instance, the shape of the trajectories strongly depends on whether the droplets are in the nematic or isotropic state. The droplet swimmers are also ideally suited for the study of collective behavior: Microfluidics enables the generation of large numbers of identical swimmers and we can tune their buoyancy. We report on the collective behavior in three-dimensional environments. Supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (SPP 1726 ``Microswimmers'').

  20. Droplet impaction on solid surfaces exposed to impinging jet fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, Zia

    2005-12-15

    The thermal response of hot surfaces exposed to impinging jet fire and subsequent impacting water droplets is investigated. The research was done mainly experimentally by utilizing three different concepts. This included experiments on a laboratory scale steel plate and large outdoor fire tests with a quadratic steel channel and steel plates. Besides the horizontal jet flame itself was characterized in a comprehensive study. As a comparative study, the last three types of the experiment were additionally modeled by the CFD-code Kameleon FireEx for validation of results. The purpose of the experiments done on bench scale steel plate (L x W x T : 300 x 200 x 8 mm) was mainly to map data on wetting temperature, water droplet size, droplet impingement angle, and droplet velocity prior to large scale jet fire tests. The droplet release angle normal to hot surface gives best cooling effect, when the surface is oriented in upright position. The partial wetting begins at about 165 degrees C. When the surface is positioned in horizontal plane, the droplet of about 5 mm in diameter wets the hot surface partially at around 240-250 degrees C within an impaction distance of 20 cm. At about 150 degrees C, the droplet is entirely attached to the surface with almost zero contact angle, and cools down the solid at a critical heat flux equivalent to 1750 kW/m{sup 2}. The cooling effectiveness is about 8 % with a Weber number of 68. Although in the event of horizontal channel (L x W x T : 1000 x 200 x 8 mm) water droplets were not applied, however, the knowledge gained with jet fire tests gave valuable information about temperature progress in solids (steels and insulation) and their response to impinging jet fire during long duration experiments. The temperature of the insulated area of the channel keeps 200 degrees C below that of the exposed surface, as long as the insulation material remained intact. Upon long test fire durations, the insulation either burns or degrades despite

  1. Why droplet dimension can be larger than, equal to, or smaller than the nanowire dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, S. Noor

    2009-11-01

    Droplets play central roles in the nanowire (NW) growth by vapor phase mechanisms. These mechanisms include vapor-liquid-solid (VLS), vapor-solid-solid or vapor-solid (VSS), vapor-quasisolid-solid or vapor-quasiliquid-solid (VQS), oxide-assisted growth (OAG), and self-catalytic growth (SCG) mechanisms. Fundamentals of the shape, size, characteristics, and dynamics of droplets and the impacts of them on the NW growth, have been studied. The influence of growth techniques, growth parameters (e.g., growth temperature, partial pressure, gas flow rates, etc.), thermodynamic conditions, surface and interface energy, molar volume, chemical potentials, etc. have been considered on the shapes and sizes of droplets. A model has been presented to explain why droplets can be larger than, equal to, or smaller than the associated NWs. Various growth techniques have been analyzed to understand defects created in NWs. Photoluminescence characteristics have been presented to quantify the roles of droplets in the creation of NW defects. The study highlights the importance of the purity of the droplet material. It attests to the superiority of the SCG mechanism, and clarifies the differences between the VSS, VQS, VLS, and SCG mechanisms. It explains why droplets produced by some mechanisms are visible but droplets produced by some other mechanisms are not visible. It elucidates the formation mechanisms of very large and very small droplets, and discusses the ground rules for droplets creating necked NWs. It puts forth reasons to demonstrate that very large droplets may not behave as droplets.

  2. A compact and facile microfluidic droplet creation device using a piezoelectric diaphragm micropump for droplet digital PCR platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, Naoaki; Nakashoji, Yuta; Koshirogane, Toshihiro; Kondo, Masaki; Tanaka, Yugo; Inoue, Kohei; Hashimoto, Masahiko

    2017-10-01

    We have exploited a compact and facile microfluidic droplet creation device consisting of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic chip possessing T-junction channel geometry, two inlet reservoirs, and one outlet reservoir, and a piezoelectric (PZT) diaphragm micropump with controller. Air was evacuated from the outlet reservoir using the PZT pump, reducing the pressure inside. The reduced pressure within the outlet reservoir pulled oil and aqueous solution preloaded in the inlet reservoirs into the microchannels, which then merged at the T-junction, successfully forming water-in-oil emulsion droplets at a rate of ∼1000 per second with minimal sample loss. We confirmed that the onset of droplet formation occurred immediately after turning on the pump (<1 s). Over repeated runs, droplet formation was highly reproducible, with droplet size purity (polydispersity, <4%) comparable to that achieved using other microfluidic droplet preparation techniques. We also demonstrated single-molecule PCR amplification in the created droplets, suggesting that the device could be used for effective droplet digital PCR platforms in most laboratories without requiring great expense, space, or time for acquiring technical skills. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Exploring Future Water Shortage for Large River Basins under Different Water Allocation Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Dan; Yao, Mingtian; Ludwig, Fulco; Kabat, Pavel; Huang, He Qing; Hutjes, Ronald W.A.; Werners, Saskia E.

    2018-01-01

    Climate change and socio-economic development increase variations in water availability and water use in the Pearl River Basin (PRB), China. This can potentially result in conflicts over water resources between water users, and cause water shortage in the dry season. To assess and manage water

  4. Droplets and sprays

    CERN Document Server

    Sazhin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Providing a clear and systematic description of droplets and spray dynamic models, this book maximises reader insight into the underlying physics of the processes involved, outlines the development of new physical and mathematical models, and broadens understanding of interactions between the complex physical processes which take place in sprays. Complementing approaches based on the direct application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), Droplets and Sprays treats both theoretical and practical aspects of internal combustion engine process such as the direct injection of liquid fuel, subcritical heating and evaporation. Includes case studies that illustrate the approaches relevance to automotive applications,  it is also anticipated that the described models can find use in other areas such as in medicine and environmental science.

  5. New droplet model developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorso, C.O.; Myers, W.D.; Swiatecki, W.J.; Moeller, P.; Treiner, J.; Weiss, M.S.

    1985-09-01

    A brief summary is given of three recent contributions to the development of the Droplet Model. The first concerns the electric dipole moment induced in octupole deformed nuclei by the Coulomb redistribution. The second concerns a study of squeezing in nuclei and the third is a study of the improved predictive power of the model when an empirical ''exponential'' term is included. 25 refs., 3 figs

  6. Recent Advances In Science Support For Isolated Droplet Combustion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryer, F. L.; Kazakov, A.; Urban, B. D.; Kroenlein, K.

    2003-01-01

    In a joint program involving Prof. F.A. Williams of the University of California, San Diego and Dr. V. Nayagam of the National Center for Microgravity Research, the combustion characteristics of isolated liquid fuel droplets of n-heptane, n-decane, methanol, methanol-water, ethanol and ethanol-water having initial diameters between about 1 mm and 6 mm continues to be investigated. The objectives of the work are to improve fundamental knowledge of droplet combustion dynamics for pure fuels and fuel-water mixtures through microgravity experiments and theoretical analyses. The Princeton contributions support the engineering design, data analysis, and data interpretation requirements for the study of initially single component, spherically symmetric, isolated droplet combustion studies through experiments and numerical modeling. UCSD contributions are described in a companion communication in this conference. The Princeton effort also addresses the analyses of Fiber Supported Droplet Combustion (FSDC) experiments conducted with the above fuels and collaborative work with others who are investigating droplet combustion in the presence of steady convection. A thorough interpretation of droplet burning behavior for n-heptane and n-decane over a relatively wide range of conditions also involves the influences of sooting on the combustion behavior, and this particular aspect on isolated burning of droplets is under consideration in a collaborative program underway with Drexel University. This collaboration is addressed in another communication at this conference. The one-dimensional, time-dependent, numerical modeling approach that we have continued to evolve for analyzing isolated, quiescent droplet combustion data has been further applied to investigate several facets of isolated droplet burning of simple alcohols, n-heptane, and n-decane. Some of the new results are described below.

  7. Prediction of oil droplet size distribution in agitated aquatic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelifa, A.; Lee, K.; Hill, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    Oil spilled at sea undergoes many transformations based on physical, biological and chemical processes. Vertical dispersion is the hydrodynamic mechanism controlled by turbulent mixing due to breaking waves, vertical velocity, density gradients and other environmental factors. Spilled oil is dispersed in the water column as small oil droplets. In order to estimate the mass of an oil slick in the water column, it is necessary to know how the droplets formed. Also, the vertical dispersion and fate of oil spilled in aquatic environments can be modelled if the droplet-size distribution of the oil droplets is known. An oil spill remediation strategy can then be implemented. This paper presented a newly developed Monte Carlo model to predict droplet-size distribution due to Brownian motion, turbulence and a differential settling at equilibrium. A kinematic model was integrated into the proposed model to simulate droplet breakage. The key physical input of the model is the maximum droplet size permissible in the simulation. Laboratory studies were found to be in good agreement with field studies. 26 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  8. Acoustic droplet vaporization of vascular droplets in gas embolotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    This work is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular droplets. Additionally, micro- or nano-droplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Functionalized droplets that are targeted to tumor vasculature are examined. The influence of fluid mechanical and acoustic parameters, as well as droplet functionalization, is explored. This work was supported by NIH Grant R01EB006476.

  9. Optical calorimetry in microfluidic droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoun, Jacob; Pattekar, Ashish; Afshinmanesh, Farzaneh; Martini, Joerg; Recht, Michael I

    2018-05-29

    A novel microfluidic calorimeter that measures the enthalpy change of reactions occurring in 100 μm diameter aqueous droplets in fluoropolymer oil has been developed. The aqueous reactants flow into a microfluidic droplet generation chip in separate fluidic channels, limiting contact between the streams until immediately before they form the droplet. The diffusion-driven mixing of reactants is predominantly restricted to within the droplet. The temperature change in droplets due to the heat of reaction is measured optically by recording the reflectance spectra of encapsulated thermochromic liquid crystals (TLC) that are added to one of the reactant streams. As the droplets travel through the channel, the spectral characteristics of the TLC represent the internal temperature, allowing optical measurement with a precision of ≈6 mK. The microfluidic chip and all fluids are temperature controlled, and the reaction heat within droplets raises their temperature until thermal diffusion dissipates the heat into the surrounding oil and chip walls. Position resolved optical temperature measurement of the droplets allows calculation of the heat of reaction by analyzing the droplet temperature profile over time. Channel dimensions, droplet generation rate, droplet size, reactant stream flows and oil flow rate are carefully balanced to provide rapid diffusional mixing of reactants compared to thermal diffusion, while avoiding thermal "quenching" due to contact between the droplets and the chip walls. Compared to conventional microcalorimetry, which has been used in this work to provide reference measurements, this new continuous flow droplet calorimeter has the potential to perform titrations ≈1000-fold faster while using ≈400-fold less reactants per titration.

  10. Ignition of a Droplet of Composite Liquid Fuel in a Vortex Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiullin, T. R.; Vershinina, K. Yu; Glushkov, D. O.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2017-11-01

    Experimental study results of a droplet ignition and combustion were obtained for coal-water slurry containing petrochemicals (CWSP) prepared from coal processing waste, low-grade coal and waste petroleum products. A comparative analysis of process characteristics were carried out in different conditions of fuel droplet interaction with heated air flow: droplet soars in air flow in a vortex combustion chamber, droplet soars in ascending air flow in a cone-shaped combustion chamber, and droplet is placed in a thermocouple junction and motionless in air flow. The size (initial radii) of CWSP droplet was varied in the range of 0.5-1.5 mm. The ignition delay time of fuel was determined by the intensity of the visible glow in the vicinity of the droplet during CWSP combustion. It was established (under similar conditions) that ignition delay time of CWSP droplets in the combustion chamber is lower in 2-3.5 times than similar characteristic in conditions of motionless droplet placed in a thermocouple junction. The average value of ignition delay time of CWSP droplet is 3-12 s in conditions of oxidizer temperature is 600-850 K. Obtained experimental results were explained by the influence of heat and mass transfer processes in the droplet vicinity on ignition characteristics in different conditions of CWSP droplet interaction with heated air flow. Experimental results are of interest for the development of combustion technology of promising fuel for thermal power engineering.

  11. Direct numerical simulation of droplet-laden isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Michael S.

    Interaction of liquid droplets with turbulence is important in numerous applications ranging from rain formation to oil spills to spray combustion. The physical mechanisms of droplet-turbulence interaction are largely unknown, especially when compared to that of solid particles. Compared to solid particles, droplets can deform, break up, coalesce and have internal fluid circulation. The main goal of this work is to investigate using direct numerical simulation (DNS) the physical mechanisms of droplet-turbulence interaction, both for non-evaporating and evaporating droplets. To achieve this objective, we develop and couple a new pressure-correction method with the volume-of-fluid (VoF) method for simulating incompressible two-fluid flows. The method's main advantage is that the variable coefficient Poisson equation that arises in solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for two-fluid flows is reduced to a constant coefficient equation. This equation can then be solved directly using, e.g., the FFT-based parallel Poisson solver. For a 10243 mesh, our new pressure-correction method using a fast Poisson solver is ten to forty times faster than the standard pressure-correction method using multigrid. Using the coupled pressure-correction and VoF method, we perform direct numerical simulations (DNS) of 3130 finite-size, non-evaporating droplets of diameter approximately equal to the Taylor lengthscale and with 5% droplet volume fraction in decaying isotropic turbulence at initial Taylor-scale Reynolds number Relambda = 83. In the droplet-laden cases, we vary one of the following three parameters: the droplet Weber number based on the r.m.s. velocity of turbulence (0.1 ≤ Werms ≤ 5), the droplet- to carrier-fluid density ratio (1 ≤ rhod/rho c ≤ 100) or the droplet- to carrier-fluid viscosity ratio (1 ≤ mud/muc ≤ 100). We derive the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) equations for the two-fluid, carrier-fluid and droplet-fluid flow. These equations allow

  12. Structural morphology of acoustically levitated and heated nanosilica droplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Ranganathan; Tijerino, Erick; Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi

    2010-01-01

    We study the vaporization and precipitation dynamics of a nanosilica encapsulated water droplet by levitating it acoustically and heating it with a CO 2 laser. For all concentrations, we observe three phases: solvent evaporation, surface agglomeration, and precipitation leading to bowl or ring shaped structures. At higher concentrations, ring reorientation and rotation are seen consistently. The surface temperature from an infrared camera is seen to be dependent on the final geometrical shape of the droplet and its rotation induced by the acoustic field of the levitator. With nonuniform particle distribution, these structures can experience rupture which modifies the droplet rotational speed.

  13. Polarizability of Fluid Droplets and the Kerr Effect on Microemulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Lisy, V

    2001-01-01

    Spheroidal fluid droplets immersed in another fluid and thermally fluctuating in the shape are considered. The polarizability of the droplet is evaluated up to the second order in the fluctuation amplitudes. The correlation functions of the polarizability tensor components are found and used to describe the polarized and depolarized scattering of light, and the Kerr effect on microemulsions. By comparison of the theoretical results with the Kerr constant measurements from the literature, we estimate the bending rigidity of the surfactant monolayer that separates the oil and water phases in droplet microemulsions.

  14. Hydrodynamic clustering of droplets in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnen, Rudie; Yavuz, Altug; van Heijst, Gertjan; Clercx, Herman

    2017-11-01

    Small, inertial particles are known to cluster in turbulent flows: particles are centrifuged out of eddies and gather in the strain-dominated regions. This so-called preferential concentration is reflected in the radial distribution function (RDF; a quantitative measure of clustering). We study clustering of water droplets in a loudspeaker-driven turbulence chamber. We track the motion of droplets in 3D and calculate the RDF. At moderate scales (a few Kolmogorov lengths) we find the typical power-law scaling of preferential concentration in the RDF. However, at even smaller scales (a few droplet diameters), we encounter a hitherto unobserved additional clustering. We postulate that the additional clustering is due to hydrodynamic interactions, an effect which is typically disregarded in modeling. Using a perturbative expansion of inertial effects in a Stokes-flow description of two interacting spheres, we obtain an expression for the RDF which indeed includes the additional clustering. The additional clustering enhances the collision probability of droplets, which enhances their growth rate due to coalescence. The additional clustering is thus an essential effect in precipitation modeling.

  15. MEMPHYS: A large scale water Cherenkov detector at Frejus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellefon, A. de; Dolbeau, J.; Gorodetzky, P.; Katsanevas, S.; Patzak, T.; Salin, P.; Tonazzo, A.; Bouchez, J.; Busto, J.; Campagne, J.E.; Cavata, C.; Mosca, L.; Dumarchez, J.; Mezzetto, M.; Volpe, C.

    2006-07-01

    A water Cherenkov detector project, of megaton scale, to be installed in the Frejus underground site and dedicated to nucleon decay, neutrinos from supernovae, solar and atmospheric neutrinos, as well as neutrinos from a super-beam and/or a beta-beam coming from CERN, is presented and compared with competitor projects in Japan and in the USA. The performances of the European project are discussed, including the possibility to measure the mixing angle θ 13 and the CP-violating phase δ. (authors)

  16. Characteristics of droplet motion in effervescent sprays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jedelský Jan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Time resolved droplet size and velocity measurement was made using Phase-Doppler anemometry in an effervescent spray at GLR of 6 % and operation pressure drops 21 – 52 kPa. The spray shows a size dependent variation of mean as well as fluctuating axial and radial velocities of droplets similarly for all operation regimes. Particles under 13 μm follow the gas flow, axially decelerated due to gas expansion. Velocity of medium sized particles is positively size correlated and larger particles keep high velocity, given them during discharge. Fluctuating radial velocity of small particles is larger than that of large particles while fluctuating axial velocity increases with size. Small particles thus reach a ratio of radial to axial velocity fluctuations ~ 0.6 but large particles only ~ 0.1, which indicates large transverse dispersion of small particles. Overall fluctuating velocity ratios smaller than 0.5 document an anisotropic character of the liquid mass fluctuations. Power spectral density (PSD of axial velocity fluctuations of large droplets is uniform up to 1 kHz, while PSD of smaller particles drops down with frequency for frequencies > 100 Hz. Large particles thus preserve the fluctuations imposed during discharge while the gas turbulence drops with frequency. Turbulence intensity reaches 14 to 21 % depending on pressure. Such high-turbulence character of the flow probably results from a heterogeneous gas–liquid mixture at the discharge.

  17. Characteristics of droplet motion in effervescent sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedelský, Jan; Zaremba, Matouš; Malý, Milan; Jícha, Miroslav

    2014-03-01

    Time resolved droplet size and velocity measurement was made using Phase-Doppler anemometry in an effervescent spray at GLR of 6 % and operation pressure drops 21 - 52 kPa. The spray shows a size dependent variation of mean as well as fluctuating axial and radial velocities of droplets similarly for all operation regimes. Particles under 13 μm follow the gas flow, axially decelerated due to gas expansion. Velocity of medium sized particles is positively size correlated and larger particles keep high velocity, given them during discharge. Fluctuating radial velocity of small particles is larger than that of large particles while fluctuating axial velocity increases with size. Small particles thus reach a ratio of radial to axial velocity fluctuations ~ 0.6 but large particles only ~ 0.1, which indicates large transverse dispersion of small particles. Overall fluctuating velocity ratios smaller than 0.5 document an anisotropic character of the liquid mass fluctuations. Power spectral density (PSD) of axial velocity fluctuations of large droplets is uniform up to 1 kHz, while PSD of smaller particles drops down with frequency for frequencies > 100 Hz. Large particles thus preserve the fluctuations imposed during discharge while the gas turbulence drops with frequency. Turbulence intensity reaches 14 to 21 % depending on pressure. Such high-turbulence character of the flow probably results from a heterogeneous gas-liquid mixture at the discharge.

  18. Analysis of Large- Capacity Water Heaters in Electric Thermal Storage Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, David M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Winiarski, David W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carmichael, Robert T. [Cadeo Group, Washington D. C. (United States); Mayhorn, Ebony T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fisher, Andrew R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-17

    This report documents a national impact analysis of large tank heat pump water heaters (HPWH) in electric thermal storage (ETS) programs and conveys the findings related to concerns raised by utilities regarding the ability of large-tank heat pump water heaters to provide electric thermal storage services.

  19. The influence of material hardness on liquid droplet impingement erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, Nobuyuki; Yamagata, Takayuki; Takano, Shotaro; Saito, Kengo; Morita, Ryo; Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Inada, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Liquid droplet impingement erosion is studied for various metal materials. • Average power dependency on droplet velocity is found as 7. • Power dependency on Vickers hardness is found as −4.5. • An empirical formula is constructed for erosion rates of metal materials. • Predicted erosion rate is well correlated with experiment within a factor of 1.5. - Abstract: This paper describes the experimental study on the liquid droplet impingement erosion of metal materials to understand the influence of material hardness on the erosion rate. The experiment is carried out using a water spray jet apparatus with a condition of relatively thin liquid film thickness. The metal materials tested are pure aluminum, aluminum alloy, brass, mild steel, carbon steel and stainless steel. The liquid droplets considered are 30 ± 5 μm in volume average diameter of water, which is the same order of droplet diameter in the actual pipeline in nuclear/fossil power plants. In order to understand the influence of material hardness on the liquid droplet impingement erosion, the scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation on the eroded surface and the measurement of erosion rate are carried out in the terminal stage of erosion. The experimental results indicate that the erosion rates are expressed by the droplet velocity, volume flux, Vickers hardness and the liquid film thickness, which are fundamentals of the liquid droplet impingement erosion. The empirical formula shows that the power index for droplet velocity dependency is found to be 7 with a scattering from 5 to 9 depending on the materials, while the power index for Vickers hardness dependency is found as −4.5

  20. The influence of material hardness on liquid droplet impingement erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, Nobuyuki, E-mail: fujisawa@eng.niigata-u.ac.jp [Visualization Research Center, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi 2-Nocho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Yamagata, Takayuki, E-mail: yamagata@eng.niigata-u.ac.jp [Visualization Research Center, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi 2-Nocho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Takano, Shotaro; Saito, Kengo [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi 2-Nocho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Morita, Ryo; Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Inada, Fumio [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-11-1, Iwatokita, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Liquid droplet impingement erosion is studied for various metal materials. • Average power dependency on droplet velocity is found as 7. • Power dependency on Vickers hardness is found as −4.5. • An empirical formula is constructed for erosion rates of metal materials. • Predicted erosion rate is well correlated with experiment within a factor of 1.5. - Abstract: This paper describes the experimental study on the liquid droplet impingement erosion of metal materials to understand the influence of material hardness on the erosion rate. The experiment is carried out using a water spray jet apparatus with a condition of relatively thin liquid film thickness. The metal materials tested are pure aluminum, aluminum alloy, brass, mild steel, carbon steel and stainless steel. The liquid droplets considered are 30 ± 5 μm in volume average diameter of water, which is the same order of droplet diameter in the actual pipeline in nuclear/fossil power plants. In order to understand the influence of material hardness on the liquid droplet impingement erosion, the scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation on the eroded surface and the measurement of erosion rate are carried out in the terminal stage of erosion. The experimental results indicate that the erosion rates are expressed by the droplet velocity, volume flux, Vickers hardness and the liquid film thickness, which are fundamentals of the liquid droplet impingement erosion. The empirical formula shows that the power index for droplet velocity dependency is found to be 7 with a scattering from 5 to 9 depending on the materials, while the power index for Vickers hardness dependency is found as −4.5.

  1. Sustainability of small reservoirs and large scale water availability under current conditions and climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Krol, Martinus S.; de Vries, Marjella J.; van Oel, P.R.; Carlos de Araújo, José

    2011-01-01

    Semi-arid river basins often rely on reservoirs for water supply. Small reservoirs may impact on large-scale water availability both by enhancing availability in a distributed sense and by subtracting water for large downstream user communities, e.g. served by large reservoirs. Both of these impacts of small reservoirs are subject to climate change. Using a case-study on North-East Brazil, this paper shows that climate change impacts on water availability may be severe, and impacts on distrib...

  2. Prediction of cloud droplet number in a general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghan, S.J.; Leung, L.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    We have applied the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) bulk cloud microphysics parameterization to the treatment of stratiform clouds in the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (CCM2). The RAMS predicts mass concentrations of cloud water, cloud ice, rain and snow, and number concnetration of ice. We have introduced the droplet number conservation equation to predict droplet number and it`s dependence on aerosols.

  3. Visual Characterization of VX Droplets on Plant Foliage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    droplets were dispensed onto plant leaves using a high-precision syringe. Digital photographs of the droplets were taken at intervals, saved, and...purposes of advertisement . Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Acknowledgments The authors would like to thank Dr...alcohol (CAS no. 67-63-0) was used as an extractant. Miracle-Gro Water Soluble All Purpose Plant Food (Scotts Company; Marysville, OH) fertilizer

  4. Droplet generation during core reflood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocamustafaogullari, G.; De Jarlais, G.; Ishii, M.

    1983-01-01

    The process of entrainment and disintegration of liquid droplets by a flow of steam has considerable practical importance in calculating the effectivenes of the emergency core cooling system. Liquid entrainment is also important in determination of the critical heat flux point in general. Thus the analysis of the reflooding phase of a LOCA requires detailed knowledge of droplet size. Droplet size is mainly determined by the droplet generation mechanisms involved. To study these mechanisms, data generated in the PWR FLECHT SEASET series of experiments was analyzed. In addition, an experiment was performed in which the hydrodynamics of low quality post-CHF flow (inverted annular flow) were simulated in an adiabatic test section

  5. A New Electropositive Filter for Concentrating Enterovirus and Norovirus from Large Volumes of Water - MCEARD

    Science.gov (United States)

    The detection of enteric viruses in environmental water usually requires the concentration of viruses from large volumes of water. The 1MDS electropositive filter is commonly used for concentrating enteric viruses from water but unfortunately these filters are not cost-effective...

  6. Engineering plant membranes using droplet interface bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, N E; Smpokou, E; Friddin, M S; Macey, R; Gould, I R; Turnbull, C; Flemming, A J; Brooks, N J; Ces, O; Barter, L M C

    2017-03-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) have become widely recognised as a robust platform for constructing model membranes and are emerging as a key technology for the bottom-up assembly of synthetic cell-like and tissue-like structures. DIBs are formed when lipid-monolayer coated water droplets are brought together inside a well of oil, which is excluded from the interface as the DIB forms. The unique features of the system, compared to traditional approaches (e.g., supported lipid bilayers, black lipid membranes, and liposomes), is the ability to engineer multi-layered bilayer networks by connecting multiple droplets together in 3D, and the capability to impart bilayer asymmetry freely within these droplet architectures by supplying droplets with different lipids. Yet despite these achievements, one potential limitation of the technology is that DIBs formed from biologically relevant components have not been well studied. This could limit the reach of the platform to biological systems where bilayer composition and asymmetry are understood to play a key role. Herein, we address this issue by reporting the assembly of asymmetric DIBs designed to replicate the plasma membrane compositions of three different plant species; Arabidopsis thaliana , tobacco, and oats, by engineering vesicles with different amounts of plant phospholipids, sterols and cerebrosides for the first time. We show that vesicles made from our plant lipid formulations are stable and can be used to assemble asymmetric plant DIBs. We verify this using a bilayer permeation assay, from which we extract values for absolute effective bilayer permeation and bilayer stability. Our results confirm that stable DIBs can be assembled from our plant membrane mimics and could lead to new approaches for assembling model systems to study membrane translocation and to screen new agrochemicals in plants.

  7. Comparison of two microextraction methods based on solidification of floating organic droplet for the determination of multiclass analytes in river water samples by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using Central Composite Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asati, Ankita; Satyanarayana, G N V; Patel, Devendra K

    2017-09-01

    Two low density organic solvents based liquid-liquid microextraction methods, namely Vortex assisted liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet (VALLME-SFO) and Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet(DLLME-SFO) have been compared for the determination of multiclass analytes (pesticides, plasticizers, pharmaceuticals and personal care products) in river water samples by using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The effect of various experimental parameters on the efficiency of the two methods and their optimum values were studied with the aid of Central Composite Design (CCD) and Response Surface Methodology(RSM). Under optimal conditions, VALLME-SFO was validated in terms of limit of detection, limit of quantification, dynamic linearity range, determination of coefficient, enrichment factor and extraction recovery for which the respective values were (0.011-0.219ngmL -1 ), (0.035-0.723ngmL -1 ), (0.050-0.500ngmL -1 ), (R 2 =0.992-0.999), (40-56), (80-106%). However, when the DLLME-SFO method was validated under optimal conditions, the range of values of limit of detection, limit of quantification, dynamic linearity range, determination of coefficient, enrichment factor and extraction recovery were (0.025-0.377ngmL -1 ), (0.083-1.256ngmL -1 ), (0.100-1.000ngmL -1 ), (R 2 =0.990-0.999), (35-49), (69-98%) respectively. Interday and intraday precisions were calculated as percent relative standard deviation (%RSD) and the values were ≤15% for VALLME-SFO and DLLME-SFO methods. Both methods were successfully applied for determining multiclass analytes in river water samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimental study of micron size droplets in a two phase flow in a converging - diverging nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurski, Kristine

    1997-01-01

    The fluid present in a pressurized vessel in normal operation is generally a mono-phase one. In accidental regime (a breach for example), a two-phase (ring and/or dispersed) flow appears and the flow is submitted to large accelerations when passing through the breach, and is then dispersed in the atmosphere. This research thesis reports an experimental simulation of an accident by generating, through a discharge of an upstream vessel into a downstream vessel, a strongly accelerated gaseous-liquid two-phase flow, with an essentially dispersed configuration in a convergent-divergent nozzle. In order to characterize the speed and diameter evolution of the dispersed liquid phase, the author reports a comparative study of two different liquid aerosols: micron-size droplets of di-octyl phthalate (DOP) of known concentration and diameter, and water droplets obtained by heterogeneous spontaneous condensation [fr

  9. Vitrification and levitation of a liquid droplet on liquid nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Young S.; Adler, Douglas; Xu, Feng; Kayaalp, Emre; Nureddin, Aida; Anchan, Raymond M.; Maas, Richard L.; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-01-01

    The vitrification of a liquid occurs when ice crystal formation is prevented in the cryogenic environment through ultrarapid cooling. In general, vitrification entails a large temperature difference between the liquid and its surrounding medium. In our droplet vitrification experiments, we observed that such vitrification events are accompanied by a Leidenfrost phenomenon, which impedes the heat transfer to cool the liquid, when the liquid droplet comes into direct contact with liquid nitroge...

  10. Activated Fraction Of Black Carbon By Cloud Droplets And Ice Crystals At The High Alpine Site Jungfraujoch (3580 m asl)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozic, J.; Mertes, S. [IFT Leipzig (Georgia); Verheggen, B.; Petzold, A. [DLR, Oberpfaffenhofen (Georgia); Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.

    2005-03-01

    Measurements of black carbon (BC) were made in winter and summer 2004 at the high Alpine site Jungfraujoch in order to study the activation of BC into cloud droplets and ice crystals. Main results showed that the activated fraction represents 61% in summer and that for a large temperature range between -25 C and 5 C, the activated BC fraction increases with increasing temperature and increasing liquid water content. (author)

  11. Chemotactic droplet swimmers in complex geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chenyu; Hokmabad, Babak V.; Baldwin, Kyle A.; Maass, Corinna C.

    2018-02-01

    Chemotaxis1 and auto-chemotaxis are key mechanisms in the dynamics of micro-organisms, e.g. in the acquisition of nutrients and in the communication between individuals, influencing the collective behaviour. However, chemical signalling and the natural environment of biological swimmers are generally complex, making them hard to access analytically. We present a well-controlled, tunable artificial model to study chemotaxis and autochemotaxis in complex geometries, using microfluidic assays of self-propelling oil droplets in an aqueous surfactant solution (Herminghaus et al 2014 Soft Matter 10 7008-22 Krüger et al 2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 117). Droplets propel via interfacial Marangoni stresses powered by micellar solubilisation. Moreover, filled micelles act as a chemical repellent by diffusive phoretic gradient forces. We have studied these chemotactic effects in a series of microfluidic geometries, as published in Jin et al (2017 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. 114 5089-94): first, droplets are guided along the shortest path through a maze by surfactant diffusing into the maze from the exit. Second, we let auto-chemotactic droplet swimmers pass through bifurcating microfluidic channels and record anticorrelations between the branch choices of consecutive droplets. We present an analytical Langevin model matching the experimental data. In a previously unpublished experiment, pillar arrays of variable sizes and shapes provide a convex wall interacting with the swimmer and, in the case of attachment, bending its trajectory and forcing it to revert to its own trail. We observe different behaviours based on the interplay of wall curvature and negative autochemotaxis, i.e. no attachment for highly curved interfaces, stable trapping at large pillars, and a narrow transition region where negative autochemotaxis makes the swimmers detach after a single orbit.

  12. Particle Manipulation Methods in Droplet Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenje, Maria; Fornell, Anna; Ohlin, Mathias; Nilsson, Johan

    2018-02-06

    This Feature describes the different particle manipulation techniques available in the droplet microfluidics toolbox to handle particles encapsulated inside droplets and to manipulate whole droplets. We address the advantages and disadvantages of the different techniques to guide new users.

  13. Size Distribution and Dispersion of Droplets Generated by Impingement of Breaking Waves on Oil Slicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Miller, J.; Wang, J.; Koley, S. S.; Katz, J.

    2017-10-01

    This laboratory experimental study investigates the temporal evolution of the size distribution of subsurface oil droplets generated as breaking waves entrain oil slicks. The measurements are performed for varying wave energy, as well as large variations in oil viscosity and oil-water interfacial tension, the latter achieved by premixing the oil with dispersant. In situ measurements using digital inline holography at two magnifications are applied for measuring the droplet sizes and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) for determining the temporal evolution of turbulence after wave breaking. All early (2-10 s) size distributions have two distinct size ranges with different slopes. For low dispersant to oil ratios (DOR), the transition between them could be predicted based on a turbulent Weber (We) number in the 2-4 range, suggesting that turbulence plays an important role. For smaller droplets, all the number size distributions have power of about -2.1, and for larger droplets, the power decreases well below -3. The measured steepening of the size distribution over time is predicted by a simple model involving buoyant rise and turbulence dispersion. Conversely, for DOR 1:100 and 1:25 oils, the diameter of slope transition decreases from ˜1 mm to 46 and 14 µm, respectively, much faster than the We-based prediction, and the size distribution steepens with increasing DOR. Furthermore, the concentration of micron-sized droplets of DOR 1:25 oil increases for the first 10 min after entrainment. These phenomena are presumably caused by the observed formation and breakup oil microthreads associated with tip streaming.

  14. Perceptions about availability and adequacy of drinking water in a large California school district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anisha I; Bogart, Laura M; Uyeda, Kimberly E; Rabin, Alexa; Schuster, Mark A

    2010-03-01

    Concerns about the influence of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption on obesity have led experts to recommend that water be freely available in schools. We explored perceptions about the adequacy of drinking water provision in a large California school district to develop policies and programs to encourage student water consumption. From March to September 2007, we used semistructured interviews to ask 26 California key stakeholders - including school administrators and staff, health and nutrition agency representatives, and families - about school drinking water accessibility; attitudes about, facilitators of, and barriers to drinking water provision; and ideas for increasing water consumption. Interviews were analyzed to determine common themes. Although stakeholders said that water was available from school drinking fountains, they expressed concerns about the appeal, taste, appearance, and safety of fountain water and worried about the affordability and environmental effect of bottled water sold in schools. Stakeholders supported efforts to improve free drinking water availability in schools, but perceived barriers (eg, cost) and mistaken beliefs that regulations and beverage contracts prohibit serving free water may prevent schools from doing so. Some schools provide water through cold-filtered water dispensers and self-serve water coolers. This is the first study to explore stakeholder perceptions about the adequacy of drinking water in US schools. Although limited in scope, our study suggests that water available in at least some schools may be inadequate. Collaborative efforts among schools, communities, and policy makers are needed to improve school drinking water provision.

  15. Interaction of Droplets Separated by an Elastic Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianshu; Xu, Xuejuan; Nadermann, Nichole; He, Zhenping; Jagota, Anand; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2017-01-10

    The Laplace pressure of a droplet placed on one side of an elastic thin film can cause significant deformation in the form of a bulge on its opposite side. Here, we show that this deformation can be detected by other droplets suspended on the opposite side of the film, leading to interaction between droplets separated by the solid (but deformable) film. The interaction is repulsive when the drops have a large overlap and attractive when they have a small overlap. Thus, if two identical droplets are placed right on top of each other (one on either side of the thin film), they tend to repel each other, eventually reaching an equilibrium configuration where there is a small overlap. This observation can be explained by analyzing the energy landscape of the droplets interacting via an elastically deformed film. We further demonstrate this idea by designing a pattern comprising a big central drop with satellite droplets. This phenomenon can lead to techniques for directed motion of droplets confined to one side of a thin elastic membrane by manipulations on the other side.

  16. Vaporization of irradiated droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, R.L.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Zardecki, A.

    1986-01-01

    The vaporization of a spherically symmetric liquid droplet subject to a high-intensity laser flux is investigated on the basis of a hydrodynamic description of the system composed of the vapor and ambient gas. In the limit of the convective vaporization, the boundary conditions at the fluid--gas interface are formulated by using the notion of a Knudsen layer in which translational equilibrium is established. This leads to approximate jump conditions at the interface. For homogeneous energy deposition, the hydrodynamic equations are solved numerically with the aid of the CON1D computer code (''CON1D: A computer program for calculating spherically symmetric droplet combustion,'' Los Alamos National Laboratory Report No. LA-10269-MS, December, 1984), based on the implict continuous--fluid Eulerian (ICE) [J. Comput. Phys. 8, 197 (1971)] and arbitrary Lagrangian--Eulerian (ALE) [J. Comput. Phys. 14, 1227 (1974)] numerical mehtods. The solutions exhibit the existence of two shock waves propagating in opposite directions with respect to the contact discontinuity surface that separates the ambient gas and vapor

  17. Explosive Leidenfrost droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colinet, Pierre; Moreau, Florian; Dorbolo, Stéphane

    2017-11-01

    We show that Leidenfrost droplets made of an aqueous solution of surfactant undergo a violent explosion in a wide range of initial volumes and concentrations. This unexpected behavior turns out to be triggered by the formation of a gel-like shell, followed by a sharp temperature increase. Comparing a simple model of the radial surfactant distribution inside a spherical droplet with experiments allows highlighting the existence of a critical surface concentration for the shell to form. The temperature rise (attributed to boiling point elevation with surface concentration) is a key feature leading to the explosion, instead of the implosion (buckling) scenario reported by other authors. Indeed, under some conditions, this temperature increase is shown to be sufficient to trigger nucleation and growth of vapor bubbles in the highly superheated liquid bulk, stretching the surrounding elastic shell up to its rupture limit. The successive timescales characterizing this explosion sequence are also discussed. Funding sources: F.R.S. - FNRS (ODILE and DITRASOL projects, RD and SRA positions of P. Colinet and S. Dorbolo), BELSPO (IAP 7/38 MicroMAST project).

  18. Analysis of slippery droplet on tilted plate by development of optical correction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Han Seo; Gim, Yeonghyeon; Choi, Sung Ho; Jang, Dong Kyu; Sohn, Dong Kee

    2017-11-01

    Because of distortion effects on a surface of a sessile droplet, the inner flow field of the droplet is measured by a PIV (particle image velocimetry) method with low reliability. In order to solve this problem, many researchers have studied and developed the optical correction method. However, the method cannot be applied for various cases such as the tilted droplet or other asymmetric shaped droplets since most methods were considered only for the axisymmetric shaped droplets. For the optical correction of the asymmetric shaped droplet, the surface function was calculated by the three-dimensional reconstruction using the ellipse curve fitting method. Also, the optical correction using the surface function was verified by the numerical simulation. Then, the developed method was applied to reconstruct the inner flow field of the droplet on the tilted plate. The colloidal droplet of water on the tilted surface was used, and the distorted effect on the surface of the droplet was calculated. Using the obtained results and the PIV method, the corrected flow field for the inner and interface parts of the droplet was reconstructed. Consequently, the error caused by the distortion effect of the velocity vector located on the apex of the droplet was removed. National Research Foundation (NRF) of Korea, (2016R1A2B4011087).

  19. Millifluidic droplet analyser for microbiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baraban, L.; Bertholle, F.; Salverda, M.L.M.; Bremond, N.; Panizza, P.; Baudry, J.; Visser, de J.A.G.M.; Bibette, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel millifluidic droplet analyser (MDA) for precisely monitoring the dynamics of microbial populations over multiple generations in numerous (=103) aqueous emulsion droplets (100 nL). As a first application, we measure the growth rate of a bacterial strain and determine the minimal

  20. Cavitation-induced fragmentation of an acoustically-levitated droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the initial sequence of events that lead to the fragmentation of a millimetre sized water droplets when interacting with a focused ns-laser pulse. The experimental results show complex processes that result from the reflection of an initial shock wave from plasma generation with the soft boundary of the levitating droplet; furthermore, when the reflected waves from the walls of the droplet refocus they leave behind a trail of microbubbles that later act as cavitation inception regions. Numerical simulations of a shock wave impacting and reflecting from a soft boundary are also reported; the simulated results show that the lowest pressure inside the droplet occurs at the equatorial plane. The results of the numerical model display good agreement with the experimental results both in time and in space.

  1. Cavitation-induced fragmentation of an acoustically-levitated droplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, Silvestre Roberto Gonzalez; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the initial sequence of events that lead to the fragmentation of a millimetre sized water droplets when interacting with a focused ns-laser pulse. The experimental results show complex processes that result from the reflection of an initial shock wave from plasma generation with the soft boundary of the levitating droplet; furthermore, when the reflected waves from the walls of the droplet refocus they leave behind a trail of microbubbles that later act as cavitation inception regions. Numerical simulations of a shock wave impacting and reflecting from a soft boundary are also reported; the simulated results show that the lowest pressure inside the droplet occurs at the equatorial plane. The results of the numerical model display good agreement with the experimental results both in time and in space. (paper)

  2. Droplet Traffic Control at a simple T junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizza, Pascal; Engl, Wilfried; Colin, Annie; Ajdari, Armand

    2006-03-01

    A basic yet essential element of every traffic flow control is the effect of a junction where the flow is separated into several streams. How do pedestrians, vehicles or blood cells divide when they reach a junction? How does the outcome depend on their density? Similar fundamental questions hold for much simpler systems: in this paper, we have studied the behaviour of periodic trains of water droplets flowing in oil through a channel as they reach a simple, locally symmetric, T junction. Depending on their dilution, we observe that the droplets are either alternately partitioned between both outlets or sorted exclusively into the shortest one. We show that this surprising behaviour results from the hydrodynamic feed-back of drops in the two outlets on the selection process occurring at the junction. Our results offer a first guide for the design and modelling of droplet traffic in complex branched networks, a necessary step towards parallelized droplet-based ``lab-on-chip'' devices.

  3. Deciduous trees are a large and overlooked sink for snowmelt water in the boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jessica; Bolton, W. Robert; Bhatt, Uma; Cristobal, Jordi; Thoman, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The terrestrial water cycle contains large uncertainties that impact our understanding of water budgets and climate dynamics. Water storage is a key uncertainty in the boreal water budget, with tree water storage often ignored. The goal of this study is to quantify tree water content during the snowmelt and growing season periods for Alaskan and western Canadian boreal forests. Deciduous trees reached saturation between snowmelt and leaf-out, taking up 21–25% of the available snowmelt water, while coniferous trees removed <1%. We found that deciduous trees removed 17.8–20.9 billion m3 of snowmelt water, which is equivalent to 8.7–10.2% of the Yukon River’s annual discharge. Deciduous trees transpired 2–12% (0.4–2.2 billion m3) of the absorbed snowmelt water immediately after leaf-out, increasing favorable conditions for atmospheric convection, and an additional 10–30% (2.0–5.2 billion m3) between leaf-out and mid-summer. By 2100, boreal deciduous tree area is expected to increase by 1–15%, potentially resulting in an additional 0.3–3 billion m3 of snowmelt water removed from the soil per year. This study is the first to show that deciduous tree water uptake of snowmelt water represents a large but overlooked aspect of the water balance in boreal watersheds.

  4. Beam Measurements of a CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2001-01-01

    A striking correlation has recently been observed between global cloud cover and the flux of incident cosmic rays. The effect of natural variations in the cosmic ray flux is large, causing estimated changes in the Earth's energy radiation balance that are comparable to those attributed to greenhouse gases from the burning of fossil fuels since the Industrial Revolution. However a direct link between cosmic rays and cloud formation has not been unambiguously established. We therefore propose to experimentally measure cloud (water droplet) formation under controlled conditions in a test beam at CERN with a CLOUD chamber, duplicating the conditions prevailing in the troposphere. These data, which have never been previously obtained, will allow a detailed understanding of the possible effects of cosmic rays on clouds and confirm, or otherwise, a direct link between cosmic rays, global cloud cover and the Earth's climate. The measurements will, in turn, allow more reliable calculations to be made of the residual e...

  5. Atomization of Impinging Droplets on Superheated Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Preston; Crockett, Julie; Maynes, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Water droplets impinging smooth superheated surfaces may be characterized by dynamic vapor bubbles rising to the surface, popping, and causing a spray of tiny droplets to erupt from the droplet. This spray is called secondary atomization. Here, atomization is quantified experimentally for water droplets impinging superheated superhydrophobic surfaces. Smooth hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces with varying rib and post microstructuring were explored. Each surface was placed on an aluminum heating block, and impingement events were captured with a high speed camera at 3000 fps. For consistency among tests, all events were normalized by the maximum atomization found over a range of temperatures on a smooth hydrophobic surface. An estimate of the level of atomization during an impingement event was created by quantifying the volume of fluid present in the atomization spray. Droplet diameter and Weber number were held constant, and atomization was found for a range of temperatures through the lifetime of the impinging droplet. The Leidenfrost temperature was also determined and defined to be the lowest temperature at which atomization ceases to occur. Both atomization and Leidenfrost temperature increase with decreasing pitch (distance between microstructures).

  6. Mechanism of supercooled droplet freezing on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Stefan; Tiwari, Manish K; Doan, N Vuong; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-01-10

    Understanding ice formation from supercooled water on surfaces is a problem of fundamental importance and general utility. Superhydrophobic surfaces promise to have remarkable 'icephobicity' and low ice adhesion. Here we show that their icephobicity can be rendered ineffective by simple changes in environmental conditions. Through experiments, nucleation theory and heat transfer physics, we establish that humidity and/or the flow of a surrounding gas can fundamentally switch the ice crystallization mechanism, drastically affecting surface icephobicity. Evaporative cooling of the supercooled liquid can engender ice crystallization by homogeneous nucleation at the droplet-free surface as opposed to the expected heterogeneous nucleation at the substrate. The related interplay between droplet roll-off and rapid crystallization is also studied. Overall, we bring a novel perspective to icing and icephobicity, unveiling the strong influence of environmental conditions in addition to the accepted effects of the surface conditions and hydrophobicity.

  7. Integrating Infrastructure and Institutions for Water Security in Large Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padowski, J.; Jawitz, J. W.; Carrera, L.

    2015-12-01

    Urban growth has forced cities to procure more freshwater to meet demands; however the relationship between urban water security, water availability and water management is not well understood. This work quantifies the urban water security of 108 large cities in the United States (n=50) and Africa (n=58) based on their hydrologic, hydraulic and institutional settings. Using publicly available data, urban water availability was estimated as the volume of water available from local water resources and those captured via hydraulic infrastructure (e.g. reservoirs, wellfields, aqueducts) while urban water institutions were assessed according to their ability to deliver, supply and regulate water resources to cities. When assessing availability, cities relying on local water resources comprised a minority (37%) of those assessed. The majority of cities (55%) instead rely on captured water to meet urban demands, with African cities reaching farther and accessing a greater number and variety of sources for water supply than US cities. Cities using captured water generally had poorer access to local water resources and maintained significantly more complex strategies for water delivery, supply and regulatory management. Eight cities, all African, are identified in this work as having water insecurity issues. These cities lack sufficient infrastructure and institutional complexity to capture and deliver adequate amounts of water for urban use. Together, these findings highlight the important interconnection between infrastructure investments and management techniques for urban areas with a limited or dwindling natural abundance of water. Addressing water security challenges in the future will require that more attention be placed not only on increasing water availability, but on developing the institutional support to manage captured water supplies.

  8. Oxidation of SO{sub 2} and formation of water droplets under irradiation of 20 MeV protons in N{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O/SO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Shigeo [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Nakai, Yoichi, E-mail: nakaiy@riken.jp [Radioactive Isotope Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Funada, Shuhei; Tanikawa, Hideomi; Harayama, Isao [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Kobara, Hitomi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Sasa, Kimikazu [Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke [National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Hvelplund, Preben [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2015-12-15

    We have performed an experiment on charged droplet formation in a humidified N{sub 2} gas with trace SO{sub 2} concentration and induced by 20 MeV proton irradiation. It is thought that SO{sub 2} reacts with the chemical species, such as OH radicals, generated through the reactions triggered by N{sub 2}{sup +} production. Both droplet number and droplet size increased with SO{sub 2} consumption for the proton irradiation. The total charged droplet numbers entering the differential mobility analyzer per unit time were proportional to the 0.68 power of the SO{sub 2} consumption. These two findings suggest that coagulation among the small droplets contributes to the formation of the droplets. The charged droplet volume detected per unit time is proportional to the SO{sub 2} consumption, which indicates that a constant amount of sulfur atoms is contained in a unit volume of droplet, regardless of different droplet-size distributions depending on the SO{sub 2} consumption.

  9. Heat and mass transfer boundary conditions at the surface of a heated sessile droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Anna-Lena; Lundström, T. Staffan

    2017-12-01

    This work numerically investigates how the boundary conditions of a heated sessile water droplet should be defined in order to include effects of both ambient and internal flow. Significance of water vapor, Marangoni convection, separate simulations of the external and internal flow, and influence of contact angle throughout drying is studied. The quasi-steady simulations are carried out with Computational Fluid Dynamics and conduction, natural convection and Marangoni convection are accounted for inside the droplet. For the studied conditions, a noticeable effect of buoyancy due to evaporation is observed. Hence, the inclusion of moisture increases the maximum velocities in the external flow. Marangoni convection will, in its turn, increase the velocity within the droplet with up to three orders of magnitude. Results furthermore show that the internal and ambient flow can be simulated separately for the conditions studied, and the accuracy is improved if the internal temperature gradient is low, e.g. if Marangoni convection is present. Simultaneous simulations of the domains are however preferred at high plate temperatures if both internal and external flows are dominated by buoyancy and natural convection. The importance of a spatially resolved heat and mass transfer boundary condition is, in its turn, increased if the internal velocity is small or if there is a large variation of the transfer coefficients at the surface. Finally, the results indicate that when the internal convective heat transport is small, a rather constant evaporation rate may be obtained throughout the drying at certain conditions.

  10. Effects of molecular weight of PVA on formation, stability and deformation of compound droplets for ICF polymer shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meifang; Zheng, Yueqing; Li, Jie; Chen, Sufen; Liu, Yiyang; Li, Jing; Li, Bo; Zhang, Zhanwen

    2017-01-01

    Sphericity and wall thickness uniformity are some of the hardest specifications to fulfill, as required by inertial confined fusion (ICF) research for polymer shells prepared by the microencapsulation technique. Driven by the need to control the deformation of compound droplets, the effects of the molecular weight of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) on the formation and stability of the droplets, as well as the sphericity and wall thickness uniformity of the resulting shells, were investigated. On increasing the molecular weight of the PVA, the densities of the external water phases (W2) are almost the same, but the viscosity of the W2 phase increases more quickly than the interfacial tension. This makes the detaching force increase more quickly than the upward one, causing the formation of compound droplets and detachment from the oil tube. On the other hand, the increase in interfacial tension makes the maximum pressures ( P max) in the O phase (O) of the compound droplets increase, causing them to rupture easily and decreasing their stability. However, for PVA with the same molecular weight, the viscous shear force in the flowing field reduces the role of gravity and makes the inner water droplet move towards the center of the compound droplet, decreasing its P max in the flowing field and improving its stability. Moreover, during the solidifying process, the viscous shear force increases more quickly than the interfacial tension force due to the quicker increase in viscosity with an increase in the molecular weight of the PVA. The increase in the viscous shear force can make the droplets deform, resulting in a decrease in their sphericity. However, the appropriate viscous shear force can also center the compound droplet—although they become decentered when the viscous shear force is too large, leading to the wall thickness uniformity increasing at first before decreasing quickly. The results presented in this work provide a more in-depth understanding of the

  11. Lossless droplet transfer of droplet-based microfluidic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan T [West Richland, WA; Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Page, Jason S [Kennewick, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-11-22

    A transfer structure for droplet-based microfluidic analysis is characterized by a first conduit containing a first stream having at least one immiscible droplet of aqueous material and a second conduit containing a second stream comprising an aqueous fluid. The interface between the first conduit and the second conduit can define a plurality of apertures, wherein the apertures are sized to prevent exchange of the first and second streams between conduits while allowing lossless transfer of droplets from the first conduit to the second conduit through contact between the first and second streams.

  12. Magnetically tunable oil droplet lens of deep-sea shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaka, M.; Hirota, N.; Oba, Y.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, the tunable properties of a bio-lens from a deep-sea shrimp were investigated for the first time using magnetic fields. The skin of the shrimp exhibited a brilliantly colored reflection of incident white light. The light reflecting parts and the oil droplets in the shrimp's skin were observed in a glass slide sample cell using a digital microscope that operated in the bore of two superconducting magnets (maximum strengths of 5 and 13 T). In the ventral skin of the shrimp, which contained many oil droplets, some comparatively large oil droplets (50 to 150 μm in diameter) were present. A distinct response to magnetic fields was found in these large oil droplets. Further, the application of the magnetic fields to the sample cell caused a change in the size of the oil droplets. The phenomena observed in this work indicate that the oil droplets of deep sea shrimp can act as lenses in which the optical focusing can be modified via the application of external magnetic fields. The results of this study will make it possible to fabricate bio-inspired soft optical devices in future.

  13. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics.

  14. Research Proposal: Methodology for Assessment Frameworks in Large-scale Infrastructural Water Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, Saskia

    2005-01-01

    Water management is a central and ongoing issue in the Netherlands. Large infrastructural projects are being carried out and planned in a number of water systems. These initiatives operate within a complex web of interactions, between short- and long-term, economic costs and benefits, technical

  15. Application of the Regional Water Mass Variations from GRACE Satellite Gravimetry to Large-Scale Water Management in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Ramillien

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Time series of regional 2° × 2° Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE solutions of surface water mass change have been computed over Africa from 2003 to 2012 with a 10-day resolution by using a new regional approach. These regional maps are used to describe and quantify water mass change. The contribution of African hydrology to actual sea level rise is negative and small in magnitude (i.e., −0.1 mm/y of equivalent sea level (ESL mainly explained by the water retained in the Zambezi River basin. Analysis of the regional water mass maps is used to distinguish different zones of important water mass variations, with the exception of the dominant seasonal cycle of the African monsoon in the Sahel and Central Africa. The analysis of the regional solutions reveals the accumulation in the Okavango swamp and South Niger. It confirms the continuous depletion of water in the North Sahara aquifer at the rate of −2.3 km3/y, with a decrease in early 2008. Synergistic use of altimetry-based lake water volume with total water storage (TWS from GRACE permits a continuous monitoring of sub-surface water storage for large lake drainage areas. These different applications demonstrate the potential of the GRACE mission for the management of water resources at the regional scale.

  16. Organosilane oxidation by water catalysed by large gold nanoparticles in a membrane reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gitis, V.; Beerthuis, R.; Shiju, N.R.; Rothenberg, G.

    2014-01-01

    We show that gold nanoparticles catalyse the oxidation of organosilanes using water as oxidant at ambient conditions. Remarkably, monodispersions of small gold particles (3.5 nm diameter) and large ones (6-18 nm diameter) give equally good conversion rates. This is important because separating large

  17. Mathematical model for prediction of droplet sizes and distribution associated with impact of liquid-containing projectile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelke, Ashish V.; Gera, B.; Maheshwari, N.K.; Singh, R.K.

    2018-01-01

    After the events of 9/11, the impact of fast flying commercial aircraft is considered as major hazard threatening the Nuclear Power Plant's (NPP) safety. The study of fuel spillage phenomenon and fireball formation is important to understand fire hazards due to burning of dispersed aviation fuel. The detailed analysis of fuel dispersion is very difficult to deliberate because both, large NPP structures and the large size of commercial aircrafts. Sandia National Laboratories, USA conducted impact tests using cylindrical projectiles filled with water to measure the associated parameters. Due to combustion properties and volatile nature of hydrocarbon fuels, the obtained parameters from impact studies using water are incomplete in fire analysis of flammable droplet clouds. A mathematical model is developed for prediction of droplet sizes and distribution associated with the impact of a liquid-containing projectile. The model can predict the transient behavior of droplet cloud. It is validated with experimental data available in literature. In the present study, the analysis has been performed using water and kerosene. The data obtained can be utilized as boundary and initial condition for CFD analysis. This information is useful for fire hazard analysis of aircraft impacts on NPP structures.

  18. Electrohydrodynamic simulation of electrically controlled droplet generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouedraogo, Yun; Gjonaj, Erion; Weiland, Thomas; Gersem, Herbert De; Steinhausen, Christoph; Lamanna, Grazia; Weigand, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop a full electrohydrodynamic simulation approach which allows for the accurate modeling of droplet dynamics under the influence of transient electric fields. The model takes into account conductive, capacitive as well as convective electrical currents in the fluid. • Simulation results are shown for an electrically driven droplet generator using highly conductive acetone droplets and low conductivity pentane droplets, respectively. Excellent agreement with measurement is found. • We investigate the operation characteristic of the droplet generator by computing droplet sizes and detachment times with respect to the applied voltage. • The droplet charging effect is demonstrated for pentane droplets as well as for acetone droplets under long voltage pulses. We show that due to the very different relaxation times, the charging behavior of the two liquids is very different. • We demonstrate that due to this behavior, also the detachment mechanisms for acetone and pentane droplets are different. For low conductivity (pentane) droplets, droplet detachment is only possible after the electric fields are switched off. This is because the effective electric polarization force points upwards, thus, inhibiting the detachment of the droplet from the capillary tip. - Abstract: An electrohydrodynamic model for the simulation of droplet formation, detachment and motion in an electrically driven droplet generator is introduced. The numerical approach is based on the coupled solution of the multiphase flow problem with the charge continuity equation. For the latter, a modified convection-conduction model is applied, taking into account conductive, capacitive as well as convective electrical currents in the fluid. This allows for a proper description of charge relaxation phenomena in the moving fluid. In particular, the charge received by the droplet after detachment is an important parameter influencing the droplet dynamics in the test chamber

  19. Interaction mechanisms between ceramic particles and atomized metallic droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    1992-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to provide insight into the dynamic interactions that occur when ceramic particles are placed in intimate contact with a metallic matrix undergoing a phase change. To that effect, Al-4 wt pct Si/SiCp composite droplets were synthesized using a spray atomization and coinjection approach, and their solidification microstructures were studied both qualitatively and quantitatively. The present results show that SiC particles (SiCp) were incor- porated into the matrix and that the extent of incorporation depends on the solidification con- dition of the droplets at the moment of SiC particle injection. Two factors were found to affect the distribution and volume fraction of SiC particles in droplets: the penetration of particles into droplets and the entrapment and/or rejection of particles by the solidification front. First, during coinjection, particles collide with the atomized droplets with three possible results: they may penetrate the droplets, adhere to the droplet surface, or bounce back after impact. The extent of penetration of SiC particles into droplets was noted to depend on the kinetic energy of the particles and the magnitude of the surface energy change in the droplets that occurs upon impact. In liquid droplets, the extent of penetration of SiC particles was shown to depend on the changes in surface energy, ΔEs, experienced by the droplets. Accordingly, large SiC particles encoun- tered more resistance to penetration relative to small ones. In solid droplets, the penetration of SiC particles was correlated with the dynamic pressure exerted by the SiC particles on the droplets during impact and the depth of the ensuing crater. The results showed that no pene- tration was possible in such droplets. Second, once SiC particles have penetrated droplets, their final location in the microstructure is governed by their interactions with the solidification front. As a result of these interactions, both entrapment and rejection of

  20. Investigations on the droplet distributions in the atomization of kerosene jets in supersonic crossflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liyin; Wang, Zhen-guo; Li, Qinglian; Zhang, Jiaqi

    2015-09-01

    Phase Doppler anemometry was applied to investigate the atomization processes of a kerosene jet injected into Ma = 1.86 crossflow. Physical behaviors, such as breakup and coalescence, are reproduced through the analysis of the spatial distribution of kerosene droplets' size. It is concluded that Sauter mean diameter distribution shape transforms into "I" type from "C" type as the atomization development. Simultaneously, the breakup of large droplets and the coalescence of small droplets can be observed throughout the whole atomization process.

  1. Droplet Impact on a Heated Surface under a Depressurized Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakenaka, Ryuta; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2016-11-01

    Behavior of a water droplet of the diameter 1-3mm impacting on a heated surface under depressurized environment (100kPa -1kPa) has been studied. A syringe pump for droplet generation and a heated plate are set into a transparent acrylic vacuum chamber. The internal pressure of the chamber is automatically controlled at a target pressure with a rotary pump, a pressure transducer, and an electrical valve. A silicon wafer of the thickness 0.28 mm is mounted on the heater plate, whose temperature is directly measured by attaching a thermocouple on the backside. The droplet behavior is captured using a high-speed camera in a direction perpendicular to droplet velocity. Some unique behaviors of droplet are observed by decreasing the environmental pressure, which are considered to be due to two basic elements: Enhancement of evaporation due to the lowered saturation temperature, and shortage of pneumatic spring effect between the droplet and heated wall due to the lowered pressure of the air.

  2. Sensible Heat Transfer during Droplet Cooling: Experimental and Numerical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Teodori

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the numerical reproduction of the entire surface temperature field resulting from a water droplet spreading on a heated surface, which is compared with experimental data. High-speed infrared thermography of the back side of the surface and high-speed images of the side view of the impinging droplet were used to infer on the solid surface temperature field and on droplet dynamics. Numerical reproduction of the phenomena was performed using OpenFOAM CFD toolbox. An enhanced volume of fluid (VOF model was further modified for this purpose. The proposed modifications include the coupling of temperature fields between the fluid and the solid regions, to account for transient heat conduction within the solid. The results evidence an extremely good agreement between the temporal evolution of the measured and simulated spreading factors of the considered droplet impacts. The numerical and experimental dimensionless surface temperature profiles within the solid surface and along the droplet radius, were also in good agreement. Most of the differences were within the experimental measurements uncertainty. The numerical results allowed relating the solid surface temperature profiles with the fluid flow. During spreading, liquid recirculation within the rim, leads to the appearance of different regions of heat transfer that can be correlated with the vorticity field within the droplet.

  3. Droplet-based chemistry on a programmable micro-chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jon A.; Vykoukal, Jody V.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the manipulation of aqueous droplets in an immiscible, low-permittivity suspending medium. Such droplets may serve as carriers for not only air- and water-borne samples, contaminants, chemical reagents, viral and gene products, and cells, but also the reagents to process and characterise these samples. We present proofs-of-concept for droplet manipulation through dielectrophoresis by: (1) moving droplets on a two-dimensional array of electrodes, (2) achieving dielectrically-activated droplet injection, (3) fusing and reacting droplets, and (4) conducting a basic biological assay through a combination of these steps. A long-term goal of this research is to provide a platform fluidic processor technology that can form the core of versatile, automated, micro-scale devices to perform chemical and biological assays at or near the point of care, which will increase the availability of modern medicine to people who do not have ready access to modern medical institutions, and decrease the cost and delays associated with that lack of access. PMID:15007434

  4. Theoretical analysis for the optical deformation of emulsion droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapp, David; Taylor, Jonathan M; Lubansky, Alex S; Bain, Colin D; Chakrabarti, Buddhapriya

    2014-02-24

    We propose a theoretical framework to predict the three-dimensional shapes of optically deformed micron-sized emulsion droplets with ultra-low interfacial tension. The resulting shape and size of the droplet arises out of a balance between the interfacial tension and optical forces. Using an approximation of the laser field as a Gaussian beam, working within the Rayleigh-Gans regime and assuming isotropic surface energy at the oil-water interface, we numerically solve the resulting shape equations to elucidate the three-dimensional droplet geometry. We obtain a plethora of shapes as a function of the number of optical tweezers, their laser powers and positions, surface tension, initial droplet size and geometry. Experimentally, two-dimensional droplet silhouettes have been imaged from above, but their full side-on view has not been observed and reported for current optical configurations. This experimental limitation points to ambiguity in differentiating between droplets having the same two-dimensional projection but with disparate three-dimensional shapes. Our model elucidates and quantifies this difference for the first time. We also provide a dimensionless number that indicates the shape transformation (ellipsoidal to dumbbell) at a value ≈ 1.0, obtained by balancing interfacial tension and laser forces, substantiated using a data collapse.

  5. Difference in growth and coalescing patterns of droplets on bi-philic surfaces with varying spatial distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Martand Mayukh; Koppu, Sudheer; Kadlaskar, Shantanu Shrikant; Pillutla, Venkata; Abhijeet; Choi, Wonjae

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports the condensation and subsequent motion of water droplets on bi-philic surfaces, surfaces that are patterned with regions of different wettability. Bi-philic surfaces can enhance the water collection efficiency: droplets condensing on hydrophobic regions wick into hydrophilic drain channels when droplets grow to a certain size, renewing the condensation on the dry hydrophobic region. The onset of drain phenomenon can be triggered by multiple events with distinct nature ranging from gravity, direct contact between a droplet and a drain channel, to a mutual coalescence between droplets. This paper focuses on the effect of the length scale of hydrophobic regions on the dynamics of mutual coalescence between droplets and subsequent drainage. The main hypothesis was that, when the drop size is sufficient, the kinetic energy associated with a coalescence of droplets may cause dynamic advancing of a newly formed drop, leading to further coalescence with nearby droplets and ultimately to a chain reaction. We fabricate bi-philic surfaces with hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes, and the result confirms that coalescing droplets, when the length scale of droplets increases beyond 0.2mm, indeed display dynamic expansion and chain reaction. Multiple droplets can thus migrate to hydrophilic drain simultaneously even when the initial motion of the droplets was not triggered by the direct contact between the droplet and the hydrophilic drain. Efficiency of drain due to mutual coalescence of droplets varies depending on the length scale of bi-philic patterns, and the drain phenomenon reaches its peak when the width of hydrophobic stripes is between 800μm and 1mm. The Ohnesorge number of droplets draining on noted surfaces is between 0.0042 and 0.0037 respectively. The observed length scale of bi-philic patterns matches that on the Stenocara beetle's fog harvesting back surface. This match between length scales suggests that the surface of the insect is optimized

  6. Methanol Droplet Combustion in Oxygen-Inert Environments in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2013-01-01

    The Flame Extinguishment (FLEX) experiment that is currently underway in the Combustion Integrated Rack facility onboard the International Space Station is aimed at understanding the effects of inert diluents on the flammability of condensed phase fuels. To this end, droplets of various fuels, including alkanes and alcohols, are burned in a quiescent microgravity environment with varying amounts of oxygen and inert diluents to determine the limiting oxygen index (LOI) for these fuels. In this study we report experimental observations of methanol droplets burning in oxygen-nitrogen-carbon dioxide and oxygen-nitrogen-helium gas mixtures at 0.7 and 1 atmospheric pressures. The initial droplet size varied between approximately 1.5 mm and 4 mm to capture both diffusive extinction brought about by insufficient residence time at the flame and radiative extinction caused by excessive heat loss from the flame zone. The ambient oxygen concentration varied from a high value of 30% by volume to as low as 12%, approaching the limiting oxygen index for the fuel. The inert dilution by carbon dioxide and helium varied over a range of 0% to 70% by volume. In these experiments, both freely floated and tethered droplets were ignited using symmetrically opposed hot-wire igniters and the burning histories were recorded onboard using digital cameras, downlinked later to the ground for analysis. The digital images yielded droplet and flame diameters as functions of time and subsequently droplet burning rate, flame standoff ratio, and initial and extinction droplet diameters. Simplified theoretical models correlate the measured burning rate constant and the flame standoff ratio reasonably well. An activation energy asymptotic theory accounting for time-dependent water dissolution or evaporation from the droplet is shown to predict the measured diffusive extinction conditions well. The experiments also show that the limiting oxygen index for methanol in these diluent gases is around 12% to

  7. Droplet-Assisted Laser Direct Nanoscale Writing on Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Jen Chang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nano-structuring using laser direct writing technology has shown great potential for industrial applications. A novel application of water droplets to this technology is proposed in this paper. With a hydrophobic layer and a controlled substrate temperature, a layer of randomly distributed water droplets with a high contact angle is formed on the substrate. These liquid droplets can be used as lenses to enhance the laser intensity at the bottom of the droplets. As a result, nanoscale holes can be fabricated on the substrate by controlling the laser energy density. We successfully fabricated holes with a diameter of 600 nm at a substrate temperature of 12 ∘C and a power density of 1.2 × 108 W/cm2 in our experiments. We also found that the hole diameter was around a ninth of the water droplet diameter. Meanwhile, the machined holes are not affected much by the focal length of the lens, but a hole with less than 100 nm in diameter at the center was observed.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations on Evaporation of Droplets with Dissolved Salts

    OpenAIRE

    Jin-Liang Xu; Min Chen; Xiao-Dong Wang; Bing-Bing Wang

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the evaporation of water droplets containing either dissolved LiCl, NaCl or KCl salt in a gaseous surrounding (nitrogen) with a constant high temperature of 600 K. The initial droplet has 298 K temperature and contains 1,120 water molecules, 0, 40, 80 or 120 salt molecules. The effects of the salt type and concentration on the evaporation rate are examined. Three stages with different evaporation rates are observed for all cases. In the initial...

  9. Exploring the Politics of Water Grabbing: The Case of Large Mining Operations in the Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagros Sosa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The operations of the large mining company Yanacocha in Cajamarca (Peru provoke and require a fundamental reshuffling of how rights to water are allocated, resulting in changes in the distribution of the benefits and burdens of accessing water. We use this paper to argue that these changes in water use and tenure can be understood as a form of water grabbing, since they result in a transfer of water control from farmers’ collectives and government agencies to the mining company, with the company also assuming de facto responsibility over executing water allocation and safeguarding certain water-quality levels. We illustrate – by using two cases: La Ramada canal and the San José reservoir – the company’s overt and covert strategies to achieve control over water, showing how these are often backed up by neo-liberal government policies and by permissive local water authorities. Next to active attempts to obtain water rights, these strategies also include skilfully bending and breaking the resistance of (some farmers through negotiation and offering compensation. The de facto handing over of water governance powers to a multinational mining company raises troubling questions about longer-term water management, such as who controls the mining company, to whom are they accountable, and what will happen after mining operations stop.

  10. Large break frequency for the SRS (Savannah River Site) production reactor process water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, W.L.; Awadalla, N.G.; Sindelar, R.L.; Bush, S.H.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the results and conclusions of an evaluation of the large break frequency for the process water system (primary coolant system), including the piping, reactor tank, heat exchangers, expansion joints and other process water system components. This evaluation was performed to support the ongoing PRA effort and to complement deterministic analyses addressing the credibility of a double-ended guillotine break. This evaluation encompasses three specific areas: the failure probability of large process water piping directly from imposed loads, the indirect failure probability of piping caused by the seismic-induced failure of surrounding structures, and the failure of all other process water components. The first two of these areas are discussed in detail in other papers. This paper primarily addresses the failure frequency of components other than piping, and includes the other two areas as contributions to the overall process water system break frequency

  11. Oleoplaning droplets on lubricated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Dan; Timonen, Jaakko V. I.; Li, Ruoping; Velling, Seneca J.; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2017-10-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in using lubricated surfaces to achieve extreme liquid repellency: a foreign droplet immiscible with the underlying lubricant layer was shown to slide off at a small tilt angle behaviour was hypothesized to arise from a thin lubricant overlayer film sandwiched between the droplet and solid substrate, but this has not been observed experimentally. Here, using thin-film interference, we are able to visualize the intercalated film under both static and dynamic conditions. We further demonstrate that for a moving droplet, the film thickness follows the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin law. The droplet is therefore oleoplaning--akin to tyres hydroplaning on a wet road--with minimal dissipative force and no contact line pinning. The techniques and insights presented in this study will inform future work on the fundamentals of wetting for lubricated surfaces and enable their rational design.

  12. Droplet Translation Actuated by Photoelectrowetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Cesar; Deegan, Robert D

    2018-03-13

    In traditional electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) devices, droplets are moved about a substrate using electric fields produced by an array of discrete electrodes. In this study, we show that a drop can be driven across a substrate with a localized light beam by exploiting the photoelectrowetting (PEW) effect, a light-activated variant of EWOD. Droplet transport actuated by PEW eliminates the need for electrode arrays and the complexities entailed in their fabrication and control, and offers a new approach for designing lab-on-a-chip applications. We report measurements of the maximum droplet speed as a function of frequency and magnitude of the applied bias, intensity of illumination, volume of the droplet, and viscosity and also introduce a model that reproduces these data.

  13. An integrated model for assessing both crop productivity and agricultural water resources at a large scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, M.; Sakurai, G.; Iizumi, T.; Yokozawa, M.

    2012-12-01

    Agricultural production utilizes regional resources (e.g. river water and ground water) as well as local resources (e.g. temperature, rainfall, solar energy). Future climate changes and increasing demand due to population increases and economic developments would intensively affect the availability of water resources for agricultural production. While many studies assessed the impacts of climate change on agriculture, there are few studies that dynamically account for changes in water resources and crop production. This study proposes an integrated model for assessing both crop productivity and agricultural water resources at a large scale. Also, the irrigation management to subseasonal variability in weather and crop response varies for each region and each crop. To deal with such variations, we used the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to quantify regional-specific parameters associated with crop growth and irrigation water estimations. We coupled a large-scale crop model (Sakurai et al. 2012), with a global water resources model, H08 (Hanasaki et al. 2008). The integrated model was consisting of five sub-models for the following processes: land surface, crop growth, river routing, reservoir operation, and anthropogenic water withdrawal. The land surface sub-model was based on a watershed hydrology model, SWAT (Neitsch et al. 2009). Surface and subsurface runoffs simulated by the land surface sub-model were input to the river routing sub-model of the H08 model. A part of regional water resources available for agriculture, simulated by the H08 model, was input as irrigation water to the land surface sub-model. The timing and amount of irrigation water was simulated at a daily step. The integrated model reproduced the observed streamflow in an individual watershed. Additionally, the model accurately reproduced the trends and interannual variations of crop yields. To demonstrate the usefulness of the integrated model, we compared two types of impact assessment of

  14. Quantification of protein interaction kinetics in a micro droplet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, L. L. [Center for Bioelectronics and Biosensors, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wang, S. P., E-mail: shaopeng.wang@asu.edu, E-mail: njtao@asu.edu; Shan, X. N.; Tao, N. J., E-mail: shaopeng.wang@asu.edu, E-mail: njtao@asu.edu [Center for Bioelectronics and Biosensors, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Zhang, S. T. [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Characterization of protein interactions is essential to the discovery of disease biomarkers, the development of diagnostic assays, and the screening for therapeutic drugs. Conventional flow-through kinetic measurements need relative large amount of sample that is not feasible for precious protein samples. We report a novel method to measure protein interaction kinetics in a single droplet with sub microliter or less volume. A droplet in a humidity-controlled environmental chamber is replacing the microfluidic channels as the reactor for the protein interaction. The binding process is monitored by a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) system. Association curves are obtained from the average SPR image intensity in the center area of the droplet. The washing step required by conventional flow-through SPR method is eliminated in the droplet method. The association and dissociation rate constants and binding affinity of an antigen-antibody interaction are obtained by global fitting of association curves at different concentrations. The result obtained by this method is accurate as validated by conventional flow-through SPR system. This droplet-based method not only allows kinetic studies for proteins with limited supply but also opens the door for high-throughput protein interaction study in a droplet-based microarray format that enables measurement of many to many interactions on a single chip.

  15. Low-Cost Experimentation for the Study of Droplet Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, David; Lee, Abraham P.

    2014-01-01

    The continued growth of microfluidics into industry settings in areas such as point-of-care diagnostics and targeted therapeutics necessitates a workforce trained in microfluidic technologies and experimental methods. Laboratory courses for students at the university and high school levels will require cost-effective in-class demonstrations that instruct in chip design, fabrication, and experimentation at the microscale. We present a hand-operated pressure pumping system to form monodisperse picoliter to nanoliter droplet streams at low cost, and a series of exercises aimed at instructing in the specific art of droplet formation. Using this setup, the student is able to generate and observe the modes of droplet formation in flow-focusing devices, and the effect of device dimensions on the characteristics of formed droplets. Lastly, at ultra-low cost we demonstrate large plug formation in a T-junction using coffee stirrers as a master mold substitute. Our method reduces the cost of experimentation to enable intuitive instruction in droplet formation, with additional implications for creating droplets in the field or at point-of-care. PMID:25133595

  16. Vitrification and levitation of a liquid droplet on liquid nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young S; Adler, Douglas; Xu, Feng; Kayaalp, Emre; Nureddin, Aida; Anchan, Raymond M; Maas, Richard L; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-03-09

    The vitrification of a liquid occurs when ice crystal formation is prevented in the cryogenic environment through ultrarapid cooling. In general, vitrification entails a large temperature difference between the liquid and its surrounding medium. In our droplet vitrification experiments, we observed that such vitrification events are accompanied by a Leidenfrost phenomenon, which impedes the heat transfer to cool the liquid, when the liquid droplet comes into direct contact with liquid nitrogen. This is distinct from the more generally observed Leidenfrost phenomenon that occurs when a liquid droplet is self-vaporized on a hot plate. In the case of rapid cooling, the phase transition from liquid to vitrified solid (i.e., vitrification) and the levitation of droplets on liquid nitrogen (i.e., Leidenfrost phenomenon) take place simultaneously. Here, we investigate these two simultaneous physical events by using a theoretical model containing three dimensionless parameters (i.e., Stefan, Biot, and Fourier numbers). We explain theoretically and observe experimentally a threshold droplet radius during the vitrification of a cryoprotectant droplet in the presence of the Leidenfrost effect.

  17. Quantum Nanostructures by Droplet Epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2009-01-01

    Droplet epitaxy is an alternative growth technique for several quantum nanostructures. Indium droplets are distributed randomly on GaAs substrates at low temperatures (120-350'C). Under background pressure of group V elements, Arsenic and Phosphorous, InAs and InP nanostructures are created. Quantum rings with isotropic shape are obtained at low temperature range. When the growth thickness is increased, quantum rings are transformed to quantum dot rings. At high temperature range, anisotropic...

  18. Capillary-based integrated digital PCR in picoliter droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyu; Luo, Zhaofeng; Li, Lin; He, Jinlong; Li, Luoquan; Zhu, Jianwei; Wu, Ping; He, Liqun

    2018-01-30

    The droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is becoming more and more popular in diagnostic applications in academia and industry. In commercially available ddPCR systems, after they have been made by a generator, the droplets have to be transferred manually to modules for amplification and detection. In practice, some of the droplets (∼10%) are lost during manual transfer, leading to underestimation of the targets. In addition, the droplets are also at risk of cross-contamination during transfer. By contrast, in labs, some chip-based ddPCRs have been demonstrated where droplets always run in channels. However, the droplets easily coalesce to large ones in chips due to wall wetting as well as thermal oscillation. The loss of droplets becomes serious when such ddPCRs are applied to absolutely quantify rare mutations, such as in early diagnostics in clinical research or when measuring biological diversity at the cell level. Here, we propose a capillary-based integrated ddPCR system that is used for the first time to realize absolute quantification in this way. In this system, a HPLC T-junction is used to generate droplets and a long HPLC capillary connects the generator with both a capillary-based thermocycler and a capillary-based cytometer. The performance of the system is validated by absolute quantification of a gene specific to lung cancer (LunX). The results show that this system has very good linearity (0.9988) at concentrations ranging from NTC to 2.4 × 10 -4 copies per μL. As compared to qPCR, the all-in-one scheme is superior both in terms of the detection limit and the smaller fold changes measurement. The system of ddPCR might provide a powerful approach for clinical or academic applications where rare events are mostly considered.

  19. Pulsating-gliding transition in the dynamics of levitating liquid nitrogen droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Jacob, Eshel Ben [School of Physics and Astronomy, 69978 Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)], E-mail: aranson@msd.anl.gov

    2008-04-15

    Hot surfaces can cause levitation of small liquid droplets if the temperature is kept above the Leidenfrost point (220 {sup 0}C for water) due to the pressure formed because of rapid evaporation. Here, we demonstrate a new class of pulsating-gliding dynamic transitions in a special setting of the Leidenfrost effect at room temperatures and above a viscous fluid for droplets of liquid nitrogen. A whole range of highly dynamic patterns unfolds when droplets of liquid nitrogen are poured on the surface of another, more viscous liquid at room temperature. We also discovered that the levitating droplets induce vortex motion in the supporting viscous liquid. Depending on the viscosity of the supporting liquid, the nitrogen droplets either adopt an oscillating (pulsating) star-like shape with different azimuthal symmetries (from 2-9 petals) or glide on the surface with random trajectories. Thus, by varying the viscosity of the supporting liquid, we achieve controlled morphology and dynamics of Leidenfrost droplets.

  20. Pulsating-gliding transition in the dynamics of levitating liquid nitrogen droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S; Jacob, Eshel Ben

    2008-01-01

    Hot surfaces can cause levitation of small liquid droplets if the temperature is kept above the Leidenfrost point (220 0 C for water) due to the pressure formed because of rapid evaporation. Here, we demonstrate a new class of pulsating-gliding dynamic transitions in a special setting of the Leidenfrost effect at room temperatures and above a viscous fluid for droplets of liquid nitrogen. A whole range of highly dynamic patterns unfolds when droplets of liquid nitrogen are poured on the surface of another, more viscous liquid at room temperature. We also discovered that the levitating droplets induce vortex motion in the supporting viscous liquid. Depending on the viscosity of the supporting liquid, the nitrogen droplets either adopt an oscillating (pulsating) star-like shape with different azimuthal symmetries (from 2-9 petals) or glide on the surface with random trajectories. Thus, by varying the viscosity of the supporting liquid, we achieve controlled morphology and dynamics of Leidenfrost droplets

  1. Community challenges when using large plastic bottles for Solar Energy Disinfection of Water (SODIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Borde

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communities living in developing countries as well as populations affected by natural or man-made disasters can be left at great risk from water related diseases, especially those spread through the faecal-oral route. Conventional water treatments such as boiling and chlorination can be effective but may prove costly for impoverished communities. Solar water disinfection (SODIS has been shown to be a cheap and effective way for communities to treat their water. The exposure to sunlight is typically carried out in small volume plastic beverage bottles (up to 2 l. Given the water requirements of consumption and basic personal hygiene, this may not always meet the needs of communities. Recent work has shown 19-L plastic water dispenser containers to be effective SODIS reactors, comparable in efficacy to PET bottles. In this paper we outline the need for studying SODIS in large volumes and discuss 4 main associated challenges. Discussion Apart from clean water needed for consumption, access to adequate water is essential for sanitation and hygiene. Contamination of treated water through unwashed hands or vessels contributes heavily to the spread of water borne pathogens in communities. Traditional water treatments such as boiling and chlorination can be effective but may prove financially burdensome for low income communities. SODIS in large vessels could be used as a simple method to meet water requirements in low income and disaster affected populations. However, there have been some concerns associated with the conventional SODIS method; we identify the main ones to be: (1 cold or cloudy weather; (2 the fear of leaching in plastic bottles; (3 water turbidity, and; (4 community acceptance. Summary The application of SODIS in large bottles like WDCs has the potential to be an efficient and cost effective method of disinfecting water, either for consumption until more rigorous water treatments can be put in place, or for

  2. Investigation on Shock Induced Stripping Breakup Process of A Liquid Droplet

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yao; Wen, Chihyung; Shen, Hua; Guan, Ben

    2017-01-01

    Stripping breakup process of a single liquid droplet under the impact of a planar shock wave is investigated both experimentally and numerically. The droplet breakup experiment is conducted in a horizontal shock tube and the evolution of the droplet is recorded by direct high-speed photography. The experimental images clearly illustrate the droplet interface evolution features from its early to relatively late stage. Compressible Euler equations are solved using an in-house inviscid upwind characteristic space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method coupled with the HLLC approximate Riemann solver. A reduced five-equation model is employed to demonstrate the air/liquid interface. Numerical results accurately reproduce the water column and axi-symmetric water droplet breakup processes in experiments. The present study confirms the validity of the present numerical method in solving the shock wave induced droplet breakup problem and elaborates the stripping breakup process numerically in a long period. Droplet inner flow pattern is depicted, based on which the drives of protrusions emerged on the droplet surface are clearly seen. The droplet deformation is proved to be determined by not only the outer air flow, but also the inner liquid flow.

  3. Engineering Surfaces for Enhanced Nucleation and Droplet Removal During Dropwise Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sanmitra; Khan, Sameera; Anand, Sushant

    2017-11-01

    Condensation plays critical role in numerous industrial applications, such as condensers, HVAC,etc In the most applications, fast formation (i.e. high nucleation) and subsequent removal of water droplets is critical for enhancing the efficiencies of their associated systems. Significant focus has been placed on the aspect of droplet removal from surfaces. This has led to, development of superhydrophobic surfaces with special textures on which droplets are self-removed after coalescence. However,because of their inherent low surface energy, nucleation energy barriers are also high on such surfaces. In contrast to conventional superhydrophobic surfaces, here we show that surfaces can be engineered such that the simultaneous benefits of high nucleation rates and fast droplet removal can be obtained during the condensation process.These benefits are obtained by impregnating a superhydrophobic surface with an oil that despite its defect-free interface provides low nucleation energy barrier during condensation. At the same time, the oil facilitates high droplet shedding rates by providing a lubricating layer below the droplets due to which droplets have negligible contact angle hysteresis. We provide a guide to choose oils that lead to enhanced nucleation, and provide experimental evidence supporting the proposed guide. We discuss the importance of different oil properties in affecting the droplet growth and subsequent removal of water droplets.

  4. Investigation on Shock Induced Stripping Breakup Process of A Liquid Droplet

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yao

    2017-03-02

    Stripping breakup process of a single liquid droplet under the impact of a planar shock wave is investigated both experimentally and numerically. The droplet breakup experiment is conducted in a horizontal shock tube and the evolution of the droplet is recorded by direct high-speed photography. The experimental images clearly illustrate the droplet interface evolution features from its early to relatively late stage. Compressible Euler equations are solved using an in-house inviscid upwind characteristic space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method coupled with the HLLC approximate Riemann solver. A reduced five-equation model is employed to demonstrate the air/liquid interface. Numerical results accurately reproduce the water column and axi-symmetric water droplet breakup processes in experiments. The present study confirms the validity of the present numerical method in solving the shock wave induced droplet breakup problem and elaborates the stripping breakup process numerically in a long period. Droplet inner flow pattern is depicted, based on which the drives of protrusions emerged on the droplet surface are clearly seen. The droplet deformation is proved to be determined by not only the outer air flow, but also the inner liquid flow.

  5. Whose waters? Large-scale agricultural development and water grabbing in the Wami-Ruvu River Basin, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelia van Eeden

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In Tanzania like in other parts of the global South, in the name of 'development' and 'poverty eradication' vast tracts of land have been earmarked by the government to be developed by investors for different commercial agricultural projects, giving rise to the contested land grab phenomenon. In parallel, Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM has been promoted in the country and globally as the governance framework that seeks to manage water resources in an efficient, equitable and sustainable manner. This article asks how IWRM manages the competing interests as well as the diverse priorities of both large and small water users in the midst of foreign direct investment. By focusing on two commercial sugar companies operating in the Wami-Ruvu River Basin in Tanzania and their impacts on the water and land rights of the surrounding villages, the article asks whether institutional and capacity weaknesses around IWRM implementation can be exploited by powerful actors that seek to meet their own interests, thus allowing water grabbing to take place. The paper thus highlights the power, interests and alliances of the various actors involved in the governance of water resources. By drawing on recent conceptual insights from the water grabbing literature, the empirical findings suggest that the IWRM framework indirectly and directly facilitates the phenomenon of water grabbing to take place in the Wami-Ruvu River Basin in Tanzania.

  6. Hydration of a Large Anionic Charge Distribution - Naphthalene-Water Cluster Anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J. Mathias; Adams, Christopher L.

    2010-06-01

    We report the infrared spectra of anionic clusters of naphthalene with up to three water molecules. Comparison of the experimental infrared spectra with theoretically predicted spectra from quantum chemistry calculations allow conclusions regarding the structures of the clusters under study. The first water molecule forms two hydrogen bonds with the π electron system of the naphthalene moiety. Subsequent water ligands interact with both the naphthalene and the other water ligands to form hydrogen bonded networks, similar to other hydrated anion clusters. Naphthalene-water anion clusters illustrate how water interacts with negative charge delocalized over a large π electron system. The clusters are interesting model systems that are discussed in the context of wetting of graphene surfaces and polyaromatic hydrocarbons.

  7. A versatile bio-based material for efficiently removing toxic dyes, heavy metal ions and emulsified oil droplets from water simultaneously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daikun; Li, Qing; Mao, Daoyong; Bai, Ningning; Dong, Hongzhou

    2017-12-01

    Developing versatile materials for effective water purification is significant for environment and water source protection. Herein, a versatile bio-based material (CH-PAA-T) was reported by simple thermal cross-linking chitosan and polyacrylic acid which exhibits excellent performances for removing insoluble oil, soluble toxic dyes and heavy metal ions from water, simultaneously. The adsorption capacities are 990.1mgg -1 for methylene blue (MB) and 135.9mgg -1 for Cu 2+ , which are higher than most of present advanced absorbents. The adsorption towards organic dyes possesses high selectivity which makes CH-PAA-T be able to efficiently separate dye mixtures. The stable superoleophobicity under water endows CH-PAA-T good performance to separate toluene-in-water emulsion stabilized by Tween 80. Moreover, CH-PAA-T can be recycled for 10 times with negligible reduction of efficiency. Such versatile bio-based material is a potential candidate for water purification. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Optimizing water resources management in large river basins with integrated surface water-groundwater modeling: A surrogate-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Zheng, Yi; Wu, Xin; Tian, Yong; Han, Feng; Liu, Jie; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2015-04-01

    Integrated surface water-groundwater modeling can provide a comprehensive and coherent understanding on basin-scale water cycle, but its high computational cost has impeded its application in real-world management. This study developed a new surrogate-based approach, SOIM (Surrogate-based Optimization for Integrated surface water-groundwater Modeling), to incorporate the integrated modeling into water management optimization. Its applicability and advantages were evaluated and validated through an optimization research on the conjunctive use of surface water (SW) and groundwater (GW) for irrigation in a semiarid region in northwest China. GSFLOW, an integrated SW-GW model developed by USGS, was employed. The study results show that, due to the strong and complicated SW-GW interactions, basin-scale water saving could be achieved by spatially optimizing the ratios of groundwater use in different irrigation districts. The water-saving potential essentially stems from the reduction of nonbeneficial evapotranspiration from the aqueduct system and shallow groundwater, and its magnitude largely depends on both water management schemes and hydrological conditions. Important implications for water resources management in general include: first, environmental flow regulation needs to take into account interannual variation of hydrological conditions, as well as spatial complexity of SW-GW interactions; and second, to resolve water use conflicts between upper stream and lower stream, a system approach is highly desired to reflect ecological, economic, and social concerns in water management decisions. Overall, this study highlights that surrogate-based approaches like SOIM represent a promising solution to filling the gap between complex environmental modeling and real-world management decision-making.

  9. Sound Propagation in Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions with Evaporation and Nonlinear Particle Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixture in the presence of evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson to accommodate the effects of nonlinear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer on sound attenuation and dispersion. The results indicate the existence of a spectral broadening effect in the attenuation coefficient (scaled with respect to the peak value) with a decrease in droplet mass concentration. It is further shown that for large values of the droplet concentration the scaled attenuation coefficient is characterized by a universal spectrum independent of droplet mass concentration.

  10. Moditored unsaturated soil transport processes as a support for large scale soil and water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanclooster, Marnik

    2010-05-01

    The current societal demand for sustainable soil and water management is very large. The drivers of global and climate change exert many pressures on the soil and water ecosystems, endangering appropriate ecosystem functioning. The unsaturated soil transport processes play a key role in soil-water system functioning as it controls the fluxes of water and nutrients from the soil to plants (the pedo-biosphere link), the infiltration flux of precipitated water to groundwater and the evaporative flux, and hence the feed back from the soil to the climate system. Yet, unsaturated soil transport processes are difficult to quantify since they are affected by huge variability of the governing properties at different space-time scales and the intrinsic non-linearity of the transport processes. The incompatibility of the scales between the scale at which processes reasonably can be characterized, the scale at which the theoretical process correctly can be described and the scale at which the soil and water system need to be managed, calls for further development of scaling procedures in unsaturated zone science. It also calls for a better integration of theoretical and modelling approaches to elucidate transport processes at the appropriate scales, compatible with the sustainable soil and water management objective. Moditoring science, i.e the interdisciplinary research domain where modelling and monitoring science are linked, is currently evolving significantly in the unsaturated zone hydrology area. In this presentation, a review of current moditoring strategies/techniques will be given and illustrated for solving large scale soil and water management problems. This will also allow identifying research needs in the interdisciplinary domain of modelling and monitoring and to improve the integration of unsaturated zone science in solving soil and water management issues. A focus will be given on examples of large scale soil and water management problems in Europe.

  11. Survey of large-scale solar water heaters installed in Taiwan, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Keh-Chin; Lee Tsong-Sheng; Chung Kung-Ming [Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (China); Lien Ya-Feng; Lee Chine-An [Cheng Kung Univ. Research and Development Foundation, Tainan (China)

    2008-07-01

    Almost all the solar collectors installed in Taiwan, China were used for production of hot water for homeowners (residential systems), in which the area of solar collectors is less than 10 square meters. From 2001 to 2006, there were only 39 large-scale systems (defined as the area of solar collectors being over 100 m{sup 2}) installed. Their utilization purposes are for rooming house (dormitory), swimming pool, restaurant, and manufacturing process. A comprehensive survey of those large-scale solar water heaters was conducted in 2006. The objectives of the survey were to asses the systems' performance and to have the feedback from the individual users. It is found that lack of experience in system design and maintenance are the key factors for reliable operation of a system. For further promotion of large-scale solar water heaters in Taiwan, a more compressive program on a system design for manufacturing process should be conducted. (orig.)

  12. Water Saving and Cost Analysis of Large-Scale Implementation of Domestic Rain Water Harvesting in Minor Mediterranean Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Campisano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a novel methodology to evaluate the benefits of large-scale installation of domestic Rain Water Harvesting (RWH systems in multi-story buildings. The methodology was specifically developed for application to small settlements of the minor Mediterranean islands characterized by sharp fluctuations in precipitation and water demands between winter and summer periods. The methodology is based on the combined use of regressive models for water saving evaluation and of geospatial analysis tools for semi-automatic collection of spatial information at the building/household level. An application to the old town of Lipari (Aeolian islands showed potential for high yearly water savings (between 30% and 50%, with return on investment in less than 15 years for about 50% of the installed RWH systems.

  13. Assembly, operation and disassembly manual for the Battelle Large Volume Water Sampler (BLVWS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, V.W.; Campbell, R.M.

    1984-12-01

    Assembly, operation and disassembly of the Battelle Large Volume Water Sampler (BLVWS) are described in detail. Step by step instructions of assembly, general operation and disassembly are provided to allow an operator completely unfamiliar with the sampler to successfully apply the BLVWS to his research sampling needs. The sampler permits concentration of both particulate and dissolved radionuclides from large volumes of ocean and fresh water. The water sample passes through a filtration section for particle removal then through sorption or ion exchange beds where species of interest are removed. The sampler components which contact the water being sampled are constructed of polyvinylchloride (PVC). The sampler has been successfully applied to many sampling needs over the past fifteen years. 9 references, 8 figures

  14. Tight coupling of particle size, number and composition in atmospheric cloud droplet activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Topping

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The substantial uncertainty in the indirect effect of aerosol particles on radiative forcing in large part arises from the influences of atmospheric aerosol particles on (i the brightness of clouds, exerting significant shortwave cooling with no appreciable compensation in the long wave, and on (ii their ability to precipitate, with implications for cloud cover and lifetime.

    Predicting the ambient conditions at which aerosol particles may become cloud droplets is largely reliant on an equilibrium relationship derived by Köhler (1936. However, the theoretical basis of the relationship restricts its application to particles solely comprising involatile compounds and water, whereas a substantial fraction of particles in the real atmosphere will contain potentially thousands of semi-volatile organic compounds in addition to containing semi-volatile inorganic components such as ammonium nitrate.

    We show that equilibration of atmospherically reasonable concentrations of organic compounds with a growing particle as the ambient humidity increases has potentially larger implications on cloud droplet formation than any other equilibrium compositional dependence, owing to inextricable linkage between the aerosol composition, a particles size and concentration under ambient conditions.

    Whilst previous attempts to account for co-condensation of gases other than water vapour have been restricted to one inorganic condensate, our method demonstrates that accounting for the co-condensation of any number of organic compounds substantially decreases the saturation ratio of water vapour required for droplet activation. This effect is far greater than any other compositional dependence; more so even than the unphysical effect of surface tension reduction in aqueous organic mixtures, ignoring differences in bulk and surface surfactant concentrations.

  15. Computer simulation for risk management: Hydrogen refueling stations and water supply of a large region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, Frank; Kozine, Igor

    2012-01-01

    in applying DES models to the analysis of large infrastructures for refueling stations and water supply. Two case studies are described which are concerned with the inherently safer supply and storage of hydrogen at refueling stations and an established drinking water supply system of a large metropolitan...... area, respectively. For both, the simulation aims at identifying points of potential improvement from the reliability point of view. This allows setting up a list of activities and safety measures to reduce risk and possible losses and mitigate the consequences of accidents. Based on the cases...

  16. Source of temperature and pressure pulsations during sessile droplet evaporation into multicomponent atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, Aaron H; Sefiane, Khellil; Ward, Charles A

    2013-10-29

    During sessile droplet evaporation, studies with IR thermography and shadowgraphs have indicated temperature pulsations. We confirm those observations with microthermocouples, but microthermocouples also indicate temperature pulsations in the atmosphere of the droplet. The pressure in this atmosphere pulsated as well and was correlated with the temperature pulsations in the droplet. Also, we find that if a droplet evaporates into its own vapor, there are no temperature or pressure pulsations. The pulsations occur only if the droplet evaporates into an atmosphere with a component having a heat of solution with the droplet when it adsorbs-absorbs. None of the currently proposed mechanisms for the temperature pulsations provide an explanation for the coupling between the temperature pulsations in the droplet and the vapor-phase pressure pulsations, and for the absence of the pulsations when the system is single-component. As a mechanism for the pulsations, we propose that when a droplet is exposed to an atmosphere containing a component that has a heat of solution with the droplet, energy will be released from adsorption-absorption. This energy will cause pulsations in the evaporation flux, and these pulsations could cause the observed temperature and pressure pulsations. We examine this mechanism by showing that, if the measured temperature pulsations in a water droplet exposed to a methanol atmosphere are used as the input to a theory of evaporation kinetics (statistical rate theory), the pressure pulsations of the water vapor in the methanol atmosphere are predicted and agree with those measured with a quadrupole mass analyzer. When the inputs and outputs are reversed in the theory, we find that the temperature pulsations in the droplet are correctly predicted from the measured water vapor pulsations in the atmosphere.

  17. Coexistence and conflict: IWRM and large-scale water infrastructure development in Piura, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Mills-Novoa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the emphasis of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM on 'soft' demand-side management, large-scale water infrastructure is increasingly being constructed in basins managed under an IWRM framework. While there has been substantial research on IWRM, few scholars have unpacked how IWRM and large-scale water infrastructure development coexist and conflict. Piura, Peru is an important site for understanding how IWRM and capital-intensive, concrete-heavy water infrastructure development articulate in practice. After 70 years of proposals and planning, the Regional Government of Piura began construction of the mega-irrigation project, Proyecto Especial de Irrigación e Hidroeléctrico del Alto Piura (PEIHAP in 2013. PEIHAP, which will irrigate an additional 19,000 hectares (ha, is being realised in the wake of major reforms in the ChiraPiura River Basin, a pilot basin for the IWRM-inspired 2009 Water Resources Law. We first map the historical trajectory of PEIHAP as it mirrors the shifting political priorities of the Peruvian state. We then draw on interviews with the newly formed River Basin Council, regional government, PEIHAP, and civil society actors to understand why and how these differing water management paradigms coexist. We find that while the 2009 Water Resources Law labels large-scale irrigation infrastructure as an 'exceptional measure', this development continues to eclipse IWRM provisions of the new law. This uneasy coexistence reflects the parallel desires of the state to imbue water policy reform with international credibility via IWRM while also furthering economic development goals via largescale water infrastructure. While the participatory mechanisms and expertise of IWRM-inspired river basin councils have not been brought to bear on the approval and construction of PEIHAP, these institutions will play a crucial role in managing the myriad resource and social conflicts that are likely to result.

  18. Numerical modeling of water spray suppression of conveyor belt fires in a large-scale tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Liming; Smith, Alex C

    2015-05-01

    Conveyor belt fires in an underground mine pose a serious life threat to miners. Water sprinkler systems are usually used to extinguish underground conveyor belt fires, but because of the complex interaction between conveyor belt fires and mine ventilation airflow, more effective engineering designs are needed for the installation of water sprinkler systems. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to simulate the interaction between the ventilation airflow, the belt flame spread, and the water spray system in a mine entry. The CFD model was calibrated using test results from a large-scale conveyor belt fire suppression experiment. Simulations were conducted using the calibrated CFD model to investigate the effects of sprinkler location, water flow rate, and sprinkler activation temperature on the suppression of conveyor belt fires. The sprinkler location and the activation temperature were found to have a major effect on the suppression of the belt fire, while the water flow rate had a minor effect.

  19. Automatic Optimization for Large-Scale Real-Time Coastal Water Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunli Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce an automatic optimization approach for the simulation of large-scale coastal water. To solve the singular problem of water waves obtained with the traditional model, a hybrid deep-shallow-water model is estimated by using an automatic coupling algorithm. It can handle arbitrary water depth and different underwater terrain. As a certain feature of coastal terrain, coastline is detected with the collision detection technology. Then, unnecessary water grid cells are simplified by the automatic simplification algorithm according to the depth. Finally, the model is calculated on Central Processing Unit (CPU and the simulation is implemented on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU. We show the effectiveness of our method with various results which achieve real-time rendering on consumer-level computer.

  20. Numerical modeling of water spray suppression of conveyor belt fires in a large-scale tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Liming; Smith, Alex C.

    2015-01-01

    Conveyor belt fires in an underground mine pose a serious life threat to miners. Water sprinkler systems are usually used to extinguish underground conveyor belt fires, but because of the complex interaction between conveyor belt fires and mine ventilation airflow, more effective engineering designs are needed for the installation of water sprinkler systems. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to simulate the interaction between the ventilation airflow, the belt flame spread, and the water spray system in a mine entry. The CFD model was calibrated using test results from a large-scale conveyor belt fire suppression experiment. Simulations were conducted using the calibrated CFD model to investigate the effects of sprinkler location, water flow rate, and sprinkler activation temperature on the suppression of conveyor belt fires. The sprinkler location and the activation temperature were found to have a major effect on the suppression of the belt fire, while the water flow rate had a minor effect. PMID:26190905

  1. Photoacoustic measurements of photokinetics in single optically trapped aerosol droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covert, Paul; Cremer, Johannes; Signorell, Ruth; Thaler, Klemens; Haisch, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    It is well established that interaction of light with atmospheric aerosols has a large impact on the Earth's climate. However, uncertainties in the magnitude of this impact remain large, due in part to broad distributions of aerosol size, composition, and chemical reactivity. In this context, photoacoustic spectroscopy is commonly used to measure light absorption by aerosols. Here, we present photoacoustic measurements of single, optically-trapped nanodroplets to reveal droplet size-depencies of photochemical and physical processes. Theoretical considerations have pointed to a size-dependence in the magnitude and phase of the photoacoustic response from aerosol droplets. This dependence is thought to originate from heat transfer processes that are slow compared to the acoustic excitation frequency. In the case of a model aerosol, our measurements of single particle absorption cross-section versus droplet size confirm these theoretical predictions. In a related study, using the same model aerosol, we also demonstrate a droplet size-dependence of photochemical reaction rates [1]. Within sub-micron sized particles, photolysis rates were observed to be an order of magnitude greater than those observed in larger droplets. [1] J. W. Cremer, K. M. Thaler, C. Haisch, and R. Signorell. Photoacoustics of single laser-trapped nanodroplets for the direct observation of nanofocusing in aerosol photokinetics. Nat. Commun., 7:10941, 2016.

  2. Electrohydrodynamic coalescence of droplets using an embedded potential flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzon, M.; Gray, L. J.; Sethian, J. A.

    2018-03-01

    The coalescence, and subsequent satellite formation, of two inviscid droplets is studied numerically. The initial drops are taken to be of equal and different sizes, and simulations have been carried out with and without the presence of an electrical field. The main computational challenge is the tracking of a free surface that changes topology. Coupling level set and boundary integral methods with an embedded potential flow model, we seamlessly compute through these singular events. As a consequence, the various coalescence modes that appear depending upon the relative ratio of the parent droplets can be studied. Computations of first stage pinch-off, second stage pinch-off, and complete engulfment are analyzed and compared to recent numerical studies and laboratory experiments. Specifically, we study the evolution of bridge radii and the related scaling laws, the minimum drop radii evolution from coalescence to satellite pinch-off, satellite sizes, and the upward stretching of the near cylindrical protrusion at the droplet top. Clear evidence of partial coalescence self-similarity is presented for parent droplet ratios between 1.66 and 4. This has been possible due to the fact that computational initial conditions only depend upon the mother droplet size, in contrast with laboratory experiments where the difficulty in establishing the same initial physical configuration is well known. The presence of electric forces changes the coalescence patterns, and it is possible to control the satellite droplet size by tuning the electrical field intensity. All of the numerical results are in very good agreement with recent laboratory experiments for water droplet coalescence.

  3. Large-Scale Ichthyoplankton and Water Mass Distribution along the South Brazil Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo-Soares, Luis Carlos Pinto; Garcia, Carlos Alberto Eiras; Freire, Andrea Santarosa; Muelbert, José Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Ichthyoplankton is an essential component of pelagic ecosystems, and environmental factors play an important role in determining its distribution. We have investigated simultaneous latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients in ichthyoplankton abundance to test the hypothesis that the large-scale distribution of fish larvae in the South Brazil Shelf is associated with water mass composition. Vertical plankton tows were collected between 21°27′ and 34°51′S at 107 stations, in austral late spring and early summer seasons. Samples were taken with a conical-cylindrical plankton net from the depth of chlorophyll maxima to the surface in deep stations, or from 10 m from the bottom to the surface in shallow waters. Salinity and temperature were obtained with a CTD/rosette system, which provided seawater for chlorophyll-a and nutrient concentrations. The influence of water mass on larval fish species was studied using Indicator Species Analysis, whereas environmental effects on the distribution of larval fish species were analyzed by Distance-based Redundancy Analysis. Larval fish species were associated with specific water masses: in the north, Sardinella brasiliensis was found in Shelf Water; whereas in the south, Engraulis anchoita inhabited the Plata Plume Water. At the slope, Tropical Water was characterized by the bristlemouth Cyclothone acclinidens. The concurrent analysis showed the importance of both cross-shelf and latitudinal gradients on the large-scale distribution of larval fish species. Our findings reveal that ichthyoplankton composition and large-scale spatial distribution are determined by water mass composition in both latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients. PMID:24614798

  4. Global models underestimate large decadal declining and rising water storage trends relative to GRACE satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Bridget R.; Zhang, Zizhan; Save, Himanshu; Sun, Alexander Y.; van Beek, Ludovicus P. H.; Wiese, David N.; Reedy, Robert C.; Longuevergne, Laurent; Döll, Petra; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2018-01-01

    Assessing reliability of global models is critical because of increasing reliance on these models to address past and projected future climate and human stresses on global water resources. Here, we evaluate model reliability based on a comprehensive comparison of decadal trends (2002–2014) in land water storage from seven global models (WGHM, PCR-GLOBWB, GLDAS NOAH, MOSAIC, VIC, CLM, and CLSM) to trends from three Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite solutions in 186 river basins (∼60% of global land area). Medians of modeled basin water storage trends greatly underestimate GRACE-derived large decreasing (≤−0.5 km3/y) and increasing (≥0.5 km3/y) trends. Decreasing trends from GRACE are mostly related to human use (irrigation) and climate variations, whereas increasing trends reflect climate variations. For example, in the Amazon, GRACE estimates a large increasing trend of ∼43 km3/y, whereas most models estimate decreasing trends (−71 to 11 km3/y). Land water storage trends, summed over all basins, are positive for GRACE (∼71–82 km3/y) but negative for models (−450 to −12 km3/y), contributing opposing trends to global mean sea level change. Impacts of climate forcing on decadal land water storage trends exceed those of modeled human intervention by about a factor of 2. The model-GRACE comparison highlights potential areas of future model development, particularly simulated water storage. The inability of models to capture large decadal water storage trends based on GRACE indicates that model projections of climate and human-induced water storage changes may be underestimated. PMID:29358394

  5. Large zero-tension plate lysimeters for soil water and solute collection in undisturbed soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Peters

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Water collection from undisturbed unsaturated soils to estimate in situ water and solute fluxes in the field is a challenge, in particular if soils are heterogeneous. Large sampling devices are required if preferential flow paths are present. We present a modular plate system that allows installation of large zero-tension lysimeter plates under undisturbed soils in the field. To investigate the influence of the lysimeter on the water flow field in the soil, a numerical 2-D simulation study was conducted for homogeneous soils with uni- and bimodal pore-size distributions and stochastic Miller-Miller heterogeneity. The collection efficiency was found to be highly dependent on the hydraulic functions, infiltration rate, and lysimeter size, and was furthermore affected by the degree of heterogeneity. In homogeneous soils with high saturated conductivities the devices perform poorly and even large lysimeters (width 250 cm can be bypassed by the soil water. Heterogeneities of soil hydraulic properties result into a network of flow channels that enhance the sampling efficiency of the lysimeter plates. Solute breakthrough into zero-tension lysimeter occurs slightly retarded as compared to the free soil, but concentrations in the collected water are similar to the mean flux concentration in the undisturbed soil. To validate the results from the numerical study, a dual tracer study with seven lysimeters of 1.25×1.25 m area was conducted in the field. Three lysimeters were installed underneath a 1.2 m filling of contaminated silty sand, the others deeper in the undisturbed soil. The lysimeters directly underneath the filled soil material collected water with a collection efficiency of 45%. The deeper lysimeters did not collect any water. The arrival of the tracers showed that almost all collected water came from preferential flow paths.

  6. Large-scale ichthyoplankton and water mass distribution along the South Brazil Shelf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos Pinto de Macedo-Soares

    Full Text Available Ichthyoplankton is an essential component of pelagic ecosystems, and environmental factors play an important role in determining its distribution. We have investigated simultaneous latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients in ichthyoplankton abundance to test the hypothesis that the large-scale distribution of fish larvae in the South Brazil Shelf is associated with water mass composition. Vertical plankton tows were collected between 21°27' and 34°51'S at 107 stations, in austral late spring and early summer seasons. Samples were taken with a conical-cylindrical plankton net from the depth of chlorophyll maxima to the surface in deep stations, or from 10 m from the bottom to the surface in shallow waters. Salinity and temperature were obtained with a CTD/rosette system, which provided seawater for chlorophyll-a and nutrient concentrations. The influence of water mass on larval fish species was studied using Indicator Species Analysis, whereas environmental effects on the distribution of larval fish species were analyzed by Distance-based Redundancy Analysis. Larval fish species were associated with specific water masses: in the north, Sardinella brasiliensis was found in Shelf Water; whereas in the south, Engraulis anchoita inhabited the Plata Plume Water. At the slope, Tropical Water was characterized by the bristlemouth Cyclothone acclinidens. The concurrent analysis showed the importance of both cross-shelf and latitudinal gradients on the large-scale distribution of larval fish species. Our findings reveal that ichthyoplankton composition and large-scale spatial distribution are determined by water mass composition in both latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients.

  7. Large-scale ichthyoplankton and water mass distribution along the South Brazil Shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo-Soares, Luis Carlos Pinto; Garcia, Carlos Alberto Eiras; Freire, Andrea Santarosa; Muelbert, José Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Ichthyoplankton is an essential component of pelagic ecosystems, and environmental factors play an important role in determining its distribution. We have investigated simultaneous latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients in ichthyoplankton abundance to test the hypothesis that the large-scale distribution of fish larvae in the South Brazil Shelf is associated with water mass composition. Vertical plankton tows were collected between 21°27' and 34°51'S at 107 stations, in austral late spring and early summer seasons. Samples were taken with a conical-cylindrical plankton net from the depth of chlorophyll maxima to the surface in deep stations, or from 10 m from the bottom to the surface in shallow waters. Salinity and temperature were obtained with a CTD/rosette system, which provided seawater for chlorophyll-a and nutrient concentrations. The influence of water mass on larval fish species was studied using Indicator Species Analysis, whereas environmental effects on the distribution of larval fish species were analyzed by Distance-based Redundancy Analysis. Larval fish species were associated with specific water masses: in the north, Sardinella brasiliensis was found in Shelf Water; whereas in the south, Engraulis anchoita inhabited the Plata Plume Water. At the slope, Tropical Water was characterized by the bristlemouth Cyclothone acclinidens. The concurrent analysis showed the importance of both cross-shelf and latitudinal gradients on the large-scale distribution of larval fish species. Our findings reveal that ichthyoplankton composition and large-scale spatial distribution are determined by water mass composition in both latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients.

  8. Numerical Buckling Analysis of Large Suction Caissons for Wind Turbines on Deep Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2013-01-01

    Using large suction caissons for offshore wind turbines is an upcoming cost-effective technology also referred to as bucket foundations. During operation, the monopod bucket foundation is loaded by a large overturning moment from the wind turbine and the wave loads. However, during installation...... the suction caisson is loaded by external pressure (internal suction) due to evacuation of water inside the bucket and vertical forces due to gravity. The risk of structural buckling during installation of large-diameter suction caissons is addressed using numerical methods. Initial imperfect geometries...

  9. Water limited agriculture in Africa: Climate change sensitivity of large scale land investments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulli, M. C.; D'Odorico, P.; Chiarelli, D. D.; Davis, K. F.

    2015-12-01

    The past few decades have seen unprecedented changes in the global agricultural system with a dramatic increase in the rates of food production fueled by an escalating demand for food calories, as a result of demographic growth, dietary changes, and - more recently - new bioenergy policies. Food prices have become consistently higher and increasingly volatile with dramatic spikes in 2007-08 and 2010-11. The confluence of these factors has heightened demand for land and brought a wave of land investment to the developing world: some of the more affluent countries are trying to secure land rights in areas suitable for agriculture. According to some estimates, to date, roughly 38 million hectares have been acquired worldwide by large scale investors, 16 million of which in Africa. More than 85% of large scale land acquisitions in Africa are by foreign investors. Many land deals are motivated not only by the need for fertile land but for the water resources required for crop production. Despite some recent assessments of the water appropriation associated with large scale land investments, their impact on the water resources of the target countries under present conditions and climate change scenarios remains poorly understood. Here we investigate irrigation water requirements by various crops planted in the acquired land as an indicator of the pressure likely placed by land investors on ("blue") water resources of target regions in Africa and evaluate the sensitivity to climate changes scenarios.

  10. Towards Large-area Field-scale Operational Evapotranspiration for Water Use Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, G. B.; Friedrichs, M.; Morton, C.; Huntington, J. L.; Verdin, J.

    2017-12-01

    Field-scale evapotranspiration (ET) estimates are needed for improving surface and groundwater use and water budget studies. Ideally, field-scale ET estimates would be at regional to national levels and cover long time periods. As a result of large data storage and computational requirements associated with processing field-scale satellite imagery such as Landsat, numerous challenges remain to develop operational ET estimates over large areas for detailed water use and availability studies. However, the combination of new science, data availability, and cloud computing technology is enabling unprecedented capabilities for ET mapping. To demonstrate this capability, we used Google's Earth Engine cloud computing platform to create nationwide annual ET estimates with 30-meter resolution Landsat ( 16,000 images) and gridded weather data using the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model in support of the National Water Census, a USGS research program designed to build decision support capacity for water management agencies and other natural resource managers. By leveraging Google's Earth Engine Application Programming Interface (API) and developing software in a collaborative, open-platform environment, we rapidly advance from research towards applications for large-area field-scale ET mapping. Cloud computing of the Landsat image archive combined with other satellite, climate, and weather data, is creating never imagined opportunities for assessing ET model behavior and uncertainty, and ultimately providing the ability for more robust operational monitoring and assessment of water use at field-scales.

  11. Understanding water delivery performance in a large-scale irrigation system in Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    During a two-year field study the performance of the water delivery was evaluated in a large-scale irrigation system on the north coast of Peru. Flow measurements were carried out along the main canals, along two secondary canals, and in two tertiary blocks in the Chancay-Lambayeque irrigation

  12. Large dose hyperpolarized water with dissolution-DNP at high magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipsø, Hans Kasper Wigh; Bowen, Sean; Rybalko, Oleksandr

    2016-01-01

    was polarized and dissolved in a fluid path compatible with clinical polarizers. The volume of hyperpolarized water produced by this method enables angiography and perfusion measurements in large animals, as well as NMR experiments for studies of e.g. proton exchange and polarization transfer to other nuclei....

  13. A method to study response of large trees to different amounts of available soil water

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.H. Marx; Shi-Jean S. Sung; J.S. Cunningham; M.D. Thompson; L.M. White

    1995-01-01

    A method was developed to manipulate available soil water on large trees by intercepting thrufall with gutters placed under tree canopies and irrigating the intercepted thrufall onto other trees. With this design, trees were exposed for 2 years to either 25% less thrufall, normal thrufall, or 25% additional thrufall.Undercanopy construction in these plots moderately...

  14. Experimental and numerical analysis of water hammer in a large-scale PVC pipeline apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergant, A.; Hou, Q.; Keramat, A.; Tijsseling, A.S.; Gajic, A.; Benisek, M.; Nedeljkovic, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of the pipe-wall viscoelasticity on water-hammer pressures. A large-scale pipeline apparatus made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) at Deltares, Delft, The Netherlands, has been used to carry out waterhammer experiments. Tests have been conducted in a

  15. Large-scale enzymatic production of natural flavour esters in organic solvent with continuous water removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubicza, L; Kabiri-Badr, A; Keoves, E; Belafi-Bako, K

    2001-11-30

    A new, large-scale process was developed for the enzymatic production of low molecular weight flavour esters in organic solvent. Solutions for the elimination of substrate and product inhibitions are presented. The excess water produced during the process was continuously removed by hetero-azeotropic distillation and esters were produced at yields of over 90%.

  16. High-Energy Laser Interaction with Gases, Droplets, and Bulk Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzembski, Maurice Anthony

    Breakdown threshold intensities (I_ {rm TH}) were measured as functions of wavelengths and pressure for air, He, Ar, and Xe using a Nd:YAG pulsed laser. Multiphoton absorption dominates in the UV and cascade collision ionization dominates in the IR; however, both can be affected by other electron gain and loss processes. Presence of droplets lowers breakdown of gases due to field enhancements. Breakdown is initiated either in the droplet material or in the gas. At lambda = 0.532mum for a 50 μm dia. water droplet in He, Ar, and air for p pressure. For droplet -in-Xe, at p pressure. For droplet-in-Xe, at p 140 Torr, breakdown occurs outside the droplet and is dependent on gas pressure. Pressure dependence of breakdown was observed for 120mum dia. water droplets in Ar at p > 400 Torr. The required intensity for breakdown of droplet depends on I_{ rm TH} of bulk liquid and the effective field enhancement created by the droplet. The I _{rm TH} of droplet-in-air provides an upper limit to the propagation of a high energy laser beam in the atmosphere containing particles. By geometrical optics approach, a significant field enhancement located at the critical ring region, encircling the axis of the sphere in the forward direction at angle theta_{c}, was discovered where nonlinear processes can occur. This was confirmed experimentally and by Mie theory. Field enhancements calculated at the critical ring for water droplets of different sizes agree well with measurements. For a droplet of given size and real refractive index, the effective field enhancement and the volume over which it occurs are two important factors governing the occurrence of breakdown in droplets for both off resonance and on resonance conditions. Measurements of wavelength dependence of breakdown showed that in the UV, I_{rm TH} for droplets and bulk liquids were comparable and lower by few orders of magnitude from that of air. Transmittance and reflectance of bulk liquids in the UV change with

  17. Communication: Mode bifurcation of droplet motion under stationary laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takabatake, Fumi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Department of Bioengineering and Robotics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Kenichi [Faculty of Life and Medical Sciences, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0394 (Japan); Ichikawa, Masatoshi, E-mail: ichi@scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2014-08-07

    The self-propelled motion of a mm-sized oil droplet floating on water, induced by a local temperature gradient generated by CW laser irradiation is reported. The circular droplet exhibits two types of regular periodic motion, reciprocal and circular, around the laser spot under suitable laser power. With an increase in laser power, a mode bifurcation from rectilinear reciprocal motion to circular motion is caused. The essential aspects of this mode bifurcation are discussed in terms of spontaneous symmetry-breaking under temperature-induced interfacial instability, and are theoretically reproduced with simple coupled differential equations.

  18. Development of dynamic PIV for droplet jet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, K.; Hong, S. D.; Bi, W. T.; Sugii, Y.; Madarame, H.; Hayami, H.

    2003-01-01

    The Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) can capture velocity vector fields with high spatial resolution. In this study, the Dynamic PIV system up to 10kHz temporal resolution was developed with combining the High-speed camera and high speed Laser with Double pulse option. The 1024 x 1024 pixel images with frame straddling were captured in 2kHz. Also, PIV data were measured in 512 x 256 pixel in 10kHz. The system had been applied to capture the water droplet flow. The transient characteristics of the droplet flow can be clearly captured using the developed Dynamic PIV System

  19. Impact of entrainment on cloud droplet spectra: theory, observations, and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, W.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the impact of entrainment and mixing on microphysical properties of warm boundary layer clouds is an important aspect of the representation of such clouds in large-scale models of weather and climate. Entrainment leads to a reduction of the liquid water content in agreement with the fundamental thermodynamics, but its impact on the droplet spectrum is difficult to quantify in observations and modeling. For in-situ (e.g., aircraft) observations, it is impossible to follow air parcels and observe processes that lead to changes of the droplet spectrum in different regions of a cloud. For similar reasons traditional modeling methodologies (e.g., the Eulerian large eddy simulation) are not useful either. Moreover, both observations and modeling can resolve only relatively narrow range of spatial scales. Theory, typically focusing on differences between idealized concepts of homogeneous and inhomogeneous mixing, is also of a limited use for the multiscale turbulent mixing between a cloud and its environment. This presentation will illustrate the above points and argue that the Lagrangian large-eddy simulation with appropriate subgrid-scale scheme may provide key insights and eventually lead to novel parameterizations for large-scale models.

  20. The Roles of Water in the Protein Matrix: A Largely Untapped Resource for Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyrakis, Francesca; Ahmed, Mostafa H; Bayden, Alexander S; Cozzini, Pietro; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Kellogg, Glen E

    2017-08-24

    The value of thoroughly understanding the thermodynamics specific to a drug discovery/design study is well known. Over the past decade, the crucial roles of water molecules in protein structure, function, and dynamics have also become increasingly appreciated. This Perspective explores water in the biological environment by adopting its point of view in such phenomena. The prevailing thermodynamic models of the past, where water was seen largely in terms of an entropic gain after its displacement by a ligand, are now known to be much too simplistic. We adopt a set of terminology that describes water molecules as being "hot" and "cold", which we have defined as being easy and difficult to displace, respectively. The basis of these designations, which involve both enthalpic and entropic water contributions, are explored in several classes of biomolecules and structural motifs. The hallmarks for characterizing water molecules are examined, and computational tools for evaluating water-centric thermodynamics are reviewed. This Perspective's summary features guidelines for exploiting water molecules in drug discovery.

  1. L2 droplet interaction with α-Al during solidification of hypermonotectic Al-8 wt.% Bi alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffer, P.L.; Mathiesen, R.H.; Arnberg, L.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of Al-based hypermonotectics have so far focused mainly on droplet motion and coagulation dynamics, with limited attention given to the interaction between droplets and the advancing solidification front which is decisive for the final distribution of the second phase within the α-Al matrix. The current work presents results from directional solidification experiments with Al-8 wt.% Bi alloys. It was found that droplets with large radii were frequently pushed and small droplets were engulfed. This is contradictory to the many models that have been proposed to explain pushing/engulfment of solid particles and can in part be ascribed to the fact that while solid-particle models only consider single, non-interacting particles that remain unaffected by solutal gradients ahead of the advancing solidification front, droplet-droplet interaction and local solute gradients have been found to be critical for droplet pushing/engulfment behaviour in hypermonotectic alloys.

  2. Water availability and vulnerability of 225 large cities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padowski, Julie C.; Jawitz, James W.

    2012-12-01

    This study presents a quantitative national assessment of urban water availability and vulnerability for 225 U.S. cities with population greater than 100,000. Here, the urban assessments account for not only renewable water flows, but also the extracted, imported, and stored water that urban systems access through constructed infrastructure. These sources represent important hydraulic components of the urban water supply, yet are typically excluded from water scarcity assessments. Results from this hydraulic-based assessment were compared to those obtained using a more conventional method that estimates scarcity solely based on local renewable flows. The inclusion of hydraulic components increased the mean availability to cities, leading to a significantly lower portion of the total U.S. population considered "at risk" for water scarcity (17%) than that obtained from the runoff method (47%). Water vulnerability was determined based on low-flow conditions, and smaller differences were found for this metric between at-risk populations using the runoff (66%) and hydraulic-based (54%) methods. The large increase in the susceptible population between the scarcity measures evaluated using the hydraulic method may better reconcile the seeming contradiction in the United States between perceptions of natural water abundance and widespread water scarcity. Additionally, urban vulnerability measures developed here were validated using a media text analysis. Vulnerability assessments that included hydraulic components were found to correlate with the frequency of urban water scarcity reports in the popular press while runoff-based measures showed no significant correlation, suggesting that hydraulic-based assessments provide better context for understanding the nature and severity of urban water scarcity issues.

  3. The role of reservoir storage in large-scale surface water availability analysis for Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrote, L. M.; Granados, A.; Martin-Carrasco, F.; Iglesias, A.

    2017-12-01

    A regional assessment of current and future water availability in Europe is presented in this study. The assessment was made using the Water Availability and Adaptation Policy Analysis (WAAPA) model. The model was built on the river network derived from the Hydro1K digital elevation maps, including all major river basins of Europe. Reservoir storage volume was taken from the World Register of Dams of ICOLD, including all dams with storage capacity over 5 hm3. Potential Water Availability is defined as the maximum amount of water that could be supplied at a certain point of the river network to satisfy a regular demand under pre-specified reliability requirements. Water availability is the combined result of hydrological processes, which determine streamflow in natural conditions, and human intervention, which determines the available hydraulic infrastructure to manage water and establishes water supply conditions through operating rules. The WAAPA algorithm estimates the maximum demand that can be supplied at every node of the river network accounting for the regulation capacity of reservoirs under different management scenarios. The model was run for a set of hydrologic scenarios taken from the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP), where the PCRGLOBWB hydrological model was forced with results from five global climate models. Model results allow the estimation of potential water stress by comparing water availability to projections of water abstractions along the river network under different management alternatives. The set of sensitivity analyses performed showed the effect of policy alternatives on water availability and highlighted the large uncertainties linked to hydrological and anthropological processes.

  4. Insights into Evaporative Droplet Dynamics in the High-Wind Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, T.; Richter, D. H.

    2017-12-01

    Sea-spray droplets ejected into the air-sea boundary layer take part in a series of complex transport processes. To model the air-sea exchange of heat and moisture under high-wind conditions, it is important yet challenging to understand influences of evaporative droplets in the atmospheric boundary layer. We implement a high-resolution Eulerian-Lagrangian algorithm with droplets laden in a turbulent open-channel flow to reveal the dynamic and thermodynamic characteristics of evaporating sea spray. Our past numerical simulations demonstrated an overall weak modification to the total heat flux by evaporative droplets. This is due to redistributed sensible and latent heat fluxes from relatively small droplets that respond rapidly to the ambient environment or the limited residence time of larger droplets. However, droplets with a slower thermodynamic response to the environment indicate a potential to enhance the total heat flux, but this is dependent on concentration and suspension time. In the current study, we focus on correlations between the residence time and thermodynamic statistics of droplets in order to better understand how best to parameterize in large-scale models. In addition, we focus in detail on the different scales of turbulence to further characterize the range of influence that evaporating droplets have on the surrounding fluid.

  5. Droplet activation, separation, and compositional analysis: laboratory studies and atmospheric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranuma, N.; Kohn, M.; Pekour, M. S.; Nelson, D. A.; Shilling, J. E.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2011-10-01

    Droplets produced in a cloud condensation nuclei chamber (CCNC) as a function of supersaturation have been separated from unactivated aerosol particles using counterflow virtual impaction. Residual material after droplets were evaporated was chemically analyzed with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument. Experiments were initially conducted to verify activation conditions for monodisperse ammonium sulfate particles and to determine the resulting droplet size distribution as a function of supersaturation. Based on the observed droplet size, the counterflow virtual impactor cut-size was set to differentiate droplets from unactivated interstitial particles. Validation experiments were then performed to verify that only droplets with sufficient size passed through the counterflow virtual impactor for subsequent analysis. A two-component external mixture of monodisperse particles was also exposed to a supersaturation which would activate one of the types (hygroscopic salts) but not the other (polystyrene latex spheres or adipic acid). The mass spectrum observed after separation indicated only the former, validating separation of droplets from unactivated particles. Results from ambient measurements using this technique and AMS analysis were inconclusive, showing little chemical differentiation between ambient aerosol and activated droplet residuals, largely due to low signal levels. When employing as single particle mass spectrometer for compositional analysis, however, we observed enhancement of sulfate in droplet residuals.

  6. Marangoni Convection in Evaporating Organic Liquid Droplets on a Nonwetting Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramohan, Aditya; Dash, Susmita; Weibel, Justin A; Chen, Xuemei; Garimella, Suresh V

    2016-05-17

    We quantitatively characterize the flow field inside organic liquid droplets evaporating on a nonwetting substrate. A mushroom-structured surface yields the desired nonwetting behavior with methanol droplets, while use of a cooled substrate (5-15 °C) slows the rate of evaporation to allow quasi-static particle image velocimetry. Visualization reveals a toroidal vortex within the droplet that is characteristic of surface tension-driven flow; we demonstrate by means of a scaling analysis that this recirculating flow is Marangoni convection. The velocities in the droplet are on the order of 10-45 mm/s. Thus, unlike in the case of evaporation on wetting substrates where Marangoni convection can be ignored for the purpose of estimating the evaporation rate, advection due to the surface tension-driven flow plays a dominant role in the heat transfer within an evaporating droplet on a nonwetting substrate because of the large height-to-radius aspect ratio of the droplet. We formulate a reduced-order model that includes advective transport within the droplet for prediction of organic liquid droplet evaporation on a nonwetting substrate and confirm that the predicted temperature differential across the height of the droplet matches experiments.

  7. Droplet behaviour in a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liew, R; Zeegers, J C H [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Michalek, W R; Kuerten, J G M, E-mail: r.liew@tue.nl [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-12-22

    The vortex tube is an apparatus by which compressed gas is separated into cold and warm streams. Although the apparatus is mostly used for cooling, the possibility to use the vortex tube as a device for removing non-desired condensable components from gas mixtures is investigated. To give first insight on how droplets behave in the vortex tube, a MATLAB model is written. The model tracks Lagrangian droplets in time and space according to the forces acting on the droplets. Phase interactions, i.e. evaporation or condensation, are modeled according to the kinetic approach for phase interactions. Liquid (water) concentrations are shown for two cases where the humidity at the inlet of the vortex tube is varied from 0% to 50%. It is clearly observed from the results that the concentration of liquid increases with increasing humidity. The higher this concentration is, the higher the probability that droplets collide with each other and form larger droplets which are swirled towards the wall to form an easy-to-separate liquid film.

  8. Continuous growth of cloud droplets in cumulus cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Suehiro, Tamotsu; Saito, Izumi

    2016-01-01

    A new method to seamlessly simulate the continuous growth of droplets advected by turbulent flow inside a cumulus cloud was developed from first principle. A cubic box ascending with a mean updraft inside a cumulus cloud was introduced and the updraft velocity was self-consistently determined in such a way that the mean turbulent velocity within the box vanished. All the degrees of freedom of the cloud droplets and turbulence fields were numerically integrated. The box ascended quickly inside the cumulus cloud due to the updraft and the mean radius of the droplets grew from 10 to 24 μ m for about 10 min. The turbulent flow tended to slow down the time evolutions of the updraft velocity, the box altitude and the mean cloud droplet radius. The size distribution of the cloud droplets in the updraft case was narrower than in the absence of the updraft. It was also found that the wavenumeber spectra of the variances of the temperature and water vapor mixing ratio were nearly constant in the low wavenumber range. The future development of the new method was argued. (paper)

  9. Splash Dynamics of Falling Surfactant-Laden Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Nur; Buitrago, Lewis; Pereyra, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Splashing dynamics is a common issue in oil and gas separation technology. In this study, droplet impact of various surfactant concentrations onto solid and liquid surfaces is studied experimentally using a high-speed imaging analysis. Although this area has been widely studied in the past, there is still not a good understanding of the role of surfactant over droplet impact and characterization of resulting splash dynamics. The experiments are conducted using tap water laden with anionic surfactant. The effects of system parameters on a single droplet impingement such as surfactant concentration (no surfactant, below, at and above critical micelle concentration), parent drop diameter (2-5mm), impact velocity and type of impact surface (thin and deep pool) are investigated. Image analysis technique is shown to be an effective technique for identification of coalescence to splashing transition. In addition, daughter droplets size distributions are analyzed qualitatively in the events of splashing. As expected, it is observed that the formation of secondary droplets is affected by the surfactant concentration. A summary of findings will be discussed.

  10. Micromachined ultrasonic droplet generator based on a liquid horn structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meacham, J. M.; Ejimofor, C.; Kumar, S.; Degertekin, F. L.; Fedorov, A. G.

    2004-05-01

    A micromachined ultrasonic droplet generator is developed and demonstrated for drop-on-demand fluid atomization. The droplet generator comprises a bulk ceramic piezoelectric transducer for ultrasound generation, a reservoir for the ejection fluid, and a silicon micromachined liquid horn structure as the nozzle. The nozzles are formed using a simple batch microfabrication process that involves wet etching of (100) silicon in potassium hydroxide solution. Device operation is demonstrated by droplet ejection of water through 30 μm orifices at 1.49 and 2.30 MHz. The finite-element simulations of the acoustic fields in the cavity and electrical impedance of the device are in agreement with the measurements and indicate that the device utilizes cavity resonances in the 1-5 MHz range in conjunction with acoustic wave focusing by the pyramidally shaped nozzles to achieve low power operation.

  11. Radio frequency feedback method for parallelized droplet microfluidics

    KAUST Repository

    Conchouso Gonzalez, David

    2016-12-19

    This paper reports on a radio frequency micro-strip T-resonator that is integrated to a parallel droplet microfluidic system. The T-resonator works as a feedback system to monitor uniform droplet production and to detect, in real-time, any malfunctions due to channel fouling or clogging. Emulsions at different W/O flow-rate ratios are generated in a microfluidic device containing 8 parallelized generators. These emulsions are then guided towards the RF sensor, which is then read using a Network Analyzer to obtain the frequency response of the system. The proposed T-resonator shows frequency shifts of 45MHz for only 5% change in the emulsion\\'s water in oil content. These shifts can then be used as a feedback system to trigger alarms and notify production and quality control engineers about problems in the droplet generation process.

  12. Early Decomposition of Retained Heavy Silicone Oil Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touka Banaee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of early decomposition of retained heavy silicone oil droplets. Case Report: The single highly myopic eye of a 16-year-old boy with history of scleral buckling and buckle revision developed redetachment due to inferior retinal dialysis. The patient underwent pars plana vitrectomy and injection of heavy silicone oil. Early emulsification of the silicone oil was observed following surgery, which was removed 4 weeks later in another operation. Retained heavy silicone droplets lost their heavier- than-water specific gravity within 2 months together with extensive iris depigmentation, and release of pigment granules into the anterior chamber and vitreous cavity. Conclusion: This case report demonstrates that heavy silicone oil droplets can undergo in vivo chemical decomposition with possible toxic effects on ocular tissues.

  13. Radio frequency feedback method for parallelized droplet microfluidics

    KAUST Repository

    Conchouso Gonzalez, David; Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo; McKerricher, Garret; Castro, David; Foulds, Ian G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a radio frequency micro-strip T-resonator that is integrated to a parallel droplet microfluidic system. The T-resonator works as a feedback system to monitor uniform droplet production and to detect, in real-time, any malfunctions due to channel fouling or clogging. Emulsions at different W/O flow-rate ratios are generated in a microfluidic device containing 8 parallelized generators. These emulsions are then guided towards the RF sensor, which is then read using a Network Analyzer to obtain the frequency response of the system. The proposed T-resonator shows frequency shifts of 45MHz for only 5% change in the emulsion's water in oil content. These shifts can then be used as a feedback system to trigger alarms and notify production and quality control engineers about problems in the droplet generation process.

  14. Effective adsorption of oil droplets from oil-in-water emulsion using metal ions encapsulated biopolymers: Role of metal ions and their mechanism in oil removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elanchezhiyan, S Sd; Prabhu, Subbaiah Muthu; Meenakshi, Sankaran

    2018-06-01

    Herein, synthesized and compared the three different kinds of hybrid bio-polymeric composites viz., lanthanum embedded chitosan/gelatin (La@CS-GEL), zirconium embedded chitosan/gelatin (Zr@CS-GEL) and cerium embedded chitosan/gelatin (Ce@CS-GEL) in terms of their oil uptake efficiency. The adsorption efficiency was studied under various optimized parameters like contact time, pH, dose, initial oil concentration and temperature. The oil adsorption capacity was found to be 91, 82 and 45% for La@CS-GEL, Zr@CS-GEL and Ce@CS-GEL composites respectively. The metals were used as a bridging material to connect both CS and GEL using the hydrophilic groups to enhance the oil recovery by hydrophobic interaction. Also, the introduction of metal ions on the surface of biopolymers would modify the oil/water properties which in turn, decrease the interfacial tension between oil and water phases. The mechanism of oil uptake was explained using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) and heat of combustion. The experimental data confirmed Langmuir isotherm as the best fit for oil adsorption process. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard free energy (ΔG°), standard enthalpy (ΔH°) and standard entropy (ΔS°) indicated that the oil adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. The oil adsorption mechanism was established based on isotherm and thermodynamic models. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. On the need for system alignment in large water infrastructure. Understanding infrastructure dynamics in Nairobi, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär Blomkvist

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article we contribute to the discussion of infrastructural change in Africa, and explore how a new theoretical perspective may offer a different, more comprehensive and historically informed understanding of the trend towards large water infrastructure in Africa. We examine the socio-technical dynamics of large water infrastructures in Nairobi, Kenya, in a longer historical perspective using two concepts that we call intra-systemic alignment and inter-level alignment. Our theoretical perspective is inspired by Large Technical Systems (LTS and Multi-Level Perspective (MLP. While inter-level alignment focuses on the process of aligning the technological system at the three levels of niche, regime and landscape, intra-systemic alignment deals with how components within the regime are harmonised and standardised to fit with each other. We pay special attention to intrasystemic alignment between the supply side and the demand side, or as we put it, upstream and downstream components of a system. In narrating the history of water supply in Nairobi, we look at both the upstream (largescale supply and downstream activities (distribution and payment, and compare the Nairobi case with European history of large infrastructures. We emphasise that regime actors in Nairobi have dealt with the issues of alignment mainly to facilitate and expand upstream activities, while concerning downstream activities they have remained incapable of expanding service and thus integrating the large segment of low-income consumers. We conclude that the present surge of large-scale water investment in Nairobi is the result of sector reforms that enabled the return to a long tradition – a 'Nairobi style' – of upstream investment mainly benefitting the highincome earners. Our proposition is that much more attention needs to be directed at inter-level alignment at the downstream end of the system, to allow the creation of niches aligned to the regime.

  16. Classification of the ejection mechanisms of charged macromolecules from liquid droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consta, Styliani; Malevanets, Anatoly

    2013-01-28

    The relation between the charge state of a macromolecule and its ejection mechanism from droplets is one of the important questions in electrospray ionization methods. In this article, effects of solvent-solute interaction on the manifestation of the charge induced instability in a droplet are examined. We studied the instabilities in a prototype system of a droplet comprised of charged poly(ethylene glycol) and methanol, acetonitrile, and water solvents. We observed instances of three, previously only conjectured, [S. Consta, J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 5263 (2010)] mechanisms of macroion ejection. The mechanism of ejection of charged macroion in methanol is reminiscent of "pearl" model in polymer physics. In acetonitrile droplets, the instability manifests through formation of solvent spines around the solvated macroion. In water, we find that the macroion is ejected from the droplet through contiguous extrusion of a part of the chain. The difference in the morphology of the instabilities is attributed to the interplay between forces arising from the macroion solvation energy and the surface energy of the droplet interface. For the contiguous extrusion of a charged macromolecule from a droplet, we demonstrate that the proposed mechanism leads to ejection of the macromolecule from droplets with sizes well below the Rayleigh limit. The ejected macromolecule may hold charge significantly higher than that suggested by prevailing theories. The simulations reveal new mechanisms of macroion evaporation that differ from conventional charge residue model and ion evaporation mechanisms.

  17. Microfluidic generation of droplets with a high loading of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jiandi; Shi, Lei; Benson, Bryan; Bruzek, Matthew J; Anthony, John E; Sinko, Patrick J; Prudhomme, Robert K; Stone, Howard A

    2012-09-18

    Microfluidic approaches for controlled generation of colloidal clusters, for example, via encapsulation of colloidal particles in droplets, have been used for the synthesis of functional materials including drug delivery carriers. Most of the studies, however, use a low concentration of an original colloidal suspension (60 wt %) particle concentrations. Three types of microfluidic devices, PDMS flow-focusing, PDMS T-junction, and microcapillary devices, are investigated for direct encapsulation of a high concentration of polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles in droplets. In particular, it is shown that PDMS devices fabricated by soft lithography can generate droplets from a 25 wt % PS suspension, whereas microcapillary devices made from glass capillary tubes are able to produce droplets from a 67 wt % PS nanoparticle suspension. When the PS concentration is between 0.6 and 25 wt %, the size of the droplets is found to change with the oil-to-water flow rate ratio and is independent of the concentration of particles in the initial suspensions. Drop sizes from ~12 to 40 μm are made using flow rate ratios Q(oil)/Q(water) from 20 to 1, respectively, with either of the PDMS devices. However, clogging occurs in PDMS devices at high PS concentrations (>25 wt %) arising from interactions between the PS colloids and the surface of PDMS devices. Glass microcapillary devices, on the other hand, are resistant to clogging and can produce droplets continuously even when the concentration of PS nanoparticles reaches 67 wt %. We believe that our findings indicate useful approaches and guidelines for the controlled generation of emulsions filled with a high loading of nanoparticles, which are useful for drug delivery applications.

  18. The dynamics of milk droplet–droplet collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finotello, G.; Kooiman, R.F.; Padding, J.T.; Buist, K.A.; Jongsma, A.; Innings, F.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2018-01-01

    Spray drying is an important industrial process to produce powdered milk, in which concentrated milk is atomized into small droplets and dried with hot gas. The characteristics of the produced milk powder are largely affected by agglomeration, combination of dry and partially dry particles, which in

  19. The dynamics of milk droplet–droplet collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finotello, Giulia; Kooiman, Roeland F.; Padding, J.T.; Buist, Kay A.; Jongsma, Alfred; Innings, Fredrik; Kuipers, J. A.M.

    2018-01-01

    Spray drying is an important industrial process to produce powdered milk, in which concentrated milk is atomized into small droplets and dried with hot gas. The characteristics of the produced milk powder are largely affected by agglomeration, combination of dry and partially dry particles, which

  20. Colliding droplets: A short film presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1981-12-01

    A series of experiments were performed in which liquid droplets were caused to collide. Impact velocities to several meters per second and droplet diameters up to 600 micrometers were used. The impact parameters in the collisions vary from zero to greater than the sum of the droplet radii. Photographs of the collisions were taken with a high speed framing camera in order to study the impacts and subsequent behavior of the droplets.

  1. Understanding spatial and temporal behavior of sea spray droplets in the marine atmospheric boundary layer using an Eulerian-Lagrangian model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissanka, I. D.; Richter, D. H.

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that sea spray droplets can play a significant role in air-sea heat and moisture exchange. The larger spray droplets have potential to transfer considerable amount of mass, momentum and heat, however they remain closer to surface and their residence times are shorter due to the faster settling. On the other hand, smaller droplets have high vertical mobility which allows sufficient time for droplets to adjust to ambient conditions. Hence, to study the heat and moisture characteristics of sea spray droplets it is important to understand how different droplet sizes behave in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL), especially their temporal evolutions. In this study sea spray droplet transport in the MABL is simulated using Large Eddy Simulation combined with a Lagrangian Particle model which represents spray droplets of varying size. The individual droplets are tracked while their radius and temperature evolve based on local ambient conditions. The particles are advected based on the local resolved velocities and the particle dispersion due to sub-filtered scale motions are modeled using a Lagrangian stochastic model. In this study a series of simulations are conducted with the focus of understanding fundamental droplet microphysics, which will help characterize and quantify the lifetime and airborne concentrations of spray droplets in the MABL, thus elucidating ongoing knowledge gaps which are impossible to fill using observations alone. We measure the size resolved spray droplet vertical concentrations, particle residence times, and temporal evolution of droplet radius and temperature to explain the behavior of sea spry droplets in MABL. The PDF of residence time of different initial droplet sizes and joint PDFs of droplet life time and radius and temperature for different droplet sizes are calculated to further quantify the temporal and spatial behavior of sea spray droplets in the MABL, which can be used as inputs into bulk models

  2. Sound Propagation in Saturated Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions Considering the Effect of Transpiration on Droplet Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixtures with evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson (1975) to accommodate the effects of transpiration on the linear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer. It is shown that the inclusion of transpiration in the presence of mass transfer improves the agreement between the theory and the experimental data of Cole and Dobbins (1971) for sound attenuation in air-water fogs at low droplet mass concentrations. The results suggest that transpiration has an appreciable effect on both sound absorption and dispersion for both low and high droplet mass concentrations.

  3. The Saskatchewan River Basin - a large scale observatory for water security research (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheater, H. S.

    2013-12-01

    The 336,000 km2 Saskatchewan River Basin (SaskRB) in Western Canada illustrates many of the issues of Water Security faced world-wide. It poses globally-important science challenges due to the diversity in its hydro-climate and ecological zones. With one of the world's more extreme climates, it embodies environments of global significance, including the Rocky Mountains (source of the major rivers in Western Canada), the Boreal Forest (representing 30% of Canada's land area) and the Prairies (home to 80% of Canada's agriculture). Management concerns include: provision of water resources to more than three million inhabitants, including indigenous communities; balancing competing needs for water between different uses, such as urban centres, industry, agriculture, hydropower and environmental flows; issues of water allocation between upstream and downstream users in the three prairie provinces; managing the risks of flood and droughts; and assessing water quality impacts of discharges from major cities and intensive agricultural production. Superimposed on these issues is the need to understand and manage uncertain water futures, including effects of economic growth and environmental change, in a highly fragmented water governance environment. Key science questions focus on understanding and predicting the effects of land and water management and environmental change on water quantity and quality. To address the science challenges, observational data are necessary across multiple scales. This requires focussed research at intensively monitored sites and small watersheds to improve process understanding and fine-scale models. To understand large-scale effects on river flows and quality, land-atmosphere feedbacks, and regional climate, integrated monitoring, modelling and analysis is needed at large basin scale. And to support water management, new tools are needed for operational management and scenario-based planning that can be implemented across multiple scales and

  4. Evaporation of polydispersed droplets in a highly turbulent channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochet, M.; Bazile, Rudy; Ferret, B.; Cazin, S. [INPT, UPS, IMFT (Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse), Universite de Toulouse (France)

    2009-09-15

    A model experiment for the study of evaporating turbulent two-phase flows is presented here. The study focuses on a situation where pre-atomized and dispersed droplets vaporize and mix in a heated turbulent flow. The test bench consists in a channel flow with characteristics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence where fluctuations levels reach very high values (25% in the established zone). An ultrasonic atomizer allows the injection of a mist of small droplets of acetone in the carrier flow. The large range diameters ensure that every kind of droplet behavior with regards to turbulence is possible. Instantaneous concentration fields of the vaporized phase are extracted from fluorescent images (PLIF) of the two phase flow. The evolution of the mixing of the acetone vapor is analyzed for two different liquid mass loadings. Despite the high turbulence levels, concentration fluctuations remain significant, indicating that air and acetone vapor are not fully mixed far from the injector. (orig.)

  5. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, David J; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2012-09-04

    A computer numerical control (CNC) apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using "wire-guided" method (a pipette tip was used in this study). This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate). Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction). The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability), in rapid succession (using droplets), and with a high level of

  6. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You David J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A computer numerical control (CNC apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using “wire-guided” method (a pipette tip was used in this study. This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate. Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction. The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability, in rapid succession (using droplets

  7. The Large Scale Distribution of Water Ice in the Polar Regions of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, A.; Wilson, J. K.; Schwadron, N.; Spence, H. E.

    2017-12-01

    For in situ resource utilization, one must know where water ice is on the Moon. Many datasets have revealed both surface deposits of water ice and su